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Sample records for pedicle screw insertion

  1. True anteroposterior view pedicle screw insertion technique

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jia-yue; Zhang, Wei; An, Ji-long; Sun, Ya-peng; Ding, Wen-yuan; Shen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background The wide use of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) surgery in the treatment of degenerative disc disease of lumbar spine in spinal surgery highlights the gradual decrease in the use of traditional pedicle screw insertion technology. This study aims to analyze the accuracy of the true anteroposterior view pedicle screw insertion technique in MIS-TLIF surgery, compare it with conventional pedicle screw insertion technology, and discuss its clinical application value. Methods Fifty-two patients undergoing true anteroposterior view (group A) and 87 patients undergoing conventional pedicle screw insertion (group B) were diagnosed with lumbar disc herniation or lumbar spinal stenosis. Time for screw placement, intraoperative irradiation exposure, accuracy rate of pedicle screw insertion, and incidence of neurovascular injury were compared between the two groups. Results The time for screw placement and intraoperative irradiation exposure was significantly less in group A. Penetration rates of the paries lateralis of vertebral pedicle, medial wall of vertebral pedicle, and anterior vertebral wall were 1.44%, 0%, and 2.40%, respectively, all of which were significantly lower than that in group B. No additional serious complications caused by the placement of screw were observed during the follow-up period in patients in group A, but two patients with medial penetration underwent revision for unbearable radicular pain. Conclusion The application of true anteroposterior view pedicle screw insertion technique in MIS-TLIF surgery shortens time for screw placement and reduces the intraoperative irradiation exposure along with a higher accuracy rate of screw placement, which makes it a safe, accurate, and efficient technique. PMID:27418828

  2. Quantitative comparison between the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique for pedicle screw placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knez, Dejan; Mohar, Janez; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2016-03-01

    Spinal deformity correction with vertebral fixation is nowadays the preferred surgical treatment, where pedicle screws are inserted through pedicles into corresponding vertebral bodies and afterwards connected with rods. In clinical practice, the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique are currently being used for pedicle screw placement surgery. However, it is difficult to quantitatively compare both techniques and determine which technique is more adequate for each planned pedicle screw before surgery (i.e. preoperatively). In this paper, we therefore describe a framework for quantitative comparison between the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique for pedicle screw placement surgery by evaluating the screw fastening strength. Quantitative comparisons were performed on computed tomography images of 11 patients with 74 manually planned pedicle screws, who underwent the vertebral fixation procedure. The first quantitative comparison was performed between the straight-forward and anatomical pedicle screw insertion technique, which resulted in a relatively high agreement with mean absolute difference of 0.0mm in screw diameter, 2.9mm in screw length, 1.2mm in pedicle crossing point and 6.5° in screw inclinations. The second quantitative comparison was performed between the best resulting pedicle screw insertion technique and manually obtained pedicle screw plans, which again resulted in a relatively high agreement with mean absolute difference of 0.5mm in screw diameter, 4.7mm in screw length, 2.4mm in pedicle crossing point and 6.0° in screw inclinations. Both the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique proved approximately equal in terms of the screw fastening strength.

  3. Quantitative Anatomy of C7 Vertebra in Southern Chinese for Insertion of Lateral Mass Screws and Pedicle Screws

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chi Hin; Wong, Kam Kwong; Wong, Wing Cheung

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To analyze the quantitative anatomy of C7 vertebra for insertion of lateral mass screws and pedicle screws in Southern Chinese patients. Overview of Literature C7 lateral mass is smaller when compared to other subaxial cervical levels, which limits the length of lateral mass screws that can be used. Some studies have suggested pedicle screws for better fixation. But, this option is limited by the narrow pedicle width. Methods We have obtained computed tomography (CT) cervical spine data in 0.625 mm slices from our radiology department. The patients were adults. CTs were from May to August, 2015. The lateral mass screw length was measured using Margerl's technique and pedicle width and pedicle screw trajectory were determined in three-dimensional reformated images. Results CT scans of cervical spines of 94 patients were obtained and 188 lateral masses and pedicles of C7 vertebrae were measured. The mean lateral mass screw length was 13.2 mm (standard deviation [SD] 1.6 mm), mean outer pedicle width was 5.9 mm (SD 1.0 mm) and mean pedicle screw trajectory was 29.4 degrees (SD 3.6 degrees). Most (91.0%) of the pedicles had an outer diameter ≥4.5 mm. Conclusions The mean lateral mass screw length was longer when compared with other similar studies, while the mean outer pedicle width was narrower. Nearly 10% of the pedicles were unable to accommodate 3.5 mm screws. These findings favor the use of lateral mass screws to provide a safe and stable fixation for C7 vertebrae in Southern Chinese patients, while the final choice of fixation method should only be confirmed after careful preoperative planning with CT scan. PMID:27559451

  4. Pedicle violation and Navigational errors in pedicle screw insertion using the intraoperative O-arm: A preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Jacob E.; Mok, Kelvin; Goulet, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Background Use of computer-assisted insertion of pedicle screws has some advantages owing to the reportedly decreased incidence of pedicle breach and clinical events. Registration-based methods based on preoperative computed tomography imaging, 2D fluoroscopy, and 3D fluoroscopy are the most popular, however each has its limitations. O-arm–based navigation, which uses intraoperative acquisition and registration of navigated images, may overcome many of these disadvantages. We set out to study the clinical accuracy and navigational accuracy for pedicle screw insertion using our recently acquired O-arm and present our preliminary findings. Methods The first 26 patients operated consecutively for L4-5 fusion were included in the study. O-arm–based navigation was used to insert the pedicle screws. Postoperative computed tomography images were acquired and assessed for pedicle breach and anterior cortical perforation. Planned trajectories of each screw were compared with the actual trajectories in the postoperative images to assess navigational accuracy in both axial and sagittal planes. Results A total of 104 screws were inserted. One screw (1%) breached the pedicle laterally. Nonsignificant anterolateral cortical perforations were noted in 7 screws (6.7%), all of which occurred at L5 level. The mean axial and sagittal navigational error was 2.3° (±1.7) and 3.1° (±2.3), respectively. There were no significant differences in the errors between L4 or L5 level. The occurrence of anterior perforation correlated with the degree of axial (P = .02) but not sagittal (P = .12) navigational error. There were no clinical events related to the screw insertion. Conclusion Use of O-arm–guided pedicle screw insertion was associated with low incidence of pedicle breach (1%) and a low range of navigational error in both sagittal and axial planes. Anterolateral vertebral body perforation was higher at L5 without any negative clinical events. Despite the high need for technical

  5. Medially-shifted rather than high-riding vertebral arteries preclude safe pedicle screw insertion.

    PubMed

    Maki, Satoshi; Koda, Masao; Iijima, Yasushi; Furuya, Takeo; Inada, Taigo; Kamiya, Koshiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Saito, Junya; Okawa, Akihiko; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-07-01

    We enrolled 100 patients who underwent preoperative CT angiography before cervical spine instrumentation and investigated the morphology of the C2 pedicle from the perspective of pedicle screw (PS) trajectory using volume rendering and multiplanar reconstruction. The narrowest portion of the pedicle was identified as the pedicle isthmus. Safe C2 PS insertion was regarded to be not feasible when the height of the medullary cavity of the pedicle isthmus and/or width of the medullary cavity of the pedicle isthmus was ⩽4mm. Forty-five (22.5%) pedicles were ⩽4mm in width, and safe insertion of a PS was determined to be not feasible. Among these, seven pedicles were ⩽4mm in both height and width. The remaining 38 pedicles were ⩽4mm in width with heights >4mm. There was no pedicle with a width >4mm and height <4mm. In other words, short pedicles were always concomitantly narrow. Therefore, the seven pedicles ⩽4mm in both height and width were considered to be morphologically narrow. The heights of the pedicle isthmus were not limited by the vertebral artery groove (VAG) and safe C2 PS insertion can be considered feasible where the VAG is marginally cranial, whereas the widths of the pedicle isthmus are limited by the VAG. Therefore, safe C2 PS insertion is precluded only when the VAG courses cranially and medially. It is a medially-shifted, rather than a high-riding, vertebral artery that precludes safe C2 PS insertion. Therefore to avoid vertebral artery injury an axial CT scan, parallel to the pedicle axis, should be evaluated before C2 PS insertion. PMID:26916906

  6. Computer tomography assessment of pedicle screw insertion in percutaneous posterior transpedicular stabilization.

    PubMed

    Schizas, Constantin; Michel, Jacky; Kosmopoulos, Victor; Theumann, Nicolas

    2007-05-01

    Percutaneous insertion of cannulated pedicle screws has been recently developed as a minimally invasive alternative to the open technique during instrumented fusion procedures. Given the reported rate of screw misplacement using open techniques (up to 40%), we considered it important to analyze possible side effects of this new technique. Placement of 60 pedicle screws in 15 consecutive patients undergoing lumbar or lumbosacral fusion, mainly for spondylolisthesis, were analyzed. Axial, coronal, and sagittal reformatted computer tomography images were examined by three observers. Individual and consensus interpretation was obtained for each screw position. Along with frank penetration, we also looked at cortical encroachment of the pedicular wall by the screw. Thirteen percent of the patients (2/15) had severe frank penetration from the screws, while 80% of them (12/15) had some perforation. On axial images the incidence of severe frank pedicle penetration was 3.3% while the overall rate of screw perforation was 23%. In coronal images the overall screw perforation rate rose to 30% while the rate of severe frank pedicle penetration remained unchanged. One patient (6.6%) suffered S1 root symptoms due to a frankly medially misplaced screw, requiring re-operation. This study has shown that percutaneous insertion of cannulated pedicle screws in the lumbar spine is an acceptable procedure. The overall rate of perforation in axial images is below the higher rates reported in the literature but does remain important. Frank penetration of the pedicle was nevertheless low. It remains a demanding technique and has to be performed with extreme care to detail. PMID:16967297

  7. Basic Study for Ultrasound-Based Navigation for Pedicle Screw Insertion Using Transmission and Backscattered Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ziqiang; Wu, Bing; Zhai, Xiao; Bai, Yushu; Zhu, Xiaodong; Luo, Beier; Chen, Xiao; Li, Chao; Yang, Mingyuan; Xu, Kailiang; Liu, Chengcheng; Wang, Chuanfeng; Zhao, Yingchuan; Wei, Xianzhao; Chen, Kai; Yang, Wu; Ta, Dean; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the acoustic properties of human vertebral cancellous bone and to study the feasibility of ultrasound-based navigation for posterior pedicle screw fixation in spinal fusion surgery. Fourteen human vertebral specimens were disarticulated from seven un-embalmed cadavers (four males, three females, 73.14 ± 9.87 years, two specimens from each cadaver). Seven specimens were used to measure the transmission, including tests of attenuation and phase velocity, while the other seven specimens were used for backscattered measurements to inspect the depth of penetration and A-Mode signals. Five pairs of unfocused broadband ultrasonic transducers were used for the detection, with center frequencies of 0.5 MHz, 1 MHz, 1.5 MHz, 2.25 MHz, and 3.5 MHz. As a result, good and stable results were documented. With increased frequency, the attenuation increased (P<0.05), stability of the speed of sound improved (P<0.05), and penetration distance decreased (P>0.05). At about 0.6 cm away from the cortical bone, warning signals were easily observed from the backscattered measurements. In conclusion, the ultrasonic system proved to be an effective, moveable, and real-time imaging navigation system. However, how ultrasonic navigation will benefit pedicle screw insertion in spinal surgery needs to be determined. Therefore, ultrasound-guided pedicle screw implantation is theoretically effective and promising. PMID:25861053

  8. In vitro study of accuracy of cervical pedicle screw insertion using an electronic conductivity device (ATPS part III)

    PubMed Central

    Hitzl, Wolfgang; Acosta, Frank; Tauber, Mark; Zenner, Juliane; Resch, Herbert; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Meier, Oliver; Schmidt, Rene; Mayer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Reconstruction of the highly unstable, anteriorly decompressed cervical spine poses biomechanical challenges to current stabilization strategies, including circumferential instrumented fusion, to prevent failure. To avoid secondary posterior surgery, particularly in the elderly population, while increasing primary construct rigidity of anterior-only reconstructions, the authors introduced the concept of anterior transpedicular screw (ATPS) fixation and plating. We demonstrated its morphological feasibility, its superior biomechanical pull-out characteristics compared with vertebral body screws and the accuracy of inserting ATPS using a manual fluoroscopically assisted technique. Although accuracy was high, showing non-critical breaches in the axial and sagittal plane in 78 and 96%, further research was indicated refining technique and increasing accuracy. In light of first clinical case series, the authors analyzed the impact of using an electronic conductivity device (ECD, PediGuard) on the accuracy of ATPS insertion. As there exist only experiences in thoracolumbar surgery the versatility of the ECD was also assessed for posterior cervical pedicle screw fixation (pCPS). 30 ATPS and 30 pCPS were inserted alternately into the C3–T1 vertebra of five fresh-frozen specimen. Fluoroscopic assistance was only used for the entry point selection, pedicle tract preparation was done using the ECD. Preoperative CT scans were assessed for sclerosis at the pedicle entrance or core, and vertebrae with dense pedicles were excluded. Pre- and postoperative reconstructed CT scans were analyzed for pedicle screw positions according to a previously established grading system. Statistical analysis revealed an astonishingly high accuracy for the ATPS group with no critical screw position (0%) in axial or sagittal plane. In the pCPS group, 88.9% of screws inserted showed non-critical screw position, while 11.1% showed critical pedicle perforations. The usage of an ECD for posterior and

  9. Feasibility Study of Free-Hand Technique for Pedicle Screw Insertion at C7 without Fluoroscopy-Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gun Woo; Kim, Ho-Joong; Yeom, Jin S.; Uh, Jae-Hyung; Park, Jong-Ho; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective interventional study. Purpose To introduce a free-hand pedicle screw (PS) insertion technique without fluoroscopic guidance in the C7 vertebra and evaluate the procedure's feasibility and radiologic outcomes. Overview of Literature Although PS insertion at C7 has been recognized as a critical procedure in posterior cervical fusion surgery, conventional techniques for C7 PS have several limitations. Methods Thirty two patients (64 screws) who underwent PS insertion in C7 with the novel technique were included in this study. Postoperative clinical and radiological outcomes were evaluated. Special attention was paid to the presence of any problems in the screw position including cortical breaches of the PS and encroachment of the PS into the spinal canal or the vertebral foramen. This novel technique for PS insertion in C7 without fluoroscopy guidance had three key elements. First, the ideal PS entry point was chosen near the C6–7 facet joint using preoperative images. Second, the convergent angle distance was measured at axial computed tomography (CT) imaging, which defined the distance between the tip of C7 spinous process and the extended line passing through the pedicle axis from the ideal entry point. Third, the cranial-caudal angle distance was measured in sagittal CT images, which defined the distance between the tip of the C7 spinous process and the extended line passing through the pedicle axis. Results Cortical breach on postoperative CT images was observed in three screws. All violated only the lateral wall of the affected pedicle. The breached screws occurred in the initial five cases. Postoperative neurologic deterioration was not observed in any patient, regardless of cortical breaching. Conclusions The novel technique successfully allows for C7 PS to be placed and is associated with a low rate of cortical breach. PMID:26949456

  10. A Robot-Assisted Surgical System Using a Force-Image Control Method for Pedicle Screw Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Wei; Han, Xiaoguang; Liu, Bo; Liu, Yajun; Hu, Ying; Han, Xiao; Xu, Yunfeng; Fan, Mingxing; Jin, Haiyang

    2014-01-01

    Objective To introduce a robot-assisted surgical system for spinal posterior fixation that can automatically recognize the drilling state and stop potential cortical penetration with force and image information and to further evaluate the accuracy and safety of the robot for sheep vertebra pedicle screw placement. Methods The Robotic Spinal Surgery System (RSSS) was composed of an optical tracking system, a navigation and planning system, and a surgical robot equipped with a 6-DOF force/torque sensor. The robot used the image message and force signals to sense the different operation states and to prevent potential cortical penetration in the pedicle screw insertion operation. To evaluate the accuracy and safety of the RSSS, 32 screw insertions were conducted. Furthermore, six trajectories were deliberately planned incorrectly to explore whether the robot could recognize the different drilling states and immediately prevent cortical penetration. Results All 32 pedicle screws were placed in the pedicle without any broken pedicle walls. Compared with the preoperative planning, the average deviations of the entry points in the axial and sagittal views were 0.50±0.33 and 0.65±0.40 mm, and the average deviations of the angles in the axial and sagittal views were 1.9±0.82° and 1.48±1.2°. The robot successfully recognized the different drilling states and prevented potential cortical penetration. In the deliberately incorrectly planned trajectory experiments, the robot successfully prevented the cortical penetration. Conclusion These results verified the RSSS’s accuracy and safety, which supported its potential use for the spinal surgery. PMID:24466043

  11. Comparative Analysis of Effect of Density, Insertion Angle and Reinsertion on Pull-Out Strength of Single and Two Pedicle Screw Constructs Using Synthetic Bone Model

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Vicky; Kumar, Gurunathan Saravana

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Biomechanical study. Purpose To determine the effect of density, insertion angle and reinsertion on pull-out strength of pedicle screw in single and two screw-rod configurations. Overview of Literature Pedicle screw pull-out studies have involved single screw construct, whereas two screws and rod constructs are always used in spine fusions. Extrapolation of results using the single screw construct may lead to using expensive implants or increasing the fusion levels specifically in osteoporotic bones. Methods Single screw and two screw pull-out strength tests were carried out according to American Society for Testing and Materials F 543-07 on foam models to test the effect of density, insertion angle and reinsertion using poly axial pedicle screws. Results Bone density was the most significant factor deciding the pull-out strength in both single and two screw constructs. The difference in pull-out strength between single screw and two screw configurations in extremely osteoporotic bone model (80 kg/m3) was 78%, whereas in the normal bone model it was 48%. Axial pull-out value was highest for the single screw configuration; in the two screw configuration the highest pull-out strength was at 10°–15°. There was an 18% reduction in pull-out strength due to reinsertion in single screw configuration. The reinsertion effect was insignificant in the two screw configuration. Conclusions A significant difference in response of various factors on holding power of pedicle screw between single and two-screw configurations is evident. The percentage increase in pull-out strength between single and two screw constructs is higher for osteoporotic bone when compared to normal bone. Reinsertion has no significant effect on pull-out strength in the two screw rod configuration. PMID:27340518

  12. Pedicle Screw Instrumentation for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: The Insertion Technique, the Fusion Levels and Direct Vertebral Rotation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The pedicle is a power nucleus of the vertebra and offers a secure grip of all 3 columns. Pedicle screw instrumentation has advantages of rigid fixation with improved three-dimensional (3D) correction and it is accepted as a reliable method with a high margin of safety. Accurate placement of the pedicle screws is important to reduce possible irreversible complications. Many methods of screw insertion have been reported. The author has been using the K-wire method coupled with the intraoperative single posteroanterior and lateral radiographs, which is the most safe, accurate and fast method. Identification of the curve patterns and determining the fusion levels are very important. The ideal classification of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis should address the all patterns, predict the extent of accurate fusion and have good inter/intraobserver reliability. My classification system matches with the ideal classification system, and it is simple and easy to learn; and my classification system has only 4 structural curve patterns and each curve has 2 types. Scoliosis is a 3D deformity; the coronal and sagittal curves can be corrected with rod rotation, and rotational deformity has to be corrected with direct vertebral rotation (DVR). Rod derotation and DVR are true methods of 3D deformity correction with shorter fusion and improved correction of both the fused and unfused curves, and this is accomplished using pedicle screw fixation. The direction of DVR is very important and it should be opposite to the direction of the rotational deformity of the vertebra. A rigid rod has to be used to prevent rod bend-out during the derotation and DVR. PMID:21629468

  13. Biomechanical efficacy of monoaxial or polyaxial pedicle screw and additional screw insertion at the level of fracture, in lumbar burst fracture: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongwei; Li, Changqing; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Wei-dong; Zhou, Yue

    2012-01-01

    Background: Use of a pedicle screw at the level of fracture, also known as an intermediate screw, has been shown to improve clinical results in managing lumbar fracture, but there is a paucity of biomechanical studies to support the claim. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding intermediate pedicle screws at the level of a fracture on the stiffness of a short-segment pedicle fixation using monoaxial or polyaxial screws and to compare the strength of monoaxial and polyaxial screws in the calf spine fracture model. Materials and Methods: Flexibility of 12 fresh-frozen calf lumbar spine specimens was evaluated in all planes. An unstable burst fracture model was created at the level of L3 by the pre-injury and dropped-mass technique. The specimens were randomly divided into monoaxial pedicle screw (MPS) and polyaxial pedicle screw (PPS) groups. Flexibility was retested without and with intermediate screws (MPSi and PPSi) placed at the level of fracture in addition to standard screws placed at L2 and L4. Results: The addition of intermediate screws significantly increased the stability of the constructs, as measured by a decreased range of motion (ROM) in flexion, extension, and lateral bending in both MPS and PPS groups (P < 0.05). There was neither any significant difference in the ROM in the spines of the two groups before injury, nor a difference in the ROM between the MPSi and PPSi groups (P > 0.05), but there was a significant difference between MPS and PPS in flexion and extension in the short-segment fixation group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The addition of intermediate screws at the level of a burst fracture significantly increased the stability of short-segment pedicle screw fixation in both the MPS and PPS groups. However, in short-segment fixation group, monoaxial pedicle screw exhibited more stability in flexion and extension than the polyaxial pedicle screw. PMID:22912513

  14. Cervical Pedicle Screw Fixation: Anatomic Feasibility of Pedicle Morphology and Radiologic Evaluation of the Anatomical Measurements

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Study Design All parameters were measured manually and with a computed tomography (CT) scanner. For the manual measurements, a Vernier scale instrument was used. Purpose This study evaluates quantitatively pedicles of middle and lower cervical spine (C3 to C7) and to evaluate the possibilities of using these structures as anchors in posterior cervical fusion. Overview of Literature Pedicle screws may be an alternative fixation technique for posterior cervical instrumentation. Methods Twenty-two bony sets of adult cervical spines were studied (110 vertebrae, 220 pedicles) from C3 down to C7. Results CT measurement of cervical pedicles appeared to be accurate and valuable for preoperative planning of cervical pedicle screw instrumentation. The study showed a high correlation between the values obtained by manual and CT measurements of pedicle dimensions. The technical challenge of insertion is the obvious theoretical drawback of the use of cervical pedicle screws. Many technical factors are important to consider, namely, the point of screw entry, the pedicle dimensions, the screw direction according to the pedicle angle and orientation, the screw diameter and length, and the method of screw introduction. Conclusions Transpedicular screw fixation of the cervical spine appears to be promising. Anatomic limitations should be clear to the surgeon. Further clinical and biomechanical studies are needed to settle this technique. PMID:24967041

  15. Occam Paradox? A Variation of Tapia Syndrome and an Unreported Complication of Guidewire-Assisted Pedicle Screw Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Emohare, Osa; Peterson, Erik; Slinkard, Nathaniel; Janus, Seth; Morgan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Clinical Question The clinical aim is to report on a previously unknown association between guidewire-assisted pedicle screw insertion and neuropraxia of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), and how this may overlap with the signs of Tapia syndrome; we also report our approach to the clinical management of this patient. Methods A 17-year-old male patient with idiopathic scoliosis experienced Tapia syndrome after posterior instrumentation and arthrodesis at the level of T1–L1. After extubation, the patient had a hoarse voice and difficulty in swallowing. Imaging showed a breach in the cortex of the anterior body of T1 corresponding to the RLN on the right. Results Otolaryngological examination noted right vocal fold immobility, decreased sensation of the endolarynx, and pooling of secretions on flexible laryngoscopy that indicated right-sided cranial nerve X injury and left-sided tongue deviation. Aspiration during a modified barium swallow prompted insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube before the patient was sent home. On postoperative day 20, a barium swallow demonstrated reduced aspiration, and the patient reported complete resolution of symptoms. The feeding tube was removed, and the patient resumed a normal diet 1 month later. Tapia syndrome, or persistent unilateral laryngeal and hypoglossal paralysis, is an uncommon neuropraxia, which has previously not been observed in association with a breached vertebral body at T1 along the course of the RLN. Conclusion Tapia syndrome should be a differential diagnostic consideration whenever these symptoms persist postoperatively and spine surgeons should be aware of this as a potential complication of guidewires in spinal instrumentation. PMID:24436711

  16. Cement leakage in pedicle screw augmentation: a prospective analysis of 98 patients and 474 augmented pedicle screws.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Jan U; Baldauf, Joerg; Marx, Sascha; Kirsch, Michael; Schroeder, Henry W S; Pillich, Dirk T

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Loosening and pullout of pedicle screws are well-known problems in pedicle screw fixation surgery. Augmentation of pedicle screws with bone cement, first described as early as 1975, increases the pedicle-screw interface and pullout force in osteoporotic vertebrae. The aim of the present study was to identify cement leakage and pulmonary embolism rates in a large prospective single-center series of pedicle screw augmentations. METHODS All patients who underwent cement-augmented pedicle screw placement between May 2006 and October 2010 at the authors' institution were included in this prospective cohort study. Perivertebral cement leakage and pulmonary cement embolism were evaluated with a CT scan of the area of operation and with a radiograph of the chest, respectively. RESULTS A total of 98 patients underwent placement of cement-augmented pedicle screws; 474 augmented screws were inserted in 237 vertebrae. No symptomatic perivertebral cement leakage or symptomatic pulmonary cement embolism was observed, but asymptomatic perivertebral cement leakage was seen in 88 patients (93.6%) and in 165 augmented vertebrae (73.3%). Cement leakage most often occurred in the perivertebral venous system. Clinically asymptomatic pulmonary cement embolism was found in 4 patients (4.1%). CONCLUSIONS Perivertebral cement leakage often occurs in pedicle screw augmentation, but in most cases, it is clinically asymptomatic. Cement augmentation should be performed under continuous fluoroscopy to avoid high-volume leakage. Alternative strategies, such as use of expandable screws, should be examined in more detail for patients at high risk of screw loosening. PMID:26943258

  17. Biomechanical testing of a new design for Schanz pedicle screws.

    PubMed

    Willett, K; Hearn, T C; Cuncins, A V

    1993-01-01

    Standard 5-mm AO Schanz pedicle screws were biomechanically compared with a new design, featuring 6-mm threads with a 5-mm core diameter continuous with the shaft. One each of the two screw designs was surgically inserted into the matching pedicles of 32 cadaveric vertebrae. The pull-out strengths of the screws were then determined by recording the peak force values during extraction under servohydraulic displacement control. The screws were also tested in three-point bending, varying the inner load point with respect to the shaft thread junction, within a clinically anticipated range. The mean pull-out strength for the 6-mm screw was 597 N, which was significantly greater than the mean strength of 405 N for the 5 mm screw (p = 0.002). The 6-mm screw was also stronger in three-point bending, and failed at the point of inner load application, with no evidence of a stress-raising effect at the shaft/thread junction. In contrast, the 5-mm screw withstood lower loads, and failed at the shaft/thread junction, regardless of the point of loading. Pedicle screw breakage and pull-out are the recognized modes of failure of spinal implants, which are dependent on pedicle screw fixation. The results suggest distinct biomechanical advantages for the 6-mm screw, which should be used whenever clinically feasible. PMID:8377050

  18. Pullout strength of misplaced pedicle screws in the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae - A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, Shyam K; Singh, Ravindra P; Singh, Vakil; Varma, Ashish

    2013-01-01

    Background: The objective of this cadaveric study was to analyze the effects of iatrogenic pedicle perforations from screw misplacement on the mean pullout strength of lower thoracic and lumbar pedicle screws. We also investigated the effect of bone mineral density (BMD), diameter of pedicle screws, and the region of spine on the pullout strength of pedicle screws. Materials and Methods: Sixty fresh human cadaveric vertebrae (D10–L2) were harvested. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan of vertebrae was done for BMD. Titanium pedicle screws of different diameters (5.2 and 6.2 mm) were inserted in the thoracic and lumbar segments after dividing the specimens into three groups: a) standard pedicle screw (no cortical perforation); b) screw with medial cortical perforation; and c) screw with lateral cortical perforation. Finally, pullout load of pedicle screws was recorded using INSTRON Universal Testing Machine. Results: Compared with standard placement, medially misplaced screws had 9.4% greater mean pullout strength and laterally misplaced screws had 47.3% lesser mean pullout strength. The pullout strength of the 6.2 mm pedicle screws was 33% greater than that of the 5.2 mm pedicle screws. The pullout load of pedicle screws in lumbar vertebra was 13.9% greater than that in the thoracic vertebra (P = 0.105), but it was not statistically significant. There was no significant difference between pullout loads of vertebra with different BMD (P = 0.901). Conclusion: The mean pullout strength was less with lateral misplaced pedicle screws while medial misplaced pedicle screw had more pullout strength. The pullout load of 6.2 mm screws was greater than that of 5.2 mm pedicle screws. No significant correlation was found between bone mineral densities and the pullout strength of vertebra. Similarly, the pullout load of screw placed in thoracic and lumbar vertebrae was not significantly different. PMID:23798753

  19. Accuracy of Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Insertion Technique with Conventional Dual Fluoroscopy Units and a Retrospective Comparative Study Based on Surgeon Experience.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Masayuki; Yasuhara, Takao; Inoue, Takafumi; Takahashi, Yuichi; Kumamoto, Shinji; Hijikata, Yasukazu; Kusumegi, Akira; Sakamoto, Yushi; Ogawa, Koichi; Nishida, Kenki

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective comparative study. Objective To evaluate the accuracy of percutaneous pedicle screw (PPS) placement and intraoperative imaging time using dual fluoroscopy units and their differences between surgeons with more versus less experience. Methods One hundred sixty-one patients who underwent lumbar fusion surgery were divided into two groups, A (n = 74) and B (n = 87), based on the performing surgeon's experience. The accuracy of PPS placement and radiation time for PPS insertion were compared. PPSs were inserted with classic technique under the assistance of dual fluoroscopy units placed in two planes. The breach definition of PPS misplacement was based on postoperative computed tomography (grade I: no breach; grade II: <2 mm; grade III: ≤2 to <4 mm). Results Of 658 PPSs, only 21 screws were misplaced. The breach rates of groups A and B were 3.3% (grade II: 3.4%, grade III: 0%) and 3.1% (grade II: 2.6%, grade III: 0.6%; p = 0.91). One patient in grade III misplacement had a transient symptom of leg numbness. Median radiation exposure time during PPS insertion was 25 seconds and 51 seconds, respectively (p < 0.01). Conclusions Without using an expensive imaging support system, the classic technique of PPS insertion using dual fluoroscopy units in the lumbar and sacral spine is fairly accurate and provides good clinical outcomes, even among surgeons lacking experience. PMID:27190733

  20. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pedicle screw spinal system. 888.3070 Section 888.3070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3070 Pedicle screw spinal system. (a) Identification. Pedicle screw spinal systems...

  1. Pedicle Morphometry for Thoracic Screw Fixation in Ethnic Koreans : Radiological Assessment Using Computed Tomographic Myelography

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yong Soo; Yi, Hyeong-Joong; Kim, Young-Joon

    2009-01-01

    Objective In the thoracic spine, insertion of a pedicle screw is annoying due to small pedicle size and wide morphological variation between different levels of the spine and between individuals. The aim of our study was to analyze radiologic parameters of the pedicle morphometry from T1 to T8 using computed tomographic myelography (CTM) in Korean population. Methods For evaluation of the thoracic pedicle morphometry, the authors prospectively analyzed a consecutive series of 26 patients with stable thoracic spines. With the consent of patients, thoracic CTM were performed, from T1 to T8. We calculated the transverse outer diameters and the transverse angles of the pedicle, distance from the cord to the inner cortical wall of the pedicle, and distance from the cord to the dura. Results Transverse outer pedicle diameter was widest at T1 (7.66 ± 2.14 mm) and narrowest at T4 (4.38 ± 1.55 mm). Transverse pedicle angle was widest at T1 (30.2 ± 12.0°) and it became less than 9.0° below T6 level. Theoretical safety zone of the medial perforation of the pedicle screw, namely, distance from the cord to inner cortical wall of the pedicle was more than 4.5 mm. Conclusion Based on this study, we suggest that the current pedicle screw system is not always suitable for Korean patients. Computed tomography is required before performing a transpedicular screw fixation at the thoracic levels. PMID:19893719

  2. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...; spinal tumor; and failed previous fusion (pseudarthrosis). These pedicle screw spinal systems must comply... tumor, and failed previous fusion (pseudarthrosis). The safety and effectiveness of these devices...

  3. [Cement augmentation of pedicle screws : Pros and cons].

    PubMed

    Schnake, K J; Blattert, T R; Liljenqvist, U

    2016-09-01

    Cement augmentation of pedicle screws biomechanically increases screw purchase in the bone. However, clinical complications may occur. The pros and cons of the technique are discussed from different clinical perspectives. PMID:27514827

  4. Robot assisted navigated drilling for percutaneous pedicle screw placement: A preliminary animal study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongwei; Zhou, Yue; Liu, Jun; Han, Jianda; Xiang, Liangbi

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is much more radiation exposure to the surgeons during minimally invasive pedicle screws placement. In order to ease the surgeon's hand-eye coordination and to reduce the iatrogenic radiation injury to the surgeons, a robot assisted percutaneous pedicle screw placement is useful. This study assesses the feasibility and clinical value of robot assisted navigated drilling for pedicle screw placement and the results thus achieved formed the basis for the development of a new robot for pedicle screw fixation surgery. Materials and Methods: Preoperative computed tomography (CT) of eight bovine lumbar spines (L1–L5) in axial plane were captured for each vertebra, the entry points and trajectories of the screws were preoperatively planned. On the basis of preoperative CT scans and intraoperative fluoroscopy, we aligned the robot drill to the desired entry point and trajectory, as dictated by the surgeon's preoperative plan. Eight bovine lumbar spines were inserted 80 K-wires using the spine robot system. The time for system registration and pedicle drilling, fluoroscopy times were measured and recorded. Postoperative CT scans were used to assess the position of the K-wires. Results: Assisted by spine robot system, the average time for system registration was (343.4 ± 18.4) s, the average time for procedure of drilling one pedicle screw trajectory was (89.5 ± 6.1) s, times of fluoroscopy for drilling one pedicle screw were (2.9 ± 0.8) times. Overall, 12 (15.0%) of the 80 K-wires violated the pedicle wall. Four screws (5.0%) were medial to the pedicle and 8 (10.5%) were lateral. The number of K-wires wholly within the pedicle were 68 (85%). Conclusions: The preliminary study supports the view that computer assisted pedicle screw fixation using spinal robot is feasible and the robot can decrease the intraoperative fluoroscopy time during the minimally invasive pedicle screw fixation surgery. As spine robotic surgery is still in its infancy, further

  5. Biomechanical Analysis of Pedicle Screw Fixation for Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Matthew; Shah, Kalpit N; Paller, David J; Thakur, Nikhil A; Koruprolu, Sarath; Palumbo, Mark A; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures remains controversial. Long-segment pedicle screw constructs may be stiffer and impart greater forces on adjacent segments compared with short-segment constructs, which may affect clinical performance and long-term out come. The purpose of this study was to biomechanically evaluate long-segment posterior pedicle screw fixation (LSPF) vs short-segment posterior pedicle screw fixation (SSPF) for unstable burst fractures. Six unembalmed human thoracolumbar spine specimens (T10-L4) were used. Following intact testing, a simulated L1 burst fracture was created and sequentially stabilized using 5.5-mm titanium polyaxial pedicle screws and rods for 4 different constructs: SSPF (1 level above and below), SSPF+L1 (pedicle screw at fractured level), LSPF (2 levels above and below), and LSPF+L1 (pedicle screw at fractured level). Each fixation construct was tested in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation; range of motion was also recorded. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was performed to identify differences between treatment groups and functional noninstrumented spine. Short-segment posterior pedicle screw fixation did not achieve stability seen in an intact spine (P<.01), whereas LSPF constructs were significantly stiffer than SSPF constructs and demonstrated more stiffness than an intact spine (P<.01). Pedicle screws at the fracture level did not improve either SSPF or LSPF construct stability (P>.1). Long-segment posterior pedicle screw fixation constructs were not associated with increased adjacent segment motion. Al though the sample size of 6 specimens was small, this study may help guide clinical decisions regarding burst fracture stabilization. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e514-e518.]. PMID:27135451

  6. Effect of different radial hole designs on pullout and structural strength of cannulated pedicle screws.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Chang; Lai, Yu-Shu; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Chen, Jou-Wen; Chang, Chia-Ming; Chen, Yi-Long; Wang, Shih-Tien; Cheng, Cheng-Kung

    2015-08-01

    Cannulated pedicle screws are designed for bone cement injection to enhance fixation strength in severely osteoporotic spines. However, the screws commonly fracture during insertion. This study aims to evaluate how different positions/designs of radial holes may affect the pullout and structural strength of cannulated pedicle screws using finite element analysis. Three different screw hole designs were evaluated under torsion and bending conditions. The pullout strength for each screw was determined by axial pullout failure testing. The results showed that when the Von Mises stress reached the yield stress of titanium alloy the screw with four radial holes required a greater torque or bending moment than the nine and twelve hole screws. In the pullout test, the strength and stiffness of each screw with cement augmentation showed no significant differences, but the screw with four radial holes had a greater average pullout strength, which probably resulted from the significantly greater mean maximum lengths of cement augmentation. Superior biomechanical responses, with lower stress around the radial holes and greater pullout strength, represented by cannulated pedicle screw with four radial holes may worth recommending for clinical application. PMID:26054806

  7. Pedicle Screw Placement in the Thoracolumbar Spine Using a Novel, Simple, Safe, and Effective Guide-Pin : A Computerized Tomography Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Yongjung J.; Cheh, Gene; Cho, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To improve pedicle screw placement accuracy with minimal radiation and low cost, we developed specially designed K-wire with a marker. To evaluate the accuracy of thoracolumbar pedicle screws placed using the novel guide-pin and portable X-rays. Methods Observational cohort study with computerized tomography (CT) analysis of in vivo and in vitro pedicle screw placement. Postoperative CT scans of 183 titanium pedicle screws (85 lumbar and 98 thoracic from T1 to L5) placed into 2 cadavers and 18 patients were assessed. A specially designed guide-pin with a marker was inserted into the pedicle to identify the correct starting point (2 mm lateral to the center of the pedicle) and aiming point (center of the pedicle isthmus) in posteroanterior and lateral X-rays. After radiographically confirming the exact starting and aiming points desired, a gearshift was inserted into the pedicle from the starting point into the vertebral body through the center of pedicle isthmus. Results Ninety-nine percent (181/183) of screws were contained within the pedicle (total 183 pedicle screws : 98 thoracic pedicle screws and 85 lumbar screws). Only two of 183 (1.0%) thoracic pedicle screws demonstrated breach (1 lateral in a patient and 1 medial in a cadaver specimen). None of the pedicle breaches were associated with neurologic or other clinical sequelae. Conclusion A simple, specially designed guide-pin with portable X-rays can provide correct starting and aiming points and allows for accurate pedicle screw placement without preoperative CT scan and intraoperative fluoroscopic assistance. PMID:26279807

  8. A new free-hand pedicle screw placement technique with reference to the supraspinal ligament

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juming; Zhao, Hong; Xie, Hao; Yu, Lipeng; Wei, Jifu; Zong, Min; Chen, Feng; Zhu, Ziqiang; Zhang, Ning; Cao, Xiaojian

    2014-01-01

    We sought to compare the safety and accuracy of a new free-hand pedicle screw placement technique to that of the conventional technique. One hundred fifty-three consecutive adult patients with simple fracture in the thoracic or/and lumbar spine were alternately assigned to either the new free-hand or the conventional group. In the new free-hand technique group, preoperative computerized tomography (CT) images were used to calculate the targeted medial-lateral angle of each pedicle trajectory and the pedicle screw was inserted perpendicular to the correspond-ing supraspinal ligament. In the conventional technique group, the medial-lateral and cranial-caudal angle of each pedicle trajectory was determined by intraoperatively under fluoroscopic guidance. The accuracy rate of pedicle screw placement, the time of intraoperative fluoroscopy, the operating time and the amount of blood loss during operation were respectively compared. All screws were analyzed by using intraoperative radiographs, intraoperative triggered electromyography (EMG) monitoring data, postoperative CT data and clinical outcomes. The accuracy rate of pedicle screw placement in the new free-hand technique group and the conventional technique group was 96.3% and 94.2% (P < 0.05), respectively. The intraoperative fluoroscopy time of the new technique group was less than that of the conventional technique group (5.37 seconds vs. 8.79 seconds, P < 0.05). However, there was no statistical difference in the operating time and the amount of blood loss during operation (P > 0.05). Pedicle screw placement with the free-hand technique which keeps the screw perpendicular to the supraspinal ligament is an accurate, reliable and safe technique to treat simple fracture in the thoracic or lumbar spine. PMID:24474966

  9. In vitro biomechanical study of pedicle screw pull-out strength based on different screw path preparation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Moldavsky, Mark; Salloum, Kanaan; Bucklen, Brandon; Khalil, Saif; Mehta, Jwalant S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Poor screw-to-bone fixation is a clinical problem that can lead to screw loosening. Under-tapping (UT) the pedicle screw has been evaluated biomechanically in the past. The objective of the study was to determine if pedicle preparation with a sequential tapping technique will alter the screw-to-bone fixation strength using a stress relaxation testing loading protocol. Materials and Methods: Three thoracolumbar calf spines were instrumented with pedicle screws that were either probed, UT, standard-tapped (ST), or sequential tapped to prepare the pedicle screw track and a stress relaxation protocol was used to determine pull-out strength. The maximum torque required for pedicle screw insertion and pull-out strength was reported. A one-way ANOVA and Tukeys post-hoc test were used to determine statistical significance. Results: The pedicle screw insertion torques for the probed, UT, ST and sequentially tapped (SQT) techniques were 5.09 (±1.08) Nm, 5.39 (±1.61) Nm, 2.93 (±0.43) Nm, and 3.54 (±0.67) Nm, respectively. There is a significant difference between probed compared to ST (P ≤ 0.05), as well as UT compared to both ST and SQT (P ≤ 0.05). The pull-out strength for pedicle screws for the probed, UT, ST and SQT techniques was 2443 (±782) N, 2353(±918) N, 2474 (±521) N, and 2146 (±582) N, respectively, with no significant difference (P ≥ 0.05) between techniques. Conclusions: The ST technique resulted in the highest pull-out strength while the SQT technique resulted in the lowest. However, there was no significant difference in the pull-out strength for the various preparation techniques and there was no correlation between insertion torque and pull-out strength. This suggests that other factors such as bone density may have a greater influence on pull-out strength. PMID:27053808

  10. Plan to procedure: combining 3D templating with rapid prototyping to enhance pedicle screw placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, Kurt E.; Stans, Anthony A.; Morris, Jonathan M.; Huddleston, Paul M.; Matsumoto, Jane M.; Holmes, David R., III; Robb, Richard A.

    2010-02-01

    Spinal fusion procedures involving the implantation of pedicle screws have steadily increased over the past decade because of demonstrated improvement in biomechanical stability of the spine. However, current methods of spinal fusion carries a risk of serious vascular, visceral, and neurological injury caused by inaccurate placement or inappropriately sized instrumentation, which may lead to patient paralysis or even fatality. 3D spine templating software developed by the Biomedical Imaging Resource (BIR) at Mayo Clinic allows the surgeon to virtually place pedicle screws using pre-operative 3D CT image data. With the template plan incorporated, a patient-specific 3D anatomic model is produced using a commercial rapid prototyping system. The pre-surgical plan and the patient-specific model then are used in the procedure room to provide real-time visualization and quantitative guidance for accurate placement of each pedicle screw, significantly reducing risk of injury. A pilot study was conducted at Mayo Clinic by the Department of Radiology, the Department of Orthopedics, and the BIR, involving seven complicated pediatric spine cases. In each case, pre-operative 3D templating was carried out and patient specific models were generated. The plans and the models were used intra-operatively, providing precise pedicle screw starting points and trajectories. Postoperative assessment by the surgeon confirmed all seven operations were successful. Results from the study suggest that patient-specific, 3D anatomic models successfully acquired from 3D templating tools are valuable for planning and conducting pedicle screw insertion procedures.

  11. Hydroxyapatite composite resin cement augmentation of pedicle screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Turner, Alexander W L; Gillies, R Mark; Svehla, Martin J; Saito, Masanobu; Walsh, William R

    2003-01-01

    Pedicle screw stability is poor in osteopenic vertebrae attributable, in part, to low screw-bone interface strength. The current authors examined cement augmentation using a low curing temperature hydroxyapatite and bis-phenol-A glycidol methacrylate-based composite resin. This cement may stiffen the screw-bone interface and reduce the harmful effects associated with polymethylmethacrylate regarding temperature and toxic monomer. Thirty-five lumbar vertebrae from human cadavers were instrumented with pedicle screws, with one pedicle previously injected with cement and the other as the control. Caudocephalad toggling of +/- 1 mm for 1600 cycles was applied to the pedicle screws, and the resulting forces supported by the implant-bone interface were captured by a load cell. A curve was constructed from the peak caudal load for each cycle and three mechanical measures parameterized this curve: (1) initial load; (2) rate of load decay during the first 400 cycles; and (3) final load. The initial load increased by 16% as a result of cement augmentation, the final load increased by 65%, and the rate of load decay decreased by 59%. Cement augmentation of pedicle screws increased the stiffness and stability of the screw-bone interface. PMID:12579026

  12. Pullout performance comparison of pedicle screws based on cement application and design parameters.

    PubMed

    Tolunay, Tolga; Başgül, Cemile; Demir, Teyfik; Yaman, Mesut E; Arslan, Arslan K

    2015-11-01

    Pedicle screws are the main fixation devices for certain surgeries. Pedicle screw loosening is a common problem especially for osteoporotic incidents. Cannulated screws with cement augmentation are widely used for that kind of cases. Dual lead dual cored pedicle screw has already given promising pullout values without augmentation. This study concentrates on the usage of dual lead dual core with cement augmentation as an alternative to cannulated and standard pedicle screws with cement augmentation. Five groups (dual lead dual core, normal pedicle screw and cannulated pedicle screw with augmentation, normal pedicle screw, dual lead dual cored pedicle screw) were designed for this study. Healthy bovine vertebrae and synthetic polyurethane foams (grade 20) were used as embedding test medium. Test samples were prepared in accordance with surgical guidelines and ASTM F543 standard testing protocols. Pullout tests were conducted with Instron 3300 testing frame. Load versus displacement values were recorded and maximum pullout loads were stated. The dual lead dual cored pedicle screw with poly-methyl methacrylate augmentation exhibited the highest pullout values, while dual lead dual cored pedicle screw demonstrated similar pullout strength as cannulated pedicle screw and normal pedicle screw with poly-methyl methacrylate augmentation. The dual lead dual cored pedicle screw with poly-methyl methacrylate augmentation can be used for osteoporotic and/or severe osteoporotic patients according to its promising results on animal cadaver and synthetic foams. PMID:26503840

  13. C2 Pedicle Screw Placement: A Novel Teaching Aid

    PubMed Central

    Moisi, Marc; Chapman, Jens; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2016-01-01

    The C2 pedicle screw is more biomechanically stable and provides patients with increased postoperative range of motion in comparison to other methods of C2 fixation. However, as a result of the proximity of the C2 pedicle to the transverse foramen, there is a considerable risk of intraoperative morbidity due to vertebral artery injury laterally or vertebral canal breach medially. Other than the use of cadavers for the demonstration and practice of C2 pedicle screw placement, there are currently few other readily available teaching aids for the training of residents and fellows. Herein, we describe a simple and cost effective modality for the demonstration, evaluation, and practice of C2 pedicle screw placement in a laboratory setting. PMID:27433409

  14. Pullout strength of pedicle screws with cement augmentation in severe osteoporosis: A comparative study between cannulated screws with cement injection and solid screws with cement pre-filling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pedicle screws with PMMA cement augmentation have been shown to significantly improve the fixation strength in a severely osteoporotic spine. However, the efficacy of screw fixation for different cement augmentation techniques, namely solid screws with retrograde cement pre-filling versus cannulated screws with cement injection through perforation, remains unknown. This study aimed to determine the difference in pullout strength between conical and cylindrical screws based on the aforementioned cement augmentation techniques. The potential loss of fixation upon partial screw removal after screw insertion was also examined. Method The Taguchi method with an L8 array was employed to determine the significance of design factors. Conical and cylindrical pedicle screws with solid or cannulated designs were installed using two different screw augmentation techniques: solid screws with retrograde cement pre-filling and cannulated screws with cement injection through perforation. Uniform synthetic bones (test block) simulating severe osteoporosis were used to provide a platform for each screw design and cement augmentation technique. Pedicle screws at full insertion and after a 360-degree back-out from full insertion were then tested for axial pullout failure using a mechanical testing machine. Results The results revealed the following 1) Regardless of the screw outer geometry (conical or cylindrical), solid screws with retrograde cement pre-filling exhibited significantly higher pullout strength than did cannulated screws with cement injection through perforation (p = 0.0129 for conical screws; p = 0.005 for cylindrical screws). 2) For a given cement augmentation technique (screws without cement augmentation, cannulated screws with cement injection or solid screws with cement pre-filling), no significant difference in pullout strength was found between conical and cylindrical screws (p >0.05). 3) Cement infiltration into the open cell of the test block led to

  15. Comparing Accuracy of Cervical Pedicle Screw Placement between a Guidance System and Manual Manipulation: A Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Yu; Bao, Nirong; Zhao, Jianning; Mao, Guangping

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of cervical pedicle screw placement between a three-dimensional guidance system and manual manipulation. Material/Methods Eighteen adult cadavers were randomized into group A (n=9) and group B (n=9). Ninety pedicle screws were placed into the C3-C7 under the guidance of a three-dimensional locator in group A, and 90 screws were inserted by manual manipulation in group B. The cervical spines were scanned using computed tomography (CT). Parallel and angular offsets of the screws were compared between the two placement methods. Results In group A, 90% of the screws were within the pedicles and 10% breached the pedicle cortex. In group B, 55.6% were within the pedicle and 44.4% breached the pedicle cortex. Locator guidance showed significantly lower parallel and angular offsets in axial CT images (P<0.01), and significantly lower angular offset in sagittal CT images (P<0.01) than manual manipulation. Conclusions Locator guidance is superior to manual manipulation in accuracy of cervical screw placement. Locator guidance might provide better safety than manual manipulation in placing cervical screws. PMID:26348197

  16. Inferolateral Entry Point for C2 Pedicle Screw Fixation in High Cervical Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Ho; Lee, Chul Hee; Hwang, Soo Hyun; Park, In Sung; Jung, Jin Myung

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of atlantoaxial stabilization using a new entry point for C2 pedicle screw fixation. Methods Data were collected from 44 patients undergoing posterior C1 lateral mass screw and C2 screw fixation. The 20 cases were approached by the Harms entry point, 21 by the inferolateral point, and three by pars screw. The new inferolateral entry point of the C2 pedicle was located about 3-5 mm medial to the lateral border of the C2 lateral mass and 5-7 mm superior to the inferior border of the C2-3 facet joint. The screw was inserted at an angle 30° to 45° toward the midline in the transverse plane and 40° to 50° cephalad in the sagittal plane. Patients received followed-up with clinical examinations, radiographs and/or CT scans. Results There were 28 males and 16 females. No neurological deterioration or vertebral artery injuries were observed. Five cases showed malpositioned screws (2.84%), with four of the screws showing cortical breaches of the transverse foramen. There were no clinical consequences for these five patients. One screw in the C1 lateral mass had a medial cortical breach. None of the screws were malpositioned in patients treated using the new entry point. There was a significant relationship between two group (p=0.036). Conclusion Posterior C1-2 screw fixation can be performed safely using the new inferolateral entry point for C2 pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of high cervical lesions. PMID:22200017

  17. Enhancement of pedicle screw stability using calcium phosphate cement in osteoporotic vertebrae: in vivo biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Taniwaki, Yoshimichi; Takemasa, Ryuichi; Tani, Toshikazu; Mizobuchi, Hiroo; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    We conducted an experimental study using female beagles with and without ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis to determine the effect of calcium phosphate cement (CPC) on the mechanical stability of inserted pedicle screws. A drill hole was created from the base of the transverse process to the vertebral body; CPC was injected into the hole, and then a screw was inserted into the same hole. In the presence of osteoporosis evidenced by dual X-ray absorptiometry, the stability of the inserted screw augmented by CPC against pull-out and cephalocaudal forces were significantly greater by 28% and 54% at 1 week after operation, 48% and 71% at 2 weeks, and 56% and 68% at 4 weeks compared with those without CPC. The pull-out strength increased progressively with time after surgery, probably reflecting new-bone growth from the surrounding cancellous bone, which was in direct contact with the CPC, as shown in the histologic study. At each time point the cephalocaudal rigidity was similar and the pull-out strength greater than that for the screws inserted without CPC in nonporotic dogs. These findings suggest that CPC augments the stability of the inserted pedicle screws and increases the stiffness of fixed osteoporotic motion segments using instrumentation. PMID:12768486

  18. Endovascular aortic injury repair after thoracic pedicle screw placement.

    PubMed

    Pesenti, S; Bartoli, M A; Blondel, B; Peltier, E; Adetchessi, T; Fuentes, S

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to describe the management and prevention of thoracic aortic injuries caused by a malposition of pedicle screws in corrective surgery of major spine deformities. Positioning pedicle screws in thoracic vertebras by posterior approach exposes to the risk of injury of the elements placed ahead of the thoracic spine, as the descending thoracic aorta. This complication can result in a cataclysmic bleeding, needing urgent vascular care, but it can also be totally asymptomatic, resulting in the long run in a pseudoaneurysm, justifying the systematic removal of the hardware. We report the case of a 76-year-old woman who underwent spinal correction surgery for thoraco-lumbar degenerative kypho-scoliosis. Immediately after the surgery, a thoracic aortic injury caused by the left T7 pedicle screw was diagnosed. The patient underwent a two-step surgery. The first step was realized by vascular surgeons and aimed to secure the aortic wall by short endovascular aortic grafting. During the second step, spine surgeons removed the responsible screw by posterior approach. The patient was discharged in a rehabilitation center 7 days after the second surgery. When such a complication occurs, a co-management by vascular and spine surgeons is necessary to avoid major complications. Endovascular management of this kind of vascular injuries permits to avoid an open surgery that have a great rate of morbi-mortality in frail patients. Nowadays, technologies exist to prevent this kind of event and may improve the security when positioning pedicle screws. PMID:25023930

  19. Virtual estimates of fastening strength for pedicle screw implantation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linte, Cristian A.; Camp, Jon J.; Augustine, Kurt E.; Huddleston, Paul M.; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2014-03-01

    Traditional 2D images provide limited use for accurate planning of spine interventions, mainly due to the complex 3D anatomy of the spine and close proximity of nerve bundles and vascular structures that must be avoided during the procedure. Our previously developed clinician-friendly platform for spine surgery planning takes advantage of 3D pre-operative images, to enable oblique reformatting and 3D rendering of individual or multiple vertebrae, interactive templating, and placement of virtual pedicle implants. Here we extend the capabilities of the planning platform and demonstrate how the virtual templating approach not only assists with the selection of the optimal implant size and trajectory, but can also be augmented to provide surrogate estimates of the fastening strength of the implanted pedicle screws based on implant dimension and bone mineral density of the displaced bone substrate. According to the failure theories, each screw withstands a maximum holding power that is directly proportional to the screw diameter (D), the length of the in-bone segm,ent of the screw (L), and the density (i.e., bone mineral density) of the pedicle body. In this application, voxel intensity is used as a surrogate measure of the bone mineral density (BMD) of the pedicle body segment displaced by the screw. We conducted an initial assessment of the developed platform using retrospective pre- and post-operative clinical 3D CT data from four patients who underwent spine surgery, consisting of a total of 26 pedicle screws implanted in the lumbar spine. The Fastening Strength of the planned implants was directly assessed by estimating the intensity - area product across the pedicle volume displaced by the virtually implanted screw. For post-operative assessment, each vertebra was registered to its homologous counterpart in the pre-operative image using an intensity-based rigid registration followed by manual adjustment. Following registration, the Fastening Strength was computed

  20. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... immobilization and stabilization of spinal segments in skeletally mature patients as an adjunct to fusion in the...; spinal tumor; and failed previous fusion (pseudarthrosis). These pedicle screw spinal systems must comply... with significant mechanical instability or deformity requiring fusion with instrumentation....

  1. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... immobilization and stabilization of spinal segments in skeletally mature patients as an adjunct to fusion in the...; spinal tumor; and failed previous fusion (pseudarthrosis). These pedicle screw spinal systems must comply... with significant mechanical instability or deformity requiring fusion with instrumentation....

  2. Prediction of Deformity Correction by Pedicle Screw Instrumentation in Thoracolumbar Scoliosis Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiriyama, Yoshimori; Yamazaki, Nobutoshi; Nagura, Takeo; Matsumoto, Morio; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    In segmental pedicle screw instrumentation, the relationship between the combinations of pedicle screw placements and the degree of deformity correction was investigated with a three-dimensional rigid body and spring model. The virtual thoracolumbar scoliosis (Cobb’s angle of 47 deg.) was corrected using six different combinations of pedicle-screw placements. As a result, better correction in the axial rotation was obtained with the pedicle screws placed at or close to the apical vertebra than with the screws placed close to the end vertebrae, while the correction in the frontal plane was better with the screws close to the end vertebrae than with those close to the apical vertebra. Additionally, two screws placed in the convex side above and below the apical vertebra provided better correction than two screws placed in the concave side. Effective deformity corrections of scoliosis were obtained with the proper combinations of pedicle screw placements.

  3. A Biomechanical Comparison of Expansive Pedicle Screws for Severe Osteoporosis: The Effects of Screw Design and Cement Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Tai, Ching-Lung; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Lai, Po-Liang; Chen, Yi-Lu; Liu, Mu-Yi; Chen, Lih-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Expansive pedicle screws significantly improve fixation strength in osteoporotic spines. However, the previous literature does not adequately address the effects of the number of lengthwise slits and the extent of screw expansion on the strength of the bone/screw interface when expansive screws are used with or without cement augmentation. Herein, four designs for expansive pedicle screws with different numbers of lengthwise slits and different screw expansion levels were evaluated. Synthetic bones simulating severe osteoporosis were used to provide a comparative platform for each screw design. The prepared specimens were then tested for axial pullout failure. Regardless of screw design, screws with cement augmentation demonstrated significantly higher pullout strength than pedicle screws without cement augmentation (p < 0.001). For screws without cement augmentation, solid screws exhibited the lowest pullout strength compared to the four expansive groups (p < 0.01). No significant differences in pullout strength were observed between the expansive screws with different designs (p > 0.05). Taken together, our results show that pedicle screws combined with cement augmentation may greatly increase screw fixation regardless of screws with or without expansion. An increase in both the number of slits and the extent of screw expansion had little impact on the screw-anchoring strength. Cement augmentation is the most influential factor for improving screw pullout strength. PMID:26720724

  4. A Biomechanical Comparison of Expansive Pedicle Screws for Severe Osteoporosis: The Effects of Screw Design and Cement Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Ching-Lung; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Lai, Po-Liang; Chen, Yi-Lu; Liu, Mu-Yi; Chen, Lih-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Expansive pedicle screws significantly improve fixation strength in osteoporotic spines. However, the previous literature does not adequately address the effects of the number of lengthwise slits and the extent of screw expansion on the strength of the bone/screw interface when expansive screws are used with or without cement augmentation. Herein, four designs for expansive pedicle screws with different numbers of lengthwise slits and different screw expansion levels were evaluated. Synthetic bones simulating severe osteoporosis were used to provide a comparative platform for each screw design. The prepared specimens were then tested for axial pullout failure. Regardless of screw design, screws with cement augmentation demonstrated significantly higher pullout strength than pedicle screws without cement augmentation (p < 0.001). For screws without cement augmentation, solid screws exhibited the lowest pullout strength compared to the four expansive groups (p < 0.01). No significant differences in pullout strength were observed between the expansive screws with different designs (p > 0.05). Taken together, our results show that pedicle screws combined with cement augmentation may greatly increase screw fixation regardless of screws with or without expansion. An increase in both the number of slits and the extent of screw expansion had little impact on the screw-anchoring strength. Cement augmentation is the most influential factor for improving screw pullout strength. PMID:26720724

  5. The Surgical Management of Traumatic Lower Cervical Spondylolisthesis with Posterior Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Peng; Ni, Wen-Fei; Wu, Yao-Sen; Wu, Ai-Min; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Hua-Zi

    2015-01-01

    We reported a technical report of traumatic lower cervical spondylolisthesisca used by bilateral pedicle fracture, without neurological compression. The patient was treated with the minimally invasive technique of percutaneous pedicle screw fixation. Fracture healing and normal cervical motion were confirmed by plain films and physical examinations on the 18-monthpostoperatively. The technique of percutaneous pedicle screw fixation might be an alternative strategy for the treatment of traumatic lower cervical spondylolisthesis with pedicle fracture. PMID:25901240

  6. A comparative study of pedicle screw fixation in dorsolumbar spine by freehand versus image-assisted technique: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Archit; Chauhan, Vijendra; Singh, Deepa; Shailendra, Raghuvanshi; Maheshwari, Rajesh; Juyal, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Background: New and expensive technology such as three-dimensional computer assisted surgery is being used for pedicle screw fixation in dorsolumbar spine. Their availability, expenses and amount of radiation exposure are issues in a developing country. On the contrary, freehand technique of pedicle screw placement utilizes anatomic landmarks and tactile palpation without fluoroscopy or navigation to place pedicle screws. The purpose of this study was to analyze and compare the accuracy of freehand and image-assisted technique to place pedicle screws in the dorsolumbar spine of cadavers by an experienced surgeon and a resident. Evaluation was done using dissection of pedicle and computed tomography (CT) imaging. Materials and Methods: Ten cadaveric dorsolumbar spines were exposed by a posterior approach. Titanium pedicle screws were inserted from D5 to L5 vertebrae by freehand and image-assisted technique on either side by an experienced surgeon and a resident. CT was obtained. A blinded radiologist reviewed the imaging. The spines were then dissected to do a macroscopic examination. Screws, having evidence of cortical perforation of more than 2 mm on CT, were considered to be a significant breach. Results: A total of 260 pedicle screws were placed. The surgeon and the resident placed 130 screws each. Out of 130 screws, both of them placed 65 screws each by freehand and image- assisted technique each. The resident had a rate of 7.69% significant medial and 10.76% significant lateral breach with freehand technique while with image-assisted had a rate of 3.07% significant medial and 9.23% significant lateral breach. The expert surgeon had a rate of 6.15% significant medial and 1.53% significant lateral breach with freehand technique while with image-assisted had a rate of 3.07% significant medial and 6.15% significant lateral breach on CT evaluation. Conclusion: Freehand technique is as good as the image-assisted technique. Under appropriate supervision, residents

  7. Thoracic Aortic Stent-Graft Placement for Safe Removal of a Malpositioned Pedicle Screw

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hongtao; Shin, Ji Hoon Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Cho, Young Jun; Ko, Gi-Young; Yoon, Hyun-Ki

    2010-10-15

    We describe a case of percutaneous placement of a thoracic aortic stent-graft for safe removal of a malpositioned pedicle screw in a 52-year-old man. The patient had undergone posterior thoracic spinal instrumentation for pyogenic spondylitis and spinal deformity 8 months previously. Follow-up CT images showed a malpositioned pedicle screw which was abutting the thoracic aorta at the T5 level. After percutaneous stent-graft placement, the malpositioned pedicle screw was safely and successfully removed.

  8. Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation Technique in the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine-Tips and Tricks.

    PubMed

    Gazzeri, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The need for spinal fixation in patients who cannot tolerate classical open surgery has led in recent years to the development of minimally invasive approaches. The use of percutaneous pedicle screw fixation offers several advantages, such as less blood loss and postoperative pain due to blunt separation of the muscles with reduction of soft tissue dissection. Medical records and demographic information, diagnosis, and preoperative pain levels of 63 patients who underwent percutaneous minimally invasive thoracolumbar spine stabilization using the Illico® Fixation System (Alphatec Spine, Carlsbad, California) were analysed: a total of 344 screws were implanted. Preoperative and postoperative clinical assessment of the patients were based on a visual analogue scale. Because percutaneous techniques do not allow gross visualization of the vertebra and erroneous placement of the screw may be high in the initial cases, we discuss the techniques for a safe implantation of pedicle screws using a single or double intraoperative fluoroscopy. We report tips and tricks for technical challenges including fixation in osteoporotic patients, percutaneous insertion of long rods, compression/distraction using multiaxial screws turning into monoaxial, and use of minimally invasive retractror for interbody fusion. Recently, indications for minimally invasive percutaneous fixation have expanded and my results support that it may be considered a safe and effective option for the treatment of degenerative and traumatic thoracolumbar spinal diseases. PMID:27121407

  9. Biomechanical impact of C2 pedicle screw length in an atlantoaxial fusion construct

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Risheng; Bydon, Mohamad; Macki, Mohamed; Belkoff, Stephen M.; Langdale, Evan R.; McGovern, Kelly; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokalsan, Ziya L.; Bydon, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Posterior, atlantoaxial (AA) fusions of the cervical spine may include either standard (26 mm) or short (16 mm) C2 pedicle screws. This manuscript focused on an in vitro biomechanical comparison of standard versus short C2 pedicle screws to perform posterior C1-C2 AA fusions. Methods: Twelve human cadaveric spines underwent C1 lateral mass screw and standard C2 pedicle screw (n = 6) versus short C2 pedicle screw (n = 6) fixation. Six additional controls were not instrumented. The peak torque, peak rotational interval, and peak stiffness of the constructs were analyzed to failure levels. Results: The peak torque to construct failure was not statistically significantly different among the control spine (12.2 Nm), short pedicle fixation (15.5 Nm), or the standard pedicle fixation (11.6 Nm), P = 0.79. While the angle at the peak rotation statistically significantly differed between the control specimens (47.7° of relative motion) and the overall instrumented specimens (P < 0.001), the 20.7° of relative rotation in the short C2 pedicle screw specimens was not statistically significantly higher than the 13.7° of relative rotation in the standard C2 pedicle screw specimens (P = 0.39). Similarly, although the average stiffness was statistically significantly lower in control group (0.026 Nm/degree) versus the overall instrumented specimens (P = 0.001), the standard C2 pedicle screws (2.54 Nm/degree) did not differ from the short C2 pedicle screws Conclusions: Both standard and short C2 pedicle screws allow for equally rigid fixation of C1 lateral mass-C2 AA fusions. Usage of a short C2 pedicle screw may be an acceptable method of stabilization in carefully selected patient populations. PMID:25289157

  10. Navigation of Pedicle Screws in the Thoracic Spine with a New Electromagnetic Navigation System: A Human Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Patrick; Oezdemir, Semih; Komp, Martin; Giannakopoulos, Athanasios; Kasch, Richard; Merk, Harry; Liermann, Dieter; Godolias, Georgios; Ruetten, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Posterior stabilization of the spine is a standard procedure in spinal surgery. In addition to the standard techniques, several new techniques have been developed. The objective of this cadaveric study was to examine the accuracy of a new electromagnetic navigation system for instrumentation of pedicle screws in the spine. Material and Method. Forty-eight pedicle screws were inserted in the thoracic spine of human cadavers using EMF navigation and instruments developed especially for electromagnetic navigation. The screw position was assessed postoperatively by a CT scan. Results. The screws were classified into 3 groups: grade 1 = ideal position; grade 2 = cortical penetration <2 mm; grade 3 = cortical penetration ≥2 mm. The initial evaluation of the system showed satisfied positioning for the thoracic spine; 37 of 48 screws (77.1%, 95% confidence interval [62.7%, 88%]) were classified as group 1 or 2. Discussion. The screw placement was satisfactory. The initial results show that there is room for improvement with some changes needed. The ease of use and short setup times should be pointed out. Instrumentation is achieved without restricting the operator's mobility during navigation. Conclusion. The results indicate a good placement technique for pedicle screws. Big advantages are the easy handling of the system. PMID:25759814

  11. Computer navigation versus fluoroscopy-guided navigation for thoracic pedicle screw placement: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiao-Tong; Guan, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Hai-Long; He, Shi-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Although application of intraoperative computer navigation technique had been integrated into placement of pedicle screws (PSs) in thoracic fusion for years, its security and practicability remain controversial. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy, the operative time consumption, the amount of intraoperative blood loss, time of pedicle insertion and the incidence of complications of thoracic pedicle screw placement in patients with thoracic diseases such as scoliosis and kyphosis. Pubmed, Web of Knowledge, and Google scholar were searched to identify comparative studies of thoracic pedicle screw placement between intraoperative computer navigation and fluoroscopy-guided navigation. Outcomes of malposition rate, operative time consumption, insertion time, intraoperative blood loss, and the incidence of complications are evaluated. Fourteen articles including 1723 patients and 9019 PSs were identified matching inclusion criteria. The malposition rate was lower (RR: 0.33, 95 % CI: 0.28-0.38, P < 0.01) in computer navigation group than that in fluoroscopy-guided navigation group; the operative time was significantly longer [weighted mean difference (WMD) = 23.66, 95 % CI: 14.74-32.57, P < 0.01] in computer navigation group than that in fluoroscopy-guided navigation group. The time of insertion was shorter (WMD = -1.88, 95 % CI: -2.25- -1.52, P < 0.01) in computer navigation group than that in fluoroscopy-guided navigation group. The incidence of complications was lower (RR = 0. 23, 95 % CI: 0.12-0.46, P < 0.01) in computer navigation group than that in the other group. The intraoperative blood loss was fewer (WMD = -167.49, 95 % CI: -266.39- -68.58, P < 0.01) in computer navigation group than that in the other. In conclusion, the meta-analysis of thoracic pedicle screw placement studies clearly demonstrated lower malposition rate, less intraoperative blood loss, and fewer complications when using computer

  12. Accuracy of Percutaneous Lumbosacral Pedicle Screw Placement Using the Oblique Fluoroscopic View Based on Computed Tomography Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Koji; Kanemura, Tokumi; Iwase, Toshiki; Togawa, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective. Purpose This study aims to investigate the accuracy of the oblique fluoroscopic view, based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) images for accurate placement of lumbosacral percutaneous pedicle screws (PPS). Overview of Literature Although PPS misplacement has been reported as one of the main complications in minimally invasive spine surgery, there is no comparative data on the misplacement rate among different fluoroscopic techniques, or comparing such techniques with open procedures. Methods We retrospectively selected 230 consecutive patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion with a pedicle screw construct for degenerative lumbar disease, and divided them into 3 groups, those who had undergone: minimally invasive percutaneous procedure using biplane (lateral and anterior-posterior views using a single C-arm) fluoroscope views (group M-1), minimally invasive percutaneous procedure using the oblique fluoroscopic view based on preoperative CT (group M-2), and conventional open procedure using a lateral fluoroscopic view (group O: controls). The relative position of the screw to the pedicle was graded for the pedicle breach as no breach, <2 mm, 2–4 mm, or >4 mm. Inaccuracy was calculated and assessed according to the spinal level, direction and neurological deficit. Inter-group radiation exposure was estimated using fluoroscopy time. Results Inaccuracy involved an incline toward L5, causing medial or lateral perforation of pedicles in group M-1, but it was distributed relatively equally throughout multiple levels in groups M-2 and controls. The mean fluoroscopy time/case ranged from 1.6 to 3.9 minutes. Conclusions Minimally invasive lumbosacral PPS placement using the conventional fluoroscopic technique carries an increased risk of inaccurate screw placement and resultant neurological deficits, compared with that of the open procedure. Inaccuracy tended to be distributed between medial and lateral perforations of the L5 pedicle

  13. Insertion Profiles of 4 Headless Compression Screws

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Adam; Harvey, Edward J.; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; Barthelat, Francois; Rabiei, Reza; Martineau, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In practice, the surgeon must rely on screw position (insertion depth) and tactile feedback from the screwdriver (insertion torque) to gauge compression. In this study, we identified the relationship between interfragmentary compression and these 2 factors. Methods The Acutrak Standard, Acutrak Mini, Synthes 3.0, and Herbert-Whipple implants were tested using a polyurethane foam scaphoid model. A specialized testing jig simultaneously measured compression force, insertion torque, and insertion depth at half-screw-turn intervals until failure occurred. Results The peak compression occurs at an insertion depth of −3.1 mm, −2.8 mm, 0.9 mm, and 1.5 mm for the Acutrak Mini, Acutrak Standard, Herbert-Whipple, and Synthes screws respectively (insertion depth is positive when the screw is proud above the bone and negative when buried). The compression and insertion torque at a depth of −2 mm were found to be 113 ± 18 N and 0.348 ± 0.052 Nm for the Acutrak Standard, 104 ± 15 N and 0.175 ± 0.008 Nm for the Acutrak Mini, 78 ± 9 N and 0.245 ± 0.006 Nm for the Herbert-Whipple, and 67 ± 2N, 0.233 ± 0.010 Nm for the Synthes headless compression screws. Conclusions All 4 screws generated a sizable amount of compression (> 60 N) over a wide range of insertion depths. The compression at the commonly recommended insertion depth of −2 mm was not significantly different between screws; thus, implant selection should not be based on compression profile alone. Conically shaped screws (Acutrak) generated their peak compression when they were fully buried in the foam whereas the shanked screws (Synthes and Herbert-Whipple) reached peak compression before they were fully inserted. Because insertion torque correlated poorly with compression, surgeons should avoid using tactile judgment of torque as a proxy for compression. Clinical relevance Knowledge of the insertion profile may improve our understanding of the implants, provide a better basis for comparing screws

  14. Treatment of Unstable Thoracolumbar Fractures through Short Segment Pedicle Screw Fixation Techniques Using Pedicle Fixation at the Level of the Fracture: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changqing; Zhou, Yue; Wang, Hongwei; Liu, Jun; Xiang, Liangbi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the von Mises stresses of the internal fixation devices among different short segment pedicle screw fixation techniques to treat thoracic 12 vertebral fractures, especially the mono-segment pedicle screw fixation and intermediate unilateral pedicle screw fixation techniques. Methods Finite element methods were utilised to investigate the biomechanical comparison of the four posterior short segment pedicle screw fixation techniques (S4+2: traditional short-segment 4 pedicle screw fixation [SPSF]; M4+2: mono-segment pedicle screw fixation; I6+2: intermediate bilateral pedicle screw fixation; and I5+2: intermediate unilateral pedicle screw fixation). Results The range of motion (ROM) in flexion, axial rotation, and lateral bending was the smallest in the I6+2 fixation model, followed by the I5+2 and S4+2 fixation models, but lateral bending was the largest in the M4+2 fixation model. The maximal stress of the upper pedicle screw is larger than the lower pedicle screw in S4+2 and M4+2. The largest maximal von Mises stress was observed in the upper pedicle screw in the S4+2 and M4+2 fixation models and in the lower pedicle screw in the I6+2 and I5+2 fixation models. The values of the largest maximal von Mises stress of the pedicle screws and rods during all states of motion were 263.1 MPa and 304.5 MPa in the S4+2 fixation model, 291.6 MPa and 340.5 MPa in the M4+2 fixation model, 182.9 MPa and 263.2 MPa in the I6+2 fixation model, and 269.3 MPa and 383.7 MPa in the I5+2 fixation model, respectively. Comparing the stress between different spinal loadings, the maximal von Mises stress of the implants were observed in flexion in all implanted models. Conclusion Additional bilateral pedicle screws at the level of the fracture to SPSF may result in a stiffer construct and less von Mises stress for pedicle screws and rods. The largest maximal von Mises stress of the pedicle screws during all states of motion were observed in the mono-segment pedicle

  15. A new alternative to expandable pedicle screws: Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell.

    PubMed

    Demir, Teyfik

    2015-05-01

    Screw pullout is a very common problem in the fixation of sacrum with pedicle screws. The principal cause of this problem is that the cyclic micro motions in the fixation of sacrum are higher than the other regions of the vertebrae that limit the osteo-integration between bone and screw. In addition to that, the bone quality is very poor at sacrum region. This study investigated a possible solution to the pullout problem without the expandable screws' handicaps. Newly designed poly-ether-ether-ketone expandable shell and classical pedicle screws were biomechanically compared. Torsion test, pullout tests, fatigue tests, flexion/extension moment test, axial gripping capacity tests and torsional gripping capacity tests were conducted in accordance with ASTM F543, F1798 and F1717. Standard polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were used as embedding medium for pullout tests. Classical pedicle screw pullout load on polyurethane foam was 564.8 N compared to the failure load for calf vertebrae's 1264 N. Under the same test conditions, expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell system's pullout loads from polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were 1196.3 and 1890 N, respectively. The pullout values for expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell were 33% and 53% higher than classical pedicle screw on polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae, respectively. The expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited endurance on its 90% of yield load. Contrary to poly-ether-ether-ketone shell, classical pedicle screw exhibited endurance on 70% of its yield load. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited much higher pullout performance than classical pedicle screw. Fatigue performance of expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is also higher than classical pedicle screw due to damping the micro motion capacity of the poly-ether-ether-ketone. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is a safe alternative to all other expandable pedicle screw systems on mechanical perspective

  16. Unilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation with Bone Graft vs. Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation with Bone Graft or Cage: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Si-Dong; Chen, Qian; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Zhao, Jian-Qiang; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Shen, Yong; Yang, Da-Long

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the clinical efficacy of unilateral pedicle screw fixation with bone graft (UPSFB) in treating single-segment lumbar degenerative diseases (LDD), as compared to bilateral pedicle screw fixation with bone graft (BPSFB) or with cage (BPSFC). Material/Methods Medical records were retrospectively collected between 01/2010 and 02/2015 in Longyao County Hospital. According to surgical methods used, all patients were divided into 3 groups: UPSFB group, BPSFB group, and BPSFC group. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by blood loss, blood transfusion, duration of operation, hospital stay, postoperative complications, interbody fusion rate, reoperation rate, medical expenses, patient satisfaction survey, and JOA score. Results Ninety-five patients were included and underwent 2.5-year follow-up, with 7 patients lost to regular follow-up. As compared to the BPSFB group and BPSFC group, the UPSFB group had less blood loss and less blood transfusion, as well as shorter hospital stay (p<0.05). Medical expenses were far lower in the UPSFB group (p<0.001). There were no significant differences among the 3 groups in postoperative complications, interbody fusion rate, reoperation rate, JOA score, and patient satisfaction (all p>0.05). Conclusions As compared to BPSFB and BPSFC, UPSFB has the same reliability and effectiveness in treating single-segment LDD with unilateral radicular symptoms in a single lower extremity, with the additional advantage being less expensive. PMID:26988532

  17. Unilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation with Bone Graft vs. Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation with Bone Graft or Cage: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Si-Dong; Chen, Qian; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Zhao, Jian-Qiang; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Shen, Yong; Yang, Da-Long

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to explore the clinical efficacy of unilateral pedicle screw fixation with bone graft (UPSFB) in treating single-segment lumbar degenerative diseases (LDD), as compared to bilateral pedicle screw fixation with bone graft (BPSFB) or with cage (BPSFC). MATERIAL AND METHODS Medical records were retrospectively collected between 01/2010 and 02/2015 in Longyao County Hospital. According to surgical methods used, all patients were divided into 3 groups: UPSFB group, BPSFB group, and BPSFC group. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by blood loss, blood transfusion, duration of operation, hospital stay, postoperative complications, interbody fusion rate, reoperation rate, medical expenses, patient satisfaction survey, and JOA score. RESULTS Ninety-five patients were included and underwent 2.5-year follow-up, with 7 patients lost to regular follow-up. As compared to the BPSFB group and BPSFC group, the UPSFB group had less blood loss and less blood transfusion, as well as shorter hospital stay (p<0.05). Medical expenses were far lower in the UPSFB group (p<0.001). There were no significant differences among the 3 groups in postoperative complications, interbody fusion rate, reoperation rate, JOA score, and patient satisfaction (all p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS As compared to BPSFB and BPSFC, UPSFB has the same reliability and effectiveness in treating single-segment LDD with unilateral radicular symptoms in a single lower extremity, with the additional advantage being less expensive. PMID:26988532

  18. Thoracic Pedicle Screw Placement Guide Plate Produced by Three-Dimensional (3-D) Laser Printing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongliang; Guo, Kaijing; Yang, Huilin; Wu, Dongying; Yuan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of an individualized thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate produced by 3-D laser printing. MATERIAL AND METHODS Thoracic pedicle samples of 3 adult cadavers were randomly assigned for 3-D CT scans. The 3-D thoracic models were established by using medical Mimics software, and a screw path was designed with scanned data. Then the individualized thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate models, matched to the backside of thoracic vertebral plates, were produced with a 3-D laser printer. Screws were placed with assistance of a guide plate. Then, the placement was assessed. RESULTS With the data provided by CT scans, 27 individualized guide plates were produced by 3-D printing. There was no significant difference in sex and relevant parameters of left and right sides among individuals (P>0.05). Screws were placed with assistance of guide plates, and all screws were in the correct positions without penetration of pedicles, under direct observation and anatomic evaluation post-operatively. CONCLUSIONS A thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate can be produced by 3-D printing. With a high accuracy in placement and convenient operation, it provides a new method for accurate placement of thoracic pedicle screws. PMID:27194139

  19. Thoracic Pedicle Screw Placement Guide Plate Produced by Three-Dimensional (3-D) Laser Printing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongliang; Guo, Kaijing; Yang, Huilin; Wu, Dongying; Yuan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of an individualized thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate produced by 3-D laser printing. Material/Methods Thoracic pedicle samples of 3 adult cadavers were randomly assigned for 3-D CT scans. The 3-D thoracic models were established by using medical Mimics software, and a screw path was designed with scanned data. Then the individualized thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate models, matched to the backside of thoracic vertebral plates, were produced with a 3-D laser printer. Screws were placed with assistance of a guide plate. Then, the placement was assessed. Results With the data provided by CT scans, 27 individualized guide plates were produced by 3-D printing. There was no significant difference in sex and relevant parameters of left and right sides among individuals (P>0.05). Screws were placed with assistance of guide plates, and all screws were in the correct positions without penetration of pedicles, under direct observation and anatomic evaluation post-operatively. Conclusions A thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate can be produced by 3-D printing. With a high accuracy in placement and convenient operation, it provides a new method for accurate placement of thoracic pedicle screws. PMID:27194139

  20. Monoaxial Pedicle Screws Are Superior to Polyaxial Pedicle Screws and the Two Pin External Fixator for Subcutaneous Anterior Pelvic Fixation in a Biomechanical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Rahul; Onwudiwe, Ndidi; Roth, Matthew; Sethi, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Comparison of monoaxial and polyaxial screws with the use of subcutaneous anterior pelvic fixation. Methods. Four different groups each having 5 constructs were tested in distraction within the elastic range. Once that was completed, 3 components were tested in torsion within the elastic range, 2 to torsional failure and 3 in distraction until failure. Results. The pedicle screw systems showed higher stiffness (4.008 ± 0.113 Nmm monoaxial, 3.638 ± 0.108 Nmm Click-x; 3.634 ± 0.147 Nmm Pangea) than the exfix system (2.882 ± 0.054 Nmm) in distraction. In failure testing, monoaxial pedicle screw system was stronger (360 N) than exfixes (160 N) and polyaxial devices which failed if distracted greater than 4 cm (157 N Click-x or 138 N Pangea). The exfix had higher peak torque and torsional stiffness than all pedicle systems. In torsion, the yield strengths were the same for all constructs. Conclusion. The infix device constructed with polyaxial or monoaxial pedicle screws is stiffer than the 2 pin external fixator in distraction testing. In extreme cases, the use of reinforcement or monoaxial systems which do not fail even at 360 N is a better option. In torsional testing, the 2 pin external fixator is stiffer than the pedicle screw systems. PMID:24368943

  1. A Novel Blasted and Grooved Low Profile Pedicle Screw Able to Resist High Compression Bending Loads

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Sung; Choi, Hong-June; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Jeong-Yoon; Jeong, Hyun-Yong; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Su; Yoon, Young-Sul; Lee, Yoon-Chul; Cho, Yong-Eun

    2012-01-01

    Objective Polyaxial pedicle screws are a safe, useful adjunct to transpedicular fixation. However, the large screw head size can cause soft tissue irritation, high rod positioning, and facet joint injury. However, the mechanical resistance provided by small and low profile pedicle screws is very limited. We therefore developed a novel, low profile pedicle screw using grooving and blasting treatment that is able to resist a high compression bending load. Methods We evaluated the compression bending force to displacement and yield loads for seven different screw head types that differed with regard to their groove intervals and whether or not they had been blasted. Results The rank order of screw types that had the greatest compression bending force to displacement was as follows: (1) universal polyaxial, (2) low polyaxial with 0.1mm grooves and blasting, (3) low polyaxial with blasting, (4) low polyaxial with 0.15mm grooves and blasting, (5) low polyaxial with 0.05mm grooves and blasting, (6) low polyaxial with 0.05mm grooves, (7) and low polyaxial. Low polyaxial screws with 0.1mm grooves and blasting had the maximum yield load and highest compression bending force to displacement of all seven polyaxial screw head systems evaluated. Conclusion Blasting and grooving treatment of pedicle screw heads resulted in screw heads with a high yield load and compression bending force relative to displacement because of increased friction. Low polyaxial pedicle screws with 0.1 mm grooves treated by blasting have mechanical characteristics similar to those of universal polyaxial pedicle screws. PMID:25983790

  2. Accuracy of robot-assisted pedicle screw placement for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in the pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Macke, Jeremy J; Woo, Raymund; Varich, Laura

    2016-06-01

    This is a retrospective review of pedicle screw placement in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients under 18 years of age who underwent robot-assisted corrective surgery. Our primary objective was to characterize the accuracy of pedicle screw placement with evaluation by computed tomography (CT) after robot-assisted surgery in AIS patients. Screw malposition is the most frequent complication of pedicle screw placement and is more frequent in AIS. Given the potential for serious complications, the need for improved accuracy of screw placement has spurred multiple innovations including robot-assisted guidance devices. No studies to date have evaluated this robot-assisted technique using CT exclusively within the AIS population. Fifty patients were included in the study. All operative procedures were performed at a single institution by a single pediatric orthopedic surgeon. We evaluated the grade of screw breach, the direction of screw breach, and the positioning of the patient for preoperative scan (supine versus prone). Of 662 screws evaluated, 48 screws (7.2 %) demonstrated a breach of greater than 2 mm. With preoperative prone position CT scanning, only 2.4 % of screws were found to have this degree of breach. Medial malposition was found in 3 % of screws, a rate which decreased to 0 % with preoperative prone position scanning. Based on our results, we conclude that the proper use of image-guided robot-assisted surgery can improve the accuracy and safety of thoracic pedicle screw placement in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. This is the first study to evaluate the accuracy of pedicle screw placement using CT assessment in robot-assisted surgical correction of patients with AIS. In our study, the robot-assisted screw misplacement rate was lower than similarly constructed studies evaluating conventional (non-robot-assisted) procedures. If patients are preoperatively scanned in the prone position, the misplacement rate is further

  3. Pedicle Screw Fixation Study in Immature Porcine Spines to Improve Pullout Resistance during Animal Testing

    PubMed Central

    Le Cann, Sophie; Cachon, Thibaut; Viguier, Eric; Miladi, Lotfi; Odent, Thierry; Rossi, Jean-Marie; Chabrand, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The porcine model is frequently used during development and validation of new spinal devices, because of its likeness to the human spine. These spinal devices are frequently composed of pedicle screws with a reputation for stable fixation but which can suffer pullouts during preclinical implantation on young animals, leading to high morbidity. With a view to identifying the best choices to optimize pedicle screw fixation in the porcine model, this study evaluates ex vivo the impact of weight (age) of the animal, the level of the vertebrae (lumbar or thoracic) and the type of screw anchorage (mono- or bi-cortical) on pedicle screw pullouts. Among the 80 pig vertebrae (90- and 140-day-old) tested in this study, the average screw pullout forces ranged between 419.9N and 1341.2N. In addition, statistical differences were found between test groups, pointing out the influence of the three parameters stated above. We found that the the more caudally the screws are positioned (lumbar level), the greater their pullout resistance is, moreover, screw stability increases with the age, and finally, the screws implanted with a mono-cortical anchorage sustained lower pullout forces than those implanted with a bi-cortical anchorage. We conclude that the best anchorage can be obtained with older animals, using a lumbar fixation and long screws traversing the vertebra and inducing bi-cortical anchorage. In very young animals, pedicle screw fixations need to be bi-cortical and more numerous to prevent pullout. PMID:26451947

  4. Comparison Between Gearshift And Drill Techniques For Pedicle Screw Placement By Resident Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jonathan; Akpolat, Yusuf T.; Kishan, Shyam; Peppers, Tim; Asgarzadie, Farbod

    2015-01-01

    Background Various techniques have been described for pedicle screw placement with established clinical and radiological success. Suboptimal screw trajectories can compromise bony purchase and, worse yet, cause neurological and vascular injuries. Thus, it is of paramount importance to achieve maximum accuracy of screw placement. Our objective is to evaluate the accuracy of pedicle screw placement in the thoracolumbar spine by resident surgeons. Two popular techniques, gearshift versus drill, were compared. Methods This is a a cadaveric surgical technique comparison study. Six resident surgeons instrumented the spine from T1 to S1 using both gearshift and drill techniques. Each pedicle was randomly assigned to either of the techniques. Pedicle screws were placed freehand without radiographic guidance. Violations (medial, lateral, anterior, superior and inferior) were recorded by studying the computerized tomographic scans of instrumented cadavers by blinded observers. Critical perforations were defined as greater than 2mm breach of the pedicle wall. Results A total of 100 vertebrae (200 pedicles) were instrumented in the six cadavers. 103 pedicles were breached (51.5% of total pedicles). Lateral violations were the most encountered (65% of violations, 67 total, 48 critical, 19 noncritical) followed by medial (24%, 25 total, 13 critical, 12 noncritical), and the rest were anterior (3%), superior (4%) and inferior (4%). There was no overall difference in violations comparing the gearshift technique (49.5%, 51 total, 37 critical, 14 noncritical) with drill technique (50.5%, 52 total, 33 critical, 19 noncritical). Analyzing the breaches at individual vertebra indicated most violations at T6 (11), T5 (10), followed by T3 (9) and T4 (9), decreasing towards the lumbosacral vertebrae. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that the gearshift and drill techniques for placement of pedicle screws in the thoracolumbar spine fare similarly with regards to risk of breach

  5. Solid and hollow pedicle screws affect the electrical resistance: A potential source of error with stimulus-evoked electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongwei; Liao, Xinhua; Ma, Xianguang; Li, Changqing; Han, Jianda; Zhou, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although stimulus evoked electromyography (EMG) is commonly used to confirm the accuracy of pedicle screw placement. There are no studies to differentiate between solid screws and hollow screws to the electrical resistance of pedicle screws. We speculate that the electrical resistance of the solid and hollow pedicle screws may be different and then a potential source of error with stimulus-evoked EMG may happen. Materials and Methods: Resistance measurements were obtained from 12 pedicle screw varieties (6 screws of each manufacturer) across the screw shank based on known constant current and measured voltage. The voltage was measured 5 times at each site. Results: Resistance of all solid screws ranged from 0.084 Ω to 0.151 Ω (mean =0.118 ± 0.024 Ω) and hollow screws ranged from 0.148 Ω to 0.402 Ω (mean = 0.285 ± 0.081 Ω). There was a significant difference of resistance between the solid screws and hollow screws (P < 0.05). The screw with the largest diameter no matter solid screws or hollow screws had lower resistance than screws with other diameters. No matter in solid screws group or hollow screws group, there were significant differences (P < 0.05) between the 5.0 mm screws and 6.0 mm screws, 6.0 mm screws and 7.0 mm screws, 5.0 mm screws and 7.0 mm screws, 4.5 mm screws and 5.5 mm screws, 5.5 mm screws and 6.5 mm screws, 4.5 mm screws and 6.5 mm screws. The resistance of hollow screws was much larger than the solid screws in the same diameter group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Hollow pedicle screws have the potential for high electrical resistance compared to the solid pedicle screws and therefore may affect the EMG response during stimulus-evoked EMG testing in pedicle screw fixation especially in minimally invasive percutaneous pedical screw fixation surgery. PMID:23960278

  6. Comparison of the bending performance of solid and cannulated spinal pedicle screws using finite element analyses and biomechanical tests.

    PubMed

    Shih, Kao-Shang; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Hou, Sheng-Mou; Yu, Shan-Chuen; Liaw, Chen-Kun

    2015-09-01

    Spinal pedicle screw fixations have been used extensively to treat fracture, tumor, infection, or degeneration of the spine. Cannulated spinal pedicle screws with bone cement augmentation might be a useful method to ameliorate screw loosening. However, cannulated spinal pedicle screws might also increase the risk of screw breakage. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the bending performance of different spinal pedicle screws with either solid design or cannulated design. Three-dimensional finite element models, which consisted of the spinal pedicle screw and the screw's hosting material, were first constructed. Next, monotonic and cyclic cantilever bending tests were both applied to validate the results of the finite element analyses. Finally, both the numerical and experimental approaches were evaluated and compared. The results indicated that the cylindrical spinal pedicle screws with a cannulated design had significantly poorer bending performance. In addition, conical spinal pedicle screws maintained the original bending performance, whether they were solid or of cannulated design. This study may provide useful recommendations to orthopedic surgeons before surgery, and it may also provide design rationales to biomechanical engineers during the development of spinal pedicle screws. PMID:26208430

  7. Current trends in pedicle screw stimulation techniques: lumbosacral, thoracic, and cervical levels.

    PubMed

    Isley, Michael R; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Balzer, Jeffrey R; Leppanen, Ronald E

    2012-06-01

    Unequivocally, pedicle screw instrumentation has evolved as a primary construct for the treatment of both common and complex spinal disorders. However an inevitable and potentially major complication associated with this type of surgery is misplacement of a pedicle screw(s) which may result in neural and vascular complications, as well as impair the biomechanical stability of the spinal instrumentation resulting in loss of fixation. In light of these potential surgical complications, critical reviews of outcome data for treatment of chronic, low-back pain using pedicle screw instrumentation concluded that "pedicle screw fixation improves radiographically demonstrated fusion rates;" however the expense and complication rates for such constructs are considerable in light of the clinical benefit (Resnick et al. 2005a). Currently, neuromonitoring using free-run and evoked (triggered) electromyography (EMG) is widely used and advocated for safer and more accurate placement of pedicle screws during open instrumentation procedures, and more recently, guiding percutaneous placement (minimally invasive) where the pedicle cannot be easily inspected visually. The latter technique, evoked or triggered EMG when applied to pedicle screw instrumentation surgeries, has been referred to as the pedicle screw stimulation technique. As concluded in the Position Statement by the American Society of Neurophysiological Monitoring (ASNM), multimodality neuromonitoring using free-run EMG and the pedicle screw stimulation technique was considered a practice option and not yet a standard of care (Leppanen 2005). Subsequently, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons/Congress of Neurological Surgeons (AANS/CNS) Joint Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves published their "Guidelines for the Performance of Fusion Procedures for Degenerative Disease of the Lumbar Spine" (Heary 2005, Resnick et al. 2005a, Resnick et al. 2005b). It was concluded that the "primary

  8. Fixation Strength of Caudal Pedicle Screws after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with the Modified Cortical Bone Trajectory Screw Method

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Clinical case series. Purpose In the posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedure in our institute, the cephalad screw trajectory follows a mediolateral and caudocephalad directed path according to the original cortical bone trajectory (CBT) method. However, the starting point of the caudal screw is at the medial border of the pedicle on an articular surface of the superior articular process, and the trajectory takes a mediolateral path parallel to the cephalad endplate. The incidence of caudal screw loosening after PLIF with this modified CBT screw method was investigated, and significant risk factors for caudal screw loosening were evaluated. Overview of Literature A biomechanical study of this modified caudal screw trajectory using the finite element method reported about a 20% increase in uniaxial yield pullout load compared with the traditional trajectory. However, there has been no clinical study concerning the fixation strength of this modified caudal screw trajectory. Methods The subjects were 193 consecutive patients who underwent single-level PLIF with modified CBT screw fixation. Caudal screw loosening was checked in computed tomography at 6 months after surgery, and screw loosening was defined as a radiolucency of 1 mm or more at the bone-screw interface. Results The incidence of caudal screw loosening after lumbosacral PLIF (46.2%) was significantly higher than that after floating PLIF (6.0%). No significant differences in sex, brand of the instruments, and diameter and length of the caudal screw were evident between patients with and without caudal screw loosening. Patients with caudal screw loosening were significantly older at the time of surgery than patients without caudal screw loosening. Conclusions Fixation strength of the caudal screw after floating PLIF with this modified CBT screw technique was sufficiently acceptable. Fixation strength after the lumbosacral procedure was not. PMID:27559442

  9. Assessing the Intraoperative Accuracy of Pedicle Screw Placement by Using a Bone-Mounted Miniature Robot System through Secondary Registration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Chang, Chih-Hui; Lin, Chih-Lung; Tsai, Tai-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pedicle screws are commonly employed to restore spinal stability and correct deformities. The Renaissance robotic system was developed to improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement. Purpose In this study, we developed an intraoperative classification system for evaluating the accuracy of pedicle screw placements through secondary registration. Furthermore, we evaluated the benefits of using the Renaissance robotic system in pedicle screw placement and postoperative evaluations. Finally, we examined the factors affecting the accuracy of pedicle screw implantation. Results Through use of the Renaissance robotic system, the accuracy of Kirschner-wire (K-wire) placements deviating <3 mm from the planned trajectory was determined to be 98.74%. According to our classification system, the robot-guided pedicle screw implantation attained an accuracy of 94.00% before repositioning and 98.74% after repositioning. However, the malposition rate before repositioning was 5.99%; among these placements, 4.73% were immediately repositioned using the robot system and 1.26% were manually repositioned after a failed robot repositioning attempt. Most K-wire entry points deviated caudally and laterally. Conclusion The Renaissance robotic system offers high accuracy in pedicle screw placement. Secondary registration improves the accuracy through increasing the precision of the positioning; moreover, intraoperative evaluation enables immediate repositioning. Furthermore, the K-wire tends to deviate caudally and laterally from the entry point because of skiving, which is characteristic of robot-assisted pedicle screw placement. PMID:27054360

  10. Clinical Use of 3D Printing Guide Plate in Posterior Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongliang; Wu, Dongying; Yang, Huilin; Guo, Kaijin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of use of a 3D printing guide plate in posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. MATERIAL AND METHODS We enrolled 43 patients receiving posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. The experimental group underwent 3D printing guide plate-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation, while the control group underwent traditional x-ray-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. After surgery, CT scanning was done to evaluate the accuracy of screw placement according to the Richter standard. RESULTS All patients were followed up for 1 month. The mean time of placement for each screw and the amount of hemorrhage was 4.9±2.1 min and 8.0±11.1 mL in the experimental group while 6.5±2.2 min and 59.9±13.0 mL in the control group, respectively, with significant differences (p<0.05). The fluoroscopy times of each screw placement was 0.5±0.4 in the experimental group, which was significantly lower than that in the control group 1.2±0.7 (p<0.05). The excellent and good screw placement rate was 100% in the experimental group and 98.4% in the control group, without any statistical difference (P>0.05). No obvious complications were reported in either group. CONCLUSIONS Compared with the traditional treatment methods, the intra-operative application of 3D printing guide plate can shorten the operation time and reduce the amount of hemorrhage. It can also reduce the fluoroscopy times compared with the traditional fluoroscopy, which cannot improve the accuracy rate of screw placement. PMID:26681388

  11. Clinical Use of 3D Printing Guide Plate in Posterior Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongliang; Wu, Dongying; Yang, Huilin; Guo, Kaijin

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of use of a 3D printing guide plate in posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. Material/Methods We enrolled 43 patients receiving posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. The experimental group underwent 3D printing guide plate-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation, while the control group underwent traditional x-ray-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. After surgery, CT scanning was done to evaluate the accuracy of screw placement according to the Richter standard. Results All patients were followed up for 1 month. The mean time of placement for each screw and the amount of hemorrhage was 4.9±2.1 min and 8.0±11.1 mL in the experimental group while 6.5±2.2 min and 59.9±13.0 mL in the control group, respectively, with significant differences (p<0.05). The fluoroscopy times of each screw placement was 0.5±0.4 in the experimental group, which was significantly lower than that in the control group 1.2±0.7 (p<0.05). The excellent and good screw placement rate was 100% in the experimental group and 98.4% in the control group, without any statistical difference (P>0.05). No obvious complications were reported in either group. Conclusions Compared with the traditional treatment methods, the intra-operative application of 3D printing guide plate can shorten the operation time and reduce the amount of hemorrhage. It can also reduce the fluoroscopy times compared with the traditional fluoroscopy, which cannot improve the accuracy rate of screw placement. PMID:26681388

  12. Balancing Rigidity and Safety of Pedicle Screw Fixation via a Novel Expansion Mechanism in a Severely Osteoporotic Model

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Thomas M.; Doulgeris, James J.; Gonzalez-Blohm, Sabrina A.; Lee, William E.; Vrionis, Frank D.

    2015-01-01

    Many successful attempts to increase pullout strength of pedicle screws in osteoporotic bone have been accompanied with an increased risk of catastrophic damage to the patient. To avoid this, a single-armed expansive pedicle screw was designed to increase fixation strength while controlling postfailure damage away from the nerves surrounding the pedicle. The screw was then subsequently tested in two severely osteoporotic models: one representing trabecular bone (with and without the presence of polymethylmethacrylate) and the other representing a combination of trabecular and cortical bone. Maximum pullout strength, stiffness, energy to failure, energy to removal, and size of the resulting block damage were statistically compared among conditions. While expandable pedicle screws produced maximum pullout forces less than or comparable to standard screws, they required a higher amount of energy to be fully removed from both models. Furthermore, damage to the cortical layer in the composite test blocks was smaller in all measured directions for tests involving expandable pedicle screws than those involving standard pedicle screws. This indicates that while initial fixation may not differ in the presence of cortical bone, the expandable pedicle screw offers an increased level of postfailure stability and safety to patients awaiting revision surgery. PMID:25705655

  13. Apparatus to test insertion and removal torque of bone screws.

    PubMed

    Koistinen, A; Santavirta, S; Lappalainen, R

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes affordable equipment for testing bone screw torque, corresponding to ASTM standard F543-00 for testing metallic medical bone screws. Correct testing of thin and long bone screws is essential due to screw failures during insertion and removal of the screws. Furthermore, insertion torque is an important factor in predicting fixation strength, screw pull-out force and effects of surface treatment of screws. The capability of the custom-built tester was determined using polytetrafluoroethylene and wood disc samples and bone screws. Bovine cortical bones allowed testing to the failure limit, i.e. the torque increased in long screws to the fracture limit. For 2.7 and 3.5 mm thick self-tapping cortical bone screws, the failure torques were 30-50 per cent higher than the minimum values required by the standard (1.0 and 2.3 N m respectively). The equipment provided reproducible results and fulfilled the ASTM standard very well. Preliminary testing with amorphous diamond coated bone screws showed good durability of the coating and on average 10-15 per cent lower torque values compared with uncoated screws. The equipment can be used to measure insertion and removal torques as described in the standard. Furthermore, it also allows testing of normal screws and bolts. PMID:14702987

  14. Percutaneous pedicle screw placement into a spinal segment previously treated with vertebroplasty: technical note.

    PubMed

    Gernsback, Joanna E; Wang, Michael Y

    2016-05-01

    Vertebral augmentation with cement has become a common procedure for the treatment of compression fractures, leading to a growing population who have had this procedure and are now in need of another spinal surgery. This technical note reports an undescribed method for placing pedicle screws through a previously cemented level. PMID:26771370

  15. Simultaneous Use of Both Bilateral Intralaminar and Pedicle Screws for C2 Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Tarukado, Kiyoshi; Tono, Osamu; Doi, Toshio

    2015-10-01

    Four patients underwent stabilization surgery using both bilateral C2 pedicle screw (PS) and intralaminar screw (LS). Neural and vascular injury resulting from incorrect screw placement was assessed using computed tomography (CT). The evaluation of bone union was assessed by lateral flexion-extension X-ray films and CT. The symptoms were improved in all patients. There were no intraoperative complications. Furthermore, there were no cases of neurological worsening or vascular injury from incorrect screw placement. Failure of instrumentation or screw loosening during the follow-up period did not occur in any of the patients. All cases had accomplished bone union at the final follow-up. Theoretically, the stabilization technique using both bilateral C2 PS and LS at the same time can provide more stability than any other single technique. Simultaneous use of both bilateral C2 PS and LS is potentially a good choice for surgical repair. PMID:26435800

  16. Expandable insert serves as screw anchor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Expandable self-locking adapter secures components to panels having one accessible side. Mounting holes in the panels may not be threaded to accommodate screws, therefore, the adapter contains a female thread that will mate a mounting screw.

  17. The Utility of a Digital Virtual Template for Junior Surgeons in Pedicle Screw Placement in the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Zhao, Jie; Xie, Youzhuan; Mi, Jie

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the utility of three-dimensional preoperative image reconstruction as digital virtual templating for junior surgeons in placing a pedicle screw (PS) in the lumbar spine. Twenty-three patients of lumbar disease were operated on with bilateral PS fixation in our hospital. The two sides of lumbar pedicles were randomly divided into “hand-free group” (HFG) and “digital virtual template group” (DVTG) in each patient. Two junior surgeons preoperatively randomly divided into these two groups finished the placement of PSs. The accuracy of PS and the procedure time of PS insertion were recorded. The accuracy of PS in DVTG was 91.8% and that in HFG was 87.7%. The PS insertion procedure time of DVTG was 74.5 ± 8.1 s and that of HFG was 90.9 ± 9.9 s. Although no significant difference was reported in the accurate rate of PS between the two groups, the PS insertion procedure time was significantly shorter in DVTG than in HFG (P < 0.05). Digital virtual template is simple and can reduce the procedure time of PS placement. PMID:27314013

  18. Evaluation of the Effect of Fixation Angle between Polyaxial Pedicle Screw Head and Rod on the Failure of Screw-Rod Connection.

    PubMed

    Çetin, Engin; Özkaya, Mustafa; Güler, Ümit Özgür; Acaroğlu, Emre; Demir, Teyfik

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Polyaxial screws had been only tested according to the ASTM standards (when they were perpendicularly positioned to the rod). In this study, effects of the pedicle screws angled fixation to the rod on the mechanical properties of fixation were investigated. Materials and Method. 30 vertically fixed screws and 30 screws fixed with angle were used in the study. Screws were used in three different diameters which were 6.5 mm, 7.0 mm, and 7.5 mm, in equal numbers. Axial pull-out and flexion moment tests were performed. Test results compared with each other using appropriate statistical methods. Results. In pull-out test, vertically fixed screws, in 6.5 mm and 7.0 mm diameter, had significantly higher maximum load values than angled fixed screws with the same diameters (P < 0.01). Additionally, vertically fixed screws, in all diameters, had significantly greater stiffness according to corresponding size fixed with angle (P < 0.005). Conclusion. Fixing the pedicle screw to the rod with angle significantly decreased the pull-out stiffness in all diameters. Similarly, pedicle screw instrumentation fixed with angle decreased the minimum sagittal angle between the rod and the screw in all diameters for flexion moment test but the differences were not significant. PMID:27019578

  19. Fluoroscopy-guided pedicle screw accuracy with a mini-open approach: a tomographic evaluation of 470 screws in 125 patients

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Sánchez, José Antonio; Gutiérrez-Partida, Carlos Francisco; Ramírez-Barrios, Luis Rodolfo; Ortíz-Leyva, Ramses Uriel; Rodríguez-García, Manuel; Sánchez-Escandón, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Background Transpedicular screws are currently placed with open free hand and minimally invasive techniques assisted with either fluoroscopy or navigation. Screw placement accuracy had been investigated with several methods reaching accuracy rates from 71.9% to 98.8%. The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy and safety for 2-D fluoroscopy-guided screw placement assisted with electrophysiological monitoring and the inter-observer agreement for the breach classification. Methods A retrospective review was performed on 125 consecutive patients who underwent minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and transpedicular screws placement between the levels of T-12 and S-1. Screw accuracy was evaluated using a postoperative computed tomography by three independent observers. Pedicle breach was documented when there was a violation in any direction of the pedicle. Inter-observer agreement was assessed with the Kappa coefficient. Results A total of 470 transpedicular screws were evaluated between the levels of T-12 and S-1. In 57 patients the instrumentation was bilateral and in 68 unilateral. A substantial degree of agreement was found between the observers AB (κ=0.769) and A-C (κ=0.784) and almost perfect agreement between observers B-C (κ=0.928). There were a total of 427.33 (90.92%) screws without breach, 39.33 (8.37%) minor breach pedicles and 3.33 (0.71%) major breach pedicles. The pedicle breach rate was 9.08% Trajectory pedicle breach percentages were as follows: minor medial pedicle breach 4.68%, minor lateral pedicle breach 3.47%, minor inferior pedicle breach 0.22%, and major medial breach 0.70%. No intraoperative instrumentation-related or postoperative clinical complications were encountered and no surgical revision was needed. Conclusions Our study demonstrated a high accuracy (90.2%) for 2-D fluoroscopy-guided pedicle screw using electromonitoring. Only 0.71% of the 470 screws had a major breach. Knowing the radiological spine

  20. Placement of C1 Pedicle Screws Using Minimal Exposure: Radiographic, Clinical, and Literature Validation

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Christopher M.; Nixon, Menarvia K.C.; Haydel, Justin; Nanda, Anil; Sin, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditional C1-2 fixation involves placement of C1 lateral mass screws. Evolving techniques have led to the placement of C1 pedicle screws to avoid exposure of the C1-C2 joint capsule. Our minimal dissection technique utilizes anatomical landmarks with isolated exposure of C2 and the inferior posterior arch of C1. We evaluate this procedure clinically and radiographically through a technical report. Methods Consecutive cases of cranial-vertebral junction surgery were reviewed for one fellowship trained spinal surgeon from 2008-2014. Information regarding sex, age, indication for surgery, private or public hospital, intra-operative complications, post-operative neurological deterioration, death, and failure of fusion was extracted. Measurement of pre-operative axial and sagittal CT scans were performed for C1 pedicle width and C1 posterior arch height respectively. Results 64 patients underwent posterior cranio-vertebral junction fixation surgery. 40 of these patients underwent occipital-cervical fusion procedures. 7/9 (77.8%) C1 instrumentation cases were from trauma with the remaining two (22.2%) from oncologic lesions. The average blood loss among isolated C1-C2 fixation was 160cc. 1/9 patients (11.1%) suffered pedicle breech requiring sub-laminar wiring at the C1 level. On radiographic measurement, the average height of the C1 posterior arch was noted at 4.3mm (range 3.8mm to 5.7mm). The average width of the C1 pedicle measured at 5.3mm (range 2.8 to 8.7mm). The patient with C1 pedicle screw failure had a pedicle width of 2.78mm on pre-operative axial CT imaging. Conclusion Our study directly adds to the literature with level four evidence supporting a minimal dissection of C1 arch in the placement of C1 pedicle screws with both radiographic and clinical validation. Clinical Relevance Justification of this technique avoids C2 nerve root manipulation or sacrifice, reduces bleeding associated with the venous plexus, and leaves the third segment of the

  1. The use of intraoperative triggered electromyography to detect misplaced pedicle screws: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mikula, Anthony L; Williams, Seth K; Anderson, Paul A

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Insertion of instruments or implants into the spine carries a risk for injury to neural tissue. Triggered electromyography (tEMG) is an intraoperative neuromonitoring technique that involves electrical stimulation of a tool or screw and subsequent measurement of muscle action potentials from myotomes innervated by nerve roots near the stimulated instrument. The authors of this study sought to determine the ability of tEMG to detect misplaced pedicle screws (PSs). METHODS The authors searched the US National Library of Medicine, the Web of Science Core Collection database, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for PS studies. A meta-analysis of these studies was performed on a per-screw basis to determine the ability of tEMG to detect misplaced PSs. Sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) were calculated overall and in subgroups. RESULTS Twenty-six studies were included in the systematic review. The authors analyzed 18 studies in which tEMG was used during PS placement in the meta-analysis, representing data from 2932 patients and 15,065 screws. The overall sensitivity of tEMG for detecting misplaced PSs was 0.78, and the specificity was 0.94. The overall ROC AUC was 0.96. A tEMG current threshold of 10-12 mA (ROC AUC 0.99) and a pulse duration of 300 µsec (ROC AUC 0.97) provided the most accurate testing parameters for detecting misplaced screws. Screws most accurately conducted EMG signals (ROC AUC 0.98). CONCLUSIONS Triggered electromyography has very high specificity but only fair sensitivity for detecting malpositioned PSs. PMID:26654343

  2. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous navigated guidewireless lumbosacral pedicle screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kevin S; Park, Paul

    2016-07-01

    This video details the minimally invasive approach for treatment of a symptomatic Grade II lytic spondylolisthesis with high-grade foraminal stenosis. In this procedure, the use of a navigated, guidewireless technique for percutaneous pedicle screw placement at the lumbosacral junction is highlighted following initial decompression and transforaminal interbody fusion. Key steps of the procedure are delineated that include positioning, exposure, technique for interbody fusion, intraoperative image acquisition, and use of a concise 2-step process for navigated screw placement without using guidewires. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/2u6H4Pc_8To . PMID:27364422

  3. Designs and techniques that improve the pullout strength of pedicle screws in osteoporotic vertebrae: current status.

    PubMed

    Shea, Thomas M; Laun, Jake; Gonzalez-Blohm, Sabrina A; Doulgeris, James J; Lee, William E; Aghayev, Kamran; Vrionis, Frank D

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a medical condition affecting men and women of different age groups and populations. The compromised bone quality caused by this disease represents an important challenge when a surgical procedure (e.g., spinal fusion) is needed after failure of conservative treatments. Different pedicle screw designs and instrumentation techniques have been explored to enhance spinal device fixation in bone of compromised quality. These include alterations of screw thread design, optimization of pilot hole size for non-self-tapping screws, modification of the implant's trajectory, and bone cement augmentation. While the true benefits and limitations of any procedure may not be realized until they are observed in a clinical setting, axial pullout tests, due in large part to their reproducibility and ease of execution, are commonly used to estimate the device's effectiveness by quantifying the change in force required to remove the screw from the body. The objective of this investigation is to provide an overview of the different pedicle screw designs and the associated surgical techniques either currently utilized or proposed to improve pullout strength in osteoporotic patients. Mechanical comparisons as well as potential advantages and disadvantages of each consideration are provided herein. PMID:24724097

  4. Designs and Techniques That Improve the Pullout Strength of Pedicle Screws in Osteoporotic Vertebrae: Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Thomas M.; Laun, Jake; Gonzalez-Blohm, Sabrina A.; Doulgeris, James J.; Lee, William E.; Vrionis, Frank D.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a medical condition affecting men and women of different age groups and populations. The compromised bone quality caused by this disease represents an important challenge when a surgical procedure (e.g., spinal fusion) is needed after failure of conservative treatments. Different pedicle screw designs and instrumentation techniques have been explored to enhance spinal device fixation in bone of compromised quality. These include alterations of screw thread design, optimization of pilot hole size for non-self-tapping screws, modification of the implant's trajectory, and bone cement augmentation. While the true benefits and limitations of any procedure may not be realized until they are observed in a clinical setting, axial pullout tests, due in large part to their reproducibility and ease of execution, are commonly used to estimate the device's effectiveness by quantifying the change in force required to remove the screw from the body. The objective of this investigation is to provide an overview of the different pedicle screw designs and the associated surgical techniques either currently utilized or proposed to improve pullout strength in osteoporotic patients. Mechanical comparisons as well as potential advantages and disadvantages of each consideration are provided herein. PMID:24724097

  5. Cortical and Standard Trajectory Pedicle Screw Fixation Techniques in Stabilizing Multisegment Lumbar Spine with Low Grade Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    İnceoğlu, Serkan

    2015-01-01

    Background Cortical screw (CS) fixation has been recently proposed as an alternative to the standard pedicle screw (PS) fixation technique. Biomechanical studies involving individual screw pullout and single level motion segment stabilization showed comparable performance of both techniques. However, whether this new fixation technique can be applied to the stabilization of multilevel lumbar segments with significant destabilization has been unclear. Purpose To compare stability of CS fixation to the traditional PS fixation in an unstable 3 level spondylolisthesis model. Study Design This is a biomechanical study comparing cortical trajectory pedicle screw fixation to traditional trajectory pedicle screw fixation in an unstable cadaveric model using nondestructive flexibility test. Methods Eight fresh frozen cadaveric lumbar spines (T12- S1) were obtained. After intact baseline testing, a 3-level lowgrade spondylolisthesis was simulated at the L1-4. Each specimen was instrumented with the PS and CS fixation systems. Standard nondestructive flexibility test was performed. Range of motion at each level was compared between the constructs during flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Results The destabilization model significantly increased the ROM in all planes (P<0.05). Both fixation techniques provided significant reduction in the ROM (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in ROM between the PS and CS groups in any of planes (P>0.05). Conclusions Cortical trajectory pedicle screw fixation provided stabilization to multilevel lumbar segment with low-grade spondylolisthesis comparable to the standard trajectory pedicle screw construct. PMID:26484009

  6. Screw-Thread Inserts As Temporary Flow Restrictors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimarchi, Paul

    1992-01-01

    Coil-spring screw-thread inserts found useful as temporary flow restrictors. Inserts placed in holes through which flow restricted, effectively reducing cross sections available for flow. Friction alone holds inserts against moderate upstream pressures. Use of coil-spring thread inserts as flow restrictors conceived as inexpensive solution to problem of adjusting flow of oxygen through orifices in faceplate into hydrogen/oxygen combustion chamber. Installation and removal of threaded inserts gentle enough not to deform orifice tubes.

  7. Treatment strategies for early neurological deficits related to malpositioned pedicle screws in the lumbosacral canal

    PubMed Central

    Du, J-Y.; Wu, J-S.; Wen, Z-Q.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To employ a simple and fast method to evaluate those patients with neurological deficits and misplaced screws in relatively safe lumbosacral spine, and to determine if it is necessary to undertake revision surgery. Methods A total of 316 patients were treated by fixation of lumbar and lumbosacral transpedicle screws at our institution from January 2011 to December 2012. We designed the criteria for post-operative revision scores of pedicle screw malpositioning (PRSPSM) in the lumbosacral canal. We recommend the revision of the misplaced pedicle screw in patients with PRSPSM = 5′ as early as possible. However, patients with PRSPSM < 5′ need to follow the next consecutive assessment procedures. A total of 15 patients were included according to at least three-stage follow-up. Results Five patients with neurological complications (PRSPSM = 5′) underwent revision surgery at an early stage. The other ten patients with PRSPSM < 5′ were treated by conservative methods for seven days. At three-month follow-up, only one patient showed delayed onset of neurological complications (PRSPSM 7′) while refusing revision. Seven months later, PRSPSM decreased to 3′ with complete rehabilitation. Conclusions This study highlights the significance of consecutively dynamic assessments of PRSPSMs, which are unlike previous implementations based on purely anatomical assessment or early onset of neurological deficits.and also confirms our hypothesis that patients with early neurological complications may not need revision procedures in the relatively broad margin of the lumbosacral canal. Cite this article: X-J. Lin. Treatment strategies for early neurological deficits related to malpositioned pedicle screws in the lumbosacral canal: A pilot study. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:46–51. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.52.2000477. PMID:26868892

  8. Litanium expandable pedicle screw for the treatment of degenerative and traumatic spinal diseases in osteoporotic patients: preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Roperto, Raffaelino; Fiore, Claudio

    2012-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a major global health problem, with over 10 million people currently diagnosed with the disease. Although 80% of osteoporotic patients are women, a considerable number of men are also affected. Also, due to increasing life expectancy, the number of elderly patients with osteoporosis affected by degenerative and traumatic spinal diseases will increase further. Osteoporosis reduces bone quality through negative bone remodelling. Low bone quality can reduce the pull-out strength of pedicle screw, and negative bone remodelling can cause delayed bone fusion. However, pedicle screw instrumentation of the osteoporotic spine carries an increased risk of screw loosening, pull-out, and fixation failure. Our preliminary study aims to investigate the efficiency of expandable pedicle screws (OsseoScrew-Spinal Fixation System, Alphatec Spine Inc., Carlsbad, CA) in osteoporotic spinal patients. All osteoporotic patients with degenerative and traumatic spinal diseases admitted in our department underwent a pre-operative spinal x-Ray and MRI or CT. Pre-operative clinical assesment of patients was based on the visual analog scale (VAS) and Owestry Disability (ODI) questionnaire-a disease-specific outcome measure. Ten osteoporotic patients were treated with expandable pedicle screws (OsseoScrew). Post-operative clinical assessment of patients was based on the VAS and ODI questionnaire at 3 months and 1 year of follow-up. Post-operative radiologic follow-up was performed after 3 days (CT, x-ray); 3 months (x-ray); 6 months (spinal CT); and 1 year (spinal CT). Expandable pedicle screws improved pull-out strength as compared to standard pedicle screws in osteoporotic patients with degenerative and traumatic spinal diseases. PMID:23023577

  9. The contralateral lamina: a reliable guide in subaxial, cervical pedicle screw placement.

    PubMed

    Hacker, A G; Molloy, S; Bernard, J

    2008-11-01

    We have assessed the clinical observation that the angle of the contralateral lamina matches the angle required from the sagital plane for the placement of pedicle screws in the subaxial cervical spine. Fifty-four randomly chosen axial CT scans taken between December 2003 and December 2004 were examined. Subjects were excluded if the scan showed signs of fracture, tumour or gross abnormality. The digitised images were analysed on the Philips PACS system using SECTRA software. One hundred and sixty-eight individual vertebrae were assessed between C3 and C7. The following were measured; the angle of the pedicle relative to the sagital plane, the smallest internal and external diameter of the pedicles and the angle of the lamina. Angular measures had a CV% of 3.9%. The re-measurement error for distance was 0.5 mm. Three hundred and thirty-six pedicles were assessed in 25 females and 29 males. Average age was 48.2 years (range 17-85). Our morphologic data from live subjects was comparable to previous cadaveric data. Mean pedicle external diameter was 4.9 mm at C3 and 6.6 mm at C7. Females were marginally smaller than males. Left and right did not significantly differ. In no case was the pedicle narrower than 3.2 mm. Mean pedicle angle was 130 degrees at C3 and 140 degrees at C7. The contralateral laminar angle correlated well at C3, 4, 5 (R (2) = 0.9, C3 P = 0.002, C4 P = 0.06, C5 P = 0.0004) and was within 1 degrees of pedicle angle. At C6, 7 it was within 11 degrees . In all cases a line parallel to the lamina provided a safe corridor of 3 mm for a pedicle implant. The contralateral lamina provides a reliable intraoperative guide to the angle from the sagital plane for subaxial cervical pedicle instrumentation in adults. PMID:18795348

  10. Biomechanical study of the sacroiliac fracture fixation with titanium rods and pedicle screws

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Fabrício Hidetoshi; Pisani, Marina Justi; Machado, André Nunes; Rodrigues, Fábio Lucas; Fujiki, Edison Noburo; Rodrigues, Luciano Miller Reis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess biomechanically different fixations means of the sacroiliac joint with pedicle screws and to compare the traditional head height with reduced ones. METHODS: We used a polyethylene model representing the pelvic ring and simulated a unilateral sacroiliac dislocation. We set up three different constructions: 1) two screws attached to a rod; 2) two rods connected to two small head screws each; and 3) two rods connected to two average headed screws each. We conducted tests in a biomechanical testing and a mechanized processing laboratory. RESULTS: Group 1 supported an average maximum load of 99.70 N. Group 2 supported an average maximum load of 362.46 N. Group 3 endured an average maximum load of 404.15 N. In the assembly with one rod, the resistance decreased as compared with the one with two bars: 72.5 % compared to small-headed screws and 75.3 % to the traditional screw. CONCLUSION: The assembly with a single bar presented inferior results when compared to the double bar assembly. There was no statistical difference in the results between the screws used. Experimental Study. PMID:26207094

  11. Cervical anterior transpedicular screw fixation (ATPS)--Part II. Accuracy of manual insertion and pull-out strength of ATPS.

    PubMed

    Koller, Heiko; Acosta, Frank; Tauber, Mark; Fox, Michael; Martin, Hudelmaier; Forstner, Rosmarie; Augat, Peter; Penzkofer, Rainer; Pirich, Christian; Kässmann, H; Resch, Herbert; Hitzl, Wolfgang

    2008-04-01

    Reconstruction after multilevel decompression of the cervical spine, especially in the weakened osteoporotic, neoplastic or infectious spine often requires circumferential stabilization and fusion. To avoid the additional posterior surgery in these cases while increasing rigidity of anterior-only screw-plate constructs, the authors introduce the concept of anterior transpedicular screw (ATPS) fixation. We demonstrated its morphological feasibility as well as its indications in a previous study in Part I of our project. Consequently, the objectives of the current study were to assess the ex vivo accuracy of placing ATPS into the cervical vertebra as well as the biomechanical performance of ATPS in comparison to traditional vertebral body screws (VBS) in terms of pull-out strength (POS). Twenty-three ATPS were inserted alternately to two screws into the pedicles and vertebral bodies, respectively, of six cadaveric specimens from C3-T1. For insertion of ATPS, a manual fluoroscopically assisted technique was used. Pre- and post insertional CT-scans were used to assess accuracy of ATPS insertion in the axial and sagittal planes. A newly designed grading system and accuracy score were used to delineate accuracy of ATPS insertion. Following insertion of screws, 23 ATPS and 22 VBS were subjected to pull-out testing (POT). The bone mineral density (BMD) of each specimen was assessed prior to POT. Statistical analysis showed that the incidence of correctly placed screws and non-critical pedicles breaches in axial plane was 78.3%, and 95.7% in sagittal plane. Hence, according to our definition of "critical" pedicle breach that exposes neurovascular structures at risk, 21.7% (n = 5) of all ATPS inserted showed a critical pedicle breach in axial plane. Notably, no critical pedicle perforation occurred at the C6 to T1 levels. Pull-out testing of ATPS and VBS revealed that pull-out resistance of ATPS was 2.5-fold that of VBS. Mean POS of 23 ATPS with a mean BMD of 0.566 g/cm(2

  12. Biomechanical comparison of unilateral and bilateral pedicle screws fixation for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion after decompressive surgery -- a finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the biomechanical effectiveness of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) cages in different positioning and various posterior implants used after decompressive surgery. The use of the various implants will induce the kinematic and mechanical changes in range of motion (ROM) and stresses at the surgical and adjacent segments. Unilateral pedicle screw with or without supplementary facet screw fixation in the minimally invasive TLIF procedure has not been ascertained to provide adequate stability without the need to expose on the contralateral side. This study used finite element (FE) models to investigate biomechanical differences in ROM and stress on the neighboring structures after TLIF cages insertion in conjunction with posterior fixation. Methods A validated finite-element (FE) model of L1-S1 was established to implant three types of cages (TLIF with a single moon-shaped cage in the anterior or middle portion of vertebral bodies, and TLIF with a left diagonally placed ogival-shaped cage) from the left L4-5 level after unilateral decompressive surgery. Further, the effects of unilateral versus bilateral pedicle screw fixation (UPSF vs. BPSF) in each TLIF cage model was compared to analyze parameters, including stresses and ROM on the neighboring annulus, cage-vertebral interface and pedicle screws. Results All the TLIF cages positioned with BPSF showed similar ROM (<5%) at surgical and adjacent levels, except TLIF with an anterior cage in flexion (61% lower) and TLIF with a left diagonal cage in left lateral bending (33% lower) at surgical level. On the other hand, the TLIF cage models with left UPSF showed varying changes of ROM and annulus stress in extension, right lateral bending and right axial rotation at surgical level. In particular, the TLIF model with a diagonal cage, UPSF, and contralateral facet screw fixation stabilize segmental motion of the surgical level mostly in extension and contralaterally axial

  13. Comparison of pullout strength of the thoracic pedicle screw between intrapedicular and extrapedicular technique: a meta-analysis and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Wang, Huafeng; Sribastav, Shilabant Sen; Ye, Fubiao; Liang, Chunxiang; Li, Zemin; Wang, Jianru; Liu, Hui; Wang, Xin; Zheng, Zhaomin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intrapedicular fixation in thoracic spine is often limited, because of high risk of complication, especially in scoliosis patients. Extrapedicular screws fixation techniques provide an alternate solution for extremely small or abnormal thoracic pedicles deformity. However, the pullout resistance of extrapedicular screws has not been clearly defined. The aim of our study was to systematically review the existing evidence regarding the pullout resistance of thoracic extrapedicular screws compared with intrapedicular screws. Methods: A systematic search of all studies published through Nov 2014 was performed using Medline, EMBASE, OVID and other databases. All studies that compared the pullout resistance of thoracic extrapedicular screws with intrapedicular screws were selected. The data from the included studies were extracted and analyzed regarding pullout resistance force. Forest plots were constructed to summarize the data and compare the biomechanical stability achieved. Results: Five studies were included, with a total of 27 cadaveric specimens and 313 screws. The vertebral levels of the cadavers potted were T1-T8, T2-T12, T7-T9, T6-T11 and T4-T12 respectively. Overall, the results demonstrated that there was no significant difference in ultimate pullout strength between intrapedicular screws and extrapedicular screws (95% CI=-63.73 to 27.74; P=0.44); extrapedicular screws significantly increased the length of placements by a mean of 6.24 mm (95% CI=5.38 to 7.10; P<0.001); while the stiffness in intrapedicular screws was significantly stronger by a mean of 45.82 N/mm compared with extrapedicular screws (95% CI=-70.09 to -21.56; P<0.001). Conclusions: Meta-analysis of the existing literature showed that thoracic extrapedicular screws provided comparable but slightly lower pullout strength compared with intrapedicular screws, extrapedicular screws placement is much safer than intrapedicular screws. So thoracic extrapedicular screws offer a good

  14. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation Using Cortical Bone Trajectory – A Prospective Cohort Study on Postoperative Pain Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Sayantan; Pham, Lan; Singh, Harminder

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Our study aims to evaluate the clinical outcomes of cortical screws in regards to postoperative pain. Background: Pedicle screw fixation is the current mainstay technique for posterior spinal fusion. Over the past decade, a new technique called cortical screw fixation has been developed, which allows for medialized screw placement through stronger cortical bone. There have been several studies that showed either biomechanical equivalence or superiority of cortical screws. However, there is currently only a single study in the literature looking at clinical outcomes of cortical screw fixation in patients who have had no prior spine surgery. Methods: We prospectively looked at the senior author’s patients who underwent cortical versus pedicle lumbar screw fixation surgeries between 2013 and 2015 for lumbar degenerative disease. Eighteen patients underwent cortical screw fixation, and 15 patients underwent traditional pedicle screw fixation. We looked at immediate postoperative pain, changes in short-term pain (six to 12 weeks post-surgery), and changes in long-term pain (six to eight months). All pain outcomes were measured using a visual analog scale ranging from 1 to 10. Mann-Whitney or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to measure continuous data, and the Fisher Exact test was used to measure categorical data as appropriate. Results: Our results showed that the cortical screw cohort showed a trend towards having less peak postoperative pain (p = 0.09). The average postoperative pain was similar between the two cohorts (p = 0.93). There was also no difference in pain six to 12 weeks after surgery (p = 0.8). However, at six to eight months, the cortical screw cohort had worse pain compared to the pedicle screw cohort (p = 0.02). Conclusions: The cortical screw patients showed a trend towards less peak pain in the short-term (one to three days post-surgery) and more pain in the long-term (six to eight months post-surgery) compared to pedicle screw patients

  15. C1-c2 pedicle screw fixation for treatment of old odontoid fractures.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lei; Li, Mu; Zhang, Shuai; Si, Haipeng; Xue, Jingsong

    2015-02-01

    Nonunion and C1-C2 instability of odontoid fractures usually result from delayed diagnosis and inappropriate treatment. However, the available treatment options for odontoid fractures remain controversial. The authors evaluated the effectiveness of internal screw fixation via the C1 and C2 pedicle in cases of old odontoid fractures. This retrospective study included 21 patients with old odontoid fractures (13 men and 8 women; mean age, 46.5 years; range, 24-69 years). Internal screw fixation via the C1 and C2 pedicle was performed in all patients. Fracture reduction and C1-C2 fusion were assessed with imaging. The neck pain visual analog scale score and cervical spinal cord functional Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (for those who had cervical spinal cord injury) were used to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment. Postoperative complications were recorded. Postoperative imaging showed that the C1-C2 dislocation was satisfactorily repositioned in all patients. Bone fusion was observed 1 year after surgery in all patients. No loosening or breaking of internal fixation occurred. The preoperative neck pain visual analog scale score was 5.9±1.5 and improved significantly to 1.8±0.8 after surgery (P<.001). The Japanese Orthopaedic Association score in patients with cervical spinal injury (n=14) was 9.2±1.9 and also significantly improved to 13.8±1.9 at the last follow-up examination (P<.001), with an average improvement rate of 61.0%. No iatrogenic vertebral artery injury or severe spinal cord injury occurred. Screw fixation via the C1 and C2 pedicle was found to be an effective and safe surgical approach for the treatment of old odontoid fractures with C1-C2 dislocation or instability. PMID:25665108

  16. Management of Unstable Thoracolumbar Spinal Fractures by Pedicle Screws and Rods Fixation

    PubMed Central

    B.M., Muralidhar; Hegde, Durgaprasad; Hussain, P.S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The thoracolumbar junction is the most common area of injury to the axial skeleton. Forces along the long stiff kyphotic thoracic spine switch abruptly into the mobile lordotic lumbar spine at the thoracolumbar junction. Goals of treatment are to obtain a painless, balanced, stable spine with optimum neurological function and maximum spine mobility. The present prospective study has evaluated the effectiveness of pedicle screw instrumentation in various fractures around the TL spine to overcome the complications encountered in the conservative line of management of these fractures. Materials & Methods: Thirty cases of fractures around the TL spine were operated with posterior pedicle screw fixation one or two level above and below the fracture. The cases were followed up for a mean of 9.5 months with radiological and neurological evaluation. Results: The average age groups of the patients studied were 21 to 53 years majority were males, fall from height being the predominant mode of injury involving the T12 and L1 vertebral body. The unstable burst fractures the most common type of fracture, radiological parameters sagittal angle and index were recorded pre and post-operatively. The neurological grading was done using the ASIA score. Follow-up was done for a minimum of 5 months where sagittal angle reduction achieved was 10.75 at final follow-up from 23.5 pre-operative. The sagittal index achieved at final follow-up was 72% compared to the pre-operative mean of 53%. The neurological improvement was regarded to be fair enough for the type of injury sustained and fixation achieved. Conclusion: We found that the application of posterior instrumentation using pedicle screw and rod resulted in a reasonable correction of the deformity with a significant reduction in recumbency-associated complications; the limiting factor being the small study group and short follow-up period. PMID:24701500

  17. Is anterior release necessary in severe scoliosis treated by posterior segmental pedicle screw fixation?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Hyok; Cho, Kyu-Jung; Kim, Sung-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Joon; Han, Yong-Taek

    2007-01-01

    With the advent of segmental pedicle screw fixation that enables more powerful corrective forces, it is postulated that an additional anterior procedure may be unnecessary even in severe deformities. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the results of a posterior procedure alone using segmental pedicle screw fixation in severe scoliotic curves over 70°. Thirty-five scoliosis patients treated by pedicle screw fixation and rod derotation were retrospectively analyzed after a minimum follow-up of 2 years (range 2–10.4). The mean age of patients was 15.3 years (range 9.8–34.2). Diagnoses were idiopathic scoliosis in 29, neuromuscular scoliosis in 3 and scoliosis associated with Marfan syndrome in 3. Scoliosis consisted of single thoracic curve in 18, double thoracic in 5 and double major in 12. Twenty-five patients showed a major thoracic curve greater than 70° (range 70–100), and different ten patients showed a major lumbar curve greater than 70° (range 70–105), pre-operatively. The deformity angle, lowest instrumented vertebral tilt (LIVT) and spinal balance were measured. Pre-operatively there were nine patients with coronal decompensation. The pre-operative thoracic curve of 80 ± 9° with the flexibility of 45 ± 11% (45 ± 11° in side-bending film) was corrected to 27 ± 10° at the most recent follow-up, showing a correction of 66% (53°) and loss of correction of 3.0% (3.7°). The pre-operative lumbar curve of 79 ± 12° with the flexibility of 62 ± 14% (30 ± 11° in side-bending film) was corrected to 33 ± 14° at the most recent follow-up [59% (46°) curve correction, 3.5% (3.0°) loss of curve correction]. The pre-operative LIVT of 30 ± 8° was corrected to 11 ± 6°, showing a correction of 62% (19°). Residual coronal decompensation was observed in three patients postoperatively. Pre-operative thoracic kyphosis of 27° (range 0–82) improved postoperatively to 31° (range 14–53). In conclusion, posterior

  18. Utility of a custom screw insertion guide and a full-scale, color-coded 3D plaster model for guiding safe surgical exposure and screw insertion during spine revision surgery.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Bungo; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Kimura, Hiroaki; Masamoto, Kazutaka; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2016-07-01

    Several articles have described the use of screw insertion guides during primary spine surgery; however, the use of such a guide during revision surgeries has not been described. The purpose of this study is to describe the utility of a custom screw insertion (CSI) guide assembled using a novel method and a full-scale, color-coded 3D plaster (FCTP) model for safe and accurate revision surgery. The authors applied the CSI guide and the FCTP model in 3 cases. In the first case, a patient with multiple failed cervical spine surgeries underwent occipitocervicothoracic fusion. After a successful result for this patient, the authors applied the CSI guide in 2 other patients who underwent revision lumbar fusion surgeries to confirm the accuracy and the efficacy of the CSI guides in such cases. The models and guides were fabricated using rapid prototyping technology. The effectiveness of these methods was examined. The FCTP model was designed using CT data. During model assembly, implants inserted during previous surgery were removed virtually, and for the cervical spine, vertebral arteries were colored red for planning. The CSI guide was designed with 5 or 6 arms to fit the bone surface precisely after removing artifacts. Surgery was performed by referring to the FCTP model. Because the actual structure of the bone surface was almost identical to that of the FCTP model, surgical exposure around the complex bone shape proceeded smoothly. The CSI guides were positioned accurately to aid the successful insertion of a pedicle screw into the C-2 vertebra in the case of cervical revision surgery, and 4 pedicle screws for lumbar vertebrae in the 2 other patients. Postoperative CT scans showed that all screw positions closely matched those predicted during the preoperative planning. In conclusion, the FCTP models and the novel CSI guides were effective for safe and accurate revision surgery of the spine. PMID:26967985

  19. Early detection of pedicle screw-related spinal cord injury by continuous intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM).

    PubMed

    Jahangiri, Faisal R; Sheryar, Muhammad; Al Behairy, Yaser

    2014-12-01

    Pedicle screw placement has a high risk of damaging the motor and sensory pathways due to the close proximity to the spinal cord and nerve roots. Early detection and prevention of injury can be achieved by utilizing Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SSEP) and Transcranial electrical Motor Evoked Potentials (TCeMEP) during a scoliosis surgery. A 19-year-old female presented for correction of scoliosis. After intubation, electrodes were placed for upper and lower SSEPs, EMGs and TCeMEPs. Total intravenous anesthesia was used. Baseline SSEP and TCeMEP responses were present in all limbs. Eight pedicle screws were placed. After placing the last screw, TCeMEP signals were lost bilaterally in lower extremities. Surgery was paused. After removing all the screws TCeMEP responses returned to baseline in left lower limb but remained absent in right lower limb. A wake-up test was performed which was positive in her right leg. Blood pressure was increased and bolus of steroids was given. There was no improvement in right lower limb TCeMEP responses. Surgeon was advised to stop the surgery and proceed for MRI and follow-up. SSEP signals remained stable in all four-extremities. The surgical correction was cancelled. MRI revealed intramedullary spinal cord ischemic changes at T11. After extubation, patient was unable to move her right lower extremity with flaccid paralysis. She also complained about severe burning in her left lower extremity. The patient was taken for rehabilitation exercises. One week post-op, she was moving hip flexors and two weeks later had afull motor function, bilaterally. Real-time IONM was useful in early identification of spinal cord injury. Significant changes were seen in TCeMEP, without any change in SSEP. We highly recommend utilizing continuous TCeMEP and SSEP monitoring during pedicle screw placement for prevention of injury to the spinal cord. In this case, the patient would have been paralyzed post-operatively without the use of IONM. PMID

  20. Short segment pedicle screw instrumentation and augmentation vertebroplasty in lumbar burst fractures: an experience.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Suhail; Akbar, Saleem; Dhar, Shabir A

    2008-03-01

    To assess the efficacy and feasibility of vertebroplasty and posterior short-segment pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of traumatic lumbar burst fractures. Short-segment pedicle screw instrumentation is a well described technique to reduce and stabilize thoracic and lumbar spine fractures. It is relatively a easy procedure but can only indirectly reduce a fractured vertebral body, and the means of augmenting the anterior column are limited. Hardware failure and a loss of reduction are recognized complications caused by insufficient anterior column support. Patients with traumatic lumbar burst fractures without neurologic deficits were included. After a short segment posterior reduction and fixation, bilateral transpedicular reduction of the endplate was performed using a balloon, and polymethyl methacrylate cement was injected. Pre-operative and post-operative central and anterior heights were assessed with radiographs and MRI. Sixteen patients underwent this procedure, and a substantial reduction of the endplates could be achieved with the technique. All patients recovered uneventfully, and the neurologic examination revealed no deficits. The post-operative radiographs and magnetic resonance images demonstrated a good fracture reduction and filling of the bone defect without unwarranted bone displacement. The central and anterior height of the vertebral body could be restored to 72 and 82% of the estimated intact height, respectively. Complications were cement leakage in three cases without clinical implications and one superficial wound infection. Posterior short-segment pedicle fixation in conjunction with balloon vertebroplasty seems to be a feasible option in the management of lumbar burst fractures, thereby addressing all the three columns through a single approach. Although cement leakage occurred but had no clinical consequences or neurological deficit. PMID:18193300

  1. Biomechanical effects of polyaxial pedicle screw fixation on the lumbosacral segments with an anterior interbody cage support

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Hao; Mo Lin, Ruey; Chen, Hsiang-Ho; Tsai, Kai-Jow

    2007-01-01

    Background Lumbosacral fusion is a relatively common procedure that is used in the management of an unstable spine. The anterior interbody cage has been involved to enhance the stability of a pedicle screw construct used at the lumbosacral junction. Biomechanical differences between polyaxial and monoaxial pedicle screws linked with various rod contours were investigated to analyze the respective effects on overall construct stiffness, cage strain, rod strain, and contact ratios at the vertebra-cage junction. Methods A synthetic model composed of two ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene blocks was used with four titanium pedicle screws (two in each block) and two rods fixation to build the spinal construct along with an anterior interbody cage support. For each pair of the construct fixed with polyaxial or monoaxial screws, the linked rods were set at four configurations to simulate 0°, 7°, 14°, and 21° lordosis on the sagittal plane, and a compressive load of 300 N was applied. Strain gauges were attached to the posterior surface of the cage and to the central area of the left connecting rod. Also, the contact area between the block and the cage was measured using prescale Fuji super low pressure film for compression, flexion, lateral bending and torsion tests. Results Our main findings in the experiments with an anterior interbody cage support are as follows: 1) large segmental lordosis can decrease the stiffness of monoaxial pedicle screws constructs; 2) polyaxial screws rather than monoaxial screws combined with the cage fixation provide higher compression and flexion stiffness in 21° segmental lordosis; 3) polyaxial screws enhance the contact surface of the cage in 21° segmental lordosis. Conclusion Polyaxial screws system used in conjunction with anterior cage support yields higher contact ratio, compression and flexion stiffness of spinal constructs than monoaxial screws system does in the same model when the spinal segment is set at large lordotic

  2. Aortic dissection associated with penetration of a spinal pedicle screw: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Saila T; Schoenhagen, Paul; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Mukherjee, Sandip K; McNamara, Robert L; Elefteriades, John; Svensson, Lars Georg

    2014-05-01

    A 30-year-old male underwent a corrective posterior instrumented spinal fusion for scoliosis. Six years later, he was found to have an aortic dissection after aortic penetration of a spinal pedicle screw. We review the literature, including diagnostic modalities, and treatment decision-making for this unusual complication. PMID:24707982

  3. Biomechanical and finite element analyses of bone cement-Injectable cannulated pedicle screw fixation in osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaoyao; Xu, Jianzhong; Sun, Dong; Luo, Fei; Zhang, Zehua; Dai, Fei

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the safety and biomechanical stability of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-augmented bone cement-injectable cannulated pedicle screw (CICPS) in cancellous bone model, and to analyze the stress distribution at the screw-cement-bone interface. The OMEGA cannulated pedicle screw (OPS) and conventional pedicle screw (CPS) were used as control groups. Safety of the CICPS was evaluated by the static bending and bending fatigue tests. Biomechanical stability was analyzed by the maximum axial pullout strength and maximum torque tests. Stress distribution at the screw-cement-bone interface was analyzed by the finite element (FE) method. The CICPS and CPS produced statistically similar values for bending stiffness, bending structural stiffness, and bending yield moment. The maximum pullout force was 53.47 ± 8.65 N in CPS group, compared to 130.82 ± 7.32 N and 175.45 ± 43.01 N in the PMMA-augmented OPS and CICPS groups, respectively (p < 0.05). The CICPS had a significantly greater torque than the OPS and CPS. The FE model did not reveal excessive stress at the screw-cement-bone interface in the CICPS group. In conclusion, PMMA-augmentation with CICPS may be a potentially useful method to increase the stability of pedicle screws in patients with osteoporosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 960-967, 2016. PMID:25976272

  4. Finite Element Analysis of a New Pedicle Screw-Plate System for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue; Li, Changqing; Liu, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) is increasingly popular for the surgical treatment of degenerative lumbar disc diseases. The constructs intended for segmental stability are varied in MI-TLIF. We adopted finite element (FE) analysis to compare the stability after different construct fixations using interbody cage with posterior pedicle screw-rod or pedicle screw-plate instrumentation system. Methods A L3–S1 FE model was modified to simulate decompression and fusion at L4–L5 segment. Fixation modes included unilateral plate (UP), unilateral rod (UR), bilateral plate (BP), bilateral rod (BR) and UP+UR fixation. The inferior surface of the S1 vertebra remained immobilized throughout the load simulation, and a bending moment of 7.5 Nm with 400N pre-load was applied on the L3 vertebra to recreate flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Range of motion (ROM) and Von Mises stress were evaluated for intact and instrumentation models in all loading planes. Results All reconstructive conditions displayed decreased motion at L4–L5. The pedicle screw-plate system offered equal ROM to pedicle screw-rod system in unilateral or bilateral fixation modes respectively. Pedicle screw stresses for plate system were 2.2 times greater than those for rod system in left lateral bending under unilateral fixation. Stresses for plate were 3.1 times greater than those for rod in right axial rotation under bilateral fixation. Stresses on intervertebral graft for plate system were similar to rod system in unilateral and bilateral fixation modes respectively. Increased ROM and posterior instrumentation stresses were observed in all loading modes with unilateral fixation compared with bilateral fixation in both systems. Conclusions Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion augmentation with pedicle screw-plate system fixation increases fusion construct stability equally to the pedicle screw-rod system. Increased posterior

  5. Biomechanical analysis of different types of pedicle screw augmentation: a cadaveric and synthetic bone sample study of instrumented vertebral specimens.

    PubMed

    Chao, Kuo-Hua; Lai, Yu-Shu; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Chang, Chia-Ming; McClean, Colin J; Fan, Chang-Yuan; Chang, Chia-Hao; Lin, Leou-Chyr; Cheng, Cheng-Kung

    2013-10-01

    This study aims to determine the pull-out strength, stiffness and failure pull-out energy of cement-augmented, cannulated-fenestrated pedicle screws in an osteoporotic cadaveric thoracolumbar model, and to determine, using synthetic bone samples, the extraction torques of screws pre-filled with cement and those with cement injected through perforations. Radiographs and bone mineral density measurements from 32 fresh thoracolumbar vertebrae were used to define specimen quality. Axial pull-out strength of screws was determined through mechanical testing. Mechanical pull-out strength, stiffness and energy-to-failure ratio were recorded for cement-augmented and non-cement-augmented screws. Synthetic bone simulating a human spinal bone with severe osteoporosis was used to measure the maximum extraction torque. The pull-out strength and stiffness-to-failure ratio of cement pre-filled and cement-injected screws were significantly higher than the non-cement-augmented control group. However, the cement pre-filled and cement-injected groups did not differ significantly across these values (p=0.07). The cement pre-filled group had the highest failure pull-out energy, approximately 2.8 times greater than that of the cement-injected (p<0.001), and approximately 11.5 times greater than that of the control groups (p<0.001). In the axial pull-out test, the cement-injected group had a greater maximum extraction torque than the cement pre-filled group, but was statistically insignificant (p=0.17). The initial fixation strength of cannulated screws pre-filled with cement is similar to that of cannulated screws injected with cement through perforations. This comparable strength, along with the heightened pull-out energy and reduced extraction torque, indicates that pedicle screws pre-filled with cement are superior for bone fixation over pedicle screws injected with cement. PMID:23669371

  6. Efficacy of Pedicle Screw Fixation in Unstable Upper and Middle Thoracic Spine Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Amir Abbas; Ashoori, Soudabeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treatment of unstable upper and middle thoracic spine fractures remains controversial. There is no consensus regarding optimal treatment. Objectives: In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of pedicular screw in the management of middle thoracic spine fractures to correct kyphosis and anterolisthesis and improve neurologic condition of patients. Patients and Methods: Twenty-five patients with unstable T1-T10 fractures treated with pedicle screw fixation technique were studied. Neurologic situation, preoperative and postoperative radiographs were evaluated. Radiographic measurements included kyphotic deformity and anterolisthesis. An American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale was used for neurologic classification of the patients. Results: From a total of 25 patients, 21 cases were male and 4 were female. The mean age of the patients was 35.40 ± 14.39 years. The mean degree of kyphosis improved from 27.04 ± 7.33 degrees preoperatively to 15.96 ± 5.76 degrees at final follow-up. The mean of anterolisthesis improved from 6.44 ± 4.93 mm to 0.96 ± 0.36 mm at final follow-up. Kyphosis (P = 0.0001), anterolisthesis (P = 0.0001) and neurological state (P = 0.01) improved significantly after operation. No cases of hardware failure, neurological deterioration and loss of correction were reported. Conclusions: Application of pedicular screw in unstable upper and middle thoracic spine fractures is an effective method that can correct kyphotic deformity and anterolisthesis and improve neurologic deficit. PMID:27218058

  7. Percutaneous pedicle screw for unstable spine fractures in polytraumatized patients: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Boon Beng; Chan, Chris Yin Wei; Saw, Lim Beng; Kwan, Mun Keong

    2012-01-01

    Unstable spine fractures commonly occur in the setting of a polytraumatized patient. The aim of management is to balance the need for early operative stabilization and prevent additional trauma due to the surgery. Recent published literature has demonstrated the benefits of early stabilization of an unstable spine fracture particularly in patients with higher injury severity score (ISS). We report two cases of polytrauma with unstable spine fractures stabilized with a minimally invasive percutaneous pedicle screw instrumentation system as a form of damage control surgery. The patients had good recovery from the polytrauma injuries. These two cases illustrate the role of minimally invasive stabilization, its limitations and technical pitfalls in the management of unstable spine fractures in the polytrauma setting as a form of damage control surgery. PMID:23325978

  8. Iliac vein compression syndrome from anterior perforation of a pedicle screw.

    PubMed

    Woo, Edward J; Ogilvie, Ross A; Krueger, Van Schaumburg; Lundin, Michael; Williams, David M

    2016-01-01

    May-Thurner syndrome is an anatomic variant where the right common iliac artery compresses the left common iliac vein. The variant exists in a significant portion of the population, but is usually asymptomatic; however, clinically significant stenosis can occur by iatrogenic means. In this report, we describe a patient who presents with left lower extremity pain and swelling. Initial workup for deep vein thrombosis was negative. After being referred to our venous clinic, a magnetic resonance angiography revealed narrowing of the left common iliac vein with a tortuous right common iliac artery crossing over the constriction. During left iliac vein stent placement, a pedicle screw from a prior L2-S1 spinal fusion was noted to be perforated through L5 vertebral body impinging the posterior aspect of the vein. This case demonstrates that increased scrutiny must be applied when dealing with pathology in close proximity to any implanted medical device. PMID:26912480

  9. Iliac vein compression syndrome from anterior perforation of a pedicle screw

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Edward J.; Ogilvie, Ross A.; Krueger, Van Schaumburg; Lundin, Michael; Williams, David M.

    2016-01-01

    May–Thurner syndrome is an anatomic variant where the right common iliac artery compresses the left common iliac vein. The variant exists in a significant portion of the population, but is usually asymptomatic; however, clinically significant stenosis can occur by iatrogenic means. In this report, we describe a patient who presents with left lower extremity pain and swelling. Initial workup for deep vein thrombosis was negative. After being referred to our venous clinic, a magnetic resonance angiography revealed narrowing of the left common iliac vein with a tortuous right common iliac artery crossing over the constriction. During left iliac vein stent placement, a pedicle screw from a prior L2–S1 spinal fusion was noted to be perforated through L5 vertebral body impinging the posterior aspect of the vein. This case demonstrates that increased scrutiny must be applied when dealing with pathology in close proximity to any implanted medical device. PMID:26912480

  10. Percutaneous Transpedicular Interbody Fusion Technique in Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Stabilization for Pseudoarthrosis Following Pyogenic Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Keigo; Yonekura, Yutaka; Kitamura, Takahiro; Senba, Hideyuki; Shidahara, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    This report introduces a percutaneous transpedicular interbody fusion (PTPIF) technique in posterior stabilization using percutaneous pedicle screws (PPSs). An 81-year-old man presented with pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis 15 months before. Although no relapse of infection was found, he complained of obstinate low back pain and mild neurological symptoms. Radiological evaluations showed a pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis at T11–12. Posterior stabilization using PPSs from Th9 to L2 and concomitant PTPIF using autologous iliac bone graft at T11–12 were performed. Low back pain and neurological symptoms were immediately improved after surgery. A solid interbody fusion at T11–12 was completed 9 months after surgery. The patient had no restriction of daily activity and could play golf at one year after surgery. PTPIF might be a useful option for perform segmental fusion in posterior stabilization using PPSs. PMID:27114777

  11. Percutaneous Transpedicular Interbody Fusion Technique in Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Stabilization for Pseudoarthrosis Following Pyogenic Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Ko; Masuda, Keigo; Yonekura, Yutaka; Kitamura, Takahiro; Senba, Hideyuki; Shidahara, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    This report introduces a percutaneous transpedicular interbody fusion (PTPIF) technique in posterior stabilization using percutaneous pedicle screws (PPSs). An 81-year-old man presented with pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis 15 months before. Although no relapse of infection was found, he complained of obstinate low back pain and mild neurological symptoms. Radiological evaluations showed a pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis at T11-12. Posterior stabilization using PPSs from Th9 to L2 and concomitant PTPIF using autologous iliac bone graft at T11-12 were performed. Low back pain and neurological symptoms were immediately improved after surgery. A solid interbody fusion at T11-12 was completed 9 months after surgery. The patient had no restriction of daily activity and could play golf at one year after surgery. PTPIF might be a useful option for perform segmental fusion in posterior stabilization using PPSs. PMID:27114777

  12. The surgical learning curve and accuracy of minimally invasive lumbar pedicle screw placement using CT based computer-assisted navigation plus continuous electromyography monitoring – a retrospective review of 627 screws in 150 patients

    PubMed Central

    McMillen, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study retrospectively assessed the accuracy of placement of lumbar pedicle screws placed by a single surgeon using a minimally-invasive, intra-operative CT-based computer navigated technique in combination with continuous electromyography (EMG) monitoring. The rates of incorrectly positioned screws were reviewed in the context of the surgeon's experience and learning curve. Methods Data was retrospectively reviewed from all consecutive minimally invasive lumbar fusions performed by the primary author over a period of over 4 years from April 2008 until October 2012. All cases that had utilized computer-assisted intra-operative CT-based image guidance and continuous EMG monitoring to guide percutaneous pedicle screw placement were analysed for the rates of malposition of the pedicle screws. Pedicle screw malposition was defined as having occurred if the screw trajectory was adjusted intraoperatively due to positive EMG responses, or due to breach of the pedicle cortex by more than 2mm on intraoperative CT imaging performed at the end of the instrumentation procedure. Further analysis of the data was undertaken to determine if the rates of malposition changed with the surgeon's experience with the technique. Results Six hundred and twenty-seven pedicle screws were placed in one hundred and fifty patients. The overall rate of intraoperative malposition and subsequent adjustment of pedicle screw placement was 3.8% (24 of 627 screws). Screw malposition was detected by intraoperative CT imaging. Warning of potential screw misplacement was provided by use of the EMG monitoring. With increased experience with the technique, rates of intraoperative pedicle screw malposition were found to decrease from 5.1% of screws in the first fifty patients, to 2.0% in the last 50 patients. Only one screw was suboptimally placed at the end of surgery, which did not result in a neurological deficit. Conclusion The use of CT-based computer-assisted navigation in combination

  13. The pedicle screw-rod system is an acceptable method of reconstructive surgery after resection of sacroiliac joint tumours

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi-Jun; Yunus, Akbar; Tian, Zheng; Chen, Jiang-Tao; Wang, Chong; Xu, Lei-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Hemipelvic resections for primary bone tumours require reconstruction to restore weight bearing along anatomic axes. However, reconstruction of the pelvic arch remains a major surgical challenge because of the high rate of associated complications. We used the pedicle screw-rod system to reconstruct the pelvis, and the purpose of this investigation was to assess the oncology, functional outcome and complication rate following this procedure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the operative indications and technique of the pedicle screw-rod system in reconstruction of the stability of the sacroiliac joint after resection of sacroiliac joint tumours. The average MSTS (Musculoskeletal Tumour Society) score was 26.5 at either three months after surgery or at the latest follow-up. Seven patients had surgery-related complications, including wound dehiscence in one, infection in two, local necrosis in four (including infection in two), sciatic nerve palsy in one and pubic symphysis subluxation in one. There was no screw loosening or deep vein thrombosis occurring in this series. Using a pedicle screw-rod after resection of a sacroiliac joint tumour is an acceptable method of pelvic reconstruction because of its reduced risk of complications and satisfactory functional outcome, as well as its feasibility of reconstruction for type IV pelvis tumour resection without elaborate preoperative customisation. Level of evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. PMID:27095944

  14. Posterior Spinal Reconstruction with Pedicle Screws, Multiple Iliac Screws and Wisconsin Spinal Wires in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Scoliosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woong-Beom; Park, Young-Seop; Park, Jong-Hwa; Hyun, Seung-Jae

    2015-09-01

    A 54-year-old female with neurofibromatosis type 1 presented with progressing truncal shift owing to spinal deformity. On plain radiograph, the Cobb angle was 54 degree in coronal plane. Radiological examinations showed severe dystrophic change with dysplastic pedicles, bony scalloping, neural foraminal widening from dural ectasia. The patient underwent deformity correction and reconstruction surgery from the T9 to the pelvis using multiple iliac screws and Wisconsin interspinous segmental instrumentation by wiring due to maximize fixation points. The postoperative course was uneventful. One-year follow-up radiographs showed a successful curve correction with solid fusion. We report a case of pedicle dysplasia and dystrophic change treated by posterior segmental spinal instrumentation and fusion with help of multiple iliac screws and modified Wisconsin interspinous segmental wiring. PMID:26512279

  15. Posterior Spinal Reconstruction with Pedicle Screws, Multiple Iliac Screws and Wisconsin Spinal Wires in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Scoliosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woong-Beom; Park, Young-Seop; Park, Jong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old female with neurofibromatosis type 1 presented with progressing truncal shift owing to spinal deformity. On plain radiograph, the Cobb angle was 54 degree in coronal plane. Radiological examinations showed severe dystrophic change with dysplastic pedicles, bony scalloping, neural foraminal widening from dural ectasia. The patient underwent deformity correction and reconstruction surgery from the T9 to the pelvis using multiple iliac screws and Wisconsin interspinous segmental instrumentation by wiring due to maximize fixation points. The postoperative course was uneventful. One-year follow-up radiographs showed a successful curve correction with solid fusion. We report a case of pedicle dysplasia and dystrophic change treated by posterior segmental spinal instrumentation and fusion with help of multiple iliac screws and modified Wisconsin interspinous segmental wiring. PMID:26512279

  16. Decisive factor in increase of loading at adjacent segments after lumbar fusion: operative technique, pedicle screws, or fusion itself: biomechanical analysis using finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Hee; Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Kim, Ka-yeon; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the change in biomechanical milieu following removal of pedicle screws or removal of spinous process with posterior ligament complex in instrumented single level lumbar arthrodesis. We developed and validated a finite element model (FEM) of the intact lumbar spine (L2-4). Four scenarios of L3-4 lumbar fusion were simulated: posterolateral fusion (PLF) at L3-4 using pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WoP), L3-4 using pedicle screw system without preservation PLC (Sp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system without preservation of PLC (Sp WoP). For these models, we investigated the range of motion and maximal Von mises stress of disc in all segments under various moments. All fusion models demonstrated increase in range of motion at adjacent segments compared to the intact model.For the four fusion models, the WiP model s P had the largest increase in range of motion at each adjacent segment. This study demonstrated that removal of pedicle screw system and preservation of PLC after complete lumbar spinal fusion could reduce the stress of adjacent segments synergistically and might have beneficial effects in preventing ASD.

  17. Decisive factor in increase of loading at adjacent segments after lumbar fusion: operative technique, pedicle screws, or fusion itself: biomechanical analysis using finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Hee; Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Kim, Ka-Yeon; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the change in biomechanical milieu following removal of pedicle screws or removal of spinous process with posterior ligament complex in instrumented single level lumbar arthrodesis. We developed and validated a finite element model (FEM) of the intact lumbar spine (L2-4). Four scenarios of L3-4 lumbar fusion were simulated: posterolateral fusion (PLF) at L3-4 using pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system with preservation of PLC (Pp WoP), L3-4 using pedicle screw system without preservation PLC (Sp WiP), L3-4 lumbar posterolateral fusion state after removal of pedicle screw system without preservation of PLC (Sp WoP). For these models, we investigated the range of motion and maximal Von mises stress of disc in all segments under various moments. All fusion models demonstrated increase in range of motion at adjacent segments compared to the intact model.For the four fusion models, the WiP model s P had the largest increase in range of motion at each adjacent segment. This study demonstrated that removal of pedicle screw system and preservation of PLC after complete lumbar spinal fusion could reduce the stress of adjacent segments synergistically and might have beneficial effects in preventing ASD.

  18. Cervical anterior transpedicular screw fixation (ATPS)—Part II. Accuracy of manual insertion and pull-out strength of ATPS

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Frank; Tauber, Mark; Fox, Michael; Martin, Hudelmaier; Forstner, Rosmarie; Augat, Peter; Penzkofer, Rainer; Pirich, Christian; Kässmann, H.; Resch, Herbert; Hitzl, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Reconstruction after multilevel decompression of the cervical spine, especially in the weakened osteoporotic, neoplastic or infectious spine often requires circumferential stabilization and fusion. To avoid the additional posterior surgery in these cases while increasing rigidity of anterior-only screw-plate constructs, the authors introduce the concept of anterior transpedicular screw (ATPS) fixation. We demonstrated its morphological feasibility as well as its indications in a previous study in Part I of our project. Consequently, the objectives of the current study were to assess the ex vivo accuracy of placing ATPS into the cervical vertebra as well as the biomechanical performance of ATPS in comparison to traditional vertebral body screws (VBS) in terms of pull-out strength (POS). Twenty-three ATPS were inserted alternately to two screws into the pedicles and vertebral bodies, respectively, of six cadaveric specimens from C3–T1. For insertion of ATPS, a manual fluoroscopically assisted technique was used. Pre- and post insertional CT-scans were used to assess accuracy of ATPS insertion in the axial and sagittal planes. A newly designed grading system and accuracy score were used to delineate accuracy of ATPS insertion. Following insertion of screws, 23 ATPS and 22 VBS were subjected to pull-out testing (POT). The bone mineral density (BMD) of each specimen was assessed prior to POT. Statistical analysis showed that the incidence of correctly placed screws and non-critical pedicles breaches in axial plane was 78.3%, and 95.7% in sagittal plane. Hence, according to our definition of “critical” pedicle breach that exposes neurovascular structures at risk, 21.7% (n = 5) of all ATPS inserted showed a critical pedicle breach in axial plane. Notably, no critical pedicle perforation occurred at the C6 to T1 levels. Pull-out testing of ATPS and VBS revealed that pull-out resistance of ATPS was 2.5-fold that of VBS. Mean POS of 23 ATPS with a mean BMD of 0.566

  19. Learning retention of thoracic pedicle screw placement using a high-resolution augmented reality simulator with haptic feedback1

    PubMed Central

    Luciano, Cristian J.; Banerjee, P. Pat; Bellotte, Brad; Lemole, G. Michael; Oh, Michael; Charbel, Fady T.; Roitberg, Ben

    2011-01-01

    Background We evaluated the use of a part-task simulator with 3D and haptic feedback as a training tool for a common neurosurgical procedure – placement of thoracic pedicle screws. Objective To evaluate the learning retention of thoracic pedicle screw placement on a high-performance augmented reality and haptic technology workstation. Methods Fifty-one fellows and residents performed thoracic pedicle screw placement on the simulator. The virtual screws were drilled into a virtual patient’s thoracic spine derived from a computed tomography data set of a real patient. Results With a 12.5% failure rate, a two-proportion z-test yielded P= 0.08. For performance accuracy, an aggregate Euclidean distance deviation from entry landmark on the pedicle and a similar deviation from the target landmark in the vertebral body yielded P=0.04 from a two-sample t-test in which the rejected null hypothesis assumes no improvement in performance accuracy from the practice to the test sessions, and the alternative hypothesis assumes an improvement. Conclusion The performance accuracy on the simulator was comparable to the accuracy reported in literature on recent retrospective evaluation of such placements. The failure rates indicated a minor drop from practice to test sessions, and also indicated a trend (P=0.08) towards learning retention resulting in improvement from practice to test sessions. The performance accuracy showed a 15% mean score improvement and over 50% reduction in standard deviation from practice to test. It showed evidence (P=0.04) of performance accuracy improvement from practice to test session. PMID:21471846

  20. Accuracy of free-hand placement of thoracic pedicle screws in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: how much of a difference does surgeon experience make?

    PubMed

    Samdani, Amer F; Ranade, Ashish; Sciubba, Daniel M; Cahill, Patrick J; Antonacci, M Darryl; Clements, David H; Betz, Randal R

    2010-01-01

    The use of thoracic pedicle screws for the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) has gained widespread popularity. However, the placement of pedicle screws in the deformed spine poses unique challenges, and surgeons experience a learning curve. The in vivo accuracy as determined by computed tomography (CT) of placement of thoracic pedicle screws in the deformed spine as a function of surgeon experience is unknown. We undertook a retrospective review to determine the effect of surgeon experience on the accuracy of thoracic pedicle screw placement in AIS. In 2005, we started to obtain routine postoperative CT scans on patients undergoing a spinal fusion. From a database of these patients, we selected AIS patients, who underwent a posterior spinal fusion. Fifteen consecutive patients for each of the following three groups stratified by attending surgeon experience were selected (N = 45): A) less than 20 cases of all pedicle screw constructs for AIS (surgeons <2 years of practice), B) 20-50 cases (surgeons 2-5 years of practice), and C) greater than 50 cases (surgeons greater than 5 years of practice). Intraoperative evaluation of all screws included probing of the pedicle screw tract, neurophysiologic monitoring, and fluoroscopic confirmation. A total of 856 thoracic pedicle screws were studied. Postoperative CT scans were evaluated by two spine surgeons and a consensus read established as follows: (1) In: intraosseous placement or 2-mm breach, either medial or lateral. Of the 856 screws, 104 demonstrated a >2-mm breach, for an overall rate of 12.1% (medial = 55, lateral = 49, P = 0.67). When the breach rates were stratified by surgeon experience, there was a trend toward decreased rate of breach for the most experienced surgeons, although this did not attain statistical significance (Group A: 12.7%, Group B: 12.9%, Group C: 10.8%, P = 0.58). However, the most experienced group (C) had a markedly decreased rate of medial

  1. Surgical outcome of posterior short segment trans-pedicle screw fixation for thoracolumbar fractures

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Shailendra; Sharma, Vijay

    2013-01-01

    Background Vast majority of spine fractures in thoracolumbar region are unstable and often associated with neurological deficit. With the advancement of technology, these fractures are now more often managed operatively. The present study aimed at evaluating the role of open reduction & internal fixation using pedicle screws and short segment fixation in patients with Thoracic and Lumbar spine fractures. Design In this prospective study, 25 patients in age group of 15–65 years (mean age 28.25 years) with thoracolumbar fractures with associated neurological deficit or compression fractures with loss of more than 50% vertebral height or angulations more than 20° with or without neurological deficit were included. The results were evaluated based on restoration and maintenance of vertebral body height, spinal lordosis/kyphosis and evaluation of the neurological recovery which was done at regular intervals using Frankel's grading. Results The mean follow-up period was 20.3 months. The average preoperative kyphotic angle as measured by Cobbs method was 20° which improved to 7.8° following instrumentation. The average preoperative vertebral height was 58.65% which improved to 78.55% postoperatively. Preoperatively, only 20% of patients had useful paraplegia (Frankel grade D and E) while 80% had useless paraplegia (Frankel's grade C and below). Following surgery, 60% patients had useful paraplegia while 40% had useless paraplegia. Conclusion Short segment trans-pedicle posterior fixation is helpful for not only stabilization of the fractures and restoration of anatomy, but also maintaining the same over a period with good functional outcome. PMID:24396235

  2. The Use of Percutaneous Lumbar Fixation Screws for Bilateral Pedicle Fractures with an Associated Dislocation of a Lumbar Disc Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, William D.; Harrison, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. Case report. Objective. To identify a safe technique for salvage surgery following complications of total disc replacement. Summary of Background Data. Lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) is considered by some as the gold standard for discogenic back pain. Revision techniques for TDR and their complications are in their infancy. This case describes a successful method of fixation for this complex presentation. Methods and Results. A 48-year-old male with lumbar degenerative disc disease and no comorbidities. Approximately two weeks postoperatively for a TDR, the patient represented with acute severe back pain and the TDR polyethylene inlay was identified as dislocated anteriorly. Subsequent revision surgery failed immediately as the polyethylene inlay redislocated intraoperatively. Further radiology identified bilateral pedicle fractures, previously unseen on the plain films. The salvage fusion of L5/S1 reutilized the anterior approach with an interbody fusion cage and bone graft. The patient was then turned intraoperatively and redraped. The percutaneous pedicle screws were used to fix L5 to the sacral body via the paracoccygeal corridor. Conclusion. The robust locking screw in the percutaneous screw allowed a complete fixation of the pedicle fractures. At 3-year followup, the patient has an excellent result and has returned to playing golf. PMID:24294533

  3. Biomechanical Comparison of Spinal Fusion Methods Using Interspinous Process Compressor and Pedicle Screw Fixation System Based on Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jisoo; Kim, Sohee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the biomechanical effects of a newly proposed Interspinous Process Compressor (IPC) and compare with pedicle screw fixation at surgical and adjacent levels of lumbar spine. Methods A three dimensional finite element model of intact lumbar spine was constructed and two spinal fusion models using pedicle screw fixation system and a new type of interspinous devices, IPC, were developed. The biomechanical effects such as range of motion (ROM) and facet contact force were analyzed at surgical level (L3/4) and adjacent levels (L2/3, L4/5). In addition, the stress in adjacent intervertebral discs (D2, D4) was investigated. Results The entire results show biomechanical parameters such as ROM, facet contact force, and stress in adjacent intervertebral discs were similar between PLIF and IPC models in all motions based on the assumption that the implants were perfectly fused with the spine. Conclusion The newly proposed fusion device, IPC, had similar fusion effect at surgical level, and biomechanical effects at adjacent levels were also similar with those of pedicle screw fixation system. However, for clinical applications, real fusion effect between spinous process and hooks, duration of fusion, and influence on spinous process need to be investigated through clinical study. PMID:26962413

  4. Posterior Interspinous Fusion Device for One-Level Fusion in Degenerative Lumbar Spine Disease : Comparison with Pedicle Screw Fixation - Preliminary Report of at Least One Year Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Jung; Chun, Hyoung Joon; Oh, Suck Jun; Kang, Tae Hoon; Yang, Moon Sool

    2012-01-01

    Objective Transpedicular screw fixation has some disadvantages such as postoperative back pain through wide muscle dissection, long operative time, and cephalad adjacent segmental degeneration (ASD). The purposes of this study are investigation and comparison of radiological and clinical results between interspinous fusion device (IFD) and pedicle screw. Methods From Jan. 2008 to Aug. 2009, 40 patients underwent spinal fusion with IFD combined with posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). In same study period, 36 patients underwent spinal fusion with pedicle screw fixation as control group. Dynamic lateral radiographs, visual analogue scale (VAS), and Korean version of the Oswestry disability index (K-ODI) scores were evaluated in both groups. Results The lumbar spine diseases in the IFD group were as followings; spinal stenosis in 26, degenerative spondylolisthesis in 12, and intervertebral disc herniation in 2. The mean follow up period was 14.24 months (range; 12 to 22 months) in the IFD group and 18.3 months (range; 12 to 28 months) in pedicle screw group. The mean VAS scores was preoperatively 7.16±2.1 and 8.03±2.3 in the IFD and pedicle screw groups, respectively, and improved postoperatively to 1.3±2.9 and 1.2±3.2 in 1-year follow ups (p<0.05). The K-ODI was decreased significantly in an equal amount in both groups one year postoperatively (p<0.05). The statistics revealed a higher incidence of ASD in pedicle screw group than the IFD group (p=0.029). Conclusion Posterior IFD has several advantages over the pedicle screw fixation in terms of skin incision, muscle dissection and short operative time and less intraoperative estimated blood loss. The IFD with PLIF may be a favorable technique to replace the pedicle screw fixation in selective case. PMID:23133725

  5. Comparative Analysis of Interval, Skipped, and Key-vertebral Pedicle Screw Strategies for Correction in Patients With Lenke Type 1 Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Xu, Xi-Ming; Lu, Yanghu; Wei, Xian-Zhao; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Li, Ming

    2016-03-01

    Pedicle screw constructs have become the mainstay for surgical correction in patients with spinal deformities. To reduce or avoid the risk of pedicle screw-based complications and to decrease the costs associated with pedicle screw instrumentation, some authors have introduced interval, skipped, and key-vertebral pedicle screw strategies for correction. However, there have been no comparisons of outcomes among these 3 pedicle screw-placement strategies.The aim of this study was to compare the correlative clinical outcomes of posterior correction and fusion with pedicle screw fixation using these 3 surgical strategies.Fifty-six consecutive patients with Lenke type 1 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were included in this study. Twenty patients were treated with the interval pedicle screw strategy (IPSS), 20 with the skipped pedicle screw strategy (SPSS), and 16 with the key-vertebral pedicle screw strategy (KVPSS). Coronal and sagittal radiographs were analyzed before surgery, at 1 week after surgery, and at the last follow-up after surgery.There were no significant differences among the 3 groups regarding preoperative radiographic parameters. No significant difference was found between the IPSS and SPSS groups in correction of the main thoracic curve (70.8% vs 70.0%; P = 0.524). However, there were statistically significant differences between the IPSS and KVPSS groups (70.8% vs 64.9%) and between the SPSS and KVPSS groups (70.0% vs 64.9%) in correction of the main thoracic curve (P < 0.001 for both). Additionally, there were no significant differences among the 3 strategies for sagittal parameters at the immediate postoperative and last postoperative follow-up periods, though there were significant differences in the Cobb angle between the preoperative and immediate postoperative periods among the 3 groups, but not between the immediate postoperative and last follow-up periods. The amount of hospital charges in the SPSS group was significantly higher than

  6. Freehand Thoracic Pedicle Screw Placement: Review of Existing Strategies and a Step-by-Step Guide Using Uniform Landmarks for All Levels

    PubMed Central

    Baaj, Ali A

    2016-01-01

    Pedicle screw fixation in the thoracic spine presents certain challenges due to the critical regional neurovascular anatomy as well as the narrow pedicular corridor that typically exists. With increased awareness of the dangers of intraoperative radiation, the ability to place pedicle screws with anatomic landmarks alone is paramount. In this study, we reviewed the literature from 1990 to 2015 for studies that included freehand pedicle screw placement in the thoracic spine with special emphasis on entry points and the trajectories of the screws. We excluded studies that used fluoroscopy guidance, navigation techniques, cadaveric and biomechanical articles, case reports, and experimental studies on animals. The search retrieved 40 articles, and after careful selection, seven articles were analyzed. Over 8,000 screws were placed in the different studies. The mean accuracy for placement of the thoracic screws was 93.3%. However, there is little consensus between studies in entry points, sagittal, and axial trajectories of the screws. We complete this review by presenting our step-by-step technique for the placement of freehand pedicle screws in the thoracic spine. PMID:27014535

  7. Freehand Thoracic Pedicle Screw Placement: Review of Existing Strategies and a Step-by-Step Guide Using Uniform Landmarks for All Levels.

    PubMed

    Avila, Mauricio J; Baaj, Ali A

    2016-01-01

    Pedicle screw fixation in the thoracic spine presents certain challenges due to the critical regional neurovascular anatomy as well as the narrow pedicular corridor that typically exists. With increased awareness of the dangers of intraoperative radiation, the ability to place pedicle screws with anatomic landmarks alone is paramount. In this study, we reviewed the literature from 1990 to 2015 for studies that included freehand pedicle screw placement in the thoracic spine with special emphasis on entry points and the trajectories of the screws. We excluded studies that used fluoroscopy guidance, navigation techniques, cadaveric and biomechanical articles, case reports, and experimental studies on animals. The search retrieved 40 articles, and after careful selection, seven articles were analyzed. Over 8,000 screws were placed in the different studies. The mean accuracy for placement of the thoracic screws was 93.3%. However, there is little consensus between studies in entry points, sagittal, and axial trajectories of the screws. We complete this review by presenting our step-by-step technique for the placement of freehand pedicle screws in the thoracic spine. PMID:27014535

  8. Comparison of Surgical Outcomes Between Short-Segment Open and Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation Techniques for Thoracolumbar Fractures.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Xi; Shi, Yaohua; Dong, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to compare the surgical outcomes between open pedicle screw fixation (OPSF) and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation (PPSF) for the treatment of thoracolumbar fractures, which has received scant research attention to date. MATERIAL AND METHODS Eight-four patients with acute and subacute thoracolumbar fractures who were treated with SSPSF from January 2013 to June 2014 at the Changzhou Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Changzhou, China) were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into 4 groups: the OPSF with 4 basic screws (OPSF-4) group, the OPSF with 4 basic and 2 additional screws (OPSF-6) group, the PPSF with 4 basic screws (PPSF-4) group, and the PPSF with 4 basic and 2 additional screws (PPSF-6) group. The intraoperative, immediate postoperative, and over 1-year follow-up outcomes were evaluated and compared among these groups. RESULTS Blood loss in the PPSF-4 group and the PPSF-6 group was significantly less than in the OPSF-4 group and the OPSF-6 group (P<0.05). The OPSF-6 group exhibited significantly higher immediate postoperative correction percentage of anterior column height of fractured vertebra than the other 3 groups (P<0.05), and higher correction of sagittal regional Cobb angle and kyphotic angle of injured vertebra than in the PPSF-4 and -6 groups (P<0.05). In addition, there was no significant difference in the correction loss of percentage of anterior column height, and loss of sagittal Cobb angle and kyphotic angle of fractured vertebrae at final follow-up among the 4 groups (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS OPSF with 6 screws had an advantage in the correction of injured vertebral height and kyphosis, and PPSF reduced the intraoperative blood loss of patients. PMID:27602557

  9. Known-component 3D-2D registration for quality assurance of spine surgery pedicle screw placement.

    PubMed

    Uneri, A; De Silva, T; Stayman, J W; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Khanna, A J; Gokaslan, Z L; Wolinsky, J-P; Siewerdsen, J H

    2015-10-21

    A 3D-2D image registration method is presented that exploits knowledge of interventional devices (e.g. K-wires or spine screws-referred to as 'known components') to extend the functionality of intraoperative radiography/fluoroscopy by providing quantitative measurement and quality assurance (QA) of the surgical product. The known-component registration (KC-Reg) algorithm uses robust 3D-2D registration combined with 3D component models of surgical devices known to be present in intraoperative 2D radiographs. Component models were investigated that vary in fidelity from simple parametric models (e.g. approximation of a screw as a simple cylinder, referred to as 'parametrically-known' component [pKC] registration) to precise models based on device-specific CAD drawings (referred to as 'exactly-known' component [eKC] registration). 3D-2D registration from three intraoperative radiographs was solved using the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES) to maximize image-gradient similarity, relating device placement relative to 3D preoperative CT of the patient. Spine phantom and cadaver studies were conducted to evaluate registration accuracy and demonstrate QA of the surgical product by verification of the type of devices delivered and conformance within the 'acceptance window' of the spinal pedicle. Pedicle screws were successfully registered to radiographs acquired from a mobile C-arm, providing TRE 1-4 mm and  <5° using simple parametric (pKC) models, further improved to  <1 mm and  <1° using eKC registration. Using advanced pKC models, screws that did not match the device models specified in the surgical plan were detected with an accuracy of  >99%. Visualization of registered devices relative to surgical planning and the pedicle acceptance window provided potentially valuable QA of the surgical product and reliable detection of pedicle screw breach. 3D-2D registration combined with 3D models of known surgical devices offers a

  10. Biomechanical Evaluation of Pedicle Screw-Based Dynamic Stabilization Devices for the Lumbar Spine: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ponnappan, Ravi K.; Song, Jason; Vaccaro, Alexander R.

    2008-01-01

    Study Design This study is a systematic review of published biomechanical studies involving pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilization devices (PDS) with a special focus on kinematics and load transmission through the functional spine unit (FSU). Methods A literature search was performed via the PubMed online database from 1990 to 2008 using the following key words: “biomechanics,” “lumbar dynamic stabilization,” “Graf system,” “Dynesys,” and “posterior dynamic implant.” Citations were limited to papers describing biomechanics of pedicle screw-based PDS devices currently available for clinical use. Studies describing clinical experience, radiology, and in vivo testing were excluded from the review. Parameters measured included kinematics of the FSU (range of motion (ROM), neutral zone (NZ), and location of the center of rotation) and load transmission through the disk, facets, and instrumentation. Results A total of 27 publications were found that concerned the biomechanical evaluation of lumbar pedicle screw-based dynamic stabilization instrumentation. Nine in vitro experimental studies and 4 finite element analyses satisfied the inclusion criteria. The Dynesys implant was the most investigated pedicle screw-based PDS system. In vitro cadaveric studies mainly focused on kinematics comparing ROM of intact versus instrumented spines whereas finite element analyses allowed analysis of load transmission at the instrumented and adjacent levels. Conclusion Biomechanical studies demonstrate that pedicle screw-based PDS devices limit intervertebral motion while unloading the intervertebral disk. The implant design and the surgical technique have a significant impact on the biomechanical behavior of the instrumented spinal segment. The posterior placement of such devices results in non-physiologic intervertebral kinematics with a posterior shift of the axis of rotation. Biomechanical studies suggest that the difference at the adjacent level

  11. Minimally Invasive Multilevel Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation for Lumbar Spinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Son, Seong; Park, Chan Woo; Kim, Woo Kyung

    2012-01-01

    Objective There are rare reports on the result of multilevel (≥3 levels) percutaneous pedicle screw fixation (PPF). The purpose of this study was to report the clinical experiences for multilevel PPF of the lumbar spine. Methods A total of 17 patients of lumbar spinal disease (7 degenerative diseases, 6 infectious diseases, and 4 traumatic instabilities) underwent neural decompression and multilevel PPF. There were 8 men and 9 women with a mean age of 61.4 years (range, 25-84) and a mean follow-up period of 23.2 months (range, 13-48). The average PPF level was 3.7. A retrospective review of clinical, radiological, and surgical data was conducted. Results "Excellent" or "good" clinical results were obtained in 15 patients (88.2%) according to the Odom's criteria. The average improvement of visual analogue scale was 5.2 points (from 9.3 to 4.1), and the average improvement of Oswestry Disability Index was 36.2 (from 71.2 to 35.0) at the last visit (p<0.05). The fusion rate was 88.2%, but, screw loosening was occurred in 2 patients, and adjacent segmental degeneration was occurred in 2 patients. There was no statistical significance in the change of total lumbar lordotic angle. The average operation time was 5.9 hours, with an estimated blood loss of 550 ml and bed rest duration of 2.0 days. Conclusion Although the current study examined a small sample with relatively short term follow up periods, our study results demonstrate that multilevel PPF is feasible and safe for selective lumbar spinal diseases. PMID:25983845

  12. Biomechanical Analysis of Fusion Segment Rigidity Upon Stress at Both the Fusion and Adjacent Segments: A Comparison between Unilateral and Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Kim, Jang-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of unilateral pedicle screw fixation on the fusion segment and the superior adjacent segment after one segment lumbar fusion using validated finite element models. Materials and Methods Four L3-4 fusion models were simulated according to the extent of decompression and the method of pedicle screws fixation in L3-4 lumbar fusion. These models included hemi-laminectomy with bilateral pedicle screw fixation in the L3-4 segment (BF-HL model), total laminectomy with bilateral pedicle screw fixation (BF-TL model), hemi-laminectomy with unilateral pedicle screw fixation (UF-HL model), and total laminectomy with unilateral pedicle screw fixation (UF-TL model). In each scenario, intradiscal pressures, annulus stress, and range of motion at the L2-3 and L3-4 segments were analyzed under flexion, extension, lateral bending, and torsional moments. Results Under four pure moments, the unilateral fixation leads to a reduction in increment of range of motion at the adjacent segment, but larger motions were noted at the fusion segment (L3-4) in the unilateral fixation (UF-HL and UF-TL) models when compared to bilateral fixation. The maximal von Mises stress showed similar patterns to range of motion at both superior adjacent L2-3 segments and fusion segment. Conclusion The current study suggests that unilateral pedicle screw fixation seems to be unable to afford sufficient biomechanical stability in case of bilateral total laminectomy. Conversely, in the case of hemi-laminectomy, unilateral fixation could be an alternative option, which also has potential benefit to reduce the stress of the adjacent segment. PMID:25048501

  13. Vertebroplasty plus short segment pedicle screw fixation in a burst fracture model in cadaveric spines.

    PubMed

    Grossbach, Andrew J; Viljoen, Stephanus V; Hitchon, Patrick W; DeVries Watson, Nicole A; Grosland, Nicole M; Torner, James

    2015-05-01

    The current project investigates the role of vertebroplasty in supplementing short segment (SS) posterior instrumentation, only one level above and below a fracture. In the treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures, long segment (LS) posterior instrumentation two levels above and below the fracture level has been used. In our study, burst fractures were produced at L1 in eight fresh frozen human cadaveric spines. The spines were then tested in three conditions: 1) intact, 2) after LS (T11-L3), 3) SS (T12-L2) instrumentation with pedicle screws and rods, and 4) short segment instrumentation plus cement augmentation of the fracture level (SSC). LS instrumentation was found to significantly reduce the motion at the instrumented level (T12-L2) as well as the levels immediately adjacent in flexion, extension and lateral bending. Similarly, SSC augmentation was found to significantly reduce the motion compared to intact at T12-L2 but still maintained the adjacent level motion. However, SS instrumentation alone did not significantly reduce the motion at T12-L2 except for left lateral bending. While LS instrumentation remains the most stable construct, SS instrumentation augmented with vertebroplasty at the fracture level increases rigidity in flexion, extension and right lateral bending beyond SS instrumentation alone. PMID:25769251

  14. Measurement of Optimal Insertion Angle for Iliosacral Screw Fixation Using Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Scans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Jae; Jung, Chul-Young; Eastman, Jonathan G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation can provide stable fixation with a minimally invasive surgical technique for unstable posterior pelvic ring injuries. This surgical technique is not limited by cases of difficult fracture patterns, sacral dysplasia, and small sacral pedicles that can occur in Asians. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of the sacral dysplasia in the Korean population and determine the optimal direction of iliosacral screws by analyzing pelvic three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scans. Methods One hundred adult patients who had pelvic 3D-CT scans were evaluated. The upper sacral morphology was classified into three groups, i.e., normal, transitional, and dysplastic groups; the cross-sectional area of the safe zone was measured in each group. S1 pedicle with a short width of more than 11 mm was defined as safe pedicle. The incidences of safe pedicles at different angles ranging from 0° to 15° were investigated in order to determine optimal angle for screw direction. Results The incidence of normal, transitional, and dysplastic group was 46%, 32%, and 22%, respectively. There were significant increases of the cross-sectional area of the safe zones by increasing the angles from 0° to 15° in all groups. The incidence of safe pedicles increased similar to the changes in cross-sectional area. The overall incidence of safe pedicles was highest at the 10° tilt angle. Conclusions The incidence of sacral dysplasia in Koreans was 54%, which is higher than previous studies for Western populations. The cross-sectional area of the safe zone can be increased by anteromedial direction of the iliosacral screw. Considering the diversity of sacral morphology present in the Korean population, a tilt angle of 10° may be the safest angle. PMID:27247736

  15. A New Electromagnetic Navigation System for Pedicle Screws Placement: A Human Cadaver Study at the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Patrick; Oezdemir, Semih; Komp, Martin; Giannakopoulos, Athanasios; Heikenfeld, Roderich; Kasch, Richard; Merk, Harry; Godolias, Georgios; Ruetten, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Technical developments for improving the safety and accuracy of pedicle screw placement play an increasingly important role in spine surgery. In addition to the standard techniques of free-hand placement and fluoroscopic navigation, the rate of complications is reduced by 3D fluoroscopy, cone-beam CT, intraoperative CT/MRI, and various other navigation techniques. Another important aspect that should be emphasized is the reduction of intraoperative radiation exposure for personnel and patient. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of a new navigation system for the spine based on an electromagnetic field. Material and Method Twenty pedicle screws were placed in the lumbar spine of human cadavers using EMF navigation. Navigation was based on data from a preoperative thin-slice CT scan. The cadavers were positioned on a special field generator and the system was matched using a patient tracker on the spinous process. Navigation was conducted using especially developed instruments that can be tracked in the electromagnetic field. Another thin-slice CT scan was made postoperatively to assess the result. The evaluation included the position of the screws in the direction of trajectory and any injury to the surrounding cortical bone. The results were classified in 5 groups: grade 1: ideal screw position in the center of the pedicle with no cortical bone injury; grade 2: acceptable screw position, cortical bone injury with cortical penetration ≤ 2 mm; grade 3: cortical bone injury with cortical penetration 2,1-4 mm, grad 4: cortical bone injury with cortical penetration 4,1-6 mm, grade 5: cortical bone injury with cortical penetration >6 mm. Results The initial evaluation of the system showed good accuracy for the lumbar spine (65% grade 1, 20% grade 2, 15% grade 3, 0% grade 4, 0% grade 5). A comparison of the initial results with other navigation techniques in literature (CT navigation, 2D fluoroscopic navigation) shows that the accuracy of

  16. Known-component 3D-2D registration for quality assurance of spine surgery pedicle screw placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uneri, A.; De Silva, T.; Stayman, J. W.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Khanna, A. J.; Gokaslan, Z. L.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-10-01

    A 3D-2D image registration method is presented that exploits knowledge of interventional devices (e.g. K-wires or spine screws—referred to as ‘known components’) to extend the functionality of intraoperative radiography/fluoroscopy by providing quantitative measurement and quality assurance (QA) of the surgical product. The known-component registration (KC-Reg) algorithm uses robust 3D-2D registration combined with 3D component models of surgical devices known to be present in intraoperative 2D radiographs. Component models were investigated that vary in fidelity from simple parametric models (e.g. approximation of a screw as a simple cylinder, referred to as ‘parametrically-known’ component [pKC] registration) to precise models based on device-specific CAD drawings (referred to as ‘exactly-known’ component [eKC] registration). 3D-2D registration from three intraoperative radiographs was solved using the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES) to maximize image-gradient similarity, relating device placement relative to 3D preoperative CT of the patient. Spine phantom and cadaver studies were conducted to evaluate registration accuracy and demonstrate QA of the surgical product by verification of the type of devices delivered and conformance within the ‘acceptance window’ of the spinal pedicle. Pedicle screws were successfully registered to radiographs acquired from a mobile C-arm, providing TRE 1-4 mm and  <5° using simple parametric (pKC) models, further improved to  <1 mm and  <1° using eKC registration. Using advanced pKC models, screws that did not match the device models specified in the surgical plan were detected with an accuracy of  >99%. Visualization of registered devices relative to surgical planning and the pedicle acceptance window provided potentially valuable QA of the surgical product and reliable detection of pedicle screw breach. 3D-2D registration combined with 3D models of known surgical

  17. Revision characteristics of cement-augmented, cannulated-fenestrated pedicle screws in the osteoporotic vertebral body: a biomechanical in vitro investigation. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Blattert, Thomas R; Glasmacher, Stefan; Riesner, Hans-Joachim; Josten, Christoph

    2009-07-01

    In generalized osteoporosis, instrumentation with cement-augmented pedicle screws is an amplification of the therapeutic spectrum. Early clinical results are promising for both solid and cannulated screws; however, there are concerns regarding the revision characteristics of these screws, especially for the cannulated-fenestrated type with its continuous cement interconnection from the core of the screw to surrounding bone tissue. In a human cadaver model, bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed radiographically. Spinal levels T9-L4 were instrumented left unilaterally, transpedicularly by using cannulated-fenestrated pedicle screws with the dimensions 6.5 x 45 mm. Polymethylmethacrylate cement (1.5 ml) was injected through the screws into each vertebra. After polymerization of the cement, the extraction torque was recorded. For both implantation and explantation of the screws, a fluoroscope was used to guarantee correct screw and cement positioning and to observe possible co-movements-that is, any movement of the cement mass within the vertebral body upon removal of the screw. For comparison, the extraction torque of same-dimension pedicle screws was recorded in a nonosteoporotic, non-cement-augmented instrumentation. The BMD was 0.60 g/cm2, a level that corresponds to a severe grade of osteoporosis. For removal of the screws, the median and mean extraction torques were 34 and 49 +/- 44 Ncm, respectively. No co-movements of the cement mass occurred within the vertebral body. In the nonosteoporotic control, BMD was 1.38 g/cm2. The median and mean extraction torques were 123 and 124 +/- 12 Ncm, respectively. Thus, the revision characteristics of cement-augmented, cannulated-fenestrated pedicle screws are not problematic, even in cases of severe osteoporosis. The winglike cement interconnection between the screw core and surrounding bone tissue is fragile enough to break off in the event of an extraction torque and to release the screw. There is no proof to support

  18. “NIMS technique” for minimally invasive spinal fixation using non-fenestrated pedicle screws: A technical note

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, Alugolu; Pelluru, Pavan Kumar; Kumar, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Study Design: Case series. Objective: To reduce the cost of minimally invasive spinal fixation. Background: Minimally invasive spine (MIS) surgery is an upcoming modality of managing a multitude of spinal pathologies. However, in a resource-limited situations, using fenestrated screws (FSs) may prove very costly for patients with poor affordability. We here in describe the Nizam's Institute of Medical Sciences (NIMS) experience of using routine non-FSs (NFSs) for transpedicular fixation by the minimally invasive way to bridge the economic gap. Materials and Methods: A total of 7 patients underwent NFS-minimally invasive spine (MIS) surgery. Male to female distribution was 6:1. The average blood loss was 50 ml and the mean operating time was 2 and 1/2 h. All patients were mobilized the very next day after confirming the position of implants on X-ray/computed tomography. Results: All 7 patients are doing well in follow-up with no complaints of a backache or fresh neurological deficits. There was no case with pedicle breach or screw pullout. The average cost of a single level fixation by FS and NFS was ₹1, 30,000/patient and ₹32,000/patient respectively (‘2166 and ‘530, respectively). At the end of 1-year follow-up, we had two cases of screw cap loosening and with a displacement of the rod cranio-caudally in one case which was revised through the same incisions. Conclusions: Transpedicular fixation by using NFS for thoracolumbar spinal pathologies is a cost-effective extension of MIS surgery. This may extend the benefits to a lower socioeconomic group who cannot afford the cost of fenestrated screw (FS). PMID:26692692

  19. Pedicular and Extrapedicular Morphometric Analysis in the Korean Population : Computed Tomographic Assessment Relevance to Pedicle and Extrapedicle Screw Fixation in the Thoracic Spine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun-Hak; Choi, Gyeong-Mi; Chang, In-Bok; Ahn, Sung-Ki; Song, Joon-Ho

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the anatomical parameters that must be considered when performing thoracic transpedicular or extrapedicular screw fixation. Methods We selected 958 vertebrae (1,916 pedicles) from 98 patients for analysis. Eight parameters were measured from CT scans : the transverse outer pedicular diameter, transverse inner pedicular diameter, length, angle, chord length of the pedicles and the transverse width, angle, and chord length of the pedicle-rib units. Results The age of the patients ranged from 21 to 82 years (mean : 48.2 years) and there were 57 men and 41 women. The narrowest transverse outer pedicular diameter was at T5 (4.4 mm). The narrowest pedicle length was at T1 (15.9 mm). For pedicle angle, T1 was 31.6 degrees, which was the most convergent angle, and it showed the tendency of the lower the level, the lesser the convergent angle. The chord length showed a horizontal pattern with similar values at all levels. For the PRU width, T5 showed a similar pattern to the pedicle width at 13.4 mm. For the PRU angle, T1 was the largest angle at 46.2 degrees and the tendency was the lower the level, the narrower the angle. For chord length, T1 was the shortest at 46.9 mm and T8 was the longest at 60.1 mm. Conclusion When transpedicular screw fixations carried out at the mid-thoracic level, special care must be taken because there is a high chance of danger of medial wall violation. In these circumstances, extrapedicular screw fixation may be considered as an alternative treatment. PMID:19844615

  20. Screw insertion in trabecular bone causes peri-implant bone damage.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Juri A; Ferguson, Stephen J; van Lenthe, G Harry

    2016-04-01

    Secure fracture fixation is still a major challenge in orthopedic surgery, especially in osteoporotic bone. While numerous studies have investigated the effect of implant loading on the peri-implant bone after screw insertion, less focus has been put on bone damage that may occur due to the screw insertion process itself. Therefore, the aim of this study was to localize and quantify peri-implant bone damage caused by screw insertion. We used non-invasive three-dimensional micro-computed tomography to scan twenty human femoral bone cores before and after screw insertion. After image registration of the pre- and post-insertion scans, changes in the bone micro-architecture were identified and quantified. This procedure was performed for screws with a small thread size of 0.3mm (STS, N=10) and large thread size of 0.6mm (LTS, N=10). Most bone damage occurred within a 0.3mm radial distance of the screws. Further bone damage was observed up to 0.6mm and 0.9mm radial distance from the screw, for the STS and LTS groups, respectively. While a similar amount of bone damage was found within a 0.3mm radial distance for the two screw groups, there was significantly more bone damage for the LTS group than the STS group in volumes of interest between 0.3-0.6mm and 0.6-0.9mm. In conclusion, this is the first study to localize and quantify peri-implant bone damage caused by screw insertion based on a non-invasive, three-dimensional, micro-CT imaging technique. We demonstrated that peri-implant bone damage already occurs during screw insertion. This should be taken into consideration to further improve primary implant stability, especially in low quality osteoporotic bone. We believe that this technique could be a promising method to assess more systematically the effect of peri-implant bone damage on primary implant stability. Furthermore, including peri-implant bone damage due to screw insertion into patient-specific in silico models of implant-bone systems could improve the

  1. Pedicle-Screw-Based Dynamic Systems and Degenerative Lumbar Diseases: Biomechanical and Clinical Experiences of Dynamic Fusion with Isobar TTL

    PubMed Central

    Barrey, Cédric; Perrin, Gilles; Champain, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic systems in the lumbar spine are believed to reduce main fusion drawbacks such as pseudarthrosis, bone rarefaction, and mechanical failure. Compared to fusion achieved with rigid constructs, biomechanical studies underlined some advantages of dynamic instrumentation including increased load sharing between the instrumentation and interbody bone graft and stresses reduction at bone-to-screw interface. These advantages may result in increased fusion rates, limitation of bone rarefaction, and reduction of mechanical complications with the ultimate objective to reduce reoperations rates. However published clinical evidence for dynamic systems remains limited. In addition to providing biomechanical evaluation of a pedicle-screw-based dynamic system, the present study offers a long-term (average 10.2 years) insight view of the clinical outcomes of 18 patients treated by fusion with dynamic systems for degenerative lumbar spine diseases. The findings outline significant and stable symptoms relief, absence of implant-related complications, no revision surgery, and few adjacent segment degenerative changes. In spite of sample limitations, this is the first long-term report of outcomes of dynamic fusion that opens an interesting perspective for clinical outcomes of dynamic systems that need to be explored at larger scale. PMID:25031874

  2. Sudden cerebral infarction after interventional vertebral artery embolism for vertebral artery injury during removal of C1-C2 pedicle screw fixation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Liu, Hao; Ma, Litai; Zeng, Jiancheng; Song, Yueming; Xie, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral artery injury (VAI) is a rare but serious complication of cervical spine surgery. Instrumented posterior surgery of the upper cervical spine places the vertebral artery at the highest risk of injury. However, VAI during removal of cervical internal fixation is really rare and unexpected. We present a case of 52-year-old male patient who suffered VAI during removal of C1-C2 pedicle screw fixation. An interventional vertebral artery embolism was performed and the patient suffered a sudden cerebral infarction one day after interventional vertebral artery embolism. From this case, removal of upper cervical pedicle screws of malposition is not recommended if it is not really necessary for some other reasons. Interventional vertebral artery embolism is an effective and less invasive procedure than open ligation surgery in the treatment of haemorrhage resulted from VAI but potential risk of cerebral infarction should not be ignored. PMID:26629224

  3. Novel Pedicle Screw and Plate System Provides Superior Stability in Unilateral Fixation for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: An In Vitro Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qingan; Zhou, Yue; Li, Changqing; Liu, Huan; Huang, Zhiping; Shang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to compare the biomechanical properties of the novel pedicle screw and plate system with the traditional rod system in asymmetrical posterior stabilization for minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF). We compared the immediate stabilizing effects of fusion segment and the strain distribution on the vertebral body. Methods Seven fresh calf lumbar spines (L3-L6) were tested. Flexion/extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation were induced by pure moments of ± 5.0 Nm and the range of motion (ROM) was recorded. Strain gauges were instrumented at L4 and L5 vertebral body to record the strain distribution under flexion and lateral bending (LB). After intact kinematic analysis, a right sided TLIF was performed at L4-L5. Then each specimen was tested for the following constructs: unilateral pedicle screw and rod (UR); unilateral pedicle screw and plate (UP); UR and transfacet pedicle screw (TFS); UP and TFS; UP and UR. Results All instrumented constructs significantly reduced ROM in all motion compared with the intact specimen, except the UR construct in axial rotation. Unilateral fixation (UR or UP) reduced ROM less compared with the bilateral fixation (UP/UR+TFS, UP+UR). The plate system resulted in more reduction in ROM compared with the rod system, especially in axial rotation. UP construct provided more stability in axial rotation compared with UR construct. The strain distribution on the left and right side of L4 vertebral body was significantly different from UR and UR+TFS construct under flexion motion. The strain distribution on L4 vertebral body was significantly influenced by different fixation constructs. Conclusions The novel plate could provide sufficient segmental stability in axial rotation. The UR construct exhibits weak stability and asymmetrical strain distribution in fusion segment, while the UP construct is a good alternative choice for unilateral posterior fixation of MI-TLIF. PMID:25807513

  4. Posterior cervical spine arthrodesis with laminar screws: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Kazuo; Tanaka, Masato; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2007-04-01

    We performed fixation using laminar screws in 2 patients in whom lateral mass screws, pedicle screws or transarticular screws could not be inserted. One was a 56-year-old woman who had anterior atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS). When a guide wire was inserted using an imaging guide, the hole bled massively. We thought the re-insertion of a guide wire or screw would thus increase the risk of vascular injury, so we used laminar screws. The other case was an 18-year-old man who had a hangman fracture. Preoperative magnetic resonance angiography showed occlusion of the left vertebral artery. A laminar screw was inserted into the patent side (i.e., the right side of C2). Cervical pedicle screws are the most biomechanically stable screws. However, their use carries a high risk of neurovascular complications during screw insertion, because the cervical pedicle is small and is adjacent laterally to the vertebral artery, medially to the spinal cord, and vertically to the nerve roots. Lateral mass screws are also reported to involve a risk of neurovascular injuries. The laminar screw method was thus thought to be useful, since arterial injuries could thus be avoided and it could also be used as a salvage modality for the previous misinsertion. PMID:17471313

  5. Evaluation of implant loosening following segmental pedicle screw fixation in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a 2 year follow-up with low-dose CT

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The long term radiological status of screw fixation following scoliosis surgery with all pedicle screw construct is not previously studied. Aim To evaluate the incidence of loosening (implant failure) evaluated with low-dose CT two years following scoliosis surgery. Study design Retrospective study. Methods 81 consecutive patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), aged 18 ± 3 years at 2 years follow-up (83% were female), subjected for scoliosis corrective surgery with all pedicle screw construct (total of 1666 screws) has been examined with plain radiography and with low dose CT 6 weeks and 2 years postoperatively. Results In 26 out of 81 (32%) patients there were signs of loosening of one or more screws, a maximum 3 screws. 47 out of 1666 (2.8%) screws showed evidence of loosening. Preoperative Cobb angle was 56° among patients with loosening compared with 53° among patients with no evidence of loosening (P = 0.288). In males there were signs of loosening in 8 out of 14 (57%) and in females 18 out of 67 (27%), (P = 0.027). Among cases with loosening, 14% had suboptimal screw placement at the first postoperative CT compared with 11% among patients with no evidence of loosening (P = 0.254). One patient with a loosened L4 screw had neurological deficit and subjected for revision of the construct. Out of 26 patients with evidence of loosening, 5 patients reported minor pain or discomfort, 1 patient had a minor proximal junctional kyphosis of about 15° and 3 patients showed evidence of pull-out of 3–5 mm at the upper end of the construct but no clinical complaint. With plain radiography loosening could be observed only in 11 out of 26 cases, 5 were in the lumbar region. Conclusions In a consecutive series of 81 cases with AIS who had underwent scoliosis surgery, one third showed, 2 years after the intervention, minor screw loosening. Males were more prone to develop screw loosening. In CT system that enables low

  6. Known-component 3D-2D registration for image guidance and quality assurance in spine surgery pedicle screw placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uneri, A.; Stayman, J. W.; De Silva, T.; Wang, A. S.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Khanna, A. J.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Gokaslan, Z. L.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose. To extend the functionality of radiographic / fluoroscopic imaging systems already within standard spine surgery workflow to: 1) provide guidance of surgical device analogous to an external tracking system; and 2) provide intraoperative quality assurance (QA) of the surgical product. Methods. Using fast, robust 3D-2D registration in combination with 3D models of known components (surgical devices), the 3D pose determination was solved to relate known components to 2D projection images and 3D preoperative CT in near-real-time. Exact and parametric models of the components were used as input to the algorithm to evaluate the effects of model fidelity. The proposed algorithm employs the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES) to maximize gradient correlation (GC) between measured projections and simulated forward projections of components. Geometric accuracy was evaluated in a spine phantom in terms of target registration error at the tool tip (TREx), and angular deviation (TREΦ) from planned trajectory. Results. Transpedicle surgical devices (probe tool and spine screws) were successfully guided with TREx<2 mm and TREΦ <0.5° given projection views separated by at least >30° (easily accommodated on a mobile C-arm). QA of the surgical product based on 3D-2D registration demonstrated the detection of pedicle screw breach with TREx<1 mm, demonstrating a trend of improved accuracy correlated to the fidelity of the component model employed. Conclusions. 3D-2D registration combined with 3D models of known surgical components provides a novel method for near-real-time guidance and quality assurance using a mobile C-arm without external trackers or fiducial markers. Ongoing work includes determination of optimal views based on component shape and trajectory, improved robustness to anatomical deformation, and expanded preclinical testing in spine and intracranial surgeries.

  7. Morphological Study of Subaxial Cervical Pedicles by Using Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Reconstruction Image

    PubMed Central

    WASINPONGWANICH, Kanthika; PAHOLPAK, Permsak; TUAMSUK, Panya; SIRICHATIVAPEE, Winai; WISANUYOTIN, Taweechok; KOSUWON, Weerachai; JEERAVIPOOLVARN, Polasak

    2014-01-01

    Malpositioning of cervical screws risks neurovascular injury. A cervical screw fixation system can provide proper rigidity, alignment correction, and high rates of fusion afforded by high pullout biomechanical strength. The objective is to assess the dimensions and axis of the C3–C7 cervical pedicles. A 1-mm slice thickness computed tomography (CT) scan of the cervical spine of 30 patients (15 males, 15 females) were analyzed and reconstructed in three-dimensions using Mimics® 10.01 software. We measured pedicle axis length (PAL), pedicle and lateral mass length (PL-LM), pedicle length (PL), outer pedicle width (OPW), and pedicle transverse angle (PTA) from the axial image and outer pedicle height (OPH) and pedicle sagittal angle (PSA) from the sagittal image. The OPH and OPW at all subaxial cervical spines were suitable for insertion of 3.5 mm cervical pedicle screws. PSA was directed cranially at C3 to C5 (13.84, 7.09, and 2.71) and directed caudally at C6 and C7 (–4.55, –6.94). PTA was greatest at C5 and smallest at C7. The respective difference between the left and right side for nearly all parameters was not statistically significant (except for C6 PL and C7 OPH). Females had a significantly smaller OPH and OPW than males at nearly all levels. The PTA was not significantly different between the sexes. Cervical pedicle screw fixation in the Thai population can be safely performed and guidelines for insertion at each vertebra documented. Appropriate preoperative planning is necessary to achieve safe and accurate placement of the screws. PMID:25169140

  8. Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation with Polymethylmethacrylate Augmentation for the Treatment of Thoracolumbar Intravertebral Pseudoarthrosis Associated with Kummell's Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of short-segment percutaneous pedicle screw fixation with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) augmentation for the treatment of osteoporotic thoracolumbar compression fracture with osteonecrosis. Methods. Osteoporotic thoracolumbar compression fractures with avascular necrosis were treated by short-segment PPF with PMMA augmentation. Eighteen were followed up for more than 2 years. The kyphotic angle, compression ratio, visual analog scale (VAS) score for back pain, and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were analyzed. In addition, radiologic and clinical parameters of PPF group were compared with percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) group. Results. Vertebral height and kyphotic angle of the compressed vertebral bodies were significantly corrected after the operation (P < 0.05). Further, restored vertebral height was maintained during the 2 or more years of postoperative follow-up. Compared to the PVP group the postoperative compression ratio and kyphotic angle were significantly lower in the PPF group (P < 0.05). The postoperative ODI and VAS of the PVP group were significantly higher than the PPF (P < 0.05). Conclusions. According to our results, short-segment PPF with PMMA augmentation may be an effective minimally invasive treatment for osteoporosis in cases of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures with Kummell's osteonecrosis. PMID:27595101

  9. Radiological Evaluation of the Initial Fixation between Cortical Bone Trajectory and Conventional Pedicle Screw Technique for Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To compare initial fixation using the cortical bone trajectory (CBT) technique versus conventional pedicle screws (PS) in radiographs of postsurgical lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature Few reports have documented the holding strength of CBT technique for spondylolisthesis cases. Methods From October 2009 to June 2014, 21 cases of degenerative spondylolisthesis were surgically treated in our institution. Ten were treated with conventional PS technique and 11 of with CBT technique. Mean lumbar lordosis and percent slippage were evaluated preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and 6 months and 1 year postoperatively using radiographs. We also investigated percent loss of slip reduction. Results There were statistically significant differences between preoperative percent slippage and postoperative slippage in both PS and CBT procedures over 1 year, and both techniques showed good slip reduction. On the other hand, lumbar lordosis did not change significantly in either the PS or CBT groups over 1 year. Conclusions CBT technique showed similarly good initial fixation compared with the PS procedure in the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. PMID:27114765

  10. Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation with Polymethylmethacrylate Augmentation for the Treatment of Thoracolumbar Intravertebral Pseudoarthrosis Associated with Kummell's Osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeun-Sung; Heo, Dong-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of short-segment percutaneous pedicle screw fixation with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) augmentation for the treatment of osteoporotic thoracolumbar compression fracture with osteonecrosis. Methods. Osteoporotic thoracolumbar compression fractures with avascular necrosis were treated by short-segment PPF with PMMA augmentation. Eighteen were followed up for more than 2 years. The kyphotic angle, compression ratio, visual analog scale (VAS) score for back pain, and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were analyzed. In addition, radiologic and clinical parameters of PPF group were compared with percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) group. Results. Vertebral height and kyphotic angle of the compressed vertebral bodies were significantly corrected after the operation (P < 0.05). Further, restored vertebral height was maintained during the 2 or more years of postoperative follow-up. Compared to the PVP group the postoperative compression ratio and kyphotic angle were significantly lower in the PPF group (P < 0.05). The postoperative ODI and VAS of the PVP group were significantly higher than the PPF (P < 0.05). Conclusions. According to our results, short-segment PPF with PMMA augmentation may be an effective minimally invasive treatment for osteoporosis in cases of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures with Kummell's osteonecrosis. PMID:27595101

  11. Increasing pedicle screw anchoring in the osteoporotic spine by cement injection through the implant. Technical note and report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Fransen, Patrick

    2007-09-01

    Instrumented spinal fusion in patients with osteoporosis is challenging because of the poor bone quality and is complicated by an elevated risk of delayed hardware failure. The author treated two patients presenting with severe osteoporosis, spinal stenosis, and degenerative spondylolisthesis. He performed decompressive laminectomy, posterolateral fusion, and pedicle screw (PS) fixation involving screws with side openings that allow cement to be injected through the implant. The cement injection was conducted under fluoroscopic control without complications. Although this technique needs validation in a larger population of patients, the author believes that the injection of cement through these PSs can be performed safely in carefully selected patients. This technique creates not only a vertebroplasty-like effect that strengthens the vertebral body but also provides the additional stability afforded by the immediate anchoring of the screw, which may allow a shorter-length construct, save mobile segments, and finally reduce the risk of hardware failure. PMID:17877276

  12. A video guided solution for screw insertion in orthopedic plate fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magaraggia, J.; Kleinszig, G.; Graumann, R.; Angelopoulou, E.; Hornegger, J.

    2013-03-01

    In orthopedic and trauma surgery, metallic plates are used for reduction and fixation of bone fractures. In clinical practice, the intra-operative planning for screw fixation is usually based on fluoroscopic images. Screw fixation is then performed on a free-hand basis. As such, multiple attempts may be required in order to achieve an optimal positioning of the fixing screws. To help the physician insert the screws in accordance to the planned position, we propose a method for screw insertion guidance. Our approach uses a small video camera, rigidly placed on the drill, and a set of small markers that are rigidly fixed on a variable angle drill sleeve. In order to investigate the achievable accuracy of our setup, we simulate the estimation of the drill bit position under two different marker arrangements, planar and 3D, and different noise levels. Furthermore, we motivate our choices for marker design and position given the limited space available for marker positioning, the requirement for accurate position estimation of the drill bit and the illumination changes that could affect the surgical site. We also describe our proposed marker detection and tracking pipeline. Our simulation results let us conclude that we can achieve an accuracy of 1° and 1mm in the estimation of angular orientation and tip position of the drill bit respectively, provided that we have accurate marker detection.

  13. CT-Guided Transfacet Pedicle Screw Fixation in Facet Joint Syndrome: A Novel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Manfré, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Axial microinstability secondary to disc degeneration and consequent chronic facet joint syndrome (CFJS) is a well-known pathological entity, usually responsible for low back pain (LBP). Although posterior lumbar fixation (PIF) has been widely used for lumbar spine instability and LBP, complications related to wrong screw introduction, perineural scars and extensive muscle dissection leading to muscle dysfunction have been described. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of facet joints zygapophyseal nerves conventionally used for pain treatment fails in approximately 21% of patients. We investigated a “covert-surgery” minimal invasive technique to treat local spinal instability and LBP, using a novel fully CT-guided approach in patients with axial instability complicated by CFJS resistant to radioablation, by introducing direct fully or partially threaded transfacet screws (transfacet fixation - TFF), to acquire solid arthrodesis, reducing instability and LBP. The CT-guided procedure was well tolerated by all patients in simple analogue sedation, and mean operative time was approximately 45 minutes. All eight patients treated underwent clinical and CT study follow-up at two months, revealing LBP disappearance in six patients, and a significant reduction of lumbar pain in two. In conclusion, CT-guided TFF is a fast and safe technique when facet posterior fixation is needed. PMID:25363265

  14. A Finite Element Model of Electrode Placement During Stimulus Evoked Electromyographic Monitoring of Iliosacral Screw Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Kopec, M.A; Moed, B.R; Barnett, D.W

    2008-01-01

    Pelvic ring fractures that occur as a result of substantial orthopedic trauma are frequently repaired using iliosacral screws to stabilize the fracture. Stimulus evoked electromyography, using pulsed current stimuli provided through the drill bit cathode, has been advocated to prevent nerve root injury during iliosacral screw insertion. Our objective was to examine the effects of anode location, drill bit position, and anatomical structure on the nerve monitoring technique. A three-dimensional finite element model was constructed from computed tomography data to evaluate the effectiveness of five anode locations at four stations of drill bit insertion. Results indicate that the anode location should be at the midline or on the side contralateral to drill bit insertion. Locating the anode at other positions, such that the nerve root is outside of the primary electromagnetic field, leads to an attenuated electromyographic response that will ultimately lead to the failure of the monitoring technique. PMID:19587797

  15. Determination of the Distal Fusion Level in the Management of Thoracolumbar and Lumbar Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Using Pedicle Screw Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Soo; Kim, Jin-Hyok; Kim, Jong-Woo; Um, Kyu-Sub; Ahn, Soo-Hyung; Suk, Se-Il

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose To determine the exact distal fusion level in the management of thoracolumbar/lumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (TL/L AIS) using pedicle screw instrumentation (PSI). Overview of Literature The selection of distal fusion level remains controversial in TL/L AIS. Methods Radiographic parameters of 66 TL/L AIS patients were analyzed. The patients were grouped according to the distal fusion level; L3 group (fusion to L3, n=58) and L4 group (fusion to L4, n=8). The L3 group was subdivided into L3A (L3 crosses the mid-sacral line with rotation of less than grade II, n=33) and L3B (L3 does not cross the mid-sacral line or rotation is grade II or more, n=25) based on both bending radiographs. All of the patients in the L4 group had the same location and rotation of L3 in bending films as that of patients in the L3B group. An unsatisfactory result was defined as a lowest instrumented vertebral tilt (LIVT) of more than 10° or coronal balance of more than 15 mm. Results Among the 3 groups, there was a significantly lesser correction in the TL/L curve and LIVT in the L3B group. Unsatisfactory results were obtained in 3 patients (9.1%) of the L3A group, in 15 patients (68.2%) of the L3B group, and in 1 patient (12.5%) of the L4 group with a significant difference. Conclusions In TL/L AIS treatment with PSI, the curve can be fused to L3 with favorable radiographic outcomes when L3 crosses the mid-sacral line with rotation of less than grade II in bending films. Otherwise, fusion has to be extended to L4. PMID:25558324

  16. Limited Unilateral Decompression and Pedicle Screw Fixation with Fusion for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with Unilateral Radiculopathy: A Retrospective Analysis of 25 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Miao, Hai-xiong; Wang, Yong; Chen, An-fu; Zhang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective Lumbar spinal stenosis is conventionally treated with surgical decompression. However, bilateral decompression and laminectomy is more invasive and may not be necessary for lumbar stenosis patients with unilateral radiculopathy. We aimed to report the outcomes of unilateral laminectomy and bilateral pedicle screw fixation with fusion for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and unilateral radiculopathy. Methods Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis with unilateral lower extremity radiculopathy who received limited unilateral decompression and bilateral pedicle screw fixation were included and evaluated using visual analog scale (VAS) pain and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores preoperatively and at follow-up visits. Ligamentum flavum thickness of the involved segments was measured on axial magnetic resonance images. Results Twenty-five patients were included. The mean preoperative VAS score was 6.6±1.6 and 4.6±3.1 for leg and back pain, respectively. Ligamentum flavum thickness was comparable between the symptomatic and asymptomatic side (p=0.554). The mean follow-up duration was 29.2 months. The pain in the symptomatic side lower extremity (VAS score, 1.32±1.2) and the back (VAS score, 1.75±1.73) significantly improved (p=0.000 vs. baseline for both). The ODI improved significantly postoperatively (6.60±6.5; p=0.000 vs. baseline). Significant improvement in VAS pain and ODI scores were observed in patients receiving single or multi-segment decompression fusion with fixation (p<0.01). Conclusion Limited laminectomy and unilateral spinal decompression followed by bilateral pedicle screw fixation with fusion achieves satisfactory outcomes in patients with spinal stenosis and unilateral radiculopathy. This procedure is less damaging to structures that are important for maintaining posterior stability of the spine. PMID:26279816

  17. One-stage posterior C2 and C3 pedicle screw fixation or combined anterior C2-C3 fusion for the treatment of unstable hangman’s fracture

    PubMed Central

    LIU, JINGCHEN; LI, YE; WU, YUNTAO

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of using one-stage posterior C2 and C3 pedicle screw fixation or combined anterior C2-C3 fusion in the treatment of unstable hangman’s fracture. A total of 13 patients with unstable hangman’s fractures underwent C2 and C3 pedicle screw fixation, lamina interbody fusion or combined anterior C2-C3 fusion and imaging examinations to evaluate the fracture fixation and healing condition at three days and three months following surgery. Postoperative X-ray and computed tomography (CT) results showed high fracture reduction, good internal fixation position and reliable fracture fixation. The three-month postoperative CT showed good vertebral fracture healing. C2 and C3 pedicle screw fixation has a good curative effect in the treatment of unstable hangman’s fracture. The direct fixation of the fracture enables early ambulation by the patients. PMID:23408668

  18. Biomechanical Comparison of Pedicle Screw Augmented with Different Volumes of Polymethylmethacrylate in Osteoporotic and Severely Osteoporotic Synthetic Bone Blocks in Primary Implantation: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Da; Zhang, Xiao-jun; Liao, Dong-fa; Zhou, Jiang-jun; Li, Zhi-qiang; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Cai-ru; Lei, Wei; Kang, Xia; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to compare screw stabilities augmented with different volumes of PMMA and analyze relationship between screw stability and volume of PMMA and optimum volume of PMMA in different bone condition. Osteoporotic and severely osteoporotic synthetic bone blocks were divided into groups A0-A5 and B0-B5, respectively. Different volumes of PMMA were injected in groups A0 to A5 and B0 to B5. Axial pullout tests were performed and Fmax was measured. Fmax in groups A1-A5 were all significantly higher than group A0. Except between groups A1 and A2, A3 and A4, and A4 and A5, there were significant differences on Fmax between any other two groups. Fmax in groups B1-B5 were all significantly higher than group B0. Except between groups B1 and B2, B2 and B3, and B4 and B5, there were significant differences on Fmax between any other two groups. There was significantly positive correlation between Fmax and volume of PMMA in osteoporotic and severely osteoporotic blocks. PMMA can significantly enhance pedicle screw stability in osteoporosis and severe osteoporosis. There were positive correlations between screw stability and volume of PMMA. In this study, injection of 3 mL and 4 mL PMMA was preferred in osteoporotic and severely osteoporotic blocks, respectively. PMID:26885525

  19. Axial cyclic behavior of the bone-screw interface.

    PubMed

    Inceoğlu, Serkan; Ehlert, Mike; Akbay, Atilla; McLain, Robert F

    2006-11-01

    Screw fixation strength is investigated by using a pullout test. Despite many screw pullout studies, the effects of loading rate on the pullout behavior of pedicle screws are not known. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of loading rate on the pullout stiffness and strength of pedicle screws. Sixty pedicle screws were inserted in foam blocks and pulled out at four different rates: 0.1, 1, 5 and 50 mm/min. Twenty of these 60 screws were cycled non-destructively at four different rates sequentially, i.e., 0.1, 1, 5 and 50 mm/min prior to pullout. Ten additional pedicle screws were inserted in five calf lumbar vertebrae, cycled as in foam group, and pulled out at a rate of either 0.1 or 50 mm/min. The results showed that the stiffness was higher at all rates compared to 0.1 mm/min in foam model but in bone model only 1 and 5 mm/min groups were higher compared to 0.1 mm/min. The pullout strength in 50 mm/min group was higher than that in 0.1 mm/min group in both foam and bone model. The results suggested that loading rate influenced the mechanics of the bone-screw interface. Therefore, a fair comparison between the pullout studies can be achieved under same loading rate conditions. Moreover, the cycling of the pedicle screws in axial direction within a pre-yield region showed an unusual hysteresis curve. Further studies are needed for a better understanding of the mechanics of the screw-bone interface. PMID:16458568

  20. Minimally Invasive Unilateral vs. Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation and Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Treatment of Multi-Segment Lumbar Degenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Guangrun; Wang, Jiefeng; Zhang, Heqing

    2015-01-01

    Background The choice for instrumentation with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) in treatment of degenerative lumbar disorders (DLD) remains controversial. The goal of this study was to investigate clinical outcomes in consecutive patients with multi-segment DLD treated with unilateral pedicle screw (UPS) vs. bilateral pedicle screw (BPS) instrumented TLIF. Material/Methods Eighty-four consecutive patients who had multi-level MIS-TLIF were retrospectively reviewed. All data were collected to compare the clinical outcomes between the 2 groups. Results Both groups showed similar clinical function scores in VAS and ODI. The two groups differed significantly in operative time (P<0.001), blood loss (P<0.001), and fusion rate (P=0.043), respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrated similar clinical outcomes between UPS fixation and BPS procedure after MIS-TLIF for multi-level DLD. Moreover, UPS technique was superior in operative time and blood loss, but represented lower fusion rate than the BPS construct did. PMID:26603050

  1. Unilateral C1 Lateral Mass and C2 Pedicle Screw Fixation for Atlantoaxial Instability in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: Comparison with the Bilateral Method

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Seung-Chull; Bak, Koang Hum; Ryu, Jeil; Choi, Kyu-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Bilateral C1 lateral mass and C2 pedicle screw fixation (C1LM-C2P) is an ideal technique for correcting atlantoaxial instability (AAI). However, the inevitable situation of vertebral artery injury or unfavorable bone structure may necessitate the use of unilateral C1LM-C2P. This study compares the fusion rates of the C1 lateral mass and C2 pedicle screw in the unilateral and bilateral methods. Methods Over five years, C1LM-C2P was performed in 25 patients with AAI in our institute. Preoperative studies including cervical X-ray, three-dimensional computed tomography (CT), CT angiogram, and magnetic resonance imaging were performed. To evaluate bony fusion, measurements of the atlanto-dental interval (ADI) and CT scans were performed in the preoperative period, immediate postoperative period, and postoperatively at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results Unilateral C1LM-C2P was performed in 11 patients (44%). The need to perform unilateral C1LM-C2P was due to anomalous course of the vertebral artery in eight patients (73%) and severe degenerative arthritis in three patients (27%). The mean ADI in the bilateral group was 2.09 mm in the immediate postoperative period and 1.75 mm in 12-months postoperatively. The mean ADI in the unilateral group was 1.82 mm in the immediate postoperative period and 1.91 mm in 12-months postoperatively. Comparison of ADI measurements showed no significant differences in either group (p=0.893), and the fusion rate was 100% in both groups. Conclusion Although bilateral C1LM-C2P is effective for AAI from a biomechanical perspective, unilateral screw fixation is a useful alternative in patients with anatomical variations. PMID:26180616

  2. Kinematic Accuracy Analysis of Lead Screw W Insertion Mechanism with Flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hu; Zhang, Lei; Kong, Jiayuan

    According to the actual requirements of w insertion, a set of variable lead screw w mechanism was designed, motion characteristics of the mechanism were analyzed and kinematics simulation was carried out with MATLAB. Mechanism precision was analyzed with the analytical method and the error coefficient curve of each component in the mechanism was obtained. Dynamics simulation for rigid mechanism and mechanism with flexibility in different speed was conducted with ADAMS, furthermore, real-time elastic deformation of the flexible Connecting rod was obtained. In consideration of the influences of the elastic connecting rod, the outputs motion error and elastic deformation of components were increased with the speed of the loom.

  3. Analysis of plastic deformation in cortical bone after insertion of coated and non-coated self-tapping orthopaedic screws.

    PubMed

    Koistinen, A P; Korhonen, H; Kiviranta, I; Kröger, H; Lappalainen, R

    2011-07-01

    Insertion of internal fracture fixation devices, such as screws, mechanically weakens the bone. Diamond-like carbon has outstanding tribology properties which may decrease the amount of damage in tissue. The purpose of this study was to investigate methods for quantification of cortical bone damage after orthopaedic bone screw insertion and to evaluate the effect of surface modification on tissue damage. In total, 48 stainless steel screws were inserted into cadaver bones. Half of the screws were coated with a smooth amorphous diamond coating. Geometrical data of the bones was determined by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Thin sections of the bone samples were prepared after screw insertion, and histomorphometric evaluation of damage was performed on images obtained using light microscopy. Micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy were also used to examine tissue damage. A positive correlation was found between tissue damage and the geometric properties of the bone. The age of the cadaver significantly affected the bone mineral density, as well as the damage perimeter and diameter of the screw hole. However, the expected positive effect of surface modification was probably obscured by large variations in the results and, thus, statistically significant differences were not found in this study. This can be explained by natural variability in bone tissue, which also made automated image analysis difficult. PMID:21870370

  4. Effect of Micrometer-Scale Roughness of the Surface of Ti6Al4V Pedicle Screws in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Zvi; Raz, Perry; Zhao, Ge; Barak, Yael; Tauber, Michael; Yao, Hai; Boyan, Barbara D.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Titanium implants that have been grit-blasted and acid-etched to produce a rough microtopography support more bone integration than do smooth-surfaced implants. In vitro studies have suggested that this is due to a stimulatory effect on osteoblasts. It is not known if grit-blasted and acid-etched Ti6Al4V implants also stimulate osteoblasts and increase bone formation clinically. In this study, we examined the effects of micrometer-scale-structured Ti6Al4V surfaces on cell responses in vitro and on tissue responses in vivo. Methods: Ti6Al4V disks were either machined to produce smooth surfaces with an average roughness (Ra) of 0.2 μm or grit-blasted, resulting in an Ra of 2.0, 3.0, or 3.3 μm. Human osteoblast-like cells were cultured on the disks and on tissue culture polystyrene. The cell number, markers of osteoblast differentiation, and levels of local factors in the conditioned media were determined at confluence. In addition, Ti6Al4V pedicle screws with smooth or rough surfaces were implanted into the L4 and L5 vertebrae of fifteen two-year-old sheep. Osteointegration was evaluated at twelve weeks with histomorphometry and on the basis of removal torque. Results: The cell numbers on the Ti6Al4V surfaces were lower than those on the tissue culture polystyrene; the effect was greatest on the roughest surface. The alkaline-phosphatase-specific activity of cell lysates was decreased in a surface-dependent manner, whereas osteocalcin, prostaglandin E2, transforming growth factor-β1, and osteoprotegerin levels were higher on the rough surfaces. Bone-implant contact was greater around the rough-surfaced Ti6Al4V screws, and the torque needed to remove the rough screws from the bone was more than twice that required to remove the smooth screws. Conclusions: Increased micrometer-scale surface roughness increases osteoblast differentiation and local factor production in vitro, which may contribute to increased bone formation and osteointegration in vivo

  5. Periaortic Pedicle Screw Removal with Endovascular Control of the Aorta and Intraoperative Aortography: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Michael Q.; Lawrence, Brandon D.; Kinikini, Daniel V.; Brodke, Darrel S.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design  Case report and review of the literature. Objective The objective of the article is to report the case of a 20-year-old patient with a threatened aortic injury from pedicle screw instrumentation successfully managed without aortic grafting. Methods The patient's clinical course is retrospectively reviewed. The offending hardware was removed after gaining endovascular control of the aorta. Results Intraoperative aortography was normal and no graft was placed. The patient remains asymptomatic at 2 years after surgery. Conclusions Hardware impinging on the aorta can safely be removed by gaining endovascular control of the aorta. In the setting of normal intraoperative aortography in a young patient, we recommend against further intervention to avoid the known morbidity of aortic grafting. PMID:24436714

  6. Augmented PMMA distribution: improvement of mechanical property and reduction of leakage rate of a fenestrated pedicle screw with diameter-tapered perforations.

    PubMed

    Tan, Quan-Chang; Wu, Jian-Wei; Peng, Fei; Zang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Zhao, Xiong; Lei, Wei; Wu, Zi-Xiang

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE This study investigated the optimum injection volume of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) to augment a novel fenestrated pedicle screw (FPS) with diameter-tapered perforations in the osteoporotic vertebral body, and how the distribution characteristics of PMMA affect the biomechanical performance of this screw. METHODS Two types of FPSs were designed (FPS-A, composed of 6 perforations with an equal diameter of 1.2 mm; and FPS-B, composed of 6 perforations each with a tapered diameter of 1.5 mm, 1.2 mm, and 0.9 mm from tip to head. Each of 28 human cadaveric osteoporotic vertebrae were randomly assigned to 1 of 7 groups: FPS-A1.0: FPS-A+1.0 ml PMMA; FPS-A1.5: FPS-A+1.5 ml PMMA; FPS-A2.0: FPS-A+2.0 ml PMMA; FPS-B1.0: FPS-B+1.0 ml PMMA; FPS-B1.5: FPS-B+1.5 ml PMMA; FPS-B2.0: FPS-B+2.0 ml PMMA; and conventional pedicle screws (CPSs) without PMMA. After the augmentation, 3D CT was performed to assess the cement distribution characteristics and the cement leakage rate. Axial pullout tests were performed to compare the maximum pullout force thereafter. RESULTS The CT construction images showed that PMMA bone cement formed a conical mass around FPS-A and a cylindrical mass around FPS-B. When the injection volume was increased from 1.0 ml to 2.0 ml, the distribution region of the PMMA cement was enlarged, the PMMA was distributed more posteriorly, and the risk of leakage was increased. When the injection volume reached 2.0 ml, the risk of cement leakage was lower for screws having diameter-tapered perforations. The pullout strengths of the augmented FPS-A groups and FPS-B groups were higher than that of the CPS group (p < 0.0001). All FPS-B groups had a higher pullout strength than the FPS-A groups. CONCLUSIONS The diameter of the perforations affects the distribution of PMMA cement. The diameter-tapered design enabled PMMA to form larger bone-PMMA interfaces and achieve a relatively higher pullout strength, although statistical significance was not reached. Study

  7. Treatment of acute thoracolumbar burst fractures with kyphoplasty and short pedicle screw fixation: Transpedicular intracorporeal grafting with calcium phosphate: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Korovessis, Panagiotis; Repantis, Thomas; George, Petsinis

    2007-01-01

    Background: In the surgical treatment of thoracolumbar fractures, the major problem after posterior correction and transpedicular instrumentation is failure to support the anterior spinal column, leading to loss of correction and instrumentation failure with associated complaints. We conducted this prospective study to evaluate the outcome of the treatment of acute thoracolumbar burst fractures by transpedicular balloon kyphoplasty, grafting with calcium phosphate cement and short pedicle screw fixation plus fusion. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three consecutive patients of thoracolumbar (T9 to L4) burst fracture with or without neurologic deficit with an average age of 43 years, were included in this prospective study. Twenty-one from the 23 patients had single burst fracture while the remaining two patients had a burst fracture and additionally an adjacent A1-type fracture. On admission six (26%) out of 23 patients had neurological deficit (five incomplete, one complete). Bilateral transpedicular balloon kyphoplasty with liquid calcium phosphate to reduce segmental kyphosis and restore vertebral body height and short (three vertebrae) pedicle screw instrumentation with posterolateral fusion was performed. Gardner kyphosis angle, anterior and posterior vertebral body height ratio and spinal canal encroachment were calculated pre- to postoperatively. Results: All 23 patients were operated within two days after admission and were followed for at least 12 months after index surgery. Operating time and blood loss averaged 45 min and 60 cc respectively. The five patients with incomplete neurological lesions improved by at least one ASIA grade, while no neurological deterioration was observed in any case. The VAS and SF-36 (Role physical and Bodily pain domains) were significantly improved postoperatively. Overall sagittal alignment was improved from an average preoperative 16° to one degree kyphosis at final followup observation. The anterior vertebral body height

  8. Less invasive reduction and fusion of fresh A2 and A 3 traumatic L 1-L 4 fractures with a novel vertebral body augmentation implant and short pedicle screw fixation and fusion.

    PubMed

    Korovessis, Panagiotis; Vardakastanis, Konstantinos; Repantis, Thomas; Vitsas, Vasilios

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to report on the efficacy in reduction and safety in PMMA leakage of a novel vertebral augmentation technique with PEEK and PMMA, together with pedicle screws in the treatment of fresh vertebral fractures in young adults. Twenty consecutive young adults aged 45 ± 11 years with fresh burst A3/AO or severely compressed A2/AO fractures underwent via a less invasive posterior approach one-staged reduction with a novel augmentation implant and PMMA plus 3-vertebrae pedicle screw fixation and fusion. Radiologic parameters as segmental kyphosis (SKA), anterior (AVBHr) and posterior vertebral body height ratio (PVBHr), spinal canal encroachment (SCE), cement leakage and functional parameters as VAS, SF-36 were measured pre- and post-operatively. Hybrid construct restored AVBHr (P < 0.000), PVBHr (P = 0.02), SKA (P = 0.015), SCE (P = 0.002) without loss of correction at an average follow-up of 17 months. PMMA leakage occurred in 3 patients (3 vertebrae) either anteriorly to the fractured vertebral body or to the adjacent disc, but in no case to the spinal canal. Two pedicle screws were malpositioned (one medially, one laterally to the pedicle at the fracture level) without neurologic sequelae. Solid posterolateral spinal fusion occurred 8-10 months post-operatively. Pre-operative VAS and SF-36 scores improved post-operatively significantly. This study showed that this novel vertebral augmentation technique using PEEK implant and PMMA reduces and stabilizes via less invasive technique A2 and A3 vertebral fractures without loss of correction and leakage to the spinal canal. PMID:24170266

  9. Transpedicular vertebral body augmentation reinforced with pedicle screw fixation in fresh traumatic A2 and A3 lumbar fractures: comparison between two devices and two bone cements.

    PubMed

    Korovessis, Panagiotis; Vardakastanis, Konstantinos; Repantis, Thomas; Vitsas, Vasilios

    2014-07-01

    This retrospective study compares efficacy and safety of balloon kyphoplasty (BK) with calcium phosphate (Group A) versus KIVA implant with PMMA (Group B) reinforced with three vertebrae pedicle screw constructs for A2 and A3 single fresh non-osteoporotic lumbar (L1-L4) fractures in 38 consecutive age- and diagnosis-matched patient populations. Extracanal leakage of both low-viscosity PMMA and calcium phosphate (CP) as well as the following roentgenographic parameters: segmental kyphosis (SKA), anterior (AVBHr) and posterior (PVBHr) vertebral body height ratio, spinal canal encroachment (SCE) clearance, and functional outcome measures: VAS and SF-36, were recorded and compared between the two groups. All patients in both groups were followed for a minimum 26 (Group A) and 25 (Group B) months. Extracanal CP and PMMA leakage was observed in four (18 %) and three (15 %) vertebrae/patients of group A and B, respectively. Hybrid fixation improved AVBHr, SKA, SCE, but PVBHr only in group B. VAS and SF-36 improved postoperatively in the patients of both groups. Short-segment construct with the novel KIVA implant restored better than BK-fractured lumbar vertebral body, but this had no impact in functional outcome. Since there was no leakage difference between PMMA and calcium phosphate and no short-term adverse related to PMMA use were observed, we advice the use of PMMA in fresh traumatic lumbar fractures. PMID:23982115

  10. A simplified technique of distal femoral screw insertion for the Grosse-Kempf interlocking nail.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, M; Gross, R H

    1988-01-01

    Failure accurately to determine distal femoral screw hole position can sometimes prolong operating time for placing an interlocking Grosse-Kempf rod. The described technique allows the distal femoral screw holes to be localized accurately with minimal radiation exposure. This technique utilizes readily available instruments and is not technically demanding. PMID:3335100

  11. One-stage partial vertebrectomy, titanium mesh implantation and pedicle screw fixation in the treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures through a posterior approach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yueju; Li, Guangbin; Dong, Tianhua; Zhang, Yingze; Li, Heng

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical results of a partial vertebrectomy with titanium mesh implantation and pedicle screw fixation using a posterior approach to reconstruct the spine in the treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures. METHOD: From January 2006 to August 2008, 20 patients with severe thoracolumbar fractures were treated.For vertebral bodies associated with one injured intervertebral disk, subtotal vertebrectomy surgery and single-segment fusion were performed. For vertebral bodies with two injured adjacent intervertebral disks, partial vertebrectomy surgery and two-segment fusion were performed. RESULTS: All 20 patients were followed up for 12 to 24 months (average of 18 months). There were no complications such as wound infections, hemopneumothorax or abdominal infections in any of the patients. The neurological status of all of the patients was improved by at least one American Spinal Injury Association grade by the last follow-up. The anterior vertebral body height was an average of 50.77% before surgery, 88.51% after surgery and 87.86% at the last follow up; the sagittal Cobb angle was improved, on average, from 26.15° to 5.39° and was 5.90° at the last follow up. The percentage of spinal stenosis was improved, on average, from 26.07% to 4.93%° and was 6.15% at the last follow up. There were significant differences in the anterior vertebral body height pre- and post-surgery and in the sagittal Cobb angle and the percentage of spinal stenosis (p<0) in all patients. CONCLUSIONS: This surgical procedure is simple and can accomplish decompression, reduction, fixation and fusion of the spine in one stage. This approach could be widely used in orthopedics. PMID:25627991

  12. Lumbosacral fixation using sacroiliac buttress screws: a modification to the Jackson technique with intrasacral rods

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of intrasacral rods has been previously reported for posterior lumbosacral fixation. However, problems associated with this technique include poor stability of the rod in the sacrum, difficulty in contouring the rod to fit the lateral sacral mass, and the complicated assembly procedure for the rod and pedicle screws in the thoracolumbar segments after insertion of the rod into the sacrum. Methods We used a screw with a polyaxial head instead of an intrasacral rod, which was inserted into the lateral sacral mass and assembled to the rod connected cephalad to pedicle screws. The dorsal side of the screw was stabilized by the sacral subchondral bone at the sacroiliac joint with iliac buttress coverage, and the tip of the screw was anchored by the sacral cortex. Results Three different cases were used to illustrate lumbosacral fixation using intrasacral screws as an anchor for the spinal instrumentation. Effective resistance of flexural bending moment and fusion were achieved in these patients at the lumbosacral level. Conclusions An intrasacral screw can be stabilized by subchondral bone with iliac buttress coverage at the dorsal and ventral sacral cortex. Posterior spinal fusion with this screw technique enables easier assembly of the instrumentation and presents better stabilization than that provided by the previously reported intrasacral rod technique for correction and fusion of thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis. PMID:25050132

  13. Biomechanical evaluation of four different posterior screw and rod fixation techniques for the treatment of the odontoid fractures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Liu, Wen-Fei; Jiang, Hong-Kun; Li, Yun-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Problems that screw cannot be inserted may occur in screw-rod fixation techniques such as Harms technique. We compared the biomechanical stability imparted to the C-2 vertebrae by four designed posterior screw and rod fixation techniques for the management of odontoid fractures. A three-dimensional finite element model of the odontoid fracture was established by subtracting several unit structures from the normal model from a healthy male volunteer. 4 different fixation techniques, shown as follows: ① C-1 lateral mass and C-2 pedicle screw fixation (Harms technique); ② C-1 lateral mass and unilateral C-2 pedicle screw fixation combined with ipsilateral laminar screw fixation; ③ Unilateral C-1lateral mass combined with ipsilateral C-1 posterior arch, and C-2 pedicle screw fixation; and ④ Unilateral C1 lateral mass screw connected with bilateral C2 pedicle screw fixation was performed on the odontoid fracture model. The model was validated for axial rotation, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and tension for 1.5 Nm. Changes in motion in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation were calculated. The finite element model of the odontoid fracture was established in this paper. All of the four screw-rod techniques significantly decreased motion in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation, as compared with the destabilized odontoid fracture complex (P<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in stability among the four screw techniques. We concluded that the first three fixation techniques are recommended to be used as surgical intervention for odontoid fracture, while the last can be used as supplementary for the former three methods. PMID:26309508

  14. Biomechanical evaluation of four different posterior screw and rod fixation techniques for the treatment of the odontoid fractures.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Liu, Wen-Fei; Jiang, Hong-Kun; Li, Yun-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Problems that screw cannot be inserted may occur in screw-rod fixation techniques such as Harms technique. We compared the biomechanical stability imparted to the C-2 vertebrae by four designed posterior screw and rod fixation techniques for the management of odontoid fractures. A three-dimensional finite element model of the odontoid fracture was established by subtracting several unit structures from the normal model from a healthy male volunteer. 4 different fixation techniques, shown as follows: ① C-1 lateral mass and C-2 pedicle screw fixation (Harms technique); ② C-1 lateral mass and unilateral C-2 pedicle screw fixation combined with ipsilateral laminar screw fixation; ③ Unilateral C-1lateral mass combined with ipsilateral C-1 posterior arch, and C-2 pedicle screw fixation; and ④ Unilateral C1 lateral mass screw connected with bilateral C2 pedicle screw fixation was performed on the odontoid fracture model. The model was validated for axial rotation, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and tension for 1.5 Nm. Changes in motion in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation were calculated. The finite element model of the odontoid fracture was established in this paper. All of the four screw-rod techniques significantly decreased motion in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation, as compared with the destabilized odontoid fracture complex (P<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in stability among the four screw techniques. We concluded that the first three fixation techniques are recommended to be used as surgical intervention for odontoid fracture, while the last can be used as supplementary for the former three methods. PMID:26309508

  15. Selection of fusion levels using the fulcrum bending radiograph for the management of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients with alternate level pedicle screw strategy: clinical decision-making and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Samartzis, Dino; Leung, Yee; Shigematsu, Hideki; Natarajan, Deepa; Stokes, Oliver; Mak, Kin-Cheung; Yao, Guanfeng; Luk, Keith D. K.; Cheung, Kenneth M. C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Selecting fusion levels based on the Luk et al criteria for operative management of thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) with hook and hybrid systems yields acceptable curve correction and balance parameters; however, it is unknown whether utilizing a purely pedicle screw strategy is effective. Utilizing the fulcrum bending radiographic (FBR) to assess curve flexibility to select fusion levels, the following study assessed the efficacy of pedicle screw fixation with alternate level screw strategy (ALSS) for thoracic AIS. Methods A retrospective study with prospective radiographic data collection/analyses (preoperative, postoperative 1-week and minimum 2-year follow-up) of 28 operative thoracic AIS patients undergoing ALSS was performed. Standing coronal/sagittal and FBR Cobb angles, FBR flexibility, fulcrum bending correction index (FBCI), trunkal shift, radiographic shoulder height (RSH), and list were assessed on x-rays. Fusion level selection was based on the Luk et al criteria and compared to conventional techniques. Results In the primary curve, the mean preoperative and postoperative 1 week and last follow-up standing coronal Cobb angles were 59.9, 17.2 and 20.0 degrees, respectively. Eighteen patients (64.3%) had distal levels saved (mean: 1.6 levels) in comparison to conventional techniques. Mean immediate and last follow-up FBCIs were 122.6% and 115.0%, respectively. Sagittal alignment did not statistically differ between any assessment intervals (p>0.05). A decrease in trunkal shift was noted from preoperative to last follow-up (p = 0.003). No statistically significant difference from preoperative to last follow-up was noted in RSH and list (p>0.05). No "add-on" of other vertebra or decompensation was noted and all patients achieved fusion. Conclusions This is the first report to note that using the FBR for decision-making in selecting fusion levels in thoracic AIS patients undergoing management with pedicle screw constructs (e.g. ALSS

  16. Neurovascular risks of sacral screws with bicortical purchase: an anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    Ergur, Ipek; Kiray, Amac; Kosay, Can; Tayefi, Hamid

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this cadaver study is to define the anatomic structures on anterior sacrum, which are under the risk of injury during bicortical screw application to the S1 and S2 pedicles. Thirty formaldehyde-preserved human male cadavers were studied. Posterior midline incision was performed, and soft tissues and muscles were dissected from the posterior part of the lumbosacral region. A 6 mm pedicle screw was inserted between the superior facet of S1 and the S1 foramen. The entry point of the S2 pedicle screw was located between S1 and S2 foramina. S1 and S2 screws were placed on both right and the left sides of all cadavers. Then, all cadavers were turned into supine position. All abdominal and pelvic organs were moved away and carefully observed for any injury. The tips of the sacral screws were marked and the relations with the anatomic structures were defined. The position of the sacral screws relative to the middle and lateral sacral arteries and veins, and the sacral sympathetic trunk were measured. There was no injury to the visceral organs. In four cases, S1 screw tip was in direct contact with middle sacral artery. In two cases, S1 screw tip was in direct contact with middle sacral vein. It was observed that the S1 screw tips were in close proximity to sacral sympathetic trunk on both right and the left sides. The tip of the S2 screw was in contact with middle sacral artery on the left side only in one case. It is found that the tip of the S2 screw was closely located with the middle sacral vein in two cases. The tip of the S2 pedicle screw was in contact with the sacral sympathetic trunk in eight cases on the right side and seven cases on the left side. Lateral sacral vein was also observed to be disturbed by the S1 and S2 screws. As a conclusion, anterior cortical penetration during sacral screw insertion carries a risk of neurovascular injury. The risk of sacral sympathetic trunk and minor vascular structures together with the major neurovascular

  17. The Superiority of Intraoperative O-arm Navigation-assisted Surgery in Instrumenting Extremely Small Thoracic Pedicles of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Jin, Mengran; Qiu, Yong; Yan, Huang; Han, Xiao; Zhu, Zezhang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the accuracy of O-arm navigation-assisted screw insertion in extremely small thoracic pedicles and to compare it with free-hand pedicle screw insertion in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). A total of 344 pedicle screws were inserted in apical region (defined as 2 vertebrae above and below the apex each) of 46 AIS patients (age range 13–18 years) with O-arm navigation and 712 screws were inserted in 92 AIS patients (age range 11–17 years) with free-hand technique. According to the narrowest diameter orthogonal to the long axis of the pedicle on a trajectory entering the vertebral body on preoperative computed tomography, the pedicles were classified into large (>3 mm) and small (≤3 mm) subgroups. Furthermore, a subset of extremely small pedicles (≤2 mm in the narrowest diameter) was specifically discussed. Screw accuracy was categorized as grade 0: no perforation, grade 1: perforation by less than 2 mm, grade 2: perforation by 2 to 4 mm, grade 3: perforation over 4 mm. In the O-arm group, the mean thoracic pedicle diameters were 2.23 mm (range 0.7–2.9 mm) and 3.48 mm (3.1–7.1 mm) for small and large pedicles, respectively. In the free-hand group, the small and large thoracic pedicle diameters were 2.42 mm (range 0.6–2.9 mm) and 3.75 mm (3.1–6.9 mm), respectively. The overall accuracies of screw insertion in large and small thoracic pedicles (grade 0, 1) were significantly higher in O-arm group (large: 93.8%, 210/224, small: 91.7%, 110/120) than those of free-hand group (large: 84.9%, 353/416, small: 78.4%, 232/296) (P < 0.05). Importantly, the overall accuracy of screw placement in extremely small pedicles was significantly higher in the O-arm group (84.3%, 48/57) compared with 62.7% (79/126) in free-hand group (P < 0.05), and the incidence of medial perforation was significantly lower in O-arm group (11.1%, 1/9) compared with 17.0% (8/47) in free-hand group (P < 0.05). The O

  18. Clinical and radiographic outcomes of the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with segmental pedicle screws and combined local autograft and allograft bone for spinal fusion: a retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background High morbidity has been reported with iliac crest bone graft harvesting; however, donor bone is typically necessary for posterior spinal fusion. Autograft bone combined with allograft may reduce the morbidity associated with iliac crest bone harvesting and improve the fusion rate. Our aim in this study was to determine the presence of complications, pseudarthrosis, non-union, and infection using combined in situ local autograft bone and freeze-dried cancellous allograft bone in patients undergoing posterior spinal fusion for the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Methods A combination of in situ local autograft bone and freeze-dried cancellous allograft blocks were used in 50 consecutive patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treated by posterior fusion and Moss Miami pedicle screw instrumentation. Results were assessed clinically and radiographically and quality of life and functional outcome was evaluated by administration of a Chinese version of the SRS-22 survey. Results There were 41 female and 9 male patients included for analysis with an average age of 14.7 years (range, 12-17). All patients had a minimum follow-up of 18 months (range, 18 to 40 months). The average preoperative Cobb angle was 49.8° (range, 40° to 86°). The average number of levels fused was 9.8 (range, 6-15). Patients had a minimum postoperative follow-up of 18 months. At final follow-up, the average Cobb angle correction was 77.8% (range, 43.4 to 92.5%). There was no obvious loss in the correction, and the average loss of correction was 1.1° (range, 0° to 4°). There was no pseudarthrosis and no major complications. Conclusions In situ autograft bone combined with allograft bone may be a promising method enhances spinal fusion in AIS treated with pedicle screw placement. By eliminating the need for iliac crest bone harvesting, significant morbidity may be avoided. PMID:20630050

  19. An Innovative Universal Screw Removal Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Elmadağ, Mehmet; Uzer, Gökçer; Acar, Mehmet Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present the clinical benefits of an instrument designed to facilitate removal of polyaxial screws during revision surgery. Methods All polyaxial screws can be removed without additional materials or a large amount of debridement using our newly designed instrument. Forty-two screws were removed from five patients without any complications using this instrument. Results We removed the cap screws and rods from the 42 polyaxial screws in five patients and made them monoaxial using the new screw removal apparatus. The screws and rods were removed quickly in a minimally invasive way with no complications. No damage to the pedicle or surrounding soft tissue occurred during screw removal. No neurogenic changes developed during revision surgery after changing the screws. Conclusion This newly designed screw removal instrument was used safely and effectively to remove all polyaxial and monoaxial pedicle screws. PMID:25883660

  20. Feasibility of C2 Vertebra Screws Placement in Patient With Occipitalization of Atlas: A Tomographic Study.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Huang, Wenhan; Huang, Zucheng; Li, Xueshi; Chen, Jianting; Wu, Zenghui; Zhu, Qingan

    2015-09-01

    Occipitalization of atlas (OA) is a congenital disease with the possibility of anomalous bony anatomies and the C2 pedicle screw insertion is technically challenging. However, there are no existing literatures clarified the dimensions and angulations of the C2 pedicles, lamina and lateral masses for screw insertion in patients with OA. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the morphometric features of C2 for screw placement in OA to guide the use of surgical screws. Measurements of the OA patients on the computer tomography (CT) images including lamina angle, length and thickness, pedicle angle, length and thickness, and lateral mass thickness and length of the axis vertebra. The OA patients data were compared with age and gender matched cohort of randomly selected patients in a control group without OA. The picture archiving and communication system was used for all patients who had received cervical CT scanning between January 2001 and January 2015. Measurements were performed independently by 2 experienced observers who reviewed the CT scans and recorded the patients with OA. Statistical analysis was performed at a level of significance P < 0.05. A total of 73 patients (29 males and 44 females) were eligible to be included in the OA group. In most of the measurements the pathological cohort had significantly smaller values compared to the control group (P < 0.05). In the OA group, only 45% of the pedicles and 88% of the lamina had thicknesses bigger than 3.5 mm. Both groups had all pedicle and lamina lengths bigger than 12 mm. Regarding the length of the lateral mass, no value was bigger than 12 mm in the OA group, whereas 40% of the values in the control group were bigger than 12 mm. The average pedicle and laminar angles were 37° and 49° in the patients with OA, respectively. The variable anatomy in patients with OA needs to be taken into account when performing spinal stabilization as the C2 bony architectures are significantly

  1. Design and fabrication of a low-frequency (1-3 MHz) ultrasound transducer for accurate placement of screw implants in the spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manbachi, Amir; Lee, Mike; Foster, F. Stuart; Ginsberg, Howard J.; Cobbold, Richard S. C.

    2014-03-01

    In 2012 approximately 800,000 spinal fusion surgeries were performed in the United States, requiring the insertion of screws into the pedicles. Their exact placement is critical and made complex due to limited visibility of the spine, continuous bleeding in the exposed regions, and variability in morphologies. The alarmingly high rate of screw misplacements (up to 20%) reported in the literature is of major concern since such misplacements can place the surrounding vital structures at risk. A potential guidance method for determining the best screw trajectory is by the use of real-time ultrasound imaging similar to that used for intravascular imaging. An endovascular transducer could be inserted into the pedicle to image the anatomy from within and identify bone boundaries. A major challenge of imaging within bone is high signal attenuation. The rapid increase of attenuation with frequency requires much lower frequencies (1-3 MHz) than those used in intravascular imaging. This study describes the custom design and fabrication of 2 MHz ultrasound probes (3.5 mm diameter/ 11 Fr) for pedicle screw guidance. Three transducer designs are explored to provide improved sensitivity and signal to noise ratio, compared to the previously tested transducer within the pedicle. Experimental measurements are compared with the results obtained using various simulation tools. The work reported in this paper represents the first stage in our ultimate goal of developing a 32- element phased array that is capable of generating a radial B-mode image.

  2. A Novel Guidewire Aiming Device to Improve the Accuracy of Guidewire Insertion in Femoral Neck Fracture Surgery Using Cannulated Screw Fixation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Haitao; Xu, Peijun; Hu, Tu; An, Zhiquan; Zhang, Changqing; Sheng, Jiagen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to improve the accuracy of guidewire insertion in the femoral neck fracture surgery using cannulated screw fixation. MATERIAL AND METHODS A novel aiming device was designed and manufactured. Between January 2010 and June 2012, 64 femoral neck fracture patients were included into the study. All 64 patients were divided into 2 groups randomly. The aiming device was used during the operation for patients in the experimental group, but not in the control group. RESULTS There were no statistically significant differences in operative time or bleed volume between the groups (P>0.05). The frequency of guidewire drilling was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). The angle between the first cannulated screw and the central axis of the femoral neck in coronal plane and sagittal plane, and the distance between the bottom cannulated screw and the medial calcar femorale rim, were significantly smaller in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS The aiming device is simple in structure and easy to use. It could help surgeons to accurately insert cannulated screw guidewires. The aiming device is suitable for broad clinical use. PMID:27529374

  3. A Novel Guidewire Aiming Device to Improve the Accuracy of Guidewire Insertion in Femoral Neck Fracture Surgery Using Cannulated Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Haitao; Xu, Peijun; Hu, Tu; An, Zhiquan; Zhang, Changqing; Sheng, Jiagen

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to improve the accuracy of guidewire insertion in the femoral neck fracture surgery using cannulated screw fixation. Material/Methods A novel aiming device was designed and manufactured. Between January 2010 and June 2012, 64 femoral neck fracture patients were included into the study. All 64 patients were divided into 2 groups randomly. The aiming device was used during the operation for patients in the experimental group, but not in the control group. Results There were no statistically significant differences in operative time or bleed volume between the groups (P>0.05). The frequency of guidewire drilling was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). The angle between the first cannulated screw and the central axis of the femoral neck in coronal plane and sagittal plane, and the distance between the bottom cannulated screw and the medial calcar femorale rim, were significantly smaller in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions The aiming device is simple in structure and easy to use. It could help surgeons to accurately insert cannulated screw guidewires. The aiming device is suitable for broad clinical use. PMID:27529374

  4. Comparison of 2D and 3D navigation techniques for percutaneous screw insertion into the scaphoid: results of an experimental cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Catala-Lehnen, Philip; Nüchtern, Jakob V; Briem, Daniel; Klink, Thorsten; Rueger, Johannes M; Lehmann, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Navigation in hand surgery is still in the process of development. Initial studies have demonstrated the feasibility of 2D and 3D navigation for the palmar approach in scaphoid fractures, but a comparison of the possibilities of 2D and 3D navigation for the dorsal approach is still lacking. The aim of the present work was to test navigation for the dorsal approach in the scaphoid using cadaver bones. After development of a special radiolucent resting splint for the dorsal approach, we performed 2D- and 3D-navigated scaphoid osteosynthesis in 12 fresh-frozen cadaver forearms using a headless compression screw (Synthes). The operation time, radiation time, number of trials for screw insertion, and screw positions were analyzed. In six 2D-navigated screw osteosyntheses, we found two false positions with an average radiation time of 5 ± 2 seconds. Using 3D navigation, we detected one false position. A false position indicates divergence from the ideal line of the axis of the scaphoid but without penetration of the cortex. The initial scan clearly increased overall radiation time in the 3D-navigated group, and for both navigation procedures operating time was longer than in our clinical experience without navigation. Nonetheless, 2D and 3D navigation for non-dislocated scaphoid fractures is feasible, and navigation might reduce the risk of choosing an incorrect screw length, thereby possibly avoiding injury to the subtending cortex. The 3D navigation is more difficult to interpret than 2D fluoroscopic navigation but shows greater precision. Overall, navigation is costly, and the moderate advantages it offers for osteosynthesis of scaphoid fractures must be considered critically in comparisons with conventional operating techniques. PMID:21991920

  5. Adjacent-Level Hypermobility and Instrumented-Level Fatigue Loosening With Titanium and PEEK Rods for a Pedicle Screw System: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Aakas; Ingels, Marcel; Kodigudla, Manoj; Momeni, Narjes; Goel, Vijay; Agarwal, Anand K

    2016-05-01

    Adjacent-level disease is a common iatrogenic complication seen among patients undergoing spinal fusion for low back pain. This is attributed to the postsurgical differences in stiffness between the spinal levels, which result in abnormal forces, stress shielding, and hypermobility at the adjacent levels. In addition, as most patients undergoing these surgeries are osteoporotic, screw loosening at the index level is a complication that commonly accompanies adjacent-level disease. Recent studies indicate that a rod with lower rigidity than that of titanium may help to overcome these detrimental effects at the adjacent level. The present study was conducted in vitro using 12 L1-S1 specimens divided into groups of six, with each group instrumented with either titanium rods or PEEK (polyetheretherketone) rods. The test protocol included subjecting intact specimens to pure moments of 10 Nm in extension and flexion using an FS20 Biomechanical Spine Test System (Applied Test Systems) followed by hybrid moments on the instrumented specimens to achieve the same L1-S1 motion as that of the intact specimens. During the protocol's later phase, the L4-L5 units from each specimen were segmented for cyclic loading followed by postfatigue kinematic analysis to highlight the differences in motion pre- and postfatigue. The objectives included the in vitro comparison of (1) the adjacent-level motion before and after instrumentation with PEEK and titanium rods and (2) the pre- and postfatigue motion at the instrumented level with PEEK and titanium rods. The results showed that the adjacent levels above the instrumentation caused increased flexion and extension with both PEEK and titanium rods. The postfatigue kinematic data showed that the motion at the instrumented level (L4-L5) increased significantly in both flexion and extension compared to prefatigue motion in titanium groups. However, there was no significant difference in motion between the pre- and postfatigue data in the PEEK

  6. Short segment screw fixation without fusion in treatment for unstable thoracolumbar burst fracture

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jiaguang; Liu, Yishan; Cao, Zheng; Hu, Yuan; Lu, Xiang; Lin, Bin

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate clinical efficacy of short segment pedicle screw fixation without bone fusion for unstable thoracolumbar burst fracture. Nineteen patients younger than 40 years old with unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures were included. The surgical procedure included postural reduction for 3 days and screw fixations at one level above, one level below and at the fractured level itself. The implants were removed 12 months after initial operation. Imaging and clinical findings were analyzed at preoperative, 12 months after surgery, just before implant removal, and at six months after implant removal. Results indicated that difference was statistically significant between preoperative period or postoperative 1 year follow-up, just before implant removal and 6 months after implant removal (P < 0.05). Results at postoperative 1 year follow-up, just before implant removal and 6 months after implant removal were better than preoperative period. There were no significant complications or neurological deterioration after screws insert and removal in any patient. The rate of clinical outcome with excellent and good was 94.7%. In conclusion, short segment pedicle screw fixation without bone fusion can be an effective and safe operative srategytechnique in the management of young patients suffering from unstable burst fracture. PMID:25664090

  7. Study of Bone-screw Surface Fixation in Lumbar Dynamic Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yun-Gang; Yu, Tao; Liu, Guo-Min; Yang, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Background: We aimed to use the animal model of dynamic fixation to examine the interaction of the pedicle screw surface with surrounding bone, and determine whether pedicle screws achieve good mechanical stability in the vertebrae. Methods: Twenty-four goats aged 2–3 years had Cosmic® pedicle screws implanted into both sides of the L2-L5 pedicles. Twelve goats in the bilateral dynamic fixation group had fixation rods implanted in L2-L3 and L4-L5. Twelve goats in the unilateral dynamic fixation group had fixation rods randomly fixed on one side of the lumbar spine. The side that was not implanted with fixation rods was used as a static control group. Results: In the static control group, new bone was formed around the pedicle screw and on the screw surface. In the unilateral and bilateral dynamic fixation groups, large amounts of connective tissue formed between and around the screw threads, with no new bone formation on the screw surface; the pedicle screws were loose after the fixed rods were removed. The bone mineral density and morphological parameters of the region of interest (ROI) in the unilateral and bilateral dynamic fixation group were not significantly different (P > 0.05), but were lower in the fixed groups than the static control group (P < 0.05). This showed the description bone of the ROI in the static control group was greater than in the fixation groups. Under loading conditions, the pedicle screw maximum pull force was not significantly different between the bilateral and unilateral dynamic fixation groups (P > 0.05); however the maximum pull force of the fixation groups was significantly less than the static control group (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Fibrous connective tissue formed at the bone-screw interface under unilateral and bilateral pedicle dynamic fixation, and the pedicle screws lost mechanical stability in the vertebrae. PMID:25635433

  8. Clear Zone Formation around Screws in the Early Postoperative Stages after Posterior Lumbar Fusion Using the Cortical Bone Trajectory Technique

    PubMed Central

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To evaluate the initial fixation using the cortical bone trajectory (CBT) technique for posterior lumbar fusion through assessment of the clear zones around the screws and the risk factors involved. Overview of Literature Postoperative radiolucent zones (clear zones) are an indicator of poor conventional pedicle screw fixation. Methods Between January 2013 and April 2014, 19 patients (8 men and 11 women) underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion or posterior lumbar fusion using the CBT technique. A total of 109 screws were used for evaluation with measurement of the maximum insertional torque of last two screw rotations. Clear zone-positivity on plain radiographs was investigated 6 months after surgery. The relation between intraoperative insertional torque and clear zone-positivity was investigated by one-way analysis of variance. In addition, the correlation between clear zone-positivity and gender, age (<75 years old or >75 years old), or operative stabilization level (<2 or >3 vertebral levels) was evaluated using the chi-square test. Results Clear zones were observed around six screws (5.50%) in five patients (26.3%). The mean insertional torque (4.00±2.09 inlbs) of clear zone-positive screws was lower than that of clear zone-negative screws (8.12±0.50 in-lbs), but the difference was not significant. There was a significant correlation between clear zone-positivity and operative level of stabilization. Conclusions The low incidence of clear zone-positive screws indicates good initial fixation using the CBT technique. Multilevel fusions may be risk factors for clear zone generation. PMID:26713120

  9. Removal torque of nail interlocking screws is related to screw proximity to the fracture and screw breakage.

    PubMed

    White, Alexander A; Kubacki, Meghan R; Samona, Jason; Telehowski, Paul; Atkinson, Patrick J

    2016-06-01

    Studies have shown that titanium implants can be challenging to explant due to the material's excellent biocompatibility and resulting osseointegration. Clinically, titanium alloy nail interlocking screws may require removal to dynamize a construct or revise the nail due to nonunion, infection, pain, or periprosthetic fracture. This study was designed to determine what variables influence the removal torque for titanium alloy interlocking screws. An intramedullary nail with four interlocking screws was used to stabilize a 1-cm segmental femoral defect in a canine model for 16 weeks. The animals were observed to be active following a several-day recovery after surgery. In six animals, the femora and implanted nail/screws were first tested to failure in torsion to simulate periprosthetic fracture of an implant after which the screws were then removed. In four additional animals, the screws were removed without mechanical testing. Both intraoperative insertional and extraction torques were recorded for all screws. Mechanical testing to failure broke 10/24 screws. On average, the intact screws required 70% of the insertional torque during removal while broken screws only required 16% of the insertional torque (p < 0.001). In addition, intact screws closer to the fracture required 2.8 times more removal torque than the outboard distal screw (p < 0.005). On average, the angle of rotation to peak torque was ∼80°. The peak axial load did not significantly correlate with the torque required to remove the screws. On average, the removal torque was lower than at the time of insertion, and less torque was required to remove broken screws and screws remote to the fracture. However, broken screws will require additional time to retrieve the remaining screw fragment. This study suggests that broken screws and screws in prematurely active patients will require less torque to remove. PMID:27129382

  10. Trans-Endplate Pedicle Pillar System in Unstable Spinal Burst Fractures: Design, Technique, and Mechanical Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Hongo, Michio; Ilharreborde, Brice; Zhao, Kristin D.; Currier, Bradford L.; An, Kai-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Background Short-segment pedicle screw instrumentation (SSPI) is used for unstable burst fractures to correct deformity and stabilize the spine for fusion. However, pedicle screw loosening, pullout, or breakage often occurs due to the large moment applied during spine motion, leading to poor outcomes. The purpose of this study was to test the ability of a newly designed device, the Trans-Endplate Pedicle Pillar System (TEPPS), to enhance SSPI rigidity and decrease the screw bending moment with a simple posterior approach. Methods Six human cadaveric spines (T11-L3) were harvested. A burst fracture was created at L1, and the SSPI (Moss Miami System) was used for SSPI fixation. Strain gauge sensors were mounted on upper pedicle screws to measure screw load bearing. Segmental motion (T12-L2) was measured under pure moment of 7.5 Nm. The spine was tested sequentially under 4 conditions: intact; first SSPI alone (SSPI-1); SSPI+TEPPS; and second SSPI alone (SSPI-2). Results SSPI+TEPPS increased fixation rigidity by 41% in flexion/extension, 28% in lateral bending, and 37% in axial rotation compared with SSPI-1 (P<0.001), and it performed even better compared to SSPI-2 (P<0.001 for all). Importantly, the bending moment on the pedicle screws for SSPI+TEPPS was significantly decreased 63% during spine flexion and 47% in lateral bending (p<0.001). Conclusion TEPPS provided strong anterior support, enhanced SSPI fixation rigidity, and dramatically decreased the load on the pedicle screws. Its biomechanical benefits could potentially improve fusion rates and decrease SSPI instrumentation failure. PMID:26502352

  11. Hybrid Stabilization of Thoracic Spine Fractures with Sublaminar Bands and Transpedicular Screws: Description of a Surgical Alternative and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Unterweger, Marie-Therese; Kandziora, Frank; Schnake, Klaus J.

    2015-01-01

    Stabilization of unstable thoracic fractures with transpedicular screws is widely accepted. However, placement of transpedicular screws can cause complications, particularly in the thoracic spine with physiologically small pedicles. Hybrid stabilization, a combination of sublaminar bands and pedicle screws, might reduce the rate of misplaced screws and can be helpful in special anatomic circumstances, such as preexisting scoliosis and osteoporosis. We report about two patients suffering from unstable thoracic fractures, of T5 in one case and T3, T4, and T5 in the other case, with preexisting scoliosis and extremely small pedicles. Additionally, one patient had osteoporosis. Patients received hybrid stabilization with pedicle screws adjacent to the fractured vertebral bodies and sublaminar bands at the level above and below the pedicle screws. No complications occurred. Follow-up was 12 months with clinically uneventful postoperative courses. No signs of implant failure or loss of reduction could be detected. In patients with very small thoracic pedicles, scoliosis, and/or osteoporosis, hybrid stabilization with sublaminar bands and pedicle screws can be a viable alternative to long pedicle screw constructs. PMID:26649214

  12. Optimization of spinal implant screw for lower vertebra through finite element studies.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Jayanta; Karmakar, Santanu; Majumder, Santanu; Banerjee, Partha Sarathi; Saha, Subrata; Roychowdhury, Amit

    2014-01-01

    The increasing older population is suffering from an increase in age-related spinal degeneration that causes tremendous pain. Spine injury is mostly indicated at the lumbar spine (L3-L5) and corresponding intervertebral disks. Finite element analysis (FEA) is now one of the most efficient and accepted tools used to simulate these pathological conditions in computer-assisted design (CAD) models. In this study, L3-L5 spines were modeled, and FEA was performed to formulate optimal remedial measures. Three different loads (420, 490.5, and 588.6 N) based on three body weights (70, 90, and 120 kg) were applied at the top surface of the L3 vertebra, while the lower surface of the L5 vertebra remained fixed. Models of implants using stainless steel and titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) pedicle screws and rods with three different diameters (4, 5, and 6 mm) were inserted into the spine models. The relative strengths of bone (very weak, weak, standard, strong, and very strong) were considered to determine the patient-specific effect. A total of 90 models were simulated, and von Mises stress and strain, shear stress, and strain intensity contour at the bone-implant interface were analyzed. Results of these analyses indicate that the 6-mm pedicle screw diameter is optimal for most cases. Experimental and clinical validation are needed to confirm these theoretical results. PMID:25272208

  13. Translaminar screw fixation of a kyphosis of the cervical and thoracic spine in neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Gardner, A; Millner, P; Liddington, M; Towns, G

    2009-09-01

    The spinal manifestations of neurofibromatosis include cervicothoracic kyphosis, in which scalloping of the vertebral body and erosion of the pedicles may render conventional techniques of fixation impossible. We describe a case of cervicothoracic kyphosis managed operatively with a vascularised fibular graft anteriorly across the apex of the kyphus, followed by a long posterior construct using translaminar screws, which allow segmental fixation in vertebral bodies where placement of the pedicle screws was impracticable. PMID:19721057

  14. Orientation of the "Lisfranc screw".

    PubMed

    Panchbhavi, Vinod K

    2012-11-01

    The reduction and stabilization of diastases between the medial cuneiform and the base of second metatarsal after a Lisfranc ligament injury is a crucial objective in the open reduction and internal fixation of these injuries. To achieve this objective, a single screw is used. The present practice is to insert the screw directed from the medial cuneiform bone into the base of the second metatarsal. This technique trick describes an easier method of insertion of the screw and one that possibly provides a better fixation. PMID:22549028

  15. Cortical bone trajectory screws for the middle-upper thorax

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Sun-Ren; Chen, Jiao-Xiang; Chen, Wei; Xue, En-Xing; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Zhu, Qing-An

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To quantify the reference data concerning the morphometrics of the middle-upper thorax to guide the placement of cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screws. Eighty patients were studied on computed tomography (CT) scans. The reference anatomical parameters were measured. Next, 20 cadaveric specimens were implanted with CBT screws based on CT measurements. These specimens were then judged directly from the cadaveric vertebrae and X-ray. The maximum length of the trajectory, the maximum diameter, and the cephaled angle exhibited a slight increase trend while the transverse and sagittal angles of the pedicle tended to decrease from T3 to T8. We recommend that the width of CBT screw for middle-upper thoracic spine is 5.0 mm, the length is 25 to 35 mm. The cadaveric anatomical study revealed that 5/240 screws penetrated in the medial or lateral areas, 5/240 screws penetrated in the superior or inferior pedicle wall, and 2/240 screws did not fit into the superior endplate of the pedicle. The CBT screws are safe for the middle-upper thorax. This study provides a theoretical basis for clinical surgery. PMID:27583893

  16. CT Morphometric Analysis to Determine the Anatomical Basis for the Use of Transpedicular Screws during Reconstruction and Fixations of Anterior Cervical Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun; Ruan, Dike; Wu, Changfu; Wu, Weidong; Sun, Peidong; Zhang, Yuanzhi; Wu, Jigong; Lu, Sheng; Ouyang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate placement of pedicle screw during Anterior Transpedicular Screw fixation (ATPS) in cervical spine depends on accurate anatomical knowledge of the vertebrae. However, little is known of the morphometric characteristics of cervical vertebrae in Chinese population. Methods Three-dimensional reconstructions of CT images were performed for 80 cases. The anatomic data and screw fixation parameters for ATPS fixation were measured using the Mimics software. Findings The overall mean OPW, OPH and PAL ranged from 5.81 to 7.49 mm, 7.77 to 8.69 mm, and 33.40 to 31.13 mm separately, and SPA was 93.54 to 109.36 degrees from C3 to C6, 104.99 degrees at C7, whereas, 49.00 to 32.26 degrees from C4 to C7, 46.79 degrees at C3 (TPA). Dl/rSIP had an increasing trend away from upper endplate with mean value from 1.87 to 5.83 mm. Dl/rTIP was located at the lateral portion of the anterior cortex of vertebrae for C3 to C5 and ipsilateral for C6 to C7 with mean value from −2.70 to −3.00 mm, and 0.17 to 3.18 mm. The entrance points for pedicular screw insertion for C3 to C5 and C6 to C7 were recommended −2∼−3 mm and 0–4 mm from the median sagittal plane, respectively, 1–4 mm and 5–6 mm from the upper endplate, with TPA being 46.79–49.00 degrees and 40.89–32.26 degrees, respectively, and SPA being 93.54–106.69 degrees and 109.36–104.99 degrees, respectively. The pedicle screw insertion diameter was recommended 3.5 mm (C3 and C4), 4.0 mm (C5 to C7), and the pedicle axial length was 21–24 mm for C3 to C7 for both genders. However, the ATPS insertion in C3 should be individualized given its relatively small anatomical dimensions. Conclusions The data provided a morphometric basis for the ATPS fixation technique in lower cervical fixation. It will help in preoperative planning and execution of this surgery. PMID:24349038

  17. Self-energized screw coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefever, A. E.; Totah, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Threaded coupling carries its own store of rotational energy. Originally developed to ease task of astronauts assembling structures in space, coupling offers same advantages in other hazardous operations, such as underwater and in and around nuclear reactors. Coupling consists of two parts: crew portion and receptacle. When screw portion is inserted into receptacle and given slight push by operator, trigger pins release ratchet, allowing energy stored in springs to rotate screw into nut in receptacle.

  18. Biomechanical comparison of different combinations of hook and screw in one spine motion unit - an experiment in porcine model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The biomechanical performance of the hooks and screws in spinal posterior instrumentation is not well-characterized. Screw-bone interface failure at the uppermost and lowermost vertebrae is not uncommon. Some have advocated for the use of supplement hooks to prevent screw loosening. However, studies describing methods for combined hook and screw systems that fully address the benefits of these systems are lacking. Thus, the choice of which implant to use in a given case is often based solely on a surgeon’s experience instead of on the biomechanical features and advantages of each device. Methods We conducted a biomechanical comparison of devices instrumented with different combinations of hooks and screws. Thirty-six fresh low thoracic porcine spines were assigned to three groups (12 per group) according to the configuration used for of fixation: (1) pedicle screw; (2) lamina hook and (3) combination of pedicle screw and lamina hook. Axial pullout tests backward on transverse plane in the direction normal to the rods were performed using a material testing machine and a specially designed grip with self-aligned function. Results The pullout force for the pedicle screws group was significantly greater than for the hooks and the combination (p < 0.05). However, no significant difference was found between the hooks and the combination (p > 0.05). Conclusions Pedicle screws achieve the maximal pullout strength for spinal posterior instrumentation. PMID:24913189

  19. Anterograde Fixation Module for Posterior Acetabular Column Fracture: Computer-Assisted Determination of Optimal Entry Point, Angle, and Length for Screw Insertion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongqiang; Lin, Chuangxin; Zhang, Lifeng; Lin, Miaoxiong; Lai, Jianqiang; Cao, Shenglu; Peng, Geng; Feng, Kai; Yan, Ge; Cai, Daozhang; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to provide valid data for a plate-screw fixation model for fractured posterior-anterior columns of the acetabulum. MATERIAL AND METHODS Nineteen cadaveric bony hemi-pelvis specimens were obtained and 50 healthy adults were enrolled. The modified Stoppa approach and computed tomography (CT) imaging were used to collect the measured parameter data of the module. RESULTS The measured parameter data were as follows: OP, 0.96±0.32 cm in females and 0.92±0.16 cm in males (P>0.05); PI, 0.98±0.28 cm in females, and 0.75±0.23 cm in males (P>0.05); Ðϴ, 59.68°±6.28° in females and 56.75°±3.22° in males (P>0.05); and Ðφ, 41.27°±2.76° in females and 34.31°±2.78° in males (P<0.05). The corresponding CT image data were as follows: PI, 1.08±0.22 cm in females and 0.85±0.27 cm in males (P>0.05); OP, 1.06±0.29 cm in females and 1.12±0.24 cm in males (P>0.05); Ðϴ, 55.33°±4.00° in females and 55. 50°±3.43° in males (P>0.05); and Ðφ was 39.21°±2.45°in females and 35.58°±2.31°in males (P<0.05). No significant difference with respect to sex and side existed between specimens and healthy adults (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS The measured parameter data obtained in healthy adults and cadaveric specimens provided an anatomic basis for the designation of the guide module, and thus confirmed the accuracy and safety of screw placement in fractured columns of the acetabulum. PMID:27584820

  20. Pull-out strength of screws from polymethylmethacrylate cement.

    PubMed

    Motzkin, N E; Chao, E Y; An, K N; Wikenheiser, M A; Lewallen, D G

    1994-03-01

    We aimed to determine the optimal method of inserting a screw into polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement to enhance fixation. We performed six groups of ten axial pull-out tests with two sizes of screw (3.5 and 4.5 mm AO cortical) and three methods of insertion. Screws were placed into 'fluid' PMMA, into 'solid' PMMA by drilling and tapping, or into 'curing' PMMA with quarter-revolution turns every 30 seconds until the PMMA had hardened. After full hardening, we measured the maximum load to failure for each screw-PMMA construct. We found no significant difference in the pull-out strengths between screw sizes or between screws placed in fluid or solid PMMA. Screws placed in curing PMMA were significantly weaker: the relative strengths of solid, fluid and curing groups were 100%, 97% and 71%, respectively. We recommend the use of either solid or fluid insertion according to the circumstances and the preference of the surgeon. PMID:8113302

  1. SCREW MIGRATION IN TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: CLINICAL REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fernando; Tomé, José; Barreto, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Complications from total knee arthroplasty caused by the implanted material are rare, with the exception of polyethylene wear. Descriptions of screw migration into the knee joint cavity are very rare. The authors report intra-articular migration of a polyethylene safety screw in a case of total knee arthroplasty, with sacrifice of the posterior cruciate ligament (TKA Performance; Biomet, Warsaw, IN, USA), which necessitated new surgery to remove the screw, replace the polyethylene insert and emplace a new fixation screw. PMID:27022526

  2. Design and testing of external fixator bone screws.

    PubMed

    Evans, M; Spencer, M; Wang, Q; White, S H; Cunningham, J L

    1990-11-01

    In external fixation, bone screw loosening still presents a major clinical problem. For this study, the design factors influencing the mechanics of the bone-screw interface were analysed and various experimental screws designed with the intention of maximizing the strength and stiffness of the inserted screw. Push-in, pull-out and bending tests were then carried out on the three experimental screws, and on two commercially available screws in both a synthetic material and in cadaveric bone; photoelastic tests on different screw threadforms were also performed. The results of the push-in and pull-out tests indicate that both the screw threadform and cutting head have a significant effect on the holding strength of the screw. The photoelastic tests show that most of the applied load is distributed over the first few threads closest to the load, and that the area between the thread crests is subjected to high shear stresses. PMID:2266740

  3. A novel approach to navigated implantation of S-2 alar iliac screws using inertial measurement units.

    PubMed

    Jost, Gregory F; Walti, Jonas; Mariani, Luigi; Cattin, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT The authors report on a novel method of intraoperative navigation with inertial measurement units (IMUs) for implantation of S-2 alar iliac (S2AI) screws in sacropelvic fixation of the human spine and its application in cadaveric specimens. METHODS Screw trajectories were planned on a multiplanar reconstruction of the preoperative CT scan. The pedicle finder and screwdriver were equipped with IMUs to guide the axial and sagittal tilt angles of the planned trajectory, and navigation software was developed. The entry points were chosen according to anatomical landmarks on the exposed spine. After referencing, the sagittal and axial orientation of the pedicle finder and screwdriver were wirelessly monitored on a computer screen and aligned with the preoperatively planned tilt angles to implant the S2AI screws. The technique was performed without any intraoperative imaging. Screw positions were analyzed on postoperative CT scans. RESULTS Seventeen of 18 screws showed a good S2AI screw trajectory. Compared with the postoperatively measured tilt angles of the S2AI screws, the IMU readings on the screwdriver were within an axial plane deviation of 0° to 5° in 15 (83%) and 6° to 10° in 2 (11%) of the screws and within a sagittal plane deviation of 0° to 5° in 15 (83%) and 6° to 10° in 3 (17%) of the screws. CONCLUSIONS IMU-based intraoperative navigation may facilitate accurate placement of S2AI screws. PMID:26565762

  4. BIOMECHANICAL EVALUATION OF THE INFLUENCE OF CERVICAL SCREWS TAPPING AND DESIGN

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Patricia; Rosa, Rodrigo César; Shimano, Antonio Carlos; Albuquerque de Paula, Francisco José; Volpon, José Batista; Aparecido Defino, Helton Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess if the screw design (self-drilling/self-tapping) and the pilot hole tapping could affect the insertion torque and screw pullout strength of the screw used in anterior fixation of the cervical spine. Methods: Forty self-tapping screws and 20 self-drilling screws were inserted into 10 models of artificial bone and 10 cervical vertebrae of sheep. The studied parameters were the insertion torque and pullout strength. The following groups were created: Group I-self-tapping screw insertion after pilot hole drilling and tapping; Group II-self-tapping screw insertion after pilot hole drilling without tapping; Group III-self-drilling screw insertion without drilling and tapping. In Groups I and II, the pilot hole had 14.0 mm in depth and was made with a 3mmn drill, while tapping was made with a 4mm tap. The insertion torque was measured and the pullout test was performed. The comparison between groups was made considering the mean insertion torque and the maximum mean pullout strength with the variance analysis (ANOVA; p≤ 0.05). Results: Previous drilling and tapping of pilot hole significantly decreased the insertion torque and the pullout strength. Conclusion: The insertion torque and pullout strength of self-drilling screws were significantly higher when compared to self-tapping screws inserted after pilot hole tapping. PMID:27004189

  5. Minimally Invasive Technique for PMMA Augmentation of Fenestrated Screws

    PubMed Central

    Kogias, Evangelos; Sircar, Ronen; Krüger, Marie T.; Volz, Florian; Scheiwe, Christian; Hubbe, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the minimally invasive technique for cement augmentation of cannulated and fenestrated screws using an injection cannula as well as to report its safety and efficacy. Methods. A total of 157 cannulated and fenestrated pedicle screws had been cement-augmented during minimally invasive posterior screw-rod spondylodesis in 35 patients from January to December 2012. Retrospective evaluation of cement extravasation and screw loosening was carried out in postoperative plain radiographs and thin-sliced triplanar computed tomography scans. Results. Twenty-seven, largely prevertebral cement extravasations were detected in 157 screws (17.2%). None of the cement extravasations was causing a clinical sequela like a new neurological deficit. One screw loosening was noted (0.6%) after a mean follow-up of 12.8 months. We observed no cementation-associated complication like pulmonary embolism or hemodynamic insufficiency. Conclusions. The presented minimally invasive cement augmentation technique using an injection cannula facilitates convenient and safe cement delivery through polyaxial cannulated and fenestrated screws during minimally invasive screw-rod spondylodesis. Nevertheless, the optimal injection technique and design of fenestrated screws have yet to be identified. This trial is registered with German Clinical Trials DRKS00006726. PMID:26075297

  6. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... spondylolisthesis with objective evidence of neurologic impairment; fracture; dislocation; scoliosis; kyphosis... with objective evidence of neurologic impairment, fracture, dislocation, scoliosis, kyphosis,...

  7. Cortical bone trajectory screws for the middle-upper thorax: An anatomico-radiological study.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Sun-Ren; Chen, Jiao-Xiang; Chen, Wei; Xue, En-Xing; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Zhu, Qing-An

    2016-08-01

    To quantify the reference data concerning the morphometrics of the middle-upper thorax to guide the placement of cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screws.Eighty patients were studied on computed tomography (CT) scans. The reference anatomical parameters were measured. Next, 20 cadaveric specimens were implanted with CBT screws based on CT measurements. These specimens were then judged directly from the cadaveric vertebrae and X-ray.The maximum length of the trajectory, the maximum diameter, and the cephaled angle exhibited a slight increase trend while the transverse and sagittal angles of the pedicle tended to decrease from T3 to T8. We recommend that the width of CBT screw for middle-upper thoracic spine is 5.0 mm, the length is 25 to 35 mm. The cadaveric anatomical study revealed that 5/240 screws penetrated in the medial or lateral areas, 5/240 screws penetrated in the superior or inferior pedicle wall, and 2/240 screws did not fit into the superior endplate of the pedicle.The CBT screws are safe for the middle-upper thorax. This study provides a theoretical basis for clinical surgery. PMID:27583893

  8. Accuracy of thoracolumbar transpedicular and vertebral body percutaneous screw placement: coupling the Rosa® Spine robot with intraoperative flat-panel CT guidance--a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Lefranc, M; Peltier, J

    2015-12-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of a new robotic device when coupled with intraoperative flat-panel CT guidance. Screws (D8-S1) were implanted during two separate cadaver sessions by coupling the Rosa(®) Spine robot with the flat-panel CT device. Of 38 implanted screws, 37 (97.4 %) were fully contained within the pedicle. One screw breached the lateral cortical of one pedicle by <1 mm. The mean ± SD accuracy (relative to pre-operative planning) was 2.05 ± 1.2 mm for the screw head, 1.65 ± 1.11 for the middle of the pedicle and 1.57 ± 1.01 for the screw tip. When coupled with intraoperative flat-panel CT guidance, the Rosa(®) Spine robot appears to be accurate in placing pedicle screws within both pedicles and the vertebral body. Large clinical studies are mandatory to confirm this preliminary cadaveric report. PMID:26530846

  9. Analysis of screw pullout strength: a function of screw orientation in subtalar joint arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    McGlamry, Michael C; Robitaille, Melissa F

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this cadaveric study was to compare the pullout strength and failure load of 2 different screw orientations for subtalar arthrodesis. Twenty-six specimens from 13 cadaver donors (1 left and 1 right each) were used. A 7.3- x 65-mm long-thread profile (32-mm length) cannulated screw inserted into the calcaneus from dorsal to plantar (calcaneal specimens) was compared with a 7.3- x 65-mm short-thread profile (16-mm length) cannulated screw inserted into the talus from plantar to dorsal (talar specimens). A torque screwdriver with a calibrated electronic vernier scale measured the torque of screw insertion. Screw pullout strength and load failure were measured by using a servohydraulic materials testing machine. Distraction was applied along the axis of the screw at a displacement rate of 25 mm/min. The peak torque of insertion in all calcaneal specimens was reached on initial insertion through the dorsal subchondral bone plate of the calcaneus; in talar specimens, it was reached as the screw threads were completely buried into the talus. A significant difference (P = .00647) was found between the mean torque of insertion for the calcaneal (1.50 Nm) and talar specimens (1.30 Nm). A comparison of pullout forces showed a significantly stronger mean failure load for calcaneal specimens (P = .000085). The mean failure load for paired calcaneal specimens was 1782 N compared with a mean 1245 N for talar specimens. Although the pullout force was clearly greater in the dorsal-to-plantar screw application, the pullout force in the plantar-to-dorsal orientation was also considerable. PMID:15480401

  10. Transsacral transdiscal L5-S1 screws for the management of high-grade spondylolisthesis in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Palejwala, Ali; Fridley, Jared; Jea, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    The surgical management of high-grade spondylolisthesis in adolescents remains a controversial issue. Because the basic procedure, posterolateral fusion, is associated with a significant rate of pseudarthrosis and listhesis progression, there is a pressing need for alternative surgical techniques. In the present report, the authors describe the case of an adolescent patient with significant low-back pain who was found to have Grade IV spondylolisthesis at L5-S1 that was treated with transsacral transdiscal screw fixation. Bilateral pedicle screws were placed starting from the top of the S-1 pedicle, across the L5-S1 intervertebral disc space, and into the L-5 body. At 14 months after surgery, the patient had considerable improvement in his pain and radiographic fusion across L5-S1. The authors conclude that transsacral transdiscal pedicle screws may serve as an efficacious and safe option for the correction of high-grade spondylolisthesis in adolescent patients. PMID:26894520

  11. Power-Tool Adapter For T-Handle Screws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed adapter enables use of pneumatic drill, electric drill, electric screwdriver, or similar power tool to tighten or loosen T-handled screws. Notched tube with perpendicular rod welded to it inserted in chuck of tool. Notched end of tube slipped over screw handle.

  12. Bending strength and holding power of a prototype tibial locking screw.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinn; Hou, Sheng-Mou

    2002-10-01

    To improve mechanical performance, a prototype tibial locking screw with two components was developed for the current study: a both-ends-threaded screw with a smooth shank and a small set screw inserted obliquely through the cap of the both-ends-threaded screw. The bending strength and holding power of this prototype screw were compared with that of five commercially available tibial locking screws: Synthes, Howmedica, Richards, Osteo AG, and Zimmer. To test bending strength, the screws were inserted into a polyethylene tube and loaded at their midpoint to simulate a three-point bending test. Single-loading yielding strength and cyclic-loading fatigue life then were measured. To test holding power, the screws were inserted into polyurethane foam tubes, and stripping torque and pushout strength were measured. The results showed that the yielding strength and the fatigue life were related closely to the inner diameter of the fully threaded screws. The stripping torque reflected the pushout strength, which also was estimated by the formula D[0.5 + 0.57735 (D - d)/2p] (D, outer diameter; d, inner diameter; p, pitch). Even though, among all of the tested screws, the prototype had the smallest outer diameter at its middle, it had the highest fatigue strength, and simultaneously preserved its high bone-holding power. A clinical trial using this prototype screw is warranted, one in which the difficult surgical technique of inserting the set screws should be investigated. PMID:12360032

  13. Cement as a locking mechanism for screw heads in acetabular revision shells - a biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Laflamme, G Y; Alami, G B; Zhim, F

    2008-01-01

    In acetabular revisions, polyethylene (PE) liners are often cemented into metal shells on top of acetabular screw heads. This study investigates the possibility of using this technique to obtain fixed-angle acetabular screws Eth a concept that has not yet been reported in the literature. Two groups of screws (n=8) were inserted into Trabecular Metal revision shells (Zimmer), into which PE liners were then cemented. Screws in Group 1, inserted in the shell's pre-fabricated holes, were countersunk, whereas screws in Group 2 were inserted in custom-drilled holes that make their heads protrude into, and interdigitate with, the overlying cement mantle. Perpendicular loading was then applied to the screw shafts both statically to failure and cyclically. A greater stiffness was observed for the protruding screws upon static loading; and while the countersunk screws all failed at the screw-cement junction (53.44 + or - 8.33 N), the protruding screws all failed at the screw shaft (1049.79 + or - 32.12 N) a 20-fold difference (p< 0.05). Under cyclic loading, only the protruding screw head specimen did not fail, undergoing an overall displacement within the limits of osseointegration.These results support the hypothesis that the protrusion of an acetabular screw head into an overlying cement mantle significantly increases its angular stability. Provided other variables are favorable, this locking effect may increase the initial stability of the whole implant, thus improving the ultimate success of complex acetabular revisions. PMID:18645971

  14. Use of polymethylmethacrylate to enhance screw fixation in bone.

    PubMed

    Cameron, H U; Jacob, R; Macnab, I; Pilliar, R M

    1975-07-01

    Pull-out testing of screws inserted into cement and bone under various conditions showed that the cement-screw complex was significantly stronger when the screw was placed in soft cement and the cement was allowed to polymerize without further manipulation. When screw fixation in osteoporotic bone was reinforced with cement, the bone was the weakest component in the system. Fixation under these conditions should be enhanced by increasing the area of contact between the cement and bone. By cooling the cement to prolong its working time, it could be injected with a syringe in such a way that maximum endosteal and periosteal contact was provided. PMID:1150708

  15. Pedicle streaking: A novel and simple aid in pedicle positioning in free tissue transfer

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Aditya; Singh, Hardeep; Mahendru, Sanjay; Brajesh, Vimalendu; Singh, Sukhdeep; Khare, Ashish; Kothari, Umang; Khazanchi, Rakesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The pedicle positioning in free tissue transfer is critical to its success. Long thin pedicles are especially prone to this complication where even a slight twist in the perforator can result in flap loss. Pedicles passing through the long tunnels are similarly at risk. Streaking the pedicle with methylene blue is a simple and safe method which increases the safety of free tissue transfer. Materials and Methods: Once the flap is islanded on the pedicle and the vascularity of the flap is confirmed, the pedicle is streaked with methylene blue dye at a distance of 6-7 mm. The streaking starts from the origin of the vessels and continued distally on to the under surface of flap to mark the complete course of the pedicle in alignment. The presence of streaking in some parts and not in rest indicates twist in the pedicle. Observation and Results: Four hundred and sixty five free flaps have been done at our centre in the last 5 years. The overall success rate of free flaps is 95.3% (22 free flap failures). There has not been a single case of pedicle twist leading to flap congestion and failure. Conclusion: This simple and novel method is very reliable for pedicle positioning avoiding any twist necessary for successful free tissue transfer. PMID:26933280

  16. Torque and pullout analysis of six currently available self-tapping and "emergency" screws.

    PubMed

    Boyle, J M; Frost, D E; Foley, W L; Grady, J J

    1993-01-01

    Insertional torque (IT), stripping torque (ST), and uniaxial pullout tests were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of six screw systems (Wurzburg, Techmedica, Synthes, Timesh, Steinhouser, Luhr) in thin porcine rib. The Timesh 2.2-mm self-tapping screw produced the largest insertional and stripping torque of all systems tested as well as the largest difference between the insertional and stripping torque. The Timesh emergency screw also had the largest insertional and stripping torque as well as the largest difference between the insertional and stripping torque. In pullout tests, the Timesh screw was found to be the most retentive. The overall data indicated that the ideal self-tapping screw should have the largest difference possible between drill size and external diameter, a channel, and at least three self-tapping threads for maximum retention. PMID:8419573

  17. Reinforcement of osteosynthesis screws with brushite cement.

    PubMed

    Van Landuyt, P; Peter, B; Beluze, L; Lemaître, J

    1999-08-01

    The fixation of osteosynthesis screws remains a severe problem for fracture repair among osteoporotic patients. Polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) is routinely used to improve screw fixation, but this material has well-known drawbacks such as monomer toxicity, exothermic polymerization, and nonresorbability. Calcium phosphate cements have been developed for several years. Among these new bone substitution materials, brushite cements have the advantage of being injectable and resorbable. The aim of this study is to assess the reinforcement of osteosynthesis screws with brushite cement. Polyurethane foams, whose density is close to that of cancellous bone, were used as bone model. A hole was tapped in a foam sample, then brushite cement was injected. Trabecular osteosynthesis screws were inserted. After 24 h of aging in water, the stripping force was measured by a pull-out test. Screws (4.0 and 6.5 mm diameter) and two foam densities (0.14 and 0.28 g/cm3) were compared. Cements with varying solid/liquid ratios and xanthan contents were used in order to obtain the best screw reinforcement. During the pull-out test, the stripping force first increases to a maximum, then drops to a steady-state value until complete screw extraction. Both maximum force and plateau value increase drastically in the presence of cement. The highest stripping force is observed for 6.5-mm screws reinforced with cement in low-density foams. In this case, the stripping force is multiplied by 3.3 in the presence of cement. In a second experiment, cements with solid/liquid ratio ranging from 2.0 to 3.5 g/mL were used with 6.5-mm diameter screws. In some compositions, xanthan was added to improve injectability. The best results were obtained with 2.5 g/mL cement containing xanthan and with 3.0 g/mL cements without xanthan. A 0.9-kN maximal stripping force was observed with nonreinforced screws, while 1.9 kN was reached with reinforced screws. These first results are very promising regarding screw

  18. Transpedicular screw fixation for type II Hangman's fracture: a motion preserving procedure.

    PubMed

    ElMiligui, Yasser; Koptan, Wael; Emran, Ihab

    2010-08-01

    Opinions have varied regarding the optimal treatment of an unstable Hangman's fracture. C2 pedicle screw instrumentation is a biomechanically strong fixation which although done through a simple posterior approach, is a technically demanding procedure. This prospective, non-randomized multicentre study included 15 consecutive patients with displaced type II traumatic spondylolisthesis of the axis. There were nine males and six females with a mean age of 37 years at surgery. The cause of injury was a road traffic accident in 11 patients and a fall from height in 4 patients. All patients had a single stage reduction and direct transpedicular screw fixation through the C2 pedicles. During follow-up, clinical evaluation and plain X-rays were performed at each visit; at 6-month follow-up, additional dynamic lateral flexion/extension views and a CT scan were performed. The average follow-up period was 32 months (range 25-56 months). At final follow-up, all patients were asymptomatic and regained a good functional outcome with no limitation of range of motion; all the patients showed solid union with no implant failure. There were no neurological complications. At 6-month follow-up, CT evaluation showed fusion in all patients and an adequate position of 28 screws. Two pedicle screws (6.6%) showed minimal (defined as <2 mm) intrusion; one into the spinal canal and the other into the vertebral foreamen. Transpedicular screw fixation through the C2 pedicles is a safe and effective method in treating type II traumatic spondylolisthesis of the axis resulting in good clinical and radiological outcomes. Adequate reduction was achieved and motion segments were preserved with its use. PMID:20401619

  19. Effect of bone material properties on effective region in screw-bone model: an experimental and finite element study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There have been numerous studies conducted to investigate the pullout force of pedicle screws in bone with different material properties. However, fewer studies have investigated the region of effect (RoE), stress distribution and contour pattern of the cancellous bone surrounding the pedicle screw. Methods Screw pullout experiments were performed from two different foams and the corresponding reaction force was documented for the validation of a computational pedicle screw-foam model based on finite element (FE) methods. After validation, pullout simulations were performed on screw-bone models, with different bone material properties to model three different age groups (<50, 50–75 and >75 years old). At maximum pullout force, the stress distribution and average magnitude of Von Mises stress were documented in the cancellous bone along the distance beyond the outer perimeter pedicle screw. The radius and volume of the RoE were predicted based on the stress distribution. Results The screw pullout strengths and the load–displacement curves were comparable between the numerical simulation and experimental tests. The stress distribution of the simulated screw-bone vertebral unit showed that the radius and volume of the RoE varied with the bone material properties. The radii were 4.73 mm, 5.06 mm and 5.4 mm for bone properties of ages >75, 75 > ages >50 and ages <50 years old, respectively, and the corresponding volumes of the RoE were 6.67 mm3, 7.35 mm3 and 8.07 mm3, respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrated that there existed a circular effective region surrounding the pedicle screw for stabilization and that this region was sensitive to the bone material characteristics of cancellous bone. The proper amount of injection cement for augmentation could be estimated based on the RoE in the treatment of osteoporosis patients to avoid leakage in spine surgery. PMID:24952724

  20. Screw-locking wrench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A tool comprises a first handle and a second handle, each handle extending from a gripping end portion to a working end portion, the first handle having first screw threads disposed circumferentially about an inner portion of a first through-hole at the working end portion thereof, the second handle having second screw threads disposed circumferentially about an inner portion of a second through-hole at the working end portion thereof, the first and second respective through-holes being disposed concentrically about a common axis of the working end portions. First and second screw locks preferably are disposed concentrically with the first and second respective through-holes, the first screw lock having a plurality of locking/unlocking screw threads for engaging the first screw threads of the first handle, the second screw lock having a plurality of locking/unlocking screw threads for engaging the second screw threads of the second handle. A locking clutch drive, disposed concentrically with the first and second respective through-holes, engages the first screw lock and the second screw lock. The first handle and the second handle are selectively operable at their gripping end portions by a user using a single hand to activate the first and second screw locks to lock the locking clutch drive for either clockwise rotation about the common axis, or counter-clockwise rotation about the common axis, or to release the locking clutch drive so that the handles can be rotated together about the common axis either the clockwise or counter-clockwise direction without rotation of the locking clutch drive.

  1. Z-2 Threaded Insert Design and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy; Rhodes, Richard; Jones, Robert J.; Graziosi, David; Ferl, Jinny; Sweeny, Mitch; Scarborough, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Z-2 prototype space suit contains several components fabricated from an advanced hybrid composite laminate consisting of IM10 carbon fiber and fiber glass. One requirement was to have removable, replaceable helicoil inserts to which other suit components would be fastened. An approach utilizing bonded in inserts with helicoils inside of them was implemented. During initial assembly, cracking sounds were heard followed by the lifting of one of the blind inserts out of its hole when the screws were torqued. A failure investigation was initiated to understand the mechanism of the failure. Ultimately, it was determined that the pre-tension caused by torqueing the fasteners is a much larger force than induced from the pressure loads of the suit which was not considered in the insert design. Bolt tension is determined by dividing the torque on the screw by a k value multiplied by the thread diameter of the bolt. The k value is a factor that accounts for friction in the system. A common value used for k for a non-lubricated screw is 0.2. The k value can go down by as much as 0.1 if the screw is lubricated which means for the same torque, a much larger tension could be placed on the bolt and insert. This paper summarizes the failure investigation that was performed to identify the root cause of the suit failure and details how the insert design was modified to resist a higher pull out tension.

  2. Polyaxial Screws in Locked Plating of Tibial Pilon Fractures.

    PubMed

    Yenna, Zachary C; Bhadra, Arup K; Ojike, Nwakile I; Burden, Robert L; Voor, Michael J; Roberts, Craig S

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the axial and torsional stiffness of polyaxial locked plating techniques compared with fixed-angle locked plating techniques in a distal tibia pilon fracture model. The effect of using a polyaxial screw to cross the fracture site was examined to determine its ability to control relative fracture site motion. A laboratory experiment was performed to investigate the biomechanical stiffness of distal tibia fracture models repaired with 3.5-mm anterior polyaxial distal tibial plates and locking screws. Sawbones Fourth Generation Composite Tibia models (Pacific Research Laboratories, Inc, Vashon, Washington) were used to model an Orthopaedic Trauma Association 43-A1.3 distal tibia pilon fracture. The polyaxial plates were inserted with 2 central locking screws at a position perpendicular to the cortical surface of the tibia and tested for load as a function of axial displacement and torque as a function of angular displacement. The 2 screws were withdrawn and inserted at an angle 15° from perpendicular, allowing them to span the fracture and insert into the opposing fracture surface. Each tibia was tested again for axial and torsional stiffness. In medial and posterior loading, no statistically significant difference was found between tibiae plated with the polyaxial plate and the central screws placed in the neutral position compared with the central screws placed at a 15° position. In torsional loading, a statistically significant difference was noted, showing greater stiffness in tibiae plated with the polyaxial plate and the central screws placed at a 15° position compared with tibiae plated with the central screws placed at a 0° (or perpendicular) position. This study showed that variable angle constructs show similar stiffness properties between perpendicular and 15° angle insertions in axial loading. The 15° angle construct shows greater stiffness in torsional loading. PMID:26270750

  3. “Two-step” technique with OsiriX™ to evaluate feasibility of C2 pedicle for surgical fixation

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Luis Miguel Sousa; d’Almeida, Gonçalo Neto; Cabral, José

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgical treatment of craniovertebral junction pathology has evolved considerably in recent decades with the implementation of short atlanto-axial fixation techniques, notwhithstanding increasing neurovascular risks. Also, there is strong evidence that fixation of C2 anatomical pedicle has the best biomechanical profile of the entire cervical spine. However, it is often difficult and misleading, to evaluate anatomical bony and vascular anomalies using the three orthogonal planes (axial, coronal, and sagittal) of CT. Objectives: The authors describe an innovative and simple technique to evaluate the feasibility of C2 pedicle for surgical screw fixation using preoperative planning with the free DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) software OsiriX™. Materials and Methods: The authors report the applicatin of this novel technique in 5 cases (3 traumatic, 1 Os Odontoideum, and 1 complex congenital malformation) collected from our general case series of the Department in the last 5 years. Results: In this proof of concept study, the pre-operative analysis with the two-step tecnique was detrimental for choosing the surgical tecnique. Detailed post-operative analysis confirmed correct position of C2 screws without cortical breach. There were no complications or mortality reported. Conclusion: This two-step technique is an easy and reliable way to determine the feasibility of C2 pedicle for surgical fixation. The detailed tridimensional radiological preoperative evaluation of craniovertebral junction anatomy is critical to the sucess and safety of this surgeries, and can avoid, to certain degree, expensive intra-operative tridimensional imaging facilities. PMID:27217652

  4. Improved Screw-Thread Lock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmartin, Malcolm

    1995-01-01

    Improved screw-thread lock engaged after screw tightened in nut or other mating threaded part. Device does not release contaminating material during tightening of screw. Includes pellet of soft material encased in screw and retained by pin. Hammer blow on pin extrudes pellet into slot, engaging threads in threaded hole or in nut.

  5. The Effects of Spinopelvic Parameters and Paraspinal Muscle Degeneration on S1 Screw Loosening

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Bum; Lee, Young-Seok; Nam, Taek-Kyun; Park, Yong-Sook; Kim, Young-Baeg

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate risk factors for S1 screw loosening after lumbosacral fusion, including spinopelvic parameters and paraspinal muscles. Methods We studied with 156 patients with degenerative lumbar disease who underwent lumbosacral interbody fusion and pedicle screw fixation including the level of L5-S1 between 2005 and 2012. The patients were divided into loosening and non-loosening groups. Screw loosening was defined as a halo sign larger than 1 mm around a screw. We checked cross sectional area of paraspinal muscles, mean signal intensity of the muscles on T2 weight MRI as a degree of fatty degeneration, spinopelvic parameters, bone mineral density, number of fusion level, and the characteristic of S1 screw. Results Twenty seven patients showed S1 screw loosening, which is 24.4% of total. The mean duration for S1 screw loosening was 7.3±4.1 months after surgery. Statistically significant risk factors were increased age, poor BMD, 3 or more fusion levels (p<0.05). Among spinopelvic parameters, a high pelvic incidence (p<0.01), a greater difference between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordotic angle preoperatively (p<0.01) and postoperatively (p<0.05). Smaller cross-sectional area and high T2 signal intensity in both multifidus and erector spinae muscles were also significant muscular risk factors (p<0.05). Small converging angle (p<0.001) and short intraosseous length (p<0.05) of S1 screw were significant screw related risk factors (p<0.05). Conclusion In addition to well known risk factors, spinopelvic parameters and the degeneration of paraspinal muscles also showed significant effects on the S1 screw loosening. PMID:26587190

  6. Bending strength and holding power of tibial locking screws.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Lin, S J; Chiang, H; Hou, S M

    2001-04-01

    The bending strength and holding power of two types of specially designed tibial locking devices, a both-ends-threaded screw and an unthreaded bolt, were studied and compared with four types of commercially available tibial interlocking screws: Synthes, Howmedica, Richards, and Osteo AG. To test bending strength, the devices were inserted into a high molecular weight polyethylene tube and loaded at their midpoint by a materials testing machine to simulate a three point bending test. Single loading yielding strength and cyclic loading fatigue life were measured. To test holding power, the devices were inserted into tubes made of polyurethane foam, and their tips were loaded axially to measure pushout strength. The devices were tested with two different densities of foam materials and two different sizes of pilot holes. Insertion torque and stripping torque of the screws were measured first. Pushout tests were performed with each screw inserted with a tightness equal to 60% of its stripping torque. Test results showed that the yielding strength and the fatigue life were related closely to the inner diameter of the screws. The stripping torque predicted the pushout strength more reliably than did the insertion torque. All tested devices showed greater holding power in the foam with the higher density and with the smaller pilot holes. The both-ends-threaded screw had the highest pushout strength and a satisfactory fatigue strength. The unthreaded bolt had the highest fatigue strength but only fair holding power. Clinical studies of the use of these two types of locking devices are worthwhile. PMID:11302315

  7. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  8. Percutaneous screw fixation of acetabular fractures: applicability of hip arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Chouhan, Devendra Kumar; Oh, Kwang-Jun

    2010-11-01

    Percutaneous screw fixation of the anterior column of the acetabulum has been a challenging task because of its unique anatomy and a risk of intra-articular penetration. Evidence is lacking for any tools to provide visual scrutiny of fracture reduction and intra-articular screw penetration. We report 2 cases of fracture of the acetabulum that developed in young female athletes, in which the anterior column was fixed with a percutaneous screw by use of hip arthroscopy as an assisting tool for intra-articular observation. In our experience this method was found to be promising in terms of anatomic reduction of the fracture site, avoiding articular penetration during screw insertion, with additional advantages of joint debridement, lavage, and reduction in radiation exposure. PMID:20888169

  9. Radiological and clinical outcome of screw placement in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: evaluation with low-dose computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ohlin, Acke; Strömbeck, Anita; Maly, Pavel; Sundgren, Pia C.

    2009-01-01

    Posterior corrective surgery using “all pedicle screw construct” carries risk of neurovascular complications. The study aims were to assess the screw placement in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis using CT with low-radiation dose, and to evaluate the clinical outcome in patients with misplaced pedicle screws. CTs of 49 consecutive patients (873 screws, 79% thoracic) were retrospectively evaluated by two independent radiologists. A new grading system was developed to distinguish between lateral, medial and anterior cortical perforations, endplate perforation and foraminal perforation. The grading system is based on whether the cortical violation is partial or total rather than on mm-basis. The overall rate of screw misplacement was 17% (n = 149): 8% were laterally placed and 6.1% were medially placed. The rates of anterior cortical, endplate and foraminal perforation were 1.5, 0.9, and 0.5%, respectively. Lateral cortical perforation was more frequent in the thoracic spine (P = 0.005), whereas other types of misplacement including medial cortical perforation were more frequent on the left and the concave side of scoliotic curves (P = 0.002 and 0.003). No neurovascular complications were reported. The association between the occurrence of screw misplacement and the Cobb angle was statistically significant (P = 0.037). Misplacements exceeding half screw diameter should be classified as unacceptable. Low-dose CT implies exposing these young individuals to a significantly lower radiation dose than do other protocols used in daily clinical practice. We recommend using low-dose CT and the grading system proposed here in the postoperative assessment of screw placement. PMID:19888607

  10. Screw Placement Accuracy for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery: A Study on 3-D Neuronavigation-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Jorge; James, Andrew R.; Alimi, Marjan; Tsiouris, Apostolos John; Geannette, Christian; Härtl, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the impact of 3-D navigation for pedicle screw placement accuracy in minimally invasive transverse lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF). Methods A retrospective review of 52 patients who had MIS-TLIF assisted with 3D navigation is presented. Clinical outcomes were assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Visual Analog Scales (VAS), and MacNab scores. Radiographic outcomes were assessed using X-rays and thin-slice computed tomography. Result The mean age was 56.5 years, and 172 screws were implanted with 16 pedicle breaches (91.0% accuracy rate). Radiographic fusion rate at a mean follow-up of 15.6 months was 87.23%. No revision surgeries were required. The mean improvement in the VAS back pain, VAS leg pain, and ODI at 11.3 months follow-up was 4.3, 4.5, and 26.8 points, respectively. At last follow-up the mean postoperative disc height gain was 4.92 mm and the mean postoperative disc angle gain was 2.79 degrees. At L5–S1 level, there was a significant correlation between a greater disc space height gain and a lower VAS leg score. Conclusion Our data support that application of 3-D navigation in MIS-TLIF is associated with a high level of accuracy in the pedicle screw placement. PMID:24353961

  11. Helical screw viscometer

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, J.H.; Chapman, R.N.; Kraynik, A.M.

    1983-06-30

    A helical screw viscometer for the measurement of the viscosity of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids comprising an elongated cylindrical container closed by end caps defining a circular cylindrical cavity within the container, a cylindrical rotor member having a helical screw or ribbon flight carried by the outer periphery thereof rotatably carried within the cavity whereby the fluid to be measured is confined in the cavity filling the space between the rotor and the container wall. The rotor member is supported by axle members journaled in the end caps, one axle extending through one end cap and connectable to a drive source. A pair of longitudinally spaced ports are provided through the wall of the container in communication with the cavity and a differential pressure meter is connected between the ports for measuring the pressure drop caused by the rotation of the helical screw rotor acting on the confined fluid for computing viscosity.

  12. Screw-Retaining Allen Wrench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granett, D.

    1985-01-01

    Steadying screws with fingers unnecessary. Crimp in uncompressed spring wire slightly protrudes from one facet of Allen wrench. Compressed spring retains Allen screw. Tool used with Allen-head screws in cramped spaces with little or no room for fingers to hold fastener while turned by wrench.

  13. A Novel Surgical Technique for Removing Buried Cannulated Screws Using a Guidewire and Countersink: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongsheng; Giri, Krishna Prasad; Pearce, Christopher Jon

    2015-01-01

    Removal of metal implants is a common procedure that is performed for a variety of indications. However, problems such as a buried screw head may occasionally arise and render hardware removal difficult or even impossible. The problem is further compounded when the initial screw was inserted percutaneously or via a minimally-invasive (MIS) technique. In the present paper, we introduce a novel, minimally invasive technique to remove buried cannulated screws which obviates the need for excessive extension of the skin incision, surgical exploration, soft tissue dissection or excess bone removal, which surgeons may otherwise have to undertake to uncover the buried screw head. This technique is especially useful in removing cannulated screws which have been inserted using small stab incisions and MIS techniques initially. This technique can be applied to the removal of buried cannulated screws which are placed into any bone in the body. PMID:26161159

  14. Bilateral pedicled gracilis flap for scrotal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Daigeler, Adrien; Behr, Björn; Mikhail, Bassem Daniel; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Wallner, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Trauma, infection and cancer can cause severe scrotal defects. The demand to a definitive reconstruction in terms of aesthetics and function is high. Primary closure, skin grafts and local fasciocutaneous flaps do not meet these high demands in most cases. The authors treated a series of patients requiring scrotal reconstruction with bilateral pedicled gracilis muscle flaps and split thickness skin grafts, resulting in satisfying aesthetic and functional outcomes. PMID:27318782

  15. Anatomic Study of Anterior Transdiscal Axial Screw Fixation for Subaxial Cervical Spine Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wei; Zheng, Minghui; Qu, Dongbin; Zou, Lin; Chen, Yongquan; Chen, Jianting; Zhu, Qingan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Anterior transdiscal axial screw (ATAS) fixation is an alternative or supplement to the plate and screw constructs for the upper cervical spine injury. However, no existing literatures clarified the anatomic feasibility of this technique for subaxial cervical spine. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomical feasibility and to establish guidelines for the use of the ATAS fixation for the subaxial cervical spine injury. Fifty normal cervical spines had radiographs to determine the proposed screw trajectory (the screw length and insertion angle) and the interbody graft-related parameters (the disc height and depth, and the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw) for all levels of the subaxial cervical spine. Following screw insertion in 8 preserved human cadaver specimens, surgical simulation and dissection verified the feasibility and safety of the ATAS fixation. Radiographic measurements showed the mean axial screw length and cephalic incline angle of all levels were 41.2 mm and 25.2°, respectively. The suitable depth of the interbody graft was >11.7 mm (the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw), but <17.1 mm (disc depth). Except the axial screw length, increase in all the measurements was seen with level up to C5–C6 segment. Simulated procedure in the preserved specimens demonstrated that ATAS fixation could be successfully performed at C2–C3, C3–C4, C4–C5, and C5–C6 levels, but impossible at C6–C7 due to the obstacle of the sternum. All screws were placed accurately. None of the screws penetrated into the spinal canal and caused fractures determined by dissecting the specimens. The anterior transdiscal axial screw fixation, as an alternative or supplementary instrumentation for subaxial cervical spine injuries, is feasible and safe with meticulous surgical planning. PMID:27495016

  16. Anatomic Study of Anterior Transdiscal Axial Screw Fixation for Subaxial Cervical Spine Injuries.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Zheng, Minghui; Qu, Dongbin; Zou, Lin; Chen, Yongquan; Chen, Jianting; Zhu, Qingan

    2016-08-01

    Anterior transdiscal axial screw (ATAS) fixation is an alternative or supplement to the plate and screw constructs for the upper cervical spine injury. However, no existing literatures clarified the anatomic feasibility of this technique for subaxial cervical spine. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomical feasibility and to establish guidelines for the use of the ATAS fixation for the subaxial cervical spine injury.Fifty normal cervical spines had radiographs to determine the proposed screw trajectory (the screw length and insertion angle) and the interbody graft-related parameters (the disc height and depth, and the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw) for all levels of the subaxial cervical spine. Following screw insertion in 8 preserved human cadaver specimens, surgical simulation and dissection verified the feasibility and safety of the ATAS fixation.Radiographic measurements showed the mean axial screw length and cephalic incline angle of all levels were 41.2 mm and 25.2°, respectively. The suitable depth of the interbody graft was >11.7 mm (the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw), but <17.1 mm (disc depth). Except the axial screw length, increase in all the measurements was seen with level up to C5-C6 segment. Simulated procedure in the preserved specimens demonstrated that ATAS fixation could be successfully performed at C2-C3, C3-C4, C4-C5, and C5-C6 levels, but impossible at C6-C7 due to the obstacle of the sternum. All screws were placed accurately. None of the screws penetrated into the spinal canal and caused fractures determined by dissecting the specimens.The anterior transdiscal axial screw fixation, as an alternative or supplementary instrumentation for subaxial cervical spine injuries, is feasible and safe with meticulous surgical planning. PMID:27495016

  17. Split pedicle roll envelope technique around implants and pontics: a prospective case series study.

    PubMed

    Man, Y; Wu, Q; Wang, T; Gong, P; Gong, T; Qu, Y

    2015-10-01

    Recreating a harmonious gingival contour for contiguous missing teeth in the anterior maxilla is challenging. The aim of this study was to evaluate a split pedicle roll envelope technique designed for pontics. Twelve patients presented a labial flat or concave profile at the implant and pontic sites before second-stage surgery. The contour deficiency was compensated with a palatal split pedicle flap with the implant part rolled into the labial envelope and the pontic part covering the denuded ridge. Interim restorations were screwed in to guide tissue remodelling. The labial convex profile (CPF) and facial mucosal level (FML) at the implant and pontic sites, the Jemt papilla index (PIS) in the different restorative environments, and peri-implant bone levels were recorded at baseline and at 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months postoperative. Results showed that the CPF had increased by 1.4mm at the implant site and 1.5mm at the pontic site at 6 months after surgery. PIS had increased by 2 at the implant-tooth/pontic-tooth sites and by 2.6 at the implant-pontic site. FML was coordinated with that of the contralateral teeth. All indices were favourable at 3 months and then remained stable. Within the limitations identified, this combined therapy can be considered as an alternative to achieve aesthetic success when contiguous maxillary anterior teeth are missing. PMID:26058360

  18. Comparison of compression and torque measurements of self-tapping and pretapped screws.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J H; Rahn, B A

    1989-03-01

    The choice of an internal fixation system for maxillofacial surgery is made difficult because of lack of information with respect to functional load. This study attempted to clarify some of the controversy with respect to maxillofacial use of these implants. Maximal compressive force to torque values were measured in standardized bone thicknesses of 1, 2, 3, and 4 mm. The screws tested were pretapped AO 1.5-, 2.0-, 2.7-, and 3.5-mm rescue screws and self-tapping Luhr, Champy, and AO 1.5- and 2.0-mm screws. Ten measurements were made for each screw type/bone thickness combination using a piezoelectric washer and torque screwdriver. It was apparent that for 1- and 2-mm bone thicknesses the use of self-tapping screws resulted in the highest compression values. In 3- and 4-mm bone thicknesses, pretapped screws offered the highest compression values. As expected, self-tapping screws had the highest torque values on insertion owing to torque loss in cutting the screw threads. The 2.7-mm screw offered no advantage over the 2.0-mm screws in 1- and 2-mm bone thicknesses but resulted in higher compression values in 3- and 4-mm bone thicknesses. PMID:2919199

  19. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube insertion; G-tube insertion; PEG tube insertion; Stomach tube insertion; Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion ... and down the esophagus, which leads to the stomach. After the endoscopy tube is inserted, the skin ...

  20. Anatomic considerations for dorsal sacral plate-screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Xu, R; Ebraheim, N A; Mohamed, A; el-Gamal, H; Yeasting, R A

    1995-10-01

    Five cadaveric pelves and 40 dry bony specimens were used to assess the feasibility of the lumbosacral plate fixation extending to beyond the S1 region and quantitatively to evaluate the posterior sacroiliac region and the dimensions of S1 and S2 pedicle and lateral mass. Partial removal of the posterior ilium was undertaken to measure the surface area available for plate fixation on the dorsal aspect of the sacrum. The results showed that the average distances between the outer edges of S1 and S2 dorsal foramina and the medial edge of the posterior ilium increased from 11.3 mm before removal of a portion of the medial posterior ilium to 16.6 mm after removal at the S1 level, and from 8.4 mm before removal of partial medial posterior ilium to 13 mm after removal at the S2 level, respectively. The average depths of the S1 and S2 pedicles were 37.1 and 32.2 mm in the direction anteromedial to the sagittal plane, respectively. The average depths of the S1 and S2 lateral mass were 37.3 and 33.9 mm in the direction anterolateral to the sagittal plane, respectively. In cases of vertebral metastases or osteoporosis, plating extending to S2 may be needed if good bony purchase cannot be achieved by the S1 pedicle or lateral mass screw. This study suggested also that partial removal of the posterior ilium enhances the space on the posterior aspect of the sacrum without severe compromise of the sacroiliac joint. PMID:8563154

  1. Percutaneous pediculoplasty: polymethylmethacrylate injection into lytic vertebral pedicle lesions.

    PubMed

    Gailloud, Philippe; Beauchamp, Norman J; Martin, Jean-Baptiste; Murphy, Kieran J

    2002-05-01

    Two patients with painful lytic lesions of the vertebral pedicle were treated with percutaneous pediculoplasty. This technique, similar to vertebroplasty but with increased procedural risks because of the immediate vicinity of neural structures, was performed under high-quality biplane fluoroscopic guidance. For lesions involving both the pedicle and the vertebral body, a double-needle unipedicular technique is advocated. PMID:11997361

  2. Thoracic pedicle subtraction osteotomy in the treatment of severe pediatric deformities.

    PubMed

    Bakaloudis, Georgios; Lolli, Francesco; Di Silvestre, Mario; Greggi, Tiziana; Astolfi, Stefano; Martikos, Konstantinos; Vommaro, Francesco; Barbanti-Brodano, Giovanni; Cioni, Alfredo; Giacomini, Stefano

    2011-05-01

    The traditional surgical treatment of severe spinal deformities, both in adult and pediatric patients, consisted of a 360° approach. Posterior-based spinal osteotomy has recently been reported as a useful and safe technique in maximizing kyphosis and/or kyphoscoliosis correction. It obviates the deleterious effects of an anterior approach and can increase the magnitude of correction both in the coronal and sagittal plane. There are few reports in the literature focusing on the surgical treatment of severe spinal deformities in large pediatric-only series (age <16 years old) by means of a posterior-based spinal osteotomy, with no consistent results on the use of a single posterior-based thoracic pedicle subtraction osteotomy in the treatment of such challenging group of patients. The purpose of the present study was to review our operative experience with pediatric patients undergoing a single level PSO for the correction of thoracic kyphosis/kyphoscoliosis in the region of the spinal cord (T12 and cephalad), and determine the safety and efficacy of posterior thoracic pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) in the treatment of severe pediatric deformities. A retrospective review was performed on 12 consecutive pediatric patients (6 F, 6 M) treated by means of a posterior thoracic PSO between 2002 and 2006 in a single Institution. Average age at surgery was 12.6 years (range, 9-16), whereas the deformity was due to a severe juvenile idiopathic scoliosis in seven cases (average preoperative main thoracic 113°; 90-135); an infantile idiopathic scoliosis in two cases (preoperative main thoracic of 95° and 105°, respectively); a post-laminectomy kypho-scoliosis of 95° (for a intra-medullar ependimoma); an angular kypho-scoliosis due to a spondylo-epiphisary dysplasia (already operated on four times); and a sharp congenital kypho-scoliosis (already operated on by means of a anterior-posterior in situ fusion). In all patients a pedicle screws instrumentation was used

  3. A capillary Archimedes' screw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Dorbolo, Stephane

    2014-11-01

    As used by Egyptians for irrigation and reported by Archimedes, a screw turning inside a hollow pipe can pull out a fluid againt gravity. At a centimetric scale, an analagous system can be found with a drop pending on a rotating spiral which is tilted toward the horizontal. The ascent of the drop to the top of the spiral is considered and a theoretical model based on geometrical considerations is proposed. The climb of the drop is limited by the fluid deposition on the screw at high capillary number and by a centrifugation phenomenon. We find out the range of fluid proprities and spiral characteristics for which an ascending motion of the drop is possible. Finally we discuss the efficiency of such system to extract a fluid from a bath at a centrimetric scale.

  4. NUT SCREW MECHANISMS

    DOEpatents

    Glass, J.A.F.

    1958-07-01

    A reactor control mechanism is described wherein the control is achieved by the partial or total withdrawal of the fissile material which is in the form of a fuel rod. The fuel rod is designed to be raised and lowered from the reactor core area by means of two concentric ball nut and screw assemblies that may telescope one within the other. These screw mechanisms are connected through a magnetic clutch to a speed reduction gear and an accurately controllable prime motive source. With the clutch energized, the fuel rod may be moved into the reactor core area, and fine adjustments may be made through the reduction gearing. However, in the event of a power failure or an emergency signal, the magnetic clutch will become deenergized, and the fuel rod will drop out of the core area by the force of gravity, thus shutting down the operation of the reactor.

  5. A mechanical evaluation of pre-tapped and self-tapped screws in small bones.

    PubMed

    Bell, J C; Ness, M G

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the holding powers of 2.7 mm pre-tapped and self-tapped screws placed closely together and tightened in small bones. Pairs of metatarsals were collected from healthy, skeletally mature Greyhounds and part of a 2.7 mm dynamic compression plate was fixed to the dorsal surface of each bone using three 2.7 mm screws. Identical screws were used throughout but only one of each pair of bones had threads pre-cut using a tap prior to insertion. All of the screws were tightened before the constructs were mounted in a materials testing machine and the centrally placed screw was loaded incrementally until failure. Load-deformation curves were plotted and yield point, ultimate load to failure, stiffness and energy prior to yield point were measured. Mean values were recorded for each parameter and Student's T-test was used to test the null hypothesis that there is no difference in holding power between pre-tapped and self-tapped screws. Significant mechanical differences were not found between pre-tapped and self-tapped screws placed closely together and tightened into small bones. Self-tapped screws can be considered for use in small animal surgery even when multiple screws are to be placed closely together in relatively small pieces of bone. PMID:18038003

  6. Experimental determination of bone cortex holding power of orthopedic screw.

    PubMed

    Bolliger Neto, R; Rossi, J D; Leivas, T P

    1999-01-01

    Cylindrical specimens of bone measuring 15 mm in diameter were obtained from the lateral cortical layer of 10 pairs of femurs and tibias. A central hole 3.2 mm in diameter was drilled in each specimen. The hole was tapped, and a 4.5 mm cortical bone screw was inserted from the outer surface. The montage was submitted to push-out testing up to a complete strip of the bone threads. The cortical thickness and rupture load were measured, and the shear stress was calculated. The results were grouped according to the bone segment from which the specimen was obtained. The results showed that bone cortex screw holding power is dependent on the bone site. Additionally, the diaphyseal cortical bone tissue is both quantitatively and qualitatively more resistant to screw extraction than the metaphyseal tissue. PMID:10881065

  7. Strength comparison of allogenic bone screws, bioabsorbable screws, and stainless steel screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Rano, James A; Savoy-Moore, Ruth T; Fallat, Lawrence M

    2002-01-01

    Allogenic bone screws are new to the fixation market and have yet to be tested against current fixation materials. An in vitro comparison of the same sizes of stainless steel, bioabsorbable, and allogenic bone screws was undertaken to assess screw resistance to the forces of bending, pullout, and shear. Using aluminum plates to support the screws, forces up to 1000 Newtons were applied to six to eight samples of each type of screw. During each test, stainless steel screws withstood the maximum force that could be exerted by the testing apparatus without failing (bending, 113.9 +/- 11.8 N mean +/- SE; pullout 999.1 +/- 33.7 N; and shear, 997.5 +/- 108.8 N). In each test, compared to bioabsorbable screws, allogenic bone screws failed faster (pullout, allogenic: 12.4 +/- 1.1 seconds vs. bioabsorbable, 120.6 +/- 13.8 seconds; p = .001; bending, allogenic: 53.4 +/- 4.8 seconds vs. bioabsorbable, 201.9 +/- 11.1 seconds; p = .001; shear, allogenic 13.5 +/- 1.4 seconds vs. bioabsorbable, 43.8 +/- 0.9 seconds; p = .001) under equivalent (pullout: bioabsorbable, 385.0 +/- 18.4 N vs. allogenic, 401.0 +/- 35.9 N; p = .001) or lower (bending, allogenic: 4.7 +/- 0.2 N vs. bioabsorbable, 11.0 +/- 0.9 N; p = .675; shear, allogenic: 312.1 +/- 15.5 N vs. bioabsorbable 680.9 +/- 8.5 N; p = .001) loads, and in a highly variable fashion. Overall, the bioabsorbable screws withstood the forces of bending, pullout, and shear better than the allogenic screws, and stainless steel screws outperformed both bioabsorbable and allogenic screws. Despite these results, allogenic screws could still be useful in compliant patients who would benefit from their osteoconductive properties. PMID:11858609

  8. Multiple recurrent postoperative spinal infections due to an unrecognized presacral abscess following placement of bicortical sacral screws: case report.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Laura; Burks, S Shelby; Levi, Allan D

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative wound infections in spinal surgery remain an important complication to diagnose and treat successfully. In most cases of deep infection, even with instrumentation, aggressive soft-tissue debridement followed by intravenous antibiotics is sufficient. This report presents a patient who underwent L3-S1 laminectomy and pedicle screw placement including bicortical sacral screws. This patient went on to develop multiple (7) recurrent infections at the operative site over a 5-year period. Continued investigation eventually revealed a large presacral abscess, which remained the source of recurrent bacterial seeding via the remaining bone tracts of the bicortical sacral screws placed during the original lumbar surgery. Two years after drainage of this presacral collection via a retroperitoneal approach, the patient remains symptom free. PMID:26613281

  9. Low noise lead screw positioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A very precise and low noise lead screw positioner, for positioning a retroreflector in an interferometer is described. A gas source supplies inert pressurized gas, that flows through narrow holes into the clearance space between a nut and the lead screw. The pressurized gas keeps the nut out of contact with the screw. The gas flows axially along the clearance space, into the environment. The small amount of inert gas flowing into the environment minimizes pollution. By allowing such flow into the environment, no seals are required between the end of the nut and the screw.

  10. A Biomechanical Comparison of Intralaminar C7 Screw Constructs with and without Offset Connector Used for C6-7 Cervical Spine Immobilization : A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Muhammad; Natarajan, Raghu N.; An, Howard S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The offset connector can allow medial and lateral variability and facilitate intralaminar screw incorporation into the construct. The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical characteristics of C7 intralaminar screw constructs with and without offset connector using a three dimensional finite element model of a C6-7 cervical spine segment. Methods Finite element models representing C7 intralaminar screw constructs with and without the offset connector were developed. Range of motion (ROM) and maximum von Mises stresses in the vertebra for the two techniques were compared under pure moments in flexion, extension, lateral bending and axial rotation. Results ROM for intralaminar screw construct with offset connector was less than the construct without the offset connector in the three principal directions. The maximum von Misses stress was observed in the C7 vertebra around the pedicle in both constructs. Maximum von Mises stress in the construct without offset connector was found to be 12-30% higher than the corresponding stresses in the construct with offset connector in the three principal directions. Conclusion This study demonstrated that the intralaminar screw fixation with offset connector is better than the construct without offset connector in terms of biomechanical stability. Construct with the offset connector reduces the ROM of C6-7 segment more significantly compared to the construct without the offset connector and causes lower stresses around the C7 pedicle-vertebral body complex. PMID:24003366

  11. Pedicle shifting or migration as one of the causes of curve progression after posterior fusion: an interesting case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sudeep; Modi, Hitesh N; Suh, Seung-Woo; Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Hong, Jae-Young

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to explain a previously undescribed mechanism of 'pedicle migration or shift' with longitudinal growth of the spine owing to biological remodeling of plastic posterior fusion mass as well as pedicles which may explain at least a few cases of deformity recurrence after posterior fusion in scoliosis surgery. Progressive loss of deformity correction after scoliosis surgery in growing children has been variously described. The various mechanisms described have been 'crankshaft effect', pseudoarthrosis, implant failure (loosening/breakage), biological plasticity, choosing wrong levels, excessive apical translation causing decompensation by unfused segments, progressive etiology, inadequate anchorage provided by some older instrumentation systems, etc. Though there have been claims that segmental pedicle instrumentation might prevent crankshaft phenomenon by providing a more rigid fixation, numerous studies have shown progressive loss of correction even after segmental pedicle instrumentation. A 10.6-year-old girl was fused posteriorly before her prepubertal growth spurt using segmental screw rod instrumentation. The index case in our study showed progressive loss of operative correction during subsequent follow-up at 2 years. This probably occurred because of longitudinal growth of the spine and posterior fusion mass because of its biological plasticity during the period of rapid growth spurt. In conclusion, despite the recent trend towards the use of segmental pedicle instrumented correction and fusion and claims that by providing rigid, tri-column fixation, it enhances fusion and controls growth of the vertebral body anteriorly; caution must be taken in children with high remaining growth and high growth velocity. PMID:19734809

  12. [Meniscal transplantation with a synovial pedicle--an animal experiment].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, K

    1993-12-01

    The effect of a meniscal transplantation with a synovial pedicle in the avascular portion of the meniscus was investigated in an animal model. An inner (free edge side) half of the middle segment of the medial meniscus, about 6 mm in length, of an adult dog was resected, and a half thickness of the remaining outer (peripheral) meniscus was advanced with a synovial pedicle to fill in the resected portion and sutured with 6-0 interrupted Nylon sutures. As a control, the same procedure without the synovial pedicle was performed for comparison. Twenty-four dogs were treated with synovial pedicle and 13 without. The treated meniscus was excised every four weeks postoperatively up to 32 weeks for gross observation and histological examination. The histological findings at the junction between the advanced meniscus and the remaining meniscus in the group with the synovial pedicle were as follows: 1) At eight to 20 weeks, vascular proliferation and fibroblasts formation were present. 2) At 24 weeks, the vascularity decreased and the junction was filled with collagen fibers. 3) At 32 weeks, the junction was almost completely repaired with chondrocytes. In contrast, in the group without the synovial pedicle, the junction was connected with fibrous tissue, but with no chondrocytes even at 32 weeks. This enhancement of the meniscus repair with the synovial pedicle was considered to be due to reparative ability of the synovial cells, neovascularization through the synovium and viability of the advanced meniscus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7508485

  13. Pre-tapped and self-tapping screws in children's mandibles. A scanning electron microscopic examination of the implant beds.

    PubMed

    Bähr, W; Stoll, P

    1991-10-01

    One hundred 2 mm AO miniscrews were inserted into the mandibles of eight fresh cadavers aged 8 to 12 years. Scanning electron microscopic examination of the implant beds showed cracks and accumulated bone material, as well as signs of crushing and shearing stress, regardless of whether the screws were pre-tapped or not. When, during screw insertion, the axis of the screw deviated by at least 10 degrees from the axis of the tap, two intersecting threads resulted. It is concluded that during osteosynthesis in child mandibles pre-tapping is not recommended. PMID:1742264

  14. Comparison of Isocentric C-Arm 3-Dimensional Navigation and Conventional Fluoroscopy for Percutaneous Retrograde Screwing for Anterior Column Fracture of Acetabulum

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiliang; Tan, Guoqing; Zhou, Dongsheng; Sun, Liang; Li, Qinghu; Yang, Yongliang; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous screw insertion for minimally displaced or reducible acetabular fracture using x-ray fluoroscopy and computer-assisted navigation system has been advocated by some authors. The purpose of this study was to compare intraoperative conditions and clinical results between isocentric C-arm 3-dimensional (Iso-C 3D) fluoroscopy and conventional fluoroscopy for percutaneous retrograde screwing of acetabular anterior column fracture. A prospective cohort study was conducted. A total of 22 patients were assigned to 2 different groups: 10 patients in the Iso-C 3D navigation group and 12 patients in the conventional group. The operative time, fluoroscopic time, time of screw insertion, blood loss, and accuracy were analyzed between the 2 groups. There were significant differences in operative time, screw insertion time, fluoroscopy time, and mean blood loss between the 2 groups. Totally 2 of 12 (16.7%) screws were misplaced in the conventional fluoroscopy group, and all 10 screws were in safe zones in the navigation group. Percutaneous screw fixation using the Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system significantly reduced the intraoperative fluoroscopy time and blood loss in percutaneous screwing for acetabular anterior column fracture. The Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system provided a reliable and effective method for percutaneous screw insertion in acetabular anterior column fractures compared to conventional fluoroscopy. PMID:26765448

  15. Comparison of Isocentric C-Arm 3-Dimensional Navigation and Conventional Fluoroscopy for Percutaneous Retrograde Screwing for Anterior Column Fracture of Acetabulum: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    He, Jiliang; Tan, Guoqing; Zhou, Dongsheng; Sun, Liang; Li, Qinghu; Yang, Yongliang; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous screw insertion for minimally displaced or reducible acetabular fracture using x-ray fluoroscopy and computer-assisted navigation system has been advocated by some authors. The purpose of this study was to compare intraoperative conditions and clinical results between isocentric C-arm 3-dimensional (Iso-C 3D) fluoroscopy and conventional fluoroscopy for percutaneous retrograde screwing of acetabular anterior column fracture.A prospective cohort study was conducted. A total of 22 patients were assigned to 2 different groups: 10 patients in the Iso-C 3D navigation group and 12 patients in the conventional group. The operative time, fluoroscopic time, time of screw insertion, blood loss, and accuracy were analyzed between the 2 groups.There were significant differences in operative time, screw insertion time, fluoroscopy time, and mean blood loss between the 2 groups. Totally 2 of 12 (16.7%) screws were misplaced in the conventional fluoroscopy group, and all 10 screws were in safe zones in the navigation group. Percutaneous screw fixation using the Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system significantly reduced the intraoperative fluoroscopy time and blood loss in percutaneous screwing for acetabular anterior column fracture.The Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system provided a reliable and effective method for percutaneous screw insertion in acetabular anterior column fractures compared to conventional fluoroscopy. PMID:26765448

  16. Insertion Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mahillon, Jacques; Chandler, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Insertion sequences (ISs) constitute an important component of most bacterial genomes. Over 500 individual ISs have been described in the literature to date, and many more are being discovered in the ongoing prokaryotic and eukaryotic genome-sequencing projects. The last 10 years have also seen some striking advances in our understanding of the transposition process itself. Not least of these has been the development of various in vitro transposition systems for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic elements and, for several of these, a detailed understanding of the transposition process at the chemical level. This review presents a general overview of the organization and function of insertion sequences of eubacterial, archaebacterial, and eukaryotic origins with particular emphasis on bacterial elements and on different aspects of the transposition mechanism. It also attempts to provide a framework for classification of these elements by assigning them to various families or groups. A total of 443 members of the collection have been grouped in 17 families based on combinations of the following criteria: (i) similarities in genetic organization (arrangement of open reading frames); (ii) marked identities or similarities in the enzymes which mediate the transposition reactions, the recombinases/transposases (Tpases); (iii) similar features of their ends (terminal IRs); and (iv) fate of the nucleotide sequence of their target sites (generation of a direct target duplication of determined length). A brief description of the mechanism(s) involved in the mobility of individual ISs in each family and of the structure-function relationships of the individual Tpases is included where available. PMID:9729608

  17. Computer-assisted periacetabular screw placement: Comparison of different fluoroscopy-based navigation procedures with conventional technique.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Björn Gunnar; Gonser, Christoph; Shiozawa, Thomas; Badke, Andreas; Weise, Kuno; Rolauffs, Bernd; Stuby, Fabian Maria

    2010-12-01

    The current gold standard for operatively treated acetabular fractures is open reduction and internal fixation. Fractures with minimal displacement may be stabilised by minimally invasive methods such as percutaneous periacetabular screws. However, their placement is a demanding procedure due to the complex pelvic anatomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of periacetabular screw placement assessing pre-defined placement corridors and comparing different fluoroscopy-based navigation procedures and the conventional technique. For each screw an individual periacetabular placement corridor was preoperatively planned using the planning software iPlan CMF(©) 3.0 (BrainLAB). 210 screws (retrograde anterior column screws, retrograde posterior column screws, supraacetabular ilium screws) were placed in an artificial Synbone pelvis model (30 hemipelves) and in human cadaver specimen (30 hemipelves). 2D- and 3D-fluoroscopy-based navigation procedures were compared to the conventional technique. Insertion time and radiation exposure to specimen were also recorded. The achieved screw position was postoperatively assessed by an Iso-C(3D) scan. Perforations of bony cortices or articular surfaces were analysed and the screw deviation severity (difference of the operatively achieved screw position and the preoperatively planned screw position in reference to the pre-defined corridors) was determined using image fusion. Using 3D-fluoroscopy-based navigation, the screw perforation rate (7%) was significantly lower compared to 2D-fluoroscopy-based navigation (20%). For all screws, the deviation severity was significantly lower using a 3D- compared to a 2D-fluoroscopy-based navigation and the conventional technique. Analysing the posterior column screws, the screw deviation severity was significantly lower using 3D- compared to 2D-fluoroscopy-based navigation. However, for the anterior column screw, the screw deviation severity was similar regardless of the imaging

  18. Screw/stud removal tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, K.; Herrick, D. E.; Rothermel, L.

    1980-01-01

    Tool removes stubborn panheaded screws or studs where conventional tools would be either too weak or inconvenient to use. Screws with damaged heads or slots can also be removed this way. Tool can be worked with one hand and easily fits limited-access and blind areas. It can be made in various sizes to fit different screwheads.

  19. Hemispheric titanium porous coated acetabular component without screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Dorr, L D; Wan, Z; Cohen, J

    1998-06-01

    One hundred fifteen hips in 108 patients with primary total hip arthroplasty using the anatomic porous replacement hemispheric acetabular component implanted without adjunctive screw fixation had a mean postoperative followup time of 6 years (range, 5-7.4 years). Clinical evaluation was performed using the Harris hip score and patient self assessment using a modified Short Form-36 questionnaire. Radiographs were measured for radiolucent lines, polyethylene wear, osteolysis, migration, and fractures. No acetabular metal shell had been revised for loosening or was radiographically loose with or without migration (more than 3 mm) at final followup. Reoperation was done in nine (8%) hips because of polyethylene insert wear or disassembly. No fracture of the acetabular bone occurred at the time of surgery or was observed on radiograph. Fixation of the metal shell was stable, with progressive radiolucent lines observed at final followup in 2% of the hips. Osteolysis was recorded in one patient with two acetabular components. The fixation of noncemented hemispheric porous coated acetabular components is more related to the technique of acetabular bone preparation and press fit implantation than to whether additional screws or peg fixation are used. Fixation of this acetabular component without screws at an average of 6 years after surgery is reproducible and predictable in primary hip arthroplasty. The design of modular polyethylene inserts has been improved and should reduce the wear rate of reoperations of the polyethylene insert. PMID:9646758

  20. Increase of stability in external fracture fixation by hydroxyapatite-coated bone screws.

    PubMed

    Augat, P; Claes, L; Hanselmann, K F; Suger, G; Fleischmann, W

    1995-01-01

    A major problem in fracture treatment by external fixation is screw loosening, which often results in reduced stability and can lead to prolonged treatment. A load-carrying experiment was conducted to determine whether coating implants with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) increases screw stability. Twelve HA-coated ASIF screws with 3 different macroporosities were inserted in 12 sheep that had already been fitted with a 6-pin external fixator for the treatment of a tibial osteotomy. The same number of uncoated polished steel screws served as controls. Although initial stability was not different for HA-coated screws, average removal torque after a 9-week implantation period increased with increasing macroporosity of the HA coating (p < .002). Instability of some screws was accompanied by histologic findings of cartilagenous tissue and proliferation of periosteal callus. Near the threads in the tibial cortex and in the shaft area of the screw were seen large numbers of HA particles that had been sheared off during implantation as well as during screw removal because of high contact forces between the HA coating and bone. Particulate debris of HA particles as well as the release of small bone fragments during explanation is likely to be unavoidable since HA adherence to bone is greater than adherence to steel after several weeks of implantation. PMID:7640445

  1. Effects of bone materials on the screw pull-out strength in human spine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing Hang; Tan, Soon Huat; Chou, Siaw Meng

    2006-10-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model simulating the threaded connections including detailed helix curve for the bone and surgical screw was constructed. Validation of the FE model was conducted by comparing the predicted screw pull-out strength in different foam materials against experimental study. The FE model was then further analyzed to investigate the interaction of bone material and purchase length on the screw pull-out strength. The results show that failure of the connection was due to bone shearing which occurred along a cylindrical surface determined by the outer perimeter of the screw. The cortical shell resists around 50% of the pull-out strength for a screw of 4mm in major diameter and 22 mm in length. The effects of purchase length on the pull-out strength were different for different bone material. It is the bone material that determines the stability of the inserted surgical screw. The significance of the purchase length on the pull-out strength of cortical screw will be much lower than that in cancellous bone screw. PMID:16414303

  2. Central pedicle reduction mammoplasty: a reliable technique

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Reduction mammoplasty is one of the most frequently performed procedures in plastic surgery for macromastia or gigantomastia. Recently it is also evolved for oncoplastic breast cancer surgery due to equivalent in terms of outcome for breast conserving surgery with radiotherapy versus mastectomy. Various techniques and modification has been made to achieve long lasting and aesthetically good result with minimal morbidity. Central (posterior) reduction mammoplasty is known for its versatile pedicle due to its good blood supply and innervation for maintaining of nipple sensation with unremarkably long term complication and proven in preservation of breastfeeding function. It is one of the good and reliable options to correct breast hypertrophy and ptosis. Various modifications were introduced by different authors to improve the technique and reduce scar formation which will give more satisfaction to patients. PMID:25083495

  3. Central pedicle reduction mammoplasty: a reliable technique.

    PubMed

    See, Mee-Hoong

    2014-02-01

    Reduction mammoplasty is one of the most frequently performed procedures in plastic surgery for macromastia or gigantomastia. Recently it is also evolved for oncoplastic breast cancer surgery due to equivalent in terms of outcome for breast conserving surgery with radiotherapy versus mastectomy. Various techniques and modification has been made to achieve long lasting and aesthetically good result with minimal morbidity. Central (posterior) reduction mammoplasty is known for its versatile pedicle due to its good blood supply and innervation for maintaining of nipple sensation with unremarkably long term complication and proven in preservation of breastfeeding function. It is one of the good and reliable options to correct breast hypertrophy and ptosis. Various modifications were introduced by different authors to improve the technique and reduce scar formation which will give more satisfaction to patients. PMID:25083495

  4. The effect of multiple processing and re-use on orthodontic mini-screw torque values

    PubMed Central

    Noorollahian, Saeed; Alavi, Shiva; Rafiei, Elahe

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reusing orthodontic mini-screws would reduce treatment cost and lead to more use of mini-screws and improvement of orthodontic treatments. This study has assessed the effects of reprocessing and reusing the titanium mini-screws on their maximum insertion, removal and fracture torque (FT). Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 20 titanium mini-screws (1.6-mm × 8-mm) were randomly divided into two equal groups. In the test group, the screws were first sterilized by autoclave and then their FT was assessed. In the control group, FT was assessed after 5 times of insertion, cleaning, processing (37% phosphoric acid for 10 min, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite for 30 min) and sterilizing with autoclave. The maximum insertion and removal torque values were compared using the repeated measure ANOVA and the FT data were analyzed by the t-test. The data were analyzed using the SPSS software (version 13.0) and the significance was set on 0.05. Results: The paired t-test for maximum insertion torque (MIT) showed that MIT1 was significantly lower than other MIT values (P = 0.02) and also MIT2 was significantly higher than MIT5 (P = 0.01), but other MIT values had no significant differences. The paired t-test for maximum removal torque (MRT) showed that only MRT2 was significantly higher than other MRT values (except MRT1) (P = 0.046). Regarding FT, the t-test showed that there was no significant difference between FT0 and FT5 (P = 0.485). Conclusion: Within limitations of this study, five time insertion, cleaning, processing and steam sterilization had no significant negative effect on insertion, removal and FT of the mini-screws. PMID:26005464

  5. Screw Placement Accuracy and Outcomes Following O-Arm-Navigated Atlantoaxial Fusion: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jacob D; Jack, Megan M; Harn, Nicholas R; Bertsch, Judson R; Arnold, Paul M

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Case series of seven patients. Objective C2 stabilization can be challenging due to the complex anatomy of the upper cervical vertebrae. We describe seven cases of C1-C2 fusion using intraoperative navigation to aid in the screw placement at the atlantoaxial (C1-C2) junction. Methods Between 2011 and 2014, seven patients underwent posterior atlantoaxial fusion using intraoperative frameless stereotactic O-arm Surgical Imaging and StealthStation Surgical Navigation System (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States). Outcome measures included screw accuracy, neurologic status, radiation dosing, and surgical complications. Results Four patients had fusion at C1-C2 only, and in the remaining three, fixation extended down to C3 due to anatomical considerations for screw placement recognized on intraoperative imaging. Out of 30 screws placed, all demonstrated minimal divergence from desired placement in either C1 lateral mass, C2 pedicle, or C3 lateral mass. No neurovascular compromise was seen following the use of intraoperative guided screw placement. The average radiation dosing due to intraoperative imaging was 39.0 mGy. All patients were followed for a minimum of 12 months. All patients went on to solid fusion. Conclusion C1-C2 fusion using computed tomography-guided navigation is a safe and effective way to treat atlantoaxial instability. Intraoperative neuronavigation allows for high accuracy of screw placement, limits complications by sparing injury to the critical structures in the upper cervical spine, and can help surgeons make intraoperative decisions regarding complex pathology. PMID:27190736

  6. Screw Placement Accuracy and Outcomes Following O-Arm-Navigated Atlantoaxial Fusion: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jacob D.; Jack, Megan M.; Harn, Nicholas R.; Bertsch, Judson R.; Arnold, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case series of seven patients. Objective C2 stabilization can be challenging due to the complex anatomy of the upper cervical vertebrae. We describe seven cases of C1–C2 fusion using intraoperative navigation to aid in the screw placement at the atlantoaxial (C1–C2) junction. Methods Between 2011 and 2014, seven patients underwent posterior atlantoaxial fusion using intraoperative frameless stereotactic O-arm Surgical Imaging and StealthStation Surgical Navigation System (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States). Outcome measures included screw accuracy, neurologic status, radiation dosing, and surgical complications. Results Four patients had fusion at C1–C2 only, and in the remaining three, fixation extended down to C3 due to anatomical considerations for screw placement recognized on intraoperative imaging. Out of 30 screws placed, all demonstrated minimal divergence from desired placement in either C1 lateral mass, C2 pedicle, or C3 lateral mass. No neurovascular compromise was seen following the use of intraoperative guided screw placement. The average radiation dosing due to intraoperative imaging was 39.0 mGy. All patients were followed for a minimum of 12 months. All patients went on to solid fusion. Conclusion C1–C2 fusion using computed tomography-guided navigation is a safe and effective way to treat atlantoaxial instability. Intraoperative neuronavigation allows for high accuracy of screw placement, limits complications by sparing injury to the critical structures in the upper cervical spine, and can help surgeons make intraoperative decisions regarding complex pathology. PMID:27190736

  7. Split spline screw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A split spline screw type payload fastener assembly, including three identical male and female type split spline sections, is discussed. The male spline sections are formed on the head of a male type spline driver. Each of the split male type spline sections has an outwardly projecting load baring segment including a convex upper surface which is adapted to engage a complementary concave surface of a female spline receptor in the form of a hollow bolt head. Additionally, the male spline section also includes a horizontal spline releasing segment and a spline tightening segment below each load bearing segment. The spline tightening segment consists of a vertical web of constant thickness. The web has at least one flat vertical wall surface which is designed to contact a generally flat vertically extending wall surface tab of the bolt head. Mutual interlocking and unlocking of the male and female splines results upon clockwise and counter clockwise turning of the driver element.

  8. Percutaneous Sacroiliac Screw Technique.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, John; Cho, Rosa; Reid, J Spence; Boateng, Henry; Copeland, Carol; Sirlin, Edward

    2016-08-01

    Remembering that preoperative planning, surgical indications, and fracture reduction are paramount for this procedure, presented here is our technique for performing percutaneous sacroiliac screws, both transiliac-transsacral and sacral style. A combination of video, still pictures, and fluoroscopy images will guide the viewer through the process we routinely use highlighting specific details. Patient positioning and intraoperative fluoroscopy imaging are critical to a successful procedure. Although inlet and outlet films remain important, we find the procedure best started on the lateral sacral view to reduce the need for start site, trajectory, and imaging position changes during the case. A cannulated pig sticker (drill guide) used with long drill tip guide wires provide improved manual control to both finding a good start site and directing the trajectory. For patient safety, sacral anatomy and safe zones are discussed as well. Using these technical points will help make this a successful procedure. PMID:27441927

  9. Vascularized Pedicled Fibula Onlay Bone Graft Augmentation for Complicated Tibiotalocalcaneal Arthrodesis With Retrograde Intramedullary Nail Fixation: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S; Kang, Rachel B

    2016-01-01

    Tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis stabilized with retrograde intramedullary nail fixation is associated with a high incidence of complications. This is especially true when performed with a bulk structural allograft and poor soft tissue quality. In select high-risk limb salvage cases, we have augmented tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis procedures stabilized using retrograde intramedullary nail fixation with a vascularized pedicled fibular onlay bone graft. We present the data from 10 such procedures with a mean follow-up period of 10.9 ± 5.4 (range 6 to 20) months involving 10 patients (9 males and 1 female). The etiology was avascular osteonecrosis of the talus and/or distal tibia and a resultant large volume cavitary bone defect (8 ankles), severe equinocavovarus contracture (1 ankle), and failed total ankle replacement (1 ankle). A frozen femoral head bulk allograft was used twice, a whole frozen talus allograft once, and a freeze-dried calcaneal allograft once. The fibula was mobilized with intact musculoperiosteal perforating branches of the peroneal artery as a vascularized pedicle onlay bone graft fixated with a screw and washer construct. The mean fibular graft length was 10.2 ± 2.3 cm. The mean interval to radiographic fusion was 2.6 ± 0.6 months and to weightbearing was 3.1 ± 1.4 months. Two stable bulk allograft-host bone and fibular graft-host bone nonunions occurred after intramedullary nail hardware failure. Tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis augmented by vascularized pedicled fibular graft stabilized with retrograde compression intramedullary nail fixation offers a reliable option for complex salvage situations when few other options exist. PMID:26810126

  10. Z-2 Threaded Insert Design and Testing Abstract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, RIchard; Graziosi, Dave; Jones, Bobby; Ferl, Jinny; Scarborough, Steve; Sweeney, Mitch

    2016-01-01

    The Z-2 Prototype Planetary Extravehicular Space Suit Assembly is a continuation of NASA's Z series of spacesuits. The Z-2 is another step in the NASA's technology development roadmap leading to human exploration of the Martian surface. To meet a more challenging set of requirements than previous suit systems standard design features, such as threaded inserts, have been re-analyzed and improved. NASA's Z-2 prototype space suit contains several components fabricated from an advanced hybrid composite laminate consisting of IM10 carbon fiber and fiber glass. One requirement NASA levied on the suit composites was the ability to have removable, replaceable helicoil inserts to which other suit components would be fastened. An approach utilizing bonded in inserts with helicoils inside of them was implemented. The design of the interface flanges of the composites allowed some of the inserts to be a "T" style insert that was installed through the entire thickness of the laminate. The flange portion of the insert provides a mechanical lock as a redundancy to the adhesive aiding in the pullout load that the insert can withstand. In some locations it was not possible to utilize at "T" style insert and a blind insert was used instead. These inserts rely completely on the bond strength of the adhesive to resist pullout. It was determined during the design of the suit that the inserts did not need to withstand loads induced from pressure cycling but instead tension induced from torqueing the screws to bolt on hardware which creates a much higher stress on them. Bolt tension is determined by dividing the torque on the screw by a k value multiplied by the thread diameter of the bolt. The k value is a factor that accounts for friction in the system. A common value used for k for a non-lubricated screw is 0.2. The k value can go down by as much as 0.1 if the screw is lubricated which means for the same torque, a much larger tension could be placed on the bolt and insert. This paper

  11. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation of a "carrot-stick" spinal fracture in an elderly man with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Huwart, Laurent; Amoretti, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    We present a case of percutaneous fixation of a "carrot-stick" spinal fracture in an elderly patient with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A surgical stabilization was not possible in this 83-year-old man with comorbidities. Under local anesthesia, percutaneous screw fixation of a transdiscal shear fracture at the level T10-T11 was performed using computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance. Two 4.0-mm Asnis III cannulated screws were placed to fix facet joints using transfacet pedicle pathway. The procedure time was 30 min. Using the visual analog scale (VAS), pain decreased from 10, preoperatively, to 1 after the procedure. Radiographic fusion was observed at a 3-month post-procedural CT scan. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation of spinal fractures could potentially be an alternative to surgery in elderly AS patients with poor performance status. PMID:23842576

  12. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your ...

  13. Dihalocarbene Insertion Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the insertion reaction using the insertion of carbenes into carbon-hydrogen bonds as an example. Outlines an experiment that will illustrate dihalocarbene insertions into diisopropyl ether. (GS)

  14. Save or sacrifice the internal mammary pedicle during anterior mediastinotomy?

    PubMed

    Apostolakis, Efstratios; Papakonstantinou, Nikolaos A; Chlapoutakis, Serafeim; Prokakis, Christos

    2014-07-01

    Ligation and dissection of internal mammary vessels is the most under-estimated complication of anterior mediastinotomy. However, patients requiring anterior mediastinotomy may experience long survival that makes the development of ischemic heart disease throughout their life possible. Therefore, the un-judicial sacrifice of the internal mammary pedicle may deprive them from the benefit to have their internal mammary artery used as a graft in order to successfully bypass severe left anterior descending artery stenoses. We recommend the preservation of the internal mammary pedicle during anterior mediastinotomy, which should be a common message among our colleagues from the beginning of their training. PMID:24987471

  15. Titanium integration with bone, welding, and screw head destruction complicating hardware removal of the distal radius: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Van Nortwick, Sara S; Yao, Jeffrey; Ladd, Amy L

    2012-07-01

    Increasingly, surgeons treat distal radius fractures with locking plate systems. Recent case reports have focused on technical insertion errors resulting in removal difficulties: poor drilling orientation or cross-threading, destruction of the screw head, and filling of the screw recess with tissue. We report 2 complications of titanium locked plate removal secondary to in vivo reactions including titanium integration with bone and mechanical binding between the titanium screw and plate. We clarify and discuss terminology relevant to implant removal, including cold-welding, galling, fretting, and anodization. Even with optimal technique, in situ reactions can complicate titanium implant removal. PMID:22652178

  16. The importance of trochanteric lag screws to achieve primary stability in cementless fixation of the RM hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Heitemeyer, U; Hierholzer, G; Haines, J

    1987-01-01

    To allow the bony incorporation of a cementless prosthesis it is important to achieve stability at the time of operation. To neutralize tension and torsional stresses the RM-shaft prosthesis is fixed with two lag screws in the trochanteric part of the femur. By measuring the applied torque intraoperatively we could demonstrate that the threads of the screws found a better grip when inserted from the bone to the prosthesis. Thus, the stronger fixation of the screws enhanced the primary stability of the cementless prosthesis. PMID:3566504

  17. Combined Percutaneous Iliosacral Screw Fixation With Sacroplasty Using Resorbable Calcium Phosphate Cement for Osteoporotic Pelvic Fractures Requiring Surgery.

    PubMed

    Collinge, Cory A; Crist, Brett D

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporotic sacral fractures, including acute and chronic insufficiency fractures, are increasing in frequency and present a number of management problem. Many of these patients are treated nonoperatively with relative immobility (eg, bedrest, wheelchair, or weight-bearing restrictions) and analgesics, which likely make the osteoporotic component worse. Surgery in this patient population may be desirable in some cases with the goals of improving mobility, relieving pain, and healing in an aligned position while minimizing deformity progression. However, internal fixation of the osteoporotic pelvis can be difficult. Large unicortical lag screws are the workhorse of posterior pelvic fixation, and yet fixation in cancellous bone corridors of an osteoporotic sacrum seems unlikely to achieve optimal fixation. As a result, the operative management and clinical results of these difficult injuries may not be uniformly successful. The authors present a technique for treating osteoporotic patients with a sacral fracture when operative treatment is indicated using percutaneous screw fixation combined with screw augmentation using a resorbable calcium phosphate bone substitute or "cement." The guide wire for a 7.3-mm or other large cannulated lag screw is fully inserted along the desired bony sacral corridor as is standard. The lag screw is then inserted over the wire to the depth where cement is desired. The guide wire is removed, and the aqueous calcium phosphate is injected through the screw's cannulation. For acute fractures, cement was applied to the areas distant to the fracture; whereas in insufficiency fractures, the cement was inserted along most of the screw path. The guide wire then can be reinserted and the lag screw fully inserted. The rationale for using these 2 modalities is their synergistic effect: the cannulated screw provides typical screw fixation and also a conduit for cement application. The cement augments the lag screw's purchase in osteoporotic bone

  18. Short-term Results of Muscle-Pedicle Bone Grafting with Tensor Fascia Lata for Delayed Femoral Neck Fractures; Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Salgotra, Kuldip; Kohli, Sarabjeet; Vishwakarma, Nilesh

    2016-01-01

    Neglected, untreated and delayed femur neck fractures are commonly encountered and the treatment dilemma arises especially when the patient is physiologically young and osteosynthesis is the preferred option. Controversy exists in the current literature as the various head salvage surgeries like valgus subtrochanteric osteotomy, non-vascularized fibular bone grafting, muscle pedicle bone grafting (Tensor fascia lata and Quadratus femoris graft) and vascularized bone grafting do not have clear lines of indications. The current study is a case series of 7 patients with femur neck fractures with delayed presentation beyond the vascular emergency period who were treated with osteosynthesis with muscle pedicle bone graft (MPBG) using tensor fascia lata muscle pedicle graft. Patients were followed clinical and radiologically at 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months, 1 year and 3 years and patients were regularly followed. The mean age of the patients was 47 ± 1.1 ranging from 38 to 55 years. There were 6 (85.7%) men and 1 (14.3%) women among the patients. Overall 5 (71.5%) patients had transcervical and 2 (28.5%) had subcapital fractures. At the end of 6 months, 6 (85.7%) patients were pain free and on plain radiographs fracture union was noted. One (14.3%) patient developed collapse and persistent nonunion. Younger group less than 50 years presenting with neglected fracture neck femur should always be give an option of head salvage surgery in selected cases. Muscle pedicle bone grafting has been proven although inconsistently as a valid option for fracture neck femur. We encourage osteosynthesis with the use of tensor fascia lata muscle pedicle grafting along with cancellous cannulated screws as a first option in selected cases of neglected femur neck fractures. PMID:27331067

  19. Application of bioabsorbable screw fixation for anterior cervical decompression and bone grafting

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Qiu, Xiaowen; Wang, Dong; Li, Haopeng; He, Xijing

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the application of bioabsorbable screws for anterior cervical decompression and bone grafting fixation and to study their clinical effects in the treatment of cervical spondylosis. METHODS: From March 2007 to September 2012, 56 patients, 36 males and 20 females (38-79 years old, average 58.3±9.47 years), underwent a novel operation. Grafts were fixed by bioabsorbable screws (PLLA, 2.7 mm in diameter) after anterior decompression. The bioabsorbable screws were inserted from the midline of the graft bone to the bone surface of the upper and lower vertebrae at 45 degree angles. Patients were evaluated post-operatively to observe the improvement of symptoms and evaluate the fusion of the bone. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score was used to evaluate the recovery of neurological functions. RESULTS: All screws were successfully inserted, with no broken screws. The rate of symptom improvement was 87.5%. All of the grafts fused well with no extrusion. The average time for graft fusion was 3.8±0.55 months (range 3-5 months). Three-dimensional reconstruction of CT scans demonstrated that the grafts fused with adjacent vertebrae well and that the screws were absorbed as predicted. The MRI findings showed that the cerebrospinal fluid was unobstructed. No obvious complications appeared in any of the follow-up evaluations. CONCLUSIONS: Cervical spondylosis with one- or two-level involvement can be effectively treated by anterior decompression and bone grafting with bioabsorbable screw fixation. This operative method is safe and can avoid the complications induced by metal implants. PMID:27438565

  20. Treatment of proximal phalangeal fractures with an antegrade intramedullary screw: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Borbas, P; Dreu, M; Poggetti, A; Calcagni, M; Giesen, T

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the articular cartilage defect created with two different antegrade techniques of intramedullary osteosynthesis with a headless compression screw inserted through the metacarpophalangeal joint. In 12 out of 24 fingers from six cadaveric hands, a trans-articular technique with cannulated headless compression screws (2.2 and 3.0 mm diameter) was used; whereas in the other 12 fingers, an intra-articular fixation technique was used. The areas of the articular surface and the defects created were measured with a digital image software program. All measurements were made twice by two observers. In the intra-articular technique, the average defect in the base of the articular surface of the proximal phalanx was 4.6% with the 2.2 mm headless compression screw and 8.5% with the 3.0 mm screw. In the trans-articular technique, the defect size was slightly smaller; 4.2% with the 2.2 mm screw and 8% with the 3.0 mm screw, but the differences were not statistically significant. The main advantage of the intra-articular technique was that it avoided damage to the articular surface of the metacarpal head. PMID:27056278

  1. Air-Lubricated Lead Screw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, G. S.

    1983-01-01

    Air lubricated lead screw and nut carefully machined to have closely matched closely fitting threads. Compressed air injected into two plenums encircle nut and flow through orifices to lubricate mating threads. Originally developed to position precisely interferometer retroreflector for airborne measurement of solar infrared radiation, device now has positioning accuracy of 0.25 micron.

  2. Metallurgical examination of gun barrel screws

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, E.L.; Clift, T.L.

    1996-06-01

    The examination was conducted to determine the extent of degradation that had occurred after a series of firings; these screws prevent live rounds of ammunition from being loaded into the firing chamber. One concern is that if the screw tip fails and a live round is accidentally loaded into the chamber, a live round could be fired. Another concern is that if the blunt end of the screw begins to degrade by cracking, pieces could become small projectiles during firing. All screws used in firing 100 rounds or more exhibited some degree degradation, which progressively worsened as the number of rounds fired increased. (SEM, metallography, x-ray analysis, and microhardness were used.) Presence of cracks in these screws after 100 fired rounds is a serious concern that warrants the discontinued use of these screws. The screw could be improved by selecting an alloy more resistant to thermal and chemical degradation.

  3. Segmental correction of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis by all-screw fixation method in adolescents and young adults. minimum 5 years follow-up with SF-36 questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In our institution, the fixation technique in treating idiopathic scoliosis was shifted from hybrid fixation to the all-screw method beginning in 2000. We conducted this study to assess the intermediate -term outcome of all-screw method in treating adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Methods Forty-nine consecutive patients were retrospectively included with minimum of 5-year follow-up (mean, 6.1; range, 5.1-7.3 years). The average age of surgery was 18.5 ± 5.0 years. We assessed radiographic measurements at preoperative (Preop), postoperative (PO) and final follow-up (FFU) period. Curve correction rate, correction loss rate, complications, accuracy of pedicle screws and SF-36 scores were analyzed. Results The average major curve was corrected from 58.0 ± 13.0° Preop to 16.0 ± 9.0° PO(p < 0.0001), and increased to 18.4 ± 8.6°(p = 0.12) FFU. This revealed a 72.7% correction rate and a correction loss of 2.4° (3.92%). The thoracic kyphosis decreased little at FFU (22 ± 12° to 20 ± 6°, (p = 0.25)). Apical vertebral rotation decreased from 2.1 ± 0.8 PreOP to 0.8 ± 0.8 at FFU (Nash-Moe grading, p < 0.01). Among total 831 pedicle screws, 56 (6.7%) were found to be malpositioned. Compared with 2069 age-matched Taiwanese, SF-36 scores showed inferior result in 2 variables: physical function and role physical. Conclusion Follow-up more than 5 years, the authors suggest that all-screw method is an efficient and safe method. PMID:22340624

  4. Pull-out strength of Caspar cervical screws.

    PubMed

    Maiman, D J; Pintar, F A; Yoganandan, N; Reinartz, J; Toselli, R; Woodward, E; Haid, R

    1992-12-01

    Anterior cervical instrumentation as an adjunct to bone fusion has an important role in cervical spine surgery. Posterior vertebral body cortex purchase is strongly recommended in the use of the Caspar system, although few biomechanical data exist to validate this requirement. In this study, Caspar screws were placed in 43 human cadaveric cervical vertebral bodies, either putting them into the posterior vertebral cortex as identified radiographically or penetrating it by 2 mm as recommended in the literature. Pull-out tests were conducted with tension applied to a connected plate at 0.25 mm/s, and force-deformation data were obtained. Failure typically occurred with clean pull-out; in most instances, cancellous bone remained attached to screw threads. Mean load without posterior cortical purchase was 375 +/- 53 N; with penetration it was 411 +/- 70 N. These differences were nonsignificant. Average deformation to failure was 1.41 +/- 0.10 mm in the group without posterior cortical penetration. In the posterior penetration group, mean deformation was 1.56 +/- 0.16 mm. Again, differences were not significant. Posterior cortical penetration does not improve the pull-out strength of Caspar screws in an isolated vertebral body model, but other biomechanical studies need to be done before insertion methods are altered. PMID:1470320

  5. [Scaphoid percutaneous osteosynthesis by screw using computer assisted surgery: an experimental study].

    PubMed

    Liverneaux, P

    2005-01-01

    Scaphoid fractures are sometimes difficult to diagnose and even more difficult to fix. Recent progress such as miniaturization of osteosynthesis material, adoption of the percutaneous route, and widening of the indications to include undisplaced fractures has still not abolished complications. In this context, computer assisted surgery (CAS) may be useful and deserves further study. To apply it to the scaphoid, it is initially necessary to immobilize the "wrist hand fingers" unit in a device adapted to make it a rigid unit. It is then necessary to choose the correct configuration of CAS system. The pedicular fluoroscopic navigation system, which is apparently similar to scaphoid screw insertion, was chosen for this study. The goal of this study is to define the osteosynthesis bases of the scaphoid with CAS. A fresh anatomical subject divided at the elbow joint was prepared at the DETERCA laboratory of the university Bordeaux 2. The solid "wrist hand fingers" unit was immobilized in extension and ulnar deviation of the wrist by a malleable, stable and radio transparent device. The first stage consisted of a calibration of the surgical instruments and the "wrist hand fingers" unit, with a three-dimensional optical localization system. The guide wire was simulated by a gauged stylet. When the axis and the length of the screw had been determined virtually, insertion of the guide wire was carried out under guidance of the virtual images of the computer's screen, without the assistance of the fluoroscopy. Finally the canulated screw was inserted over the guide wire. Insertion was stopped when the screw reached the intra osseous virtually predetermined length. A check using conventional fluoroscopy made it possible to ensure the correct positioning of the screw. Our results show that it is possible to insert a screw into a scaphoid without conventional fluoroscopy, by using the fluoroscopic navigation system. The procedure was performed without difficulty, apart from the

  6. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R.

    1982-01-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  7. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  8. Screw-fed pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, Kenneth M

    2014-11-25

    A pump system includes a pump that includes a first belt and a second belt that are spaced apart from each other to provide generally straight sides of a passage there between. There is an inlet at one end of the passage and an outlet at an opposite end of the passage, with a passage length that extends between the inlet and the outlet. The passage defines a gap distance in a width direction between the straight sides at the passage inlet. A hopper includes an interior space that terminates at a mouth at the passage inlet. At least one screw is located within the interior space of the hopper and includes a screw diameter in the width direction that is less than or equal to the gap distance.

  9. Spinal pedicle subtraction osteotomy for fixed sagittal imbalance patients

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Yongjung J; Rhim, Seung-Chul

    2013-01-01

    In addressing spinal sagittal imbalance through a posterior approach, the surgeon now may choose from among a variety of osteotomy techniques. Posterior column osteotomies such as the facetectomy or Ponte or Smith-Petersen osteotomy provide the least correction, but can be used at multiple levels with minimal blood loss and a lower operative risk. Pedicle subtraction osteotomies provide nearly 3 times the per-level correction of Ponte/Smith-Petersen osteotomies; however, they carry increased technical demands, longer operative time, and greater blood loss and associated significant morbidity, including neurological injury. The literature focusing on pedicle subtraction osteotomy for fixed sagittal imbalance patients is reviewed. The long-term overall outcomes, surgical tips to reduce the complications and suggestions for their proper application are also provided. PMID:24340276

  10. The Use of MMF Screws: Surgical Technique, Indications, Contraindications, and Common Problems in Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Carl-Peter; Ehrenfeld, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Mandibulo-maxillary fixation (MMF) screws are inserted into the bony base of both jaws in the process of fracture realignment and immobilisation. The screw heads act as anchor points to fasten wire loops or rubber bands connecting the mandible to the maxilla. Traditional interdental chain-linked wiring or arch bar techniques provide the anchorage by attached cleats, hooks, or eyelets. In comparison to these tooth-borne appliances MMF screws facilitate and shorten the way to achieve intermaxillary fixation considerably. In addition, MMF screws help to reduce the hazards of glove perforation and wire stick injuries. On the downside, MMF screws are attributed with the risk of tooth root damage and a lack of versatility beyond the pure maintenance of occlusion such as stabilizing loose teeth or splinting fragments of the alveolar process. The surgical technique of MMF screws as well as the pros and cons of the clinical application are reviewed. The adequate screw placement to prevent serious tooth root injuries is still an issue to rethink and modify conceptual guidelines. PMID:22110819

  11. Innovative techniques in preventing and salvaging neurovascular pedicle flaps in reconstructive foot and ankle surgery.

    PubMed

    Zgonis, Thomas; Stapleton, John J

    2008-04-01

    Pedicle flaps to cover soft tissue defects of the foot, ankle, and lower extremity are invaluable. However, venous congestion and flap necrosis, a common complication, poses greater morbidity to the patient as few remaining options for attempted limb salvage remain. The authors discuss how to prevent flap failure by allowing close observation and strict offloading of the pedicle flap through current external fixation designs. This article also discusses the role of medicinal leeches in reestablishing blood flow through the pedicle flap to prevent tissue necrosis. In addition, the use of hydrosurgery as an innovative technique offers the surgeon another option if faced with pedicle flap necrosis. PMID:19825700

  12. Pedicle versus free flap reconstruction in patients receiving intraoperative brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Erik J; Basques, Bryce A; Chang, Christopher C; Son, Yung; Sasaki, Clarence T; McGregor, Andrew; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak

    2016-08-01

    Introduction This study compared complication rates between pedicle flaps and free flaps used for resurfacing of intraoperative brachytherapy (IOBT) implants placed following head and neck tumour extirpation to help clarify the ideal reconstructive procedure for this scenario. Patients and methods A retrospective review of reconstructions with IOBT at our institution was conducted. Patient and treatment details were recorded, as were the number and type of flap complications, including re-operations. Logistic regressions compared complications between flap groups. Results Fifty free flaps and 55 pedicle flaps were included. On multivariate analysis, free flap reconstruction with IOBT was significantly associated with both an increased risk of having any flap complication (OR = 2.9, p = 0.037) and with need for operative revision (OR = 3.5, p = 0.048) compared to pedicle flap reconstruction. Conclusions In the setting of IOBT, free flaps are associated with an increased risk of having complications and requiring operative revisions. PMID:26983038

  13. Oropharyngeal reconstruction with a pedicled submandibular gland flap.

    PubMed

    Mashrah, Mubarak A; Zhou, Shang-Hui; Abdelrehem, Ahmed; Ma, Chunyue; Xu, Liqun; He, Yue; Zhang, Chen-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Locoregional flaps are widely used for reconstruction of small and medium defects in the oral cavity. The submandibular gland flap is a pedicled flap, which derives its blood supply from the facial artery, based on the submandibular gland. We describe the use of the flap in 20 patients who required oropharyngeal reconstruction with a pedicled submandibular gland flap after resection of a tumour between July 2012 and October 2014. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma were excluded. All flaps were pedicled on the facial vessels (inferiorly in 17 patients and superiorly in 3). The indications were: reconstruction of intraoral mucosal defects (n=13), filling the parapharyngeal dead space (n=6), and obliteration of the mastoid (n=1). All the flaps atrophied, but with no clinical effect. One patient developed partial loss of the flap, and one early leakage. There were no cases of xerostomia, and no signs of recurrence during the postoperative follow-up period of 3-26 months. The flap is useful, as it is simple and reliable for reconstruction of small to medium oropharyngeal defects in carefully selected cases, and gives good cosmetic and functional results. PMID:26388070

  14. Are allogenic or xenogenic screws and plates a reasonable alternative to alloplastic material for osteosynthesis--a histomorphological analysis in a dynamic system.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, C; Obwegeser, J A

    2010-12-01

    Despite invention of titanium and resorbable screws and plates, still, one of the main challenges in bone fixation is the search for an ideal osteosynthetic material. Biomechanical properties, biocompatibility, and also cost effectiveness and clinical practicability are factors for the selection of a particular material. A promising alternative seems to be screws and plates made of bone. Recently, xenogenic bone pins and screws have been invented for use in joint surgery. In this study, screws made of allogenic sheep and xenogenic human bone were analyzed in a vital and dynamic sheep-model and compared to conventional titanium screws over a standard period of bone healing of 56 days with a constant applied extrusion force. Biomechanical analysis and histomorphological evaluation were performed. After 56 days of insertion xenogenic screws made of human bone showed significantly larger distance of extrusion of on average 173.8 μm compared to allogenic screws made of sheep bone of on average 27.8 and 29.95 μm of the titanium control group. Severe resorption processes with connective tissue interposition were found in the histomorphological analysis of the xenogenic screws in contrast to new bone formation and centripetal vascularization of the allogenic bone screw, as well as in processes of incorporation of the titanium control group. The study showed allogenic cortical bone screws as a substantial alternative to titanium screws with good biomechanical properties. In contrast to other reports a different result was shown for the xenogenic bone screws. They showed insufficient holding strength with confirmative histomorphological signs of degradation and insufficient osseointegration. Before common clinical use of xenogenic osteosynthetic material, further evaluation should be performed. PMID:20813368

  15. Shock-Absorbent Ball-Screw Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirr, Otto A., Jr.; Meneely, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Actuator containing two ball screws in series employs Belleville springs to reduce impact loads, thereby increasing life expectancy. New application of springs increases reliability of equipment in which ball screws commonly used. Set of three springs within lower screw of ball-screw mechanism absorbs impacts that result when parts reach their upper and lower limits of movement. Mechanism designed with Belleville springs as shock-absorbing elements because springs have good energy-to-volume ratio and easily stacked to attain any stiffness and travel.

  16. Establishment of a rat model of chronic thoracolumbar cord compression with a flat plastic screw.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Zhang, Li-Hai; Fu, Yang-Mu; Li, Zhi-Rui; Liu, Jian-Heng; Peng, Jiang; Liu, Bin; Tang, Pei-Fu

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies of animal models of chronic mechanical compression of the spinal cord have mainly focused on cervical and thoracic lesions, but few studies have investigated thoracolumbar injury. The specific pathophysiological mechanism of chronic thoracolumbar cord injury has not yet been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to improve animal models of chronic thoracolumbar cord compression using the progressive screw. A custom-designed flat plastic screw was implanted in the spinal cord between thoracic vertebrae 12 and lumbar 1 of rats. The screw was tightened one complete turn (0.5 mm) every 7 days for 4 weeks to create different levels of chronic spinal cord compression. Following insertion of the screw, there was a significant decline in motor function of the hind limbs, and severe stenosis of micro-computed tomography parameters in the spinal cord. Cortical somatosensory evoked potential amplitudes were reduced remarkably, and latencies were prolonged at 30 minutes after surgery. The loss of motor neurons in the gray matter was marked. Demyelination and cavitation were observed in the white matter. An appropriate rat model of chronic thoracolumbar cord compression was successfully created using the progressive screw compression method, which simulated spinal cord compression injury. PMID:27482226

  17. Establishment of a rat model of chronic thoracolumbar cord compression with a flat plastic screw

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yong; Zhang, Li-hai; Fu, Yang-mu; Li, Zhi-rui; Liu, Jian-heng; Peng, Jiang; Liu, Bin; Tang, Pei-fu

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies of animal models of chronic mechanical compression of the spinal cord have mainly focused on cervical and thoracic lesions, but few studies have investigated thoracolumbar injury. The specific pathophysiological mechanism of chronic thoracolumbar cord injury has not yet been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to improve animal models of chronic thoracolumbar cord compression using the progressive screw. A custom-designed flat plastic screw was implanted in the spinal cord between thoracic vertebrae 12 and lumbar 1 of rats. The screw was tightened one complete turn (0.5 mm) every 7 days for 4 weeks to create different levels of chronic spinal cord compression. Following insertion of the screw, there was a significant decline in motor function of the hind limbs, and severe stenosis of micro-computed tomography parameters in the spinal cord. Cortical somatosensory evoked potential amplitudes were reduced remarkably, and latencies were prolonged at 30 minutes after surgery. The loss of motor neurons in the gray matter was marked. Demyelination and cavitation were observed in the white matter. An appropriate rat model of chronic thoracolumbar cord compression was successfully created using the progressive screw compression method, which simulated spinal cord compression injury. PMID:27482226

  18. 100 Consecutive Cases of Degenerative Lumbar Conditions Using a Non-Threaded Locking Screw System With a 90-Degree Locking Cap

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Bryan W.; Tortolani, P. Justin; Fedder, Ira L.; Sefter, John C.; Davis, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Background This prospective study analyzes the perioperative outcomes and long-term fusion success of 100 consecutive lumbar degenerative cases. The cases were managed using a non-threaded locking screw system, in conjunction with polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages, for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedures. These 100 cases were compared to another prospective study treating patients with the same inclusion and exclusion criteria using conventional plate-based pedicle screw spinal instrumentation augmented with carbon fiber interbody cages. Methods A total of 167 operative levels were treated in 100 patients (51 single-level, 39 two-level and 10 three-level cases). Eleven cases were revisions and 67 patients received interbody fusion cages. Patients had an average of 22.8 ± 4.0 months followup. Results: There was one instrumentation failure but no significant subsidence at the interbody fusion level. The disc space height was restored as part of the surgical procedure at the interbody cage levels: from 7.5 ± 2.3 mm preoperative to 9.0 ± 2.1 mm postoperative. There were 2 cases of pseudarthrosis (2 / 100 = 2%). The average operative time for 1-level cases was 111 ± 25 minutes; for 2-level cases it was 132.4 ± 21.8 minutes; and for 3-level cases it was 162.6 ± 33 minutes. Blood loss averaged 800 ± 473 cc for 1-level cases, 1055 ± 408 cc for 2 levels, and 1155 ± 714 cc for 3 levels. The length of stay was similar between the 3 groups (4.4 ± 1.2 days for single-level cases, 4.7 ± 1.1 for 2 levels, and 5.0 ± 1.1 for 3 levels; P > .05). There were 3 incidental durotomies, and 4 other patients developed infections postoperatively that required reoperation. Conclusion The disc and foraminal heights can be restored and maintained with a unilateral cage and pedicle screw construct. Unilateral transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using a PEEK cage combined with a non-threaded locking pedicle screw and rod system results in similar fusion rates to

  19. Anatomic Consideration of the C1 Laminar Arch for Lateral Mass Screw Fixation via C1 Lateral Lamina : A Landmark between the Lateral and Posterior Lamina of the C1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hwan; Kwak, Dai-Soon; Han, Seung-Ho; Cho, Sung-Min; You, Seung-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Objective To clarify the landmark for deciding the entry point for C1 lateral mass screws via the posterior arch by using 3-dimensional (3D) computed images. Methods Resnick insisted that the C1 posterior arch could be divided into pure posterior and lateral lamina (C1 pedicle). Authors studied where this transition point (TP) is located between the posterior lamina and the C1 pedicle and how it can be recognized. The 3D computed images of 86 cadaver C1s (M : F=45 : 41) were used in this study. Results The superior ridge of the C1 posterior arch had 2 types of orientation. One was in the vertical direction in the C1 posterior lamina and the other was in the horizontal direction in the C1 pedicle. The TP was located at the border between the 2 areas, the same site as the posterior end of the groove of the vertebral artery. On posterior-anterior projection, the posterior arch was sharpened abruptly at TP. We were unable to identify the TP in 6.4% of specimens due to complete or partial osseous bridges. A total of 93.8% of the TP were located between the most enlarged point of the spinal canal and the medial wall of the vertebral artery. Conclusion The anatomic entry zone of C1 lateral laminar screws was clarified and identified based on the TP by using preoperative 3D computed images. PMID:24044076

  20. Anomalous insertion of the medial menisci.

    PubMed

    Jung, Y B; Yum, J K; Bae, Y J; Song, K S

    1998-01-01

    Many types of meniscal anomalies have been reported. The authors encountered two cases of anomalous insertion of the anterior horn of the medial menisci to the lateral femoral condyle, which ran up along the course of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), but was independent of the ACL. These anomalies were noted during arthroscopic examination and surgery of the ipsilateral knee for a torn discoid meniscus and a patellar fracture. A 34-year-old woman had a horizontal tear of the lateral discoid meniscus. We performed arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of the inner torn portion of the lateral discoid meniscus and contoured it to resemble a normal meniscus. An anomalous insertion of the medial meniscus was found on examination of the joint during surgery. A 32-year-old man had a patellar fracture and we performed reduction under arthroscopy and internal fixation with cannulated screws. The same anomalous insertion of the medial meniscus was also found on examination of the joint during surgery. We report the cases with a review of the literature. PMID:9681544

  1. Concomitant Correction of a Soft-Tissue Fenestration with Keratinised Tissue Augmentation By Using A Rotated Double-Pedicle Flap During Second-Stage Implant Surgery- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Aileni Amarender; Kumar, P. Anoop; Sailaja, Sistla; Chakravarthy, Yshs

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue deficiencies and defects around dental implants have been observed frequently. Soft-tissue defects after implant procedures originate from the process of modelling of periimplant mucosa and often cause aesthetic disharmony, food debris accumulation and soft tissue shrinkage. Periimplant mucogingival surgery focuses on creating an optimum band of keratinized tissue resulting in soft tissue architecture similar to the gingiva around natural teeth. A 23-year-old male reported to the Department of Periodontology with a complaint of gum soreness, foul smell and food accumulation at a site where a 3.75 x 11.5mm implant was placed previously. On clinical examination, fenestration of tissue above the cover screw was observed and there appeared to be a keratinized tissue of 1mm surrounding the implant. The case was managed by use of a rotated double-pedicle flap during second-stage implant surgery to correct the soft-tissue fenestration defect and to obtain a keratinized periimplant soft tissue. A periosteal bed was prepared by giving a horizontal incision at the mucogingival junction to a depth of 4 mm. Two split-thickness keratinized pedicles were dissected from the mesial and distal interproximal tissues near the implant. After rotation, both the pedicles were sutured to each other mid-buccally and the pedicles were rigidly immobilized with sutures. At 1 month, there was a 3mm band of stable and firm keratinized tissue over the underlying tissues. The procedure resulted in an aesthetic improvement due to enhanced soft tissue architecture and optimum integration between the peri-implant soft tissue and the final prosthesis. PMID:26816998

  2. Linear motion device and method for inserting and withdrawing control rods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jay E.

    1984-01-01

    A linear motion device, more specifically a control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) for inserting and withdrawing control rods into a reactor core, is capable of independently and sequentially positioning two sets of control rods with a single motor stator and rotor. The CRDM disclosed can control more than one control rod lead screw without incurring a substantial increase in the size of the mechanism.

  3. [Suprapubic catheter insertion].

    PubMed

    Neumann, Eva; Schwentner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The suprapubic catheter enables a percutaneous drainage of urine. The insertion is made superior of the pubic bone through the abdominal wall into the bladder. It allows a permanent drainage of urine bypassing the urethra. The insertion of a suprapubic catheter requires knowledge and expertise. This paper summarizes the basic background and allows to follow the practical application step by step. PMID:26800072

  4. Intraoperative Computed Tomography Navigation for Transpedicular Screw Fixation to Treat Unstable Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ching-Yu; Wu, Meng-Huang; Li, Yen-Yao; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Hsu, Chu-Hsiang; Huang, Tsung-Jen; Hsu, Robert Wen-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Transpedicular screw (TPS) fixation in unstable thoracic and lumbar (TL) spine fractures remains technically difficult because of destroyed anatomical landmarks, unstable gross segments, and discrepancies in anatomic orientation using conventional anatomic landmarks, fluoroscopic guidance, or computed tomography (CT)-based navigation. In this study, we evaluated the safety and accuracy of TPS placement under intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) navigation in managing unstable TL spine fractures. From 2010 to 2013, we retrospectively reviewed the Spine Operation Registry records of patients who underwent posterior instrumented fusion to treat unstable TL spine fractures via the iCT navigation system. An unstable spine fracture was identified as AO/Magerl classification type B or type C. In all, 316 screws in 37 patients with unstable TL spine fractures were evaluated and involved 7 thoracic, 23 thoracolumbar junctional, and 7 lumbar fractures. The accuracy of TPS positioning in the pedicle without breach was 98% (310/316). The average number of iCT scans per patient was 2.1 (range 2–3). The average total radiation dose to patients was 15.8 mSv; the dose per single level exposure was 2.7 mSv. The TPS intraoperative revision rate was 0.6% (2/316) and no neurovascular sequela was observed. TPS fixation using the iCT navigation system obtained a 98% accuracy in stabilizing unstable TL spine fractures. A malplaced TPS could be revised during real-time confirmation of the TPS position, and no secondary operation was required to revise malplaced screws. The iCT navigation system provides accurate and safe management of unstable TL spine fractures. In addition, operating room personnel, including surgeons and nurses, did not need to wear heavy lead aprons as they were not exposed to radiation. PMID:25997042

  5. Periosteal Pedicle Flap Harvested during Vestibular Extension for Root Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shubham; Gupta, Krishna Kumar; Agrawal, Rahul; Srivastava, Pratima; Soni, Shalabh

    2015-01-01

    Root exposure along with inadequate vestibular depth is a common clinical finding. Treatment option includes many techniques to treat such defects for obtaining predictable root coverage. Normally, the vestibular depth is increased first followed by a second surgery for root coverage. The present case report describes a single-stage technique for vestibular extension and root coverage in a single tooth by using the Periosteal Pedicle Flap (PPF). This technique involves no donor site morbidity and allows for reflection of sufficient amount of periosteal flap tissue with its own blood supply at the surgical site, thus increasing the chances of success of root coverage with simultaneous increase in vestibular depth. PMID:26788377

  6. Spectacles under Pedicles: Eyewear Modification with the Paramedian Forehead Flap.

    PubMed

    Qu, Linda T; Kelpin, John P; Eichhorn, Mitchell G; Komorowska-Timek, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    The paramedian forehead flap is a widely used method of nasal reconstruction. The flap requires a bridge of tissue from forehead to the nose, for a period of 2 to 3 weeks, before it can be divided at a second procedure. During this time, patients often have difficulty positioning and wearing their eyewear underneath the pedicle of the flap. Here we present a novel approach to the problem. It requires only a simple modification to the patient's eyewear and greatly facilitates wear and removal. PMID:27622084

  7. Spectacles under Pedicles: Eyewear Modification with the Paramedian Forehead Flap

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Linda T.; Kelpin, John P.; Komorowska-Timek, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The paramedian forehead flap is a widely used method of nasal reconstruction. The flap requires a bridge of tissue from forehead to the nose, for a period of 2 to 3 weeks, before it can be divided at a second procedure. During this time, patients often have difficulty positioning and wearing their eyewear underneath the pedicle of the flap. Here we present a novel approach to the problem. It requires only a simple modification to the patient’s eyewear and greatly facilitates wear and removal.

  8. Screw vs cement-implant-retained restorations: an experimental study in the beagle. Part 2. Immunohistochemical evaluation of the peri-implant tissues.

    PubMed

    Assenza, Bartolomeo; Artese, Luciano; Scarano, Antonio; Rubini, Corrado; Perrotti, Vittoria; Piattelli, Maurizio; Thams, Ulf; San Roman, Fidel; Piccirilli, Marcello; Piattelli, Adriano

    2006-01-01

    Crestal bone loss has been reported to occur around dental implants. Even if the causes of this bone loss are not completely understood, the presence of a microgap between implant and abutment with a possible contamination of the internal portion of the implants has been suggested. The aim of this study was to see if there were differences in the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, microvessel density (MVD), proliferative activity (MIB-1), and inflammatory infiltrate in the soft tissues around implants with screwed and cemented abutments. Sandblasted and acid-etched implants were inserted in the mandibles of 6 Beagle dogs. Ten 3.5- x 10-mm root-form implants were inserted in each mandible. A total of 60 implants (30 with screwed abutments and 30 with cemented abutments) were used. After 12 months, all the bridges were removed and all abutments were checked for mobility. A total of 8 loosened screws (27%) were found in the screwed abutments, whereas no loosening was observed in cemented abutments. A gingival biopsy was performed in 8 implants with cemented abutments, in 8 implants with screwed abutments, and in 8 implants with unscrewed abutments. No statistically significant differences were found in the inflammatory infiltrate and in the MIB-1 among the different groups. No statistically significant difference was found in the MVD between screwed and cemented abutments (P = .2111), whereas there was a statistically significant difference in MVD between screwed and unscrewed abutments (P = .0277) and between cemented and unscrewed abutments (P = .0431). A low intensity of VEGF was prevalent in screwed and in cemented abutments, whereas a high intensity of VEGF was prevalent in unscrewed abutments. These facts could be explained by the effects induced, in the abutments that underwent a screw loosening, by the presence of bacteria inside the hollow portion of the implants or by enhanced reparative processes. PMID:16526575

  9. Ear tube insertion - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100045.htm Ear tube insertion - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 4 Overview The eardrum (tympanic membrane) separates the ear canal from the middle ear. Update Date 8/ ...

  10. PEG tube insertion -- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site ... To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A PEG (percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy) feeding tube insertion is the placement of ...

  11. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... leaks from inside the lung into the chest ( pneumothorax ) Fluid buildup in the chest (called a pleural ... on the reason a chest tube is inserted. Pneumothorax usually improves, but sometimes needs minimally invasive surgery. ...

  12. Bony Healing of Unstable Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures in the Elderly Using Percutaneously Applied Titanium Mesh Cages and a Transpedicular Fixation System with Expandable Screws

    PubMed Central

    Eschler, Anica; Ender, Stephan Albrecht; Schiml, Katharina; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Gradl, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There is a high incidence of vertebral burst fractures following low velocity trauma in the elderly. Treatment of unstable vertebral burst fractures using the same principles like in stable vertebral burst fractures may show less favourable results in terms of fracture reduction, maintenance of reduction and cement leakage. In order to address these shortcomings this study introduces cementless fixation of unstable vertebral burst fractures using internal fixators and expandable intravertebral titanium mesh cages in a one-stage procedure via minimum-invasive techniques. Material and Methods A total of 16 consecutive patients (median age 76 years, range 58–94) with unstable thoracolumbar burst fractures and concomitant osteoporosis were treated by an internal fixator inserted via minimum invasive technique one level above and below the fractured vertebra. Fracture reduction was achieved and maintained by transpedicular placement of two titanium mesh cages into the fractured vertebral body during the same procedure. Intra- and postoperative safety of the procedure as well as analysis of reduction quality was analysed by 3D C-arm imaging or CT, respectively. Clinical and radiographic follow-up averaged 10.4 months (range 4.5–24.5). Results Stabilization of the collapsed vertebral body was achieved in all 16 cases without any intraoperative complication. Surgical time averaged 102±6.6 minutes (71–194). The postoperative kyphotic angle (KA) and Cobb angle revealed significant improvements (KA 13.7° to 7.4°, p<0.001; Cobb 9.6° to 6.0°, p<0.002) with partial loss of reduction at final follow-up (KA 8.3°, Cobb 8.7°). VAS (Visual Analogue Scale) improved from 7.6 to 2.6 (p<0.001). Adjacent fractures were not observed. One minor (malposition of pedicle screw) complication was encountered. Conclusion Cementless fixation of osteoporotic burst fractures revealed substantial pain relief, adequate maintenance of reduction and a low complication rate

  13. Scaphoid Fracture Fixation with an Acutrak(®) Screw.

    PubMed

    Loving, Vilert A; Richardson, Michael L

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of fixation of a scaphoid fracture using an Acutrak(®) screw. This screw is cannulated and headless, which allows it to be implanted below the surface of the bone. It uses the same concept of variable thread pitch as the Herbert screw, but unlike the Herbert screw, is fully threaded, with continuously varying pitch along its length. This variable pitch creates constant compression across a fracture as the screw is advanced, and gives the screw its unique appearance. This feature may improve internal holding power, as well as allow a fracture or osteotomy site to lie anywhere along the length of the screw. PMID:27298683

  14. Screw-released roller brake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A screw-released roller brake including an input drive assembly, an output drive assembly, a plurality of locking sprags, a mechanical tripper nut for unlocking the sprags, and a casing therefor. The sprags consist of three dimensional (3-D) sprag members having pairs of contact surface regions which engage respective pairs of contact surface regions included in angular grooves or slots formed in the casing and the output drive assembly. The sprags operate to lock the output drive assembly to the casing to prevent rotation thereof in an idle mode of operation. In a drive mode of operation, the tripper is either self actuated or motor driven and is translated linearly up and down against a spline and at the limit of its travel rotates the sprags which unlock while coupling the input drive assembly to the output drive assembly so as to impart a turning motion thereto in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction.

  15. Vertical-Screw-Auger Conveyer Feeder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis (Inventor); Vollmer, Hubert J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A conical feeder is attached to a vertically conveying screw auger. The feeder is equipped with scoops and rotated from the surface to force-feed regolith the auger. Additional scoops are possible by adding a cylindrical section above the conical funnel section. Such then allows the unit to collect material from swaths larger in diameter than the enclosing casing pipe of the screw auger. A third element includes a flexible screw auger. All three can be used in combination in microgravity and zero atmosphere environments to drill and recover a wide area of subsurface regolith and entrained volatiles through a single access point on the surface.

  16. Minifragment screw fixation of oblique metacarpal fractures: a biomechanical analysis of screw types and techniques.

    PubMed

    Liporace, Frank A; Kinchelow, Tosca; Gupta, Salil; Kubiak, Erik N; McDonnell, Matthew

    2008-12-01

    The lag screw technique has historically been a successful and accepted way to treat oblique metacarpal fractures. However, it does take additional time and involve multiple steps that can increase the risk of fracture propagation or comminution in the small hand bones of the hand. An alternate fixation technique uses bicortical interfragmentary screws. Other studies support the clinical effectiveness and ease of this technique. The purpose of this study is to biomechanically assess the strength of the bicortical interfragmentary screw versus that of the traditional lag screw. Using 48 cadaver metacarpals, oblique osteotomies were created and stabilized using one of four methods: 1.5 mm bicortical interfragmentary (IF) screw, 1.5 mm lag technique screw, 2.0 mm bicortical IF screw, or 2.0 mm lag technique screw. Biomechanical testing was performed to measure post cyclic displacement and load to failure. Data was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). There was no significant difference among the fixation techniques with regard to both displacement and ultimate failure strength. There was a slight trend for a higher load to failure with the 2.0 mm IF screw and 2.0 mm lag screw compared to the 1.5 mm IF and 1.5 mm lag screws, but this was not significant. Our results support previously established clinical data that bicortical interfragmentary screw fixation is an effective treatment option for oblique metacarpal fractures. This technique has clinical importance because it is an option to appropriately stabilize the often small and difficult to control fracture fragments encountered in metacarpal fractures. PMID:18780019

  17. Loosening torque of Universal Abutment screws after cyclic loading: influence of tightening technique and screw coating

    PubMed Central

    Regalin, Alexandre; Bhering, Claudia Lopes Brilhante; Alessandretti, Rodrigo; Spazzin, Aloisio Oro

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of tightening technique and the screw coating on the loosening torque of screws used for Universal Abutment fixation after cyclic loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty implants (Titamax Ti Cortical, HE, Neodent) (n=10) were submerged in acrylic resin and four tightening techniques for Universal Abutment fixation were evaluated: A - torque with 32 Ncm (control); B - torque with 32 Ncm holding the torque meter for 20 seconds; C - torque with 32 Ncm and retorque after 10 minutes; D - torque (32 Ncm) holding the torque meter for 20 seconds and retorque after 10 minutes as initially. Samples were divided into subgroups according to the screw used: conventional titanium screw or diamond like carbon-coated (DLC) screw. Metallic crowns were fabricated for each abutment. Samples were submitted to cyclic loading at 106 cycles and 130 N of force. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). RESULTS The tightening technique did not show significant influence on the loosening torque of screws (P=.509). Conventional titanium screws showed significant higher loosening torque values than DLC (P=.000). CONCLUSION The use of conventional titanium screw is more important than the tightening techniques employed in this study to provide long-term stability to Universal Abutment screws. PMID:26576253

  18. Benefits of using omental pedicle flap over muscle flap for closure of open window thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Chikaishi, Yasuhiro; Kuwata, Taiji; Takenaka, Masaru; Oka, Soichi; Hirai, Ayako; Imanishi, Naoko; Kuroda, Koji; Tanaka, Fumihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Open window thoracotomy (OWT) as well as its closure are challenging. Transposition of omental pedicle and muscle flaps is often performed for OWT closure; however, the better technique among the two is unknown. The purpose of this series was to evaluate the outcomes of using both omental pedicle and muscle flaps for the aforementioned closure. Methods This was an observational retrospective cohort study on 27 consecutive patients who underwent OWT closure at a single institution between January 2005 and December 2014. The operation was performed using either omental pedicle or muscle flap with thoracoplasty. We compared both techniques in terms of the patient background [sex, age, body mass index (BMI) and C-reactive protein (CRP) before OWT and serum albumin levels before OWT closure], presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection, rate of bronchopleural fistula (BPF), duration of OWT, recurrence of local infection, morbidity, duration of indwelling drainage after operation, success, mortality and postoperative hospital stay. Results There were 9 (33.3%) omental pedicle flap procedures and 18 (66.7%) muscle flap procedures. The rate of local recurrence after closure of OWT was significantly higher with muscle flap than with omental pedicle flap (0% vs. 50.0%, P=0.012). The median duration of postoperative hospital stay was significantly shorter with omental pedicle flap than that with muscle flap (16.0 vs. 41.5 days, P=0.037). Mortality was observed in 2 patients (11.2%) in the muscle flap group and no patient in the omental pedicle flap group. Success rate was similar between the two groups (100% for omental pedicle flap vs. 83.3% for muscle flap). Conclusions Omental pedicle flap was superior to muscle flap in terms of reducing local recurrence and shortening postoperative hospital stay. However, mortality, morbidity and success rates were not affected by the choice of flap. PMID:27499959

  19. Tool Preloads Screw and Applies Locknut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, K. E.

    1982-01-01

    Special tool reaches through structural members inside Space Shuttle fasten nut on preloaded screw that holds thermal protection tile against outside skin of vehicle. Tool attaches tiles with accuratelycontrolled tensile loading.

  20. The development and evaluation of individualized templates to assist transoral C2 articular mass or transpedicular screw placement in TARP-IV procedures: adult cadaver specimen study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-Shi; Wu, Zeng-Hui; Xia, Hong; Ma, Xiang-Yang; Ai, Fu-Zhi; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Jian-Hua; Mai, Xiao-Hong; Yin, Qing-Shui

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate system treats irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation from transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-I to transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-III. However, this system has demonstrated problems associated with screw loosening, atlantoaxial fixation and concealed or manifest neurovascular injuries. This study sought to design a set of individualized templates to improve the accuracy of anterior C2 screw placement in the transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-IV procedure. METHODS: A set of individualized templates was designed according to thin-slice computed tomography data obtained from 10 human cadavers. The templates contained cubic modules and drill guides to facilitate transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate positioning and anterior C2 screw placement. We performed 2 stages of cadaveric experiments with 2 cadavers in stage one and 8 in stage two. Finally, guided C2 screw placement was evaluated by reading postoperative computed tomography images and comparing the planned and inserted screw trajectories. RESULTS: There were two cortical breaching screws in stage one and three in stage two, but only the cortical breaching screws in stage one were ranked critical. In stage two, the planned entry points and the transverse angles of the anterior C2 screws could be simulated, whereas the declination angles could not be simulated due to intraoperative blockage of the drill bit and screwdriver by the upper teeth. CONCLUSIONS: It was feasible to use individualized templates to guide transoral C2 screw placement. Thus, these drill templates combined with transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-IV, may improve the accuracy of transoral C2 screw placement and reduce related neurovascular complications. PMID:25518033

  1. Surgical Delay Facilitates Pedicled Nipple-sparing Mastectomy and Reconstruction in the Ptotic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Skowronksi, Piotr P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Significant ptosis is a relative contraindication for nipple-sparing mastectomy and reconstruction. Repositioning of the nipple on the reconstructed breast is best accomplished using a pedicled approach that is risky in the immediate setting. We utilized a surgical delay before reconstruction that allowed for repositioning of the nipple-areola complex on an inferior pedicle. This also allows for resizing of the nipple-areola complex, reliable complete coverage of the prosthesis with viable tissue, and creation of an ideal skin envelope in patients with skin excess. Here, we present the first description of a surgical delay to facilitate pedicled nipple-sparing mastectomy and reconstruction. PMID:27482483

  2. Surgical Delay Facilitates Pedicled Nipple-sparing Mastectomy and Reconstruction in the Ptotic Patient.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jean-Claude D; Skowronksi, Piotr P

    2016-06-01

    Significant ptosis is a relative contraindication for nipple-sparing mastectomy and reconstruction. Repositioning of the nipple on the reconstructed breast is best accomplished using a pedicled approach that is risky in the immediate setting. We utilized a surgical delay before reconstruction that allowed for repositioning of the nipple-areola complex on an inferior pedicle. This also allows for resizing of the nipple-areola complex, reliable complete coverage of the prosthesis with viable tissue, and creation of an ideal skin envelope in patients with skin excess. Here, we present the first description of a surgical delay to facilitate pedicled nipple-sparing mastectomy and reconstruction. PMID:27482483

  3. Additional Drive Circuitry for Piezoelectric Screw Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smythe, Robert; Palmer, Dean; Gursel, Yekta; Reder, Leonard; Savedra, Raymond

    2004-01-01

    Modules of additional drive circuitry have been developed to enhance the functionality of a family of commercially available positioning motors (Picomotor . or equivalent) that provide linear motion controllable, in principle, to within increments .30 nm. A motor of this type includes a piezoelectric actuator that turns a screw. Unlike traditional piezoelectrically actuated mechanisms, a motor of this type does not rely on the piezoelectric transducer to hold position: the screw does not turn except when the drive signal is applied to the actuator.

  4. Helical rotary screw expander power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R. A.; Sprankle, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    An energy converter for the development of wet steam geothermal fields is described. A project to evaluate and characterize a helical rotary screw expander for geothermal applications is discussed. The helical screw expander is a positive displacement machine which can accept untreated corrosive mineralized water of any quality from a geothermal well. The subjects of corrosion, mineral deposition, the expansion process, and experience with prototype devices are reported.

  5. Inserting IUDs safely.

    PubMed

    Burnhill, M S

    1989-01-01

    A comprehensive discussion of safe insertion of IUDs in the contemporary U.S. setting, when any IUD complication may provoke litigation, includes explanations of complications listed on package inserts, what to look for in the pelvic exam, now to handle the inserter, whether to give prophylactic antibiotics or a cervical block, follow-up management, and advice on safe sex and hygiene. The similarities and differences in listed contraindications for the ParaGard and Progestasert IUDs are analyzed. It is important to know these listed contraindications to avoid being the sole defendant in a court case. Neither explicitly rules out nulliparas, and some women who have completed childbearing may be willing to risk ectopic pregnancy. The physician must be sure to avoid any possible risks of pelvic infection, however. It is important to postpone IUD insertion if there is any suggestion of lower genital tract infection. Similarly, IUD insertion is intended to last for years, so a paracervical block is recommended if access is difficult. Tips for ensuring scrupulous asepsis are suggested. Women for whom prophylactic antibiotics are advised include diabetics, those with heart valve disease or transplants. IUD patients should be clearly identified when they call in with complaints, and seen urgently. Finally, a sexual history should be taken to avoid candidates who engage in anal sex practices. PMID:12284992

  6. Femoral Condyles Tangential Views: An Effective Method to Detect the Screw Penetration of Femoral Condyles After Retrograde Nailing

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhan-Le; Yu, Xian; Chen, Wei; Liu, Yue-Ju; Yu, Kun-Lun; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative knee soft tissue irritation is a common complication after retrograde nail fixation of femoral fractures. Distal locking screw prominence is one of the causes for soft tissue irritation. This study aimed to determine whether the use of the femoral condyles tangential views improve the diagnostic accuracy compared with anteroposterior (A-P) view in detecting distal locking screw penetrations during retrograde femoral nailing. Methods: The angle between the sagittal plane and lateral aspect of the condyle and the angle between the sagittal plane and medial aspect of condyle were measured on computed tomography (CT) images. After the angles were measured and recorded, cadaveric femurs were used in a simulated surgical procedure. The retrograde femoral nail was inserted into the femur and placed distal locking screws, which were left 2, 4, and 6 mm proud of the medial and lateral condyles for each femur. A-P view, lateral condyle tangential view and medial condyle tangential view were obtained. All fluoroscopic images were recorded and sent to three observers blinded to the experimental procedure to determine whether screws penetrated the condyle cortex or not. Results: According to the results of CT scan, the lateral condyle view was 20.88 ± 0.98° and the medial condyle view was 40.46 ± 3.14°. In the A-P view, we detected 0% at 2 mm penetration, 16.7% (lateral condyle screw) and 25.0% (medial condyle screw) at 4 mm, and 41.7% (lateral condyle screw) and 58.3% (medial condyle screw) at 6 mm. In the lateral tangential view, we detected 91.7% at 2 mm penetration of the lateral condyle and 100% at 4 mm and 6 mm. In the medial tangential view, we detected 66.7% at 2 mm penetration of the medial condyle and 100% at 4 mm and 6 mm. The femoral condyle tangential views provided significant improvement in detecting screw penetrations at all lengths (2, 4, and 6 mm) compared with the A-P view (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The femoral condyles tangential

  7. Combination of luque instrumentation with polyaxial screws in the treatment of myelomeningocele kyphosis.

    PubMed

    Kocaoğlu, Bariş; Erol, Bülent; Akgülle, Hamdi; Gasimov, Elviz; Yalçin, Selim

    2008-05-01

    Rigid congenital kyphosis in myelomeningocele is associated with an important morbidity with skin breakdown, recurrent infection, and decreased function. Kyphectomy is the classic treatment to restore spinal alignment; however, surgery is associated with morbidity and long-term complications. The purpose of this retrospective study was to examine the authors' experience using combination of Luque instrumentation with posterolaterally placed polyaxial screws in the treatment of myelomeningocele kyphosis. From June 1999 to June 2003, 7 patients were treated and followed up for an average of 68.6 months. The average age at the time of the operation was 7 year and 1 month. All patients underwent vertebral excision from just above the apex of vertebral deformity to realign the sagittal deformity. Posterolaterally placed polyaxial screws were used in combination with segmental Luque instrumentation. Kyphotic deformity averaged 104 degrees before surgery, 15.2 degrees after surgery, and 18.5 degrees at the latest follow-up. The average loss of correction was 3.3 degrees. The average blood loss was 611 mL. Complications occurred in 2 of 7 patients were superficial wound breakdown and deep wound infection that required rotational flap closure. Kyphectomy with posterior instrumentation by using Luque technique in the combination with polyaxial screws is reliable method for correcting rigid kyphotic deformity in patients with myelomeningocele. Rigidity of the construct, greater correction capacity, and low profile instrumentation by the help of posterolateral insertion of the polyaxial screws and wiring were the distinct advantages of this technique. PMID:18458590

  8. ALS insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.

    1990-11-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), the first US third generation synchrotron radiation source, is currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The low-emittance, 1.5 GeV electron storage ring and the insertion devices are specifically designed to produce high brightness beams in the UV to soft X-Ray range. The planned initial complement of insertion devices includes four 4.6 m long undulators, with period lengths of 3.9 cm, 5.0 cm (2) and 8.0 cm, and a 2.9 m long wiggler of 16 cm period length. Undulator design is well advanced and fabrication has begun on the 5.0 cm and 8.0 cm period length undulators. This paper discusses ALS insertion device requirements; general design philosophy; and design of the magnetic structure, support structure/drive systems, control system and vacuum system. 18 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Scaphoid excision and 4-corner fusion using retrograde headless compression screws.

    PubMed

    Ball, Brandon; Bergman, Joseph W

    2012-12-01

    Scapholunate advanced collapse is a predictable form of wrist arthritis resulting from longstanding scapholunate instability. Four-corner fusion and scaphoid excision is a reliable procedure used to treat scapholunate advanced collapse wrist that improves pain and preserves range of motion. Multiple methods of achieving fixation have been described for the procedure including K-wires, staples, and headless compression screws. In previously described techniques, the compression screws are inserted in an antegrade manner, breaching the articular surface of the lunate. Even small areas of chondral damage may undermine the long-term durability of the radiocarpal joint. Given the 4-corner fusion relies on the integrity of the radiolunate articulation for success, it would seem advantageous to preserve the articular cartilage of the lunate. The technique described here involves retrograde insertion of headless compression screws to achieve a 4-corner fusion. Although it is still early, we anticipate that this procedure will result in similar fusion rates to other forms of fixation. PMID:23160552

  10. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Stop with an Integral Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Perek, John (Inventor); Geck, Kellan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a housing assembly, a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is rotationally mounted in the housing assembly, is adapted to receive an input torque, and is configured, upon receipt thereof, to rotate and supply a drive force. The ball screw is mounted within the housing assembly and extends through the ball nut. The ball screw has a first end and a second end, and is coupled to receive the drive force from the ball nut. The ball screw is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively translate between a stow position and a deploy position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw to translate therewith and is configured to at selectively engage the housing assembly while the ball screw is translating, and engage the ball nut when the ball screw is in the deploy position.

  11. Microendoscopic Excision of Osteoid Osteoma in the Pedicle of the Third Lumbar Vertebra

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Eizo; Murakami, Hideki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of a patient who underwent complete microendoscopic excision of an osteoid osteoma, which induced radiculopathy without nerve root compression. A 20-year-old man presented severe right groin pain that was temporarily relieved by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed typical features of a nidus located in the inferior cortex of the right L3 pedicle. We performed surgery using a posterior microendoscopic approach. We drilled vertically along the line of the cortex of the caudal pedicle using a high-speed drill. After identifying the tumor, en bloc resection of the nidus was achieved. Immediately after surgery, pain in the right groin disappeared. A CT scan showed that most of the right L3 pedicle remained. This minimally invasive technique preserves spinal structures, including the facet and pedicle, and is a viable option for the treatment of spinal osteoid osteomas located close to vital structures. PMID:26713130

  12. Interfacial insert for electrical connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macavay, D.

    1975-01-01

    The development of interfacial inserts for improved electric connectors is discussed. The inserts were manufactured from epoxy resins. The design features of the inserts and the manufacturing equipment are described. The reliability test program is reported. Drawings of the interfacial inserts are provided.

  13. Insertion in Persian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kambuziya, Aliyeh Kord-e Zafaranlu; Dehghan, Masoud

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates epenthesis process in Persian to catch some results in relating to vowel and consonant insertion in Persian lexicon. This survey has a close relationship to the description of epenthetic consonants and the conditions in which these consonants are used. Since no word in Persian may begin with a vowel, so that hiatus can't be…

  14. Reverse Sural Artery Island Flap With Skin Extension Along the Pedicle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Il; Ha, Sung Han; Yu, Sun O; Park, Min Jong; Chae, Sang Hoon; Lee, Gi Jun

    2016-01-01

    The distally based sural flap is an efficient flap for reconstruction of soft tissues defects of lower limb. The unstable vascular pedicle, however, is prone to compression by the subcutaneous tunnel, especially when a long pedicle covers the distal area of the foot. The aim of the present study was to introduce a modified surgical technique that leaves the skin extension over the pedicle and to report the clinical results of this modification. A total of 25 consecutive patients with a mean age of 51.7 ± 14.7 years underwent surgery. We modified the conventional sural flap technique by leaving a skin extension over the entire length of the pedicle, creating a fasciocutaneous vascular pedicle. The postoperative flap survival rates, complications, and the characteristics of the flaps such as flap size, pedicle length, and the most distal area that could be covered with this modification, were reviewed. At the last clinical follow-up examination, all the flaps survived, although partial necrosis was observed in 2 (8%) cases. Four cases of venous congestion developed but healed without additional complications. The mean flap size was 5.9 ± 1.8 × 9.2 ± 2.7 cm. With this modification, the sural flap could cover the defect located in extreme distal areas, such as the medial forefoot and dorsum of the first metatarsophalangeal joint, with a longer pedicle (≤27 cm) in 7 patients (28%). A skin extension along the pedicle achieved the favorable survival rate of the sural flap and successfully extended the surgical indications to more distal areas. PMID:26810124

  15. Preventing surgical complications: A survey on surgeons' perception of intra-articular malleolar screw misplacement in a cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Intra-articular hardware penetration can occur during osteosynthesis of ankle fractures, jeopardizing patients' outcomes. The intraoperative recognition of misplaced screws may be difficult due to the challenge of adequate interpretation of specific radiographic views. The present study was designed to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of standardized radiographic ankle views to determine the accuracy of diagnosis for intra-articular hardware placement of medial malleolar screws in a cadaveric model. Methods Nine preserved human cadaveric lower extremity specimens were used. Under direct visualization, two 4.0 mm cancellous screws were inserted into the medial malleolus. Each specimen was analyzed radiographically using antero-posterior (AP) and mortise views. The X-rays were randomly uploaded on a CD-ROM and included in a survey submitted to ten selected orthopaedic surgeons. The "Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy" (STARD) questionnaire was used to determine the surgeons' perception of accuracy of screw placement in the medial malleolus. The selection of items was based on evidence whenever possible, therefore the "inconclusive" category was added. Inter and intraobserver variations were analyzed by kappa statistics to measure the amount of agreement. Results There was a poor level of agreement (kappa 0.4) both in the AP and in the mortise view among all the examiners. Associating the two x-rays, the agreement remained poor (kappa 0.4). In the cases in which there was a diagnosis of articular penetration, there was a poor agreement related to which of the screws was intra-articular. The number of "inconclusive" responses was low and constant, without a statistically significant difference between the subspecialists Conclusion The routine intraoperative radiographic imaging of the ankle is difficult to interpret and unreliable for detection of intra-articular hardware penetration. We therefore recommend to reposition medial malleolar

  16. Twin screw wet granulation: Binder delivery.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Cartwright, James J; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2015-06-20

    The effects of three ways of binder delivery into the twin screw granulator (TSG) on the residence time, torque, properties of granules (size, shape, strength) and binder distribution were studied. The binder distribution was visualised through the transparent barrel using high speed imaging as well as quantified using offline technique. Furthermore, the effect of binder delivery and the change of screw configuration (conveying elements only and conveying elements with kneading elements) on the surface velocity of granules across the screw channel were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The binder was delivered in three ways; all solid binder incorporated with powder mixture, 50% of solid binder mixed with powder mixture and 50% mixed with water, all the solid binder dissolved in water. Incorporation of all solid binder with powder mixture resulted in the relatively longer residence time and higher torque, narrower granule size distribution, more spherical granules, weaker big-sized granules, stronger small-sized granules and better binder distribution compared to that in other two ways. The surface velocity of granules showed variation from one screw to another as a result of uneven liquid distribution as well as shown a reduction while introducing the kneading elements into the screw configuration. PMID:25869451

  17. One-Stage Posterior Debridement and Transpedicular Screw Fixation for Treating Monosegmental Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Tuberculosis in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhili; Peng, Aifeng; Long, Xinhua; Yang, Dong; Huang, Shanhu

    2014-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis is still prevalent in some developing countries. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy and safety of one-stage posterior debridement, autogenous bone grafting, and transpedicular screw fixation in treating monosegmental thoracic and lumbar tuberculosis in adults. 37 patients were retrospectively reviewed in this study. The data of images, operative time and blood loss volume, perioperative complications, time to achieve bony fusion, VAS score, and neurologic function preoperatively and postoperatively were collected. The mean follow-up period was 21.5 ± 3.5 months. The tuberculosis was cured after surgery in all patients, and no recurrence was observed. Bony fusion was achieved in all patients with a mean time of 5.6 ± 2.5 months. Neurological outcome did not change in one case with grade A, and increased by 1–3 grades in the other patients with nerve deficit. The average preoperative and postoperative VAS scores were 5.5 ± 2.23 and 1.5 ± 1.22, respectively; the difference was significant (P < 0.05). There were three perioperative complications (8.1%, 3/37) observed in this study. In conclusion, the procedure of one-stage posterior debridement, interbody fusion with autogenous bone grafting, and posterior fixation with pedicle screw is effective and safe for treating monosegmental thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis in adults. PMID:24701134

  18. [Orthopedic shoe treatment : Inserts].

    PubMed

    Schuh, R; Windhager, R

    2016-03-01

    The use of inserts and orthopedic shoe adjustment represents an essential component of the conservative therapy of degenerative diseases and deformities of the musculoskeletal system. Inserts can have supportive, bedding and corrective effects and are used in particular for complaints of the feet and ankles. The combination of diverse materials allows a high level of cushioning and supporting features and corresponding longevity to be accomplished. The production is carried out on an individual basis and if necessary computer-assisted in order to achieve an optimal fit. For severe and rigid deformities the formation of pressure ulcers can be prevented by orthopedic shoe adjustment and by the use of orthopedic tailor-made shoes. PMID:26861757

  19. Commentary: Utility of the O-Arm in spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: More studies report the intraoperative benefits vs. risks of utilizing the O-Arm in performing pedicle screw insertion in spinal surgery. Methods/Results: Several studies document the utility of CT-guided O-arm placement of pedicle/lateral mass screws. Singh et al. documented the efficacy of CT guided-O Arm placement of pedicle screws and lateral mass screws in the upper cervical spine.[4] Specifically, 10 patients with unstable hangman's fractures (ages 17-80) required 52 screws; C2 pedicle screws (20), C3 lateral mass screws (20), C4 lateral mass screws (12) and one C2 pedicle screw. Of these only 5% were misplaced, and none had new neuorlogical deficits. Kim et al. demonstrated the safety/efficacy of the CT/O-arm in minimally invasive spine surgery (MIS) (posterior percutaneous spinal fusions).[1] Of 290 pedicle screws, 280 (96.6%) were acceptably placed. Kotani et al. compared the placement of 222 pedicle screws (29 patients operated upon with CT-based navigation) vs. 416 screws (32 having surgery using O-arm-based navigation); postoperative CT studies confirmed the accuracy of screw placement, and no significant differences in the frequency of grade 2-3 perforations between the two groups. Nelson et al. analyzed the radiation exposure delivered to the operating room staff utilizing C-arm fluoroscopy (C-arm), portable X-ray (XR) radiography, and portable cone-beam computed tomography (O-arm); the surgeon and assistant were exposed to higher levels of scatter radiation from the C-arm, with a 7.7-fold increase in radiation exposure on the tube vs. detector sides.[3] Conclusion: There are several pros and a few cons (radiation dosage) for the use of the O-arm in spine surgery. PMID:25593769

  20. The reaction of cortical bone to compression by screw threads.

    PubMed

    Schatzker, J; Horne, J G; Sumner-Smith, G

    1975-09-01

    Cortical bone subjected to compression by screw threads retains its integrity and is not resorbed. Screws which generate compression at the interface of their threads with bone can be expected to provide adequate fixation until bone union occurs. PMID:1157421

  1. Impact of screw configuration on the particle size distribution of granules produced by twin screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, J; Burggraeve, A; Fonteyne, M; Cappuyns, P; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-02-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) has been reported by different research groups as an attractive technology for continuous wet granulation. However, in contrast to fluidized bed granulation, granules produced via this technique typically have a wide and multimodal particle size distribution (PSD), resulting in suboptimal flow properties. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the impact of granulator screw configuration on the PSD of granules produced by TSG. Experiments were performed using a 25 mm co-rotating twin screw granulator, being part of the ConsiGma™-25 system (a fully continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line from GEA Pharma Systems). Besides the screw elements conventionally used for TSG (conveying and kneading elements), alternative designs of screw elements (tooth-mixing-elements (TME), screw mixing elements (SME) and cutters) were investigated using an α-lactose monohydrate formulation granulated with distilled water. Granulation with only conveying elements resulted in wide and multimodal PSD. Using kneading elements, the width of the PSD could be partially narrowed and the liquid distribution was more homogeneous. However, still a significant fraction of oversized agglomerates was obtained. Implementing additional kneading elements or cutters in the final section of the screw configuration was not beneficial. Furthermore, granulation with only TME or SME had limited impact on the width of the PSD. Promising results were obtained by combining kneading elements with SME, as for these configurations the PSD was narrower and shifted to the size fractions suitable for tableting. PMID:25562758

  2. Screw expander for light duty diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary selection and sizing of a positive displacement screw compressor-expander subsystem for a light-duty adiabatic diesel engine; development of a mathematical model to describe overall efficiencies for the screw compressor and expander; simulation of operation to establish overall efficiency for a range of design parameters and at given engine operating points; simulation to establish potential net power output at light-duty diesel operating points; analytical determination of mass moments of inertia for the rotors and inertia of the compressor-expander subsystem; and preparation of engineering layout drawings of the compressor and expander are discussed. As a result of this work, it was concluded that the screw compressor and expander designed for light-duty diesel engine applications are viable alternatives to turbo-compound systems, with acceptable efficiencies for both units, and only a moderate effect on the transient response.

  3. Low energy high pressure miniature screw valve

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J.; Spletzer, Barry L.

    2006-12-12

    A low energy high pressure screw valve having a valve body having an upper portion and a lower portion, said lower portion of said valve body defining an inlet flow passage and an outlet flow passage traversing said valve body to a valve seat, said upper portion of said valve body defining a cavity at said valve seat, a diaphragm restricting flow between said upper portion of said valve body and said lower portion, said diaphragm capable of engaging said valve seat to restrict fluid communication between said inlet passage and said outlet passage, a plunger within said cavity supporting said diaphragm, said plunger being capable of engaging said diaphragm with said valve seat at said inlet and outlet fluid passages, said plunger being in point contact with a drive screw having threads engaged with opposing threads within said upper portion of said valve body such engagement allowing motion of said drive screw within said valve body.

  4. Head-locking durability of fixed and variable angle locking screws under repetitive loading.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Mark; Wahl, Dieter; Zderic, Ivan; Gueorguiev, Boyko; Jupiter, Jesse B; Perren, Stephan M

    2016-06-01

    Polyaxial locking screws are increasingly applied in fracture fixation. To investigate the durability of the head-locking mechanism, the removal torque of variable angle (VA) and fixed angle (FA) stainless steel and titanium locking screws was investigated without and after a cyclic loading test. Stainless steel (St) and titanium (Ti) 2.4 mm orthogonally inserted FA screws and 2.4 mm VA screws inserted in different inclinations (0°-15°) (n = 6 per group) were locked at 0.8 Nm. Removal torque was determined without (W) and after (A) cyclic loading (sinusoidal load, 5 Hz, constant amplitude of 25 N, up to 10'000 cycles, or failure). Significant differences in-between the groups were detected by Student's t-test (p < 0.05). Except VA Ti in 0deg and FA, all groups exhibited a drop in removal torque below the insertion torque without and after cyclic testing. The removal torque was (St: FA W:0.81 Nm ± 0.04 A:0.72Nm ± 0.04; VA0deg W:0.73 Nm ± 0.04 A:0.65 Nm ± 0.05; VA15deg W:0.51 Nm ± 0.05 A:0.50 Nm ± 0.08; Ti: FA W:0.82 Nm ± 0.03 A:0.70 Nm ± 0.04; VA0deg W:0.80 Nm ± 0.02 A:0.72 Nm ± 0.05; VA15deg W:0.55 Nm ± 0.03 A:0.54 Nm ± 0.06). In all groups, the removal torque after cyclic testing did not drop below 16% of the removal torque without cyclic testing. No head loosening was observed after cyclic testing. Stainless steel and titanium 2.4 mm fixed and variable angle locking screws provide a stable and lasting head-locking mechanism. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:949-952, 2016. PMID:26580296

  5. Spline-Screw Multiple-Rotation Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Mechanism functions like combined robotic gripper and nut runner. Spline-screw multiple-rotation mechanism related to spline-screw payload-fastening system described in (GSC-13454). Incorporated as subsystem in alternative version of system. Mechanism functions like combination of robotic gripper and nut runner; provides both secure grip and rotary actuation of other parts of system. Used in system in which no need to make or break electrical connections to payload during robotic installation or removal of payload. More complicated version needed to make and break electrical connections. Mechanism mounted in payload.

  6. Reversed-field pinch and screw pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Kito, M.; Yoshimura, H.

    1983-12-01

    The Electrotechnical Laboratory and the College of Science and Technology at Nihon University discuss the results, device parameters, and objectives of reversed-field pinch TPE-1R(M). This device is illustrated and tables are given of machine parameters, as well as plasma parameters and temperature and density scalings. Other reversed-field pinch (RFP) machines are discussed, and tables show the RFP devices of Japan and design parameters of TPE-2, a screw-pinch device with a noncircular cross section. The STP-3 screw-pinch device is also discussed.

  7. Biomechanical evaluation of a new composite bioresorbable screw.

    PubMed

    Bailey, C A; Kuiper, J H; Kelly, C P

    2006-04-01

    A new bioresorbable composite cannulated screw has been developed for small bone fracture fixation. The LG ("Little Grafter") screw is manufactured from Biosteon, which is a composite of poly L-lactic acid and hydroxyapatite. This study aimed to compare interfragmentary compression generated by this new screw with conventional metal screws commonly used in scaphoid fracture fixation. Four small metallic screws were compared with the LG screw, using a bone model produced from rigid polyurethane foam. The screws included the Acutrak, Asnis III, Herbert and Herbert-Whipple screws. The mean maximum compression forces for the LG screw, the Asnis and the Acutrak were comparable (LG 32.3 N, Asnis 32.8 N, Acutrak 38.3 N), whereas those using the Herbert and the Herbert-Whipple screw were significantly lower (Herbert 21.8 N, Herbert-Whipple 19.9 N). The bioresorbable LG screw has been shown to have good compressive properties compared to commonly used small bone fragment compression screws. PMID:16361004

  8. Pedicle viability as the determinant factor for conversion to free nipple graft

    PubMed Central

    Al-shaham, AA

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Women with extremely large breasts have many complaints. Reduction mammaplasty improves shape and relieves physical symptoms and alleviates psychological complaints. Mammaplasty is a an evolving technique; no single method is ideal or suitable for all breasts. Many techniques are advocated for reduction mammaplasty, including the superior, vertical, horizontal, lateral and inferior (the most popular) pedicle techniques. Even after 60 years of development in breast reduction techniques, there are still reported incidences of nipple-areola complex (NAC) necrosis. OBJECTIVE: To assess the perioperative conversion to free nipple graft to prevent the complication of nipple necrosis when pedicle viability is grossly compromised. METHODS: Between January 2002 and March 2006, 66 patients (132 breasts) underwent reduction mammaplasty using the inferior pedicle technique. The patients presented with breast gigantism and required excision of more than 1000 g of breast tissue per side. The mean patient age was 34.81 years. Patients had neck, shoulder and back pain as well as psychological complaints. Data regarding sternal notch-to-nipple distances and inframammary fold-to-nipple distances were recorded preoperatively and postoperatively. The weights of the excised breast tissue from either side were recorded. Viability of the pedicle flap was carefully monitored through perioperative clinical observation of skin colour, temperature, capillary refill and bleeding characteristics, and reassessed after pedicle folding and placement inside the newly tailored skin envelope. Nonvital NAC, as evaluated by the surgeon during surgery, necessitated conversion to the free nipple graft technique. RESULTS: During the course of the study, two patients (four breasts; 3.03%) exhibited impending gangrene to the NAC, and perioperative conversion to the free nipple graft was performed. In these two patients, the pedicle length ranged from 23 cm to 25 cm, and breast mass reduction

  9. Linear motion device and method for inserting and withdrawing control rods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.E.

    Disclosed is a linear motion device and more specifically a control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) for inserting and withdrawing control rods into a reactor core. The CRDM and method disclosed is capable of independently and sequentially positioning two sets of control rods with a single motor stator and rotor. The CRDM disclosed can control more than one control rod lead screw without incurring a substantial increase in the size of the mechanism.

  10. Inserts Automatically Lubricate Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Inserts on ball-separator ring of ball bearings provide continuous film of lubricant on ball surfaces. Inserts are machined or molded. Small inserts in ball pockets provide steady supply of lubricant. Technique is utilized on equipment for which maintenance is often poor and lubrication interval is uncertain, such as household appliances, automobiles, and marine engines.

  11. [Identification of gallbladder pedicle anatomy during laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Tebala, Giovanni D; Innocenti, Paolo; Ciani, Renzo; Zumbo, Antonella; Fonsi, Giovanni B; Bellini, Pierpaolo; De Chiara, Fabio; Fittipaldi, Domenico; Hadjiamiri, Hossein; Lamaro, Stefano; Marinoni, Riccardo

    2004-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is widely accepted nowadays as the gold standard in the treatment of cholelithiasis. This new technique was initially associated with a significant increase in morbidity, and in particular in iatrogenic biliary injuries and arterial haemorrhages, perhaps due to a lack of knowledge of the "laparoscopic anatomy" of the gallbladder pedicle. In this technique the anatomical structures are viewed on a two-dimensional video monitor, and the dissection is performed with long instruments without manual sensitivity. Therefore, the laparoscopic surgeon has to deal with new anatomical views and must be aware of the possible arterial and biliary variants. In this review we describe our technique of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, with particular reference to manoeuvres useful for identifying the various anatomical structures at the gallbladder hilum. In our opinion, it is mandatory to avoid cutting any duct if its identity has yet to be established. For this reason, we pay great attention to the anatomical dissection of Calot's triangle, in order to accurately identify the cystic duct and the cystic artery and any other vascular or biliary structures. Routine intraoperative cholangiography may be useful for identifying the biliary anatomy. When in doubt, the surgeon should not hesitate to convert the procedure to open surgery. PMID:15287636

  12. Insertion assembly for a pipe completion plug

    SciTech Connect

    Jiles, S.L.

    1991-08-13

    This patent describes an insertion assembly for installing a completion plug in a branching saddle having an internally-threaded pipe stub and a peripheral beveled seating surface in the pipe stub. It comprises a tube; a shaft extending through the tube; a spring-loaded socket extending partially into one end of the tube, resiliently biased against further movement into the tube and mounted on one end of the shaft so as to turn with it; a completion plug having an elastomeric disk with a beveled peripheral edge and a circular metal plate attached to the disk; a camming groove at the end of the tube and a camming pin extending from the hub to releasably retain the plate at the end of the tube, the groove having a radially-extending portion terminating in a pair of axially-extending recesses for receiving the pin and an axially-extending inlet slot between the recesses, whereby the completion plug may be lowered into place in the branching saddle by means of the tube and engaged so that its beveled edge seats against the beveled seating surface of the pipe stub by screwing the plate into the threaded pipe stub as the shaft is turned within the tube while the pin is seated in one of the recesses and may be left in place in the pipe stub by releasing the camming pin from the camming groove through the inlet slot.

  13. Fatigue strength of common tibial intramedullary nail distal locking screws

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Lanny V; Harris, Robert M; Zubak, Joseph J

    2009-01-01

    Background Premature failure of either the nail and/or locking screws with unstable fracture patterns may lead to angulation, shortening, malunion, and IM nail migration. Up to thirty percent of all unreamed nail locking screws can break after initial weight bearing is allowed at 8–10 weeks if union has not occurred. The primary problem this presents is hardware removal during revision surgery. The purposes of our study was to evaluate the relative fatigue resistance of distal locking screws and bolts from representative manufacturers of tibial IM nail systems, and develop a relative risk assessment of screws and materials used. Evaluations included quantitative and qualitative measures of the relative performance of these screws. Methods Fatigue tests were conducted to simulate a comminuted fracture that was treated by IM nailing assuming that all load was carried by the screws. Each screw type was tested ten times in a single screw configuration. One screw type was tested an additional ten times in a two-screw parallel configuration. Fatigue tests were performed using a servohydraulic materials testing system and custom fixturing that simulated screws placed in the distal region of an appropriately sized tibial IM nail. Fatigue loads were estimated based on a seventy-five kilogram individual at full weight bearing. The test duration was one million cycles (roughly one year), or screw fracture, whichever occurred first. Failure analysis of a representative sample of titanium alloy and stainless steel screws included scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and quantitative metallography. Results The average fatigue life of a single screw with a diameter of 4.0 mm was 1200 cycles, which would correspond roughly to half a day of full weight bearing. Single screws with a diameter of 4.5 mm or larger have approximately a 50 percent probability of withstanding a week of weight bearing, whereas a single 5.0 mm diameter screw has greater than 90 percent probability of

  14. Computer simulation of screw dislocation in aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esterling, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The atomic structure in a 110 screw dislocation core for aluminum is obtained by computer simulation. The lattice statics technique is employed since it entails no artificially imposed elastic boundary around the defect. The interatomic potential has no adjustable parameters and was derived from pseudopotential theory. The resulting atomic displacements were allowed to relax in all three dimensions.

  15. Improvements In Ball-Screw Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iskenderian, Theodore; Joffe, Benjamin; Summers, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Report describes modifications of design of type of ball-screw linear actuator driven by dc motor, with linear-displacement feedback via linear variable-differential transformer (LVDT). Actuators used to position spacecraft engines to direct thrust. Modifications directed toward ensuring reliable and predictable operation during planned 12-year cruise and interval of hard use at end of cruise.

  16. Computation of Flow in Screw Compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalitzin, Georgi; Cai, Xiaodan; Reba, Ramons; Medic, Gorazd

    2015-08-01

    A CFD model enabling accurate and computationally affordable simulation of unsteady flow in screw compressors has been developed. This paper focuses on computational aspects, including real-gas CFD using hybrid structured/unstructured moving grids, and specifics of grid generation for moving rotors and their communication with the discharge plenum.

  17. Improvements to the single screw extruder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiemenz, C.; Ziegmann, G.; Franzkoch, B.; Hoffmanns, W.; Michaeli, W.

    1977-01-01

    The extrusion on a single screw extruder is examined. The process is divided into several steps: the dosage of the materials to be conveyed; the modification of the shape of the feeding opening which influences the feeding process and consequently the throughput of the extruder; optimizing the shape of the feeding zone to meet the specific material requirements; and plasticizing and homogenizing.

  18. Nylon screws make inexpensive coil forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aucoin, G.; Rosenthal, C.

    1978-01-01

    Standard nylon screws act as coil form copper wire laid down in spiral thread. Completed coil may be bonded to printed-circuit board. However, it is impossible to tune coil by adjusting spacing between windings, technique sometimes used with air-core coils.

  19. Effects of vascular pedicle ligation on blood flow in canine semitendinosus muscle.

    PubMed

    Solano, M; Purinton, P T; Chambers, J N; Munnell, J F

    1995-06-01

    Blood flow to the semitendinosus muscle was studied in 12 dogs after ligation of either the proximal or distal vascular pedicle and elevation of the muscle from its normal position. Using 15-micron-diameter radioactive microspheres, flow was measured at rest, 6 and 18 days after muscle elevation and pedicle ligation. Mean blood flow in the proximal region of the muscle 6 and 18 days after ligation of the caudal gluteal (proximal) pedicle was not significantly different from mean blood flow calculated in the middle and distal regions of the muscle. There was also no significant difference in mean blood flow among proximal, middle, and distal regions of the muscle, 6 and 18 days after ligation of the distal caudal femoral (distal) pedicle. There was significantly (P < 0.05) increased blood flow between group-A (ligation of caudal gluteal artery) and group-C (operated-control) muscles, 6 and 18 days after surgery. There was no loss of muscle fiber striations or nuclei, or presence of fibrous tissue that might have indicated ischemic necrosis in any of the experimental groups. These results indicate that the entire semitendinosus muscle can be sustained by the blood flow from either of its 2 vascular pedicles, which reinforces its potential as a muscle flap. PMID:7653880

  20. Surgical screw segmentation for mobile C-arm CT devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, Joseph; Brehler, Michael; Franke, Jochen; Wolf, Ivo; Vetter, Sven Y.; Grützner, Paul A.; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Nabers, Diana

    2014-03-01

    Calcaneal fractures are commonly treated by open reduction and internal fixation. An anatomical reconstruction of involved joints is mandatory to prevent cartilage damage and premature arthritis. In order to avoid intraarticular screw placements, the use of mobile C-arm CT devices is required. However, for analyzing the screw placement in detail, a time-consuming human-computer interaction is necessary to navigate through 3D images and therefore to view a single screw in detail. Established interaction procedures of repeatedly positioning and rotating sectional planes are inconvenient and impede the intraoperative assessment of the screw positioning. To simplify the interaction with 3D images, we propose an automatic screw segmentation that allows for an immediate selection of relevant sectional planes. Our algorithm consists of three major steps. At first, cylindrical characteristics are determined from local gradient structures with the help of RANSAC. In a second step, a DBScan clustering algorithm is applied to group similar cylinder characteristics. Each detected cluster represents a screw, whose determined location is then refined by a cylinder-to-image registration in a third step. Our evaluation with 309 screws in 50 images shows robust and precise results. The algorithm detected 98% (303) of the screws correctly. Thirteen clusters led to falsely identified screws. The mean distance error for the screw tip was 0.8 +/- 0.8 mm and for the screw head 1.2 +/- 1 mm. The mean orientation error was 1.4 +/- 1.2 degrees.

  1. Outcome of intertrochanteric fractures treated by intramedullary nail with two integrated lag screws: A study in Asian population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Won; Kim, Tae-Young; Ha, Yong-Chan; Lee, Young-Kyun; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The incidence of intertrochanteric fracture has increased during recent years as life expectancy has also increased. Currently, orthopedic surgeons use various fixation methods for intertrochanteric fractures like, intramedullary (IM) nailing or dynamic hip screws and plates. The intramedullary (IM) nail with two integrated lag screws has been used recently in intertrochanteric fractures to overcome Z-affect phenomenon. However, no study is available in an Asian population. This prospective study was undertaken to document the clinical and radiologic outcomes of the IM nail with two integrated lag screws and its limitations in Asian patients. Materials and Methods: Osteosynthesis was performed using InterTAN nail in 100 patients with an intertrochanteric fractures followed up for at least 1 year after surgery. We evaluated the recovery rates to prefracture status, time to bony union and the incidence of complications. Results: Seventy four patients were available for at least 1 year followup examinations. Forty-five patients (60.8%) recovered prefracture status. Mean time to bony union was 18.3 ± 8.6 weeks. Intraoperative technical problems related to an unavoidable superior positioning of the lag screw occurred in five cases. Postoperative complications requiring reoperation occurred in three patients; two cases of varus collapse with cut out and one case of periprosthetic fracture. Conclusions: The IM nail with two integrated lag screws showed favorable outcomes in Asian patients with an intertrochanteric fracture even though several complications that were not previously reported with this nail were found. The proper selection of patients and careful insertion of two lag screws should be mandatory in Asian patients. PMID:26229165

  2. Effect of Vertical Misfit on Screw Joint Stability of Implant-Supported Crowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves; Delben, Juliana Aparecida; Tabata, Lucas Fernando; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Gomes, Érica Alves

    2011-08-01

    The passive fit between prosthesis and implant is a relevant factor for screw joint stability and treatment success. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of vertical misfit in abutment-implant interface on preload maintenance of retention screw of implant-supported crowns. The crowns were fabricated with different abutments and veneering materials and divided into 5 groups ( n = 12): Gold UCLA abutments cast in gold alloy veneered with ceramic (Group I) and resin (Group II), UCLA abutments cast in titanium veneered with ceramic (Group III) and resin (Group IV), and zirconia abutments with ceramic veneering (Group V). The crowns were attached to implants by gold retention screws with 35-N cm insertion torque. Specimens were submitted to mechanical cycling up to 106 cycles. Measurements of detorque and vertical misfit in abutment-implant interface were performed before and after mechanical cycling. ANOVA revealed statistically significant difference ( P < 0.05) among groups for vertical misfit measured before and after mechanical cycling. The abutments cast in titanium exhibited the highest misfit values. Pearson correlation test did not demonstrate significant correlation ( P > 0.05) between vertical misfit and detorque value. It was concluded that vertical misfit did not influence torque maintenance and the abutments cast in titanium exhibited the highest misfit values.

  3. Addition of an anti-rotation screw to the dynamic hip screw for femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Makki, Daoud; Mohamed, Ahmed M; Gadiyar, Rajeev; Patterson, Marc

    2013-07-01

    The authors investigated the use of an anti-rotation screw with the dynamic hip screw (DHS) during internal fixation of Garden I and II femoral neck fractures. Sixty-five patients with Garden I and II femoral neck fractures (mean age, 70 years) were treated with internal fixation at the authors' institution. In 31 patients, a 2-hole DHS was used alone (group 1), and in 34 patients, the DHS was combined with an anti-rotation screw placed in the cranial part of femoral head and neck (group 2). Patients' preinjury function and mental level were assessed using the Barthel index and the Abbreviated Mental test, respectively. The outcome measures included cost implications, operative time, and intraoperative radiation dose. The modified Harris Hip Score and a radiological assessment were performed at a mean of 11 months (range, 8-24 months) postoperatively. The use of the anti-rotation screw was associated with a longer operative time (mean, 44.54 minutes in group 1 vs 51.52 minutes in group 2; P<.0001) and more fluoroscopy screening (mean dose area product, 28.39 cGy/cm(2) in group 1 vs 44.33 cGy/cm(2) in group 2; P=.03). The additional cost of using an anti-rotation screw was £106 ($170) per case. No difference existed between the 2 groups with regard to radiological union, onset of avascular necrosis, and rate of revision surgeries. An anti-rotation screw, used with the dynamic hip screw, involves extra costs, prolongs operative time, and requires more intraoperative fluoroscopy screening but offers no advantages with regard to fracture union. PMID:23823042

  4. Dynamic Change of CD34 Level during the Survival Process of Narrow Pedicle Flap

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lijun; Zhao, Tianlan; Yu, Daojiang; Chen, Qi; Han, Wenya; Yu, Wenyuan; Sun, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the dynamic change of CD34 level during the survival process of narrow pedicle flaps. Methods Twenty-five white pigs were randomly and equally divided into 5 experimental groups. Five different type of narrow pedicle with different length-to-width ratio were employed, and each type of narrow pedicle was covered with 5 different size random flaps and which was classified into A, B, C, D and E for 5 groups. Group A was control group. Each type narrow pedicle with 5 different skin flaps were implanted onto the back of the pigs along the midline of back with a reverse direction. A 0.3 cm×0.3 cm full thickness skin flap in the middle of distal segment was collected and on 3rd, 5th, 7th and 14th days of post-operation. The expression of CD34 was measured by immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA). Results Histological examination showed that with the increasing of length-to-width ratio of the narrow pedicle skin flaps, the expression of CD34 increased in the skin flaps. Increased level of CD34 was found on 3rd day post-operation, and the peak expression was found on 7th day. Persistent high level of CD34 was found until 14th day. Conclusion Increased CD34 level in the distal skin flap, there is the association between CD34 level and ischemia injury. Moreover, CD34 expression plays an important role during the repair processes of pedicle flaps. PMID:26561392

  5. Satisfaction following Unilateral Breast Reconstruction: A Comparison of Pedicled TRAM and Free Abdominal Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Schwitzer, Jonathan A.; Miller, H. Catherine; Pusic, Andrea L.; Matros, Evan; Mehrara, Babak J.; McCarthy, Colleen M.; Lennox, Peter A.; Van Laeken, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare patient satisfaction following unilateral pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) and free abdominal flap reconstruction. Methods: Patients who underwent unilateral breast reconstruction using pedicled TRAM or free abdominal flaps (muscle-sparing TRAM or deep inferior epigastric perforator flap) and completed the BREAST-Q were identified from 2 prospectively maintained databases. BREAST-Q scores were assessed and compared for Satisfaction with Breasts, Outcome, and Physical Well-being Chest/Abdomen. Results: Of the 138 patients who completed the BREAST-Q, 84 underwent pedicled TRAM flap reconstruction and 54 underwent free abdominal flap reconstruction. Overall, pedicled TRAM flap patients scored higher than free abdominal flap patients on all 4 BREAST-Q scales. This difference reached statistical significance in Satisfaction with Breasts (+7.74; P = 0.02). Similar results were found among patients who completed the BREAST-Q at <3 years postoperation. However, among patients at ≥3 years postoperation, there were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups, with the pedicled flap cohort scoring higher in Satisfaction with Breasts and Physical Well-being Chest and the free abdominal flap cohort scoring higher in Satisfaction with Outcome and Physical Well-being Abdomen scores. Conclusions: Patients who underwent unilateral pedicled TRAM flap reconstruction experienced greater initial breast satisfaction than patients who underwent unilateral free abdominal flap reconstruction, but satisfaction equalized between the two over time, suggesting that long-term satisfaction may be equivalent between the 2 methods of reconstruction. PMID:26495195

  6. Pedicle torsion of ovarian cyst and acupuncture--a case report.

    PubMed

    Qu, Fan; Zhou, Jue

    2006-09-01

    A case history is reported of a patient who presented with acute pedicle torsion in a left ovarian cyst, which had been diagnosed seven months previously. The diagnosis was established by sonography. She declined surgery for personal reasons, and was treated with acupuncture. Her pain was successfully relieved, and she continued to be observed. The acupuncture was repeated daily for 15 days, after which time repeat sonography showed reduction in size of the cyst, and no torsion of the pedicle. No relapse had occurred at 16 months follow up. PMID:17013361

  7. The applicability of PEEK-based abutment screws.

    PubMed

    Schwitalla, Andreas Dominik; Abou-Emara, Mohamed; Zimmermann, Tycho; Spintig, Tobias; Beuer, Florian; Lackmann, Justus; Müller, Wolf-Dieter

    2016-10-01

    The high-performance polymer PEEK (poly-ether-ether-ketone) is more and more being used in the field of dentistry, mainly for removable and fixed prostheses. In cases of screw-retained implant-supported reconstructions of PEEK, an abutment screw made of PEEK might be advantageous over a conventional metal screw due to its similar elasticity. Also in case of abutment screw fracture, a screw of PEEK could be removed more easily. M1.6-abutment screws of four different PEEK compounds were subjected to tensile tests to set their maximum tensile strengths in relation to an equivalent stress of 186MPa, which is aused by a tightening torque of 15Ncm. Two screw types were manufactured via injection molding and contained 15% short carbon fibers (sCF-15) and 40% (sCF-40), respectively. Two screw types were manufactured via milling and contained 20% TiO2 powder (TiO2-20) and >50% parallel orientated, continuous carbon fibers (cCF-50). A conventional abutments screw of Ti6Al4V (Ti; CAMLOG(®) abutment screw, CAMLOG, Wimsheim, Germany) served as control. The maximum tensile strength was 76.08±5.50MPa for TiO2-20, 152.67±15.83MPa for sCF-15, 157.29±20.11MPa for sCF-40 and 191.69±36.33MPa for cCF-50. The maximum tensile strength of the Ti-screws amounted 1196.29±21.4MPa. The results of the TiO2-20 and the Ti screws were significantly different from the results of the other samples, respectively. For the manufacturing of PEEK abutment screws, PEEK reinforced by >50% continuous carbon fibers would be the material of choice. PMID:27434650

  8. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  9. Comparison of the retro screw and standard interference screw for ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Robert Y; Arciero, Robert A; Obopilwe, Elifho; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2012-07-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the load to failure between a retro screw (RS) and a standard interference screw (IS) for tibial-sided anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) fixation. We used 20 bovine tibia and extensor tendons for the study. A group of 10 specimens underwent IS fixation while the other 10 underwent RS fixation. Within each group, five specimens had graft suture in contact (interdigitating) with the screw threads. All specimens were tested on the MTS 858 Mini Bionix II (MTS Systems, Shakopee, MN). There was no statistically significant difference between the RS and IS with respect to peak load to failure. IS with suture interdigitation failed at an average of 520 N (range: 358 to 793 N), while the RS with suture interdigitation failed at 613 N (range: 438 to 1089 N). The IS without suture interdigitation failed at 654 N and the RS without suture interdigitation at 531 N. Specimens with a whipstitch in contact with the screw did not demonstrate higher pull out strength. The RS fixation strength appears to equal the IS. Graft suture contact with screw threads does not increase fixation strength. Based on this study, using a RS for tibial ACL soft tissue graft fixation is feasible and provides equal fixation strength compared with the standard IS. PMID:23057142

  10. Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

  11. Translational mini-screw implant research.

    PubMed

    Rossouw, Emile

    2014-09-01

    It is important to thoroughly test new materials as well as techniques when these innovations are to be utilized in the human clinical situation. Translational research fills this important niche. The purpose of translational research is to establish the continuity of evidence from the laboratory to the clinic and in so-doing, provide evidence that the material is functioning appropriately and that the process in the human will be successful. This concept applies to the mini-screw implant; which, has been very successfully introduced into the orthodontic armamentarium over the last decade for application as a temporary anchorage device. The examples of translational research that will be illustrated in this paper have paved the way to ensure that clinicians have evidence to confidently utilize mini-screw implants in orthodontic practice. Needless to say, more studies are needed to ensure a safe, effective and efficient manner to practice orthodontics. PMID:25138369

  12. Analysis of Modeling Parameters on Threaded Screws.

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, Miquela S.; Brake, Matthew Robert; Vangoethem, Douglas

    2015-06-01

    Assembled mechanical systems often contain a large number of bolted connections. These bolted connections (joints) are integral aspects of the load path for structural dynamics, and, consequently, are paramount for calculating a structure's stiffness and energy dissipation prop- erties. However, analysts have not found the optimal method to model appropriately these bolted joints. The complexity of the screw geometry cause issues when generating a mesh of the model. This paper will explore different approaches to model a screw-substrate connec- tion. Model parameters such as mesh continuity, node alignment, wedge angles, and thread to body element size ratios are examined. The results of this study will give analysts a better understanding of the influences of these parameters and will aide in finding the optimal method to model bolted connections.

  13. Biomechanical analysis of expansion screws and cortical screws used for ventral plate fixation on the cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Bernhard; Huber, Gerd; Morlock, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    Compared to bicortical screws, the surgical risk of injuring intraspinal structures can be minimized with the use of monocortical screws. However, this reduction should not be achieved at the expense of the stability of the fixation. With monocortical stabilization, the expansion screws have the potential of absorbing high loads. Therefore, they are expected to be a suitable alternative to bicortical screws for revision surgeries and in osteoporotic bone. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the stiffness of the two screw-plate systems used for ventral stabilization of the cervical spine, by focusing on the suitability of expansion screws as tools for revision treatments. The study was conducted in ten functional units of human cervical spines. The device sample stiffness was determined for four conditions using a turning moment of 2.25 N m each around one of the three principle axes. The conditions were native, destabilized, primarily stabilized with one of the screw-plate systems, followed by secondary stabilization using the expansion screw implant. The stabilized samples achieved a comparable, in most cases higher stiffness than the native samples. The samples undergoing secondary stabilization using expansion screws tend to display greater stiffness for all three axes compared to the primarily stabilized samples. The achieved tightening moment of the screws was higher than the one achieved with primary fixation. Both plates revealed similar primary stability. Revision surgeries with secondary instrumentation achieve a high stiffness of the screwed up segments. Monocortical expansion screws combined with a trapezoidal plate allow ventral stabilization of the cervical spine that is comparable to the plate fixation using bicortical screws. PMID:19588171

  14. Sliding screw implants for extracapsular hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Kouvidis, George; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A; Stavrakakis, Loannis; Katonis, Pavlos; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2012-01-01

    Hip fractures are associated with significant mortality and morbidity for the patients, more dependent residual status, and increased socio-economic cost. Many hip-fracture patients experience severe functional impairment, and most never recover their pre-fracture level of function. Current research has sought to identify the most effective treatments to reduce the incidence of hip fractures, improve survival and quality of life, and minimize complications and disability. The treatment of these fractures in the elderly aims to return these people to their pre-fracture mobility and functional level. This article reviews the surgical treatment options for extracapsular hip fractures and discusses their associated advantages, disadvantages, and complications. Two types of implants are currently available: the dynamic hip screw (DHS), and the intramedullary hip nail with one or two sliding screws. In this review, no clear advantage of one implant over another for the treatment of extracapsular hip fractures was evident. Both the DHS and hip nails can be used successfully for the treatment of stable hip fractures; for unstable fractures and low subtrochanteric fractures, hip nails are preferred. Although hip nails are associated with limited exposure, lower blood loss and transfusion requirements, and shorter operative time, complications are more common with hip nails. Long-term survival and function are similar in the two approaches. Hip nails with two sliding screws do not seem to make the difference in clinical practice that is reported in biomechanical studies. PMID:23016784

  15. Dual load path ball screw with rod end swivel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wngett, Paul (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A dual drive ball has a ball screw shaft coupled at one end to a gear train and coupled at the other end to a ball screw nut. The ball screw shaft and ball screw nut are connected through complementary helical grooves filled with ball bearing balls. The outer surface of the ball screw nut is plined and can be driven by a second gear train. An output tube is coupled at one end to the ball screw nut and at its opposite end has a connector portion with a groove on its inner surface. A rod end has a coupling member for coupling to a surface to be actuated and a shaft portion with a groobe on its outer surface. This shaft portion is received with in the outputtube portion and the corresponding grooves are coupled through the use of a plurality of ball bearing balls.

  16. Osteosynthesis of ununited femoral neck fracture by internal fixation combined with iliac crest bone chips and muscle pedicle bone grafting

    PubMed Central

    Baksi, D D; Pal, A K; Baksi, D P

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ununited femoral neck fracture is seen commonly in developing countries due to delayed presentation or failure of primary internal fixation. Such fractures, commonly present with partial or total absorption of femoral neck, osteonecrosis of femoral head in 8–30% cases with upward migration of trochanter posing problem for osteosynthesis, especially in younger individuals. Several techniques for treatment of such conditions are described like osteotomies or nonvascularied cortical or cancellous bone grafting provided varying degrees of success in terms of fracture union but unsatisfactory long term results occurred due to varying incidence of avascular necrosis (AVN) of femoral head. Moreover, in presence of AVN of femoral head neither free fibular graft nor cancellous bone graft is satisfactory. The vascularied bone grafting by deep circumflex iliac artery based on iliac crest bone grafting, free vascularied fibular grafting and muscle pedicle periosteal grafting showed high incidence of success rate. Osteosynthesis is the preferred treatment of choice in ununited femoral neck fracture in younger individuals. Materials and Methods: Of the 293 patients operated during the period from June 1977 to June 2009, 42 were lost to followup. Seven patients with gluteus medius muscle pedicle bone grafting (MPBG) were excluded. Thus, out of 244 patients, 208 (85.3%) untreated nonunion and 36 (14.7%) following failure of primary internal fixation were available for studies. Time interval between the date of injury and operation in untreated nonunion cases was mean 6.5 months and in failed internal fixation cases was mean 11.2 months. Ages of the patients varied from 16 to 55 years. Seventy patients had partial and 174 had subtotal absorption of the femoral neck. Evidence of avascular necrosis (AVN) femoral head was found histologically in 135 (54.3%) and radiologically in 48 (19.7%) patients. The patients were operated by open reduction of fracture, cannulated hip

  17. Fracture fixation with two locking screws versus three non-locking screws

    PubMed Central

    Grawe, B.; Le, T.; Williamson, S.; Archdeacon, A.; Zardiackas, L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to further evaluate the biomechanical characteristics of two locking screws versus three standard bicortical screws in synthetic models of normal and osteoporotic bone. Methods Synthetic tubular bone models representing normal bone density and osteoporotic bone density were used. Artificial fracture gaps of 1 cm were created in each specimen before fixation with one of two constructs: 1) two locking screws using a five-hole locking compression plate (LCP) plate; or 2) three non-locking screws with a seven-hole LCP plate across each side of the fracture gap. The stiffness, maximum displacement, mode of failure and number of cycles to failure were recorded under progressive cyclic torsional and eccentric axial loading. Results Locking plates in normal bone survived 10% fewer cycles to failure during cyclic axial loading, but there was no significant difference in maximum displacement or failure load. Locking plates in osteoporotic bone showed less displacement (p = 0.02), but no significant difference in number of cycles to failure or failure load during cyclic axial loading (p = 0.46 and p = 0.25, respectively). Locking plates in normal bone had lower stiffness and torque during torsion testing (both p = 0.03), but there was no significant difference in rotation (angular displacement) (p = 0.84). Locking plates in osteoporotic bone showed lower torque and rotation (p = 0.008), but there was no significant difference in stiffness during torsion testing (p = 0.69). Conclusions The mechanical performance of locking plate constructs, using only two screws, is comparable to three non-locking screw constructs in osteoporotic bone. Normal bone loaded with either an axial or torsional moment showed slightly better performance with the non-locking construct. PMID:23610681

  18. Insertion device vacuum system designs

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, E.

    1988-05-01

    Synchrotron light source insertion device vacuum systems now in operation and systems proposed for the future are reviewed. An overview of insertion devices is given and four generic vacuum chamber designs, transition section design and pumping considerations are discussed. Examples of vacuum chamber systems are presented.

  19. Screws, Propellers and Fans Based on a Mobius Strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, John M.; Backley, Floyd D.; Gilinsky, Mikhail

    1998-01-01

    A Mobius strip concept is intended for improving the working efficiency of propellers and screws. Applications involve cooling, boat propellers, mixing in appliance, blenders, and helicopters. Several Mobius shaped screws for the average size kitchen mixers have been made and tested. The tests have shown that the mixer with the Mobius shaped screw pair is most efficient, and saves more than 30% of the electric power by comparison with the standard. The created video film about these tests illustrates efficiency of Mobius shaped screws.

  20. Surgical anatomy and utility of pedicled vascularized tissue flaps for multilayered repair of skull base defects.

    PubMed

    Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Komune, Noritaka; Archer, Jacob B; Sun, Hai; Theodore, Nicholas; James, Jeffrey; Little, Andrew S; Nakaji, Peter; Sughrue, Michael E; Rhoton, Albert L; Spetzler, Robert F

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to describe the surgical anatomy and technical nuances of various vascularized tissue flaps. METHODS The surgical anatomy of various tissue flaps and their vascular pedicles was studied in 5 colored silicone-injected anatomical specimens. Medical records were reviewed of 11 consecutive patients who underwent repair of extensive skull base defects with a combination of various vascularized flaps. RESULTS The supraorbital, supratrochlear, superficial temporal, greater auricular, and occipital arteries contribute to the vascular supply of the pericranium. The pericranial flap can be designed based on an axial blood supply. Laterally, various flaps are supplied by the deep or superficial temporal arteries. The nasoseptal flap is a vascular pedicled flap based on the nasoseptal artery. Patients with extensive skull base defects can undergo effective repair with dual flaps or triple flaps using these pedicled vascularized flaps. CONCLUSIONS Multiple pedicled flaps are available for reconstitution of the skull base. Knowledge of the surgical anatomy of these flaps is crucial for the skull base surgeon. These vascularized tissue flaps can be used effectively as single or combination flaps. Multilayered closure of cranial base defects with vascularized tissue can be used safely and may lead to excellent repair outcomes. PMID:26613175

  1. Complications and oncologic outcomes of pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Somintara, Ongart; Lertsithichai, Panuwat; Kongdan, Youwanush; Supsamutchai, Chairat; Sukpanich, Rupporn

    2016-01-01

    Background There are several techniques for harvesting the pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap after mastectomy in breast cancer patients. We examined the whole muscle with partial sheath sparing technique and determined factors associated with its complications and oncological outcomes. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the results of 168 TRAM flaps performed between January 2003 and December 2010, focusing on complications and oncologic outcomes. Results Among the 168 pedicled TRAM flap procedures in 158 patients, flap complications occurred in 34%. Most of the flap complications included some degree of fat necrosis. There was no total flap loss. Flap complications were associated with elderly patients and the presence of major donor site complications. Abdominal bulging and hernia occurred in 12% of patients. The bi-pedicled TRAM flap and higher body mass index (BMI) were significant factors associated with increased donor site complications. Seven patients (4%) developed loco-regional recurrence. Within a median follow-up of 27 months, distant metastasis and death occurred in 6% and 4% of patients, respectively. Conclusions The pedicled TRAM flap using the whole muscle with partial sheath sparing technique in the present study is consistent with the results from previous studies in flap complication rates and oncological outcomes. PMID:27563562

  2. A new Simplified Method of Selective Exposure of Hepatic Pedicles for Controlled Hepatectomies

    PubMed Central

    Karagiulian, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    Our experience of 90 hepatectomies (HE) and examinations of 64 cadaver livers resulted in the elaboration of a simplified technique for the exposure of hepatic pedicles (HP) and the rapid selective ligation without significant normothermal ischemia of the retained parts of the liver. The method comprises 4 consecutive steps: 1) a superficial T-shaped incision of Glisson's capsule at the site of HP projection on the liver's inferior surface, 2) introduction of the surgeon's forefinger into the liver parenchyma, controlled by clamping the hepatoduodenal ligament, the fingertip finding a tubular structure well distinguished by its smooth elastic surface from the friable parenchyma and bending the finger to hook the pedicle, 3) drawing the hooked pedicle downwards through the slit in the capsule and temporarily clamping it, while releasing the hepatoduodenal ligament so as to restore blood supply to the retained parts of the liver, 4) checking for correct ligature position on the HP before its final ligation by matching the actual ischemic area with the intended line of resection and moving the clamp proximally or distally along the exposed pedicle for the release or clamping of lateral branches as necessary. Whereupon resection can be performed by any of the known methods. This method has been used in 8 major HE, allowing to reduce intraoperative blood loss from 2200±247 ml to 1000±225 ml and reducing general liver ischemia from 10 minutes and more to 2–3 minutes. PMID:2487059

  3. Pedicle Reduction Osteotomy in the Upper Cervical Spine: Technique, Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Post, Nicholas; Cooper, Colin S.; Pivec, Robert; Paulino, Carl B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present a case report of the correction of a degenerative cervical 45-degree kyphosis centered at C4 with a single stage PSO. Summary of Background Data Correction of a fixed cervical kyphosis is a surgical challenge that is frequently managed with a combination of anterior and posterior surgical procedures. An alternative the three stage operation is a single stage pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO). A PSO releases the posterior, middle and anterior columns of the spine by resecting the facet joints, pedicles, and a portion of the vertebral body at the apex of a kyphosis through a posterior approach. Methods This was a case report of a patient who had degenerative cervical 45 degree kyphosis and was corrected with a single stage pedicle subtraction osteotomy. We did a literature review to provide information on current techniques to treat these patients. Results With careful resection of the lateral mass and decompression of the vertebral artery by removal of the posterior margin of the foramen transversarium the upper cervical pedicles can be accessed and a PSO can be performed. The vertebral arteries were not obstructed or kinked with posterior reduction of the PSO in this case. Conclusions A closing wedge PSO is a useful tool for correcting fixed kyphotic deformities in the upper cervical spine. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the long-term outcomes in these patients. PMID:26609512

  4. Pedicled-perforator (propeller) flaps in lower extremity defects: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gir, Phanette; Cheng, Angela; Oni, Georgette; Mojallal, Ali; Saint-Cyr, Michel

    2012-11-01

    Pedicled-perforator (propeller) flaps for lower extremity reconstruction have gained popularity due to minimal donor site morbidity, relatively simple surgical technique, and replacement of tissue using "like-by-like" principles. We reviewed and analyzed the clinical use of these flaps in regards to patient age and gender, etiology and location of the defect, size and type of flap, arc of rotation, and complications to determine the reliability of this technique. A systematic review of the PubMed database using search terms to include perforator, pedicled, and propeller flaps in the lower extremity. Data from 15 case series provided 186 cases of pedicled-perforator (propeller) flaps for analysis using Chi-square tests. The Peroneal Artery Perforator (PAP) flaps and Posterior Tibial Artery Perforator (PTAP) flaps were the most frequently used flaps. The overall complication rate was 25.8% and the failure rate was 1.1%. No significant differences were found in complication rate related to age, gender, etiology or location of the defect, type or size of the flap. The most common complications were partial flap loss and venous congestion (11.3 and 8.1%). Pedicled-perforator flaps appear to be a reliable and safe procedure for the coverage soft tissue defects of the lower extremity based on favorable results reported in the literature. PMID:22715046

  5. Reconstruction of a subtotally amputated auricle with a very narrow inferior pedicle

    PubMed Central

    Kemaloğlu, Cemal Alper; Kılıç, Fatih; Günay, Galip Kemali

    2015-01-01

    In our case study, the left ear of a 57-year-old male patient was subtotally amputated due to an iron-plate cutting accident. Only a 5-mm inferior skin pedicle connected the amputated ear to the lobule. The ear was reattached with primary suture without microsurgery. The reattached ear healed uneventfully. PMID:27252977

  6. Finite Element Analysis of Osteosynthesis Screw Fixation in the Bone Stock: An Appropriate Method for Automatic Screw Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Wieding, Jan; Souffrant, Robert; Fritsche, Andreas; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The use of finite element analysis (FEA) has grown to a more and more important method in the field of biomedical engineering and biomechanics. Although increased computational performance allows new ways to generate more complex biomechanical models, in the area of orthopaedic surgery, solid modelling of screws and drill holes represent a limitation of their use for individual cases and an increase of computational costs. To cope with these requirements, different methods for numerical screw modelling have therefore been investigated to improve its application diversity. Exemplarily, fixation was performed for stabilization of a large segmental femoral bone defect by an osteosynthesis plate. Three different numerical modelling techniques for implant fixation were used in this study, i.e. without screw modelling, screws as solid elements as well as screws as structural elements. The latter one offers the possibility to implement automatically generated screws with variable geometry on arbitrary FE models. Structural screws were parametrically generated by a Python script for the automatic generation in the FE-software Abaqus/CAE on both a tetrahedral and a hexahedral meshed femur. Accuracy of the FE models was confirmed by experimental testing using a composite femur with a segmental defect and an identical osteosynthesis plate for primary stabilisation with titanium screws. Both deflection of the femoral head and the gap alteration were measured with an optical measuring system with an accuracy of approximately 3 µm. For both screw modelling techniques a sufficient correlation of approximately 95% between numerical and experimental analysis was found. Furthermore, using structural elements for screw modelling the computational time could be reduced by 85% using hexahedral elements instead of tetrahedral elements for femur meshing. The automatically generated screw modelling offers a realistic simulation of the osteosynthesis fixation with screws in the adjacent

  7. Finite element analysis of osteosynthesis screw fixation in the bone stock: an appropriate method for automatic screw modelling.

    PubMed

    Wieding, Jan; Souffrant, Robert; Fritsche, Andreas; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The use of finite element analysis (FEA) has grown to a more and more important method in the field of biomedical engineering and biomechanics. Although increased computational performance allows new ways to generate more complex biomechanical models, in the area of orthopaedic surgery, solid modelling of screws and drill holes represent a limitation of their use for individual cases and an increase of computational costs. To cope with these requirements, different methods for numerical screw modelling have therefore been investigated to improve its application diversity. Exemplarily, fixation was performed for stabilization of a large segmental femoral bone defect by an osteosynthesis plate. Three different numerical modelling techniques for implant fixation were used in this study, i.e. without screw modelling, screws as solid elements as well as screws as structural elements. The latter one offers the possibility to implement automatically generated screws with variable geometry on arbitrary FE models. Structural screws were parametrically generated by a Python script for the automatic generation in the FE-software Abaqus/CAE on both a tetrahedral and a hexahedral meshed femur. Accuracy of the FE models was confirmed by experimental testing using a composite femur with a segmental defect and an identical osteosynthesis plate for primary stabilisation with titanium screws. Both deflection of the femoral head and the gap alteration were measured with an optical measuring system with an accuracy of approximately 3 µm. For both screw modelling techniques a sufficient correlation of approximately 95% between numerical and experimental analysis was found. Furthermore, using structural elements for screw modelling the computational time could be reduced by 85% using hexahedral elements instead of tetrahedral elements for femur meshing. The automatically generated screw modelling offers a realistic simulation of the osteosynthesis fixation with screws in the adjacent

  8. Near-Infrared Imaging of Face Transplants: Are Both Pedicles Necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, John T.; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Venugopal, Vivek; Neacsu, Florin; Kettenring, Frank; Frangioni, John V.; Gioux, Sylvain; Lee, Bernard T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Facial transplantation is a complex procedure that corrects severe facial defects due to traumas, burns, and congenital disorders. Although face transplantation has been successfully performed clinically, potential risks include tissue ischemia and necrosis. The vascular supply is typically based on the bilateral neck vessels. As it remains unclear whether perfusion can be based off a single pedicle, this study was designed to assess perfusion patterns of facial transplant allografts using near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging. Methods Upper facial composite tissue allotransplants were created using both carotid artery and external jugular vein pedicles in Yorkshire pigs. A flap validation model was created in n = 2 pigs and a clamp occlusion model was performed in n = 3 pigs. In the clamp occlusion models, sequential clamping of the vessels was performed to assess perfusion. Animals were injected with indocyanine green (ICG) and imaged with NIR fluorescence. Quantitative metrics were assessed based on fluorescence intensity (FI). Results With NIR imaging, arterial perforators emitted fluorescence indicating perfusion along the surface of the skin. Isolated clamping of one vascular pedicle showed successful perfusion across the midline based on NIR fluorescence imaging. This perfusion extended into the facial allograft within 60 seconds and perfused the entire contralateral side within 5 minutes. Conclusions Determination of vascular perfusion is important in microsurgical constructs as complications can lead to flap loss. It is still unclear if facial transplants require both pedicles. This initial pilot study using intraoperative NIR fluorescence imaging suggests that facial flap models can be adequately perfused from a single pedicle. PMID:23706565

  9. Screw Placement and Osteoplasty Under Computed Tomographic-Fluoroscopic Guidance in a Case of Advanced Metastatic Destruction of the Iliosacral Joint

    SciTech Connect

    Trumm, Christoph Gregor; Rubenbauer, Bianca; Piltz, Stefan; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten

    2011-02-15

    We present a case of combined surgical screw placement and osteoplasty guided by computed tomography-fluoroscopy (CTF) in a 68-year-old man with unilateral osteolytic destruction and a pathological fracture of the iliosacral joint due to a metastasis from renal cell carcinoma. The patient experienced intractable lower back pain that was refractory to analgesia. After transarterial particle and coil embolization of the tumor-feeding vessels in the angiography unit, the procedure was performed under general anesthesia by an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologists and trauma surgeons. Under intermittent single-shot CTF, two K wires were inserted into the left iliosacral joint from a lateral transiliac approach at the S1 level followed by two self-tapping surgical screws. Continuous CTF was used for monitoring of the subsequent polymethylmethacrylate injection through two vertebroplasty cannulas for further stabilization of the screw threads within the osteolytic sacral ala. Both the screw placement and cement injection were successful, with no complications occurring during or after the procedure. With additional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory and opioid medication, the patient reported a marked decrease in his lower back pain and was able to move independently again at the 3-month follow-up assessment. In our patient with intolerable back pain due to tumor destruction and consequent pathological fracture of the iliosacral joint, CTF-guided iliosacral screw placement combined with osteoplasty was successful with respect to joint stabilization and a reduction in the need for analgesic therapy.

  10. Metal artifacts from titanium and steel screws in CT, 1.5T and 3T MR images of the tibial Pilon: a quantitative assessment in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Radzi, Shairah; Cowin, Gary; Robinson, Mark; Pratap, Jit; Volp, Andrew; Schuetz, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Radiographs are commonly used to assess articular reduction of the distal tibia (pilon) fractures postoperatively, but may reveal malreductions inaccurately. While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) are potential three-dimensional (3D) alternatives they generate metal-related artifacts. This study aims to quantify the artifact size from orthopaedic screws using CT, 1.5T and 3T MRI data. Three screws were inserted into one intact human cadaver ankle specimen proximal to and along the distal articular surface, then CT, 1.5T and 3T MRI scanned. Four types of screws were investigated: titanium alloy (TA), stainless steel (SS) (Ø =3.5 mm), cannulated TA (CTA) and cannulated SS (CSS) (Ø =4.0 mm, Ø empty core =2.6 mm). 3D artifact models were reconstructed using adaptive thresholding. The artifact size was measured by calculating the perpendicular distance from the central screw axis to the boundary of the artifact in four anatomical directions with respect to the distal tibia. The artifact sizes (in the order of TA, SS, CTA and CSS) from CT were 2.0, 2.6, 1.6 and 2.0 mm; from 1.5T MRI they were 3.7, 10.9, 2.9, and 9 mm; and 3T MRI they were 4.4, 15.3, 3.8, and 11.6 mm respectively. Therefore, CT can be used as long as the screws are at a safe distance of about 2 mm from the articular surface. MRI can be used if the screws are at least 3 mm away from the articular surface except for SS and CSS. Artifacts from steel screws were too large thus obstructed the pilon from being visualised in MRI. Significant differences (P<0.05) were found in the size of artifacts between all imaging modalities, screw types and material types, except 1.5T versus 3T MRI for the SS screws (P=0.063). CTA screws near the joint surface can improve postoperative assessment in CT and MRI. MRI presents a favourable non-ionising alternative when using titanium hardware. Since these factors may influence the quality of postoperative assessment, potential improvements in

  11. Metal artifacts from titanium and steel screws in CT, 1.5T and 3T MR images of the tibial Pilon: a quantitative assessment in 3D.

    PubMed

    Radzi, Shairah; Cowin, Gary; Robinson, Mark; Pratap, Jit; Volp, Andrew; Schuetz, Michael A; Schmutz, Beat

    2014-06-01

    Radiographs are commonly used to assess articular reduction of the distal tibia (pilon) fractures postoperatively, but may reveal malreductions inaccurately. While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) are potential three-dimensional (3D) alternatives they generate metal-related artifacts. This study aims to quantify the artifact size from orthopaedic screws using CT, 1.5T and 3T MRI data. Three screws were inserted into one intact human cadaver ankle specimen proximal to and along the distal articular surface, then CT, 1.5T and 3T MRI scanned. Four types of screws were investigated: titanium alloy (TA), stainless steel (SS) (Ø =3.5 mm), cannulated TA (CTA) and cannulated SS (CSS) (Ø =4.0 mm, Ø empty core =2.6 mm). 3D artifact models were reconstructed using adaptive thresholding. The artifact size was measured by calculating the perpendicular distance from the central screw axis to the boundary of the artifact in four anatomical directions with respect to the distal tibia. The artifact sizes (in the order of TA, SS, CTA and CSS) from CT were 2.0, 2.6, 1.6 and 2.0 mm; from 1.5T MRI they were 3.7, 10.9, 2.9, and 9 mm; and 3T MRI they were 4.4, 15.3, 3.8, and 11.6 mm respectively. Therefore, CT can be used as long as the screws are at a safe distance of about 2 mm from the articular surface. MRI can be used if the screws are at least 3 mm away from the articular surface except for SS and CSS. Artifacts from steel screws were too large thus obstructed the pilon from being visualised in MRI. Significant differences (P<0.05) were found in the size of artifacts between all imaging modalities, screw types and material types, except 1.5T versus 3T MRI for the SS screws (P=0.063). CTA screws near the joint surface can improve postoperative assessment in CT and MRI. MRI presents a favourable non-ionising alternative when using titanium hardware. Since these factors may influence the quality of postoperative assessment, potential improvements in

  12. Modeling bicortical screws under a cantilever bending load.

    PubMed

    James, Thomas P; Andrade, Brendan A

    2013-12-01

    Cyclic loading of surgical plating constructs can precipitate bone screw failure. As the frictional contact between the plate and the bone is lost, cantilever bending loads are transferred from the plate to the head of the screw, which over time causes fatigue fracture from cyclic bending. In this research, analytical models using beam mechanics theory were developed to describe the elastic deflection of a bicortical screw under a statically applied load. Four analytical models were developed to simulate the various restraint conditions applicable to bicortical support of the screw. In three of the models, the cortical bone near the tip of the screw was simulated by classical beam constraints (1) simply supported, (2) cantilever, and (3) split distributed load. In the final analytical model, the cortices were treated as an elastic foundation, whereby the response of the constraint was proportional to screw deflection. To test the predictive ability of the new analytical models, 3.5 mm cortical bone screws were tested in a synthetic bone substitute. A novel instrument was developed to measure the bending deflection of screws under radial loads (225 N, 445 N, and 670 N) applied by a surrogate surgical plate at the head of the screw. Of the four cases considered, the analytical model utilizing an elastic foundation most accurately predicted deflection at the screw head, with an average difference of 19% between the measured and predicted results. Determination of the bending moments from the elastic foundation model revealed that a maximum moment of 2.3 N m occurred near the middle of the cortical wall closest to the plate. The location of the maximum bending moment along the screw axis was consistent with the fracture location commonly observed in clinical practice. PMID:24105350

  13. Magnesium Alloys as a Biomaterial for Degradable Craniofacial Screws

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Verdelis, Konstantinos; Maiti, Spandan; Pal, Siladitya; Chung, William L.; Chou, Da-Tren; Kumta, Prashant N.; Almarza, Alejandro J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, magnesium (Mg) alloys have received significant attention as a potential biomaterial for degradable implants, and this study was directed at evaluating the suitability of Mg for craniofacial bone screws. The objective was to implant screws fabricated from commercially available Mg-alloys (pure Mg and AZ31) in-vivo in a rabbit mandible. First, Mg-alloy screws were compared to stainless steel screws in an in-vitro pull-out test and determined to have a similar holding strength (~40N). A finite element model of the screw was created using the pull-out test data, and the model can be used for future Mg-alloy screw design. Then, Mg-alloy screws were implanted for 4, 8, and 12 weeks, with two controls of an osteotomy site (hole) with no implant and a stainless steel screw implanted for 12 weeks. MicroCT (computed tomography) was used to assess bone remodeling and Mg-alloy degradation, both visually and qualitatively through volume fraction measurements for all time points. Histologic analysis was also completed for the Mg-alloys at 12 weeks. The results showed that craniofacial bone remodeling occurred around both Mg-alloy screw types. Pure Mg had a different degradation profile than AZ31, however bone growth occurred around both screw types. The degradation rate of both Mg-alloy screw types in the bone marrow space and the muscle were faster than in the cortical bone space at 12 weeks. Furthermore, it was shown that by alloying Mg, the degradation profile could be changed. These results indicate the promise of using Mg-alloys for craniofacial applications. PMID:24384125

  14. 3D Mapping of Safe and Danger Zones in the Maxilla and Mandible for the Placement of Intermaxillary Fixation Screws

    PubMed Central

    Purmal, Kathiravan; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Pohchi, Abdullah; Abdul Razak, Noor Hayati

    2013-01-01

    Intermaxillary (IMF) screws feature several advantages over other devices used for intermaxillary fixation, but using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans to determine the safe and danger zones to place these devices for all patients can be expensive. This study aimed to determine the optimal interradicular and buccopalatal/buccolingual spaces for IMF screw placement in the maxilla and mandible. The CBCT volumetric data of 193 patients was used to generate transaxial slices between the second molar on the right to the second molar on the left in both arches. The mean interradicular and buccopalatal/buccolingual distances and standard deviation values were obtained at heights of 2, 5, 8 and 11 mm from the alveolar bone crest. An IMF screw with a diameter of 1.0 mm and length of 7 mm can be placed distal to the canines (2 - 11 mm from the alveolar crest) and less than 8 mm between the molars in the maxilla. In the mandible, the safest position is distal to the first premolar (more than 5 mm) and distal to the second premolar (more than 2 mm). There was a significant difference (p<0.05) between the right and left quadrants. The colour coding 3D template showed the safe and danger zones based on the mesiodistal, buccopalatal and buccolingual distances in the maxilla and mandible.The safest sites for IMF screw insertion in the maxilla were between the canines and first premolars and between the first and second molars. In the mandible, the safest sites were between the first and second premolars and between the second premolar and first molar. However, the IMF screw should not exceed 1.0 mm in diameter and 7 mm in length. PMID:24367643

  15. Porous-coated acetabular components with screw fixation. Five to ten-year results.

    PubMed

    Latimer, H A; Lachiewicz, P F

    1996-07-01

    The results of 136 consecutive primary total hip arthroplasties performed by one surgeon with the Harris-Galante-I porous-coated acetabular component were reviewed at a mean of seven years (range, five to ten years). In all hips, the outer diameter of the acetabular component was the same as the diameter of the final reamer used in the preparation of the acetabulum. However, this reamer was used only briefly at the rim of the acetabulum, and therefore the components had so-called press-fit stability. A mean of four screws (range, three to six screws) were used for additional fixation of the component. The clinical evaluation was performed with use of the Harris hip score. Standardized anteroposterior radiographs of the pelvis were assessed for migration of the component, radiolucent and radiodense lines, linear wear of the polyethylene, and osteolysis. No acetabular component had been revised for loosening and none were radiographically loose at the time of the most recent follow-up evaluation. There were no complications related to the use of the screws, and no screw had bent or broken. A non-progressive radiolucent line was seen in one acetabular zone in thirty-four hips (25 per cent) and in two acetabular zones in six hips (4 per cent). No hip had a radiolucent line in all three acetabular zones. The mean rate of linear wear of the polyethylene was 0.1 millimeter per year. There was no dissociation of the acetabular liner from the metal shell. Two hips (1 per cent) had asymptomatic osteolysis in the ischium and adjacent to the rim of the acetabular component; this was treated with grafting at the site of the lesion and exchange of the femoral head and the worn polyethylene liner. Five femoral components inserted without cement and one inserted with cement were revised because of loosening. The data suggest that, at a mean of seven years, fixation of this porous-coated component was uniformly excellent. The low prevalence of radiolucent lines and the absence of

  16. Tangential View and Intraoperative Three-Dimensional Fluoroscopy for the Detection of Screw-Misplacements in Volar Plating of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Sascha; Marintschev, Ivan; Graul, Isabel; Wilharm, Arne; Klos, Kajetan; Hofmann, Gunther O.; Florian Gras, Marc

    2015-01-01

    , time and radiation-exposure, for each step of the operating procedure, were recorded. Results: In the standard 2D-fluoroscopic views (postero-anterior and true lateral projection), 22 screw misplacements of 232 inserted screws were not detected. Based on the additional tangential view, 12 screws were exchanged, followed by further 10 screws after performing the 3D fluoroscopic scan. The most lateral screw position had the highest risk for screw misplacement (accounting for 45.5% of all exchanged screws). The mean number of images for the tangential view was 3 ± 2.5 images. The mean surgical time was extended by 10.02 ± 3.82 minutes for the 3D fluoroscopic scan. An additional radiation exposure of 4.4 ± 4.5seconds, with a dose area product of 39.2 ± 14.5 cGy/cm2 were necessary for the tangential view and 54.4 ± 20.9 seconds with a dose area product of 2.1 ± 2.2 cGy/cm2, for the 3D fluoroscopic scan. Conclusions: We recommend the additional 2D-fluoroscopic tangential view for detection of screw misplacements caused by overlength, with penetration on the dorsal cortical surface of the distal radius, predominantly observed for the most lateral screw position. The use of intraoperative 3D fluoroscopy did not become accepted in our clinical routine, due to the technical demanding and time consuming procedure, with a limited image quality so far. PMID:26101762

  17. Single screw interrupted thread positive displacement mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boblitt, Wayne W.

    1992-07-01

    A single screw positive displacement compressor mechanism employing shallow gate rotor tooth penetration of the main rotor for purposes of reducing internal leakage and consequent compressor inefficiencies is presented. The invention is provided with an interrupted main rotor thread for purposes of insuring multiple gate rotor teeth meshing with the drive portion of the main rotor thread, thereby reducing gate rotor tooth flank loads in the compressor section of the device. Provision is also made for main rotor thread baffling between the main rotor chamber section and the mechanism inlet.

  18. Injection of coal by screw feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of the screw feeder for injecting solids through a 20 to 30 psi barrier is common practice in the cement making industry. An analytical extrapolation of that design, accounting for pressure holding characteristics of a column of solids, shows that coal can be fed to zones at several hundred psi with minimal or no loss of gas. A series of curves showing the calculated pressure gradient through a moving column of solids is presented. Mean particle size, solids velocity, and column length are parameters. Further study of this system to evaluate practicality is recommended.

  19. Application studies of CFRTP hexagon socket head cap screws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Masaru

    PPS thermoplastic CFRP is used to fabricate screws via injection molding; these samples were tested for tensile strength and torque vs axial tension. Attention was given to the effects of various lubricants. When MoS2 was applied to the screw's threading, its axial tension increased from 10 to 16 kN.

  20. [Loosening of a Calcaneo-Stop Screw after Trampolining].

    PubMed

    Trieb, K; Fingernagel, T; Petershofer, A; Hofstaetter, S G

    2015-06-01

    Flexible flatfoot is a common malalignment in the paediatric population. Arthroereisis with a calcaneo-stop screw is an effective surgical procedure for treating juvenile flexible flatfoot after conservative measures have been fully exploited. In the present report, we describe the case of a loosening of a calcaneo-stop screw in a 12-year-old youth after excessive trampolining. PMID:25710392

  1. Periodic Stresses in Gyroscopic Bodies, with Applications to Air Screws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1918-01-01

    Report discusses periodic stresses in gyroscopic bodies with applications to air screws caused by particle mass. Report concludes that all modern air screws obey the laws found for plane groups of particles. In particular the two-bladers exert on the shaft a rhythmic gyroscopic torque; the multibladers a steady one; both easily calculable for any given conditions of motion and mass distribution.

  2. 21 CFR 872.4880 - Intraosseous fixation screw or wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. 872.4880 Section 872.4880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES.... (a) Identification. An intraosseous fixation screw or wire is a metal device intended to be...

  3. Use of small cannulated screws for fixation in foot surgery.

    PubMed

    Burns, A E

    2000-05-01

    Use of cannulated bone screws, as compared with use of traditional bone screws, has been reported to decrease surgical time, allow for more precise screw placement, and reduce sources of error. Cannulation of the smaller-size screws that are routinely used in foot surgery has not been available until the last few years. This article reports on the use of the small cannulated screws manufactured by Alphatec Manufacturing, Inc (Palm Desert, California). The screw sizes available in the Mini Lag Screw System are 2.7, 3.5, and 4.0 mm. A long-term clinical and radiographic prospective evaluation of 70 procedures performed on 49 patients was conducted. The follow-up time for all patients was 2 years. None of the 70 implants fractured, and seven procedures (in seven patients) resulted in some type of implant-fixation failure. All of the fixation failures, however, appeared to be related to an untoward event or patient noncompliance. These smaller cannulated screws proved to be a reliable and effective means of fixation in foot surgery. PMID:10833872

  4. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - infants; PQC - infants; Pic line - infants; Per-Q cath - infants ... A percutaneously inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long, very thin, soft plastic tube that is put into a small blood vessel. This article addresses PICCs in ...

  5. Tool Removes Coil-Spring Thread Inserts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Gerald J., Jr.; Swenson, Gary J.; Mcclellan, J. Scott

    1991-01-01

    Tool removes coil-spring thread inserts from threaded holes. Threads into hole, pries insert loose, grips insert, then pulls insert to thread it out of hole. Effects essentially reverse of insertion process to ease removal and avoid further damage to threaded inner surface of hole.

  6. The Analysis of Soil Resistance During Screw Displacement Pile Installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasinski, Adam

    2015-02-01

    The application of screw displacement piles (SDP) is still increasing due to their high efficiency and many advantages. However, one technological problem is a serious disadvantage of those piles. It relates to the generation of very high soil resistance during screw auger penetration, especially when piles are installed in non-cohesive soils. In many situations this problem causes difficulties in creating piles of designed length and diameter. It is necessary to find a proper method for prediction of soil resistance during screw pile installation. The analysis of screw resistances based on model and field tests is presented in the paper. The investigations were carried out as part of research project, financed by the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education. As a result of tests and analyses the empirical method for prediction of rotation resistance (torque) during screw auger penetration in non-cohesive subsoil based on CPT is proposed.

  7. Ball Screw Actuator Including an Axial Soft Stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Forrest, Steven Talbert (Inventor); Abel, Steve (Inventor); Woessner, George (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An actuator includes an actuator housing, a ball screw, and an axial soft stop assembly. The ball screw extends through the actuator housing and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw is coupled to receive a drive force and is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively move in a retract direction and an extend direction. The axial soft stop assembly is disposed within the actuator housing. The axial soft stop assembly is configured to be selectively engaged by the ball screw and, upon being engaged thereby, to translate, with compliance, a predetermined distance in the extend direction, and to prevent further movement of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  8. Twin screw granulation - review of current progress.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M R

    2015-01-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) is a new process of interest to the pharmaceutical community that can continuously wet granulate powders, doing so at lower liquid concentrations and with better product consistency than found by a high shear batch mixer. A considerable body of research has evolved over the short time since this process was introduced but generally with little comparison of results. A certain degree of confidence has been developed through these studies related to how process variables and many attributes of machinery configuration will affect granulation but some major challenges still lay ahead related to scalability, variations in the processing regimes related to degree of channel fill and the impact of wetting and granulation of complex powder formulations. This review examines the current literature for wet granulation processes studied in twin screw extrusion machinery, summarizing the influences of operational and system parameters affecting granule properties as well as strives to provide some practical observations to newly interested users of the technique. PMID:25402966

  9. Screw dislocations in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Jasinski, Jacek B.; Washburn, Jack; O'Keefe, Michael A.

    2002-02-15

    GaN has received much attention over the past few years because of several new applications, including light emitting diodes, blue laser diodes and high-power microwave transistors. One of the biggest problems is a high density of structural defects, mostly dislocations, due to a lack of a suitable lattice-matched substrate since bulk GaN is difficult to grow in large sizes. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been applied to study defects in plan-view and cross-sections on samples prepared by conventional techniques such as mechanical thinning and precision ion milling. The density of dislocations close to the sample surface of a 1 mm-thick HVPE sample was in the range of 3x109 cm-2. All three types of dislocations were present in these samples, and almost 50 percent were screw dislocations. Our studies suggest that the core structure of screw dislocations in the same material might differ when the material is grown by different methods.

  10. Asymmetric distribution in twin screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Chan Seem, Tim; Rowson, Neil A; Gabbott, Ian; de Matas, Marcel; Reynolds, Gavin K; Ingram, Andy

    2016-09-01

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) was successfully employed to validate measured transverse asymmetry in material distribution in the conveying zones of a Twin Screw Granulator (TSG). Flow asymmetry was established to be a property of the granulator geometry and dependent on fill level. The liquid distribution of granules as a function of fill level was determined. High flow asymmetry at low fill level negatively affects granule nucleation leading to high variance in final uniformity. Wetting of material during nucleation was identified as a critical parameter in determining final granule uniformity and fill level is highlighted as a crucial control factor in achieving this. Flow asymmetry of dry material in conveying zones upstream of binder fluid injection leads to poor non-uniform wetting at nucleation and results in heterogeneous final product. The granule formation mechanism of 60°F kneading blocks is suggested to be primarily breakage of agglomerates formed during nucleation. Optimisation of screw configuration would be required to provide secondary growth. This work shows how fill dependent flow regimes affect granulation mechanisms. PMID:26820919

  11. A Surgical Method for Determining Proper Screw Length in ACDF

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hae-Gi; Kang, Moo-Sung; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Jeong-Yoon; Kim, Keun-Su

    2014-01-01

    Objective We describe a surgical tool that uses the distractor pin as a reference for determining proper screw length in ACDF. It is critical that screw purchase depth be as deep as possible without violating or penetrating the posterior cortical wall, which ensures strong pull out strength. Methods We enrolled 81 adult patients who underwent ACDF using an anterior cervical plate from 2010 to 2012. Patients were categorized into Groups A (42 patients: retractor pin used as a reference for screw length) and B (39 patients: control group). Intraoperative lateral x-rays were taken after screwing the retractor pin to confirm the approaching vertebral level. The ratio of retractor pin length to body anteroposterior (A-P) diameter was measured as a reference. Proper screw length was determined by comparison to the reference. Results The average distance from screw tip to posterior wall was 3.0±1.4mm in Group A and 4.1±2.3mm in Group B. The ratio of screw length to body sagittal diameter was 86.2±5.7% in Group A and 80.8±9.0% in Group B. Screw length to body sagittal diameter ratios higher than 4/5 occurred in 33 patients (90%) in Group A and 23 patients (59%) in Group B. No cases violated the posterior cortical wall. Conclusion We introduce a useful surgical method for determining proper screw length in ACDF using the ratio of retractor pin length to body A-P diameter as a reference. This method allows for deeper screw purchase depth without violation of the posterior cortical wall. PMID:25346756

  12. Lateral Movement of Screw Dislocations During Homoepitaxial Growth and Devices Yielded Therefrom Free of the Detrimental Effects of Screw Dislocations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G. (Inventor); Powell, J. Anthony (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention is related to a method that enables and improves wide bandgap homoepitaxial layers to be grown on axis single crystal substrates, particularly SiC. The lateral positions of the screw dislocations in epitaxial layers are predetermined instead of random, which allows devices to be reproducibly patterned to avoid performance degrading crystal defects normally created by screw dislocations.

  13. Scar due to skin incision for screw fixation through the transbuccal approach after sagittal split ramus osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Muto, Toshitaka

    2012-05-01

    Most rigid fixation techniques after sagittal split ramus osteotomies of the mandible involve the transbuccal approach. A skin incision in the cheek carries with it possible undesirable sequelae, such as noticeable scarring. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is scarring in the face after this technique. For screw insertion, a 5-mm stab incision was performed on 40 Japanese patients (20 men and 20 women) with class III occlusion. After surgery, gross examination (via the naked eyes) of the skin incision was performed monthly for 1 year by the same oral surgeon. In all cases, the skin incision had disappeared by 1 year after the surgery. PMID:22627425

  14. In vivo evaluation of immediately loaded stainless steel and titanium orthodontic screws in a growing bone.

    PubMed

    Gritsch, Kerstin; Laroche, Norbert; Bonnet, Jeanne-Marie; Exbrayat, Patrick; Morgon, Laurent; Rabilloud, Muriel; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The present work intends to evaluate the use of immediate loaded orthodontic screws in a growing model, and to study the specific bone response. Thirty-two screws (half of stainless steel and half of titanium) were inserted in the alveolar bone of 8 growing pigs. The devices were immediately loaded with a 100 g orthodontic force. Two loading periods were assessed: 4 and 12 weeks. Both systems of screws were clinically assessed. Histological observations and histomorphometric analysis evaluated the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" and static and dynamic bone parameters in the vicinity of the devices (test zone) and in a bone area located 1.5 cm posterior to the devices (control zone). Both systems exhibit similar responses for the survival rate; 87.5% and 81.3% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.64; 4-week period), and 62.5% and 50.0% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.09; 12-week period). No significant differences between the devices were found regarding the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" (p = 0.1) or the static and dynamic bone parameters. However, the 5% threshold of "bone-to-implant contact" was obtained after 4 weeks with the stainless steel devices, leading to increased survival rate values. Bone in the vicinity of the miniscrew implants showed evidence of a significant increase in bone trabecular thickness when compared to bone in the control zone (p = 0.05). In our study, it is likely that increased trabecular thickness is a way for low density bone to respond to the stress induced by loading. PMID:24124540

  15. Pedicled buccal fat pad graft for root coverage in severe gingival recession defect

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Saurav; Del Fabbro, Massimo; Satpathy, Anurag; Das, Abhaya Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Gingival recession (GR) is a condition resulting in root exposure which leads to root sensitivity, pain, root caries, plaque retention, poor esthetics, and tooth loss. Sites exhibiting Miller Class III and IV GR are not suitable for treatment with surgical root coverage techniques, and their prognosis are very poor with current techniques. In this case report, pedicled buccal fat pad (PBFP) was employed as subepithelial graft technique for root coverage of maxillary tooth with Class III GR defect along with furcation involvement and the absence of keratinized gingiva. PBFP as the subepithelial graft is likely to increase the predictability and outcome of root coverage procedures in the treatment of cases with poor prognosis, owing to its pedicled vascularity. PBFP may be considered as a reliable modality for root coverage of such severe maxillary posterior GR defects, as reported, that could not be repaired by other conventional procedures. PMID:27143839

  16. Pedicled buccal fat pad graft for root coverage in severe gingival recession defect.

    PubMed

    Panda, Saurav; Del Fabbro, Massimo; Satpathy, Anurag; Das, Abhaya Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Gingival recession (GR) is a condition resulting in root exposure which leads to root sensitivity, pain, root caries, plaque retention, poor esthetics, and tooth loss. Sites exhibiting Miller Class III and IV GR are not suitable for treatment with surgical root coverage techniques, and their prognosis are very poor with current techniques. In this case report, pedicled buccal fat pad (PBFP) was employed as subepithelial graft technique for root coverage of maxillary tooth with Class III GR defect along with furcation involvement and the absence of keratinized gingiva. PBFP as the subepithelial graft is likely to increase the predictability and outcome of root coverage procedures in the treatment of cases with poor prognosis, owing to its pedicled vascularity. PBFP may be considered as a reliable modality for root coverage of such severe maxillary posterior GR defects, as reported, that could not be repaired by other conventional procedures. PMID:27143839

  17. Latissimus dorsi pedicle flap for coverage of soft tissue defects about the elbow.

    PubMed

    Stevanovic, M; Sharpe, F; Thommen, V D; Itamura, J M; Schnall, S B

    1999-01-01

    Sixteen consecutive patients who were treated with a pedicled latissimus dorsi flap for complex soft tissue defects about the elbow were reviewed. The average defect size was 100 cm2. Thirteen of the 16 patients achieved stable wound healing with a single procedure. Three patients had partial necrosis of the latissimus and required additional coverage procedures. We recommend that the latissimus dorsi flap should not be routinely used to cover defects more than 8 cm distal to the olecranon. The flap should be closely monitored in the first 48 hours, drains should be routinely used at the recipient and donor sites, and the elbow should be maintained in an extended position for the first 5 days after the procedure. The latissimus dorsi flap may also have a prophylactic role in selected patients with compromised soft tissue coverage about the elbow. The pedicled latissimus flap can be performed under loupe magnification and requires no microsurgical skills or equipment. PMID:10633903

  18. Misdiagnosing Absent Pedicle of Cervical Spine in the Acute Trauma Setting

    PubMed Central

    Rossel, Felipe; Nooh, Anas; Jarzem, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Congenital absence of cervical spine pedicle can be easily misdiagnosed as facet dislocation on plain radiographs especially in the acute trauma setting. Additional imaging, including computed tomography (CT)-scan with careful interpretation is required in order to not misdiagnose cervical posterior arch malformation with subsequent inappropriate management. A 39-year-old patient presented to the emergency unit of our university hospital after being trampled by a cow over her back and head followed by loss of consciousness, retrograde amnesia and neck pain. Her initial cervical CT-scan showed possible C5-C6 dislocation, then, it became clear that her problem was a misdiagnosed congenital cervical abnormality. Patient was treated symptomatically without consequences. The congenital absence of a cervical pedicle is a very unusual condition that is easily misdiagnosed. Diagnosis can be accurately confirmed with a CT-scan of the cervical spine. Symptomatic conservative treatment will result in resolution of the symptoms. PMID:26605026

  19. Misdiagnosing Absent Pedicle of Cervical Spine in the Acute Trauma Setting.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Fahad H; Rossel, Felipe; Nooh, Anas; Jarzem, Peter

    2015-09-28

    Congenital absence of cervical spine pedicle can be easily misdiagnosed as facet dislocation on plain radiographs especially in the acute trauma setting. Additional imaging, including computed tomography (CT)-scan with careful interpretation is required in order to not misdiagnose cervical posterior arch malformation with subsequent inappropriate management. A 39-year-old patient presented to the emergency unit of our university hospital after being trampled by a cow over her back and head followed by loss of consciousness, retrograde amnesia and neck pain. Her initial cervical CT-scan showed possible C5-C6 dislocation, then, it became clear that her problem was a misdiagnosed congenital cervical abnormality. Patient was treated symptomatically without consequences. The congenital absence of a cervical pedicle is a very unusual condition that is easily misdiagnosed. Diagnosis can be accurately confirmed with a CT-scan of the cervical spine. Symptomatic conservative treatment will result in resolution of the symptoms. PMID:26605026

  20. Repair of Fingertip Defect Using an Anterograde Pedicle Flap Based on the Dorsal Perforator

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Peng; Chen, Weiwei; Mei, Jin; Ding, Maochao; Yu, Yaling; Xi, Shanshan; Zhou, Renpeng

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purposes of this article are to introduce and assess the results of a long-term follow-up of using anterograde pedicle flap based on the dorsal branches of proper digital neurovascular bundles from the dorsum of the middle phalanx for the fingertip defect. Methods: Between February 2011 and December 2012, 31 patients underwent reconstruction of fingertip defects using a homodigital flap based on the dorsal perforator in the middle phalanx. The defect size ranged from 1.3 cm × 1.5 cm to 2.4 cm × 3.0 cm. During surgery, the flap was designed on the dorsal middle phalangeal region. The pedicle was a neurovascular bundle consisting of an artery, vein, and sensory nerve; the rotation of pedicle was <90 degrees. Results: The clinical results were satisfactory after 3 to 9 months of follow-up. The flaps were considered cosmetically acceptable by both patients and doctors. The sensory recovery was excellent, 2-point discrimination was 4.96 ± 1.47 mm, and the recovery of range of motion of the interphalangeal joints was very good. Conclusions: The anterograde island flap based on the dorsal branches of proper digital neurovascular bundles is an ideal aesthetic reconstruction method for fingertip defect. A 90-degree rotated island pedicle flap was very versatile, easy to design, and had good survival. This technique is simple with less damage to the donor site, without sacrificing the branch of the digital artery and nerve. The reliable source of blood supply and satisfactory recovery of sensation can be achieved without affecting the interphalangeal joint activity. PMID:27482478

  1. Saving grace: distally pedicled gracilis muscular flap in lower limb salvage

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Kavit; Dempsey, Marlese; Ghali, Shadi; Grobbelaar, Adriaan

    2014-01-01

    During the 1970s, the incidence of limb amputation following surgery for sarcoma excision was as high as 50%. Two important developments have led to modern day limb salvage, namely chemotherapy and precision imaging techniques. We present a case of limb salvage in a patient with osteosarcoma plagued with recurrent infection after prosthetic revision. We discuss the use of the distally based pedicled gracilis muscular flap, which has little mention as a reconstructive option for defects around the knee. PMID:25085952

  2. The iliac bone or osteocutaneous transplant pedicled to the deep circumflex iliac artery. II. Clinical application.

    PubMed

    Bitter, K; Schlesinger, S; Westerman, U

    1983-12-01

    10 patients received a bone or osteocutaneous transplant pedicled to the deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) after in-continuity resection of the mandible. 9 grafts healed primarily and were stable after a period of time corresponding to that needed in fractured bones. No infection or resorption occurred. In one case, varicosity made the vessel preparation impossible. Indications, reliability and pitfalls of this method are outlined and discussed in this paper. PMID:6361188

  3. The pedicled latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap in head and neck reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ong, Hui Shan; Ji, Tong; Zhang, Chen Ping

    2014-08-01

    The pedicled latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap (PLDMF) is not the first-line reconstructive option for most clinicians; however, when treating salvage patients or those with depleted neck vessels, the PLDMF provides a valuable armamentarium. Unlike the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap or the lower island trapezius flap, the PLDMF has greater versatility in soft tissue design and a longer arc of rotation. These advantages are of great importance in managing advanced reconstructive cases. PMID:24958381

  4. Posterior Titanium Screw Fixation without Debridement of Infected Tissue for the Treatment of Thoracolumbar Spontaneous Pyogenic Spondylodiscitis

    PubMed Central

    Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Nasi, Davide; Nocchi, Niccolo; Di Rienzo, Alessandro; di Somma, Lucia; Colasanti, Roberto; Vaira, Carmela; Benigni, Roberta; Liverotti, Valentina; Scerrati, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose The aim of our study was to analyze the safety and effectiveness of posterior pedicle screw fixation for treatment of pyogenic spondylodiscitis (PSD) without formal debridement of the infected tissue. Overview of Literature Posterior titanium screw fixation without formal debridement of the infected tissue and anterior column reconstruction for the treatment of PSD is still controversial. Methods From March 2008 to June 2013, 18 patients with PSD underwent posterior titanium fixation with or without decompression, according to their neurological deficit. Postero-lateral fusion with allograft transplantation alone or bone graft with both the allogenic bone and the autologous bone was also performed. The outcome was assessed using the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain and the Frankel grading system for neurological status. Normalization both of C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate was adopted as criterion for discontinuation of antibiotic therapy and infection healing. Segmental instability and fusion were also analyzed. Results At the mean follow-up time of 30.16 months (range, 24–53 months), resolution of spinal infection was achieved in all patients. The mean CRP before surgery was 14.32±7.9 mg/dL, and at the final follow-up, the mean CRP decreased to 0.5±0.33 mg/dL (p <0.005). Follow-up computed tomography scan at 12 months after surgery revealed solid fusion in all patients. The VAS before surgery was 9.16±1.29 and at the final follow-up, it improved to 1.38±2.03, which was statistically significant (p <0.05). Eleven patients out of eighteen (61.11%) with initial neurological impairment had an average improvement of 1.27 grades at the final follow-up documented with the Frankel grading system. Conclusions Posterior screw fixation with titanium instrumentation was safe and effective in terms of stability and restoration of neurological impairment. Fixation also rapidly reduced back pain

  5. The effect of movement on the holding power of screws in bone.

    PubMed

    Schatzker, J; Horne, J G; Sumner-Smith, G

    1975-09-01

    Movement between screw threads and bone inhibits bone formation, revascularization and remodeling of dead bone. Movement causes the screw to become enveloped by fibrous tissue in response to necrosis and resorption of adjacent dead cortical bone. This results in a radiologically discernible radiolucent "halo" about the screw, a certain sign of screw loosening. PMID:1157420

  6. Economics of water injected air screw compressor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venu Madhav, K.; Kovačević, A.

    2015-08-01

    There is a growing need for compressed air free of entrained oil to be used in industry. In many cases it can be supplied by oil flooded screw compressors with multi stage filtration systems, or by oil free screw compressors. However, if water injected screw compressors can be made to operate reliably, they could be more efficient and therefore cheaper to operate. Unfortunately, to date, such machines have proved to be insufficiently reliable and not cost effective. This paper describes an investigation carried out to determine the current limitations of water injected screw compressor systems and how these could be overcome in the 15-315 kW power range and delivery pressures of 6-10 bar. Modern rotor profiles and approach to sealing and cooling allow reasonably inexpensive air end design. The prototype of the water injected screw compressor air system was built and tested for performance and reliability. The water injected compressor system was compared with the oil injected and oil free compressor systems of the equivalent size including the economic analysis based on the lifecycle costs. Based on the obtained results, it was concluded that water injected screw compressor systems could be designed to deliver clean air free of oil contamination with a better user value proposition than the oil injected or oil free screw compressor systems over the considered range of operations.

  7. Management of a fractured implant abutment screw: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Canpolat, Ceyhun; Ozkurt-Kayahan, Zeynep; Kazazoğlu, Ender

    2014-07-01

    In an abutment screw fracture, it is generally a challenge for the clinician to remove fractured fragments. In some cases, the screw cannot be removed, and alternative solutions should be considered. This clinical report describes the replacement of a ball attachment with a fractured screw, which was impossible to retrieve, with a cast dowel with ball attachment. The patient who presented to the Department of Prosthodontics, Yeditepe University, Faculty of Dentistry was a 65-year-old woman, wearing a mandibular complete denture supported by two implants for 4 years. She complained about the loss of retention of the denture because of the fractured abutment screw, and it was found that another dentist had previously tried to retrieve the fractured screw with no success. It was decided to construct a cast dowel with ball attachment to improve retention without sacrificing the implant. The interior of the implant and the fractured screw were machined with a rotating instrument. An impression was taken with a metal strip and silicone-based materials. In the laboratory, a stone die was generated from the impression, and a custom-made cast dowel with ball attachment was constructed. It was then cemented with glass ionomer cement and connected to the denture with the direct method. The alternative procedure described in this clinical report was successful for the removal of the fractured abutment screw and use of the existing denture. PMID:24393481

  8. Parametric analysis of orthopedic screws in relation to bone density.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Elisabetta M; Salaorno, Massimiliano; Grasso, Giovanni; Audenino, Alberto L

    2009-01-01

    A global study of geometry and material properties of orthopedic screws was performed, considering not only the effect of each single factor (screw pitch, number of threads, fillet angle, etc.) but also their interactions with respect to bone density.The stress patterns resulting from different screw geometries and bone densities were analyzed using finite element techniques, taking into account different levels of osseointegration between the screw and the bone. These numerical models where validated through experimental pull-out tests, where a pull out force of 120 N produced localized failure of the last thread (stresses above 0.42 MPa). The results of the numerical simulations were then summarised using a multi-factorial parametric analysis. This demonstrated the great relevance of the interaction between bone density and screw pitch, showing that the optimal screw pitch can vary by more than 25% for different densities (0.35 g/cm(3) and 0.47 g/cm(3), respectively).The parameters calculated by means of the multi-factorial analysis allow the pull out force to be estimated for different osseointegration levels, different screw geometries and material properties, and for different bone densities. The final objective is to determine the best choice of implant for each individual patient. PMID:19587807

  9. A reverse flow cross finger pedicle skin flap from hemidorsum of finger.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Satyanarayan; Manisundaram, S

    2010-04-01

    A reverse-flow cross-finger pedicle skin flap raised from the hemidorsum has been used, which is a modification of the distally based dorsal cross-finger flap. The flap is raised from the hemidorsum at a plane above the paratenon, the distal-most location of the base being at the level of the distal interphalangeal joint. Thirty-two flaps were used from as many fingers of as many patients. Of these, 31 (97%) flaps survived fully; there was stiffness of finger in one (3%) patient and the two-point discrimination was 4-8mm (n=14). Follow-up period was 2 months to 3 years, the median being 1 year and 3 months. The advantages of this flap are that there is less disruption of veins and less visible disfigurement of the dorsum of the finger when compared to other pedicled cross-finger skin flaps. The disadvantage of this flap is its restricted width. It is recommended as the cross-finger pedicle skin flap of choice when the defect is not wide. PMID:19386561

  10. Cholecystectomy after breast reconstruction with a pedicled autologous tram flap. Types of surgical access.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, Magdalena; Kostro, Justyna; Jankau, Jerzy; Bigda, Justyna; Skorek, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    The number of breast reconstruction procedures has been increasing in recent years. One of the suggested treatment methods is breast reconstruction with a pedicled skin and muscle TRAM flap (transverse rectus abdominis muscle - TRAM). Surgical incisions performed during a cholecystectomy procedure may be located in the areas significant for flap survival. The aim of this paper is to present anatomical changes in abdominal walls secondary to pedicled skin and muscle (TRAM) flap breast reconstruction, which influence the planned access in cholecystectomy procedures. The authors present 2 cases of cholecystectomy performed due to cholelithiasis in female patients with a history of TRAM flap breast reconstruction procedures. The first patient underwent a traditional method of surgery 14 days after the reconstruction due to acute cholecystitis. The second patient underwent a laparoscopy due to cholelithiasis 7 years after the TRAM procedure. In both cases an abdominal ultrasound scan was performed prior to the operation, and surgical access was determined following consultation with a plastic surgeon. The patient who had undergone traditional cholecystectomy developed an infection of the postoperative wound. The wound was treated with antibiotics, vacuum therapy and skin grafting. After 7 weeks complete postoperative wound healing and correct healing of the TRAM flap were achieved. The patient who had undergone laparoscopy was discharged home on the second postoperative day without any complications. In order to plan a safe surgical access, it is necessary to know the changes in the anatomy of abdominal walls following a pedicled TRAM flap breast reconstruction procedure. PMID:25337177

  11. To Pringle or not to pringle: is Pedicle clamping a necessity in liver resection?

    PubMed

    Obiekwe, S R; Quintaine, L; Khannaz, A; Laurent, C; Saric, J

    2014-01-01

    A single center prospective study was done to evaluate the role of hepatic portal pedicle clamping (PC) during right hepatectomy (RH) in patients with primary and secondary liver tumors. Cirrhotics were excluded. Two groups were compared for preoperative demographics including diagnosis, tumor size, portal vein embolization and liver enzymes, pre and postoperative hemoglobin levels, percentage of residual liver mass, morbidity and mortality, pedicle clamp time, intensive care unit stay, length of hospital stay and blood loss. We observed no significant difference in the analysis of the post-operative hemoglobin, liver enzymes, residual liver size, size of tumor resected, need for postoperative monitoring in ICU stay, length of hospital stay and blood loss. Mortality and morbidity were the same. None of the patients were transfused during surgery. Our findings show that pedicle clamping was beneficial 15% of the time when uncontrolled intra-operative bleeding was encountered or in a subset of patients with peliosis, steatohepatitis, Jehovah Witness patient, and post-chemotherapy patients. However, its advantage has to be weighed against the disadvantages. PMID:25513103

  12. To Pringle or not to pringle: is Pedicle clamping a necessity in liver resection?

    PubMed

    Obiekwe, S R; Quintaine, L; Khannaz, A; Laurent, C; Saric, J

    2014-01-01

    A single center prospective study was done to evaluate the role of hepatic portal pedicle clamping (PC) during right hepatectomy (RH) in patients with primary and secondary liver tumors. Cirrhotics were excluded. Two groups were compared for preoperative demographics including diagnosis, tumor size, portal vein embolization and liver enzymes, pre and postoperative hemoglobin levels, percentage of residual liver mass, morbidity and mortality, pedicle clamp time, intensive care unit stay, length of hospital stay and blood loss. We observed no significant difference in the analysis of the post-operative hemoglobin, liver enzymes, residual liver size, size of tumor resected, need for postoperative monitoring in ICU stay, length of hospital stay and blood loss. Mortality and morbidity were the same. None of the patients were transfused during surgery. Our findings show that pedicle clamping was beneficial 15% of the time when uncontrolled intra-operative bleeding was encountered or in a subset of patients with peliosis, steatohepatitis, Jehovah Witness patient, and post-chemotherapy patients. However, its advantage has to be weighed against the disadvantages. PMID:25436318

  13. A Two-Step Control of Secondary Splenic Pedicles Using Ligasure during Laparoscopic Splenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Bai; Liu, Yahui; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Yingchao; Wang, Guangyi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We modified the LigaSure vessel sealing into a two-step technique without using Endo-GIA stapler for the secondary splenic pedicle control in laparoscopic splenectomy (LS). This study evaluated the efficacy and safety outcomes of this technique. Methods: Patients (n = 105) scheduled for elective LS were consecutively and prospectively enrolled, including 24 males and 81 females, with a mean age of 43.6 (range 11-75) years. Following the mobilization of the spleen, the splenic inflow was interrupted by applying a Hem-o-lock clip. LigaSure was used to seal and transect the secondary splenic pedicles adjacent to the pancreatic tail and subsequently in proximity to the spleen. Results: Of 105 patients, 103 patients (98.1%) underwent successful LS, whereas two patients (1.9%) required the conversion to laparotomy. The mean operative time was 100 min, whilst the mean volume of blood loss was 500 mL. No clinically significant morbidities or mortality occurred following LS. An average of 8,000 RMB (range: 6900 to 9000; 1 USD = 6.5 RMB) was saved by using this two-step technique. Conclusion: Secondary splenic pedicles can be successfully controlled in LS by using a two-step technique with the LigaSure vessel sealing system in an economically favorable way. PMID:23136536

  14. Gene Insertion Patterns and Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vain, Philippe; Thole, Vera

    During the past 25 years, the molecular analysis of transgene insertion patterns and sites in plants has greatly contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying transgene integration, expression, and stability in the nuclear genome. Molecular characterization is also an essential step in the safety assessment of genetically modified crops. This chapter describes the standard experimental procedures used to analyze transgene insertion patterns and loci in cereals and grasses transformed using Agrobacterium tumefaciens or direct transfer of DNA. Methods and protocols enabling the determination of the number and configuration of transgenic loci via a combination of inheritance studies, polymerase chain reaction, and Southern analyses are presented. The complete characterization of transgenic inserts in plants is, however, a holistic process relying on a wide variety of experimental approaches. In this chapter, these additional approaches are not detailed but references to relevant bibliographic records are provided.

  15. Optically driven Archimedes micro-screws for micropump applications: multiple blade design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldeck, Patrice L.; Lin, Chih-Lang; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Lin, Chin-Te; Chung, Tien-Tung; Bouriau, Michel; Vitrant, Guy

    2011-10-01

    We study the rotation of photo-driven Archimedes screw with multiple blades. The micron-sized Archimedes screws are readily made by the two-photon polymerization technique. Free-floating screws that are trapped by optical tweezers align in the laser irradiation direction, and rotate spontaneously. In this study we demonstrate that the rotation speeds of two-blade-screws is twice the rotation speed of one-blade-screw. However, more complex 3-blade-screws rotate slower than 2-blade-screws due to their limited geometry resolution at this micron scale.

  16. Vibration analysis of three-screw pumps under pressure loads and rotor contact forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wanyou; Lu, Hanfeng; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Chuan; Lu, Xiqun; Shuai, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    Two main vibration sources in three-screw pumps, the fluid exciting force and the screw contact force, are studied to provide the basis for vibration control in this paper. A fluid exciting force model and a screw contact model are proposed to calculate these forces. An experimental test is carried out to obtain the vibration response of a three-screw pump. A calibrated finite element model of the three-screw pump is used to verify the vibration response under the fluid exciting force and the screw contact force obtained from the proposed models. The results show that the screw contact force is more dominant than the fluid exciting force.

  17. Spline-Screw Payload-Fastening System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Payload handed off securely between robot and vehicle or structure. Spline-screw payload-fastening system includes mating female and male connector mechanisms. Clockwise (or counter-clockwise) rotation of splined male driver on robotic end effector causes connection between robot and payload to tighten (or loosen) and simultaneously causes connection between payload and structure to loosen (or tighten). Includes mechanisms like those described in "Tool-Changing Mechanism for Robot" (GSC-13435) and "Self-Aligning Mechanical and Electrical Coupling" (GSC-13430). Designed for use in outer space, also useful on Earth in applications needed for secure handling and secure mounting of equipment modules during storage, transport, and/or operation. Particularly useful in machine or robotic applications.

  18. Spline-Locking Screw Fastening Strategy (SLSFS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1991-01-01

    A fastener was developed by NASA Goddard for efficiently performing assembly, maintenance, and equipment replacement functions in space using either robotic or astronaut means. This fastener, the 'Spline Locking Screw' (SLS) would also have significant commercial value in advanced manufacturing. Commercial (or DoD) products could be manufactured in such a way that their prime subassemblies would be assembled using SLS fasteners. This would permit machines and robots to disconnect and replace these modules/parts with ease, greatly reducing life cycle costs of the products and greatly enhancing the quality, timeliness, and consistency of repairs, upgrades, and remanufacturing. The operation of the basic SLS fastener is detailed, including hardware and test results. Its extension into a comprehensive fastening strategy for NASA use in space is also outlined. Following this, the discussion turns toward potential commercial and government applications and the potential market significance of same.

  19. Spline-locking screw fastening strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1992-01-01

    A fastener was developed by NASA Goddard for efficiently performing assembly, maintenance, and equipment replacement functions in space using either robotics or astronaut means. This fastener, the 'Spline Locking Screw' (SLS) would also have significant commercial value in advanced space manufacturing. Commercial (or DoD) products could be manufactured in such a way that their prime subassemblies would be assembled using SLS fasteners. This would permit machines and robots to disconnect and replace these modules/parts with ease, greatly reducing life cycle costs of the products and greatly enhancing the quality, timeliness, and consistency of repairs, upgrades, and remanufacturing. The operation of the basic SLS fastener is detailed, including hardware and test results. Its extension into a comprehensive fastening strategy for NASA use in space is also outlined. Following this, the discussion turns toward potential commercial and government applications and the potential market significance of same.

  20. Screw Compressor Characteristics for Helium Refrigeration Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganni, V.; Knudsen, P.; Creel, J.; Arenius, D.; Casagrande, F.; Howell, M.

    2008-03-01

    The oil injected screw compressors have practically replaced all other types of compressors in modern helium refrigeration systems due to their large displacement capacity, minimal vibration, reliability and capability of handling helium's high heat of compression. At the present state of compressor system designs for helium systems, typically two-thirds of the lost input power is due to the compression system. Therefore it is important to understand the isothermal and volumetric efficiencies of these machines to help properly design these compression systems to match the refrigeration process. This presentation summarizes separate tests that have been conducted on Sullair compressors at the Superconducting Super-Collider Laboratory (SSCL) in 1993, Howden compressors at Jefferson Lab (JLab) in 2006 and Howden compressors at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) in 2006. This work is part of an ongoing study at JLab to understand the theoretical basis for these efficiencies and their loss mechanisms, as well as to implement practical solutions.

  1. Noninvasive method for retrieval of broken dental implant abutment screw.

    PubMed

    Gooty, Jagadish Reddy; Palakuru, Sunil Kumar; Guntakalla, Vikram Reddy; Nera, Mahipal

    2014-04-01

    Dental implants made of titanium for replacement of missing teeth are widely used because of ease of technical procedure and high success rate, but are not free of complications and may fail. Fracturing of the prosthetic screw continues to be a problem in restorative practice and great challenge to remove the fractured screw conservatively. This case report describes and demonstrates the technique of using an ultrasonic scaler in the removal of the fracture screw fragment as a noninvasive method without damaging the hex of implants. PMID:24963261

  2. Noninvasive method for retrieval of broken dental implant abutment screw

    PubMed Central

    Gooty, Jagadish Reddy; Palakuru, Sunil Kumar; Guntakalla, Vikram Reddy; Nera, Mahipal

    2014-01-01

    Dental implants made of titanium for replacement of missing teeth are widely used because of ease of technical procedure and high success rate, but are not free of complications and may fail. Fracturing of the prosthetic screw continues to be a problem in restorative practice and great challenge to remove the fractured screw conservatively. This case report describes and demonstrates the technique of using an ultrasonic scaler in the removal of the fracture screw fragment as a noninvasive method without damaging the hex of implants. PMID:24963261

  3. Screw- vs cement-implant-retained restorations: an experimental study in the Beagle. Part 1. Screw and abutment loosening.

    PubMed

    Assenza, Bartolomeo; Scarano, Antonio; Leghissa, Giulio; Carusi, Giorgio; Thams, Ulf; Roman, Fidel San; Piattelli, Adriano

    2005-01-01

    The causes of implant failures can be biological or mechanical. The mechanical causes include fracture of the implant, fracture of the abutment, and loosening of the abutment. Numerous studies show that abutment loosening constitutes one of the marked implant postsurgery complications requiring clinical intervention. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of the screw loosening in screwed or cemented abutments. Six adult male Beagles were used. In each dog, the first molars and 2 premolars were extracted. The sutures were removed after 7 days. After 3 months, 10 implants were placed in each dog, 5 in the right mandible and 5 in the left mandible. The abutments either were screwed in (n=30) by applying a total strength of 30 N/cm or were cemented (n=30). After 12 months, 8 (27%) loosened screws were present in screwed abutments, whereas no abutment loosening was observed in cemented abutments (P = .0001). Screwed abutments are often submitted to nonaxial loads that determine screw and abutment loosening. PMID:16265854

  4. Impact on Neurological Recovery of Transforaminal Debridement and Interbody Fusion versus Transpedicular Decompression in Combination with Pedicle Screw Instrumentation for Treating Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Choovongkomol, Kongtush; Piyapromdee, Urawit; Leownorasate, Manoon

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To compare the neurological outcome of transforaminal debridement and interbody fusion with transpedicular decompression for treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis. Overview of Literature Few articles have addressed the impact of neurological recovery in patients with tuberculosis who were treated by two different operative methods via the posterior-only approach. Methods Clinical and radiographic results of one-stage posterior instrumented spinal fusion for treatment of tuberculous spondylodiscitis with neurological deficits were reviewed and analyzed from 2009 to 2013. The extensive (E) group consisted of patients who received transforaminal debridement and interbody fusion, whereas transpedicular decompression was performed on limited (L) group. Rapid recovery was improvement of at least one Frankel grade within 6 weeks after operation. Otherwise, it was slow recovery. Results All 39 patients had improved neurological signs. The median follow-up period was 24 months. Proportionately younger patients (under 65 years of age) received extensive surgery (15 of 18, 83.3% vs. 11 of 21, 52.4%; p=0.04). The mean operative time and blood loss in the group E were higher than in the group L (both p<0.01). With regard to type of procedure, especially at thoracic and thoracolumbar spine, patients who underwent extensive surgery had rapid neurological recovery significantly different from those of limited surgery (p=0.01; Relative Risk, 3.06; 95% Confidence Interval, 1.13 to 8.29). Conclusions Transforaminal debridement and interbody fusion provides more rapid neurological recovery in patients with thoracic and thoracolumbar spinal tuberculosis compared to transpedicular decompression. PMID:27340536

  5. Insertion device for pressure testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howland, B. T.; Maurin, A. L.

    1969-01-01

    Test device which introduces either pressure or vacuum into a test pipe or tube, is insertable into the tested item where it secures itself into position and requires no external support. The unit has an operating range from zero to 25,000 psig and to any vacuum level that available equipment can reach.

  6. Precise-Conductance Valve Insert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Hoyt, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    Valve modification provides two operating modes fully open and small, precise leak. Copper insert with radially oriented holes allows small, controllable, precise effusion rate when valve closed or nearly unobstructed flow when valve open. Numerous applications in surface physics, vacuum physics, materials science, gas kinetics, thin films, and other areas of research requiring measured flows of gas into or out of system.

  7. Screw-matrix method in dynamics of multibody systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanzhu, Liu

    1988-05-01

    In the present paper the concept of screw in classical mechanics is expressed in matrix form, in order to formulate the dynamical equations of the multibody systems. The mentioned method can retain the advantages of the screw theory and avoid the shortcomings of the dual number notation. Combining the screw-matrix method with the tool of graph theory in Roberson/Wittenberg formalism. We can expand the application of the screw theory to the general case of multibody systems. For a tree system, the dynamical equations for each j-th subsystem, composed of all the outboard bodies connected by j-th joint can be formulated without the constraint reaction forces in the joints. For a nontree system, the dynamical equations of subsystems and the kinematical consistency conditions of the joints can be derived using the loop matrix. The whole process of calculation is unified in matrix form. A three-segment manipulator is discussed as an example.

  8. Adhesive-backed terminal board eliminates mounting screws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Low-profile terminal board is used in dense electronic circuits where mounting and working space is limited. The board has a thin layer of pressure-sensitive adhesive backing which eliminates the need for mounting screws.

  9. 21. NBS SUIT LAB. THREE GLOVES, HELMET, AND SCREW DRIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. NBS SUIT LAB. THREE GLOVES, HELMET, AND SCREW DRIVER TORQUE WRENCH FOR ASSEMBLY AND REPAIR OF BOTH. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  10. Cadaveric Spinal Surgery Simulation: A Comparison of Cadaver Types

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, James E.; Yiasemidou, Marina; Watts, Anna L.; Roberts, Dave J. H.; Timothy, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Single-blinded study. Objective To assess the suitability of three types of cadaver for simulating pedicle screw insertion and establish if there is an ideal. Methods Three types of cadaver—Thiel-embalmed, Crosado-embalmed, and formaldehyde-embalmed—were draped and the spines exposed. Experienced surgeons were asked to place pedicle screws in each cadaver and give written questionnaire feedback using a modified Likert scale. Soft tissue and bony properties were assessed, along with the role of simulation in spinal surgery training. Results The Thiel cadaver rated highest for soft tissue feel and appearance with a median score of 6 for both (range 2 to 7). The Crosado cadaver rated highest for bony feel, with a median score of 6 (range 2 to 7). The formaldehyde cadaver rated lowest for all categories with median scores of 2, 2.5, and 3.5, respectively. All surgeons felt pedicle screw insertion should be learned in a simulated setting using human cadavers. Conclusion Thiel and Crosado cadavers both offered lifelike simulation of pedicle screw insertion, with each having advantages depending on whether the focus is on soft tissue approach or technical aspects of bony screw insertion. Both cadaver types offer the advantage of long life span, unlike fresh frozen tissue, which means cadavers can be used multiple times, thus reducing the costs. PMID:27190738

  11. Cadaveric Spinal Surgery Simulation: A Comparison of Cadaver Types.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, James E; Yiasemidou, Marina; Watts, Anna L; Roberts, Dave J H; Timothy, Jake

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Single-blinded study. Objective To assess the suitability of three types of cadaver for simulating pedicle screw insertion and establish if there is an ideal. Methods Three types of cadaver-Thiel-embalmed, Crosado-embalmed, and formaldehyde-embalmed-were draped and the spines exposed. Experienced surgeons were asked to place pedicle screws in each cadaver and give written questionnaire feedback using a modified Likert scale. Soft tissue and bony properties were assessed, along with the role of simulation in spinal surgery training. Results The Thiel cadaver rated highest for soft tissue feel and appearance with a median score of 6 for both (range 2 to 7). The Crosado cadaver rated highest for bony feel, with a median score of 6 (range 2 to 7). The formaldehyde cadaver rated lowest for all categories with median scores of 2, 2.5, and 3.5, respectively. All surgeons felt pedicle screw insertion should be learned in a simulated setting using human cadavers. Conclusion Thiel and Crosado cadavers both offered lifelike simulation of pedicle screw insertion, with each having advantages depending on whether the focus is on soft tissue approach or technical aspects of bony screw insertion. Both cadaver types offer the advantage of long life span, unlike fresh frozen tissue, which means cadavers can be used multiple times, thus reducing the costs. PMID:27190738

  12. Effects of Multilevel Facetectomy and Screw Density on Postoperative Changes in Spinal Rod Contour in Thoracic Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kokabu, Terufumi; Sudo, Hideki; Abe, Yuichiro; Ito, Manabu; Ito, Yoichi M.; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2016-01-01

    Flattening of the preimplantation rod contour in the sagittal plane influences thoracic kyphosis (TK) restoration in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery. The effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on postoperative changes in spinal rod contour have not been documented. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on changes in spinal rod contour from before implantation to after surgical correction of thoracic curves in patients with AIS prospectively. The concave and convex rod shapes from patients with thoracic AIS (n = 49) were traced prior to insertion. Postoperative sagittal rod shape was determined by computed tomography. The angle of intersection of the tangents to the rod end points was measured. Multiple stepwise linear regression analysis was used to identify variables independently predictive of change in rod contour (Δθ). Average Δθ at the concave and convex side were 13.6° ± 7.5° and 4.3° ± 4.8°, respectively. The Δθ at the concave side was significantly greater than that of the convex side (P < 0.0001) and significantly correlated with Risser sign (P = 0.032), the preoperative main thoracic Cobb angle (P = 0.031), the preoperative TK angle (P = 0.012), and the number of facetectomy levels (P = 0.007). Furthermore, a Δθ at the concave side ≥14° significantly correlated with the postoperative TK angle (P = 0.003), the number of facetectomy levels (P = 0.021), and screw density at the concave side (P = 0.008). Rod deformation at the concave side suggests that corrective forces acting on that side are greater than on the convex side. Multilevel facetectomy and/or screw density at the concave side have positive effects on reducing the rod deformation that can lead to a loss of TK angle postoperatively. PMID:27564683

  13. Effects of Multilevel Facetectomy and Screw Density on Postoperative Changes in Spinal Rod Contour in Thoracic Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kokabu, Terufumi; Sudo, Hideki; Abe, Yuichiro; Ito, Manabu; Ito, Yoichi M; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2016-01-01

    Flattening of the preimplantation rod contour in the sagittal plane influences thoracic kyphosis (TK) restoration in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery. The effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on postoperative changes in spinal rod contour have not been documented. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of multilevel facetectomy and screw density on changes in spinal rod contour from before implantation to after surgical correction of thoracic curves in patients with AIS prospectively. The concave and convex rod shapes from patients with thoracic AIS (n = 49) were traced prior to insertion. Postoperative sagittal rod shape was determined by computed tomography. The angle of intersection of the tangents to the rod end points was measured. Multiple stepwise linear regression analysis was used to identify variables independently predictive of change in rod contour (Δθ). Average Δθ at the concave and convex side were 13.6° ± 7.5° and 4.3° ± 4.8°, respectively. The Δθ at the concave side was significantly greater than that of the convex side (P < 0.0001) and significantly correlated with Risser sign (P = 0.032), the preoperative main thoracic Cobb angle (P = 0.031), the preoperative TK angle (P = 0.012), and the number of facetectomy levels (P = 0.007). Furthermore, a Δθ at the concave side ≥14° significantly correlated with the postoperative TK angle (P = 0.003), the number of facetectomy levels (P = 0.021), and screw density at the concave side (P = 0.008). Rod deformation at the concave side suggests that corrective forces acting on that side are greater than on the convex side. Multilevel facetectomy and/or screw density at the concave side have positive effects on reducing the rod deformation that can lead to a loss of TK angle postoperatively. PMID:27564683

  14. Backside wear of Miller-Galante I and Insall-Burstein II tibial inserts.

    PubMed

    Taki, Naoya; Goldberg, Victor M; Kraay, Matthew J; Rimnac, Clare M

    2004-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if there was a difference in the amount, type, and location of backside wear in the Miller-Galante I and Insall-Burstein II PE tibial inserts. A secondary objective was to determine if backside wear damage in these two designs was a function of clinical factors (patient height, weight, gender, age, and length of time of implantation), shelf life of the PE tibial insert, and tibial component thickness. Backside wear damage was assessed on 24 Miller-Galante I and 11 Insall-Burstein II tibial inserts (implantation time, 0.5-12.4 years). For both groups combined, implantation time was positively correlated to wear damage and to PE peg height into screw holes. The Miller-Galante I group had significantly larger PE pegs than the Insall-Burstein II group. The Miller-Galante I group had significantly more burnishing and larger PE pegs posteriorly than anteriorly. There was no correlation between insert shelf life before initial surgery and backside wear. The thinner the component, the larger the total damage scores in the Miller-Galante I group. This study supports the hypothesis that backside wear of PE tibial inserts may be influenced by design and component thickness and by clinical factors. PMID:15534543

  15. Crystal geometry of screw dislocation glide in tungsten nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadanov, E. V.

    2015-02-01

    A zigzag pattern of low-temperature dislocation glide occurring in tungsten nanocrystals in the intersecting planes {110} and {211}, which belong to the <111> crystallographic zone, has been revealed using field ion microscopy. It has been shown that cores of 1/2[111] screw dislocations are undissociated within the limits of the resolution of the field ion microscope. It has been found experimentally that surface atoms are displaced into metastable positions in the region of the trace of screw dislocation motion.

  16. Screw thread parameter measurement system based on image processing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Zhimin; Huang, Kanggao; Mao, Jiandong; Zhang, Yaya; Zhang, Fan

    2013-08-01

    In the industrial production, as an important transmission part, the screw thread is applied extensively in many automation equipments. The traditional measurement methods of screw thread parameter, including integrated test methods of multiparameters and the single parameter measurement method, belong to contact measurement method. In practical the contact measurement exists some disadvantages, such as relatively high time cost, introducing easily human error and causing thread damage. In this paper, as a new kind of real-time and non-contact measurement method, a screw thread parameter measurement system based on image processing method is developed to accurately measure the outside diameter, inside diameter, pitch diameter, pitch, thread height and other parameters of screw thread. In the system the industrial camera is employed to acquire the image of screw thread, some image processing methods are used to obtain the image profile of screw thread and a mathematics model is established to compute the parameters. The C++Builder 6.0 is employed as the software development platform to realize the image process and computation of screw thread parameters. For verifying the feasibility of the measurement system, some experiments were carried out and the measurement errors were analyzed. The experiment results show the image measurement system satisfies the measurement requirements and suitable for real-time detection of screw thread parameters mentioned above. Comparing with the traditional methods the system based on image processing method has some advantages, such as, non-contact, easy operation, high measuring accuracy, no work piece damage, fast error analysis and so on. In the industrial production, this measurement system can provide an important reference value for development of similar parameter measurement system.

  17. The Harris-Galante porous acetabular component press-fit without screw fixation. Five-year radiographic analysis of primary cases.

    PubMed

    Schmalzried, T P; Wessinger, S J; Hill, G E; Harris, W H

    1994-06-01

    One hundred twenty-two primary total hip arthroplasties were followed for an average of 56 months (range, 48-66 months) in which the Harris-Galante (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN) porous ingrowth acetabular component had been press-fit into the innominate bone without screw fixation. There were no acetabular fractures. No socket was revised for loosening and none were radiographically loose. There was no evidence of disruption of the titanium porous mesh. There was no acetabular osteolysis. Compared to the authors' series of primary hip reconstructions using this same prosthesis inserted with line-to-line reaming and screw fixation, the data indicate that the tight peripheral fit associated with the press-fit technique is effective in reducing both the incidence and extent of bone-implant radiolucencies. However, the increased incidence of radiolucencies near the apex of the acetabulum also suggest that initial contact of the porous surface with live acetabular bone at this location is desirable in order to obtain and maintain an optimal bone-implant interface. Additional studies are necessary to further establish the relationship between the initial fit and long-term fixation of cementless acetabular components. Based on the data and other considerations for eliminating both vascular risk and the potential for fretting wear between the screws and shell, the authors recommend press-fitting without screw fixation for this acetabular component in primary cases when anatomy and bone stock permit. Full seating of the component is recommended in order to obtain dome contact. PMID:8077971

  18. Impact of posterior tibial nail malpositioning on iatrogenic injuries by distal medio-lateral interlocking screws. A cadaveric study on plastinated specimens.

    PubMed

    Wegmann, Kilian; Burkhart, Klaus Josef; Buhl, Jörg; Gausepohl, Thomas; Koebke, Jürgen; Müller, Lars Peter

    2012-12-01

    In intramedullary tibial nailing, multi-planar locking makes stabilization of proximal and distal metaphyseal fractures possible. A known complication in intramedullary nailing of the tibia is iatrogenic injury to neuro-vascular structures caused by the insertion of locking screws. As shown in previous studies, the distal positioning of the nail is important, as it determines the course of the locking bolts. The goal of the present study was to display the consequences of posterior nail malpositioning with respect to the safety of the distal medio-lateral locking screws and the available options. Human cadaveric legs were plastinated according to the sequential plastination technique after intramedullary nailing of the tibia and were then cut transversely. The tibial nails were placed centrally or posteriorly. Macroscopic analysis showed a distinct drawback of posterior nail positioning, with diminished options for the placement of the locking screws and thereby a risk of damaging the anterior and posterior neuro-vascular bundles by distal medio-lateral locking screws. PMID:23409576

  19. Increasing the vascular pedicle length in a free flap using a two-stage preliminary ectopic transfer.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A; Herndl, E; Mühlbauer, W

    1991-08-01

    The length of the vascular pedicle is critically important in the use and safety of a free flap. A lengthening of the artery and vein, until now, has been achieved through the use of either an autologous vein interposition graft or an arteriovenous loop. In such patients, the risk is nevertheless increased and does so proportionally to the increasing length of the venous interposition. We present a 30-year-old male electrician who had lost his left forearm and most of his right ulna after high-voltage electrical trauma. Lengthening of the vascular pedicle of a free fibula flap was achieved by anastomosis to the thoracodorsal vessels for 4 weeks. After this time, the flap was raised again together with the pedicle of the latissimus dorsi and used safely for reconstruction of the ulnar defect. Postoperative recovery after both operations was uneventful and the aim of reconstruction fully realized. In our opinion, this procedure provides an interesting alternative in patients in whom the length of the vascular pedicle is crucial but the designated flap has only a short pedicle. PMID:1952745

  20. Robot-assisted Anterior Odontoid Screw Fixation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei; Wang, Han; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Anterior odontoid screw fixation has been proved to be effective but technically challenging because the difficult approach is associated with high risks of screw malposition and damage to surrounding vital structures. Navigation techniques are therefore increasingly being used to improve safety and accuracy. However, no robot-assisted odontoid screw fixation has yet been reported. We here report a 61-year-old woman with a type II dens fracture on whom anterior odontoid screw fixation was performed under the guidance of a newly developed robotic system (TiRobot, co-designed by Beijing Jishuitan Hospital and TINAVI Medical Technologies). One odontoid screw was safely and accurately placed, the calculated deviation between the planned and actual positions being 0.9 mm. No intraoperative complications were identified and the patient was discharged on Day 5. Follow-up studies after 2 weeks showed good clinical and radiological results. We believe this is the first reported case of robot-assisted anterior odontoid screw fixation. We consider that complicated procedures can become feasible, safe and accurate using TiRobot systems. PMID:27627725

  1. The structure of pedicle and hard antler bone in the European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus): a light microscope and backscattered electron imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Kierdorf, Uwe; Flohr, Stefan; Gomez, Santiago; Landete-Castillejos, Tomas; Kierdorf, Horst

    2013-01-01

    Deer antlers are deciduous bony structures that develop from permanent frontal outgrowths, the pedicles. While growth and bone architecture of antlers have been studied in greater detail, information on pedicle formation and structure is scarce. The present study provides information on the structure of pedicle and hard antler bone in the European roe deer. A pronounced seasonal variation in pedicle architecture was observed, with high porosity around antler casting and a very compact bone structure during the hard antler stage. These observations suggest a corresponding marked variation also in the biomechanical properties of the pedicles. The seasonally alternating extensive resorption and formation processes make the pedicles of older deer heavily remodeled structures. Pedicles increase in thickness by apposition of primary bone that subsequently becomes replaced by secondary osteons. The antler cortex of roe deer is largely composed of a tubular framework of woven bone trabeculae with some remnants of mineralized cartilage, and primary osteons that have filled in the intertrabecular spaces. Secondary osteons are scarce, denoting little remodeling in antlers, which can be related to their short lifespan. The occurrence of cement lines around primary osteons indicates resorption on the trabecular scaffold prior to infilling of the intertrabecular spaces. The outer cortex showed a higher autofluorescence and a more immature structure than the main cortex, suggesting that it was secondarily formed by periosteal activity. Pedicles and antlers constitute a functional entity, and future histological and/or biomechanical studies should therefore consider both components of the cranial appendages. PMID:23961846

  2. Ultrasound guided spine needle insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Elvis C. S.; Mousavi, Parvin; Gill, Sean; Fichtinger, Gabor; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2010-02-01

    An ultrasound (US) guided, CT augmented, spine needle insertion navigational system is introduced. The system consists of an electromagnetic (EM) sensor, an US machine, and a preoperative CT volume of the patient anatomy. Three-dimensional (3D) US volume is reconstructed intraoperatively from a set of two-dimensional (2D) freehand US slices, and is coregistered with the preoperative CT. This allows the preoperative CT volume to be used in the intraoperative clinical coordinate. The spatial relationship between the patient anatomy, surgical tools, and the US transducer are tracked using the EM sensor, and are displayed with respect to the CT volume. The pose of the US transducer is used to interpolate the CT volume, providing the physician with a 2D "x-ray vision" to guide the needle insertion. Many of the system software components are GPU-accelerated, allowing real-time performance of the guidance system in a clinical setting.

  3. Insertion device calculations with mathematica

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.; Lidia, S.

    1995-02-01

    The design of accelerator insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators has usually been aided by numerical modeling on digital computers, using code in high level languages like Fortran. In the present era, there are higher level programming environments like IDL{reg_sign}, MatLab{reg_sign}, and Mathematica{reg_sign} in which these calculations may be performed by writing much less code, and in which standard mathematical techniques are very easily used. The authors present a suite of standard insertion device modeling routines in Mathematica to illustrate the new techniques. These routines include a simple way to generate magnetic fields using blocks of CSEM materials, trajectory solutions from the Lorentz force equations for given magnetic fields, Bessel function calculations of radiation for wigglers and undulators and general radiation calculations for undulators.

  4. Development and Testing of X-Ray Imaging-Enhanced Poly-L-Lactide Bone Screws.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Jen; Pan, Yu-Hwa; Tzeng, Jy-Jiunn; Wu, Ting-Lin; Fong, Tsorng-Harn; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Nanosized iron oxide particles exhibit osteogenic and radiopaque properties. Thus, iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were incorporated into a biodegradable polymer (poly-L-lactic acid, PLLA) to fabricate a composite bone screw. This multifunctional, 3D printable bone screw was detectable on X-ray examination. In this study, mechanical tests including three-point bending and ultimate tensile strength were conducted to evaluate the optimal ratio of iron oxide nanoparticles in the PLLA composite. Both injection molding and 3D printing techniques were used to fabricate the PLLA bone screws with and without the iron oxide nanoparticles. The fabricated screws were implanted into the femoral condyles of New Zealand White rabbits. Bone blocks containing the PLLA screws were resected 2 and 4 weeks after surgery. Histologic examination of the surrounding bone and the radiopacity of the iron-oxide-containing PLLA screws were evaluated. Our results indicated that addition of iron oxide nanoparticles at 30% significantly decreased the ultimate tensile stress properties of the PLLA screws. The screws with 20% iron oxide exhibited strong radiopacity compared to the screws fabricated without the iron oxide nanoparticles. Four weeks after surgery, the average bone volume of the iron oxide PLLA composite screws was significantly greater than that of PLLA screws without iron oxide. These findings suggested that biodegradable and X-ray detectable PLLA bone screws can be produced by incorporation of 20% iron oxide nanoparticles. Furthermore, these screws had significantly greater osteogenic capability than the PLLA screws without iron oxide. PMID:26466309

  5. Development and Testing of X-Ray Imaging-Enhanced Poly-L-Lactide Bone Screws

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Jy-Jiunn; Wu, Ting-Lin; Fong, Tsorng-Harn; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Nanosized iron oxide particles exhibit osteogenic and radiopaque properties. Thus, iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were incorporated into a biodegradable polymer (poly-L-lactic acid, PLLA) to fabricate a composite bone screw. This multifunctional, 3D printable bone screw was detectable on X-ray examination. In this study, mechanical tests including three-point bending and ultimate tensile strength were conducted to evaluate the optimal ratio of iron oxide nanoparticles in the PLLA composite. Both injection molding and 3D printing techniques were used to fabricate the PLLA bone screws with and without the iron oxide nanoparticles. The fabricated screws were implanted into the femoral condyles of New Zealand White rabbits. Bone blocks containing the PLLA screws were resected 2 and 4 weeks after surgery. Histologic examination of the surrounding bone and the radiopacity of the iron-oxide-containing PLLA screws were evaluated. Our results indicated that addition of iron oxide nanoparticles at 30% significantly decreased the ultimate tensile stress properties of the PLLA screws. The screws with 20% iron oxide exhibited strong radiopacity compared to the screws fabricated without the iron oxide nanoparticles. Four weeks after surgery, the average bone volume of the iron oxide PLLA composite screws was significantly greater than that of PLLA screws without iron oxide. These findings suggested that biodegradable and X-ray detectable PLLA bone screws can be produced by incorporation of 20% iron oxide nanoparticles. Furthermore, these screws had significantly greater osteogenic capability than the PLLA screws without iron oxide. PMID:26466309

  6. Investigation of an 11mm diameter twin screw granulator: Screw element performance and in-line monitoring via image analysis.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Ridade; Martinez-Marcos, Laura; Osorio, Juan G; Cruise, Paul; Jones, Ian; Halbert, Gavin W; Lamprou, Dimitrios A; Litster, James D

    2015-12-30

    As twin screw granulation (TSG) provides one with many screw element options, characterization of each screw element is crucial in optimizing the screw configuration in order to obtain desired granule attributes. In this study, the performance of two different screw elements - distributive feed screws and kneading elements - was studied in an 11 mm TSG at different liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratios. The kneading element configuration was found to break large granules more efficiently, leading to narrower granule size distributions. While pharmaceutical industry shifts toward continuous manufacturing, inline monitoring and process control are gaining importance. Granules from an 11 mm TSG were analysed using the Eyecon™, a real-time high speed direct imaging system, which has been used to capture accurate particle size distribution and particle count. The size parameters and particle count were then assessed in terms of their ability to be a suitable control measure using the Shewhart control charts. d10 and particle count were found to be good indicators of the change in L/S ratio. However, d50 and d90 did not reflect the change, due to their inherent variability even when the process is at steady state. PMID:26385406

  7. Minimally Invasive Spinal Stabilization Using Fluoroscopic-Guided Percutaneous Screws as a Form of Palliative Surgery in Patients with Spinal Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Mun Keong; Chan, Chris Yin Wei

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Purpose To report the outcome of 50 patients with spinal metastases treated with minimally invasive stabilization (MISt) using fluoroscopic guided percutaneous pedicle screws with/without minimally invasive decompression. Overview of Literature The advent of minimally invasive percutaneous pedicle screw stabilization system has revolutionized the treatment of spinal metastasis. Methods Between 2008 and 2013, 50 cases of spinal metastasis with pathological fracture(s) with/without neurology deficit were treated by MISt at our institution. The patients were assessed by Tomita score, pain score, operation time, blood loss, neurological recovery, time to ambulation and survival. Results The mean Tomita score was 6.3±2.4. Thirty seven patients (74.0%) required minimally invasive decompression in addition to MISt. The mean operating time was 2.3±0.5 hours for MISt alone and 3.4±1.2 hours for MISt with decompression. Mean blood loss for MISt alone and MISt with decompression was 0.4±0.2 L and 1.7±0.9 L, respectively. MISt provided a statistically significant reduction in visual analog scale pain score with mean preoperative score of 7.9±1.4 that was significantly decreased to 2.5±1.2 postoperatively (p=0.000). For patients with neurological deficit, 70% displayed improvement of one Frankel grade and 5% had an improvement of 2 Frankel grades. No patient was bed-ridden postoperatively, with the average time to ambulation of 3.4±1.8 days. The mean overall survival time was 11.3 months (range, 2–51 months). Those with a Tomita score <8 survived significantly longer than those a Tomita score ≥8 with a mean survival of 14.1±12.5 months and 6.8±4.9 months, respectively (p=0.019). There were no surgical complications, except one case of implant failure. Conclusions MISt is an acceptable treatment option for spinal metastatic patients, providing good relief of instability back pain with no major complications. PMID:26949465

  8. Assessing safety of negative-pressure wound therapy over pedicled muscle flaps: A retrospective review of gastrocnemius muscle flap.

    PubMed

    Lance, Samuel; Harrison, Lindsey; Orbay, Hakan; Boudreault, David; Pereira, Gavin; Sahar, David

    2016-04-01

    The use of negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for management of open wounds and immobilization of split-thickness skin grafts (STSGs) over wounds has been well described. However, there is a concern for potential compromise of flap viability when NPWT is used for skin grafts over pedicled muscle flaps. We have used NPWT to immobilize STSGs in eight patients who underwent a pedicled gastrocnemius muscle flap operation in our department. We applied a negative pressure of -75 mmHg on the muscle flaps for 5 days postoperatively. All wounds healed successfully, with a 97.5 ± 5.5% mean STSG uptake. No flap necrosis was observed. In our series, the use of NPWT for fixation of STSGs over pedicled gastrocnemius muscle flap was effective and had no negative impact on flap viability. PMID:26732293

  9. Helical Screw Expander Evaluation Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A functional 1-MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested in Utah in 1978 to 1979 with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer-equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000-kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Additional testing was performed in Mexico in 1980 under a cooperative test program using the same test array, and machine efficiency was measured at 62% maximum with the rotors partially coated with scale, compared with approximately 54% maximum in Utah with uncoated rotors, confirming the importance of scale deposits within the machine on performance. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  10. Perforator pedicled sural neurocutaneous vascular flap: a modeling study in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Gen; Zhong, Wanrun; Lu, Shengdi; Wang, Chunyang; Han, Pei; Chai, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    Background: An animal model of a distal pedicled sural neurocutaneous flap for experimental research has not previously been established. The purpose of this study was to construct a sural neurocutaneous vascular flap model in the rabbit. Materials and methods: Thirty-five New England rabbits were divided into four groups. Five rabbits in Group A were used for an anatomical study. Red latex and gelatin-lead oxide were injected into posterior tibial arteries of five rabbits in Groups B and C, respectively. In Group D, 40 neurocutaneous flaps with a single perforator pedicle were raised bilaterally in twenty rabbits. In the right legs, 20 flaps were raised by the normal procedure. In the left legs, the perforator pedicles of 20 flaps were ligated as controls. Results: The sural nerve originated from the posterior tibial nerve. Its accompanying artery originated from the deep femoral artery and ran to the lateral malleolus following the sural nerve. A perforator of the posterior tibial artery at the superior calcaneus originated from the midpoint of the connecting line between the medial malleolus and calcaneus, and was 0.4