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Sample records for pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation

  1. Computational modeling of pedunculopontine nucleus deep brain stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitella, Laura M.; Mohsenian, Kevin; Pahwa, Mrinal; Gloeckner, Cory; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) near the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has been posited to improve medication-intractable gait and balance problems in patients with Parkinson's disease. However, clinical studies evaluating this DBS target have not demonstrated consistent therapeutic effects, with several studies reporting the emergence of paresthesia and oculomotor side effects. The spatial and pathway-specific extent to which brainstem regions are modulated during PPN-DBS is not well understood. Approach. Here, we describe two computational models that estimate the direct effects of DBS in the PPN region for human and translational non-human primate (NHP) studies. The three-dimensional models were constructed from segmented histological images from each species, multi-compartment neuron models and inhomogeneous finite element models of the voltage distribution in the brainstem during DBS. Main Results. The computational models predicted that: (1) the majority of PPN neurons are activated with -3 V monopolar cathodic stimulation; (2) surgical targeting errors of as little as 1 mm in both species decrement activation selectivity; (3) specifically, monopolar stimulation in caudal, medial, or anterior PPN activates a significant proportion of the superior cerebellar peduncle (up to 60% in the human model and 90% in the NHP model at -3 V) (4) monopolar stimulation in rostral, lateral or anterior PPN activates a large percentage of medial lemniscus fibers (up to 33% in the human model and 40% in the NHP model at -3 V) and (5) the current clinical cylindrical electrode design is suboptimal for isolating the modulatory effects to PPN neurons. Significance. We show that a DBS lead design with radially-segmented electrodes may yield improved functional outcome for PPN-DBS.

  2. Stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus area in Parkinson's disease: effects on speech and intelligibility.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Serge; Ferraye, Murielle; Espesser, Robert; Fraix, Valérie; Maillet, Audrey; Guirchoum, Jennifer; Layani-Zemour, Deborah; Ghio, Alain; Chabardès, Stéphan; Pollak, Pierre; Debû, Bettina

    2014-10-01

    Improvement of gait disorders following pedunculopontine nucleus area stimulation in patients with Parkinson's disease has previously been reported and led us to propose this surgical treatment to patients who progressively developed severe gait disorders and freezing despite optimal dopaminergic drug treatment and subthalamic nucleus stimulation. The outcome of our prospective study on the first six patients was somewhat mitigated, as freezing of gait and falls related to freezing were improved by low frequency electrical stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus area in some, but not all, patients. Here, we report the speech data prospectively collected in these patients with Parkinson's disease. Indeed, because subthalamic nucleus surgery may lead to speech impairment and a worsening of dysarthria in some patients with Parkinson's disease, we felt it was important to precisely examine any possible modulations of speech for a novel target for deep brain stimulation. Our results suggested a trend towards speech degradation related to the pedunculopontine nucleus area surgery (off stimulation) for aero-phonatory control (maximum phonation time), phono-articulatory coordination (oral diadochokinesis) and speech intelligibility. Possibly, the observed speech degradation may also be linked to the clinical characteristics of the group of patients. The influence of pedunculopontine nucleus area stimulation per se was more complex, depending on the nature of the task: it had a deleterious effect on maximum phonation time and oral diadochokinesis, and mixed effects on speech intelligibility. Whereas levodopa intake and subthalamic nucleus stimulation alone had no and positive effects on speech dimensions, respectively, a negative interaction between the two treatments was observed both before and after pedunculopontine nucleus area surgery. This combination effect did not seem to be modulated by pedunculopontine nucleus area stimulation. Although limited in our group of

  3. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus (PPN) Influences Visual Contrast Sensitivity in Human Observers

    PubMed Central

    Strumpf, Hendrik; Noesselt, Toemme; Schoenfeld, Mircea Ariel; Voges, Jürgen; Panther, Patricia; Kaufmann, Joern; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Hopf, Jens-Max

    2016-01-01

    The parapontine nucleus of the thalamus (PPN) is a neuromodulatory midbrain structure with widespread connectivity to cortical and subcortical motor structures, as well as the spinal cord. The PPN also projects to the thalamus, including visual relay nuclei like the LGN and the pulvinar. Moreover, there is intense connectivity with sensory structures of the tegmentum in particular with the superior colliculus (SC). Given the existence and abundance of projections to visual sensory structures, it is likely that activity in the PPN has some modulatory influence on visual sensory selection. Here we address this possibility by measuring the visual discrimination performance (luminance contrast thresholds) in a group of patients with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) treated with deep-brain stimulation (DBS) of the PPN to control gait and postural motor deficits. In each patient we measured the luminance-contrast threshold of being able to discriminate an orientation-target (Gabor-grating) as a function of stimulation frequency (high 60Hz, low 8/10, no stimulation). Thresholds were determined using a standard staircase-protocol that is based on parameter estimation by sequential testing (PEST). We observed that under low frequency stimulation thresholds increased relative to no and high frequency stimulation in five out of six patients, suggesting that DBS of the PPN has a frequency-dependent impact on visual selection processes at a rather elementary perceptual level. PMID:27167979

  4. Low-frequency stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus affects gait and the neurotransmitter level in the ventrolateral thalamic nucleus in 6-OHDA Parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Wen, Peng; Li, Min; Xiao, Hu; Ding, Rui; Chen, Huan; Chang, Jingyu; Zhou, Ming; Yang, Yong; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Weixin; Zhang, Wangming

    2015-07-23

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is connected to spinal, cerebellar and cerebral motor control structures and can be activated with external electrodes. Intrinsic cholinergic neuronal degeneration in the PPN is associated with postural instabilities and gait disturbances (PIGD) in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Clinical studies have demonstrated that PPN stimulation may improve PIGD. We investigated this claim and the underlying mechanisms using the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) hemilesion model of PD. In this study, gait-related parameters, including the base of support (BOS), stride length, and maximum contact area, were analyzed via CatWalk gait analysis following PPN-low frequency stimulation (LFS) of rats with unilateral 6-OHDA lesions. Additionally, neurotransmitter concentrations in the ventrolateral thalamic nucleus (VL) were measured by microdialysis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Our data revealed that unilateral 6-OHDA lesions of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) induced significant gait deficits. PPN-LFS significantly improved the BOS (hindlimb) and maximum contact area (impaired forelimb) scores, whereas no other gait parameters were significantly affected. Unilateral 6-OHDA MFB lesions significantly decreased acetylcholine (ACh) and moderately decreased noradrenaline (NA) concentrations in the VL. PPN-LFS mildly reversed the ACh loss in the VL in the lesioned rats but did not alter the NA levels. Taken together, our data indicate that PPN-LFS is useful for treating gait deficits of PD and that these effects are probably mediated by a rebalancing of ACh levels in the PPN-VL pathway. Thus, our findings provide possible insight into the mechanisms underlying PIGD in PD. PMID:26054938

  5. The serendipity case of the pedunculopontine nucleus low-frequency brain stimulation: chasing a gait response, finding sleep, and cognition improvement.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Alessandro; Peppe, Antonella; Galati, Salvatore; Bassi, Mario Stampanoni; D'Angelo, Vincenza; Pierantozzi, Mariangela

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an efficacious therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) but its effects on non-motor facets may be detrimental. The low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN or the nucleus tegmenti pedunculopontini - PPTg-) opened new perspectives. In our hands, PPTg-LFS revealed a modest influence on gait but increased sleep quality and degree of attentiveness. At odds with potential adverse events following STN-DBS, executive functions, under PPTg-ON, ameliorated. A recent study comparing both targets found that only PPTg-LFS improved night-time sleep and daytime sleepiness. Chances are that different neurosurgical groups influence either the PPN sub-portion identified as pars dissipata (more interconnected with GPi/STN) or the caudal PPN region known as pars compacta, preferentially targeting intralaminar and associative nucleus of the thalamus. Yet, the wide electrical field delivered affects a plethora of en passant circuits, and a fine distinction on the specific pathways involved is elusive. This review explores our angle of vision, by which PPTg-LFS activates cholinergic and glutamatergic ascending fibers, influencing non-motor behaviors. PMID:23761781

  6. Muscarinic and alpha(1)-adrenergic mechanisms contribute to the spinal mediation of stimulation-induced antinociception from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dias, Quintino M; Crespilho, Simone F; Silveira, João Walter S; Prado, Wiliam A

    2009-05-01

    The effects of intraperitoneal (i.p.) or intrathecal (i.t.) injection of antagonists of acetylcholine, noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, opioids and GABA on stimulation-produced antinociception (SPA) from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) of rats were studied using the tail-flick test. The electrical stimulation of the PPTg produced a strong and long-lasting increase in tail-flick latency. The intensity and duration of the effect were significantly reduced in rats pretreated with i.p. or i.t. atropine (a non-selective muscarinic cholinergic antagonist), or i.t. phenoxybenzamine or WB 4101 (non-selective and selective alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonists, respectively). Intraperitoneal phenoxybenzamine, i.p. or i.t. methysergide or naloxone (non-selective serotonin and opioid antagonists, respectively), or i.t. idazoxan (a selective alpha(2)-adrenergic antagonist) only reduced the duration of the effect. The duration of SPA from the PPTg was increased by i.t. phaclofen (a GABA(B) antagonist). The effect from the nucleus was not altered following i.t. bicuculline (a GABA(A) antagonist), or i.p. or i.t. mecamylamine, propranolol or haloperidol (non-selective nicotinic cholinergic, beta-adrenergic and dopaminergic antagonists, respectively). Thus, SPA from the PPTg involves the spinal activation of muscarinic and alpha(1)-adrenergic but not nicotinic cholinergic, beta-adrenergic and dopaminergic mechanisms. Serotonergic, endogenous opioid and alpha(2)-adrenergic mechanisms are involved in the duration but not in the intensity of the effect. PMID:19463264

  7. Pedunculopontine arousal system physiology – Deep brain stimulation (DBS)

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Luster, Brennon; D’Onofrio, Stasia; Mahaffey, Susan; Bisagno, Veronica; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the wake/sleep symptoms present in Parkinson׳s disease, and the role of the pedunculopontine nucleus in these symptoms. The physiology of PPN cells is important not only because it is a major element of the reticular activating system, but also because it is a novel target for deep brain stimulation in the treatment of gait and postural deficits in Parkinson׳s disease. A greater understanding of the physiology of the target nuclei within the brainstem and basal ganglia, amassed over the past decades, has enabled increasingly better patient outcomes from deep brain stimulation for movement disorders. PMID:26779322

  8. The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus-A functional hypothesis from the comparative literature.

    PubMed

    Gut, Nadine K; Winn, Philip

    2016-05-01

    We present data from animal studies showing that the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus-conserved through evolution, compartmentalized, and with a complex pattern of inputs and outputs-has functions that involve formation and updates of action-outcome associations, attention, and rapid decision making. This is in contrast to previous hypotheses about pedunculopontine function, which has served as a basis for clinical interest in the pedunculopontine in movement disorders. Current animal literature points to it being neither a specifically motor structure nor a master switch for sleep regulation. The pedunculopontine is connected to basal ganglia circuitry but also has primary sensory input across modalities and descending connections to pontomedullary, cerebellar, and spinal motor and autonomic control systems. Functional and anatomical studies in animals suggest strongly that, in addition to the pedunculopontine being an input and output station for the basal ganglia and key regulator of thalamic (and consequently cortical) activity, an additional major function is participation in the generation of actions on the basis of a first-pass analysis of incoming sensory data. Such a function-rapid decision making-has very high adaptive value for any vertebrate. We argue that in developing clinical strategies for treating basal ganglia disorders, it is necessary to take an account of the normal functions of the pedunculopontine. We believe that it is possible to use our hypothesis to explain why pedunculopontine deep brain stimulation used clinically has had variable outcomes in the treatment of parkinsonism motor symptoms and effects on cognitive processing. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26880095

  9. Understanding the human pedunculopontine nucleus in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fytagoridis, Anders; Silburn, Peter A; Coyne, Terry J; Thevathasan, Wesley

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the Brisbane experience of pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Clinical outcomes along with studies of the mechanisms and neurophysiology of PPN in PD patients with severe freezing of gait (FoG) and postural imbalance (PI) are summarised and presented. Our results indicate that PPN DBS improves FoG and falls in the relatively uncommon group of PD patients who respond well to medication other than for continuing on time FoG and falls. Our studies indicate that bilateral DBS is more beneficial than unilateral DBS, and that the more caudal region of the PPN seems preferable for stimulation. There is evidence that rapid-release programs for initiation and correction of gait and posture are modulated by the PPN, possibly to some extent independently of the cerebral cortex. These functions were found to be impaired in PD patients with severe FoG/PI, but to some extent corrected by bilateral PPN DBS. PMID:26780720

  10. Implications of gamma band activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rill, E; Luster, B; D'Onofrio, S; Mahaffey, S; Bisagno, V; Urbano, F J

    2016-07-01

    The fact that the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is part of the reticular activating system places it in a unique position to modulate sensory input and fight-or-flight responses. Arousing stimuli simultaneously activate ascending projections of the PPN to the intralaminar thalamus to trigger cortical high-frequency activity and arousal, as well as descending projections to reticulospinal systems to alter posture and locomotion. As such, the PPN has become a target for deep brain stimulation for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, modulating gait, posture, and higher functions. This article describes the latest discoveries on PPN physiology and the role of the PPN in a number of disorders. It has now been determined that high-frequency activity during waking and REM sleep is controlled by two different intracellular pathways and two calcium channels in PPN cells. Moreover, there are three different PPN cell types that have one or both calcium channels and may be active during waking only, REM sleep only, or both. Based on the new discoveries, novel mechanisms are proposed for insomnia as a waking disorder. In addition, neuronal calcium sensor protein-1 (NCS-1), which is over expressed in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, may be responsible for the dysregulation in gamma band activity in at least some patients with these diseases. Recent results suggest that NCS-1 modulates PPN gamma band activity and that lithium acts to reduce the effects of over expressed NCS-1, accounting for its effectiveness in bipolar disorder. PMID:26597124

  11. Decoding brain state transitions in the pedunculopontine nucleus: cooperative phasic and tonic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Petzold, Anne; Valencia, Miguel; Pál, Balázs; Mena-Segovia, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic neurons of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) are most active during the waking state. Their activation is deemed to cause a switch in the global brain activity from sleep to wakefulness, while their sustained discharge may contribute to upholding the waking state and enhancing arousal. Similarly, non-cholinergic PPN neurons are responsive to brain state transitions and their activation may influence some of the same targets of cholinergic neurons, suggesting that they operate in coordination. Yet, it is not clear how the discharge of distinct classes of PPN neurons organize during brain states. Here, we monitored the in vivo network activity of PPN neurons in the anesthetized rat across two distinct levels of cortical dynamics and their transitions. We identified a highly structured configuration in PPN network activity during slow-wave activity that was replaced by decorrelated activity during the activated state (AS). During the transition, neurons were predominantly excited (phasically or tonically), but some were inhibited. Identified cholinergic neurons displayed phasic and short latency responses to sensory stimulation, whereas the majority of non-cholinergic showed tonic responses and remained at high discharge rates beyond the state transition. In vitro recordings demonstrate that cholinergic neurons exhibit fast adaptation that prevents them from discharging at high rates over prolonged time periods. Our data shows that PPN neurons have distinct but complementary roles during brain state transitions, where cholinergic neurons provide a fast and transient response to sensory events that drive state transitions, whereas non-cholinergic neurons maintain an elevated firing rate during global activation. PMID:26582977

  12. Pedunculopontine nucleus and basal ganglia: distant relatives or part of the same family?

    PubMed

    Mena-Segovia, Juan; Bolam, J Paul; Magill, Peter J

    2004-10-01

    The basal ganglia are more highly interconnected with the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPN) than with any other brain region. Regulation and relay of basal ganglia activity are two key functions of the PPN. The PPN provides an interface for the basal ganglia to influence sleep and waking, and the two structures are similarly implicated in learning, reward and other cognitive functions. Perturbations of basal ganglia activity have consequences for the PPN and vice versa, exemplified by their interdependencies in motor function and Parkinson's disease. Thus, close anatomical and physiological links between the PPN and basal ganglia make it increasingly difficult to consider the two as separate functional entities. PMID:15374668

  13. The primate pedunculopontine nucleus region: towards a dual role in locomotion and waking state.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Laurent; Piallat, Brigitte; Bhattacharjee, Manik; Mathieu, Hervé; David, Olivier; Chabardès, Stéphan

    2016-07-01

    The mesencephalic reticular formation (MRF) mainly composed by the pedunculopontine and the cuneiform nuclei is involved in the control of several fundamental brain functions such as locomotion, rapid eye movement sleep and waking state. On the one hand, the role of MRF neurons in locomotion has been investigated for decades in different animal models, including in behaving nonhuman primate (NHP) using extracellular recordings. On the other hand, MRF neurons involved in the control of waking state have been consistently shown to constitute the cholinergic component of the reticular ascending system. However, a dual control of the locomotion and waking state by the same groups of neurons in NHP has never been demonstrated in NHP. Here, using microelectrode recordings in behaving NHP, we recorded 38 neurons in the MRF that were followed during transition between wakefulness (TWS) and sleep, i.e., until the emergence of sleep episodes characterized by typical cortical slow wave activity (SWA). We found that the MRF neurons, mainly located in the pedunculopontine nucleus region, modulated their activity during TWS with a decrease in firing rate during SWA. Of interest, we could follow some MRF neurons from locomotion to SWA and found that they also modulated their firing rate during locomotion and TWS. These new findings confirm the role of MRF neurons in both functions. They suggest that the MRF is an integration center that potentially allows to fine tune waking state and locomotor signals in order to establish an efficient locomotion. PMID:27216823

  14. Role of G-proteins in the effects of leptin on pedunculopontine nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Beck, Paige; Mahaffey, Susan; Urbano, Francisco J; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2013-09-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), the cholinergic arm of the reticular activating system, regulates waking and rapid eye movement sleep. Here, we demonstrate immunohistochemical labeling of the leptin receptor signaling isoform in PPN neurons, and investigated the effects of G-protein modulation and the leptin triple antagonist (TA) on the action of leptin in the PPN. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were performed in rat brainstem slices from 9 to 17 day old pups. Previous results showed that leptin caused a partial blockade of sodium (I(Na)) and h-current (I(H)) in PPN neurons. TA (100 nM) reduced the blockade of I(Na) (~ 50% reduction) and I(H) (~ 93% reduction) caused by leptin. Intracellular guanosine 5'-[β-thio]diphosphate trilithium salt (a G-protein inhibitor) significantly reduced the effect of leptin on I(Na) (~ 60% reduction) but not on I(H) (~ 25% reduction). Intracellular GTPγS (a G-protein activator) reduced the effect of leptin on both I(Na) (~ 80% reduction) and I(H) (~ 90% reduction). These results suggest that the effects of leptin on the intrinsic properties of PPN neurons are leptin receptor- and G-protein dependent. We also found that leptin enhanced NMDA receptor-mediated responses in single neurons and in the PPN population as a whole, an effect blocked by TA. These experiments further strengthen the association between leptin dysregulation and sleep disturbances. Beck et al. investigated the effects of leptin on the intrinsic properties of neurons from the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN). Leptin reduced the amplitude of voltage-gated sodium (I(Na)) and hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated HCN (I(H)) channels. These effects were antagonized by a leptin receptor (OB-R) antagonist and by the G-protein antagonist GDPβ. PMID:23692342

  15. GABAergic mechanisms in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus of the cat promote active (REM) sleep.

    PubMed

    Torterolo, Pablo; Morales, Francisco R; Chase, Michael H

    2002-07-19

    The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) has been implicated in the generation and/or maintenance of both active sleep (AS) and wakefulness (W). GABAergic neurons are present within this nucleus and recent studies have shown that these neurons are active during AS. In order to examine the role of mesopontine GABAergic processes in the generation of AS, the GABA(A) agonist muscimol and the GABA(A) antagonist bicuculline were microinjected into the PPT of chronic cats that were prepared for recording the states of sleep and wakefulness. Muscimol increased the time spent in AS by increasing the frequency and duration of AS episodes; this increase in AS was at the expense of the time spent in wakefulness. A decrease in PGO density during AS was also observed following the microinjection of muscimol. On the other hand, bicuculline decreased both AS and quiet sleep and increased the time spent in wakefulness. These data suggest that GABA acts on GABA(A) receptors within the PPT to facilitate the generation of AS by suppressing the activity of waking-related processes within this nucleus. PMID:12106660

  16. Altered neuronal activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus: An electrophysiological study in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiwen; Xie, Jinlu; Wang, Xuenan; Wang, Xiusong; Zhang, Xiao; Hou, Yabing; Lei, Chengdong; Li, Min; Qu, Qingyang; He, Tingting; Han, Hongyu; Yao, Xiaomeng; Wang, Min

    2016-05-15

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is a new deep brain stimulation target for treating Parkinson's disease (PD). But the alterations of the PPN electrophysiological activities in PD are still debated. To investigate these potential alterations, extracellular single unit and local field potential (LFP) activities in the PPN were recorded in unilateral hemispheric 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rats and in control rats, respectively. The spike activity results revealed two types of neurons (Type I and Type II) with distinct electrophysiological characteristics in the PPN. Both types of neurons had increased firing rate and changed firing pattern in lesioned rats when compared to control rats. Specifically, Type II neurons showed an increased firing rate when the rat state was switched from rest to locomotion. The LFP results demonstrated that lesioned rats had lower LFP power at 0.7-12Hz and higher power at 12-30Hz than did control animals in either resting or locomotor state. These findings provide a better understanding of the effects of 6-OHDA lesion on neuronal activities in the PPN and also provide a proof of the link between this structure and locomotion, which contributes to better understanding the mechanisms of the PPN functioning in the pathophysiology of PD. PMID:26924016

  17. Pedunculopontine Nucleus Gamma Band Activity-Preconscious Awareness, Waking, and REM Sleep.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Francisco J; D'Onofrio, Stasia M; Luster, Brennon R; Beck, Paige B; Hyde, James Robert; Bisagno, Veronica; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is a major component of the reticular activating system (RAS) that regulates waking and REM sleep, states of high-frequency EEG activity. Recently, we described the presence of high threshold, voltage-dependent N- and P/Q-type calcium channels in RAS nuclei that subserve gamma band oscillations in the mesopontine PPN, intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD). Cortical gamma band activity participates in sensory perception, problem solving, and memory. Rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as in the cortex, gamma band activity in the RAS may participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions. That is, the RAS may play an early permissive role in volition. Our latest results suggest that (1) the manifestation of gamma band activity during waking may employ a separate intracellular pathway compared to that during REM sleep, (2) neuronal calcium sensor (NCS-1) protein, which is over expressed in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, modulates gamma band oscillations in the PPN in a concentration-dependent manner, (3) leptin, which undergoes resistance in obesity resulting in sleep dysregulation, decreases sodium currents in PPN neurons, accounting for its normal attenuation of waking, and (4) following our discovery of electrical coupling in the RAS, we hypothesize that there are cell clusters within the PPN that may act in concert. These results provide novel information on the mechanisms controlling high-frequency activity related to waking and REM sleep by elements of the RAS. PMID:25368599

  18. Pedunculopontine Nucleus Gamma Band Activity-Preconscious Awareness, Waking, and REM Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Francisco J.; D’Onofrio, Stasia M.; Luster, Brennon R.; Beck, Paige B.; Hyde, James Robert; Bisagno, Veronica; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is a major component of the reticular activating system (RAS) that regulates waking and REM sleep, states of high-frequency EEG activity. Recently, we described the presence of high threshold, voltage-dependent N- and P/Q-type calcium channels in RAS nuclei that subserve gamma band oscillations in the mesopontine PPN, intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD). Cortical gamma band activity participates in sensory perception, problem solving, and memory. Rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as in the cortex, gamma band activity in the RAS may participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions. That is, the RAS may play an early permissive role in volition. Our latest results suggest that (1) the manifestation of gamma band activity during waking may employ a separate intracellular pathway compared to that during REM sleep, (2) neuronal calcium sensor (NCS-1) protein, which is over expressed in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, modulates gamma band oscillations in the PPN in a concentration-dependent manner, (3) leptin, which undergoes resistance in obesity resulting in sleep dysregulation, decreases sodium currents in PPN neurons, accounting for its normal attenuation of waking, and (4) following our discovery of electrical coupling in the RAS, we hypothesize that there are cell clusters within the PPN that may act in concert. These results provide novel information on the mechanisms controlling high-frequency activity related to waking and REM sleep by elements of the RAS. PMID:25368599

  19. Gamma band unit activity and population responses in the pedunculopontine nucleus.

    PubMed

    Simon, Christen; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Ye, Meijun; Hyde, James; Hayar, A; Williams, D K; Garcia-Rill, E

    2010-07-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is involved in the activated states of waking and paradoxical sleep, forming part of the reticular activating system (RAS). The studies described tested the hypothesis that single unit and/or population responses of PPN neurons are capable of generating gamma band frequency activity. Whole cell patch clamp recordings (immersion chamber) and population responses (interface chamber) were conducted on 9- to 20-day-old rat brain stem slices. Regardless of cell type (I, II, or III) or type of response to the nonselective cholinergic receptor agonist carbachol (excitation, inhibition, biphasic), almost all PPN neurons fired at gamma band frequency, but no higher, when subjected to depolarizing steps (50 +/- 2 Hz, mean +/- SE). Nonaccommodating neurons fired at 18-100 Hz throughout depolarizing steps, while most accommodating neurons exhibited gamma band frequency of action potentials followed by gamma band membrane oscillations. These oscillations were blocked by the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX), suggesting that at least some are mediated by sodium currents. Population responses in the PPN showed that carbachol induced peaks of activation in the theta and gamma range, while glutamatergic receptor agonists induced overall increases in activity at theta and gamma frequencies, although in differing patterns. Gamma band activity appears to be a part of the intrinsic membrane properties of PPN neurons, and the population as a whole generates different patterns of gamma band activity under the influence of specific transmitters. Given sufficient excitation, the PPN may impart gamma band activation on its targets. PMID:20463196

  20. Gamma Band Unit Activity and Population Responses in the Pedunculopontine Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Christen; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Ye, Meijun; Hyde, James; Hayar, A.; Williams, D. K.

    2010-01-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is involved in the activated states of waking and paradoxical sleep, forming part of the reticular activating system (RAS). The studies described tested the hypothesis that single unit and/or population responses of PPN neurons are capable of generating gamma band frequency activity. Whole cell patch clamp recordings (immersion chamber) and population responses (interface chamber) were conducted on 9- to 20-day-old rat brain stem slices. Regardless of cell type (I, II, or III) or type of response to the nonselective cholinergic receptor agonist carbachol (excitation, inhibition, biphasic), almost all PPN neurons fired at gamma band frequency, but no higher, when subjected to depolarizing steps (50 ± 2 Hz, mean ± SE). Nonaccommodating neurons fired at 18–100 Hz throughout depolarizing steps, while most accommodating neurons exhibited gamma band frequency of action potentials followed by gamma band membrane oscillations. These oscillations were blocked by the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX), suggesting that at least some are mediated by sodium currents. Population responses in the PPN showed that carbachol induced peaks of activation in the theta and gamma range, while glutamatergic receptor agonists induced overall increases in activity at theta and gamma frequencies, although in differing patterns. Gamma band activity appears to be a part of the intrinsic membrane properties of PPN neurons, and the population as a whole generates different patterns of gamma band activity under the influence of specific transmitters. Given sufficient excitation, the PPN may impart gamma band activation on its targets. PMID:20463196

  1. Sleep Disorders in Parkinsonian Macaques: Effects of l-Dopa Treatment and Pedunculopontine Nucleus Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Belaid, Hayat; Adrien, Joëlle; Laffrat, Elodie; Tandé, Dominique; Karachi, Carine; Grabli, David; Arnulf, Isabelle; Clark, Stewart D.; Drouot, Xavier; Hirsch, Etienne C.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) display significant sleep disturbances and daytime sleepiness. Dopaminergic treatment dramatically improves PD motor symptoms, but its action on sleep remains controversial, suggesting a causal role of nondopaminergic lesions in these symptoms. Because the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) regulates sleep and arousal, and in view of the loss of its cholinergic neurons in PD, the PPN could be involved in these sleep disorders. The aims of this study were as follows: (1) to characterize sleep disorders in a monkey model of PD; (2) to investigate whether l-dopa treatment alleviates sleep disorders; and (3) to determine whether a cholinergic PPN lesion would add specific sleep alterations. To this end, long-term continuous electroencephalographic monitoring of vigilance states was performed in macaques, using an implanted miniaturized telemetry device. 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine treatment induced sleep disorders that comprised sleep episodes during daytime and sleep fragmentation and a reduction of sleep efficiency at nighttime. It also induced a reduction in time spent in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and slow-wave sleep and an increase in muscle tone during REM and non-REM sleep episodes and in the number of awakenings and movements. l-Dopa treatment resulted in a partial but significant improvement of almost all sleep parameters. PPN lesion induced a transient decrease in REM sleep and in slow-wave sleep followed by a slight improvement of sleep quality. Our data demonstrate the efficacy of l-dopa treatment in improving sleep disorders in parkinsonian monkeys, and that adding a cholinergic PPN lesion improves sleep quality after transient sleep impairment. PMID:24990932

  2. Intracellular mechanisms modulating gamma band activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN).

    PubMed

    Luster, Brennon R; Urbano, Francisco J; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2016-06-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus is a part of the reticular activating system, and is active during waking and REM sleep. Previous results showed that all PPN cells tested fired maximally at gamma frequencies when depolarized. This intrinsic membrane property was shown to be mediated by high-threshold N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels. Recent studies show that the PPN contains three independent populations of neurons which can generate gamma band oscillations through only N-type channels, only P/Q-type channels, or both N- and P/Q-type channels. This study investigated the intracellular mechanisms modulating gamma band activity in each population of neurons. We performed in vitro patch-clamp recordings of PPN neurons from Sprague-Dawley rat pups, and applied 1-sec ramps to induce intrinsic membrane oscillations. Our results show that there are two pathways modulating gamma band activity in PPN neurons. We describe populations of neurons mediating gamma band activity through only N-type channels and the cAMP/PKA pathway (presumed "REM-on" neurons), through only P/Q-type channels and the CaMKII pathway (presumed "Wake-on" neurons), and a third population which can mediate gamma activity through both N-type channels and cAMP/PK and P/Q-type channels and CaMKII (presumed "Wake/REM-on" neurons). These novel results suggest that PPN gamma oscillations are modulated by two independent pathways related to different Ca(2+) channel types. PMID:27354537

  3. Pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus lesions impair probabilistic reversal learning by reducing sensitivity to positive reward feedback.

    PubMed

    Syed, Anam; Baker, Phillip M; Ragozzino, Michael E

    2016-05-01

    Recent findings indicate that pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) neurons encode reward-related information that is context-dependent. This information is critical for behavioral flexibility when reward outcomes change signaling a shift in response patterns should occur. The present experiment investigated whether NMDA lesions of the PPTg affects the acquisition and/or reversal learning of a spatial discrimination using probabilistic reinforcement. Male Long-Evans rats received a bilateral infusion of NMDA (30nmoles/side) or saline into the PPTg. Subsequently, rats were tested in a spatial discrimination test using a probabilistic learning procedure. One spatial location was rewarded with an 80% probability and the other spatial location rewarded with a 20% probability. After reaching acquisition criterion of 10 consecutive correct trials, the spatial location - reward contingencies were reversed in the following test session. Bilateral and unilateral PPTg-lesioned rats acquired the spatial discrimination test comparable to that as sham controls. In contrast, bilateral PPTg lesions, but not unilateral PPTg lesions, impaired reversal learning. The reversal learning deficit occurred because of increased regressions to the previously 'correct' spatial location after initially selecting the new, 'correct' choice. PPTg lesions also reduced the frequency of win-stay behavior early in the reversal learning session, but did not modify the frequency of lose-shift behavior during reversal learning. The present results suggest that the PPTg contributes to behavioral flexibility under conditions in which outcomes are uncertain, e.g. probabilistic reinforcement, by facilitating sensitivity to positive reward outcomes that allows the reliable execution of a new choice pattern. PMID:26976089

  4. The anterior and posterior pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus are involved in behavior and neuronal activity of the cuneiform and entopeduncular nuclei.

    PubMed

    Jin, X; Schwabe, K; Krauss, J K; Alam, M

    2016-05-13

    Loss of cholinergic neurons in the mesencephalic locomotor region, comprising the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) and the cuneiform nucleus (CnF), is related to gait disturbances in late stage Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigate the effect of anterior or posterior cholinergic lesions of the PPN on gait-related motor behavior, and on neuronal network activity of the PPN area and basal ganglia (BG) motor loop in rats. Anterior PPN lesions, posterior PPN lesions or sham lesions were induced by stereotaxic microinjection of the cholinergic toxin AF64-A or vehicle in male Sprague-Dawley rats. First, locomotor activity (open field), postural disturbances (Rotarod) and gait asymmetry (treadmill test) were assessed. Thereafter, single-unit and oscillatory activities were measured in the non-lesioned area of the PPN, the CnF and the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN), the BG output region, with microelectrodes under urethane anesthesia. Additionally, ECoG was recorded in the motor cortex. Injection of AF64-A into the anterior and posterior PPN decreased cholinergic cell counts as compared to naive controls (P<0.001) but also destroyed non-cholinergic cells. Only anterior PPN lesions decreased the front limb swing time of gait in the treadmill test, while not affecting other gait-related parameters tested. Main electrophysiological findings were that anterior PPN lesions increased the firing activity in the CnF (P<0.001). Further, lesions of either PPN region decreased the coherence of alpha (8-12Hz) band between CnF and motor cortex (MCx), and increased the beta (12-30Hz) oscillatory synchronization between EPN and the MCx. Lesions of the PPN in rats had complex effects on oscillatory neuronal activity of the CnF and the BG network, which may contribute to the understanding of the pathophysiology of gait disturbance in PD. PMID:26880033

  5. Modulation of gamma oscillations in the pedunculopontine nucleus by neuronal calcium sensor protein-1: relevance to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    D'Onofrio, Stasia; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James R.; Luster, Brennon; Messias, Erick; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced levels of gamma-band activity are present in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients. In the same disorders, increased neuronal calcium sensor protein-1 (NCS-1) expression was reported in a series of postmortem studies. These disorders are also characterized by sleep dysregulation, suggesting a role for the reticular activating system (RAS). The discovery of gamma-band activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), the cholinergic arm of the RAS, revealed that such activity was mediated by high-threshold calcium channels that are regulated by NCS-1. We hypothesized that NCS-1 normally regulates gamma-band oscillations through these calcium channels and that excessive levels of NCS-1, such as would be expected with overexpression, decrease gamma-band activity. We found that PPN neurons in rat brain slices manifested gamma-band oscillations that were increased by low levels of NCS-1 but suppressed by high levels of NCS-1. Our results suggest that NCS-1 overexpression may be responsible for the decrease in gamma-band activity present in at least some schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients. PMID:25376789

  6. Stereotactic localization of the human pedunculopontine nucleus: atlas-based coordinates and validation of a magnetic resonance imaging protocol for direct localization.

    PubMed

    Zrinzo, Ludvic; Zrinzo, Laurence V; Tisch, Stephen; Limousin, Patricia Dowsey; Yousry, Tarek A; Afshar, Farhad; Hariz, Marwan I

    2008-06-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is a promising new target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in parkinsonian patients with gait disturbance and postural instability refractory to other treatment modalities. This region of the brain is unfamiliar territory to most functional neurosurgeons. This paper reviews the anatomy of the human PPN and describes novel, clinically relevant methods for the atlas-based and MRI-based localization of the nucleus. These two methods of PPN localization are evaluated and compared on stereotactic MRI data acquired from a diverse group of 12 patients undergoing implantation of deep brain electrodes at sites other than the PPN. Atlas-based coordinates of the rostral and caudal PPN poles in relation to fourth ventricular landmarks were established by amalgamating information sourced from two published human brain atlases. These landmarks were identified on acquired T1 images and atlas-derived coordinates used to plot the predicted PPN location on all 24 sides. Images acquired using a specifically modified, proton-density MRI protocol were available for each patient and were spatially fused to the T1 images. This widely available and rapid protocol provided excellent definition between gray and white matter within the region of interest. Together with an understanding of the regional anatomy, direct localization of the PPN was possible on all 24 sides. The coordinates for each directly localized nucleus were measured in relation to third and fourth ventricular landmarks. The mean (SD) of the directly localized PPN midpoints was 6.4 mm (0.5) lateral, 3.5 mm (1.0) posterior and 11.4 mm (1.2) caudal to the posterior commissure in the anterior commissure-posterior commissure plane. For the directly localized nucleus, there was similar concordance for the rostral pole of the PPN in relation to third and fourth ventricular landmarks (P>0.05). For the caudal PPN pole, fourth ventricular landmarks provided greater concordance with reference to the

  7. The network of causal interactions for beta oscillations in the pedunculopontine nucleus, primary motor cortex, and subthalamic nucleus of walking parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zhou, Ming; Wen, Peng; Wang, Qiang; Yang, Yong; Xiao, Hu; Xie, Zhengyuan; Li, Xing; Wang, Ning; Wang, Jinyan; Luo, Fei; Chang, Jingyu; Zhang, Wangming

    2016-08-01

    Oscillatory activity has been well-studied in many structures within cortico-basal ganglia circuits, but it is not well understood within the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), which was recently introduced as a potential target for the treatment of gait and postural impairments in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). To investigate oscillatory activity in the PPN and its relationship with oscillatory activity in cortico-basal ganglia circuits, we simultaneously recorded local field potentials in the PPN, primary motor cortex (M1), and subthalamic nucleus (STN) of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced hemiparkinsonian rats during resting and walking. After analysis of power spectral density, coherence, and partial Granger causality, three major findings emerged: 1) after 6-OHDA lesions, beta band oscillations were enhanced in all three regions during walking; 2) the direction of information flow for beta oscillations among the three structures was STN→M1, STN→PPN, and PPN→M1; 3) after the treatment of levodopa, beta activity in the three regions was reduced significantly and the flow of beta band was also abrogated. Our results suggest that beta activity in the PPN is transmitted from the basal ganglia and probably comes from the STN, and the STN plays a dominant role in the network of causal interactions for beta activity. Thus, the STN may be a potential source of aberrant beta band oscillations in PD. Levodopa can inhibit beta activity in the PPN of parkinsonian rats but cannot relieve parkinsonian patients' axial symptoms clinically. Therefore, beta oscillations may not be the major cause of axial symptoms. PMID:27163550

  8. The M-current contributes to high threshold membrane potential oscillations in a cell type-specific way in the pedunculopontine nucleus of mice

    PubMed Central

    Bordas, Csilla; Kovacs, Adrienn; Pal, Balazs

    2015-01-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus is known as a cholinergic nucleus of the reticular activating system, participating in regulation of sleep and wakefulness. Besides cholinergic neurons, it consists of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons as well. According to classical and recent studies, more subgroups of neurons were defined. Groups based on the neurotransmitter released by a neuron are not homogenous, but can be further subdivided. The PPN neurons do not only provide cholinergic and non-cholinergic inputs to several subcortical brain areas but they are also targets of cholinergic and other different neuromodulatory actions. Although cholinergic neuromodulation has been already investigated in the nucleus, one of its characteristic targets, the M-type potassium current has not been described yet. Using slice electrophysiology, we provide evidence in the present work that cholinergic neurons possess M-current, whereas GABAergic neurons lack it. The M-current contributes to certain functional differences of cholinergic and GABAergic neurons, as spike frequency adaptation, action potential firing frequency or the amplitude difference of medium afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs). Furthermore, we showed that high threshold membrane potential oscillation with high power, around 20 Hz frequency is a functional property of almost all cholinergic cells, whereas GABAergic neurons have only low amplitude oscillations. Blockade of the M-current abolished the oscillatory activity at 20 Hz, and largely diminished it at other frequencies. Taken together, the M-current seems to be characteristic for PPN cholinergic neurons. It provides a possibility for modulating gamma band activity of these cells, thus contributing to neuromodulatory regulation of the reticular activating system. PMID:25904846

  9. Nucleus accumbens stimulation in pathological obesity.

    PubMed

    Harat, Marek; Rudaś, Marcin; Zieliński, Piotr; Birska, Julita; Sokal, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    One of the potential treatment methods of obesity is deep brain stimulation (DBS) of nucleus accumbens. We describe the case of 19 years old woman with hypothalamic obesity. She weighted 151.4 kg before DBS and the non-surgical methods proved to be inefficient. She was treated with implantation of DBS electrode to nucleus accumbens bilaterally. Results were measured with body mass index and neuropsychological tests. Follow-up was 14 months. Fourteen months after surgery weight was 138 kg, BMI was 48.3. Neuropsychological test results were intact. The presented case supports the thesis of treatment of obesity with nucleus accumbens stimulation. PMID:27154450

  10. Stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus engages the cerebellum for motor function in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Alexander C; O'Connor, Katherine A; Pilitsis, Julie G; Shin, Damian S

    2015-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is effective in managing motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease in well-selected individuals. Recently, research has shown that DBS in the basal ganglia (BG) can alter neural circuits beyond the traditional basal ganglia-thalamus-cortical (BG-TH-CX) loop. For instance, functional imaging showed alterations in cerebellar activity with DBS in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). However, these imaging studies revealed very little about how cell-specific cerebellar activity responds to STN stimulation or if these changes contribute to its efficacy. In this study, we assess whether STN-DBS provides efficacy in managing motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease by recruiting cerebellar activity. We do this by applying STN-DBS in hemiparkinsonian rats and simultaneously recording neuronal activity from the STN, brainstem and cerebellum. We found that STN neurons decreased spiking activity by 55% during DBS (P = 0.038), which coincided with a decrease in most pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus and Purkinje neurons by 29% (P < 0.001) and 28% (P = 0.003), respectively. In contrast, spike activity in the deep cerebellar nuclei increased 45% during DBS (P < 0.001), which was likely from reduced afferent activity of Purkinje cells. Then, we applied STN-DBS at sub-therapeutic current along with stimulation of the deep cerebellar nuclei and found similar improvement in forelimb akinesia as with therapeutic STN-DBS alone. This suggests that STN-DBS can engage cerebellar activity to improve parkinsonian motor symptoms. Our study is the first to describe how STN-DBS in Parkinson's disease alters cerebellar activity using electrophysiology in vivo and reveal a potential for stimulating the cerebellum to potentiate deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. PMID:25124274

  11. Pedunculopontine arousal system physiology—Implications for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; D’Onofrio, Stasia; Mahaffey, Susan; Bisagno, Veronica; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by major sleep/wake disturbances including increased vigilance and arousal, decreased slow wave sleep, and increased REM sleep drive. Other arousal-related symptoms include sensory gating deficits as exemplified by decreased habituation of the blink reflex. There is also dysregulation of gamma band activity, suggestive of disturbances in a host of arousal-related mechanisms. This review examines the role of the reticular activating system, especially the pedunculopontine nucleus, in the symptoms of the disease. Recent discoveries on the physiology of the pedunculopontine nucleus help explain many of these disorders of arousal in, and point to novel therapeutic avenues for, schizophrenia. PMID:26483949

  12. Deficit in sustained attention following selective cholinergic lesion of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus in rat, as measured with both post-mortem immunocytochemistry and in vivo PET imaging with [¹⁸F]fluoroethoxybenzovesamicol.

    PubMed

    Cyr, Marilyn; Parent, Maxime J; Mechawar, Naguib; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Clark, Stewart D; Aghourian, Meghmik; Bedard, Marc-Andre

    2015-02-01

    Cholinergic neurons of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) are thought to be involved in cognitive functions such as sustained attention, and lesions of these cells have been documented in patients showing fluctuations of attention such as in Parkinson's disease or dementia with Lewy Body. Animal studies have been conducted to support the role of these cells in attention, but the lesions induced in these animals were not specific to the cholinergic PPTg system, and were assessed by post-mortem methods remotely performed from the in vivo behavioral assessments. Moreover, sustained attention have not been directly assessed in these studies, but rather deduced from indirect measurements. In the present study, rats were assessed on the 5-Choice Serial Reaction Time Task (5-CSRTT), and a specific measure of variability in response latency was created. Animals were observed both before and after selective lesion of the PPTg cholinergic neurons. Brain cholinergic denervation was assessed both in vivo and ex vivo, using PET imaging with [(18)F]fluoroethoxybenzovesamicol ([(18)F]FEOBV) and immunocytochemistry respectively. Results showed that the number of correct responses and variability in response latency in the 5-CSRTT were the only behavioral measures affected following the lesions. These measures were found to correlate significantly with the number of PPTg cholinergic cells, as measured with both [(18)F]FEOBV and immunocytochemistry. This suggests the primary role of the PPTg cholinergic cells in sustained attention. It also allows to reliably use the PET imaging with [(18)F]FEOBV for the purpose of assessing the relationship between behavior and cholinergic innervation in living animals. PMID:25257103

  13. Brain networks modulated by subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Accolla, Ettore A; Herrojo Ruiz, Maria; Horn, Andreas; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Draganski, Bogdan; Kühn, Andrea A

    2016-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an established treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Given the frequent occurrence of stimulation-induced affective and cognitive adverse effects, a better understanding about the role of the subthalamic nucleus in non-motor functions is needed. The main goal of this study is to characterize anatomical circuits modulated by subthalamic deep brain stimulation, and infer about the inner organization of the nucleus in terms of motor and non-motor areas. Given its small size and anatomical intersubject variability, functional organization of the subthalamic nucleus is difficult to investigate in vivo with current methods. Here, we used local field potential recordings obtained from 10 patients with Parkinson's disease to identify a subthalamic area with an analogous electrophysiological signature, namely a predominant beta oscillatory activity. The spatial accuracy was improved by identifying a single contact per macroelectrode for its vicinity to the electrophysiological source of the beta oscillation. We then conducted whole brain probabilistic tractography seeding from the previously identified contacts, and further described connectivity modifications along the macroelectrode's main axis. The designated subthalamic 'beta' area projected predominantly to motor and premotor cortical regions additional to connections to limbic and associative areas. More ventral subthalamic areas showed predominant connectivity to medial temporal regions including amygdala and hippocampus. We interpret our findings as evidence for the convergence of different functional circuits within subthalamic nucleus' portions deemed to be appropriate as deep brain stimulation target to treat motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. Potential clinical implications of our study are illustrated by an index case where deep brain stimulation of estimated predominant non-motor subthalamic nucleus induced hypomanic behaviour. PMID

  14. Tractography patterns of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Arroyave, Nora; Lauro, Peter M; Huang, Ling; Hallett, Mark; Horovitz, Silvina G; Zaghloul, Kareem A; Lungu, Codrin

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation therapy is an effective symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease, yet the precise mechanisms responsible for its therapeutic effects remain unclear. Although the targets of deep brain stimulation are grey matter structures, axonal modulation is known to play an important role in deep brain stimulation's therapeutic mechanism. Several white matter structures in proximity to the subthalamic nucleus have been implicated in the clinical benefits of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease. We assessed the connectivity patterns that characterize clinically beneficial electrodes in Parkinson's disease patients, after deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. We evaluated 22 patients with Parkinson's disease (11 females, age 57 ± 9.1 years, disease duration 13.3 ± 6.3 years) who received bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus at the National Institutes of Health. During an initial electrode screening session, one month after deep brain stimulation implantation, the clinical benefits of each contact were determined. The electrode was localized by coregistering preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative computer tomography images and the volume of tissue activated was estimated from stimulation voltage and impedance. Brain connectivity for the volume of tissue activated of deep brain stimulation contacts was assessed using probabilistic tractography with diffusion-tensor data. Areas most frequently connected to clinically effective contacts included the thalamus, substantia nigra, brainstem and superior frontal gyrus. A series of discriminant analyses demonstrated that the strength of connectivity to the superior frontal gyrus and the thalamus were positively associated with clinical effectiveness. The connectivity patterns observed in our study suggest that the modulation of white matter tracts directed to the superior frontal gyrus and the thalamus is associated with favourable clinical

  15. Pedunculopontine Gamma Band Activity and Development

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Luster, Brennon; Mahaffey, Susan; MacNicol, Melanie; Hyde, James R.; D’Onofrio, Stasia M.; Phillips, Cristy

    2015-01-01

    This review highlights the most important discovery in the reticular activating system in the last 10 years, the manifestation of gamma band activity in cells of the reticular activating system (RAS), especially in the pedunculopontine nucleus, which is in charge of waking and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The identification of different cell groups manifesting P/Q-type Ca2+ channels that control waking vs. those that manifest N-type channels that control REM sleep provides novel avenues for the differential control of waking vs. REM sleep. Recent discoveries on the development of this system can help explain the developmental decrease in REM sleep and the basic rest-activity cycle. PMID:26633526

  16. Pedunculopontine Gamma Band Activity and Development.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Luster, Brennon; Mahaffey, Susan; MacNicol, Melanie; Hyde, James R; D'Onofrio, Stasia M; Phillips, Cristy

    2015-01-01

    This review highlights the most important discovery in the reticular activating system in the last 10 years, the manifestation of gamma band activity in cells of the reticular activating system (RAS), especially in the pedunculopontine nucleus, which is in charge of waking and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The identification of different cell groups manifesting P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels that control waking vs. those that manifest N-type channels that control REM sleep provides novel avenues for the differential control of waking vs. REM sleep. Recent discoveries on the development of this system can help explain the developmental decrease in REM sleep and the basic rest-activity cycle. PMID:26633526

  17. Neuropsychological functioning following bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Morrison, C E; Borod, J C; Perrine, K; Beric, A; Brin, M F; Rezai, A; Kelly, P; Sterio, D; Germano, I; Weisz, D; Olanow, C W

    2004-03-01

    The cognitive effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation in Parkinson's disease (PD) have been examined. However, there are no reported studies that evaluate, by incorporating a disease control group, whether neuropsychological performance in surgical patients changes beyond the variability of the assessment measures. To examine this issue, 17 PD patients were tested before and after bilateral STN stimulator implantation, both on and off stimulation. Eleven matched PD controls were administered the same repeatable neuropsychological test battery twice. Relative to changes seen in the controls, the surgery for electrode placement mildly adversely affected attention and language functions. STN stimulation, per se, had little effect on cognition. The STN DBS procedure as a whole resulted in a mild decline in delayed verbal recall and language functions. There were no surgery, stimulation, or procedure effects on depression scale scores. In contrast to these group findings, one DBS patient demonstrated significant cognitive decline following surgery. PMID:15010083

  18. Improvement of sleep architecture in PD with subthalamic nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Arnulf, I; Bejjani, B P; Garma, L; Bonnet, A M; Houeto, J L; Damier, P; Derenne, J P; Agid, Y

    2000-12-12

    High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) was used to investigate the relationship of sleep disorders with motor handicap in PD. In 10 insomniac patients with PD, stimulation reduced nighttime akinesia by 60% and completely suppressed axial and early morning dystonia, but did not alleviate periodic leg movements (n = 3) or REM sleep behavior disorders (n = 5). Total sleep time increased by 47%; wakefulness after sleep onset decreased by 51 minutes. Insomnia in patients with PD may predominantly result from nighttime motor disability. PMID:11113233

  19. Arachnophobia alleviated by subthalamic nucleus stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Allert, Niels; Gippert, Sabrina M; Sajonz, Bastian E A; Nelles, Christoph; Bewernick, Bettina; Schlaepfer, Thomas E; Coenen, Volker A

    2016-06-01

    We report on a Parkinson patient with motor fluctuations and dyskinesias in whom deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) not only improved motor symptoms but also pre-existing arachnophobia. Arachnophobia had been unchanged by the course of Parkinson's disease but rapidly improved with STN-DBS. Both, motor effects and the improvement of arachnophobia were stable during 2 years follow-up. To our knowledge this is the first report on STN stimulation effects on a specific phobia. PMID:27198699

  20. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation improves balance control in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Colnat-Coulbois, S; Gauchard, G; Maillard, L; Barroche, G; Vespignani, H; Auque, J; Perrin, P.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Parkinson's disease (PD), the most common basal ganglia degenerative disease, affects balance control, especially when patients change balance strategy during postural tasks. Bilateral chronic stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is therapeutically useful in advanced PD, and reduces the motor signs of patients. Nevertheless, the effects of STN stimulation on postural control are still debatable. Aims: To assess the impact of bilateral STN stimulation on balance control in PD and to determine how basal ganglia related sensorimotor modifications act on neurosensorial organisation of balance and motor postural programming. Methods: Twelve subjects aged 45–70 years underwent unified Parkinson's disease rating scale motor (part III) clinical tests, static and dynamic posturography, including sensory organisation and adaptation tests, shortly before and six months after bilateral implantation of electrodes into the STN. Results: The postoperative static test showed an improvement in postural control precision both in eyes open and eyes closed conditions. The dynamic test highlighted the decreased number of falls and the ability of the patients to develop more appropriate sensorimotor strategies when stimulated. The sensory organisation test showed an improvement of equilibrium score and, thus, a better resolution of sensorial conflicts. Conclusions: STN stimulation allowed a reduction in rigidity and therefore an improvement in the ability to use muscular proprioception as reliable information, resulting in vestibulo-proprioceptive conflict suppression. STN stimulation has a synergistic effect with levodopa for postural control. Accordingly, non-dopaminergic pathways could be involved in postural regulation and STN stimulation may influence the functioning of these pathways. PMID:15897498

  1. Suppression of Subthalamic Nucleus Activity by Micromagnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Woo; Fried, Shelley I.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic stimulation delivered via 0.5-mm diameter coils was recently shown to activate retinal neurons; the small coil size raises the possibility that micromagnetic stimulation (μMS) could underlie a new generation of implanted neural prosthetics. Such an approach has several inherent advantages over conventional electric stimulation, including the potential for selective activation of neuronal targets as well as less susceptibility to inflamma-tory responses. The viability of μMS for some applications, e.g., deep brain stimulation (DBS), may require suppression (rather than creation) of neuronal activity, however, and therefore we explore here whether (μMS) could, in fact, suppress activity. While single pulses elicited weak and inconsistent spiking in neurons of the mouse subthalamic nucleus (in vitro), repetitive stimulation effectively suppressed activity in ~70% of targeted neurons. This is the same percentage suppressed by conventional electric stimulation; with both modalities, suppression occurred only after an initial increase in spiking. The latency to the onset of suppression was inversely correlated to the energy of the stimulus waveform: larger amplitudes and lower frequencies had the fastest onset of suppression. These findings continue to support the viability of μMS as a next-generation implantable neural prosthetic. PMID:25163063

  2. Activation of the retrotrapezoid nucleus by posterior hypothalamic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Fortuna, Michal G; Stornetta, Ruth L; West, Gavin H; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2009-01-01

    The retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) contains chemically defined neurons (ccRTN neurons) that provide a pH-regulated excitatory drive to the central respiratory pattern generator. Here we test whether ccRTN neurons respond to stimulation of the perifornical hypothalamus (PeF), a region that regulates breathing during sleep, stress and exercise. PeF stimulation with gabazine increased blood pressure, phrenic nerve discharge (PND) and the firing rate of ccRTN neurons in isoflurane-anaesthetized rats. Gabazine produced an approximately parallel upward shift of the steady-state relationship between ccRTN neuron firing rate and end-tidal CO2, and a similar shift of the relationship between PND and end-tidal CO2. The central respiratory modulation of ccRTN neurons persisted after gabazine without a change in pattern. Morphine administration typically abolished PND and reduced the discharge rate of most ccRTN neurons (by 25% on average). After morphine administration, PeF stimulation activated the ccRTN neurons normally but PND activation and the central respiratory modulation of the ccRTN neurons were severely attenuated. In the same rat preparation, most (58%) ccRTN neurons expressed c-Fos after exposure to hypercapnic hyperoxia (6–7% end-tidal CO2; 3.5 h; no hypothalamic stimulation) and 62% expressed c-Fos under hypocapnia (∼3% end-tidal CO2) after PeF stimulation. Under baseline conditions (∼3% end-tidal CO2, hyperoxia, no PeF stimulation) few (11%) ccRTN neurons expressed c-Fos. In summary, most ccRTN neurons are excited by posterior hypothalamic stimulation while retaining their normal response to CNS acidification. ccRTN neurons probably contribute both to the chemical drive of breathing and to the feed-forward control of breathing associated with emotions and or locomotion. PMID:19752119

  3. Pedunculopontine arousal system physiology – Implications for insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Luster, Brennon; Mahaffey, Susan; Bisagno, Veronica; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    We consider insomnia a disorder of waking rather than a disorder of sleep. This review examines the role of the reticular activating system, especially the pedunculopontine nucleus, in the symptoms of insomnia, mainly representing an overactive waking drive. We determined that high frequency activity during waking and REM sleep is controlled by two different intracellular pathways and channel types in PPN cells. We found three different PPN cell types that have one or both channels and may be active during waking only, REM sleep only, or both. These discoveries point to a specific mechanism and novel therapeutic avenues for insomnia. PMID:26483950

  4. Modulation of medial geniculate nucleus neuronal activity by electrical stimulation of the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Barry, K M; Paolini, A G; Robertson, D; Mulders, W H A M

    2015-11-12

    Dysfunctional sensory gating has been proposed to result in the generation of phantom perceptions. In agreement, it has been recently suggested that tinnitus, a phantom perception of sound commonly associated with hearing loss, is the result of a breakdown of circuitry involving the limbic system and the medial geniculate nucleus (MGN) of the thalamus. In humans with tinnitus, structural changes and abnormal activity have been found to occur in the auditory pathway as well as parts of the limbic system such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc). However, at present, no studies have been conducted on the influence of the NAc on the MGN. We investigated the functional connectivity between the NAc and MGN single neurons. Bipolar electrical stimulation was delivered to the NAc while recording single neuron activity in MGN in anesthetized Wistar rats. Histological analysis was used to confirm placement of electrodes. NAc electrical stimulation generally decreased spontaneous firing rates in MGN neurons and, in a limited number of neurons, caused an increase in firing rate. This suggests that NAc can modulate the activity of auditory neurons in the MGN and may play a role in the development of tinnitus. PMID:26349008

  5. The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus—A functional hypothesis from the comparative literature

    PubMed Central

    Gut, Nadine K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present data from animal studies showing that the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus—conserved through evolution, compartmentalized, and with a complex pattern of inputs and outputs—has functions that involve formation and updates of action–outcome associations, attention, and rapid decision making. This is in contrast to previous hypotheses about pedunculopontine function, which has served as a basis for clinical interest in the pedunculopontine in movement disorders. Current animal literature points to it being neither a specifically motor structure nor a master switch for sleep regulation. The pedunculopontine is connected to basal ganglia circuitry but also has primary sensory input across modalities and descending connections to pontomedullary, cerebellar, and spinal motor and autonomic control systems. Functional and anatomical studies in animals suggest strongly that, in addition to the pedunculopontine being an input and output station for the basal ganglia and key regulator of thalamic (and consequently cortical) activity, an additional major function is participation in the generation of actions on the basis of a first‐pass analysis of incoming sensory data. Such a function—rapid decision making—has very high adaptive value for any vertebrate. We argue that in developing clinical strategies for treating basal ganglia disorders, it is necessary to take an account of the normal functions of the pedunculopontine. We believe that it is possible to use our hypothesis to explain why pedunculopontine deep brain stimulation used clinically has had variable outcomes in the treatment of parkinsonism motor symptoms and effects on cognitive processing. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PMID:26880095

  6. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation reverses mediofrontal influence over decision threshold.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, James F; Wiecki, Thomas V; Cohen, Michael X; Figueroa, Christina M; Samanta, Johan; Sherman, Scott J; Frank, Michael J

    2011-11-01

    It takes effort and time to tame one's impulses. Although medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is broadly implicated in effortful control over behavior, the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is specifically thought to contribute by acting as a brake on cortico-striatal function during decision conflict, buying time until the right decision can be made. Using the drift diffusion model of decision making, we found that trial-to-trial increases in mPFC activity (EEG theta power, 4-8 Hz) were related to an increased threshold for evidence accumulation (decision threshold) as a function of conflict. Deep brain stimulation of the STN in individuals with Parkinson's disease reversed this relationship, resulting in impulsive choice. In addition, intracranial recordings of the STN area revealed increased activity (2.5-5 Hz) during these same high-conflict decisions. Activity in these slow frequency bands may reflect a neural substrate for cortico-basal ganglia communication regulating decision processes. PMID:21946325

  7. Motor and non-motor circuitry activation induced by subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) in Parkinson’s disease patients: Intraoperative fMRI for DBS

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Emily J.; Testini, Paola; Min, Hoon-Ki; Gibson, William S.; Gorny, Krzysztof R.; Favazza, Christopher P.; Felmlee, Joel P.; Kim, Inyong; Welker, Kirk M.; Clayton, Daniel A.; Klassen, Bryan T.; Chang, Su-youne; Lee, Kendall H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis suggested by previous studies that subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients with PD would affect the activity of both motor and non-motor networks, we applied intraoperative fMRI to patients receiving DBS. Patients and Methods Ten patients receiving STN DBS for PD underwent intraoperative 1.5T fMRI during high frequency stimulation delivered via an external pulse generator. The study was conducted between the dates of January 1, 2013 and September 30, 2014. Results We observed blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal changes (FDR<.001) in the motor circuitry, including primary motor, premotor, and supplementary motor cortices, thalamus, pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), and cerebellum, as well as in the limbic circuitry, including cingulate and insular cortices. Activation of the motor network was observed also after applying a Bonferroni correction (p<.001) to our dataset, suggesting that, across subjects, BOLD changes in the motor circuitry are more consistent compared to those occurring in the non-motor network. Conclusions These findings support the modulatory role of STN DBS on the activity of motor and non-motor networks, and suggest complex mechanisms at the basis of the efficacy of this treatment modality. Furthermore, these results suggest that, across subjects, BOLD changes in the motor circuitry are more consistent compared to those occurring in the non-motor network. With further studies combining the use of real time intraoperative fMRI with clinical outcomes in patients treated with DBS, functional imaging techniques have the potential not only to elucidate the mechanisms of DBS functioning, but also to guide and assist in the surgical treatment of patients affected by movement and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26046412

  8. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation affects incentive salience attribution in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Serranová, Tereza; Jech, Robert; Dušek, Petr; Sieger, Tomáš; Růžička, Filip; Urgošík, Dušan; Růžička, Evžen

    2011-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) can induce nonmotor side effects such as behavioral and mood disturbances or body weight gain in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. We hypothesized that some of these problems could be related to an altered attribution of incentive salience (ie, emotional relevance) to rewarding and aversive stimuli. Twenty PD patients (all men; mean age ± SD, 58.3 ± 6 years) in bilateral STN DBS switched ON and OFF conditions and 18 matched controls rated pictures selected from the International Affective Picture System according to emotional valence (unpleasantness/pleasantness) and arousal on 2 independent visual scales ranging from 1 to 9. Eighty-four pictures depicting primary rewarding (erotica and food) and aversive fearful (victims and threat) and neutral stimuli were selected for this study. In the STN DBS ON condition, the PD patients attributed lower valence scores to the aversive pictures compared with the OFF condition (P < .01) and compared with controls (P < .01). The difference between the OFF condition and controls was less pronounced (P < .05). Furthermore, postoperative weight gain correlated with arousal ratings from the food pictures in the STN DBS ON condition (P < .05 compensated for OFF condition). Our results suggest that STN DBS increases activation of the aversive motivational system so that more relevance is attributed to aversive fearful stimuli. In addition, STN DBS-related sensitivity to food reward stimuli cues might drive DBS-treated patients to higher food intake and subsequent weight gain. PMID:21780183

  9. Suppression of the swallowing reflex by stimulation of the red nucleus.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yoshihide; Tsuji, Kojun; Tsujimura, Takanori; Ishizuka, Ken'Ichi; Inoue, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    We study whether the red nucleus is involved in control of swallowing. The swallowing reflex was induced in anesthetized rats by repetitive electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve. The electromyographic activities of the mylohyoid and thyrohyoid muscles were recorded in order to identify the swallowing reflex. Repetitive electrical stimulation applied to the red nucleus reduced the number of swallows. The onset latency of the first swallow was increased during repetitive electrical stimulation applied to the magnocellular part of the red nucleus. Microinjection of monosodium glutamate into the red nucleus also reduced the number of swallows. The onset latency of the first swallow was increased after microinjection of monosodium glutamate into the magnocellular part of the red nucleus. These results imply that the red nucleus is involved in the control of swallowing. PMID:26012722

  10. Functional topography of respiratory, cardiovascular and pontine-wave responses to glutamate microstimulation of the pedunculopontine tegmentum of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Topchiy, Irina; Waxman, Jonathan; Radulovacki, Miodrag; Carley, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Functionally distinct areas were mapped within the pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) of 42 ketamine/xylazine anesthetized rats using local stimulation by glutamate microinjection (10 mM, 5–12 nl). Functional responses were classified as: 1) apnea; 2) tachypnea; 3) hypertension (HTN); 4) sinus tachycardia; 5) genioglossus electromyogram activation or 6) pontine-waves (p-waves) activation. We found that short latency apneas were predominantly elicited by stimulation in the lateral portion of the PPT, in close proximity to cholinergic neurons. Tachypneic responses were elicited from ventral regions of the PPT and HTN predominated in the ventral portion of the antero-medial PPT. We observed sinus tachycardia after stimulation of the most ventral part of the medial PPT at the boundary with nucleus reticularis pontis oralis, whereas p-waves were registered predominantly following stimulation in the dorso-caudal portion of the PPT. Genioglossus EMG activation was evoked from the medial PPT. Our results support the existence of the functionally distinct areas within the PPT affecting respiration, cardio-vascular function, EEG and genioglossus EMG. PMID:20601208

  11. Pedunculopontine arousal system physiology-Effects of psychostimulant abuse.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Francisco J; Bisagno, Verónica; González, Betina; Celeste Rivero-Echeto, María; Muñiz, Javier A; Luster, Brennon; D'Onofrio, Stasia; Mahaffey, Susan; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2015-11-01

    This review describes the interactions between the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and the thalamocortical system. Experiments using modulators of cholinergic receptors in the PPN clarified its role on psychostimulant-induced locomotion. PPN activation was found to be involved in the animal's voluntary search for psychostimulants. Every PPN neuron is known to generate gamma band oscillations. Voltage-gated calcium channels are key elements in the generation and maintenance of gamma band activity of PPN neurons. Calcium channels are also key elements mediating psychostimulant-induced alterations in the thalamic targets of PPN output. Thus, the PPN is a key substrate for maintaining arousal and REM sleep, but also in modulating psychostimulant self-administration. PMID:26779323

  12. Pedunculopontine arousal system physiology—Effects of psychostimulant abuse

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Francisco J.; Bisagno, Verónica; González, Betina; Celeste Rivero-Echeto, María; Muñiz, Javier A.; Luster, Brennon; D’Onofrio, Stasia; Mahaffey, Susan; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the interactions between the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and the thalamocortical system. Experiments using modulators of cholinergic receptors in the PPN clarified its role on psychostimulant-induced locomotion. PPN activation was found to be involved in the animal’s voluntary search for psychostimulants. Every PPN neuron is known to generate gamma band oscillations. Voltage-gated calcium channels are key elements in the generation and maintenance of gamma band activity of PPN neurons. Calcium channels are also key elements mediating psychostimulant-induced alterations in the thalamic targets of PPN output. Thus, the PPN is a key substrate for maintaining arousal and REM sleep, but also in modulating psychostimulant self-administration. PMID:26779323

  13. Changes of reactions of neurones in dorsal raphe nucleus and locus coeruleus to electroacupuncture by hypothalamic arcuate nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Q H; Mao, J R; Guo, S Y

    1988-01-01

    In this experiment the role of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) in acupuncture analgesia and its mechanisms were studied with behavioural and electrophysiological methods. After ARC stimulation the analgesic effect of acupuncture was enhanced significantly and the responses of neurones to electroacupuncture were increased in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) and reduced in the locus coeruleus (LC), which could be reversed by intraperitoneal injection of naloxone. The results indicate that ARC might participate in acupuncture analgesia via changing the responses of DR and LC neurones to electroacupuncture, a process in which opiate-like substances (probably beta-endorphin) are involved. PMID:3192102

  14. Dopamine Dysregulation Syndrome and Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    De la Casa-Fages, Beatriz; Grandas, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine dysregulation syndrome is a complication of the dopaminergic treatment in Parkinson's disease that may be very disabling due to the negative impact that compulsive medication use may have on patients' social, psychological, and physical functioning. The relationship between subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation and dopamine dysregulation syndrome in patients with Parkinson's disease remains unclear. Deep brain stimulation may improve, worsen, or have no effect on preoperative dopamine dysregulation syndrome. Moreover, dopamine dysregulation syndrome may appear for the first time after deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. The outcome of postoperative dopamine dysregulation syndrome is poor despite stimulation and medication adjustments. Here we review the phenomenology and neurobiology of this disorder, discuss possible mechanisms that may underlie the diverse outcomes of dopamine dysregulation syndrome after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation, and propose management strategies. PMID:22135744

  15. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation and Dysarthria in Parkinson's Disease: A PET Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Serge; Thobois, Stephane; Costes, Nicolas; Le Bars, Didier; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Pollak, Pierre; Gentil, Michele

    2004-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, functional imaging studies during limb motor tasks reveal cerebral activation abnormalities that can be reversed by subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation. The effect of STN stimulation on parkinsonian dysarthria has not, however, been investigated using PET. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of STN…

  16. Cholinergic modulation of fast inhibitory and excitatory transmission to pedunculopontine thalamic projecting neurons.

    PubMed

    Ye, Meijun; Hayar, Abdallah; Strotman, Beau; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2010-05-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is part of the cholinergic arm of the reticular activating system, which is mostly active during waking and rapid-eye movement sleep. The PPN projects to the thalamus and receives cholinergic inputs from the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus and contralateral PPN. We employed retrograde labeling and whole cell recordings to determine the modulation of GABAergic, glycinergic, and glutamatergic transmission to PPN thalamic projecting neurons, and their postsynaptic responses to the nonspecific cholinergic agonist carbachol. M2 and M4 muscarinic receptor-modulated inhibitory postsynaptic responses were observed in 73% of PPN output neurons; in 12.9%, M1 and nicotinic receptor-mediated excitation was detected; and muscarinic and nicotinic-modulated fast inhibitory followed by slow excitatory biphasic responses were evident in 6.7% of cells. A significant increase in the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and inhibitory postsynaptic currents during carbachol application was observed in 66.2% and 65.2% of efferent neurons, respectively. This effect was blocked by a M1 antagonist or nonselective muscarinic blocker, indicating that glutamatergic, GABAergic, and/or glycinergic neurons projecting to PPN output neurons are excited through muscarinic receptors. Decreases in the frequency of miniature EPSCs, and amplitude of electrical stimulation-evoked EPSCs, were blocked by a M2 antagonist, suggesting the presence of M2Rs at terminals of presynaptic glutamatergic neurons. Carbachol-induced multiple types of postsynaptic responses, enhancing both inhibitory and excitatory fast transmission to PPN thalamic projecting neurons through muscarinic receptors. These results provide possible implications for the generation of different frequency oscillations in PPN thalamic projecting neurons during distinct sleep-wake states. PMID:20181729

  17. Suppression of beta oscillations in the subthalamic nucleus following cortical stimulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Doyle Gaynor, L M F; Kühn, A A; Dileone, M; Litvak, V; Eusebio, A; Pogosyan, A; Androulidakis, A G; Tisch, S; Limousin, P; Insola, A; Mazzone, P; Di Lazzaro, V; Brown, P

    2008-01-01

    It is unclear how subthalamic nucleus activity is modulated by the cerebral cortex. Here we investigate the effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the cortex on oscillatory subthalamic local field potential activity in the 8–35 Hz (alpha/beta) band, as exaggerated synchronization in this band is implicated in the pathophysiology of parkinsonism. We studied nine patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) to test whether cortical stimulation can modulate synchronized oscillations in the human subthalamic nucleus. With patients at rest, single-pulse TMS was delivered every 5 s over each primary motor area and supplementary motor area at intensities of 85–115% resting motor threshold. Subthalamic local field potentials were recorded from deep brain stimulation electrodes implanted into this nucleus for the treatment of PD. Motor cortical stimulation suppressed beta activity in the subthalamic nucleus from ∼0.2 to 0.6 s after TMS (repeated measures anova; main effect of time, P<0.01; main effect of side, P=0.03), regardless of intensity. TMS over the supplementary motor area also reduced subthalamic beta activity at 95% (P=0.05) and 115% resting motor threshold (P=0.01). The oscillatory activity decreased to 80 ± 26% of baseline (averaged across sites and stimulation intensities). Suppression with subthreshold stimuli confirmed that these changes were centrally driven and not due to peripheral afference. The results may have implications for mechanisms underlying the reported therapeutic benefits of cortical stimulation. PMID:18657185

  18. Paradoxical augmented relapse in alcohol-dependent rats during deep-brain stimulation in the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Hadar, R; Vengeliene, V; Barroeta Hlusicke, E; Canals, S; Noori, H R; Wieske, F; Rummel, J; Harnack, D; Heinz, A; Spanagel, R; Winter, C

    2016-01-01

    Case reports indicate that deep-brain stimulation in the nucleus accumbens may be beneficial to alcohol-dependent patients. The lack of clinical trials and our limited knowledge of deep-brain stimulation call for translational experiments to validate these reports. To mimic the human situation, we used a chronic-continuous brain-stimulation paradigm targeting the nucleus accumbens and other brain sites in alcohol-dependent rats. To determine the network effects of deep-brain stimulation in alcohol-dependent rats, we combined electrical stimulation of the nucleus accumbens with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and studied neurotransmitter levels in nucleus accumbens-stimulated versus sham-stimulated rats. Surprisingly, we report here that electrical stimulation of the nucleus accumbens led to augmented relapse behavior in alcohol-dependent rats. Our associated fMRI data revealed some activated areas, including the medial prefrontal cortex and caudate putamen. However, when we applied stimulation to these areas, relapse behavior was not affected, confirming that the nucleus accumbens is critical for generating this paradoxical effect. Neurochemical analysis of the major activated brain sites of the network revealed that the effect of stimulation may depend on accumbal dopamine levels. This was supported by the finding that brain-stimulation-treated rats exhibited augmented alcohol-induced dopamine release compared with sham-stimulated animals. Our data suggest that deep-brain stimulation in the nucleus accumbens enhances alcohol-liking probably via augmented dopamine release and can thereby promote relapse. PMID:27327255

  19. Paradoxical augmented relapse in alcohol-dependent rats during deep-brain stimulation in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Hadar, R; Vengeliene, V; Barroeta Hlusicke, E; Canals, S; Noori, H R; Wieske, F; Rummel, J; Harnack, D; Heinz, A; Spanagel, R; Winter, C

    2016-01-01

    Case reports indicate that deep-brain stimulation in the nucleus accumbens may be beneficial to alcohol-dependent patients. The lack of clinical trials and our limited knowledge of deep-brain stimulation call for translational experiments to validate these reports. To mimic the human situation, we used a chronic-continuous brain-stimulation paradigm targeting the nucleus accumbens and other brain sites in alcohol-dependent rats. To determine the network effects of deep-brain stimulation in alcohol-dependent rats, we combined electrical stimulation of the nucleus accumbens with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and studied neurotransmitter levels in nucleus accumbens-stimulated versus sham-stimulated rats. Surprisingly, we report here that electrical stimulation of the nucleus accumbens led to augmented relapse behavior in alcohol-dependent rats. Our associated fMRI data revealed some activated areas, including the medial prefrontal cortex and caudate putamen. However, when we applied stimulation to these areas, relapse behavior was not affected, confirming that the nucleus accumbens is critical for generating this paradoxical effect. Neurochemical analysis of the major activated brain sites of the network revealed that the effect of stimulation may depend on accumbal dopamine levels. This was supported by the finding that brain-stimulation-treated rats exhibited augmented alcohol-induced dopamine release compared with sham-stimulated animals. Our data suggest that deep-brain stimulation in the nucleus accumbens enhances alcohol-liking probably via augmented dopamine release and can thereby promote relapse. PMID:27327255

  20. Spike coding during osmotic stimulation of the rat supraoptic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Bhumbra, GS; Inyushkin, AN; Syrimi, M; Dyball, REJ

    2005-01-01

    Novel measures of coding based on interspike intervals were used to characterize the responses of supraoptic cells to osmotic stimulation. Infusion of hypertonic NaCl in vivo increased the firing rate of continuous (putative oxytocin) cells (Wilcoxon z = 3.84, P = 0.001) and phasic (putative vasopressin) cells (z = 2.14, P = 0.032). The irregularity of activity, quantified by the log interval entropy, was decreased for continuous (Student's t = 3.06, P = 0.003) but not phasic cells (t = 1.34, P = 0.181). For continuous cells, the increase in frequency and decrease in entropy was significantly greater (t = 2.61, P = 0.036 and t = 3.06, P = 0.007, respectively) than for phasic cells. Spike patterning, quantified using the mutual information between intervals, was decreased for phasic (z = −2.64, P = 0.008) but not continuous cells (z = −1.14, P = 0.256). Although continuous cells showed similar osmotic responses to mannitol infusion, phasic cells showed differences: spike frequency decreased (z = −3.70, P < 0.001) and entropy increased (t = −3.41, P < 0.001). Considering both cell types together, osmotic stimulation in vitro using 40 mm NaCl had little effect on firing rate (z = −0.319, P = 0.750), but increased both entropy (t = 2.75, P = 0.010) and mutual information (z = −2.73, P = 0.006) in contrast to the decreases (t = 2.92, P = 0.004 and z = −2.40, P = 0.017) seen in vivo. Responses to less severe osmotic stimulation with NaCl or mannitol were not significant. Potassium-induced depolarization in vitro increased firing rate (r = 0.195, P = 0.034), but the correlation with decreased entropy was not significant (r = −0.097, P = 0.412). Intracellular recordings showed a small depolarization and decrease in input resistance during osmotic stimulation with NaCl or mannitol, and membrane depolarization following addition of potassium. Differences in responses of oxytocin and vasopressin cells in vivo, suggest differences in the balance between the

  1. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Changes Velopharyngeal Control in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Michael J.; Barlow, Steven M.; Lyons, Kelly E.; Pahwa, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Adequate velopharyngeal control is essential for speech, but may be impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD). Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) improves limb function in PD, but the effects on velopharyngeal control remain unknown. We tested whether STN DBS would change aerodynamic measures of velopharyngeal…

  2. Mood Response to Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Meghan C.; Black, Kevin J.; Weaver, Patrick M.; Lugar, Heather M.; Videen, Tom O.; Tabbal, Samer D.; Karimi, Morvarid; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Hershey, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) in Parkinson disease (PD) improves motor function but has variable effects on mood. Little is known about the relationship between electrode contact location and mood response. We identified the anatomical location of electrode contacts and measured mood response to stimulation with the Visual Analog Scale in 24 STN DBS PD patients. Participants reported greater positive mood, decreased anxiety and apathy with bilateral and unilateral stimulation. Left DBS improved mood more than right DBS. Right DBS-induced increase in positive mood was related to more medial and dorsal contact locations. These results highlight the functional heterogeneity of the STN. PMID:22450611

  3. Direct visualization of the murine dorsal cochlear nucleus for optogenetic stimulation of the auditory pathway.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Elliott D; Darrow, Keith N; Hight, Ariel E; Lehmann, Ashton E; Kaplan, Alyson B; Brown, M Christian; Lee, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Investigation into the use of virus-mediated gene transfer to arrest or reverse hearing loss has largely been relegated to the peripheral auditory system. Few studies have examined gene transfer to the central auditory system. The dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) of the brainstem, which contains second order neurons of the auditory pathway, is a potential site for gene transfer. In this protocol, a technique for direct and maximal exposure of the murine DCN via a posterior fossa approach is demonstrated. This approach allows for either acute or survival surgery. Following direct visualization of the DCN, a host of experiments are possible, including injection of opsins into the cochlear nucleus and subsequent stimulation by an optical fiber coupled to a blue light laser. Other neurophysiology experiments, such as electrical stimulation and neural injector tracings are also feasible. The level of visualization and the duration of stimulation achievable make this approach applicable to a wide range of experiments. PMID:25650555

  4. Direct Visualization of the Murine Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus for Optogenetic Stimulation of the Auditory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Ashton E.; Kaplan, Alyson B.; Brown, M. Christian; Lee, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Investigation into the use of virus-mediated gene transfer to arrest or reverse hearing loss has largely been relegated to the peripheral auditory system. Few studies have examined gene transfer to the central auditory system. The dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) of the brainstem, which contains second order neurons of the auditory pathway, is a potential site for gene transfer. In this protocol, a technique for direct and maximal exposure of the murine DCN via a posterior fossa approach is demonstrated. This approach allows for either acute or survival surgery. Following direct visualization of the DCN, a host of experiments are possible, including injection of opsins into the cochlear nucleus and subsequent stimulation by an optical fiber coupled to a blue light laser. Other neurophysiology experiments, such as electrical stimulation and neural injector tracings are also feasible. The level of visualization and the duration of stimulation achievable make this approach applicable to a wide range of experiments. PMID:25650555

  5. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus modulates sensitivity to decision outcome value in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Ben; Barbe, Michael; Dayan, Peter; Shiner, Tamara; Dolan, Ray; Fink, Gereon R

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson's disease is known to cause a subtle but important adverse impact on behaviour, with impulsivity its most widely reported manifestation. However, precisely which computational components of the decision process are modulated is not fully understood. Here we probe a number of distinct subprocesses, including temporal discount, outcome utility, instrumental learning rate, instrumental outcome sensitivity, reward-loss trade-offs, and perseveration. We tested 22 Parkinson's Disease patients both on and off subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS), while they performed an instrumental learning task involving financial rewards and losses, and an inter-temporal choice task for financial rewards. We found that instrumental learning performance was significantly worse following stimulation, due to modulation of instrumental outcome sensitivity. Specifically, patients became less sensitive to decision values for both rewards and losses, but without any change to the learning rate or reward-loss trade-offs. However, we found no evidence that DBS modulated different components of temporal impulsivity. In conclusion, our results implicate the subthalamic nucleus in a modulation of outcome value in experience-based learning and decision-making in Parkinson's disease, suggesting a more pervasive role of the subthalamic nucleus in the control of human decision-making than previously thought. PMID:27624437

  6. Electro-stimulation of cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FNS) improves axonal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuyan; Zhang, Qinli; Zhang, John H; Qin, Xinyue

    2008-01-01

    This study focused on the effect of electro-stimulation of fastigial nucleus on the expression of NgR and on axonal regeneration after focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion in rats. Cerebral ischemia and reperfusion was induced by nylon monofilament. Ninety-six male SD rats were randomly divided into sham group and ischemic insult groups at 12 hours, 24 hours, and 1 to 3 weeks after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine the changes of NgR mRNA expression. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of NgR protein and the state of axonal regeneration. Fastigial nucleus stimulation was applied at 2 hours after ischemia for one hour. The results demonstrated that NgR mRNA and protein in the infarcted cortex and hippocampus were significantly increased (p<0.01). The axons were grossly damaged at 24 h after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion when compared to the sham group. Fastigial nucleus stimulation decreased NgR mRNA and protein levels in the infarcted cortex and hippocampus (p<0.01) and improved axonal growth at 24 hours and 2 weeks after ischemia-reperfusion (p<0.05). These results suggest that electrostimulation of fastigial nucleus might provide a new strategy to promote CNS axonal regeneration. PMID:18508711

  7. The subthalamic nucleus. Part I: development, cytology, topography and connections.

    PubMed

    Marani, Enrico; Heida, Tjitske; Lakke, Egbert A J F; Usunoff, Kamen G

    2008-01-01

    This monograph (Part I of two volumes) on the subthalamic nucleus (STN) accentuates the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections. The light and electron microscopical cytology focuses on the open nucleus concept and the neuronal types present in the STN. The cytochemistry encompasses enzymes, NO, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), calcium binding proteins, and receptors (dopamine, cannabinoid, opioid, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonin, cholinergic, and calcium channels). The ontogeny of the subthalamic cell cord is also reviewed. The topography concerns the rat, cat, baboon and human STN. The descriptions of the connections are also given from a historical point of view. Recent tracer studies on the rat nigro-subthalamic connection revealed contralateral projections. Part II of the two volumes (volume 199) on the subthalamic nucleus (STN) starts with a systemic model of the basal ganglia to evaluate the position of the STN in the direct, indirect and hyperdirect pathways. A summary of in vitro studies is given, describing STN spontaneous activity as well as responses to depolarizing and hyperpolarizing inputs and high-frequency stimulation. STN bursting activity and the underlying ionic mechanisms are investigated. Deep brain stimulation used for symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease is discussed in terms of the elements that are influenced and its hypothesized mechanisms. This part of the monograph explores the pedunculopontine-subthalamic connections and summarizes attempts to mimic neurotransmitter actions of the pedunculopontine nucleus in cell cultures and high-frequency stimulation on cultured dissociated rat subthalamic neurons. STN cell models--single- and multi-compartment models and system-level models are discussed in relation to subthalamic function and dysfunction. Parts I and II are compared. PMID:18727483

  8. The subthalamic nucleus part II: modelling and simulation of activity.

    PubMed

    Heida, Tjitske; Marani, Enrico; Usunoff, Kamen G

    2008-01-01

    Part I of The Subthalamic Nucleus (volume 198) (STN) accentuates the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections.The light and electron microscopical cytology focuses on the open nucleus concept and the neuronal types present in the STN. The cytochemistry encompasses enzymes, NO, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), calcium binding proteins, and receptors (dopamine, cannabinoid, opioid, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonin, cholinergic, and calcium channels). The ontogeny of the subthalamic cell cord is also reviewed. The topography concerns the rat, cat, baboon and human STN. The descriptions of the connections are also given from a historical point of view. Recent tracer studies on the rat nigro-subthalamic connection revealed contralateral projections. This monograph (Part II of the two volumes) on the subthalamic nucleus (STN) starts with a systemic model of the basal ganglia to evaluate the position of the STN in the direct, indirect and hyperdirect pathways. A summary of in vitro studies is given, describing STN spontaneous activity as well as responses to depolarizing and hyperpolarizing inputs and high-frequency stimulation. STN bursting activity and the underlying ionic mechanisms are investigated. Deep brain stimulation used for symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease is discussed in terms of the elements that are influenced and its hypothesized mechanisms. This part of the monograph explores the pedunculopontine-subthalamic connections and summarizes attempts to mimic neurotransmitter actions of the pedunculopontine nucleus in cell cultures and high-frequency stimulation on cultured dissociated rat subthalamic neurons. STN cell models - single- and multi-compartment models and system-level models are discussed in relation to subthalamic function and dysfunction. Parts I and II are compared. PMID:18727495

  9. Electrical stimulation in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis alleviates severe obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Luyten, L; Hendrickx, S; Raymaekers, S; Gabriëls, L; Nuttin, B

    2016-09-01

    In 1998, we proposed deep brain stimulation as a last-resort treatment option for patients suffering from severe, treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here, 24 OCD patients were included in a long-term follow-up study to evaluate the effects of electrical stimulation in the anterior limbs of the internal capsule (ALIC) and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST). We find that electrical stimulation in the ALIC/BST area is safe and significantly decreases obsessions, compulsions, and associated anxiety and depressive symptoms, and improves global functioning in a blinded crossover trial (n=17), after 4 years (n=18), and at last follow-up (up to 171 months, n=24). Moreover, our data indicate that BST may be a better stimulation target compared with ALIC to alleviate OCD symptoms. We conclude that electrical stimulation in BST is a promising therapeutic option for otherwise treatment-resistant OCD patients. PMID:26303665

  10. Does bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus aggravate apathy in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Czernecki, V; Pillon, B; Houeto, J; Welter, M; Mesnage, V; Agid, Y; Dubois, B

    2005-01-01

    Objective: High frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) dramatically decreases motor disability in patients with Parkinson"s disease (PD), but has been reported to aggravate apathy. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of STN stimulation on motivation and reward sensitivity in a consecutive series of PD patients. Methods: Apathy and reward sensitivity (Apathy Scale, Stimulus-Reward Learning, Reversal, Extinction, and Gambling tasks) were assessed in 18 PD patients treated by bilateral STN stimulation ("on" and "off" conditions) compared with 23 matched patients undergoing long term treatment with levodopa ("on" and "off" conditions). Results: Apathy decreased under both STN stimulation and levodopa treatment, whereas explicit and implicit stimulus reward learning was unchanged. Conclusions: Bilateral STN stimulation in PD patients does not necessarily have a negative effect on motivation and reward sensitivity and can even improve apathy provided patients have been appropriately selected for neurosurgery. PMID:15897497

  11. Beyond nine years of continuous subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zibetti, Maurizio; Merola, Aristide; Rizzi, Laura; Ricchi, Valeria; Angrisano, Serena; Azzaro, Corrado; Artusi, Carlo Alberto; Arduino, Nichy; Marchisio, Alice; Lanotte, Michele; Rizzone, Mario; Lopiano, Leonardo

    2011-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an effective treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease. The benefits of bilateral subthalamic stimulation are well documented, and some studies reported outcomes with a follow-up of 5 to 6 years; nevertheless, few data are available beyond 5 years. We report a long-term prospective evaluation of 14 consecutive parkinsonian patients, treated by bilateral subthalamic stimulation for at least 9 years. Motor symptoms, activity of daily living, and motor complications were evaluated by means of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, while cognition and mood were assessed with a specific neuropsychological test battery; medication intake, stimulation parameters, comorbidity, and adverse events were also recorded. Patients were evaluated before surgery and at 1, 5, and ≥ 9 years after surgery. At last follow-up, deep brain stimulation significantly improved the motor score by 42% compared to baseline, whereas activities of daily living were no longer improved; there was a 39% reduction in the dosage of dopaminergic drugs and a 59% improvement of L-dopa-related motor complications. The neuropsychological assessment showed that 4 patients (29%) developed a significant cognitive decline over the follow-up period. These results indicate a persistent effect of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus on the cardinal motor symptoms in advanced Parkinson's disease patients in the long-term; however, a worsening of patients' disability, mainly due to disease progression, was observed. PMID:22012750

  12. Stimulation of the nucleus accumbens as behavioral reward in awake behaving monkeys.

    PubMed

    Bichot, Narcisse P; Heard, Matthew T; Desimone, Robert

    2011-08-15

    It has been known that monkeys will repeatedly press a bar for electrical stimulation in several different brain structures. We explored the possibility of using electrical stimulation in one such structure, the nucleus accumbens, as a substitute for liquid reward in animals performing a complex task, namely visual search. The animals had full access to water in the cage at all times on days when stimulation was used to motivate them. Electrical stimulation was delivered bilaterally at mirror locations in and around the accumbens, and the animals' motivation to work for electrical stimulation was quantified by the number of trials they performed correctly per unit of time. Acute mapping revealed that stimulation over a large area successfully supported behavioral performance during the task. Performance improved with increasing currents until it reached an asymptotic, theoretically maximal level. Moreover, stimulation with chronically implanted electrodes showed that an animal's motivation to work for electrical stimulation was at least equivalent to, and often better than, when it worked for liquid reward while on water control. These results suggest that electrical stimulation in the accumbens is a viable method of reward in complex tasks. Because this method of reward does not necessitate control over water or food intake, it may offer an alternative to the traditional liquid or food rewards in monkeys, depending on the goals and requirements of the particular research project. PMID:21704383

  13. Stimulation with chronically implanted microelectrodes in the cochlear nucleus of the cat: histologic and physiologic effects.

    PubMed

    McCreery, D B; Yuen, T G; Agnew, W F; Bullara, L A

    1992-09-01

    The effects of several hours of continuous electrical stimulation in the cats' cochlear nucleus with chronically implanted activated iridium microelectrodes was investigated from the changes in the evoked response near the inferior colliculus and also by histologic evaluation of the stimulated tissue. The stimulating microelectrodes had geometric surface areas of 75-500 microns2. They were pulsed continuously for 4 h, at a pulse repetition rate of 200 Hz, using charge-balanced pulse pairs. The charge per phase was 1.8 or 3.6 nC/ph. The animals were sacrificed for histologic evaluation 2 h, or several days later. The only remarkable histologic change resulting from the 4 h of stimulation was some aggregation of lymphocytes at the site of stimulation. However, depression of the electrical excitability of neurons near the sites often persisted for several days after 4 h of stimulation at 3.6 nC/phase. The charge per phase of the stimulus pulse pair was correlated strongly with the depression of excitability, and there was a weaker correlation between the depression and the amplitude of the first phase of voltage transient induced across the electrode-tissue interface. The charge density, calculated from the geometric surface area of the stimulating electrodes, was poorly correlated with the severity of the depression. The findings suggest a means of detecting impending stimulation-induced neural damage while it is still reversible. PMID:1429250

  14. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation and levodopa on the autonomic nervous system in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Janne; Remien, Piet; Guballa, Christoph; Binder, Andreas; Binder, Sabine; Schattschneider, Jörn; Herzog, Jan; Volkmann, Jens; Deuschl, Günther; Wasner, Gunnar; Baron, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Dysfunctions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) are common in Parkinson's disease (PD). Regarding motor disability, deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective treatment option in long lasting PD. The aims of this study were to examine whether STN stimulation has an influence on functions of the ANS and to compare these effects to those induced by levodopa. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) during rest and orthostatic conditions, HR variability (HRV) and breathing‐induced cutaneous sympathetic vasoconstriction (CVC) were tested in 14 PD patients treated with STN stimulation during “ON” and “OFF” condition of the stimulator. The effects of a single dose of levodopa on ANS were tested in 15 PD patients without DBS. STN stimulation had no influence on cardiovascular ANS functions, whereas CVC was significantly increased. In contrast, levodopa significantly lowered BP and HR at rest and enhanced orthostatic hypotension. Further, HRV, skin perfusion and temperature increased after administration of levodopa. Our results suggest that in contrast to levodopa, STN stimulation has only minor effects on autonomic functions. Since less pharmacotherapy is needed after STN stimulation, reduced levodopa intake results in relative improvement of autonomic function in deep brain stimulated PD patients. PMID:17371906

  15. Unilateral Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation Has a Measurable Ipsilateral Effect on Rigidity And Bradykinesia in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tabbal, Samer D.; Ushe, Mwiza; Mink, Jonathan W.; Revilla, Fredy J.; Wernle, Angie R.; Hong, Minna; Karimi, Morvarid; Perlmutter, Joel S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) improves motor function in Parkinson disease (PD). However, little is known about the quantitative effects on motor behavior of unilateral STN DBS. Methods In 52 PD subjects with STN DBS, we quantified in a double-blinded manner rigidity (n= 42), bradykinesia (n= 38), and gait speed (n= 45). Subjects were tested in four DBS conditions: both on, left on, right on and both off. A force transducer was used to measure rigidity across the elbow, and gyroscopes were used to measure angular velocity of hand rotations for bradykinesia. About half of the subjects were rated using the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (part III) motor scores for arm rigidity and repetitive hand rotation simultaneously during the kinematic measurements. Subjects were timed walking 25 feet. Results All subjects had significant improvement with bilateral STN DBS. Contralateral, ipsilateral and bilateral stimulation significantly reduced rigidity and bradykinesia. Bilateral stimulation improved rigidity more than unilateral stimulation of either side, but there was no significant difference between ipsilateral and contralateral stimulation. Although bilateral stimulation also increased hand rotation velocity more than unilateral stimulation of either side, contralateral stimulation increased hand rotation significantly more than ipsilateral stimulation. All stimulation conditions improved walking time but bilateral stimulation provided the greatest improvement. Conclusions Unilateral STN DBS decreased rigidity and bradykinesia contralaterally as well ipsilaterally. As expected, bilateral DBS improved gait more than unilateral DBS. These findings suggest that unilateral STN DBS alters pathways that affect rigidity and bradykinesia bilaterally but do not support the clinical use of unilateral STN DBS since bilateral DBS clearly provides greater benefit. PMID:18329019

  16. Hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus stimulation reduces intestinal injury in rats with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Quan-Jun; Deng, Ding-Jing; Che, Jin; Zhao, Hai-Rong; Yu, Jun-Jie; Lu, Yong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect and mechanism of stimulation of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus with glutamate acid in rats with ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: The rats were anesthetized with 10% chloral hydrate via abdominal injection and treated with an equal volume of TNBS + 50% ethanol enema, injected into the upper section of the anus with the tail facing up. Colonic damage scores were calculated after injecting a certain dose of glutamic acid into the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and the effect of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and vagus nerve in alleviating UC injury through chemical stimulation of the PVN was observed in rats. Expression changes of C-myc, Apaf-1, caspase-3, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-17 during the protection against UC injury through chemical stimulation of the PVN in rats were detected by Western blot. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in colon tissues of rats were measured by colorimetric methods. RESULTS: Chemical stimulation of the PVN significantly reduced UC in rats in a dose-dependent manner. The protective effects of the chemical stimulation of the PVN on rats with UC were eliminated after chemical damage to the PVN. After glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid was injected into the PVN, the protective effects of the chemical stimulation of the PVN were eliminated in rats with UC. After AVP-Vl receptor antagonist ([Deamino-penl, val4, D-Arg8]-vasopressin) was injected into NTS or bilateral chemical damage to NTS, the protective effect of the chemical stimulation of PVN on UC was also eliminated. After chemical stimulation of the PVN, SOD activity increased, MDA content decreased, C-myc protein expression significantly increased, caspase-3 and Apaf-1 protein expression significantly decreased, and IL-6 and IL-17 expression decreased in colon tissues in rats with UC. CONCLUSION: Chemical stimulation of the hypothalamic PVN provides a protective effect against UC injury in

  17. Familiar companions diminish cocaine conditioning and attenuate cocaine-stimulated dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Wen-Yu; Cherng, Chian-Fang G; Wang, Shyi-Wu; Yu, Lung

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the impact of companions on the rewarding effects of cocaine. Three cage mates, serving as companions, were housed with each experimental mouse throughout cocaine-place conditioning in a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm using conditioning doses of 10 and 20mg/kg. The presence of companions decreased the magnitude of the CPP. At 20mg/kg, cocaine stimulated dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens as evidenced by a significant decrease in total (spontaneous and electrical stimulation-provoked) DA release in accumbal superfusate samples. The presence of companions prevented this cocaine-stimulated DA release; such a reduction in cocaine-induced DA release may account for the reduction in the magnitude of the CPP in the presence of the companions. Furthermore, cocaine pretreatment (2.5mg/kg) was found to prevent the companion-produced decreases in cocaine (10mg/kg/conditioning)-induced CPP as well as the cocaine (10mg/kg)-stimulated DA release. Moreover, the presence of methamphetamine (MA) (1mg/kg)-treated companions decreased cocaine (20mg/kg/conditioning)-induced CPP and prevented the cocaine (20mg/kg)-stimulated DA release. Finally, the presence of companions decreased the magnitude of the CPP could not seem to be accounted for by cocaine-stimulated corticosterone (CORT) release. Taken together, these results indicate that familiar companions, regardless of their pharmacological status, may exert dampening effects on CPP induced by moderate to high conditioning doses of cocaine, at least in part, by preventing cocaine-stimulated DA release in the nucleus accumbens. PMID:27001454

  18. Spatiotemporal visualization of deep brain stimulation-induced effects in the subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Nada; Borisyuk, Roman; Pavese, Nicola; Nandi, Dipankar; Bain, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a successful surgical therapy used to treat the disabling symptoms of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. It involves the chronic stimulation of disorder-specific nuclei. However, the mechanisms that lead to clinical improvements remain unclear. Consequently, this slows the optimization of present-day DBS therapy and hinders its future development and application. We used a computational model to calculate the distribution of electric potential induced by DBS and study the effect of stimulation on the spiking activity of a subthalamic nucleus (STN) projection neuron. We previously showed that such a model can reveal detailed spatial effects of stimulation in the vicinity of the electrode. However, this multi-compartmental STN neuron model can fire in either a burst or tonic mode and, in this study, we hypothesized that the firing mode of the cell will have a major impact on the DBS-induced effects. Our simulations showed that the bursting model exhibits behaviour observed in studies of high-frequency stimulation of STN neurons, such as the presence of a silent period at stimulation offset and frequency-dependent stimulation effects. We validated the model by simulating the clinical parameter settings used for a Parkinsonian patient and showed, in a patient-specific anatomical model, that the region of affected tissue is consistent with clinical observations of the optimal DBS site. Our results demonstrated a method of quantitatively assessing neuronal changes induced by DBS, to maximize therapeutic benefit and minimize unwanted side effects. PMID:22805069

  19. Optogenetic stimulation of the cochlear nucleus using channelrhodopsin-2 evokes activity in the central auditory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Darrow, Keith N.; Slama, Michaël C. C.; Owoc, Maryanna; Kozin, Elliott; Hancock, Kenneth; Kempfle, Judith; Edge, Albert; Lacour, Stephanie; Boyden, Edward; Polley, Daniel; Brown, M. Christian; Lee, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics has become an important research tool and is being considered as the basis for several neural prostheses. However, few studies have applied optogenetics to the auditory brainstem. This study explored whether optical activation of the cochlear nucleus (CN) elicited responses in neurons in higher centers of the auditory pathway, and it measured the evoked response to optical stimulation. Viral-mediated gene transfer was used to express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in the mouse CN. Blue light was delivered via an optical fiber placed near the surface of the infected CN and recordings were made in higher-level centers. Optical stimulation evoked excitatory multiunit spiking activity throughout the tonotopic axis of central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (IC) and the auditory cortex (Actx). The pattern and magnitude of IC activity elicited by optical stimulation was comparable to that obtained with a 50 dB SPL acoustic click stimulus. This broad pattern of activity was consistent with histological confirmation of GFP label of cell bodies and axons throughout the CN. Increasing pulse rates up to 320 Hz did not significantly affect threshold or bandwidth of the IC responses, but rates higher than 50 Hz resulted in desynchronized activity. Optical stimulation also evoked an auditory brainstem response, which had a simpler waveform than the response to acoustic stimulation. Control cases showed no responses to optical stimulation. These data suggest that optogenetic control of central auditory neurons is feasible, but opsins with faster channel kinetics will be necessary to convey information in rates typical of many auditory signals. PMID:25481416

  20. Observational learning in mice can be prevented by medial prefrontal cortex stimulation and enhanced by nucleus accumbens stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jurado-Parras, M Teresa; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M

    2012-03-01

    The neural structures involved in ongoing appetitive and/or observational learning behaviors remain largely unknown. Operant conditioning and observational learning were evoked and recorded in a modified Skinner box provided with an on-line video recording system. Mice improved their acquisition of a simple operant conditioning task by observational learning. Electrical stimulation of the observer's medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) at a key moment of the demonstration (when the demonstrator presses a lever in order to obtain a reward) cancels out the benefits of observation. In contrast, electrical stimulation of the observer's nucleus accumbens (NAc) enhances observational learning. Ongoing cognitive processes in the demonstrator could also be driven by electrical stimulation of these two structures, preventing the proper execution of the ongoing instrumental task (mPFC) or stopping pellet intake (NAc). Long-term potentiation (LTP) evoked in these two cortical structures did not prevent the acquisition or retrieval process--namely, mPFC and/or NAc stimulation only prevented, or modified, the ongoing behavioral process. The dorsal hippocampus was not involved in either of these two behavioral processes. Thus, both ongoing observational learning and performance of an instrumental task require the active contribution of the mPFC and/or the NAc. PMID:22354947

  1. Modulation of two types of jaw-opening reflex by stimulation of the red nucleus.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yoshihide; Yajima, Eriko; Ishizuka, Ken'Ichi; Nagamine, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Shin-ichi

    2013-08-01

    The red nucleus (RN) is divided cytoarchitecturally into two parts, the parvicellular part (RPC) and the magnocellular part (RMC). The present study aims, first, to compare the effects of RN stimulation between low- and high-threshold afferents-evoked jaw opening reflexes (JORs), and secondly to compare the size of these effects in the RPC and RMC. Experiments were performed on rats anesthetized with urethane-chloralose. The JOR was evoked by electrical stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve and was recorded as the electromyographic response of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle. The stimulus intensity was either 1.2 (low-threshold) or 4.0 (high-threshold) times that necessary to elicit the JOR. Conditioning electrical stimulation of the RN significantly facilitated the JOR evoked by the low-threshold afferents. On the other hand, conditioning electrical stimulation of the RN significantly suppressed the JOR evoked by the high-threshold afferents. Microinjection of monosodium glutamate into the RN also facilitated the JOR evoked by the low-threshold afferents, but suppressed that evoked by high-threshold afferents. Facilitation did not differ between the RMC and the RPC. Suppression by the RMC stimulation was significantly greater than that by the RPC stimulation. These results suggest that the RN has distinct functional roles in the control of the JOR. PMID:23708019

  2. Motor behaviors in the sheep evoked by electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Linnea; Zhao, Yan; Kelly, Matthew T; Schindeldecker, William; Goetz, Steven; Nelson, Dwight E; Raike, Robert S

    2015-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is used to treat movement disorders, including advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). The pathogenesis of PD and the therapeutic mechanisms of DBS are not well understood. Large animal models are essential for investigating the mechanisms of PD and DBS. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel sheep model of STN DBS and quantify the stimulation-evoked motor behaviors. To do so, a large sample of animals was chronically-implanted with commercial DBS systems. Neuroimaging and histology revealed that the DBS leads were implanted accurately relative to the neurosurgical plan and also precisely relative to the STN. It was also possible to repeatedly conduct controlled evaluations of stimulation-evoked motor behavior in the awake-state. The evoked motor responses depended on the neuroanatomical location of the electrode contact selected for stimulation, as contacts proximal to the STN evoked movements at significantly lower voltages. Tissue stimulation modeling demonstrated that selecting any of the contacts stimulated the STN, whereas selecting the relatively distal contacts often also stimulated thalamus but only the distal-most contact stimulated internal capsule. The types of evoked motor behaviors were specific to the stimulation frequency, as low but not high frequencies consistently evoked movements resembling human tremor or dyskinesia. Electromyography confirmed that the muscle activity underlying the tremor-like movements in the sheep was consistent with human tremor. Overall, this work establishes that the sheep is a viable a large-animal platform for controlled testing of STN DBS with objective motor outcomes. Moreover, the results support the hypothesis that exaggerated low-frequency activity within individual nodes of the motor network can drive symptoms of human movement disorders, including tremor and dyskinesia. PMID:26231574

  3. Deep brain stimulation of nucleus accumbens region in alcoholism affects reward processing.

    PubMed

    Heldmann, Marcus; Berding, Georg; Voges, Jürgen; Bogerts, Bernhard; Galazky, Imke; Müller, Ulf; Baillot, Gunther; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Münte, Thomas F

    2012-01-01

    The influence of bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the nucleus nucleus (NAcc) on the processing of reward in a gambling paradigm was investigated using H(2)[(15)O]-PET (positron emission tomography) in a 38-year-old man treated for severe alcohol addiction. Behavioral data analysis revealed a less risky, more careful choice behavior under active DBS compared to DBS switched off. PET showed win- and loss-related activations in the paracingulate cortex, temporal poles, precuneus and hippocampus under active DBS, brain areas that have been implicated in action monitoring and behavioral control. Except for the temporal pole these activations were not seen when DBS was deactivated. These findings suggest that DBS of the NAcc may act partially by improving behavioral control. PMID:22629317

  4. Medial auditory thalamus is necessary for acquisition and retention of eyeblink conditioning to cochlear nucleus stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Poremba, Amy; Freeman, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Associative learning tasks commonly involve an auditory stimulus, which must be projected through the auditory system to the sites of memory induction for learning to occur. The cochlear nucleus (CN) projection to the pontine nuclei has been posited as the necessary auditory pathway for cerebellar learning, including eyeblink conditioning. However, the medial auditory thalamic nuclei (MATN), consisting of the medial division of the medial geniculate, suprageniculate, and posterior interlaminar nucleus have also been implicated as a critical auditory relay to the pontine nuclei for cerebellum-dependent motor learning. The MATN also conveys auditory information to the amygdala necessary for avoidance and fear conditioning. The current study used CN stimulation to increase activity in the pontine nuclei, relative to a tone stimulus, and possibly provide sufficient input to the cerebellum for acquisition or retention of eyeblink conditioning during MATN inactivation. Primary and secondary effects of CN stimulation and MATN inactivation were examined using 2-deoxy-glucose autoradiography. Stimulation of CN increased activity in the pontine nuclei, however, this increase was not sufficient for cerebellar learning during MATN inactivation. Results of the current experiment provide additional evidence indicating the MATN may be the critical auditory relay for many associative learning tasks. PMID:25878138

  5. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease: clinical evaluation of 18 patients.

    PubMed

    Thobois, S; Mertens, P; Guenot, M; Hermier, M; Mollion, H; Bouvard, M; Chazot, G; Broussolle, E; Sindou, M

    2002-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy and safety of chronic subthalamic nucleus deep-brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). 18 consecutive severely affected PD patients were included (mean age, SD: 56.9+/-6 years; mean disease duration: 13.5+/-4.4 years). All the patients were evaluated clinically before and 6 months after the surgical procedure using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Additionally, a 12 months follow-up was available in 14 patients. The target coordinates were determined by ventriculography under stereotactic conditions, followed by electrophysiology and intraoperative stimulation. After surgery, continuous monopolar stimulation was applied bilaterally in 17 patients at 2.9+/-0.4 V through 1 (n = 31) or 2 contacts (n = 3). One patient had bilateral bipolar stimulation. The mean frequency of stimulation was 140+/-16 Hz and pulse width 68+/-13 micros. Off medication, the UPDRS part III score (max = 108) was reduced by 55 % during on stimulation (score before surgery: 44.9+/-13.4 vs at 6 months: 20.2+/-10; p < 0.001). In the on medication state, no difference was noted between the preoperative and the postoperative off stimulation conditions (scores were respectively: 17.9+/-9.2 and 23+/-12.6). The severity of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias assessed by UPDRS IV was reduced by 76 % at 6 months (scores were respectively: 10.3+/-3 and 2.5+/-3; p < 0.001). Off medication, the UPDRS II or ADL score was reduced by 52.8 % during on stimulation (26.9+/-6.5 preop versus 12.7+/-7 at 6 months). The daily dose of antiparkinsonian treatment was diminished by 65.5 % (levodopa equivalent dose -- mg/D -- was 1045 +/- 435 before surgery and 360 +/- 377 at 6 months; p < 0.01). These results remained stable at 12 months for the 14 patients studied. Side effects comprised lower limb phlebitis (n = 2), pulmonary embolism (n = 1), depression (n = 6), dysarthria and freezing (n = 1), sialorrhea and

  6. Optogenetic stimulation of the cochlear nucleus using channelrhodopsin-2 evokes activity in the central auditory pathways.

    PubMed

    Darrow, Keith N; Slama, Michaël C C; Kozin, Elliott D; Owoc, Maryanna; Hancock, Kenneth; Kempfle, Judith; Edge, Albert; Lacour, Stephanie; Boyden, Edward; Polley, Daniel; Brown, M Christian; Lee, Daniel J

    2015-03-01

    Optogenetics has become an important research tool and is being considered as the basis for several neural prostheses. However, few studies have applied optogenetics to the auditory brainstem. This study explored whether optical activation of the cochlear nucleus (CN) elicited responses in neurons in higher centers of the auditory pathway and whether it elicited an evoked response. Viral-mediated gene transfer was used to express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in the mouse CN. Blue light was delivered via an optical fiber placed near the surface of the infected CN and recordings were made in higher-level centers. Optical stimulation evoked excitatory multiunit spiking activity throughout the tonotopic axis of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (IC) and the auditory cortex (Actx). The pattern and magnitude of IC activity elicited by optical stimulation was comparable to that obtained with a 50dB SPL acoustic click. This broad pattern of activity was consistent with histological confirmation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) label of cell bodies and axons throughout the CN. Increasing pulse rates up to 320Hz did not significantly affect threshold or bandwidth of the IC responses, but rates higher than 50Hz resulted in desynchronized activity. Optical stimulation also evoked an auditory brainstem response, which had a simpler waveform than the response to acoustic stimulation. Control cases showed no responses to optical stimulation. These data suggest that optogenetic control of central auditory neurons is feasible, but opsins with faster channel kinetics may be necessary to convey information at rates typical of many auditory signals. PMID:25481416

  7. Effects of Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation on Emotional Prosody Comprehension in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kreifelts, Benjamin; Krüger, Rejko; Wächter, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Background Although impaired decoding of emotional prosody has frequently been associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), to date only few reports have sought to explore the effect of Parkinson's treatment on disturbances of prosody decoding. In particular, little is known about how surgical treatment approaches such as high frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) affect emotional speech perception in patients with PD. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation on prosody processing. Methodology/Principal Findings To this end the performance of 13 PD patients on three tasks requiring the decoding of emotional speech was assessed and subsequently compared to the performance of healthy control individuals. To delineate the effect of STN-DBS, all patients were tested with stimulators turned on as well as with stimulators turned off. Results revealed that irrespective of whether assessments were made “on” or “off” stimulation, patients' performance was less accurate as compared to healthy control participants on all tasks employed in this study. However, while accuracy appeared to be unaffected by stimulator status, a facilitation of reactions specific to highly conflicting emotional stimulus material (i.e. stimulus material presenting contradicting emotional messages on a verbal and non-verbal prosodic level) was observed during “on” stimulation assessments. Conclusion In sum, presented results suggest that the processing of emotional speech is indeed modulated by STN-DBS. Observed alterations might, on the one hand, reflect a more efficient processing of highly conflicting stimulus material following DBS. However, on the other hand, given the lack of an improvement in accuracy, increased impulsivity associated with STN stimulation needs to be taken into consideration. PMID:21552518

  8. Improved Sequence Learning with Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation: Evidence for Treatment-Specific Network Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Mure, Hideo; Tang, Chris C.; Argyelan, Miklos; Ghilardi, Maria-Felice; Kaplitt, Michael G.; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2015-01-01

    We used a network approach to study the effects of anti-parkinsonian treatment on motor sequence learning in humans. Eight Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients with bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation underwent H2 15Opositron emission tomography (PET) imaging to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) while they performed kinematically matched sequence learning and movement tasks at baseline and during stimulation. Network analysis revealed a significant learning-related spatial covariance pattern characterized by consistent increases in subject expression during stimulation (p = 0.008, permutation test). The network was associated with increased activity in the lateral cerebellum, dorsal premotor cortex, and parahippocampal gyrus, with covarying reductions in the supplementary motor area (SMA) and orbitofrontal cortex. Stimulation-mediated increases in network activity correlated with concurrent improvement in learning performance (p < 0.02). To determine whether similar changes occurred during dopaminergic pharmacotherapy, we studied the subjects during an intravenous levodopa infusion titrated to achieve a motor response equivalent to stimulation. Despite consistent improvement in motor ratings during infusion, levodopa did not alter learning performance or network activity. Analysis of learning-related rCBF in network regions revealed improvement in baseline abnormalities with STN stimulation but not levodopa. These effects were most pronounced in the SMA. In this region, a consistent rCBF response to stimulation was observed across subjects and trials (p = 0.01), although the levodopa response was not significant. These findings link the cognitive treatment response in PD to changes in the activity of a specific cerebello-premotor cortical network. Selective modulation of overactive SMA–STN projection pathways may underlie the improvement in learning found with stimulation. PMID:22357863

  9. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation improves health-related quality of life in Parkinsonian patients.

    PubMed

    Erola, Tuomo; Karinen, Petri; Heikkinen, Esa; Tuominen, Juho; Haapaniemi, Tarja; Koivukangas, John; Myllylä, Vilho

    2005-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurological disorder. Recently, bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has become an option in the treatment of severe PD. We measured the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of 27 parkinsonian patients, who underwent a bilateral STN-operation. The instruments used for the evaluation of the HRQoL were the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) and the Finnish version of the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP). We found that the quality of life significantly improved when measured with both HRQoL scales. Clinical improvement and improvement in HRQoL were positively correlated. PMID:15734666

  10. Enhanced consumption of salient solutions following pedunculopontine tegmental lesions

    PubMed Central

    MacLaren, Duncan AA; Markovic, Tamara; Daniels, Derek; Clark, Stewart D

    2014-01-01

    Rats with lesions of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) reliably overconsume high concentration sucrose solution. This effect is thought to be indicative of response-perseveration or loss of behavioral control in conditions of high excitement. While these theories have anatomical and behavioral support, they have never been explicitly tested. Here, we used a contact lickometer to examine the microstructure of drinking behavior to gain insight into the behavioral changes during overconsumption. Rats received either excitotoxic (ibotenic acid) damage to all PPTg neuronal subpopulations or selective depletion of the cholinergic neuronal sub-population (Dtx-UII lesions). We offered rats a variety of pleasant, neutral and aversive tastants to assess the generalizability and specificity of the overconsumption effect. Ibotenic lesioned rats consumed significantly more 20% sucrose than sham controls, and did so through licking significantly more times. However, the behavioral microstructure during overconsumption was unaffected by the lesion and showed no indications of response-perseveration. Furthermore, the overconsumption effect did not generalize to highly consumed saccharin. In contrast, while only consuming small amounts of quinine solution, ibotenic lesioned rats had significantly more licks and bursts for this tastant. Selective depletion of cholinergic PPTg neurons had no effect on consumption of any tastant. We then assessed whether it is the salience of the solution which determines overconsumption by ibotenic lesioned rats. While maintained on free-food, ibotenic lesioned rats had normal consumption of sucrose and hypertonic saline. After mild food deprivation ibotenic PPTg lesioned rats overconsumed 20% sucrose. Subsequently, after dietary induced sodium deficiency, lesioned rats consumed significantly more saline than controls. These results establish that it is the salience of the solution which is the determining factor leading to

  11. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrical and Optogenetic Deep Brain Stimulation at the Rat Nucleus Accumbens.

    PubMed

    Albaugh, Daniel L; Salzwedel, Andrew; Van Den Berge, Nathalie; Gao, Wei; Stuber, Garret D; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens (NAc-DBS) is an emerging therapy for diverse, refractory neuropsychiatric diseases. Although DBS therapy is broadly hypothesized to work through large-scale neural modulation, little is known regarding the neural circuits and networks affected by NAc-DBS. Using a healthy, sedated rat model of NAc-DBS, we employed both evoked- and functional connectivity (fc) MRI to examine the functional circuit and network changes achieved by electrical NAc stimulation. Optogenetic-fMRI experiments were also undertaken to evaluate the circuit modulation profile achieved by selective stimulation of NAc neurons. NAc-DBS directly modulated neural activity within prefrontal cortex and a large number of subcortical limbic areas (e.g., amygdala, lateral hypothalamus), and influenced functional connectivity among sensorimotor, executive, and limbic networks. The pattern and extent of circuit modulation measured by evoked-fMRI was relatively insensitive to DBS frequency. Optogenetic stimulation of NAc cell bodies induced a positive fMRI signal in the NAc, but no other detectable downstream responses, indicating that therapeutic NAc-DBS might exert its effect through antidromic stimulation. Our study provides a comprehensive mapping of circuit and network-level neuromodulation by NAc-DBS, which should facilitate our developing understanding of its therapeutic mechanisms of action. PMID:27601003

  12. Acute intermittent optogenetic stimulation of nucleus tractus solitarius neurons induces sympathetic long-term facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kenta; Lalley, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induces sympathetic and phrenic long-term facilitation (LTF), defined as a sustained increase in nerve discharge. We investigated the effects of AIH and acute intermittent optogenetic (AIO) stimulation of neurons labeled with AAV-CaMKIIa, hChR2(H134R), and mCherry in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) of anesthetized, vagotomized, and mechanically ventilated rats. We measured renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), phrenic nerve activity (PNA), power spectral density, and coherence, and we made cross-correlation measurements to determine how AIO stimulation and AIH affected synchronization between PNA and RSNA. Sixty minutes after AIH produced by ventilation with 10% oxygen in balanced nitrogen, RSNA and PNA amplitude increased by 80% and by 130%, respectively (P < 0.01). Sixty minutes after AIO stimulation, RSNA and PNA amplitude increased by 60% and 100%, respectively, (P < 0.01). These results suggest that acute intermittent stimulation of NTS neurons can induce renal sympathetic and phrenic LTF in the absence of hypoxia or chemoreceptor afferent activation. We also found that while acute intermittent optogenetic and hypoxic stimulations increased respiration-related RSNA modulation (P < 0.01), they did not increase synchronization between central respiratory drive and RSNA. We conclude that mechanisms that induce LTF originate within the caudal NTS and extend to other interconnecting neuronal elements of the central nervous cardiorespiratory network. PMID:25519734

  13. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrical and Optogenetic Deep Brain Stimulation at the Rat Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Albaugh, Daniel L.; Salzwedel, Andrew; Van Den Berge, Nathalie; Gao, Wei; Stuber, Garret D.; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens (NAc-DBS) is an emerging therapy for diverse, refractory neuropsychiatric diseases. Although DBS therapy is broadly hypothesized to work through large-scale neural modulation, little is known regarding the neural circuits and networks affected by NAc-DBS. Using a healthy, sedated rat model of NAc-DBS, we employed both evoked- and functional connectivity (fc) MRI to examine the functional circuit and network changes achieved by electrical NAc stimulation. Optogenetic-fMRI experiments were also undertaken to evaluate the circuit modulation profile achieved by selective stimulation of NAc neurons. NAc-DBS directly modulated neural activity within prefrontal cortex and a large number of subcortical limbic areas (e.g., amygdala, lateral hypothalamus), and influenced functional connectivity among sensorimotor, executive, and limbic networks. The pattern and extent of circuit modulation measured by evoked-fMRI was relatively insensitive to DBS frequency. Optogenetic stimulation of NAc cell bodies induced a positive fMRI signal in the NAc, but no other detectable downstream responses, indicating that therapeutic NAc-DBS might exert its effect through antidromic stimulation. Our study provides a comprehensive mapping of circuit and network-level neuromodulation by NAc-DBS, which should facilitate our developing understanding of its therapeutic mechanisms of action. PMID:27601003

  14. A computational model for bipolar deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Iacono, Maria I; Neufeld, Esra; Bonmassar, Giorgio; Akinnagbe, Esther; Jakab, Andras; Cohen, Ethan; Kuster, Niels; Kainz, Wolfgang; Angelone, Leonardo M

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been shown to reduce some of the symptoms of advanced, levodopa-responsive Parkinson's disease that are not adequately controlled with medication. However, the precise mechanism of the therapeutic action of DBS is still unclear. Stimulation-induced side effects are not uncommon and require electrical "dose" adjustments. Quantitative methods are needed to fully characterize the electric field in the deep brain region that surrounds the electrodes in order to help with adjustments and maximize the efficacy of the device. Herein we report a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based head model proposed for analysis of fields generated by deep brain stimulation (DBS). The model was derived from multimodal image data at 0.5mm isotropic spatial resolution and distinguishes 142 anatomical structures, including the basal ganglia and 38 nuclei of the thalamus. Six bipolar electrode configurations (1-2, 1-3, 1-4, 2-3, 2-4, 3-4) were modeled in order to assess the effects of the inter-electrode distance of the electric field. Increasing the distance between the electrodes results in an attenuated stimulation, with up to 25% reduction in electric field amplitude delivered (2-3 vs. 1-4). The map of the deep brain structures provided a highly precise anatomical detail which is useful for the quantitative assessment of current spread around the electrode and a better evaluation of the stimulation setting for the treatment optimization. PMID:25571427

  15. Electrical stimulation of the parabrachial nucleus induces reanimation from isoflurane general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Muindi, Fanuel; Kenny, Jonathan D; Taylor, Norman E; Solt, Ken; Wilson, Matthew A; Brown, Emery N; Van Dort, Christa J

    2016-06-01

    Clinically, emergence from general anesthesia is viewed as a passive process where anesthetics are discontinued at the end of surgery and anesthesiologists wait for the drugs to wear off. The mechanisms involved in emergence are not well understood and there are currently no drugs that can actively reverse the state of general anesthesia. An emerging hypothesis states that brain regions that control arousal become active during emergence and are a key part of the return to wakefulness. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that electrical activation of the glutamatergic parabrachial nucleus (PBN) in the brainstem is sufficient to induce reanimation (active emergence) during continuous isoflurane general anesthesia. Using c-Fos immunohistochemistry as a marker of neural activity, we first show a selective increase in active neurons in the PBN during passive emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. We then electrically stimulated the PBN to assess whether it is sufficient to induce reanimation from isoflurane general anesthesia. Stimulation induced behavioral arousal and restoration of the righting reflex during continuous isoflurane general anesthesia. In contrast, stimulation of the nearby central inferior colliculus (CIC) did not restore the righting reflex. Spectral analysis of the electroencephalogram (EEG) revealed that stimulation produced a significant decrease in EEG delta power during PBN stimulation. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the PBN provides critical arousal input during emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. PMID:26971629

  16. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus transiently enhances loss-chasing behaviour in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Robert D; Wielenberg, Birgit; Wojtecki, Lars; Elben, Saskia; Campbell-Meiklejohn, Daniel; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2011-09-01

    Dopaminergic treatments are associated with impulse control disorders such as pathological gambling in a subset of patients with Parkinson's Disease. While deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus has been reported to reduce symptoms of impulse control disorders in some Parkinson's Disease patients, little is known about its specific effects on gambling behaviour. In this experiment, we investigated the effects of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus on one of the central features of pathological gambling: the tendency to chase losses. Loss-chasing is associated with impaired control over gambling behaviour and it is one of the most salient features of pathological gambling as it presents in the clinic. Twenty two patients with advanced idiopathic Parkinson's Disease and chronically implanted subthalamic nucleus electrodes for deep brain stimulation completed a simple laboratory model of loss-chasing behaviour twice: once with and once without stimulation. Exploratory analysis indicated that deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus increased the value of losses chased by patients with Parkinson's Disease when shifting from off- to on-stimulation. These effects were not attributable to changes in state affect or to the motor impairments produced by the withdrawal of deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. The effects of the stimulation on the value of losses chased were more pronounced in female than in male patients and reduced in patients taking dopamine receptor agonists. Collectively, these results suggest that deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus can transiently alter the evaluation of accumulated losses during gambling episodes in idiopathic Parkinson's Disease. PMID:21726554

  17. Effects of Nucleus Basalis Magnocellularis Stimulation on a Socially Transmitted Food Preference and c-Fos Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boix-Trelis, Nuria; Vale-Martinez, Anna; Guillazo-Blanch, Gemma; Costa-Miserachs, David; Marti-Nicolovius, Margarita

    2006-01-01

    Experiment 1 examined the effects of electrical stimulation of nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) on a relational odor-association task--the social transmission of food preference (STFP). Rats were stimulated unilaterally in the NBM for 20 min (100 [mu]A, 1 Hz) immediately before the social training. They were tested on their ability to…

  18. A case of musical preference for Johnny Cash following deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Mantione, Mariska; Figee, Martijn; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    Music is among all cultures an important part of the live of most people. Music has psychological benefits and may generate strong emotional and physiological responses. Recently, neuroscientists have discovered that music influences the reward circuit of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), even when no explicit reward is present. In this clinical case study, we describe a 60-year old patient who developed a sudden and distinct musical preference for Johnny Cash following deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeted at the NAcc. This case report substantiates the assumption that the NAcc is involved in musical preference, based on the observation of direct stimulation of the accumbens with DBS. It also shows that accumbens DBS can change musical preference without habituation of its rewarding properties. PMID:24834035

  19. A case of musical preference for Johnny Cash following deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Mantione, Mariska; Figee, Martijn; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    Music is among all cultures an important part of the live of most people. Music has psychological benefits and may generate strong emotional and physiological responses. Recently, neuroscientists have discovered that music influences the reward circuit of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), even when no explicit reward is present. In this clinical case study, we describe a 60-year old patient who developed a sudden and distinct musical preference for Johnny Cash following deep brain stimulation (DBS) targeted at the NAcc. This case report substantiates the assumption that the NAcc is involved in musical preference, based on the observation of direct stimulation of the accumbens with DBS. It also shows that accumbens DBS can change musical preference without habituation of its rewarding properties. PMID:24834035

  20. The effect of microinjections of amphetamine into the neostriatum and the nucleus accumbens on self-stimulation behaviour.

    PubMed

    Broekkamp, C L; Pijnenburg, A J; Cools, A R; Van Rossum, J M

    1975-05-28

    The effect of micro-injections of dexamphetamine chloride into the neostriatum, the nucleus accumbens, the anterior hypothalamus, and the ventricular system on self-stimulation with electrodes in the ventral tegmentum was studied. Unilateral injections of 10 mug into the anterior hypothalamus produced no effect. Injections into the neostriatum tended to depress the self-stimulation rate, whereas injections into the nucleus accumbens increased the rate markedly. Bilateral injections (2 times 2.5 mug and 2 times 5 mug amph.) into the nucleus accumbens were more effective than unilateral injections and were as effective as systemic injections of 1 mg/kg amphetamine (i.p.). Bilateral injections into the neostriatum also increased the self-stimulation rate. Injections of 10 mug into the ventricular system resulted in a smaller increase which was not statistically significant. These results are discussed in relation to the involvement of the dopaminergic system in the maintenance of self-stimulation behaviour. PMID:1161977

  1. The influence of subthalamic nucleus stimulation on pragmatic language production in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Van Lier, Sam; Batens, Katja; Santens, Patrick; Van Roost, Dirk; Van Herreweghe, Mieke; De Letter, Miet

    2016-06-01

    While the influence of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on the comprehension of pragmatic language in Parkinson's disease (PD) has been the focus of studies, its impact on production, however, has yet to be elucidated. (1) Investigating the inf luence of DBS STN on pragmatic language production in spontaneous speech by comparing different stimulation conditions and (2) evaluating the effect of asymmetric dopaminergic denervation. This paper included 18 patients with advanced idiopathic PD with STN DBS. [Ten PD patients with predominantly left hemispheric dopamine denervation (PD-left) and eight PD patients with predominantly right-hemispheric dopamine denervation (PD-right).] The pragmatic components 'communicative functions' and 'conversational skills' were evaluated by analysing the spontaneous language production in four stimulation conditions. STN stimulation did not appear to influence the pragmatic production skills. Only when asymmetric dopamine depletion was taken into account the parameter 'giving an explanation' interaction was detectable. STN DBS appears to have some influence on the production of pragmatic language depending on asymmetric dopaminergic denervation. Suggestions are made for further research of pragmatic production in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26442686

  2. Effects of electrical stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus on local cerebral blood flow in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Bonvento, G.; Lacombe, P.; Seylaz, J. )

    1989-06-01

    We have studied the effects of electrical stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus on local cerebral blood flow (LCBF), as assessed by the quantitative ({sup 14}C)-iodoantipyrine autoradiographic technique. Stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus in the alpha-chloralose anesthetized rat caused a significant decrease in LCBF, ranging from -13 to -26% in 24 brain structures out of 33 investigated. The most pronounced decreases (-23 to -26%) were observed in the accumbens, amygdaloid, interpeduncular nuclei and in the median raphe nucleus, limbic system relays. The decreases also concerned cortical regions and the extrapyramidal system. These results indicate that activation of ascending serotonergic system produces a vasoconstriction and that the dorsal raphe nucleus has a widespread modulatory influence on the cerebral circulation.

  3. Optogenetic versus electrical stimulation of dopamine terminals in the nucleus accumbens reveals local modulation of presynaptic release

    PubMed Central

    Melchior, James R.; Ferris, Mark J.; Stuber, Garret D.; Riddle, David R.; Jones, Sara R.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens is highly heterogeneous, integrating regionally distinct afferent projections and accumbal interneurons, resulting in diverse local microenvironments. Dopamine (DA) neuron terminals similarly express a heterogeneous collection of terminal receptors that modulate DA signaling. Cyclic voltammetry is often used to probe DA terminal dynamics in brain slice preparations; however, this method traditionally requires electrical stimulation to induce DA release. Electrical stimulation excites all of the neuronal processes in the stimulation field, potentially introducing simultaneous, multi-synaptic modulation of DA terminal release. We used optogenetics to selectively stimulate DA terminals and used voltammetry to compare DA responses from electrical and optical stimulation of the same area of tissue around a recording electrode. We found that with multiple pulse stimulation trains, optically stimulated DA release increasingly exceeded that of electrical stimulation. Furthermore, electrical stimulation produced inhibition of DA release across longer duration stimulations. The GABAB antagonist, CGP 55845, increased electrically stimulated DA release significantly more than light stimulated release. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, dihydro-β-erythroidine hydrobromide, inhibited single pulse electrically stimulated DA release while having no effect on optically stimulated DA release. Our results demonstrate that electrical stimulation introduces local multi-synaptic modulation of DA release that is absent with optogenetically targeted stimulation. PMID:26011081

  4. Plasma leptin inhibits the response of nucleus of the solitary tract neurons to aortic baroreceptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, John

    2013-08-01

    Leptin receptors have been identified within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and leptin injections into the caudal NTS inhibit the baroreceptor reflex. However, whether plasma leptin alters the discharge of NTS neurons mediating aortic baroreceptor reflex activity is not known. A series of electrophysiological single unit recording experiments was done in the urethane-chloralose anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated Wistar and Zucker obese rat with either their neuroaxis intact or with mid-collicular transections. Single units in NTS antidromically activated by electrical stimulation of depressor sites in the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) were found to display a cardiac cycle-related rhythmicity. These units were tested for their responses to stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) and intra-carotid injections of leptin (50-200ng/0.1ml). Of 63 single units tested in NTS, 33 were antidromically activated by stimulation of CVLM depressor sites and 18 of these single units responded with a decrease in discharge rate after intracarotid injections of leptin. Thirteen of these leptin responsive neurons (∼72%) were excited by ADN stimulation. Furthermore, the excitatory response of these single units to ADN stimulation was attenuated by about 50% after the intracarotid leptin injection. Intracarotid injections of leptin (200ng/0.1ml) in the Zucker obese rat did not alter the discharge rate of NTS-CVLM projecting neurons. These data suggest that leptin exerts a modulatory effect on brainstem neuronal circuits that control cardiovascular responses elicited during the reflex activation of arterial baroreceptors. PMID:23792336

  5. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus modulates reward processing and action selection in Parkinson patients.

    PubMed

    Wagenbreth, Caroline; Zaehle, Tino; Galazky, Imke; Voges, Jürgen; Guitart-Masip, Marc; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Düzel, Emrah

    2015-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective treatment for motor impairments in Parkinson's disease (PD) but its effect on the motivational regulation of action control is still not fully understood. We investigated whether DBS of the STN influences the ability of PD patients to act for anticipated reward or loss, or whether DBS improves action execution independent of motivational valence. 16 PD patients (12 male, mean age = 58.5 ± 10.17 years) treated with bilateral STN-DBS and an age- and gender-matched group of healthy controls (HC) performed a go/no-go task whose contingencies explicitly decouple valence and action. Patients were tested with (ON) and without (OFF) active STN stimulation. For HC, there was a benefit in performing rewarded actions when compared to actions that avoided punishment. PD patients showed such a benefit reliably only when STN stimulation was ON. In fact, the relative behavioral benefit for go for reward over go to avoid losing was stronger in the PD patients under DBS ON than in HC. In PD patients, rather than generally improving motor functions independent of motivational valence, modulation of the STN by DBS improves action execution specifically when rewards are anticipated. Thus, STN-DBS establishes a reliable congruency between action and reward ("Pavlovian congruency") and remarkably enhances it over the level observed in HC. PMID:25929662

  6. Presynaptic actions of transcranial and local direct current stimulation in the red nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Bączyk, M; Jankowska, E

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to examine to what extent long-lasting subcortical actions of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may be related to its presynaptic actions. This was investigated in the red nucleus, where tDCS was recently demonstrated to facilitate transmission between interpositorubral and rubrospinal neurons. Changes in the excitability of preterminal axonal branches of interpositorubral neurons close to rubrospinal neurons were investigated during and after tDCS (0.2 mA) applied over the sensorimotor cortical area in deeply anaesthetized rats and cats. As a measure of the excitability, we used the probability of antidromic activation of individual interpositorubral neurons by electrical stimuli applied in the red nucleus. Our second aim was to compare effects of weak (≤1 μA) direct current applied within the red nucleus with effects of tDCS to allow the use of local depolarization in a further analysis of mechanisms of tDCS instead of widespread and more difficult to control depolarization evoked by distant electrodes. Local cathodal polarization was found to replicate all effects of cathodal tDCS hitherto demonstrated in the rat, including long-lasting facilitation of trans-synaptically evoked descending volleys and trisynaptically evoked EMG responses in neck muscles. It also replicated all effects of anodal tDCS in the cat. In both species, it increased the excitability of preterminal axonal branches of interpositorubral neurons up to 1 h post-tDCS. Local anodal polarization evoked opposite effects. We thus show that presynaptic actions of polarizing direct current may contribute to both immediate and prolonged effects of tDCS. PMID:25085891

  7. Neurophysiological modulation of the subthalamic nucleus by pallidal stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sterio, D; Rezai, A; Mogilner, A; Zonenshayn, M; Gracies, J; Kathirithamby, K; Beric, A

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Current models of basal ganglia dysfunction in Parkinson's disease suggest a pivotal role of subthalamic nucleus (STN) hyperactivity. There is a direct excitatory output to the globus pallidus internus (GPi), which in turn hyperinhibits the motor thalamus and leads to a lack of cortical facilitation. The model, however, does not address the reciprocal influence of GPi on STN activity. Methods: Measurement of immediate changes in STN single cell activity after GPi deep brain stimulation (DBS). Results: An opposite effect of GPi DBS in the dorsal versus ventral STN was found. There was an almost exclusive reduction of firing rate in the dorsal region of the STN, whereas the cells in the ventral region exhibited facilitation similar to the recordings from the substantia nigra pars reticulata. Conclusion: Although these findings require confirmation, they suggest that the current theories of GPi DBS action, which do not include a GPi-STN modulation, are most likely incomplete. PMID:11861688

  8. Behavioural and physiological effects of electrical stimulation in the nucleus accumbens: a review.

    PubMed

    van Kuyck, K; Gabriëls, L; Cosyns, P; Arckens, L; Sturm, V; Rasmussen, S; Nuttin, B

    2007-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) in the brain is becoming a new treatment option in patients with treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). A possible brain target might be the nucleus accumbens (NACC). This review aims to summarise the behavioural and physiological effects of ES in the NACC in humans and in animals and to discuss these findings with regard to neuroanatomical, electrophysiological and behavioural insights. The results clearly demonstrate that ES in the NACC has an effect on reward, activity, fight-or-flight, exploratory behaviour and food intake, with evidence for only moderate physiological effects. Seizures were rarely observed. Finally, the results of ES studies in patients with treatment-resistant OCD and in animal models for OCD are promising. PMID:17691326

  9. Pedunculopontine cell loss and protein aggregation direct microglia activation in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Elson, Joanna L; Yates, Abi; Pienaar, Ilse S

    2016-05-01

    We previously reported a loss of cholinergic neurons within the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) in rats that had been intra-nigrally lesioned with the proteasomal inhibitor lactacystin, with levels of neuronal loss corresponding to that seen in the post-mortem pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Here we reveal lower expression values of the acetylcholine synthesising enzyme, choline acetyltransferase, within the remaining PPTg cholinergic neurons of lesioned rats compared to sham controls. We further characterise this animal model entailing dopaminergic- and non-dopaminergic neurodegeneration by reporting on stereological counts of non-cholinergic neurons, to determine whether the toxin is neuro-type specific. Cell counts between lesioned and sham-lesioned rats were analysed in terms of the topological distribution pattern across the rostro-caudal extent of the PPTg. The study also reports somatic hypotrophy in the remaining non-cholinergic neurons, particularly on the side closest to the nigral lesion. The cytotoxicity affecting the PPTg in this rat model of PD involves overexpression and accumulation of alpha-synuclein (αSYN), affecting cholinergic and non-cholinergic neurons as well as microglia on the lesioned hemispheric side. We ascertained that microglia within the PPTg become fully activated due to the extensive neuronal damage and neuronal death resulting from a lactacystin nigral lesion, displaying a distinct rostro-caudal distribution profile which correlates with PPTg neuronal loss, with the added implication that lactacystin-induced αSYN aggregation might trigger neuronophagia for promoting PPTg cell loss. The data provide critical insights into the mechanisms underlying the lactacystin rat model of PD, for studying the PPTg in health and when modelling neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25989851

  10. Delayed synchronization of activity in cortex and subthalamic nucleus following cortical stimulation in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Magill, Peter J; Sharott, Andrew; Bolam, J Paul; Brown, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Oscillations may play a role in the functional organization of cortico-basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuits, and it is important to understand their underlying mechanisms. The cortex often drives basal ganglia (BG) activity, and particularly, oscillatory activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). However, the STN may also indirectly influence cortex. The aim of this study was to characterize the delayed (>200 ms) responses of STN neurons to synchronized cortical inputs, focusing on their relationship with oscillatory cortical activity. We recorded the short-latency and delayed responses of STN units and frontal electrocorticogram (ECoG) to cortical stimulation in anaesthetized rats. Similar to previous studies, stimulation of ipsilateral frontal cortex, but not temporal cortex, evoked a short-latency triphasic response, followed by a sustained reduction or pause in firing, in rostral STN units. Caudal STN units did not show the short-latency triphasic response but often displayed a prolonged firing reduction. Oscillations in STN unit activity and ECoG were common after this sustained firing reduction, particularly between 200 and 600 ms after frontal cortical stimulation. These delayed oscillations were significantly coherent in a broad frequency band of 5–30 Hz. Coherence with ECoG at 5–15 Hz was observed throughout STN, though coherence at 15–30 Hz was largely restricted to rostral STN. Furthermore, oscillatory responses at 5–30 Hz in rostral STN predominantly led those in cortex (mean latency of 29 ms) after frontal cortical stimulation. These findings suggest that STN neurons responding to corticosubthalamic inputs may provide a delayed input to cortex, via BG output nuclei, and thence, thalamocortical pathways. PMID:16709634

  11. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Improves Lexical Switching in Parkinsons Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vonberg, Isabelle; Ehlen, Felicitas; Fromm, Ortwin; Kühn, Andrea A.; Klostermann, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Objective Reduced verbal fluency (VF) has been reported in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), especially those treated by Deep Brain Stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS). To delineate the nature of this dysfunction we aimed at identifying the particular VF-related operations modified by STN DBS. Method Eleven PD patients performed VF tasks in their STN DBS ON and OFF condition. To differentiate VF-components modulated by the stimulation, a temporal cluster analysis was performed, separating production spurts (i.e., ‘clusters’ as correlates of automatic activation spread within lexical fields) from slower cluster transitions (i.e., ‘switches’ reflecting set-shifting towards new lexical fields). The results were compared to those of eleven healthy control subjects. Results PD patients produced significantly more switches accompanied by shorter switch times in the STN DBS ON compared to the STN DBS OFF condition. The number of clusters and time intervals between words within clusters were not affected by the treatment state. Although switch behavior in patients with DBS ON improved, their task performance was still lower compared to that of healthy controls. Discussion Beyond impacting on motor symptoms, STN DBS seems to influence the dynamics of cognitive procedures. Specifically, the results are in line with basal ganglia roles for cognitive switching, in the particular case of VF, from prevailing lexical concepts to new ones. PMID:27575379

  12. ERK1/2 Phosphorylation in the Rat Supraoptic Nucleus, Dorsal Raphe Nucleus, and Locus Coeruleus Neurons Following Noxious Stimulation to the Hind Paw.

    PubMed

    Donnerer, Josef; Liebmann, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Phospho-ERK1/2 (pERK1/2) fluorescence-immunohistochemistry is specifically well suited to mirror neuronal activity in the pain pathway at the cellular level. This study employed this method to visualize neuronal activity in 3 rat CNS nuclei following an acute noxious stimulation. The rat hind paw was stimulated either by heat or by a sequence of mustard oil and heat. Two min after the thermal stimulation or after the combined mustard oil and thermal stimulation, there was a significant increase in cells showing pERK1/2 immunoreactivity in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), and in the locus coeruleus (LC). Pretreatment with the opioid analgesic morphine or the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist MK-801 markedly attenuated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. These findings support the concept that the SON, the DRN, and the LC are integrated into pain processing at the hypothalamic and brain stem level. PMID:26599629

  13. Interventional magnetic resonance imaging-guided subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease: Patient selection

    PubMed Central

    Azmi, Hooman; Gupta, Fiona; Vukic, Mario; Kreitner, Jason; Kera, Elizabeth; Nicola, Gregory; Pierce, Sean; Panush, David; Cohen, Randy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interventional magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) guided deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson's disease (PD) has been shown to be effective. The costs of a dedicated intraoperative MRI may be prohibitive. The procedure can also be performed in a diagnostic scanner, however this presents challenges for utilization of time when the scanner is used both as a diagnostic and an interventional unit. This report outlines our novel methodology for patient selection for implantation in a diagnostic MR scanner, as an attempt to streamline the use of resources. A retrospective review of our outcomes is also presented. Methods: DBS candidacy evaluation included a PD questionnaire-39. Anxiety, age, difficulties in communication and body habitus were factors that were assessed in selecting patients for this technique. Eleven patients underwent iMRI-guided DBS implantation in the subthalamic nucleus. All patients were implanted bilaterally. Unified PD rating scale (UPDRS) part III and L-dopa dose were compared pre- and post-stimulation. A cohort of 11 DBS patients not selected for iMRI-guided DBS were also reported for comparison. Results: For the iMRI-guided patients, mean “Off” UPDRS III score was 47.6 (standard deviation [SD] 8.26). Postoperative “On” medication, “On” stimulation UPDRS III was 13.6 (SD 5.23). Mean preoperative L-dopa dose was 1060 mg (SD 474.3) and mean postoperative L-dopa dose was 320 (SD 298.3). Conclusion: iMRI-guided DBS is a newly emerging technique for surgical treatment of patients with PD. We present a novel scoring system for patient selection assessing anxiety, age, ability to communicate, and body habitus to identify patients who will be benefited most from this technique.

  14. Serotonin-2C Receptor Agonists Decrease Potassium-Stimulated GABA Release In the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, James M; Booth, Raymond G; Peris, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT2C receptor has shown promise in vivo as a pharmacotherapeutic target for alcoholism. For example, recently, a novel 4-phenyl-2-N,N-dimethylaminotetralin (PAT) drug candidate, that demonstrates 5-HT2C receptor agonist activity together with 5-HT2A/2B receptor inverse agonist activity, was shown to reduce operant responding for ethanol after peripheral administration to rats. Previous studies have shown that the 5-HT2C receptor is found throughout the mesoaccumbens pathway and that 5-HT2C receptor agonism causes activation of ventral tegmental area (VTA) GABA neurons. It is unknown what effect 5-HT2C receptor modulation has on GABA release in the nucleus accumbens core (NAcc). To this end, microdialysis coupled to capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence was used to quantify extracellular neurotransmitter concentrations in the NAcc under basal and after potassium stimulation conditions, in response to PAT analogs and other 5-HT2C receptor modulators administered by reverse dialysis to rats. 5-HT2C receptor agonists specifically attenuated stimulated GABA release in the NAcc while 5-HT2C antagonists or inverse agonists had no effect. Agents with activity at 5-HT2A receptors had no effect on GABA release. Thus, in contrast to results reported for the VTA, current results suggest 5-HT2C receptor agonists decrease stimulated GABA release in the NAcc, and provide a possible mechanism of action for 5HT2C-mediated negative modulation of ethanol self-administration. PMID:25382408

  15. Effects of subthalamic nucleus stimulation on motor cortex plasticity in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Jin; Udupa, Kaviraja; Ni, Zhen; Moro, Elena; Gunraj, Carolyn; Mazzella, Filomena; Lozano, Andres M.; Hodaie, Mojgan; Lang, Anthony E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) will improve long-term potentiation (LTP)-like plasticity in motor cortex in Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: We studied 8 patients with PD treated with STN-DBS and 9 age-matched healthy controls. Patients with PD were studied in 4 sessions in medication (Med) OFF/stimulator (Stim) OFF, Med-OFF/Stim-ON, Med-ON/Stim-OFF, and Med-ON/Stim-ON states in random order. Motor evoked potential amplitude and cortical silent period duration were measured at baseline before paired associated stimulation (PAS) and at 3 different time intervals (T0, T30, T60) up to 60 minutes after PAS in the abductor pollicis brevis and abductor digiti minimi muscles. Results: Motor evoked potential size significantly increased after PAS in controls (+67.7% of baseline at T30) and in patients in the Med-ON/Stim-ON condition (+55.8% of baseline at T30), but not in patients in the Med-OFF/Stim-OFF (−0.4% of baseline at T30), Med-OFF/Stim-ON (+10.3% of baseline at T30), and Med-ON/Stim-OFF conditions (+17.3% of baseline at T30). Cortical silent period duration increased after PAS in controls but not in patients in all test conditions. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that STN-DBS together with dopaminergic medications restore LTP-like plasticity in motor cortex in PD. Restoration of cortical plasticity may be one of the mechanisms of how STN-DBS produces clinical benefit. PMID:26156511

  16. Effects of Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus on Naming and Reading Nouns and Verbs in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silveri, Maria Caterina; Ciccarelli, Nicoletta; Baldonero, Eleonora; Piano, Carla; Zinno, Massimiliano; Soleti, Francesco; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Albanese, Alberto; Daniele, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    An impairment for verbs has been described in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), suggesting that a disruption of frontal-subcortical circuits may result in dysfunction of the neural systems involved in action-verb processing. A previous study suggested that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) during verb generation…

  17. Pitch Variability in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation of Caudal Zona Incerta and Subthalamic Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Olofsson, Katarina; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; van Doorn, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) pitch characteristics of connected speech in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Method: The authors evaluated 16 patients preoperatively and 12 months after DBS surgery. Eight…

  18. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT[R]LOUD) for Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielman, Jennifer; Mahler, Leslie; Halpern, Angela; Gilley, Phllip; Klepitskaya, Olga; Ramig, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Intensive voice therapy (LSVT[R]LOUD) can effectively manage voice and speech symptoms associated with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). This small-group study evaluated voice and speech in individuals with and without deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) before and after LSVT LOUD, to determine whether outcomes…

  19. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus increases premature responding in a rat gambling task.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, Lily R; Creed, Meaghan C; Fletcher, Paul J; Lobo, Daniela S S; Hamani, Clement; Nobrega, José N

    2013-05-15

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is a treatment option for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, several recent studies have found an association between STN-DBS and increased impulsivity. Currently, it is not clear whether the observed increase in impulsivity results from STN-DBS per se, or whether it involves an interaction with the underlying PD neuropathology and/or intake of dopaminergic drugs. We investigated the effects of STN-DBS on performance of intact rats on two tasks measuring impulsive responding: a novel rat gambling task (rGT) and a differential reinforcement of low rate responding (DRL20s) schedule. Following initial behavioural training, animals received electrode implantation into the STN (n=24) or sham surgery (n=24), and were re-tested on their assigned behavioural task, with or without STN-DBS. Bilateral STN-DBS administered for two hours immediately prior to testing, had no effects on rGT choice behaviour or on DRL response inhibition (p>0.05). However, STN-DBS significantly increased premature responding in the rGT task (p=0.0004), an effect that took several sessions to develop and persisted in subsequent trials when no stimulation was given. Consistent with the notion of distinct facets of impulsivity with unique neurochemical underpinnings, we observed differential effects of STN-DBS in the two tasks employed. These results suggest that STN-DBS in the absence of parkinsonism may not lead to a general loss of inhibitory control, but may instead affect impulsivity under specific conditions. PMID:23434606

  20. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation Increases Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the Nigrostriatal System and Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Spieles-Engemann, Anne L.; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Behbehani, Michael M.; Collier, Timothy J.; Wohlgenant, Susan L.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Levine, Nathan D.; Gombash, Sara E.; Thompson, Valerie B.; Lipton, Jack W.; Sortwell, Caryl E.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the effects of long-term deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) as a therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD) remain poorly understood. The present study examined whether functionally effective, long-term STN DBS modulates glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and/or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in both unlesioned and unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats. Lesioned rats that received two weeks of continuous unilateral STN DBS exhibited significant improvements in parkinsonian motor behaviors in tests of forelimb akinesia and rearing activity. Unilateral STN DBS did not increase GDNF in the nigrostriatal system, primary motor cortex (M1), or hippocampus of unlesioned rats. In contrast, unilateral STN DBS increased BDNF protein 2–3 fold bilaterally in the nigrostriatal system with the location (substantia nigra vs. striatum) dependent upon lesion status. Further, BDNF protein was bilaterally increased in M1 cortex by as much as 2 fold regardless of lesion status. STN DBS did not impact cortical regions that receive less input from the STN. STN DBS also was associated with bilateral increases in BDNF mRNA in the substantia nigra (SN) and internal globus pallidus (GPi). The increase observed in GPi was completely blocked by pretreatment with 5-Methyl-10,11-dihydro-5 H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK-801), suggesting that the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors was involved in this phenomenon. The upregulation of BDNF associated with long term STN DBS suggest that this therapy may exert pronounced and underappreciated effects on plasticity in the basal ganglia circuitry that may play a role in the symptomatic effects of this therapy as well as support the neuroprotective effect of stimulation documented in this rat model. PMID:22328911

  1. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation affects orbitofrontal cortex in facial emotion recognition: a pet study

    PubMed Central

    Le Jeune, F.; Péron, J.; Biseul, I.; Fournier, S.; Sauleau, P.; Drapier, S.; Haegelen, C.; Drapier, D.; Millet, B.; Garin, E.; Herry, J.-Y.; Malbert, C.-H.

    2008-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) in Parkinson's disease is thought to produce adverse events such as emotional disorders, and in a recent study, we found fear recognition to be impaired as a result. These changes have been attributed to disturbance of the STN's limbic territory and would appear to confirm that the negative emotion recognition network passes through the STN. In addition, it is now widely acknowledged that damage to the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), especially the right side, can result in impaired recognition of facial emotions (RFE). In this context, we hypothesized that this reduced recognition of fear is correlated with modifications in the cerebral glucose metabolism of the right OFC. The objective of the present study was first, to reinforce our previous results by demonstrating reduced fear recognition in our Parkinson's disease patient group following STN DBS and, second, to correlate these emotional performances with glucose metabolism using 18FDG-PET. The 18FDG-PET and RFE tasks were both performed by a cohort of 13 Parkinson's disease patients 3 months before and 3 months after surgery for STN DBS. As predicted, we observed a significant reduction in fear recognition following surgery and obtained a positive correlation between these neuropsychological results and changes in glucose metabolism, especially in the right OFC. These results confirm the role of the STN as a key basal ganglia structure in limbic circuits. PMID:18490359

  2. Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus under Sedation with Propofol and Fentanyl

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woong-Woo; Ehm, Gwanhee; Yang, Hui-Jun; Song, In Ho; Lim, Yong Hoon; Kim, Mi-Ryoung; Kim, Young Eun; Hwang, Jae Ha; Park, Hye Ran; Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Cheolyoung; Kim, Hee Chan; Park, Eunkyoung; Kim, In Young; Kim, Dong Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Awakening during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery may be stressful to patients. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect on MER signals and their applicability to subthalmic nucleus (STN) DBS surgery for patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) under sedation with propofol and fentanyl. Sixteen consecutive patients with PD underwent STN-DBS surgery with propofol and fentanyl. Their MER signals were achieved during the surgery. To identify the microelectrodes positions, the preoperative MRI and postoperative CT were used. Clinical profiles were also collected at the baseline and at 6 months after surgery. All the signals were slightly attenuated and contained only bursting patterns, compared with our previous report. All electrodes were mostly located in the middle one third part of the STN on both sides of the brain in the fused images. Six months later, the patients were improved significantly in the medication-off state and they met with less dyskinesia and less off-duration. Our study revealed that the sedation with propofol and fentanyl was applicable to STN-DBS surgery. There were no significant problems in precise positioning of bilateral electrodes. The surgery also improved significantly clinical outcomes in 6-month follow-up. PMID:27018855

  3. Stimulation of the Rat Subthalamic Nucleus is Neuroprotective Following Significant Nigral Dopamine Neuron Loss

    PubMed Central

    Spieles-Engemann, A. L.; Behbehani, M. M.; Collier, T. J.; Wohlgenant, S. L.; Steece-Collier, K.; Paumier, K.; Daley, B. F.; Gombash, S.; Madhavan, L.; Mandybur, G. T.; Lipton, J.W.; Terpstra, B.T.; Sortwell, C.E.

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is efficacious in treating the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, the impact of STN-DBS on the progression of PD is unknown. Previous preclinical studies have demonstrated that STN-DBS can attenuate the degeneration of a relatively intact nigrostriatal system from dopamine (DA)-depleting neurotoxins. The present study examined whether STN-DBS can provide neuroprotection in the face of prior significant nigral DA neuron loss similar to PD patients at the time of diagnosis. STN-DBS between two and four weeks after intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) provided significant sparing of DA neurons in the SN of rats. This effect was not due to inadvertent lesioning of the STN and was dependent upon proper electrode placement. Since STN-DBS appears to have significant neuroprotective properties, initiation of STN-DBS earlier in the course of PD may provide added neuroprotective benefits in addition to its ability to provide symptomatic relief. PMID:20307668

  4. Clinical, neuropsychological, and pre-stimulus dorsomedial thalamic nucleus electrophysiological data in deep brain stimulation patients.

    PubMed

    Sweeney-Reed, Catherine M; Zaehle, Tino; Voges, Jürgen; Schmitt, Friedhelm C; Buentjen, Lars; Kopitzki, Klaus; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Knight, Robert T; Rugg, Michael D

    2016-09-01

    The data presented here comprise clinical, neuropsychological, and intrathalamic electrophysiological data from 7 patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy and are related to the article "Pre-stimulus thalamic theta power predicts human memory formation" C.M. Sweeney-Reed, T. Zaehle, J. Voges, F.C. Schmitt, L. Buentjen, K. Kopitzki, et al. (2016) [1]. The patients participated in a memory paradigm after receiving electrodes implanted in the DMTN due to the surgical approach taken in electrode insertion for deep brain stimulation of the anterior thalamic nucleus. Epilepsy duration and pre-operative neuropsychological tests provide an indication of the profile of patients receiving intrathalamic electrode implantation and the memory capabilities in such a patient group. The electrophysiological data were recorded from the right DMTN preceding stimulus presentation during intentional memory encoding. The patients viewed a series of photographic scenes, which they judged as indoors or outdoors. The 900 ms epochs prior to stimulus presentation were labeled as preceding successful or unsuccessful subsequent memory formation according to a subsequent memory test for the items. The difference between theta power preceding successful versus unsuccessful subsequent memory formation is shown against time for each patient individually. PMID:27508216

  5. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation affects fear and sadness recognition in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Péron, Julie; Biseul, Isabelle; Leray, Emmanuelle; Vicente, Siobhan; Le Jeune, Florence; Drapier, Sophie; Drapier, Dominique; Sauleau, Paul; Haegelen, Claire; Vérin, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) can produce emotional disorders that have been linked to disturbance of the STN's limbic territory. The aim of this study was to confirm the impairment of the recognition of facial emotions (RFE) induced by STN DBS, not only ruling out the effect of the disease's natural progression in relation to the effect of DBS, but also assessing the influence of modifications in dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) following STN DBS. RFE was investigated in 24 PD patients who underwent STN DBS and 20 PD patients treated with apomorphine. They were assessed 3 months before and after treatment. The 2 patient groups were compared with a group of 30 healthy matched controls. The results showed that RFE for negative emotions (fear and sadness) was impaired in only the STN DBS group in the posttreatment condition and was unrelated to DRT. Results confirm the selective reduction of RFE induced by STN DBS, due neither to the disease's natural progression nor to modifications in DRT. PMID:20063943

  6. Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus under Sedation with Propofol and Fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woong-Woo; Ehm, Gwanhee; Yang, Hui-Jun; Song, In Ho; Lim, Yong Hoon; Kim, Mi-Ryoung; Kim, Young Eun; Hwang, Jae Ha; Park, Hye Ran; Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Cheolyoung; Kim, Hee Chan; Park, Eunkyoung; Kim, In Young; Kim, Dong Gyu; Jeon, Beomseok; Paek, Sun Ha

    2016-01-01

    Awakening during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery may be stressful to patients. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect on MER signals and their applicability to subthalmic nucleus (STN) DBS surgery for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) under sedation with propofol and fentanyl. Sixteen consecutive patients with PD underwent STN-DBS surgery with propofol and fentanyl. Their MER signals were achieved during the surgery. To identify the microelectrodes positions, the preoperative MRI and postoperative CT were used. Clinical profiles were also collected at the baseline and at 6 months after surgery. All the signals were slightly attenuated and contained only bursting patterns, compared with our previous report. All electrodes were mostly located in the middle one third part of the STN on both sides of the brain in the fused images. Six months later, the patients were improved significantly in the medication-off state and they met with less dyskinesia and less off-duration. Our study revealed that the sedation with propofol and fentanyl was applicable to STN-DBS surgery. There were no significant problems in precise positioning of bilateral electrodes. The surgery also improved significantly clinical outcomes in 6-month follow-up. PMID:27018855

  7. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus facilitates coordination of hand preshaping in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Schettino, L F; Van Erp, E; Hening, W; Lessig, S; Song, D; Barba, D; Poizner, H

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have found that Parkinson's disease (PD) disrupts the organization of complex motor sequences regardless of the influence of parkinsonian medications. A clear candidate for the neural bases of such deficits, which we term "coordinative," is the failure to integrate propioceptive and visual information by cortico-striatal circuits in a timed fashion. Recent reports, however, have indicated that deep-brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) may result in an improvement in coordinative deficits beyond the amelioration of "intensive deficits" such as bradykinesia and scaling errors. The present study examined the spatio-temporal organization underlying the shaping of the hand during reaching to grasp objects differing in shape. Six PD patients ON and OFF their STN DBS when OFF their concomitant medications and six age-matched controls participated in this study. STN DBS improved the coordination involved in preshaping the hand while grasping. We discuss these results in light of our earlier work with PD patients on and off dopamine replacement therapy. PMID:19922392

  8. Influence of propofol and fentanyl on deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonki; Song, In Ho; Lim, Yong Hoon; Kim, Mi-Ryoung; Kim, Young Eun; Hwang, Jae Ha; Kim, In Keyoung; Song, Sang Woo; Kim, Jin Wook; Lee, Woong-Woo; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Cheolyoung; Kim, Hee Chan; Kim, In Young; Park, Hee Pyoung; Kim, Dong Gyu; Jeon, Beom Seok; Paek, Sun Ha

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the effect of propofol and fentanyl on microelectrode recording (MER) and its clinical applicability during subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. We analyzed 8 patients with Parkinson's disease, underwent bilateral STN DBS with MER. Their left sides were done under awake and then their right sides were done with a continuous infusion of propofol and fentanyl under local anesthesia. The electrode position was evaluated by preoperative MRI and postoperative CT. The clinical outcomes were assessed at six months after surgery. We isolated single unit activities from the left and the right side MERs. There was no significant difference in the mean firing rate between the left side MERs (38.7 ± 16.8 spikes/sec, n=78) and the right side MERs (35.5 ± 17.2 spikes/sec, n=66). The bursting pattern of spikes was more frequently observed in the right STN than in the left STN. All the electrode positions were within the STNs on both sides and the off-time Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III scores at six months after surgery decreased by 67% of the preoperative level. In this study, a continuous infusion of propofol and fentanyl did not significantly interfere with the MER signals from the STN. The results of this study suggest that propofol and fentanyl can be used for STN DBS in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease improving the overall experience of the patients. PMID:25246748

  9. Chronic electrical stimulation of the contralesional lateral cerebellar nucleus enhances recovery of motor function after cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Machado, Andre G; Baker, Kenneth B; Schuster, Daniel; Butler, Robert S; Rezai, Ali

    2009-07-14

    Novel neurorehabilitative strategies are needed to improve motor outcomes following stroke. Based on the disynaptic excitatory projections of the dentatothalamocortical pathway to the motor cortex as well as to anterior and posterior cortical areas, we hypothesize that chronic electrical stimulation of the contralesional dentate (lateral cerebellar) nucleus output can enhance motor recovery after ischemia via augmentation of perilesional cortical excitability. Seventy-five Wistar rats were pre-trained in the Montoya staircase task and subsequently underwent left cerebral ischemia with the 3-vessel occlusion model. All survivors underwent stereotactic right lateral cerebellar nucleus (LCN) implantation of bipolar electrodes. Rats were then randomized to 4 groups: LCN stimulation at 10 pps, 20 pps, 50 pps or sham stimulation, which was delivered for a period of 6 weeks. Performance on the Montoya staircase task was re-assessed over the last 4 weeks of the stimulation period. On the right (contralesional) side, motor performance of the groups undergoing sham, 10 pps, 20 pps and 50 pps stimulation was, respectively, 2.5+/-2.7; 2.1+/-2.5; 6.0+/-3.9 (p<0.01) and 4.5+/-3.5 pellets. There was no difference on the left (ipsilesional) side motor performance among the sham or stimulation groups, varying from 15.9+/-6.7 to 17.2+/-2.1 pellets. We conclude that contralesional chronic electrical stimulation of the lateral cerebellar nucleus at 20 pps but not at 10 or 50 pps improves motor recovery in rats following ischemic strokes. This effect is likely to be mediated by increased perilesional cortical excitability via chronic activation of the dentatothalamocortical pathway. PMID:19445910

  10. Changes in handwriting resulting from bilateral high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Siebner, H R; Ceballos-Baumann, A; Standhardt, H; Auer, C; Conrad, B; Alesch, F

    1999-11-01

    High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a promising therapeutic approach in patients with severely disabling Parkinson's disease (PD). Whereas STN stimulation improves the cardinal signs of PD, little is known about the effects of STN stimulation on fine manual skills like handwriting. Therefore, the present study investigated the changes in handwriting during bilateral STN stimulation in 12 patients with advanced PD. Dopaminergic medication was discontinued at least 12 hours before the study. The patients were asked to write a standardized sentence repetitively. Five samples of the patient's script were recorded during effective bilateral STN stimulation and 1 hour after both stimulators had been switched off. The movements of the tip of the pencil were recorded using a digitizing tablet. Handwriting movements were segmented into subsequent up- and down-strokes, and a stroke-based kinematic analysis of handwriting was performed. During high-frequency STN stimulation, handwriting movements became faster and smoother indicating a partial restoration of an "open-loop" automatic performance. In addition, STN stimulation gave rise to a significant increase in the mean vertical stroke length demonstrating a stimulation-related reduction in micrographia. The present data underscores the importance of the STN in "open-loop" performance of highly skilled sequential hand movements. PMID:10584671

  11. Recognition of emotional prosody is altered after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Péron, Julie; Grandjean, Didier; Le Jeune, Florence; Sauleau, Paul; Haegelen, Claire; Drapier, Dominique; Rouaud, Tiphaine; Drapier, Sophie; Vérin, Marc

    2010-03-01

    The recognition of facial emotions is impaired following subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD). These changes have been linked to a disturbance in the STN's limbic territory, which is thought to be involved in emotional processing. This was confirmed by a recent PET study where these emotional modifications were correlated with changes in glucose metabolism in different brain regions, including the amygdala and the orbitofrontal regions that are well known for their involvement in emotional processing. Nevertheless, the question as to whether these emotional changes induced by STN DBS in PD are modality-specific has yet to be answered. The objective of this study was therefore to examine the effects of STN DBS in PD on the recognition of emotional prosody. An original emotional prosody paradigm was administered to twenty-one post-operative PD patients, twenty-one pre-operative PD patients and twenty-one matched controls. Results showed that both the pre- and post-operative groups differed from the healthy controls. There was also a significant difference between the pre and post groups. More specifically, an analysis of their continuous judgments revealed that the performance of the post-operative group compared with that of the other two groups was characterized by a systematic emotional bias whereby they perceived emotions more strongly. These results suggest that the impaired recognition of emotions may not be specific to the visual modality but may also be present when emotions are expressed through the human voice, implying the involvement of the STN in the brain network underlying the recognition of emotional prosody. PMID:20005239

  12. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in elderly patients – analysis of outcome and complications

    PubMed Central

    Vesper, Jan; Haak, Susanne; Ostertag, Christoph; Nikkhah, Guido

    2007-01-01

    Background There is an ongoing discussion about age limits for deep brain stimulation (DBS). Current indications for DBS are tremor-dominant disorders, Parkinson's disease, and dystonia. Electrode implantation for DBS with analgesia and sedation makes surgery more comfortable, especially for elderly patients. However, the value of DBS in terms of benefit-risk ratio in this patient population is still uncertain. Methods Bilateral electrode implantation into the subthalamic nucleus (STN) was performed in a total of 73 patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Patients were analyzed retrospectively. For this study they were divided into two age groups: group I (age <65 years, n = 37) and group II (age ≥ 65 years, n = 36). Examinations were performed preoperatively and at 6-month follow-up intervals for 24 months postoperatively. Age, UPDRS motor score (part III) on/off, Hoehn & Yahr score, Activity of Daily Living (ADL), L-dopa medication, and complications were determined. Results Significant differences were found in overall performance determined as ADL scores (group I: 48/71 points, group II: 41/62 points [preoperatively/6-month postoperatively]) and in the rate of complications (group I: 4 transient psychosis, 4 infections in a total of 8 patients, group II: 2 deaths [unrelated to surgery], 1 intracerebral hemorrhage, 7 transient psychosis, 3 infections, 2 pneumonia in a total of 13 patients), (p < 0.05). Interestingly, changes in UPDRS scores, Hoehn & Yahr scores, and L-dopa medication were not statistically different between the two groups. Conclusion DBS of the STN is clinically as effective in elderly patients as it is in younger ones. However, a more careful selection and follow-up of the elderly patients are required because elderly patients have a higher risk of surgery-related complications and a higher morbidity rate. PMID:17367531

  13. Subthalamic nucleus high-frequency stimulation modulates neuronal reactivity to cocaine within the reward circuit.

    PubMed

    Hachem-Delaunay, Sabira; Fournier, Marie-Line; Cohen, Candie; Bonneau, Nicolas; Cador, Martine; Baunez, Christelle; Le Moine, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a critical component of a complex network controlling motor, associative and limbic functions. High-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the STN is an effective therapy for motor symptoms in Parkinsonian patients and can also reduce their treatment-induced addictive behaviors. Preclinical studies have shown that STN HFS decreases motivation for cocaine while increasing that for food, highlighting its influence on rewarding and motivational circuits. However, the cellular substrates of these effects remain unknown. Our objectives were to characterize the cellular consequences of STN HFS with a special focus on limbic structures and to elucidate how STN HFS may interfere with acute cocaine effects in these brain areas. Male Long-Evans rats were subjected to STN HFS (130 Hz, 60 μs, 50-150 μA) for 30 min before an acute cocaine injection (15 mg/kg) and sacrificed 10 min following the injection. Neuronal reactivity was analyzed through the expression of two immediate early genes (Arc and c-Fos) to decipher cellular responses to STN HFS and cocaine. STN HFS only activated c-Fos in the globus pallidus and the basolateral amygdala, highlighting a possible role on emotional processes via the amygdala, with a limited effect by itself in other structures. Interestingly, and despite some differential effects on Arc and c-Fos expression, STN HFS diminished the c-Fos response induced by acute cocaine in the striatum. By preventing the cellular effect of cocaine in the striatum, STN HFS might thus decrease the reinforcing properties of the drug, which is in line with the inhibitory effect of STN HFS on the rewarding and reinforcing properties of cocaine. PMID:25982833

  14. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation May Reduce Medication Costs in Early Stage Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Mallory L.; Currie, Amanda D.; Molinari, Anna L.; Turchan, Maxim; Millan, Sarah M.; Heusinkveld, Lauren E.; Roach, Jonathon; Konrad, Peter E.; Davis, Thomas L.; Neimat, Joseph S.; Phibbs, Fenna T.; Hedera, Peter; Byrne, Daniel W.; Charles, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is well-known to reduce medication burden in advanced stage Parkinson’s disease (PD). Preliminary data from a prospective, single blind, controlled pilot trial demonstrated that early stage PD subjects treated with STN-DBS also required less medication than those treated with optimal drug therapy (ODT). Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze medication cost and utilization from the pilot trial of DBS in early stage PD and to project 10 year medication costs. Methods: Medication data collected at each visit were used to calculate medication costs. Medications were converted to levodopa equivalent daily dose, categorized by medication class, and compared. Medication costs were projected to advanced stage PD, the time when a typical patient may be offered DBS. Results: Medication costs increased 72% in the ODT group and decreased 16% in the DBS+ODT group from baseline to 24 months. This cost difference translates into a cumulative savings for the DBS+ODT group of $7,150 over the study period. Projected medication cost savings over 10 years reach $64,590. Additionally, DBS+ODT subjects were 80% less likely to require polypharmacy compared with ODT subjects at 24 months (p <  0.05; OR = 0.2; 95% CI: 0.04–0.97). Conclusions: STN-DBS in early PD reduced medication cost over the two-year study period. DBS may offer substantial long-term reduction in medication cost by maintaining a simplified, low dose medication regimen. Further study is needed to confirm these findings, and the FDA has approved a pivotal, multicenter clinical trial evaluating STN-DBS in early PD. PMID:26967937

  15. Cognitive predictors of cognitive change following bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yágüez, Lidia; Costello, Angela; Moriarty, John; Hulse, Natasha; Selway, Richard; Clough, Chris; Samuel, Michael; Ashkan, Keyoumars

    2014-03-01

    The beneficial effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) for the motor symptoms in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) are well established. Early in PD, mild cognitive impairment is present in a proportion of patients. Hence, it can also be present in PD patients considered for DBS. The potential impact of even a modest decline post-surgically is a concern because it could result in impaired cognitive function. Therefore, attempts to determine which pre-operative cognitive measures predict post-operative cognitive change warrant further attention. We report our findings in a cohort of 30 routinely operated non-demented patients who underwent detailed neuropsychological assessments on average 7.1 months before and 9.4 months after STN DBS. We report the individual and group differences pre- and post-DBS. Stepwise regression analysis was used to analyse the best cognitive predictors of post-operative cognitive changes. We describe our data in relation to published normative data. Post-STN DBS, the immediate story recall component of verbal memory was the most affected cognitive function showing a significant decline in its group mean with a large effect size. The best predictors for this change were pre-surgical list learning and Full Scale Intelligence Quotient. These results suggest that non-demented patients, with even mild impairments in both general intellectual functions and list learning, may be at greater risk of decline in other aspects of verbal memory after STN DBS. Pre-existing mild executive dysfunction was not influenced post-operatively. These findings may help selection and consent for STN DBS. PMID:24231557

  16. mGluR5 stimulates gliotransmission in the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    D'Ascenzo, Marcello; Fellin, Tommaso; Terunuma, Miho; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Meaney, David F.; Auberson, Yves P.; Moss, Stephen J.; Haydon, Philip G.

    2007-01-01

    Although metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) is essential for cocaine self-administration and drug-seeking behavior, there is limited knowledge of the cellular actions of this receptor in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Although mGluR5 has the potential to regulate neurons directly, recent studies have shown the importance of mGluR5 in regulating Ca2+ signaling in astrocytes and, as a consequence, the Ca2+-dependent release of excitatory transmitters from these glia. In this study, we demonstrate that activation of mGluR5 induces Ca2+ oscillations in NAc astrocytes with the correlated appearance of NMDA receptor-dependent slow inward currents detected in medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Photolysis of caged Ca2+ loaded specifically into astrocytes evoked slow inward currents demonstrating that Ca2+ elevations in astrocytes are responsible for these excitatory events. Pharmacological evaluation of these glial-evoked NMDA currents shows that they are mediated by NR2B-containing NMDA receptors, whereas synaptic NMDA receptors rely on NR2A-containing receptors. Stimulation of glutamatergic afferents activates mGluR5-dependent astrocytic Ca2+ oscillations and gliotransmission that is sustained for minutes beyond the initial stimulus. Because gliotransmission is mediated by NMDA receptors, depolarized membrane potentials exhibited during up-states augment excitation provided by gliotransmission, which drives bursts of MSN action potentials. Because the predominant mGluR5-dependent action of glutamatergic afferents is to cause the sustained activation of astrocytes, which in turn excite MSNs through extrasynaptic NMDA receptors, our results raise the potential for gliotransmission being involved in prolonged mGluR5-dependent adaptation in the NAc. PMID:17259307

  17. Long-term impact on quality of life of subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lezcano, Elena; Gómez-Esteban, Juan Carlos; Tijero, Beatriz; Bilbao, Gaizka; Lambarri, Imanol; Rodriguez, Olivia; Villoria, Rafael; Dolado, Ainara; Berganzo, Koldo; Molano, Ana; de Gopegui, Edurne Ruiz; Pomposo, Iñigo; Gabilondo, Iñigo; Zarranz, Juan José

    2016-05-01

    Long-term impact of bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and associated factors in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are not clear. In this prospective study, we included 69 PD patients (64 % men, mean age 61.3 ± 7.4 and disease duration 13.2 ± 5.7 years) undergoing STN-DBS. They were evaluated preoperatively (baseline), 1 and 5 years postoperatively assessing 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39), Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living Scale (SEADL), Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) off- and on-medication, patient diaries, dopaminergic treatment, mortality and surgical complications. Five years postoperatively, off-medication, there were improvements from baseline in UPDRS-II and III total (27.2 and 26.7 %, respectively) and SEADL (18.6 % more completely independent patients) (p < 0.05) scores, while on-medication, there was a deterioration in UPDRS-III (37.8 %, mainly axial signs) (p < 0.05) and minor improvements in SEADL (3.7 %). While at 1 year PDQ-39, the summary index improved substantially (36.5 %) (p < 0.05), at 5 years patients regressed (only 8.8 %) (p < 0.05), though changes in PDQ-39 subscores remained significant, with improvements in ADL (18.8 %), emotional well-being (19.0 %), stigma (36.4 %) and discomfort (20.6 %), despite worsening in communication (47.8 %) (p < 0.05). Lower preoperative PDQ-39 summary index and greater 1-year UPDRS-III-off total score gain predicted better long-term HRQOL. STN-DBS produces long-term improvements in HRQOL in PD. Preoperative HRQOL and short-term postoperative changes in off-medication motor status may predict long-term HRQOL in PD following STN-DBS. PMID:26964542

  18. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Impacts Language in Early Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Lara; Litcofsky, Kaitlyn A.; Pelster, Michael; Gelfand, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basal ganglia improves motor outcomes in Parkinson's disease (PD), its effects on cognition, including language, remain unclear. This study examined the impact of subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS on two fundamental capacities of language, grammatical and lexical functions. These functions were tested with the production of regular and irregular past-tenses, which contrast aspects of grammatical (regulars) and lexical (irregulars) processing while controlling for multiple potentially confounding factors. Aspects of the motor system were tested by contrasting the naming of manipulated (motor) and non-manipulated (non-motor) objects. Performance was compared between healthy controls and early-stage PD patients treated with either DBS/medications or medications alone. Patients were assessed on and off treatment, with controls following a parallel testing schedule. STN-DBS improved naming of manipulated (motor) but not non-manipulated (non-motor) objects, as compared to both controls and patients with just medications, who did not differ from each other across assessment sessions. In contrast, STN-DBS led to worse performance at regulars (grammar) but not irregulars (lexicon), as compared to the other two subject groups, who again did not differ. The results suggest that STN-DBS negatively impacts language in early PD, but may be specific in depressing aspects of grammatical and not lexical processing. The finding that STN-DBS affects both motor and grammar (but not lexical) functions strengthens the view that both depend on basal ganglia circuitry, although the mechanisms for its differential impact on the two (improved motor, impaired grammar) remain to be elucidated. PMID:22880117

  19. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation induces impulsive action when patients with Parkinson's disease act under speed pressure.

    PubMed

    Pote, Inês; Torkamani, Mariam; Kefalopoulou, Zinovia-Maria; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin-Dowsey, Patricia; Foltynie, Thomas; Speekenbrink, Maarten; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2016-07-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is proposed to modulate response thresholds and speed-accuracy trade-offs. In situations of conflict, the STN is considered to raise response thresholds, allowing time for the accumulation of information to occur before a response is selected. Conversely, speed pressure is thought to reduce the activity of the STN and lower response thresholds, resulting in fast, errorful responses. In Parkinson's disease (PD), subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) reduces the activity of the nucleus and improves motor symptoms. We predicted that the combined effects of STN stimulation and speed pressure would lower STN activity and lead to fast, errorful responses, hence resulting in impulsive action. We used the motion discrimination 'moving-dots' task to assess speed-accuracy trade-offs, under both speed and accuracy instructions. We assessed 12 patients with PD and bilateral STN-DBS and 12 age-matched healthy controls. Participants completed the task twice, and the patients completed it once with STN-DBS on and once with STN-DBS off, with order counterbalanced. We found that STN stimulation was associated with significantly faster reaction times but more errors under speed instructions. Application of the drift diffusion model showed that stimulation resulted in lower response thresholds when acting under speed pressure. These findings support the involvement of the STN in the modulation of speed-accuracy trade-offs and establish for the first time that speed pressure alone, even in the absence of conflict, can result in STN stimulation inducing impulsive action in PD. PMID:26892884

  20. Responses from two firing patterns in inferior colliculus neurons to stimulation of the lateral lemniscus dorsal nucleus.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Ting; Wang, Ning-Yu; Wang, Yan-Jun; Xu, Zhi-Qing; Liu, Jin-Feng; Bai, Yun-Fei; Dai, Jin-Sheng; Zhao, Jing-Yi

    2016-05-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid neurons (GABAergic neurons) in the inferior colliculus are classified into various patterns based on their intrinsic electrical properties to a constant current injection. Although this classification is associated with physiological function, the exact role for neurons with various firing patterns in acoustic processing remains poorly understood. In the present study, we analyzed characteristics of inferior colliculus neurons in vitro, and recorded responses to stimulation of the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Seven inferior colliculus neurons were tested and were classified into two firing patterns: sustained-regular (n = 4) and sustained-adapting firing patterns (n = 3). The majority of inferior colliculus neurons exhibited slight changes in response to stimulation and bicuculline. The responses of one neuron with a sustained-adapting firing pattern were suppressed after stimulation, but recovered to normal levels following application of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor antagonist. One neuron with a sustained-regular pattern showed suppressed stimulation responses, which were not affected by bicuculline. Results suggest that GABAergic neurons in the inferior colliculus exhibit sustained-regular or sustained-adapting firing patterns. Additionally, GABAergic projections from the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus to the inferior colliculus are associated with sound localization. The different neuronal responses of various firing patterns suggest a role in sound localization. A better understanding of these mechanisms and functions will provide better clinical treatment paradigms for hearing deficiencies. PMID:27335563

  1. Responses from two firing patterns in inferior colliculus neurons to stimulation of the lateral lemniscus dorsal nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-ting; Wang, Ning-yu; Wang, Yan-jun; Xu, Zhi-qing; Liu, Jin-feng; Bai, Yun-fei; Dai, Jin-sheng; Zhao, Jing-yi

    2016-01-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid neurons (GABAergic neurons) in the inferior colliculus are classified into various patterns based on their intrinsic electrical properties to a constant current injection. Although this classification is associated with physiological function, the exact role for neurons with various firing patterns in acoustic processing remains poorly understood. In the present study, we analyzed characteristics of inferior colliculus neurons in vitro, and recorded responses to stimulation of the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Seven inferior colliculus neurons were tested and were classified into two firing patterns: sustained-regular (n = 4) and sustained-adapting firing patterns (n = 3). The majority of inferior colliculus neurons exhibited slight changes in response to stimulation and bicuculline. The responses of one neuron with a sustained-adapting firing pattern were suppressed after stimulation, but recovered to normal levels following application of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor antagonist. One neuron with a sustained-regular pattern showed suppressed stimulation responses, which were not affected by bicuculline. Results suggest that GABAergic neurons in the inferior colliculus exhibit sustained-regular or sustained-adapting firing patterns. Additionally, GABAergic projections from the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus to the inferior colliculus are associated with sound localization. The different neuronal responses of various firing patterns suggest a role in sound localization. A better understanding of these mechanisms and functions will provide better clinical treatment paradigms for hearing deficiencies. PMID:27335563

  2. High-Frequency Stimulation of the Rat Entopeduncular Nucleus Does Not Provide Functional or Morphological Neuroprotection from 6-Hydroxydopamine

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, D. Luke; Collier, Timothy J.; Cole-Strauss, Allyson; Wohlgenant, Susan L.; Lipton, Jack W.; Steece-Collier, Kathy; Manfredsson, Fredric P.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Sortwell, Caryl E.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the most common neurosurgical treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD). Whereas the globus pallidus interna (GPi) has been less commonly targeted than the subthalamic nucleus (STN), a recent clinical trial suggests that GPi DBS may provide better outcomes for patients with psychiatric comorbidities. Several laboratories have demonstrated that DBS of the STN provides neuroprotection of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) dopamine neurons in preclinical neurotoxin models of PD and increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, whether DBS of the entopeduncular nucleus (EP), the homologous structure to the GPi in the rat, has similar neuroprotective potential in preclinical models has not been investigated. We investigated the impact of EP DBS on forelimb use asymmetry and SNpc degeneration induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and on BDNF levels. EP DBS in male rats received unilateral, intrastriatal 6-OHDA and ACTIVE or INACTIVE stimulation continuously for two weeks. Outcome measures included quantification of contralateral forelimb use, stereological assessment of SNpc neurons and BDNF levels. EP DBS 1) did not ameliorate forelimb impairments induced by 6-OHDA, 2) did not provide neuroprotection for SNpc neurons and 3) did not significantly increase BDNF levels in any of the structures examined. These results are in sharp contrast to the functional improvement, neuroprotection and BDNF-enhancing effects of STN DBS under identical experimental parameters in the rat. The lack of functional response to EP DBS suggests that stimulation of the rat EP may not represent an accurate model of clinical GPi stimulation. PMID:26222442

  3. Hydrodynamic stimulation and long term cultivation of nucleus pulposus cells: a new bioreactor system to induce extracellular matrix synthesis by nucleus pulposus cells dependent on intermittent hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Gokorsch, S; Nehring, D; Grottke, C; Czermak, P

    2004-11-01

    A novel bioreactor system was constructed to induce extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis by intervertebral disc (ID) cells due to intermittent hydrostatic pressure. The developed system is completely sterilizable and reusable. It is viable for cultivation, immobilization, and stimulation of various other cell types and tissues especially for cartilage. The custom made lid allows long-run cultivation through semi-continuous operation. Manual interferences and therefore the risk of contamination are reduced. Sampling, medium changing and addition of supplements are easily performed from the connected conditioning vessel, which could be placed in an incubator. For the present investigations nucleus pulposus cells from pigs were taken and immobilized in agarose to obtain three-dimensional cell matrix constructs which were subjected to intermittent hydrostatic pressure. Afterwards the construct was biochemically examined. The proven constituents of ECM were found to be released in dependence of the magnitude and profile of the applied pressure. PMID:15636054

  4. Effect of vardenafil on nitric oxide synthase expression in the paraventricular nucleus of rats without sexual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Shin, M-S; Ko, I-G; Kim, S-E; Kim, B-K; Kim, C-J; Kim, D-H; Yoon, S-J; Kim, K-H

    2012-05-01

    Vardenafil hydrochloride (HCl) is a potent and selective phosphodiesterase type-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor that enhances nitric oxide (NO)-mediated relaxation of human corpus cavernosum and NO-induced rabbit penile erection, and enhances erectile function in patients. In the present study, the effect of vardenafil on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and neuronal NOS expressions in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of rats without sexual stimulation was investigated using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) histochemistry and neuronal NOS (nNOS) immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The present results showed that NOS and nNOS expression in the PVN was increased by vardenafil treatment as the dose- and duration-dependently without sexual stimulation. The phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor, vardenafil, augmented NOS expression in the brain without sexual stimulation. The present study suggests that sexual behaviour can be directly modulated by neurotransmitters such as nitric oxide. PMID:21950284

  5. High-frequency electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus excites target structures in a model using c-fos immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Shehab, S; D'souza, C; Ljubisavljevic, M; Redgrave, P

    2014-06-13

    Deep-brain stimulation at high frequencies (HFS) directed to the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is used increasingly to treat patients with Parkinson's disease. However, the mechanism of action by which HFS of the STN achieves its therapeutic effects remains unresolved. Insofar as lesions of the STN have similar therapeutic benefit, a favored hypothesis is that HFS acts by suppressing neural activity in the STN. The purpose of the present study was to exploit prior observations that exposure to ether anesthesia in a rodent model evokes c-fos expression (a marker of neural activation) in the STN and its efferent structures, the globus pallidus, entopeduncular nucleus and substantia nigra. We showed first that exposure to ether induced a profound oscillatory pattern of neural activity in the STN and SNr, which could explain the marked induction of c-fos immunoreactivity in these structures. Secondly, inhibition of the STN by local injections of the GABA agonist, muscimol, suppressed ether-evoked c-fos expression in all target structures. This showed that excitation of target structures in the ether model originated, at least in part, from the STN. Thirdly, and contrary to expectation, HFS of the STN increased further the expression of c-fos in the STN target structures of animals treated with ether. Finally, we demonstrated, in the absence of ether treatment, that HFS and chemical stimulation of the STN with local injections of kainic acid both induced c-fos expression in the globus pallidus, entopeduncular nucleus and substantia nigra. Together these results suggest that the principal action of STN stimulation at high frequencies is to excite rather than inhibit its efferent targets. Given that Parkinsonism has been associated with increased levels of inhibitory output activity from the basal ganglia, it is unlikely that excitation of output structures revealed in this study provides a basis for deep-brain stimulation's therapeutic action. PMID:24755486

  6. Spinal direct current stimulation modulates the activity of gracile nucleus and primary somatosensory cortex in anaesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, J; Pulecchi, F; Dilena, R; Oliviero, A; Priori, A; Foffani, G

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Afferent somatosensory activity from the spinal cord has a profound impact on the activity of the brain. Here we investigated the effects of spinal stimulation using direct current, delivered at the thoracic level, on the spontaneous activity and on the somatosensory evoked potentials of the gracile nucleus, which is the main entry point for hindpaw somatosensory signals reaching the brain from the dorsal columns, and of the primary somatosensory cortex in anaesthetized rats. Anodal spinal direct current stimulation (sDCS) increased the spontaneous activity and decreased the amplitude of evoked responses in the gracile nucleus, whereas cathodal sDCS produced the opposite effects. At the level of the primary somatosensory cortex, the changes in spontaneous activity induced by sDCS were consistent with the effects observed in the gracile nucleus, but the changes in cortical evoked responses were more variable and state dependent. Therefore, sDCS can modulate in a polarity-specific manner the supraspinal activity of the somatosensory system, offering a versatile bottom-up neuromodulation technique that could potentially be useful in a number of clinical applications. PMID:21825031

  7. Autoradiographic distribution of cerebral blood flow increases elicited by stimulation of the nucleus basalis magnocellularis in the unanesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Vaucher, E; Borredon, J; Seylaz, J; Lacombe, P

    1995-09-11

    The nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) of the rat, equivalent of Meynert's nucleus in the primate, is the origin of the main cholinergic innervation of the cerebral cortex. Stimulation of this area has been previously shown to induced marked, cholinergically mediated, blood flow increases in the frontal and parietal cortices. However, the complete distribution of the cerebrovascular effects of NBM stimulation within the whole brain has not been determined. In the present study, we used the [14C]iodoantipyrine autoradiographic method to measure local cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the unanesthetized rat, chronically implanted with a stimulation electrode. We performed unilateral electrical stimulation of the NBM in order to compare both the interhemispheric differences in blood flow and the differences with a group of sham-stimulated rats. Considerable blood flow increases were found in most neocortical areas, exceeding 400% in the frontal area, compared to the control group. Marked responses also appeared in discrete subcortical regions such as the zona incerta, some thalamic nuclei and structures of the extrapyramidal system. These responses were mostly ipsilateral to the stimulation. The significance and the distribution of these blood flow increases are related first, to anatomical and functional data on mainly the cholinergic projections from the NBM, but also non-cholinergic pathways connected with the NBM, second, to biochemical data on the basalocortical system, and third, to the limited ultrastructural data on the innervation of microvascular elements. This cerebrovascular study represents a step in the elucidation of the function of the basalocortical system and provides data which may be related to certain deficits of degenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease in which this system is consistently affected. PMID:8590065

  8. Deep brain stimulation in the nucleus ventralis intermedius in patients with essential tremor: habituation of tremor suppression.

    PubMed

    Barbe, Michael T; Liebhart, Lena; Runge, Matthias; Pauls, K Amande M; Wojtecki, Lars; Schnitzler, Alfons; Allert, Niels; Fink, Gereon R; Sturm, Volker; Maarouf, Mohammad; Timmermann, Lars

    2011-03-01

    In patients with essential tremor (ET) already treated with chronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the nucleus ventralis intermedius (VIM) we investigated whether optimization of stimulation parameters could improve clinical tremor suppression, and whether this putative effect could be sustained over time. Twenty-three ET patients with VIM-DBS participated in the prospective study. All electrode contacts were tested systematically and stimulation parameters were optimized over the course of 2 days. Clinical tremor rating scale (TRS) was videotaped before, directly after the optimization and at a 10 weeks follow-up and evaluated blindly and independently by two clinicians. For stimulation effect optimization we increased the number of active contacts whereas the total charge applied to the tissue was kept constant. TRS hemi-body scores decreased significantly after optimization. At the 10 weeks follow-up, however, the improvement had faded and was no longer significant. The activities of daily living (ADL) remained significantly improved. Systematic optimization of VIM-DBS parameters in ET patients leads to a short term improvement which habituates over time. Our results provide further evidence for a tolerance effect in chronic VIM stimulation thereby suggesting that frequently alternating stimulation protocols should be tested in future studies of ET patients treated with VIM-DBS. PMID:20927533

  9. Does deep brain stimulation of the nucleus ventralis intermedius affect postural control and locomotion in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Pinter, M M; Murg, M; Alesch, F; Freundl, B; Helscher, R J; Binder, H

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of unilateral stimulation of the nucleus ventralis intermedius (VIM) on parkinsonian signs like postural stability and locomotion with respect to the severity of Parkinson's disease (PD). Seven patients with idiopathic PD were included in the study. Changes in visual cues on postural stability and step initiation were assessed on a fixed platform system with VIM stimulation switched either on (VIM ON) or off (VIM OFF), and compared with a control group of seven age-matched normal individuals. Sway scores (area and path) were significantly (p <0.05) higher in the parkinsonian patients with VIM OFF than with VIM ON as well as compared with the control subjects. No correlation was obtained between extent of sway scores and severity of contralateral tremor after cessation of VIM stimulation. Locomotion parameters, by contrast, were not influenced by VIM stimulation: latency until step initiation and walking-cycle time were the same among parkinsonian patients as among normal individuals, both in the presence and in the absence of VIM stimulation. In conclusion, our results indicate that tremor suppression by VIM stimulation improves postural stability. PMID:10584670

  10. mu-Opioid receptor stimulation in the nucleus accumbens elevates fatty tastant intake by increasing palatability and suppressing satiety signals.

    PubMed

    Katsuura, Yoshihiro; Heckmann, Jennifer A; Taha, Sharif A

    2011-07-01

    Infusion of a μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist into the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) drives voracious food intake, an effect hypothesized to occur through increased tastant palatability. While intake of many palatable foods is elevated by MOR stimulation, this manipulation has a preferential effect on fatty food ingestion. Consumption of high-fat foods is increased by NAcc MOR stimulation even in rats that prefer a carbohydrate-rich alternative under baseline conditions. This suggests that NAcc MOR stimulation may not simply potentiate palatability signals and raises the possibility that mechanisms mediating fat intake may be distinct from those underlying intake of other tastants. The present study was conducted to investigate the physiological mechanisms underlying the effects of NAcc MOR stimulation on fatty food intake. In experiment 1, we analyzed lick microstructure in rats ingesting Intralipid to identify the changes underlying feeding induced by infusion of a MOR-specific agonist into the NAcc. MOR stimulation in the NAcc core, but not shell, increased burst duration and first-minute licks, while simultaneously increasing the rate and duration of Intralipid ingestion. These results suggest that MOR activation in the core increases Intralipid palatability and attenuates inhibitory postingestive feedback. In experiment 2, we measured the effects of MOR stimulation in the NAcc core on consumption of nonnutritive olestra. A MOR-specific agonist dose dependently increased olestra intake, demonstrating that caloric signaling is not required for hyperphagia induced by NAcc MOR stimulation. Feeding induced by drug infusion in both experiments 1 and 2 was blocked by a MOR antagonist. In experiment 3, we determined whether MOR activation in the NAcc core could attenuate satiety-related signaling caused by infusion of the melanocortin agonist MTII into the third ventricle. Suppression of intake caused by MTII was reversed by MOR stimulation. Together, our results suggest

  11. Stimulation of the nucleus locus coeruleus/subcoeruleus suppresses visceromotor responses to colorectal distention in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tsuruoka, Masayoshi; Maeda, Masako; Inoue, Tomio

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether the nucleus locus coeruleus/subcoeruleus (LC/SC) modulates visceromotor function. In the present study, an electromyogram (EMG) of the external abdominal oblique muscle evoked by colorectal distention was measured as a visceromotor reflex response, and inhibitory effects of LC/SC stimulation were estimated by the decrease of EMG activity. Under halothane anesthesia (1% in air), graded colorectal distentions (30, 60 or 80 mmHg) were produced by inflating a balloon inside the descending colon and rectum. A bipolar EMG electrode was inserted into the left external abdominal oblique muscle to record the EMG response to colorectal distention. Colorectal distention at a pressure of 30 mmHg did not evoke any EMG activity in the external abdominal oblique muscle in all rats tested. Electrical stimulation of the LC/SC (30, 50 and 70 microA, 100 Hz, 0.1 ms pulses) reduced EMG responses evoked by colorectal distention to 60 and 80 mmHg. LC/SC stimulation was effective both ipsilaterally and contralaterally indicating a bilateral effect. EMG responses decreased with an increase of LC/SC stimulation intensity. Following recordings of the inhibitory effects of LC/SC stimulation, lesions of the LC/SC ipsilateral to the EMG recording site were induced; 1 h after lesions the inhibitory effects of LC/SC stimulation were examined again. LC/SC stimulation did not reduce the EMG responses when LC/SC stimulation was applied to the ipsilateral LC/SC, whereas EMG responses were observed by stimulation of the intact LC/SC contralateral to the EMG recording site. From lesion experiments, it could be considered that suppression of the visceromotor response to colorectal distention is due to activation of the LC/SC. The results suggest that the visceromotor function is under the control of the centrifugal pathways from the LC/SC. PMID:15882797

  12. Deep brain stimulation of the posterior hypothalamic nucleus reverses akinesia in bilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Young, C K; Koke, S J; Kiss, Z H; Bland, B H

    2009-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the basal ganglia motor circuitry is a highly effective treatment for the debilitating motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, recent findings have indicated promising potential for PD therapy with DBS in brain structures outside the basal ganglia. For example, high frequency stimulation of the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PH) can reverse haloperidol-induced akinesia in rats [Jackson J, Young CK, Hu B, Bland BH (2008) High frequency stimulation of the posterior hypothalamic nucleus restores movement and reinstates hippocampal-striatal theta coherence following haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Exp Neurol 213:210-219]. In the current study, we used the bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model of Parkinsonian akinesia in male Long-Evans rats to further explore the efficacy of PH DBS. The application of PH DBS in lesioned animals reversed akinesia in an active avoidance paradigm with increased latency compared to pre-lesion performance. The dramatic reversal of akinesia in two models of rodent Parkinsonism by PH DBS warrants further exploration of its therapeutic potential. PMID:19401216

  13. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Improves Reward-Based Decision-Learning in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    van Wouwe, Nelleke C.; Ridderinkhof, K. R.; van den Wildenberg, W. P. M.; Band, G. P. H.; Abisogun, A.; Elias, W. J.; Frysinger, R.; Wylie, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been shown to be critically involved in decision-making, action selection, and motor control. Here we investigate the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the STN on reward-based decision-learning in patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD). We determined computational measures of outcome evaluation and reward prediction from PD patients who performed a probabilistic reward-based decision-learning task. In previous work, these measures covaried with activation in the nucleus caudatus (outcome evaluation during the early phases of learning) and the putamen (reward prediction during later phases of learning). We observed that stimulation of the STN motor regions in PD patients served to improve reward-based decision-learning, probably through its effect on activity in frontostriatal motor loops (prominently involving the putamen and, hence, reward prediction). In a subset of relatively younger patients with relatively shorter disease duration, the effects of DBS appeared to spread to more cognitive regions of the STN, benefiting loops that connect the caudate to various prefrontal areas importantfor outcome evaluation. These results highlight positive effects of STN stimulation on cognitive functions that may benefit PD patients in daily-life association-learning situations. PMID:21519377

  14. Camptocormia and deep brain stimulation: The interesting overlapping etiologies and the therapeutic role of subthalamic nucleus-deep brain stimulation in Parkinson disease with camptocormia

    PubMed Central

    Ekmekci, Hakan; Kaptan, Hulagu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Camptocormia is known as “bent spine syndrome” and defined as a forward hyperflexion. The most common etiologic factor is related with the movement disorders, mainly in Parkinson's disease (PD). Case Description: We present the case of a 51-year-old woman who has been followed with PD for the last 10 years, and also under the therapy for PD. An unappreciated correlation low back pain with camptocormia developed. She underwent deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus bilaterally and improved her bending posture. Conclusion: The relationship between the DBS and camptocormia is discussed in this unique condition. PMID:26958425

  15. Capgras Syndrome in a Patient with Parkinson's Disease after Bilateral Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kyrtsos, Christina Rose; Stahl, Mark C.; Eslinger, Paul; Subramanian, Thyagarajan; Lucassen, Elisabeth B.

    2015-01-01

    Capgras syndrome is a delusional misidentification syndrome (DMS) which can be seen in neurodegenerative diseases such as Lewy body dementia and, to a lesser extent, in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we report the case of a 78-year-old man with a history of idiopathic PD who developed Capgras syndrome following bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (DBS) implantation. As the risk of DMS has been related to deficits in executive, memory, and visuospatial function preoperatively, this case highlights the importance of continuing to improve patient selection for DBS surgery. Capgras syndrome is a rare potential complication of DBS surgery in PD patients with preexisting cognitive decline. PMID:26078747

  16. Stimulation of the Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nucleus Modulates Cardiorespiratory Responses via Oxytocinergic Innervation of Neurons in Pre-Bötzinger Complex

    PubMed Central

    Mack, S.O.; Wu, M.; Kc, P.; Haxhiu, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Previously we reported that oxytocin (OT)-containing neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) project to the preBötzinger complex (preBötC) region and phrenic motoneurons innervating the diaphragm (D). The aim of these studies was to determine pathways involved in PVN stimulation-induced changes in upper airway and chest wall pumping muscle activity. In addition, we determined the role of OT-containing neurons in the PVN in mediating increased respiratory output elicited by PVN stimulation. Neuroanatomical experiments, using pseudorabies virus (PRV) as a transneuronal tracer in C8 spinalectomized animals showed that PVN neurons project to hypoglossal motoneurons innervating the genioglossus (GG) muscle. Furthermore, microinjection of the PVN with bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, significantly increased (P<0.05) peak electromyographic activity of GG (GGEMG) and of DEMG, frequency discharge, and arterial blood pressure (BP) and heart rate. Prior injection of oxytocin antagonist [d-(CH2)5, Tyr(Me)2,Orn8]-vasotocin(OVT) intracisternally or blockade of oxytocin receptors in the preBötC region with oxytocin antagonist L-368,899, diminished GGEMG and DEMG responses and blunted the increase in BP and heart rate to PVN stimulation. These data show that PVN stimulation affects central regulatory mechanisms via the preBötC region controlling both respiratory and cardiovascular functions. The parallel changes induced by PVN stimulation were mediated mainly through an OT-OT receptor signaling pathway. PMID:16857863

  17. Impulsivities and Parkinson's disease: delay aversion is not worsened by Deep Brain Stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Torta, Diana M E; Vizzari, Vincenzo; Castelli, Lorys; Zibetti, Maurizio; Lanotte, Michele; Lopiano, Leonardo; Geminiani, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) of the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) improves motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD), but can exert detrimental effects on impulsivity. These effects are especially related to the inability to slow down when high-conflict choices have to be made. However, the influence that DBS has on delay aversion is still under-investigated. Here, we tested a group of 21 PD patients on and off stimulation (off medication) by using the Cambridge Gamble Task (CGT), a computerized task that allows the investigation of risk-related behaviours and delay aversion, and psychological questionnaires such as the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS), the Sensitivity to Punishment and to Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ), and the Quick Delay Questionnaire (QDQ). We found that delay aversion scores on the CGT were no higher when patients were on stimulation as compared to when they were off stimulation. In contrast, PD patients reported feeling more impulsive in the off stimulation state, as revealed by significantly higher scores on the BIS. Higher scores on the sensitivity to punishment subscale of the SPSRQ highlighted that possible punishments influence patients' behaviours more than possible rewards. Significant correlations between delay aversion scores on the CGT and QDQ delay aversion subscale suggest that these two instruments can be used in synergy to reach a convergent validity. In conclusion, our results show that not all impulsivities are detrimentally affected by DBS of the STN and that the joint use of experimental paradigms and psychological questionnaires can provide useful insights in the study of impulsivity. PMID:22984415

  18. Serotonin release in the central nucleus of the amygdala in response to noxious and innocuous cutaneous stimulation in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Ryota; Shimoju, Rie; Takagi, Noriaki; Shibata, Hideshi; Kurosawa, Mieko

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the effect of noxious (pinching) and innocuous (stroking) stimulation of skin on serotonin (5-HT) release in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) in anesthetized rats. 5-HT in the CeA was collected by microdialysis methods. Dialysate output from consecutive 10-min periods was injected into a high-performance liquid chromatograph and 5-HT was measured with an electrochemical detector. Bilateral pinching of the back for 10 min increased 5-HT release significantly; 5-HT release was also increased with stimulation of the forelimb or hindlimb. In contrast, stroking of these areas decreased 5-HT release significantly. Furthermore, simultaneous stroking and pinching produced no change in the 5-HT release. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that 5-HT release in the CeA is regulated by somatic afferent stimulation in a modality-dependent manner, and that innocuous stimulation can dampen the change in 5-HT release that occurs in response to noxious stimulation. PMID:26668011

  19. Effects of nucleus basalis magnocellularis stimulation on a socially transmitted food preference and c-Fos expression

    PubMed Central

    Boix-Trelis, Núria; Vale-Martínez, Anna; Guillazo-Blanch, Gemma; Costa-Miserachs, David; Martí-Nicolovius, Margarita

    2006-01-01

    Experiment 1 examined the effects of electrical stimulation of nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) on a relational odor-association task—the social transmission of food preference (STFP). Rats were stimulated unilaterally in the NBM for 20 min (100 μA, 1 Hz) immediately before the social training. They were tested on their ability to remember preference for the trained food either immediately or following a 24-h delay. Stimulation of NBM improved retention regardless of delay, and additional behavioral measures (social interaction, motor activity, or exploration) did not account for such effects. Experiment 2 investigated brain regions activated after NBM electrical stimulation by examining the induction of c-Fos. This treatment led to bilateral increased c-Fos expression in prefrontal regions, such as orbitofrontal, prelimbic, and infralimbic cortices, and some hippocampal subregions (dorsal CA and ventral dentate gyrus). In contrast, no differences between groups in c-Fos expression were found in basolateral amygdala, dorsal dentate gyrus, ventral CA, or ventral subiculum. Present findings indicate that pretraining NBM electrical stimulation facilitates the acquisition of STFP, supporting a role of NBM in the early stages of memory formation, and suggest that the treatment might cause such effects by inducing neural changes, related to transcription factors such as c-Fos, in the prefrontal cortex or the hippocampal formation. PMID:17101878

  20. Medial Auditory Thalamus Is Necessary for Acquisition and Retention of Eyeblink Conditioning to Cochlear Nucleus Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Hunter E.; Poremba, Amy; Freeman, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Associative learning tasks commonly involve an auditory stimulus, which must be projected through the auditory system to the sites of memory induction for learning to occur. The cochlear nucleus (CN) projection to the pontine nuclei has been posited as the necessary auditory pathway for cerebellar learning, including eyeblink conditioning.…

  1. [Facilitation of memory consolidation induced by electrical stimulation of the medial septal nucleus in BALB/c mice (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Galey, D; Jeantet, Y; Destrade, C; Jaffard, R

    1982-05-01

    Sinusoidal (100Hz) electrical stimulation was applied at a weak intensity (7.5microA peak to peak) to the medial septal nucleus after partial acquisition of an appetitive operant conditioning task in a Skinner box. Analysis of performance recorded 24 hrs later during a retention session shows that (i) implantation alone impaired performance; (ii) electrical stimulation applied 30 sec. after the end of the acquisition session improves retention; this facilitatory effect disappears when the treatment is delayed 15 min. Furthermore spectral analysis of hippocampal EEG showed that there was no significant modification of theta rhythms. These results are discussed in relation to studies in the literature which demonstrate that RSA (rhythmical slow activity) is associated with memory-storage processes and our own hypothesis which underlines the importance of activation of septo-hippocampal cholinergic neurons in the early stages of these mnemonic processes.U PMID:6809247

  2. Dopamine Release in the Nonhuman Primate Caudate and Putamen Depends upon Site of Stimulation in the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Min, Hoon-Ki; Ross, Erika K.; Jo, Hang Joon; Cho, Shinho; Settell, Megan L.; Jeong, Ju Ho; Duffy, Penelope S.; Chang, Su-Youne; Bennet, Kevin E.; Blaha, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective treatment for medically refractory Parkinson's disease. Although DBS has recognized clinical utility, its biologic mechanisms are not fully understood, and whether dopamine release is a potential factor in those mechanisms is in dispute. We tested the hypothesis that STN DBS-evoked dopamine release depends on the precise location of the stimulation site in the STN and the site of recording in the caudate and putamen. We conducted DBS with miniature, scaled-to-animal size, multicontact electrodes and used functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify the best dopamine recording site in the brains of nonhuman primates (rhesus macaques), which are highly representative of human brain anatomy and circuitry. Real-time stimulation-evoked dopamine release was monitored using in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. This study demonstrates that STN DBS-evoked dopamine release can be reduced or increased by redirecting STN stimulation to a slightly different site. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Electrical stimulation of deep structures of the brain, or deep brain stimulation (DBS), is used to modulate pathological brain activity. However, technological limitations and incomplete understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms of DBS prevent personalization of this therapy and may contribute to less-than-optimal outcomes. We have demonstrated that DBS coincides with changes in dopamine neurotransmitter release in the basal ganglia. Here we mapped relationships between DBS and changes in neurochemical activity. Importantly, this study shows that DBS-evoked dopamine release can be reduced or increased by refocusing the DBS on a slightly different stimulation site. PMID:27251623

  3. Population synaptic potentials evoked in lumbar motoneurons following stimulation of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis during carbachol-induced atonia.

    PubMed

    Yamuy, J; Jiménez, I; Morales, F; Rudomin, P; Chase, M

    1994-03-14

    The effect of electrical stimulation of the medullary nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc) on lumbar spinal cord motoneurons was studied in the decerebrate cat using sucrose-gap recordings from ventral roots. The NRGc was stimulated ipsi- and contralaterally before and during atonia elicited by the microinjection of carbachol into the pontine reticular formation. Prior to carbachol administration, the NRGc-induced response recorded from the sucrose-gap consisted of two consecutive excitatory population synaptic potentials followed by a long-lasting, small amplitude inhibitory population synaptic potential. Following carbachol injection, the same NRGc stimulus evoked a distinct, large amplitude inhibitory population synaptic potential, whereas the excitatory population synaptic potentials decreased in amplitude. In addition, after carbachol administration, the amplitude of the monosynaptic excitatory population synaptic potential, which was evoked by stimulation of group Ia afferents in hindlimb nerves, was reduced by 18 to 43%. When evoked at the peak of the NRGc-induced inhibitory response, this potential was further decreased in amplitude. Systemic strychnine administration (0.07-0.1 mg/kg, i.v.) blocked the NRGc-induced inhibitory population synaptic potential and promoted an increase in the amplitude of the excitatory population synaptic potentials induced by stimulation of the NRGc and group Ia afferents. These data indicate that during the state of carbachol-induced atonia, the NRGc effects on ipsi- and contralateral spinal cord motoneurons are predominantly inhibitory and that glycine is likely to be involved in this inhibitory process. These results support the hypothesis that the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis is part of the system responsible for state-dependent somatomotor inhibition that occurs during active sleep. PMID:8205484

  4. Spatial distance between anatomically- and physiologically-identified targets in subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Parvaresh-Rizi, Mansour; Tabibkhoei, Alireza; Shahidi, Gholamali; Vaidyanathan, Janardan; Tabibkhoei, Amirreza; Rohani, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation is the treatment of choice for carefully chosen patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and refractory motor fluctuations. We evaluated the value of intraoperative electrophysiology during STN deep brain stimulation (DBS) procedures in refining the anatomically-defined target. Methods: We determined the spatial distance between the anatomical and physiological targets along x, y and z axes in 50 patients with PD who underwent bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS surgery. Results: The mean spatial distance between anatomical and functional targets was 1.84 ± 0.88 mm and the least distances in different methods were 0.66 mm [standard error (SE): 0.07], 1.07 mm (SE: 0.08) and 1.01 mm (SE: 0.08) on x, y and z axes, respectively, for the combined method. Conclusion: The most physiologically-accurate anatomical targeting was achieved via a combination of multiple independent methods. There was a statistically significant difference between the anatomical and functional targets in all methods (even the combined) on the y coordinate, emphasizing the need for intra-operative electrophysiological monitoring to refine the anatomico-radiologically-defined target. PMID:27141275

  5. Delta frequency optogenetic stimulation of a thalamic nucleus reuniens is sufficient to produce working memory deficits; relevance to schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Aranda R.; Varela, Carmen; Zhang, Yuchun; Shen, Yinghua; Xiong, Lealia; Wilson, Matthew; Lisman, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Low-frequency (delta/theta) oscillations in the thalamocortical system are elevated in schizophrenia during wakefulness and are also induced in the NMDAR hypofunction rat model. To determine whether abnormal delta oscillations might produce functional deficits, we used optogenetic methods in awake rats. We illuminated channelrhodopsin-2 in the thalamic nucleus reuniens (RE) at delta frequency and measured the effect on working memory performance (the RE is involved in working memory (WM), a process affected in schizophrenia (SZ)). Methods We injected RE with a virus (AAV) to transduce cells with channelrhodopsin-2. An optical fiber was implanted just dorsal to the hippocampus in order to illuminate RE axon terminals. Results During optogenetic delta frequency stimulation, rats displayed a strong WM deficit. On the following day, performance was normal if illumination was omitted. Conclusions The optogenetic experiments showed that delta frequency stimulation of a thalamic nucleus is sufficient to produce deficits in WM. This result supports the hypothesis that delta frequency bursting in particular thalamic nuclei has a causal role producing WM deficits in this SZ. The action potentials in these bursts may jam communication through the thalamus, thereby interfering with behaviors dependent on WM. Studies in thalamic slices using the NMDAR hypofunction model show that delta frequency bursting is dependent on T-type Ca2+ channels, a result that we confirmed here in vivo. These channels, which are strongly implicated in SZ by GWAS studies, may thus be a therapeutic target for treatment of SZ. PMID:25891221

  6. Stimulated dopamine overflow and alpha-synuclein expression in the nucleus accumbens core distinguish rats bred for differential ethanol preference.

    PubMed

    Pelkonen, Anssi; Hiltunen, Mikko; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Yavich, Leonid

    2010-08-01

    The key neurochemical systems and structures involved in the predisposition to substance abuse and preference to ethanol (EtOH) are not known in detail but clearly dopamine (DA) is an important modulator of addiction. Recent data indicate that alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn), a pre-synaptic protein, plays a role in regulation of DA release from the pre-synaptic terminals in striatum and the expression of this protein is different after drug abuse or following abstinence. In the present work, we analysed stimulated DA overflow in the dorsal and ventral striatum in EtOH naïve alko alchohol (AA) and alko non-alchohol (ANA) rats selected for more than 100 generations for their differential EtOH preference. In the same structures, we studied the expression of alpha-syn using western blotting. AA rats, in comparison with ANA rats, showed a marked reduction of stimulated peak DA overflow and higher levels of alpha-syn in the nucleus accumbens core. In the same structure, DA re-uptake was increased in AA rats in comparison with ANA rats. The effects of EtOH at low (0.1 g/kg) and higher (3 mg/kg) doses on DA overflow measured in the nucleus accumbens shell were similar in both lines. These results indicate that high expression of alpha-syn may contribute to the reduced DA overflow and the possible activation of re-uptake in the nucleus accumbens core of AA rats in comparison with ANA rats. PMID:20533994

  7. The fine structure of the lymphocyte nucleus under conditions of phytohaemagglutinin stimulation.

    PubMed

    Valkov, I

    1975-01-01

    The nucleus of PHA (phytohaemagglutinin) cultured lymphocytes is studied by EDTA, Thalium-Schiff and uranyl-lead techniques. Scattering of the dense chromatin, increase in the number of NB (nuclear bodies) and nucleolar modifications are established. Transportation is seen of granules similar to perichromatin ones from the nucleus into the cytoplasm. Morphometric investigation reveals a decrease between 7,7 and 26,3% of the dense chromatin and also that the number of PCG (perichromatin granules) to be the greatest in the untransformed PHA lymphocytes, e.g. B lymphocytes. It is established in new born chickens that the lymphocytes of the bourse of Fabricius are richer in PCG than these of the thymus. PMID:1080322

  8. Stimulation of raphe (obscurus) nucleus causes long-term potentiation of phrenic nerve activity in cat.

    PubMed

    Millhorn, D E

    1986-12-01

    1. The respiratory response, measured as integrated phrenic nerve activity, during and for up to an hour following 10 min of continuous electrical stimulation of raphe obscurus was quantitated in anaesthetized, artificially ventilated cats whose carotid sinus nerves and vagus nerves had been cut. End-tidal PCO2 and body temperature were kept constant with servocontrollers. 2. Stimulation of raphe obscurus caused a significant increase in both phrenic tidal activity and respiratory frequency that persisted following cessation of the stimulus. This persistent facilitation is referred to as 'long-term potentiation' of respiration. 3. Control stimulations in the parenchyma of the medulla oblongata failed to stimulate respiration and cause the long-term potentiation. 4. Both the direct facilitatory effects of raphe obscurus stimulation on phrenic nerve activity and the long-term potentiation of respiration following the stimulus were prevented by pre-treating cats with methysergide, a serotonin receptor antagonist. 5. The results are discussed in terms of the raphe obscurus being the potential source of the long-term potentiation of respiration that occurs following stimulation of carotid body afferents (Millhorn, Eldridge & Waldrop, 1980a, b). PMID:3114470

  9. Active stimulation site of nucleus accumbens deep brain stimulation in obsessive-compulsive disorder is localized in the ventral internal capsule.

    PubMed

    van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Bosch, D Andries; Mantione, Mariska H M; Figee, Martijn; Denys, Damiaan A J P; Schuurman, P Richard

    2013-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic psychiatric disorder characterized by persistent thoughts and repetitive ritualistic behaviours. Despite optimal cognitive-behavioral and pharmacological therapy, approximately 10 % of patients remain treatment-resistant. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is being investigated as experimental therapy for treatment-refractory OCD. In the current study, we determined the relationship between anatomical location of active electrode contacts and clinical outcome in 16 OCD patients undergoing bilateral nucleus accumbens (NAc) DBS. We found that most patients actually do not receive active stimulation in the NAc but in the more laterally, anteriorly and dorsally located ventral part of the anterior limb of the internal capsule, ventral ALIC (vALIC). Our nine patients receiving bilateral vALIC DBS improved on average 73 % on their Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) scores, whereas the six patients with their centers of stimulation located otherwise improved on average only 42 %. We therefore propose bilateral vALIC as a promising new DBS target for patients with treatment-refractory OCD. Future studies employing a direct vALIC targeting approach in larger patient numbers are needed to test whether this proposal holds true. PMID:23652657

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the subthalamic nucleus for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Arjun S; Bynevelt, Michael; Lind, Christopher R P

    2016-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is one of the most important stereotactic targets in neurosurgery, and its accurate imaging is crucial. With improving MRI sequences there is impetus for direct targeting of the STN. High-quality, distortion-free images are paramount. Image reconstruction techniques appear to show the greatest promise in balancing the issue of geometrical distortion and STN edge detection. Existing spin echo- and susceptibility-based MRI sequences are compared with new image reconstruction methods. Quantitative susceptibility mapping is the most promising technique for stereotactic imaging of the STN. PMID:26295914

  11. Effect of monaural and binaural stimulation on cytoplasmic RNA content in cells of the central nucleus of the cat inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Shmigidina, G N

    1981-01-01

    A cytophotometric study of sections stained with gallocyanin and chrome alum showed that monaural stimulation for 2 h and binaural stimulation for 1.5 h with rhythmic noise signals led to a marked increase in the cytoplasmic RNA content per cell in the principal and large multipolar neurons of the dorsal and ventral parts of the ventrolateral region of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. The increase in cytoplasmic RNA content in the principal cells of the ipsi- and contralateral parts of this nucleus relative to the stimulated ear in the case of monaural stimulation and the increase in RNA content in response to binaural stimulation suggests a uniform distribution of bilaterally converging connections from the lower nuclei of the auditory system on the principal cells. The increase in cytoplasmic RNA in the large multipolar cells of the contralateral central nucleus in response to monaural stimulation is evidence of the predominantly contralateral projection to these cells. The results are evidence of convergence of binaural influences on the principal and large multipolar cells of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. PMID:6173796

  12. High-Frequency Stimulation at the Subthalamic Nucleus Suppresses Excessive Self-Grooming in Autism-Like Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Chang, Andrew D; Berges, Victoria A; Chung, Sunho J; Fridman, Gene Y; Baraban, Jay M; Reti, Irving M

    2016-06-01

    Approximately one quarter of individuals with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) display self-injurious behavior (SIB) ranging from head banging to self-directed biting and punching. Sometimes, these behaviors are extreme and unresponsive to pharmacological and behavioral therapies. We have found electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can produce life-changing results, with more than 90% suppression of SIB frequency. However, these patients typically require frequent maintenance ECT (mECT), as often as every 5 days, to sustain the improvement gained during the acute course. Long-term consequences of such frequent mECT started as early as childhood in some cases are unknown. Accordingly, there is a need for alternative forms of chronic stimulation for these patients. To explore the feasibility of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for intractable SIB seen in some patients with an ASD, we utilized two genetically distinct mouse models demonstrating excessive self-grooming, namely the Viaat-Mecp2(-/y) and Shank3B(-/-) lines, and administered high-frequency stimulation (HFS) via implanted electrodes at the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS). We found that STN-HFS significantly suppressed excessive self-grooming in both genetic lines. Suppression occurs both acutely when stimulation is switched on, and persists for several days after HFS is stopped. This effect was not explained by a change in locomotor activity, which was unaffected by STN-HFS. Likewise, social interaction deficits were not corrected by STN-HFS. Our data show STN-HFS suppresses excessive self-grooming in two autism-like mouse models, raising the possibility DBS might be used to treat intractable SIB associated with ASDs. Further studies are required to explore the circuitry engaged by STN-HFS, as well as other potential stimulation sites. Such studies might also yield clues about pathways, which could be modulated by non-invasive stimulatory techniques. PMID:26606849

  13. Subthalamic nucleus high-frequency stimulation generates a concomitant synaptic excitation–inhibition in substantia nigra pars reticulata

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Clémentine; Degos, Bertrand; Deniau, Jean-Michel; Venance, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Deep brain stimulation is an efficient treatment for various neurological pathologies and a promising tool for neuropsychiatric disorders. This is particularly exemplified by high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS), which has emerged as an efficient symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease. How STN-HFS works is still not fully elucidated. With dual patch-clamp recordings in rat brain slices, we analysed the cellular responses of STN stimulation on SNr neurons by simultaneously recording synaptic currents and firing activity. We showed that STN-HFS caused an increase of the spontaneous spiking activity in half of SNr neurons while the remaining ones displayed a decrease. At the synaptic level, STN stimulation triggered inward current in 58% of whole-cell recorded neurons and outward current in the remaining ones. Using a pharmacological approach, we showed that STN-HFS-evoked responses were mediated in all neurons by a balance between AMPA/NMDA receptors and GABAA receptors, whose ratio promotes either a net excitation or a net inhibition. Interestingly, we observed a higher excitation occurrence in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-treated rats. In vivo injections of phaseolus revealed that GABAergic pallido-nigral fibres travel through the STN whereas striato-nigral fibres travel below it. Therefore, electrical stimulation of the STN does not only recruit glutamatergic axons from the STN, but also GABAergic passing fibres probably from the globus pallidus. For the first time, we showed that STN-HFS induces concomitant excitatory–inhibitory synaptic currents in SNr neurons by recruitment of efferences and passing fibres allowing a tight control on basal ganglia outflow. PMID:21690190

  14. Stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus increases brown adipose tissue nerve activity via hypothalamic paraventricular and dorsomedial nuclei.

    PubMed

    Chitravanshi, Vineet C; Kawabe, Kazumi; Sapru, Hreday N

    2016-08-01

    Hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARCN) stimulation elicited increases in sympathetic nerve activity (IBATSNA) and temperature (TBAT) of interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT). The role of hypothalamic dorsomedial (DMN) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei in mediating these responses was studied in urethane-anesthetized, artificially ventilated, male Wistar rats. In different groups of rats, inhibition of neurons in the DMN and PVN by microinjections of muscimol attenuated the increases in IBATSNA and TBAT elicited by microinjections of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid into the ipsilateral ARCN. In other groups of rats, blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors by combined microinjections of D(-)-2-amino-7-phosphono-heptanoic acid (D-AP7) and NBQX into the DMN and PVN attenuated increases in IBATSNA and TBAT elicited by ARCN stimulation. Blockade of melanocortin 3/4 receptors in the DMN and PVN in other groups of rats resulted in attenuation of increases in IBATSNA and TBAT elicited by ipsilateral ARCN stimulation. Microinjections of Fluoro-Gold into the DMN resulted in retrograde labeling of cells in the ipsilateral ARCN, and some of these cells contained proopiomelanocortin (POMC), α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), or vesicular glutamate transporter-3. Since similar projections from ARCN to the PVN have been reported by us and others, these results indicate that neurons containing POMC, α-MSH, and glutamate project from the ARCN to the DMN and PVN. Stimulation of ARCN results in the release of α-MSH and glutamate in the DMN and PVN which, in turn, cause increases in IBATSNA and TBAT. PMID:27402666

  15. Modulation of serotonin dynamics in the dorsal raphe nucleus via high frequency medial prefrontal cortex stimulation.

    PubMed

    Srejic, Luka R; Wood, Kevin M; Zeqja, Anisa; Hashemi, Parastoo; Hutchison, William D

    2016-10-01

    The subcallosal cingulate (SCC) region, or its rodent homologue the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and midbrain dorsal raphe (DR) are crucial nodes of the widespread network implicated in emotional regulation. Stimulation of the SCC is being explored as a potential treatment for depression. Because modulation of the 5-HT system is the most common pharmacological means of treating depression, we sought to establish 5-HT's role in the mPFC-DR projection. Using anaesthetized mice, we recorded neuronal activity in 49 neurons of the DR before, during, and after high frequency stimulation (HFS) of the mPFC. The majority of DR cells (74%) significantly decreased firing rate during HFS (p<0.001, 65.7±9.4% of baseline, 14 mice). To see the effect of mPFC-HFS on 5-HT neurons, we used transgenic mice with expression of the channelrhodopsin fusion protein directed to the 5-HT neuronal population. Neurons were categorized as 5-HT based on their excitatory response to blue light stimulation (p<0.05, n=11). Our main finding was that identified 5-HT neurons in the DR were clearly inhibited by HFS, albeit non-selectively. Lastly, we used fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to investigate the effects of mPFC-HFS on the release and reuptake of electrically stimulated 5-HT in the DR of C57BL/6J mice. Serotonin clearance was significantly faster following 5min HFS (2.3±1.0s, n=5, p<0.05) when compared to control levels (3.7±1.0s, n=5), indicating less release or more efficient 5-HT reuptake. Taken together, these findings imply that mPFC stimulation alters 5-HT activity dynamics in the DR. Such altered 5-HT dynamics may modulate the potential therapeutic mechanisms of SCC/mPFC stimulation. PMID:27326670

  16. The influence of bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on impulsivity and prepulse inhibition in Parkinson’s disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Lucy; Smith, Heather; Cruz, Priscilla De La; Campbell, Joannalee; Fama, Chris; Haller, Jessica; Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Durphy, Jennifer; Hanspal, Era; Molho, Eric; Barba, Anne; Shin, Damian; Pilitsis, Julie G.

    2015-01-01

    Background At least 14% of Parkinson disease (PD) patients develop impulse control disorders (ICDs). The pathophysiology behind these behaviors and the impact of deep brain stimulation in a real-life setting remains unclear. Objectives We prospectively examined the impact of bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) on ICDs in PD patients, as well as the relationship between impaired sensorimotor gaiting and impulsivity. Methods Patients undergoing bilateral STN-DBS were assessed for ICDs preoperatively and 1-year postoperatively using a validated questionnaire (QUIP-RS). A subset of patients completed the Balloon Analog Risk Task (BART) and auditory pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) testing. Results Analysis revealed 12 patients had an improvement in score assessing ICDs (“good responders” – GR; p = 0.006) while 4 had a worse or stable score (“poor responders” – PR; p > 0.05). GR further exemplified a significant decrease in hypersexual behavior (p = 0.005) and binge eating (p = 0.01). Impaired PPI responses also significantly correlated with impulsivity in BART (r = −0.72, p = 0.044). Discussion Following bilateral STN-DBS 75% of our cohort had a reduction in ICDs, thus suggesting deep brain stimulation effectively manages ICDs in PD. The role of impaired PPI in predisposition to ICDs in PD warrants further investigation. PMID:26066569

  17. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation Modulates Motor Cortex Oscillatory Activity in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devos, D.; Labyt, E.; Derambure, P.; Bourriez, J. L.; Cassim, F.; Reyns, N.; Blond, S.; Guieu, J. D.; Destee, A.; Defebvre, L.

    2004-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, impaired motor preparation has been related to an increased latency in the appearance of movement-related desynchronization (MRD) throughout the contralateral primary sensorimotor (PSM) cortex. Internal globus pallidus (GPi) stimulation improved movement desynchronization over the PSM cortex during movement execution but…

  18. Cervical Stimulation Activates A1 and Locus Coeruleus Neurons that Project to the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Poletini, Maristela O.; McKee, De’Nise T.; Szawka, Raphael E.; Bertram, Richard; Helena, Cleyde V. V.; Freeman, Marc E.

    2012-01-01

    In female rats, stimulation of the uterine cervix during mating induces two daily surges of prolactin. Inhibition of hypothalamic dopamine release and stimulation of oxytocin neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) are required for prolactin secretion. We aim to better understand how stimulation of the uterine cervix is translated into two daily prolactin surges. We hypothesize that noradrenergic neurons in the A1, A2, and locus coeruleus (LC) are responsible for conveying the peripheral stimulus to the PVN. In order to determine whether projections from these neurons to the PVN are activated by cervical stimulation (CS), we injected a retrograde tracer, Fluoro-Gold (FG), into the PVN of ovariectomized rats. Fourteen days after injection, animals were submitted to artificial CS or handling and perfused with a fixative solution. Brains were removed and sectioned from the A1, A2, and LC for c-Fos, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and FG triple-labeling using immunohistochemistry. CS increased the percentage of TH/FG+ double-labeled neurons expressing c-Fos in the A1 and LC. CS also increased the percentage of TH+ neurons expressing c-Fos within the A1 and A2, independent of their projections to the PVN. Our data reinforce the significant contributions of the A1 and A2 to carry sensory information during mating, and provide evidence of a functional pathway in which CS activates A1 and LC neurons projecting to the PVN, which is potentially involved in the translation of CS into two daily prolactin surges. PMID:22732530

  19. Effect of stimulation of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis on the membrane potential of cat lumbar motoneurons during sleep and wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Chase, M H; Morales, F R; Boxer, P A; Fung, S J; Soja, P J

    1986-10-29

    The present study was performed in order to determine the effect of electrical stimulation of the medullary nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc) on the membrane potential of spinal cord motoneurons during sleep and wakefulness. Accordingly, intracellular recordings were obtained from lumbar motoneurons in unanesthetized normally respiring cats during naturally occurring states of wakefulness, quiet sleep and active sleep. Electrical stimuli applied to the NRGc evoked synaptic potentials which occurred at short latency (less than 10 ms) and did not exhibit consistent changes in their waveforms during any states of sleep or wakefulness. During wakefulness and quiet sleep, longer latency (greater than 20 ms) low-amplitude hyperpolarizing potentials occasionally followed NRGc stimulation. However, during active sleep, NRGc stimulation produced, in all motoneurons, relatively large hyperpolarizing potentials that were characterized by a mean amplitude of 3.5 +/- 0.4 mV (mean +/- S.E.M.), a mean latency-to-peak of 43.0 +/- 0.8 ms, and an average duration of 34.4 +/- 1.7 ms. These potentials were capable of blocking the generation of orthodromic spikes elicited by sciatic nerve stimulation. When anodal current or chloride was passed through the recording electrode, the hyperpolarizing potentials decreased in amplitude, and in some cases their polarity was reversed. These results indicate that the active sleep-specific hyperpolarizing potentials were inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. Thus, the NRGc possesses the capability of providing a postsynaptic inhibitory drive that is directed toward lumbar motoneurons which is dependent on the occurrence of the behavioral state of active sleep.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3779411

  20. α2-Adrenergic Stimulation of the Ventrolateral Preoptic Nucleus Destabilizes the Anesthetic State

    PubMed Central

    McCarren, Hilary S.; Chalifoux, Michael R.; Han, Bo; Moore, Jason T.; Meng, Qing Cheng; Baron-Hionis, Nina; Sedigh-Sarvestani, Madineh; Contreras, Diego; Beck, Sheryl G.

    2014-01-01

    The sleep-promoting ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) shares reciprocal inhibitory inputs with wake–active neuronal nuclei, including the locus ceruleus. Electrophysiologically, sleep-promoting neurons in the VLPO are directly depolarized by the general anesthetic isoflurane and hyperpolarized by norepinephrine, a wake-promoting neurotransmitter. However, the integration of these competing influences on the VLPO, a sleep- and anesthetic-active structure, has yet to be evaluated in either brain slices in vitro or the intact organism. Single-cell multiplex RT-PCR conducted on both isoflurane-activated, putative sleep-promoting VLPO neurons and neighboring, state-indifferent VLPO neurons in mouse brain slices revealed widespread expression of α2A-, α2B- and α2C-adrenergic receptors in both populations. Indeed, both norepinephrine and the highly selective α2 agonist dexmedetomidine each reversed the VLPO depolarization induced by isoflurane in slices in vitro. When microinjected directly into the VLPO of a mouse lightly anesthetized with isoflurane, dexmedetomidine increased behavioral arousal and reduced the depressant effects of isoflurane on barrel cortex somatosensory-evoked potentials but failed to elicit spectral changes in spontaneous EEG. Based on these observations, we conclude that local modulation of α-adrenergic activity in the VLPO destabilizes, but does not fully antagonize, the anesthetic state, thus priming the brain for anesthetic emergence. PMID:25471576

  1. α2-Adrenergic stimulation of the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus destabilizes the anesthetic state.

    PubMed

    McCarren, Hilary S; Chalifoux, Michael R; Han, Bo; Moore, Jason T; Meng, Qing Cheng; Baron-Hionis, Nina; Sedigh-Sarvestani, Madineh; Contreras, Diego; Beck, Sheryl G; Kelz, Max B

    2014-12-01

    The sleep-promoting ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) shares reciprocal inhibitory inputs with wake-active neuronal nuclei, including the locus ceruleus. Electrophysiologically, sleep-promoting neurons in the VLPO are directly depolarized by the general anesthetic isoflurane and hyperpolarized by norepinephrine, a wake-promoting neurotransmitter. However, the integration of these competing influences on the VLPO, a sleep- and anesthetic-active structure, has yet to be evaluated in either brain slices in vitro or the intact organism. Single-cell multiplex RT-PCR conducted on both isoflurane-activated, putative sleep-promoting VLPO neurons and neighboring, state-indifferent VLPO neurons in mouse brain slices revealed widespread expression of α2A-, α2B- and α2C-adrenergic receptors in both populations. Indeed, both norepinephrine and the highly selective α2 agonist dexmedetomidine each reversed the VLPO depolarization induced by isoflurane in slices in vitro. When microinjected directly into the VLPO of a mouse lightly anesthetized with isoflurane, dexmedetomidine increased behavioral arousal and reduced the depressant effects of isoflurane on barrel cortex somatosensory-evoked potentials but failed to elicit spectral changes in spontaneous EEG. Based on these observations, we conclude that local modulation of α-adrenergic activity in the VLPO destabilizes, but does not fully antagonize, the anesthetic state, thus priming the brain for anesthetic emergence. PMID:25471576

  2. Spatial distribution of neural activity in the anterior olfactory nucleus evoked by odor and electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    KAY, RACHEL B.; MEYER, ELIZABETH AMORY; ILLIG, KURT R.; BRUNJES, PETE C.

    2012-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that complex odorant stimuli are parsed into separate data streams in the glomeruli of the olfactory bulb, yielding a combinatorial “odotopic map.” However, this pattern does not appear to be maintained in the piriform cortex, where stimuli appear to be coded in a distributed fashion. The anterior olfactory nucleus (AON) is intermediate and reciprocally interconnected between these two structures, and also provides a route for the interhemispheric transfer of olfactory information. The present study examined potential coding strategies used by the AON. Rats were exposed to either caproic acid, butyric acid, limonene, or purified air and the spatial distribution of Fos-immunolabeled cells was quantified. The two major subregions of the AON exhibited different results. Distinct odor-specific spatial patterns of activity were observed in pars externa, suggesting that it employs a topographic strategy for odor representation similar to the olfactory bulb. A spatially distributed pattern that did not appear to depend on odor identity was observed in pars principalis, suggesting that it employs a distributed representation of odors more similar to that seen in the piriform cortex. PMID:21165975

  3. Cue-evoked dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens shell tracks reinforcer magnitude during intracranial self-stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Beyene, Manna; Carelli, Regina M.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2010-01-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine system is critically involved in modulating reward-seeking behavior and is transiently activated upon presentation of reward-predictive cues. It has previously been shown, using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in behaving rats, that cues predicting a variety of reinforcers including food/water, cocaine or intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) elicit time-locked transient fluctuations in dopamine concentration in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell. These dopamine transients have been found to correlate with reward-related learning and are believed to promote reward-seeking behavior. Here, we investigated the effects of varying reinforcer magnitude (intracranial stimulation parameters) on cue-evoked dopamine release in the NAc shell in rats performing ICSS. We found that the amplitude of cue-evoked dopamine is adaptable, tracks reinforcer magnitude and is significantly correlated with ICSS seeking behavior. Specifically, the concentration of cue-associated dopamine transients increased significantly with increasing reinforcer magnitude, while, at the same time, the latency to lever press decreased with reinforcer magnitude. These data support the proposed role of NAc dopamine in the facilitation of reward-seeking and provide unique insight into factors influencing the plasticity of dopaminergic signaling during behavior. PMID:20600644

  4. Cue-evoked dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens shell tracks reinforcer magnitude during intracranial self-stimulation.

    PubMed

    Beyene, M; Carelli, R M; Wightman, R M

    2010-09-15

    The mesolimbic dopamine system is critically involved in modulating reward-seeking behavior and is transiently activated upon presentation of reward-predictive cues. It has previously been shown, using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in behaving rats, that cues predicting a variety of reinforcers including food/water, cocaine or intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) elicit time-locked transient fluctuations in dopamine concentration in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell. These dopamine transients have been found to correlate with reward-related learning and are believed to promote reward-seeking behavior. Here, we investigated the effects of varying reinforcer magnitude (intracranial stimulation parameters) on cue-evoked dopamine release in the NAc shell in rats performing ICSS. We found that the amplitude of cue-evoked dopamine is adaptable, tracks reinforcer magnitude and is significantly correlated with ICSS seeking behavior. Specifically, the concentration of cue-associated dopamine transients increased significantly with increasing reinforcer magnitude, while, at the same time, the latency to lever press decreased with reinforcer magnitude. These data support the proposed role of NAc dopamine in the facilitation of reward-seeking and provide unique insight into factors influencing the plasticity of dopaminergic signaling during behavior. PMID:20600644

  5. Characteristic laryngoscopic findings in Parkinson's disease patients after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation and its correlation with voice disorder.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Takashi; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Ohdake, Reiko; Yoneyama, Noritaka; Hara, Kazuhiro; Ito, Mizuki; Hirayama, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Kajita, Yasukazu; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Sobue, Gen

    2015-12-01

    Speech and voice disorders are one of the most common adverse effects in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients treated with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS). However, the pathophysiology of voice and laryngeal dysfunction after STN-DBS remains unclear. We assessed 47 PD patients (22 treated with bilateral STN-DBS (PD-DBS) and 25 treated medically (PD-Med); all patients in both groups matched by age, sex, disease duration, and motor and cognitive function) using the objective and subjective voice assessment batteries (GRBAS scale and Voice Handicap Index), and laryngoscopy. Laryngoscopic examinations revealed that PD-DBS patients showed a significantly higher incidence of incomplete glottal closure (77 vs 48 %; p = 0.039), hyperadduction of the false vocal folds (73 vs 44 %; p = 0.047), anteroposterior hypercompression (50 vs 20 %; p = 0.030) and asymmetrical glottal movement (50 vs 16 %; p = 0.002) than PD-Med patients. On- and off-stimulation assessment revealed that STN-DBS could induce or aggravate incomplete glottal closure, hyperadduction of the false vocal folds, anteroposterior hypercompression, and asymmetrical glottal movement. Incomplete glottal closure and hyperadduction of the false vocal folds significantly correlated with breathiness and strained voice, respectively (r = 0.590 and 0.539). We should adjust patients' DBS settings in consideration of voice and laryngeal functions as well as motor function. PMID:26254905

  6. [Response of vasopressin and tyrosine hydroxylase expressing neurons of the rat supraoptic nucleus to chronic osmotic stimulation].

    PubMed

    Abramova, M A; Calas, A; Maiily, P; Thibault, J; Ugriumov, M V

    1999-06-01

    This study has evaluated the dynamic of intracellular vasopressin and tyrosine hydroxylase contents in the neuron cell bodies in the supraoptic nucleus and in the axons of the posterior lobe in rats drinking 2% NaCl for 1, 2, and 3 weeks. The number of vasopressin-immunoreactive neurons increased by the end of the second week of osmotic stimulation that might be explained by the onset of vasopressin synthesis in the neurons which do not synthesize this neurohormone under normal physiological conditions. The concentration of vasopressin fell down continuously during the first two weeks of salt-loading, apparently, due to predominance of the vasopressin release over its synthesis. Over the third week of salt-loading, the intracellular concentration of vasopressin was not changed significantly suggesting the establishment of the dynamic equilibrium between the vasopressin synthesis and release. The number of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons and the amount of tyrosine hydroxylase in cell bodies and the large axonal swellings, Herring bodies, increased gradually showing that the rate of tyrosine hydroxylase synthesis prevailed over that of its enzymatic degradation. Thus, the chronic stimulation of vasopressin neurons is accompanied by a number of the adaptive reactions; the most important is related to the onset of vasopressin and tyrosine hydroxylase synthesis in the neurons which do not synthetize both of them under normal conditions. PMID:10512003

  7. The angiotensin II-AT1 receptor stimulates reactive oxygen species within the cell nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, Karl D.; Gwathmey, TanYa M.; Michalek, Ryan D.; Grayson, Jason M.; Chappell, Mark C.

    2009-06-26

    We and others have reported significant expression of the Ang II Type 1 receptor (AT1R) on renal nuclei; thus, the present study assessed the functional pathways and distribution of the intracellular AT1R on isolated nuclei. Ang II (1 nM) stimulated DCF fluorescence, an intranuclear indicator of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while the AT1R antagonist losartan or the NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitor DPI abolished the increase in ROS. Dual labeling of nuclei with antibodies against nucleoporin 62 (Nup62) and AT1R or the NADPH oxidase isoform NOX4 revealed complete overlap of the Nup62 and AT1R (99%) by flow cytometry, while NOX4 was present on 65% of nuclei. Treatment of nuclei with a PKC agonist increased ROS while the PKC inhibitor GF109203X or PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 abolished Ang II stimulation of ROS. We conclude that the Ang II-AT1R-PKC axis may directly influence nuclear function within the kidney through a redox sensitive pathway.

  8. Operative techniques and morbidity with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in 100 consecutive patients with advanced Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, R R; Kim, B; McClelland, S; Senatus, P B; Winfield, L M; Pullman, S L; Yu, Q; Ford, B; McKhann, G M

    2006-01-01

    Objective Subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation for patients with medically refractory Parkinson disease (PD) is expanding. Reported experience has provided some indication of techniques, efficacy, and morbidity, but few centres have reported more than 50 patients. To expand this knowledge, we reviewed our experience with a large series of consecutive patients. Methods From March 1999 to September 2003, 191 subthalamic stimulator devices (19 unilateral) were implanted in 100 patients with PD at New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center. Sixteen patients had undergone a prior surgery for PD (pallidotomy, thalamotomy, or fetal transplant). Microelectrode guided implantations were performed using techniques similar to those described previously. Electrode implantation occurred 1–2 weeks before outpatient pulse generator implantation. Results Reductions of dyskinesias and off severity/duration were similar to prior published reports. Morbidity included: 7 device infections (3.7%), 1 cerebral infarct, 1 intracerebral haematoma, 1 subdural haematoma, 1 air embolism, 2 wound haematomas requiring drainage (1.0%), 2 skin erosions over implanted hardware (1.0%), 3 periprocedural seizures (1.6%), 6 brain electrode revisions (3.1%), postoperative confusion in 13 patients (6.8%), and 16 battery failures (8.4%). Of the 100 patients, there were no surgical deaths or permanent new neurological deficits. The average hospital stay for all 100 patients was 3.1 days. Conclusion Subthalamic stimulator implantation in a large consecutive series of patients with PD produced significant clinical improvement without mortality or major neurological morbidity. Morbidity primarily involved device infections and hardware/wound revisions. PMID:16361585

  9. Deep Brain Stimulation of Medial Dorsal and Ventral Anterior Nucleus of the Thalamus in OCD: A Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Lenartz, Doris; Kuhn, Jens; Sturm, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Background The current notion that cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits are involved in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has instigated the search for the most suitable target for deep brain stimulation (DBS). However, despite extensive research, uncertainty about the ideal target remains with many structures being underexplored. The aim of this report is to address a new target for DBS, the medial dorsal (MD) and the ventral anterior (VA) nucleus of the thalamus, which has thus far received little attention in the treatment of OCD. Methods In this retrospective trial, four patients (three female, one male) aged 31–48 years, suffering from therapy-refractory OCD underwent high-frequency DBS of the MD and VA. In two patients (de novo group) the thalamus was chosen as a primary target for DBS, whereas in two patients (rescue DBS group) lead implantation was performed in a rescue DBS attempt following unsuccessful primary stimulation. Results Continuous thalamic stimulation yielded no significant improvement in OCD symptom severity. Over the course of thalamic DBS symptoms improved in only one patient who showed “partial response” on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive (Y-BOCS) Scale. Beck Depression Inventory scores dropped by around 46% in the de novo group; anxiety symptoms improved by up to 34%. In the de novo DBS group no effect of DBS on anxiety and mood was observable. Conclusion MD/VA-DBS yielded no adequate alleviation of therapy-refractory OCD, the overall strategy in targeting MD/VA as described in this paper can thus not be recommended in DBS for OCD. The magnocellular portion of MD (MDMC), however, might prove a promising target in the treatment of mood related and anxiety disorders. PMID:27504631

  10. Effects of Medication and Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation on Tongue Movements in Speakers with Parkinson's Disease Using Electropalatography: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartinger, Mariam; Tripoliti, Elina; Hardcastle, William J.; Limousin, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) affects speech in the majority of patients. Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is particularly effective in reducing tremor and rigidity. However, its effect on speech is variable. The aim of this pilot study was to quantify the effects of bilateral STN-DBS and medication on articulation, using…

  11. Articulatory Closure Proficiency in Patients with Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Caudal Zona Incerta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Olofsson, Katarina; Blomstedt, Patric; Linder, Jan; Nordh, Erik; van Doorn, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed at comparing the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the caudal zona incerta (cZi) on the proficiency in achieving oral closure and release during plosive production of people with Parkinson's disease. Method: Nineteen patients participated preoperatively and…

  12. GLP-1 receptor stimulation of the lateral parabrachial nucleus reduces food intake: neuroanatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral evidence.

    PubMed

    Richard, Jennifer E; Farkas, Imre; Anesten, Fredrik; Anderberg, Rozita H; Dickson, Suzanne L; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank; Jansson, John-Olov; Liposits, Zsolt; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2014-11-01

    The parabrachial nucleus (PBN) is a key nucleus for the regulation of feeding behavior. Inhibitory inputs from the hypothalamus to the PBN play a crucial role in the normal maintenance of feeding behavior, because their loss leads to starvation. Viscerosensory stimuli result in neuronal activation of the PBN. However, the origin and neurochemical identity of the excitatory neuronal input to the PBN remain largely unexplored. Here, we hypothesize that hindbrain glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) neurons provide excitatory inputs to the PBN, activation of which may lead to a reduction in feeding behavior. Our data, obtained from mice expressing the yellow fluorescent protein in GLP-1-producing neurons, revealed that hindbrain GLP-1-producing neurons project to the lateral PBN (lPBN). Stimulation of lPBN GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) reduced the intake of chow and palatable food and decreased body weight in rats. It also activated lPBN neurons, reflected by an increase in the number of c-Fos-positive cells in this region. Further support for an excitatory role of GLP-1 in the PBN is provided by electrophysiological studies showing a remarkable increase in firing of lPBN neurons after Exendin-4 application. We show that within the PBN, GLP-1R activation increased gene expression of 2 energy balance regulating peptides, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and IL-6. Moreover, nearly 70% of the lPBN GLP-1 fibers innervated lPBN CGRP neurons. Direct intra-lPBN CGRP application resulted in anorexia. Collectively, our molecular, anatomical, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral data provide evidence for a functional role of the GLP-1R for feeding control in the PBN. PMID:25116706

  13. Thyroid-induced worsening of parkinsonian tremor resistant to drugs and subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Minár, Michal; Valkovič, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Symptoms of both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis can be easily overlooked in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We report on a patient whose parkinsonian tremor worsened and proved refractory not only to common treatment, but also to deep brain stimulation (DBS). Case Presentation. A 61-year-old woman with advanced PD underwent bilateral subthalamic DBS, with an excellent outcome. Twenty-one months after the surgery, however, patient's resting/postural tremor markedly worsened. There was a slight improvement for 1 month after repeated adjustments of DBS parameters, but then the tremor worsened again. Since even a minimal increase of the dose of dopaminergic drugs caused extremely severe dyskinesias, an anticholinergic drug biperiden and benzodiazepine clonazepam were introduced, what helped for another month. With the onset of severe diarrhoea, a laboratory workup was performed. Thyrotoxicosis was detected. During treatment with the antithyroid agent carbimazole, the parkinsonian tremor clearly improved within two weeks. Conclusion. A hyperthyroid state can markedly exaggerate all forms of tremor, as well as other types of movement disorders. This condition can be overlooked or masked by other symptoms. Therefore, if the tremor in a patient with PD gradually worsens and proves resistant to the usual treatment, examine the thyroid gland. PMID:25628904

  14. Stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferents activates glutamatergic neurons in the parabrachial nucleus: relation to neurons containing nNOS.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi-Ling; Moazzami, Ali R; Longhurst, John C

    2005-08-16

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferents activates neurons in the parabrachial nucleus (PBN), a region known to play a role in central integration of cardiovascular autonomic reflexes. However, phenotypes of these activated neurons have not been well identified. Glutamate, an important excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, is involved in PBN-mediated cardiovascular responses. Recent identification of vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGLUT3) has provided a novel and unique marker to locate distinctive perikarya of neurons that use glutamate as a neurotransmitter. The action of glutamate in the brain is influenced by nitric oxide. Thus, using triple immunofluorescent labeling, the present study examined expression of c-Fos, an immediate early gene, in the neurons containing VGLUT3 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the PBN following stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferents. In anesthetized cats with bilateral barodenervation and cervical vagotomy, topical application of bradykinin (BK, 1-10 microg/ml, 50 microl, n = 6) on the left ventricle was performed six times, every 20 min. Repeated administration of BK elicited consistent increases in blood pressure over a 100 min period while no changes were noted in the animals treated with the vehicle for BK (0.9% saline, n=5). Compared to control cats, c-Fos expression was increased significantly in the cell bodies containing VGLUT3 as well as both VGLUT3 and nNOS in the external lateral PBN (elPBN) in BK-treated animals (all P < 0.01). In addition, using similar triple-staining method, we noted that fibers of activated neurons containing nNOS in the elPBN co-localized with vesicular glutamate transporter 2 following BK stimulation. These data suggest that glutamatergic neurons represent a cell type in the PBN that is activated by stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferents. Nitric oxide has the potential to influence the action of glutamatergic neurons in

  15. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in Early Stage Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Charles, David; Konrad, Peter E.; Neimat, Joseph S.; Molinari, Anna L.; Tramontana, Michael G.; Finder, Stuart G.; Gill, Chandler E.; Bliton, Mark J.; Kao, Chris C.; Phibbs, Fenna T.; Hedera, Peter; Salomon, Ronald M.; Cannard, Kevin R.; Wang, Lily; Song, Yanna; Davis, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective and approved therapy for advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD), and a recent study suggests efficacy in mid-stage disease. This manuscript reports the results of a pilot trial investigating preliminary safety and tolerability of DBS in early PD. Methods Thirty subjects with idiopathic PD (Hoehn & Yahr Stage II off medication), age 50–75, on medication ≥ 6 months but < 4 years, and without motor fluctuations or dyskinesias were randomized to optimal drug therapy (ODT) (n=15) or DBS+ODT (n=15). Co-primary endpoints were the time to reach a 4-point worsening from baseline in the UPDRS-III off therapy and the change in levodopa equivalent daily dose from baseline to 24 months. Results As hypothesized, the mean UPDRS total and part III scores were not significantly different on or off therapy at 24 months. The DBS+ODT group took less medication at all time points, and this reached maximum difference at 18 months. With a few exceptions, differences in neuropsychological functioning were not significant. Two subjects in the DBS+ODT group suffered serious adverse events; remaining adverse events were mild or transient. Conclusions This study demonstrates that subjects with early stage PD will enroll in and complete trials testing invasive therapies and provides preliminary evidence that DBS is well tolerated in early PD. The results of this trial provide the data necessary to design a large, phase III, double-blind, multicenter trial investigating the safety and efficacy of DBS in early PD. PMID:24768120

  16. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulates cell proliferation, proteoglycan synthesis and expression of growth factor-related genes in human nucleus pulposus cell line.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Y; Sakai, D; Iwashina, T; Iwabuchi, S; Mochida, J

    2009-01-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation has been shown to effect differentiation and activation of human chondrocytes. A study involving stimulation of rabbit disc cells with LIPUS revealed upregulation of cell proliferation and proteoglycan (PG) synthesis. However, the effect of LIPUS on human nucleus pulposus cells has not been investigated. In the present study, therefore, we investigated whether LIPUS stimulation of a human nucleus pulposus cell line (HNPSV-1) exerted a positive effect on cellular activity. HNPSV-1 cells were encapsulated in 1.2% sodium alginate solution at 1x10(5) cells/ml and cultured at 10 beads/well in 6-well plates. The cells were stimulated for 20 min each day using a LIPUS generator, and the effects of LIPUS were evaluated by measuring DNA and PG synthesis. Furthermore, mRNA expression was analyzed by cDNA microarray using total RNA extracted from the cultured cells. Our study revealed no significant difference in cell proliferation between the control and the ultrasound treated groups. However, PG production was significantly upregulated in HNPSV cells stimulated at intensities of 15, 30, 60, and 120 mW/cm(2) compared with the control. The results of cDNA array showed that LIPUS significantly stimulated the gene expression of growth factors and their receptors (BMP2, FGF7, TGFbetaR1 EGFRF1, VEGF). These findings suggest that LIPUS stimulation upregulates PG production in human nucleus pulposus cells by the enhancement of several matrix-related genes including growth factor-related genes. Safe and non-invasive stimulation using LIPUS may be a useful treatment for delaying the progression of disc degeneration. PMID:19598131

  17. A novel turning behavior control method for rat-robot through the stimulation of ventral posteromedial thalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kedi; Zhang, Jiacheng; Zhou, Hong; Lee, Ji Chao Tristan; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2016-02-01

    The concept of a rat-robot was initially introduced in 2002, bringing to the field, a novel area of research using modern research into neuroscience and robotics. This paper brings to the table, a study into the method best used for navigation systems in a rat-robot. Current research is epitomized by the use of reward-based spatial navigation, combining the concept of an induced reward sensation as well as a 'virtual touch' sensation to control the movement of the rat-robot. However, such methods are plagued by limitations affecting the success rate as well as preparation procedures which may have varying effects on different rats, even under similar conditions. Hence, this paper studies the stimulation of two different portions of the brain to induce a turning motion within the rat, namely the Ventral Posteromedial (VPM) thalamic nucleus as well as the Barrel-Field (BF) cortex and demonstrates the preferential usage of VPM as the choice use of navigational control in a rat-robot. PMID:26546880

  18. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT®LOUD) for Parkinson’s disease following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Spielman, Jennifer; Mahler, Leslie; Halpern, Angela; Gilley, Phllip; Klepitskaya, Olga; Ramig, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Intensive voice therapy (LSVT®LOUD) can effectively manage voice and speech symptoms associated with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). This small-group study evaluated voice and speech in individuals with and without deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) before and after LSVT LOUD, to determine whether outcomes for surgical subjects were comparable to non-surgical cohorts. Methods Eight subjects with PD (four with STN-DBS and four without) received LSVT LOUD four times a week for four weeks. Four additional subjects with PD remained untreated. Voice intensity (SPL), Vowel Articulation Index (VAI), the Voice Handicap Index (VHI), and a structured interview were evaluated before and after treatment and again six months later. Results Both treated groups showed significant increases in SPL from pre to post and six-month follow up. VAI was significantly higher for the treated groups compared to the untreated subjects at follow up. Several treated individuals had significant clinical improvement in VHI scores, particularly within the LSVT-DBS group. Treated individuals reported improvements in voice and speech in structured interviews; however, answers suggest more variable long-term maintenance within the LSVT-DBS group. The untreated group exhibited no significant changes in any measure throughout the study. Conclusions Results support LSVT LOUD for treating voice and speech in individuals with PD following STN-DBS surgery. However, modifications may be required to maintain functional improvements. PMID:21724193

  19. Chronic Deep Brain Stimulation of the Hypothalamic Nucleus in Wistar Rats Alters Circulatory Levels of Corticosterone and Proinflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Calleja-Castillo, Juan Manuel; De La Cruz-Aguilera, Dora Luz; Manjarrez, Joaquín; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Morales-Espinoza, Gabriel; Moreno-Aguilar, Julia; Hernández, Maria Eugenia; Aguirre-Cruz, Lucinda

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a therapeutic option for several diseases, but its effects on HPA axis activity and systemic inflammation are unknown. This study aimed to detect circulatory variations of corticosterone and cytokines levels in Wistar rats, after 21 days of DBS-at the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMHvl), unilateral cervical vagotomy (UCVgX), or UCVgX plus DBS. We included the respective control (C) and sham (S) groups (n = 6 rats per group). DBS treated rats had higher levels of TNF-α (120%; P < 0.01) and IFN-γ (305%; P < 0.001) but lower corticosterone concentration (48%; P < 0.001) than C and S. UCVgX animals showed increased corticosterone levels (154%; P < 0.001) versus C and S. UCVgX plus DBS increased IL-1β (402%; P < 0.001), IL-6 (160%; P < 0.001), and corsticosterone (178%; P < 0.001 versus 48%; P < 0.001) compared with the C and S groups. Chronic DBS at VMHvl induced a systemic inflammatory response accompanied by a decrease of HPA axis function. UCVgX rats experienced HPA axis hyperactivity as result of vagus nerve injury; however, DBS was unable to block the HPA axis hyperactivity induced by unilateral cervical vagotomy. Further studies are necessary to explore these findings and their clinical implication. PMID:24235973

  20. Cognitive Changes following Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation of Subthalamic Nucleus in Parkinson's Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangyu; Xiao, Jinsong; Zhang, Junjian

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nowadays, it has been largely acknowledged that deep brain stimulation of subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) can alleviate motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, but its effects on cognitive function remain unclear, which are not given enough attention by many clinical doctors and researchers. To date, 3 existing meta-analyses focusing on this issue included self-control studies and have not drawn consistent conclusions. The present study is the first to compare effect sizes of primary studies that include control groups, hoping to reveal the net cognitive outcomes after STN DBS and the clinical significance. Methods. A structured literature search was conducted using strict criteria. Only studies with control group could be included. Data on age, duration of disease, levodopa equivalent dosage (LED), and multiple cognitive scales were collected and pooled. Results. Of 172 articles identified, 10 studies (including 3 randomized controlled trials and 7 nonrandomized controlled studies) were eligible for inclusion. The results suggest that STN DBS results in decreased global cognition, memory, verbal fluency, and executive function compared with control group. No significant difference is found in other cognitive domains. Conclusions. STN DBS seems relatively safe with respect to cognitive function, and further studies should focus on the exact mechanisms of possible verbal deterioration after surgery in the future. PMID:27314016

  1. Differential effects of naloxone on rewarding electrical stimulation of the central nucleus of the amygdala and parabrachial complex in a place preference study.

    PubMed

    Agüera, Antonio D R; García, Raquel; Puerto, Amadeo

    2016-06-01

    The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is considered to be involved in different affective, sensory, regulatory, and acquisition processes. This study analyzed whether electrical stimulation of the PB-CeA system induces preferences in a concurrent place preference (cPP) task, as observed after stimulation of the parabrachial-insular cortex (PB-IC) axis. It also examined whether the rewarding effects are naloxone-dependent. The results show that electrical stimulation of the CeA and external lateral parabrachial subnucleus (LPBe) induces consistent preference behaviors in a cPP task. However, subcutaneous administration of an opiate antagonist (naloxone; 4mg/ml/kg) blocked the rewarding effect of the parabrachial stimulation but not that of the amygdala stimulation. These results are interpreted in the context of multiple brain reward systems that appear to differ both anatomically and neurochemically, notably with respect to the opiate system. PMID:27173444

  2. MSG-Evoked c-Fos Activity in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Is Dependent upon Fluid Delivery and Stimulation Parameters.

    PubMed

    Stratford, Jennifer M; Thompson, John A

    2016-03-01

    The marker of neuronal activation, c-Fos, can be used to visualize spatial patterns of neural activity in response to taste stimulation. Because animals will not voluntarily consume aversive tastes, these stimuli are infused directly into the oral cavity via intraoral cannulae, whereas appetitive stimuli are given in drinking bottles. Differences in these 2 methods make comparison of taste-evoked brain activity between results that utilize these methods problematic. Surprisingly, the intraoral cannulae experimental conditions that produce a similar pattern of c-Fos activity in response to taste stimulation remain unexplored. Stimulation pattern (e.g., constant/intermittent) and hydration state (e.g., water-restricted/hydrated) are the 2 primary differences between delivering tastes via bottles versus intraoral cannulae. Thus, we quantified monosodium glutamate (MSG)-evoked brain activity, as measured by c-Fos, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS; primary taste nucleus) across several conditions. The number and pattern of c-Fos neurons in the nTS of animals that were water-restricted and received a constant infusion of MSG via intraoral cannula most closely mimicked animals that consumed MSG from a bottle. Therefore, in order to compare c-Fos activity between cannulae-stimulated and bottle-stimulated animals, cannulated animals should be water restricted prior to stimulation, and receive taste stimuli at a constant flow. PMID:26762887

  3. Microinjections of α-melanocyte stimulating hormone into the nucleus ambiguus of the rat elicit vagally mediated bradycardia

    PubMed Central

    Chitravanshi, Vineet C.; Bhatt, Suresh; Sapru, Hreday N.

    2009-01-01

    Neurons that immunostain for alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) have been identified in the nucleus ambiguus (nAmb). The presence of mRNA for melanocortin type 4 receptors (MC4Rs) has also been reported in this nucleus. On the basis of this information, it was hypothesized that activation of MC4Rs in the nAmb may play a role in the regulation of cardiac function. This hypothesis was tested in urethane-anesthetized, artificially ventilated, adult male Wistar rats. Microinjections (30 nl) of α-MSH (0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 mM) into the nAmb of anesthetized rats elicited decreases in heart rate (HR; 1.3 ± 0.6, 3 ± 1, 11 ± 2, 46.3 ± 3, and 43.3 ± 7 bpm, respectively) and no changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP). Maximum decreases in HR were elicited by 0.8 mM concentration of α-MSH. Bradycardic responses to α-MSH were similar in unanesthetized midcollicular decerebrate rats. Microinjections of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (30 nl) into the nAmb did not elicit a HR response. Bilateral vagotomy completely abolished α-MSH-induced bradycardia. The decreases in HR elicited by α-MSH (0.8 mM) were completely blocked by a selective MC4R antagonist. Direct application of α-MSH on the nAmb neurons increased their firing, which was blocked by prior applications of the MC4R antagonist. Microinjections of the MC4R antagonist into the nAmb did not alter reflex bradycardic responses elicited by intravenous infusions of phenylephrine, suggesting that MC4Rs did not play a role in mediating the parasympathetic component of baroreflex-induced bradycardia. These results indicated that α-MSH microinjections into the nAmb exert excitatory effects on parasympathetic preganglionic nAmb neurons via MC4Rs, leading to bradycardic responses. PMID:19297540

  4. Efficacies of globus pallidus stimulation and subthalamic nucleus stimulation for advanced Parkinson’s disease: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Qian; Huang, Tao; Jiang, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the surgical procedure for patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease. Globus pallidus internus (GPi) and subthalamic nucleus (STN) are the most targeted locations for the procedure. To investigate the variable efficiencies for the two different locations, we conducted a meta-analysis to compare both stimulation sites. Materials and methods A systematic search was performed in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases. Randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacies of GPi and STN DBS were included. Clinical outcomes of motor function, nonmotor function, and quality of life (QOL) were collected for the meta-analysis. Results Ten eligible trials with 1,034 patients were included in the analysis. Unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale III (UPDRS-III) scores were collected at 6, 12, and 24 months postsurgery separately to assess the motor function of the patients. A statistically significant effect in favor of the GPi DBS was obtained in the off-medication/on-stimulation phase of UPDRS-III at 12 months (mean difference [MD] =6.87, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 3.00–10.74, P=0.57, I2=0%). However, GPi DBS showed an opposite result at 24 months (MD =−2.46, 95% CI: −4.91 to −0.02, P=0.05, I2=0%). In the on-medication/on-stimulation phase, GPi DBS obtained a worse outcome compared with STN DBS (MD =−2.90, 95% CI: −5.71 to −0.09, P=0.05, I2=0%). Compared with STN DBS, increased dosage of levodopa equivalent doses was needed in GPi DBS (standardized MD =0.60, 95% CI: 0.46–0.74, P<0.00001, I2=24%). Meanwhile, Beck Depression Inventory II scores demonstrated that STN has a better performance (standardized MD =−0.31, 95% CI: −0.51 to −0.12, P=0.002, I2=0%). As for neurocognitive phase postsurgery, GPi DBS showed better performance in three of the nine tests, especially in verbal fluency. Use of GPi DBS was associated with a greater effect in eight of the nine subscales of QOL. Conclusion

  5. Inhibition of the pontine Kölliker-Fuse nucleus reduces genioglossal activity elicited by stimulation of the retrotrapezoid chemoreceptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Silva, Josiane N; Lucena, Elvis V; Silva, Talita M; Damasceno, Rosélia S; Takakura, Ana C; Moreira, Thiago S

    2016-07-22

    The Kölliker-Fuse (KF) region, located in the dorsolateral pons, projects to several brainstem areas involved in respiratory regulation, including the chemoreceptor neurons within the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN). Several lines of evidence indicate that the pontine KF region plays an important role in the control of the upper airways for the maintenance of appropriate airflow to and from the lungs. Specifically, we hypothesized that the KF region is involved in mediating the response of the hypoglossal motor activity to central respiratory chemoreflex activation and to stimulation of the chemoreceptor neurons within the RTN region. To test this hypothesis, we combined immunohistochemistry and physiological experiments. We found that in the KF, the majority of biotinylated dextran amine (BDA)-labeled axonal varicosities contained detectable levels of vesicular glutamate transporter-2 (VGLUT2), but few contained glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (GAD67). The majority of the RTN neurons that were FluorGold (FG)-immunoreactive (i.e., projected to the KF) contained hypercapnia-induced Fos, but did not express tyrosine hydroxylase. In urethane-anesthetized sino-aortic denervated and vagotomized male Wistar rats, hypercapnia (10% CO2) or N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) injection (0.1mM) in the RTN increased diaphragm (DiaEMG) and genioglossus muscle (GGEMG) activities and elicited abdominal (AbdEMG) activity. Bilateral injection of muscimol (GABA-A agonist; 2mM) into the KF region reduced the increase in DiaEMG and GGEMG produced by hypercapnia or NMDA into the RTN. Our data suggest that activation of chemoreceptor neurons in the RTN produces a significant increase in the genioglossus muscle activity and the excitatory pathway is dependent on the neurons located in the dorsolateral pontine KF region. PMID:27126558

  6. Does acute, intense stimulation of oxytocin neurones in the supraoptic nucleus increase their content of oxytocin mRNA?

    PubMed

    Sumner, B E; Kawata, M; Russell, J A

    1989-06-12

    We investigated whether a sustained increase in oxytocin secretion, with or without enhanced electrical activity of the cell-bodies of oxytocin neurones, leads to a rapid increase in oxytocin mRNA content in these neurones. To stimulate oxytocin release, naloxone (2.5 mg/kg i.v. twice, 30 min apart) was given to urethane-anaesthetized female rats after intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) morphine or vehicle infusion for 5 days; in the latter, naloxone acts on the neurohypophysis to increase oxytocin release without affecting the electrical activity of oxytocin neurone cell-bodies, but in the former, naloxone acts both on the neucohypophysis and on the cell-bodies to excite them electrically. Oxytocin content in peripheral plasma was measured intermittently by radioimmunoassay for 4 h after i.v. naloxone or vehicle, then the brain was removed and cryostat sections were cut through the supraoptic nucleus (SON). Oxytocin mRNA content in individual neurones (25-50 per rat) was measured semiquantitatively by in situ hybridisation histochemistry, using a tritiated synthetic cDNA 25-mer oligonucleotide probe, autoradiographical visualisation, and computer-assisted image-analysis to measure silver grain density. Nalaxone increased oxytocin content in plasma 7-fold for at least 40 min in i.c.v. vehicle-infused rats, and 40-fold for at least 40 min in i.c.v. morphine-infused rats. Naloxone had no significant effect on the oxytocin mRNA content in labelled cells in the SON, and no effect on the proportion of labelled cells, in either the i.c.v. morphine- or i.c.v. vehicle-infused rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2743158

  7. Movement-Related Discharge in the Macaque Globus Pallidus during High-Frequency Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Zimnik, Andrew J.; Nora, Gerald J.; Desmurget, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) has largely replaced ablative therapies for Parkinson's disease. Because of the similar efficacies of the two treatments, it has been proposed that DBS acts by creating an “informational lesion,” whereby pathologic neuronal firing patterns are replaced by low-entropy, stimulus-entrained firing patterns. The informational lesion hypothesis, in its current form, states that DBS blocks the transmission of all information from the basal ganglia, including both pathologic firing patterns and normal, task-related modulations in activity. We tested this prediction in two healthy rhesus macaques by recording single-unit spiking activity from the globus pallidus (232 neurons) while the animals completed choice reaction time reaching movements with and without STN-DBS. Despite strong effects of DBS on the activity of most pallidal cells, reach-related modulations in firing rate were equally prevalent in the DBS-on and DBS-off states. This remained true even when the analysis was restricted to cells affected significantly by DBS. In addition, the overall form and timing of perimovement modulations in firing rate were preserved between DBS-on and DBS-off states in the majority of neurons (66%). Active movement and DBS had largely additive effects on the firing rate of most neurons, indicating an orthogonal relationship in which both inputs contribute independently to the overall firing rate of pallidal neurons. These findings suggest that STN-DBS does not act as an indiscriminate informational lesion but rather as a filter that permits task-related modulations in activity while, presumably, eliminating the pathological firing associated with parkinsonism. PMID:25740526

  8. High Frequency Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Leads to Presynaptic GABA(B)-Dependent Depression of Subthalamo-Nigral Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Dvorzhak, Anton; Gertler, Christoph; Harnack, Daniel; Grantyn, Rosemarie

    2013-01-01

    Patients with akinesia benefit from chronic high frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Among the mechanisms contributing to the therapeutic success of HFS-STN might be a suppression of activity in the output region of the basal ganglia. Indeed, recordings in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) of fully adult mice revealed that HFS-STN consistently produced a reduction of compound glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents at a time when the tetrodotoxin-sensitive components of the local field potentials had already recovered after the high frequency activation. These observations suggest that HFS-STN not only alters action potential conduction on the way towards the SNr but also modifies synaptic transmission within the SNr. A classical conditioning-test paradigm was then designed to better separate the causes from the indicators of synaptic depression. A bipolar platinum-iridium macroelectrode delivered conditioning HFS trains to a larger group of fibers in the STN, while a separate high-ohmic glass micropipette in the rostral SNr provided test stimuli at minimal intensity to single fibers. The conditioning-test interval was set to 100 ms, i.e. the time required to recover the excitability of subthalamo-nigral axons after HFS-STN. The continuity of STN axons passing from the conditioning to the test sites was examined by an action potential occlusion test. About two thirds of the subthalamo-nigral afferents were occlusion-negative, i.e. they were not among the fibers directly activated by the conditioning STN stimulation. Nonetheless, occlusion-negative afferents exhibited signs of presynaptic depression that could be eliminated by blocking GABA(B) receptors with CGP55845 (1 µM). Further analysis of single fiber-activated responses supported the proposal that the heterosynaptic depression of synaptic glutamate release during and after HFS-STN is mainly caused by the tonic release of GABA from co-activated striato

  9. Facilitation of memory consolidation by post-training electrical stimulation of the medial septal nucleus: is it mediated by changes in rhythmic slow activity?

    PubMed

    Galey, D; Jeantet, Y; Destrade, C; Jaffard, R

    1983-07-01

    Sinusoidal (100 Hz) electrical stimulation was applied at a weak intensity (7.5 muA peak to peak) through bipolar electrodes located in the medial septal nucleus after partial acquisition of an appetitive operant conditioning task in a Skinner box. Analysis of performance in a retention test 24 hr later showed that (i) the presence of stimulation electrodes by itself impaired retention-test performance, and (ii) electrical stimulation applied 30 sec after the end of the acquisition session improves retention; this facilitatory effect disappeared when the treatment was delayed 15 min. Both impairment and facilitation were found to vary (considerably) among subjects. Electrodes located in the center of the medial septal nucleus led to both a greater impairment in unstimulated subjects and a greater facilitation in stimulated subjects than more anterior placements in the vicinity of the diagonal band. Finally, spectral analysis of hippocampal EEG showed that stimulation had no effect on rhythmic slow activity (RSA). These results are discussed in relation to studies showing that RSA is associated with memory-storage processes and our own hypothesis which underlines the importance of activation of septo-hippocampal cholinergic neurons in the early stages of these mnemonic processes. PMID:6314987

  10. The describability of the rats' behaviour in categories of certain statistical procedures after applying the electrical stimulation to the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Fabianczyk, Karol

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the describability of animals' behaviour in categories of certain statistical procedures after applying the electrical stimulation to the nucleus accumbens. Six rats were trained to run to a burette filled with glucose or water after 0, 10 and 20 of food deprivation. After an animal reached the burette, a train of cathodal rectangular pulses of 100 Hz frequency and 0.5 s was delivered alternatively to each nucleus accumbens frequency and duration of the current train were held unvaried during the experiment. Current intensity, time of food deprivation, and burette content were randomly changed during successive sessions of the experiment. The applied current intensities were 0, 500 and 700 &mgr;A. In the initial phase, rats that had been deprived, run to the burette filled with glucose until running speed stabilized. Each session consisted of 20 trials, which formed an executive activity pattern of responding for a particular animal. Obtained data were investigated by means of the regression analysis, autocorrelation function and ANOVA. The electrical stimulation of the nucleus accumbens exerted no influence on running speed, latency to run or fluid intake but crucially affected patterns of animals' responding. This experiment supports the thesis, that the nucleus accumbens is responsible for a mode of the executive activity control and therefore final characteristics of responding. This means, that brain representation of activity resulting from deprivation creates an input for the nucleus accumbens, in which final characteristics of responding are established. This conclusion is discussed in the context of conditions of predictability of the time course of animals' activity. PMID:11738509

  11. Stimulation through electrodes implanted near the subthalamic nucleus activates projections to motor areas of cerebral cortex in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, Colum D; Webb, Ruth M; Silberstein, Paul; Tisch, Steven; Asselman, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Rothwell, John C

    2005-03-01

    High-frequency electrical stimulation through electrodes implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been shown to reduce significantly the cardinal symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). Despite the success of this treatment, the mechanisms of action of stimulation are poorly understood. To elucidate further the mechanisms of action of deep brain stimulation and its effects on cortical activity, we recorded electroencephalographic potentials from 61 scalp-surface electrodes during low-frequency (5-10 Hz) bipolar stimulation in 11 patients with advanced PD (14 implanted electrodes were tested). In all electrodes tested, stimulation through at least one of the four contacts produced a medium-latency waveform with an average onset of 14 +/- 3 ms and peak at 23 +/- 4 ms. This potential typically increased in magnitude across contacts from ventral to dorsal. Within-subject comparisons of median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials demonstrated that the generator of the medium-latency potential was within the primary sensorimotor cortex or lateral premotor cortex ipsilateral to stimulation. The timing and topography of this potential were consistent with indirect activation of the cortex by excitation of pallido-thalamic axons that traverse the dorsal aspect of the STN. The potential evoked by stimulation through the contact used for optimal clinical effect was highly variable across electrodes and frequently different from the medium-latency potential described above, suggesting that the neuronal elements mediating the medium-latency potential were different from those that mediate the clinical effects. PMID:15813949

  12. Intraoperative MRI for optimizing electrode placement for deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhiqiang; Pan, Longsheng; Song, Huifang; Xu, Xin; Xu, Bainan; Yu, Xinguang; Ling, Zhipei

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The degree of clinical improvement achieved by deep brain stimulation (DBS) is largely dependent on the accuracy of lead placement. This study reports on the evaluation of intraoperative MRI (iMRI) for adjusting deviated electrodes to the accurate anatomical position during DBS surgery and acute intracranial changes. METHODS Two hundred and six DBS electrodes were implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in 110 patients with Parkinson disease. All patients underwent iMRI after implantation to define the accuracy of lead placement. Fifty-six DBS electrode positions in 35 patients deviated from the center of the STN, according to the result of the initial postplacement iMRI scans. Thus, we adjusted the electrode positions for placement in the center of the STN and verified this by means of second or third iMRI scans. Recording was performed in adjusted parameters in the x-, y-, and z-axes. RESULTS Fifty-six (27%) of 206 DBS electrodes were adjusted as guided by iMRI. Electrode position was adjusted on the basis of iMRI 62 times. The sum of target coordinate adjustment was -0.5 mm in the x-axis, -4 mm in the y-axis, and 15.5 mm in the z-axis; the total of distance adjustment was 74.5 mm in the x-axis, 88 mm in the y-axis, and 42.5 mm in the z-axis. After adjustment with the help of iMRI, all electrodes were located in the center of the STN. Intraoperative MRI revealed 2 intraparenchymal hemorrhages in 2 patients, brain shift in all patients, and leads penetrating the lateral ventricle in 3 patients. CONCLUSIONS The iMRI technique can guide surgeons as they adjust deviated electrodes to improve the accuracy of implanting the electrodes into the correct anatomical position. The iMRI technique can also immediately demonstrate acute changes such as hemorrhage and brain shift during DBS surgery. PMID:26274983

  13. Dorsal periaqueductal gray post-stimulation freezing is counteracted by neurokinin-1 receptor antagonism in the central nucleus of the amygdala in rats.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, M C; Santos, J M; Brandão, M L

    2015-05-01

    Electrical stimulation of the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) in rats generates defensive responses that are characterized by freezing and escape behaviors, followed by post-stimulation freezing that resembles symptoms of panic attacks. dPAG post-stimulation freezing involves the processing of ascending aversive information to prosencephalic centers, including the amygdala, which allows the animal to evaluate the consequences of stressful situations. The basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) is thought to act as a filter for innate and learned aversive information that is transmitted to higher structures. The central (CeA) and medial (MeA) nuclei of the amygdala constitute an output for the expression of fear reactions through projections to limbic and brainstem regions. Neurokinin (NK) receptors are abundant in the CeA, MeA, and BLA, but their role in the expression of defensive responses and processing of aversive information that is evoked by electrical stimulation of the dPAG is still unclear. In the present study, we examined the role of NK1 receptors in these amygdala nuclei in the expression of defensive responses induced by electrical stimulation of the dPAG in rats and fear memory of this aversive stimulation. Rats were implanted with an electrode into the dPAG for electrical stimulation and one cannula in the CeA, MeA, or BLA for injections of vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) or the NK1 receptor antagonist spantide (SPA; 100 pmol/0.2 μl). Injections of SPA into the CeA but not BLA or MeA reduced the duration of post-stimulation freezing evoked by electrical stimulation of the dPAG, without changing the aversive thresholds of freezing or escape. Twenty-four hours later, exploratory behavior was evaluated in the elevated plus maze test (EPM) in the CeA group of rats. Electrical stimulation of the dPAG rats that received vehicle exhibited higher aversion to the open arms of the EPM than sham rats that did not receive any dPAG stimulation. SPA

  14. FGF–2 is required to prevent astrogliosis in the facial nucleus after facial nerve injury and mechanical stimulation of denervated vibrissal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Hizay, Arzu; Seitz, Mark; Grosheva, Maria; Sinis, Nektarios; Kaya, Yasemin; Bendella, Habib; Sarikcioglu, Levent; Dunlop, Sarah A.; Angelov, Doychin N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recently, we have shown that manual stimulation of paralyzed vibrissal muscles after facial-facial anastomosis reduced the poly-innervation of neuromuscular junctions and restored vibrissal whisking. Using gene knock outs, we found a differential dependence of manual stimulation effects on growth factors. Thus, insulin-like growth factor-1 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are required to underpin manual stimulation-mediated improvements, whereas FGF-2 is not. The lack of dependence on FGF-2 in mediating these peripheral effects prompted us to look centrally, i.e. within the facial nucleus where increased astrogliosis after facial-facial anastomosis follows "synaptic stripping". We measured the intensity of Cy3-fluorescence after immunostaining for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) as an indirect indicator of synaptic coverage of axotomized neurons in the facial nucleus of mice lacking FGF-2 (FGF-2-/- mice). There was no difference in GFAP-Cy3-fluorescence (pixel number, gray value range 17–103) between intact wildtype mice (2.12± 0.37×107) and their intact FGF-2-/- counterparts (2.12± 0.27×107) nor after facial-facial anastomosis +handling (wildtype: 4.06± 0.32×107; FGF-2-/-: 4.39±0.17×107). However, after facial-facial anastomosis, GFAP-Cy3-fluorescence remained elevated in FGF-2-/--animals (4.54±0.12×107), whereas manual stimulation reduced the intensity of GFAP-immunofluorescence in wild type mice to values that were not significantly different from intact mice (2.63± 0.39×10 ). We conclude that FGF-2 is not required to underpin the beneficial effects of manual stimulation at the neuro-muscular junction, but it is required to minimize astrogliosis in the brainstem and, by implication, restore synaptic coverage of recovering facial motoneurons.

  15. Deep brain stimulation of the ventral caudate nucleus in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder and major depression. Case report.

    PubMed

    Aouizerate, Bruno; Cuny, Emmanuel; Martin-Guehl, Corinne; Guehl, Dominique; Amieva, Helene; Benazzouz, Abdelhamid; Fabrigoule, Colette; Allard, Michele; Rougier, Alain; Bioulac, Bernard; Tignol, Jean; Burbaud, Pierre

    2004-10-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is an anxiety disorder associated with recurrent intrusive thoughts and repetitive behaviors. Although conventional pharmacological and/or psychological treatments are well established and effective in treating OCD, symptoms remain unchanged in up to 30% of patients. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the anterior limb of the internal capsule has recently been proposed as a possible therapeutic alternative in treatment-resistant OCD. In the present study, the authors tested the hypothesis that DBS of the ventral caudate nucleus might be effective in a patient with intractable severe OCD and concomitant major depression. Psychiatric assessment included the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS), and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) Scale for determining the symptom severity of OCD, depression, and anxiety as well as the quality of pychosocial and occupational functioning, respectively. Neuropsychological assessment consisted of a wide range of tests primarily exploring memory and executive functions. Deep brain stimulation of the ventral caudate nucleus markedly improved symptoms of depression and anxiety until their remission, which was achieved at 6 months after the start of stimulation (HDRS < or = 7 and HARS < or = 10). Remission of OCD (Y-BOCS < 16) was also delayed after 12 or 15 months of DBS. The level of functioning pursuant to the GAF scale progressively increased during the 15-month follow-up period. No neuropsychological deterioration was observed, indicating that DBS of the ventral caudate nucleus could be a promising strategy in the treatment of refractory cases of both OCD and major depression. PMID:15481726

  16. Alterations in blood glucose and plasma glucagon concentrations during deep brain stimulation in the shell region of the nucleus accumbens in rats

    PubMed Central

    Diepenbroek, Charlene; van der Plasse, Geoffrey; Eggels, Leslie; Rijnsburger, Merel; Feenstra, Matthijs G. P.; Kalsbeek, Andries; Denys, Damiaan; Fliers, Eric; Serlie, Mireille J.; la Fleur, Susanne E.

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is an effective therapy for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and is currently under investigation as a treatment for eating disorders. DBS of this area is associated with altered food intake and pharmacological treatment of OCD is associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Therefore we examined if DBS of the NAc-shell (sNAc) influences glucose metabolism. Male Wistar rats were subjected to DBS, or sham stimulation, for a period of 1 h. To assess the effects of stimulation on blood glucose and glucoregulatory hormones, blood samples were drawn before, during and after stimulation. Subsequently, all animals were used for quantitative assessment of Fos immunoreactivity in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) using computerized image analysis. DBS of the sNAc rapidly increased plasma concentrations of glucagon and glucose while sham stimulation and DBS outside the sNAc were ineffective. In addition, the increase in glucose was dependent on DBS intensity. In contrast, the DBS-induced increase in plasma corticosterone concentrations was independent of intensity and region, indicating that the observed DBS-induced metabolic changes were not due to corticosterone release. Stimulation of the sNAc with 200 μA increased Fos immunoreactivity in the LHA compared to sham or 100 μA stimulated animals. These data show that DBS of the sNAc alters glucose metabolism in a region- and intensity- dependent manner in association with neuronal activation in the LHA. Moreover, these data illustrate the need to monitor changes in glucose metabolism during DBS-treatment of OCD patients. PMID:24339800

  17. The effects of intraperitoneal administration of antagonists and development of morphine tolerance on the antinociception induced by stimulating the anterior pretectal nucleus of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Rees, H.; Prado, W. A.; Rawlings, S.; Roberts, M. H.

    1987-01-01

    1 The effects of intraperitoneal administration of antagonists to morphine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), noradrenaline and dopamine have been studied on the antinociceptive effects of electrical stimulation of the anterior pretectal nucleus (APtN) of the rat. 2 A 15 s period of 35 microA sine wave stimulation of APtN significantly increased the latency of the tail flick reflex to noxious heat for periods up to 1 h. 3 Naloxone (0.25-1.0 mg kg-1) attenuated the effects of APtN stimulation in a dose-dependent manner. In rats made tolerant to morphine by daily administration of morphine, the antinociceptive effects of APtN stimulation were significantly reduced. 4 The 5-HT receptor antagonists methysergide (5 mg kg-1) and ketanserin (1 mg kg-1), the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol (1 mg kg-1) and the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol (1 mg kg-1) had little effect on the antinociceptive effects of stimulating the APtN. 5 alpha-Adrenoceptor antagonists caused a dose-dependent antagonism of the response. The order of potency was; idazoxan greater than prazosin greater than phenoxybenzamine, the respective ED50 for each drug being 0.08: 0.45: 1.5 mg kg-1. 6 It is concluded that antagonism at opioid receptors and alpha-adrenoceptors but not beta-adrenoceptors, dopamine or 5-HT receptors reduces the antinociceptive effects of APtN stimulation. This differs from the reported effects of these antagonists on the antinociception caused by stimulating other sites in the brain. PMID:2892554

  18. Alterations in blood glucose and plasma glucagon concentrations during deep brain stimulation in the shell region of the nucleus accumbens in rats.

    PubMed

    Diepenbroek, Charlene; van der Plasse, Geoffrey; Eggels, Leslie; Rijnsburger, Merel; Feenstra, Matthijs G P; Kalsbeek, Andries; Denys, Damiaan; Fliers, Eric; Serlie, Mireille J; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is an effective therapy for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and is currently under investigation as a treatment for eating disorders. DBS of this area is associated with altered food intake and pharmacological treatment of OCD is associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Therefore we examined if DBS of the NAc-shell (sNAc) influences glucose metabolism. Male Wistar rats were subjected to DBS, or sham stimulation, for a period of 1 h. To assess the effects of stimulation on blood glucose and glucoregulatory hormones, blood samples were drawn before, during and after stimulation. Subsequently, all animals were used for quantitative assessment of Fos immunoreactivity in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) using computerized image analysis. DBS of the sNAc rapidly increased plasma concentrations of glucagon and glucose while sham stimulation and DBS outside the sNAc were ineffective. In addition, the increase in glucose was dependent on DBS intensity. In contrast, the DBS-induced increase in plasma corticosterone concentrations was independent of intensity and region, indicating that the observed DBS-induced metabolic changes were not due to corticosterone release. Stimulation of the sNAc with 200 μA increased Fos immunoreactivity in the LHA compared to sham or 100 μA stimulated animals. These data show that DBS of the sNAc alters glucose metabolism in a region- and intensity- dependent manner in association with neuronal activation in the LHA. Moreover, these data illustrate the need to monitor changes in glucose metabolism during DBS-treatment of OCD patients. PMID:24339800

  19. Increased number of TH-immunoreactive cells in the ventral tegmental area after deep brain stimulation of the anterior nucleus of the thalamus.

    PubMed

    Dela Cruz, J A D; Hescham, S; Adriaanse, B; Campos, F L; Steinbusch, H W M; Rutten, B P F; Temel, Y; Jahanshahi, A

    2015-09-01

    Dopamine (DA) has been long implicated with the processes of memory. In long-term memory, the hippocampus and ventral tegmental area (VTA) use DA to enhance long-term potentiation, while prefrontal DA D1 receptors are involved in working memory. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of specific brain areas have been shown to affect memory impairments in animal models. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DBS could reverse memory impairments by increasing the number of dopaminergic cells in the VTA. Rats received DBS at the level of the mammillothalamic tract, the anterior nucleus of the thalamus, and entorhinal cortex before euthanasia. These regions are part of the so-called memory circuit. Brain sections were processed for c-Fos and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunocytochemistry in the VTA and the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). c-Fos, TH and c-Fos/TH immunoreactive cells were analyzed by means of stereology and confocal microscopy. Our results showed that DBS of the anterior nucleus of the thalamus induced substantial higher numbers of TH-immunoreactive cells in the VTA, while there were no significant differences between the experimental groups in the number of TH immunoreactive cells in the SNc, c-Fos immunoreactive cells and c-Fos/TH double-labeled cells in both the SNc and VTA. Our findings suggest a phenotypic switch, or neurotransmitter respecification, of DAergic cells specifically in the VTA which may be induced by DBS in the anterior nucleus of the thalamus. PMID:25074751

  20. Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens shell attenuates cue-induced reinstatement of both cocaine and sucrose seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Guercio, Leonardo A; Schmidt, Heath D; Pierce, R Christopher

    2015-03-15

    Stimuli previously associated with drug taking can become triggers that can elicit craving and lead to relapse of drug-seeking behavior. Here, we examined the influence of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the nucleus accumbens shell on cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking, an animal model of relapse. Rats were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.254 mg, i.v.) for 2 h daily for 21 days, with each infusion of cocaine being paired with a cue light. After 21 days of self-administration, cocaine-taking behavior was extinguished by replacing cocaine with saline in the absence of the cue light. Next, during the reinstatement phase, DBS was administered bilaterally into the nucleus accumbens shell through bipolar stainless steel electrodes immediately prior to re-exposure to cues previously associated with cocaine reinforcement. DBS continued throughout the 2 h reinstatement session. Parallel studies examined the influence of accumbens shell DBS on reinstatement induced by cues previously associated with sucrose reinforcement. Results indicated that DBS of the nucleus accumbens shell significantly attenuated cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine and sucrose seeking. Together, these results indicate that DBS of the accumbens shell disrupts cue-induced reinstatement associated with both a drug and a natural reinforcer. PMID:25529183

  1. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Nucleus Accumbens Shell Attenuates Cue-Induced Reinstatement of Both Cocaine and Sucrose Seeking in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guercio, Leonardo A.; Schmidt, Heath D.; Pierce, R. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Stimuli previously associated with drug taking can become triggers that can elicit craving and lead to relapse of drug-seeking behavior. Here, we examined the influence of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the nucleus accumbens shell on cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking, an animal model of relapse. Rats were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.254 mg, i.v.) for 2 h daily for 21 d, with each infusion of cocaine being paired with a cue light. After 21 d of self-administration, cocaine-taking behavior was extinguished by replacing cocaine with saline in the absence of the cue light. Next, during the reinstatement phase, DBS was administered bilaterally into the nucleus accumbens shell through bipolar stainless steel electrodes immediately prior to re-exposure to cues previously associated with cocaine reinforcement. DBS continued throughout the 2 h reinstatement session. Parallel studies examined the influence of accumbens shell DBS on reinstatement induced by cues previously associated with sucrose reinforcement. Results indicated that DBS of the nucleus accumbens shell significantly attenuated cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine and sucrose seeking. Together, these results indicate that DBS of the accumbens shell disrupts cue-induced reinstatement associated with both a drug and a natural reinforcer. PMID:25529183

  2. MAgnetic stimulation of the brain increase Na+, K+-ATPase activity decreased by injection of AlCl3 into nucleus basalis magnocellularis of rats.

    PubMed

    Jovanova-Nesic, Katica; Eric-Jovicic, Milena; Spector, Novera Herbert

    2006-06-01

    This article reports here on the influence of the static magnetic fields (MFs), locally applied to the brain area, on Na, K-ATPase activity in the rat with lesioned nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) by intracerebral injection of 5 microl, 1% AlCl3 into the nucleus. Two AKMA micromagnets (M) flux density of 60 miliTesla, 5 mm in diameter, were bilaterally implanted with "N" polarity facing down to the cranial bones in the vicinity of the pineal gland (PG), immediately after the lesioning of NBM, during the same operation procedure. Ten days after the lesions of NBM, Na, K-ATPase activity on the erythrocyte membranes in the peripheral blood, measured spectrophotometrically, was completely inhibited. Magnetic stimulation (60 mT) of the brain during the 10 days significantly increased Na, K-ATPase activity on the erythrocyte membranes of rats with lesioned NBM. This results suggests that altered by lesions Na, K-ATPase activity in an experimental model of Alzheimer's disease might be ameliorated by magnetic stimulation of the brain. PMID:16753895

  3. Selective lesions of the cholinergic neurons within the posterior pedunculopontine do not alter operant learning or nicotine sensitization.

    PubMed

    MacLaren, Duncan A A; Wilson, David I G; Winn, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Cholinergic neurons within the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus have been implicated in a range of functions, including behavioral state control, attention, and modulation of midbrain and basal ganglia systems. Previous experiments with excitotoxic lesions have found persistent learning impairment and altered response to nicotine following lesion of the posterior component of the PPTg (pPPTg). These effects have been attributed to disrupted input to midbrain dopamine systems, particularly the ventral tegmental area. The pPPTg contains a dense collection of cholinergic neurons and also large numbers of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. Because these interdigitated populations of neurons are all susceptible to excitotoxins, the effects of such lesions cannot be attributed to one neuronal population. We wished to assess whether the learning impairments and altered responses to nicotine in excitotoxic PPTg-lesioned rats were due to loss of cholinergic neurons within the pPPTg. Selective depletion of cholinergic pPPTg neurons is achievable with the fusion toxin Dtx-UII, which targets UII receptors expressed only by cholinergic neurons in this region. Rats bearing bilateral lesions of cholinergic pPPTg neurons (>90 % ChAT+ neuronal loss) displayed no deficits in the learning or performance of fixed and variable ratio schedules of reinforcement for pellet reward. Separate rats with the same lesions had a normal locomotor response to nicotine and furthermore sensitized to repeated administration of nicotine at the same rate as sham controls. Previously seen changes in these behaviors following excitotoxic pPPTg lesions cannot be attributed solely to loss of cholinergic neurons. These findings indicate that non-cholinergic neurons within the pPPTg are responsible for the learning deficits and altered responses to nicotine seen after excitotoxic lesions. The functions of cholinergic neurons may be related to behavioral state control and attention rather than learning

  4. Inclusion of Cocoa as a Dietary Supplement Represses Expression of Inflammatory Proteins in Spinal Trigeminal Nucleus in Response to Chronic Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Ryan J.; Denson, Jennifer E.; Durham, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    Scope Central sensitization is implicated in the pathology of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and other types of orofacial pain. We investigated the effects of dietary cocoa on expression of proteins involved in the development of central sensitization in the spinal trigeminal nucleus (STN) in response to inflammatory stimulation of trigeminal nerves. Methods and results Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed either a control diet or an isocaloric diet consisting of 10% cocoa powder 14 days prior to bilateral injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the temporomandibular joint to promote prolonged activation of trigeminal ganglion neurons and glia. While dietary cocoa stimulated basal expression of GLAST and MKP-1 when compared to animals on a normal diet, cocoa suppressed basal calcitonin gene-related peptide levels in the STN. CFA-stimulated levels of protein kinase A, P2X3, P-p38, GFAP, and OX-42, whose elevated levels in the STN are implicated in central sensitization, were repressed to near control levels in animals on a cocoa enriched diet. Similarly, dietary cocoa repressed CFA-stimulated inflammatory cytokine expression. Conclusion Based on our findings, we speculate that cocoa enriched diets could be beneficial as a natural therapeutic option for TMD and other chronic orofacial pain conditions. PMID:23576361

  5. Depolarization and stimulation of neurons in nucleus tractus solitarii by carbon dioxide does not require chemical synaptic input.

    PubMed

    Dean, J B; Bayliss, D A; Erickson, J T; Lawing, W L; Millhorn, D E

    1990-01-01

    The effects of elevated CO2 (i.e. hypercapnia) on neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarii were studied using extracellular (n = 82) and intracellular (n = 33) recording techniques in transverse brain slices prepared from rat. Synaptic connections from putative chemosensitive neurons in the ventrolateral medulla were removed by bisecting each transverse slice and discarding the ventral half. In addition, the response to hypercapnia in 20 neurons was studied during high magnesium-low calcium synaptic blockade. Sixty-five per cent of the neurons (n = 75) tested were either insensitive or inhibited by hypercapnia. However, 35% (n = 40) were depolarized and/or increased their firing rate during hypercapnia. Nine out of 10 CO2-excited neurons retained their chemosensitivity to CO2 in the presence of high magnesium-low calcium synaptic blockade medium. Our findings demonstrate that many neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarii were depolarized and/or increased their firing rate during hypercapnia. These neurons were not driven synaptically by putative chemosensitive neurons of the ventrolateral medulla since this region was removed from the slice. Furthermore, because chemosensitivity persisted in most neurons tested during synaptic blockade, we conclude that some neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarii are inherently CO2-chemosensitive. Although the function of dorsal medullary chemosensitive neurons cannot be determined in vitro, their location and their inherent chemosensitivity suggest a role in cardiorespiratory central chemoreception. PMID:2120613

  6. Microelectrode Guided Implantation of Electrodes into the Subthalamic Nucleus of Rats for Long-term Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fluri, Felix; Bieber, Micheal; Volkmann, Jens; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a widely used and effective therapy for several neurologic disorders, such as idiopathic Parkinson's disease, dystonia or tremor. DBS is based on the delivery of electrical stimuli to specific deep anatomic structures of the central nervous system. However, the mechanisms underlying the effect of DBS remain enigmatic. This has led to an interest in investigating the impact of DBS in animal models, especially in rats. As DBS is a long-term therapy, research should be focused on molecular-genetic changes of neural circuits that occur several weeks after DBS. Long-term DBS in rats is challenging because the rats move around in their cage, which causes problems in keeping in place the wire leading from the head of the animal to the stimulator. Furthermore, target structures for stimulation in the rat brain are small and therefore electrodes cannot easily be placed at the required position. Thus, a set-up for long-lasting stimulation of rats using platinum/iridium electrodes with an impedance of about 1 MΩ was developed for this study. An electrode with these specifications allows for not only adequate stimulation but also recording of deep brain structures to identify the target area for DBS. In our set-up, an electrode with a plug for the wire was embedded in dental cement with four anchoring screws secured onto the skull. The wire from the plug to the stimulator was protected by a stainless-steel spring. A swivel was connected to the circuit to prevent the wire from becoming tangled. Overall, this stimulation set-up offers a high degree of free mobility for the rat and enables the head plug, as well as the wire connection between the plug and the stimulator, to retain long-lasting strength. PMID:26485522

  7. Inhibition of the amygdala central nucleus by stimulation of cerebellar output in rats: a putative mechanism for extinction of the conditioned fear response.

    PubMed

    Magal, Ari; Mintz, Matti

    2014-11-01

    The amygdala and the cerebellum serve two distinctively different functions. The amygdala plays a role in the expression of emotional information, whereas the cerebellum is involved in the timing of discrete motor responses. Interaction between these two systems is the basis of the two-stage theory of learning, according to which an encounter with a challenging event triggers fast classical conditioning of fear-conditioned responses in the amygdala and slow conditioning of motor-conditioned responses in the cerebellum. A third stage was hypothesised when an apparent interaction between amygdala and cerebellar associative plasticity was observed: an adaptive rate of cerebellum-dependent motor-conditioned responses was associated with a decrease in amygdala-dependent fear-conditioned responses, and was interpreted as extinction of amygdala-related fear-conditioned responses by the cerebellar output. To explore this hypothesis, we mimicked some components of classical eyeblink conditioning in anesthetised rats by applying an aversive periorbital pulse as an unconditioned stimulus and a train of pulses to the cerebellar output nuclei as a cerebellar neuronal-conditioned response. The central amygdala multiple unit response to the periorbital pulse was measured with or without a preceding train to the cerebellar output nuclei. The results showed that activation of the cerebellar output nuclei prior to periorbital stimulation produced diverse patterns of inhibition of the amygdala response to the periorbital aversive stimulus, depending upon the nucleus stimulated, the laterality of the nucleus stimulated, and the stimulus interval used. These results provide a putative extinction mechanism of learned fear behavior, and could have implications for the treatment of pathologies involving abnormal fear responses by using motor training as therapy. PMID:25185877

  8. Role of dopamine D2-like receptors within the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens in antinociception induced by lateral hypothalamus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Marzieh; Yazdanian, Mohamadreza; Haghparast, Abbas

    2015-10-01

    Several lines of evidence have shown that stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) can induce antinociception. It has been indicated that hypothalamic orexinergic neurons send projections throughout the dopamine mesolimbic pathway. Functional interaction between the LH and the main area of the mesolimbic pathway such as the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the nucleus accumbens (NAc) implicates in pain modulation. Thus, in this study, we investigated the role of D2-like dopamine receptors within the VTA and NAc in the LH stimulation-induced antinociception. Male Wistar rats weighing 230-280 g were unilaterally implanted with two separate cannulae into the LH and VTA or NAc. Animals received intra-VTA (0.25, 1 and 4 μg/0.3 μl DMSO) and intra-accumbal (0.125, 0.25, 1 and 4 μg/0.5 μl DMSO) infusions of sulpiride as a selective D2-like receptor antagonist, prior to intra-LH carbachol (125 nM/rat) administration. In the tail-flick test, the antinociceptive effects were measured using a tail-flick algesiometer and represented as maximal possible effect (%MPE) within 5, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min after injections. Our results showed that intra-VTA and intra-accumbal sulpiride dose-dependently attenuated the LH stimulation-induced antinociception. However, the blockade of D2-like receptors within the NAc was more significant than that of the VTA. These findings show that D2-like dopamine receptors in these regions play an important role in the LH-mediated modulation of nociceptive information in the acute model of pain in the rats. It seems that this pain modulating system is more relevant to D2-like receptors in the nucleus accumbens. PMID:26166189

  9. Electrical stimulation of the midbrain increases heart rate and arterial blood pressure in awake humans

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Judith M; Aziz, Tipu; Schlugman, David; Paterson, David J

    2002-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus, basal ganglia or pedunculopontine nucleus in decorticate animals results in locomotion and a cardiorespiratory response resembling that seen during exercise. This has led to the hypothesis that parallel activation of cardiorespiratory and locomotor systems from the midbrain could form part of the ‘central command’ mechanism of exercise. However, the degree to which subcortical structures play a role in cardiovascular activation in awake humans has not been established. We studied the effects on heart rate (HR) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) of electrically stimulating the thalamus and basal ganglia in awake humans undergoing neurosurgery for movement disorders (n = 13 Parkinson's disease, n = 1 myoclonic dystonia, n = 1 spasmodic torticollis). HR and MAP increased during high frequency (> 90 Hz) electrical stimulation of the thalamus (HR 5 ± 3 beats min−1, P = 0.002, MAP 4 ± 3 mmHg, P = 0.05, n = 9), subthalamic nucleus (HR 5 ± 3 beats min−1, P = 0.002, MAP 5 ± 3 mmHg, P = 0.006, n = 8) or substantia nigra (HR 6 ± 3 beats min−1, P = 0.001, MAP 5 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.005, n = 8). This was accompanied by the facilitation of movement, but without the movement itself. Stimulation of the internal globus pallidus did not increase cardiovascular variables but did facilitate movement. Low frequency (< 20 Hz) stimulation of any site did not affect cardiovascular variables or movement. Electrical stimulation of the midbrain in awake humans can cause a modest increase in cardiovascular variables that is not dependent on movement feedback from exercising muscles. The relationship between this type of response and that occurring during actual exercise is unclear, but it indicates that subcortical command could be involved in ‘parallel activation’ of the locomotor and cardiovascular systems and thus contribute to the neurocircuitry of ‘central command’. PMID:11882692

  10. Topography of Auditory Nerve Projections to the Cochlear Nucleus in Cats after Neonatal Deafness and Electrical Stimulation by a Cochlear Implant

    PubMed Central

    Hradek, Gary T.; Bonham, Ben H.; Snyder, Russell L.

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that auditory nerve projections from the cochlear spiral ganglion (SG) to the cochlear nucleus (CN) exhibit clear cochleotopic organization in adult cats deafened as neonates before hearing onset. However, the topographic specificity of these CN projections in deafened animals is proportionately broader than normal (less precise relative to the CN frequency gradient). This study examined SG-to-CN projections in adult cats that were deafened as neonates and received a unilateral cochlear implant at ∼7 weeks of age. Following several months of electrical stimulation, SG projections from the stimulated cochleae were compared to projections from contralateral, non-implanted ears. The fundamental organization of SG projections into frequency band laminae was clearly evident, and discrete projections were always observed following double SG injections in deafened cochleae, despite severe auditory deprivation and/or broad electrical activation of the SG. However, when normalized for the smaller CN size after deafness, AVCN, PVCN, and DCN projections on the stimulated side were broader by 32%, 34%, and 53%, respectively, than projections in normal animals (although absolute projection widths were comparable to normal). Further, there was no significant difference between projections from stimulated and contralateral non-implanted cochleae. These findings suggest that early normal auditory experience may be essential for normal development and/or maintenance of the topographic precision of SG-to-CN projections. After early deafness, the CN is smaller than normal, the topographic distribution of these neural projections that underlie frequency resolution in the central auditory system is proportionately broader, and projections from adjacent SG sectors are more overlapping. Several months of stimulation by a cochlear implant (beginning at ∼7 weeks of age) did not lessen or exacerbate these degenerative changes observed in adulthood. One clinical

  11. The Soluble Heparin-Binding EGF-Like Growth Factor Stimulates EGF Receptor Trafficking to the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Korotkevych, Nataliia V.; Labyntsev, Andrii Ju.; Kolybo, Denis V.; Komisarenko, Serhiy V.

    2015-01-01

    Most ligands of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have the ability to induce EGFR translocation into the nucleus, where EGFR acts as an important transcriptional regulator. Soluble form of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (sHB-EGF) is one of the ligands for EGFR in many cell types; however, there is no evidence for the ability of sHB-EGF to induce EGFR nuclear importation. Here, we demonstrated that treatment of A431 cells with sHB-EGF resulted in nuclear localization of EGFR and such translocation occurs via retrograde pathway. It was shown by confocal microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation assay that the translocation complex consisted of both ligand and receptor. The chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed the association of sHB-EGF–EGFR complex with promoter region of cyclin D1 in the cell nucleus and this association was prevented by application of EGFR kinase inhibitor AG-1478. The obtained data suggest that sHB-EGF acts similarly to other EGFR ligands and is capable to induce EGFR nuclear translocation as a part of ligand-receptor complex in a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent manner. PMID:26016774

  12. Dominant efficiency of nonregular patterns of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease and obsessive-compulsive disorder in a data-driven computational model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamintziou, Sofia D.; Deligiannis, Nick G.; Piallat, Brigitte; Polosan, Mircea; Chabardès, Stephan; David, Olivier; Stathis, Pantelis G.; Tagaris, George A.; Boviatsis, Efstathios J.; Sakas, Damianos E.; Polychronaki, Georgia E.; Tsirogiannis, George L.; Nikita, Konstantina S.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Almost 30 years after the start of the modern era of deep brain stimulation (DBS), the subthalamic nucleus (STN) still constitutes a standard stimulation target for advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD), but the use of STN-DBS is also now supported by level I clinical evidence for treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Disruption of neural synchronization in the STN has been suggested as one of the possible mechanisms of action of standard and alternative patterns of STN-DBS at a local level. Meanwhile, recent experimental and computational modeling evidence has signified the efficiency of alternative patterns of stimulation; however, no indications exist for treatment-refractory OCD. Here, we comparatively simulate the desynchronizing effect of standard (regular at 130 Hz) versus temporally alternative (in terms of frequency, temporal variability and the existence of bursts or pauses) patterns of STN-DBS for PD and OCD, by means of a stochastic dynamical model and two microelectrode recording (MER) datasets. Approach. The stochastic model is fitted to subthalamic MERs acquired during eight surgical interventions for PD and eight surgical interventions for OCD. For each dynamical system simulated, we comparatively assess the invariant density (steady-state phase distribution) as a measure inversely related to the desynchronizing effect yielded by the applied patterns of stimulation. Main results. We demonstrate that high (130 Hz)—and low (80 Hz)—frequency irregular patterns of stimulation, and low-frequency periodic stimulation interrupted by bursts of pulses, yield in both pathologic conditions a significantly stronger desynchronizing effect compared with standard STN-DBS, and distinct alternative patterns of stimulation. In PD, values of the invariant density measure are proven to be optimal at the dorsolateral oscillatory region of the STN including sites with the optimal therapeutic window. Significance. In addition to providing

  13. Reduced cortical vasodilatory response to stimulation of the nucleus basalis of Meynert in the aged rat and evidence for a control of the cerebral circulation.

    PubMed

    Lacombe, P; Sercombe, R; Vaucher, E; Seylaz, J

    1997-09-26

    In earlier studies we showed that electrical stimulation of the rat nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM) induces large increases in cerebral blood flow, mainly through cholinergic mechanisms. We then investigated the effect of aging on this influence by measuring cortical blood flow (CoBF) and tissue gas partial pressures (PtO2, PtCO2) in the conscious young adult and aged rat. NBM stimulation increased frontal (+101%) and parietal (+29%) CoBF in young rats. The effects were halved in aged rats. Moreover, PtO2 was significantly increased in young but not in aged rats. By contrast, the corticovascular reactivity to hypercapnia did not differ between young and aged rats, nor did the potentiating vasodilator effect of physostigmine. In combined autoradiographic measurements of cerebral blood flow and cerebral glucose utilization, we recently found that the cortical circulatory response to NBM stimulation was not accompanied by significant metabolic change. Thus, the blood flow changes observed in the cortex cannot be ascribed to increased metabolic activity. The distribution of this uncoupling coincides with that of cholinergic NBM projections directly impinging on cortical microvessels. These data support the cortical microcirculation and suggest the possible involvement of NBM dysfunction in the pathology of cortical microcirculation. PMID:9329714

  14. Continuous High-Frequency Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Improves Cell Survival and Functional Recovery Following Dopaminergic Cell Transplantation in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Furlanetti, Luciano L; Cordeiro, Joacir Graciolli; Cordeiro, Karina Kohn; García, Joanna A; Winkler, Christian; Lepski, Guilherme A; Coenen, Volker A; Nikkhah, Guido; Döbrössy, Máté D

    2015-01-01

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) high-frequency stimulation (HFS) is a routine treatment in Parkinson's disease (PD), with confirmed long-term benefits. An alternative, but still experimental, treatment is cell replacement and restorative therapy based on transplanted dopaminergic neurons. The current experiment evaluated the potential synergy between neuromodulation and grafting by studying the effect of continuous STN-HFS on the survival, integration, and functional efficacy of ventral mesencephalic dopaminergic precursors transplanted into a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine medial forebrain bundle lesioned rodent PD model. One group received continuous HFS of the ipsilateral STN starting a week prior to intrastriatal dopaminergic neuron transplantation, whereas the sham-stimulated group did not receive STN-HFS but only dopaminergic grafts. A control group was neither lesioned nor transplanted. Over the following 7 weeks, the animals were probed on a series of behavioral tasks to evaluate possible graft and/or stimulation-induced functional effects. Behavioral and histological data suggest that STN-HFS significantly increased graft cell survival, graft-host integration, and functional recovery. These findings might open an unexplored road toward combining neuromodulative and neuroregenerative strategies to treat severe neurologic conditions. PMID:25857428

  15. Paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus: axonal projections to the brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Geerling, Joel C.; Shin, Jung-Won; Chimenti, Peter C.; Loewy, Arthur D.

    2010-01-01

    The paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH) contains many neurons that innervate the brainstem, but information regarding their target sites remains incomplete. Here, we labeled neurons in the rat PVH with an anterograde axonal tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (PHAL) and studied their descending projections in reference to specific neuronal subpopulations throughout the brainstem. While many of their target sites were identified previously, numerous new observations were made. Major findings include: (1) In the midbrain, the PVH projects lightly to the ventral tegmental area, Edinger-Westphal nucleus, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray matter, reticular formation, pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus, and dorsal raphe nucleus. (2) In the dorsal pons, the PVH projects heavily to the pre-locus coeruleus, yet very little to the catecholamine neurons in the locus coeruleus, and selectively targets the viscerosensory subregions of the parabrachial nucleus; (3) In the ventral medulla, the superior salivatory nucleus, retrotrapezoid nucleus, compact and external formations of the nucleus ambiguus, A1 and caudal C1 catecholamine neurons, and caudal pressor area receive dense axonal projections, generally exceeding the PVH projection to the rostral C1 region; (4) The medial nucleus of the solitary tract (including A2 noradrenergic and aldosterone-sensitive neurons) receives the most extensive projections of the PVH, substantially more than the dorsal vagal nucleus or area postrema. Our findings suggest that the PVH may modulate a range of homeostatic functions, including cerebral and ocular blood flow, corneal and nasal hydration, ingestive behavior, sodium intake, and glucose metabolism, as well as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and respiratory activities. PMID:20187136

  16. Deep brain stimulation for movement disorders: update on recent discoveries and outlook on future developments.

    PubMed

    Mahlknecht, Philipp; Limousin, Patricia; Foltynie, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Modern deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become a routine therapy for patients with movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, generalized or segmental dystonia and for multiple forms of tremor. Growing numbers of publications also report beneficial effects in other movement disorders such as Tourette's syndrome, various forms of chorea and DBS is even being studied for Parkinson's-related dementia. While exerting remarkable effects on many motor symptoms, DBS does not restore normal neurophysiology and therefore may also have undesirable side effects including speech and gait deterioration. Furthermore, its efficacy might be compromised in the long term, due to progression of the underlying disease. Various programming strategies have been studied to try and address these issues, e.g., the use of low-frequency rather than high-frequency stimulation or the targeting of alternative brain structures such as the pedunculopontine nucleus. In addition, further technical developments will soon provide clinicians with an expanded choice of hardware such as segmented electrodes allowing for a steering of the current to optimize beneficial effects and reduce side effects as well as the possibility of adaptive stimulation systems based on closed-loop concepts with or without accompanying advances in programming and imaging software. In the present article, we will provide an update on the most recent achievements and discoveries relevant to the application of DBS in the treatment of movement disorder patients and give an outlook on future clinical and technical developments. PMID:26037016

  17. Effect of Bilateral Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus on Different Speech Subsystems in Patients with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putzer, Manfred; Barry, William J.; Moringlane, Jean Richard

    2008-01-01

    The effect of deep brain stimulation on the two speech-production subsystems, articulation and phonation, of nine Parkinsonian patients is examined. Production parameters (stop closure voicing; stop closure, VOT, vowel) in fast syllable-repetitions were defined and measured and quantitative, objective metrics of vocal fold function were obtained…

  18. DDX21 translocates from nucleus to cytoplasm and stimulates the innate immune response due to dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yangchao; Ye, Wei; Yang, Jing; Han, Peijun; Wang, Yuan; Ye, Chuantao; Weng, Daihui; Zhang, Fanglin; Xu, Zhikai; Lei, Yingfeng

    2016-04-29

    Successful DENV infection relies on its ability to evade the host innate immune system. By using iTRAQ labeling followed by LC-MS/MS analysis, DDX21 was identified as a new host RNA helicase involved in the DENV life cycle. In DENV infected cells, DDX21 translocates from nucleus to cytoplasm to active the innate immune response and thus inhibits DENV replication in the early stages of infection. DDX21 is then degraded by the viral NS2B-NS3 protease complex and the innate immunity is thus subverted to facilitate DENV replication. The results reveal a new mechanism in which DENV subverts the host innate immune system to facilitate its replication in host cells. PMID:27033607

  19. Acute deep brain stimulation in the thalamic reticular nucleus protects against acute stress and modulates initial events of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno-Madrigal, Víctor Manuel; Pantoja-Jiménez, Christopher Rodrigo; Bazaldúa, Adrián; Fernández-Mas, Rodrigo; Almazán-Alvarado, Salvador; Bolaños-Alejos, Fernanda; Ortíz-López, Leonardo; Ramírez-Rodriguez, Gerardo Bernabé

    2016-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used as an alternative therapeutic procedure for pharmacoresistant psychiatric disorders. Recently the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) gained attention due to the description of a novel pathway from the amygdala to this nucleus suggesting that may be differentially disrupted in mood disorders. The limbic system is implicated in the regulation of these disorders that are accompanied by neuroplastic changes. The hippocampus is highly plastic and shows the generation of new neurons, process affected by stress but positively regulated by antidepressant drugs. We explored the impact of applying acute DBS to the TRN (DBS-TRN) in male Wistar rats exposed to acute stress caused by the forced-swim Porsolt's test (FST) and on initial events of hippocampal neurogenesis. After the first session of forced-swim, rats were randomly subdivided in a DBS-TRN and a Sham group. Stimulated rats received 10min of DBS, thus the depressant-like behavior reflected as immobility was evaluated in the second session of forced-swim. Locomotricity was evaluated in the open field test. Cell proliferation and doublecortin-associated cells were quantified in the hippocampus of other cohorts of rats. No effects of electrode implantation were found in locomotricity. Acute DBS-TRN reduced immobility in comparison to the Sham group (p<0.001). DBS-TRN increased cell proliferation (Ki67 or BrdU-positive cells; p=0.02, p=0.02) and the number of doublecortin-cells compared to the Sham group (p<0.02). Similar effects were found in rats previously exposed to the first session of forced-swim. Our data could suggest that TRN brain region may be a promising target for DBS to treat intractable depression. PMID:27435420

  20. The antidepressant effects of ventromedial prefrontal cortex stimulation is associated with neural activation in the medial part of the subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lee Wei; Janssen, Marcus L F; Kocabicak, Ersoy; Temel, Yasin

    2015-02-15

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc), ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), and cingulate gyrus (Cg) are key regions in the control of mood-related behaviors. Electrical stimulation of these areas induces antidepressant-like effects in both patients and animal models. Another structure whose limbic connections are receiving more interest in the context of mood-related behaviors is the medial part of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Here, we tested the hypothesis that the mood-related effects of NAc, vmPFC, and Cg are accompanied by changes in the neural activity of the STN. We performed high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the NAc, vmPFC, and Cg. Animals were behaviorally tested for hedonia and forced swim immobility; and the cellular activities in the different parts of the STN were assessed by means of c-Fos immunoreactivity (c-Fos-ir). Our results showed that HFS of the NAc and vmPFC, but not Cg reduced anhedonic-like and forced swim immobility behaviors. Interestingly, there was a significant increase of c-Fos-ir in the medial STN with HFS of the vmPFC, but not the NAc and Cg as compared to the sham. Correlation analysis showed that the medial STN is associated with the antidepressant-like behaviors in vmPFC HFS animals. No behavioral correlation was found with respect to behavioral outcome and activity in the lateral STN. In conclusion, HFS of the vmPFC induced profound antidepressant-like effects with enhanced neural activity in the medial part of the STN. PMID:25446757

  1. Stimulation of the middle meningeal artery leads to Fos expression in the trigeminocervical nucleus: a comparative study of monkey and cat

    PubMed Central

    HOSKIN, KAREN L.; ZAGAMI, ALESSANDRO S.; GOADSBY, PETER J.

    1999-01-01

    The pain of a migraine attack is often described as unilateral, with a throbbing or pulsating quality. The middle meningeal artery (MMA) is the largest artery supplying the dura mater, is paired, and pain-producing in humans. This artery, or its branches, and other large intracranial extracerebral vessels have been implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine by theories suggesting neurogenic inflammation or cranial vasodilatation, or both, as explanations for the pain of migraine. Having previously studied in detail the distribution of the second order neurons that are involved in the transmission of nociceptive signals from intracranial venous sinuses, we sought to compare the distribution of second order neurons from a pain-producing intracranial artery in both monkey and cat. By electrically stimulating the middle meningeal artery in these species and using immunohistochemical detection of the proto-oncogene Fos as a marker of neuronal activation, we have mapped the sites of the central trigeminal neurons which may be involved in transmission of nociception from intracranial extracerebral arteries. Ten cats and 3 monkeys were anaesthetised with α-chloralose and the middle meningeal artery was isolated following a temporal craniotomy. The animals were maintained under stable anaesthesia for 24 h to allow Fos expression due to the initial surgery to dissipate. Following the rest period, the vessel was carefully lifted onto hook electrodes, and then left alone in control animals (cat n = 3), or stimulated (cat n = 6, monkey n = 3). Stimulation of the left middle meningeal artery evoked Fos expression in the trigeminocervical nucleus, consisting of the dorsal horn of the caudal medulla and upper 2 divisions of the cervical spinal cord, on both the ipsilateral and contralateral sides. Cats had larger amounts of Fos expressed on the ipsilateral than on the contralateral side. Fos expression in the caudal nucleus tractus solitarius and its caudal extension in lamina

  2. Encoding of the amplitude modulation of pulsatile electrical stimulation in the feline cochlear nucleus by neurons in the inferior colliculus; effects of stimulus pulse rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreery, Douglas; Han, Martin; Pikov, Victor; Yadav, Kamal; Pannu, Satinderpall

    2013-10-01

    Objectives. Persons without a functional auditory nerve cannot benefit from cochlear implants, but some hearing can be restored by an auditory brainstem implant (ABI) with stimulating electrodes implanted on the surface of the cochlear nucleus (CN). Most users benefit from their ABI, but speech recognition tends to be poorer than for users of cochlear implants. Psychophysical studies suggest that poor modulation detection may contribute to the limited performance of ABI users. In a cat model, we determined how the pulse rate of the electrical stimulus applied within or on the CN affects temporal and rate encoding of amplitude modulation (AM) by neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC). Approach. Stimulating microelectrodes were implanted chronically in and on the cats' CN, and multi-site recording microelectrodes were implanted chronically into the ICC. Encoding of AM pulse trains by neurons in the ICC was characterized as vector strength (VS), the synchrony of neural activity with the AM, and as the mean rate of neuronal action potentials (neuronal spike rate (NSR)). Main results. For intranuclear microstimulation, encoding of AM as VS was up to 3 dB greater when stimulus pulse rate was increased from 250 to 500 pps, but only for neuronal units with low best acoustic frequencies, and when the electrical stimulation was modulated at low frequencies (10-20 Hz). For stimulation on the surface of the CN, VS was similar at 250 and 500 pps, and the dynamic range of the VS was reduced for pulse rates greater than 250 pps. Modulation depth was encoded strongly as VS when the maximum stimulus amplitude was held constant across a range of modulation depth. This ‘constant maximum’ protocol allows enhancement of modulation depth while preserving overall dynamic range. However, modulation depth was not encoded as strongly as NSR. Significance. The findings have implications for improved sound processors for present and future ABIs. The performance of

  3. Axial disability and deep brain stimulation in patients with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Alfonso; Aquino, Camila C; Krauss, Joachim K; Honey, Christopher R; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2015-02-01

    Axial motor signs-including gait impairment, postural instability and postural abnormalities-are common and debilitating symptoms in patients with advanced Parkinson disease. Dopamine replacement therapy and physiotherapy provide, at best, partial relief from axial motor symptoms. In carefully selected candidates, deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus or globus pallidus internus is an established treatment for 'appendicular' motor signs (limb tremor, bradykinesia and rigidity). However, the effects of DBS on axial signs are much less clear, presumably because motor control of axial and appendicular functions is mediated by different anatomical-functional pathways. Here, we discuss the successes and failures of DBS in managing axial motor signs. We systematically address a series of common clinical questions associated with the preoperative phase, during which patients presenting with prominent axial signs are considered for DBS implantation surgery, and the postoperative phase, in particular, the management of axial motor signs that newly develop as postoperative complications, either acutely or with a delay. We also address the possible merits of new targets-including the pedunculopontine nucleus area, zona incerta and substantia nigra pars reticulata-to specifically alleviate axial symptoms. Supported by a rapidly growing body of evidence, this practically oriented Review aims to support decision-making in the management of axial symptoms. PMID:25582445

  4. Reduced tonicity stimulates an inflammatory response in nucleus pulposus tissue that can be limited by a COX-2-specific inhibitor.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Bart; Potier, Esther; van DIjk, Maarten; Langelaan, Marloes; Papen-Botterhuis, Nicole; Ito, Keita

    2015-11-01

    In intervertebral disc herniation with nucleus pulposus (NP) extrusion, the elicited inflammatory response is considered a key pain mechanism. However, inflammatory cytokines are reported in extruded herniated tissue, even before monocyte infiltration, suggesting that the tissue itself initiates the inflammation. Since herniated tissue swells, we investigated whether this simple mechanobiological stimulus alone could provoke an inflammatory response that could cause pain. Furthermore, we investigated whether sustained-release cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) inhibitor would be beneficial in such conditions. Healthy bovine NP explants were allowed to swell freely or confined. The swelling explants were treated with Celecoxib, applied either as a bolus or in sustained-release. Swelling explants produced elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) for 28 days, while confined explants did not. Both a high concentration bolus and 10 times lower concentration in sustained release completely inhibited PGE2 production, but did not affect IL-6 production. Swelling of NP tissue, without the inflammatory system response, can trigger cytokine production and Celecoxib, even in bolus form, may be useful for pain control in extruded disc herniation. PMID:25991050

  5. High-Frequency Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Counteracts Cortical Expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex Genes in a Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grieb, Benjamin; Engler, Gerhard; Sharott, Andrew; von Nicolai, Constantin; Streichert, Thomas; Papageorgiou, Ismini; Schulte, Alexander; Westphal, Manfred; Lamszus, Katrin; Engel, Andreas K.

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS) is widely used as therapeutic intervention in patients suffering from advanced Parkinson’s disease. STN-HFS exerts a powerful modulatory effect on cortical motor control by orthodromic modulation of basal ganglia outflow and via antidromic activation of corticofugal fibers. However, STN-HFS-induced changes of the sensorimotor cortex are hitherto unexplored. To address this question at a genomic level, we performed mRNA expression analyses using Affymetrix microarray gene chips and real-time RT-PCR in sensorimotor cortex of parkinsonian and control rats following STN-HFS. Experimental parkinsonism was induced in Brown Norway rats by bilateral nigral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine and was assessed histologically, behaviorally, and electrophysiologically. We applied prolonged (23h) unilateral STN-HFS in awake and freely moving animals, with the non-stimulated hemisphere serving as an internal control for gene expression analyses. Gene enrichment analysis revealed strongest regulation in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) related genes. STN-HFS led to a cortical downregulation of several MHC class II (RT1-Da, Db1, Ba, and Cd74) and MHC class I (RT1CE) encoding genes. The same set of genes showed increased expression levels in a comparison addressing the effect of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning. Hence, our data suggest the possible association of altered microglial activity and synaptic transmission by STN-HFS within the sensorimotor cortex of 6-hydroxydopamine treated rats. PMID:24621597

  6. Underlying neurobiology and clinical correlates of mania status after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Amit; Tye, Susannah J; Lee, Kendall H; Sampson, Shirlene; Matsumoto, Joseph; Adams, Andrea; Klassen, Bryan; Stead, Matt; Fields, Julie A; Frye, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a novel and effective surgical intervention for refractory Parkinson's disease (PD). The authors review the current literature to identify the clinical correlates associated with subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS-induced hypomania/mania in PD patients. Ventromedial electrode placement has been most consistently implicated in the induction of STN DBS-induced mania. There is some evidence of symptom amelioration when electrode placement is switched to a more dorsolateral contact. Additional clinical correlates may include unipolar stimulation, higher voltage (>3 V), male sex, and/or early-onset PD. STN DBS-induced psychiatric adverse events emphasize the need for comprehensive psychiatric presurgical evaluation and follow-up in PD patients. Animal studies and prospective clinical research, combined with advanced neuroimaging techniques, are needed to identify clinical correlates and underlying neurobiological mechanisms of STN DBS-induced mania. Such working models would serve to further our understanding of the neurobiological underpinnings of mania and contribute valuable new insight toward development of future DBS mood-stabilization therapies. PMID:22450620

  7. Deep brain stimulation reveals a dissociation of consummatory and motivated behaviour in the medial and lateral nucleus accumbens shell of the rat.

    PubMed

    van der Plasse, Geoffrey; Schrama, Regina; van Seters, Sebastiaan P; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Westenberg, Herman G M

    2012-01-01

    Following the successful application of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and promising results in clinical trials for obsessive compulsive disorder and major depression, DBS is currently being tested in small patient-populations with eating disorders and addiction. However, in spite of its potential use in a broad spectrum of disorders, the mechanisms of action of DBS remain largely unclear and optimal neural targets for stimulation in several disorders have yet to be established. Thus, there is a great need to examine site-specific effects of DBS on a behavioural level and to understand how DBS may modulate pathological behaviour. In view of the possible application of DBS in the treatment of disorders characterized by impaired processing of reward and motivation, like addiction and eating disorders, we examined the effect of DBS of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) on food-directed behavior. Rats were implanted with bilateral stimulation electrodes in one of three anatomically and functionally distinct sub-areas of the NAcc: the core, lateral shell (lShell) and medial shell (mShell). Subsequently, we studied the effects of DBS on food consumption, and the motivational and appetitive properties of food. The data revealed a functional dissociation between the lShell and mShell. DBS of the lShell reduced motivation to respond for sucrose under a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement, mShell DBS, however, profoundly and selectively increased the intake of chow. DBS of the NAcc core did not alter any form of food-directed behavior studied. DBS of neither structure affected sucrose preference. These data indicate that the intake of chow and the motivation to work for palatable food can independently be modulated by DBS of subregions of the NAcc shell. As such, these findings provide important leads for the possible future application of DBS as a treatment for eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa. PMID:22428054

  8. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus preferentially alters the translational profile of striatopallidal neurons in an animal model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Visanji, Naomi P.; Kamali Sarvestani, Iman; Creed, Meaghan C.; Shams Shoaei, Zahra; Nobrega, José N.; Hamani, Clement; Hazrati, Lili-Naz

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation targeting the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is an effective surgical treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), the precise neuronal mechanisms of which both at molecular and network levels remain a topic of debate. Here we employ two transgenic mouse lines, combining translating ribosomal affinity purification (TRAP) with bacterial artificial chromosome expression (Bac), to selectively identify changes in translational gene expression in either Drd1a-expressing striatonigral or Drd2-expressing striatopallidal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the striatum following STN-DBS. 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned mice received either 5 days stimulation via a DBS electrode implanted in the ipsilateral STN or 5 days sham treatment (no stimulation). Striatal polyribosomal RNA was selectively purified from either Drd2 or Drd1a MSNs using the TRAP method and gene expression profiling performed. We identified eight significantly altered genes in Drd2 MSNs (Vps33b, Ppp1r3c, Mapk4, Sorcs2, Neto1, Abca1, Penk1, and Gapdh) and two overlapping genes in Drd1a MSNs (Penk1 and Ppp1r3c) implicated in the molecular mechanisms of STN-DBS. A detailed functional analysis, using a further 728 probes implicated in STN-DBS, suggested an increased ability to receive excitation (mediated by increased dendritic spines, increased calcium influx and enhanced excitatory post synaptic potentials) accompanied by processes that would hamper the initiation of action potentials, transport of neurotransmitters from soma to axon terminals and vesicular release in Drd2-expressing MSNs. Finally, changes in expression of several genes involved in apoptosis as well as cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism were also identified. This increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms induced by STN-DBS may reveal novel targets for future non-surgical therapies for PD. PMID:26106299

  9. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus preferentially alters the translational profile of striatopallidal neurons in an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Visanji, Naomi P; Kamali Sarvestani, Iman; Creed, Meaghan C; Shams Shoaei, Zahra; Nobrega, José N; Hamani, Clement; Hazrati, Lili-Naz

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation targeting the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is an effective surgical treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), the precise neuronal mechanisms of which both at molecular and network levels remain a topic of debate. Here we employ two transgenic mouse lines, combining translating ribosomal affinity purification (TRAP) with bacterial artificial chromosome expression (Bac), to selectively identify changes in translational gene expression in either Drd1a-expressing striatonigral or Drd2-expressing striatopallidal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the striatum following STN-DBS. 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned mice received either 5 days stimulation via a DBS electrode implanted in the ipsilateral STN or 5 days sham treatment (no stimulation). Striatal polyribosomal RNA was selectively purified from either Drd2 or Drd1a MSNs using the TRAP method and gene expression profiling performed. We identified eight significantly altered genes in Drd2 MSNs (Vps33b, Ppp1r3c, Mapk4, Sorcs2, Neto1, Abca1, Penk1, and Gapdh) and two overlapping genes in Drd1a MSNs (Penk1 and Ppp1r3c) implicated in the molecular mechanisms of STN-DBS. A detailed functional analysis, using a further 728 probes implicated in STN-DBS, suggested an increased ability to receive excitation (mediated by increased dendritic spines, increased calcium influx and enhanced excitatory post synaptic potentials) accompanied by processes that would hamper the initiation of action potentials, transport of neurotransmitters from soma to axon terminals and vesicular release in Drd2-expressing MSNs. Finally, changes in expression of several genes involved in apoptosis as well as cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism were also identified. This increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms induced by STN-DBS may reveal novel targets for future non-surgical therapies for PD. PMID:26106299

  10. Low-frequency stimulation in anterior nucleus of thalamus alleviates kainate-induced chronic epilepsy and modulates the hippocampal EEG rhythm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Liang, Jiao; Xu, Cenglin; Wang, Ying; Kuang, Yifang; Xu, Zhenghao; Guo, Yi; Wang, Shuang; Gao, Feng; Chen, Zhong

    2016-02-01

    High-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the anterior nucleus of thalamus (ANT) is a new and alternative option for the treatment of intractable epilepsy. However, the responder rate is relatively low. The present study was designed to determine the effect of low-frequency stimulation (LFS) in ANT on chronic spontaneous recurrent seizures and related pathological pattern in intra-hippocampal kainate mouse model. We found that LFS (1 Hz, 100 μs, 300 μA), but not HFS (100 Hz, 100 μs, 30 μA), in bilateral ANT significantly decreased the frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures, either non-convulsive focal seizures or tonic-clonic generalized seizures. The anti-epileptic effect persisted for one week after LFS cessation, which manifested as a long-term inhibition of the frequency of seizures with short (20-60 s) and intermediate duration (60-120 s). Meanwhile, LFS decreased the frequency of high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) and interictal spikes, two indicators of seizure severity, whereas HFS increased the HFO frequency. Furthermore, LFS decreased the power of the delta band and increased the power of the gamma band of hippocampal background EEG. In addition, LFS, but not HFS, improved the performance of chronic epileptic mice in objection-location task, novel objection recognition and freezing test. These results provide the first evidence that LFS in ANT alleviates kainate-induced chronic epilepsy and cognitive impairment, which may be related to the modulation of the hippocampal EEG rhythm. This may be of great therapeutic significance for clinical treatment of epilepsy with deep brain stimulation. PMID:26621617

  11. Inverted-U shaped effects of D1 dopamine receptor stimulation in the medial preoptic nucleus on sexually motivated song in male European starlings.

    PubMed

    Riters, Lauren V; Pawlisch, Benjamin A; Kelm-Nelson, Cynthia A; Stevenson, Sharon A

    2014-02-01

    Past studies in songbirds have highlighted a central role for the medial preoptic nucleus (mPOA) in context-appropriate vocal communication. During the breeding season, male songbirds sing primarily to attract females (sexually motivated song) and to repel competitors (agonistically motivated song). Past data have linked dopamine and D1 dopamine receptors in the mPOA to sexually motivated but not agonistically motivated song; however, direct effects of dopamine receptor manipulations in the mPOA on song have not been experimentally tested. Here, we tested the hypothesis that D1 receptor stimulation in the mPOA selectively influences sexually motivated male song, and the possibility that the effects of D1 receptor agonism differ at low and high doses. In a first study, breeding-condition male European starlings received infusions of saline or a single dose of the D1 receptor agonist SKF 38393 on separate test days into the mPOA or hypothalamic control areas. Stimulation of D1 receptors in the mPOA triggered sexually motivated but not agonistically motivated song. A second study showed inverted-U shaped dose-response effects of the agonist, such that low levels of sexually motivated song were observed at low and high levels of D1 receptor activation. A third study showed that the effects of the D1 receptor agonist were blocked by the D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390. These findings suggest that an optimal level of D1 receptor stimulation in the mPOA is needed to facilitate sexually motivated vocal production. The results support a central, context-specific role for the mPOA in vocal communication, and more broadly demonstrate a complex, modulatory influence of D1 receptors in the mPOA on sexually motivated behavior. PMID:24528137

  12. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus reestablishes neuronal information transmission in the 6-OHDA rat model of parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Grill, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Pathophysiological activity of basal ganglia neurons accompanies the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. High-frequency (>90 Hz) deep brain stimulation (DBS) reduces parkinsonian symptoms, but the mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesize that parkinsonism-associated electrophysiological changes constitute an increase in neuronal firing pattern disorder and a concomitant decrease in information transmission through the ventral basal ganglia, and that effective DBS alleviates symptoms by decreasing neuronal disorder while simultaneously increasing information transfer through the same regions. We tested these hypotheses in the freely behaving, 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model of hemiparkinsonism. Following the onset of parkinsonism, mean neuronal firing rates were unchanged, despite a significant increase in firing pattern disorder (i.e., neuronal entropy), in both the globus pallidus and substantia nigra pars reticulata. This increase in neuronal entropy was reversed by symptom-alleviating DBS. Whereas increases in signal entropy are most commonly indicative of similar increases in information transmission, directed information through both regions was substantially reduced (>70%) following the onset of parkinsonism. Again, this decrease in information transmission was partially reversed by DBS. Together, these results suggest that the parkinsonian basal ganglia are rife with entropic activity and incapable of functional information transmission. Furthermore, they indicate that symptom-alleviating DBS works by lowering the entropic noise floor, enabling more information-rich signal propagation. In this view, the symptoms of parkinsonism may be more a default mode, normally overridden by healthy basal ganglia information. When that information is abolished by parkinsonian pathophysiology, hypokinetic symptoms emerge. PMID:24554786

  13. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus reestablishes neuronal information transmission in the 6-OHDA rat model of parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Dorval, Alan D; Grill, Warren M

    2014-05-01

    Pathophysiological activity of basal ganglia neurons accompanies the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. High-frequency (>90 Hz) deep brain stimulation (DBS) reduces parkinsonian symptoms, but the mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesize that parkinsonism-associated electrophysiological changes constitute an increase in neuronal firing pattern disorder and a concomitant decrease in information transmission through the ventral basal ganglia, and that effective DBS alleviates symptoms by decreasing neuronal disorder while simultaneously increasing information transfer through the same regions. We tested these hypotheses in the freely behaving, 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model of hemiparkinsonism. Following the onset of parkinsonism, mean neuronal firing rates were unchanged, despite a significant increase in firing pattern disorder (i.e., neuronal entropy), in both the globus pallidus and substantia nigra pars reticulata. This increase in neuronal entropy was reversed by symptom-alleviating DBS. Whereas increases in signal entropy are most commonly indicative of similar increases in information transmission, directed information through both regions was substantially reduced (>70%) following the onset of parkinsonism. Again, this decrease in information transmission was partially reversed by DBS. Together, these results suggest that the parkinsonian basal ganglia are rife with entropic activity and incapable of functional information transmission. Furthermore, they indicate that symptom-alleviating DBS works by lowering the entropic noise floor, enabling more information-rich signal propagation. In this view, the symptoms of parkinsonism may be more a default mode, normally overridden by healthy basal ganglia information. When that information is abolished by parkinsonian pathophysiology, hypokinetic symptoms emerge. PMID:24554786

  14. Comparative effects of unilateral and bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on gait kinematics in Parkinson's disease: a randomized, blinded study.

    PubMed

    Lizarraga, Karlo J; Jagid, Jonathan R; Luca, Corneliu C

    2016-08-01

    Gait dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD) does not always respond to bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS). Since right hemisphere motor networks may be dominant for gait control, identical stimulation of asymmetric circuits could account for gait dysfunction. We compared the effects of bilateral and unilateral STN-DBS on gait kinematics in PD patients who developed gait impairment after STN-DBS. Twenty-two PD patients with >50 % improvement in motor scores, but dopamine-resistant gait dysfunction 6-12 months after bilateral STN-DBS were blindly tested off dopaminergic effects in four randomly assigned DBS conditions: bilateral, right-sided, left-sided and off stimulation. Motor scores (MDS-UPDRS III), gait scores (MDS-UPRDS 2.11-2.13 + 3.9-3.13), turning time (seconds), stride length (meters) and velocity (meters/second) were measured 1 h after DBS changes. Motor and gait scores significantly improved with bilateral versus unilateral STN-DBS. Stride length and velocity (0.95 ± 0.06, 0.84 ± 0.07) significantly improved with bilateral (1.09 ± 0.04, 0.95 ± 0.05), right-sided (1.06 ± 0.04, 0.92 ± 0.05) and left-sided stimulation (1.01 ± 0.05, 0.90 ± 0.05) (p < 0.05). Stride length significantly improved with right-sided versus left-sided (0.05 ± 0.02) and bilateral versus left-sided stimulation (0.07 ± 0.02) (p < 0.05). Turning time (4.89 ± 0.6) tended to improve with bilateral (4.13 ± 0.5) (p = 0.15) and right-sided (4.27 ± 0.6) (p = 0.2) more than with left STN-DBS (4.69 ± 0.5) (p = 0.5). Bilateral STN-DBS yields greater improvement in motor and gait scores in PD patients. Yet, unilateral stimulation has similar effects on gait kinematics. Particularly, right-sided stimulation might produce slightly greater improvements. Although the clinical relevance of differential programming of right versus left-sided STN-DBS is unclear, this approach could be considered in the management of

  15. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Modulate Catecholamine Levels with Significant Relations to Clinical Outcome after Surgery in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Asahina, Masato; Hirano, Shigeki; Yamanaka, Yoshitaka; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Aims Although subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is effective in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD), its physiological mechanisms remain unclear. Because STN-DBS is effective in patients with PD whose motor symptoms are dramatically alleviated by L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) treatment, the higher preoperative catecholamine levels might be related to the better clinical outcome after surgery. We aimed to examine the correlation between the preoperative catecholamine levels and postoperative clinical outcome after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. The effectiveness of STN-DBS in the patient who responded well to dopaminergic medication suggest the causal link between the dopaminergic system and STN-DBS. We also examined how catecholamine levels were modulated after subthalamic stimulation. Methods In total 25 patients with PD were enrolled (Mean age 66.2 ± 6.7 years, mean disease duration 11.6 ± 3.7 years). Mean levodopa equivalent doses were 1032 ± 34.6 mg before surgery. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma catecholamine levels were measured an hour after oral administration of antiparkinsonian drugs before surgery. The mean Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale scores (UPDRS) and the Parkinson’s disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39) were obtained before and after surgery. Of the 25 patients, postoperative cerebrospinal fluid and plasma were collected an hour after oral administration of antiparkinsonian drugs during on stimulation at follow up in 11 patients. Results Mean levodopa equivalent doses significantly decreased after surgery with improvement in motor functions and quality of life. The preoperative catecholamine levels had basically negative correlations with postoperative motor scores and quality of life, suggesting that higher preoperative catecholamine levels were related to better outcome after STN-DBS. The preoperative plasma levels of L-DOPA had significantly negative correlations with

  16. Stimulation of α2-adrenergic receptors in the central nucleus of the amygdala attenuates stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hidetaka; Bruijnzeel, Adrie W.

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco addiction is a chronic disorder that is characterized by craving for tobacco products, withdrawal upon smoking cessation, and relapse after periods of abstinence. Previous studies demonstrated that systemic administration of α2-adrenergic receptor agonists attenuates stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking in rats. The aim of the present experiments was to investigate the role of noradrenergic transmission in the central nucleus of amygdala (CeA) in stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking. Rats self-administered nicotine for 14–16 days and then nicotine seeking was extinguished by substituting saline for nicotine. The effect of the intra-CeA infusion of the α2-adrenergic receptor agonists clonidine and dexmedetomidine, the nonselective β1/β2-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol, and the α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin on stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking was investigated. In all the experiments, exposure to footshocks reinstated extinguished nicotine seeking. The administration of clonidine or dexmedetomidine into the CeA attenuated stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking. The administration of propranolol or prazosin into the CeA did not affect stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking. Furthermore, intra-CeA administration of clonidine or dexmedetomidine did not affect operant responding for food pellets. This suggests that the effects of clonidine and dexmedetomidine on stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking were not mediated by motor impairments or sedation. Taken together, these findings indicate that stimulation of α2-adrenergic receptors, but not blockade of α1 or β-adrenergic receptors, in the CeA attenuates stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking. These findings suggest that α2-adrenergic receptor agonists may at least partly attenuate stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking by stimulating α2-adrenergic receptors in the CeA. PMID:20854830

  17. Cognition and Depression Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus and Globus Pallidus Pars Internus in Parkinson's Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Combs, Hannah L; Folley, Bradley S; Berry, David T R; Segerstrom, Suzanne C; Han, Dong Y; Anderson-Mooney, Amelia J; Walls, Brittany D; van Horne, Craig

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common, degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. Individuals experience predominantly extrapyramidal symptoms including resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, gait abnormalities, cognitive impairment, depression, and neurobehavioral concerns. Cognitive impairments associated with PD are diverse, including difficulty with attention, processing speed, executive functioning, memory recall, visuospatial functions, word-retrieval, and naming. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or globus pallidus internus (GPi) is FDA approved and has been shown to be effective in reducing motor symptoms of PD. Studies have found that stimulating STN and GPi are equally effective at improving motor symptoms and dyskinesias; however, there has been discrepancy as to whether the cognitive, behavioral, and mood symptoms are affected differently between the two targets. The present study used random-effects meta-analytic models along with a novel p-curve analytic procedure to compare the potential cognitive and emotional impairments associated with STN-DBS in the current literature to those associated with GPi-DBS. Forty-one articles were reviewed with an aggregated sample size of 1622 patients. Following STN-DBS, small declines were found in psychomotor speed, memory, attention, executive functions, and overall cognition; and moderate declines were found in both semantic and phonemic fluency. However, GPi-DBS resulted in fewer neurocognitive declines than STN-DBS (small declines in attention and small-moderate declines in verbal fluency). With regards to its effect on depression symptomatology, both GPi-DBS and STN-DBS resulted in lower levels of depressive symptoms post-surgery. From a neurocognitive standpoint, both GPi-DBS and STN-DBS produce subtle cognitive declines but appears to be relatively well tolerated. PMID:26459361

  18. Raclopride or high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus stops cocaine-induced motor stereotypy and restores related alterations in prefrontal basal ganglia circuits.

    PubMed

    Aliane, Verena; Pérez, Sylvie; Deniau, Jean-Michel; Kemel, Marie-Louise

    2012-11-01

    Motor stereotypy is a key symptom of various neurological or neuropsychiatric disorders. Neuroleptics or the promising treatment using deep brain stimulation stops stereotypies but the mechanisms underlying their actions are unclear. In rat, motor stereotypies are linked to an imbalance between prefrontal and sensorimotor cortico-basal ganglia circuits. Indeed, cortico-nigral transmission was reduced in the prefrontal but not sensorimotor basal ganglia circuits and dopamine and acetylcholine release was altered in the prefrontal but not sensorimotor territory of the dorsal striatum. Furthermore, cholinergic transmission in the prefrontal territory of the dorsal striatum plays a crucial role in the arrest of motor stereotypy. Here we found that, as previously observed for raclopride, high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (HFS STN) rapidly stopped cocaine-induced motor stereotypies in rat. Importantly, raclopride and HFS STN exerted a strong effect on cocaine-induced alterations in prefrontal basal ganglia circuits. Raclopride restored the cholinergic transmission in the prefrontal territory of the dorsal striatum and the cortico-nigral information transmissions in the prefrontal basal ganglia circuits. HFS STN also restored the N-methyl-d-aspartic-acid-evoked release of acetylcholine and dopamine in the prefrontal territory of the dorsal striatum. However, in contrast to raclopride, HFS STN did not restore the cortico-substantia nigra pars reticulata transmissions but exerted strong inhibitory and excitatory effects on neuronal activity in the prefrontal subdivision of the substantia nigra pars reticulata. Thus, both raclopride and HFS STN stop cocaine-induced motor stereotypy, but exert different effects on the related alterations in the prefrontal basal ganglia circuits. PMID:22845853

  19. Long-term Efficacy of Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease: A 5-year Follow-up Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lu-Lu; Liu, Jin-Long; Fu, Xiao-Li; Xian, Wen-Biao; Gu, Jing; Liu, Yan-Mei; Ye, Jing; Chen, Jie; Qian, Hao; Xu, Shao-Hua; Pei, Zhong; Chen, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Background: Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) is effective against advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), allowing dramatic improvement of Parkinsonism, in addition to a significant reduction in medication. Here we aimed to investigate the long-term effect of STN DBS in Chinese PD patients, which has not been thoroughly studied in China. Methods: Ten PD patients were assessed before DBS and followed up 1, 3, and 5 years later using Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III (UPDRS III), Parkinson's Disease Questionnatire-39, Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale-Chinese Version, Mini-mental State Examination, Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Hamilton Anxiety Scale and Hamilton Depression Scale. Stimulation parameters and drug dosages were recorded at each follow-up. Data were analyzed using the ANOVA for repeated measures. Results: In the “off” state (off medication), DBS improved UPDRS III scores by 35.87% in 5 years, compared with preoperative baseline (P < 0.001). In the “on” state (on medication), motor scores at 5 years were similar to the results of preoperative levodopa challenge test. The quality of life is improved by 58.18% (P < 0.001) from baseline to 3 years and gradually declined afterward. Sleep, cognition, and emotion were mostly unchanged. Levodopa equivalent daily dose was reduced from 660.4 ± 210.1 mg at baseline to 310.6 ± 158.4 mg at 5 years (by 52.96%, P < 0.001). The average pulse width, frequency and amplitude at 5 years were 75.0 ± 18.21 μs, 138.5 ± 19.34 Hz, and 2.68 ± 0.43 V, respectively. Conclusions: STN DBS is an effective intervention for PD, although associated with a slightly diminished efficacy after 5 years. Compared with other studies, patients in our study required lower voltage and medication for satisfactory symptom control. PMID:26365958

  20. Predictive timing functions of cortical beta oscillations are impaired in Parkinson's disease and influenced by L-DOPA and deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Gulberti, A.; Moll, C.K.E.; Hamel, W.; Buhmann, C.; Koeppen, J.A.; Boelmans, K.; Zittel, S.; Gerloff, C.; Westphal, M.; Schneider, T.R.; Engel, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Cortex-basal ganglia circuits participate in motor timing and temporal perception, and are important for the dynamic configuration of sensorimotor networks in response to exogenous demands. In Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) induces motor performance benefits. Hitherto, little is known concerning contributions of the basal ganglia to sensory facilitation and cortical responses to RAS in PD. Therefore, we conducted an EEG study in 12 PD patients before and after surgery for subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) and in 12 age-matched controls. Here we investigated the effects of levodopa and STN-DBS on resting-state EEG and on the cortical-response profile to slow and fast RAS in a passive-listening paradigm focusing on beta-band oscillations, which are important for auditory–motor coupling. The beta-modulation profile to RAS in healthy participants was characterized by local peaks preceding and following auditory stimuli. In PD patients RAS failed to induce pre-stimulus beta increases. The absence of pre-stimulus beta-band modulation may contribute to impaired rhythm perception in PD. Moreover, post-stimulus beta-band responses were highly abnormal during fast RAS in PD patients. Treatment with levodopa and STN-DBS reinstated a post-stimulus beta-modulation profile similar to controls, while STN-DBS reduced beta-band power in the resting-state. The treatment-sensitivity of beta oscillations suggests that STN-DBS may specifically improve timekeeping functions of cortical beta oscillations during fast auditory pacing. PMID:26594626

  1. Long-Term Migration of a Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) Lead in the Third Ventricle Caused by Cerebral Atrophy in a Patient with Anterior Thalamic Nucleus DBS

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-gyu; Lee, Si-hoon; Shon, Young-Min; Son, Byung-chul

    2015-01-01

    The long-term (5-years) antiepileptic effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the anterior nucleus of the thalamus (ANT) against refractory epilepsy has been reported. However, experience with ANT DBS for epilepsy is limited, and so hardware complications and technical problems related to ANT DBS are unclear. We report the case of a 57-year-old male who underwent re-implantation of a DBS lead in the left ANT because of lead migration into the third ventricle detected 8 years after the first DBS, and which was caused by the significant enlargement of the lateral and third ventricles. After re-implantation, the patient showed a mechanically-related antiepileptic effect and a prominent driving response of the electroencephalography was verified. We speculate that progressive dilatation of the ventricle and shallow, insufficient implantation of the lead during the initial ANT DBS may have caused migration of the DBS lead. Because dilatation of the ventricle could progress years after DBS in a patient with chronic epilepsy, regular follow-up imaging is warranted in ANT DBS patients with an injured, atrophied brain. PMID:26819942

  2. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL PATTERNS OF SEROTONIN RELEASE IN THE RAT’S LUMBAR SPINAL CORD FOLLOWING ELECTRICAL STIMULATION OF THE NUCLEUS RAPHE MAGNUS

    PubMed Central

    Hentall, I. D.; Pinzon, A.; Noga, B. R.

    2009-01-01

    The monoamine neurotransmitter serotonin is released from spinal terminals of nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) neurons and important in sensory and motor control, but its pattern of release has remained unclear. Serotonin was measured by the high-resolution method of fast cyclic voltammetry (2 Hz) with carbon-fiber microelectrodes in lumbar segments (L3–L6) of halothane-anesthetized rats during electrical stimulation of the NRM. Because sites of serotonin release are often histologically remote from membrane transporters and receptors, rapid emergence into aggregate extracellular space was expected. Increased monoamine oxidation currents were found in 94% of trials of 50-Hz, 20-s NRM stimulation across all laminae. The estimated peak serotonin concentration averaged 37.8 nM (maximum 287 nM), and was greater in dorsal and ventral laminae (I–III and VIII–IX) than in intermediate laminae (IV–VI). When measured near NRM-evoked changes, basal monoamine levels (relative to dorsal white matter) were highest in intermediate laminae, while changes in norepinephrine level produced by locus ceruleus (LC) stimulation were lowest in laminae II/III and VII. The NRM-evoked monoamine peak was linearly proportional to stimulus frequency (10–100 Hz). The peak often occurred before the stimulus ended (mean 15.6 s at 50 Hz, range 4–35 s) regardless of frequency, suggesting that release per impulse was constant during the rise but fell later. The latency from stimulus onset to electrochemical signal detection (mean 4.2 s, range 1–23 s) was inversely correlated with peak amplitude and directly correlated with time-to-peak. Quantitative modeling suggested that shorter latencies mostly reflected the time below detection threshold (5–10 nM), so that extrasynaptic serotonin was significantly elevated well within 1 s. Longer latencies (>5 s), which were confined to intermediate laminae, appeared mainly to be due to diffusion from distant sources. In conclusion, except possibly in

  3. Optogenetic Stimulation of Arcuate Nucleus Kiss1 Neurons Reveals a Steroid-Dependent Glutamatergic Input to POMC and AgRP Neurons in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Nestor, Casey C; Qiu, Jian; Padilla, Stephanie L; Zhang, Chunguang; Bosch, Martha A; Fan, Wei; Aicher, Sue A; Palmiter, Richard D; Rønnekleiv, Oline K; Kelly, Martin J

    2016-06-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) neurons are essential for reproduction, but their role in the control of energy balance and other homeostatic functions remains unclear. Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons, located in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus, integrate numerous excitatory and inhibitory inputs to ultimately regulate energy homeostasis. Given that POMC and AgRP neurons are contacted by Kiss1 neurons in the ARC (Kiss1(ARC)) and they express androgen receptors, Kiss1(ARC) neurons may mediate the orexigenic action of testosterone via POMC and/or AgRP neurons. Quantitative PCR analysis of pooled Kiss1(ARC) neurons revealed that mRNA levels for Kiss1 and vesicular glutamate transporter 2 were higher in castrated male mice compared with gonad-intact males. Single-cell RT-PCR analysis of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) ARC neurons harvested from males injected with AAV1-EF1α-DIO-ChR2:YFP revealed that 100% and 88% expressed mRNAs for Kiss1 and vesicular glutamate transporter 2, respectively. Whole-cell, voltage-clamp recordings from nonfluorescent postsynaptic ARC neurons showed that low frequency photo-stimulation (0.5 Hz) of Kiss1-ChR2:YFP neurons elicited a fast glutamatergic inward current in POMC and AgRP neurons. Paired-pulse, photo-stimulation revealed paired-pulse depression, which is indicative of greater glutamate release, in the castrated male mice compared with gonad-intact male mice. Group I and group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists depolarized and hyperpolarized POMC and AgRP neurons, respectively, which was mimicked by high frequency photo-stimulation (20 Hz) of Kiss1(ARC) neurons. Therefore, POMC and AgRP neurons receive direct steroid- and frequency-dependent glutamatergic synaptic input from Kiss1(ARC) neurons in male mice, which may be a critical pathway for Kiss1 neurons to help coordinate energy homeostasis and reproduction. PMID:27093227

  4. Nucleus accumbens deep-brain stimulation efficacy in ACTH-pretreated rats: alterations in mitochondrial function relate to antidepressant-like effects

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y; McGee, S; Czeczor, J K; Walker, A J; Kale, R P; Kouzani, A Z; Walder, K; Berk, M; Tye, S J

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has a critical role in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and treatment response. To investigate this, we established an animal model exhibiting a state of antidepressant treatment resistance in male Wistar rats using 21 days of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) administration (100 μg per day). First, the effect of ACTH treatment on the efficacy of imipramine (10 mg kg−1) was investigated alongside its effect on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) mitochondrial function. Second, we examined the mood-regulatory actions of chronic (7 day) high-frequency nucleus accumbens (NAc) deep-brain stimulation (DBS; 130 Hz, 100 μA, 90 μS) and concomitant PFC mitochondrial function. Antidepressant-like responses were assessed in the open field test (OFT) and forced swim test (FST) for both conditions. ACTH pretreatment prevented imipramine-mediated improvement in mobility during the FST (P<0.05). NAc DBS effectively improved FST mobility in ACTH-treated animals (P<0.05). No improvement in mobility was observed for sham control animals (P>0.05). Analyses of PFC mitochondrial function revealed that ACTH-treated animals had decreased capacity for adenosine triphosphate production compared with controls. In contrast, ACTH animals following NAc DBS demonstrated greater mitochondrial function relative to controls. Interestingly, a proportion (30%) of the ACTH-treated animals exhibited heightened locomotor activity in the OFT and exaggerated escape behaviors during the FST, together with general hyperactivity in their home-cage settings. More importantly, the induction of this mania-like phenotype was accompanied by overcompensative increased mitochondrial respiration. Manifestation of a DBS-induced mania-like phenotype in imipramine-resistant animals highlights the potential use of this model in elucidating mechanisms of mood dysregulation. PMID:27327257

  5. Nucleus accumbens deep-brain stimulation efficacy in ACTH-pretreated rats: alterations in mitochondrial function relate to antidepressant-like effects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; McGee, S; Czeczor, J K; Walker, A J; Kale, R P; Kouzani, A Z; Walder, K; Berk, M; Tye, S J

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has a critical role in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and treatment response. To investigate this, we established an animal model exhibiting a state of antidepressant treatment resistance in male Wistar rats using 21 days of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) administration (100 μg per day). First, the effect of ACTH treatment on the efficacy of imipramine (10 mg kg(-1)) was investigated alongside its effect on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) mitochondrial function. Second, we examined the mood-regulatory actions of chronic (7 day) high-frequency nucleus accumbens (NAc) deep-brain stimulation (DBS; 130 Hz, 100 μA, 90 μS) and concomitant PFC mitochondrial function. Antidepressant-like responses were assessed in the open field test (OFT) and forced swim test (FST) for both conditions. ACTH pretreatment prevented imipramine-mediated improvement in mobility during the FST (P<0.05). NAc DBS effectively improved FST mobility in ACTH-treated animals (P<0.05). No improvement in mobility was observed for sham control animals (P>0.05). Analyses of PFC mitochondrial function revealed that ACTH-treated animals had decreased capacity for adenosine triphosphate production compared with controls. In contrast, ACTH animals following NAc DBS demonstrated greater mitochondrial function relative to controls. Interestingly, a proportion (30%) of the ACTH-treated animals exhibited heightened locomotor activity in the OFT and exaggerated escape behaviors during the FST, together with general hyperactivity in their home-cage settings. More importantly, the induction of this mania-like phenotype was accompanied by overcompensative increased mitochondrial respiration. Manifestation of a DBS-induced mania-like phenotype in imipramine-resistant animals highlights the potential use of this model in elucidating mechanisms of mood dysregulation. PMID:27327257

  6. Differential sensitivity of the caudal and rostral nucleus accumbens to the rewarding effects of a H1-histaminergic receptor blocker as measured with place-preference and self-stimulation behavior.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, P; Privou, C; Huston, J P

    1999-01-01

    A recent series of studies in rats has demonstrated positively reinforcing and memory enhancing effects following lesions of the nucleus tuberomammillaris, which is the only known source of neuronal histamine. The aim of the present experiments was to assess whether inhibition of histaminergic neurotransmission in the ventral striatum has positively reinforcing effects. In Experiment 1 rats with chronically-implanted cannulae were injected with the H1 receptor blocker d-( + )-chlorpheniramine at doses of 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 microg into the rostral or caudal parts of the nucleus accumbens, a brain region known to be involved in reward-related processes. Immediately after the treatment the animals were placed into one of four restricted quadrants of a circular open field (closed corral) for a single conditioning trial. During the drug-free test for conditioned place preference, when a choice among the four quadrants was provided, those rats injected with 10.0 microg chlorpheniramine in the caudal nucleus accumbens spent more time in the treatment corral, indicative of a positively rewarding drug action. In Experiment 2 the question was posed whether injection of chlorpheniramine into the nucleus accumbens influences electrical self-stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus. For this purpose rats were chronically implanted with two bipolar electrodes aimed at the lateral-hypothalami and with two additional guide cannulae aimed either at the rostral or caudal nucleus accumbens. After having established reliable self-stimulation behavior at one of the two electrode sites the animals were allowed to self-stimulate for one hour (baseline). Then they were unilaterally injected with 10.0 microg chlorpheniramine or vehicle and allowed to self-stimulate for another hour (test). On the next day the same procedure took place, except for the difference that the animals received an injection aimed at the hemisphere not treated so far. Animals treated with chlorpheniramine in the

  7. Behavioral Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation of the Anterior Nucleus of Thalamus, Entorhinal Cortex and Fornix in a Rat Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Hu, Wen-Han; Wu, De-Long; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent clinical and preclinical studies have suggested that deep brain stimulation (DBS) can be used as a tool to enhance cognitive functions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of DBS at three separate targets in the Papez circuit, including the anterior nucleus of thalamus (ANT), the entorhinal cortex (EC), and the fornix (FX), on cognitive behaviors in an Alzheimer's disease (AD) rat model. Methods: Forty-eight rats were subjected to an intrahippocampal injection of amyloid peptides 1-42 to induce an AD model. Rats were divided into six groups: DBS and sham DBS groups of ANT, EC, and FX. Spatial learning and memory were assessed by the Morris water maze (MWM). Recognition memory was investigated by the novel object recognition memory test (NORM). Locomotor and anxiety-related behaviors were detected by the open field test (OF). By using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), behavior differences between the six groups were analyzed. Results: In the MWM, the ANT, EC, and FX DBS groups performed differently in terms of the time spent in the platform zone (F(2,23) = 6.04, P < 0.01), the frequency of platform crossing (F(2,23) = 11.53, P < 0.001), and the percent time spent within the platform quadrant (F(2,23) = 6.29, P < 0.01). In the NORM, the EC and FX DBS groups spent more time with the novel object, although the ANT DBS group did not (F(2,23) = 10.03, P < 0.001). In the OF, all of the groups showed a similar total distance moved (F(1,42) = 1.14, P = 0.29) and relative time spent in the center (F(2,42) = 0.56, P = 0.58). Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that DBS of the EC and FX facilitated hippocampus-dependent spatial memory more prominently than ANT DBS. In addition, hippocampus-independent recognition memory was enhanced by EC and FX DBS. None of the targets showed side-effects of anxiety or locomotor behaviors. PMID:25947402

  8. Reduced ethanol consumption by alcohol-preferring (P) rats following pharmacological silencing and deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens shell

    PubMed Central

    Wilden, Jessica A.; Qing, Kurt Y.; Hauser, Sheketha R.; McBride, William J.; Irazoqui, Pedro P.; Rodd, Zachary A.

    2015-01-01

    Object There is increasing interest in deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of addiction. Initial testing must be conducted in animals, and the alcohol-preferring (P) rat meets the criteria for an animal model of alcoholism. This study is composed of 2 experiments designed to examine the effects of 1) pharmacological inactivation and 2) DBS of the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh) on the consumption of alcohol by P rats. Methods In the first experiment, the effects of reversible inactivation of the AcbSh were investigated by administering intracranial injections of γ–aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists. Bilateral microinjections of drug were administered to the AcbSh in P rats (8–10 rats/group), after which the animals were placed in operant chambers containing 2 levers—one used to administer water and the other to administer 15% EtOH—to examine the acquisition and maintenance of oral EtOH self-administration. In the second experiment, a DBS electrode was placed in each P rat’s left AcbSh. The animals then received 100 or 200 μA (3–4 rats/group) of DBS to examine the effect on daily consumption of oral EtOH in a free-access paradigm. Results In the first experiment, pharmacological silencing of the AcbSh with GABA agonists did not decrease the acquisition of EtOH drinking behavior but did reduce EtOH consumption by 55% in chronically drinking rats. Similarly, in the second experiment, 200 μA of DBS consistently reduced EtOH intake by 47% in chronically drinking rats. The amount of EtOH consumption returned to baseline levels following termination of therapy in both experiments. Conclusions Pharmacological silencing and DBS of the AcbSh reduced EtOH intake after chronic EtOH use had been established in rodents. The AcbSh is a neuroanatomical substrate for the reinforcing effects of alcohol and may be a target for surgical intervention in cases of alcoholism. PMID:24460492

  9. Our first decade of experience in deep brain stimulation of the brainstem: elucidating the mechanism of action of stimulation of the ventrolateral pontine tegmentum.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Paolo; Vilela Filho, Osvaldo; Viselli, Fabio; Insola, Angelo; Sposato, Stefano; Vitale, Flora; Scarnati, Eugenio

    2016-07-01

    The region of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) has been proposed as a novel target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat levodopa resistant symptoms in motor disorders. Recently, the anatomical organization of the brainstem has been revised and four new distinct structures have been represented in the ventrolateral pontine tegmentum area in which the PPTg was previously identified. Given this anatomical reassessment, and considering the increasing of our experience, in this paper we revisit the value of DBS applied to that area. The reappraisal of clinical outcomes in the light of this revisitation may also help to understand the consequences of DBS applied to structures located in the ventrolateral pontine tegmentum, apart from the PPTg. The implantation of 39 leads in 32 patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD, 27 patients) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP, four patients) allowed us to reach two major conclusions. The first is that the results of the advancement of our technique in brainstem DBS matches the revision of brainstem anatomy. The second is that anatomical and functional aspects of our findings may help to explain how DBS acts when applied in the brainstem and to identify the differences when it is applied either in the brainstem or in the subthalamic nucleus. Finally, in this paper we discuss how the loss of neurons in brainstem nuclei occurring in both PD and PSP, the results of intraoperative recording of somatosensory evoked potentials, and the improvement of postural control during DBS point toward the potential role of ascending sensory pathways and/or other structures in mediating the effects of DBS applied in the ventrolateral pontine tegmentum region. PMID:26865208

  10. [Effect of electric stimulation of the caudal reticular nucleus of the pons on foci of epileptic activity in the cerebral cortex].

    PubMed

    Kryzhanovskiĭ, G N; Makul'kin, R F; Shandra, A A; Lobasiuk, B A

    1980-11-01

    It was shown in experiments on cats that electrostimulation (ES) of the nucleus caudalis reticularis pontis under the destruction of the central grey matter suppressed discharges in a single epileptic focus, created with application of strychnine to the brain cortex and did not suppress the epileptic activity in the complex of foci, formed under the influence of a determinant focus after local application of strychnine to different zones of the neocortex. After increasing the number of foci in the complex the resistance of the latter to suppressive effects of ES of the nucleus caudalis increases too. The complex reduction owing to liquidation of its foci (local application of nembutal) facilitates the suppressive effects of ES of the nucleus caudalis. Under prolonged inhibition of the epileptic activity in the focus, the coagulation of the nucleus caudalis leads after its long-term ES to the recovery of the epileptic activity. The evidence obtained is discussed from the standpoint of the properties of the pathological system (epileptic complex) and the role of the "antisystem" in suppression of its activity. PMID:6969606

  11. Cholinergic projections to the substantia nigra from the pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei.

    PubMed

    Gould, E; Woolf, N J; Butcher, L L

    1989-01-01

    The cholinergic innervation of the compact and reticular parts of the substantia nigra in the rat was investigated by use of highly sensitive retrograde and anterograde tract-tracing methods in combination with choline acetyltransferase immunohistochemistry. The fluorescent tracers True Blue, propidium iodide, or fluorogold were infused preferentially into either nigral subnucleus. Cells positive for choline acetyltransferase and retrograde tracer were found in both the pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei, although considerably more double-labeled somata were observed in the former than in the latter component of the pontomesencephalotegmental cholinergic complex. Approximately 2-3 times more cholinergic cells were labeled in the peduculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei when tracer injections were centered in the compact nigral subdivision than when infusions of about the same size were confined totally to the reticular part. Infusions of the anterogradely transported tracer Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin into the pontomesencephalotegmental cholinergic complex resulted in uptake and transport of that label to both nigral subnuclei, and some of the Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin-accumulating somata and proximal processes also demonstrated choline acetyltransferase-like immunoreactivity. The Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin-labeled entities in the substantia nigra exhibited terminal-like profiles that were reminiscent of the pattern of nigral choline acetyltransferase-positive puncta demonstrated immunohistochemically by use of nickel ammonium sulfate enhancement of the final reaction product in the avidin-biotin procedure. These observations strongly support the contention that the pontomesencephalotegmental cholinergic complex is the major source of cholinergic projections to both the compact and reticular portions of the rat substantia nigra. PMID:2710334

  12. Mechanisms underlying sleep-wake disturbances in alcoholism: focus on the cholinergic pedunculopontine tegmentum

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Clifford M.; Ciraulo, Domenic A.; Datta, Subimal

    2014-01-01

    Sleep-wake (S-W) disturbances are frequently associated with alcohol use disorders (AUD), occurring during periods of active drinking, withdrawal, and abstinence. These S-W disturbances can persist after months or even years of abstinence, suggesting that chronic alcohol consumption may have enduring negative effects on both homeostatic and circadian sleep processes. It is now generally accepted that S-W disturbances in alcohol-dependent individuals are a significant cause of relapse in drinking. Although significant progress has been made in identifying the socio-economic burden and health risks of alcohol addiction, the underlying neurobiological mechanisms that lead to S-W disorders in AUD are poorly understood. Marked progress has been made in understanding the basic neurobiological mechanisms of how different sleep stages are normally regulated. This review article in seeking to explain the neurobiological mechanisms underlying S-W disturbances associated with AUD, describes an evidence-based, easily testable, novel hypothesis that chronic alcohol consumption induces neuroadaptive changes in the cholinergic cell compartment of the pedunculopontine tegmentum (CCC-PPT). These changes include increases in N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and kainate receptor sensitivity and a decrease in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAB) - receptor sensitivity in the CCC-PPT. Together these changes are the primary pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie S-W disturbances in AUD. This review is targeted for both basic neuroscientists in alcohol addiction research and clinicians who are in search of new and more effective therapeutic interventions to treat and/or eliminate sleep disorders associated with AUD. PMID:25151622

  13. Muscarinic control of rostromedial tegmental nucleus GABA neurons and morphine-induced locomotion.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, David I; Tan, Joel M J; Kim, Jun Chul; Yeomans, John S

    2016-07-01

    Opioids induce rewarding and locomotor effects by inhibiting rostromedial tegmental GABA neurons that express μ-opioid and nociceptin receptors. These GABA neurons then strongly inhibit dopamine neurons. Opioid-induced reward, locomotion and dopamine release also depend on pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental cholinergic and glutamate neurons, many of which project to and activate ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons. Here we show that laterodorsal tegmental and pedunculopontine cholinergic neurons project to both rostromedial tegmental nucleus and ventral tegmental area, and that M4 muscarinic receptors are co-localized with μ-opioid receptors associated with rostromedial tegmental GABA neurons. To inhibit or excite rostromedial tegmental GABA neurons, we utilized adeno-associated viral vectors and DREADDs to express designed muscarinic receptors (M4D or M3D respectively) in GAD2::Cre mice. In M4D-expressing mice, clozapine-N-oxide increased morphine-induced, but not vehicle-induced, locomotion. In M3D-expressing mice, clozapine-N-oxide blocked morphine-induced, but not vehicle-induced, locomotion. We propose that cholinergic inhibition of rostromedial tegmental GABA neurons via M4 muscarinic receptors facilitates opioid inhibition of the same neurons. This model explains how mesopontine cholinergic systems and muscarinic receptors in the rostromedial tegmental nucleus and ventral tegmental area are important for dopamine-dependent and dopamine-independent opioid-induced rewards and locomotion. PMID:26990801

  14. Restoration of quinine-stimulated Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the central nucleus of the amygdala and gustatory cortex following reinnervation or cross-reinnervation of the lingual taste nerves in rats

    PubMed Central

    King, Camille Tessitore; Garcea, Mircea; Spector, Alan C.

    2014-01-01

    Remarkably, when lingual gustatory nerves are surgically re-routed to inappropriate taste fields in the tongue, some taste functions recover. We previously demonstrated that quinine-stimulated oromotor rejection reflexes and neural activity (assessed by Fos-immunoreactivity) in subregions of hindbrain gustatory nuclei were restored if the posterior tongue, which contains receptor cells that respond strongly to bitter compounds, was cross-reinnervated by the chorda tympani nerve. Such functional recovery was not seen if instead, the anterior tongue, where receptor cells are less responsive to bitter compounds, was cross-reinnervated by the glossopharyngeal nerve, despite that this nerve typically responds robustly to bitter substances. Thus, recovery depended more on the taste field being reinnervated than on the nerve itself. Here, the distribution of quinine-stimulated Fos-immunoreactive neurons in two taste-associated forebrain areas was examined in these same rats. In the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a rostrocaudal gradient characterized the normal quinine-stimulated Fos response, with the greatest number of labeled cells rostrally situated. Quinine-stimulated neurons were found throughout the gustatory cortex but a ‘hot spot’ was observed in its anterior-posterior center in subregions approximating the dysgranular/agranular layers. Fos neurons here and in the rostral CeA were highly correlated with quinine-elicited gapes. Denervation of the posterior tongue eliminated, and its reinnervation by either nerve restored, numbers of quinine-stimulated labeled cells in the rostral-most CeA and in the subregion approximating dysgranular gustatory cortex. These results underscore the remarkable plasticity of the gustatory system and also help clarify the functional anatomy of neural circuits activated by bitter taste stimulation. PMID:24477770

  15. The Foxb1-expressing neurons of the ventrolateral hypothalamic parvafox nucleus project to defensive circuits.

    PubMed

    Bilella, Alessandro; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo; Celio, Marco R

    2016-10-15

    The parvafox nucleus is an elongated structure that is lodged within the ventrolateral hypothalamus and lies along the optic tract. It comprises axially located parvalbumin (Parv)-positive neurons and a peripheral cuff of Foxb1-expressing ones. In the present study, injections of Cre-dependent adenoviral constructs were targeted to the ventrolateral hypothalamus of Foxb1/Cre mice to label specifically and map the efferent connections of the Foxb1-expressing subpopulation of neurons of the parvafox nucleus. These neurons project more widely than do the Parv-positive ones and implicate a part of the axons known to emanate from the lateral hypothalamus. High labeling densities were found in the dorsolateral and the upper lateral portion of the periaqueductal gray (PAG), the Su3 and PV2 nuclei of the ventrolateral PAG, the cuneiform nucleus, the mesencephalic reticular formation, and the superior colliculus. Intermediate densities of terminals were encountered in the septum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, substantia innominata, various thalamic and hypothalamic nuclei, pedunculopontine nucleus, Barrington's nucleus, retrofacial nucleus, and retroambigual nucleus. Scattered terminals were observed in the olfactory bulbs, the prefrontal cortex and the lamina X of the cervical spinal cord. Because the terminals were demonstrated to express the glutamate transporter VGlut2, the projections are presumed to be excitatory. A common denominator of the main target sites of the Foxb1-positive axons of the parvafox nucleus appears to be an involvement in the defensive reactions to life-threatening situations. The hypothalamic parvafox nucleus may contribute to the autonomic manifestations that accompany the expression of emotions. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2955-2981, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27292133

  16. Role of orexin-2 receptors in the nucleus accumbens in antinociception induced by carbachol stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus in formalin test.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Fatemeh; Jahangirvand, Mahboubeh; Ezzatpanah, Somayeh; Haghparast, Abbas

    2016-08-01

    Orexins, which are mainly produced by orexin-expressing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus (LH), play an important role in pain modulation. Previously, it has been established that the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is involved in the modulation of formalin-induced nociceptive responses, a model of tonic pain. In this study, the role of intra-accumbal orexin-2 receptors (OX2rs) in the mediation of formalin-induced pain was investigated. A volume of 0.5 μl of 10, 20, and 40 nmol/l solutions of TCS OX2 29, an OX2r antagonist, were unilaterally microinjected into the NAc 5 min before an intra-LH carbachol microinjection (0.5 μl of 250 nmol/l solution). After 5 min, animals received a subcutaneous injection of formalin 2.5% (50 μl) into the hind paw. Pain-related behaviors were assessed at 5 min intervals during a 60-min test period. The findings showed that TCS OX2 29 administration dose dependently blocked carbachol-induced antinociception during both phases of formalin-induced pain. The antianalgesic effect of TCS OX2 29 was greater during the late phase compared with the early phase. These observations suggest that the NAc, as a part of a descending pain-modulatory circuitry, partially mediates LH-induced analgesia in the formalin test through recruitment of OX2rs. This makes the orexinergic system a good potential therapeutic target in the control of persistent inflammatory pain. PMID:26871404

  17. Whole-brain mapping of afferent projections to the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in tree shrews.

    PubMed

    Ni, Rong-Jun; Luo, Peng-Hao; Shu, Yu-Mian; Chen, Ju-Tao; Zhou, Jiang-Ning

    2016-10-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) plays an important role in integrating and relaying input information to other brain regions in response to stress. The cytoarchitecture of the BST in tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) has been comprehensively described in our previous publications. However, the inputs to the BST have not been described in previous reports. The aim of the present study was to investigate the sources of afferent projections to the BST throughout the brain of tree shrews using the retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold (FG). The present results provide the first detailed whole-brain mapping of BST-projecting neurons in the tree shrew brain. The BST was densely innervated by the prefrontal cortex, entorhinal cortex, ventral subiculum, amygdala, ventral tegmental area, and parabrachial nucleus. Moreover, moderate projections to the BST originated from the medial preoptic area, supramammillary nucleus, paraventricular thalamic nucleus, pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus, dorsal raphe nucleus, locus coeruleus, and nucleus of the solitary tract. Afferent projections to the BST are identified in the ventral pallidum, nucleus of the diagonal band, ventral posteromedial thalamic nucleus, posterior complex of the thalamus, interfascicular nucleus, retrorubral field, rhabdoid nucleus, intermediate reticular nucleus, and parvicellular reticular nucleus. In addition, the different densities of BST-projecting neurons in various regions were analyzed in the tree shrew brains. In summary, whole-brain mapping of direct inputs to the BST is delineated in tree shrews. These brain circuits are implicated in the regulation of numerous physiological and behavioral processes including stress, reward, food intake, and arousal. PMID:27436534

  18. Transforming growth factor-beta 3 stimulates cartilage matrix elaboration by human marrow-derived stromal cells encapsulated in photocrosslinked carboxymethylcellulose hydrogels: potential for nucleus pulposus replacement.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Michelle S; Cooper, Elana S; Nicoll, Steven B

    2011-12-01

    Degeneration of the nucleus pulposus (NP) has been implicated as a major cause of low back pain. Tissue engineering strategies using marrow-derived stromal cells (MSCs) have been used to develop cartilaginous tissue constructs, which may serve as viable NP replacements. Supplementation with growth factors, such as transforming growth factor-beta 3 (TGF-β3), has been shown to enhance the differentiation of MSCs and promote functional tissue development of such constructs. A potential candidate material that may be useful as a scaffold for NP tissue engineering is carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), a biocompatible, cost-effective derivative of cellulose. Photocrosslinked CMC hydrogels have been shown to support NP cell viability and promote phenotypic matrix deposition capable of maintaining mechanical properties when cultured in serum-free, chemically defined medium (CDM) supplemented with TGF-β3. However, MSCs have not been characterized using this hydrogel system. In this study, human MSCs (hMSCs) were encapsulated in photocrosslinked CMC hydrogels and cultured in CDM with and without TGF-β3 to determine the effect of the growth factor on the differentiation of hMSCs toward an NP-like phenotype. Constructs were evaluated for matrix elaboration and functional properties consistent with native NP tissue. CDM supplemented with TGF-β3 resulted in significantly higher glycosaminoglycan content (762.69±220.79 ng/mg wet weight) and type II collagen (COL II) content (6.25±1.64 ng/mg wet weight) at day 21 compared with untreated samples. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed uniform, pericellular, and interterritorial staining for chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and COL II in growth factor-supplemented constructs compared with faint, strictly pericellular staining in untreated constructs at 21 days. Consistent with matrix deposition, mechanical properties of hydrogels treated with TGF-β3 increased over time and exhibited the highest peak stress in stress-relaxation (

  19. Handwriting in patients with Parkinson disease: effect of L-dopa and stimulation of the sub-thalamic nucleus on motor anticipation.

    PubMed

    Bidet-Ildei, Christel; Pollak, Pierre; Kandel, Sonia; Fraix, Valérie; Orliaguet, Jean-Pierre

    2011-08-01

    The present research focused on how patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) produce handwriting sequences. PD patients who were on/off medication or deep brain stimulation treatments had to write lll and lln trigrams. We evaluated their ability to anticipate on-line the last letter in the trigram. The results revealed that in PD patients, contrary to healthy participants, the percentage of time taken by the down-stroke of the second l did not vary as a function of the spatial constraints of the following letter (l or n). In other words, the handwriting of the PD patients did not exhibit any sign of motor anticipation. However, under treatment, PD patients exhibited similar results to healthy participants despite no improvement in movement variability. Taken together these results do not seem consistent with the hypothesis that PD patients do not anticipate future movements because of their movement variability. They are more in agreement with theories that postulate that PD patients have a general deficit in the parallel processing of the components of a motor sequence. PMID:21339012

  20. Dynamic risk control by human nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Nachev, Parashkev; Lopez-Sosa, Fernando; Gonzalez-Rosa, Javier Jesus; Galarza, Ana; Avecillas, Josue; Pineda-Pardo, Jose Angel; Lopez-Ibor, Juan José; Reneses, Blanca; Barcia, Juan Antonio; Strange, Bryan

    2015-12-01

    Real-world decisions about reward often involve a complex counterbalance of risk and value. Although the nucleus accumbens has been implicated in the underlying neural substrate, its criticality to human behaviour remains an open question, best addressed with interventional methodology that probes the behavioural consequences of focal neural modulation. Combining a psychometric index of risky decision-making with transient electrical modulation of the nucleus accumbens, here we reveal profound, highly dynamic alteration of the relation between probability of reward and choice during therapeutic deep brain stimulation in four patients with treatment-resistant psychiatric disease. Short-lived phasic electrical stimulation of the region of the nucleus accumbens dynamically altered risk behaviour, transiently shifting the psychometric function towards more risky decisions only for the duration of stimulation. A critical, on-line role of human nucleus accumbens in dynamic risk control is thereby established. PMID:26428667

  1. Three-dimensional SPACE fluid-attenuated inversion recovery at 3 T to improve subthalamic nucleus lead placement for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease: from preclinical to clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Senova, Suhan; Hosomi, Koichi; Gurruchaga, Jean-Marc; Gouello, Gaëtane; Ouerchefani, Naoufel; Beaugendre, Yara; Lepetit, Hélène; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Badin, Romina Aron; Dauguet, Julien; Jan, Caroline; Hantraye, Philippe; Brugières, Pierre; Palfi, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a well-established therapy for motor symptoms in patients with pharmacoresistant Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the procedure, which requires multimodal perioperative exploration such as imaging, electrophysiology, or clinical examination during macrostimulation to secure lead positioning, remains challenging because the STN cannot be reliably visualized using the gold standard, T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) at 1.5 T. Thus, there is a need to improve imaging tools to better visualize the STN, optimize DBS lead implantation, and enlarge DBS diffusion. METHODS Gradient-echo sequences such as those used in T2WI suffer from higher distortions at higher magnetic fields than spin-echo sequences. First, a spin-echo 3D SPACE (sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolutions) FLAIR sequence at 3 T was designed, validated histologically in 2 nonhuman primates, and applied to 10 patients with PD; their data were clinically compared in a double-blind manner with those of a control group of 10 other patients with PD in whom STN targeting was performed using T2WI. RESULTS Overlap between the nonhuman primate STNs segmented on 3D-histological and on 3D-SPACE-FLAIR volumes was high for the 3 most anterior quarters (mean [± SD] Dice scores 0.73 ± 0.11, 0.74 ± 0.06, and 0.60 ± 0.09). STN limits determined by the 3D-SPACE-FLAIR sequence were more consistent with electrophysiological edges than those determined by T2WI (0.9 vs 1.4 mm, respectively). The imaging contrast of the STN on the 3D-SPACE-FLAIR sequence was 4 times higher (p < 0.05). Improvement in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III score (off medication, on stimulation) 12 months after the operation was higher for patients who underwent 3D-SPACE-FLAIR-guided implantation than for those in whom T2WI was used (62.2% vs 43.6%, respectively; p < 0.05). The total electrical energy

  2. High energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wosiek, B.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results on high energy nucleus-nucleus interactions are presented. The data are discussed within the framework of standard super-position models and from the point-of-view of the possible formation of new states of matter in heavy ion collisions.

  3. Nucleus-nucleus scattering at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, V.; Varma, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    Nucleus-nucleus scattering is treated in the Glauber approximation. The usual optical limit result, generally thought to improve as the number of nucleons in the colliding nuclei increases, is found to be the first term of a series which diverges for large nuclei. Corrections to the optical limit are obtained which provide a means of performing realistic calculations for collisions involving light nuclei. Total cross section predictions agree well with recent measurements.

  4. Centrifugal inhibitory processes affecting neurones in the cat cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Comis, S. D.

    1970-01-01

    1. Stimulation of the lateral part of the olivary S-segment in the cat inhibited neurones in the ipsilateral cochlear nucleus. A smaller number of neurones located in the ventral division of the cochlear nucleus were excited. 2. It is suggested that inhibition in the ipsilateral cochlear nucleus may be mediated directly by fibres making synaptic connexions on the cochlear nucleus neurones, or indirectly by inhibitory fibres acting at the cochlea. 3. The direct inhibitory process at the cochlear nucleus is unaffected by strychnine, whereas the inhibitory process at the cochlea is abolished by strychnine. 4. A cochlear nucleus neurone can be influenced simultaneously by excitatory and inhibitory processes. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:5499823

  5. Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, Joel S.; Mink, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has provided remarkable benefits for people with a variety of neurologic conditions. Stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus can dramatically relieve tremor associated with essential tremor or Parkinson disease (PD). Similarly, stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus or the internal segment of the globus pallidus can substantially reduce bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor, and gait difficulties in people with PD. Multiple groups are attempting to extend this mode of treatment to other conditions. Yet, the precise mechanism of action of DBS remains uncertain. Such studies have importance that extends beyond clinical therapeutics. Investigations of the mechanisms of action of DBS have the potential to clarify fundamental issues such as the functional anatomy of selected brain circuits and the relationship between activity in those circuits and behavior. Although we review relevant clinical issues, we emphasize the importance of current and future investigations on these topics. PMID:16776585

  6. The mesopontine rostromedial tegmental nucleus: a structure targeted by the lateral habenula that projects to the ventral tegmental area of Tsai and substantia nigra compacta

    PubMed Central

    Jhou, Thomas C.; Geisler, Stefanie; Marinelli, Michela; DeGarmo, Beth A.; Zahm, Daniel S.

    2011-01-01

    Prior studies revealed that aversive stimuli and psychostimulant drugs elicit Fos expression in neurons clustered above and behind the interpeduncular nucleus that project strongly to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN) compacta (C). Other reports suggest that these neurons modulate responding to aversive stimuli. We now designate the region containing them as the mesopontine rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg) and report herein on its neuroanatomy. Dense mu opioid receptor and somatostatin immunoreactivity characterize the RMTg, as do neurons projecting to the VTA/SNC that are enriched in GAD 67 mRNA. Strong inputs to the RMTg arise in the lateral habenula (LHb) and, to a lesser extent, the SN. Other inputs come from the frontal cortex, ventral striatopallidum, extended amygdala, septum, preoptic region, lateral, paraventricular and posterior hypothalamus, zona incerta, periaqueductal gray, intermediate layers of the contralateral superior colliculus, dorsal raphe, mesencephalic, pontine and medullary reticular formation, and the following nuclei: parafascicular, supramammillary, mammillary, ventral lateral geniculate, deep mesencephalic, red, pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental, cuneiform, parabrachial and deep cerebellar. The RMTg has meager outputs to the forebrain, mainly to the ventral pallidum, preoptic-lateral hypothalamic continuum and midline-intralaminar thalamus, but much heavier outputs to the brainstem, including, most prominently, the VTA/SNC, as noted above, and to medial tegmentum, pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei, dorsal raphe and the locus ceruleus and subceruleus. The RMTg may integrate multiple forebrain and brainstem inputs in relation to a dominant LHb input. Its outputs to neuromodulatory projection systems likely converge with direct LHb projections to those structures. PMID:19235216

  7. The Nucleus Introduced

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Thoru

    2011-01-01

    Now is an opportune moment to address the confluence of cell biological form and function that is the nucleus. Its arrival is especially timely because the recognition that the nucleus is extremely dynamic has now been solidly established as a paradigm shift over the past two decades, and also because we now see on the horizon numerous ways in which organization itself, including gene location and possibly self-organizing bodies, underlies nuclear functions. PMID:20660024

  8. The Subthalamic Nucleus, oscillations and conflict

    PubMed Central

    Zavala, Baltazar; Zaghloul, Kareem; Brown, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN), which is currently the most common target for deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease, has received increased attention over the past few years for the roles it may play in functions beyond simple motor control. In this article we will highlight several of the theoretical, interventional, and electrophysiological studies that have implicated the STN in response inhibition. Most influential amongst this evidence has been the reported effect of STN deep brain stimulation in increasing impulsive responses in the laboratory setting. Yet, how this relates to pathological impulsivity in patient’s everyday lives remains uncertain. PMID:25688872

  9. Kaon-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Byungsik; Maung, Khin Maung; Wilson, John W.; Buck, Warren W.

    1989-01-01

    The derivations of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation and Watson multiple scattering are given. A simple optical potential is found to be the first term of that series. The number density distribution models of the nucleus, harmonic well, and Woods-Saxon are used without t-matrix taken from the scattering experiments. The parameterized two-body inputs, which are kaon-nucleon total cross sections, elastic slope parameters, and the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, are presented. The eikonal approximation was chosen as our solution method to estimate the total and absorptive cross sections for the kaon-nucleus scattering.

  10. Convergence of the nucleus-nucleus Glauber multiple scattering series

    SciTech Connect

    Usmani, A.A.; Ahmad, I. )

    1991-05-01

    The Glauber {ital S}-matrix operator for nucleus-nucleus scattering is expressed as a finite series of matrix elements involving Bell's polynomials. Analyzing {alpha}{sup 4}He elastic-scattering data at the incident momentum of 4.32 GeV/{ital c}, we infer that our expansion is appreciably converging. Further, by applying closure over target and projectile states and neglecting a certain class of terms involving intermediate excitations, we arrive at a recurrence relation for nucleus-nucleus multiple scattering series terms, which invites further study as it seems to provide a simple method for calculating the nucleus-nucleus elastic-scattering cross section.

  11. A descending dopamine pathway conserved from basal vertebrates to mammals

    PubMed Central

    Ryczko, Dimitri; Cone, Jackson J.; Alpert, Michael H.; Goetz, Laurent; Auclair, François; Dubé, Catherine; Parent, Martin; Roitman, Mitchell F.; Alford, Simon; Dubuc, Réjean

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine neurons are classically known to modulate locomotion indirectly through ascending projections to the basal ganglia that project down to brainstem locomotor networks. Their loss in Parkinson’s disease is devastating. In lampreys, we recently showed that brainstem networks also receive direct descending dopaminergic inputs that potentiate locomotor output. Here, we provide evidence that this descending dopaminergic pathway is conserved to higher vertebrates, including mammals. In salamanders, dopamine neurons projecting to the striatum or brainstem locomotor networks were partly intermingled. Stimulation of the dopaminergic region evoked dopamine release in brainstem locomotor networks and concurrent reticulospinal activity. In rats, some dopamine neurons projecting to the striatum also innervated the pedunculopontine nucleus, a known locomotor center, and stimulation of the dopaminergic region evoked pedunculopontine dopamine release in vivo. Finally, we found dopaminergic fibers in the human pedunculopontine nucleus. The conservation of a descending dopaminergic pathway across vertebrates warrants re-evaluating dopamine’s role in locomotion. PMID:27071118

  12. A descending dopamine pathway conserved from basal vertebrates to mammals.

    PubMed

    Ryczko, Dimitri; Cone, Jackson J; Alpert, Michael H; Goetz, Laurent; Auclair, François; Dubé, Catherine; Parent, Martin; Roitman, Mitchell F; Alford, Simon; Dubuc, Réjean

    2016-04-26

    Dopamine neurons are classically known to modulate locomotion indirectly through ascending projections to the basal ganglia that project down to brainstem locomotor networks. Their loss in Parkinson's disease is devastating. In lampreys, we recently showed that brainstem networks also receive direct descending dopaminergic inputs that potentiate locomotor output. Here, we provide evidence that this descending dopaminergic pathway is conserved to higher vertebrates, including mammals. In salamanders, dopamine neurons projecting to the striatum or brainstem locomotor networks were partly intermingled. Stimulation of the dopaminergic region evoked dopamine release in brainstem locomotor networks and concurrent reticulospinal activity. In rats, some dopamine neurons projecting to the striatum also innervated the pedunculopontine nucleus, a known locomotor center, and stimulation of the dopaminergic region evoked pedunculopontine dopamine release in vivo. Finally, we found dopaminergic fibers in the human pedunculopontine nucleus. The conservation of a descending dopaminergic pathway across vertebrates warrants re-evaluating dopamine's role in locomotion. PMID:27071118

  13. Nucleus Course in Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akiyama, Nobuo; Flamm, Carol S.

    The "Nucleus Course in Japanese," based on the Institute of Modern Languages'"Situational Reinforcement" approach, is designed for 80 to 100 hours of instruction. Each lesson has several sections--Response drills, Appropriate Response Sequence, and Reading. Most of the lessons also include optional sections with Sentences for Repetition or a…

  14. Cell nucleus in context

    SciTech Connect

    Lelievre, Sophie A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Pujuguet, Philippe

    1999-11-11

    The molecular pathways that participate in regulation of gene expression are being progressively unraveled. Extracellular signals, including the binding of extracellular matrix and soluble molecules to cell membrane receptors, activate specific signal transducers that convey information inside the cell and can alter gene products. Some of these transducers when translocated to the cell nucleus may bind to transcription complexes and thereby modify the transcriptional activity of specific genes. However, the basic molecules involved in the regulation of gene expression are found in many different cell and tissue types; thus the mechanisms underlying tissue-specific gene expression are still obscure. In this review, we focus on the study of signals that are conveyed to the nucleus. We propose that the way in which extracellular signals are integrated may account for tissue-specific gene expression. We argue that the integration of signals depends on the structural organization of cells ( i.e., extracellular matrix, cell membrane, cytoskeleton, nucleus) which a particular cell type within a tissue. Putting the nuclei in context allows us to envision gene expression as being regulated not only by the communication between the extracellular environment and the nucleus, but also by the influence of organized assemblies of cells on extracellular-nuclear communications.

  15. Onset of deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gazdzicki, M.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Seyboth, P.

    2012-05-15

    The energy dependence of hadron production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions reveals anomalies-the kink, horn, and step. They were predicted as signals of the deconfinement phase transition and observed by the NA49 Collaboration in central PbPb collisions at the CERN SPS. This indicates the onset of the deconfinement in nucleus-nucleus collisions at about 30 A GeV.

  16. Proton Nucleus Elastic Scattering Data.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-08-18

    Version 00 The Proton Nucleus Elastic Scattering Data file PNESD contains the numerical data and the related bibliography for the differential elastic cross sections, polarization and integral nonelastic cross sections for elastic proton-nucleus scattering.

  17. GABAergic neurons of the laterodorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei of the cat express c-fos during carbachol-induced active sleep.

    PubMed

    Torterolo, P; Yamuy, J; Sampogna, S; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    2001-02-23

    The laterodorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei (LDT-PPT) are involved in the generation of active sleep (AS; also called REM or rapid eye movement sleep). Although the LDT-PPT are composed principally of cholinergic neurons that participate in the control of sleep and waking states, the function of the large number of GABAergic neurons that are also located in the LDT-PPT is unknown. Consequently, we sought to determine if these neurons are activated (as indicated by their c-fos expression) during active sleep induced by the microinjection of carbachol into the rostro-dorsal pons (AS-carbachol). Accordingly, immunocytochemical double-labeling techniques were used to identify GABA and Fos protein, as well as choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), in histological sections of the LDT-PPT. Compared to control awake cats, there was a larger number of GABAergic neurons that expressed c-fos during AS-carbachol (31.5+/-6.1 vs. 112+/-15.2, P<0.005). This increase in the number of GABA+Fos+ neurons occurred on the ipsilateral side relative to the injection site; there was a small decrease in GABA+Fos+ cells in the contralateral LDT-PPT. However, the LDT-PPT neurons that exhibited the largest increase in c-fos expression during AS-carbachol were neither GABA+ nor ChAT+ (47+/-22.5 vs. 228.7+/-14.0, P<0.0005). The number of cholinergic neurons that expressed c-fos during AS-carbachol was not significantly different compared to wakefulness. These data demonstrate that, during AS-carbachol, GABAergic as well as an unidentified population of neurons are activated in the LDT-PPT. We propose that these non-cholinergic LDT-PPT neurons may participate in the regulation of active sleep. PMID:11172778

  18. Colocalization of gamma-aminobutyric acid and acetylcholine in neurons in the laterodorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei in the cat: a light and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hong-Ge; Yamuy, Jack; Sampogna, Sharon; Morales, Francisco R; Chase, Michael H

    2003-12-01

    Cholinergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) mechanisms in the dorsolateral pontomesencephalic tegmentum have been implicated in the control of active (REM) sleep and wakefulness. To determine the relationships between neurons that contain these neurotransmitters in this region of the brainstem in adult cats, combined light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical procedures were employed. Light microscopic analyses revealed that choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and GABA immunoreactive neurons were distributed throughout the laterodorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei (LDT and PPT). Surprisingly, approximately 50% of the ChAT immunoreactive neurons in these nuclei also contained GABA. Using electron microscopic pre-embedding immunocytochemistry, GABA immunoreactivity was observed in somas, dendrites and axon terminals in both the LDT and PPT. Most of the GABA immunoreactive terminals formed symmetrical synapses with non-immunolabeled dendrites. Electron microscopic double-immunolabeling techniques revealed that ChAT and GABA were colocalized in axon terminals in the LDT/PPT. Approximately 30% of the ChAT immunoreactive terminals were also GABA immunoreactive, whereas only 6-8% of the GABA immunoreactive terminals were ChAT immunoreactive. Most of the ChAT/GABA immunoreactive terminals formed symmetrical synapses with non-immunolabeled dendrites; however, ChAT/GABA immunoreactive terminals were also observed that contacted ChAT immunoreactive dendrites. With respect to ChAT immunoreactive postsynaptic profiles, approximately 40% of the somas and 50% of the dendrites received synaptic contact from GABA immunoreactive terminals in both the LDT and PPT. These findings (a) indicate that there are fundamental interactions between cholinergic and GABAergic neurons within the LDT/PPT that play an important role in the control of active sleep and wakefulness and (b) provide an anatomical basis for the intriguing possibility that a mechanism of acetylcholine and

  19. Electron microscopic localization of M2-muscarinic receptors in cholinergic and noncholinergic neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental and pedunculopontine nuclei of the rat mesopontine tegmentum.

    PubMed

    Garzón, Miguel; Pickel, Virginia M

    2016-10-15

    Muscarinic m2 receptors (M2Rs) are implicated in autoregulatory control of cholinergic output neurons located within the pedunculopontine (PPT) and laterodorsal tegmental (LTD) nuclei of the mesopontine tegmentum (MPT). However, these nuclei contain many noncholinergic neurons in which activation of M2R heteroceptors may contribute significantly to the decisive role of the LTD and PPT in sleep-wakefulness. We examined the electron microscopic dual immunolabeling of M2Rs and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAchT) in the MPT of rat brain to identify the potential sites for M2R activation. M2R immunogold labeling was predominately seen in somatodendritic profiles throughout the PPT/LTD complex. In somata, M2R immunogold particles were often associated with Golgi lamellae and cytoplasmic endomembrannes, but were rarely in contact with the plasma membrane, as was commonly seen in dendrites. Approximately 36% of the M2R-labeled somata and 16% of the more numerous M2R-labeled dendrites coexpressed VAchT. M2R and M2R/VAchT-labeled dendritic profiles received synapses from inhibitory- and excitatory-type axon terminals, over 88% of which were unlabeled and others contained exclusively M2R or VAchT immunoreactivity. In axonal profiles M2R immunogold was localized to plasmalemmal and cytoplasmic regions and showed a similar distribution in many VAchT-negative glial profiles. These results provide ultrastructural evidence suggestive of somatic endomembrane trafficking of M2Rs, whose activation serves to regulate the postsynaptic excitatory and inhibitory responses in dendrites of cholinergic and noncholinergic neurons in the MPT. They also suggest the possibility that M2Rs in this brain region mediate the effects of acetylcholine on the release of other neurotransmitters and on glial signaling. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3084-3103, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27038330

  20. Electrical microstimulation of the nucleus incertus induces forward locomotion and rotation in rats.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Usman; Kumar, Jigna Rajesh; Rajkumar, Ramamoorthy; Dawe, Gavin S

    2016-06-01

    Locomotion is essential for goal-oriented behavior. Theta frequency oscillations in the hippocampus have been associated with behavioral activation and initiation of movement. Recently, the nucleus incertus, a brainstem nucleus with widespread cortical and subcortical projections, has been reported to modulate the septo-hippocampal axis triggering theta activity in the hippocampus. This suggests that activation of the nucleus incertus would induce movement. In this study, we investigated the effects of electrical microstimulation of the nucleus incertus on locomotion in conscious rats. Rats chronically implanted with microelectrodes targeting the nucleus incertus were electrically stimulated while their behavior was tracked. High frequency electrical microstimulation of the nucleus incertus was sufficient to induce forward locomotion and rotation. The latencies of evoked locomotion were consistent with a role of the nucleus incertus in modulating premotor areas, possibly the septo-hippocampal axis. Electrical microstimulation of the nucleus incertus increased velocity, mobility and rotations during stimulation and post-stimulation. These results suggest that the nucleus incertus plays a role in behavioral activation and locomotion. PMID:27049117

  1. Analytic optical potentials for nucleon-nucleus nucleus-nucleus collisions involving light and medium nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidasaria, H. B.; Townsend, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    Utilizing an optical model potential approximation to the exact nucleus-nucleus multiple-scattering series, optical potentials for nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions are analytically derived. These expressions are applicable to light and medium cosmic ray nuclei as their single-particle density distributions are analytically determined, without approximation, from their actual harmonic well charge density distributions. Pauli correlation effects are included through the use of a simple Gaussian function to replace the usual expression obtained in the infinite nuclear matter approximation.

  2. Nucleus from string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Morita, Takeshi

    2011-08-01

    In generic holographic QCD, we find that baryons are bound to form a nucleus, and that its radius obeys the empirically-known mass-number (A) dependence r∝A1/3 for large A. Our result is robust, since we use only a generic property of D-brane actions in string theory. We also show that nucleons are bound completely in a finite volume. Furthermore, employing a concrete holographic model (derived by Hashimoto, Iizuka, and Yi, describing a multibaryon system in the Sakai-Sugimoto model), the nuclear radius is evaluated as O(1)×A1/3[fm], which is consistent with experiments.

  3. Neutrino-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, H.; Garvey, G.; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  4. Higgs-Boson Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Cross section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  5. Higgs-boson production in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Cross-section calculations are presented for the production of intermediate-mass Higgs bosons produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions via two-photon fusion. The calculations are performed in position space using Baur's method for folding together the Weizsacker-Williams virtual-photon spectra of the two colliding nuclei. It is found that two-photon fusion in nucleus-nucleus collisions is a plausible way of finding intermediate-mass Higgs bosons at the Superconducting Super Collider or the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  6. Functional morphology of the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ibata, Y; Okamura, H; Tanaka, M; Tamada, Y; Hayashi, S; Iijima, N; Matsuda, T; Munekawa, K; Takamatsu, T; Hisa, Y; Shigeyoshi, Y; Amaya, F

    1999-07-01

    In mammals, the biological clock (circadian oscillator) is situated in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a small bilaterally paired structure just above the optic chiasm. Circadian rhythms of sleep-wakefulness and hormone release disappear when the SCN is destroyed, and transplantation of fetal or neonatal SCN into an arrhythmic host restores rhythmicity. There are several kinds of peptide-synthesizing neurons in the SCN, with vasoactive intestinal peptide, arginine vasopressin, and somatostatine neurons being most prominent. Those peptides and their mRNA show diurnal rhythmicity and may or may not be affected by light stimuli. Major neuronal inputs from retinal ganglion cells as well as other inputs such as those from the lateral geniculate nucleus and raphe nucleus are very important for entrainment and shift of circadian rhythms. In this review, we describe morphological and functional interactions between neurons and glial elements and their development. We also consider the expression of immediate-early genes in the SCN after light stimulation during subjective night and their role in the mechanism of signal transduction. The reciprocal interaction between the SCN and melatonin, which is synthesized in the pineal body under the influence of polysynaptic inputs from the SCN, is also considered. Finally, morphological and functional characteristics of clock genes, particularly mPers, which are considered to promote circadian rhythm, are reviewed. PMID:10433864

  7. Networking the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Rajapakse, Indika; Scalzo, David; Tapscott, Stephen J; Kosak, Steven T; Groudine, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The nuclei of differentiating cells exhibit several fundamental principles of self-organization. They are composed of many dynamical units connected physically and functionally to each other—a complex network—and the different parts of the system are mutually adapted and produce a characteristic end state. A unique cell-specific signature emerges over time from complex interactions among constituent elements that delineate coordinate gene expression and chromosome topology. Each element itself consists of many interacting components, all dynamical in nature. Self-organizing systems can be simplified while retaining complex information using approaches that examine the relationship between elements, such as spatial relationships and transcriptional information. These relationships can be represented using well-defined networks. We hypothesize that during the process of differentiation, networks within the cell nucleus rewire according to simple rules, from which a higher level of order emerges. Studying the interaction within and among networks provides a useful framework for investigating the complex organization and dynamic function of the nucleus. PMID:20664641

  8. Revisiting the supratrigeminal nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Fujio, T; Sato, F; Tachibana, Y; Kato, T; Tomita, A; Higashiyama, K; Ono, T; Maeda, Y; Yoshida, A

    2016-06-01

    The supratrigeminal nucleus (Vsup), originally proposed as a premotoneuron pool in the trigeminal reflex arc, is a key structure of jaw movement control. Surprisingly, however, the location of the rat Vsup has not precisely been defined. In light of our previous cat studies, we made two hypotheses regarding the rat Vsup: (1) the Vsup is cytoarchitectonically distinguishable from its surrounding structures; (2) the Vsup receives central axon terminals of the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (Vmes) neurons which are primary afferents innervating muscle spindles of jaw-closing muscles and periodontal ligaments around the teeth. To test the first hypothesis, we examined the cytoarchitecture of the rat Vsup. The Vsup was identified as an area medially adjacent to the dorsomedial part of trigeminal principal sensory nucleus (Vp), and extended from the level just rostral to the caudal two-thirds of the trigeminal motor nucleus (Vmo) to the level approximately 150μm caudal to the Vmo. Our rat Vsup was much smaller and its location was considerably different in comparison to the Vsup reported previously. To evaluate the second hypothesis, we tested the distribution patterns of Vmes primary afferent terminals in the cytoarchitectonically identified Vsup. After transganglionic tracer applications to the masseter, deep temporal, and medial pterygoid nerves, a large number of axon terminals were observed in all parts of Vsup (especially in its medial part). After applications to the inferior alveolar, infraorbital, and lingual nerves, a small number of axon terminals were labeled in the caudolateral Vsup. The Vsup could also be identified electrophysiologically. After electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve, evoked potentials with slow negative component were isolated only in the Vsup. The present findings suggest that the rat Vsup can be cytoarchitectonically and electrophysiologically identified, receives somatotopic termination of the trigeminal primary afferents, and

  9. Electric quadrupole excitations in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    Calculations are presented for electric quadrupole excitations in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The theoretical results are compared to an extensive data set and it is found that electric quadrupole effects provide substantial corrections to cross sections, especially for heavier nuclei.

  10. Meson multiplicity versus energy in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, T. W.; Freier, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic study of meson multiplicity as a function of energy at energies up to 100 GeV/u in nucleus-nucleus collisions has been made, using cosmic-ray data in nuclear emulsion. The data are consistent with simple nucleon-nucleon superposition models. Multiplicity per interacting nucleon in AA collisions does not appear to differ significantly from pp collisions.

  11. Scaling phenomenon in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C. Y.; Blankenbecler, R.

    1980-01-01

    New scaling variables for proton and pion production in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions are introduced which are the generalizations of the Feynmann scaling variable. They allow a simple description of the cross sections at forward and backward angles. 2 figures.

  12. Momentum loss in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Ferdous; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    An optical model description, based on multiple scattering theory, of longitudinal momentum loss in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. The crucial role of the imaginary component of the nucleon-nucleon transition matrix in accounting for longitudinal momentum transfer is demonstrated. Results obtained with this model are compared with Intranuclear Cascade (INC) calculations, as well as with predictions from Vlasov-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (VUU) and quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations. Comparisons are also made with experimental data where available. These indicate that the present model is adequate to account for longitudinal momentum transfer in both proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions over a wide range of energies.

  13. The Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, Fulvio

    Exciting new broadband observations of the galactic nucleus have placed the heart of the Milky Way under intense scrutiny in recent years. This has been due in part to the growing interest from theorists motivated to study the physics of black hole accretion, magnetized gas dynamics, and unusual star formation. The center of our Galaxy is now known to harbor the most compelling supermassive black hole candidate, weighing in at 3-4 million solar masses. Its nearby environment is comprised of a molecular dusty ring, clusters of evolved and young stars, diffuse hot gas, ionized gas streamers, and several supernova remnants. This chapter will focus on the physical makeup of this dynamic region and the feasibility of actually imaging the black hole's shadow in the coming decade with mm interferometry.

  14. [The role of the nucleus accumbens in psychiatric disorders].

    PubMed

    Mavridis, I

    2015-01-01

    -resistant depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, Tourette syndrome and addiction to drugs or alcohol. Specifically, bilateral and unilateral (right) deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens has been applied in obsessive-compulsive patients resulting into significant improvement of their symptoms and their quality of life. Nucleus accumbens deep brain stimulation has been also associated with antidepressant and anxiolytic effect, as well as quality of life improvement in patients suffering from severe resistant depression. Finally, this minimally invasive stereotactic procedure has been proved beneficial for all phenotypic components of the Tourette syndrome, with remarkable reduction of the syndrome's motor manifestations, including tics. PMID:26709994

  15. Antiproton-nucleus interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugnon, J.; Vandermeulen, J.

    The antiproton-nucleus physics is reviewed. On the experimental side, the recent results obtained at the LEAR, BNL and KEK facilities are analyzed. A brief summary of the main pp and pn experimental data is also given. The antiproton-nucleus interaction can lead to elasic, inelastic and charge exchange scattering and to annihilation. The latter is very dominant. The scattering cross-sections are usually analyzed in terms of complex potential models. The relationship between potentials, charge conjugation and Dirac phenomenology is discussed. Much emphasis is put on the dynamics of the antiproton annihilation on nuclei. The energy transfer, pion absorption and target response are analyzed within the intranuclear cascade model. Special interest is devoted to strangeness production, hypernucleus formation and possible annihilation on two nucleons. Signatures for this new process are searched in experimental data. Finally, the highly debated question of quark-gluon formation is analyzed. Cet article constitue une revue de la physique antiproton-noyau. Du point de vue expérimental, cette revue porte particulièrement sur les récents résultats obtenus à LEAR, BNL et KEK. On y a aussi inclus une mise à jour des faits expérimentaux principaux pour pp et pn. L'interaction antiproton-noyau conduit à la diffusion élastique, inélastique et d'xA9change de charge et à des processus d'annihilation. Habituellement, les expériences de diffusion sont analysées en termes de potentiels complexes. La relation entre ces potentiels, la conjugaison de charge et la phénoménologie de Dirac est discutée. On s'est particulièrement intéressé à la dynamique de l'annihilation d'antiprotons sur des noyaux. Le transfert d'énergie, l'absorption de pions et la réponse de la cible sont analysés dans le cadre du modèle de cascade intranucléaire. Certains autres points sont discutés plus en détail: la production d'étrangeté, la formation d'hypernoyaux et l'annihilation sur

  16. Mechanics of the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Lammerding, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus is the distinguishing feature of eukaryotic cells. Until recently, it was often considered simply as a unique compartment containing the genetic information of the cell and associated machinery, without much attention to its structure and mechanical properties. This article provides compelling examples that illustrate how specific nuclear structures are associated with important cellular functions, and how defects in nuclear mechanics can cause a multitude of human diseases. During differentiation, embryonic stem cells modify their nuclear envelope composition and chromatin structure, resulting in stiffer nuclei that reflect decreased transcriptional plasticity. In contrast, neutrophils have evolved characteristic lobulated nuclei that increase their physical plasticity, enabling passage through narrow tissue spaces in their response to inflammation. Research on diverse cell types further demonstrates how induced nuclear deformations during cellular compression or stretch can modulate cellular function. Pathological examples of disturbed nuclear mechanics include the many diseases caused by mutations in the nuclear envelope proteins lamin A/C and associated proteins, as well as cancer cells that are often characterized by abnormal nuclear morphology. In this article, we will focus on determining the functional relationship between nuclear mechanics and cellular (dys-)function, describing the molecular changes associated with physiological and pathological examples, the resulting defects in nuclear mechanics, and the effects on cellular function. New insights into the close relationship between nuclear mechanics and cellular organization and function will yield a better understanding of normal biology and will offer new clues into therapeutic approaches to the various diseases associated with defective nuclear mechanics. PMID:23737203

  17. Two Neutron Removal in Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Significant discrepancies between theory and experiment have previously been noted for double neutron removal via electromagnetic processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The present work examines the cause of these discrepancies and systematically investigates whether the problem might be due to electromagnetic theory, nuclear contributions, or an underestimate of experimental error. Using cross section systematics from other reactions it is found that the discrepancies can be resolved in a plausible manner.

  18. Unexpected doubly-magic nucleus.

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, R. V. F.; Physics

    2009-01-01

    Nuclei with a 'magic' number of both protons and neutrons, dubbed doubly magic, are particularly stable. The oxygen isotope {sup 24}O has been found to be one such nucleus - yet it lies just at the limit of stability.

  19. Characterization of a folate-induced hypermotility response after bilateral injection into the rat nucleus accumbens

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, R.L. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of these studies was to pharmacologically characterize the mechanism responsible for a folate-induced stimulation of locomotor activity in rats after bilateral injection into the nucleus accumbens region of the brain. Folic acid (FA) and 5-formyltetrahydrofolic acid (FTHF) produced this hypermotility response after intra-accumbens injection, while other reduced folic acid derivatives dihydrofolic acid, tetrahydrofolic acid, and 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid were ineffective. Studies were designed to determine the role of catecholamines in the nucleus accumbens in the folate-induced hypermotility response. The findings suggest that the folate-induced response is dependent on intact neuronal dopamine stores, and is mediated by stimulation of dopamine receptors of the nucleus accumbens. However the folates do not appear to enhance dopaminergic neutransmission. Thus, FA and FTHF were inefficient at 1 mM concentrations in stimulating /sup 3/H-dopamine release from /sup 3/H-dopamine preloaded nucleus accumbens slices or dopamine from endogenous stores. Pteroic acid, the chemical precursor of folic acid which lacks the glutamate moiety, was ineffective in producing a stimulation of locomotor activity after intra-accumbens injection. Since glutamate is an excitatory amino acid (EAA), compounds characterized as EAA receptor antagonists were utilized to determine if the folate-induced hypermotility response is mediated by activation of EAA receptors in the nucleus accumbens. These results suggest that activation of quisqualate receptors of the nucleus accumbens may mediate the folate-induced hypermotility response.

  20. Interactions between Brainstem Noradrenergic Neurons and the Nucleus Accumbens Shell in Modulating Memory for Emotionally Arousing Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerfoot, Erin C.; Williams, Cedric L.

    2011-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens shell (NAC) receives axons containing dopamine-[beta]-hydroxylase that originate from brainstem neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Recent findings show that memory enhancement produced by stimulating NTS neurons after learning may involve interactions with the NAC. However, it is unclear whether these…

  1. Growth behavior of cochlear nucleus neuronal cells on semiconductor substrates.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Wasielewski, Natalia; Radeloff, Andreas; Scherzed, Agmal; Jablonka, Sibylle; Hagen, Rudolf; Mlynski, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Auditory brainstem implants provide sound information by direct stimulation of the cochlear nucleus to patients with dysfunctional or absent cranial nerve VIII. In contrast to patients with cochlear implants, the use of the auditory brainstem implants is less successful. This cannot be fully explained by the difference location of stimulation but a rather unspecific neuronal stimulation. The aim of this study was to further examine neuronal cells of the cochlear nucleus and to test their interactions with semiconductor substrates as a potential electrode material for improved auditory brainstem implants. The cochlear nuclei of postnatal day 7 rats were microsurgically dissected. The tissue was dissociated enzymatically and plated on coverslips as control and on the semiconductor substrates silicon or silicon nitride. After 4 days in culture the morphology and growth of dissociated cells was determined by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. Dissociated cells of the cochlear nucleus showed reduced cell growth on semiconductor substrates compared with controls. SEM analysis demonstrated close contact of neurons with supporting cells in culture and good adherence of neuronal growth cones on the used materials. These findings present basic knowledge for the development of neuron-electrode interfaces for future auditory brainstem implants. PMID:21370446

  2. The deafferented reticular thalamic nucleus generates spindle rhythmicity.

    PubMed

    Steriade, M; Domich, L; Oakson, G; Deschênes, M

    1987-01-01

    The hypothesis that nucleus reticularis thalami (RE) is the generator of spindle rhythmicity during electroencephalogram (EEG) synchronization was tested in acutely prepared cats. Unit discharges and focal waves were extracellularly recorded in the rostral pole of RE nucleus, which was completely disconnected by transections from all other thalamic nuclei. In some experiments, additional transections through corona radiata created a triangular island in which the rostral RE pole survived with the caudate nucleus, putamen, basal forebrain nuclei, prepyriform area, and the adjacent cortex. Similar results were obtained in two types of experiments: brain stem-transected preparations that exhibited spontaneous spindle sequences, and animals under ketamine anesthesia in which transient spindling was repeatedly precipitated during recording by very low doses of a short-acting barbiturate. Both spindle-related rhythms (7- to 16-Hz waves grouped in sequences that recur with a rhythm of 0.1-0.3 Hz) are seen in focal recordings of the deafferented RE nucleus. The presence of spindling rhythmicity in the disconnected RE nucleus contrasts with total absence of spindles in cortical EEG leads and in thalamic recordings behind the transection. Oscillations within the same frequency range as that of spontaneous spindles can be evoked in the deafferented RE nucleus by subcortical white matter stimulation. In deafferented RE cells, the burst structure consists of an initially biphasic acceleration-deceleration pattern, eventually leading to a long-lasting tonic tail. Quantitative group data show that the burst parameters of disconnected RE cells are very similar to those of RE neurons with intact connections. In the deafferented RE nucleus, spike bursts of RE neurons recur periodically (0.1-0.3 Hz) in close time-relation with simultaneously recorded focal spindle sequences. The burst occurrence of deafferented RE cells is greatly reduced after systemic administration of bicuculline

  3. Sensitivity of cross sections for elastic nucleus-nucleus scattering to halo nucleus density distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhazov, G. D.; Sarantsev, V. V.

    2012-12-15

    In order to clear up the sensitivity of the nucleus-nucleus scattering to the nuclear matter distributions in exotic halo nuclei, we have calculated differential cross sections for elastic scattering of the {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li nuclei on several nuclear targets at the energy of 0.8 GeV/nucleon with different assumed nuclear density distributions in {sup 6}He and {sup 11}Li.

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptors destined for the nucleus are internalized via a clathrin-dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    De Angelis Campos, Ana Carolina; Rodrigues, Michele Angela; Andrade, Carolina de; Miranda de Goes, Alfredo; Nathanson, Michael H.; Gomes, Dawidson A.

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} EGF and its receptor translocates to the nucleus in liver cells. {yields} Real time imaging shows that EGF moves to the nucleus. {yields} EGF moves with its receptor to the nucleus. {yields} Dynamin and clathrin are necessary for EGFR nuclear translocation. -- Abstract: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) transduces its actions via the EGF receptor (EGFR), which can traffic from the plasma membrane to either the cytoplasm or the nucleus. However, the mechanism by which EGFR reaches the nucleus is unclear. To investigate these questions, liver cells were analyzed by immunoblot of cell fractions, confocal immunofluorescence and real time confocal imaging. Cell fractionation studies showed that EGFR was detectable in the nucleus after EGF stimulation with a peak in nuclear receptor after 10 min. Movement of EGFR to the nucleus was confirmed by confocal immunofluorescence and labeled EGF moved with the receptor to the nucleus. Small interference RNA (siRNA) was used to knockdown clathrin in order to assess the first endocytic steps of EGFR nuclear translocation in liver cells. A mutant dynamin (dynamin K44A) was also used to determine the pathways for this traffic. Movement of labeled EGF or EGFR to the nucleus depended upon dynamin and clathrin. This identifies the pathway that mediates the first steps for EGFR nuclear translocation in liver cells.

  5. Closing the loop of deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Carron, Romain; Chaillet, Antoine; Filipchuk, Anton; Pasillas-Lépine, William; Hammond, Constance

    2013-01-01

    High-frequency deep brain stimulation is used to treat a wide range of brain disorders, like Parkinson's disease. The stimulated networks usually share common electrophysiological signatures, including hyperactivity and/or dysrhythmia. From a clinical perspective, HFS is expected to alleviate clinical signs without generating adverse effects. Here, we consider whether the classical open-loop HFS fulfills these criteria and outline current experimental or theoretical research on the different types of closed-loop DBS that could provide better clinical outcomes. In the first part of the review, the two routes followed by HFS-evoked axonal spikes are explored. In one direction, orthodromic spikes functionally de-afferent the stimulated nucleus from its downstream target networks. In the opposite direction, antidromic spikes prevent this nucleus from being influenced by its afferent networks. As a result, the pathological synchronized activity no longer propagates from the cortical networks to the stimulated nucleus. The overall result can be described as a reversible functional de-afferentation of the stimulated nucleus from its upstream and downstream nuclei. In the second part of the review, the latest advances in closed-loop DBS are considered. Some of the proposed approaches are based on mathematical models, which emphasize different aspects of the parkinsonian basal ganglia: excessive synchronization, abnormal firing-rate rhythms, and a deficient thalamo-cortical relay. The stimulation strategies are classified depending on the control-theory techniques on which they are based: adaptive and on-demand stimulation schemes, delayed and multi-site approaches, stimulations based on proportional and/or derivative control actions, optimal control strategies. Some of these strategies have been validated experimentally, but there is still a large reservoir of theoretical work that may point to ways of improving practical treatment. PMID:24391555

  6. Double Nucleus in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, Damián; Díaz, Rubén J.; Agüero, M. Paz

    2006-03-01

    M83 is one of the nearest galaxies with enhanced nuclear star formation, and it presents one of the best opportunities to study the kinematics and physical properties of a circumnuclear starburst. Our three-dimensional spectroscopy data in the R band confirm the presence of a secondary nucleus or mass concentration (previously suggested by Thatte and coworkers). We determine the position of this hidden nucleus, which would be more massive than the visible one and was not detected in the optical Hubble Space Telescope images due, probably, to the strong dust extinction. Using a Keplerian approximation, we estimated for the optical nucleus a mass of (5.0+/-0.8)×106 Msolar/sini (r<1.5"), and for the hidden nucleus, located 4''+/-1'' to the northwest (position angle of 271deg+/-15deg) of the optical nucleus, a mass of (1.00+/-0.08)×107 Msolar/sini (r<1.5"). The emission-line ratio map also unveils the presence of a second circumnuclear ring structure, previously discovered by IR imaging (Elmegreen and coworkers). The data allow us to resolve the behavior of the interstellar medium inside the circumnuclear ring and around the binary mass concentration.

  7. Electrophysiological registration of phonological perception in the subthalamic nucleus of patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    De Letter, M; Aerts, A; Van Borsel, J; Vanhoutte, S; De Taeye, L; Raedt, R; van Mierlo, P; Boon, P; Van Roost, D; Santens, P

    2014-11-01

    Phonological processing is usually associated with the activation of cortical areas, especially in the left cerebral hemisphere. This study examined if phonologically elicited evoked potentials can be recorded directly from the subthalamic nucleus in patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD). Seven PD patients who had undergone implantation of deep brain electrodes for the stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus were included. Local field potentials were recorded in a pre-attentive auditory phonological task, an attentive auditory phonological discrimination task, and a word recognition task. Auditory evoked potentials related to phonological, but not lexical processing, could be demonstrated in the subthalamic nucleus for all three tasks. Only minor changes were found after levodopa administration. This study demonstrates that the subthalamic nucleus is involved in early phonological perception, which puts the subthalamic nucleus in a position to modify phonological perception in a larger cortico-subcortical network. PMID:25265552

  8. Nucleus management with irrigating vectis.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Aravind

    2009-01-01

    The main objective in modern cataract surgery is to achieve a better unaided visual acuity with rapid post-surgical recovery and minimal surgery-related complications. Early visual rehabilitation and better unaided vision can be achieved only by reducing the incision size. In manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS), incision is between 5.5 to 7 mm. Once the nucleus is prolapsed into the anterior chamber, it can be extracted through the tunnel. Nucleus extraction with an irrigating vectis is a very simple technique, which combines mechanical and hydrostatic forces to express out the nucleus. This technique is time-tested with good results and more than 95% of nuclei in MSICS are extracted in this way offering all the merits of phacoemulsification with the added benefits of having wider applicability, better safety, shorter learning curve and lower cost. PMID:19075403

  9. Nigral stimulation for resistant axial motor impairment in Parkinson’s disease? A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Walach, Margarete; Meisner, Christoph; Fritz, Melanie; Scholten, Marlieke; Breit, Sorin; Plewnia, Christian; Bender, Benjamin; Gharabaghi, Alireza; Wächter, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Gait and balance disturbances typically emerge in advanced Parkinson’s disease with generally limited response to dopaminergic medication and subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. Therefore, advanced programming with interleaved pulses was put forward to introduce concomittant nigral stimulation on caudal contacts of a subthalamic lead. Here, we hypothesized that the combined stimulation of subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata improves axial symptoms compared with standard subthalamic nucleus stimulation. Twelve patients were enrolled in this 2 × 2 cross-over double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial and both the safety and efficacy of combined subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata stimulation were evaluated compared with standard subthalamic nucleus stimulation. The primary outcome measure was the change of a broad-scaled cumulative axial Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale score (Scale II items 13–15, Scale III items 27–31) at ‘3-week follow-up’. Secondary outcome measures specifically addressed freezing of gait, balance, quality of life, non-motor symptoms and neuropsychiatric symptoms. For the primary outcome measure no statistically significant improvement was observed for combined subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata stimulation at the ‘3-week follow-up’. The secondary endpoints, however, revealed that the combined stimulation of subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata might specifically improve freezing of gait, whereas balance impairment remained unchanged. The combined stimulation of subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata was safe, and of note, no clinically relevant neuropsychiatric adverse effect was observed. Patients treated with subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata stimulation revealed no ‘global’ effect on axial motor domains. However, this study opens the perspective that concomittant stimulation

  10. Cometary nucleus and active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of the icy conglomerate model of cometary nuclei, various observations demonstrate the spotted nature of many or most nuclei, i.e., regions of unusual activity, either high or low. Rotation periods, spin axes and even precession of the axes are determined. The observational evidence for variations in activity over the surfaces of cometary nuclei are listed and discussed. On June 11 the comet IRAS-ARAKI-ALCOCK approached the Earth to a distance of 0.031 AU, the nearest since C/Lexell, 1770 I, providing a unique opportunity for near-nucleus observations. Preliminary analysis of these images establishes the spin axis of the nucleus, with an oblioquity to the orbit plane of approximately 50 deg, and a lag angle of sublimation approximately 35 deg from the solar meridian on the nucleus. Asymmetries of the inner coma suggests a crazy-quilt distribution of ices with differing volatility over the surface of the nucleus. The observations of Comet P/Homes 1892 III, exhibiting two 8-10 magnitude bursts, are carefully analyzed. The grazing encounter produced, besides the first great burst, an active area on the nucleus, which was rotating retrograde with a period of 16.3hr and inclination nearly 180 deg. After the first burst the total magnitude fell less than two magnitudes from November 7 to November 30 (barely naked eye) while the nuclear region remained diffuse or complex, rarely if ever showing a stellar appearance. The fading was much more rapid after the second burst. The grazing encounter distributed a volume of large chunks in the neighborhood of the nucleus, maintaining activity for weeks.

  11. Formin' actin in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Many if not most proteins can, under certain conditions, change cellular compartments, such as, for example, shuttling from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Thus, many proteins may exert functions in various and very different subcellular locations, depending on the signaling context. A large amount of actin regulatory proteins has been detected in the mammalian cell nucleus, although their potential roles are much debated and are just beginning to emerge. Recently, members of the formin family of actin nucleators were also reported to dynamically localize to the nuclear environment. Here we discuss our findings that specific diaphanous-related formins can promote nuclear actin assembly in a signal-dependent manner. PMID:24637338

  12. Acridine: a versatile heterocyclic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramesh; Kaur, Mandeep; Kumari, Meena

    2012-01-01

    Acridine is a heterocyclic nucleus. It plays an important role in various medicines. A number of therapeutic agents are based on acridine nucleus such as quinacrine (antimalarial), acriflavine and proflavine (antiseptics), ethacridine (abortifacient), amsacrine and nitracine (anticancer), and tacrine. Acridine is obtained from high boiling fraction of coal tar. It is also obtained in nature from plant and marine sources. Acridine undergoes a number of reactions such as nucleophilic addition, electrophilic substitution, oxidation, reduction, reductive alkylation and photoalkylation. The present review article summarizes the synthesis, reaction, literature review and pharmaceutical importance of acridine. PMID:22574501

  13. Top-down-directed synchrony from medial frontal cortex to nucleus accumbens during reward anticipation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael X; Bour, Lo; Mantione, Mariska; Figee, Martijn; Vink, Matthijs; Tijssen, Marina A J; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Schuurman, P Richard; Denys, Damiaan

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens and medial frontal cortex (MFC) are part of a loop involved in modulating behavior according to anticipated rewards. However, the precise temporal landscape of their electrophysiological interactions in humans remains unknown because it is not possible to record neural activity from the nucleus accumbens using noninvasive techniques. We recorded electrophysiological activity simultaneously from the nucleus accumbens and cortex (via surface EEG) in humans who had electrodes implanted as part of deep-brain-stimulation treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Patients performed a simple reward motivation task previously shown to activate the ventral striatum. Spectral Granger causality analyses were applied to dissociate "top-down" (cortex → nucleus accumbens)- from "bottom-up" (nucleus accumbens → cortex)-directed synchronization (functional connectivity). "Top-down"-directed synchrony from cortex to nucleus accumbens was maximal over medial frontal sites and was significantly stronger when rewards were anticipated. These findings provide direct electrophysiological evidence for a role of the MFC in modulating nucleus accumbens reward-related processing and may be relevant to understanding the mechanisms of deep-brain stimulation and its beneficial effects on psychiatric conditions. PMID:21547982

  14. Functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Wemmer, David E.; Spence, Megan; Rubin, Seth

    2003-11-25

    A functionalized active-nucleus complex sensor that selectively associates with one or more target species, and a method for assaying and screening for one or a plurality of target species utilizing one or a plurality of functionalized active-nucleus complexes with at least two of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes having an attraction affinity to different corresponding target species. The functionalized active-nucleus complex has an active-nucleus and a targeting carrier. The method involves functionalizing an active-nucleus, for each functionalized active-nucleus complex, by incorporating the active-nucleus into a macromolucular or molecular complex that is capable of binding one of the target species and then bringing the macromolecular or molecular complexes into contact with the target species and detecting the occurrence of or change in a nuclear magnetic resonance signal from each of the active-nuclei in each of the functionalized active-nucleus complexes.

  15. Higgs and Particle Production in Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhe

    We apply a diagrammatic approach to study Higgs boson, a color-neutral heavy particle, pro- duction in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the saturation framework without quantum evolution. We assume the strong coupling constant much smaller than one. Due to the heavy mass and colorless nature of Higgs particle, final state interactions are absent in our calculation. In order to treat the two nuclei dynamically symmetric, we use the Coulomb gauge which gives the appropriate light cone gauge for each nucleus. To further eliminate initial state interactions we choose specific prescriptions in the light cone propagators. We start the calculation from only two nucleons in each nucleus and then demonstrate how to generalize the calculation to higher orders diagrammatically. We simplify the diagrams by the Slavnov-Taylor-Ward identities. The resulting cross section is factorized into a product of two Weizsacker-Williams gluon distributions of the two nuclei when the transverse momentum of the produced scalar particle is around the saturation momentum. To our knowledge this is the first process where an exact analytic formula has been formed for a physical process, involving momenta on the order of the saturation momentum, in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the quasi-classical approximation. Since we have performed the calculation in an unconventional gauge choice, we further confirm our results in Feynman gauge where the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution is interpreted as a transverse momentum broadening of a hard gluons traversing a nuclear medium. The transverse momentum factorization manifests itself in light cone gauge but not so clearly in Feynman gauge. In saturation physics there are two different unintegrated gluon distributions usually encountered in the literature: the Weizsacker-Williams gluon distribution and the dipole gluon distribution. The first gluon distribution is constructed by solving classical Yang-Mills equation of motion in the Mc

  16. Dynamical nucleus-nucleus potential at short distances

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Yongying; Wang Ning; Li Zhuxia; Scheid, Werner

    2010-04-15

    The dynamical nucleus-nucleus potentials for fusion reactions {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca, {sup 48}Ca+{sup 208}Pb, and {sup 126}Sn+{sup 130}Te are studied with the improved quantum molecular dynamics model together with the extended Thomas-Fermi approximation for the kinetic energies of nuclei. The obtained fusion barrier for {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca is in good agreement with the extracted fusion barrier from the measured fusion excitation function, and the depths of the fusion pockets are close to the results of time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations. The energy dependence of the fusion barrier is also investigated. The fusion pocket becomes shallow for a heavy fusion system and almost disappears for heavy nearly symmetric systems, and the obtained potential at short distances is higher than the adiabatic potential.

  17. Azimuthal correlation and collective behavior in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mali, P.; Mukhopadhyay, A. Sarkar, S.; Singh, G.

    2015-03-15

    Various flow effects of nuclear and hadronic origin are investigated in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Nuclear emulsion data collected from {sup 84}Kr + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 1.52 GeV per nucleon and from {sup 28}Si + Ag/Br interaction at an incident energy of 14.5 GeV per nucleon are used in the investigation. The transverse momentum distribution and the flow angle analysis show that collective behavior, like a bounce-off effect of the projectile spectators and a sidesplash effect of the target spectators, are present in our event samples. From an azimuthal angle analysis of the data we also see a direct flow of the projectile fragments and of the produced charged particles. On the other hand, for both data samples the target fragments exhibit a reverse flow, while the projectile fragments exhibit an elliptic flow. Relevant flow parameters are measured.

  18. Analysis of relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Stephen C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a computer-assisted method is reported for the determination of the angular distribution data for secondary particles produced in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions in emulsions. The method is applied to emulsion detectors that were placed in a constant, uniform magnetic field and exposed to beams of 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon O-16 ions at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) of the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Linear regression analysis is used to determine the azimuthal and polar emission angles from measured track coordinate data. The software, written in BASIC, is designed to be machine independent, and adaptable to an automated system for acquiring the track coordinates. The fitting algorithm is deterministic, and takes into account the experimental uncertainty in the measured points. Further, a procedure for using the track data to estimate the linear momenta of the charged particles observed in the detectors is included.

  19. Single nucleon emission in relativistic nucleus-nucleus reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1992-01-01

    Significant discrepancies between theory and experiment have previously been noted for nucleon emission via electromagnetic processes in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The present work investigates the hypothesis that these discrepancies have arisen due to uncertainties about how to deduce the experimental electromagnetic cross section from the total measured cross section. An optical-model calculation of single neutron removal is added to electromagnetic cross sections and compared to the total experimental cross sections. Good agreement is found thereby resolving some of the earlier noted discrepancies. A detailed comparison to the recent work of Benesh, Cook, and Vary is made for both the impact parameter and the nuclear cross section. Good agreement is obtained giving an independent confirmation of the parameterized formulas developed by those authors.

  20. The cellular mastermind(?) – Mechanotransduction and the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Ashley; Fedorchak, Gregory R.; Lammerding, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical stimulation by activation of specific signaling pathways and genes that allow the cell to adapt to its dynamic physical environment. How cells sense the various mechanical inputs and translate them into biochemical signals remains an area of active investigation. Recent reports suggest that the cell nucleus may be directly implicated in this cellular mechanotransduction process. In this chapter, we discuss how forces applied to the cell surface and cytoplasm induce changes in nuclear structure and organization, which could directly affect gene expression, while also highlighting the complex interplay between nuclear structural proteins and transcriptional regulators that may further modulate mechanotransduction signaling. Taken together, these findings paint a picture of the nucleus as a central hub in cellular mechanotransduction—both structurally and biochemically—with important implications in physiology and disease. PMID:25081618

  1. Therapeutic stimulation versus ablation.

    PubMed

    Hariz, Marwan I; Hariz, Gun-Marie

    2013-01-01

    The renaissance of functional stereotactic neurosurgery was pioneered in the mid 1980s by Laitinen's introduction of Leksell's posteroventral pallidotomy for Parkinson´s disease (PD). This ablative procedure experienced a worldwide spread in the 1990s, owing to its excellent effect on dyskinesias and other symptoms of post-l-dopa PD. Modern deep brain stimulation (DBS), pioneered by Benabid and Pollak in 1987 for the treatment of tremor, first became popular when it was applied to the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in the mid 1990s, where it demonstrated a striking effect on all cardinal symptoms of advanced PD, and permitted reduced dosages of medication. DBS, as a nondestructive, adaptable, and reversible procedure that is proving safe in bilateral surgery on basal ganglia, has great appeal to clinicians and patients alike, despite the fact that it is expensive, laborious, and relies on very strict patient selection criteria, especially for STN DBS. Psychiatric surgery has experienced the same phenomenon, with DBS supplanting completely stereotactic ablative procedures. This chapter discusses the pros and cons of ablation versus stimulation and investigates the reasons why DBS has overshadowed proven efficient ablative procedures such as pallidotomy for PD, and capsulotomy and cingulotomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression. PMID:24112885

  2. Hummingbird Comet Nucleus Analysis Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel; Carle, Glenn C.; Lasher, Larry E.

    2000-01-01

    Hummingbird is a highly focused scientific mission, proposed to NASA s Discovery Program, designed to address the highest priority questions in cometary science-that of the chemical composition of the cometary nucleus. After rendezvous with the comet, Hummingbird would first methodically image and map the comet, then collect and analyze dust, ice and gases from the cometary atmosphere to enrich characterization of the comet and support landing site selection. Then, like its namesake, Hummingbird would carefully descend to a pre-selected surface site obtaining a high-resolution image, gather a surface material sample, acquire surface temperature and then immediately return to orbit for detailed chemical and elemental analyses followed by a high resolution post-sampling image of the site. Hummingbird s analytical laboratory contains instrumentation for a comprehensive molecular and elemental analysis of the cometary nucleus as well as an innovative surface sample acquisition device.

  3. Convergence of limb, visceral, and vertical semicircular canal or otolith inputs onto vestibular nucleus neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jian, B. J.; Shintani, T.; Emanuel, B. A.; Yates, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to determine the patterns of convergence of non-labyrinthine inputs from the limbs and viscera onto vestibular nucleus neurons receiving signals from vertical semicircular canals or otolith organs. A secondary aim was to ascertain whether the effects of non-labyrinthine inputs on the activity of vestibular nucleus neurons is affected by bilateral peripheral vestibular lesions. The majority (72%) of vestibular nucleus neurons in labyrinth-intact animals whose firing was modulated by vertical rotations responded to electrical stimulation of limb and/or visceral nerves. The activity of even more vestibular nucleus neurons (93%) was affected by limb or visceral nerve stimulation in chronically labyrinthectomized preparations. Some neurons received non-labyrinthine inputs from a variety of peripheral sources, including antagonist muscles acting at the same joint, whereas others received inputs from more limited sources. There was no apparent relationship between the spatial and dynamic properties of a neuron's responses to tilts in vertical planes and the non-labyrinthine inputs that it received. These data suggest that non-labyrinthine inputs elicited during movement will modulate the processing of information by the central vestibular system, and may contribute to the recovery of spontaneous activity of vestibular nucleus neurons following peripheral vestibular lesions. Furthermore, some vestibular nucleus neurons with non-labyrinthine inputs may be activated only during particular behaviors that elicit a specific combination of limb and visceral inputs.

  4. Convergence of limb, visceral, and vertical semicircular canal or otolith inputs onto vestibular nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Jian, B J; Shintani, T; Emanuel, B A; Yates, B J

    2002-05-01

    The major goal of this study was to determine the patterns of convergence of non-labyrinthine inputs from the limbs and viscera onto vestibular nucleus neurons receiving signals from vertical semicircular canals or otolith organs. A secondary aim was to ascertain whether the effects of non-labyrinthine inputs on the activity of vestibular nucleus neurons is affected by bilateral peripheral vestibular lesions. The majority (72%) of vestibular nucleus neurons in labyrinth-intact animals whose firing was modulated by vertical rotations responded to electrical stimulation of limb and/or visceral nerves. The activity of even more vestibular nucleus neurons (93%) was affected by limb or visceral nerve stimulation in chronically labyrinthectomized preparations. Some neurons received non-labyrinthine inputs from a variety of peripheral sources, including antagonist muscles acting at the same joint, whereas others received inputs from more limited sources. There was no apparent relationship between the spatial and dynamic properties of a neuron's responses to tilts in vertical planes and the non-labyrinthine inputs that it received. These data suggest that non-labyrinthine inputs elicited during movement will modulate the processing of information by the central vestibular system, and may contribute to the recovery of spontaneous activity of vestibular nucleus neurons following peripheral vestibular lesions. Furthermore, some vestibular nucleus neurons with non-labyrinthine inputs may be activated only during particular behaviors that elicit a specific combination of limb and visceral inputs. PMID:12012162

  5. Infant Stimulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Children's Centre, Paris (France).

    This set of documents consists of English, French, and Spanish translations of four pamphlets on infant stimulation. The pamphlets provide information designed for lay persons, educators and primary care personnel, academics and professionals, and for health administrators and family-planning organizations. The contents cover infant needs; infant…

  6. Comparing Realistic Subthalamic Nucleus Neuron Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njap, Felix; Claussen, Jens C.; Moser, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2011-06-01

    The mechanism of action of clinically effective electrical high frequency stimulation is still under debate. However, recent evidence points at the specific activation of GABA-ergic ion channels. Using a computational approach, we analyze temporal properties of the spike trains emitted by biologically realistic neurons of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) as a function of GABA-ergic synaptic input conductances. Our contribution is based on a model proposed by Rubin and Terman and exhibits a wide variety of different firing patterns, silent, low spiking, moderate spiking and intense spiking activity. We observed that most of the cells in our network turn to silent mode when we increase the GABAA input conductance above the threshold of 3.75 mS/cm2. On the other hand, insignificant changes in firing activity are observed when the input conductance is low or close to zero. We thus reproduce Rubin's model with vanishing synaptic conductances. To quantitatively compare spike trains from the original model with the modified model at different conductance levels, we apply four different (dis)similarity measures between them. We observe that Mahalanobis distance, Victor-Purpura metric, and Interspike Interval distribution are sensitive to different firing regimes, whereas Mutual Information seems undiscriminative for these functional changes.

  7. Photoproduction of lepton pairs in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, B. D.; Goncalves, V. P.; De Santana Amaral, J. T.

    2013-03-25

    In this contribution we study coherent interactions as a probe of the nonlinear effects in the Quantum Electrodynamics (QED). In particular, we study the multiphoton effects in the production of leptons pairs for proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions for heavy nuclei. In the proton-nucleus we assume the ultrarelativistic proton as a source of photons and estimate the photoproduction of lepton pairs on nuclei at RHIC and LHC energies considering the multiphoton effects associated to multiple rescattering of the projectile photon on the proton of the nucleus. In nucleus - nucleus colllisions we consider the two nuclei as a source of photons. As each scattering contributes with a factor {alpha}Z to the cross section, this contribution must be taken into account for heavy nuclei. We consider the Coulomb corrections to calculate themultiple scatterings and estimate the total cross section for muon and tau pair production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies.

  8. Centrally administered glucagon stimulates sympathetic nerve activity in rat.

    PubMed

    Krzeski, R; Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Trzebski, A; Millhorn, D E

    1989-12-18

    The effect of pancreatic glucagon given intravenously, intracerebroventricularly and microinjected into the nucleus of the solitary tract on sympathetic activity in the cervical trunk and adrenal nerve was examined in rat. In each case glucagon caused a relatively long-lasting substantial increase in discharge of both nerves. This finding shows that glucagon can act centrally to stimulate sympathetic activity. The most probable site for the sympathoexcitatory effect of glucagon is the nucleus of the solitary tract. PMID:2598031

  9. Deep brain stimulation modulates synchrony within spatially and spectrally distinct resting state networks in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Oswal, Ashwini; Beudel, Martijn; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Litvak, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Chronic dopamine depletion in Parkinson’s disease leads to progressive motor and cognitive impairment, which is associated with the emergence of characteristic patterns of synchronous oscillatory activity within cortico-basal-ganglia circuits. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an effective treatment for Parkinson’s disease, but its influence on synchronous activity in cortico-basal-ganglia loops remains to be fully characterized. Here, we demonstrate that deep brain stimulation selectively suppresses certain spatially and spectrally segregated resting state subthalamic nucleus–cortical networks. To this end we used a validated and novel approach for performing simultaneous recordings of the subthalamic nucleus and cortex using magnetoencephalography (during concurrent subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation). Our results highlight that clinically effective subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation suppresses synchrony locally within the subthalamic nucleus in the low beta oscillatory range and furthermore that the degree of this suppression correlates with clinical motor improvement. Moreover, deep brain stimulation relatively selectively suppressed synchronization of activity between the subthalamic nucleus and mesial premotor regions, including the supplementary motor areas. These mesial premotor regions were predominantly coupled to the subthalamic nucleus in the high beta frequency range, but the degree of deep brain stimulation-associated suppression in their coupling to the subthalamic nucleus was not found to correlate with motor improvement. Beta band coupling between the subthalamic nucleus and lateral motor areas was not influenced by deep brain stimulation. Motor cortical coupling with subthalamic nucleus predominantly involved driving of the subthalamic nucleus, with those drives in the higher beta frequency band having much shorter net delays to subthalamic nucleus than those in the lower beta band. These observations raise

  10. Comet nucleus sample return mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A comet nucleus sample return mission in terms of its relevant science objectives, candidate mission concepts, key design/technology requirements, and programmatic issues is discussed. The primary objective was to collect a sample of undisturbed comet material from beneath the surface of an active comet and to preserve its chemical and, if possible, its physical integrity and return it to Earth in a minimally altered state. The secondary objectives are to: (1) characterize the comet to a level consistent with a rendezvous mission; (2) monitor the comet dynamics through perihelion and aphelion with a long lived lander; and (3) determine the subsurface properties of the nucleus in an area local to the sampled core. A set of candidate comets is discussed. The hazards which the spacecraft would encounter in the vicinity of the comet are also discussed. The encounter strategy, the sampling hardware, the thermal control of the pristine comet material during the return to Earth, and the flight performance of various spacecraft systems and the cost estimates of such a mission are presented.

  11. Theoretical antideuteron-nucleus absorptive cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, W. W.; Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Antideuteron-nucleus absorptive cross sections for intermediate to high energies are calculated using an ion-ion optical model. Good agreement with experiment (within 15 percent) is obtained in this same model for (bar p)-nucleus cross sections at laboratory energies up to 15 GeV. We describe a technique for estimating antinucleus-nucleus cross sections from NN data and suggest that further cosmic ray studies to search for antideuterons and other antinuclei be undertaken.

  12. The development of the Nucleus Freedom Cochlear implant system.

    PubMed

    Patrick, James F; Busby, Peter A; Gibson, Peter J

    2006-12-01

    Cochlear Limited (Cochlear) released the fourth-generation cochlear implant system, Nucleus Freedom, in 2005. Freedom is based on 25 years of experience in cochlear implant research and development and incorporates advances in medicine, implantable materials, electronic technology, and sound coding. This article presents the development of Cochlear's implant systems, with an overview of the first 3 generations, and details of the Freedom system: the CI24RE receiver-stimulator, the Contour Advance electrode, the modular Freedom processor, the available speech coding strategies, the input processing options of Smart Sound to improve the signal before coding as electrical signals, and the programming software. Preliminary results from multicenter studies with the Freedom system are reported, demonstrating better levels of performance compared with the previous systems. The final section presents the most recent implant reliability data, with the early findings at 18 months showing improved reliability of the Freedom implant compared with the earlier Nucleus 3 System. Also reported are some of the findings of Cochlear's collaborative research programs to improve recipient outcomes. Included are studies showing the benefits from bilateral implants, electroacoustic stimulation using an ipsilateral and/or contralateral hearing aid, advanced speech coding, and streamlined speech processor programming. PMID:17172547

  13. Optogenetically-induced tonic dopamine release from VTA-nucleus accumbens projections inhibits reward consummatory behaviors.

    PubMed

    Mikhailova, Maria A; Bass, Caroline E; Grinevich, Valentina P; Chappell, Ann M; Deal, Alex L; Bonin, Keith D; Weiner, Jeff L; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Budygin, Evgeny A

    2016-10-01

    Recent optogenetic studies demonstrated that phasic dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens may play a causal role in multiple aspects of natural and drug reward-related behaviors. The role of tonic dopamine release in reward consummatory behavior remains unclear. The current study used a combinatorial viral-mediated gene delivery approach to express ChR2 on mesolimbic dopamine neurons in rats. We used optical activation of this dopamine circuit to mimic tonic dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and to explore the causal relationship between this form of dopamine signaling within the ventral tegmental area (VTA)-nucleus accumbens projection and consumption of a natural reward. Using a two bottle choice paradigm (sucrose vs. water), the experiments revealed that tonic optogenetic stimulation of mesolimbic dopamine transmission significantly decreased reward consummatory behaviors. Specifically, there was a significant decrease in the number of bouts, licks and amount of sucrose obtained during the drinking session. Notably, activation of VTA dopamine cell bodies or dopamine terminals in the nucleus accumbens resulted in identical behavioral consequences. No changes in water intake were evident under the same experimental conditions. Collectively, these data demonstrate that tonic optogenetic stimulation of VTA-nucleus accumbens dopamine release is sufficient to inhibit reward consummatory behavior, possibly by preventing this circuit from engaging in phasic activity that is thought to be essential for reward-based behaviors. PMID:27421228

  14. Paraventricular Nucleus Modulates Excitatory Cardiovascular Reflexes during Electroacupuncture.

    PubMed

    Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C; Guo, Zhi-Ling; Fu, Liang-Wu; Longhurst, John C

    2016-01-01

    The paraventricular nucleus (PVN) regulates sympathetic outflow and blood pressure. Somatic afferent stimulation activates neurons in the hypothalamic PVN. Parvocellular PVN neurons project to sympathoexcitatory cardiovascular regions of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (rVLM). Electroacupuncture (EA) stimulates the median nerve (P5-P6) to modulate sympathoexcitatory responses. We hypothesized that the PVN and its projections to the rVLM participate in the EA-modulation of sympathoexcitatory cardiovascular responses. Cats were anesthetized and ventilated. Heart rate and mean blood pressure were monitored. Application of bradykinin every 10-min on the gallbladder induced consistent pressor reflex responses. Thirty-min of bilateral EA stimulation at acupoints P5-P6 reduced the pressor responses for at least 60-min. Inhibition of the PVN with naloxone reversed the EA-inhibition. Responses of cardiovascular barosensitive rVLM neurons evoked by splanchnic nerve stimulation were reduced by EA and then restored with opioid receptor blockade in the PVN. EA at P5-P6 decreased splanchnic evoked activity of cardiovascular barosensitive PVN neurons that also project directly to the rVLM. PVN neurons labeled with retrograde tracer from rVLM were co-labeled with μ-opioid receptors and juxtaposed to endorphinergic fibers. Thus, the PVN and its projection to rVLM are important in processing acupuncture modulation of elevated blood pressure responses through a PVN opioid mechanism. PMID:27181844

  15. Paraventricular Nucleus Modulates Excitatory Cardiovascular Reflexes during Electroacupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C.; Guo, Zhi-Ling; Fu, Liang-Wu; Longhurst, John C.

    2016-01-01

    The paraventricular nucleus (PVN) regulates sympathetic outflow and blood pressure. Somatic afferent stimulation activates neurons in the hypothalamic PVN. Parvocellular PVN neurons project to sympathoexcitatory cardiovascular regions of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (rVLM). Electroacupuncture (EA) stimulates the median nerve (P5-P6) to modulate sympathoexcitatory responses. We hypothesized that the PVN and its projections to the rVLM participate in the EA-modulation of sympathoexcitatory cardiovascular responses. Cats were anesthetized and ventilated. Heart rate and mean blood pressure were monitored. Application of bradykinin every 10-min on the gallbladder induced consistent pressor reflex responses. Thirty-min of bilateral EA stimulation at acupoints P5-P6 reduced the pressor responses for at least 60-min. Inhibition of the PVN with naloxone reversed the EA-inhibition. Responses of cardiovascular barosensitive rVLM neurons evoked by splanchnic nerve stimulation were reduced by EA and then restored with opioid receptor blockade in the PVN. EA at P5-P6 decreased splanchnic evoked activity of cardiovascular barosensitive PVN neurons that also project directly to the rVLM. PVN neurons labeled with retrograde tracer from rVLM were co-labeled with μ-opioid receptors and juxtaposed to endorphinergic fibers. Thus, the PVN and its projection to rVLM are important in processing acupuncture modulation of elevated blood pressure responses through a PVN opioid mechanism. PMID:27181844

  16. Responses of vestibular nucleus neurons to inputs from the hindlimb are enhanced following a bilateral labyrinthectomy

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Jennifer D.; Puterbaugh, Sonya R.; DeMayo, William M.; Yates, Bill J.

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular nucleus neurons have been shown to respond to stimulation of afferents innervating the limbs. However, a limitation in the potential translation of these findings is that they were obtained from decerebrate or anesthetized animals. The goal of the present study was to determine whether stimulation of hindlimb nerves similarly affects vestibular nucleus neuronal activity in conscious cats, and whether the responsiveness of neurons to the stimuli is altered following a bilateral labyrinthectomy. In labyrinth-intact animals, the firing rate of 24/59 (41%) of the neurons in the caudal vestibular nucleus complex was affected by hindlimb nerve stimulation. Most responses were excitatory; the median response latency was 20 ms, but some units had response latencies as short as 10 ms. In the first week after a bilateral labyrinthectomy, the proportion of vestibular nucleus neurons that responded to hindlimb nerve stimulation increased slightly (to 24/55 or 44% of units). However, during the subsequent postlabyrinthectomy survival period, the proportion of vestibular nucleus neurons with hindlimb inputs increased significantly (to 30/49 or 61% of units). Stimuli to hindlimb nerves needed to elicit neuronal responses was consistently over three times the threshold for eliciting an afferent volley. These data show that inputs from hindlimb afferents smaller than those innervating muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs affect the processing of information in the vestibular nuclei, and that these inputs are enhanced following a bilateral labyrinthectomy. These findings have implications for the development of a limb neuroprosthetics device for the management of bilateral vestibular loss. PMID:23305979

  17. Responses of vestibular nucleus neurons to inputs from the hindlimb are enhanced following a bilateral labyrinthectomy.

    PubMed

    McCall, Andrew A; Moy, Jennifer D; Puterbaugh, Sonya R; DeMayo, William M; Yates, Bill J

    2013-03-15

    Vestibular nucleus neurons have been shown to respond to stimulation of afferents innervating the limbs. However, a limitation in the potential translation of these findings is that they were obtained from decerebrate or anesthetized animals. The goal of the present study was to determine whether stimulation of hindlimb nerves similarly affects vestibular nucleus neuronal activity in conscious cats, and whether the responsiveness of neurons to the stimuli is altered following a bilateral labyrinthectomy. In labyrinth-intact animals, the firing rate of 24/59 (41%) of the neurons in the caudal vestibular nucleus complex was affected by hindlimb nerve stimulation. Most responses were excitatory; the median response latency was 20 ms, but some units had response latencies as short as 10 ms. In the first week after a bilateral labyrinthectomy, the proportion of vestibular nucleus neurons that responded to hindlimb nerve stimulation increased slightly (to 24/55 or 44% of units). However, during the subsequent postlabyrinthectomy survival period, the proportion of vestibular nucleus neurons with hindlimb inputs increased significantly (to 30/49 or 61% of units). Stimuli to hindlimb nerves needed to elicit neuronal responses was consistently over three times the threshold for eliciting an afferent volley. These data show that inputs from hindlimb afferents smaller than those innervating muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs affect the processing of information in the vestibular nuclei, and that these inputs are enhanced following a bilateral labyrinthectomy. These findings have implications for the development of a limb neuroprosthetics device for the management of bilateral vestibular loss. PMID:23305979

  18. Distribution of the neuronal inputs to the ventral premammillary nucleus of male and female rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante, Judney Cley; Bittencourt, Jackson Cioni; Elias, Carol Fuzeti

    2014-01-01

    The ventral premammillary nucleus (PMV) expresses dense collections of sex steroid receptors and receptors for metabolic cues, including leptin, insulin and ghrelin. The PMV responds to opposite sex odor stimulation and projects to areas involved in reproductive control, including direct innervation of gonadotropin releasing hormone neurons. Thus, the PMV is well positioned to integrate metabolic and reproductive cues, and control downstream targets that mediate reproductive function. In fact, lesions of PMV neurons blunt female reproductive function and maternal aggression. However, although the projections of PMV neurons have been well documented, little is known about the neuronal inputs received by PMV neurons. To fill this gap, we performed a systematic evaluation of the brain sites innervating the PMV neurons of male and female rats using the retrograde tracer subunit B of the cholera toxin (CTb). In general, we observed that males and females show a similar pattern of afferents. We also noticed that the PMV is preferentially innervated by neurons located in the forebrain, with very few projections coming from brainstem nuclei. The majority of inputs originated from the medial nucleus of the amygdala, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the medial preoptic nucleus. A moderate to high density of afferents was also observed in the ventral subiculum, the arcuate nucleus and the ventrolateral subdivision of the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus. Our findings strengthen the concept that the PMV is part of the vomeronasal system and integrates the brain circuitry controlling reproductive functions. PMID:25084037

  19. [Deep brain stimulation for movement disorders: indications, results and complications].

    PubMed

    Fleury, Vanessa; Vingerhoets, François; Horvath, Judit; Pollak, Pierre; Burkhard, Pierre

    2015-04-29

    Movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD), essential tremor (ET) and dystonia can benefit from deep brain stimulation (DBS). DBS is considered when symptoms are disabling despite optimal medical therapy. Contraindications include dementia, uncontrolled psychiatric disease and/or comorbid conditions with potential for evolution. Targets are the subthalamic nucleus for PD, the ventral intermediate nucleus for ET and the globus pallidus internus for dystonia. The beneficial effet of DBS has been well documented for symptom control. Optimal target localization of the electrodes reduces the occurrence of side-effects. Stimulation-induced adverse effects can usually be abolished by turning the stimulation off, changing the active contact or other stimulation parameters. PMID:26062221

  20. Actomyosin contractility rotates the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhishek; Maitra, Ananyo; Sumit, Madhuresh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2014-01-01

    The cell nucleus functions amidst active cytoskeletal filaments, but its response to their contractile stresses is largely unexplored. We study the dynamics of the nuclei of single fibroblasts, with cell migration suppressed by plating onto micro-fabricated patterns. We find the nucleus undergoes noisy but coherent rotational motion. We account for this observation through a hydrodynamic approach, treating the nucleus as a highly viscous inclusion residing in a less viscous fluid of orientable filaments endowed with active stresses. Lowering actin contractility selectively by introducing blebbistatin at low concentrations drastically reduced the speed and coherence of the angular motion of the nucleus. Time-lapse imaging of actin revealed a correlated hydrodynamic flow around the nucleus, with profile and magnitude consistent with the results of our theoretical approach. Coherent intracellular flows and consequent nuclear rotation thus appear to be an intrinsic property of cells. PMID:24445418

  1. Role of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in cardiovascular regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sapru, Hreday N.

    2012-01-01

    Recently the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) has been implicated in cardiovascular regulation. Both pressor and depressor responses can be elicited by the chemical stimulation of the Arc. The direction of cardiovascular responses (increase or decrease) elicited from the Arc depends on the baseline blood pressure. The pressor responses are mediated via increase in sympathetic nerve activity and involve activation of the spinal ionotropic glutamate receptors. Arc-stimulation elicits tachycardic responses which are mediated via inhibition of vagal input and excitation of sympathetic input to the heart. The pathways within the brain mediating the pressor and tachycardic responses elicited from the Arc have not been delineated. The depressor responses to the Arc-stimulation are mediated via the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptors, neuropeptide Y1 receptors, and opiate receptors in the PVN mediate the depressor responses elicited from the Arc. Some circulating hormones (e.g., leptin and insulin) may reach the Arc via the leaky blood-brain barrier and elicit their cardiovascular effects. Although the Arc is involved in mediating the cardiovascular responses to intravenously injected angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-12), these effects may not be due to leakage of these peptides across the blood-brain barrier in the Arc; instead, circulating angiotensins may act on neurons in the SFO and mediate cardiovascular actions via the projections of SFO neurons to the Arc. Cardiovascular responses elicited by acupuncture have been reported to be mediated by direct and indirect projections of the Arc to the RVLM. PMID:23260431

  2. Role of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in cardiovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Sapru, Hreday N

    2013-04-01

    Recently the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) has been implicated in cardiovascular regulation. Both pressor and depressor responses can be elicited by the chemical stimulation of the Arc. The direction of cardiovascular responses (increase or decrease) elicited from the Arc depends on the baseline blood pressure. The pressor responses are mediated via increase in sympathetic nerve activity and involve activation of the spinal ionotropic glutamate receptors. Arc-stimulation elicits tachycardic responses which are mediated via inhibition of vagal input and excitation of sympathetic input to the heart. The pathways within the brain mediating the pressor and tachycardic responses elicited from the Arc have not been delineated. The depressor responses to the Arc-stimulation are mediated via the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptors, neuropeptide Y1 receptors, and opiate receptors in the PVN mediate the depressor responses elicited from the Arc. Some circulating hormones (e.g., leptin and insulin) may reach the Arc via the leaky blood-brain barrier and elicit their cardiovascular effects. Although the Arc is involved in mediating the cardiovascular responses to intravenously injected angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-12), these effects may not be due to leakage of these peptides across the blood-brain barrier in the Arc; instead, circulating angiotensins may act on neurons in the SFO and mediate cardiovascular actions via the projections of SFO neurons to the Arc. Cardiovascular responses elicited by acupuncture have been reported to be mediated by direct and indirect projections of the Arc to the RVLM. PMID:23260431

  3. Deep brain stimulation affects conditioned and unconditioned anxiety in different brain areas.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, A; Klanker, M; van Oorschot, N; Post, R; Hamelink, R; Feenstra, M G P; Denys, D

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) has proven to be an effective treatment for therapy refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder. Clinical observations show that anxiety symptoms decrease rapidly following DBS. As in clinical studies different regions are targeted, it is of principal interest to understand which brain area is responsible for the anxiolytic effect and whether high-frequency stimulation of different areas differentially affect unconditioned (innate) and conditioned (learned) anxiety. In this study, we examined the effect of stimulation in five brain areas in rats (NAc core and shell, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), internal capsule (IC) and the ventral medial caudate nucleus (CAU)). The elevated plus maze was used to test the effect of stimulation on unconditioned anxiety, the Vogel conflict test for conditioned anxiety, and an activity test for general locomotor behaviour. We found different anxiolytic effects of stimulation in the five target areas. Stimulation of the CAU decreased both conditioned and unconditioned anxiety, while stimulation of the IC uniquely reduced conditioned anxiety. Remarkably, neither the accumbens nor the BNST stimulation affected conditioned or unconditioned anxiety. Locomotor activity increased with NAc core stimulation but decreased with the BNST. These findings suggest that (1) DBS may have a differential effect on unconditioned and conditioned anxiety depending on the stimulation area, and that (2) stimulation of the IC exclusively reduces conditioned anxiety. This suggests that the anxiolytic effects of DBS seen in OCD patients may not be induced by stimulation of the NAc, but rather by the IC. PMID:23900312

  4. The retrotrapezoid nucleus and breathing.

    PubMed

    Guyenet, Patrice G; Stornetta, Ruth L; Abbott, Stephen B G; Depuy, Seth D; Kanbar, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) is located in the rostral medulla oblongata close to the ventral surface and consists of a bilateral cluster of glutamatergic neurons that are non-aminergic and express homeodomain transcription factor Phox2b throughout life. These neurons respond vigorously to increases in local pCO(2) via cell-autonomous and paracrine (glial) mechanisms and receive additional chemosensory information from the carotid bodies. RTN neurons exclusively innervate the regions of the brainstem that contain the respiratory pattern generator (RPG). Lesion or inhibition of RTN neurons largely attenuates the respiratory chemoreflex of adult rats whereas their activation increases respiratory rate, inspiratory amplitude and active expiration. Phox2b mutations that cause congenital central hypoventilation syndrome in humans prevent the development of RTN neurons in mice. Selective deletion of the RTN Phox2b-VGLUT2 neurons by genetic means in mice eliminates the respiratory chemoreflex in neonates.In short, RTN Phox2b-VGLUT2 neurons are a major nodal point of the CNS network that regulates pCO(2) via breathing and these cells are probable central chemoreceptors. PMID:23080151

  5. The multifunctional lateral geniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Weyand, Theodore G

    2016-02-01

    Providing the critical link between the retina and visual cortex, the well-studied lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) has stood out as a structure in search of a function exceeding the mundane 'relay'. For many mammals, it is structurally impressive: Exquisite lamination, sophisticated microcircuits, and blending of multiple inputs suggest some fundamental transform. This impression is bolstered by the fact that numerically, the retina accounts for a small fraction of its input. Despite such promise, the extent to which an LGN neuron separates itself from its retinal brethren has proven difficult to appreciate. Here, I argue that whereas retinogeniculate coupling is strong, what occurs in the LGN is judicious pruning of a retinal drive by nonretinal inputs. These nonretinal inputs reshape a receptive field that under the right conditions departs significantly from its retinal drive, even if transiently. I first review design features of the LGN and follow with evidence for 10 putative functions. Only two of these tend to surface in textbooks: parsing retinal axons by eye and functional group and gating by state. Among the remaining putative functions, implementation of the principle of graceful degradation and temporal decorrelation are at least as interesting but much less promoted. The retina solves formidable problems imposed by physics to yield multiple efficient and sensitive representations of the world. The LGN applies context, increasing content, and gates several of these representations. Even if the basic concentric receptive field remains, information transmitted for each LGN spike relative to each retinal spike is measurably increased. PMID:26479339

  6. Music and the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Mavridis, Ioannis N

    2015-03-01

    Music is a universal feature of human societies over time, mainly because it allows expression and regulation of strong emotions, thus influencing moods and evoking pleasure. The nucleus accumbens (NA), the most important pleasure center of the human brain (dominates the reward system), is the 'king of neurosciences' and dopamine (DA) can be rightfully considered as its 'crown' due to the fundamental role that this neurotransmitter plays in the brain's reward system. Purpose of this article was to review the existing literature regarding the relation between music and the NA. Studies have shown that reward value for music can be coded by activity levels in the NA, whose functional connectivity with auditory and frontal areas increases as a function of increasing musical reward. Listening to music strongly modulates activity in a network of mesolimbic structures involved in reward processing including the NA. The functional connectivity between brain regions mediating reward, autonomic and cognitive processing provides insight into understanding why listening to music is one of the most rewarding and pleasurable human experiences. Musical stimuli can significantly increase extracellular DA levels in the NA. NA DA and serotonin were found significantly higher in animals exposed to music. Finally, passive listening to unfamiliar although liked music showed activations in the NA. PMID:25102783

  7. Hypocretinergic facilitation of synaptic activity of neurons in the nucleus pontis oralis of the cat.

    PubMed

    Xi, Ming Chu; Fung, Simon J; Yamuy, Jack; Morales, Francisco R; Chase, Michael H

    2003-06-27

    The present study was undertaken to explore the neuronal mechanisms of hypocretin actions on neurons in the nucleus pontis oralis (NPO), a nucleus which plays a key role in the generation of active (REM) sleep. Specifically, we sought to determine whether excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked by stimulation of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) and spontaneous EPSPs in NPO neurons are modulated by hypocretin. Accordingly, recordings were obtained from NPO neurons in the cat in conjunction with the juxtacellular microinjection of hypocretin-1 onto intracellularly recorded cells. The application of hypocretin-1 significantly increased the mean amplitude of LDT-evoked EPSPs of NPO neurons. In addition, the frequency and the amplitude of spontaneous EPSPs in NPO neurons increased following hypocretin-1 administration. These data suggest that hypocretinergic processes in the NPO are capable of modulating the activity of NPO neurons that receive excitatory cholinergic inputs from neurons in the LDT. PMID:12763260

  8. Motor task event detection using Subthalamic Nucleus Local Field Potentials.

    PubMed

    Niketeghad, Soroush; Hebb, Adam O; Nedrud, Joshua; Hanrahan, Sara J; Mahoor, Mohammad H

    2015-08-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) provides significant therapeutic benefit for movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Current DBS devices lack real-time feedback (thus are open loop) and stimulation parameters are adjusted during scheduled visits with a clinician. A closed-loop DBS system may reduce power consumption and DBS side effects. In such systems, DBS parameters are adjusted based on patient's behavior, which means that behavior detection is a major step in designing such systems. Various physiological signals can be used to recognize the behaviors. Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) Local Field Potential (LFP) is a great candidate signal for the neural feedback, because it can be recorded from the stimulation lead and does not require additional sensors. A practical behavior detection method should be able to detect behaviors asynchronously meaning that it should not use any prior knowledge of behavior onsets. In this paper, we introduce a behavior detection method that is able to asynchronously detect the finger movements of Parkinson patients. As a result of this study, we learned that there is a motor-modulated inter-hemispheric connectivity between LFP signals recorded bilaterally from STN. We used non-linear regression method to measure this connectivity and use it to detect the finger movements. Performance of this method is evaluated using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC). PMID:26737550

  9. Effects of Intralaminar Thalamic Stimulation on Language Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatnagar, Subhash C.; Mandybur, George T.

    2005-01-01

    Fifteen neurosurgical subjects, who were undergoing thalamic chronic electrode implants as a treatment for dyskinesia and chronic pain, were evaluated on a series of neurolinguistic functions to determine if the stimulation of the centromedianum nucleus of the thalamus affected language and cognitive processing. Analysis of the data revealed that…

  10. Distinct roles of dopamine and subthalamic nucleus in learning and probabilistic decision making

    PubMed Central

    Bogacz, Rafal; Javed, Shazia; Mooney, Lucy K.; Murphy, Gillian; Keeley, Sophie; Whone, Alan L.

    2012-01-01

    Even simple behaviour requires us to make decisions based on combining multiple pieces of learned and new information. Making such decisions requires both learning the optimal response to each given stimulus as well as combining probabilistic information from multiple stimuli before selecting a response. Computational theories of decision making predict that learning individual stimulus–response associations and rapid combination of information from multiple stimuli are dependent on different components of basal ganglia circuitry. In particular, learning and retention of memory, required for optimal response choice, are significantly reliant on dopamine, whereas integrating information probabilistically is critically dependent upon functioning of the glutamatergic subthalamic nucleus (computing the ‘normalization term’ in Bayes’ theorem). Here, we test these theories by investigating 22 patients with Parkinson’s disease either treated with deep brain stimulation to the subthalamic nucleus and dopaminergic therapy or managed with dopaminergic therapy alone. We use computerized tasks that probe three cognitive functions—information acquisition (learning), memory over a delay and information integration when multiple pieces of sequentially presented information have to be combined. Patients performed the tasks ON or OFF deep brain stimulation and/or ON or OFF dopaminergic therapy. Consistent with the computational theories, we show that stopping dopaminergic therapy impairs memory for probabilistic information over a delay, whereas deep brain stimulation to the region of the subthalamic nucleus disrupts decision making when multiple pieces of acquired information must be combined. Furthermore, we found that when participants needed to update their decision on the basis of the last piece of information presented in the decision-making task, patients with deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus region did not slow down appropriately to revise their

  11. Neuronal activity-regulated gene transcription: how are distant synaptic signals conveyed to the nucleus?

    PubMed Central

    Matamales, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic activity can trigger gene expression programs that are required for the stable change of neuronal properties, a process that is essential for learning and memory. Currently, it is still unclear how the stimulation of dendritic synapses can be coupled to transcription in the nucleus in a timely way given that large distances can separate these two cellular compartments. Although several mechanisms have been proposed to explain long distance communication between synapses and the nucleus, the possible co-existence of these models and their relevance in physiological conditions remain elusive. One model suggests that synaptic activation triggers the translocation to the nucleus of certain transcription regulators localised at postsynaptic sites that function as synapto-nuclear messengers. Alternatively, it has been hypothesised that synaptic activity initiates propagating regenerative intracellular calcium waves that spread through dendrites into the nucleus where nuclear transcription machinery is thereby regulated. It has also been postulated that membrane depolarisation of voltage-gated calcium channels on the somatic membrane is sufficient to increase intracellular calcium concentration and activate transcription without the need for transported signals from distant synapses. Here I provide a critical overview of the suggested mechanisms for coupling synaptic stimulation to transcription, the underlying assumptions behind them and their plausible physiological significance. PMID:24327840

  12. The Effect of Deep Brain Stimulation on the Speech Motor System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mücke, Doris; Becker, Johannes; Barbe, Michael T.; Meister, Ingo; Liebhart, Lena; Roettger, Timo B.; Dembek, Till; Timmermann, Lars; Grice, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Chronic deep brain stimulation of the nucleus ventralis intermedius is an effective treatment for individuals with medication-resistant essential tremor. However, these individuals report that stimulation has a deleterious effect on their speech. The present study investigates one important factor leading to these effects: the…

  13. Psychiatric and Cognitive Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Nassery, Adam; Palmese, Christina A; Sarva, Harini; Groves, Mark; Miravite, Joan; Kopell, Brian Harris

    2016-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is effective for Parkinson's disease (PD), dystonia, and essential tremor (ET). While motor benefits are well documented, cognitive and psychiatric side effects from the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus interna (GPi) DBS for PD are increasingly recognized. Underlying disease, medications, microlesions, and post-surgical stimulation likely all contribute to non-motor symptoms (NMS). PMID:27539167

  14. Testing string dynamics in lepton nucleus reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.; Pluemer, M.

    1989-10-01

    The sensitivity of nuclear attenuation of 10-100 GeV lepton nucleus ({ell}A) reactions to space-time aspects of hadronization is investigated within the context of the Lund string model. We consider two mechanisms for attenuation in a nucleus: final state cascading and string flip excitations. Implications for the evolution of the energy density in nuclear collisions are discussed. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Volumes of cochlear nucleus regions in rodents.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Donald A; Lee, Augustine C; Hamilton, Walter D; Benjamin, Louis C; Vishwanath, Shilpa; Simo, Hermann; Godfrey, Lynn M; Mustapha, Abdurrahman I A A; Heffner, Rickye S

    2016-09-01

    The cochlear nucleus receives all the coded information about sound from the cochlea and is the source of auditory information for the rest of the central auditory system. As such, it is a critical auditory nucleus. The sizes of the cochlear nucleus as a whole and its three major subdivisions - anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN), posteroventral cochlear nucleus (PVCN), and dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) - have been measured in a large number of mammals, but measurements of its subregions at a more detailed level for a variety of species have not previously been made. Size measurements are reported here for the summed granular regions, DCN layers, AVCN, PVCN, and interstitial nucleus in 15 different rodent species, as well as a lagomorph, carnivore, and small primate. This further refinement of measurements is important because the granular regions and superficial layers of the DCN appear to have some different functions than the other cochlear nucleus regions. Except for DCN layers in the mountain beaver, all regions were clearly identifiable in all the animals studied. Relative regional size differences among most of the rodents, and even the 3 non-rodents, were not large and did not show a consistent relation to their wide range of lifestyles and hearing parameters. However, the mountain beaver, and to a lesser extent the pocket gopher, two rodents that live in tunnel systems, had relative sizes of summed granular regions and DCN molecular layer distinctly larger than those of the other mammals. Among all the mammals studied, there was a high correlation between the size per body weight of summed granular regions and that of the DCN molecular layer, consistent with other evidence for a close relationship between granule cells and superficial DCN neurons. PMID:27435005

  16. Isoperiodic neuronal activity in suprachiasmatic nucleus of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. D.; Fuller, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    A subpopulation of neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is shown here to exhibit isoperiodic bursting activity. The period of discharge in these cells may be lengthened or the periodicity may be transiently disrupted by photic stimulation. It is suggested that many, if not all, of these cells are vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) neurons. It is shown that the ultradian periodicity of these cells, estimates of the VIP neuron population size in the SCN, effects of partial lesions on tau (period), and estimates of the phase stability of SCN-driven circadian rhythms are consistent with a strongly coupled, multioscillator model of circadian rhythmicity, in which the oscillator population constitutes a restricted subset of the SCN neuronal population.

  17. Input/output properties of the lateral vestibular nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R.; Bush, G.; Ehsanian, R.

    2004-01-01

    This article is a review of work in three species, squirrel monkey, cat, and rat studying the inputs and outputs from the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Different electrophysiological shock paradigms were used to determine the synaptic inputs derived from thick to thin diameter vestibular nerve afferents. Angular and linear mechanical stimulations were used to activate and study the combined and individual contribution of inner ear organs and neck afferents. The spatio-temporal properties of LVN neurons in the decerebrated rat were studied in response to dynamic acceleration inputs using sinusoidal linear translation in the horizontal head plane. Outputs were evaluated using antidromic identification techniques and identified LVN neurons were intracellularly injected with biocytin and their morphology studied.

  18. Laser-nucleus interactions: The quasi-adiabatic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pálffy, Adriana; Buss, Oliver; Hoefer, Axel; Weidenmüller, Hans A.

    2015-10-01

    The interaction between nuclei and a strong zeptosecond laser pulse with coherent MeV photons is investigated theoretically. We provide a first semiquantitative study of the quasi-adiabatic regime where the photon absorption rate is comparable to the nuclear equilibration rate. In that regime, multiple photon absorption leads to the formation of a compound nucleus in the so-far unexplored regime of excitation energies several hundred MeV above the yrast line. The temporal dynamics of the process is investigated by means of a set of master equations that account for dipole absorption, stimulated dipole emission, neutron decay, and induced fission in a chain of nuclei. That set is solved numerically by means of state-of-the-art matrix exponential methods also used in nuclear fuel burn-up and radioactivity transport calculations. Our quantitative estimates predict the excitation path and range of nuclei reached by neutron decay and provide relevant information for the layout of future experiments.

  19. Commissural axons of the mouse cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Brown, M Christian; Drottar, Marie; Benson, Thane E; Darrow, Keith

    2013-05-01

    The axons of commissural neurons that project from one cochlear nucleus to the other were studied after labeling with anterograde tracer. Injections were made into the dorsal subdivision of the cochlear nucleus in order to restrict labeling only to the group of commissural neurons that gave off collaterals to, or were located in, this subdivision. The number of labeled commissural axons in each injection was correlated with the number of labeled radiate multipolar neurons, suggesting radiate neurons as the predominant origin of the axons. The radiate commissural axons are thick and myelinated, and they exit the dorsal acoustic stria of the injected cochlear nucleus to cross the brainstem in the dorsal half, near the crossing position of the olivocochlear bundle. They enter the opposite cochlear nucleus via the dorsal and ventral acoustic stria and at its medial border. Reconstructions of single axons demonstrate that terminations are mostly in the core and typically within a single subdivision of the cochlear nucleus. Extents of termination range from narrow to broad along both the dorsoventral (i.e., tonotopic) and the rostrocaudal dimensions. In the electron microscope, labeled swellings form synapses that are symmetric (in that there is little postsynaptic density), a characteristic of inhibitory synapses. Our labeled axons do not appear to include excitatory commissural axons that end in edge regions of the nucleus. Radiate commissural axons could mediate the broadband inhibition observed in responses to contralateral sound, and they may balance input from the two ears with a quick time course. PMID:23124982

  20. Inflammation Induces Irreversible Biophysical Changes in Isolated Nucleus Pulposus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maidhof, Robert; Jacobsen, Timothy; Papatheodorou, Angelos; Chahine, Nadeen O.

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration is accompanied by elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines that have been implicated in disease etiology and matrix degradation. While the effects of inflammatory stimulation on disc cell metabolism have been well-studied, their effects on cell biophysical properties have not been investigated. The hypothesis of this study is that inflammatory stimulation alters the biomechanical properties of isolated disc cells and volume responses to step osmotic loading. Cells from the nucleus pulposus (NP) of bovine discs were isolated and treated with either lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an inflammatory ligand, or with the recombinant cytokine TNF-α for 24 hours. We measured cellular volume regulation responses to osmotic loading either immediately after stimulation or after a 1 week recovery period from the inflammatory stimuli. Cells from each group were tested under step osmotic loading and the transient volume-response was captured via time-lapse microscopy. Volume-responses were analyzed using mixture theory framework to investigate two biomechanical properties of the cell, the intracellular water content and the hydraulic permeability. Intracellular water content did not vary between treatment groups, but hydraulic permeability increased significantly with inflammatory treatment. In the 1 week recovery group, hydraulic permeability remained elevated relative to the untreated recovery control. Cell radius was also significantly increased both after 24 hours of treatment and after 1 week recovery. A significant linear correlation was observed between hydraulic permeability and cell radius in untreated cells at 24 hours and at 1-week recovery, though not in the inflammatory stimulated groups at either time point. This loss of correlation between cell size and hydraulic permeability suggests that regulation of volume change is disrupted irreversibly due to inflammatory stimulation. Inflammatory treated cells exhibited altered F

  1. PI3K in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus mediates estrogenic actions on energy expenditure in female mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogens act in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) to regulate body weight homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these estrogenic effects are unknown. We show that activation of estrogen receptor-a (ERa) stimulates neural firing of VMH neurons expressing ERa, and these ...

  2. Improved Cloud Condensation Nucleus Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun

    2010-01-01

    An improved thermal-gradient cloud condensation nucleus spectrometer (CCNS) has been designed to provide several enhancements over prior thermal- gradient counters, including fast response and high-sensitivity detection covering a wide range of supersaturations. CCNSs are used in laboratory research on the relationships among aerosols, supersaturation of air, and the formation of clouds. The operational characteristics of prior counters are such that it takes long times to determine aerosol critical supersaturations. Hence, there is a need for a CCNS capable of rapid scanning through a wide range of supersaturations. The present improved CCNS satisfies this need. The improved thermal-gradient CCNS (see Figure 1) incorporates the following notable features: a) The main chamber is bounded on the top and bottom by parallel thick copper plates, which are joined by a thermally conductive vertical wall on one side and a thermally nonconductive wall on the opposite side. b) To establish a temperature gradient needed to establish a supersaturation gradient, water at two different regulated temperatures is pumped through tubes along the edges of the copper plates at the thermally-nonconductive-wall side. Figure 2 presents an example of temperature and supersaturation gradients for one combination of regulated temperatures at the thermally-nonconductive-wall edges of the copper plates. c) To enable measurement of the temperature gradient, ten thermocouples are cemented to the external surfaces of the copper plates (five on the top plate and five on the bottom plate), spaced at equal intervals along the width axis of the main chamber near the outlet end. d) Pieces of filter paper or cotton felt are cemented onto the interior surfaces of the copper plates and, prior to each experimental run, are saturated with water to establish a supersaturation field inside the main chamber. e) A flow of monodisperse aerosol and a dilution flow of humid air are introduced into the main

  3. Neuroelectric signatures of reward learning and decision-making in the human nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael X; Axmacher, Nikolai; Lenartz, Doris; Elger, Christian E; Sturm, Volker; Schlaepfer, Thomas E

    2009-06-01

    Learning that certain actions lead to risky rewards is critical for biological, social, and economic survival, but the precise neural mechanisms of such reward-guided learning remain unclear. Here, we show that the human nucleus accumbens plays a key role in learning about risks by representing reward value. We recorded electrophysiological activity directly from the nucleus accumbens of five patients undergoing deep brain stimulation for treatment of refractory major depression. Patients engaged in a simple reward-learning task in which they first learned stimulus-outcome associations (learning task), and then were able to choose from among the learned stimuli (choosing task). During the learning task, nucleus accumbens activity reflected potential and received reward values both during the cue stimulus and during the feedback. During the choosing task, there was no nucleus accumbens activity during the cue stimulus, but feedback-related activity was pronounced and similar to that during the learning task. This pattern of results is inconsistent with a prediction error response. Finally, analyses of cross-correlations between the accumbens and simultaneous recordings of medial frontal cortex suggest a dynamic interaction between these structures. The high spatial and temporal resolution of these recordings provides novel insights into the timing of activity in the human nucleus accumbens, its functions during reward-guided learning and decision-making, and its interactions with medial frontal cortex. PMID:19092783

  4. Baroreflex failure in a patient with central nervous system lesions involving the nucleus tractus solitarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biaggioni, I.; Whetsell, W. O.; Jobe, J.; Nadeau, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    Animal studies have shown the importance of the nucleus tractus solitarii, a collection of neurons in the brain stem, in the acute regulation of blood pressure. Impulses arising from the carotid and aortic baroreceptors converge in this center, where the first synapse of the baroreflex is located. Stimulation of the nucleus tractus solitarii provides an inhibitory signal to other brain stem structures, particularly the rostral ventrolateral medulla, resulting in a reduction in sympathetic outflow and a decrease in blood pressure. Conversely, experimental lesions of the nucleus tractus solitarii lead to loss of baroreflex control of blood pressure, sympathetic activation, and severe hypertension in animals. In humans, baroreflex failure due to deafferentation of baroreceptors has been previously reported and is characterized by episodes of severe hypertension and tachycardia. We present a patient with an undetermined process of the central nervous system characterized pathologically by ubiquitous infarctions that were particularly prominent in the nucleus tractus solitarii bilaterally but spared the rostral ventrolateral medulla. Absence of a functioning baroreflex was evidenced by the lack of reflex tachycardia to the hypotensive effects of sodium nitroprusside, exaggerated pressor responses to handgrip and cold pressor test, and exaggerated depressor responses to meals and centrally acting alpha 2-agonists. This clinicopathological correlate suggests that the patient's baroreflex failure can be explained by the unique combination of the destruction of sympathetic inhibitory centers (ie, the nucleus tractus solitarii) and preservation of centers that exert a positive modulation on sympathetic tone (ie, the rostral ventrolateral medulla).

  5. Cortical drive of low-frequency oscillations in the human nucleus accumbens during action selection

    PubMed Central

    Litvak, Vladimir; Rutledge, Robb B.; Zaehle, Tino; Schmitt, Friedhelm C.; Voges, Jürgen; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens is thought to contribute to action selection by integrating behaviorally relevant information from multiple regions, including prefrontal cortex. Studies in rodents suggest that information flow to the nucleus accumbens may be regulated via task-dependent oscillatory coupling between regions. During instrumental behavior, local field potentials (LFP) in the rat nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex are coupled at delta frequencies (Gruber AJ, Hussain RJ, O'Donnell P. PLoS One 4: e5062, 2009), possibly mediating suppression of afferent input from other areas and thereby supporting cortical control (Calhoon GG, O'Donnell P. Neuron 78: 181–190, 2013). In this report, we demonstrate low-frequency cortico-accumbens coupling in humans, both at rest and during a decision-making task. We recorded LFP from the nucleus accumbens in six epilepsy patients who underwent implantation of deep brain stimulation electrodes. All patients showed significant coherence and phase-synchronization between LFP and surface EEG at delta and low theta frequencies. Although the direction of this coupling as indexed by Granger causality varied between subjects in the resting-state data, all patients showed a cortical drive of the nucleus accumbens during action selection in a decision-making task. In three patients this was accompanied by a significant coherence increase over baseline. Our results suggest that low-frequency cortico-accumbens coupling represents a highly conserved regulatory mechanism for action selection. PMID:25878159

  6. Regulation of calcium signals in the nucleus by a nucleoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Echevarría, Wihelma; Leite, M. Fatima; Guerra, Mateus T.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium is a second messenger in virtually all cells and tissues1. Calcium signals in the nucleus have effects on gene transcription and cell growth that are distinct from those of cytosolic calcium signals; however, it is unknown how nuclear calcium signals are regulated. Here we identify a reticular network of nuclear calcium stores that is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. This network expresses inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, and the nuclear component of InsP3-mediated calcium signals begins in its locality. Stimulation of these receptors with a little InsP3 results in small calcium signals that are initiated in this region of the nucleus. Localized release of calcium in the nucleus causes nuclear protein kinase C (PKC) to translocate to the region of the nuclear envelope, whereas release of calcium in the cytosol induces translocation of cytosolic PKC to the plasma membrane. Our findings show that the nucleus contains a nucleoplasmic reticulum with the capacity to regulate calcium signals in localized subnuclear regions. The presence of such machinery provides a potential mechanism by which calcium can simultaneously regulate many independent processes in the nucleus. PMID:12717445

  7. Hearing in action; auditory properties of neurons in the red nucleus of alert primates

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, Jonathan M.; Mylius, Judith; Scheich, Henning; Brosch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The response of neurons in the Red Nucleus pars magnocellularis (RNm) to both tone bursts and electrical stimulation were observed in three cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), in a series of studies primarily designed to characterize the influence of the dopaminergic ventral midbrain on auditory processing. Compared to its role in motor behavior, little is known about the sensory response properties of neurons in the red nucleus (RN); particularly those concerning the auditory modality. Sites in the RN were recognized by observing electrically evoked body movements characteristic for this deep brain structure. In this study we applied brief monopolar electrical stimulation to 118 deep brain sites at a maximum intensity of 200 μA, thus evoking minimal body movements. Auditory sensitivity of RN neurons was analyzed more thoroughly at 15 sites, with the majority exhibiting broad tuning curves and phase locking up to 1.03 kHz. Since the RN appears to receive inputs from a very early stage of the ascending auditory system, our results suggest that sounds can modify the motor control exerted by this brain nucleus. At selected locations, we also tested for the presence of functional connections between the RN and the auditory cortex by inserting additional microelectrodes into the auditory cortex and investigating how action potentials and local field potentials (LFPs) were affected by electrical stimulation of the RN. PMID:24860417

  8. The Impact of Deep Brain Stimulation on Sleep and Olfactory Function in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Breen, David P; Low, Hu Liang; Misbahuddin, Anjum

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Relatively little is known about the effects of deep brain stimulation on non-motor symptoms. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the impact of deep brain stimulation on sleep and olfactory function in Parkinson’s disease. Methods: Subjective sleep quality and olfactory testing were performed on 11 consecutive Parkinson’s disease patients (eight men and three women) undergoing bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation. All patients consented to undergo clinical assessments prior to the procedure, and at regular intervals afterwards. Results: Subjective sleep quality improved at six months following deep brain stimulation and this benefit was sustained in the majority of patients at later follow-up assessments. There was no significant change in olfactory function following deep brain stimulation. Conclusions: In addition to having beneficial effects on motor function and quality of life, bilateral subthalamic nucleus stimulation improves subjective sleep quality in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26535069

  9. Suppression and facilitation of auditory neurons through coordinated acoustic and midbrain stimulation: investigating a deep brain stimulator for tinnitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offutt, Sarah J.; Ryan, Kellie J.; Konop, Alexander E.; Lim, Hubert H.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. The inferior colliculus (IC) is the primary processing center of auditory information in the midbrain and is one site of tinnitus-related activity. One potential option for suppressing the tinnitus percept is through deep brain stimulation via the auditory midbrain implant (AMI), which is designed for hearing restoration and is already being implanted in deaf patients who also have tinnitus. However, to assess the feasibility of AMI stimulation for tinnitus treatment we first need to characterize the functional connectivity within the IC. Previous studies have suggested modulatory projections from the dorsal cortex of the IC (ICD) to the central nucleus of the IC (ICC), though the functional properties of these projections need to be determined. Approach. In this study, we investigated the effects of electrical stimulation of the ICD on acoustic-driven activity within the ICC in ketamine-anesthetized guinea pigs. Main Results. We observed ICD stimulation induces both suppressive and facilitatory changes across ICC that can occur immediately during stimulation and remain after stimulation. Additionally, ICD stimulation paired with broadband noise stimulation at a specific delay can induce greater suppressive than facilitatory effects, especially when stimulating in more rostral and medial ICD locations. Significance. These findings demonstrate that ICD stimulation can induce specific types of plastic changes in ICC activity, which may be relevant for treating tinnitus. By using the AMI with electrode sites positioned with the ICD and the ICC, the modulatory effects of ICD stimulation can be tested directly in tinnitus patients.

  10. State-dependent control of breathing by the retrotrapezoid nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Peter GR; Kanbar, Roy; Basting, Tyler M; Hodges, Walter M; Viar, Kenneth E; Stornetta, Ruth L; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2015-01-01

    Key points This study explores the state dependence of the hypercapnic ventilatory reflex (HCVR). We simulated an instantaneous increase or decrease of central chemoreceptor activity by activating or inhibiting the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) by optogenetics in conscious rats. During quiet wake or non-REM sleep, hypercapnia increased both breathing frequency (fR) and tidal volume (VT) whereas, in REM sleep, hypercapnia increased VT exclusively. Optogenetic inhibition of RTN reduced VT in all sleep–wake states, but reduced fR only during quiet wake and non-REM sleep. RTN stimulation always increased VT but raised fR only in quiet wake and non-REM sleep. Phasic RTN stimulation produced active expiration and reduced early expiratory airflow (i.e. increased upper airway resistance) only during wake. We conclude that the HCVR is highly state-dependent. The HCVR is reduced during REM sleep because fR is no longer under chemoreceptor control and thus could explain why central sleep apnoea is less frequent in REM sleep. Abstract Breathing has different characteristics during quiet wake, non-REM or REM sleep, including variable dependence on . We investigated whether the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a proton-sensitive structure that mediates a large portion of the hypercapnic ventilatory reflex, regulates breathing differently during sleep vs. wake. Electroencephalogram, neck electromyogram, blood pressure, respiratory frequency (fR) and tidal volume (VT) were recorded in 28 conscious adult male Sprague–Dawley rats. Optogenetic stimulation of RTN with channelrhodopsin-2, or inhibition with archaerhodopsin, simulated an instantaneous increase or decrease of central chemoreceptor activity. Both opsins were delivered with PRSX8-promoter-containing lentiviral vectors. RTN and catecholaminergic neurons were transduced. During quiet wake or non-REM sleep, hypercapnia (3 or 6% ) increased both fR and VT whereas, in REM sleep, hypercapnia increased VT exclusively. RTN

  11. The Fos expression in rat brain following electrical stimulation of dura mater surrounding the superior sagittal sinus changed with the pre-treatment of rizatriptan benzoate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Yu, Shengyuan; Dong, Zhao; Jiang, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Fos expression in the brain was systematically investigated by means of immunohistochemical staining after electrical stimulation of the dura mater surrounding the superior sagittal sinus in conscious rats. Fos-like immunoreactive neurons are distributed mainly in the upper cervical spinal cord, spinal trigeminal nucleus caudal part, raphe magnus nucleus, periaqueductal gray, ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, and mediodorsal thalamus nucleus. With the pre-treatment of intraperitoneal injection of rizatriptan benzoate, the number of Fos-like immunoreactive neurons decreased in the spinal trigeminal nucleus caudal part and raphe magnus nucleus, increased in the periaqueductal gray, and remained unchanged in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and mediodorsal thalamus nucleus. These results provide morphological evidence that the nuclei described above are involved in the development and maintenance of the trigeminovascular headache. PMID:20934408

  12. Effects of acute selective pudendal nerve electrical stimulation after simulated childbirth injury

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Bradley C.; Dissaranan, Charuspong; Zutshi, Massarat; Balog, Brian M.; Lin, Danli; Damaser, Margot S.

    2013-01-01

    During childbirth, a combinatorial injury occurs and can result in stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Simulated childbirth injury, consisting of vaginal distension (VD) and pudendal nerve crush (PNC), results in slowed recovery of continence, as well as decreased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a regenerative cytokine. Electrical stimulation has been shown to upregulate BDNF in motor neurons and facilitate axon regrowth through the increase of βII-tubulin expression after injury. In this study, female rats underwent selective pudendal nerve motor branch (PNMB) stimulation after simulated childbirth injury or sham injury to determine whether such stimulation affects bladder and anal function after injury and whether the stimulation increases BDNF expression in Onuf's nucleus after injury. Rats received 4 h of VD followed by bilateral PNC and 1 h of subthreshold electrical stimulation of the left PNMB and sham stimulation of the right PNMB. Rats underwent filling cystometry and anal pressure recording before, during, and after the stimulation. Bladder and anal contractile function were partially disrupted after injury. PNMB stimulation temporarily inhibited bladder contraction after injury. Two days and 1 wk after injury, BDNF expression in Onuf's nucleus of the stimulated side was significantly increased compared with the sham-stimulated side, whereas βII-tubulin expression in Onuf's nucleus of the stimulated side was significantly increased only 1 wk after injury. Acute electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve proximal to the crush site upregulates BDNF and βII-tubulin in Onuf's nucleus after simulated childbirth injury, which could be a potential preventive option for SUI after childbirth injury. PMID:23152293

  13. Computer program for parameterization of nucleus-nucleus electromagnetic dissociation cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Badavi, Forooz F.

    1988-01-01

    A computer subroutine parameterization of electromagnetic dissociation cross sections for nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented that is suitable for implementation in a heavy ion transport code. The only inputs required are the projectile kinetic energy and the projectile and target charge and mass numbers.

  14. A Model of Comet Nucleus Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, H. U.; Jorda, L.; Rickman, H.; Thomas, N.

    2000-10-01

    Modelling cometary rotation is of particular interest for the preparation of space missions to comets. For example, the mapping phase during the ROSETTA mission must be planned keeping in mind that, unlike most asteroids, the rotational state of most short-period comets might be complex (excited). The modelling of cometary nucleus rotation can also provide us with important parameters that are needed to interpret coma structures or to build time-dependent thermal models of the nucleus. We combine a general three-dimensional model for the nucleus shape, surface properties, and insolation with a simplified thermal model to calculate the local time-dependent activity and consequently the non-gravitational forces acting on the nucleus. The torque of this force is then used to numerically solve the forced Euler equations for a homogeneously outgassing irregularly-shaped cometary nucleus. We will discuss the results of our model for comets 46P/Wirtanen, the target of the ROSETTA mission, and 19P/Borrelly, the target of DEEP-SPACE 1 and derive some generalized inferences.

  15. Facilitation of the lordosis reflex of female rats from the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaff, D W; Sakuma, Y

    1979-01-01

    1. Effects of electrical stimulation of hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (v.m.n.) on the lordosis reflex of female rats were examined in ovariectomized and oestrogen-primed animals with chronically implanted electrodes. 2. Lordosis triggered either by manual cutaneous stimulation or by male mounting, was facilitated by electrical stimulation of the v.m.n. 3 A gradual increase in lordosis performance followed a relatively long period of stimulation; never less than 15 min and usually about 1 hr of stimulation was necessary for maximum facilitation. Following the termination of stimulation, the performance returned gradually to the control level during a 5--8 hr period. 4. The optimal frequency of stimulation was between 10 and 30 Hz. Threshold for effective facilitation was, on the average, 12.5 microA. 5. Stimulation tended to induce larger facilitation when applied to the lateral side of v.m.n. 6. Pre-treatment with oestrogen was necessary to obtain facilitation by v.m.n. stimulation. The threshold dosage of oestrogen was 2.5 microgram per animal. 7. Stimulation was effective in adrenalectomized rats, in dexamethasone-primed animals, and in rats pre-treated with exogenous progesterone. Thus, adrenal prodesterone release is not required for the v.m.n. facilitation of lordosis. 8. Medial preoptic stimulation with the same parameters suppressed the lordosis reflex. 9. The v.m.n. participates in the control of lordosis by a facilitatory output. The delay before facilitation implies that the v.m.n. is not in the direct reflex-arc for the execution of lordosis. Rather, a summation or interaction process with an unusually long time course is involved. PMID:469715

  16. On Parallel Streams through the Mouse Dorsal Lateral Geniculate Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Denman, Daniel J.; Contreras, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The mouse visual system is an emerging model for the study of cortical and thalamic circuit function. To maximize the usefulness of this model system, it is important to analyze the similarities and differences between the organization of all levels of the murid visual system with other, better studied systems (e.g., non-human primates and the domestic cat). While the understanding of mouse retina and cortex has expanded rapidly, less is known about mouse dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). Here, we study whether parallel processing streams exist in mouse dLGN. We use a battery of stimuli that have been previously shown to successfully distinguish parallel streams in other species: electrical stimulation of the optic chiasm, contrast-reversing stationary gratings at varying spatial phase, drifting sinusoidal gratings, dense noise for receptive field reconstruction, and frozen contrast-modulating noise. As in the optic nerves of domestic cats and non-human primates, we find evidence for multiple conduction velocity groups after optic chiasm stimulation. As in so-called “visual mammals”, we find a subpopulation of mouse dLGN cells showing non-linear spatial summation. However, differences in stimulus selectivity and sensitivity do not provide sufficient basis for identification of clearly distinct classes of relay cells. Nevertheless, consistent with presumptively homologous status of dLGNs of all mammals, there are substantial similarities between response properties of mouse dLGN neurons and those of cats and primates. PMID:27065811

  17. On Parallel Streams through the Mouse Dorsal Lateral Geniculate Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Denman, Daniel J; Contreras, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The mouse visual system is an emerging model for the study of cortical and thalamic circuit function. To maximize the usefulness of this model system, it is important to analyze the similarities and differences between the organization of all levels of the murid visual system with other, better studied systems (e.g., non-human primates and the domestic cat). While the understanding of mouse retina and cortex has expanded rapidly, less is known about mouse dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). Here, we study whether parallel processing streams exist in mouse dLGN. We use a battery of stimuli that have been previously shown to successfully distinguish parallel streams in other species: electrical stimulation of the optic chiasm, contrast-reversing stationary gratings at varying spatial phase, drifting sinusoidal gratings, dense noise for receptive field reconstruction, and frozen contrast-modulating noise. As in the optic nerves of domestic cats and non-human primates, we find evidence for multiple conduction velocity groups after optic chiasm stimulation. As in so-called "visual mammals", we find a subpopulation of mouse dLGN cells showing non-linear spatial summation. However, differences in stimulus selectivity and sensitivity do not provide sufficient basis for identification of clearly distinct classes of relay cells. Nevertheless, consistent with presumptively homologous status of dLGNs of all mammals, there are substantial similarities between response properties of mouse dLGN neurons and those of cats and primates. PMID:27065811

  18. Representation of interaural time difference in the central nucleus of the barn owl's inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Wagner, H; Takahashi, T; Konishi, M

    1987-10-01

    This paper investigates the role of the central nucleus of the barn owl's inferior colliculus in determination of the sound-source azimuth. The central nucleus contains many neurons that are sensitive to interaural time difference (ITD), the cue for azimuth in the barn owl. The response of these neurons varies in a cyclic manner with the ITD of a tone or noise burst. Response maxima recur at integer multiples of the period of the stimulating tone, or, if the stimulus is noise, at integer multiples of the period corresponding to the neuron's best frequency. Such neurons can signal, by means of their relative spike rate, the phase difference between the sounds reaching the left and right ears. Since an interaural phase difference corresponds to more than one ITD, these neurons represent ITD ambiguously. We call this phenomenon phase ambiguity. The central nucleus is tonotopically organized and its neurons are narrowly tuned to frequency. Neurons in an array perpendicular to isofrequency laminae form a physiological and anatomical unit; only one ITD, the array-specific ITD, activates all neurons in an array at the same relative level. We, therefore, may say that, in the central nucleus, an ITD is conserved in an array of neurons. Array-specific ITDs are mapped and encompass the entire auditory space of the barn owl. Individual space-specific neurons of the external nucleus, which receive inputs from a wide range of frequency channels (Knudsen and Konishi, 1978), are selective for a unique ITD. Space-specific neurons do not show phase ambiguity when stimulated with noise (Takahashi and Konishi, 1986). Space-specific neurons receive inputs from arrays that are selective for the same ITD. The collective response of the neurons in an array may be the basis for the absence of phase ambiguity in space-specific neurons. PMID:3668618

  19. [Postsynaptic reactions of cerebral cortex neurons, activated by nociceptive afferents during stimulation of the Raphe nuclei].

    PubMed

    Labakhua, T Sh; Dzhanashiia, T K; Gedevanishvili, G I; Dzhokhadze, L D; Tkemaladze, T T; Abzianidze, I V

    2012-01-01

    On cats, we studied the influence of stimulation of the Raphe nuclei (RN) on postsynaptic processes evoked in neurons of the somatosensory cortex by stimulation of nociceptive (intensive stimulation of the tooth pulp) and non-nociceptive (moderate stimulation of the ventroposteromedial--VPN--nucleus of the thalamus) afferent inputs. 6 cells, selectively excited by stimulation of nocciceptors and 9 cells, activated by both the above nociceptive and non-nociceptive influences (nociceptive and convergent neurons, respectively) were recorded intracellular. In neurons of both groups, responses to nociceptive stimulation (of sufficient intensity) looked like an EPSP-spike-IPSP (the letter of significant duration, up to 200-300 ms) compleх. Conditioning stimulation of the RN which preceded test stimulus applied to the tooth pulp or VPM nucleus by 100 to 800 ms, induced 40-60 % decrease of the IPSP amplitude only, while maхimal effect of influence, in both cases, was noted within intervals of 300-800 ms between conditioning and test stimulus. During stimulation of the RN, serotonin released via receptor and second messengers, provides postsynaptic modulation of GABAergic system, decreasing the IPSP amplitude which occurs after stimulation of both the tooth pulp and VPM thalamic nucleus. This process may be realized trough either pre- or postsynaptic mechanisms. PMID:22392784

  20. Protein quality control in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ramon D; Gardner, Richard G

    2016-06-01

    The nucleus is the repository for the eukaryotic cell's genetic blueprint, which must be protected from harm to ensure survival. Multiple quality control (QC) pathways operate in the nucleus to maintain the integrity of the DNA, the fidelity of the DNA code during replication, its transcription into mRNA, and the functional structure of the proteins that are required for DNA maintenance, mRNA transcription, and other important nuclear processes. Although we understand a great deal about DNA and RNA QC mechanisms, we know far less about nuclear protein quality control (PQC) mechanisms despite that fact that many human diseases are causally linked to protein misfolding in the nucleus. In this review, we discuss what is known about nuclear PQC and we highlight new questions that have emerged from recent developments in nuclear PQC studies. PMID:27015023

  1. Interpretive monitoring in the caudate nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Yanike, Marianna; Ferrera, Vincent P

    2014-01-01

    In a dynamic environment an organism has to constantly adjust ongoing behavior to adapt to a given context. This process requires continuous monitoring of ongoing behavior to provide its meaningful interpretation. The caudate nucleus is known to have a role in behavioral monitoring, but the nature of these signals during dynamic behavior is still unclear. We recorded neuronal activity in the caudate nucleus in monkeys during categorization behavior that changed rapidly across contexts. We found that neuronal activity maintained representation of the identity and context of a recently categorized stimulus, as well as interpreted the behavioral meaningfulness of the maintained trace. The accuracy of this cognitive monitoring signal was highest for behavior for which subjects were prone to make errors. Thus, the caudate nucleus provides interpretive monitoring of ongoing behavior, which is necessary for contextually specific decisions to adapt to rapidly changing conditions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03727.001 PMID:25415238

  2. Infrared neural stimulation: beam path in the guinea pig cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Laura E; Rajguru, Suhrud M; Matic, Agnella Izzo; Yerram, Nitin; Robinson, Alan M; Hwang, Margaret; Stock, Stuart; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2011-01-01

    It has been demonstrated INS can be utilized to stimulate spiral ganglion cells in the cochlea. Although neural stimulation can be achieved without direct contact of the radiation source and the tissue, the presence of fluids or bone between the target structure and the radiation source may lead to absorption or scattering of the radiation, which may limit the efficacy of INS. The present study demonstrates the neural structures in the radiation beam path that can be stimulated. Histological reconstructions and microCT of guinea pig cochleae stimulated with an infrared laser suggest that the orientation of the beam from the optical fiber determined the site of stimulation in the cochlea. Best frequencies of the INS-evoked neural responses obtained from the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus matched the histological sites in the spiral ganglion. PMID:21763410

  3. Theory of feedback controlled brain stimulations for Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzeni, A.; Celani, A.; Tiana, G.; Vergassola, M.

    2016-01-01

    Limb tremor and other debilitating symptoms caused by the neurodegenerative Parkinson's disease are currently treated by administering drugs and by fixed-frequency deep brain stimulation. The latter interferes directly with the brain dynamics by delivering electrical impulses to neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. While deep brain stimulation has shown therapeutic benefits in many instances, its mechanism is still unclear. Since its understanding could lead to improved protocols of stimulation and feedback control, we have studied a mathematical model of the many-body neural network dynamics controlling the dynamics of the basal ganglia. On the basis of the results obtained from the model, we propose a new procedure of active stimulation, that depends on the feedback of the network and that respects the constraints imposed by existing technology. We show by numerical simulations that the new protocol outperforms the standard ones for deep brain stimulation and we suggest future experiments that could further improve the feedback procedure.

  4. Tinnitus: Is there a place for brain stimulation?

    PubMed Central

    van Zwieten, Gusta; Smit, Jasper V.; Jahanshahi, Ali; Temel, Yasin; Stokroos, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Tinnitus is the perception of a “phantom sound” and has a high prevalence. Although many therapies have been investigated within the last decades, there is still no effective standard therapy. Animal studies and human functional imaging studies revealed that tinnitus perception is associated with many complex changes in multiple brain structures. There is growing evidence that brain stimulation might be able to interrupt the local altered neuronal activity and hereby inhibit tinnitus perception. In this editorial review, an update is given on the most promising targets for brain stimulation. Promising structures for stimulation are the dorsal cochlear nucleus, the inferior colliculus and the medial geniculate body of the thalamus. For cortical stimulation, the auditory cortex is considered as a target. Nevertheless, the field is waiting for evidence from well-designed clinical trials, based on supporting evidence from experimental/mechanistic research, to support or discourage the application of brain stimulation in tinnitus. PMID:26958429

  5. Cortically evoked responses of superior salivary nucleus neurons in the cat.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, K; Murakami, T

    1989-01-01

    Salivation can be controlled by the inputs from the cerebral cortex as well as from the sensory nerves. However, there has been no detailed report so far on the inputs to superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) neurons from the cerebral cortex. The responses of SSN neurons to electrical stimulation of orbital and coronal gyri were investigated in ketamine anesthetized cats. A total of 56 SSN neurons were identified by the antidromic spike responses to stimulation of the right chorda tympani nerve. Their responsiveness to stimulation of the orbital and anterior coronal gyri and the lingual nerve at the ipsilateral side was tested. Thirty-five neurons (63%) responded with spikes to stimulation of the orbital and/or coronal gyri. They were also activated by stimulation of the lingual nerve. Other eleven neurons (20%) received the inputs from the lingual nerve only. The remaining 10 neurons (17%) failed to respond to stimulation of either the cerebral cortex or the lingual nerve. The mean latencies of the responses to stimulation of the orbital gyrus, coronal gyrus and lingual nerve were 29.0 ms (n = 28), 22.7 ms (n = 33) and 10.2 ms (n = 46), respectively. In this study, the excitatory inputs converging from the cerebral cortex and the lingual nerve, found in 63% of SSN neurons, could play an important role in submandibular and sublingual salivation. Cortically induced salivation, in particular, may be involved in salivary secretion in the conditioned reflexes as well as in mastication. PMID:2635781

  6. Radiant energy required for infrared neural stimulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tan, Xiaodong; Rajguru, Suhrud; Young, Hunter; Xia, Nan; Stock, Stuart R.; Xiao, Xianghui; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-08-25

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has been proposed as an alternative method to electrical stimulation because of its spatial selective stimulation. Independent of the mechanism for INS, to translate the method into a device it is important to determine the energy for stimulation required at the target structure. Custom-designed, flat and angle polished fibers, were used to deliver the photons. By rotating the angle polished fibers, the orientation of the radiation beam in the cochlea could be changed. INS-evoked compound action potentials and single unit responses in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) were recorded. X-ray computed tomography wasmore » used to determine the orientation of the optical fiber. Maximum responses were observed when the radiation beam was directed towards the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), whereas little responses were seen when the beam was directed towards the basilar membrane. The radiant exposure required at the SGNs to evoke compound action potentials (CAPs) or ICC responses was on average 18.9 ± 12.2 or 10.3 ± 4.9 mJ/cm2, respectively. For cochlear INS it has been debated whether the radiation directly stimulates the SGNs or evokes a photoacoustic effect. The results support the view that a direct interaction between neurons and radiation dominates the response to INS.« less

  7. Radiant energy required for infrared neural stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Xiaodong; Rajguru, Suhrud; Young, Hunter; Xia, Nan; Stock, Stuart R.; Xiao, Xianghui; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-08-25

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has been proposed as an alternative method to electrical stimulation because of its spatial selective stimulation. Independent of the mechanism for INS, to translate the method into a device it is important to determine the energy for stimulation required at the target structure. Custom-designed, flat and angle polished fibers, were used to deliver the photons. By rotating the angle polished fibers, the orientation of the radiation beam in the cochlea could be changed. INS-evoked compound action potentials and single unit responses in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) were recorded. X-ray computed tomography was used to determine the orientation of the optical fiber. Maximum responses were observed when the radiation beam was directed towards the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), whereas little responses were seen when the beam was directed towards the basilar membrane. The radiant exposure required at the SGNs to evoke compound action potentials (CAPs) or ICC responses was on average 18.9 ± 12.2 or 10.3 ± 4.9 mJ/cm2, respectively. For cochlear INS it has been debated whether the radiation directly stimulates the SGNs or evokes a photoacoustic effect. The results support the view that a direct interaction between neurons and radiation dominates the response to INS.

  8. Radiant energy required for infrared neural stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaodong; Rajguru, Suhrud; Young, Hunter; Xia, Nan; Stock, Stuart R.; Xiao, Xianghui; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has been proposed as an alternative method to electrical stimulation because of its spatial selective stimulation. Independent of the mechanism for INS, to translate the method into a device it is important to determine the energy for stimulation required at the target structure. Custom-designed, flat and angle polished fibers, were used to deliver the photons. By rotating the angle polished fibers, the orientation of the radiation beam in the cochlea could be changed. INS-evoked compound action potentials and single unit responses in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) were recorded. X-ray computed tomography was used to determine the orientation of the optical fiber. Maximum responses were observed when the radiation beam was directed towards the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), whereas little responses were seen when the beam was directed towards the basilar membrane. The radiant exposure required at the SGNs to evoke compound action potentials (CAPs) or ICC responses was on average 18.9 ± 12.2 or 10.3 ± 4.9 mJ/cm2, respectively. For cochlear INS it has been debated whether the radiation directly stimulates the SGNs or evokes a photoacoustic effect. The results support the view that a direct interaction between neurons and radiation dominates the response to INS. PMID:26305106

  9. Uncovering the Nucleus Candidate for NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günthardt, G. I.; Agüero, M. P.; Camperi, J. A.; Díaz, R. J.; Gomez, P. L.; Bosch, G.; Schirmer, M.

    2015-11-01

    NGC 253 is the nearest spiral galaxy with a nuclear starburst that becomes the best candidate for studying the relationship between starburst and active galactic nucleus activity. However, this central region is veiled by large amounts of dust, and it has been so far unclear which is the true dynamical nucleus to the point that there is no strong evidence that the galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole co-evolving with the starburst as was supposed earlier. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, especially NIR emission line analysis, could be advantageous in shedding light on the true nucleus identity. Using Flamingos-2 at Gemini South we have taken deep K-band spectra along the major axis of the central structure and through the brightest infrared source. In this work, we present evidence showing that the brightest NIR and mid-infrared source in the central region, already known as radio source TH7 and so far considered just a large stellar supercluster, in fact presents various symptoms of a genuine galactic nucleus. Therefore, it should be considered a valid nucleus candidate. Mentioning some distinctive aspects, it is the most massive compact infrared object in the central region, located at 2.″0 of the symmetry center of the galactic bar, as measured in the K-band emission. Moreover, our data indicate that this object is surrounded by a large circumnuclear stellar disk and it is also located at the rotation center of the large molecular gas disk of NGC 253. Furthermore, a kinematic residual appears in the H2 rotation curve with a sinusoidal shape consistent with an outflow centered in the candidate nucleus position. The maximum outflow velocity is located about 14 pc from TH7, which is consistent with the radius of a shell detected around the nucleus candidate, observed at 18.3 μm (Qa) and 12.8 μm ([Ne ii]) with T-ReCS. Also, the Brγ emission line profile shows a pronounced blueshift and this emission line also has the highest equivalent width at this

  10. Sigma-nucleus potential in A=28.

    PubMed

    Noumi, H; Saha, P K; Abe, D; Ajimura, S; Aoki, K; Bhang, H C; Endo, T; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, T; Guo, H C; Imai, K; Hashimoto, O; Hotchi, H; Kim, E H; Kim, J H; Kishimoto, T; Krutenkova, A; Maeda, K; Nagae, T; Nakamura, M; Outa, H; Sekimoto, M; Saito, T; Sakaguchi, A; Sato, Y; Sawafta, R; Shimizu, Y; Takahashi, T; Tang, L; Tamura, H; Tanida, K; Watanabe, T; Xia, H H; Zhou, S H; Zhu, L H; Zhu, X F

    2002-08-12

    We have studied the (pi(-),K+) reaction on a silicon target to investigate the sigma-nucleus potential. The inclusive spectrum was measured at a beam momentum of 1.2 GeV/c with an energy resolution of 3.3 MeV (FWHM) by employing the superconducting kaon spectrometer system. The spectrum was compared with theoretical calculations within the framework of the distorted-wave impulse approximation, which demonstrates that a strongly repulsive sigma-nucleus potential with a nonzero size of the imaginary part reproduces the observed spectrum. PMID:12190516

  11. Nucleus model for periodic Comet Tempel 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    1991-01-01

    Observational data obtained primarily during 1988 are analyzed and synthesized to develop a comprehensive physical model for the nucleus of Periodic Comet Tempel 2, one of the best studied members of Jupiter's family of short-period comets. It is confirmed that a previous investigation provided reliable information on the comet's spin-axis orientation, which implies and obliquity of 54 degrees of the orbit plane to the equatorial plane and which appears to have varied little - if at all - with time. This conclusion is critical for fitting a triaxial ellipsoid to approximate the figure of the nucleus.

  12. Hydrated nucleus pulposus herniation in seven dogs.

    PubMed

    Manunta, M L; Evangelisti, M A; Bergknut, N; Grinwis, G C M; Ballocco, I; Meij, B P

    2015-03-01

    The clinical signs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, treatment and follow-up in seven dogs with hydrated nucleus pulposus extrusion (HNPE) are reported. All dogs had tetraparesis or tetraplegia. T2-weighted MRI revealed extradural hyperintense homogeneous material compressing the cervical spinal cord. After conservative treatment (five dogs) or surgical decompression (two dogs), all dogs returned to ambulatory function within 1 month. Follow-up MRI in conservatively treated dogs revealed complete disappearance of the extruded material. Histopathological examination of surgical specimens confirmed that the retrieved material was extruded nucleus pulposus with evidence of early degeneration. PMID:25599897

  13. Transcutaneous induction of stimulus-timing-dependent plasticity in dorsal cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Calvin; Martel, David T.; Shore, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    The cochlear nucleus (CN) is the first site of multisensory integration in the ascending auditory pathway. The principal output neurons of the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), fusiform cells, receive somatosensory information relayed by the CN granule cells from the trigeminal and dorsal column pathways. Integration of somatosensory and auditory inputs results in long-term enhancement or suppression in a stimulus-timing-dependent manner. Here, we demonstrate that stimulus-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) can be induced in DCN fusiform cells using paired auditory and transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the face and neck to activate trigeminal and dorsal column pathways to the CN, respectively. Long-lasting changes in fusiform cell firing rates persisted for up to 2 h after this bimodal stimulation, and followed Hebbian or anti-Hebbian rules, depending on tone duration, but not somatosensory stimulation location: 50 ms paired tones evoked predominantly Hebbian, while 10 ms paired tones evoked predominantly anti-Hebbian plasticity. The tone-duration-dependent STDP was strongly correlated with first inter-spike intervals, implicating intrinsic cellular properties as determinants of STDP. This study demonstrates that transcutaneous stimulation with precise auditory–somatosensory timing parameters can non-invasively induce fusiform cell long-term modulation, which could be harnessed in the future to moderate tinnitus-related hyperactivity in DCN. PMID:26321928

  14. Reversing cognitive-motor impairments in Parkinson's disease patients using a computational modelling approach to deep brain stimulation programming.

    PubMed

    Frankemolle, Anneke M M; Wu, Jennifer; Noecker, Angela M; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Ho, Jason C; Vitek, Jerrold L; McIntyre, Cameron C; Alberts, Jay L

    2010-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation in the subthalamic nucleus is an effective and safe surgical procedure that has been shown to reduce the motor dysfunction of patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation, however, has been associated with declines in cognitive and cognitive-motor functioning. It has been hypothesized that spread of current to nonmotor areas of the subthalamic nucleus may be responsible for declines in cognitive and cognitive-motor functioning. The aim of this study was to assess the cognitive-motor performance in advanced Parkinson's disease patients with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation parameters determined clinically (Clinical) to settings derived from a patient-specific computational model (Model). Data were collected from 10 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease bilaterally implanted with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation systems. These patients were assessed off medication and under three deep brain stimulation conditions: Off, Clinical or Model based stimulation. Clinical stimulation parameters had been determined based on clinical evaluations and were stable for at least 6 months prior to study participation. Model-based parameters were selected to minimize the spread of current to nonmotor portions of the subthalamic nucleus using Cicerone Deep Brain Stimulation software. For each stimulation condition, participants performed a working memory (n-back task) and motor task (force tracking) under single- and dual-task settings. During the dual-task, participants performed the n-back and force-tracking tasks simultaneously. Clinical and Model parameters were equally effective in improving the Unified Parkinson's disease Rating Scale III scores relative to Off deep brain stimulation scores. Single-task working memory declines, in the 2-back condition, were significantly less under Model compared with Clinical deep brain stimulation settings. Under dual-task conditions, force

  15. Projections of the sensory trigeminal nucleus in a percomorph teleost, tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Xue, Hao-Gang; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Yang, Chun-Ying; Kerem, Gulnisa; Yoshimoto, Masami; Sawai, Nobuhiko; Ito, Hironobu; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2006-03-20

    The sensory trigeminal nucleus of teleosts is the rostralmost nucleus among the trigeminal sensory nuclear group in the rhombencephalon. The sensory trigeminal nucleus is known to receive the somatosensory afferents of the ophthalmic, maxillar, and mandibular nerves. However, the central connections of the sensory trigeminal nucleus remain unclear. Efferents of the sensory trigeminal nucleus were examined by means of tract-tracing methods, in a percomorph teleost, tilapia. After tracer injections to the sensory trigeminal nucleus, labeled terminals were seen bilaterally in the ventromedial thalamic nucleus, periventricular pretectal nucleus, medial part of preglomerular nucleus, stratum album centrale of the optic tectum, ventrolateral nucleus of the semicircular torus, lateral valvular nucleus, prethalamic nucleus, tegmentoterminal nucleus, and superior and inferior reticular formation, with preference for the contralateral side. Labeled terminals were also found bilaterally in the oculomotor nucleus, trochlear nucleus, trigeminal motor nucleus, facial motor nucleus, facial lobe, descending trigeminal nucleus, medial funicular nucleus, and contralateral sensory trigeminal nucleus and inferior olive. Labeled terminals in the oculomotor nucleus and trochlear nucleus showed similar densities on both sides of the brain. However, labelings in the trigeminal motor nucleus, facial motor nucleus, facial lobe, descending trigeminal nucleus, and medial funicular nucleus showed a clear ipsilateral dominance. Reciprocal tracer injection experiments to the ventromedial thalamic nucleus, optic tectum, and semicircular torus resulted in labeled cell bodies in the sensory trigeminal nucleus, with a few also in the descending trigeminal nucleus. PMID:16440296

  16. Nucleus-nucleus interactions between 20 and 65 GeV per nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Meegan, C. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Roberts, F. E.; Watts, J. W.; Oda, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Jones, W. V.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid electronic-counter/emulsion-chamber instrument was exposed to high-energy cosmic rays on a balloon. The data on 105 nucleus-nucleus collisions in the energy range 20-65 GeV/nucleon and for incident nuclear charges Zp in the range of 22 to 28 are presented. Inclusive characteristics of particle production on different targets (plastic, emulsion, and lead) are shown and compared with models based on the superposition of nucleon-nucleus interactions. Features of a subset of the more central collisions with a plastic target and some characteristics of individual events with the highest multiplicity of produced particles are described.

  17. PRESYNAPTIC DOPAMINE MODULATION BY STIMULANT SELF ADMINISTRATION

    PubMed Central

    España, Rodrigo A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine system is an essential participant in the initiation and modulation of various forms of goal-directed behavior, including drug reinforcement and addiction processes. Dopamine neurotransmission is increased by acute administration of all drugs of abuse, including the stimulants cocaine and amphetamine. Chronic exposure to these drugs via voluntary self-administration provides a model of stimulant abuse that is useful in evaluating potential behavioral and neurochemical adaptations that occur during addiction. This review describes commonly used methodologies to measure dopamine and baseline parameters of presynaptic dopamine regulation, including exocytotic release and reuptake through the dopamine transporter in the nucleus accumbens core, as well as dramatic adaptations in dopamine neurotransmission and drug sensitivity that occur with acute non-contingent and chronic, contingent self-administration of cocaine and amphetamine. PMID:23277050

  18. Compound nucleus studies withy reverse kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.

    1985-06-01

    Reverse kinematics reactions are used to demonstrate the compound nucleus origin of intermediate mass particles at low energies and the extension of the same mechanism at higher energies. No evidence has appeared in our energy range for liquid-vapor equilibrium or cold fragmentation mechanisms. 11 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholberg, Kate

    2015-05-01

    I describe physics potential and experimental prospects for coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS), a process which has not yet been observed. Germanium- based detectors represent a promising technology for CEvNS experiments. I focus primarily on stopped-pion neutrino sources.

  20. Transport model of nucleon-nucleus reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    A simplified model of nucleon-nucleus reaction is developed and some of its properties are examined. Comparisons with proton production measured for targets of Al-27, Ni-58, Zr-90, and Bi-209 show some hope for developing an accurate model for these complex reactions. It is suggested that binding effects are the next step required for further development.

  1. The Checkerboard Model of the Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Theodore

    2015-04-01

    The Checker Board Model (CBM) of the nucleus and the associated extended standard model predicts that nature has 5 generations of quarks not 3 and that Nucleus is 2 dimensional. The CBM theory began with an insight into the structure of the He nucleus around the year 1989. Details of how this theory evolved which took many years, and is found on my web site (http://checkerboard.dnsalias.net) or in the following references One independent check of this model is that the wavelength of the ``up'' quark orbiting inside the proton at 84.8123% the speed of light (around the ``dn'' quark in the center of the proton) turns out to be exactly one de Broglie wavelength something determined after the mass and speed of the up quark were determined by other means. This theory explains the mass of the proton and neutron and their magnetic moments and this along with the beautiful symmetric 2D structure of the He nucleus led to the evolution of this theory. When this theory was first presented at Argonne in 1996, it was the first time that anyone had predicted the quarks orbited inside the proton at relativistic speeds and it was met with skepticism.

  2. The Nucleus and the Simple Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Brian J.

    1982-01-01

    The 150th anniversary of the naming of the nucleus by Robert Brown in 1831 was commemorated by re-creating some of his most important observations using two of his microscopes. Comments on Brown's career and the microtechnique employed during his time are provided. (Author/JN)

  3. Nucleon-nucleus interactions from JACEE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Results on hadron-nucleus interactions from the Japanese-American Cooperation Emulsion Experiment experiment are presented. Angular distributions for charged particles, and angular and transverse momentum spectra for photons have been measured for a sample of events with sigma epsilon sub gamma. Results on central rapidity density and transverse energy flow are discussed.

  4. GABAA receptor antagonism at the hypoglossal motor nucleus increases genioglossus muscle activity in NREM but not REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Janna L; Sood, Sandeep; Liu, Hattie; Park, Eileen; Nolan, Philip; Horner, Richard L

    2003-04-15

    The pharyngeal muscles, such as the genioglossus (GG) muscle of the tongue, are important for effective lung ventilation since they maintain an open airspace. Rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, however, recruits powerful neural mechanisms that can abolish GG activity, even during strong reflex respiratory stimulation by elevated CO2. In vitro studies have demonstrated the presence of GABAA receptors on hypoglossal motoneurons, and these and other data have led to the speculation that GABAA mechanisms may contribute to the suppression of hypoglossal motor outflow to the GG muscle in REM sleep. We have developed an animal model that allows us to chronically manipulate neurotransmission at the hypoglossal motor nucleus using microdialysis across natural sleep-wake states in rats. The present study tests the hypothesis that microdialysis perfusion of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline into the hypoglossal motor nucleus will prevent the suppression of GG muscle activity in REM sleep during both room-air and CO2-stimulated breathing. Ten rats were implanted with electroencephalogram and neck muscle electrodes to record sleep-wake states, and GG and diaphragm electrodes for respiratory muscle recording. Microdialysis probes were implanted into the hypoglossal motor nucleus for perfusion of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) or 100 microM bicuculline during room-air and CO2-stimulated breathing (7 % inspired CO2). GABAA receptor antagonism at the hypoglossal motor nucleus increased respiratory-related GG activity during both room-air (P = 0.01) and CO2-stimulated breathing (P = 0.007), indicating a background inhibitory GABA tone. However, the effects of bicuculline on GG activity depended on the prevailing sleep-wake state (P < 0.005), with bicuculline increasing GG activity in non-REM (NREM) sleep and wakefulness both in room air and hypercapnia (P < 0.01), but GG activity was effectively abolished in those REM periods without phasic twitches in the GG muscle

  5. Optical Stimulation of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Alexander C.; Stoddart, Paul R.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2014-01-01

    Our capacity to interface with the nervous system remains overwhelmingly reliant on electrical stimulation devices, such as electrode arrays and cuff electrodes that can stimulate both central and peripheral nervous systems. However, electrical stimulation has to deal with multiple challenges, including selectivity, spatial resolution, mechanical stability, implant-induced injury and the subsequent inflammatory response. Optical stimulation techniques may avoid some of these challenges by providing more selective stimulation, higher spatial resolution and reduced invasiveness of the device, while also avoiding the electrical artefacts that complicate recordings of electrically stimulated neuronal activity. This review explores the current status of optical stimulation techniques, including optogenetic methods, photoactive molecule approaches and infrared neural stimulation, together with emerging techniques such as hybrid optical-electrical stimulation, nanoparticle enhanced stimulation and optoelectric methods. Infrared neural stimulation is particularly emphasised, due to the potential for direct activation of neural tissue by infrared light, as opposed to techniques that rely on the introduction of exogenous light responsive materials. However, infrared neural stimulation remains imperfectly understood, and techniques for accurately delivering light are still under development. While the various techniques reviewed here confirm the overall feasibility of optical stimulation, a number of challenges remain to be overcome before they can deliver their full potential. PMID:26322269

  6. The projection of joint receptors to the cuneate nucleus in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Tracey, D J

    1980-01-01

    1. Records were made from axons in the dorsal columns and cells in the cuneate nucleus which responded to stimulation of the wrist joint nerve. 2. A sample of twenty-five axons activated by the wrist joint nerve was recorded in the dorsal columns at the level of the third cervical segment. All twenty-five were post-synaptic fibres as judged by response latency, burst length, and maximum frequency of following. Nineteen of the twenty-five had convergent inputs from the wrist joint nerve and the cutaneous superficial radial nerve. 3. While no primary wrist joint afferent fibres were recorded in the dorsal columns, their presence was demonstrated by recording single units in the wrist joint nerve which were antidromically activated by microstimulation in the cuneate fasciculus. 4. The majority of cells recorded in the cuneate nucleus were activated not only by stimulation of joint afferents, but also by skin and muscle afferent fibres. 5. About half of the cells in the cuneate nucleus responded to wrist movement in animals with partially denervated forelimbs, where the intact wrist joint nerve was the only afferent channel providing information about natural, imposed wrist movements. The majority of the cells had phasic responses, which were weak and irregular in comparison with the responses of primary wrist joint afferents to the same movements. 6. Only two of thirty-four cells tested could be shown to project directly to the ventrobasal thalamus, using collision of antidromic and peripherally activated impulses as the criterion. PMID:7441563

  7. Subthalamic nucleus phase–amplitude coupling correlates with motor impairment in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    van Wijk, Bernadette C.M.; Beudel, Martijn; Jha, Ashwani; Oswal, Ashwini; Foltynie, Tom; Hariz, Marwan I.; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Aziz, Tipu Z.; Green, Alexander L.; Brown, Peter; Litvak, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Objective High-amplitude beta band oscillations within the subthalamic nucleus are frequently associated with Parkinson’s disease but it is unclear how they might lead to motor impairments. Here we investigate a likely pathological coupling between the phase of beta band oscillations and the amplitude of high-frequency oscillations around 300 Hz. Methods We analysed an extensive data set comprising resting-state recordings obtained from deep brain stimulation electrodes in 33 patients before and/or after taking dopaminergic medication. We correlated mean values of spectral power and phase–amplitude coupling with severity of hemibody bradykinesia/rigidity. In addition, we used simultaneously recorded magnetoencephalography to look at functional interactions between the subthalamic nucleus and ipsilateral motor cortex. Results Beta band power and phase–amplitude coupling within the subthalamic nucleus correlated positively with severity of motor impairment. This effect was more pronounced within the low-beta range, whilst coherence between subthalamic nucleus and motor cortex was dominant in the high-beta range. Conclusions We speculate that the beta band might impede pro-kinetic high-frequency activity patterns when phase–amplitude coupling is prominent. Furthermore, results provide evidence for a functional subdivision of the beta band into low and high frequencies. Significance Our findings contribute to the interpretation of oscillatory activity within the cortico-basal ganglia circuit. PMID:26971483

  8. Dendritic geometry shapes neuronal cAMP signalling to the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lu; Gervasi, Nicolas; Girault, Jean-Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Neurons have complex dendritic trees, receiving numerous inputs at various distances from the cell body. Yet the rules of molecular signal propagation from dendrites to nuclei are unknown. DARPP-32 is a phosphorylation-regulated signalling hub in striatal output neurons. We combine diffusion-reaction modelling and live imaging to investigate cAMP-activated DARPP-32 signalling to the nucleus. The model predicts maximal effects on the nucleus of cAMP production in secondary dendrites, due to segmental decrease of dendrite diameter. Variations in branching, perikaryon size or spines have less pronounced effects. Biosensor kinase activity measurement following cAMP or dopamine uncaging confirms these predictions. Histone 3 phosphorylation, regulated by this pathway, is best stimulated by cAMP released in secondary-like dendrites. Thus, unexpectedly, the efficacy of diffusion-based signalling from dendrites to nucleus is not inversely proportional to the distance. We suggest a general mechanism by which dendritic geometry counterbalances the effect of dendritic distance for signalling to the nucleus. PMID:25692798

  9. Thyroid hormones regulate levels of thyrotropin-releasing-hormone mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Koller, K.J.; Wolff, R.S.; Warden, M.K.; Zoeller, R.T.

    1987-10-01

    Cellular levels of messenger RNA encoding thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) were measured in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the reticular nucleus of the thalamus in male rats after chemical thyroidectomy and thyroid hormone, replacement. TRH mRNA levels were measured by quantitative in situ hybridization histochemistry using a /sup 35/S-labeled synthetic 48-base oligodeoxynucleotide probe and quantitative autoradiography. Chemical thyroidectomy, produced by the administration of 6-(n-propyl)-2-thiouracil (PrSur), reduced plasma thyroxine below detection limits and significantly increased TRH mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus. Treatments with exogenous L-triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) reduced TRH mRNA to the same level in both hypothyroid and euthyroid animals. Neither PrSur treatment nor T/sub 3/ replacement influenced TRH mRNA levels in the reticular nucleus of the thalamus. Blot hybridization analysis of electrophoretically fractionated total RNA from pituitaries of these animals indicated that thyrotropin-..beta.. mRNA levels were elevated after thyroidectomy and reduced by T/sub 3/ treatment, showing that the pituitary-thyroid axis was indeed stimulated by PrSur treatment. These results suggest that thyroid hormones are involved, either directly or indirectly, in regulating the biosynthesis of TRH in the thyrotropic center of the hypothalamus.

  10. miR-21 promotes human nucleus pulposus cell proliferation through PTEN/AKT signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongzhe; Huang, Xiangwang; Liu, Xiangyang; Xiao, Sheng; Zhang, Yi; Xiang, Tiecheng; Shen, Xiongjie; Wang, Guoping; Sheng, Bin

    2014-01-01

    The precise role of nucleus pulposus cell proliferation in the pathogenesis of intervertebral disc degeneration remains to be elucidated. Recent findings have revealed that microRNAs, a class of small noncoding RNAs, may regulate cell proliferation in many pathological conditions. Here, we showed that miR-21 was significantly upregulated in degenerative nucleus pulposus tissues when compared with nucleus pulposus tissues that were isolated from patients with idiopathic scoliosis and that miR-10b levels were associated with disc degeneration grade. Moreover, bioinformatics target prediction identified PTEN as a putative target of miR-21. miR-21 inhibited PTEN expression by directly targeting the 3'UTR, and this inhibition was abolished through miR-21 binding site mutations. miR-21 overexpression stimulated cell proliferation and AKT signaling pathway activation, which led to cyclin D1 translation. Additionally, the increase in proliferation and cyclin D1 expression induced by miR-21 overexpression was almost completely blocked by Ly294002, an AKT inhibitor. Taken together, aberrant miR-21 upregulation in intervertebral disc degeneration could target PTEN, which would contribute to abnormal nucleus pulposus cell proliferation through derepressing the Akt pathway. Our study also underscores the potential of miR-21 and the PTEN/Akt pathway as novel therapeutic targets in intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:24603539

  11. miR-21 Promotes Human Nucleus Pulposus Cell Proliferation through PTEN/AKT Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongzhe; Huang, Xiangwang; Liu, Xiangyang; Xiao, Sheng; Zhang, Yi; Xiang, Tiecheng; Shen, Xiongjie; Wang, Guoping; Sheng, Bin

    2014-01-01

    The precise role of nucleus pulposus cell proliferation in the pathogenesis of intervertebral disc degeneration remains to be elucidated. Recent findings have revealed that microRNAs, a class of small noncoding RNAs, may regulate cell proliferation in many pathological conditions. Here, we showed that miR-21 was significantly upregulated in degenerative nucleus pulposus tissues when compared with nucleus pulposus tissues that were isolated from patients with idiopathic scoliosis and that miR-10b levels were associated with disc degeneration grade. Moreover, bioinformatics target prediction identified PTEN as a putative target of miR-21. miR-21 inhibited PTEN expression by directly targeting the 3′UTR, and this inhibition was abolished through miR-21 binding site mutations. miR-21 overexpression stimulated cell proliferation and AKT signaling pathway activation, which led to cyclin D1 translation. Additionally, the increase in proliferation and cyclin D1 expression induced by miR-21 overexpression was almost completely blocked by Ly294002, an AKT inhibitor. Taken together, aberrant miR-21 upregulation in intervertebral disc degeneration could target PTEN, which would contribute to abnormal nucleus pulposus cell proliferation through derepressing the Akt pathway. Our study also underscores the potential of miR-21 and the PTEN/Akt pathway as novel therapeutic targets in intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:24603539

  12. ACTH (cosyntropin) stimulation test

    MedlinePlus

    ... The ACTH stimulation test measures how well the adrenal glands respond to adrenocorticotropic hormone ( ACTH ). ACTH is a ... produced in the pituitary gland that stimulates the adrenal glands to release a hormone called cortisol. How the ...

  13. Heavy-flavour dynamics in proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardi, M.; Beraudo, A.; De Pace, A.; Monteno, M.; Prino, F.

    2016-01-01

    We present recent results for heavy-quark observables in nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC energies, obtained by the POWLANG transport setup. The initial creation of c c ¯ and b b ¯ pairs is simulated with a perturbative QCD approach (POWHEG+PYTHIA) and validated through comparison to experimental data of proton-proton collisions. In the nucleus-nucleus case, the propagation of the heavy quarks in the plasma is studied with the relativistic Langevin equation, here solved using weak-coupling transport-coefficients. Successively, the heavy quarks hadronize in the medium. We compute the nuclear modification factor RAA and the elliptic flow v2 of the final D mesons, as well as D - h correlations, and compare our results to experimental data from the ALICE and CMS Collaborations.

  14. Ethanol intake is increased by injection of galanin in the paraventricular nucleus and reduced by a galanin antagonist.

    PubMed

    Rada, Pedro; Avena, Nicole M; Leibowitz, Sarah F; Hoebel, Bartley G

    2004-06-01

    Ethanol intake stimulates expression of galanin in several hypothalamic sites, including the paraventricular nucleus. Because injection of galanin in the paraventricular nucleus induces eating, we hypothesized that galanin might also affect ethanol intake. Rats were given ad libitum access to 4% ethanol for 4 weeks and assigned to one of two groups according to levels of ethanol consumption: high levels (>1.5 g/ kg/day) or low levels (<1.0 g/kg/day). In Experiment 1, galanin (1.0 nmol) or Ringer's solution was injected unilaterally into the paraventricular nucleus, with food and water absent during the first 4 h. Galanin significantly increased ethanol intake only in rats that drank high levels of ethanol. In Experiment 2, injection of galanin (0.5 and 1.0 nmol) in the paraventricular nucleus dose-dependently increased ethanol intake with food and water available. The higher dose was also effective in eliciting ethanol intake when tested with food and water absent. In Experiment 3, a test of receptor specificity was provided by injecting rats with the galanin antagonist M-40 (0.5 nmol) or Ringer's solution. Injection of M-40 in the paraventricular nucleus significantly decreased ethanol consumption. In Experiment 4, an anatomic control, with galanin injected 2 mm dorsal to the paraventricular nucleus in the same animals, caused no change in ethanol intake. In conclusion, injection of galanin in the paraventricular nucleus, at a dose known to induce feeding, acted by means of a galanin receptor to potentiate intake of 4% ethanol, even with food and water available as alternate sources of calories and fluid, respectively. Because ethanol can increase expression of galanin mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus, this could set the stage for a positive feedback loop between galanin and ethanol intake. PMID:15528006

  15. Average transverse momentum and energy density in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Emulsion chambers were used to measure the transverse momenta of photons or pi(0) mesons produced in high-energy cosmic-ray nucleus-nucleus collisions. A group of events having large average transverse momenta has been found which apparently exceeds the expected limiting values. Analysis of the events at early interaction times, of the order of 1 fm/c, indicates that the observed transverse momentum increases with both rapidity density and energy density.

  16. Results on ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions from balloon-borne emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W.; Meegan, C. A.; Takahashi, Y.; Watts, J. W.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.

    1985-01-01

    The results of balloon-borne emulsion-chamber measurements on high-energy cosmic-ray nuclei (Burnett et al., 1983) are summarized in tables and graphs and briefly characterized. Special consideration is given to seven nucleus-nucleus interaction events at energy in excess of 1 TeV/A with multiplicity greater than 400, and to Fe interactions (53 with CHO, 10 with emulsion, and 14 with Pb) at 20-60 GeV/A.

  17. Applicability of fluid-dynamical modeling of nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazineh, Dean; Auvinen, Jussi; Nahrgang, Marlene; Bass, Steffen

    2015-10-01

    At sufficiently high temperatures and densities, similar to the conditions found in the early universe, QCD matter forms a deconfined state called the quark gluon plasma (QGP). This state of matter can be created in collisions of ultra-relativistic heavy-ions, and RHIC data suggests that this QGP behaves similar to an ideal fluid. Viscous relativistic fluid dynamics therefore is one of the preferred theoretical tools to model the time-evolution and properties of the QGP. As the collision energy or the system size is decreased, the range of applicability of viscous fluid dynamics becomes smaller as the length scale of the interaction among the basic constituents is similar to the overall scale of the collision system itself. In order to investigate the validity of fluid-dynamical modeling of proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC and RHIC, we conduct an analysis of the spatial and temporal evolution of the Knudsen number, i.e. the ratio of the microscopic mean free path to the macroscopic length scale of the system. We show results for large and small collision systems, as a function of the specific shear viscosity, and discuss the range of applicability of fluid-dynamical modeling in relativistic proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at different energies.

  18. Nucleus-nucleus total reaction cross sections, and the nuclear interaction radius

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Ibrahim, Badawy

    2011-04-15

    We study the nucleus-nucleus total reaction cross sections for stable nuclei, in the energy region from 30A MeV to about 1A GeV, and find them to be in proportion to ({radical}({sigma}{sub pp}{sup tot}Z{sub 1}{sup 2/3}+{sigma}{sub pn}{sup tot}N{sub 1}{sup 2/3})+{radical}({sigma}{sub pp}{sup tot}Z{sub 2}{sup 2/3}+{sigma}{sub pn}{sup tot}N{sub 2}{sup 2/3})) {sup 2} in the mass range 8 to 100. Also, we find a parameter-free relation that enables us to predict a total reaction cross section for any nucleus-nucleus within 10% uncertainty at most, using the experimental value of the total reaction cross section of a given nucleus-nucleus. The power of the relation is demonstrated by several examples. The energy dependence of the nuclear interaction radius is deduced; it is found to be almost constant in the energy range from about 200A MeV to about 1A GeV; in this energy range and for nuclei with N=Z, R{sub I}(A)=(1.14{+-}0.02)A{sup 1/3} fm.

  19. Effect of unilateral versus bilateral electrostimulation in subthalamic nucleus on speech in Parkinsons disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Emily; Verhagen Metman, Leo; Bakay, Roy; Arzbaecher, Jean; Bernard, Bryan

    2001-05-01

    Previously, it was found that 16 right-handed patients with idiopathic Parkinsons disease who underwent unilateral implantation of deep brain stimulator in subthalamic nucleus (STN) showed significant improvement in their nonspeech motor functions. Eight of the 16 patients had stimulator in the left STN and eight in the right STN. In contrast, their speech function showed very mild improvement that was limited to the respiratory/phonotory subsystems. Further, there seemed a trend that the patients with right STN stimulation did better than those with left STN stimulation. It was speculated that the difference might be due to a micro lesion caused by the surgical procedure to the corticobulbar fibers run in the left internal capsule. This paper reports speech changes associated with bilateral DBS in STN in four of the 16 subjects who elected to have deep brain stimulator implanted in STN on the opposite side of the brain at a later time. Results show negative changes in speech after bilateral DBS in STN. The changes were not limited to the micro lesion effect due to the surgery itself, but also related to the active stimulation on the dominant hemisphere for speech processing. [Work supported by NIH.

  20. Collateral projections from the lateral parabrachial nucleus to the paraventricular thalamic nucleus and the central amygdaloid nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shao-Hua; Yin, Jun-Bin; Sun, Yi; Bai, Yang; Zhou, Kai-Xiang; Zhao, Wen-Jun; Wang, Wei; Dong, Yu-Lin; Li, Yun-Qing

    2016-08-26

    Combined the retrograde double tracing with immunofluorescence histochemical staining, we examined the neurons in the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPB) sent collateral projections to the paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT) and central amygdaloid nucleus (CeA) and their roles in the nociceptive transmission in the rat. After the injection of Fluoro-gold (FG) into the PVT and tetramethylrhodamine-dextran (TMR) into the CeA, respectively, FG/TMR double-labeled neurons were observed in the LPB. The percentages of FG/TMR double-labeled neurons to the total number of FG- or TMR-labeled neurons were 6.18% and 9.09%, respectively. Almost all of the FG/TMR double-labeled neurons (95%) exhibited calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunoreactivity. In the condition of neuropathic pain, 94% of these neurons showed FOS immunoreactivity. The present data indicates that some of CGRP-expressing neurons in the LPB may transmit nociceptive information toward the PVT and CeA by way of axon collaterals. PMID:27423318

  1. Differential effects of deep brain stimulation on verbal fluency.

    PubMed

    Ehlen, Felicitas; Schoenecker, Thomas; Kühn, Andrea A; Klostermann, Fabian

    2014-07-01

    We aimed at gaining insights into principles of subcortical lexical processing. Therefore, effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in different target structures on verbal fluency (VF) were tested. VF was assessed with active vs. inactivated DBS in 13 and 14 patients with DBS in the vicinity of the thalamic ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM) and, respectively, of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Results were correlated to electrode localizations in postoperative MRI, and compared to those of 12 age-matched healthy controls. Patients' VF performance was generally below normal. However, while activation of DBS in the vicinity of VIM provoked marked VF decline, it induced subtle phonemic VF enhancement in the vicinity of STN. The effects correlated with electrode localizations in left hemispheric stimulation sites. The results show distinct dependencies of VF on DBS in the vicinity of VIM vs. STN. Particular risks for deterioration occur in patients with relatively ventromedial thalamic electrodes. PMID:24815947

  2. Observational Learning in Mice Can Be Prevented by Medial Prefrontal Cortex Stimulation and Enhanced by Nucleus Accumbens Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurado-Parras, M. Teresa; Gruart, Agnes; Delgado-Garcia, Jose M.

    2012-01-01

    The neural structures involved in ongoing appetitive and/or observational learning behaviors remain largely unknown. Operant conditioning and observational learning were evoked and recorded in a modified Skinner box provided with an on-line video recording system. Mice improved their acquisition of a simple operant conditioning task by…

  3. Dropped nucleus following phacoemulsification cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Tajunisah, I; Reddy, S C

    2007-12-01

    Twenty two cases of dropped nucleus following 1,196 phacoemulsification procedures in cataract surgery were examined retrospectively to determine the incidence, predisposing factors and visual outcomes of this dreaded complication. All the cases underwent pars plana vitrectomy and the lens fragments were removed with phacofragmotome, vitrectomy cutter or delivered through limbus. The incidence of dropped nucleus was 1.84%. The predisposing factors were hard cataracts (13.6%), polar cataracts (9.1%), previously vitrectomized eyes (4.5%) and high myopia (4.5%). The final visual outcome was > or = 6/12 in 10 eyes (45.5%); complications were seen in 5 eyes (22.7%). The interval between initial surgery and vitrectomy, the method of fragment removal and the type of lens implanted, did not influence the final visual outcome. PMID:18705466

  4. Cell Nucleus-Targeting Zwitterionic Carbon Dots

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yun Kyung; Shin, Eeseul; Kim, Byeong-Su

    2015-01-01

    An innovative nucleus-targeting zwitterionic carbon dot (CD) vehicle has been developed for anticancer drug delivery and optical monitoring. The zwitterionic functional groups of the CDs introduced by a simple one-step synthesis using β-alanine as a passivating and zwitterionic ligand allow cytoplasmic uptake and subsequent nuclear translocation of the CDs. Moreover, multicolor fluorescence improves the accuracy of the CDs as an optical code. The CD-based drug delivery system constructed by non-covalent grafting of doxorubicin, exhibits superior antitumor efficacy owing to enhanced nuclear delivery in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo, resulting in highly effective tumor growth inhibition. Since the zwitterionic CDs are highly biocompatible and effectively translocated into the nucleus, it provides a compelling solution to a multifunctional nanoparticle for substantially enhanced nuclear uptake of drugs and optical monitoring of translocation. PMID:26689549

  5. Macromolecular transport in synapse to nucleus communication.

    PubMed

    Panayotis, Nicolas; Karpova, Anna; Kreutz, Michael R; Fainzilber, Mike

    2015-02-01

    Local signaling events at synapses or axon terminals must be communicated to the nucleus to elicit transcriptional responses. The lengths of neuronal processes pose a significant challenge for such intracellular communication. This challenge is met by mechanisms ranging from rapid signals encoded in calcium waves to slower macromolecular signaling complexes carried by molecular motors. Here we summarize recent findings on macromolecular signaling from the synapse to the nucleus, in comparison to those employed in injury signaling along axons. A number of common themes emerge, including combinatorial signal encoding by post-translational mechanisms such as differential phosphorylation and proteolysis, and conserved roles for importins in coordinating signaling complexes. Neurons may integrate ionic flux with motor-transported signals as a temporal code for synaptic plasticity signaling. PMID:25534890

  6. Core-nucleus distortation in hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1995-08-01

    We are completing a study of the effects of the spherical distortion of the {open_quotes}core{close_quotes} nucleus by the {Lambda} in a hypernucleus. The response of the core was determined by an appropriately chosen energy-density functional which depends, in particular, on the nuclear compressibility. The forcing action of the A is determined by the nuclear density dependence of the {Lambda} binding in nuclear matter which is obtained from our work on the {Lambda} single-particle energies. Because of the strongly repulsive {Lambda}NN forces, this {Lambda} binding {open_quotes}saturates{close_quotes} at a density close to the central density of nuclei, and results in a reduced core-nucleus distortion much less than would otherwise be obtained. The effects of the core distortion then turn out to be very small even for quite light hypernuclei. This result justifies the assumption that spherical core nuclei are effectively undistorted in a hypernucleus.

  7. Coherency in neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerman, S.; Sharma, V.; Deniz, M.; Wong, H. T.; Chen, J.-W.; Li, H. B.; Lin, S. T.; Liu, C.-P.; Yue, Q.; Texono Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering provides a unique laboratory to study the quantum mechanical coherency effects in electroweak interactions, towards which several experimental programs are being actively pursued. We report results of our quantitative studies on the transitions towards decoherency. A parameter (α ) is identified to describe the degree of coherency, and its variations with incoming neutrino energy, detector threshold, and target nucleus are studied. The ranges of α that can be probed with realistic neutrino experiments are derived, indicating complementarity between projects with different sources and targets. Uncertainties in nuclear physics and in α would constrain sensitivities in probing physics beyond the standard model. The maximum neutrino energies corresponding to α >0.95 are derived.

  8. Finite nucleus effects on relativistic energy corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.; Faegri, Knut, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of using a finite nucleus model in quantum-chemical calculations is examined. Relativistic corrections from the first order Foldy-Wouthuysen terms are affected indirectly by the change in wavefunction, but also directly as a result of revised expressions for the Darwin and spin-orbit terms due to the change in nuclear potential. A calculation for the Rn atom indicates that the mass-velocity and Darwin corrections are much more sensitive to the finite nucleus than the non-relativistic total energy, but that the total contribution for these two terms is quite stable provided the revised form of the Darwin term is used. The spin-orbit interaction is not greatly affected by the choice of nuclear model.

  9. Neurofibromin is actively transported to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Ina; Van Oostveldt, Patrick; Coene, Elisabeth; De Paepe, Anne; Messiaen, Ludwine

    2004-02-27

    Mutations in the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) tumor suppressor gene predispose individuals to a variety of benign and malignant tumors. Many tumor suppressors 'shuttle' between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, thus regulating their function. By expressing different NF1 constructs in COS-7 cells (encompassing exons 28-49 and fused to the green fluorescent protein), we identified a functional nuclear localization signal (NLS) in exon 43. Mutation of the NLS completely abolishes the nuclear entry of the NF1-derivative fusion protein. A highly expressed splice variant that lacks this NLS controls the localization and hence the function of neurofibromin. The localization of neurofibromin in the nucleus may provide novel clues to unknown functions for NF1. PMID:14988005

  10. Projection of tooth pulp afferents to the cat trigeminal nucleus caudalis.

    PubMed

    Nord, S G; Young, R F

    1975-06-13

    Unit activity was recorded extracellularly from cat medullary neurons following electrical stimulation of the canine tooth pulp. Response characteristics of the neurons quickly stabilized at specific suprathreshold stimulus intensities but such properties as spike latency, interspike interval and spike density varied systematically as intensity was raised to maximally effective values. Receptive fields were principally unilateral. The majority included both canines and extended into other oro-facial areas. Suppression of a pulpal response could be effected by preceding tooth stimulation with a conditioning stimulus applied to some other point in the receptive field of the responding cell at an appropriate interstimulus interval. In contrast, a pulpal response could be enhanced by presenting two stimuli successively to the same canine at such intervals. Similar enhancing effects followed simultaneous stimulation of spatially segregated loci in a field. The pulp-responsive neurons were localized histologically in, or in the immediate vicinity of, the nucleus caudalis of the spinal trigeminal complex where the possibility of their existence has been questioned previously. Most of the cells were situated along the ventromedial border of the nucleus, a region reported to contain other pain-related neurons with trigeminal fields. PMID:1139303

  11. Performance of multisite silicon microprobes implanted chronically in the ventral cochlear nucleus of the cat.

    PubMed

    McCreery, Douglas; Lossinsky, Albert; Pikov, Victor

    2007-06-01

    A central auditory prosthesis based on microstimulation within the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) offers a means of restoring hearing to persons whose auditory nerve has been destroyed bilaterally and cannot benefit from cochlear implants. Arrays of silicon probes with 16 stimulating sites were implanted into the VCN of adult cats, for up to 314 days. Compound neuronal responses evoked from the sites in the VCN were recorded periodically in the central nucleus of the contralateral inferior colliculus (ICC). The threshold and growth of most of the responses were stable for at least 250 days after implantation of the arrays. The responses evoked from the deepest and shallowest electrode sites did exhibit some changes over time but none of the thresholds exceeded 10 microA. The thresholds and growth of the compound responses from most of the stimulating sites were very stable over time, and comparable to those of chronically implanted single-site iridium microelectrodes. Multiunit neuronal activity evoked from the stimulating sites in the VCN was recorded along the dorsolateral-ventromedial (DLVM) axis of the ICC. The distribution, span and degree of overlap of the multiunit activity demonstrated the utility of the multisite, multishank array configuration as a means of accessing the neuronal populations in the VCN that encode various acoustic frequencies. These findings are encouraging for the prospects of developing an auditory prosthesis employing multi-site silicon microprobes. PMID:17554823

  12. Conflict-dependent dynamic of subthalamic nucleus oscillations during moral decisions.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Manuela; Giannicola, Gaia; Rosa, Manuela; Marceglia, Sara; Lucchiari, Claudio; Mrakic-Sposta, Simona; Servello, Domenico; Pacchetti, Claudio; Porta, Mauro; Sassi, Marco; Zangaglia, Roberta; Franzini, Angelo; Albanese, Alberto; Romito, Luigi; Piacentini, Sylvie; Zago, Stefano; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Barbieri, Sergio; Priori, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Although lesional, neuroimaging, and brain stimulation studies have provided an insight into the neural mechanisms of judgement and decision-making, all these works focused on the cerebral cortex, without investigating the role of subcortical structures such as the basal ganglia. Besides being an effective therapeutic tool, deep brain stimulation (DBS) allows local field potential (LFP) recordings through the stimulation electrodes thus providing a physiological "window" on human subcortical structures. In this study we assessed whether subthalamic nucleus LFP oscillations are modulated by processing of moral conflictual, moral nonconflictual, and neutral statements. To do so, in 16 patients with Parkinson's disease (8 men) bilaterally implanted with subthalamic nucleus (STN) electrodes for DBS, we recorded STN LFPs 4 days after surgery during a moral decision task. During the task, recordings from the STN showed changes in LFP oscillations. Whereas the 14--30 Hz band (beta) changed during the movement executed to perform the task, the 5--13 Hz band (low-frequency) changed when subjects evaluated the content of statements. Low-frequency band power increased significantly more during conflictual than during nonconflictual or neutral sentences. We conclude that STN responds specifically to conflictual moral stimuli, and could be involved in conflictual decisions of all kinds, not only those for moral judgment. LFP oscillations provide novel direct evidence that the neural processing of conflictual decision-making spreads beyond the cortex to the basal ganglia and encompasses a specific subcortical conflict-dependent component. PMID:21061226

  13. Physical Properties of Cometary Nucleus Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David; Hillman, John (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In this proposal we aim to study the physical properties of the Centaurs and the dead comets, these being the precursors to, and the remnants from, the active cometary nuclei. The nuclei themselves are very difficult to study, because of the contaminating effects of near-nucleus coma. Systematic investigation of the nuclei both before they enter the zone of strong sublimation and after they have depleted their near-surface volatiles should neatly bracket the properties of these objects, revealing evolutionary effects.

  14. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, Gregory; Kulkarni, Gourihar

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70 deg C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45 deg C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  15. The fast Ice Nucleus chamber FINCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundke, U.; Nillius, B.; Jaenicke, R.; Wetter, T.; Klein, H.; Bingemer, H.

    2008-11-01

    We present first results of our new developed Ice Nucleus (IN) counter FINCH from the sixth Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CLACE 6) campaign at Jungfraujoch station, 3571 m asl. Measurements were made at the total and the ICE CVI inlet. Laboratory measurements of ice onset temperatures by FINCH are compared to those of the static diffusion chamber FRIDGE (FRankfurt Ice Deposition Freezing Experiment). Within the errors of both new instruments the results compare well to published data.

  16. Parity violation in the compound nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G. E.; Crawford, B. E.; Grossmann, C. A.; Lowie, L. Y.; Bowman, J. D.; Knudson, J.; Penttilae, S.; Seestrom, S. J.; Smith, D. A.; Yen, Yi-Fen; Yuan, V. W.; Delheij, P. P. J.; Haseyama, T.; Masaike, A.; Matsuda, Y.; Postma, H.; Roberson, N. R.; Sharapov, E. I.; Stephenson, S. L.

    1999-06-10

    Measurements have been performed on the helicity dependence of the neutron resonance cross section for many nuclei by our TRIPLE Collaboration. A large number of parity violations are observed. Generic enhancements amplify the signal for symmetry breaking and the stochastic properties of the compound nucleus permit the strength of the symmetry-breaking interaction to be determined without knowledge of the wave functions of individual states. A total of 15 nuclei have been analyzed with this statistical approach. The results are summarized.

  17. Comet nucleus impact probe feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    A top level listing of the comet nucleus impact probe (CNIP) feasibility experiments requirements are presented. A conceptual configuration which shows that the feasibility of engineering the experiment is possible and describes the candidate hardware is discussed. The design studies required in order to design the operating experiment are outlined. An overview of a program plan used to estimate a rough order of magnitude cost for the CNIP experiment is given.

  18. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-06-01

    Three Advanced Design Projects have been completed this academic year at Penn State. At the beginning of the fall semester the students were organized into eight groups and given their choice of either a comet nucleus or an asteroid sample return mission. Once a mission had been chosen, the students developed conceptual designs. These were evaluated at the end of the fall semester and combined into three separate mission plans, including a comet nucleus same return (CNSR), a single asteroid sample return (SASR), and a multiple asteroid sample return (MASR). To facilitate the work required for each mission, the class was reorganized in the spring semester by combining groups to form three mission teams. An integration team consisting of two members from each group was formed for each mission so that communication and information exchange would be easier among the groups. The types of projects designed by the students evolved from numerous discussions with Penn State faculty and mission planners at the Johnson Space Center Human/Robotic Spacecraft Office. Robotic sample return missions are widely considered valuable precursors to manned missions in that they can provide details about a site's environment and scientific value. For example, a sample return from an asteroid might reveal valuable resources that, once mined, could be utilized for propulsion. These missions are also more adaptable when considering the risk to humans visiting unknown and potentially dangerous locations, such as a comet nucleus.

  19. Comet nucleus and asteroid sample return missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Three Advanced Design Projects have been completed this academic year at Penn State. At the beginning of the fall semester the students were organized into eight groups and given their choice of either a comet nucleus or an asteroid sample return mission. Once a mission had been chosen, the students developed conceptual designs. These were evaluated at the end of the fall semester and combined into three separate mission plans, including a comet nucleus same return (CNSR), a single asteroid sample return (SASR), and a multiple asteroid sample return (MASR). To facilitate the work required for each mission, the class was reorganized in the spring semester by combining groups to form three mission teams. An integration team consisting of two members from each group was formed for each mission so that communication and information exchange would be easier among the groups. The types of projects designed by the students evolved from numerous discussions with Penn State faculty and mission planners at the Johnson Space Center Human/Robotic Spacecraft Office. Robotic sample return missions are widely considered valuable precursors to manned missions in that they can provide details about a site's environment and scientific value. For example, a sample return from an asteroid might reveal valuable resources that, once mined, could be utilized for propulsion. These missions are also more adaptable when considering the risk to humans visiting unknown and potentially dangerous locations, such as a comet nucleus.

  20. Efficient nucleus detector in histopathology images.

    PubMed

    Vink, J P; Van Leeuwen, M B; Van Deurzen, C H M; De Haan, G

    2013-02-01

    In traditional cancer diagnosis, (histo)pathological images of biopsy samples are visually analysed by pathologists. However, this judgment is subjective and leads to variability among pathologists. Digital scanners may enable automated objective assessment, improved quality and reduced throughput time. Nucleus detection is seen as the corner stone for a range of applications in automated assessment of (histo)pathological images. In this paper, we propose an efficient nucleus detector designed with machine learning. We applied colour deconvolution to reconstruct each applied stain. Next, we constructed a large feature set and modified AdaBoost to create two detectors, focused on different characteristics in appearance of nuclei. The proposed modification of AdaBoost enables inclusion of the computational cost of each feature during selection, thus improving the computational efficiency of the resulting detectors. The outputs of the two detectors are merged by a globally optimal active contour algorithm to refine the border of the detected nuclei. With a detection rate of 95% (on average 58 incorrectly found objects per field-of-view) based on 51 field-of-view images of Her2 immunohistochemistry stained breast tissue and a complete analysis in 1 s per field-of-view, our nucleus detector shows good performance and could enable a range of applications in automated assessment of (histo)pathological images. PMID:23252774

  1. The nucleus basalis in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Clark, A W; Parhad, I M; Folstein, S E; Whitehouse, P J; Hedreen, J C; Price, D L; Chase, G A

    1983-10-01

    The nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM) provides most of the cholinergic input to the cerebral cortex. The loss of cortical choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type (SDAT) appears to be related to a severe depopulation of the nbM in this dementia. In Huntington's disease (HD), by contrast, there is no loss of cortical CAT activity. The present quantitative study indicates that (1) there is no significant loss of neurons from the nbM in HD, and (2) that the previously described cytologic changes in the neurons of this nucleus in HD patients do not differ significantly from controls. These findings are consistent with the working hypothesis that the types of dementia associated with reductions of neocortical CAT activity are characterized by dysfunction or death of neurons in the nbM, but dementing disorders with normal neocortical CAT activity manifest no major abnormalities in this cholinergic nucleus of the basal forebrain. PMID:6225032

  2. Hypoxia Silences Retrotrapezoid Nucleus Respiratory Chemoreceptors via Alkalosis

    PubMed Central

    Basting, Tyler M.; Burke, Peter G.R.; Kanbar, Roy; Viar, Kenneth E.; Stornetta, Daniel S.; Stornetta, Ruth L.

    2015-01-01

    In conscious mammals, hypoxia or hypercapnia stimulates breathing while theoretically exerting opposite effects on central respiratory chemoreceptors (CRCs). We tested this theory by examining how hypoxia and hypercapnia change the activity of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a putative CRC and chemoreflex integrator. Archaerhodopsin-(Arch)-transduced RTN neurons were reversibly silenced by light in anesthetized rats. We bilaterally transduced RTN and nearby C1 neurons with Arch (PRSx8-ArchT-EYFP-LVV) and measured the cardiorespiratory consequences of Arch activation (10 s) in conscious rats during normoxia, hypoxia, or hyperoxia. RTN photoinhibition reduced breathing equally during non-REM sleep and quiet wake. Compared with normoxia, the breathing frequency reduction (ΔfR) was larger in hyperoxia (65% FiO2), smaller in 15% FiO2, and absent in 12% FiO2. Tidal volume changes (ΔVT) followed the same trend. The effect of hypoxia on ΔfR was not arousal-dependent but was reversed by reacidifying the blood (acetazolamide; 3% FiCO2). ΔfR was highly correlated with arterial pH up to arterial pH (pHa) 7.5 with no frequency inhibition occurring above pHa 7.53. Blood pressure was minimally reduced suggesting that C1 neurons were very modestly inhibited. In conclusion, RTN neurons regulate eupneic breathing about equally during both sleep and wake. RTN neurons are the first putative CRCs demonstrably silenced by hypocapnic hypoxia in conscious mammals. RTN neurons are silent above pHa 7.5 and increasingly active below this value. During hyperoxia, RTN activation maintains breathing despite the inactivity of the carotid bodies. Finally, during hypocapnic hypoxia, carotid body stimulation increases breathing frequency via pathways that bypass RTN. PMID:25589748

  3. Hypoxia silences retrotrapezoid nucleus respiratory chemoreceptors via alkalosis.

    PubMed

    Basting, Tyler M; Burke, Peter G R; Kanbar, Roy; Viar, Kenneth E; Stornetta, Daniel S; Stornetta, Ruth L; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2015-01-14

    In conscious mammals, hypoxia or hypercapnia stimulates breathing while theoretically exerting opposite effects on central respiratory chemoreceptors (CRCs). We tested this theory by examining how hypoxia and hypercapnia change the activity of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a putative CRC and chemoreflex integrator. Archaerhodopsin-(Arch)-transduced RTN neurons were reversibly silenced by light in anesthetized rats. We bilaterally transduced RTN and nearby C1 neurons with Arch (PRSx8-ArchT-EYFP-LVV) and measured the cardiorespiratory consequences of Arch activation (10 s) in conscious rats during normoxia, hypoxia, or hyperoxia. RTN photoinhibition reduced breathing equally during non-REM sleep and quiet wake. Compared with normoxia, the breathing frequency reduction (Δf(R)) was larger in hyperoxia (65% FiO2), smaller in 15% FiO2, and absent in 12% FiO2. Tidal volume changes (ΔV(T)) followed the same trend. The effect of hypoxia on Δf(R) was not arousal-dependent but was reversed by reacidifying the blood (acetazolamide; 3% FiCO2). Δf(R) was highly correlated with arterial pH up to arterial pH (pHa) 7.5 with no frequency inhibition occurring above pHa 7.53. Blood pressure was minimally reduced suggesting that C1 neurons were very modestly inhibited. In conclusion, RTN neurons regulate eupneic breathing about equally during both sleep and wake. RTN neurons are the first putative CRCs demonstrably silenced by hypocapnic hypoxia in conscious mammals. RTN neurons are silent above pHa 7.5 and increasingly active below this value. During hyperoxia, RTN activation maintains breathing despite the inactivity of the carotid bodies. Finally, during hypocapnic hypoxia, carotid body stimulation increases breathing frequency via pathways that bypass RTN. PMID:25589748

  4. Nucleus accumbens GLP-1 receptors influence meal size and palatability.

    PubMed

    Dossat, Amanda M; Diaz, Ryan; Gallo, Lindsay; Panagos, Alyssa; Kay, Kristen; Williams, Diana L

    2013-06-15

    Recent evidence suggests that the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) neuronal projection to the nucleus accumbens core (NAcC) contributes to food intake control. To investigate the role of endogenous stimulation of GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) in NAcC, we examined the effects of the GLP-1R antagonist exendin-(9-39) (Ex9) on meal pattern and microstructure of ingestive behavior in rats. Intra-NAcC Ex9 treatment selectively increased meal size relative to vehicle in rats consuming 0.25 M sucrose solution or sweetened condensed milk. Microstructural analysis revealed effects of NAcC Ex9 on initial lick rate and the size and duration of licking bursts in rats consuming 0.1 or 0.25 M sucrose, suggesting that blockade of NAcC GLP-1R increases palatability. Because NAcC Ex9 did not affect licking for nonnutritive saccharin (0.1%), we suggest that the presence of nutrients in the gut may be required for endogenous stimulation of NAcC GLP-1R. Consistent with this, we also found that the meal size-suppressive effects of intragastric nutrient infusion were attenuated by NAcC delivery of Ex9 at a dose that had no effect when delivered alone. Analysis of licking patterns revealed that NAcC Ex9 did not reverse intragastric nutrient-induced suppression of burst number but rather blunted the effect of nutrient infusion on meal size primarily by increasing the size and duration of licking bursts. Together, our results suggest that NAcC Ex9 influences taste evaluation. We conclude that GLP-1 released in NAcC in response to gastrointestinal nutrients reduces the hedonic value of food. PMID:23612998

  5. Nucleus accumbens GLP-1 receptors influence meal size and palatability

    PubMed Central

    Dossat, Amanda M.; Diaz, Ryan; Gallo, Lindsay; Panagos, Alyssa; Kay, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) neuronal projection to the nucleus accumbens core (NAcC) contributes to food intake control. To investigate the role of endogenous stimulation of GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R) in NAcC, we examined the effects of the GLP-1R antagonist exendin-(9–39) (Ex9) on meal pattern and microstructure of ingestive behavior in rats. Intra-NAcC Ex9 treatment selectively increased meal size relative to vehicle in rats consuming 0.25 M sucrose solution or sweetened condensed milk. Microstructural analysis revealed effects of NAcC Ex9 on initial lick rate and the size and duration of licking bursts in rats consuming 0.1 or 0.25 M sucrose, suggesting that blockade of NAcC GLP-1R increases palatability. Because NAcC Ex9 did not affect licking for nonnutritive saccharin (0.1%), we suggest that the presence of nutrients in the gut may be required for endogenous stimulation of NAcC GLP-1R. Consistent with this, we also found that the meal size-suppressive effects of intragastric nutrient infusion were attenuated by NAcC delivery of Ex9 at a dose that had no effect when delivered alone. Analysis of licking patterns revealed that NAcC Ex9 did not reverse intragastric nutrient-induced suppression of burst number but rather blunted the effect of nutrient infusion on meal size primarily by increasing the size and duration of licking bursts. Together, our results suggest that NAcC Ex9 influences taste evaluation. We conclude that GLP-1 released in NAcC in response to gastrointestinal nutrients reduces the hedonic value of food. PMID:23612998

  6. Rapid feedback processing in human nucleus accumbens and motor thalamus.

    PubMed

    Schüller, Thomas; Gruendler, Theo O J; Jocham, Gerhard; Klein, Tilmann A; Timmermann, Lars; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Kuhn, Jens; Ullsperger, Markus

    2015-04-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and thalamus are integral parts in models of feedback processing. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been successfully employed to alleviate symptoms of psychiatric conditions including obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette's syndrome (TS). Common target structures are the NAcc and the ventral anterior and ventro-lateral nuclei (VA/VL) of the thalamus, for OCD and TS, respectively. The feedback related negativity (FRN) is an event-related potential associated with feedback processing reflecting posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC) activity. Here we report on three cases where we recorded scalp EEG and local field potentials (LFP) from externalized electrodes located in the NAcc or thalamus (VA/VL) while patients engaged in a modified time estimation task, known to engage feedback processing and elicit the FRN. Additionally, scalp EEG were recorded from 29 healthy participants (HP) engaged in the same task. The signal in all structures (pMFC, NAcc, and thalamus) was differently modulated by positive and negative feedback. LFP activity in the NAcc showed a biphasic time course after positive feedback during the FRN time interval. Negative feedback elicited a much weaker and later response. In the thalamus a monophasic modulation was recorded during the FRN time interval. Again, this modulation was more pronounced after positive performance feedback compared to negative feedback. In channels outside the target area no modulation was observed. The surface-FRN was reliably elicited on a group level in HP and showed no significant difference following negative feedback between patients and HP. German Clinical Trial Register: Neurocognitive specification of dysfunctions within basal ganglia-cortex loops and their therapeutic modulation by deep brain stimulation in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder and Tourette syndrome, http://www.drks.de/DRKS00005316. PMID:25726897

  7. Primary auditory cortical responses to electrical stimulation of the thalamus.

    PubMed

    Atencio, Craig A; Shih, Jonathan Y; Schreiner, Christoph E; Cheung, Steven W

    2014-03-01

    Cochlear implant electrical stimulation of the auditory system to rehabilitate deafness has been remarkably successful. Its deployment requires both an intact auditory nerve and a suitably patent cochlear lumen. When disease renders prerequisite conditions impassable, such as in neurofibromatosis type II and cochlear obliterans, alternative treatment targets are considered. Electrical stimulation of the cochlear nucleus and midbrain in humans has delivered encouraging clinical outcomes, buttressing the promise of central auditory prostheses to mitigate deafness in those who are not candidates for cochlear implantation. In this study we explored another possible implant target: the auditory thalamus. In anesthetized cats, we first presented pure tones to determine frequency preferences of thalamic and cortical sites. We then electrically stimulated tonotopically organized thalamic sites while recording from primary auditory cortical sites using a multichannel recording probe. Cathode-leading biphasic thalamic stimulation thresholds that evoked cortical responses were much lower than published accounts of cochlear and midbrain stimulation. Cortical activation dynamic ranges were similar to those reported for cochlear stimulation, but they were narrower than those found through midbrain stimulation. Our results imply that thalamic stimulation can activate auditory cortex at low electrical current levels and suggest an auditory thalamic implant may be a viable central auditory prosthesis. PMID:24335216

  8. Near-infrared stimulation on globus pallidus and subthalamus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Minsu; Koo, Ho; Kim, Minsun; Kim, Hyoung-Ihl; Kim, Sohee

    2013-12-01

    Near-infrared stimulation (NIS) is an emerging technique used to evoke action potentials in nervous systems. Its efficacy of evoking action potentials has been demonstrated in different nerve tissues. However, few studies have been performed using NIS to stimulate the deep brain structures, such as globus pallidus (GP) and subthalamic nucleus (STN). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into GP stimulation group (n=11) and STN stimulation group (n=6). After introducing optrodes stereotaxically into the GP or STN, we stimulated neural tissue for 2 min with continuous near-infrared light of 808 nm while varying the radiant exposure from 40 to 10 mW. The effects were investigated with extracellular recordings and the temperature rises at the stimulation site were also measured. NIS was found to elicit excitatory responses in eight out of 11 cases (73%) and inhibitory responses in three cases in the GP stimulation group, whereas it predominantly evoked inhibitory responses in seven out of eight cases (87.5%) and an excitatory response in one case in STN stimulation group. Only radiation above 20 mW, accompanying temperature increases of more than 2°C, elicited a statistically significant neural response (p<0.05). The responsiveness to NIS was linearly dependent on the power of radiation exposure.

  9. Low P sub T hadron-nucleus interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holynski, R.; Wozniak, K.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility of describing hadron-nucleus (hA) interactions is discussed in terms of a number of independent collisions of the projectile inside the target nucleus. This multiple rescattering may occur on a particle or quark parton level. To investigate the characteristics of hA interactions as a function of antineutrinos advantage is taken of the correlation between the average number antineutrinos of collisions of the projectile inside the nucleus and the number Ng of fast protons ejected from the struck nucleus. The relation antineutrinos vs Ng obtained in antineutrinos was used. For a given target nucleus this allows the selection of interactions occurring at different impact parameters.

  10. Neuronal activity correlated with checking behaviour in the subthalamic nucleus of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Burbaud, Pierre; Clair, Anne-Hélène; Langbour, Nicolas; Fernandez-Vidal, Sara; Goillandeau, Michel; Michelet, Thomas; Bardinet, Eric; Chéreau, Isabelle; Durif, Franck; Polosan, Mircea; Chabardès, Stephan; Fontaine, Denys; Magnié-Mauro, Marie-Noelle; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Bataille, Benoît; Millet, Bruno; Vérin, Marc; Baup, Nicolas; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Cornu, Philippe; Pelissolo, Antoine; Arbus, Christophe; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion; Yelnik, Jérôme; Welter, Marie-Laure; Mallet, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Doubt, and its behavioural correlate, checking, is a normal phenomenon of human cognition that is dramatically exacerbated in obsessive-compulsive disorder. We recently showed that deep brain stimulation in the associative-limbic area of the subthalamic nucleus, a central core of the basal ganglia, improved obsessive-compulsive disorder. To understand the physiological bases of symptoms in such patients, we recorded the activity of individual neurons in the therapeutic target during surgery while subjects performed a cognitive task that gave them the possibility of unrestricted repetitive checking after they had made a choice. We postulated that the activity of neurons in this region could be influenced by doubt and checking behaviour. Among the 63/87 task-related neurons recorded in 10 patients, 60% responded to various combinations of instructions, delay, movement or feedback, thus highlighting their role in the integration of different types of information. In addition, task-related activity directed towards decision-making increased during trials with checking in comparison with those without checking. These results suggest that the associative-limbic subthalamic nucleus plays a role in doubt-related repetitive thoughts. Overall, our results not only provide new insight into the role of the subthalamic nucleus in human cognition but also support the fact that subthalamic nucleus modulation by deep brain stimulation reduced compulsive behaviour in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. PMID:23365104

  11. Effects of the neurotrophic factors BDNF, NT-3, and FGF2 on dissociated neurons of the cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Völker, Johannes; Frenz, Silke; Scherzad, Agmal; Schendzielorz, Philipp; Radeloff, Andreas; Jablonka, Sibylle; Hagen, Rudolf; Mlynski, Robert

    2014-08-20

    The cochlear nucleus is the first relay station for acoustic information in the auditory pathway and its cellular integrity is affected by hearing loss. Neurotrophic factors, which are known to regulate fundamental processes in the brain, are expressed in the cochlear nucleus and are regulated by the changes in the stimulation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the neurotrophins Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) and the neurotrophic factor Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) on primary cultured cells of the mouse cochlear nucleus. No effect on overall cell growth was detected after 8 days in culture by the factors applied. NT-3 had a strong impact on enhancement of neuronal survival, whereas BDNF stimulated neuronal survival and axonal outgrowth. Axonal branching was negatively affected by the administration of BDNF. FGF2 did not show any effect. The results presented represent fundamental research on auditory neurons, but might be one step toward defining novel therapeutic strategies in the future to prevent cochlear nucleus degeneration induced by hearing loss. PMID:24978398

  12. The Nucleus Accumbens: A Switchboard for Goal-Directed Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Patricio

    2009-01-01

    Reward intake optimization requires a balance between exploiting known sources of rewards and exploring for new sources. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) and associated basal ganglia circuits are likely candidates as neural structures responsible for such balance, while the hippocampus may be responsible for spatial/contextual information. Although studies have assessed interactions between hippocampus and PFC, and between hippocampus and the nucleus accumbens (NA), it is not known whether 3-way interactions among these structures vary under different behavioral conditions. Here, we investigated these interactions with multichannel recordings while rats explored an operant chamber and while they performed a learned lever-pressing task for reward in the same chamber shortly afterward. Neural firing and local field potentials in the NA core synchronized with hippocampal activity during spatial exploration, but during lever pressing they instead synchronized more strongly with the PFC. The latter is likely due to transient drive of NA neurons by bursting prefrontal activation, as in vivo intracellular recordings in anesthetized rats revealed that NA up states can transiently synchronize with spontaneous PFC activity and PFC stimulation with a bursting pattern reliably evoked up states in NA neurons. Thus, the ability to switch synchronization in a task-dependent manner indicates that the NA core can dynamically select its inputs to suit environmental demands, thereby contributing to decision-making, a function that was thought to primarily depend on the PFC. PMID:19352511

  13. The subthalamic nucleus contributes to post-error slowing.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, James F; Sanguinetti, Joseph L; Allen, John J B; Sherman, Scott J; Frank, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    pFC is proposed to implement cognitive control via directed "top-down" influence over behavior. But how is this feat achieved? The virtue of such a descriptive model is contingent on a mechanistic understanding of how motor execution is altered in specific circumstances. In this report, we provide evidence that the well-known phenomenon of slowed RTs following mistakes (post-error slowing) is directly influenced by the degree of subthalamic nucleus (STN) activity. The STN is proposed to act as a brake on motor execution following conflict or errors, buying time so a more cautious response can be made on the next trial. STN local field potentials from nine Parkinson disease patients undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery were recorded while they performed a response conflict task. In a 2.5- to 5-Hz frequency range previously associated with conflict and error processing, the degree phase consistency preceding the response was associated with increasingly slower RTs specifically following errors. These findings provide compelling evi