Science.gov

Sample records for penicillium subgenus penicillium

  1. A high density COX1 barcode oligonucleotide array for identification and detection of species of Penicillium subgenus Penicillium.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Seifert, K A; Lévesque, C A

    2009-05-01

    We developed a COX1 barcode oligonucleotide array based on 358 sequences, including 58 known and two new species of Penicillium subgenus Penicillium, and 12 allied species. The array was robotically spotted at near microarray density on membranes. Species and clade-specific oligonucleotides were selected using the computer programs SigOli and Array Designer. Robotic spotting allowed 768 spots with duplicate sets of perfect match and the corresponding mismatch and positive control oligonucleotides, to be printed on 2 × 6 cm(2) nylon membranes. The array was validated with hybridizations between the array and digoxigenin (DIG)-labelled COX1 polymerase chain reaction amplicons from 70 pure DNA samples, and directly from environmental samples (cheese and plants) without culturing. DNA hybridization conditions were optimized, but undesired cross-reactions were detected frequently, reflecting the relatively high sequence similarity of the COX1 gene among Penicillium species. Approximately 60% of the perfect match oligonucleotides were rejected because of low specificity and 76 delivered useful group-specific or species-specific reactions and could be used for detecting certain species of Penicillium in environmental samples. In practice, the presence of weak signals on arrays exposed to amplicons from environmental samples, which could have represented weak detections or weak cross reactions, made interpretation difficult for over half of the oligonucleotides. DNA regions with very few single nucleotide polymorphisms or lacking insertions/deletions among closely related species are not ideal for oligonucleotide-based diagnostics, and supplementing the COX1-based array with oligonucleotides derived from additional genes would result in a more robust hierarchical identification system. PMID:21564971

  2. Phylogeny and nomenclature of the genus Talaromyces and taxa accommodated in Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium

    PubMed Central

    Samson, R.A.; Yilmaz, N.; Houbraken, J.; Spierenburg, H.; Seifert, K.A.; Peterson, S.W.; Varga, J.; Frisvad, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    The taxonomic history of anamorphic species attributed to Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium is reviewed, along with evidence supporting their relationship with teleomorphic species classified in Talaromyces. To supplement previous conclusions based on ITS, SSU and/or LSU sequencing that Talaromyces and subgenus Biverticillium comprise a monophyletic group that is distinct from Penicillium at the generic level, the phylogenetic relationships of these two groups with other genera of Trichocomaceae was further studied by sequencing a part of the RPB1 (RNA polymerase II largest subunit) gene. Talaromyces species and most species of Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium sensu Pitt reside in a monophyletic clade distant from species of other subgenera of Penicillium. For detailed phylogenetic analysis of species relationships, the ITS region (incl. 5.8S nrDNA) was sequenced for the available type strains and/or representative isolates of Talaromyces and related biverticillate anamorphic species. Extrolite profiles were compiled for all type strains and many supplementary cultures. All evidence supports our conclusions that Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium is distinct from other subgenera in Penicillium and should be taxonomically unified with the Talaromyces species that reside in the same clade. Following the concepts of nomenclatural priority and single name nomenclature, we transfer all accepted species of Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium to Talaromyces. A holomorphic generic diagnosis for the expanded concept of Talaromyces, including teleomorph and anamorph characters, is provided. A list of accepted Talaromyces names and newly combined Penicillium names is given. Species of biotechnological and medical importance, such as P. funiculosum and P. marneffei, are now combined in Talaromyces. Excluded species and taxa that need further taxonomic study are discussed. An appendix lists other generic names, usually considered synonyms of Penicillium sensu lato that

  3. Ochratoxin A producing species in the genus Penicillium.

    PubMed

    Cabañes, Francisco Javier; Bragulat, Maria Rosa; Castellá, Gemma

    2010-05-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) producing fungi are members of the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium. Nowadays, there are about 20 species accepted as OTA producers, which are distributed in three phylogenetically related but distinct groups of aspergilli of the subgenus Circumdati and only in two species of the subgenus Penicillium. At the moment, P. verrucosum and P. nordicum are the only OTA producing species accepted in the genus Penicillium. However, during the last century, OTA producers in this genus were classified as P. viridicatum for many years. At present, only some OTA producing species are known to be a potential source of OTA contamination of cereals and certain common foods and beverages such as bread, beer, coffee, dried fruits, grape juice and wine among others. Penicillium verrucosum is the major producer of OTA in cereals such as wheat and barley in temperate and cold climates. Penicillium verrucosum and P. nordicum can be recovered from some dry-cured meat products and some cheeses. PMID:22069629

  4. Tremorgenic Mycotoxin from Penicillium paraherquei

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizawa, Takumi; Morooka, Nobuichi; Sawada, Yuzuru; Udagawa, Shun-Ichi

    1976-01-01

    A tremorgenic mycotoxin was isolated from Penicillium paraherquei Abe ex G. Smith and identified as verruculogen. It was produced at the rate of approximately 1 mg/g of the dried fungal mycelium cultured on peptone-enriched Czapek-Dox medium at 28°C. PMID:984820

  5. Tremorgenic mycotoxin from Penicillium paraherquei.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, T; Morooka, N; Sawada, Y; Udagawa, S I

    1976-09-01

    A tremorgenic mycotoxin was isolated from Penicillium paraherquei Abe ex G. Smith and identified as verruculogen. It was produced at the rate of approximately 1 mg/g of the dried fungal mycelium cultured on peptone-enriched Czapek-Dox medium at 28 degrees C. PMID:984820

  6. New sections in Penicillium containing novel species producing patulin, pyripyropens or other bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Houbraken, J; Wang, L; Lee, H B; Frisvad, J C

    2016-06-01

    Subgenera and sections have traditionally been used in Penicillium classifications. In the past, this sectional classification was based on macro- and microscopic characters, and occasionally supplemented with physiological and/or extrolite data. Currently, 25 sections are accepted, largely based on phylogenetic data. Certain sections of subgenus Penicillium were never studied in detail using a multigene sequence approach combined with phenotypic, ecological and extrolite data. Based on a combined partial β-tubulin (BenA), calmodulin (CaM) and RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2) multigene sequence dataset, we introduce two new sections (Osmophila and Robsamsonia) in subgenus Penicillium and synonymize section Digitata with section Penicillium. The phylogeny correlates well with phenotypic, physiological and ecological data, and some extrolites were diagnostic for certain Penicillium sections. Furthermore, four new species belonging to the newly introduced sections are described using a polyphasic approach, including BenA, CaM and RPB2 sequences, macro- and micromorphological data and extrolite profiles. The new section Robsamsonia and the new species Penicillium robsamsonii and Penicillium samsonianum were introduced to celebrate Dr. Robert A. Samson's 70th birthday. PMID:27616794

  7. Tremorgenic toxin from Penicillium veruculosum.

    PubMed

    Cole, R J; Kirksey, J W; Moore, J H; Blankenship, B R; Diener, U L; Davis, N D

    1972-08-01

    A new mycotoxin that produces severe tremors and acute toxicity when administered orally or intraperitoneally (ip) to mice and 1-day-old cockerels was obtained from a strain of Penicillium verruculosum Peyronel isolated from peanuts. The ip 50% lethal dose (LD(50)) of this tremorgen was 2.4 mg/kg in mice and 15.2 mg/kg in chickens. Orally administered LD(50) values for the toxin were 126.7 mg/kg in mice and 365.5 mg/kg in chickens. The trivial name "verruculogen" is proposed for this tremorgenic mycotoxin. Physical and chemical characteristics of the mycotoxin are described. PMID:4341967

  8. Tremorgenic Toxin from Penicillium verruculosum

    PubMed Central

    Cole, R. J.; Kirksey, J. W.; Moore, J. H.; Blankenship, B. R.; Diener, U. L.; Davis, N. D.

    1972-01-01

    A new mycotoxin that produces severe tremors and acute toxicity when administered orally or intraperitoneally (ip) to mice and 1-day-old cockerels was obtained from a strain of Penicillium verruculosum Peyronel isolated from peanuts. The ip 50% lethal dose (LD50) of this tremorgen was 2.4 mg/kg in mice and 15.2 mg/kg in chickens. Orally administered LD50 values for the toxin were 126.7 mg/kg in mice and 365.5 mg/kg in chickens. The trivial name „verruculogen” is proposed for this tremorgenic mycotoxin. Physical and chemical characteristics of the mycotoxin are described. PMID:4341967

  9. Screening and productivity of penicillin antibiotic from Penicillium sp.

    PubMed

    Sivakumari, V; Dhinakaran, J; Rajendran, A

    2009-10-01

    This paper highlights the antagonism effect of Penicillium isolates, which were screened against the test organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli and Penicillium sp. Penicillium notatum and Penicillium chrysogenum isolates were used for penicillin biosynthesis. The antibacterial activities of fermented crude penicillin extract were assayed by disc diffusion method. Maximum antibacterial activity was observed in Gram positive organisms (Staphylococcus aureus) when compared with Gram negative organisms. The isolated Penicillium chrysogenum can be used for large-scale penicillin antibiotic production. PMID:21117415

  10. Penicillium species present in Uruguayan salami.

    PubMed

    Galvalisi, Umberto; Lupo, Sandra; Piccini, Juan; Bettucci, Lina

    2012-01-01

    The surface coverage of certain dry fermented sausages such as Italian salami by some species of Penicillium provides their characteristic flavor and other beneficial properties. One of them is the protective effect by means of a uniform film of white mold against undesirable microorganisms. The aim of this work was to identify and to isolate the fungal species present in mature Italian type of salami and to evaluate if it is possible to obtain some of them as starters. In addition, the effects of temperature (14 °C and 25 °C), water activity (a w) (0.90, 0.95 and 0.995) and 2.5 % sodium chloride (NaCl) on fungal growth were determined. Similarly, the proteolytic and lipolytic activity and the ability to produce toxic secondary metabolites were evaluated in order to characterize some possible starter strain. All species found belong to the genus Penicillium, including a performing starter as Penicillium nalgiovense and some potentially toxicogenic species. All the strains showed a higher growth rate at 25 °C. The production of extracellular proteases and lipases was significantly higher at 25 °C than at 14 °C with and without sodium chloride. Only Penicillium expansum produced patulin. On the other hand, Penicillium griseofulvum was the only species that produced ciclopiazonic acid but none of the strains produced penicillin. The species present on salami, Penicillium nalgiovense, Penicillium minioluteum, Penicillium brevicompactum and Penicillium puberulum were unable to produce any of the evaluated toxins. These findings suggest that some fungal isolates from the surface of salami such as P. nalgiovense are potentially useful as starters in sausage manufacture. PMID:22610286

  11. Fifteen new species of Penicillium.

    PubMed

    Visagie, C M; Renaud, J B; Burgess, K M N; Malloch, D W; Clark, D; Ketch, L; Urb, M; Louis-Seize, G; Assabgui, R; Sumarah, M W; Seifert, K A

    2016-06-01

    We introduce 15 new species of Penicillium isolated from a diverse range of locations, including Canada, Costa Rica, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, Tanzania, USA and the Dry Valleys of Antarctica, from a variety of habitats, including leaf surfaces in tropical rain forests, soil eaten by chimpanzees, infrabuccal pockets of carpenter ants, intestinal contents of caterpillars and soil. The new species are classified in sections Aspergilloides (1), Canescentia (2), Charlesia (1), Exilicaulis (3), Lanata-Divaricata (7) and Stolkia (1). Each is characterised and described using classical morphology, LC-MS based extrolite analyses and multigene phylogenies based on ITS, BenA and CaM. Significant extrolites detected include andrastin, pulvilloric acid, penitrem A and citrinin amongst many others. PMID:27616792

  12. Penicillium marneffei Infection in AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Stephenie Y. N.; Wong, K. F.

    2011-01-01

    Penicillium marneffei is a dimorphic fungus which is endemic in Southeast Asia. It is an opportunistic pathogen which has emerged to become an AIDS-defining illness in the endemic areas. Early diagnosis with prompt initiation of treatment is crucial for its management. Prompt diagnosis can often be established through careful cytological and histological examination of clinical specimens although microbiological culture remains the gold standard for its diagnosis. Standard antifungal treatment for AIDS patients with penicilliosis is well established. Highly active antiretroviral therapy should be started early together with the antifungal treatment. Special attention should be paid to potential drug interaction between antiretroviral and antifungal treatments. Secondary prophylaxis may be discontinued with a low risk of relapse of the infection once the immune dysfunction has improved. PMID:21331327

  13. Taxonomy of Penicillium section Citrina

    PubMed Central

    Houbraken, J.; Frisvad, J.C.; Samson, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Species of Penicillium section Citrina have a worldwide distribution and occur commonly in soils. The section is here delimited using a combination of phenotypic characters and sequences of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene operon, including the internal transcribed spacer regions ITS1 and ITS2, the 5.8S nrDNA (ITS) and partial RPB2 sequences. Species assigned to section Citrina share the production of symmetrically biverticillate conidiophores, flask shaped phialides (7.0–9.0 μm long) and relatively small conidia (2.0–3.0 μm diam). Some species can produce greyish-brown coloured cleistothecia containing flanged ascospores. In the present study, more than 250 isolates presumably belonging to section Citrina were examined using a combined analysis of phenotypic and physiological characters, extrolite profiles and ITS, β-tubulin and/or calmodulin sequences. Section Citrina includes 39 species, and 17 of those are described here as new. The most important phenotypic characters for distinguishing species are growth rates and colony reverse colours on the agar media CYA, MEA and YES; shape, size and ornamentation of conidia and the production of sclerotia or cleistothecia. Temperature-growth profiles were made for all examined species and are a valuable character characters for species identification. Species centered around P. citrinum generally have a higher maximum growth temperature (33–36 °C) than species related to P. westlingii (27–33 °C). Extrolite patterns and partial calmodulin and β-tubulin sequences can be used for sequence based identification and resolved all species. In contrast, ITS sequences were less variable and only 55 % of the species could be unambiguously identified with this locus. Taxonomic novelties: Penicillium argentinense Houbraken, Frisvad & Samson, P. atrofulvum Houbraken, Frisvad & Samson, P. aurantiacobrunneum Houbraken, Frisvad & Samson, P. cairnsense Houbraken, Frisvad & Samson, P. christenseniae Houbraken, Frisvad & Samson

  14. Ochratoxin A production by Penicillium thymicola.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hai D T; McMullin, David R; Ponomareva, Ekaterina; Riley, Robert; Pomraning, Kyle R; Baker, Scott E; Seifert, Keith A

    2016-08-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin produced by some Aspergillus and Penicillium species that grow on economically important agricultural crops and food products. OTA is classified as Group 2B carcinogen and is potently nephrotoxic, which is the basis for its regulation in some jurisdictions. Using high resolution mass spectroscopy, OTA and ochratoxin B (OTB) were detected in liquid culture extracts of Penicillium thymicola DAOMC 180753 isolated from Canadian cheddar cheese. The genome of this strain was sequenced, assembled and annotated to probe for putative genes involved in OTA biosynthesis. Known OTA biosynthetic genes from Penicillium verrucosum or Penicillium nordicum, two related Penicillium species that produce OTA, were not found in P. thymicola. However, a gene cluster containing a polyketide synthase (PKS) and PKS-nonribosomal peptide synthase (NRPS) hybrid encoding genes were located in the P. thymicola genome that showed a high degree of similarity to OTA biosynthetic enzymes of Aspergillus carbonarius and Aspergillus ochraceus. This is the first report of ochratoxin from P. thymicola and a new record of the species in Canada. PMID:27521635

  15. Postflood pseudofungemia due to Penicillium species.

    PubMed

    Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Thongphubeth, Kanokporn; Yuekyen, Chananart; Damnin, Suwat; Mungkornkaew, Narissara; Mundy, Linda M

    2012-07-01

    We report an outbreak investigation of fungemia due to Penicillium species after prolonged flooding of a Thai hospital. Contaminated rubber diaphragms of blood culture bottles were identified, and the pseudo-outbreak was resolved after environmental cleaning, use of high-efficiency particulate air filtration, and strict compliance with basic infection control practices for blood culture procurement. PMID:22523267

  16. Microbial transformation of citral by Penicillium sp..

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Akbar; Tavassoli, Afsaneh

    2010-01-01

    Thymol is present in the essential oils from herbs and spices, such as thyme. It is produced by these plant species as a chemical defense against phytopathogenic microorganisms. Therefore, this compound has attracted great attention in food industry, i.e., it has been used as a natural preservative in foods such as cheese to prevent fungal growth. Previous studies concerning the biotransformation of nerol by Penicillium sp. and microbial transformation of citral by sporulated surface cultures method (SSCM) of Penicillium digitatum have been reported. The objective of this research was to study the pathway involved during biotransformation of citral by Penicillium sp. using two methods. The culture preparation was done using different microbial methods and incubation periods to obtain Penicillium for citral biotransformation. The biotransformation products were identified by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). A comparison of the two methods showed that SSCM was more effective, its major products were thymol (21.5 %), geranial (18.6 %) and nerol (13.7 %). LM produced only one compound — thymol — with a low efficiency. PMID:20842292

  17. Identification and nomenclature of the genus Penicillium.

    PubMed

    Visagie, C M; Houbraken, J; Frisvad, J C; Hong, S-B; Klaassen, C H W; Perrone, G; Seifert, K A; Varga, J; Yaguchi, T; Samson, R A

    2014-06-01

    Penicillium is a diverse genus occurring worldwide and its species play important roles as decomposers of organic materials and cause destructive rots in the food industry where they produce a wide range of mycotoxins. Other species are considered enzyme factories or are common indoor air allergens. Although DNA sequences are essential for robust identification of Penicillium species, there is currently no comprehensive, verified reference database for the genus. To coincide with the move to one fungus one name in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants, the generic concept of Penicillium was re-defined to accommodate species from other genera, such as Chromocleista, Eladia, Eupenicillium, Torulomyces and Thysanophora, which together comprise a large monophyletic clade. As a result of this, and the many new species described in recent years, it was necessary to update the list of accepted species in Penicillium. The genus currently contains 354 accepted species, including new combinations for Aspergillus crystallinus, A. malodoratus and A. paradoxus, which belong to Penicillium section Paradoxa. To add to the taxonomic value of the list, we also provide information on each accepted species MycoBank number, living ex-type strains and provide GenBank accession numbers to ITS, β-tubulin, calmodulin and RPB2 sequences, thereby supplying a verified set of sequences for each species of the genus. In addition to the nomenclatural list, we recommend a standard working method for species descriptions and identifications to be adopted by laboratories working on this genus. PMID:25505353

  18. Identification and nomenclature of the genus Penicillium

    PubMed Central

    Visagie, C.M.; Houbraken, J.; Frisvad, J.C.; Hong, S.-B.; Klaassen, C.H.W.; Perrone, G.; Seifert, K.A.; Varga, J.; Yaguchi, T.; Samson, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Penicillium is a diverse genus occurring worldwide and its species play important roles as decomposers of organic materials and cause destructive rots in the food industry where they produce a wide range of mycotoxins. Other species are considered enzyme factories or are common indoor air allergens. Although DNA sequences are essential for robust identification of Penicillium species, there is currently no comprehensive, verified reference database for the genus. To coincide with the move to one fungus one name in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants, the generic concept of Penicillium was re-defined to accommodate species from other genera, such as Chromocleista, Eladia, Eupenicillium, Torulomyces and Thysanophora, which together comprise a large monophyletic clade. As a result of this, and the many new species described in recent years, it was necessary to update the list of accepted species in Penicillium. The genus currently contains 354 accepted species, including new combinations for Aspergillus crystallinus, A. malodoratus and A. paradoxus, which belong to Penicillium section Paradoxa. To add to the taxonomic value of the list, we also provide information on each accepted species MycoBank number, living ex-type strains and provide GenBank accession numbers to ITS, β-tubulin, calmodulin and RPB2 sequences, thereby supplying a verified set of sequences for each species of the genus. In addition to the nomenclatural list, we recommend a standard working method for species descriptions and identifications to be adopted by laboratories working on this genus. PMID:25505353

  19. A taxonomic and phylogenetic revision of the Penicillium sclerotiorum complex

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, K.G.; Seifert, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    The morphological concept of Penicillium sclerotiorum (subgenus Aspergilloides) includes strains with monoverticillate, vesiculate conidiophores, and vivid orange to red colony colours, with colourful sclerotia sometimes produced. Multigene phylogenetic analyses with the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1), β-tubulin (benA), translation elongation factor 1-α (tef1-α), and calmodulin (cmd), reveal that the P. sclerotiorum morphospecies is a complex of seven phylogenetically distinct species, three of which were recently described, namely P. guanacastense, P. mallochii, and P. viticola. Three previously unidentified species are described here as P. cainii, P. jacksonii, and P. johnkrugii. The phylogenetic species are morphologically similar, but differ in combinations of colony characters, sclerotium production, conidiophore stipe roughening and branching, and conidial shape. Ecological characters and differences in geographical distribution further characterise some of the species, but increased sampling is necessary to confirm these differences. The fungal DNA barcode, the ITS, and the animal DNA barcode, cox1, have lower species resolving ability in our phylogenetic analyses, but still allow identification of all the species. Tef1-α and cmd were superior in providing fully resolved, statistically well-supported phylogenetic trees for this species complex, whereas benA resolved all species but had some issues with paraphyly. Penicillium adametzioides and P. multicolor, considered synonyms of P. sclerotiorum by some previous authors, do not belong to the P. sclerotiorum complex. Taxonomic novelties: New species: Penicillium cainii K.G. Rivera, Malloch & Seifert, P. jacksonii K.G. Rivera, Houbraken & Seifert, P. johnkrugii K.G. Rivera, Houbraken & Seifert. PMID:22308047

  20. Biosynthesis of radiolabeled verruculogen by Penicillium simplicissimum.

    PubMed Central

    Day, J B; Mantle, P G

    1982-01-01

    In surface culture of Penicillium simplicissimum, verruculogen was shown to be biosynthesized from the intact carbon skeletons of tryptophan and proline, isoprenoid derivatives of mevalonic acid, and a methyl group donated by methionine. Selected radiolabeled precursors (1 mCi) pulse-fed at the optimum stage of fermentation yielded verruculogen (specific activity, 5.89 X 10(2) microCi mmol-1) labeled in the prolyl and isoprenyl regions of the molecule and suitable for metabolic studies. PMID:7041819

  1. Biosynthesis of radiolabeled verruculogen by Penicillium simplicissimum.

    PubMed

    Day, J B; Mantle, P G

    1982-03-01

    In surface culture of Penicillium simplicissimum, verruculogen was shown to be biosynthesized from the intact carbon skeletons of tryptophan and proline, isoprenoid derivatives of mevalonic acid, and a methyl group donated by methionine. Selected radiolabeled precursors (1 mCi) pulse-fed at the optimum stage of fermentation yielded verruculogen (specific activity, 5.89 X 10(2) microCi mmol-1) labeled in the prolyl and isoprenyl regions of the molecule and suitable for metabolic studies. PMID:7041819

  2. Steroids' transformations in Penicillium notatum culture.

    PubMed

    Bartmańska, Agnieszka; Dmochowska-Gładysz, Jadwiga; Huszcza, Ewa

    2005-03-01

    The application of Penicillium notatum genus for biotransformations of steroids has been investigated. The reactions observed include insertion of an oxygen atom into D-ring of steroids, 15alpha-hydroxylation of 17alpha-methyl testosterone derivatives, ester bond hydrolysis, and degradation of a testosterone derivatives side chain. Microbial production of testolactones, the biologically active compounds, was also achieved using this strain in up to 98% yield. PMID:15763598

  3. Expanding the species and chemical diversity of Penicillium section Cinnamopurpurea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A set of isolates very similar to or potentially conspecific with an unidentified Penicillium isolate NRRL 735, was assembled using a BLAST search of ITS similarity among described (GenBank) and undescribed Penicillium isolates in our laboratories. DNA was amplified from six loci of the assembled is...

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Fungus Penicillium brasilianum MG11.

    PubMed

    Horn, Fabian; Linde, Jörg; Mattern, Derek J; Walther, Grit; Guthke, Reinhard; Brakhage, Axel A; Valiante, Vito

    2015-01-01

    The genus Penicillium belongs to the phylum Ascomycota and includes a variety of fungal species important for food and drug production. We report the draft genome sequence of Penicillium brasilianum MG11. This strain was isolated from soil, and it was reported to produce different secondary metabolites. PMID:26337871

  5. Expanding the species and chemical diversity of Penicillium section Cinnamopurpurea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A set of isolates genetically similar to or potentially conspecific with an unidentified Penicillium isolate NRRL 735, was assembled using a Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) search of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) similarity among described (GenBank) and undescribed Penicillium isolates...

  6. Endophytic Penicillium citrinum Thom. from Scoparia dulcis Linn.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Annie J; Jayachandran, K; Mathew, Jyothis

    2010-10-01

    Scoparia dulcis of Scrophulariaceae is an annual herb distributed through out the tropics. Penicillium citrinum was obtained from apparently healthy roots, stem, leaves and fruits of this plant. Callus and multiple shoots produced during micropropagation from various explants were also symptomless but showed occurrence of Penicillium citrinum when cultured in Murashige & Skoog liquid medium for the production of secondary metabolites. PMID:22815580

  7. Non-gravitational effects on genus penicillium

    SciTech Connect

    Loup, M.

    1995-09-01

    In September 1994, Shuttle Orbiter Discovery, STS-64, launched into space. Aboard that shuttle was a payload containing Fungi spores, genus Penicillium. With the over looking help of Dr. Audrey Gabel, Associate Professor of Biology at Black Hills State University, investigations on differing media types began. Basis for this experimentation was to determine if there was any differences between the space exposed spores and control spores. Studies concluded that there were differences and those differences were then recorded. It was hypothesized the spores may have been effected causing differences in growth rate, colony size, depth and margins, coloring, germination, and growth on different media.

  8. Non-gravitational effects on genus penicillium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loup, Mackenzie

    1995-01-01

    In September 1994, Shuttle Orbiter Discovery, STS-64, launched into space. Aboard that shuttle was a payload containing Fungi spores, genus Penicillium. With the over looking help of Dr. Audrey Gabel, Associate Professor of Biology at Black Hills State University, investigations on differing media types began. Basis for this experimentation was to determine if there was any differences between the space exposed spores and control spores. Studies concluded that there were differences and those differences were then recorded. It was hypothesized the spores may have been effected causing differences in growth rate, colony size, depth and margins, coloring, germination, and growth on different media.

  9. Plant growth promotion and Penicillium citrinum

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sumera Afzal; Hamayun, Muhammad; Yoon, Hyeokjun; Kim, Ho-Youn; Suh, Seok-Jong; Hwang, Seon-Kap; Kim, Jong-Myeong; Lee, In-Jung; Choo, Yeon-Sik; Yoon, Ung-Han; Kong, Won-Sik; Lee, Byung-Moo; Kim, Jong-Guk

    2008-01-01

    Background Endophytic fungi are known plant symbionts. They produce a variety of beneficial metabolites for plant growth and survival, as well as defend their hosts from attack of certain pathogens. Coastal dunes are nutrient deficient and offer harsh, saline environment for the existing flora and fauna. Endophytic fungi may play an important role in plant survival by enhancing nutrient uptake and producing growth-promoting metabolites such as gibberellins and auxins. We screened roots of Ixeris repenes (L.) A. Gray, a common dune plant, for the isolation of gibberellin secreting endophytic fungi. Results We isolated 15 endophytic fungi from the roots of Ixeris repenes and screened them for growth promoting secondary metabolites. The fungal isolate IR-3-3 gave maximum plant growth when applied to waito-c rice and Atriplex gemelinii seedlings. Analysis of the culture filtrate of IR-3-3 showed the presence of physiologically active gibberellins, GA1, GA3, GA4 and GA7 (1.95 ng/ml, 3.83 ng/ml, 6.03 ng/ml and 2.35 ng/ml, respectively) along with other physiologically inactive GA5, GA9, GA12, GA15, GA19, GA20 and, GA24. The plant growth promotion and gibberellin producing capacity of IR-3-3 was much higher than the wild type Gibberella fujikuroi, which was taken as control during present study. GA5, a precursor of bioactive GA3 was reported for the first time in fungi. The fungal isolate IR-3-3 was identified as a new strain of Penicillium citrinum (named as P. citrinum KACC43900) through phylogenetic analysis of 18S rDNA sequence. Conclusion Isolation of new strain of Penicillium citrinum from the sand dune flora is interesting as information on the presence of Pencillium species in coastal sand dunes is limited. The plant growth promoting ability of this fungal strain may help in conservation and revegetation of the rapidly eroding sand dune flora. Penicillium citrinum is already known for producing mycotoxin citrinin and cellulose digesting enzymes like cellulase and

  10. Comparison of glucose oxidases from Penicillium adametzii, Penicillium Funiculosum and Aspergillus Niger in the design of amperometric glucose biosensors.

    PubMed

    Ramanavicius, Arunas; Voronovic, Jaroslav; Semashko, Tatiana; Mikhailova, Raisa; Kausaite-Minkstimiene, Asta; Ramanaviciene, Almira

    2014-01-01

    The properties of amperometric glucose biosensors based on three different glucose oxidases and various redox mediators were evaluated. Glucose oxidases (GOx) from Penicillium adametzii, Penicillium funiculosum and Aspergillus niger and artificial redox mediators, such as ferrocene, ferrocenecarboxaldehyde, α-methylferrocene methanol and ferrocenecarboxylic acid, were used for modifying the graphite rod electrode and amperometrical reagent-less glucose detection. The obtained results were compared using N-methylphenazonium methyl sulphate in the solution. Taking into account the experimental kinetic parameters and the stability of the tested enzymatic electrodes, GOx from Penicillium funiculosum proved to be more suitable for glucose biosensor design in comparison with other evaluated enzymes. PMID:25492463

  11. Ultraviolet Radiation Induction of Mutation in Penicillium Claviforme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New, June; Jolley, Ray

    1986-01-01

    Cites reasons why Penicillium claviforme is an exceptionally good species for ultraviolet induced mutation experiments. Provides a set of laboratory instructions for teachers and students. Includes a discussion section. (ML)

  12. Contrasting Genomic Diversity in Two Closely Related Postharvest Pathogens: Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium expansum.

    PubMed

    Julca, Irene; Droby, Samir; Sela, Noa; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Gabaldón, Toni

    2016-01-01

    Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium expansum are two closely related fungal plant pathogens causing green and blue mold in harvested fruit, respectively. The two species differ in their host specificity, being P. digitatum restricted to citrus fruits and P. expansum able to infect a wide range of fruits after harvest. Although host-specific Penicillium species have been found to have a smaller gene content, it is so far unclear whether these different host specificities impact genome variation at the intraspecific level. Here we assessed genome variation across four P. digitatum and seven P. expansum isolates from geographically distant regions. Our results show very high similarity (average 0.06 SNPs [single nucleotide polymorphism] per kb) between globally distributed isolates of P. digitatum pointing to a recent expansion of a single lineage. This low level of genetic variation found in our samples contrasts with the higher genetic variability observed in the similarly distributed P. expansum isolates (2.44 SNPs per kb). Patterns of polymorphism in P. expansum indicate that recombination exists between genetically diverged strains. Consistent with the existence of sexual recombination and heterothallism, which was unknown for this species, we identified the two alternative mating types in different P. expansum isolates. Patterns of polymorphism in P. digitatum indicate a recent clonal population expansion of a single lineage that has reached worldwide distribution. We suggest that the contrasting patterns of genomic variation between the two species reflect underlying differences in population dynamics related with host specificities and related agricultural practices. It should be noted, however, that this results should be confirmed with a larger sampling of strains, as new strains may broaden the diversity so far found in P. digitatum. PMID:26672008

  13. Contrasting Genomic Diversity in Two Closely Related Postharvest Pathogens: Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium expansum

    PubMed Central

    Julca, Irene; Droby, Samir; Sela, Noa; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Gabaldón, Toni

    2016-01-01

    Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium expansum are two closely related fungal plant pathogens causing green and blue mold in harvested fruit, respectively. The two species differ in their host specificity, being P. digitatum restricted to citrus fruits and P. expansum able to infect a wide range of fruits after harvest. Although host-specific Penicillium species have been found to have a smaller gene content, it is so far unclear whether these different host specificities impact genome variation at the intraspecific level. Here we assessed genome variation across four P. digitatum and seven P. expansum isolates from geographically distant regions. Our results show very high similarity (average 0.06 SNPs [single nucleotide polymorphism] per kb) between globally distributed isolates of P. digitatum pointing to a recent expansion of a single lineage. This low level of genetic variation found in our samples contrasts with the higher genetic variability observed in the similarly distributed P. expansum isolates (2.44 SNPs per kb). Patterns of polymorphism in P. expansum indicate that recombination exists between genetically diverged strains. Consistent with the existence of sexual recombination and heterothallism, which was unknown for this species, we identified the two alternative mating types in different P. expansum isolates. Patterns of polymorphism in P. digitatum indicate a recent clonal population expansion of a single lineage that has reached worldwide distribution. We suggest that the contrasting patterns of genomic variation between the two species reflect underlying differences in population dynamics related with host specificities and related agricultural practices. It should be noted, however, that this results should be confirmed with a larger sampling of strains, as new strains may broaden the diversity so far found in P. digitatum. PMID:26672008

  14. Effect of Penicillium chrysogenum on Lignin Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, A.; Carnicero, A.; Perestelo, F.; de la Fuente, G.; Milstein, O.; Falcón, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    A strain of Penicillium chrysogenum has been isolated from pine forest soils in Tenerife (Canary Islands). This strain was capable of utilizing hydroxylated and nonhydroxylated aromatic compounds, in particular cinnamic acid, as its sole carbon source. In an optimum medium with high levels of nitrogen (25.6 mM) and low levels of glucose (5.5 mM), it was able to decolorize Poly B-411 and to transform kraft, organosolv, and synthetic dehydrogenative polymerisate lignins. After 30 days of incubation, the amount of recovered kraft lignin was reduced to 83.5 and 91.3% of that estimated for uninoculated controls by spectrophotometry and klason lignin, respectively. At the same time, the pattern of molecular mass distribution of the lignin remaining in cultures was changed. The amount of organosolv lignin recovered from cultures was reduced to 90.1 and 94.6% of the initial amount as evaluated by spectrophotometry and klason lignin, respectively. About 6% of total applied radioactivity of O14CH3-organosolv lignin was recovered as 14CO2 after 30 days of incubation, and 18.5% of radioactivity from insoluble O14CH3-organosolv lignin was solubilized. After 26 days of incubation, 2.9% of 14C-β-dehydrogenative polymerisate and 4.1% of 14C-ring-dehydrogenative polymerisate evolved as 14CO2. PMID:16349361

  15. Reminiscence of phospholipase B in Penicillium notatum

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    Since the phospholipase B (PLB) was reported as a deacylase of both lecithin and lysolecithin yielding fatty acids and glycerophosphocholine (GPC), there was a question as to whether it is a single enzyme or a mixture of a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and a lysophospholipase (LPL). We purified the PLB in Penicillium notatum and showed that it catalyzed deacylation of sn-1 and sn-2 fatty acids of 1,2-diacylphospholipids and also sn-1 or sn-2 fatty acids of 1- or 2-monoacylphospholipids (lysophospholipids). Further, it also has a monoacyllipase activity. The purified PLB is a glycoprotein with m.w. of 91,300. The sugar moiety is M9 only and the protein moiety consists of 603 amino acids. PLB, different from PLA2, shows other enzymatic activities, such as transacylase, lipase and acylesterase. PLB activity is influenced by various substances, e.g. detergents, deoxycholate, diethylether, Fe3+, and endogenous protease. Therefore, PLB might have broader roles than PLA2 in vivo. The database shows an extensive sequence similarity between P. notatum PLB and fungal PLB, cPLA2 and patatin, suggesting a homologous relationship. The catalytic triad of cPLA2, Ser, Asp and Arg, is also present in P. notatum PLB. Other related PLBs, PLB/Lipases are discussed. PMID:25391318

  16. Reminiscence of phospholipase B in Penicillium notatum.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kunihiko

    2014-01-01

    Since the phospholipase B (PLB) was reported as a deacylase of both lecithin and lysolecithin yielding fatty acids and glycerophosphocholine (GPC), there was a question as to whether it is a single enzyme or a mixture of a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and a lysophospholipase (LPL). We purified the PLB in Penicillium notatum and showed that it catalyzed deacylation of sn-1 and sn-2 fatty acids of 1,2-diacylphospholipids and also sn-1 or sn-2 fatty acids of 1- or 2-monoacylphospholipids (lysophospholipids). Further, it also has a monoacyllipase activity. The purified PLB is a glycoprotein with m.w. of 91,300. The sugar moiety is M9 only and the protein moiety consists of 603 amino acids. PLB, different from PLA2, shows other enzymatic activities, such as transacylase, lipase and acylesterase. PLB activity is influenced by various substances, e.g. detergents, deoxycholate, diethylether, Fe(3+), and endogenous protease. Therefore, PLB might have broader roles than PLA2 in vivo. The database shows an extensive sequence similarity between P. notatum PLB and fungal PLB, cPLA2 and patatin, suggesting a homologous relationship. The catalytic triad of cPLA2, Ser, Asp and Arg, is also present in P. notatum PLB. Other related PLBs, PLB/Lipases are discussed. PMID:25391318

  17. Polyketides, Toxins and Pigments in Penicillium marneffei

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Emily W. T.; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Penicillium marneffei (synonym: Talaromyces marneffei) is the most important pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungus in China and Southeastern Asia. The HIV/AIDS pandemic, particularly in China and other Southeast Asian countries, has led to the emergence of P. marneffei infection as an important AIDS-defining condition. Recently, we published the genome sequence of P. marneffei. In the P. marneffei genome, 23 polyketide synthase genes and two polyketide synthase-non-ribosomal peptide synthase hybrid genes were identified. This number is much higher than those of Coccidioides immitis and Histoplasma capsulatum, important pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungi in the Western world. Phylogenetically, these polyketide synthase genes were distributed evenly with their counterparts found in Aspergillus species and other fungi, suggesting that polyketide synthases in P. marneffei did not diverge from lineage-specific gene duplication through a recent expansion. Gene knockdown experiments and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detector/electrospray ionization-quadruple time of flight-mass spectrometry analysis confirmed that at least four of the polyketide synthase genes were involved in the biosynthesis of various pigments in P. marneffei, including melanin, mitorubrinic acid, mitorubrinol, monascorubrin, rubropunctatin, citrinin and ankaflavin, some of which were mycotoxins and virulence factors of the fungus. PMID:26529013

  18. Effect of LED Blue Light on Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum Strains.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, María T; Alférez, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    Studies on the antimicrobial properties of light have considerably increased due in part to the development of resistance to actual control methods. This study investigates the potential of light-emitting diodes (LED) blue light for controlling Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum. These fungi are the most devastating postharvest pathogens of citrus fruit and cause important losses due to contaminations and the development of resistant strains against fungicides. The effect of different periods and quantum fluxes, delaying light application on the growth and morphology of P. digitatum strains resistant and sensitive to fungicides, and P. italicum cultured at 20°C was examined. Results showed that blue light controls the growth of all strains and that its efficacy increases with the quantum flux. Spore germination was always avoided by exposing the cultures to high quantum flux (700 μmol m(-2) s(-1) ) for 18 h. Continuous light had an important impact on the fungus morphology and a fungicidal effect when applied at a lower quantum flux (120 μmol m(-2) s(-1) ) to a growing fungus. Sensitivity to light increased with mycelium age. Results show that blue light may be a tool for P. digitatum and P. italicum infection prevention during handling of citrus fruits. PMID:26288067

  19. Anti-fungal activity of Citrus reticulata Blanco essential oil against Penicillium italicum and Penicillium digitatum.

    PubMed

    Tao, Nengguo; Jia, Lei; Zhou, Haien

    2014-06-15

    The chemical composition of Citrus reticulata Blanco essential oil was analysed using GC/MS. Monoterpene hydrocarbons (C10H16) constituted the majority (88.96%, w/w) of the total oil. The oils dose-dependently inhibited Penicillium italicum and Penicillium digitatum. The anti-fungal activity of the oils against P. italicum was attributed to citronellol, octanal, citral, decanal, nonanal, β-pinene, linalool, and γ-terpinene, whereas anti-fungal activity against P. digitatum is attributed to octanal, decanal, nonanal, limonene, citral, γ-terpinene, linalool, and α-terpineol. The oils altered the hyphal morphology of P. italicum and P. digitatum by causing loss of cytoplasm and distortion of the mycelia. The oils significantly altered extracellular conductivity, the release of cell constituents, and the total lipid content of P. italicum and P. digitatum. The results suggest that C. reticulata Blanco essential oils generate cytotoxicity in P. italicum and P. digitatum by disrupting cell membrane integrity and causing the leakage of cell components. PMID:24491729

  20. Penicillium Mycelium Waste as Protein Supplement in Animals

    PubMed Central

    Doctor, V. M.; Kerur, L.

    1968-01-01

    Dried Penicillium mycelium served as a protein source in animal diet when it was supplemented at 7.5% protein level along with 7.5% protein level from peanut meal. Under these conditions, the food consumption was optimal, and the rat growth response was comparable with 15% casein diet. The role of peanut meal appears to be twofold; it makes the mycelium diet more palatable and it supplies protein. The amino acids, lysine and threonine, which are found to be limiting in peanut meal, are reported to be present in the Penicillium mycelium. This type of formulation affords considerable economic advantage because both the peanut meal and the Penicillium mycelium are by-products and, therefore, are inexpensive sources of protein. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:16349822

  1. Acidification of apple and orange hosts by Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium expansum.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, L; Viñas, I; Torres, R; Usall, J; Buron-Moles, G; Teixidó, N

    2014-05-16

    New information about virulence mechanisms of Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium expansum could be an important avenue to control fungal diseases. In this study, the ability of P. digitatum and P. expansum to enhance their virulence by locally modulating the pH of oranges and apples was evaluated. For each host, pH changes with a compatible pathogen and a non-host pathogen were recorded, and the levels of different organic acids were evaluated to establish possible relationships with host pH modifications. Moreover, fruits were harvested at three maturity stages to determine whether fruit maturity could affect the pathogens' virulence. The pH of oranges and apples decreased when the compatible pathogens (P. digitatum and P. expansum, respectively) decayed the fruit. The main organic acid detected in P. digitatum-decayed oranges was galacturonic acid produced as a consequence of host maceration in the rot development process. However, the obtained results showed that this acid was not responsible for the pH decrease in decayed orange tissue. The mixture of malic and citric acids could at least contribute to the acidification of P. digitatum-decayed oranges. The pH decrease in P. expansum decayed apples is related to the accumulation of gluconic and fumaric acids. The pH of oranges and apples was not affected when the non-host pathogen was not able to macerate the tissues. However, different organic acid contents were detected in comparison to healthy tissues. The main organic acids detected in P. expansum-oranges were oxalic and gluconic and in P. digitatum-apples were citric, gluconic and galacturonic. Further research is needed to identify the pathogenicity factors of both fungi because the contribution of organic acids has profound implications. PMID:24667317

  2. Sargassopenillines A–G, 6,6-Spiroketals from the Alga-Derived Fungi Penicillium thomii and Penicillium lividum

    PubMed Central

    Zhuravleva, Olesya I.; Sobolevskaya, Maria P.; Afiyatullov, Shamil Sh.; Kirichuk, Natalya N.; Denisenko, Vladimir A.; Dmitrenok, Pavel S.; Yurchenko, Ekaterina A.; Dyshlovoy, Sergey A.

    2014-01-01

    Seven new 6,6-spiroketals, sargassopenillines A–G (1–7) were isolated from the alga-derived fungi Penicillium thomii KMM 4645 and Penicillium lividum KMM 4663. The structures of these metabolites were determined by HR-MS and 1D and 2D NMR. The absolute configurations of compounds 1, 5 and 6 were assigned by the modified Mosher’s method and by CD data. Sargassopenilline C (3) inhibited the transcriptional activity of the oncogenic nuclear factor AP-1 with an IC50 value of 15 µM. PMID:25501795

  3. EVALUATION OF FUNGAL GROWTH (PENICILLIUM GLABRUM) ON A CEILING TILE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study employing static chambers to study the impact of different equilibrium relative humidities (RHs) and moisture conditions on the ability of a new ceiling tile to support fungal growth. Amplification of the mold, Penicillium glabrum, occurred at R...

  4. EVALUATION OF FUNGAL GROWTH (PENICILLIUM GLABRUM) ON A CEILING TILE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study employing static chambers to study the impact of different equilibrium relative humidities (RHs) and moisture conditions on the ability of a new ceiling tile to support fungal growth. mplification of the mold, Penicillium glabrum, occurred at RH...

  5. Use of chemosensitization to overcome fludioxonil resistance in Penicillium expansum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penicillium expansum mutants (FR2 and FR3) resistant to fludioxonil, a phenylpyrrole fungicide, became susceptible through chemosensitization mediated by natural phenolics. Increased sensitivity of FR3 to oxidizing agents, compared to its parental strain (W2), indicated the oxidative stress respons...

  6. Meroterpenes from Penicillium sp found in association with Melia azedarach.

    PubMed

    Geris dos Santos, Regina M; Rodrigues-Fo, Edson

    2002-12-01

    A Penicillium sp was isolated from the root bark of Melia azedarach and cultivated over sterilized rice. After chromatographic procedures, two meroterpenes, named preaustinoid A and B, were obtained in addition to the known alkaloid verruculogen. Their structures were identified by extensive spectroscopic studies, and they exhibited moderate bacteriostatic effects on Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus sp. PMID:12453515

  7. Penicillium menonorum, a new species related to P. pimiteouiense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penicillium menonorum is described as a new monoverticillate, non-vesiculate species that resembles P. restrictum and P. pimiteouiense. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequences from four loci, P. menorum occurs in a clade with P. pimiteouiense, P. vinaceum, P. guttulosum, E. rubidurum,...

  8. A new polyoxygenated farnesylcyclohexenone from Fungus Penicillium sp.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yabin; Yang, Fangfang; Zhao, Lixing; Duang, Rongting; Chen, Guangyi; Li, Xiaozhan; Li, Qiling; Qin, Shaohuan; Ding, Zhongtao

    2016-01-01

    A new polyoxygenated farnesylcyclohexenone, peniginsengin A (1), was isolated from the fermentation of Penicillium sp. YIM PH30003, an endophytic fungus associated with Panax notoginseng (Burk.) F. H. Chen. The structure was assigned based on a combination of 1 D and 2 D NMR and mass spectral data. The cytotoxicity and antimicrobial activities of compound 1 were investigated. PMID:25906789

  9. QUANTITATIVE PCR OF SELECTED ASPERGILLUS, PENICILLIUM AND PAECILOMYCES SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A total of 65 quantitative PCR (QPCR) assays, incorporating fluorigenic 5' nuclease (TaqMan®) chemistry and directed at the nuclear ribosomal RNA operon, internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1 or ITS2) was developed and tested for the detection of Aspergillus, Penicillium and ...

  10. HEMOLYSIN, CHRYSOLYSIN FROM PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM PROMOTES INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Some strains of Penicillium chrysogenum produce a proteinaceous hemolysin, chrysolysin, when incubated on sheep's blood agar at 37 �C but not at 23 �C. Chrysolysin is an aggregating protein composed of approximately 2 kDa monomers, contains one cysteine amino acid, and has an is...

  11. DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC ASTHMA RESPONSES TO PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    Indoor mold has been associated with development of allergic asthma. Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and its viable conidia can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. The hypothesis o...

  12. PENICILLIUM ASTROLABIUM AND PENICILLIUM NEOCRASSUM, TWO NEW SPECIES ISOLATED FROM GRAPES AND THEIR PHYLOGENETIC PLACEMENT IN THE P. OLSONII AND P. BREVICOMPACTUM CLADE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We describe two new terverticillate Penicillium species isolated from grapes on the basis of phenotypic and phylogenetic differences from known species. The strains were isolated in the course of a study to establish the mycobiota of grapes in Portugal. Penicillium astrolabium is phenotypically si...

  13. Patulin Accumulation In Apples During Storage by Penicillium Expansum and Penicillium Griseofulvum Strains

    PubMed Central

    Welke, Juliane Elisa; Hoeltz, Michele; Dottori, Horacio Alberto; Noll, Isa Beatriz

    2011-01-01

    A part of apples destined to juice production is generally of poor quality. Apples from cold storage or recently harvest (ground harvested or low quality apples) are stored under ambient conditions until they are processed. Since Penicillium expansum and P. griseofulvum are the principal fungal species isolated from stored apples in Brazil, the objective of this study was to investigate the ability of these strains to produce patulin in apples and report the consequences of this type of storage in loss of quality. The toxin was quantified using thin layer chromatography and charge-coupled device camera (TLC-CCD). The rate and quantities that P. expansum and P. griseofulvum can grow and produce patulin are highly dependent on the fungal strain and time. Lesion diameter resulted to be independent of the strain considered. The maximum period of time which apples were kept at cold storage (4 °C) without patulin accumulation was 27 days. When these apples were kept at 25 °C during 3 days, both factors lesion diameter and patulin production increased significantly. These results confirm that time in which apples are taken out from cold storage room before juice production is critical in order to prevent patulin accumulation. PMID:24031618

  14. Superactive cellulase formulation using cellobiohydrolase-1 from Penicillium funiculosum

    DOEpatents

    Adney, William S.; Baker, John O.; Decker, Stephen R.; Chou, Yat-Chen; Himmel, Michael E.; Ding, Shi-You

    2012-10-09

    Purified cellobiohydrolase I (glycosyl hydrolase family 7 (Cel7A)) enzymes from Penicillium funiculosum demonstrate a high level of specific performance in comparison to other Cel7 family member enzymes when formulated with purified EIcd endoglucanase from A. cellulolyticus and tested on pretreated corn stover. This result is true of the purified native enzyme, as well as recombinantly expressed enzyme, for example, that enzyme expressed in a non-native Aspergillus host. In a specific example, the specific performance of the formulation using purified recombinant Cel7A from Penicillium funiculosum expressed in A. awamori is increased by more than 200% when compared to a formulation using purified Cel7A from Trichoderma reesei.

  15. Superactive cellulase formulation using cellobiohydrolase-1 from Penicillium funiculosum

    DOEpatents

    Adney, William S.; Baker, John O.; Decker, Stephen R.; Chou, Yat-Chen; Himmel, Michael E.; Ding, Shi-You

    2008-11-11

    Purified cellobiohydrolase I (glycosyl hydrolase family 7 (Cel7A) enzymes from Penicillium funiculosum demonstrate a high level of specific performance in comparison to other Cel7 family member enzymes when formulated with purified EIcd endoglucanase from A. cellulolyticus and tested on pretreated corn stover. This result is true of the purified native enzyme, as well as recombinantly expressed enzyme, for example, that enzyme expressed in a non-native Aspergillus host. In a specific example, the specific performance of the formulation using purified recombinant Cel7A from Penicillium funiculosum expressed in A. awamori is increased by more than 200% when compared to a formulation using purified Cel7A from Trichoderma reesei.

  16. Purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a Penicillium expansum lipase.

    PubMed

    Bian, Chuanbing; Yuan, Cai; Lin, Lin; Lin, Junhan; Shi, Xiaoli; Ye, Xiaoming; Huang, Zixiang; Huang, Mingdong

    2005-08-31

    PF898 is a strain of Penicillium expansum optimized for the high level production of Penicillium expansum lipase (PEL). This PEL is unique compared with other lipases in several aspects, For example, the PEL shows low sequence identities (<30%) to all other known lipases, and high percentage of hydrophobic residues in the N-terminal region. The PEL was purified to homogeneity and shown to be 28 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis were obtained by the sitting-drop method of vapor diffusion with ammonia sulfate as the precipitating agent at 298 K. The crystals have tetragonal lattice and unit-cell parameters of a=b=88.09 A, c=126.54 A. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.08 A on an in-house rotating-anode generator. PMID:16112629

  17. Secondary metabolites from Penicillium corylophilum isolated from damp buildings.

    PubMed

    McMullin, David R; Nsiama, Tienabe K; Miller, J David

    2014-01-01

    Indoor exposure to the spores and mycelial fragments of fungi that grow on damp building materials can result in increased non-atopic asthma and upper respiratory disease. The mechanism appears to involve exposure to low doses of fungal metabolites. Penicillium corylophilum is surprisingly common in damp buildings in USA, Canada and western Europe. We examined isolates of P. corylophilum geographically distributed across Canada in the first comprehensive study of secondary metabolites of this fungus. The sesquiterpene phomenone, the meroterpenoids citreohybridonol and andrastin A, koninginin A, E and G, three new alpha pyrones and four new isochromans were identified from extracts of culture filtrates. This is the first report of koninginins, meroterpenoids and alpha pyrones from P. corylophilum. These secondary metabolite data support the removal of P. corylophilum from Penicillium section Citrina and suggest that further taxonomic studies are required on this species. PMID:24891425

  18. Expanding the Species and Chemical Diversity of Penicillium Section Cinnamopurpurea

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Stephen W.; Jurjević, Željko; Frisvad, Jens C.

    2015-01-01

    A set of isolates very similar to or potentially conspecific with an unidentified Penicillium isolate NRRL 735, was assembled using a BLAST search of ITS similarity among described (GenBank) and undescribed Penicillium isolates in our laboratories. DNA was amplified from six loci of the assembled isolates and sequenced. Two species in section Cinnamopurpurea are self-compatible sexual species, but the asexual species had polymorphic loci suggestive of sexual reproduction and variation in conidium size suggestive of ploidy level differences typical of heterothallism. Accordingly we use genealogical concordance analysis, a technique valid only in heterothallic organisms, for putatively asexual species. Seven new species were revealed in the analysis and are described here. Extrolite analysis showed that two of the new species, P. colei and P. monsserratidens produce the mycotoxin citreoviridin that has demonstrated pharmacological activity against human lung tumors. These isolates could provide leads in pharmaceutical research. PMID:25853891

  19. Penicillium subrubescens, a new species efficiently producing inulinase.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, S; Houbraken, J; Samson, R A; Frisvad, J C; Christensen, M; Tuthill, D E; Koutaniemi, S; Hatakka, A; Lankinen, P

    2013-06-01

    Inulin is a reserve carbohydrate in about 15 % of the flowering plants and is accumulated in underground tubers of e.g. chicory, dahlia and Jerusalem artichoke. This carbohydrate consists of linear chains of β-(2,1)-linked fructose attached to a sucrose molecule. Inulinases hydrolyse inulin into fructose and glucose. To find efficient inulin degrading fungi, 126 fungal strains from the Fungal Biotechnology Culture Collection (FBCC) at University of Helsinki and 74 freshly isolated strains from soil around Jerusalem artichoke tubers were screened in liquid cultures with inulin as a sole source of carbon or ground Jerusalem artichoke tubers, which contains up to 19 % (fresh weight) inulin. Inulinase and invertase activities were assayed by the dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) method and a freshly isolated Penicillium strain originating from agricultural soil (FBCC 1632) was the most efficient inulinase producer. When it was cultivated at pH 6 and 28 °C in 2 litre bioreactors using inulin and Jerusalem artichoke as a carbon source, inulinase and invertase activities were on day 4 7.7 and 3.1 U mL(-1), respectively. The released sugars analysed by TLC and HPLC showed that considerable amounts of fructose were released while the levels of oligofructans were low, indicating an exoinulinase type of activity. Taxonomic study of the inulinase producing strain showed that this isolate represents a new species belonging in Penicillium section Lanata-divaricata. This new species produces a unique combination of extrolites and is phenotypically and phylogenetically closely related to Penicillium pulvillorum. We propose the name Penicillium subrubescens sp. nov. (CBS 132785(T) = FBCC 1632(T)) for this new species. PMID:23559042

  20. Genetic diversity, recombination, and divergence in animal associated Penicillium dipodomyis.

    PubMed

    Henk, Daniel A; Fisher, Matthew C

    2011-01-01

    Penicillium dipodomyis is thought to be an exclusively asexual fungus associated with Kangaroo Rats, Dipodomys species, and is unique among Penicillium species in growing at 37°C but producing no known toxins. Lack of recombination within P. dipodomyis would result in limited adaptive flexibility but possibly enhance local adaptation and host selection via maintenance of favourable genotypes. Here, analysis of DNA sequence data from five protein-coding genes shows that recombination occurs within P. dipodomyis on a small spatial scale. Furthermore, detection of mating-type alleles supports outcrossing and a sexual cycle in P. dipodomyis. P. dipodomyis was a weaker competitor in in vitro assays with other Penicillium species found in association with Kanagaroo rats. Bayesian species level analysis suggests that the P. dipodomyis lineage diverged from closely related species also found in cheek pouches of Kangaroo Rats and their stored seeds about 11 million years ago, a similar divergence time as Dipodomys from its sister rodent taxa. PMID:21850241

  1. Genetic Diversity, Recombination, and Divergence in Animal Associated Penicillium dipodomyis

    PubMed Central

    Henk, Daniel A.; Fisher, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Penicillium dipodomyis is thought to be an exclusively asexual fungus associated with Kangaroo Rats, Dipodomys species, and is unique among Penicillium species in growing at 37°C but producing no known toxins. Lack of recombination within P. dipodomyis would result in limited adaptive flexibility but possibly enhance local adaptation and host selection via maintenance of favourable genotypes. Here, analysis of DNA sequence data from five protein-coding genes shows that recombination occurs within P. dipodomyis on a small spatial scale. Furthermore, detection of mating-type alleles supports outcrossing and a sexual cycle in P. dipodomyis. P. dipodomyis was a weaker competitor in in vitro assays with other Penicillium species found in association with Kanagaroo rats. Bayesian species level analysis suggests that the P. dipodomyis lineage diverged from closely related species also found in cheek pouches of Kangaroo Rats and their stored seeds about 11 million years ago, a similar divergence time as Dipodomys from its sister rodent taxa. PMID:21850241

  2. Production of multifunctional lipases by Penicillium verrucosum and Penicillium brevicompactum under solid state fermentation of babassu cake and castor meal.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marceli Fernandes; Freire, Denise M G; de Castro, Aline Machado; Di Luccio, Marco; Mazutti, Marcio A; Oliveira, J Vladimir; Treichel, Helen; Oliveira, Débora

    2011-02-01

    The main objective of this work was to optimize lipase production, in terms of hydrolytic and esterification activities, by Penicillium brevicompactum and Penicillium verrucosum in solid state fermentation using agroindustrial residues as raw material. Maxima hydrolytic activities of 48.6 and 87.7 U/g were achieved when P. brevicompactum was cultured in babassu cake and castor meal, respectively. Higher esterification activities (around 244 U/g) were achieved when P. brevicompactum was used as microorganism and babassu cake as raw material. Different experimental conditions led to these promising values, clearly showing that no correlation can be attributed between hydrolytic and esterification activities. In spite of the several applications of lipases which are capable of catalyze synthesis reactions, only few works in this subject are presented in the literature, especially when low cost raw materials are used. PMID:20652598

  3. Blue mold to genomics and beyond: Insights into the biology and virulence of phytopathogenic Penicillium species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pomes, mainly apples and pears, are economically important fruits produced and consumed worldwide. The United States is the second largest producer of pome fruit in the world behind China. Penicillium expansum and other Penicillium spp. are the most common fungal plant pathogens that cause blue mold...

  4. Multilocus Sequence Identification of Penicillium Species in Cork Bark During the Manufacture of Wine Bottle Stoppers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite several studies reporting Penicillium as one of the most frequent fungal genera in cork at all the stages of manufacturing stoppers, the isolates were rarely identified to species level. We conducted a detailed study to identify Penicillium species, from the field to the factory environment...

  5. Multi-Locus Analysis of a Citreoviridin-Producing Isolate Previously Identified as Penicillium NRRL 13013

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cole et al (1981) reported a citreoviridin-producing isolate of Penicillium charlesii (NRRL 13013) from molded pecans. Wicklow later identified it as a variant of Penicillium citreoviride, noting that it produced sclerotia, although the species as a whole is not known to do so. We sequenced the IT...

  6. Clinical, morphological, and molecular characterization of Penicillium canis, sp. nov., isolated from a dog with osteomyelitis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections caused by Penicillium spp. are rare in dogs, and the prognosis in these cases is poor. An unknown species of Penicillium was isolated from a bone lesion in a young dog with osteomyelitis of the right ilium. Extensive diagnostic evaluation did not reveal evidence of dissemination. Resoluti...

  7. Host ranges of North American isolates of Penicillium causing blue mold of bulb crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single isolates of four Penicillium species belonging to series Corymbifera (Penicillium allii, P. hirsutum, P. tulipae, P. venetum) plus an isolate of P. polonicum, all from North American sources, were inoculated individually into Crocus sativus, Allium sativum (garlic), A. cepa (onion), Iris holl...

  8. Genome Sequence of Penicillium solitum RS1, Which Causes Postharvest Apple Decay

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guangxi; Jurick, Wayne M.; Gaskins, Verneta L.; Yin, Yanbin; Bennett, Joan W.; Shelton, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Penicillium species cause postharvest decay, commonly known as blue mold, in pome fruits, such as apples and pears. To devise novel strategies to prevent and reduce economic losses during storage, the genome sequence of Penicillium solitum RS1 is reported here for the first time. PMID:27174276

  9. Genetic and Morphological Diversity of the Genus Penicillium From Mazandaran and Tehran Provinces, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Abastabar, Mahdi; Mirhendi, Hossein; Hedayati, Mohammad Taghi; Shokohi, Tahereh; Rezaei-Matehkolaei, Ali; Mohammadi, Rasoul; Badali, Hamid; Moazeni, Maryam; Haghani, Iman; Ghojoghi, Aynaz; Akhtari, Javad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The genus Penicillium contains a large number of ubiquitous environmental taxa, of which some species are clinically important. Identification of Penicillium down to the species level is currently based on polyphasic criteria, including phenotypic features and genetic markers. Biodiversity of the genus Penicillium from Mazandaran and Tehran provinces has not been described. Objectives: The current paper focused on the environmental biodiversity of Penicillium isolates within some areas of Mazandaran and Tehran provinces, based on morphological traits and the molecular data from partial sequence of the β-tubulin (BT2) gene. Materials and Methods: A total of 400 strains were isolated from the environment and investigated using morphological tests and sequencing of BT2, in order to characterize the spectrum of the Penicillium species. Results: Sequence analysis of BT2 and morphological criteria of 20 strains representative of 10 species showed that Penicillium chrysogenum was the most prevalent species (n = 6), followed by P. polonicum (n = 3), P. glabrum (n = 2), P. palitans (n = 2), P. melanoconidium (n = 2), and other species, including P. expansum, P. canescense, P. griseofulvum, P. italicum, and P. raistrickii with one case each. Conclusions: It was shown that partial β-tubulin sequence, as a reliable genetic target, supported specific morphological criteria for identification of the Penicillium species. Like other assessments throughout the world, P. chrysogenum remains the most frequent environmental Penicillium species in Mazandaran and Tehran Provinces. PMID:27099684

  10. Elucidation of the biochemical basis of specificity and pathogenicity of Penicillium digitatum on citrus fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Green mold caused by Penicillium digitatum is the most damaging postharvest diseases of citrus fruit. This Penicillium species is specific to citrus fruit and do not cause progressive decay in any other fresh fruit or vegetable crops. While the etiology of P. digitatum is well understood, the phys...

  11. Augmenting antifungal activity of oxidizing agent with kojic acid: Control of Penicillium strains infecting crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative treatment is a strategy for preventing Penicillium contamination in foods or crops. Antifungal efficacy of oxidant [hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)], biotic effector [kojic acid (KA)] and abiotic stress (heat), alone or in combination, was investigated in Penicillium. The levels of antifungal int...

  12. Genome, transcriptome, and functional analyses of Penicillium expansum provide new insights into secondary metabolism and pathogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relationship between secondary metabolism and infection in pathogenic fungi has remained largely elusive. Penicillium comprises a group of plant pathogens with varying host specificities and with the ability to produce a wide array of secondary metabolites. The genomes of three Penicillium exp...

  13. Genome Sequence of Penicillium solitum RS1, Which Causes Postharvest Apple Decay.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiujiang; Wu, Guangxi; Jurick, Wayne M; Gaskins, Verneta L; Yin, Yanbin; Yin, Guohua; Bennett, Joan W; Shelton, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    Penicillium species cause postharvest decay, commonly known as blue mold, in pome fruits, such as apples and pears. To devise novel strategies to prevent and reduce economic losses during storage, the genome sequence of Penicillium solitum RS1 is reported here for the first time. PMID:27174276

  14. PENICILLIUM BROCAE A NEW SPECIES ASSOCIATED WITH THE COFFEE BERRY BORER IN CHIAPAS, MEXICO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penicillium brocae is a new monoverticillate species isolated from coffee berry borers collected at coffee plantations in Mexico near Cacahoatán, Chiapas, or from borers reared on artificial diets at ECOSUR laboratory facilities in Tapachula, Chiapas. Phenotypically, it is in Penicillium series Imp...

  15. Methylenolactocin, a novel antitumor antibiotic from Penicillium sp.

    PubMed

    Park, B K; Nakagawa, M; Hirota, A; Nakayama, M

    1988-06-01

    A novel antitumor antibiotic, methylenolactocin, was isolated from the culture filtrate of a new isolate of fungus identified as Penicillium sp. The fermentation yield reached about 100 mg per liter of the broth. Methylenolactocin has the molecular formula of C11H16O4 and possess an exomethylene lactone structure. Its structure was determined to be 3-carboxy-2-methylene-4-nonanolide by spectroscopic data. It is active against some Gram-positive bacteria and it prolongs the life span of mice inoculated with Ehrlich carcinoma. PMID:3403369

  16. Penicillium discolor, a new species from cheese, nuts and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Frisvad, J C; Samson, R A; Rassing, B R; van der Horst, M I; van Rijn, F T; Stark, J

    1997-08-01

    The new species Penicillium discolor, frequently isolated from nuts, vegetables and cheese is described. It is characterised by rough, dark green conidia, synnemateous growth on malt agar and the production of the secondary metabolites chaetoglobosins A, B and C, palitantin, cyclopenin, cyclopenol, cyclopeptin, dehydrocyclopeptin, viridicatin and viridicatol. It also produces the mouldy smelling compounds geosmin and 2-methyl-isoborneol, and a series of specific orange to red pigments on yeast extract sucrose agar, hence the epithet discolor. P. discolor resembles P. echinulatum morphologically but on basis of the secondary metabolites is also related to P. expansum, P. solitum and P. crustosum. PMID:9298190

  17. Selective cytotoxic eremophilane-type sesquiterpenes from Penicillium citreonigrum.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei-Hua; Goto, Masuo; Hsieh, Kan-Yen; Yuan, Bo; Zhao, Yu; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    One new eremophilane-type sesquiterpene (1, citreopenin) was isolated from Penicillium citreonigrum (HQ738282), and the structure was elucidated by a combination of spectroscopic data interpretation and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis using Cu Kα radiation (CCDC 1030588). Compound 1 showed weak activity against KB-VIN (IC50 = 11.0 ± 0.156 μM), while the known compound 3 exhibited selective cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (IC50 = 5.42 ± 0.167 μM). PMID:26666171

  18. Production of verruculogen by Penicillium estinogenum in stirred fermenters.

    PubMed

    Day, J B; Mantle, P G; Shaw, B I

    1980-04-01

    A spectrofluorometric assay for the estimation of the tremorgenic mycotoxin verruculogen in crude mycelial extract has been devised and used to determine concentrations as low as 0.2 microgram ml-1. Verruculogen production by Penicillium estinogenum has been extended from surface culture to submerged culture in 60 1 stirred fermenters, in which the maximum cell-associated mycotoxin yield [5 mg (100 ml culture)-1] was obtained within 7 d. It was found necessary to supplement the medium (Czapek Dox broth plus 0.5% yeast extract) with calcium chloride (2%) to induce profuse sporulation (2 X 10(7) conidia ml-1). PMID:7420051

  19. Beak infection by Penicillium cyclopium in a macaw (Ara ararauna).

    PubMed

    Bengoa, A; Briones, V; López, M B; Payá, M J

    1994-01-01

    A case of localized beak infection by Penicillium cyclopium in a macaw (Ara ararauna) is described. A necrotic lesion, with destruction of the corneous layer, was localized in the upper zone of the beak. Diagnosis was carried out on samples of the affected zone by direct microscopic observation, routine fungal culturing techniques, and scanning electron microscopy. Results were consistent: P. cyclopium was the only microorganism associated with the lesion site. No previous reports concerning this type of beak pathology have been found in the literature. PMID:7702532

  20. [Study on secondary metabolites of endophytic fungi Penicillium dangeardii].

    PubMed

    Lv, Hai-ning; Ding, Guang-zhi; Liu, Yun-bao; Qu, Jing

    2015-05-01

    Endophytic fungi Penicillium dangeardii, isolated from Lysidice rhodostegia Hance root, was fermented and the secondary metabolites were studied. By means of Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography, ODS column chromatography and PHPLC over the fermented culture, 5 compounds were isolated. By using ESI-MS and NMR, the structures of the compounds were determined as N-[9-(β- D-ribofuranosyl)-9H-purin-6-yl]-L-aspartic acid (1), 3-caffeoylquinic acid (2), 4-caffeoylquinic acid (3), and 5-caffeoylquinic acid (4), 3-hydroxy-benzoic acid-4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5). PMID:26323144

  1. Mycotoxin-producing strains of Penicillium viridicatum: classification into subgroups.

    PubMed

    Ciegler, A; Fennell, D I; Sansing, G A; Detroy, R W; Bennett, G A

    1973-09-01

    Fifty-two isolates of Penicillium viridicatum Westling were divided into three groups based on ability to produce ochratoxin and/or citrinin, color, growth rate, type of growth, odor, and isolation source. Members of group I resemble one of the representative strains of P. viridicatum described in the literature; those belonging to group II differ from group I strains in several characteristics; group III is a heterogeneous series of highly variable isolates. Although three subgroupings can be recognized, retention of all isolates in the species P. viridicatum is deemed most appropriate at this time. Spore macerates of all isolates were examined for virus-like particles but none were detected. PMID:4751786

  2. New promoters for strain engineering of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Polli, Fabiola; Meijrink, Ben; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2016-04-01

    Filamentous fungi such as Aspergillus and Penicillium are widely used as hosts for the industrial products such as proteins and secondary metabolites. Although filamentous fungi are versatile in recognizing transcriptional and translational elements present in genes from other filamentous fungal species, only few promoters have been applied and compared in performance so far in Penicillium chrysogenum. Therefore, a set of homologous and heterologous promoters were tested in a reporter system to obtain a set of potential different strengths. Through in vivo homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, twelve Aspergillus niger and P. chrysogenum promoter-reporter pathways were constructed that drive the expression of green fluorescent protein while concurrent expression of the red fluorescent protein was used as an internal standard and placed under control of the PcPAF promoter. The pathways were integrated into the genome of P. chrysogenum and tested using the BioLector system for fermentation. Reporter gene expression was monitored during growth and classified according to promoter strength and expression profile. A set of novel promoters was obtained that can be used to tune the expression of target genes in future strain engineering programs. PMID:26701309

  3. Penicillium strains isolated from Slovak grape berries taxonomy assessment by secondary metabolite profile.

    PubMed

    Santini, Antonello; Mikušová, Petra; Sulyok, Michael; Krska, Rudolf; Labuda, Roman; Srobárová, Antónia

    2014-11-01

    The secondary metabolite profiles of microfungi of the genus Penicillium isolated from samples of grape berries collected in two different phases during two vegetative seasons in Slovakia is described to assess the taxonomy. Three Slovak vine regions have been selected for this study, based on their climatic differences and national economic importance. Cultures of microfungi isolated from berries were incubated on different selective media for macro and micromorphology identification. The species Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium expansum, Penicillium palitans and Penicillium polonicum were identified according to growth and morphology. The related strains were found to produce a broad spectrum of fungal metabolites, including roquefortine C, chaetoglobosin A, penitrem A, cyclopeptin, cyclopenin, viridicatin, methylviridicatin, verrucofortine, secalonic acid D, cyclopiazonic acid, fumigaclavine and mycophenolic acid. Chemotaxonomy was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry (MS). Dried grape berries were also analyzed allowing to assess the presence of patulin, roquefortine C and penicillic acid; this last one has been identified in dried berries but not in vitro. PMID:25109845

  4. Use of Penicillium chrysogenum Mycelium as Animal Food

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, S. G.; Seshadri, R.

    1965-01-01

    The mycelial cake of Penicillium chrysogenum, when dried and specially processed, has been found to serve as a source of protein in place of soybean meal in the diet of experimental mice. Animals were fed a control diet first, and an increase in weight proved the formulation to be satisfactory. The changeover from the control to the experimental diet was sudden, and initially caused a decrease in the weight of the experimental mice. However, at the end of a 29-day period, the experimental mice showed increases in weight comparable to those of the control animals. This supports the view that dried mycelium can be substituted as a protein source for soybean meal, provided it is made more palatable and less disagreeable in odor. PMID:14325891

  5. Penipyridones A-F, Pyridone Alkaloids from Penicillium funiculosum.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haibo; Li, Liyuan; Wu, Chongming; Kurtán, Tibor; Mándi, Attila; Liu, Yankai; Gu, Qianqun; Zhu, Tianjiao; Guo, Peng; Li, Dehai

    2016-07-22

    Six new pyridone alkaloids, named penipyridones A-F (1-6), were isolated from the fermentation broth of an Antarctic moss-derived fungus, Penicillium funiculosum GWT2-24. Their structures were elucidated from extensive NMR and MS data. Although they possess the same major chromophore and some of them presented almost mirror ECD spectra, their absolute configurations were found to be uniformly S, as evidenced by X-ray single-crystal diffraction analysis, stereocontrolled total synthesis, and chemical conversions. TDDFT-ECD calculations of compounds 3 and 6 revealed that subtle conformational changes are responsible for the significantly different ECD curves. None of the compounds were cytotoxic (IC50 > 50 μM), while compounds 1, 2, 5, and 7 elicited lipid-lowering activity in HepG2 hepatocytes. PMID:27359163

  6. The paf gene product modulates asexual development in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Hegedüs, Nikoletta; Sigl, Claudia; Zadra, Ivo; Pócsi, Istvan; Marx, Florentine

    2011-06-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum secretes a low molecular weight, cationic and cysteine-rich protein (PAF). It has growth inhibitory activity against the model organism Aspergillus nidulans and numerous zoo- and phytopathogenic fungi but shows only minimal conditional antifungal activity against the producing organism itself. In this study we provide evidence for an additional function of PAF which is distinct from the antifungal activity against putative ecologically concurrent microorganisms. Our data indicate that PAF enhances conidiation in P. chrysogenum by modulating the expression of brlA, the central regulatory gene for mitospore development. A paf deletion strain showed a significant impairment of mitospore formation which sustains our hypothesis that PAF plays an important role in balancing asexual differentiation in P. chrysogenum. PMID:21298690

  7. Heterologous Expression of Two Ferulic Acid Esterases from Penicillium funiculosum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoshaug, Eric P.; Selig, Michael J.; Baker, John O.; Decker, Stephen R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Adney, William S.

    Two recombinant ferulic acid esterases from Penicillium funiculosum produced in Aspergillus awamori were evaluated for their ability to improve the digestibility of pretreated corn stover. The genes, faeA and faeB, were cloned from P. funiculosum and expressed in A. awamori using their native signal sequences. Both enzymes contain a catalytic domain connected to a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module by a threonine-rich linker peptide. Interestingly, the carbohydrate binding-module is N-terminal in FaeA and C-terminal in FaeB. The enzymes were purified to homogeneity using column chromatography, and their thermal stability was characterized by differential scanning microcalorimetry. We evaluated both enzymes for their potential to enhance the cellulolytic activity of purified Trichoderma reesei Cel7A on pretreated corn stover.

  8. Mycotoxin production by Penicillium expansum on blackcurrant and cherry juice.

    PubMed

    Larsen, T O; Frisvad, J C; Ravn, G; Skaaning, T

    1998-01-01

    The production of mycotoxins and other secondary metabolites by Penicillium expansum on blackcurrant and cherry juice has been studied at 10 degrees C and 25 degrees C under storage imitated conditions. P. expansum was able to synthesize extracellular patulin under all conditions, and together with extracellular chaetoglobosin A when unlimited oxygen was available. Patulin, the chaetoglobosins A and C, the communesins A and B and the expansolides A and B could be detected intracellularly depending on the conditions. The metabolites were detected using thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection by comparison to standards. A method to detect the expansolides A and B by TLC was developed. PMID:10209577

  9. Isolation and characterization of catalase from Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G S; Medin, A S; Chaga, S G; Porath, J O

    1992-06-26

    Catalase from a crude preparation of Penicillium chrysogenum was isolated in a single chromatographic step by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) on Cu(II)-Chelating Sepharose Fast Flow. A chromatographically and electrophoretically homogeneous enzyme was obtained in 89% yield. IMAC was found to be superior to ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction, size-exclusion and concanavalin A affinity chromatography. Analytical and preparative chromatography gave essentially the same chromatograms. Isoelectric point, molecular weight (by ultracentrifugation), amino acid composition, carbohydrate content and subunit organization were determined. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant, KM, and the azide competitor constant, Ki, were calculated and found to be 59 microM and 6.1 microM, respectively. PMID:1639925

  10. Oxidation mechanism of Penicillium digitatum spores through neutral oxygen radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the inactivation process of Penicillium digitatum spores through neutral oxygen species, the spores were treated with an atmospheric-pressure oxygen radical source and observed in-situ using a fluorescent confocal-laser microscope. The treated spores were stained with two fluorescent dyes, 1,1‧-dioctadecyl-3,3,Y,3‧-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) and diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine (DPPP). The intracellular organelles as well as the cell membranes in the spores treated with the oxygen radical source were stained with DiI without a major morphological change of the membranes. DPPP staining revealed that the organelles were oxidized by the oxygen radical treatment. These results suggest that neutral oxygen species, especially atomic oxygen, induce a minor structural change or functional inhibition of cell membranes, which leads to the oxidation of the intracellular organelles through the penetration of reactive oxygen species into the cell.

  11. Simulated microgravity inhibits cell wall regeneration of Penicillium decumbens protoplasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Sun, Y.; Yi, Z. C.; Rong, L.; Zhuang, F. Y.; Fan, Y. B.

    2010-09-01

    This work compares cell wall regeneration from protoplasts of the fungus Penicillium decumbens under rotary culture (simulated microgravity) and stationary cultures. Using an optimized lytic enzyme mixture, protoplasts were successfully released with a yield of 5.3 × 10 5 cells/mL. Under simulated microgravity conditions, the protoplast regeneration efficiency was 33.8%, lower than 44.9% under stationary conditions. Laser scanning confocal microscopy gave direct evidence for reduced formation of polysaccharides under simulated conditions. Scanning electron microscopy showed the delayed process of cell wall regeneration by simulated microgravity. The delayed regeneration of P. decumbens cell wall under simulated microgravity was likely caused by the inhibition of polysaccharide synthesis. This research contributes to the understanding of how gravitational loads affect morphological and physiological processes of fungi.

  12. Biodegradation of glyceryl trinitrate by Penicillium corylophilum Dierckx.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y Z; Sundaram, S T; Sharma, A; Brodman, B W

    1997-01-01

    Penicillium corylophilum Dierckx, isolated from a contaminated water wet, double-base propellant, was able to completely degrade glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) in a buffered medium (pH 7.0) containing glucose and ammonium nitrate. In the presence of 12 mg of initial fungal inoculum, GTN (48.5 to 61.6 mumol) was quantitatively transformed in a stepwise process to glyceryl dinitrate (GDN) and glyceryl mononitrate (GMN) within 48 h followed by a decrease in the GDN content with a concomitant increase in the GMN level. GDN was totally transformed to GMN within 168 h, and the complete degradation of GMN was achieved within 336 h. The presence of glucose and ammonium nitrate in the growth medium was essential for completion of the degradation of GTN and its metabolites. Complete degradation of GTN by a fungal culture has not been previously reported in the literature. PMID:9143106

  13. Effects of carbon dioxide on Penicillium chrysogenum: an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, A.G.; Ho, C.S.

    1988-06-20

    Previous research has shown that dissolved carbon dioxide causes significant changes in submerged penicillin fermentations, such as stunted, swollen hyphae, increased branching, lower growth rates, and lower penicillin productivity. Influent carbon dioxide levels of 5 and 10% were shown through the use of autoradiography to cause an increase in chitin synthesis in submerged cultures of Penicillium chrysogenum. At an influent 5% carbon dioxide level, chitin synthesis is ca. 100% greater in the subapical region of P. chrysogenum hyphae than that of the control, in which there was no influent carbon dioxide. Influent carbon dioxide of 10% caused an increase of 200% in chitin synthesis. It is believed that the cell wall must be plasticized before branching can occur and that high amounts of dissolved carbon dioxide cause the cell to lose control of the plasticizing effect, thus the severe morphological changes occur.

  14. Biosynthesis of penitrems and roquefortine by Penicillium crustosum.

    PubMed Central

    Mantle, P G; Perera, K P; Maishman, N J; Mundy, G R

    1983-01-01

    Roquefortine and the penitrems were biosynthesised concurrently at an approximately equimolar rate by Penicillium crustosum after growth and sporulation. [14C]mevalonic acid was incorporated (15% efficiency) into the isoprenoid regions of the penitrem and roquefortine molecules to an extent consistent with their 6:1 molar ratio of isoprenoid components. [14C]penitrem A (specific activity, 3.4 X 10(2) mu Ci mmol-1) and 14C-penitrems B, C, and E readministered to young cultures were metabolically interconverted, indicating considerable metabolic flux, though generally directed towards penitrem A as the end product and suggesting a metabolic grid for the penitrem metabolites. Addition of bromide to the medium preferentially favored the production of bromo-analogs rather than the usual chloropenitrems. PMID:6870239

  15. The paf gene product modulates asexual development in Penicillium chrysogenum

    PubMed Central

    Hegedüs, Nikoletta; Sigl, Claudia; Zadra, Ivo; Pócsi, Istvan; Marx, Florentine

    2011-01-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum secretes a low molecular weight, cationic and cysteine-rich protein (PAF). It has growth inhibitory activity against the model organism Aspergillus nidulans and numerous zoo- and phytopathogenic fungi but shows only minimal conditional antifungal activity against the producing organism itself. In this study we provide evidence for an additional function of PAF which is distinct from the antifungal activity against putative ecologically concurrent microorganisms. Our data indicate that PAF enhances conidiation in P. chrysogenum by modulating the expression of brlA, the central regulatory gene for mitospore development. A paf deletion strain showed a significant impairment of mitospore formation which sustains our hypothesis that PAF plays an important role in balancing asexual differentiation in P. chrysogenum. PMID:21298690

  16. Heterologous Expression of Two Ferulic Acid Esterases from Penicillium Funiculosum

    SciTech Connect

    Knoshaug, E. P.; Selig, M. J.; Baker, J. O.; Decker, S. R.; Himmel, M. E.; Adney, W. S.

    2008-01-01

    Two recombinant ferulic acid esterases from Penicillium funiculosum produced in Aspergillus awamori were evaluated for their ability to improve the digestibility of pretreated corn stover. The genes, faeA and faeB, were cloned from P. funiculosum and expressed in A. awamori using their native signal sequences. Both enzymes contain a catalytic domain connected to a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module by a threonine-rich linker peptide. Interestingly, the carbohydrate binding-module is N-terminal in FaeA and C-terminal in FaeB. The enzymes were purified to homogeneity using column chromatography, and their thermal stability was characterized by differential scanning microcalorimetry. We evaluated both enzymes for their potential to enhance the cellulolytic activity of purified Trichoderma reesei Cel7A on pretreated corn stover.

  17. [Study on secondary metabolites of endophytic fungi Penicillium polonicum].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Ding, Guang-Zhi; Fang, Lei; Yu, Shi-Shan

    2014-10-01

    The PDB culture medium was selected to ferment the endophyte strain, and the secondary metabolites of endophytic fungi Penicillium polonicum were studied. Combined application of Sephadex LH-20, ODS and HPLC chromatographies over the ethyl acetate extract of the fermented culture led to the isolation of 6 compounds. By spectral methods, the structures were elucidated as [3, 5-dihydroxy-2-(7-hydroxy-octanoyl)]-ethylphenylacetate (1), (3, 5-dihydroxy-2- octanoyl)-ethyl phenylacetate (2), (5, 7-di- hydroxy-9-heptyl)-isobenzo pyran-3-one (3), 3-(hydroxymethyl) 4-(1E)-1- propen-1-yl-(1R, 2S, 5R, 6S)-7-oxabicyclo [4.1.0] hept-3-ene-2, 5-diol (4), (E)-2-methoxy-3-(prop-1-enyl) phenol (5) and p-hydroxylphenylethanol (6). PMID:25751949

  18. Penicillium marneffei infection in a lung transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Stathakis, A; Lim, K P; Boan, P; Lavender, M; Wrobel, J; Musk, M; Heath, C H

    2015-06-01

    Penicillium marneffei is a thermally dimorphic fungus that can cause severe opportunistic infections in endemic regions of Southeast Asia, particularly in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus-1, but has rarely been reported in solid organ transplant recipients. Herein, we report the first case, to our knowledge, of P. marneffei infection in a lung transplant recipient, occurring in a 41-year-old woman 28 months post lung transplantation, after recent travel to Vietnam. We have reviewed the literature to derive some management principles for this rare infection in this clinical context. The number of P. marneffei infections in transplant recipients may increase, as a result of increasing rates of transplantation and travel to endemic areas. PMID:25809145

  19. Penicillium keratitis in a HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Anutarapongpan, Orapin; Thanathanee, Onsiri; Suwan-Apichon, Olan

    2016-01-01

    A 36-year-old HIV-positive man presented with symptoms of redness, blurred vision and foreign body sensation in his right eye for 3 months. The slit lamp examination revealed deep stromal infiltration with a feathery margin in an otherwise minimal anterior chamber reaction. A corneal scraping was negative. Confocal microscopy demonstrated an abnormal large hyper-reflective oval shape in the corneal stroma. Corneal infiltration did not show improvement after topical, intrastromal and intracameral antifungal treatment. Therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty was performed to eradicate the infection. Corneal button culture and histopathological results confirmed the diagnosis of Penicillium marneffei keratitis. No recurrent infection occurred after corneal transplantation. This appears to be the first report of P. marneffei keratitis in an HIV-infected patient. Although it is an uncommon condition, it should be one of the differential diagnoses in an HIV-infected patient presenting with keratitis. PMID:27535731

  20. Post-harvest proteomics of grapes infected by Penicillium during withering to produce Amarone wine.

    PubMed

    Lorenzini, Marilinda; Mainente, Federica; Zapparoli, Giacomo; Cecconi, Daniela; Simonato, Barbara

    2016-05-15

    The study of withered grape infection by Penicillium, a potentially toxigenic fungus, is relevant to preserve grape quality during the post-harvest dehydration process. This report describes the first proteomic analysis of Amarone wine grapes, infected by two strains of Penicillium expansum (Pe1) and Penicillium crustosum (Pc4). Protein identification by MS analysis allowed a better understanding of physiological mechanisms underlying the pathogen attack. The Pe1 strain had a major impact on Vitis vinifera protein expression inducing pathogenesis-related proteins and other protein species involved in energy metabolism. A greater expression of new Penicillium proteins involved in energy metabolism and some protein species related to redox homeostasis has been observed on grapes infected by Pc4 strain. Moreover, the new induced proteins in infected grapes could represent potential markers in withered grapes, thus creating the chance to develop case-sensitive prevention strategies to inhibit fungal growth. PMID:26776019

  1. The janthitrems: fluorescent tremorgenic toxins produced by Penicillium janthinellum isolates from ryegrass pastures.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, R T; Latch, G C; Keogh, R G

    1980-01-01

    New tremorgenic mycotoxins named janthitrem A, B, and C (molecular weights 601, 585, and 569, respectively) were produced by more than half of 21 Penicillium janthinellum isolates obtained from ryegrass pastures involved in ryegrass staggers outbreaks in sheep. PMID:7356319

  2. [Nitrogen-containing mycotoxins of fungi of Aspergillus and Penicillium species infesting grain and its products].

    PubMed

    Reshetilova, T A; Vinokurova, N G; L'vova, L S

    1993-01-01

    The review summarizes the literature data on distribution of nitrogen-containing mycotoxins (alkaloids) among Penicillium and Aspergillus fungi infesting grain and products of grain processing. Particular attention in given to clavins (ergotalkaloids) and tremorgens (roquefortine, verruculogen, penitrems). PMID:8295871

  3. High throughput de novo RNA sequencing elucidates novel responses in Penicillium chrysogenum under microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sathishkumar, Yesupatham; Krishnaraj, Chandran; Rajagopal, Kalyanaraman; Sen, Dwaipayan; Lee, Yang Soo

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the transcriptional alterations in Penicillium chrysogenum under simulated microgravity conditions were analyzed for the first time using an RNA-Seq method. The increasing plethora of eukaryotic microbial flora inside the spaceship demands the basic understanding of fungal biology in the absence of gravity vector. Penicillium species are second most dominant fungal contaminant in International Space Station. Penicillium chrysogenum an industrially important organism also has the potential to emerge as an opportunistic pathogen for the astronauts during the long-term space missions. But till date, the cellular mechanisms underlying the survival and adaptation of Penicillium chrysogenum to microgravity conditions are not clearly elucidated. A reference genome for Penicillium chrysogenum is not yet available in the NCBI database. Hence, we performed comparative de novo transcriptome analysis of Penicillium chrysogenum grown under microgravity versus normal gravity. In addition, the changes due to microgravity are documented at the molecular level. Increased response to the environmental stimulus, changes in the cell wall component ABC transporter/MFS transporters are noteworthy. Interestingly, sustained increase in the expression of Acyl-coenzyme A: isopenicillin N acyltransferase (Acyltransferase) under microgravity revealed the significance of gravity in the penicillin production which could be exploited industrially. PMID:26603994

  4. Clinical, Morphological, and Molecular Characterization of Penicillium canis sp. nov., Isolated from a Dog with Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Deanna A.; Swenson, Cheryl L.; Bailey, Chris J.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Nelson, Nathan C.; Thompson, Elizabeth H.; Wickes, Brian L.; French, Stephanie; Fu, Jianmin; Vilar-Saavedra, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by Penicillium species are rare in dogs, and the prognosis in these cases is poor. An unknown species of Penicillium was isolated from a bone lesion in a young dog with osteomyelitis of the right ilium. Extensive diagnostic evaluation did not reveal evidence of dissemination. Resolution of lameness and clinical stability of disease were achieved with intravenous phospholipid-complexed amphotericin B initially, followed by long-term combination therapy with terbinafine and ketoconazole. A detailed morphological and molecular characterization of the mold was undertaken. Sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer revealed the isolate to be closely related to Penicillium menonorum and Penicillium pimiteouiense. Additional sequence analysis of β-tubulin, calmodulin, minichromosome maintenance factor, DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and pre-rRNA processing protein revealed the isolate to be a novel species; the name Penicillium canis sp. nov. is proposed. Morphologically, smooth, ovoid conidia, a greenish gray colony color, slow growth on all media, and a failure to form ascomata distinguish this species from closely related Penicillium species. PMID:24789186

  5. Inactivation of Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum under in vitro and in vivo conditions by using UV-C light.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, Gülten Tıryakı; Pazir, Fikret

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the effects of UV-C on two of the main wound pathogens of citrus fruits, Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum, were investigated with different inoculation methods in vitro and on oranges. P. digitatum and P. italicum spores were inoculated onto the surface of potato dextrose agar or oranges using spread, spot, wound, and piercing inoculation methods. UV-C treatment for 1 min from a working distance of 8 cm reduced the numbers of P. italicum and P. digitatum by about 3.9 and 5.3 log units, respectively, following spread inoculation under in vitro conditions. Significant reductions were obtained after 1-min UV-C treatments of the tested fungi following inoculation using the spread and spot methods. With inoculation by the wound and piercing methods, the tested spores were not inactivated completely even after 10- and 20-min treatment times, respectively. The application of UV-C (7.92 kJ m(-2)) on oranges reduced the percentage of oranges infected at least threefold compared with the rate of infection in the untreated control samples. UV-C irradiation could effectively inactivate spores of P. italicum and P. digitatum inoculated by the spread plate and spot inoculation methods under in vitro and in vivo conditions. On the other hand, because of the low penetration ability of UV-C light, the tested fungi were not completely inactivated following inoculation with the wound and piercing methods. UV-C treatment has potential for use in surface decontamination of citrus fruits. PMID:24112577

  6. Taxonomy, chemodiversity, and chemoconsistency of Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Talaromyces species.

    PubMed

    Frisvad, Jens C

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Talaromyces are among the most chemically inventive of all fungi, producing a wide array of secondary metabolites (exometabolites). The three genera are holophyletic in a cladistic sense and polythetic classes in an anagenetic or functional sense, and contain 344, 354, and 88 species, respectively. New developments in classification, cladification, and nomenclature have meant that the species, series, and sections suggested are natural groups that share many extrolites, including exometabolites, exoproteins, exocarbohydrates, and exolipids in addition to morphological features. The number of exometabolites reported from these species is very large, and genome sequencing projects have shown that a large number of additional exometabolites may be expressed, given the right conditions ("cryptic" gene clusters for exometabolites). The exometabolites are biosynthesized via shikimic acid, tricarboxylic acid cycle members, nucleotides, carbohydrates or as polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, terpenes, or mixtures of those. The gene clusters coding for these compounds contain genes for the biosynthetic building blocks, the linking of these building blocks, tailoring enzymes, resistance for own products, and exporters. Species within a series or section in Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Talaromyces have many exometabolites in common, seemingly acquired by cladogenesis, but some the gene clusters for autapomorphic exometabolites may have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Despite genome sequencing efforts, and the many breakthroughs these will give, it is obvious that epigenetic factors play a large role in evolution and function of chemodiversity, and better methods for characterizing the epigenome are needed. Most of the individual species of the three genera produce a consistent and characteristic profile of exometabolites, but growth medium variations, stimulation by exometabolites from other species, and variations in abiotic

  7. Taxonomy, chemodiversity, and chemoconsistency of Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Talaromyces species

    PubMed Central

    Frisvad, Jens C.

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Talaromyces are among the most chemically inventive of all fungi, producing a wide array of secondary metabolites (exometabolites). The three genera are holophyletic in a cladistic sense and polythetic classes in an anagenetic or functional sense, and contain 344, 354, and 88 species, respectively. New developments in classification, cladification, and nomenclature have meant that the species, series, and sections suggested are natural groups that share many extrolites, including exometabolites, exoproteins, exocarbohydrates, and exolipids in addition to morphological features. The number of exometabolites reported from these species is very large, and genome sequencing projects have shown that a large number of additional exometabolites may be expressed, given the right conditions (“cryptic” gene clusters for exometabolites). The exometabolites are biosynthesized via shikimic acid, tricarboxylic acid cycle members, nucleotides, carbohydrates or as polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, terpenes, or mixtures of those. The gene clusters coding for these compounds contain genes for the biosynthetic building blocks, the linking of these building blocks, tailoring enzymes, resistance for own products, and exporters. Species within a series or section in Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Talaromyces have many exometabolites in common, seemingly acquired by cladogenesis, but some the gene clusters for autapomorphic exometabolites may have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Despite genome sequencing efforts, and the many breakthroughs these will give, it is obvious that epigenetic factors play a large role in evolution and function of chemodiversity, and better methods for characterizing the epigenome are needed. Most of the individual species of the three genera produce a consistent and characteristic profile of exometabolites, but growth medium variations, stimulation by exometabolites from other species, and variations in abiotic

  8. Potential of Penicillium Species in the Bioremediation Field

    PubMed Central

    Leitão, Ana Lúcia

    2009-01-01

    The effects on the environment of pollution, particularly that caused by various industrial activities, have been responsible for the accelerated fluxes of organic and inorganic matter in the ecosphere. Xenobiotics such as phenol, phenolic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and heavy metals, even at low concentrations, can be toxic to humans and other forms of life. Many of the remediation technologies currently being used for contaminated soil and water involve not only physical and chemical treatment, but also biological processes, where microbial activity is the responsible for pollutant removal and/or recovery. Fungi are present in aquatic sediments, terrestrial habitats and water surfaces and play a significant part in natural remediation of metal and aromatic compounds. Fungi also have advantages over bacteria since fungal hyphae can penetrate contaminated soil, reaching not only heavy metals but also xenobiotic compounds. Despite of the abundance of such fungi in wastes, penicillia in particular have received little attention in bioremediation and biodegradation studies. Additionally, several studies conducted with different strains of imperfecti fungi, Penicillium spp. have demonstrated their ability to degrade different xenobiotic compounds with low co-substrate requirements, and could be potentially interesting for the development of economically feasible processes for pollutant transformation. PMID:19440525

  9. Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jasper F W; Lau, Susanna K P; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-01-01

    Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei is an important pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungus causing systemic mycosis in Southeast Asia. The clinical significance of T. marneffei became evident when the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic arrived in Southeast Asia in 1988. Subsequently, a decline in the incidence of T. marneffei infection among HIV-infected patients was seen in regions with access to highly active antiretroviral therapy and other control measures for HIV. Since the 1990s, an increasing number of T. marneffei infections have been reported among non-HIV-infected patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. Their comorbidities included primary adult-onset immunodeficiency due to anti-interferon-gamma autoantibodies and secondary immunosuppressive conditions including other autoimmune diseases, solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantations, T-lymphocyte-depleting immunsuppressive drugs and novel anti-cancer targeted therapies such as anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies and kinase inhibitors. Moreover, improved immunological diagnostics identified more primary immunodeficiency syndromes associated with T. marneffei infection in children. The higher case-fatality rate of T. marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected than HIV-infected patients might be related to delayed diagnosis due to the lack of clinical suspicion. Correction of the underlying immune defects and early use of antifungals are important treatment strategies. Clinicians should be familiar with the changing epidemiology and clinical management of T. marneffei infection among non-HIV-infected patients. PMID:26956447

  10. Structural Variation among Wild and Industrial Strains of Penicillium chrysogenum

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, Michael B.; Pachter, Lior; Brem, Rachel B.

    2014-01-01

    Strain selection and strain improvement are the first, and arguably most important, steps in the industrial production of biological compounds by microorganisms. While traditional methods of mutagenesis and selection have been effective in improving production of compounds at a commercial scale, the genetic changes underpinning the altered phenotypes have remained largely unclear. We utilized high-throughput Illumina short read sequencing of a wild Penicillium chrysogenum strain in order to make whole genome comparisons to a sequenced improved strain (WIS 54–1255). We developed an assembly-free method of identifying chromosomal rearrangements and validated the in silico predictions with a PCR-based assay and Sanger sequencing. Despite many rounds of mutagen treatment and artificial selection, WIS 54–1255 differs from its wild progenitor at only one of the identified rearrangements. We suggest that natural variants predisposed for high penicillin production were instrumental in the success of WIS 54–1255 as an industrial strain. In addition to finding a previously published inversion in the penicillin biosynthesis cluster, we located several genes related to penicillin production associated with these rearrangements. By comparing the configuration of rearrangement events among several historically important strains known to be high penicillin producers to a collection of recently isolated wild strains, we suggest that wild strains with rearrangements similar to those in known high penicillin producers may be viable candidates for further improvement efforts. PMID:24824901

  11. Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jasper FW; Lau, Susanna KP; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick CY

    2016-01-01

    Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei is an important pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungus causing systemic mycosis in Southeast Asia. The clinical significance of T. marneffei became evident when the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic arrived in Southeast Asia in 1988. Subsequently, a decline in the incidence of T. marneffei infection among HIV-infected patients was seen in regions with access to highly active antiretroviral therapy and other control measures for HIV. Since the 1990s, an increasing number of T. marneffei infections have been reported among non-HIV-infected patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. Their comorbidities included primary adult-onset immunodeficiency due to anti-interferon-gamma autoantibodies and secondary immunosuppressive conditions including other autoimmune diseases, solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantations, T-lymphocyte-depleting immunsuppressive drugs and novel anti-cancer targeted therapies such as anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies and kinase inhibitors. Moreover, improved immunological diagnostics identified more primary immunodeficiency syndromes associated with T. marneffei infection in children. The higher case-fatality rate of T. marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected than HIV-infected patients might be related to delayed diagnosis due to the lack of clinical suspicion. Correction of the underlying immune defects and early use of antifungals are important treatment strategies. Clinicians should be familiar with the changing epidemiology and clinical management of T. marneffei infection among non-HIV-infected patients. PMID:26956447

  12. Antifungal, phytotoxic and toxic metabolites produced by Penicillium purpurogenum.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Wei, Jing; Pan, Shi-Yin; Gao, Jin-Ming; Tian, Jun-Mian

    2014-01-01

    Nine known metabolites, 6,8,1'-tri-O-methyl averantin (1), 6,8-di-O-methyl averufnin (2), 6,8-di-O-methyl averufanin (3), aversin (4), 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-dimethoxy-9,10-anthraquinone (5), 6,8-di-O-methylnidurufin (6), 6,8-di-O-methyl versiconol (7), 5-methyoxysterigmatocystin (8) and (S)-ornidazole (9), were isolated from the extracts of Penicillium purpurogenum, and their structures were elucidated by using spectroscopic methods. The brine shrimp toxicity, anti-phytopathogenic and phytotoxic effects of these compounds were evaluated. Among them, compounds 1 and 8 exhibited the strongest toxicity against brine shrimp (Artemia salina), with lethality rates of 100% at a low concentration of 10 μM, comparable to the positive control toosendanin. Compounds 1, 4 and 7 moderately inhibited the growth of Botrytis cinerea. Moreover, 4 displayed moderate antifungal effects on Gibberella saubinettii. In addition, compounds 6, 7 and 9 produced the phytotoxic effects on radish seedlings at 100 μM. This is the first report on the isolation of these metabolites from this organism. PMID:25103412

  13. Antimicrobial and allelopathic metabolites produced by Penicillium brasilianum.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao-Yu; Zhang, Qiang; Li, He; Gao, Jin-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Six known compounds, isoroquefortine C (1), griseofulvin (2), ergosterol peroxide (3), 3β-hydroxy-(22E,24R)-ergosta-5,8,22-trien-7-one (4), cerevisterol (5) and (22E,24R)-6β-methoxyergosta-7,22-diene-3β,5α-diol (6), were produced by the fungus Penicillium brasilianum, and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. This is the first report on isoroquefortine C as naturally occurring compound. Their bioactivities against five phytopathogenic fungi (Gibeberalla saubinetti, Fusarium solani, Botrytis cinerea, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and Alternaria solani) and four pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Staphyloccocus aureus and Bacillus cereus), as well as allelopathic activities on Raphanus sativus were tested. Compound 1 exhibited a remarkable antifungal activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 12.5 μM against C. gloeosporioides, in comparison with positive control hymexazol (MIC 25 μM). Compound 2 displayed strong inhibitory effects on the growth of A. solani and S. aureus with MIC of 3.13 μM for each. Compounds 2 and 3 displayed a significant growth-inhibition activity on R. sativus. PMID:25103127

  14. Isolation and characterization of a novel mycovirus from Penicillium digitatum.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yuhui; Zhang, Tingfu; Zhu, Ying; Yuan, Yongze; Wang, Shengqiang; Liu, Jing; Liu, Deli

    2016-07-01

    A novel double-stranded RNA virus designated Penicillium digitatum virus 1 (PdV1) was isolated from the citrus fruit rot pathogen P. digitatum (HS-RH1). The full-length cDNA sequence of the dsRNA/PdV1 (5211bp) possesses two partially overlapping open reading frames, which encode a coat protein (CP) and a putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on multiple alignments of the amino acid sequences of the RdRp and CP indicated that PdV1 tentatively belongs to the genus Victorivirus in the Totiviridae family. Electron micrographs of negatively stained viral particles purified from the peak fraction of sucrose density gradient centrifugation showed spherical particles ~35nm in diameter. Transfection experiments with purified virions indicated that PdV1 could reduce the vegetative growth and virulence of P. digitatum strain HS-F6. In summary, we report the first isolation and characterization of a mycovirus from P. digitatum that contributes to the hypovirulence phenotypes of the host strain. PMID:27061053

  15. The Penicillium echinulatum Secretome on Sugar Cane Bagasse

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Daniela A.; Cota, Júnio; Alvarez, Thabata M.; Brüchli, Fernanda; Bragato, Juliano; Pereira, Beatriz M. P.; Pauletti, Bianca A.; Jackson, George; Pimenta, Maria T. B.; Murakami, Mario T.; Camassola, Marli; Ruller, Roberto; Dillon, Aldo J. P.; Pradella, Jose G. C.; Paes Leme, Adriana F.; Squina, Fabio M.

    2012-01-01

    Plant feedstocks are at the leading front of the biofuel industry based on the potential to promote economical, social and environmental development worldwide through sustainable scenarios related to energy production. Penicillium echinulatum is a promising strain for the bioethanol industry based on its capacity to produce large amounts of cellulases at low cost. The secretome profile of P. echinulatum after grown on integral sugarcane bagasse, microcrystalline cellulose and three types of pretreated sugarcane bagasse was evaluated using shotgun proteomics. The comprehensive chemical characterization of the biomass used as the source of fungal nutrition, as well as biochemical activity assays using a collection of natural polysaccharides, were also performed. Our study revealed that the enzymatic repertoire of P. echinulatum is geared mainly toward producing enzymes from the cellulose complex (endogluganases, cellobiohydrolases and β-glucosidases). Glycoside hydrolase (GH) family members, important to biomass-to-biofuels conversion strategies, were identified, including endoglucanases GH5, 7, 6, 12, 17 and 61, β-glycosidase GH3, xylanases GH10 and GH11, as well as debranching hemicellulases from GH43, GH62 and CE2 and pectinanes from GH28. Collectively, the approach conducted in this study gave new insights on the better comprehension of the composition and degradation capability of an industrial cellulolytic strain, from which a number of applied technologies, such as biofuel production, can be generated. PMID:23227186

  16. Maximizing production of Penicillium cyclopium partial acylglycerol lipase.

    PubMed

    Vanot, G; Valérie, D; Guilhem, M-C; Phan Tan Luu, R; Comeau, L-C

    2002-12-01

    Penicillium cyclopium partial acylglycerol lipase production was maximized in shaken batch culture. The effect of inoculum size and substrate concentration on the lipase activity released in the culture medium was visualized using a surface response methodology based on a Doehlert experimental design. The main advantage of this approach is the low number of experiments required to construct a predictive model of the experimental domain. Substrate percentage (corn steep, w/v) ranged from 0.1% to 1.9% and inoculum from 100 spores/ml to 3,200 spores/ml. We determined that an optimal set of experimental conditions for high lipase production was 1.0% substrate and 3,200 spores/ml, with initial pH 5.0, temperature 25 degrees C and shaking speed 120 rpm. Between the conditions giving the minimum and the maximum lipase production, we observed a three-fold increase in both the predicted and the measured values. PMID:12466881

  17. Potential pancreatic lipase inhibitory activity of an endophytic Penicillium species.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mahiti; Saxena, Sanjai; Goyal, Dinesh

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic lipase (PL) is considered as one of the safest target for diet-induced anti-obesity drug development. Orlistat is the only PL inhibitor approved for anti-obesity treatment till date. In the process of exploration of new PL inhibitors, we have screened culture filtrates of 70 endophytic fungi of medicinal plants using qualitative as well as quantitative in-vitro PL assays. The qualitative assays indicated potential PL inhibition in only three isolates, namely #57 TBBALM, #33 TBBALM and #1 CSSTOT. Only ethyl acetate extracts of the culture filtrates of these isolates exhibited the PL inhibition. #57 TBBLAM ethyl acetate extract of culture filtrate exhibited potential PL inhibition with an IC50 of 3.69 µg/ml which was comparable to the positive control, i.e. Orlistat exhibiting IC50 value of 2.73 µg/ml. Further molecular phylogenetic tools and morphological studies were used to identify the isolate #57 TBBALM as Penicillium species. PMID:24417211

  18. Microbial Beneficiation of Salem Iron Ore Using Penicillium purpurogenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, M.; Pradhan, M.; Sukla, L. B.; Mishra, B. K.

    2011-02-01

    High alumina and silica content in the iron ore affects coke rate, reducibility, and productivity in a blast furnace. Iron ore is being beneficiated all around the world to meet the quality requirement of iron and steel industries. Choosing a beneficiation treatment depends on the nature of the gangue present and its association with the ore structure. The advanced physicochemical methods used for the beneficiation of iron ore are generally unfriendly to the environment. Biobeneficiation is considered to be ecofriendly, promising, and revolutionary solutions to these problems. A characterization study of Salem iron ore indicates that the major iron-bearing minerals are hematite, magnetite, and goethite. Samples on average contains (pct) Fe2O3-84.40, Fe (total)-59.02, Al2O3-7.18, and SiO2-7.53. Penicillium purpurogenum (MTCC 7356) was used for the experiment . It removed 35.22 pct alumina and 39.41 pct silica in 30 days in a shake flask at 10 pct pulp density, 308 K (35 °C), and 150 rpm. In a bioreactor experiment at 2 kg scale using the same organism, it removed 23.33 pct alumina and 30.54 pct silica in 30 days at 300 rpm agitation and 2 to 3 l/min aeration. Alumina and silica dissolution follow the shrinking core model for both shake flask and bioreactor experiments.

  19. The Penicillium echinulatum secretome on sugar cane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniela A; Cota, Júnio; Alvarez, Thabata M; Brüchli, Fernanda; Bragato, Juliano; Pereira, Beatriz M P; Pauletti, Bianca A; Jackson, George; Pimenta, Maria T B; Murakami, Mario T; Camassola, Marli; Ruller, Roberto; Dillon, Aldo J P; Pradella, Jose G C; Paes Leme, Adriana F; Squina, Fabio M

    2012-01-01

    Plant feedstocks are at the leading front of the biofuel industry based on the potential to promote economical, social and environmental development worldwide through sustainable scenarios related to energy production. Penicillium echinulatum is a promising strain for the bioethanol industry based on its capacity to produce large amounts of cellulases at low cost. The secretome profile of P. echinulatum after grown on integral sugarcane bagasse, microcrystalline cellulose and three types of pretreated sugarcane bagasse was evaluated using shotgun proteomics. The comprehensive chemical characterization of the biomass used as the source of fungal nutrition, as well as biochemical activity assays using a collection of natural polysaccharides, were also performed. Our study revealed that the enzymatic repertoire of P. echinulatum is geared mainly toward producing enzymes from the cellulose complex (endogluganases, cellobiohydrolases and β-glucosidases). Glycoside hydrolase (GH) family members, important to biomass-to-biofuels conversion strategies, were identified, including endoglucanases GH5, 7, 6, 12, 17 and 61, β-glycosidase GH3, xylanases GH10 and GH11, as well as debranching hemicellulases from GH43, GH62 and CE2 and pectinanes from GH28. Collectively, the approach conducted in this study gave new insights on the better comprehension of the composition and degradation capability of an industrial cellulolytic strain, from which a number of applied technologies, such as biofuel production, can be generated. PMID:23227186

  20. CRISPR/Cas9 Based Genome Editing of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Pohl, C; Kiel, J A K W; Driessen, A J M; Bovenberg, R A L; Nygård, Y

    2016-07-15

    CRISPR/Cas9 based systems have emerged as versatile platforms for precision genome editing in a wide range of organisms. Here we have developed powerful CRISPR/Cas9 tools for marker-based and marker-free genome modifications in Penicillium chrysogenum, a model filamentous fungus and industrially relevant cell factory. The developed CRISPR/Cas9 toolbox is highly flexible and allows editing of new targets with minimal cloning efforts. The Cas9 protein and the sgRNA can be either delivered during transformation, as preassembled CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) or expressed from an AMA1 based plasmid within the cell. The direct delivery of the Cas9 protein with in vitro synthesized sgRNA to the cells allows for a transient method for genome engineering that may rapidly be applicable for other filamentous fungi. The expression of Cas9 from an AMA1 based vector was shown to be highly efficient for marker-free gene deletions. PMID:27072635

  1. A taxonomic and phylogenetic revision of Penicillium section Aspergilloides

    PubMed Central

    Houbraken, J.; Visagie, C.M.; Meijer, M.; Frisvad, J.C.; Busby, P.E.; Pitt, J.I.; Seifert, K.A.; Louis-Seize, G.; Demirel, R.; Yilmaz, N.; Jacobs, K.; Christensen, M.; Samson, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Species belonging to Penicillium section Aspergilloides have a world-wide distribution with P. glabrum, P. spinulosum and P. thomii the most well-known species of this section. These species occur commonly and can be isolated from many substrates including soil, food, bark and indoor environments. The taxonomy of these species has been investigated several times using various techniques, but species delimitation remains difficult. In the present study, 349 strains belonging to section Aspergilloides were subjected to multilocus molecular phylogenetic analyses using partial β-tubulin (BenA), calmodulin (CaM) and RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (RPB2) sequences. Section Aspergilloides is subdivided into 12 clades and 51 species. Twenty-five species are described here as new and P. yezoense, a species originally described without a Latin diagnosis, is validated. Species belonging to section Aspergilloides are phenotypically similar and most have monoverticillate conidiophores and grow moderately or quickly on agar media. The most important characters to distinguish these species were colony sizes on agar media, growth at 30 °C, ornamentation and shape of conidia, sclerotium production and stipe roughness. PMID:25492984

  2. Safety evaluation of nuclease P1 from Penicillium citrinum.

    PubMed

    Okado, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Kazushige; Mizuhashi, Fukutaro; Lynch, Barry S; Vo, Trung D; Roberts, Ashley S

    2016-02-01

    Nuclease P1 has been widely used in the food industry to enhance or create flavor. One commercial source of this enzyme is Penicillium citrinum, an anamorphic mesophilic fungus with a long history of safe use in Europe and Asia as a fermentation organism used in the production of ribonucleases. Given the intended use in food for human consumption, and noting its potential presence at trace levels in finished products, a series of safety studies including an in vitro Ames and chromosome aberration assay, an in vivo rat erythrocyte micronucleus assay and a 90-day oral toxicity study in rats were conducted. No mutagenic activity was observed in the Ames assay. Equivocal activity in the chromosome aberration assay was not replicated in the micronucleus assay at doses of up to 1007 mg total organic solids (TOS)/kg body weight (bw)/day. Following oral administration of nuclease P1 at dosages of 10.1, 101 or 1007 mg TOS/kg bw/day to Sprague-Dawley rats, no adverse effects on any study parameter were observed. The no-observed-adverse-effect level was considered to be 1007 mg TOS/kg bw/day. The results of the genotoxicity studies and subchronic rat study support the safe use in food production of nuclease P1 produced from P. citrinum. PMID:26686996

  3. Production of the Fusarium Mycotoxin Moniliformin by Penicillium melanoconidium.

    PubMed

    Hallas-Møller, Magnus; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2016-06-01

    Moniliformin is a mycotoxin produced by several cereal associated Fusaria. Here, we show for the first time that moniliformin can be produced by the cereal fungus, Penicillium melanoconidium (4 out of 4 strains), but not in the related species in the Viridicata series. Moniliformin was detected in 10 out of 11 media: two agars and several cereal and bean types. Moniliformin was identified by a novel mixed-mode anionic exchange reversed phase chromatographic method which was coupled to both tandem mass spectrometry (MS) and high resolution MS. Mixed-mode chromatography showed superior peak shape compared to that of HILIC and less matrix interference compared to that of reversed phase chromatography, but during a large series of analyses, the column was fouled by matrix interferences. Wheat and beans were artificially infected by P. melanoconidium containing up to 64 and 11 mg/kg moniliformin, respectively, while penicillic acid, roquefortine C, and penitrem A levels in wheat were up to 1095, 38, and 119 mg/kg, respectively. PMID:27195914

  4. Penicillium expansum volatiles reduce pine weevil attraction to host plants.

    PubMed

    Azeem, Muhammad; Rajarao, Gunaratna Kuttuva; Nordenhem, Henrik; Nordlander, Göran; Borg-Karlson, Anna Karin

    2013-01-01

    The pine weevil Hylobius abietis (L.) is a severe pest of conifer seedlings in reforested areas of Europe and Asia. To identify minimally toxic and ecologically sustainable compounds for protecting newly planted seedlings, we evaluated the volatile metabolites produced by microbes isolated from H. abietis feces and frass. Female weevils deposit feces and chew bark at oviposition sites, presumably thus protecting eggs from feeding conspecifics. We hypothesize that microbes present in feces/frass are responsible for producing compounds that deter weevils. Here, we describe the isolation of a fungus from feces and frass of H. abietis and the biological activity of its volatile metabolites. The fungus was identified by morphological and molecular methods as Penicillium expansum Link ex. Thom. It was cultured on sterilized H. abietis frass medium in glass flasks, and volatiles were collected by SPME and analyzed by GC-MS. The major volatiles of the fungus were styrene and 3-methylanisole. The nutrient conditions for maximum production of styrene and 3-methylanisole were examined. Large quantities of styrene were produced when the fungus was cultured on grated pine bark with yeast extract. In a multi-choice arena test, styrene significantly reduced male and female pine weevils' attraction to cut pieces of Scots pine twigs, whereas 3-methylanisole only reduced male weevil attraction to pine twigs. These studies suggest that metabolites produced by microbes may be useful as compounds for controlling insects, and could serve as sustainable alternatives to synthetic insecticides. PMID:23297108

  5. Prenyl Ethers: Novel Fungal Volatiles Formed by Penicillium digitatum.

    PubMed

    Amrein, Thomas M; Frey, Peter; Meier, Roberto; Baumann, Heidi; Tanner, Miriam; Gassenmeier, Klaus F

    2014-10-01

    Prenyl ethyl ether (PEE) was previously described as the cause for a solvent-like off-note in ground hazelnuts, but its origin remained unclear. Investigations were carried out by analytical groups of Coop and Givaudan over four years to elucidate this phenomenon. From mouldy citrus fruits a strain of Penicillium digitatum was isolated and found to form PEE. Formation on citrus and other fruits was prominent and contributed to the particular smell of decayed fruits. Several strains of P. digitatum formed PEE, while other fungal species did not. In contrast to citrus fruit, prenyl methyl ether (PME) was formed as dominant prenyl ether on hazelnuts while only small amounts of PEE were found. PME has not been previously described as volatile metabolite of fungi or as a food-taint. Spiking experiments with deuterated ethanol showed that the ethyl group is likely incorporated into PEE via the aldehyde form. On hazelnuts strongly decayed by P. digitatum yet another prenyl ether was tentatively identified: Prenyl isopropyl ether. Prenyl ethers present a novel group of volatile metabolites of P. digitatum. They are likely typical for this species and have not been described before. Prenyl ethers seem to play a significant role in the smell of food decayed by P. digitatum and should be considered in cases of off-notes and taints. PMID:25437159

  6. Genomic and Secretomic Analyses Reveal Unique Features of the Lignocellulolytic Enzyme System of Penicillium decumbens

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yuqi; Ma, Liang; Li, Jie; Zheng, Huajun; Wang, Shengyue; Wang, Chengshu; Xun, Luying; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Zhou, Zhihua; Qu, Yinbo

    2013-01-01

    Many Penicillium species could produce extracellular enzyme systems with good lignocellulose hydrolysis performance. However, these species and their enzyme systems are still poorly understood and explored due to the lacking of genetic information. Here, we present the genomic and secretomic analyses of Penicillium decumbens that has been used in industrial production of lignocellulolytic enzymes in China for more than fifteen years. Comparative genomics analysis with the phylogenetically most similar species Penicillium chrysogenum revealed that P. decumbens has evolved with more genes involved in plant cell wall degradation, but fewer genes in cellular metabolism and regulation. Compared with the widely used cellulase producer Trichoderma reesei, P. decumbens has a lignocellulolytic enzyme system with more diverse components, particularly for cellulose binding domain-containing proteins and hemicellulases. Further, proteomic analysis of secretomes revealed that P. decumbens produced significantly more lignocellulolytic enzymes in the medium with cellulose-wheat bran as the carbon source than with glucose. The results expand our knowledge on the genetic information of lignocellulolytic enzyme systems in Penicillium species, and will facilitate rational strain improvement for the production of highly efficient enzyme systems used in lignocellulose utilization from Penicillium species. PMID:23383313

  7. Identification and Antifungal Susceptibility of Penicillium-Like Fungi from Clinical Samples in the United States.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Suarez, Marcela; Sutton, Deanna A; Cano-Lira, José F; García, Dania; Martin-Vicente, Adela; Wiederhold, Nathan; Guarro, Josep; Gené, Josepa

    2016-08-01

    Penicillium species are some of the most common fungi observed worldwide and have an important economic impact as well as being occasional agents of human and animal mycoses. A total of 118 isolates thought to belong to the genus Penicillium based on morphological features were obtained from the Fungus Testing Laboratory at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio (United States). The isolates were studied phenotypically using standard growth conditions. Molecular identification was made using two genetic markers, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and a fragment of the β-tubulin gene. In order to assess phylogenetic relationships, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference assessments were used. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed according to CLSI document M38-A2 for nine antifungal drugs. The isolates were identified within three genera, i.e., Penicillium, Talaromyces, and Rasamsonia The most frequent species in our study were Penicillium rubens, P. citrinum, and Talaromyces amestolkiae The potent in vitro activity of amphotericin B (AMB) and terbinafine (TRB) and of the echinocandins against Penicillium and Talaromyces species might offer a good therapeutic alternative for the treatment of infections caused by these fungi. PMID:27280422

  8. Genomic and secretomic analyses reveal unique features of the lignocellulolytic enzyme system of Penicillium decumbens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guodong; Zhang, Lei; Wei, Xiaomin; Zou, Gen; Qin, Yuqi; Ma, Liang; Li, Jie; Zheng, Huajun; Wang, Shengyue; Wang, Chengshu; Xun, Luying; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Zhou, Zhihua; Qu, Yinbo

    2013-01-01

    Many Penicillium species could produce extracellular enzyme systems with good lignocellulose hydrolysis performance. However, these species and their enzyme systems are still poorly understood and explored due to the lacking of genetic information. Here, we present the genomic and secretomic analyses of Penicillium decumbens that has been used in industrial production of lignocellulolytic enzymes in China for more than fifteen years. Comparative genomics analysis with the phylogenetically most similar species Penicillium chrysogenum revealed that P. decumbens has evolved with more genes involved in plant cell wall degradation, but fewer genes in cellular metabolism and regulation. Compared with the widely used cellulase producer Trichoderma reesei, P. decumbens has a lignocellulolytic enzyme system with more diverse components, particularly for cellulose binding domain-containing proteins and hemicellulases. Further, proteomic analysis of secretomes revealed that P. decumbens produced significantly more lignocellulolytic enzymes in the medium with cellulose-wheat bran as the carbon source than with glucose. The results expand our knowledge on the genetic information of lignocellulolytic enzyme systems in Penicillium species, and will facilitate rational strain improvement for the production of highly efficient enzyme systems used in lignocellulose utilization from Penicillium species. PMID:23383313

  9. Molecular characterization of patulin producing and non-producing Penicillium species in apples from Morocco.

    PubMed

    Rharmitt, Sanae; Hafidi, Majida; Hajjaj, Hassan; Scordino, Fabio; Giosa, Domenico; Giuffrè, Letterio; Barreca, Davide; Criseo, Giuseppe; Romeo, Orazio

    2016-01-18

    The isolation of patulin-producing Penicillia in apples collected in different markets in four localities in Morocco is reported. Fungi were identified by β-tubulin sequencing and further characterized using a specific PCR-based method targeting the isoepoxydon dehydrogenase (IDH) gene to discriminate between patulin-producing and non-producing strains. Production of patulin was also evaluated using standard cultural and biochemical methods. Results showed that 79.5% of contaminant fungi belonged to the genus Penicillium and that Penicillium expansum was the most isolated species (83.9%) followed by Penicillium chrysogenum (~9.7%) and Penicillium crustosum (~6.4%). Molecular analysis revealed that 64.5% of the Penicillium species produced the expected IDH-amplicon denoting patulin production in these strains. However, patulin production was not chemically confirmed in all P. expansum strains. The isolation of IDH(-)/patulin(+) strains poses the hypothesis that gentisylaldehyde is not a direct patulin precursor, supporting previous observations that highlighted the importance of the gentisyl alcohol in the production of this mycotoxin. Total agreement between IDH-gene detection and cultural/chemical methods employed was observed in 58% of P. expansum strains and for 100% of the other species isolated. Overall the data reported here showed a substantial genetic variability within P. expansum population from Morocco. PMID:26513254

  10. UV-C light inactivation kinetics of Penicillium expansum on pear surfaces: Influence on physicochemical and sensory quality during storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postharvest quality and storage life of fresh pear are often limited by fungal growth caused by Penicillium expansum. Ultraviolet-C light (UV-C 254 nm) is a promising alternative disinfestation method to reduce fruit spoilage by fungi. In this study, UV-C inactivation kinetic data of Penicillium exp...

  11. Morphological variation in pathogenic strains of Penicillium marneffei.

    PubMed

    Pracharktam, R; Sriurairatna, S; Jayanetra, P

    1992-01-01

    Penicillium marneffei is a dimorphic fungus known to be pathogenic to animals and man. The natural reservoir of this organism was known to be bamboo rats found in South Vietnam, Thailand and China. The first two human infections were reported in 1959 and 1973 from the United States. Up to 1984, five new cases of human penicillosis were reported from Thailand. Since then several more cases have been reported from different parts of the world mainly from the southern part of China. However, there are very limited mycological descriptions of this fungi. In this report, five Thai strains were studied for colonial morphology in comparison with Reference strain PLM 689. Variation in mycelial pigment was observed ranging from yellowish-green to orange with water soluble red pigment produced in every strain which can be seen early from the reverse side. Ultrastructural study by both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was compared with that of the reference strain PLM 689. PLM 689 strain had only biverticillate penicilli, but all five strains from Thailand had both monoverticillate and biverticillate penicilli which occasionally appeared on the same branch. The conidia of the Thai isolates were oval in shape and 1.3-2 x 0.7-1.6 microns in size smaller than those of PLM 689 which were 2.5-4 x 2-3 microns. Phialides were also smaller and a little shorter but the number of phialides was similar to those of PLM 689 ranging 4-10 except for one strain which had 3-16 phialides. All Thai strains have stipes smaller and somewhat longer than those of PLM 689.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1402460

  12. [Overexpression of Penicillium expansum lipase gene in Pichia pastoris].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Cai; Lin, Lin; Shi, Qiao-Qin; Wu, Song-Gang

    2003-03-01

    The alkaline lipase gene of Penicillium expansum (PEL) was coloned into the yeast integrative plasmid pPIC3.5K, which was then transformed into His4 mutant yeast GS115. Recombinant Pichia strains were obtained by minimal olive oil-methanol plates screening and confirmed by PCR. The expression producus of PEL gene was analysis by SDS-PAGE and olive oil plate, the result indicated that PEL gene was functionally overexpressed in Pichia pastoris and up to 95% of the secreted protein. Recombinant lipase had a molecular mass of 28kD, showing a range similar to that of PEL, could hydrolyze olive oil and formed clear halos in the olive oil plates. Four different strategies (different media, pH, glycerol and methanol concentration) were applied to optimize the cultivation conditions, the activity of lipase was up to 260 u/mL under the optimal cultivation conditions. It is pointed out that the absence of the expensive biotin and yeast nitrogen base in the medium increased the lipase production. The possible reason of this result is absence of yeast nitrogen base increased the medium pH during cultivation, and PEL shows a higher stability at this condition. The lipase activity of the supernatant from the culture grown at pH 7 was higher than the one from the culture in the same medium at pH 6.0 is due to the pH stability of PEL too. The results also showed that the methanol and glycerol concentration had a marked effect on the production of lipase. PMID:15966328

  13. Direct electrochemistry of Penicillium chrysogenum catalase adsorbed on spectroscopic graphite.

    PubMed

    Dimcheva, Nina; Horozova, Elena

    2013-04-01

    The voltammetric studies of Penicillium chrysogenum catalase (PcCAT) adsorbed on spectroscopic graphite, showed direct electron transfer (DET) between its active site and the electrode surface. Analogous tests performed with the commercially available bovine catalase revealed that mammalian enzyme is much less efficient in the DET process. Both catalases were found capable to catalyse the electrooxidation of phenol, but differed in the specifics of catalytic action. At an applied potential of 0.45V the non-linear regression showed the kinetics of the bioelectrochemical oxidation catalysed by the PcCAT obeyed the Hill equation with a binding constant K=0.034±0.002 M(2) (Hill's coefficient n=2.097±0.083, R(2)=0.997), whilst the catalytic action of the bovine catalase was described by the Michaelis-Menten kinetic model with the following parameters: V(max,app)=7.780±0.509 μA, and K(M,app)=0.068±0.070 mol L(-1). The performance of the electrode reaction was affected by the electrode potential, the pH, and temperature. Based on the effect of pH and temperature on the electrode response in presence of phenol a tentative reaction pathway of its bioelectrocatalytic oxidation has been hypothesised. The possible application of these findings in biosensing phenol up to concentration 30 mM at pHs below 7 and in absence of oxidising agents (oxygen or H(2)O(2)) was considered. PMID:23103554

  14. Proteome Analysis of the Penicillin Producer Penicillium chrysogenum

    PubMed Central

    Jami, Mohammad-Saeid; Barreiro, Carlos; García-Estrada, Carlos; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics is a powerful tool to understand the molecular mechanisms causing the production of high penicillin titers by industrial strains of the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum as the result of strain improvement programs. Penicillin biosynthesis is an excellent model system for many other bioactive microbial metabolites. The recent publication of the P. chrysogenum genome has established the basis to understand the molecular processes underlying penicillin overproduction. We report here the proteome reference map of P. chrysogenum Wisconsin 54-1255 (the genome project reference strain) together with an in-depth study of the changes produced in three different strains of this filamentous fungus during industrial strain improvement. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, peptide mass fingerprinting, and tandem mass spectrometry were used for protein identification. Around 1000 spots were visualized by “blue silver” colloidal Coomassie staining in a non-linear pI range from 3 to 10 with high resolution, which allowed the identification of 950 proteins (549 different proteins and isoforms). Comparison among the cytosolic proteomes of the wild-type NRRL 1951, Wisconsin 54-1255 (an improved, moderate penicillin producer), and AS-P-78 (a penicillin high producer) strains indicated that global metabolic reorganizations occurred during the strain improvement program. The main changes observed in the high producer strains were increases of cysteine biosynthesis (a penicillin precursor), enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway, and stress response proteins together with a reduction in virulence and in the biosynthesis of other secondary metabolites different from penicillin (pigments and isoflavonoids). In the wild-type strain, we identified enzymes to utilize cellulose, sorbitol, and other carbon sources that have been lost in the high penicillin producer strains. Changes in the levels of a few specific proteins correlated well with the improved penicillin

  15. Gibberellins in Penicillium strains: Challenges for endophyte-plant host interactions under salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Leitão, Ana Lúcia; Enguita, Francisco J

    2016-02-01

    The genus Penicillium is one of the most versatile "mycofactories", comprising some species able to produce gibberellins, bioactive compounds that can modulate plant growth and development. Although plants have the ability to synthesize gibberellins, their levels are lower when plants are under salinity stress. It has been recognized that detrimental abiotic conditions, such as saline stress, have negative effects on plants, being the availability of bioactive gibberellins a critical factor for their growth under this conditions. This review summarizes the interplay existing between endophytic Penicillium strains and plant host interactions, with focus on bioactive gibberellins production as a fungal response that allows plants to overcome salinity stress. PMID:26805614

  16. [Progress in Proteomic Study of the Penicillin Producer---Penicillium Chrysogenum].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shun; Wang, Peihong; Zhang, Nan; Gao, Ruichang

    2015-12-01

    Penicillin is a kind of β-lactam drug which has been applied in the clinical treatment firstly in the world, and it has still been widely used at present. The synthesis and regulation mechanism of Penicillium chrysogenum, which is used to produce penicillin, has been studied quite maturely, but its proteomics research started relatively late and fewer reports were published. This paper reviews the synthesis and application of penicillin, transformation of Penicillium chrysogenum, and the research progress of its proteomics. On this basis, the study highlights the advantages of proteomics in the research of protein expression. PMID:27079113

  17. Time course production of indole alkaloids by an endophytic strain of Penicillium brasilianum cultivated in rice.

    PubMed

    Fill, Taicia Pacheco; Asenha, Heloísa Briganti Rodrigues; Marques, Anna Silvia; Ferreira, Antônio Gilberto; Rodrigues-Fo, Edson

    2013-01-01

    During our studies concerning endophytic fungi, two indole alkaloids were co-produced with verruculogen by Penicillium brasilianum isolated from Melia azedarach (Meliaceae). The compounds were isolated by the use of combined chromatographic procedures and identified by physical methods, mainly 1D- and 2D-NMR experiments. This article also describes the production of verruculogen TR-2, first described for this species of Penicillium, and a verruculogen TR-2C-11 epimer, that is a novel fungal natural product. The kinetic production of verruculogen and verruculogen TR-2 produced by P. brasilianum were evaluated in order to understand the involvement of verruculogen TR-2 in verruculogen biosynthesis. PMID:22757643

  18. Enhancement of Penicillium echinulatum glycoside hydrolase enzyme complex.

    PubMed

    dos Santos Costa, Patrícia; Büchli, Fernanda; Robl, Diogo; Delabona, Priscila da Silva; Rabelo, Sarita Candida; Pradella, José Geraldo da Cruz

    2016-05-01

    The enhancement of enzyme complex produced by Penicillium echinulatum grown in several culture media components (bagasse sugarcane pretreated by various methods, soybean meal, wheat bran, sucrose, and yeast extract) was studied to increment FPase, xylanase, pectinase, and β-glucosidase enzyme activities. The present results indicated that culture media composed with 10 g/L of the various bagasse pretreatment methods did not have any substantial influence with respect to the FPase, xylanase, and β-glucosidase attained maximum values of, respectively, 2.68 FPU/mL, 2.04, and 115.4 IU/mL. On the other hand, proposed culture media to enhance β-glucosidase production composed of 10 g/L steam-exploded bagasse supplemented with soybean flour 5.0 g/L, yeast extract 1.0 g/L, and sucrose 10.0 g/L attained, respectively, 3.19 FPU/mL and 3.06 IU/mL while xylanase was maintained at the same level. The proteomes obtained from the optimized culture media for enhanced FPase, xylanase, pectinase, and β-glucosidase production were analyzed using mass spectrometry and a panel of GH enzyme activities against 16 different substrates. Culture medium designed to enhance β-glucosidase activity achieved higher enzymatic activities values (13 measured activities), compared to the culture media for FPase/pectinase (9 measured activities) and xylanase (7 measured activities), when tested against the 16 substrates. Mass spectrometry analyses of secretome showed a consistent result and the greatest number of spectral counts of Cazy family enzymes was found in designed β-glucosidase culture medium, followed by FPase/pectinase and xylanase. Most of the Cazy identified protein was cellobiohydrolase (GH6 and GH7), endoglucanase (GH5), and endo-1,4-β-xylanase (GH10). Enzymatic hydrolysis of hydrothermally pretreated sugarcane bagasse performed with β-glucosidase enhanced cocktail achieved 51.4 % glucose yield with 10 % w/v insoluble solids at enzyme load of 15 FPU/g material. Collectively the

  19. Resistance of apples from the Kazakhstan germplasm collection to postharvest decay caused by Penicillium expansum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite causing significant losses, apple breeders do not evaluate crosses for resistance to blue mold, caused by Penicillium expansum, because historically there has been little resistance to this decay in this gene pool of germplasm they use a new apple germplasm collection from the center of orig...

  20. Occurrence of fludioxonil resistance in penicillium digitatum from citrus in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penicillium digitatum is the causal agent of green mold, the most important postharvest disease of citrus (Citrus spp.). Fludioxonil is marketed as either a solo product or in combination with azoxystrobin for control of green mold and other postharvest diseases. Baseline sensitivity to fludioxonil ...

  1. DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF CITRUS PEEL EXTRACTS ON GROWTH OF PENICILLIUM DIGITATIUM, P. ITALICUM AND P. EXPANSUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most pathogenic species of Penicillium have a limited host range, suggesting unique adaptations to particular hosts. P. digitatum and P. italicum are primarily pathogens of mature citrus fruit, while P. expansum has a broad host range, but does not infect citrus. One possible basis of host specifi...

  2. Haenamindole and fumiquinazoline analogs from a fungicolous isolate of Penicillium lanosum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two new amino acid-derived compounds, lanosindole (1) and 2'-epi-fumiquinazoline C (2), were isolated from cultures of a fungicolous isolate of Penicillium lanosum (MYC 1813 = NRRL 66231), together with 2'-epi-fumiquinazoline D (3), previously reported only as a product of an in vitro enzymatic step...

  3. Dihydrotrichodimerol and tetrahydrotrichodimerol, two new bisorbicillinoids, from a marine-derived Penicillium terrestre.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weizhong; Gu, Qianqun; Zhu, Weiming; Cui, Chengbin; Fan, Guotao

    2005-10-01

    Two new bisorbicillinoids possessing an open-ended cage structure, dihydrotrichodimerol (1) and tetrahydrotrichodimerol (2), were isolated from a marine-derived Penicillium terrestre. Their structures were established by spectroscopic methods. Their cytotoxic activities against P388 and A-549 cell lines were preliminarily evaluated by the MTT method. PMID:16392677

  4. First report of Penicillium crustosum causing blue mold on stored apple fruit in Serbia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penicillium crustosum Thom causes blue mold on pome fruits and is also regularly found on cheese, nuts and soil. The fungus produces an array of mycotoxins that impact human health, including penitrem A, roquefortine C, terrestric acid, and cyclopenol. In January and February 2013, decayed apples, ‘...

  5. First report of Penicillium carneum causing blue mold on stored apples in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blue mold decay occurs during long term storage of apples and is predominantly caused by Penicillium expansum Link. Apples harvested in 2010 were stored in controlled atmosphere at a commercial Pennsylvania apple packing and storage facility, and were examined for occurrence of decay in May 2011. ...

  6. A Rapid Assay to Detect Toxigenic Penicillium spp. Contamination in Wine and Musts

    PubMed Central

    Sanzani, Simona Marianna; Miazzi, Monica Marilena; di Rienzo, Valentina; Fanelli, Valentina; Gambacorta, Giuseppe; Taurino, Maria Rosaria; Montemurro, Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    Wine and fermenting musts are grape products widely consumed worldwide. Since the presence of mycotoxin-producing fungi may greatly compromise their quality characteristics and safety, there is an increasing need for relatively rapid “user friendly” quantitative assays to detect fungal contamination both in grapes delivered to wineries and in final products. Although other fungi are most frequently involved in grape deterioration, secondary infections by Penicillium spp. are quite common, especially in cool areas with high humidity and in wines obtained by partially dried grapes. In this work, a single-tube nested real-time PCR approach—successfully applied to hazelnut and peanut allergen detection—was tested for the first time to trace Penicillium spp. in musts and wines. The method consisted of two sets of primers specifically designed to target the β-tubulin gene, to be simultaneously applied with the aim of lowering the detection limit of conventional real-time PCR. The assay was able to detect up to 1 fg of Penicillium DNA. As confirmation, patulin content of representative samples was determined. Most of analyzed wines/musts returned contaminated results at >50 ppb and a 76% accordance with molecular assay was observed. Although further large-scale trials are needed, these results encourage the use of the newly developed method in the pre-screening of fresh and processed grapes for the presence of Penicillium DNA before the evaluation of related toxins. PMID:27509524

  7. First report of Penicillium expansum isolates resistant to pyrimethanil from stored apple fruit in Pennsylvania

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apples in the United States are stored in low temperature controlled atmosphere for 9–12 months and are susceptible to decay by blue mold. Penicillium spp. cause significant economic losses worldwide and produce mycotoxins that contaminate processed apple products. Blue mold is managed by a combinat...

  8. A Rapid Assay to Detect Toxigenic Penicillium spp. Contamination in Wine and Musts.

    PubMed

    Sanzani, Simona Marianna; Miazzi, Monica Marilena; di Rienzo, Valentina; Fanelli, Valentina; Gambacorta, Giuseppe; Taurino, Maria Rosaria; Montemurro, Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    Wine and fermenting musts are grape products widely consumed worldwide. Since the presence of mycotoxin-producing fungi may greatly compromise their quality characteristics and safety, there is an increasing need for relatively rapid "user friendly" quantitative assays to detect fungal contamination both in grapes delivered to wineries and in final products. Although other fungi are most frequently involved in grape deterioration, secondary infections by Penicillium spp. are quite common, especially in cool areas with high humidity and in wines obtained by partially dried grapes. In this work, a single-tube nested real-time PCR approach-successfully applied to hazelnut and peanut allergen detection-was tested for the first time to trace Penicillium spp. in musts and wines. The method consisted of two sets of primers specifically designed to target the β-tubulin gene, to be simultaneously applied with the aim of lowering the detection limit of conventional real-time PCR. The assay was able to detect up to 1 fg of Penicillium DNA. As confirmation, patulin content of representative samples was determined. Most of analyzed wines/musts returned contaminated results at >50 ppb and a 76% accordance with molecular assay was observed. Although further large-scale trials are needed, these results encourage the use of the newly developed method in the pre-screening of fresh and processed grapes for the presence of Penicillium DNA before the evaluation of related toxins. PMID:27509524

  9. Penicillium digitatum suppresses production of hydrogen peroxide in host tissue during infection of citrus fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the development of green mold disease (Penicillium digitatum) on citrus fruit, there is little evidence of a host resistance response against the invading fungus. This suggests that P. digitatum has the ability to suppress host defenses. Current knowledge of plant-fungal interactions indica...

  10. Occurrence and phenotypes of pyrimethanil resistance in penicillium expansum from apple in Washington state

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penicillium expansum is the primary cause of blue mold of apple. Pyrimethanil is a recently registered postharvest fungicide for control of postharvest diseases in apple. To monitor pyrimethanil resistance, 779 isolates of P. expansum were collected from decayed apple fruit in 2010 and 2011 from fiv...

  11. Ultraviolet-C light inactivation of Penicillium expansum on fruit surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the influence of fruit surface morphology on ultraviolet-C (UV-C 254 nm) inactivation of microorganisms is required for designing effective treatment systems. In this study, we analyzed UV-C inactivation of Penicillium expansum that was inoculated onto the surface of organic fruits. Re...

  12. Use of chemosensitization to overcome fludioxonil-resistance in Penicillium expansum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance in two mutant strains of Penicillium expansum to the fungicide fludioxonil was overcome by co-application of natural phenolic chemosensitizing agents that targeted various elements of the oxidative stress-response pathway. Fludioxonil resistance in these strains resulted from cell-linked ...

  13. [Clavine alkaloid biosynthesis by the fungus Penicillium palitans westling 1911 isolated from ancient permafrost deposits].

    PubMed

    Kozlovskiĭ, A G; Zhelifonova, V P; Antipova, T V

    2009-01-01

    The relic strain of Penicillium palitans isolated from the ancient permafrost deposits produces clavine alkaloids such as festuclavine, fumigaclavine A, and fumigaclavine B. Alkaloid biosynthesis is concurrent with the growth. Tryptophan and zinc ion additives to the culture medium stimulate the synthesis of alkaloids. PMID:19382708

  14. Production of the Tremorgenic Mycotoxins Verruculogen and Fumitremorgin B by Penicillium piscarium Westling.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, R T; Latch, G C

    1977-03-01

    The tremorgenic mycotoxins verruculogen and fumitremorgin B were isolated from Penicillium piscarium Westling. The coexistence of these tremorgens in culture has previously been reported for one other unrelated fungal species, Aspergillus caespitosus Raper and Thom, and lends further support to the suggestion that the tremorgens have a common biosynthetic origin. PMID:16345234

  15. Production of the Tremorgenic Mycotoxins Verruculogen and Fumitremorgin B by Penicillium piscarium Westling

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, R. T.; Latch, G. C. M.

    1977-01-01

    The tremorgenic mycotoxins verruculogen and fumitremorgin B were isolated from Penicillium piscarium Westling. The coexistence of these tremorgens in culture has previously been reported for one other unrelated fungal species, Aspergillus caespitosus Raper and Thom, and lends further support to the suggestion that the tremorgens have a common biosynthetic origin. PMID:16345234

  16. Performance of fogged disinfectants to inactivate conida of Penicillium digitatum within citrus degreening rooms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fogging with formaldehyde of citrus packinghouses when the fruit are absent is a practice to control conidia of Penicillium digitatum (Pers.) Sacc., cause of citrus green mold. Replacements for formaldehyde in these facilities are needed because of worker and environmental health issues. To evaluate...

  17. Influence of temperature and humidity on survival of Penicillium digitatum and Geotrichum citri-aurantii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Longevity of conidia of Penicillium digitatum and arthrospores of Geotrichum citri-aurantii, cause of green mold and sour rot of citrus, respectively, was determined. Conidia of P. digitatum were exposed to ambient summer conditions in central California or to conditions of controlled temperature an...

  18. Endophytic synthesis of silver chloride nanoparticles from Penicillium sp. of Calophyllum apetalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrappa, C. P.; Govindappa, M.; Chandrasekar, N.; Sarkar, Sonia; Ooha, Sepuri; Channabasava, R.

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, Penicillium species extract isolated from Calophyllum apetalum was used for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles and it was confirmed by changing the color of the silver nitrate UV–Vis spectrum. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by biophysical techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction.

  19. The biochemical basis of pathogenicity and host-specificity of Penicillium digitatum on citrus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work, we report that volatiles emitted from wounded citrus peel play a major role in host recognition by Penicillium digitatum. Volatiles of various citrus cultivars had a pronounced stimulatory effect on germination and germ tube elongation of green mold pathogen. When exposed to volatile...

  20. ASSESSMENT OF IMMUNE RESPONSES TO PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ITS ALLERGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of immune responses to Penicillium chrysogenum and characterization of its allergens

    Yongjoo Chung1, Michael E Viana2, Lisa B Copeland3, and MaryJane K Selgrade3, Marsha D W Ward3. 1 UNC, SPH, Chapel Hill, NC, 2NCSU, CVM, Raleigh, NC, 3US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP,...

  1. Inhibitory effect of selenium against Penicillium expansum and its possible mechanisms of action

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penicillium expansum is a widely spread fungal pathogen that causes blue mold rot in a variety of fruits. This pathogen not only induces blue mold rot but also produces patulin in affected apple fruit, a secondary metabolite that is toxic to humans and animals. Currently, diseases caused by P. expan...

  2. Genome sequence of Penicillium solitum RS1, which causes postharvest apple decay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penicillium species cause postharvest decay, commonly known as blue mold, in pome fruits such as apples and pears. Among the species that cause blue mold, P. expansum is the most virulent and prevalent, while P. solitum is signficantly less virulent. For devising novel strategies to prevent and to r...

  3. Detection of additional genes of the patulin biosynthetic pathway in Penicillium griseofulvum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genes in the patulin biosynthetic pathway are likely to be arranged in a cluster as has been found for biosynthetic pathways of other mycotoxins. The mycotoxin patulin, common in apples and apple juice, is most often associated with Penicillium expansum. However, of 15 fungal species capable of sy...

  4. DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC RESPONSES TO AN EXTRACT OF PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM IN BAL/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor mold has been associated with the development of allergic asthma. Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. Our hypothesis is that soluble components of ...

  5. DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC RESPONSES TO AN EXTRACT OF PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM IN BALB/MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor mold has been associated with the development of allergic asthma. Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. Our hypothesis is that soluble components of ...

  6. AN EXTRACT OF PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM INDUCES DOSE-DEPENDENT ALLERGIC ASTHMA RESPONSES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Penicillium chrysogenum, a common indoor mold, is known to have several allergens and can induce allergic responses in a mouse model of allergic penicilliosis. Our hypothesis is that soluble components of P. chrysogenum (PCE) can dose-dependently induce responses typ...

  7. THE ISOAMYL OXIDASE GENE IN PENICILLIUM GRISEOFULVUM IS PART OF THE PATULIN BIOSYNTHETIC PATHWAY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genes for the patulin biosynthetic pathway are likely to be arranged in a cluster, as is the case for other mycotoxins. GeneWalking was performed to identify genes both upstream and downstream of the isoepoxydon dehydrogenase (idh) gene in Penicillium griseofulvum NRRL 2159A. A gene with high sequ...

  8. Phylogeny of Penicillium and the segregation of Trichocomaceae into three families

    PubMed Central

    Houbraken, J.; Samson, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Species of Trichocomaceae occur commonly and are important to both industry and medicine. They are associated with food spoilage and mycotoxin production and can occur in the indoor environment, causing health hazards by the formation of β-glucans, mycotoxins and surface proteins. Some species are opportunistic pathogens, while others are exploited in biotechnology for the production of enzymes, antibiotics and other products. Penicillium belongs phylogenetically to Trichocomaceae and more than 250 species are currently accepted in this genus. In this study, we investigated the relationship of Penicillium to other genera of Trichocomaceae and studied in detail the phylogeny of the genus itself. In order to study these relationships, partial RPB1, RPB2 (RNA polymerase II genes), Tsr1 (putative ribosome biogenesis protein) and Cct8 (putative chaperonin complex component TCP-1) gene sequences were obtained. The Trichocomaceae are divided in three separate families: Aspergillaceae, Thermoascaceae and Trichocomaceae. The Aspergillaceae are characterised by the formation flask-shaped or cylindrical phialides, asci produced inside cleistothecia or surrounded by Hülle cells and mainly ascospores with a furrow or slit, while the Trichocomaceae are defined by the formation of lanceolate phialides, asci borne within a tuft or layer of loose hyphae and ascospores lacking a slit. Thermoascus and Paecilomyces, both members of Thermoascaceae, also form ascospores lacking a furrow or slit, but are differentiated from Trichocomaceae by the production of asci from croziers and their thermotolerant or thermophilic nature. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Penicillium is polyphyletic. The genus is re-defined and a monophyletic genus for both anamorphs and teleomorphs is created (Penicillium sensu stricto). The genera Thysanophora, Eupenicillium, Chromocleista, Hemicarpenteles and Torulomyces belong in Penicillium s. str. and new combinations for the species belonging to these genera

  9. DESTRUCTION OF ASPERGILLUS VERSICOLOR, PENICILLIUM CRYSOGENUM, STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM, AND CLADOSPORIUM CLADOSPORIDES SPORES USING CHEMICAL OXIDATION TREATMENT PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The survival of aqueous suspensions of Penicillium chrysogenum, Stachybotrys chartarum, Aspergillus versicolor, and Cladosporium cladosporioides spores was evaluated using various combinations of hydrogen peroxide and iron (II) as catalyst. Spores were suspended in water and trea...

  10. Survival of Penicillium spp. conidia during deep-frying and baking steps of frozen chicken nuggets processing.

    PubMed

    Wigmann, Évelin Francine; Moreira, Rafael Chelala; Alvarenga, Verônica Ortiz; Sant'Ana, Anderson S; Copetti, Marina Venturini

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed at determining whether Penicillium spp. strains could survive through the heat treatment applied during the processing of frozen chicken nuggets. Firstly, it was found that the conidia of Penicillium were not able to survive the heat shock in phosphate buffer at pH 7.2 in thermal death tubes (TDT) at 80 °C/30 min. Subsequently, each Penicillium strain was inoculated in frozen chicken nuggets, which were subjected to the following treatments: i) only deep frying (frying oil at 195-200 °C), ii) only baking (120-130 °C until the internal temperature reached 70 °C) and iii) deep frying followed by baking (frying oil temperature of 195-200 °C and baking temperature of 120-130 °C, until the internal temperature reached 70 °C). The results indicated that Penicillium polonicum NGT 23/12, Penicillium commune NGT 16/12, Penicillium solitum NGT 30/12 and Penicillium crustosum NGT 51/12 were able to survive after the combined treatment (deep frying followed by baking) when inoculated in chicken nuggets. P. polonicum NGT 23/12 was the most resistant strain to the combined treatment (deep frying and baking), as its population was reduced by 3 log cycles CFU/g, when the internal temperature reached 78 °C after 10 min and 30 s of baking. The present data show that if Penicillium spp. is present in high numbers in raw materials, such as breading flours, it will survive the thermal processing applied during chicken nuggets production. PMID:26742610

  11. An evaluation of the proteolytic and lipolytic potential of Penicillium spp. isolated from traditional Greek sausages in submerged fermentation.

    PubMed

    Papagianni, Maria

    2014-01-01

    A number of novel Penicillium strains belonging to Penicillium nalgiovense, Penicillium solitum, Penicillium commune, Penicillium olsonii, and Penicillium oxalicum species, isolated from the surface of traditional Greek sausages, were evaluated for their proteolytic and lipolytic potential in a solid substrate first and next in submerged fermentations, using complex media. Extracellular proteolytic activity was assessed at acid, neutral, and alkaline pH, while the lipolytic activity was assessed using olive oil, the short-chain triacylglycerol tributyrin, and the long-chain triolein, as substrates. The study revealed that although closely related, the tested strains produce enzymes of distinct specificities. P. nalgiovense PNA9 produced the highest alkaline proteolytic activity (13.2 unit (U)/ml) and the highest lipolytic activity with tributyrin (92 U/ml). Comparisons with known sources show that proteases and/or lipases can be secreted effectively by some Penicillia (P. nalgiovense PNA4, PNA7, and PNA9 and P. solitum PSO1), and further investigations on their properties and characteristics would be promising. PMID:24122629

  12. [Rapid improvement of lipase production in Penicillium expansum by genome shuffling].

    PubMed

    Lin, Jun; Shi, Bi-Hong; Shi, Qiao-Qin; He, Yun-Xia; Wang, Ming-Zi

    2007-07-01

    In the present study, the genome shuffling was used to improve lipase production of Penicillium expansum. A lipase producing mutant strain-Penicillium expansum FS8486 and a wild type of Aspergillus Tamarii FS-132 isolated from soil of a volcano in Xinjiang were used as the parental strains. After two rounds of genome shuffling, several elite daughter strains were screened. The lipase activity in one of the daughter strains was increased 317% over the starting strain FS8486. Comparisons of the morphology, RAPD (Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA) polymorphism and the fatty acid compositions between the daughter and the parental strains suggested that the filial generation were generated by genome shuffling. In this study, the genome shuffling used successfully first time in eukaryotic microorganism and increases the production of the desired metabolite in short time, the study will be useful to spread the genome shuffling in eukaryotic microbial breeding. PMID:17822042

  13. Production of tremorgenic toxins by Penicillium janthinellum Biourge: a possible aetiological factor in ryegrass staggers.

    PubMed

    Lanigan, G W; Payne, A L; Cockrum, P A

    1979-02-01

    Topsoil, herbage and faeces collected during an outbreak of ryegrass staggers in sheep were examined for tremorgenic penicillia. No such fungi were recovered from the plant material, but they were found among the predominant fungi in the soil and faecal samples. The commonest species of Penicillium, and almost the only tremorgenic species encountered, was Penicillium janthinellum Biourge. When fed to sheep, the mycelium of this fungus evoked a number of the clinical signs seen in field cases of ryegrass staggers. Two tremorgenic toxins were isolated from the mycelial felts and available evidence indicates that they are verruculogen and fumitremorgin A. P. janthinellum also produced these tremorgens when cultured in moist, autoclaved soil, but not in unheated soil. The results obtained from this study are in accord with the hypothesis that ryegrass staggers is caused by tremorgenic mycotoxins. PMID:475667

  14. Tremorgenic mycotoxins produced by strains of Penicillium spp. isolated from toxic Poa huecu parodi.

    PubMed

    Scuteri, M; Sala de Miguel, M A; Blanco Viera, J; Planes de Banchero, E

    1992-12-01

    Seventeen strains of Penicillium spp. have been isolated from Poa huecu Parodi from the Zapala zone, exhibiting toxicity to sheet. The following strains have been identified: P. crustosum, cyclopium, notatum, palitans, puberulum, verrucosum, viridicatum and Penicillium spp. The toxigenic capacity of the strains was studied after growing them under suitable conditions. Toxins produced were analysed by thin layer chromatography (TLC). Penitrem A (PA) and Penitrem B (PB) neurotoxins were identified and quantitated in twelve strains; verruculogen (VERR) and fumitremorgen B (FTB) being present in one of them. The effect of these mycotoxins was studied in mice. Neurological symptoms characteristic of the intoxication by tremorgenic toxins and similar to those observed in sheep suffering from 'huecu's disease' were observed. The possible role of these toxins as causative agents of 'huecu's disease' is discussed. PMID:1494361

  15. Meroterpenoids and isoberkedienolactone from endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. associated with Dysosma versipellis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Wei; Duan, Rui-Gang; Zou, Jian-Hua; Chen, Ri-Dao; Chen, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Jun-Gui

    2014-06-01

    Seven meroterpenoids and five small-molecular precursors were isolated from Penicillium sp., an endophytic fungus from Dysosma versipellis. The structures of new compounds, 11beta-acetoxyisoaustinone (1) and isoberkedienolactone (2) were elucidated based on analysis of the spectral data, and the absolute configuration of 2 was established by TDDFT ECD calculation with satisfactory match to its experimental ECD data. Meroterpenoids originated tetraketide and pentaketide precursors, resepectively, were found to be simultaneously produced in specific fungus of Penicillium species. These compounds showed weak cytotoxicity in vitro against HCT-116, HepG2, BGC-823, NCI-H1650, and A2780 cell lines with IC 50 > 10 micromol x L(-1). PMID:25212040

  16. Aspergillus, Penicillium and Talaromyces isolated from house dust samples collected around the world

    PubMed Central

    Visagie, C.M.; Hirooka, Y.; Tanney, J.B.; Whitfield, E.; Mwange, K.; Meijer, M.; Amend, A.S.; Seifert, K.A.; Samson, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of a worldwide survey of the indoor mycobiota, dust was collected from nine countries. Analyses of dust samples included the culture-dependent dilution-to-extinction method and the culture-independent 454-pyrosequencing. Of the 7 904 isolates, 2 717 isolates were identified as belonging to Aspergillus, Penicillium and Talaromyces. The aim of this study was to identify isolates to species level and describe the new species found. Secondly, we wanted to create a reliable reference sequence database to be used for next-generation sequencing projects. Isolates represented 59 Aspergillus species, including eight undescribed species, 49 Penicillium species of which seven were undescribed and 18 Talaromyces species including three described here as new. In total, 568 ITS barcodes were generated, and 391 β-tubulin and 507 calmodulin sequences, which serve as alternative identification markers. PMID:25492981

  17. Tanzawaic acids I–L: Four new polyketides from Penicillium sp. IBWF104-06

    PubMed Central

    Sandjo, Louis P; Thines, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    Summary Four new polyketides have been identified in culture filtrates of the fungal strain Penicillium sp. IBWF104-06 isolated from a soil sample. They are structurally based on the same trans-decalinpentanoic acid skeleton as tanzawaic acids A–H. One of the new compounds was found to inhibit the conidial germination in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae at concentrations of 25 μg/mL. PMID:24605144

  18. Abundance of airborne Penicillium CFU in relation to urbanization in Mexico City.

    PubMed Central

    Rosas, I; Calderón, C; Ulloa, M; Lacey, J

    1993-01-01

    Air was sampled simultaneously at three localities in Mexico City differing in urbanization index and air pollution level on 22 days during a period covering both dry and rainy seasons. An Andersen two-stage microbial sampler was used for 15 min at 28 liters min-1 to isolate culturable fungi on malt extract agar. After exposure, plates were incubated at 25 degrees C for 48 to 72 h before colonies were counted and identified to give concentrations of total fungal spores and of Penicillium spp., expressed as CFU per cubic meter of air. Total fungi numbered 91 to 602 CFU m-3 in Tlalpan Borough (southern area), 40 to 264 CFU m-3 in Cuauhtémoc Borough (downtown), and 26 to 495 CFU m-3 in Gustavo A. Madero Borough (northern area). Although Penicillium spp. were the second most frequently isolated fungal genus, concentrations were small, with a maximum of only 133 CFU m-3. Twice as many colonies were isolated in the southern area, with an urbanization index of 0.25 (arithmetic mean, 41 CFU m-3), as at other sampling stations with greater urbanization indices (arithmetic means, 19 and 20 CFU m-3). In the downtown area, with an urbanization index of 1.0, Penicillium spp. were more numerous than any other genus and formed 25% of the total fungal count compared with 14 and 17% in the other areas. Concentrations of airborne Penicillium spp. did not differ significantly between rainy and dry seasons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8368852

  19. Penicillium marneffei Infection with β-D-glucan Elevation: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Sakamoto, Yohei; Lee, Kwangyeol; Amano, Yuichiro; Tachikawa, Natsuo

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of Penicillium marneffei infection (PMI) in a Japanese man who was infected with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), who was diagnosed on the basis of a bone marrow culture and who was effectively treated with itraconazole. Our review of the PMI cases reported in Japan suggests that increased serum (1→3)-β-D-glucan levels are a useful diagnostic tool in cases of suspected PMI. PMID:27580558

  20. Effect of dissolved carbon dioxide on penicillin fermentations: mycelial growth and penicillin production. [Penicillium chrysogenum

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.S.; Smith, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of dissolved carbon dioxide on the specific growth rate and the penicillin production rate of Penicillium chrysogenum was examined experimentally. The dissolved carbon dioxide was found to inhibit the specific growth rate and the penicillin production rate when the aerated submerged penicillin fermentation was exposed to influent gases of 12.6 and 20% carbon dioxide, respectively. Upon exposure to influent gases of 3 and 5% carbon dioxide, no pronounced metabolic inhibition was noted.

  1. Tanzawaic acids I-L: Four new polyketides from Penicillium sp. IBWF104-06.

    PubMed

    Sandjo, Louis P; Thines, Eckhard; Opatz, Till; Schüffler, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Four new polyketides have been identified in culture filtrates of the fungal strain Penicillium sp. IBWF104-06 isolated from a soil sample. They are structurally based on the same trans-decalinpentanoic acid skeleton as tanzawaic acids A-H. One of the new compounds was found to inhibit the conidial germination in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae at concentrations of 25 μg/mL. PMID:24605144

  2. Evaluation of secretome of highly efficient lignocellulolytic Penicillium sp. Dal 5 isolated from rhizosphere of conifers.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rohit; Kaur, Baljit; Singh, Surender; Di Falco, Macros; Tsang, Adrian; Chadha, B S

    2016-09-01

    Penicillium sp. (Dal 5) isolated from rhizosphere of conifers from Dalhousie (Himachal Pradesh, India) was found to be an efficient cellulolytic strain. The culture under shake flask on CWR (cellulose, wheat bran and rice straw) medium produced appreciably higher levels of endoglucanase (35.69U/ml), β-glucosidase (4.20U/ml), cellobiohydrolase (2.86U/ml), FPase (1.2U/ml) and xylanase (115U/ml) compared to other Penicillium strains reported in literature. The mass spectroscopy analysis of Penicillium sp. Dal 5 secretome identified 108 proteins constituting an array of CAZymes including glycosyl hydrolases (GH) belonging to 24 different families, polysaccharide lyases (PL), carbohydrate esterases (CE), lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases (LPMO) in addition to swollenin and a variety of carbohydrate binding modules (CBM) indicating an elaborate genetic potential of this strain for hydrolysis of lignocellulosics. Further, the culture extract was evaluated for hydrolysis of alkali treated rice straw, wheat straw, bagasse and corn cob at 10% substrate loading rate. PMID:27341464

  3. A phylogenetic revision of Penicillium sect. Exilicaulis, including nine new species from fynbos in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Visagie, Cobus M; Seifert, Keith A; Houbraken, Jos; Samson, Robert A; Jacobs, Karin

    2016-06-01

    A survey of the fynbos biome in South Africa resulted in the isolation of 61 Penicillium species from Protea repens infructescences, air, and soil samples. Fourteen of these belong to Penicillium sect. Exilicaulis and therefore we considered it an opportunity to re-evaluate the taxonomy of the section. Phylogenetic comparisons of the ITS, β-tubulin, calmodulin and RPB2 gene regions of the 76 section Exilicaulis species, revealed 52 distinct species, including nine new species from fynbos. Morphological comparisons confirmed the novelty for most of these, however, new species closely related to P. rubefaciens did not show significant or consistent morphological differences and we thus placed a bias on phylogenetic data applying the Genealogical Concordance Phylogenetic Species Recognition (GCPSR) concept. In this paper we describe the nine new species and update the accepted species list and resolve synonyms in the section. Importantly, we reveal that P. citreosulfuratum is the correct name for the clade previously considered to represent P. toxicarium fide Serra et al. (2008). The nine new species are: Penicillium atrolazulinum, P. consobrinum, P. cravenianum, P. hemitrachum, P. pagulum, P. repensicola, P. momoii, P. subturcoseum, and P. xanthomelinii spp. nov. PMID:27433442

  4. Putative structure and characteristics of a red water-soluble pigment secreted by Penicillium marneffei.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Sonia; Shukla, Anshuman; Mukherjee, Sourav; Sharma, Swati; Guptasarma, Purnananda; Chakraborti, Asit K; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke

    2007-08-01

    The dimorphic fungus, Penicillium marneffei, produces and secretes a brick red pigment, during growth at temperatures below 30 degrees C. It generally diffuses into commonly used media like Sabouraud dextrose agar and malt extract agar. The pigment was purified by reverse-phase liquid chromatography and subjected to structural determination by elemental and spectral analysis using atomic absorption (AAS), ultra violet and visible (UV-VIS), fluorescence, infra red (IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS). The pigment showed a buffering ability in aqueous solutions, maintaining an alkaline pH of 8.0. It behaved as a colorimetric pH indicator over a wide acidic and alkaline pH range, with discoloration occurring ostensibly through hydrolysis of key chemical groups at extremely acidic pH ( approximately 2.0). The pigment was found to have some structural resemblance with the copper-colored pigment (herquinone) produced by Penicillium herquei as both pigments contain the phenalene carbon framework. The notable differences between herquinone and the pigment produced by P. marneffei are (i) the latter's apparent dimerization through a sulphur-sulphur (disulfide) bond and (ii) the presence of 1,1,3,3-tetramethyl-2,3-dihydropyrrole moiety in the latter instead of 2,3,3-trimethyl-2,3-dihydrofuran moiety found in the former. The delineation of the structure of the pigment produced by Penicillium marneffei may help in understanding certain aspects of the biology of this pathogenic fungus. PMID:17654268

  5. Genomic Characterization Reveals Insights Into Patulin Biosynthesis and Pathogenicity in Penicillium Species.

    PubMed

    Li, Boqiang; Zong, Yuanyuan; Du, Zhenglin; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Zhanquan; Qin, Guozheng; Zhao, Wenming; Tian, Shiping

    2015-06-01

    Penicillium species are fungal pathogens that infect crop plants worldwide. P. expansum differs from P. italicum and P. digitatum, all major postharvest pathogens of pome and citrus, in that the former is able to produce the mycotoxin patulin and has a broader host range. The molecular basis of host-specificity of fungal pathogens has now become the focus of recent research. The present report provides the whole genome sequence of P. expansum (33.52 Mb) and P. italicum (28.99 Mb) and identifies differences in genome structure, important pathogenic characters, and secondary metabolite (SM) gene clusters in Penicillium species. We identified a total of 55 gene clusters potentially related to secondary metabolism, including a cluster of 15 genes (named PePatA to PePatO), that may be involved in patulin biosynthesis in P. expansum. Functional studies confirmed that PePatL and PePatK play crucial roles in the biosynthesis of patulin and that patulin production is not related to virulence of P. expansum. Collectively, P. expansum contains more pathogenic genes and SM gene clusters, in particular, an intact patulin cluster, than P. italicum or P. digitatum. These findings provide important information relevant to understanding the molecular network of patulin biosynthesis and mechanisms of host-specificity in Penicillium species. PMID:25625822

  6. Genome, Transcriptome, and Functional Analyses of Penicillium expansum Provide New Insights Into Secondary Metabolism and Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Ballester, Ana-Rosa; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Levin, Elena; Sela, Noa; Selma-Lázaro, Cristina; Carmona, Lourdes; Wisniewski, Michael; Droby, Samir; González-Candelas, Luis; Gabaldón, Toni

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between secondary metabolism and infection in pathogenic fungi has remained largely elusive. The genus Penicillium comprises a group of plant pathogens with varying host specificities and with the ability to produce a wide array of secondary metabolites. The genomes of three Penicillium expansum strains, the main postharvest pathogen of pome fruit, and one Pencillium italicum strain, a postharvest pathogen of citrus fruit, were sequenced and compared with 24 other fungal species. A genomic analysis of gene clusters responsible for the production of secondary metabolites was performed. Putative virulence factors in P. expansum were identified by means of a transcriptomic analysis of apple fruits during the course of infection. Despite a major genome contraction, P. expansum is the Penicillium species with the largest potential for the production of secondary metabolites. Results using knockout mutants clearly demonstrated that neither patulin nor citrinin are required by P. expansum to successfully infect apples. Li et al. ( MPMI-12-14-0398-FI ) reported similar results and conclusions in their recently accepted paper. PMID:25338147

  7. Proteomics Shows New Faces for the Old Penicillin Producer Penicillium chrysogenum

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Carlos; Martín, Juan F.; García-Estrada, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Fungi comprise a vast group of microorganisms including the Ascomycota (majority of all described fungi), the Basidiomycota (mushrooms or higher fungi), and the Zygomycota and Chytridiomycota (basal or lower fungi) that produce industrially interesting secondary metabolites, such as β-lactam antibiotics. These compounds are one of the most commonly prescribed drugs world-wide. Since Fleming's initial discovery of Penicillium notatum 80 years ago, the role of Penicillium as an antimicrobial source became patent. After the isolation of Penicillium chrysogenum NRRL 1951 six decades ago, classical mutagenesis and screening programs led to the development of industrial strains with increased productivity (at least three orders of magnitude). The new “omics” era has provided the key to understand the underlying mechanisms of the industrial strain improvement process. The review of different proteomics methods applied to P. chrysogenum has revealed that industrial modification of this microorganism was a consequence of a careful rebalancing of several metabolic pathways. In addition, the secretome analysis of P. chrysogenum has opened the door to new industrial applications for this versatile filamentous fungus. PMID:22318718

  8. [Effect of alcoholic extracts of wild plants on the inhibition of growth of Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium expansum, Fusarium moniliforme and Fusarium poae moulds].

    PubMed

    Tequida-Meneses, Martín; Cortez-Rocha, Mario; Rosas-Burgos, Ema Carina; López-Sandoval, Susana; Corrales-Maldonado, Consuelo

    2002-06-01

    Fungicidal activity of wild plants Larrea tridentata, Karwinskia humboldtiana, Ricinus communis, Eucalyptus globulus, Ambrosia ambrosioides, Nicotiana glauca, Ambrosia confertiflora, Datura discolor, Baccharis glutinosa, Proboscidea parviflora, Solanum rostratum, Jatropha cinerea, Salpianthus macrodonthus y Sarcostemma cynanchoides was evaluated against the moulds species Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium expansum, Fusarium poae y Fusarium moniliforme moulds species. Alcoholic extracts 6% (w/v) were prepared using six grams of dried plant powders (leaves and stems) and alcohol (70% ethanol or 70% methanol). A spore suspension (1x10(6); ufc/ml) of each mould was prepared by adding saline solution (0.85%) and 0.1% tween 80. The extracts were mixed with Czapeck yeast agar (CYA) at 45-50 degrees C in 1:10 relation on Petri dishes. Triplicate Petri dishes of each treatment and for each mould were centrally inoculated and three Petri dishes were used without treatment as controls. The inoculated dishes and controls were incubated at 25 +/- 2 degrees C for eight days. The incubated dishes were examined each 48 h and after the colony diameter (radial growth) was measured. Two mould species were controlled by L. tridentata, B. glutinosa and P. parviflora. Extracts of L. tridentata in methanol or ethanol at 41.5-100% inhibited all six species of moulds. PMID:12828509

  9. Inhibition of Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum by hydroxypropyl methylcellulose-lipid edible composite films containing food additives with antifungal properties.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Chamorro, Silvia A; Palou, Lluís; del Río, Miguel A; Pérez-Gago, María B

    2008-12-10

    New hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC)-lipid edible composite films containing low-toxicity chemicals with antifungal properties were developed. Tested chemicals were mainly salts of organic acids, salts of parabens, and mineral salts, classified as food additives or generally recognized as safe (GRAS) compounds. Selected films containing food preservatives were used for in vitro evaluation (disk diameter test) of their antifungal activity against Penicillium digitatum (PD) and Penicillium italicum (PI), the most important postharvest pathogens of fresh citrus fruit. Mechanical properties and oxygen (OP) and water vapor permeabilities (WVP) of selected films were also determined. Film disks containing parabens and their mixtures inhibited PD and PI to a higher extent than the other chemicals tested. Among all organic acid salts tested, potassium sorbate (PS) and sodium benzoate (SB) were the most effective salts in controlling both PD and PI. The use of mixtures of parabens or organic acid salts did not provide an additive or synergistic effect for mold inhibition when compared to the use of single chemicals. Barrier and mechanical properties of films were affected by the addition of food preservatives. Results showed that HPMC-lipid films containing an appropriate food additive should promise as potential commercial antifungal edible coatings for fresh citrus fruit. PMID:19012404

  10. The effect of locust bean gum (LBG)-based edible coatings carrying biocontrol yeasts against Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum causal agents of postharvest decay of mandarin fruit.

    PubMed

    Parafati, Lucia; Vitale, Alessandro; Restuccia, Cristina; Cirvilleri, Gabriella

    2016-09-01

    Strains belonging to Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Aureobasidium pullulans species were tested in vitro as biocontrol agents (BCAs) against the post-harvest pathogenic molds Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum. Moreover, studies aimed at screening the antifungal activity of selected yeast strains in vivo conditions against P. digitatum and P. italicum, and investigated the efficacy of a polysaccharidic matrix, locust bean gum (LBG), enriched with the tested BCAs, in controlling postharvest decays in artificially inoculated mandarins. The population dynamics of BCAs on wounds and the magnitude of peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in fruit tissues were also investigated after treatments of mandarins with antagonistic yeasts. W. anomalus BS91, M. pulcherrima MPR3 and A. pullulans PI1 provided excellent control of postharvest decays caused by P. digitatum and P. italicum on mandarins, both when the yeasts were used alone and in combination with LBG, which enhanced the yeast cell viability over time. Finally, the increased activity of POD and lower decrease in SOD activity in response to BCAs application in mandarin fruits confirmed their involvement in the biocontrol mechanism. PMID:27217363

  11. Bioactive metabolites produced by Penicillium sp. 1 and sp. 2, two endophytes associated with Alibertia macrophylla (Rubiaceae).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Camila M; Silva, Geraldo H; Regasini, Luis O; Zanardi, Lisinéia M; Evangelista, Alana H; Young, Maria C M; Bolzani, Vanderlan S; Araujo, Angela R

    2009-01-01

    In the course of our continuous search for bioactive metabolites from endophytic fungi living in plants from the Brazilian flora, leaves of Alibertia macrophylla (Rubiaceae) were submitted to isolation of endophytes, and two species of Penicillium were isolated. The acetonitrile fraction obtained in corn from a culture of Penicillium sp. 1 afforded orcinol (1). On the other hand, Penicillium sp. 1 cultivated in potato-dextrose-broth furnished two different compounds, cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Val) (2) and uracil (3). The chromatographic fractionation of the acetonitrile fraction obtained from Penicillium sp. 2 led to three dihydroisocoumarins, 4-hydroxymellein (4), 8-methoxymellein (5) and 5-hydroxymellein (6). Compounds 5 and 6 were obtained from the Penicillium genus for the first time. Additionally, metabolites 1-6 were evaluated for their antifungal and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activities. The most active compounds 1 and 4 exhibited detection limits of 5.00 and 10.0 microg against Cladosporium cladosporioides and C. sphaerospermum, respectively. Compound 2 showed a detection limit of 10.0 microg, displaying potent AChE inhibitory activity. PMID:20158153

  12. Chemical response of Picea glehnii seed-epiphytic Penicillium species to Pythium vexans under in vitro competitive conditions for mycelial growth.

    PubMed

    Yamaji, Keiko; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki; Fukushi, Yukiharu; Tahara, Satoshi

    2005-04-01

    The potential protection of Picea glehnii seedlings from damping-off by seed-epiphytic Penicillium species was investigated. We studied the chemical response of seed-epiphytic Penicillium species (Pen. cyaneum, Pen. damascenum, and Pen. implicatum) to Pythium vexans, a damping-off fungus, in vitro. Penicillium species were cultured singly or cocultured with Pyt. vexans for 14 or 18 d, and mycelial growth, pH of culture filtrate, antifungal activity of the culture filtrate against Pyt. vexans, and the amount of antifungal compound produced by each Penicillium species, were examined. The filtrate of both the single culture of Penicillium and the coculture of Penicillium and Pyt. vexans showed antifungal activity against Pyt. vexans. In a coculture with Pyt. vexans, Pen. cyaneum produced an antifungal compound (patulin) as in the single culture. Pen. damascenum cocultured with Pyt. vexans produced an antifungal compound (citrinin), as it did in the single culture and in larger amounts on day 10. Pen. implicatum produced two antifungal compounds, frequentin and palitantin, and the ratio of frequentin (with higher antifungal activity than palitantin) to palitantin was higher in the coculture with Pyt. vexans than in the single culture. Our results indicate that these Penicillium species have the ability to produce antifungal compounds and to keep anti-fungal activity under competitive condition with Pyt. vexans. The chemical response of these Penicillium species to Pyt. vexans may contribute to protect P. glehnii seedlings from damage by Pyt. vexans. PMID:16124252

  13. Rapid inactivation of Penicillium digitatum spores using high-density nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Iseki, Sachiko; Hori, Masaru; Ohta, Takayuki; Aomatsu, Akiyoshi; Ito, Masafumi; Kano, Hiroyuki; Higashijima, Yasuhiro

    2010-04-12

    A promising, environmentally safe method for inactivating fungal spores of Penicillium digitatum, a difficult-to-inactivate food spoilage microorganism, was developed using a high-density nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). The NEAPP employing Ar gas had a high electron density on the order of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}. The spores were successfully and rapidly inactivated using the NEAPP, with a decimal reduction time in spores (D value) of 1.7 min. The contributions of ozone and UV radiation on the inactivation of the spores were evaluated and concluded to be not dominant, which was fundamentally different from the conventional sterilizations.

  14. Atpenins, new antifungal antibiotics produced by Penicillium sp. Production, isolation, physico-chemical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Omura, S; Tomoda, H; Kimura, K; Zhen, D Z; Kumagai, H; Igarashi, K; Imamura, N; Takahashi, Y; Tanaka, Y; Iwai, Y

    1988-12-01

    Penicillium sp. FO-125, a soil isolate, was found to produce a new antifungal antibiotic complex named atpenin. Three components A4, A5 and B were isolated from the fermentation broth of the producing strain by solvent extraction, silica gel column chromatography and HPLC. The molecular formula of atpenins A4, A5 and B were determined to be C15H22NO5Cl, C15H21NO5Cl2 and C15H23NO5, respectively, on the basis of high resolution electron impact mass spectrometry and elemental analysis. They are active against filamentous fungi, especially, Trichophyton sp. PMID:3209470

  15. Pretrichodermamides D-F from a Marine Algicolous Fungus Penicillium sp. KMM 4672.

    PubMed

    Yurchenko, Anton N; Smetanina, Olga F; Ivanets, Elena V; Kalinovsky, Anatoly I; Khudyakova, Yuliya V; Kirichuk, Natalya N; Popov, Roman S; Bokemeyer, Carsten; von Amsberg, Gunhild; Chingizova, Ekaterina A; Afiyatullov, Shamil Sh; Dyshlovoy, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    Three new epidithiodiketopiperazines pretrichodermamides D-F (1-3), together with the known N-methylpretrichodermamide B (4) and pretrichodermamide С (5), were isolated from the lipophilic extract of the marine algae-derived fungus Penicillium sp. KMM 4672. The structures of compounds 1-5 were determined based on spectroscopic methods. The absolute configuration of pretrichodermamide D (1) was established by a combination of modified Mosher's method, NOESY data, and biogenetic considerations. N-Methylpretrichodermamide B (5) showed strong cytotoxicity against 22Rv1 human prostate cancer cells resistant to androgen receptor targeted therapies. PMID:27355960

  16. Pretrichodermamides D–F from a Marine Algicolous Fungus Penicillium sp. KMM 4672

    PubMed Central

    Yurchenko, Anton N.; Smetanina, Olga F.; Ivanets, Elena V.; Kalinovsky, Anatoly I.; Khudyakova, Yuliya V.; Kirichuk, Natalya N.; Popov, Roman S.; Bokemeyer, Carsten; von Amsberg, Gunhild; Chingizova, Ekaterina A.; Afiyatullov, Shamil Sh.; Dyshlovoy, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    Three new epidithiodiketopiperazines pretrichodermamides D–F (1–3), together with the known N-methylpretrichodermamide B (4) and pretrichodermamide С (5), were isolated from the lipophilic extract of the marine algae-derived fungus Penicillium sp. KMM 4672. The structures of compounds 1–5 were determined based on spectroscopic methods. The absolute configuration of pretrichodermamide D (1) was established by a combination of modified Mosher′s method, NOESY data, and biogenetic considerations. N-Methylpretrichodermamide B (5) showed strong cytotoxicity against 22Rv1 human prostate cancer cells resistant to androgen receptor targeted therapies. PMID:27355960

  17. X-ray diffraction study of Penicillium Vitale catalase in the complex with aminotriazole

    SciTech Connect

    Borovik, A. A.; Grebenko, A. I.; Melik-Adamyan, V. R.

    2011-07-15

    The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme catalase from Penicillium vitale in a complex with the inhibitor aminotriazole was solved and refined by protein X-ray crystallography methods. An analysis of the three-dimensional structure of the complex showed that the inhibition of the enzyme occurs as a result of the covalent binding of aminotriazole to the amino-acid residue His64 in the active site of the enzyme. An investigation of the three-dimensional structure of the complex resulted in the amino-acid residues being more precisely identified. The binding sites of saccharide residues and calcium ions in the protein molecule were found.

  18. Lipase production by Penicillium restrictum using solid waste of industrial babassu oil production as substrate.

    PubMed

    Palma, M B; Pinto, A L; Gombert, A K; Seitz, K H; Kivatinitz, S C; Castilho, L R; Freire, D M

    2000-01-01

    Lipase, protease, and amylase production by Penicillium restrictum in solid-state fermentation was investigated. The basal medium was an industrial waste of babassu oil (Orbignya oleifera) production. It was enriched with peptone, olive oil, and Tween-80. The supplementation positively influenced both enzyme production and fungal growth. Media enriched with Tween-80 provided the highest protease activity (8.6 U/g), whereas those enriched with peptone and olive oil led to the highest lipase (27.8 U/g) and amylase (31.8 U/g) activities, respectively. PMID:10849864

  19. Phenylpyropenes E and F: new meroterpenes from the marine-derived fungus Penicillium concentricum ZLQ-69.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhuang; Zhang, Lianqing; Fu, Juan; Che, Qian; Li, Dehai; Gu, Qianqun; Zhu, Tianjiao

    2015-12-01

    Two new meroterpenes, phenylpyropenes E (1) and F (2), together with seven known phenylpyropenes (3-5) and pyripyropenes (6-9) were isolated from the marine-derived fungus Penicillium concentricum ZLQ-69. Their structures including the absolute configurations were elucidated using a combination of spectroscopic methods and electronic circular dichroism calculation. Bioactivity evaluation showed that compounds 1 and 4 were cytotoxic to the MGC-803 cell line with IC50 values of 19.1 and 13.6 μM, respectively. PMID:26058567

  20. Penicillium excelsum sp. nov from the Brazil Nut Tree Ecosystem in the Amazon Basin'.

    PubMed

    Taniwaki, Marta Hiromi; Pitt, John I; Iamanaka, Beatriz T; Massi, Fernanda P; Fungaro, Maria Helena P; Frisvad, Jens C

    2015-01-01

    A new Penicillium species, P. excelsum, is described here using morphological characters, extrolite and partial sequence data from the ITS, β-tubulin and calmodulin genes. It was isolated repeatedly using samples of nut shells and flowers from the brazil nut tree, Bertolletia excelsa, as well as bees and ants from the tree ecosystem in the Amazon rainforest. The species produces andrastin A, curvulic acid, penicillic acid and xanthoepocin, and has unique partial β-tubulin and calmodulin gene sequences. The holotype of P. excelsum is CCT 7772, while ITAL 7572 and IBT 31516 are cultures derived from the holotype. PMID:26717519

  1. Recurrent hemoptysis with Penicillium marneffei and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in Job’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bosco HM; Ng, Calvin SH; Lam, Rebecca KY; Wan, Song; Wan, Innes YP; Lee, Tak Wai; Yim, Anthony PC

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary infection caused by the opportunistic organisms Penicillium marneffei and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in patients with Job’s syndrome is rare and not well documented. The case of a 30-year-old man with Job’s syndrome who developed recurrent pneumonia and lung abscesses caused by P marneffei and S maltophilia, complicated by massive hemoptysis, is described. Bronchial artery embolization was successful in controlling the hemoptysis; however, the infection proved fatal despite appropriate antimicrobial therapy. A brief review of the literature on Job’s syndrome and its associated infective pulmonary manifestations is also presented. PMID:19707602

  2. Monosubstituted Benzene Derivatives from Fruits of Ficus hirta and Their Antifungal Activity against Phytopathogen Penicillium italicum.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunpeng; Han, Jianxin; Chen, Chuying; Yao, Liangliang; Chen, Jinyin; Yuan, Tao

    2016-07-20

    Ficus hirta, a widely consumed food by Hakka people, has been reported to show potent antifungal activity against phytopathogen Penicillium italicum. However, there is no report of chemical constituents responsible for the antifungal activity. In the current study, nine monosubstituted benzene derivatives, including three new derivatives (1-3), were isolated from the fruits of F. hirta. The structures of these isolates were elucidated on the basis of the analysis of spectroscopic data (mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance). All of the isolates were evaluated for antifungal activities against P. italicum. At an equivalent concentration, compound 1 exhibited stronger antifungal activity than that of the ethanol extract of F. hirta fruits. PMID:27381890

  3. Environmental and Nutritional Factors Affecting the Production of Rubratoxin B by Penicillium rubrum Stoll 1

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, A. Wallace; Wyatt, Elwanda P.; King, Patricia A.

    1970-01-01

    Rubratoxin B can be produced in a semisynthetic medium by Penicillium rubrum under varying environmental and nutritional conditions. Maximum production (552.0 mg/500 ml) was obtained with P. rubrum NRRL A-11785 grown in stationary cultures of Mosseray's simplified Raulin solution supplemented with 2.5% malt extract broth at ambient temperature. Zinc is required at levels of at least 0.4 mg per liter. In the absence of iron sulfate, there was a 50-fold reduction in rubratoxin B production but not in growth. No toxin was produced by this isolate in 5- or 7-liter fermentors. PMID:5485727

  4. Penicillium excelsum sp. nov from the Brazil Nut Tree Ecosystem in the Amazon Basin’

    PubMed Central

    Taniwaki, Marta Hiromi; Pitt, John I.; Iamanaka, Beatriz T.; Massi, Fernanda P.; Fungaro, Maria Helena P.; Frisvad, Jens C.

    2015-01-01

    A new Penicillium species, P. excelsum, is described here using morphological characters, extrolite and partial sequence data from the ITS, β-tubulin and calmodulin genes. It was isolated repeatedly using samples of nut shells and flowers from the brazil nut tree, Bertolletia excelsa, as well as bees and ants from the tree ecosystem in the Amazon rainforest. The species produces andrastin A, curvulic acid, penicillic acid and xanthoepocin, and has unique partial β-tubulin and calmodulin gene sequences. The holotype of P. excelsum is CCT 7772, while ITAL 7572 and IBT 31516 are cultures derived from the holotype. PMID:26717519

  5. [OPTIMIZATION OF CULTIVATION CONDITIONS OF PENICILLIUM TARDUM--THE α-L- RHAMNOSIDASE PRODUCER].

    PubMed

    Gudsenko, O V; Varbanets, L D

    2015-01-01

    The influence of some technological cultivation parameters of Penicillium tardum to synthesize of the extracellular α.-L-rhamnosidase were studied. It was shown that rhamnose (0.8%), yeasts autolysate (0.2%), temperature of the cultivation 25 degrees C, pH 5.0 are necessary for maximal α-L-rhamnosidase production. The enzyme reaches the maximal activity level in 96 hours with sulphitic number equal 0.44. At cultivation of P. tardum in the picked up conditions the α-L-rhamnosidase synthesis has raised in 4 times. PMID:26422921

  6. First Report on Isolation of Penicillium adametzioides and Purpureocillium lilacinum from Decayed Fruit of Cheongsoo Grapes in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jian Xin; Paul, Narayan Chandra; Sang, Hyun Kyu; Lee, Ji Hye; Hwang, Yong Soo

    2012-01-01

    Two species, Penicillium adametzioides and Purpureocillium lilacinum, were isolated from decayed grapes (cv. Cheongsoo) in Korea. Each species was initially identified by phylogenetic analysis of a combined dataset of two genes. Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and β-tubulin (BT2) genes were used for identification of Penicillium adametzioides, and ITS and partial translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF) genes were used for identification of Purpureocillium lilacinum. Morphologically, they were found to be identical to previous descriptions. The two species presented here have not been previously reported in Korea. PMID:22783137

  7. Optimization of cellulase production by Penicillium oxalicum using banana agrowaste as a substrate.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shilpa P; Kalia, Kiran S; Patel, Jagdish S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to produce a higher amount of cellulase by using an alternative carbon source, such as banana agrowaste, and to optimize the fermentation parameters for a high yield. In the present study, cellulase-producing Penicillium was isolated from a decaying wood sample. Different nutritional and environmental factors were investigated to assess their effect on cellulase production. The highest crude enzyme production was observed at a pH 6.0 and a temperature of 28°C in a medium that was supplemented with banana agrowaste as the carbon source. Pretreatment with 2N NaOH, at 7% substrate (banana agrowaste) concentration yielded the highest cellulase activity. Further to this, the effect of other parameters such as inoculum age, inoculum size, static and agitated conditions were also studied. It is concluded that Penicillium oxalicum is a powerful cellulase-producer strain under our tested experimental conditions using banana agrowaste as the carbon source. PMID:26018499

  8. Penicillium sp. as an organism that degrades endosulfan and reduces its genotoxic effects.

    PubMed

    Romero-Aguilar, Mariana; Tovar-Sánchez, Efrain; Sánchez-Salinas, Enrique; Mussali-Galante, Patricia; Sánchez-Meza, Juan Carlos; Castrejón-Godínez, María Luisa; Dantán-González, Edgar; Trujillo-Vera, Miguel Ángel; Ortiz-Hernández, Ma Laura

    2014-01-01

    Endosulfan is an organochloride and persistent pesticide that has caused concern because of its impact in the environment and its toxicity to and bioaccumulation in living organisms. In this study, we isolated an endosulfan-degrading fungus from the activated sludge from an industrial wastewater treatment plant. Through repetitive enrichment and successive subculture in media containing endosulfan as the sole carbon source, a fungus designated CHE 23 was isolated. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, strain CHE 23 was assigned to the genus Penicillium sp. In a mineral salt medium with 50 mg/l endosulfan as the sole source carbon, CHE 23 removed the added endosulfan in a period of six days. To verify the decrease in endosulfan toxicity due to the activity of the fungus, we performed genotoxicity tests trough the single cell gel electrophoresis assay or comet assay, with Eisenia fetida as the bioindicator species. This organism was exposed to the supernatants of the culture of the fungus and endosulfan. Our results indicated that the genotoxicity of endosulfan was completely reduced due the activity of this fungus. These results suggest that the Penicillium sp. CHE 23 strain can be used to degrade endosulfan residues and/or for water and soil bioremediation processes without causing toxicity problems, which are probably due to the generation of no-toxic metabolites during biodegradation. PMID:25279327

  9. Purification, sequencing and evaluation of a divergent phytase from Penicillium oxalicum KCTC6440.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong-Hyun; Lee, Ji Yeon; Lee, Peter C W

    2015-01-01

    A fungal strain producing high levels of phytase was purified to homogeneity from Penicillium oxalicum KCTC6440 (PhyA). The molecular mass of the purified PhyA was 65 kDa and optimal activity occurred at 55°C. The enzyme was stable in a pH range of 4.5-6.5, with an optimum performance at pH 5.5. The Km value for the substrate sodium phytate was 0.48 mM with a Vmax of 672 U/mg. The enzyme was inhibited by Ca(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+), and slightly enhanced by EDTA. The PhyA efficiently released phosphate from feedstuffs such as soybean, rich bran and corn meal. The PhyA gene was cloned in two steps of degenerate PCR and inverse PCR and found to comprise 1501 bp and encode 461 amino acid residues. The enzyme was found to have only 13 amino acids differing to the known PhyA from other Penicillium sp., but has distinct enzyme characteristics. Computational analysis showed that PhyA possessed more positively charged residues in the active sites compared to other PhyA molecules, which may explain the broader pH spectrum. PMID:26377131

  10. Metabolomic and Transcriptomic Comparison of Solid-State and Submerged Fermentation of Penicillium expansum KACC 40815

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Min; Singh, Digar; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Penicillium spp. are known to harbor a wide array of secondary metabolites with cryptic bioactivities. However, the metabolomics of these species is not well-understood in terms of different fermentation models and conditions. The present study involved metabolomics profiling and transcriptomic analysis of Penicillium expansum 40815 under solid-state fermentation (SSF) and submerged fermentation (SmF). Metabolite profiling was carried out using ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry with multivariate analysis, followed by transcriptomic analyses of differentially expressed genes. In principal component analysis, the metabolite profiling data was studied under different experimental sets, including SSF and SmF. The significantly different metabolites such as polyketide metabolites (agonodepside B, rotiorin, verrucosidin, and ochrephilone) and corresponding gene transcripts (polyketide synthase, aromatic prenyltransferase, and terpenoid synthase) were primarily detected under SmF conditions. In contrast, the meroterpenoid compounds (andrastin A and C) and their genes transcripts were exclusively detected under SSF conditions. We demonstrated that the metabolite production and its corresponding gene expression levels in P. expansum 40815 were significantly influenced by the varying growth parameters and the immediate environment. This study further provides a foundation to produce specific metabolites by regulating fermentation conditions. PMID:26863302

  11. Successful treatment of intra-abdominal eumycotic mycetoma caused by Penicillium duponti in a dog.

    PubMed

    Janovec, J; Brockman, D J; Priestnall, S L; Kulendra, N J

    2016-03-01

    A 2-year-old female neutered golden retriever was presented for investigation of an intra-abdominal mass. Computed tomography revealed a mass associated with the caudal pole of the right kidney. Incisional biopsy findings were consistent with eumycotic mycetoma. The mass was subsequently removed in conjunction with right ureteronephrectomy. Two years later, the dog re-presented with a splenic mass and fungal plaques located throughout the peritoneum. Splenectomy was performed and the mass was diagnosed as eumycotic mycetoma caused by Penicillium duponti. Indefinite systemic treatment with 10 mg/kg itraconazole orally once a day was initiated. Thirty-two months after the last surgery, there were no clinical signs apart from mild polydipsia. Haematology and biochemistry results were unremarkable. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment of intra-abdominal eumycotic mycetoma with a combination of surgery and systemic antifungal therapy in the dog. Penicillium duponti has not apparently been reported to cause disease in animals or humans. PMID:26017318

  12. Cloning and sequence analysis of complete gene encoding an alkaline lipase from Penicillium cyclopium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H M; Wu, M C; Guo, J; Li, J F

    2011-01-01

    The complete gene (PG37 lipI) encoding an alkaline lipase (PG37 LipI) was cloned from the genomic DNA of Penicillium cyclopium PG37. The cloned PG37 lipI is 2020 bp in length, consisting of 632 bp of the 5' flanking promoter region and 1388 bp of the downstream fragment that contains 6 exons and 5 short introns. The promoter region harbors putative TATA box, CAAT box and several transcription factor binding sites. The open reading frame (ORF) encodes a PG37 LipI of 285 amino acid residues, which was predicted to contain a 20-aa signal peptide, a 7-aa propeptide and a 258-aa mature peptide with a conserved motif Gly-X-Ser-X-Gly. However, PG37 LipI shows only 32%, 30%, 28% and 26% identity with lipases of Aspergillus parasiticus, Penicillium camembertii, Thermomyces lanuginosus and Rhizomucor miehei, respectively. It was predicted that the main secondary structures of PG37 LipI are alpha-helix and random coil. Three amino acid residues, Ser132-Asp188-His241, compose the enzymatic active center in the tertiary structure. PMID:22288192

  13. Genome sequencing and analysis of the paclitaxel-producing endophytic fungus Penicillium aurantiogriseum NRRL 62431

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Paclitaxel (Taxol™) is an important anticancer drug with a unique mode of action. The biosynthesis of paclitaxel had been considered restricted to the Taxus species until it was discovered in Taxomyces andreanae, an endophytic fungus of T. brevifolia. Subsequently, paclitaxel was found in hazel (Corylus avellana L.) and in several other endophytic fungi. The distribution of paclitaxel in plants and endophytic fungi and the reported sequence homology of key genes in paclitaxel biosynthesis between plant and fungi species raises the question about whether the origin of this pathway in these two physically associated groups could have been facilitated by horizontal gene transfer. Results The ability of the endophytic fungus of hazel Penicillium aurantiogriseum NRRL 62431 to independently synthesize paclitaxel was established by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The genome of Penicillium aurantiogriseum NRRL 62431 was sequenced and gene candidates that may be involved in paclitaxel biosynthesis were identified by comparison with the 13 known paclitaxel biosynthetic genes in Taxus. We found that paclitaxel biosynthetic gene candidates in P. aurantiogriseum NRRL 62431 have evolved independently and that horizontal gene transfer between this endophytic fungus and its plant host is unlikely. Conclusions Our findings shed new light on how paclitaxel-producing endophytic fungi synthesize paclitaxel, and will facilitate metabolic engineering for the industrial production of paclitaxel from fungi. PMID:24460898

  14. New penicillin-producing Penicillium species and an overview of section Chrysogena.

    PubMed

    Houbraken, J; Frisvad, J C; Seifert, K A; Overy, D P; Tuthill, D M; Valdez, J G; Samson, R A

    2012-12-01

    Species classified in Penicillium sect. Chrysogena are primary soil-borne and the most well-known members are P. chrysogenum and P. nalgiovense. Penicillium chrysogenum has received much attention because of its role in the production on penicillin and as a contaminant of indoor environments and various food and feedstuffs. Another biotechnologically important species is P. nalgiovense, which is used as a fungal starter culture for the production of fermented meat products. Previous taxonomic studies often had conflicting species circumscriptions. Here, we present a multigene analysis, combined with phenotypic characters and extrolite data, demonstrating that sect. Chrysogena consists of 18 species. Six of these are newly described here (P. allii-sativi, P. desertorum, P. goetzii, P. halotolerans, P. tardochrysogenum, P. vanluykii) and P. lanoscoeruleum was found to be an older name for P. aethiopicum. Each species produces a unique extrolite profile. The species share phenotypic characters, such as good growth on CYA supplemented with 5 % NaCl, ter- or quarterverticillate branched conidiophores and short, ampulliform phialides (< 9 μm). Conidial colours, production of ascomata and ascospores, shape and ornamentation of conidia and growth rates on other agar media are valuable for species identification. Eight species (P. allii-sativi, P. chrysogenum, P. dipodomyis, P. flavigenum, P. nalgiovense, P. rubens, P. tardochrysogenum and P. vanluykii) produce penicillin in culture. PMID:23606767

  15. Penicillium salamii strain ITEM 15302: A new promising fungal starter for salami production.

    PubMed

    Magistà, D; Ferrara, M; Del Nobile, M A; Gammariello, D; Conte, A; Perrone, G

    2016-08-16

    Traditional sausages are often considered of superior quality to sausages inoculated with commercial starter cultures and this is partially due to the action of the typical house microflora. Penicillium nalgiovense is the species commonly used as starter culture for dry-cured meat production. Recently a new species, Penicillium salamii, was described as typical colonizer during salami seasoning. In order to understand its contribution to the seasoning process, two different experiments on curing of fresh pork sausages were conducted using P. salamii ITEM 15302 in comparison with P. nalgiovense ITEM 15292 at small and industrial scale, and the dry-cured sausages were subjected to sensory analyses. Additionally, proteolytic and lipolytic in vitro assays were performed on both strains. P. salamii ITEM 15302 proved to be a fast growing mould on dry-cured sausage casings, well adapted to the seasoning process, with high lipolytic and proteolytic enzymatic activity that confers typical sensory characteristics to meat products. Therefore, P. salamii ITEM 15302 was shown to be a good candidate as new starter for meat industry. PMID:27183229

  16. Effect of ozone on sterilization of Penicillium digitatum using non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Takayuki; Iseki, Sachiko; Ito, Masafumi; Kano, Hiroyuki; Higashijima, Yasuhiro; Hori, Masaru

    2008-10-01

    Methyl bromide has been sprayed to the crops for protecting from insects and virus, but has high ozone depletion potential. Thus, the development of substitute-technology has been strongly required. We have investigated a plasma sterilization for spores of Penicillium digitatum, which causes green mold disease of the crops, using non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma. The sterilization was caused by UV light, ozone, O and OH radicals. In this study, ozone density was measured and the effect to sterilization was discussed. The plasma was generated at an alternative current of 6kV and Ar gas flow rate of 3L/min. In order to investigate the sterilization mechanism of ozone, the absolute density of ozone was measured using ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and was from 2 to 8 ppm. The sterilization by this plasma was larger than that by the ozonizer (03:600ppm). It is confirmed that the effect of ozone to the sterilization of Penicillium digitatum would be small.

  17. Proteomics Insights into the Biomass Hydrolysis Potentials of a Hypercellulolytic Fungus Penicillium funiculosum.

    PubMed

    Ogunmolu, Funso Emmanuel; Kaur, Inderjeet; Gupta, Mayank; Bashir, Zeenat; Pasari, Nandita; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2015-10-01

    The quest for cheaper and better enzymes needed for the efficient hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass has placed filamentous fungi in the limelight for bioprospecting research. In our search for efficient biomass degraders, we identified a strain of Penicillium funiculosum whose secretome demonstrates high saccharification capabilities. Our probe into the secretome of the fungus through qualitative and label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based proteomics studies revealed a high abundance of inducible CAZymes and several nonhydrolytic accessory proteins. The preferential association of these proteins and the attending differential biomass hydrolysis gives an insight into their interactions and clues about possible roles of novel hydrolytic and nonhydrolytic proteins in the synergistic deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass. Our study thus provides the first comprehensive insight into the repertoire of proteins present in a high-performing secretome of a hypercellulolytic Penicillium funiculosum, their relative abundance in the secretome, and the interaction dynamics of the various protein groups in the secretome. The gleanings from the stoichiometry of these interactions hold a prospect as templates in the design of cost-effective synthetic cocktails for the optimal hydrolysis of biomass. PMID:26288988

  18. Impact of water activity of diverse media on spore germination of Aspergillus and Penicillium species.

    PubMed

    Nanguy, Sidjè Paule-Marina; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie; Bensoussan, Maurice; Dantigny, Philippe

    2010-08-15

    The effects of water activity (a(w)) of diverse media i/ culture medium for sporogenesis, a(w sp) ii/ liquid spore suspension medium, a(w su) and iii/ medium for germination, a(w ge), on the germination time t(G) of Aspergillus carbonarius, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium chrysogenum and Penicillium expansum were assessed according to a screening matrix at 0.95 and 0.99 a(w). It was shown that i/ reduced t(G)s were obtained at 0.95 a(w sp) except for P. expansum ii/ a significant effect of a(w su) on t(G) was demonstrated for A. carbonarius, P. chrysogenum and P. expansum iii/ the most important factor for controlling the germination time was the medium for germination except for A. carbonarius (a(w su)). In accordance with the fact that fungal spores can swell as soon as they are suspended in an aqueous solution it is recommended to re-suspend fungal spores in a solution at the same water activity as that of subsequent germination studies. PMID:20673593

  19. Host specificity of Eupenicillium ochrosalmoneum, E. cinnamopurpureum, and two new Penicillium species associated with the conidial heads of Aspergillus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Penicillium comprises species that mostly colonize plant matter. However, early reports suggest that several species are capable of parasitizing Aspergillus and sporulating on the conidial heads of the host. More recently Eupenicillium ochrosalmoneum and E. cinnamopurpureum, both with Pe...

  20. Identification of wild apple germplasm (Malus spp.) with resistance to the postharvest decay pathogens Penicillium expansum and Colletotrichum acutatum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penicillium expansum and Colletotrichum acutatum cause blue mold and bitter rot of apples during storage which results in significant economic losses. Resistance to these pathogens in commercial apple cultivars has not been documented in the literature. An apple germplasm collection, from the center...

  1. GenBank submission of draft whole genome sequence of the apple decay pathogen Penicillium solitum (RS1 isolate)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penicillium species cause postharvest blue mold decay of apples and pears in the United States and in many countries worldwide. This genus is responsible for severe economic losses and produces an array of mycotoxins that contaminate processed apple products. Among the species that cause blue mold,...

  2. Carbon, nitrogen and pH regulate the production and activity of a polygalacturonase isozyme produced by Penicillium expansum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of carbon, nitrogen and pH on polygalacturonase activity produced by Penicillium expansum were investigated. P. expansum mycelial growth was greatest on lyophilized fruit tissue and the highest PG activity occurred in apple pectin medium. Nitrogen source influenced PG activity and was ...

  3. Isolation, purification, and characterization of a polygalacturonase produced in Penicillium solitum-decayed 'Golden Delicious' apple fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase (PG) was extracted and purified from decayed Golden Delicious apple fruit inoculated with Penicillium solitum. Gel filtration and cation exchange chromatography were used to purify the enzyme. Both methods revealed a single peak corresponding to PG activity and analysis of cation ...

  4. Speciation despite globally overlapping distributions in Penicillium chrysogenum: the population genetics of Alexander Fleming’s lucky fungus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eighty years ago, Alexander Fleming described the antibiotic effects of a fungus that had contaminated his bacterial culture, kick starting the antimicrobial revolution. The fungus was later ascribed to a globally distributed asexual species, Penicillium chrysogenum. Recently, the species has been...

  5. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)-based methods for detection and identification of mycotoxigenic Penicillium species using conserved genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymerase chain reaction amplification of conserved genes and sequence analysis provides a very powerful tool for the identification of toxigenic as well as non-toxigenic Penicillium species. Sequences are obtained by amplification of the gene fragment, sequencing via capillary electrophoresis of d...

  6. Preliminary evaluation of apple germplasm from Kazakhstan for resistance to blue mold decay caused by Penicillium expansum after harvest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blue mold of apples, incited by Penicillium expansum, causes extensive loss on stored apples worldwide. Despite the severity of this problem, apple breeders do not evaluate their crosses for resistance to this disease, because there has been little resistance to blue mold in the gene pool of the ge...

  7. First report of Penicillium expansum isolates with reduced sensitivity to fludioxonil from a commercial packinghouse in Pennsylvania

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blue mold is caused by Penicillium expansum and is among the most economically significant disease of stored apples worldwide. The fungus gains ingress through cracks, natural openings, and wounds in the fruit and produces mycotoxins that contaminate processed apple products. All commercial apples a...

  8. Purification and biochemical characterization of polygalacturonase produced by Penicillium expansum during postharvest decay of ‘Anjou’ pear

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A polygalacturonase (PG) was extracted and purified from decayed tissue of ‘Anjou’ pear fruit inoculated with Penicillium expansum. Ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration and cation exchange chromatography were used to purify the enzyme. Both chromatographic methods revealed a single peak co...

  9. Radiosensitization of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum using basil essential oil and ionizing radiation for food decontamination.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of basil oil, was determined for two pathogenic fungi of rice, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum. The antifungal activity of the basil oil in combination with ionising radiation was then investigated to determine if basil oil caused radiosensit...

  10. Yaequinolones, new insecticidal antibiotics produced by Penicillium sp. FKI-2140. I. Taxonomy, fermentation, isolation and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Ryuji; Imasato, Rie; Yamaguchi, Yuichi; Masuma, Rokuro; Shiomi, Kazuro; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Omura, Satoshi

    2006-10-01

    New nine insecticidal antibiotics designated yaequinolones were isolated from the culture broth of the fungal strain Penicillium sp. FKI-2140 by solvent extraction, centrifugal partition chromatography and HPLC. Yaequinolones showed growth inhibitory activity against brine shrimp (Artemia salina). Among them, yaequinolone F has the most potent activity with MIC value of 0.19 microg/ml. PMID:17191680

  11. Penicillium solitum produces a polygalacturonase isozyme in decayed ‘Anjou’ pear fruit capable of macerating host tissue in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A polygalacturonase (PG) isozyme was isolated from Penicillium solitum-decayed ‘Anjou’ pear fruit and purified to homogeneity using a multistep process. Both gel filtration and cation exchange chromatography revealed a single PG activity peak and analysis of the purified protein showed a single band...

  12. Exopisiod B and farylhydrazone C, two new alkaloids from the Antarctic-derived fungus Penicillium sp. HDN14-431.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Zhu, Mei-Lin; Sun, Guang-Yu; Li, Na; Gu, Qian-Qun; Li, De-Hai; Che, Qian; Zhu, Tian-Jiao

    2016-10-01

    Two new compounds, exopisiod B (1) and farylhydrazone C (2), together with two known compounds (3-4), were isolated from the Antarctic-derived fungus Penicillium sp. HDN14-431. Their structures including absolute configurations were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and TDDFT ECD calculations. The cytotoxicity and antimicrobial activities of all compounds were tested. PMID:27249624

  13. Temperature suppresses decay on apple fruit by affecting Penicillium solitum conidial germination, mycelial growth and polygalacturonase activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penicillium solitum causes blue mold on apples during storage which results in economic losses. Information pertaining to growth and decay caused by this pathogen is important for developing disease control strategies. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of temperature on decay caused by P. solitum ...

  14. Molecular characterization and a multiplex allele-specific PCR method for detection of thiabendazole resistance in Penicillium expansum from apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thiabendazole (TBZ) is commonly used as a postharvest treatment for control of blue mold in apples caused by Penicillium expansum. Different point mutations in the ß-tubulin gene conferring benzimidazole resistance have been reported in plant pathogens, but molecular mechanisms of TBZ resistance in ...

  15. Comparative stability and catalytic and chemical properties of the sulfate-activating enzymes from Penicillium chrysogenum (mesophile) and Penicillium duponti (thermophile).

    PubMed Central

    Renosto, F; Schultz, T; Re, E; Mazer, J; Chandler, C J; Barron, A; Segel, I H

    1985-01-01

    ATP sulfurylases from Penicillium chrysogenum (a mesophile) and from Penicillium duponti (a thermophile) had a native molecular weight of about 440,000 and a subunit molecular weight of about 69,000. (The P. duponti subunit appeared to be a little smaller than the P. chrysogenum subunit.) The P. duponti enzyme was about 100 times more heat stable than the P. chrysogenum enzyme; k inact (the first-order rate constant for inactivation) at 65 degrees C = 3.3 X 10(-4) s-1 for P. duponti and 3.0 X 10(-2) s-1 for P. chrysogenum. The P. duponti enzyme was also more stable to low pH and urea at 30 degrees C. Rabbit serum antibodies to each enzyme showed heterologous cross-reaction. Amino acid analyses disclosed no major compositional differences between the two enzymes. The analogous Km and Ki values of the forward and reverse reactions were also essentially identical at 30 degrees C. At 30 degrees C, the physiologically important adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) synthesis activity of the P. duponti enzyme was 4 U mg of protein-1, which is about half that of the P. chrysogenum enzyme. The molybdolysis and ATP synthesis activities of the P. duponti enzyme at 30 degrees C were similar to those of the P. chrysogenum enzyme. At 50 degrees C, the APS synthesis activity of the P. duponti enzyme was 12 to 19 U mg of protein-1, which was higher than that of the P. chrysogenum enzyme at 30 degrees C (8 +/- 1 U mg of protein-1). Treatment of the P. chrysogenum enzyme with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) (DTNB) at 30 degrees C under nondenaturing conditions modified one free sulfhydryl group per subunit. Vmax was not significantly altered, but the catalytic activity at low magnesium-ATP or SO4(2-) (or MoO4(2-)) was markedly reduced. Chemical modification with tetranitromethane had the same results on the kinetics. The native P. duponti enzyme was relatively unreactive toward DTNB or tetranitromethane at 30 degrees C and pH 8.0 or pH 9.0, but at 50 degrees C and pH 8.0, DTNB rapidly

  16. Significance of Penicillium ochrochloron chitinase as a biocontrol agent against pest Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nilambari S; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2015-06-01

    Penicillium ochrochloron chitinase purified by DEAE-cellulose ion exchange chromatography was evaluated for its antifeedant and growth inhibitory activities against Helicoverpa armigera at different concentrations of 2000, 1000, 500, 250 and 100 U mL(-1). It reduced the successful pupation and increased larval and pupal mortality, adult emergence in a dosage-dependent manner when applied topically. The highest mortalities were recorded for groups treated with 2000 U mL(-1) chitinase activity. The studies showed P.ochrochloron chitinase can affect the growth of H.armigera larvae. Since this insect pest species has developed resistance and resurgence to chemical insecticides, only alternate is the usage of enzyme-based pesticide formulations as an environmentally friendly pest management tool. PMID:25723715

  17. A Sterol and Spiroditerpenoids from a Penicillium sp. Isolated from a Deep Sea Sediment Sample

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Ye, Dezan; Shao, Zongze; Cui, Chengbin; Che, Yongsheng

    2012-01-01

    A new polyoxygenated sterol, sterolic acid (1), three new breviane spiroditerpenoids, breviones I–K (2–4), and the known breviones (5–8), were isolated from the crude extract of a Penicillium sp. obtained from a deep sea sediment sample that was collected at a depth of 5115 m. The structures of 1–4 were elucidated primarily by NMR experiments, and 1 was further confirmed by X-ray crystallography. The absolute configurations of 2 and 3 were deduced by comparison of their CD spectra with those of the model compounds. Compounds 2 and 5 showed significant cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells, which is comparable to the positive control cisplatin. PMID:22412815

  18. Production of citric and oxalic acids and solubilization of calcium phosphate by Penicillium bilaii.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, J E; Kuiack, C

    1992-01-01

    An isolate of Penicillium bilaii previously reported to solubilize mineral phosphates and enhance plant uptake of phosphate was studied. Using agar media with calcium phosphate and the pH indicator alizarin red S, the influence of the medium composition on phosphate solubility and medium acidification was recorded. The major acidic metabolites produced by P. bilaii in a sucrose nitrate liquid medium were found to be oxalic acid and citric acid. Citric acid production was promoted under nitrogen-limited conditions, while oxalic acid production was promoted under carbon-limited conditions. Citric acid was produced in both growth and stationary phases, but oxalic acid production occurred only in stationary phase. When submerged cultures which normally produce acid were induced to sporulate, the culture medium shifted toward alkaline rather than acid reaction with growth. PMID:1622211

  19. Influence of Different Nanomaterials on Growth and Mycotoxin Production of Penicillium verrucosum

    PubMed Central

    Kotzybik, Kathrin; Gräf, Volker; Kugler, Lena; Stoll, Dominic A.; Greiner, Ralf; Geisen, Rolf; Schmidt-Heydt, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles are ubiquitous in the environment. They originate from anthropogenic or natural sources or they are intentionally produced for different purposes. There exist manifold applications of nanoparticles in modern life leading unavoidably to a confrontation and interaction between nanomaterial and living organisms. Based on their wide distribution tending to increase steadily, the influence of particles based on silica and silver, exhibiting nominal sizes between 0.65 nm and 200 nm, on the physiology of the mycotoxigenic filamentous fungus Penicillium verrucosum was analyzed. The applied concentration and time-point, the size and the chemical composition of the particles was shown to have a strong influence on growth and mycotoxin biosynthesis. On microscopic scale it could be shown that silver nanoparticles attach to the mycelial surface. Moreover, silver nanoparticles with 0.65 nm and 5 nm in size were shown to internalize within the cell, form agglomerates in the cytoplasm and associate to cell organelles. PMID:26974550

  20. Morphogenesis and Production of Enzymes by Penicillium echinulatum in Response to Different Carbon Sources

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Willian Daniel Hahn; dos Reis, Laísa; Dillon, Aldo José Pinheiro

    2014-01-01

    The effect of different carbon sources on morphology and cellulase and xylanase production of Penicillium echinulatum was evaluated in this work. Among the six carbon sources studied, cellulose and sugar cane bagasse were the most suitable for the production of filter paper activity, endoglucanases, xylanases, and β-glucosidases. However, sucrose and glucose showed β-glucosidase activities similar to those obtained with the insoluble sources. The polyacrylamide gels proved the enzymatic activity, since different standards bands were detected in the media mentioned above. Regarding morphology, it was observed that the mycelium in a dispersed form provided the greatest enzymatic activity, possibly due to greater interaction between the substrate and hyphae. These data are important in understanding the physiology of fungi and could contribute to obtaining enzyme with potential application in the technology of second generation ethanol. PMID:24877074

  1. Eremophilane Sesquiterpenes and Diphenyl Thioethers from the Soil Fungus Penicillium copticola PSU-RSPG138.

    PubMed

    Daengrot, Charuwan; Rukachaisirikul, Vatcharin; Tansakul, Chittreeya; Thongpanchang, Tienthong; Phongpaichit, Souwalak; Bowornwiriyapan, Kawitsara; Sakayaroj, Jariya

    2015-04-24

    Four new compounds including two eremophilane sesquiterpenes, penicilleremophilanes A (1) and B (2), as well as two sulfur-containing biphenols, penicillithiophenols A (3) and B (4), were isolated from the soil fungus Penicillium copticola PSU-RSPG138 together with 16 known compounds. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. Known sporogen AO-1 exhibited significant antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum with an IC50 value of 1.53 μM and cytotoxic activity to noncancerous (Vero) cell lines with an IC50 value of 4.23 μM. Although compound 1 was approximately half as active against P. falciparum with the IC50 value of 3.45 μM, it showed much weaker cytotoxic activity. PMID:25734623

  2. Secondary metabolites from Penicillium pinophilum SD-272, a marine sediment-derived fungus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Hui; Li, Xiao-Ming; Li, Chun-Shun; Ji, Nai-Yun; Wang, Bin-Gui

    2013-06-01

    Two new secondary metabolites, namely, pinodiketopiperazine A (1) and 6,7-dihydroxy-3-methoxy-3-methylphthalide (2), along with alternariol 2,4-dimethyl ether (3) and L-5-oxoproline methyl ester (4), which were isolated from a natural source for the first time but have been previously synthesized, were characterized from the marine sediment-derived fungus Penicillium pinophilum SD-272. In addition, six known metabolites (5-10) were also identified. Their structures were elucidated by analysis of the NMR and mass spectroscopic data. The absolute configuration of compound 1 was determined by experimental and calculated ECD spectra. Compound 2 displayed potent brine shrimp (Artemia salina) lethality with LD₅₀ 11.2 μM. PMID:23792827

  3. Phytotoxic eremophilane sesquiterpenes from the coprophilous fungus Penicillium sp. G1-a14.

    PubMed

    Del Valle, Paulina; Figueroa, Mario; Mata, Rachel

    2015-02-27

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of an extract from the grain-based culture of the coprophilous fungus Penicillium sp. G1-a14 led to the isolation of a new eremophilane-type sesquiterpene, 3R,6R-dihydroxy-9,7(11)-dien-8-oxoeremophilane (1), along with three known analogues, namely, isopetasol (2), sporogen AO-1 (3), and dihydrosporogen AO-1 (4). The structure of 1 was elucidated using 1D and 2D NMR and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Assignment of absolute configuration at the stereogenic centers of 1 was achieved using ECD spectroscopy combined with time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Sporogen AO-1 (3) and dihydrosporogen AO-1 (4) caused significant inhibition of radicle growth against Amaranthus hypochondriacus (IC50 = 0.17 mM for both compounds) and Echinochloa crus-galli (IC50 = 0.17 and 0.30 mM, respectively). PMID:25603174

  4. Penicillium marneffei presenting as an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in a patient with advanced HIV

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Charlotte; Hajjawi, Rachel; Barlow, Gavin; Thaker, Hiten; Adams, Kate; Moss, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A 62-year-old British man with advanced HIV was established on antiretroviral therapy and treatment for disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex and Cytomegalovirus infections. One month later he re-presented with epigastric pain, an epigastric mass and skin lesions. Abdominal imaging revealed large volume lymphadenopathy, which was not present on previous imaging. Blood cultures yielded Penicillium marneffei, a dimorphic fungus endemic to South-east Asia. The patient had spent several years travelling in Thailand prior to the diagnosis of HIV. Penicilliosis is a common AIDS-defining illness in endemic areas, but remains rare in Europe. In this case, it presented in the context of a rapidly decreasing viral load as an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. The challenges of management in the context of multiple comorbidities and polypharmacy are discussed. PMID:23362074

  5. Alkaloids with Cardiovascular Effects from the Marine-Derived Fungus Penicillium expansum Y32

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ya-Qin; Li, Pei-Hai; Chao, Ya-Xi; Chen, Hao; Du, Ning; He, Qiu-Xia; Liu, Ke-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Three new alkaloids (1, 4 and 8), together with nine known analogues (2, 3, 5–7, and 9–12), were isolated from the marine-derived fungus Penicillium expansum Y32. Their structures including the absolute configurations were elucidated by spectroscopic and Mosher’s and Marfey’s methods, along with quantum electronic circular dichroism (ECD) calculations. Each of the compounds was evaluated for cardiovascular effects in a live zebrafish model. All of the compounds showed a significant mitigative effect on bradycardia caused by astemizole (ASM) in the heart rate experiments. Compounds 4–6 and 8–12 exhibited potent vasculogenetic activity in vasculogenesis experiments. This is the first study to report that these types of compounds show cardiovascular effects in zebrafish. The results suggest that these compounds could be promising candidates for cardiovascular disease lead compounds. PMID:26506361

  6. Antimicrobial effects of ionizing radiation on artificially and naturally contaminated cacao beans. [Aspergillus flavus; Penicillium citrinum

    SciTech Connect

    Restaino, L.; Myron, J.J.J.; Lenovich, L.M.; Bills, S.; Tscherneff, K.

    1984-04-01

    With an initial microbial level of ca. 10/sup 7/ microorganisms per g of Ivory Coast cacao beans, 5 kGy of gamma radiation from a Co/sup 60/ source under an atmosphere of air reduced the microflora per g by 2.49 and 3.03 logs at temperatures of 35 and 50/sup 0/C, respectively. Bahia cacao beans were artificially contaminated with dried spores of Aspergillus flavus and Penicillium citrinum, giving initial fungal levels of 1.9 x 10/sup 4/ and 1.4 x 10/sup 3/ spores per g of whole Bahia cacao beans, respectively. The average D/sub 10/ values for A. flavus and P. citrinum spores on Bahia cacao beans were 0.66 and 0.88 kGy, respectively. 12 references.

  7. Improvement of a gene targeting system for genetic manipulation in Penicillium digitatum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Zhu, Cong-yi; Wang, Ming-shang; Sun, Xue-peng; Li, Hong-ye

    2014-02-01

    Penicillium digitatum is the most important pathogen of postharvest citrus. Gene targeting can be done in P. digitatum using homologous recombination via Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation (ATMT), but the frequencies are often very low. In the present study, we replaced the Ku80 homolog (a gene of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway) with the hygromycin resistance cassette (hph) by ATMT. No significant change in vegetative growth, conidiation, or pathogenicity was observed in Ku80-deficient strain (ΔPdKu80) of P. digitatum. However, using ΔPdKu80 as a targeting strain, the gene-targeting frequencies for both genes PdbrlA and PdmpkA were significantly increased. These results suggest that Ku80 plays an important role in homologous integration and the created ΔPdKu80 strain would be a good candidate for rapid gene function analysis in P. digitatum. PMID:24510704

  8. Characterization of novel thermostable polygalacturonases from Penicillium brasilianum and Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Zeni, Jamile; Pili, Jonaina; Cence, Karine; Toniazzo, Geciane; Treichel, Helen; Valduga, Eunice

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this research was the partial characterization of polygalacturonase (PG) extracts produced by a newly isolated Penicillium brasilianum and Aspergillus niger in submerged fermentation. The partial characterization of the crude enzymatic extracts showed optimum activity at pH 5.5 and 37 °C for both extracts. The results of temperature stability showed that PG from both microorganisms were more stable at 55 °C. However, the enzyme obtained by P. brasilianum presents a half-life time (t 1/2 = 693.10 h), about one order of magnitude higher than those observed in for A. niger at 55 °C. In terms of pH stability, the PG produced by P. brasilianum presented higher stability at pH 4.0 and 5.0, while the PG from A. niger showed higher stability at pH 5.0. PMID:26341112

  9. Morphogenesis and production of enzymes by Penicillium echinulatum in response to different carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Willian Daniel Hahn; dos Reis, Laísa; Camassola, Marli; Dillon, Aldo José Pinheiro

    2014-01-01

    The effect of different carbon sources on morphology and cellulase and xylanase production of Penicillium echinulatum was evaluated in this work. Among the six carbon sources studied, cellulose and sugar cane bagasse were the most suitable for the production of filter paper activity, endoglucanases, xylanases, and β-glucosidases. However, sucrose and glucose showed β -glucosidase activities similar to those obtained with the insoluble sources. The polyacrylamide gels proved the enzymatic activity, since different standards bands were detected in the media mentioned above. Regarding morphology, it was observed that the mycelium in a dispersed form provided the greatest enzymatic activity, possibly due to greater interaction between the substrate and hyphae. These data are important in understanding the physiology of fungi and could contribute to obtaining enzyme with potential application in the technology of second generation ethanol. PMID:24877074

  10. Production, characterization and (co-)immobilization of dextranase from Penicillium aculeatum.

    PubMed

    Erhardt, Frank A; Stammen, Simon; Jördening, Hans-Joachim

    2008-06-01

    Fermentation kinetics of Penicillium aculeatum ATCC 10409 demonstrated that fungal growth and dextranase release are decoupled. Inoculation by conidia or mycelia resulted in identical kinetics. Two new isoenzymes of the dextranase were characterized regarding their kinetic constants, pI, MW, activation energy and stabilities. The larger enzyme was 3-fold more active (turnover number: 2,230 +/- 97 s(-1)). Pre-treatment of bentonite with H(2)O(2) did not affect adsorption characteristics of dextranase. Enzyme to bentonite ratios above 0.5:1 (w/w) resulted in a high conservation of activity upon adsorption. Furthermore, dextranase could be used in co-immobilizates for the direct conversion of sucrose into isomalto-oligosaccharides (e.g. isomaltose). Yields of co-immobilizates were 2-20 times that of basic immobilizates, which consist of dextransucrase without dextranase. PMID:18264680

  11. Gentisyl alcohol derivatives from the marine-derived fungus Penicillium terrestre.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Fang, Yuchun; Zhu, Tianjiao; Gu, Qianqun; Zhu, Weiming

    2008-01-01

    Nine new gentisyl alcohol derivatives, namely, the trimeric terrestrol A (8), dimeric terrestrols B-H (1-7), and a monomeric derivative (12), together with four known analogues (9-11, 13) were isolated from the marine-derived fungus Penicillium terrestre. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including one- and two-dimensional NMR as well as low- and high-resolution mass spectrometric analysis. These new compounds (1-8, 12) showed cytotoxic effects on HL-60, MOLT-4, BEL-7402, and A-549 cell lines with IC50 values in the range 5-65 microM. Compound 6 also showed moderate inhibitory activity against protein tyrosine kinases (Src and KDR). Furthermore, all new compounds exhibited moderate radical scavenging activity against DPPH with IC50 values in the range 2.6-8.5 microM. PMID:18163588

  12. Cybernetic modeling based on pathway analysis for Penicillium chrysogenum fed-batch fermentation.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jun; Yuan, Jingqi

    2010-08-01

    A macrokinetic model employing cybernetic methodology is proposed to describe mycelium growth and penicillin production. Based on the primordial and complete metabolic network of Penicillium chrysogenum found in the literature, the modeling procedure is guided by metabolic flux analysis and cybernetic modeling framework. The abstracted cybernetic model describes the transients of the consumption rates of the substrates, the assimilation rates of intermediates, the biomass growth rate, as well as the penicillin formation rate. Combined with the bioreactor model, these reaction rates are linked with the most important state variables, i.e., mycelium, substrate and product concentrations. Simplex method is used to estimate the sensitive parameters of the model. Finally, validation of the model is carried out with 20 batches of industrial-scale penicillin cultivation. PMID:19543751

  13. Morphogenetic circuitry regulating growth and development in the dimorphic pathogen Penicillium marneffei.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Kylie J; Andrianopoulos, Alex

    2013-02-01

    Penicillium marneffei is an emerging human-pathogenic fungus endemic to Southeast Asia. Like a number of other fungal pathogens, P. marneffei exhibits temperature-dependent dimorphic growth and grows in two distinct cellular morphologies, hyphae at 25°C and yeast cells at 37°C. Hyphae can differentiate to produce the infectious agents, asexual spores (conidia), which are inhaled into the host lung, where they are phagocytosed by pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Within macrophages, conidia germinate into unicellular yeast cells, which divide by fission. This minireview focuses on the current understanding of the genes required for the morphogenetic control of conidial germination, hyphal growth, asexual development, and yeast morphogenesis in P. marneffei. PMID:23204189

  14. Production of conidia of Penicillium camemberti in liquid medium through microcycles of conidiation.

    PubMed

    Boualem, Khadidja; Gervais, Patrick; Cavin, Jean-François; Waché, Yves

    2014-11-01

    Microcycle conidiation is a survival mechanism of fungi encountering unfavorable conditions. In this phenomenon, asexual spores germinate secondary spores directly without formation of mycelium. As Penicillium camemberti conidia have the ability to produce conidiophores after germination in liquid culture induced by a thermal stress (18 and 30 °C), our work has aimed at producing conidia through this mean. Incubation at 18 and 30 °C increased the swelling of conidia and their proportion thereby producing conidiophores. Our results showed that the microcycle of conidiation can produce 5 × 10(8) conidia ml(-1) after 7 days at 18 °C of culture. The activity of these conidia was checked through culture on a solid medium. Conidia produced by microcycle conidiation formed a normal mycelium on the surface of solid media and 25 % could still germinate after 5 months of storage. PMID:24975730

  15. Bioactive Compounds Produced by Strains of Penicillium and Talaromyces of Marine Origin

    PubMed Central

    Nicoletti, Rosario; Trincone, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the search for novel natural compounds with bioactive properties has received a remarkable boost in view of their possible pharmaceutical exploitation. In this respect the sea is entitled to hold a prominent place, considering the potential of the manifold animals and plants interacting in this ecological context, which becomes even greater when their associated microbes are considered for bioprospecting. This is the case particularly of fungi, which have only recently started to be considered for their fundamental contribution to the biosynthetic potential of other more valued marine organisms. Also in this regard, strains of species which were previously considered typical terrestrial fungi, such as Penicillium and Talaromyces, disclose foreground relevance. This paper offers an overview of data published over the past 25 years concerning the production and biological activities of secondary metabolites of marine strains belonging to these genera, and their relevance as prospective drugs. PMID:26901206

  16. Identification of intermediates in the biosynthesis of PR toxin by Penicillium roqueforti.

    PubMed

    Riclea, Ramona; Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2015-10-01

    The sesquiterpenoid 7-epi-neopetasone was synthesized via the Wieland-Miescher ketone. The compound was identical to a previously tentatively identified headspace constituent of Penicillium roqueforti. Feeding experiments with (13) C-labeled mevalonolactone isotopomers demonstrated that oxidation at C12 and an isomerization of the C11C12 to a C7C11 double bond must occur independently and not via a C7-C11-C12 allyl radical in one step. Feeding with (11,12,13-(13) C3 )-7-epi-neopetasone resulted in labelling of the PR toxin, thus establishing this compound as a newly identified pathway intermediate. PMID:26274339

  17. Study of the Interactions Between Penicillium Oxalicum Currie & Thom And Alternaria Alternata (Fr.) Keissler

    PubMed Central

    Sempere, F.; Santamarina, M.P

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this research was the analysis of the possible antagonistic effect of Penicillium oxalicum over the pathogen rice fungus A. alternata under different conditions of temperature, water activity and culture media. The macroscopic study of the dual growth revealed that according to the Index of Dominance P. oxalicum was more competitive that A. alternata at 25°C whereas at 15°C was this species. Microscopic analysis showed that P. oxalicum was a mycoparasite of A. alternata at all conditions tested. The antagonist penetrated into A. alternata and disintegrated its conidiophores and conidia. The results suggests that P. oxalicum may be a possible biological control agent of the rice pathogens in a future. PMID:24031546

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene from Penicillium expansum PE-12.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T; Qi, Z; Yu, Q S; Tang, K X

    2013-01-01

    Penicillium expansum produces large amounts of lipase, which is widely used in laundry detergent and leather industry. We isolated the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (PeGPD) from P. expansum PE-12 through reverse transcriptase PCR and 5'-3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE-PCR). The gene is 1266 bp long, including an ORF of 1014 bp, encoding a polypeptide chain of 337 amino acids. A phylogenetic tree based on GPD proteins showed that P. expansum is close to Aspergillus species, but comparatively distant from P. marneffei. Southern blot results revealed a single copy of PeGPD, and expression analysis gave evidence of high expression levels. PeGPD genes have potential for genetic engineering of P. expansum for industrial lipase production. PMID:23420404

  19. A highly regioselective route to arbutin esters by immobilized lipase from Penicillium expansum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rong-Ling; Li, Ning; Li, Ri-Feng; Smith, Thomas J; Zong, Min-Hua

    2010-01-01

    Immobilized lipase from Penicillium expansum, a novel and inexpensive enzyme preparation that we immobilized in our laboratory, was an excellent catalyst for highly regioselective acylation of arbutin with fatty acid vinyl esters. For the enzymatic butanoylation of arbutin, under the optimal conditions, initial reaction rate was 75.1 mM/h, and substrate conversion and regioselectivity were greater than 99%. In addition, a variety of 6'-esters of arbutin were prepared with high conversion (>99%) and excellent regioselectivity (>99%). It was found that the enzymatic reaction rate varied widely with different acyl donors, presumably owing to their different interactions with the active site of the lipase. The immobilized lipase from P. expansum displayed highest catalytic activity with medium-length straight-chain acyl donors. Acyl donors bearing a substituent or a conjugate double bond gave reduced reaction rates. PMID:19695875

  20. Purification and application of a lipase from Penicillium expansum PED-03.

    PubMed

    Lianghua, Tang; Liming, Xia; Min, Su; Huaying, Guo

    2007-08-01

    An extracellular lipase was purified from the fermentation broth of Penicillium expansum PED-03 by DEAE-Sepharose chromatography, followed by sephacryl S-200 chromatography. The enzyme was purified 81.8-fold with 19.8% recovery and a specific activity of 85.94 U/mg. The molecular weight of the homogeneous enzyme was about 28 kDa, determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzymatic resolution of racemic ibuprofen was carried out by the lipase from P. expansum PED-03, and the conversion reached 46% with excellent enantioselectivity(E > 200), which showed a good application potential in the production of optically pure ibuprofen. PMID:18025580

  1. Residue Val237 is critical for the enantioselectivity of Penicillium expansum lipase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lianghua; Su, Min; Chi, Liying; Zhang, Junling; Zhang, Huihui; Zhu, Ling

    2014-03-01

    The shape of the hydrophobic tunnel leading to the active site of Penicillium expansum lipase (PEL) was redesigned by single-point mutations, in order to better understand enzyme enantioselectivity towards naproxen. A variant with a valine-to-glycine substitution at residue 237 exhibited almost no enantioselectivity (E = 1.1) compared with that (E = 104) of wild-type PEL. The function of the residue, Val237, in the hydrophobic tunnel was further analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis. For each of these variants a significant decrease of enantioselectivity (E < 7) was observed compared with that of wild-type enzyme. Further docking result showed that Val237 plays the most important role in stabilizing the correct orientation of (R)-naproxen. Overall, these results indicate that the residue Val237 is the key amino acid residue maintaining the enantioselectivity of the lipase. PMID:24338160

  2. Investigation of the gibberellic acid optimization with a statistical tool from Penicillium variable in batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Isa, Nur Kamilah Md; Mat Don, Mashitah

    2014-01-01

    The culture conditions for gibberellic acid (GA3) production by the fungus Penicillium variable (P. variable) was optimized using a statistical tool, response surface methodology (RSM). Interactions of culture conditions and optimization of the system were studied using Box-Behnken design (BBD) with three levels of three variables in a batch flask reactor. Experimentation showed that the model developed based on RSM and BBD had predicted GA3 production with R(2) = 0.987. The predicted GA3 production was optimum (31.57 mg GA3/kg substrate) when the culture conditions were at 7 days of incubation period, 21% v/w of inoculum size, and 2% v/w of olive oil concentration as a natural precursor. The results indicated that RSM and BBD methods were effective for optimizing the culture conditions of GA3 production by P. variable mycelia. PMID:24499362

  3. Travel-related disseminated Penicillium marneffei infection in a renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Hart, J; Dyer, J R; Clark, B M; McLellan, D G; Perera, S; Ferrari, P

    2012-08-01

    Penicillium marneffei is a thermally dimorphic fungus that causes severe human immunodeficiency virus-related opportunistic infection in endemic areas of Southeast Asia and has rarely been reported in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. We report here the case of an Australian renal transplant patient who presented with disseminated P. marneffei infection shortly after a 10-day holiday to Vietnam, and review all previously published cases of penicilliosis associated with renal transplantation. This is the first reported case, to our knowledge, of P. marneffei infection in an SOT recipient acquired during travel to an endemic country, and highlights the importance of an accurate travel history when opportunistic infection is suspected, as well as giving appropriate health advice to transplant patients who travel. PMID:22188555

  4. Use of active extracts of poplar buds against Penicillium italicum and possible modes of action.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuzhen; Liu, Limei; Li, Dongmei; Xia, Huan; Su, Xiaojun; Peng, Litao; Pan, Siyi

    2016-04-01

    Antifungal components, from poplar buds active fraction (PBAF) against Penicillium italicum, the causal agent of blue mold in citrus fruits, were identified and possible action modes were investigated. Pinocembrin, chrysin and galangin were determined as active components in PBAF, using HPLC and HPLC-MS analysis. The antifungal activity is stable at temperatures ranging from 4 °C to 100 °C and pH levels ranging from 4 to 8. In the presence of PBAF, the hyphae become shriveled, wrinkled and the cell membrane became seriously disrupted. Further investigation on cell permeability, nucleic acid content and alkaline phosphatase suggest that the cell membrane might be the target. Mycelial oxygen consumption and the respiration-related enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase and ATPase were all inhibited by PBAF. We propose that PBAF is a potentially useful alternative for blue mold control and may act against P. italicum by interfering with respiration and disrupting the cell membrane. PMID:26593534

  5. Effect of culture conditions on tremorgen production by some Penicillium species.

    PubMed Central

    di Menna, M E; Lauren, D R; Wyatt, P A

    1986-01-01

    Four strains each of seven tremorgenic Penicillium species were grown under various conditions and tested for tremorgen production by intraperitoneal injection of mice and by chemical analysis. Half of the strains had previously been found to be tremorgenic on bioassay after growth on Czapek Dox yeast extract broth or potato-milk-sucrose broth for 3 weeks at 26 degrees C. In the tests reported here nearly all previously nontremorgenic strains were either tremorgenic to mice or produced tremorgens detectable by chemical analysis but did so after longer incubation periods than used in the original screening. Bioassay was not suitable for the estimation of absolute levels but was preferable to chemical analysis when the identity of the tremorgens was not known. Species and strains within species gave different responses to changes in culture medium, incubation temperature, light irradiation, and shaking. Overall, tremorgen production was maximal at 20 or 26 degrees C, increased with time, and was reduced in shaken culture. PMID:3707124

  6. Effect of culture conditions on tremorgen production by some Penicillium species.

    PubMed

    di Menna, M E; Lauren, D R; Wyatt, P A

    1986-04-01

    Four strains each of seven tremorgenic Penicillium species were grown under various conditions and tested for tremorgen production by intraperitoneal injection of mice and by chemical analysis. Half of the strains had previously been found to be tremorgenic on bioassay after growth on Czapek Dox yeast extract broth or potato-milk-sucrose broth for 3 weeks at 26 degrees C. In the tests reported here nearly all previously nontremorgenic strains were either tremorgenic to mice or produced tremorgens detectable by chemical analysis but did so after longer incubation periods than used in the original screening. Bioassay was not suitable for the estimation of absolute levels but was preferable to chemical analysis when the identity of the tremorgens was not known. Species and strains within species gave different responses to changes in culture medium, incubation temperature, light irradiation, and shaking. Overall, tremorgen production was maximal at 20 or 26 degrees C, increased with time, and was reduced in shaken culture. PMID:3707124

  7. Quantitative clarification of inactivation mechanism of Penicillium digitatum spores treated with neutral oxygen radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    We have quantitatively investigated the oxidative inactivation process of Penicillium digitatum spores including intracellular nanostructural changes through neutral oxygen species with a flux-defined atmospheric-pressure oxygen radical source, using fluorescent confocal-laser microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results suggest that neutral oxygen species, particularly ground-state atomic oxygen [O(3Pj)], which is an effective species for inactivating P. digitatum spores, inhibit the function of the cell membrane of spores without causing major superficial morphological changes at a low O(3Pj) dose of ˜2.1 × 1019 cm-2 under an O(3Pj) flux of 2.3 × 1017 cm-2 s-1, following the oxidation of intracellular organelles up to an O(3Pj) dose of ˜1.0 × 1020 cm-2. Finally, intracellular nanostructures are degraded by excess oxygen radicals over an O(3Pj) dose of ˜1.0 × 1020 cm-2.

  8. Penicillium roqueforti: a multifunctional cell factory of high value-added molecules.

    PubMed

    Mioso, R; Toledo Marante, F J; Herrera Bravo de Laguna, I

    2015-04-01

    This is a comprehensive review, with 114 references, of the chemical diversity found in the fungus Penicillium roqueforti. Secondary metabolites of an alkaloidal nature are described, for example, ergot alkaloids such as festuclavine, isofumigaclavines A and B, and diketopiperazine alkaloids such as roquefortines A-D, which are derived from imidazole. Other metabolites are marcfortines A-C, PR-toxin, eremofortines A-E, mycophenolic and penicillic acids, and some γ-lactones. Also, recent developments related to the structural characteristics of botryodiplodin and andrastin are studied-the latter has anticancer properties. Finally, we discuss the enzymes of P. roqueforti, which can participate in the biotechnological production of high value-added molecules, as well as the use of secondary metabolite profiles for taxonomic purposes. PMID:25421646

  9. A kinetic study of textile dyeing wastewater degradation by Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Durruty, Ignacio; Fasce, Diana; González, Jorge Froilán; Wolski, Erika Alejandra

    2015-06-01

    The potential of Penicillium chrysogenum to decolorize azo dyes and a real industrial textile wastewater was studied. P. chrysogenum was able to decolorize and degrade three azo dyes (200 mg L(-1)), either independently or in a mixture of them, using glucose as a carbon source. A kinetic model for degradation was developed and it allowed predicting the degradation kinetics of the mixture of the three azo dyes. In addition, P. chrysogenum was able to decolorize real industrial wastewater. The kinetic model proposed was also able to predict the decolorization of the real wastewater. The calibration of the proposed model makes it a useful tool for future wastewater facilities' design and for practical applications. PMID:25555702

  10. [Exometabolites of the Fungal Isolates (Genus Penicillium, Section Chrysogena) from Low-Temperature Ecotopes].

    PubMed

    Kozlovskii, A G; Antipova, T V; Zhelifonova, V P; Baskunov, B P; Kochkina, G A; Ozerskaya, S M

    2016-01-01

    Exometabolites of 22 strains of the genus Penicillium, section Chrysogena isolated from low-temperature ecotopes of various geographical regions were analyzed. The ecotopes included permafrost deposits, frozen volcanic ash, a fossil horse, cryopeg, and water from an Antarctic lake. The studied strains were found to contain exometabolites belonging to the groups of penicillins (penicillin G), chrysogins (chrysogin, 3-acetylquinazolone-4, 2-pyruvoyl aminobenzamide, 2-hydroxypropionyl amunobenzamide, and questiomycin A), roquefortines (3,12-dihydroroquefortine, roquefortine, glandicolines A and B, and meleagrine), xanthocillins (xanthocillin X), and simple tryptophan derivatives (N-acetyltriptamine and indoleacetic acid). In five P. chrysogenum strains and three P. nalgiovense strains a correlation was found between exometabolite spectra and morphological characteristics of the cultures isolated from modern ecotopes. For other strains species identification was based on morphological features, due to the absence of biosynthesis of penicillin G, on of the major chemotaxonomic markers for these species. PMID:27476202

  11. Common Reservoirs for Penicillium marneffei Infection in Humans and Rodents, China

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Cunwei; Wang, Wenjuan; Luo, Hong; Huang, Shaobiao; Liu, Donghua; Xu, Jianping; Henk, Daniel A.; Fisher, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Human penicilliosis marneffei is an emerging infectious disease caused by the fungus Penicillium marneffei. High prevalence of infection among bamboo rats of the genera Rhizomys and Cannomys suggest that these rodents are a key facet of the P. marneffei life cycle. We trapped bamboo rats during June 2004–July 2005 across Guangxi Province, China, and demonstrated 100% prevalence of infection. Multilocus genotypes show that P. marneffei isolates from humans are similar to those infecting rats and are in some cases identical. Comparison of our dataset with genotypes recovered from sites across Southeast Asia shows that the overriding component of genetic structure in P. marneffei is spatial, with humans containing a greater diversity of genotypes than rodents. Humans and bamboo rats are sampling an as-yet undiscovered common reservoir of infection, or bamboo rats are a vector for human infections by acting as amplifiers of infectious dispersal stages. PMID:21291590

  12. Bioactive metabolites isolated from Penicillium sp. YY-20, the endophytic fungus from Ginkgo biloba.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Tian, Jun-Mian; Xiao, Jian; Shao, Qi; Gao, Jin-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Six known metabolites, adenosine (1), methyl β-D-ribofuranoside (2), adenine (3), 2'-deoxyadenosine (4), 3-methylpiperazine-2,5-dione (5) and 2'-deoxyuridine (6), were isolated from the extracts of the endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. YY-20 isolated from the root of Ginkgo biloba, and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. The antioxidant and growth-promoting activities of these compounds were first evaluated. The results indicated that compounds 1, 3 and 4 exhibited potential DPPH-scavenging activities compared with positive control. In addition, all the compounds (except 5) stimulated seed germination of Raphanus sativus, Brassica napus and Brassica chinensis but had weak stimulating effect on their root and hypocotyl growth. PMID:24144081

  13. Six New Polyketide Decalin Compounds from Mangrove Endophytic Fungus Penicillium aurantiogriseum 328#

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yanhong; Li, Jing; Huang, Meixiang; Liu, Lan; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yongcheng

    2015-01-01

    Six new compounds with polyketide decalin ring, peaurantiogriseols A–F (1–6), along with two known compounds, aspermytin A (7), 1-propanone,3-hydroxy-1-(1,2,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-octahydro-2,5-dihydroxy-1,2,6-trimethyl-1-naphthalenyl) (8), were isolated from the fermentation products of mangrove endophytic fungus Penicillium aurantiogriseum 328#. Their structures were elucidated based on their structure analysis. The absolute configurations of compounds 1 and 2 were determined by 1H NMR analysis of their Mosher esters; the absolute configurations of 3–6 were determined by using theoretical calculations of electronic circular dichroism (ECD). Compounds 1–8 showed low inhibitory activity against human aldose reductase, no activity of inducing neurite outgrowth, nor antimicrobial activity. PMID:26473887

  14. Untargeted Metabolic Profiling of Winery-Derived Biomass Waste Degradation by Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Karpe, Avinash V; Beale, David J; Godhani, Nainesh B; Morrison, Paul D; Harding, Ian H; Palombo, Enzo A

    2015-12-16

    Winery-derived biomass waste was degraded by Penicillium chrysogenum under solid state fermentation over 8 days in a (2)H2O-supplemented medium. Multivariate statistical analysis of the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) data resulted in the identification of 94 significant metabolites, within 28 different metabolic pathways. The majority of biomass sugars were utilized by day 4 to yield products such as sugars, fatty acids, isoprenoids, and amino acids. The fungus was observed to metabolize xylose to xylitol, an intermediate of ethanol production. However, enzyme inhibition and autolysis were observed from day 6, indicating 5 days as the optimal time for fermentation. P. chrysogenum displayed metabolism of pentoses (to alcohols) and degraded tannins and lignins, properties that are lacking in other biomass-degrading ascomycetes. Rapid fermentation (3-5 days) may not only increase the pentose metabolizing efficiency but also increase the yield of medicinally important metabolites, such as syringate. PMID:26611372

  15. Mixed Pulmonary Infection with Penicillium notatum and Pneumocystis jiroveci in a Patient with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Shabnam; Hemmatian, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Penicillium notatum is a fungus that widely exists in the environment and is often non-pathogenic to humans. However, in immunocompromised hosts it may be recognized as a cause of systemic mycosis. A 44-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was admitted to our hospital with fever and neutropenia. Due to no improvement after initial treatment, he underwent bronchoscopy. The patient was found to have P. notatum and Pneumocystis jiroveci infection, and therefore was given voriconazole, primaquine and clindamycin. The patient was successfully treated and suffered no complications. Conclusion: This case highlights P. notatum as a cause of infection in immunocompromised patients. To the best of our knowledge, mixed lung infection with P. notatum and P. jiroveci in a patient with AML has not been previously reported. PMID:27403180

  16. [Mycological examination of domestic unpolished rice and mycotoxin production by isolated Penicillium islandicum].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Ayako; Tanaka, Hiroki; Konishi, Yoshiko; Hanazawa, Ryo; Ota, Toshiko; Nakahara, Yoshiyuki; Sekiguchi, Shoji; Oshida, Emi; Takino, Masahiko; Ichinoe, Masakatsu; Yoshikawa, Kunie; Yoshizawa, Takumi; Takatori, Kosuke

    2005-10-01

    Fungi growing on domestic rice were examined from April to June, 2003. One hundred samples of rice, which had been harvested in the autumn of 2002, were collected from the local market, and 15 samples of stored rice, which had been harvested in 2001 and stored in warehouses under government control, were used as samples. From each sample, 50 grains (100 grains in total) were plated on potato-dextrose agar (PDA) and malt yeast 40% sucrose agar (M40YA) containing chloramphenicol after being washed with sterile distilled water to remove any microorganisms on the surface, and incubated at 25 degrees C for a week. For most of the rice samples harvested in the preceding year, the proportion of grains infected with fungi was less than 20% of the total grains tested. In about half the samples of rice stored for one and half years, more than 80% of the grains were infected with fungi that grew on M40YA. The major genera of fungi isolated from the rice harvested in the preceding year were Penicillium and Alternaria, and those from the rice stored for one and a half years were Aspergillus, Penicillium and Eurotium. P. islandicum, A. versicolor, A. ochraceus and others were isolated as possible mycotoxin-producers in the mycoflora of domestic rice. P. islandicum was isolated from 3 samples, and 82% of the grains were infected with this fungus in one sample. All three isolates from these samples appeared to produce luteoskyrin on Czapek yeast extract agar, based on TLC and HPLC analysis. PMID:16305175

  17. In vivo application of a small molecular weight antifungal protein of Penicillium chrysogenum (PAF)

    SciTech Connect

    Palicz, Zoltán; Jenes, Ágnes; Gáll, Tamás; Miszti-Blasius, Kornél; Kollár, Sándor; Kovács, Ilona; Emri, Miklós; Márián, Teréz; Leiter, Éva; Pócsi, István; Csősz, Éva; Kalló, Gergő; Hegedűs, Csaba; Virág, László; Csernoch, László; Szentesi, Péter

    2013-05-15

    The antifungal protein of Penicillium chrysogenum (PAF) inhibits the growth of important pathogenic filamentous fungi, including members of the Aspergillus family and some dermatophytes. Furthermore, PAF was proven to have no toxic effects on mammalian cells in vitro. To prove that PAF could be safely used in therapy, experiments were carried out to investigate its in vivo effects. Adult mice were inoculated with PAF intranasally in different concentrations, up to 2700 μg·kg{sup −1} daily, for 2 weeks. Even at the highest concentration – a concentration highly toxic in vitro for all affected molds – used, animals neither died due to the treatment nor were any side effects observed. Histological examinations did not find pathological reactions in the liver, in the kidney, and in the lungs. Mass spectrometry confirmed that a measurable amount of PAF was accumulated in the lungs after the treatment. Lung tissue extracts from PAF treated mice exerted significant antifungal activity. Small-animal positron emission tomography revealed that neither the application of physiological saline nor that of PAF induced any inflammation while the positive control lipopolysaccharide did. The effect of the drug on the skin was examined in an irritative dermatitis model where the change in the thickness of the ears following PAF application was found to be the same as in control and significantly less than when treated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate used as positive control. Since no toxic effects of PAF were found in intranasal application, our result is the first step for introducing PAF as potential antifungal drug in therapy. - Highlights: • PAF, the antifungal protein of Penicillium chrysogenum, was not toxic in mice. • Its intranasal application didn't induce pathological reactions in the lung. • PAF retained its antifungal activity in lung extracts. • Its application on the skin did not cause inflammation.

  18. Genome sequence of the necrotrophic fungus Penicillium digitatum, the main postharvest pathogen of citrus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Penicillium digitatum is a fungal necrotroph causing a common citrus postharvest disease known as green mold. In order to gain insight into the genetic bases of its virulence mechanisms and its high degree of host-specificity, the genomes of two P. digitatum strains that differ in their antifungal resistance traits have been sequenced and compared with those of 28 other Pezizomycotina. Results The two sequenced genomes are highly similar, but important differences between them include the presence of a unique gene cluster in the resistant strain, and mutations previously shown to confer fungicide resistance. The two strains, which were isolated in Spain, and another isolated in China have identical mitochondrial genome sequences suggesting a recent worldwide expansion of the species. Comparison with the closely-related but non-phytopathogenic P. chrysogenum reveals a much smaller gene content in P. digitatum, consistent with a more specialized lifestyle. We show that large regions of the P. chrysogenum genome, including entire supercontigs, are absent from P. digitatum, and that this is the result of large gene family expansions rather than acquisition through horizontal gene transfer. Our analysis of the P. digitatum genome is indicative of heterothallic sexual reproduction and reveals the molecular basis for the inability of this species to assimilate nitrate or produce the metabolites patulin and penicillin. Finally, we identify the predicted secretome, which provides a first approximation to the protein repertoire used during invasive growth. Conclusions The complete genome of P. digitatum, the first of a phytopathogenic Penicillium species, is a valuable tool for understanding the virulence mechanisms and host-specificity of this economically important pest. PMID:23171342

  19. Purification and biochemical characterization of a novel alkaline protease produced by Penicillium nalgiovense.

    PubMed

    Papagianni, M; Sergelidis, D

    2014-04-01

    Penicillium nalgiovense PNA9 produces an extracellular protease during fermentation with characteristics of growth-associated product. Enzyme purification involved ammonium sulfate precipitation, dialysis, and ultrafiltration, resulting in 12.1-fold increase of specific activity (19.5 U/mg). The protein was isolated through a series of BN-PAGE and native PAGE runs. ESI-MS analysis confirmed the molecular mass of 45.2 kDa. N-Terminal sequencing (MGFLKLLKGSLATLAVVNAGKLLTANDGDE) revealed 93 % similarity to a Penicillium chrysogenum protease, identified as major allergen. The protease exhibits simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics and K m (1.152 mg/ml), V max (0.827 mg/ml/min), and k cat (3.2 × 10(2)) (1/s) values against azocasein show that it possesses high substrate affinity and catalytic efficiency. The protease is active within 10-45 °C, pH 4.0-10.0, and 0-3 M NaCl, while maximum activity was observed at 35 °C, pH 8.0, and 0.25 M NaCl. It is active against the muscle proteins actin and myosin and inactive against myoglobin. It is highly stable in the presence of non-ionic surfactants, hydrogen peroxide, BTNB, and EDTA. Activity was inhibited by SDS, Mn(2+) and Zn(2+), and by the serine protease inhibitor PMSF, indicating the serine protease nature of the enzyme. These properties make the novel protease a suitable candidate enzyme in meat ripening and other biotechnological applications. PMID:24585382

  20. Degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a halotolerant strain of Penicillium chrysogenum: antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Guedes, Sumaya; Mendes, Benilde; Leitão, Ana Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    The extensive use of pesticides in agriculture has prompted intensive research on chemical and biological methods in order to protect contamination of water and soil resources. In this paper the degradation of the pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a Penicillium chrysogenum strain previously isolated from a salt mine was studied in batch cultures. Co-degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid with additives such as sugar and intermediates of pesticide metabolism was also investigated. Penicillium chrysogenum in solid medium was able to grow at concentrations up to 1000 mg/L of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) with sucrose. Meanwhile, supplementation of the solid medium with glucose and lactose led to fungal growth at concentrations up to 500 mg/L of herbicide. Batch cultures of 2,4-D at 100 mg/L were developed under aerobic conditions with the addition of glucose, lactose and sucrose, showing sucrose as the best additional carbon source. The 2,4-D removal was quantified by liquid chromatography. The fungus was able to use 2,4-D as the sole carbon and energy source under 0%, 2% and 5.9% NaCl. The greatest 2,4-D degradation efficiency was found using alpha-ketoglutarate and ascorbic acid as co-substrates under 2% NaCl at pH 7. Penicillin production was evaluated in submerged cultures by bioassay, and higher amounts of beta-lactam antibiotic were produced when the herbicide was alone. Taking into account the ability of P. chrysogenum CLONA2 to degrade aromatic compounds, this strain could be an interesting tool for 2,4-D herbicide remediation in saline environments. PMID:22629643

  1. Screening and optimization of some inorganic salts for the production of ergot alkaloids from Penicillium species using surface culture fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Memuna Ghafoor; Nadeem, Muhammad; Baig, Shahjehan; Cheema, Tanzeem Akbar; Atta, Saira; Ghafoor, Gul Zareen

    2016-03-01

    The present study deals with the production of ergot alkaloids from Penicillium commune and Penicillium citrinum, using surface culture fermentation process. Impact of various inorganic salts was tested on the production of ergot alkaloids during the optimization studies of fermentation medium such as impact of various concentration levels of succinic acid, ammonium chloride, MgSO4, FeSO4, ZnSO4, pH and the effect of various incubation time periods was also determined on the production of ergot alkaloids from Penicillium commune and Penicillium citrinum. Highest yield of ergot alkaloids was obtained when Penicillium commune and Penicillium citrinum that were grown on optimum levels of ingredients such as 2 g succinic acid, 1.5 and 2 g NH4Cl, 1.5 g MgSO4, 1 g FeSO4, 1 and 1.5 g ZnSO4 after 21 days of incubation time period using pH 5 at 25(°)C incubation temperature in the fermentation medium. Ergot alkaloids were determined using Spectrophotometry and Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) techniques. PMID:27087069

  2. Ochratoxin A-producing strains of Penicillium spp. isolated from grapes used for the production of "passito" wines.

    PubMed

    Torelli, Emanuela; Firrao, Giuseppe; Locci, Romano; Gobbi, Emanuela

    2006-02-15

    The post-harvest mycobiota of dried grapes, used in Friuli Venezia Giulia (Northern-East Italy) for the production of "passito" dessert wines, was investigated in order to detect potential ochratoxin A (OTA)-producers. Five grape cultivars were analysed and only isolates belonging to the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium were evaluated. No Aspergillus spp. was found while 379 strains of Penicillium spp. were isolated. Four strains produced UV fluorescent metabolites on grape juice agar and synthetic liquid media as observed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Three of these resulted OTA producers when analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), following immunoaffinity column purification. According to the results of morphological examinations and ribosomal DNA sequencing, the OTA producer strains did not belong to the species P. verrucosum or P. nordicum. The corresponding passito wines did not contain OTA. PMID:16246444

  3. Functional characterization of a Penicillium chrysogenum mutanase gene induced upon co-cultivation with Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microbial gene expression is strongly influenced by environmental growth conditions. Comparison of gene expression under different conditions is frequently used for functional analysis and to unravel regulatory networks, however, gene expression responses to co-cultivation with other microorganisms, a common occurrence in nature, is rarely studied under laboratory conditions. To explore cellular responses of the antibiotic-producing fungus Penicillium chrysogenum to prokaryotes, the present study investigates its transcriptional responses during co-cultivation with Bacillus subtilis. Results Steady-state glucose-limited chemostats of P. chrysogenum grown under penillicin-non-producing conditions were inoculated with B. subtilis. Physiological and transcriptional responses of P. chrysogenum in the resulting mixed culture were monitored over 72 h. Under these conditions, B. subtilis outcompeted P. chrysogenum, as reflected by a three-fold increase of the B. subtilis population size and a two-fold reduction of the P. chrysogenum biomass concentration. Genes involved in the penicillin pathway and in synthesis of the penicillin precursors and side-chain were unresponsive to the presence of B. subtilis. Moreover, Penicillium polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthase genes were either not expressed or down-regulated. Among the highly responsive genes, two putative α-1,3 endoglucanase (mutanase) genes viz Pc12g07500 and Pc12g13330 were upregulated by more than 15-fold and 8-fold, respectively. Measurement of enzyme activity in the supernatant of mixed culture confirmed that the co-cultivation with B. subtilis induced mutanase production. Mutanase activity was neither observed in pure cultures of P. chrysogenum or B. subtilis, nor during exposure of P. chrysogenum to B. subtilis culture supernatants or heat-inactivated B. subtilis cells. However, mutanase production was observed in cultures of P. chrysogenum exposed to filter-sterilized supernatants

  4. Mycotoxin production by different ochratoxigenic Aspergillus and Penicillium species on coffee- and wheat-based media.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Katherine; Vega, Mario; Rios, Gisela; Geisen, Rolf; Degen, Gisela H

    2011-11-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most widespread mycotoxins, and is produced by several Aspergillus or Penicillium species. Human exposure to OTA is mainly by intake of contaminated food, with cereal products, followed by coffee and red wine as the main sources of OTA. In this study, the OTA production of four ochratoxigenic fungi (two Aspergillus and two Penicillium species) was investigated in four different media, i.e. wheat and coffee model media as food-based media and two standard laboratory media (malt extract glucose agar, MEA and yeast extract sucrose agar, YES). Colony growth was documented and OTA concentrations in cultures were determined at day 2, 4 and 8 of incubation at 25°C by high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). OTA production clearly depended upon time of incubation, fungal species, and medium composition. On coffee based medium, moderate OTA levels were produced by A. ochraceus BFE635 (9.8 μg/g) and by A. niger BFE632 (10.6 μg/g) on day 8 of incubation. In wheat-based medium, these strains produced much more OTA than in coffee. The highest OTA concentration (83.8 μg/g on day 8) was formed by A. ochraceus BFE635 followed by the other Aspergillus niger BFE632 (49 μg/g). Lower OTA levels were produced by P. verrucosum BFE550 and P. nordicum BFE487, in both wheat and in YES medium, whilst OTA was hardly detectable in coffee and in MEA in case of P. nordicum. Colony growth of the tested strains on different media was not indicative of OTA production. Guttation droplets developed on wheat-based medium with the Aspergillus strains within a week, and this phenomenon coincided with the high OTA amounts formed by these species. Results from this study add to our knowledge on the behaviour of ochratoxigenic fungal species when cultured on food based media. PMID:23605925

  5. Comparison of the secondary metabolites in Penicillium chrysogenum between pilot and industrial penicillin G fermentations.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ying-Xiu; Qiao, Bin; Lu, Hua; Chen, Yao; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2011-02-01

    The disparity of secondary metabolites in Penicillium chrysogenum between two scales of penicillin G fermentation (50 L as pilot process and 150,000 L as industrial one) was investigated by ion-pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography tandemed with hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In industrial process, the pools of intracellular L-α-aminoadipyl-L-cysteinyl-D-valine (LLD-ACV) and isopenicillin N (IPN) were remarkably less than that in the pilot one, which indicated that the productivity of penicillin G might be higher in the large scale of fermentation. This conclusion was supported by the higher intracellular penicillin G concentration as well as its higher yield per unit biomass in industrial cultivation. The different changing tendencies of IPN, 6-aminopenicillanic acid and 6-oxopiperide-2-carboxylic acid between two processes also suggested the same conclusion. The higher content of intracellular LLD-ACV in pilot process lead to a similarly higher concentration of bis-δ-(L-α-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine, which had an inhibitory effect on ACV synthetase and also subdued the activity of IPN synthetase. The interconversion of secondary metabolites and the influence they put on enzymes would intensify the discrepancy between two fermentations more largely. These findings provided new insight into the changes and regulation of secondary metabolites in P. chrysogenum under different fermentation sizes. PMID:20941491

  6. Penicillium chrysogenum DSOA associated with marine sponge (Tedania anhelans) exhibit antimycobacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Visamsetti, Amarendra; Ramachandran, Santhosh Sarojini; Kandasamy, Dhevendaran

    2016-04-01

    A strain of Penicillium chrysogenum was isolated from Tedania anhelans (marine sponge) collected from Indian Ocean (8°22'30″N latitude and 76°59'16″ longitude) and deposited in culture collection centers. The strain subjected to different culture conditions for production of extrolites were extracted using ethyl acetate and chloroform. When both extracts were subjected for antibacterial activity, latter had high activity. Minimum inhibitory concentration of chloroform extract ranged from 31.25-1000 μg/mL in tested microbes such as, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium fortuitum, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium vaccae, Staphylococcus aureus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae. No cytotoxicity was observed in Vero cell line up to 399.10 μg/mL. Antibacterial activity previously reported by Parameswaran et al. in 1997 from ethyl acetate extract of T. anhelans might be due to the diketopiperazines, Cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Phe) and Cyclo-(L-Leu-L-Pro) produced by the associated fungi-P. chrysogenum DSOA. It is producing a metabolites having antimycobacterial activity, a first report. PMID:26717859

  7. Simultaneous utilization of glucose and gluconate in Penicillium chrysogenum during overflow metabolism.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Katja; Peter, Vivien; Meinert, Sabine; Kornfeld, Georg; Hardiman, Timo; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Noack, Stephan

    2013-12-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum is one of the most important production organism for β-lactam antibiotics, especially penicillin. A specific feature of P. chrysogenum is the formation of gluconate as the primary overflow metabolite under non-limiting growth on glucose. Gluconate can be formed extracellularly by the enzyme glucose oxidase (GOD) that shows high activities under glucose excess conditions. Currently, it is assumed that under these conditions glucose is the preferred carbon substrate for P. chrysogenum and gluconate consumption first starts after glucose becomes limiting. Here, we specifically address this hypothesis by combining batch cultivation experiments on defined glucose media, time-dependent GOD activity measurements, and (13)C-tracer studies. Our data prove that both substrates are metabolized simultaneously independent from the actual glucose concentration and therefore suggest that no distinct mechanism of carbon catabolite repression exists for gluconate in P. chrysogenum. Moreover, gluconate consumption does not interfere with penicillin V production by repression of the penicillin genes. Finally, by following a model-driven approach the specific uptake rates for glucose and gluconate were quantified and found to be significantly higher for gluconate. In summary, our results show that P. chrysogenum metabolizes gluconate directly and at high rates making it an interesting alternative carbon source for production purposes. PMID:23775209

  8. Mathematical modeling of lipase and protease production by Penicillium restrictum in a batch fermenter.

    PubMed

    Freire, D M; Sant'Anna, G L; Alves, T L

    1999-01-01

    This work presents a mathematical model that describes time course variations of extracellular lipase and protease activities for the batch fermentation of the fungus Penicillium restrictum, a new and promising strain isolated from soil and wastes of a Brazilian babassu coconut oil industry. The fermentation process was modeled by an unstructured model, which considered the following dependent variables: cells, fat acid, dissolved oxygen concentrations, lipase and protease activities, and cell lysate concentration. The last variable represents the amount of cells that has been lysed by the shear stress and natural cell death. Proteases released to the medium, as consequence of this process, enhance lipase inactivation. The model is able to predict the effects of some operation variables such as air flow rate and agitation speed. The mathematical model was validated against batch-fermentation data obtained under several operating conditions. Because substrate concentration has antagonistic effects on lipase activity, a typical optimization scheme should be developed in order to minimize these deleterious effects while maximizing lipase activity. PMID:15304703

  9. Phosphonoacetate hydrolase from Penicillium oxalicum: purification and properties, phosphate starvation-independent expression, and partial sequencing.

    PubMed

    Klimek-Ochab, Magdalena; Raucci, Giuseppe; Lejczak, Barbara; Forlani, Giuseppe

    2006-03-01

    The enzyme responsible for the hydrolysis of phosphonoacetic acid, a non-biogenic C-P compound, was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from a wild-type strain of Penicillium oxalicum. A 50-fold enrichment was obtained by a combination of anion exchange, hydrophobic interaction and MonoQ-fast protein liquid chromatography, with a yield of one-third of the initial activity. A characterization of the protein showed both similarities and differences with respect to the well-characterized bacterial counterpart. The fungal phosphonoacetate hydrolase is a 43-kDa monomeric protein showing low affinity toward its substrate and high sensitivity to even mildly acidic pH values. Enzyme activity neither required nor was stimulated by the presence of divalent cations. Polyclonal antibodies were raised in mouse against the purified protein, allowing the study of enzyme induction as a function of the phosphate status of the cell. Peptide mass mapping led to the determination of about 20% of the primary structure. Despite the biochemical differences, amino acid alignment showed a high degree of similarity of the fungal hydrolase with the few sequences available to date for the bacterial enzyme. The possible physiological role of a phosphonoacetate hydrolase is discussed. PMID:16129582

  10. UP-HILIC-MS/MS to Determine the Action Pattern of Penicillium sp. Dextranase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Lin; Sun, Xue; Du, Kenze; Ouyang, Yilan; Wu, Chengling; Xu, Naiyu; Linhardt, Robert J.; Zhang, Zhenqing

    2015-07-01

    Investigation of the action pattern of enzymes acting on carbohydrates is challenging, as both the substrate and the digestion products are complex mixtures. Dextran and its enzyme-derived oligosaccharides are widely used for many industrial applications. In this work, a new method relying on ultra-performance hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UP-HILIC- Q/TOF-MS/MS) was developed to analyze a complex mixture of dextran oligosaccharide products to determine the action pattern of dextranase. No derivatization of oligosaccharides was required and the impact of the α- and β-configurations of the native oligosaccharides on the chromatographic separation was eliminated. The 1→6, 1→3, 1→4 backbone linkages and the branch linkages of these oligosaccharides were all distinguished from diagnostic ions in their MS/MS spectra, including fragments corresponding to 0,2A, 0,3A, 0,4A, B-H2O, 2,5A, and 3,5A. The sequences of the oligosaccharide products were similarly established. Thus, the complex oligosaccharide mixtures in dextran digestion products were profiled and identified using this method. The more enzyme-resistant structures in dextran were established using much less sample, labor, time, and uncertainty than in previous studies. This method provides an efficient, sensitive, and straightforward way to monitor the entire process of digestion, establish the action pattern of the dextranase from Penicillium sp., and to support the proper industrial application of dextranase.

  11. Upflow column reactor design for dechlorination of chlorinated pulping wastes by Penicillium camemberti.

    PubMed

    Taşeli, Başak K; Gökçay, Celal F; Taşeli, Hasan

    2004-09-01

    A Penicillium camemberti strain isolated in our laboratory has been studied for its ability to degrade chlorinated pulping wastes, presumably containing a variety of chlorinated polyphenols. In batch tests, the highest removals (76% AOX, 61% color and 65% TOC) were obtained with 0.2 g/l feed acetate concentration. The tendency of the fungus to dechlorinate bleachery effluents better under non-shaking conditions and to attach onto surfaces suggested the use of immobilized cells rather than freely suspended ones in further exploitation of the process. An upflow glass wool packed column reactor established with this fungus could be operated for nearly two years in the laboratory. At best around 70% AOX could be removed from chlorinated pulping wastes in 7.3 h of contact with no aeration and with a minimal amount of carbon supplement (0.2 g/l). Finally, an asymptotic mathematical formula for determining Michaelis-Menten kinetic rates has been derived. The kinetic rates K(m) (the Michaelis constant or saturation constant for the substrate) and V(m) (the product of maximum rate for the enzymatic reaction and biomass concentration) were then calculated as 126.386 mg/l and 2.83017 mg/lh, respectively. PMID:15251223

  12. Identification and characterization of an acidic and acid-stable endoxyloglucanase from Penicillium oxalicum.

    PubMed

    Xian, Liang; Wang, Fei; Yin, Xin; Feng, Jia-Xun

    2016-05-01

    Xyloglucan is a major structural macromolecule of the primary cell wall of spermatophytes. The hydrolysis of xyloglucan by xyloglucanases may facilitate the hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulases, which is beneficial for bioethanol production. Penicillium oxalicum has been employed for commercial cellulase production. In P. oxalicum, many genes and proteins related to the degradation of structural macromolecules of the plant cell wall have been found, but no gene encoding a xyloglucanase has been identified. In this study, a gene, PoxXEG12A, was cloned from P. oxalicum and expressed in Pichia pastoris, and the gene product was enzymatically characterized. PoxXEG12A shared 63% sequence identity with endoxyloglucanases from Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus aculeatus. PoxXEG12A specifically hydrolyzed tamarind xyloglucan in endo-acting mode and, thus, it is an endoxyloglucanase. PoxXEG12A was most active at pH 4.5-5.5 and at 55-60 °C, with a specific activity of 172 U/mg protein toward tamarind xyloglucan. The enzyme was stable at pH 3.5-7.0 and below 40 °C. The properties of the endoxyloglucanase PoxXEG12A suggest that the enzyme might have potential in industrial applications. PMID:26840178

  13. Cellulases from Penicillium funiculosum: production, properties and application to cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Aline Machado; de Albuquerque de Carvalho, Marcelle Lins; Leite, Selma Gomes Ferreira; Pereira, Nei

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the utilization of two abundant agricultural residues in Brazil for the production and application of cellulolytic enzymes. Different materials obtained after pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse, as well as pure synthetic substrates, were considered for cellulase production by Penicillium funiculosum. The best results for FPase (354 U L(-1)) and beta-glucosidase (1,835 U L(-1)) production were observed when sugarcane bagasse partially delignified cellulignin (PDC) was used. The crude extract obtained from PDC fermentation was then partially characterized. Optimal temperatures for cellulase action ranged from 52 to 58 degrees C and pH values of around 4.9 contributed to maximum enzyme activity. At 37 degrees C, the cellulases were highly stable, losing less than 15% of their initial activity after 23 h of incubation. There was no detection of proteases in the P. funiculosum extract, but other hydrolases, such as endoxylanases, were identified (147 U L(-1)). Finally, when compared to commercial preparations, the cellulolytic complex from P. funiculosum showed more well-balanced amounts of beta-glucosidase, endo- and exoglucanase, resulting in the desired performance in the presence of a lignocellulosic material. Cellulases from this filamentous fungus had a higher glucose production rate (470 mg L(-1) h(-1)) when incubated with corn cob than with Celluclast, GC 220 and Spezyme (312, 454 and 400 mg L(-1) h(-1), respectively). PMID:19902281

  14. Rare Chromones from a Fungal Mutant of the Marine-Derived Penicillium purpurogenum G59

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ming-Wen; Cui, Cheng-Bin; Li, Chang-Wei; Wu, Chang-Jing; Peng, Ji-Xing; Li, De-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Three new and rare chromones, named epiremisporine B (2), epiremisporine B1 (3) and isoconiochaetone C (4), along with three known remisporine B (1), coniochaetone A (5) and methyl 8-hydroxy-6-methyl-9-oxo-9H-xanthene-1-carboxylate (6) were isolated from a mutant from the diethyl sulfate (DES) mutagenesis of a marine-derived Penicillium purpurogenum G59. The structures of 2–4 including the absolute configurations were determined by spectroscopic methods, especially by NMR analysis and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) experiments in conjunction with calculations. The absolute configuration of the known remisporine B (1) was determined for the first time. Compounds 2 and 3 have a rare feature that has only been reported in one example so far. The compounds 1–6 were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against several human cancer cell lines. The present work explored the great potential of our previous DES mutagenesis strategy for activating silent fungal pathways, which has accelerated the discovery of new bioactive compounds. PMID:26295241

  15. The mechanism of inactivation of glucose oxidase from Penicillium amagasakiense under ambient storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Caves, Michael S; Derham, Barry K; Jezek, Jan; Freedman, Robert B

    2011-06-10

    Glucose oxidase (GOx) from Penicillium amagasakiense has a higher specific activity than the more commonly studied Aspergillus niger enzyme, and may therefore be preferred in many medical and industrial applications. The enzyme rapidly inactivates on storage at pH 7.0-7.6 at temperatures between 30 and 40°C. Results of fluorimetry and circular dichroism spectroscopy indicate that GOx inactivation under these conditions is associated with release of the cofactor FAD and molten globule formation, indicated by major loss of tertiary structure but almost complete retention of secondary structure. Inactivation of GOx at pH<7 leads to precipitation, but at pH ≥ 7 it leads to non-specific formation of small soluble aggregates detectable by PAGE and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Inactivation of P. amagasakiense GOx differs from that of A. niger GOx in displaying complete rather than partial retention of secondary structure and in being promoted rather than prevented by NaCl. The contrasting salt effects may reflect differences in the nature of the interface between subunits in the native dimers and/or the quantity of secondary structure loss upon inactivation. PMID:22112275

  16. Integrated control of Penicillium digitatum by the predacious yeast Saccharomycopsis crataegensis and sodium bicarbonate on oranges

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, R. S.; Silva, J. F. M.; Coelho, C. M.; Morais, P. B.; Rosa, C. A.; Corrêa Jr, A.

    2010-01-01

    Our investigation of integrated biological control (IBC) started with an assay testing activity of the predacious yeast Saccharomycopsis crataegensis UFMG-DC19.2 against Penicillium digitatum LCP 4354, a very aggressive fungus that causes postharvest decay in oranges. Under unfavourable environmental conditions, the yeast showed a high potential for control (39.9% disease severity reduction) of this fungus. This result was decisive for the next step, in which S. crataegensis was tested in association with sodium bicarbonate salt, a generally regarded as safe (GRAS) substance. The yeast was able to survive at different concentrations of the salt (1%, 2% and 5%), and continued to grow for a week at the wound site, remaining viable at high population for 14 days on the fruit surface. The yeast alone reduced the severity of decay by 41.7% and sodium bicarbonate alone reduced severity of decay by 19.8%, whereas the application of both led to a delay in the development of symptoms from 2 to 10 days. Ingredients of the formulations were not aggressive to fruits since no lesions were produced in control experiments. PMID:24031511

  17. Function of a p24 Heterodimer in Morphogenesis and Protein Transport in Penicillium oxalicum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangzhong; Liu, Kuimei; Han, Lijuan; Jiang, Baojie; Wang, Mingyu; Fang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    The lignocellulose degradation capacity of filamentous fungi has been widely studied because of their cellulase hypersecretion. The p24 proteins in eukaryotes serve important functions in this secretory pathway. However, little is known about the functions of the p24 proteins in filamentous fungi. In this study, four p24 proteins were identified in Penicillium oxalicum. Six p24 double-deletion strains were constructed, and further studies were carried out with the ΔerpΔpδ strain. The experimental results suggested that Erp and Pδ form a p24 heterodimer in vivo. This p24 heterodimer participates in important morphogenetic events, including sporulation, hyphal growth, and lateral branching. The results suggested that the p24 heterodimer mediates protein transport, particularly that of cellobiohydrolase. Analysis of the intracellular proteome revealed that the ΔerpΔpδ double mutant is under secretion stress due to attempts to remove proteins that are jammed in the endomembrane system. These results suggest that the p24 heterodimer participates in morphogenesis and protein transport. Compared with P. oxalicum Δerp, a greater number of cellular physiological pathways were impaired in ΔerpΔpδ. This finding may provide new insights into the secretory pathways of filamentous fungi. PMID:26149342

  18. [Production of pectinases by Penicillium simplicissimum A3263 in an amaranth-seed flour medium].

    PubMed

    Pastor, M D; Lorda, G S; Balatti, A

    2002-01-01

    The present work studies the production of pectinases using a strain of Penicillium simplicissimum A3263 and considering the influence of adding Amaranthus cruentus seed meal in a selected medium. We also considered the influence of aeration on enzyme production. Research was oriented towards the production of pectin lyase, the enzyme having the highest commercial value. This work was carried out in Erlenmeyer flasks in rotary shaker to select the medium and in a mechanically stirred fermentor to study aeration. The microorganism was developed as pellets of 1 mm diameter. Enzyme levels were of the order of 8216.21 pectin lyase units and 167.57 polygalacturonase units per gram of fungal biomass, respectively, using a medium containing 40 g/l of amaranth seed meal. As for the influence of aeration, it was determined that the higher values were obtained at 750 rpm corresponding to an oxygen absorption rate of 2691 ml O2/lh for an air flow of 1 l/l.min. The results obtained are considered very important in view of the fact that they exceeded in 550% those obtained by other authors. PMID:11942079

  19. A microscopy study of hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum under dynamic humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    van Laarhoven, Karel A; Huinink, Hendrik P; Adan, Olaf C G

    2016-05-01

    To remediate indoor fungal growth, understanding the moisture relations of common indoor fungi is crucial. Indoor moisture conditions are commonly quantified by the relative humidity (RH). RH is a major determinant of the availability of water in porous indoor surfaces that fungi grow on. The influence of steady-state RH on growth is well understood. Typically, however, the indoor RH constantly changes so that fungi have to endure frequent periods of alternating low and high RH. Knowledge of how common indoor fungi survive and are affected by the low-RH periods is limited. In particular, the specific effects of a drop in RH on the growth of the mycelium remain unclear. In this work, video microscopy was used to monitor hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum substrates under controlled dynamic humidity conditions. The effect of a single period of low RH (RH = 50-90%) interrupting favourable conditions (RH = 97%) was tested. It was found that hyphal tips ceased to extend when exposed to any tested decrease in RH. However, new hyphal growth always emerges, seemingly from the old mycelium, suggesting that this indoor fungus does not rely only on conidia to survive the humidity patterns considered. These findings are a fundamental step in unravelling the effect of RH on indoor fungal growth. PMID:26996401

  20. Bioleaching of tungsten-rich spent hydrocracking catalyst using Penicillium simplicissimum.

    PubMed

    Amiri, F; Yaghmaei, S; Mousavi, S M

    2011-01-01

    Adaptation of Penicillium simplicissimum with different heavy metals present in a spent hydrocracking catalyst, as well as one-step, two-step, and spent medium bioleaching of the spent catalyst by the adapted fungus, was examined in batch cultures. Adaptation experiments with the single metal ions Ni, Mo, Fe, and W showed that the fungus could tolerate up to 1500 mg/L Ni, 8000 mg/L Mo, 3000 mg/L Fe, and 8000 mg/L W. In the presence of multi-metals, the fungus was able to tolerate up to 300 mg/L Ni, 200 mg/L Mo, 150 mg/L Fe and 2500 mg/L W. A total of 3% (w/v) spent catalyst generally gave the maximum extraction yields in the two-step bioleaching process (100% of W, 100% of Fe, 92.7% of Mo, 66.43% of Ni, and 25% of Al). The main lixiviant in the bioleaching was shown to be gluconic acid. The red pigment produced by the fungus could also possibly act as an agent in Al leaching. PMID:20863693

  1. Role of Penicillium chrysogenum XJ-1 in the Detoxification and Bioremediation of Cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xingjian; Xia, Lu; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Zheyi; Huang, Qiaoyun; Chen, Wenli

    2015-01-01

    Microbial bioremediation is a promising technology to treat heavy metal-contaminated soils. However, the efficiency of filamentous fungi as bioremediation agents remains unknown, and the detoxification mechanism of heavy metals by filamentous fungi remains unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the cell morphology and antioxidant systems of Penicillium chrysogenum XJ-1 in response to different cadmium (Cd) concentrations (0–10 mM) by using physico-chemical and biochemical methods. Cd in XJ-1 was mainly bound to the cell wall. The malondialdehyde level in XJ-1 cells was increased by 14.82–94.67 times with the increase in Cd concentration. The activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase (GR), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) peaked at 1 mM Cd, whereas that of catalase peaked at 5 mM Cd. Cd exposure increased the glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio and the activities of GR and G6PDH in XJ-1. These results suggested that the Cd detoxification mechanism of XJ-1 included biosorption, cellular sequestration, and antioxidant defense. The application of XJ-1 in Cd-polluted soils (5–50 mg kg-1) successfully reduced bioavailable Cd and increased the plant yield, indicating that this fungus was a promising candidate for in situ bioremediation of Cd-polluted soil. PMID:26733967

  2. Role of Penicillium chrysogenum XJ-1 in the Detoxification and Bioremediation of Cadmium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xingjian; Xia, Lu; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Zheyi; Huang, Qiaoyun; Chen, Wenli

    2015-01-01

    Microbial bioremediation is a promising technology to treat heavy metal-contaminated soils. However, the efficiency of filamentous fungi as bioremediation agents remains unknown, and the detoxification mechanism of heavy metals by filamentous fungi remains unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the cell morphology and antioxidant systems of Penicillium chrysogenum XJ-1 in response to different cadmium (Cd) concentrations (0-10 mM) by using physico-chemical and biochemical methods. Cd in XJ-1 was mainly bound to the cell wall. The malondialdehyde level in XJ-1 cells was increased by 14.82-94.67 times with the increase in Cd concentration. The activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase (GR), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) peaked at 1 mM Cd, whereas that of catalase peaked at 5 mM Cd. Cd exposure increased the glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio and the activities of GR and G6PDH in XJ-1. These results suggested that the Cd detoxification mechanism of XJ-1 included biosorption, cellular sequestration, and antioxidant defense. The application of XJ-1 in Cd-polluted soils (5-50 mg kg(-1)) successfully reduced bioavailable Cd and increased the plant yield, indicating that this fungus was a promising candidate for in situ bioremediation of Cd-polluted soil. PMID:26733967

  3. Penicillium menonorum: A Novel Fungus to Promote Growth and Nutrient Management in Cucumber Plants

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Anam Giridhar; Kim, Sang Woo; Yadav, Dil Raj; Hyum, Umyong; Adhikari, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    The present study is the first report on the isolation of Penicillium menonorum from rhizosphere soil in Korea and its identification based on morphological characteristics and internal transcribed spacer gene sequence. The fungal isolate was named KNU-3 and was found to exhibit plant growth-promoting (PGP) activity through indole acetic acid (IAA) and siderophore production, as well as P solubilization. KNU-3 produced 9.7 mg/L IAA and solubilized 408 mg of Ca3PO4/L, and inoculation with the isolate significantly (p < 0.05) increased the dry biomass of cucumber roots (57%) and shoots (52%). Chlorophyll, starch, protein, and P contents were increased by 16%, 45%, 22%, and 14%, respectively, compared to plants grown in uninoculated soil. The fungus also increased soil dehydrogenase (30%) and acid phosphatase (19%) activities. These results demonstrate that the isolate KNU-3 has potential PGP attributes, and therefore it can be considered as a new fungus to enhance soil fertility and promote plant growth. Moreover, the discovery of PGP ability and traits of this fungus will open new aspects of research and investigations. In this study, plant growth promotion by P. menonorum KNU-3 is reported for the first time in Korea after its original description. PMID:25892915

  4. Direct Biotransformation of Dioscin into Diosgenin in Rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis by Penicillium dioscin.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jingzhou; Lei, Can; Lu, Dayan; Wang, Ying

    2015-06-01

    Diosgenin is an important precursor for synthesis of more than 200 steroidal hormone medicines. Rhizome of Dioscorea zingiberensis C. H. Wright (RDZ) contained the highest content of diosgenin in Dioscorea plant species. Diosgenin is traditionally extracted by acid hydrolysis from RDZ. However, the acid hydrolysis process produces massive wastewater which caused serious environment pollution. In this study, diosgenin extraction by direct biotransformation with Penicillium dioscin was investigated. The spawn cultivation conditions were optimized as: Czapeks liquid culture medium without sugar and agar (1,000 ml) + 6.0 g dioscin/6.0 g DL, 30 °C, 36 h; solid fermentation of RDZ: mycelia/RDZ of 0.05 g/kg, 30 °C, 50 h; the yield of diosgenin was over 90 %. Spawn cultivation was crucial for the direct biotransformation. In the spawn cultivation, amount and ratio of dioscin/DL were the key factors to promote biotransformation activity of P. dioscin. This biotransformation method was environment-friendly, simple and energy saving, and might be a potential substitute for acid hydrolysis in diosgenin extraction industry. PMID:25805907

  5. Strain-Specific Synthesis of Mycophenolic Acid by Penicillium roqueforti in Blue-Veined Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Günter; von Milczewski, Karl Ernst; Prokopek, Dieter; Teuber, Michael

    1982-01-01

    Twenty of 80 strains of Penicillium roqueforti were able to produce up to 600 mg of mycophenolic acid (MPA) liter−1 in 2% yeast extract-5% sucrose broth. Sixty-two of these strains had been isolated from the main blue-veined cheese varieties of western Europe or from starter cultures. Of these 62 dairy strains, only 7 had MPA-producing potential in vitro. These seven strains had all been isolated during the period 1975 to 1981 from the blue cheese of one individual factory. In cheese from the market, MPA (up to 5 mg kg−1) was only found in samples of this same factory. With MPA-producing and -nonproducing strains for the experimental manufacture of blue cheese, MPA synthesis in cheese was only detected with strains which form MPA in yeast extract-sucrose broth. The maximum MPA level at 4 mg kg−1 was similar to that in commercial cheese. Toxicity of MPA was tested with two established human cell lines (Detroit 98 and Girardi Heart) and one established pig kidney cell line (AmII). PMID:16346004

  6. Newly Isolated Penicillium ramulosum N1 Is Excellent for Producing Protease-Resistant Acidophilic Xylanase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chaoyang; Shen, Zhicheng; Zhu, Tingheng; Qin, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    Penicillium ramulosum N1 was isolated from decaying wood. This strain produces extracellular xylanases and cellulases. The highest activities of xylanases (250 U/ml) and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMCase; 6.5 U/ml) were produced when 1% barley straw was added as a carbon source. The optimum temperature and pH for xylanase activity was 55 and 3.0 °C, respectively. The xylanases exhibited strong protease resistance. CMCase revealed maximum activities at pH 3.0 and in the range of 60-70 °C. Filter paper activity was optimally active at pH 5.0 and 55 °C. The zymograms produced by the SDS-PAGE resolution of the crude enzymes indicated that there are four bands of protein with xylanase activity and three bands of proteins with endoglucanase. The results revealed that P. ramulosum N1 is a promising acidophilic and protease-resistant xylanase-producing microorganism that has great potential to be used in animal feed and food industry applications. PMID:26431535

  7. Compactin production studies using Penicillium brevicompactum under solid-state fermentation conditions.

    PubMed

    Shaligram, N S; Singh, S K; Singhal, R S; Pandey, A; Szakacs, G

    2009-11-01

    In the present study, compactin production by Penicillium brevicompactum WA 2315 was optimized using solid-state fermentation. The initial one factor at a time approach resulted in improved compactin production of 905 microg gds(-1) compared to initial 450 microg gds(-1). Subsequently, nutritional, physiological, and biological parameters were screened using fractional factorial and Box-Behnken design. The fractional factorial design studied inoculum age, inoculum volume, pH, NaCl, NH(4)NO(3), MgSO(4), and KH(2)PO(4). All parameters were found to be significant except pH and KH(2)PO(4). The Box-Behnken design studied inoculum volume, inoculum age, glycerol, and NH(4)NO(3) at three different levels. Inoculum volume (p = 0.0013) and glycerol (p = 0.0001) were significant factors with greater effect on response. The interaction effects were not significant. The validation study using model-defined conditions resulted in an improved yield of 1,250 microg gds(-1) compactin. Further improvement in yield was obtained using fed batch mode of carbon supplementation. The feeding of glycerol (20% v/v) on day 3 resulted in further improved compactin yield of 1,406 microg gds(-1). The present study demonstrates that agro-industrial residues can be successfully used for compactin production, and statistical experiment designs provide an easy tool to improve the process conditions for secondary metabolite production. PMID:19099208

  8. Production and properties of alpha-amylase from Penicillium chrysogenum and its application in starch hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Balkan, Bilal; Ertan, Figen

    2005-01-01

    Fungi were screened for their ability to produce alpha-amylase by a plate culture method. Penicillium chrysogenum showed high enzymatic activity. Alpha-amylase production by P. chrysogenum cultivated in liquid media containing maltose (2%) reached its maximum at 6-8 days, at 30 degrees C, with a level of 155 U ml(-1). Some general properties of the enzyme were investigated. The optimum reaction pH and temperature were 5.0 and 30-40 degrees C, respectively. The enzyme was stable at a pH range from 5.0-6.0 and at 30 degrees C for 20 min and the enzyme's 92.1% activity's was retained at 40 degrees C for 20 min without substrate. Hydrolysis products of the enzyme were maltose, unidefined oligosaccharides, and a trace amount of glucose. Alpha-amylase of P. chrysogenum hydrolysed starches from different sources. The best hydrolysis was determined (98.69%) in soluble starch for 15 minute at 30 degrees C. PMID:15881598

  9. Novel small molecule 11β-HSD1 inhibitor from the endophytic fungus Penicillium commune

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Weiguang; Chen, Xintao; Tong, Qingyi; Zhu, Hucheng; He, Yan; Lei, Liang; Xue, Yongbo; Yao, Guangmin; Luo, Zengwei; Wang, Jianping; Li, Hua; Zhang, Yonghui

    2016-01-01

    Two new phenone derivatives penicophenones A (1) and B (2), a new cyclic tetrapeptide penicopeptide A (3), and five known compounds were isolated from the culture broth of Penicillium commune, an endophytic fungus derived from Vitis vinifera. Compounds 1–3 were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analyses including 1D and 2D NMR and HRESIMS. The absolute configurations of 1 and 3 were determined by comparing its ECD with related molecules and modified Marfey’s analysis, respectively. Penicophenone A (1) possesses a rare benzannulated 6,6-spiroketal moiety, which is a new member of the unusual structural class with peniphenone A as the representative. Compound 3 exhibited significant inhibition activities against 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) in vitro and showed strong binding affinity to 11β-HSD1. Moreover, compound 3 treatments decreased the lipid droplet accumulation associate with the inhibition of 11β-HSD1 expression in differentiate-induced 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Furthermore, the molecular docking demonstrated that compound 3 coordinated in the active site of 11β-HSD1 is essential for the ability of diminishing the enzyme activity. PMID:27194583

  10. Production, Purification, and Characterization of a Major Penicillium glabrum Xylanase Using Brewer's Spent Grain as Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Beitel, Susan Michelz; Fortkamp, Diana; Terrasan, César Rafael Fanchini; de Almeida, Alex Fernando

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, xylanases have been used in many processing industries. This study describes the xylanase production by Penicillium glabrum using brewer's spent grain as substrate. Additionally, this is the first work that reports the purification and characterization of a xylanase using this agroindustrial waste. Optimal production was obtained when P. glabrum was grown in liquid medium in pH 5.5, at 25 °C, under stationary condition for six days. The xylanase from P. glabrum was purified to homogeneity by a rapid and inexpensive procedure, using ammonium sulfate fractionation and molecular exclusion chromatography. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed one band with estimated molecular mass of 18.36 kDa. The optimum activity was observed at 60 °C, in pH 3.0. The enzyme was very stable at 50 °C, and high pH stability was verified from pH 2.5 to 5.0. The ion Mn2+ and the reducing agents β-mercaptoethanol and DTT enhanced xylanase activity, while the ions Hg2+, Zn2+, and Cu2+ as well as the detergent SDS were strong inhibitors of the enzyme. The use of brewer's spent grain as substrate for xylanase production cannot only add value and decrease the amount of this waste but also reduce the xylanase production cost. PMID:23762855

  11. Inactivation Process of Penicillium digitatum Spores Treated with Non-equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Mori, Takumi; Iseki, Sachiko; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the inactivation process of Penicillium digitatum spores treated with a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma, the spores were observed using a fluorescent microscope and compared with those treated with ultraviolet (UV) light or moist heat. The treated spores were stained with two fluorescent dyes, 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,Y,3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) and diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine (DPPP). The intracellular organelles as well as cell membranes in the spores treated with the plasma were stained with DiI without a major morphological change of the membranes, while the organelles were never stained in the spores treated with UV light or moist heat. Moreover, DPPP staining revealed that organelles were oxidized by plasma treatment unlike UV light or moist heat treatments. These results suggest that only plasma treatment induces a minor structural change or functional inhibition of cell membranes, which leads to the oxidation of the intracellular organelles without a major deformation of the membranes through the penetration of reactive oxygen species generated by the plasma into the cell.

  12. An Antifungal Role of Hydrogen Sulfide on the Postharvest Pathogens Aspergillus niger and Penicillium italicum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-Hong; Hu, Liang-Bin; Yan, Hong; Liu, Yong-Sheng; Zhang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    In this research, the antifungal role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the postharvest pathogens Aspergillus niger and Penicillium italicum growing on fruits and under culture conditions on defined media was investigated. Our results show that H2S, released by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) effectively reduced the postharvest decay of fruits induced by A. niger and P. italicum. Furthermore, H2S inhibited spore germination, germ tube elongation, mycelial growth, and produced abnormal mycelial contractions when the fungi were grown on defined media in Petri plates. Further studies showed that H2S could cause an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in A. niger. In accordance with this observation we show that enzyme activities and the expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) genes in A. niger treated with H2S were lower than those in control. Moreover, H2S also significantly inhibited the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rhizopus oryzae, the human pathogen Candida albicans, and several food-borne bacteria. We also found that short time exposure of H2S showed a microbicidal role rather than just inhibiting the growth of microbes. Taken together, this study suggests the potential value of H2S in reducing postharvest loss and food spoilage caused by microbe propagation. PMID:25101960

  13. Separation and immobilization of lipase from Penicillium simplicissimum by selective adsorption on hydrophobic supports.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Aline G; Fernández-Lorente, Gloria; Gutarra, Melissa L E; Bevilaqua, Juliana V; Almeida, Rodrigo V; Paiva, Lúcia M C; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisán, Jose M; Freire, Denise M G

    2009-05-01

    Lipases are an enzyme class of a great importance as biocatalysts applied to organic chemistry. However, it is still necessary to search for new enzymes with special characteristics such as good stability towards high temperatures, organic solvents, and high stereoselectivity presence. The present work's aim was to immobilize the lipases pool produced by Penicillium simplissicimum, a filamentous fungi strain isolated from Brazilian babassu cake residue. P. simplissicimum lipases were separated into three different fractions using selective adsorption method on different hydrophobic supports (butyl-, phenyl-, and octyl-agarose) at low ionic strength. After immobilization, it was observed that these fractions' hyperactivation is in the range of 131% to 1133%. This phenomenon probably occurs due to enzyme open form stabilization when immobilized onto hydrophobic supports. Those fractions showed different thermal stability, specificity, and enantioselectivity towards some substrates. Enantiomeric ratio for the hydrolysis of (R,S) 2-O-butyryl-2-phenylacetic acid ranged from 1 to 7.9 for different immobilized P. simplissicimum lipase fractions. Asymmetry factor for diethyl 2-phenylmalonate hydrolysis ranged from 11.8 to 16.4 according to the immobilized P. simplissicimum lipase fractions. Those results showed that sequential adsorption methodology was an efficient strategy to obtain new biocatalysts with different enantioselectivity degrees, thermostability, and specificity prepared with a crude extract produced by a simple and low-cost technology. PMID:19037600

  14. Biochemistry of lipolytic enzymes secreted by Penicillium solitum and Cladosporium cladosporioides.

    PubMed

    Chinaglia, Selene; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Maggi, Maristella; Rodolfi, Marinella; Valentini, Giovanna; Picco, Anna Maria

    2014-01-01

    Two distinct extracellular lipases were obtained from Penicillium solitum 194A, isolated from domestic compost, and Cladosporium cladosporioides 194B, isolated from dairy wastewater. These alkaline enzymes had molecular masses of 42 and 30 kDa, respectively. The P. solitum 194A lipase differed in mass from previously reported enzyme, indicating that it is a novel lipase, and indicating that penicillia can secrete lipase isoenzymes. The C. cladosporioides lipase was more active on esters of medium-chain acids, whereas the P. solitum lipase was more active on longer chained substrates. The C. cladosporioides enzyme displayed higher thermal stability than the P. solitum lipase, preserving full activity up to 48 °C and showing a T₅₀ (10 min) of 60 °C. Their different catalytic properties and good protein stability should make these enzymes suitable for biotechnological applications. Furthermore, the combined use of these two fungal strains may prove to be valuable in lipid-rich waste management. PMID:25036677

  15. A gene encoding a new cold-active lipase from an Antarctic isolate of Penicillium expansum.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Suja; Te'o, Junior; Nevalainen, Helena

    2013-08-01

    Cold-active lipases are of significant interest as biocatalysts in industrial processes. We have identified a lipase that displayed activity towards long carbon-chain-p-nitrophenyl substrates (C12-C18) at 25 °C from the culture supernatant of an Antarctic Penicillium expansum strain assigned P. expansum SM3. Zymography revealed a protein band of around 30 kDa with activity towards olive oil. DNA fragments of a lipase gene designated as lipPE were isolated from the genomic DNA of P. expansum SM3 by genomic walking PCR. Subsequently, the complete genomic lipPE gene was amplified using gene-specific primers designed from the 5'- and 3'-regions. Reverse transcription PCR was used to amplify the lipPE cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence consisted of 285 residues that included a predicted signal peptide. Three peptides identified by LC/MS/MS analysis of the proteins in the culture supernatant of P. expansum were also present in the deduced amino acid sequence of the lipPE gene suggesting that this gene encoded the lipase identified by initial zymogram activity analysis. Full analysis of the nucleotide and the deduced amino acid sequences indicated that the lipPE gene encodes a novel P. expansum lipase. The lipPE gene was expressed in E. coli for further characterization of the enzyme with a view of assessing its suitability for industrial applications. PMID:23779196

  16. Penicillium expansum lipase-catalyzed production of biodiesel in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai-Pei; Lai, Jing-Qi; Huang, Ze-Lin; Yang, Zhen

    2011-02-01

    Penicillium expansum lipase (PEL) was used to catalyze biodiesel production from corn oil in [BMIm][PF(6)](1) (an ionic liquid, IL) and tert-butanol. Both systems were optimized in terms of MeOH/oil molar ratio, reaction temperature, enzyme loading, solvent volume, and water content. The high conversion obtained in the IL (86%) as compared to that in tert-butanol (52%) demonstrates that the IL is a superior solvent for PEL-catalyzed biodiesel production. Poor yields were obtained in a series of hydrophilic ILs. Addition of salt hydrates affected biodiesel production predominantly through the specific ion (Hofmeister) effect. The impact of methanol on both activity and stability of PEL in the IL and in hexane was investigated, in comparison to the results obtained by two commonly used lipases, Novozym 435 and Lipozyme TLIM. The results substantiate that while different lipases show different resistance to methanol in different reaction systems, PEL is tolerant to methanol in both systems. PMID:21138789

  17. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of Penicillium expansum PE-12 and its application in molecular breeding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian; Qi, Zhen; Wang, Yueyue; Zhang, Fangyuan; Li, Renyong; Yu, Qingsheng; Chen, Xiangbin; Wang, Huojun; Xiong, Xin; Tang, Kexuan

    2013-03-30

    Lipase produced by Penicillium expansum is widely used in laundry detergent and leather industry; however, the absence of an efficient transformation technology sets a major obstacle for further enhancement of its lipase productivity through advanced gene engineering. In this work, Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) was investigated for P. expansum PE-12 transformation, using hygromycin phosphotransferase (hph) as a selectable marker gene. As a result, we revealed that the frequency of transformation surpassed 100 transformants/10(5)condida, most of the integrated T-DNA appeared as a single copy at a random position in chromosomal DNA, and all the transformants showed mitotic stability. Facilitated by this newly established method, for the first time, P. expansum PE-12 was genetically engineered to improve the lipase yield, through a homologous expression vector carrying the endogenous lipase gene (PEL) driven by the strong constitutive promoter of the glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (gpdA) from Aspergillus nidulans. The highest expression level of the engineered strain reached up to 1700 U/mL, nearly 2-fold of the original industrial strain (900 U/mL). Our reproducible ATMT system has not only revealed the great potential of homologous expression-directed genetic engineering, which is more efficient and specific compared to traditional mutagenesis, but also provided new possibilities and perspectives for any other practical applications of P. expansum-related genetic engineering in the future. PMID:23265791

  18. Lipase production and Penicillium simplicissimum morphology in solid-state and submerged fermentations.

    PubMed

    Gutarra, Melissa Limoeiro Estrada; de Godoy, Mateus Gomes; Silva, Jaqueline do Nascimento; Guedes, Iamê Alves; Lins, Ulysses; Castilho, Leda Dos Reis; Freire, Denise Maria Guimarães

    2009-10-01

    A comparative study of Penicillium simplicissimum morphology and lipase production was performed using solid-state (SSF) and submerged (SmF) fermentation. SSF was carried out on babassu cake as culture medium and SmF on a semi-synthetic medium and a medium based on suspended babassu cake grains. Yield of product on biomass, specific activity and conidia production were 3.3-, 1.3- and 2-fold higher in SSF. In SmF, the type of fungus growth differed according to the medium. Using the semi-synthetic medium, the fungus formed densely interwoven mycelial masses without conidia production, whereas using the babassu-based medium the fungus formed free mycelia and adhered to the surfaces of the grains, producing conidia. The results show that babassu cake induces conidiation in SmF. In SSF, the fungus not only grew on the surface of the grains, producing conidia abundantly, but also effectively colonized and penetrated the babassu particles. The high conidia production and lipase productivity in SSF may be related to the low availability of nutrients or to other stimuli associated with this type of fermentation. Thus, the high production of the thermostable P. simplicissimum lipase, using a non-supplemented, low-cost agro-industrial residue as the culture medium, demonstrates the biotechnological potential of SSF for the production of industrial enzymes. PMID:19606429

  19. Cloning of an alkaline lipase gene from Penicillium cyclopium and its expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minchen; Qian, Zhikang; Jiang, Peihong; Min, Taishan; Sun, Chongrong; Huang, Weida

    2003-03-01

    The gene encoding an alkaline lipase of Penicillium cyclopium PG37 was cloned with four steps of PCR amplification based on different principles. The cloned gene was 1,480 nucleotides in length, consisted of 94 bp of promoter region, and had 6 exons and 5 short introns ranging from 50 to 70 nucleotides. The open reading frame encoded a protein of 285 amino acid residues consisting of a 27-AA signal peptide and a 258-AA mature peptide, with a conserved motif of Gly-X-Ser-X-Gly shared by all types of alkaline lipases. However, this protein had a low homology with lipases of P. camembertii (22.9%), Humicola lanuginosa (25.6%), and Rhizomucor miehei (22.3%) at the amino acid level. The mature peptide-encoding cDNA was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli on pET-30a for confirmation. A distinct band with a M.W. of 33 kDa was detected on SDS-PAGE. Results of a Western blot analysis and an enzyme activity assay verified the recombinant 33-kDa protein as an alkaline lipase. Its catalytic properties were not changed when compared with its natural counterpart. PMID:12784858

  20. Production and regulation of lipase activity from Penicillium restrictum in submerged and solid-state fermentations.

    PubMed

    de Azeredo, Luciana A I; Gomes, Patrícia M; Sant'Anna, Geraldo L; Castilho, Leda R; Freire, Denise M G

    2007-05-01

    Different carbon (C) sources, mainly carbohydrates and lipids, have been screened for their capacity to support growth and lipase production by Penicillium restrictum in submerged fermentation (SmF) and in solid-state fermentation (SSF). Completely different physiological behaviors were observed after the addition of easily (oleic acid and glucose) and complex (olive oil and starch) assimilable C sources to the liquid and solid media. Maximal lipolytic activities (12.1 U/mL and 17.4 U/g) by P. restrictum were obtained with olive oil in SmF and in SSF, respectively. Biomass levels in SmF (12.2-14.1 mg/mL) and SSF (7.0-8.0 mg/g) did not varied greatly with the distinct C sources used. High lipase production (12.3 U/g) using glucose was only attained in SSF, perhaps due to the ability of this fermentation process to minimize catabolite repression. PMID:17457647

  1. Cultivation conditions and properties of extracellular crude lipase from the psychrotrophic fungus Penicillium chrysogenum 9'.

    PubMed

    Bancerz, R; Ginalska, G; Fiedurek, J; Gromada, A

    2005-06-01

    Among 97 fungal strains isolated from soil collected in the arctic tundra (Spitsbergen), Penicillium chrysogenum 9' was found to be the best lipase producer. The maximum lipase activity was 68 units mL(-1) culture medium on the fifth day of incubation at pH 6.0 and 20 degrees C. Therefore, P. chrysogenum 9' was classified as a psychrotrophic microorganism. The non-specific extracellular lipase showed a maximum activity at 30 degrees C and pH 5.0 for natural oils or at pH 7.0 for synthetic substrates. Tributyrin was found to be the best substrate for lipase, among those tested. The Km and Vmax were calculated to be 2.33 mM and 22.1 units mL(-1), respectively, with tributyrin as substrate. The enzyme was inhibited more by EDTA than by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and was reactivated by Ca2+. The P. chrysogenum 9' lipase was very stable in the presence of hexane and 1,4-dioxane at a concentration of 50%, whereas it was unstable in presence of xylene. PMID:15895263

  2. Substitution of Val72 residue alters the enantioselectivity and activity of Penicillium expansum lipase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lianghua; Su, Min; Zhu, Ling; Chi, Liying; Zhang, Junling; Zhou, Qiong

    2013-01-01

    Error-prone PCR was used to create more active or enantioselective variants of Penicillium expansum lipase (PEL). A variant with a valine to glycine substitution at residue 72 in the lid structure exhibited higher activity and enantioselectivity than those of wild-type PEL. Site-directed saturation mutagenesis was used to explore the sequence-function relationship and the substitution of Val72 of P. expansum lipase changed both catalytic activity and enantioselectivity greatly. The variant V72A, displayed a highest enantioselectivity enhanced to about twofold for the resolution of (R, S)-naproxen (E value increased from 104 to 200.7 for wild-type PEL and V72A variant, respectively). In comparison to PEL, the variant V72A showed a remarkable increase in specific activity towards p-nitrophenyl palmitate (11- and 4-fold increase at 25 and 35 °C, respectively) whereas it had a decreased thermostability. The results suggest that the enantioselective variant V72A could be used for the production of pharmaceutical drugs such as enantiomerically pure (S)-naproxen and the residue Val 72 of P. expansum lipase plays a significant role in the enantioselectivity and activity of this enantioselective lipase. PMID:22972595

  3. [Growth characteristics of Fusarium poae (Peck) Wollenw. and Penicillium funiculosum Thom strains].

    PubMed

    Kurchenko, I N; Pavlichenko, A K; Iur'eva, E M

    2013-01-01

    A comparative study of growth characteristics and peculiarities of glucose utilization by Fusarium poae and Penicillium funiculosum strains isolated from different habitats was conducted. It was found that F. poae and P. funiculosum strains differ as to their growth characteristics. Specific growth rate of endophytic strain F. poae was maximal (0.38 h(-1)), lower for plant pathogenic one (0.30 h(-1)) and the lowest for soil strain (0.18 hr(-1)). In contrast, the level of biomass accumulation was the highest for soil strain F. poae and minimal for plant pathogenic strain, endophytic strain took up an intermediate position. High economic coefficient was characteristic of soil strain and minimal of endophyte at medium biomass level and specific growth rate. In contrast to the strains of F. poae, the specific growth rate of soil strain of P. funiculosum was higher than that of endophyte one (0.35 and 0.24 h(-1), respectively). Biomass level of endophytic strain was significantly higher than that of the soil strain, and economic coefficient was 2.3 times higher for endophyte in comparison with soil strain. PMID:24479313

  4. Induction of sexual reproduction and genetic diversity in the cheese fungus Penicillium roqueforti

    PubMed Central

    Ropars, Jeanne; López-Villavicencio, Manuela; Dupont, Joëlle; Snirc, Alodie; Gillot, Guillaume; Coton, Monika; Jany, Jean-Luc; Coton, Emmanuel; Giraud, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    The emblematic fungus Penicillium roqueforti is used throughout the world as a starter culture in the production of blue-veined cheeses. Like other industrial filamentous fungi, P. roqueforti was thought to lack a sexual cycle. However, an ability to induce recombination is of great economic and fundamental importance, as it would make it possible to transform and improve industrial strains, promoting the creation of novel phenotypes and eliminating the deleterious mutations that accumulate during clonal propagation. We report here, for the first time, the induction of the sexual structures of P. roqueforti — ascogonia, cleistothecia and ascospores. The progeny of the sexual cycle displayed clear evidence of recombination. We also used the recently published genome sequence for this species to develop microsatellite markers for investigating the footprints of recombination and population structure in a large collection of isolates from around the world and from different environments. Indeed, P. roqueforti also occurs in silage, wood and human-related environments other than cheese. We found tremendous genetic diversity within P. roqueforti, even within cheese strains and identified six highly differentiated clusters that probably predate the use of this species for cheese production. Screening for phenotypic and metabolic differences between these populations could guide future development strategies. PMID:24822078

  5. Paths and determinants for Penicillium janthinellum to resist low and high copper.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Guo-Li; Sun, Xue-Zhe; Fan, Xian-Wei; You-Zhi, Li

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) tolerance was well understood in fungi yeasts but not in filamentous fungi. Filamentous fungi are eukaryotes but unlike eukaryotic fungi yeasts, which are a collection of various fungi that are maybe classified into different taxa but all characterized by growth as filamentous hyphae cells and with a complex morphology. The current knowledge of Cu resistance of filamentous fungi is still fragmental and therefore needs to be bridged. In this study, we characterized Cu resistance of Penicillium janthinellum strain GXCR and its Cu-resistance-decreasing mutants (EC-6 and UC-8), and conducted sequencing of a total of 6 transcriptomes from wild-type GXCR and mutant EC-6 grown under control and external Cu. Taken all the results together, Cu effects on the basal metabolism were directed to solute transport by two superfamilies of solute carrier and major facilitator, the buffering free CoA and Acyl-CoA pool in the peroxisome, F-type H(+)-transporting ATPases-based ATP production, V-type H(+)-transporting ATPases-based transmembrane transport, protein degradation, and alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Roles of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants in resistance to low and high Cu were defined. The backbone paths, signaling systems, and determinants that involve resistance of filamentous fungi to high Cu were determined, discussed and outlined in a model. PMID:26265593

  6. Identification and Functional Analysis of the Mycophenolic Acid Gene Cluster of Penicillium roqueforti.

    PubMed

    Del-Cid, Abdiel; Gil-Durán, Carlos; Vaca, Inmaculada; Rojas-Aedo, Juan F; García-Rico, Ramón O; Levicán, Gloria; Chávez, Renato

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium roqueforti is widely known as the ripening agent of blue-veined cheeses. Additionally, this fungus is able to produce several secondary metabolites, including the meroterpenoid compound mycophenolic acid (MPA). Cheeses ripened with P. roqueforti are usually contaminated with MPA. On the other hand, MPA is a commercially valuable immunosuppressant. However, to date the molecular basis of the production of MPA by P. roqueforti is still unknown. Using a bioinformatic approach, we have identified a genomic region of approximately 24.4 kbp containing a seven-gene cluster that may be involved in the MPA biosynthesis in P. roqueforti. Gene silencing of each of these seven genes (named mpaA, mpaB, mpaC, mpaDE, mpaF, mpaG and mpaH) resulted in dramatic reductions in MPA production, confirming that all of these genes are involved in the biosynthesis of the compound. Interestingly, the mpaF gene, originally described in P. brevicompactum as a MPA self-resistance gene, also exerts the same function in P. roqueforti, suggesting that this gene has a dual function in MPA metabolism. The knowledge of the biosynthetic pathway of MPA in P. roqueforti will be important for the future control of MPA contamination in cheeses and the improvement of MPA production for commercial purposes. PMID:26751579

  7. [Novel Enzyme Preparations with High Pectinase and Hemicellulase Activity Based on Penicillium canescens Strains].

    PubMed

    Rubtsova, E A; Bushina, E V; Rozhkova, A M; Korotkova, O G; Nemashkalov, V A; Koshelev, A V; Sinitsyn, A P

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant strains of Penicillium canescens producing homologous pectin lyase A and heterologous endo- 1,5-α-arabinase A and endo- 1,4-α-polygalacturonase, as well as enzymes of the host strain (α-L-arabinofuranosidases, xylanases, and others), were obtained by genetic engineering. The enzyme preparations (EPs) obtained from the cultural medium of recombinant P. canescens strains efficiently hydrolyzed raw plant material with a high content of pectin compounds. It was shown that the yield of reducing sugars and arabinose increased 16 and 22% in comparison with the control EP based on the host strain when one of the obtained EPs was used for beet pulp hydrolysis. It was established that the most active EP consisted of pectin lyase (10%), endo-1,5-arabinase (26%), α-L-arabinofuranosidase and arabinoxylan-arabinofuranohydrolase (12%), and xylanase (10%). The activities of pectin lyase, polygalacturonase, and arabinase of the EP in reactions with various substrates were determined. The specificity, pH and T-optima, and thermal stability of the homogenous recombinant endo- 1,5-α-arabinase were investigated. The kinetic parameters (K(m), K(cat)) of the linear arabinan hydrolysis were determined. PMID:26596087

  8. Influence of rhamnolipids and Triton X-100 on adsorption of phenol by Penicillium simplicissimum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhifeng; Zeng, Zhuotong; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Jianbing; Zhong, Hua; Yuan, Xingzhong; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Jiachao; Chen, Ming; Liu, Yuanyuan; Xie, Gengxin

    2012-04-01

    The effects of rhamnolipids and Triton X-100 on phenol adsorption by Penicillium simplicissimum were studied. The optimum pH was 7 for phenol adsorption by all the test biomasses. The adsorption of phenol at pH 7 by biomass pre-treated with 0.05% Triton X-100, 0.2% Triton X-100, 0.05% rhamnolipids and 0.005% rhamnolipids was 3.4, 2.7, 2.4, and 1.8-fold, respectively, that of untreated biomass. The pseudo-second-order model and the Freundlich isotherms described the adsorption processes better than the pseudo-first-order model and the Langmuir isotherms, respectively. The pre-treatments by surfactants increased the zeta potential and hydrophobicity of P. simplicissimum. Analysis of the cell surface by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, energy dispersive X-ray, and environmental scanning electron microscopy indicated that the pre-treatments by surfactants changed the cell surface functional groups, element concentrations and micrographs. The results indicated that surfactants can be potentially used to increase phenol adsorption. PMID:22326331

  9. The Mutation Breeding and Mutagenic Effect of Air Plasma on Penicillium Chrysogenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Fang; Wang, Hui; Wang, Peng; Liu, Hui; Cai, Xiaochun; Hu, Yihua; Yuan, Chengling; Zheng, Zhiming

    2012-04-01

    Low temperature air plasma was used as the mutation tool for penicillin-producing strain Penicillium chrysogenum. The discharge conditions were RF power of 360 W, temperature of 40°C in a sealed chamber, and pressure of 10 Pa to 30 Pa. The result showed that the kinetics of the survival rate followed a typical saddle-shaped curve. Based on a statistic analysis, at the treating duration of 10 min, the positive mutation rate was as high as 37.5% while the negative mutation rate was low. The colonial morphology changed obviously when the plasma treating duration reached or exceeded 45 min. After both primary and secondary screening, a mutant designated as aPc051310 with high productivity of penicillin was obtained, and a strong mutagenic effect on P. chrysogenum was observed in the process. It was proved that after five generations, the mutant aPc051310 still exhibits a high productivity. All the results prove that the plasma mutation method could be developed as a convenient and effective tool to breed high-yield strains in the fermentation industry, while expanding the plasm application at the same time.

  10. Deletion and Gene Expression Analyses Define the Paxilline Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Penicillium paxilli

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Barry; Young, Carolyn A.; Saikia, Sanjay; McMillan, Lisa K.; Monahan, Brendon J.; Koulman, Albert; Astin, Jonathan; Eaton, Carla J.; Bryant, Andrea; Wrenn, Ruth E.; Finch, Sarah C.; Tapper, Brian A.; Parker, Emily J.; Jameson, Geoffrey B.

    2013-01-01

    The indole-diterpene paxilline is an abundant secondary metabolite synthesized by Penicillium paxilli. In total, 21 genes have been identified at the PAX locus of which six have been previously confirmed to have a functional role in paxilline biosynthesis. A combination of bioinformatics, gene expression and targeted gene replacement analyses were used to define the boundaries of the PAX gene cluster. Targeted gene replacement identified seven genes, paxG, paxA, paxM, paxB, paxC, paxP and paxQ that were all required for paxilline production, with one additional gene, paxD, required for regular prenylation of the indole ring post paxilline synthesis. The two putative transcription factors, PP104 and PP105, were not co-regulated with the pax genes and based on targeted gene replacement, including the double knockout, did not have a role in paxilline production. The relationship of indole dimethylallyl transferases involved in prenylation of indole-diterpenes such as paxilline or lolitrem B, can be found as two disparate clades, not supported by prenylation type (e.g., regular or reverse). This paper provides insight into the P. paxilli indole-diterpene locus and reviews the recent advances identified in paxilline biosynthesis. PMID:23949005

  11. Characterization of the ice nucleation activity of an airborne Penicillium species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanova, Petya; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Pummer, Bernhard G.; Franc, Gary D.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2016-04-01

    Microorganisms are ubiquitous both on and above the Earth. Several bacterial and fungal spe-cies are the focus of atmospheric studies due to their ability to trigger ice formation at high subzero temperatures. Thus, they have potential to modify cloud albedo, lifetime and precipita-tion, and ultimately the hydrological cycle. Several fungal strains have already been identified as possessing ice nucleation (IN) activity, and recent studies have shown that IN active fungi are present in the cultivable community of air and soil samples [1, 2]. However, the abundance, diversity, and sources of fungal ice nuclei in the atmosphere are still poorly characterized. In this study, fungal colonies obtained from air samples were screened for IN activity in the droplet-freezing assay described in Fröhlich-Nowoisky et al., 2015 [2]. Out of 128 tested iso-lates, two were found to catalyze ice formation at temperatures up to -4°C. By DNA analysis, both isolates were classified as Penicillium spp. The freezing activity of both was further char-acterized after different filtration, heat, and enzymatic treatments in the temperature range from ‑4°C to ‑15°C. Preliminary results show that a proteinaceous compound is responsible for the IN activity. Furthermore, ongoing experiments indicate that the activity is associated only with the hyphae. [1] Huffman, et al. (2013): Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 6151-6164. [2] Fröhlich-Nowoisky et al. (2015): Biogeosciences, 12: 1057-1071.

  12. Novel small molecule 11β-HSD1 inhibitor from the endophytic fungus Penicillium commune.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weiguang; Chen, Xintao; Tong, Qingyi; Zhu, Hucheng; He, Yan; Lei, Liang; Xue, Yongbo; Yao, Guangmin; Luo, Zengwei; Wang, Jianping; Li, Hua; Zhang, Yonghui

    2016-01-01

    Two new phenone derivatives penicophenones A (1) and B (2), a new cyclic tetrapeptide penicopeptide A (3), and five known compounds were isolated from the culture broth of Penicillium commune, an endophytic fungus derived from Vitis vinifera. Compounds 1-3 were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analyses including 1D and 2D NMR and HRESIMS. The absolute configurations of 1 and 3 were determined by comparing its ECD with related molecules and modified Marfey's analysis, respectively. Penicophenone A (1) possesses a rare benzannulated 6,6-spiroketal moiety, which is a new member of the unusual structural class with peniphenone A as the representative. Compound 3 exhibited significant inhibition activities against 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) in vitro and showed strong binding affinity to 11β-HSD1. Moreover, compound 3 treatments decreased the lipid droplet accumulation associate with the inhibition of 11β-HSD1 expression in differentiate-induced 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Furthermore, the molecular docking demonstrated that compound 3 coordinated in the active site of 11β-HSD1 is essential for the ability of diminishing the enzyme activity. PMID:27194583

  13. Neurotoxicity of mycotoxins produced in vitro by Penicillium roqueforti isolated from maize and grass silage.

    PubMed

    Malekinejad, H; Aghazadeh-Attari, J; Rezabakhsh, A; Sattari, M; Ghasemsoltani-Momtaz, B

    2015-10-01

    Fungal growth in human foods and animal feeds causes profound damage indicating a general spoilage, nutritional losses, and the formation of mycotoxins. Thirty apparently contaminated maize and grass silage samples were analyzed for the presence of total fungi. Penicillium roqueforti were isolated from all (100%) moldy silage samples on general and selective culture media. Furthermore, P. roqueforti-positive samples culture media subjected to the toxin extraction and toxins of patulin, penicillic acid, mycophenolic acid, and roquefortin-C (ROQ-C) were identified by means of high-performance liquid chromatography method. Cytotoxicity of identified toxins was investigated on neuro-2a cells. Alamar blue reduction, neutral red uptake, and intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content assays indicated that patulin and ROQ-C exert the strongest and weakest toxicity, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by the toxins-exposed cells was measured, and the results supported the mitochondrial and lysosomal dysfunction and ATP depletion in exposed cells. Our data suggest that P. roqueforti is the widely present mold in analyzed maize and grass silage samples, which is able to produce toxins that cause neurotoxicity. This finding may explain in part some neuronal disorders in animals, which are fed contaminated feedstuffs with mentioned fungus. Moreover, mitochondrial and lysosomal dysfunction, intracellular ATP depletion, and the excessive ROS generation were found as the mechanisms of cytotoxicity for P. roqueforti-produced toxins. PMID:25743727

  14. Toxicity of penicillic acid for rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. [Aspergillus; Penicillium

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, W.G.; Simpson, J.

    1985-12-01

    Penicillic acid (PA) is a polyketide mycotoxin produced by several species of Aspergillus and Penicillium. This mycotoxin is toxic in experimental animals and has also been reported to be carcinogenic. The cytotoxicity of penicillic acid was studied in rat albeolar macrophages (AM) in vitro. The effects of penicillic acid on membrane integrity were studied by measuring cell volume changes and /sup 51/Cr release. There was a significant decrease in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in cell cultures exposed to 1.0 mM penicillic acid for 4 hr. Inhibition of the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)leucine into protein was both dose- and time-dependent and protein synthesis was inhibited significantly after 2 hr exposure to greater than or equal to0.1 mM penicillic acid. RNA synthesis was inhibited to a lesser extent than protein synthesis. There was significant inhibition of phagocytosis after 2 hr exposure at greater than or equal to0.3 mM penicillic acid and the ED/sub 50/ for phagocytosis was 0.09 mM. Thus phagocytosis was more sensitive to the toxic effects of penicillic acid than any other cellular process studied. The data suggest the possibility of a respiratory hazard to agricultural workers exposed to contaminated grain.

  15. Purification and full characterisation of citreoviridin produced by Penicillium citreonigrum in yeast extract sucrose (YES) medium.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Mariana Wagner; Resck, Inês Sabioni; Caldas, Eloisa Dutra

    2015-01-01

    The mycotoxin citreoviridin has been associated with the 'yellow rice' disease, which caused cardiac beriberi in Japan. In Brazil, the consumption of contaminated rice was suspected to be involved in a recent beriberi outbreak. In this work, citreoviridin was produced by Penicillium citreonigrum, cultivated in 500 ml yeast extract sucrose (YES) liquid medium for 8 days at 25ºC, and the toxin extracted with chloroform from the liquid medium and the mycelium. A total of 15.3 g of crude extract was obtained from 48 culture flasks, with an estimated citreoviridin contend of 5.54 g, 74.3% being present in the mycelia. Semi-preparative HPLC of the crude extract yielded 27.1% citreoviridin. The HPLC-purified citreoviridin fraction was fully characterised by UV/VIS, FT-IR, (1)H- and (13)C-NMR, LC-MS/MS and LC-MSD TOF, and purity confirmed by gravimetric analysis. Isocitreoviridin was also produced by P. citreonigrum, accounting for about 10% of the citreoviridin present in the crude extract, most transformed into citreoviridin after 10 months under freezing conditions protected from light. Citreoviridin was shown to be stable under the same conditions, although it can suffer isomerisation after a longer storage period. Isomerisation is a potential source of variability in toxicological studies and purity of the material should be checked before study initiation. PMID:25190053

  16. Some Properties of Acid Protease from the Thermophilic Fungus, Penicillium duponti K1014

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Hikotaka; Iwaasa, Takashi; Yokotsuka, Tamotsu

    1973-01-01

    A purified acid protease from a true thermophilic fungus, Penicillium duponti K1014, was most active at pH 2.5 for milk casein and at pH 3.0 for hemoglobin. The enzyme was stable at a pH range of 2.5 to 6.0 at 30 C for 20 h. The acid protease retained full activity after 1 h at 60 C at a pH range between 3.5 and 5.5. At the most stable pH of 4.5, more than 65% of its activity remained after heat treatment for 1 h at 70 C. These thermal properties show the enzyme as a thermophilic protein. The enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by sodium lauryl sulfate and oxidizing reagents such as potassium permanganate and N-bromosuccinimide. No inhibition was caused by chelating reagents, potato inhibitor, and those reagents which convert sulfhydryl groups to mercaptides. Reducing reagents showed an activating effect. The enzyme showed the trypsinogen-activating property at an acidic pH range; optimal trypsinogen activation was obtained at a pH of approximately 3.0. The isoelectric point of the enzyme was estimated to be pH 3.89 by disk electrofocusing. By using gel filtration, an approximate value of 41,000 was estimated for the molecular weight. PMID:4699217

  17. Efficacy of salicylic acid to reduce Penicillium expansum inoculum and preserve apple fruits.

    PubMed

    da Rocha Neto, Argus Cezar; Luiz, Caroline; Maraschin, Marcelo; Di Piero, Robson Marcelo

    2016-03-16

    Apples are among the most commonly consumed fruits worldwide. Blue mold (Penicillium expansum) is one of the major diseases in apples postharvest, leading to wide use of fungicides and the search for alternative products to control the pathogen. In this context, this study aimed to evaluate the potential of salicylic acid (SA) as an alternative product to control blue mold and to preserve the physicochemical characteristics of apple fruit postharvest. The antimicrobial effect of SA was determined both in vitro and in situ, by directly exposing conidia to solutions of different concentrations SA or by inoculating the fruit with P. expansum and treating them curatively, eradicatively, or preventively with a 2.5mM SA solution. The physiological effects of SA on fruit were determined by quantifying the weight loss, total soluble solids content, and titratable acidity. In addition, the accumulation of SA in the fruit was determined by HPLC. SA (2.5mM) inhibited 100% of fungal germination in vitro and also controlled blue mold in situ when applied eradicatively. In addition, HPLC analysis demonstrated that SA did not persist in apple fruit. SA also maintained the physicochemical characteristics of fruit of different quality categories. Thus, SA may be an alternative to the commercial fungicides currently used against P. expansum. PMID:26808096

  18. Statistical optimization of alkaline protease production from Penicillium citrinum YL-1 under solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun-Zhu; Wu, Duan-Kai; Zhao, Si-Yang; Lin, Wei-Min; Gao, Xiang-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Proteases from halotolerant and halophilic microorganisms were found in traditional Chinese fish sauce. In this study, 30 fungi were isolated from fermented fish sauce in five growth media based on their morphology. However, only one strain, YL-1, which was identified as Penicillium citrinum by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analysis, can produce alkaline protease. This study is the first to report that a protease-producing fungus strain was isolated and identified in traditional Chinese fish sauce. Furthermore, the culture conditions of alkaline protease production by P. citrinum YL-1 in solid-state fermentation were optimized by response surface methodology. First, three variables including peptone, initial pH, and moisture content were selected by Plackett-Burman design as the significant variables for alkaline protease production. The Box-Behnken design was then adopted to further investigate the interaction effects between the three variables on alkaline protease production and determine the optimal values of the variables. The maximal production (94.30 U/mL) of alkaline protease by P. citrinum YL-1 took place under the optimal conditions of peptone, initial pH, and moisture content (v/w) of 35.5 g/L, 7.73, and 136%, respectively. PMID:24840211

  19. Pyomelanin production in Penicillium chrysogenum is stimulated by L-tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Vasanthakumar, Archana; DeAraujo, Alice; Mazurek, Joy; Schilling, Michael; Mitchell, Ralph

    2015-06-01

    From a tomb in Upper Egypt we isolated a strain of Penicillium chrysogenum that was capable of producing brown pigment in vitro when grown in a minimal salts medium containing tyrosine. We present evidence that this pigment is a pyomelanin, a compound that is known to assist in the survival of some micro-organisms in adverse environments. We tested type strains of Pe. chrysogenum, which were also able to produce this pigment under similar conditions. Inhibitors of the DHN and DOPA melanin pathways were unable to inhibit the formation of the pigment. Fourier transform IR analysis indicated that this brown pigment is similar to pyomelanin. Pyrolysis-GC/MS revealed the presence of phenolic compounds. Using LC/MS, homogentisic acid, the monomeric precursor of pyomelanin, was detected in supernatants of Pe. chrysogenum cultures growing in tyrosine medium but not in cultures lacking tyrosine. Partial regions of the genes encoding two enzymes in the homogentisic acid pathway of tyrosine degradation were amplified. Data from reverse-transcription PCR demonstrated that hmgA transcription was increased in cultures grown in tyrosine medium, suggesting that tyrosine induced the transcription. PMID:25568259

  20. Bioethanol potentials of corn cob hydrolysed using cellulases of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium decumbens

    PubMed Central

    Saliu, Bolanle Kudirat; Sani, Alhassan

    2012-01-01

    Corn cob is a major component of agricultural and domestic waste in many parts of the world. It is composed mainly of cellulose which can be converted to energy in form of bioethanol as an efficient and effective means of waste management. Production of cellulolytic enzymes were induced in the fungi Aspergillus niger and Penicillium decumbens by growing them in mineral salt medium containing alkali pre-treated and untreated corn cobs. The cellulases were characterized and partially purified. Alkali pre-treated corn cobs were hydrolysed with the partially purified cellulases and the product of hydrolysis was fermented using the yeast saccharomyces cerevisae to ethanol. Cellulases of A. niger produced higher endoglucanase and exoglucanase activity (0.1698 IU ml-1 and 0.0461 FPU ml-1) compared to that produced by P. decumbens (0.1111 IU ml-1 and 0.153 FPU ml-1). Alkali pre-treated corn cob hydrolysed by cellulases of A. niger yielded 7.63 mg ml-1 sugar which produced 2.67 % (v/v) ethanol on fermentation. Ethanol yield of the hydrolysates of corn cob by cellulases of P. decumbens was much lower at 0.56 % (v/v). Alkali pre-treated corn cob, hydrolysed with cellulases of A. niger is established as suitable feedstock for bioethanol production.

  1. Effects of naled and dichlorvos on growth and production of Luteoskyrin byPenicillium islandicum.

    PubMed

    Tseng, H H; Tseng, T C

    1993-03-01

    Two organophosphorus insecticides, 1, 2-dibromo -2, 2-dichloroethyl dimethyl phosphate (naled) and dimethyl 2, 2 -dichlorovinyl phosphate (dichlorvos) were used for investigation of their effects on growth and production of luteoskyrin mycotoxin byPenicillium islandicum in various cultural media at 25°C for 30 days or 60 days. When the concentration of naled and dichlorvos in Czapek solution broth reached 5mg/50mL, growth and production of luteoskyrin by the fungus was completely inhibited. In unpolished rice medium, 15mg/50g of naled was required to retard fungal growth, while the concentration to inhibit the biosynthesis of luteoskyrin was 10mg/50g. On the other hand, if the medium contained dichlorvos at the level of 30mg/50g, the ability to produce luteoskyrin byP islandicum was significantly reduced. In the unhulled rice case, both naled and dichlorvos at the concentration of 15mg/50g were necessary to retard the fungal growth, and 1 mg/50g of each compound exhibits its ability to inhibit the toxin production. Furthermore, it was also found when the cultural medium contained only small amounts of naled and dichlorvos [0.5mg/50g (mL)] the capability to synthesize luteoskyrin by the fungus was drastically reduced. These data strongly suggest that both naled and dichlorvos have similar ability to inhibit luteoskyrin biosynthesis byP islandicum and are also able to retard the fungal growth. PMID:23606065

  2. 1-Octanol, a self-inhibitor of spore germination in Penicillium camemberti.

    PubMed

    Gillot, Guillaume; Decourcelle, Nicolas; Dauer, Gaëlle; Barbier, Georges; Coton, Emmanuel; Delmail, David; Mounier, Jérôme

    2016-08-01

    Penicillium camemberti is a technologically relevant fungus used to manufacture mold-ripened cheeses. This fungal species produces many volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including ammonia, methyl-ketones, alcohols and esters. Although it is now well known that VOCs can act as signaling molecules, nothing is known about their involvement in P. camemberti lifecycle. In this study, spore germination was shown to be self-regulated by quorum sensing in P. camemberti. This phenomenon, also called "crowding effect", is population-dependent (i.e. observed at high population densities). After determining the volatile nature of the compounds involved in this process, 1-octanol was identified as the main compound produced at high-spore density using GC-MS. Its inhibitory effect was confirmed in vitro and 3 mM 1-octanol totally inhibited spore germination while 100 μM only transiently inhibited spore germination. This is the first time that self-inhibition of spore germination is demonstrated in P. camemberti. The obtained results provide interesting perspectives for better control of mold-ripened cheese processes. PMID:27052695

  3. Paths and determinants for Penicillium janthinellum to resist low and high copper

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Guo-Li; Sun, Xue-Zhe; Fan, Xian-Wei; You-Zhi, Li

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) tolerance was well understood in fungi yeasts but not in filamentous fungi. Filamentous fungi are eukaryotes but unlike eukaryotic fungi yeasts, which are a collection of various fungi that are maybe classified into different taxa but all characterized by growth as filamentous hyphae cells and with a complex morphology. The current knowledge of Cu resistance of filamentous fungi is still fragmental and therefore needs to be bridged. In this study, we characterized Cu resistance of Penicillium janthinellum strain GXCR and its Cu-resistance-decreasing mutants (EC-6 and UC-8), and conducted sequencing of a total of 6 transcriptomes from wild-type GXCR and mutant EC-6 grown under control and external Cu. Taken all the results together, Cu effects on the basal metabolism were directed to solute transport by two superfamilies of solute carrier and major facilitator, the buffering free CoA and Acyl-CoA pool in the peroxisome, F-type H+-transporting ATPases-based ATP production, V-type H+-transporting ATPases-based transmembrane transport, protein degradation, and alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Roles of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants in resistance to low and high Cu were defined. The backbone paths, signaling systems, and determinants that involve resistance of filamentous fungi to high Cu were determined, discussed and outlined in a model. PMID:26265593

  4. Identification and functional characterization of Penicillium marneffei pleiotropic drug resistance transporters ABC1 and ABC2.

    PubMed

    Panapruksachat, Siribun; Iwatani, Shun; Oura, Takahiro; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Chindamporn, Ariya; Niimi, Kyoko; Niimi, Masakazu; Lamping, Erwin; Cannon, Richard D; Kajiwara, Susumu

    2016-07-01

    Penicilliosis caused by the dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei is an endemic, AIDS-defining illness and, after tuberculosis and cryptococcosis, the third most common opportunistic infection of AIDS patients in tropical Southeast Asia. Untreated, patients have poor prognosis; however, primary amphotericin B treatment followed by prolonged itraconazole prophylaxis is effective. To identify ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that may play a role in potential multidrug resistance of P. marneffei, we identified and classified all 46 P. marneffei ABC transporters from the genome sequence. PmABC1 and PmABC2 were most similar to the archetype Candida albicans multidrug efflux pump gene CDR1. P. marneffei Abc1p (PmAbc1p) was functionally expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, although at rather low levels, and correctly localized to the plasma membrane, causing cells to be fourfold to eightfold more resistant to azoles and many other xenobiotics than untransformed cells. P. marneffei Abc2p (PmAbc2p) was expressed at similarly low levels, but it had no efflux activity and did not properly localize to the plasma membrane. Interestingly, PmAbc1p mislocalized and lost its transport activity when cells were shifted to 37 °C. We conclude that expression of PmAbc1p in S. cerevisiae confers resistance to several xenobiotics indicating that PmAbc1p may be a multidrug efflux pump. PMID:26782644

  5. Alteration of Acrylonitrile-Methylacrylate-Butadiene Terpolymer by Nocardia rhodochrous and Penicillium notatum†

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, A. D.; Dean, A. V.; Gilbert, S. G.

    1980-01-01

    [14C]Barex-210, a terpolymer of acrylonitrile, methylacrylate, and butadiene, was tested for bioconversion. Powdered samples of polymer, each specifically 14C labeled at different carbon atoms of the polymer, were incubated with either Nocardia rhodochrous or Penicillium notatum in an enriched growth medium for various periods of time. After 6 months of incubation, the 14C-labeled polymer was transformed from a high-molecular-weight material completely soluble in dimethyl formamide (DMF) into both a lower-molecular-weight form still soluble in DMF and a second form that was no longer soluble in DMF. The amount of 14C-labeled carbon atoms converted into DMF-insoluble material was 8% of the backbone carbon-carbon atoms and 12% of the side-chain nitrile and acrylate atoms from the acrylonitrile-methylacrylate copolymer and 60% of the elastomer (acrylonitrile-butadiene copolymer) atoms. Metabolism of the polymer was not established from measurements of metabolic 14CO2. Evolution of 14CO2 amounted to only 0.3, 0.6, 1.8, and 3.3% of these four fractions, respectively. Although the transformation of high-molecular-weight polymer into DMF-insoluble material was rapid in the early stages of microbial growth, the accompanying CO2 evolution was much slower. Further evidence of polymer alteration was indicated by the infrared spectrum of the insoluble material, which showed a disappearance of the nitrile and methylacrylate peaks. PMID:16345541

  6. Role of Cannomys badius as a Natural Animal Host of Penicillium marneffei in India

    PubMed Central

    Gugnani, Harish; Fisher, Matthew C.; Paliwal-Johsi, Anubha; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Singh, Irabanta; Yadav, Pratap Singh

    2004-01-01

    Infection by Penicillium marneffei in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients in India has recently been described; the aim of our study was to survey wild rodents and their associated environment in order to identify the natural populations of this fungus. Surveys recovered P. marneffei from the internal organs of 10 (9.1%) of 110 bamboo rats (Cannomys badius) examined from Manipur state, India, an area endemic for penicilliosis marneffei. Identification of the isolates was based on a detailed study of their morphological characteristics, in vitro conversion to fission yeast form, and exoantigen tests. Multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT) of the isolates revealed five genotypes. No genotypes were shared between sample sites, and all bamboo rats were infected with a single genotype within sample sites, demonstrating spatial genetic heterogeneity. One MLMT genotype was identical to that seen in a human isolate, suggesting that either coinfection from a common source or host-to-host transmission had occurred. This demonstrates the utility of an MLMT-based approach to elucidating the epidemiology of P. marneffei. PMID:15528698

  7. Novel mutations in CYP51B from Penicillium digitatum involved in prochloraz resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinlong; Yu, Jinhui; Liu, Jing; Yuan, Yongze; Li, Na; He, Muqing; Qi, Ting; Hui, Geng; Xiong, Li; Liu, Deli

    2014-09-01

    Green mold caused by Penicillium digitatum is one of the most serious postharvest diseases of citrus fruit, and it is ubiquitous in all citrus growing regions in the world. Sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) is one of the key enzymes of sterol biosynthesis in the biological kingdom and a prime target of antifungal drugs. Mutations in CYP51s have been found to be correlated with resistance to azole fungicides in many fungal species. To investigate the mechanism of resistance to prochloraz (PRC) in P. digitatum, the PRC sensitivity was determined in vitro in this study to assess the sensitivity of 78 P. digitatum isolates collected in Hubei province. The results showed that 25 isolates were prochloraz-resistant (PRC-R), including six high-resistant (HR) strains, twelve medium-resistant (MR) and seven low-resistant (LR) strains. A sequence analysis showed no consistent point mutations of PdCYP51A in the PRC-R strains, but four substitutions of CYP51B were found, Q309H in LR strains, Y136H and Q309H in HR strains, and G459S and F506I in MR strains, which corresponded to the four sensitivity levels. Based on the sequence alignment analysis and homology modeling followed by the molecular docking of the PdCYP51B protein, the potential correlation between the mutations and PRC resistance is proposed. PMID:25085733

  8. Antifungal activity of salicylic acid against Penicillium expansum and its possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    da Rocha Neto, Argus Cezar; Maraschin, Marcelo; Di Piero, Robson Marcelo

    2015-12-23

    Apple is a fruit widely produced and consumed around the world. Blue mold (Penicillium expansum) is one of the main postharvest diseases in apples, leading to a wide use of fungicides and the search for alternative products. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of salicylic acid (SA) against P. expansum, elucidating its mechanisms of action. The antimicrobial effect was determined by exposing conidia to a 2.5 mM SA solution for 0 to 120 min, followed by incubation. The effect of pH on the efficacy of SA against P. expansum was assessed both in vitro and in situ. The action mechanisms were investigated through fluorescence assays, measurement of protein leakage, lipid damage, and transmission electronic microscopy. SA was capable of inhibiting 90% of the fungal germination after 30 min, causing damage to the conidial plasma membrane and leading to protein leakage up to 3.2 μg of soluble protein per g of mycelium. The pH of the SA solution affected the antimicrobial activity of this secondary metabolite, which inhibited the germination of P. expansum and the blue mold incidence in apples in solutions with pH≤3 by 100%, gradually losing its activity at higher pH. PMID:26340673

  9. Organic Acid Excretion in Penicillium ochrochloron Increases with Ambient pH

    PubMed Central

    Vrabl, Pamela; Fuchs, Viktoria; Pichler, Barbara; Schinagl, Christoph W.; Burgstaller, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Despite being of high biotechnological relevance, many aspects of organic acid excretion in filamentous fungi like the influence of ambient pH are still insufficiently understood. While the excretion of an individual organic acid may peak at a certain pH value, the few available studies investigating a broader range of organic acids indicate that total organic acid excretion rises with increasing external pH. We hypothesized that this phenomenon might be a general response of filamentous fungi to increased ambient pH. If this is the case, the observation should be widely independent of the organism, growth conditions, or experimental design and might therefore be a crucial key point in understanding the function and mechanisms of organic acid excretion in filamentous fungi. In this study we explored this hypothesis using ammonium-limited chemostat cultivations (pH 2–7), and ammonium or phosphate-limited bioreactor batch cultivations (pH 5 and 7). Two strains of Penicillium ochrochloron were investigated differing in the spectrum of excreted organic acids. Confirming our hypothesis, the main result demonstrated that organic acid excretion in P. ochrochloron was enhanced at high external pH levels compared to low pH levels independent of the tested strain, nutrient limitation, and cultivation method. We discuss these findings against the background of three hypotheses explaining organic acid excretion in filamentous fungi, i.e., overflow metabolism, charge balance, and aggressive acidification hypothesis. PMID:22493592

  10. Purification and characterization of an extracellular alkaline phosphatase from Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Politino, M; Brown, J; Usher, J J

    1996-01-01

    An extracellular alkaline phosphatase from Penicillium chrysogenum was purified to homogeneity using DEAE ion-exchange chromatography and size exclusion chromatography. SDS-PAGE of the purified enzyme indicated a molecular weight of 58,000. The mobility of the native enzyme on a Superose 12 column suggests that the active form of the enzyme is a monomer. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphate from a variety of substrates including p-nitrophenyl phosphate, alpha-naphthyl phosphate and the anti-tumor compound etoposide phosphate. The apparent K(m) for the substrate p-nitrophenyl phosphate is 1.3 mM and the enzyme is inhibited by inorganic phosphate. The pH optimum of the enzyme is 9.0 with a broad optimal temperature range between 40 and 50 degrees C. The isoelectric point of the enzyme is approximately 5.5. The enzyme is a glycoprotein; digestion with endoglycosidase H indicates that the protein consists primarily of N-linked carbohydrates. Enzymatic activity is enhanced by the addition of divalent cations such as Mg+2 and Mn+2 and inhibited by addition of a chelator such as EDTA suggesting a metal ion requirement. The enzyme was found to be an inexpensive catalyst for the conversion of etoposide phosphate to etoposide in the manufacture of this anti-tumor compound. PMID:8958566

  11. [Construction of Producers of Cellulolytic and Pectinolytic Enzymes Based on the Fungus Penicillium verruculosum].

    PubMed

    Bushina, E V; Rubtsova, E A; Rozhkova, A M; Sinitsyna, O A; Koshelev, A V; Matys, V Yu; Nemashkalov, V A; Sinitsyn, A P

    2015-01-01

    Based on the fungus Penicillium verruculosum, we created strains with a complex of extracellular enzymes that contains both cellulolytic enzymes of the fungus and heterologous pectin lyase A from P. canescens and endo- 1,4-α-polygalacturonase from Aspergillus niger. The endopolygalacturonase and pectin lyase activities of enzyme preparations obtained from culture media of the producer strains reached 46-53 U/mg of protein and 1.3-2.3 U/mg of protein, respectively. The optimal temperature and pH values for recombinant pectin lyase and endopolygalacturonase corresponded to those described in the literature for these enzymes. The content of heterologous endopolygalacturonase and pectin lyase in the studied enzyme preparations was 4-5% and 23% of the total protein content, respectively. The yield of reducing sugars upon the hydrolysis of sugar beet and apple processing wastes with the most efficient preparation was 41 and 71 g/L, respectively, which corresponded to a polysaccharide conversion of 49% and 65%. Glucose was the main product of the hydrolysis of sugar beet and apple processing wastes. PMID:26353405

  12. Improvement of submerged culture conditions to produce colorants by Penicillium purpurogenum.

    PubMed

    Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria Carvalho; Roberto, Inês Conceição; Teixeira, Maria Francisca Simas; Pessoa, Adalberto

    2014-01-01

    Safety issues related to the employment of synthetic colorants in different industrial segments have increased the interest in the production of colorants from natural sources, such as microorganisms. Improved cultivation technologies have allowed the use of microorganisms as an alternative source of natural colorants. The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of some factors on natural colorants production by a recently isolated from Amazon Forest, Penicillium purpurogenum DPUA 1275 employing statistical tools. To this purpose the following variables: orbital stirring speed, pH, temperature, sucrose and yeast extract concentrations and incubation time were studied through two fractional factorial, one full factorial and a central composite factorial designs. The regression analysis pointed out that sucrose and yeast extract concentrations were the variables that influenced more in colorants production. Under the best conditions (yeast extract concentration around 10 g/L and sucrose concentration of 50 g/L) an increase of 10, 33 and 23% respectively to yellow, orange and red colorants absorbance was achieved. These results show that P. purpurogenum is an alternative colorants producer and the production of these biocompounds can be improved employing statistical tool. PMID:25242965

  13. Improvement of submerged culture conditions to produce colorants by Penicillium purpurogenum

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria Carvalho; Roberto, Inês Conceição; Teixeira, Maria Francisca Simas; Pessoa, Adalberto

    2014-01-01

    Safety issues related to the employment of synthetic colorants in different industrial segments have increased the interest in the production of colorants from natural sources, such as microorganisms. Improved cultivation technologies have allowed the use of microorganisms as an alternative source of natural colorants. The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of some factors on natural colorants production by a recently isolated from Amazon Forest, Penicillium purpurogenum DPUA 1275 employing statistical tools. To this purpose the following variables: orbital stirring speed, pH, temperature, sucrose and yeast extract concentrations and incubation time were studied through two fractional factorial, one full factorial and a central composite factorial designs. The regression analysis pointed out that sucrose and yeast extract concentrations were the variables that influenced more in colorants production. Under the best conditions (yeast extract concentration around 10 g/L and sucrose concentration of 50 g/L) an increase of 10, 33 and 23% respectively to yellow, orange and red colorants absorbance was achieved. These results show that P. purpurogenum is an alternative colorants producer and the production of these biocompounds can be improved employing statistical tool. PMID:25242965

  14. Production, purification and characterization of an exo-polygalacturonase from Penicillium janthinellum sw09.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuping; Sun, Siwen; Hao, Hui; Xu, Chunping

    2016-01-01

    A soil isolate, Penicillium janthinellum sw09 has been found to produce significant amounts of an extracellular pectinase subsequently characterized as exo-polygalacturonase (exo-PG). By optimizing growth conditions, P. janthinellum sw09 produced high amount of exo-PG (16.54 units/mL). The crude enzyme was purified by gel filtration chromatography and two exo-PG activity peaks (designated as PGI and PGII) were revealed. On SDS-PAGE analysis, purified PGII using DEAE-Sepharose FF column, was found to be a single band with a molecular mass of 66.2 kDa. The purified PGII exhibited maximal activity at the temperature of 45 oC and pH 5.0. The stability profiles show that PGII is more stable in the pH range of 4.0-8.0 and below 60 oC. The Km and Vmax for the enzyme was 1.74 mg/mL and 18.08 μmol/ (mL•min), respectively. Due to this enzymatic characterization, this pectinase is an attractive candidate for applications in degradation of pectin. PMID:27142550

  15. A taxonomic review of Penicillium species producing conidiophores with solitary phialides, classified in section Torulomyces.

    PubMed

    Visagie, C M; Houbraken, J; Dijksterhuis, J; Seifert, K A; Jacobs, K; Samson, R A

    2016-06-01

    The genus Torulomyces was characterised by species that typically have conidiophores consisting of solitary phialides that produce long chains of conidia connected by disjunctors. Based on the phylogenetic position of P. lagena (generic ex-neotype), the genus and its seven species were transferred to Penicillium and classified in sect. Torulomyces along with P. cryptum and P. lassenii. The aim of this study was to review the species currently classified in sect. Torulomyces using morphology and phylogenies of the ITS, BenA, CaM and RPB2 regions. Based on our results, we accept 16 species in sect. Torulomyces, including 12 new species described as P. aeris, P. austricola, P. cantabricum, P. catalonicum, P. oregonense, P. marthae-christenseniae, P. riverlandense, P. tubakianum, P. variratense, P. williamettense, P. wisconsinense and P. wollemiicola. In addition, we reclassify P. laeve and P. ovatum in sect. Exilicaulis and correct the typification of P. lagena. We provide descriptions and notes on the identification of the species. PMID:27616790

  16. Isolation, characterization and antifungal docking studies of wortmannin isolated from Penicillium radicum

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vineeta; Praveen, Vandana; Tripathi, Divya; Haque, Shafiul; Somvanshi, Pallavi; Katti, S. B.; Tripathi, C. K. M.

    2015-01-01

    During the search for a potent antifungal drug, a cell-permeable metabolite was isolated from a soil isolate taxonomically identified as Penicillium radicum. The strain was found to be a potent antifungal agent. Production conditions of the active compound were optimized and the active compound was isolated, purified, characterized and identified as a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, commonly known as wortmannin (Wtmn). This is very first time we are reporting the production of Wtmn from P. radicum. In addition to its previously discovered anticancer properties, the broad spectrum antifungal property of Wtmn was re-confirmed using various fungal strains. Virtual screening was performed through molecular docking studies against potential antifungal targets, and it was found that Wtmn was predicted to impede the actions of these targets more efficiently than known antifungal compounds such as voriconazole and nikkomycin i.e. 1) mevalonate-5-diphosphate decarboxylase (1FI4), responsible for sterol/isoprenoid biosynthesis; 2) exocyst complex component SEC3 (3A58) where Rho- and phosphoinositide-dependent localization is present and 3) Kre2p/Mnt1p a Golgi alpha1,2-mannosyltransferase (1S4N) involved in the biosynthesis of yeast cell wall glycoproteins). We conclude that Wtmn produced from P. radicum is a promising lead compound which could be potentially used as an efficient antifungal drug in the near future after appropriate structural modifications to reduce toxicity and improve stability. PMID:26159770

  17. Penicillinolide A: A New Anti-Inflammatory Metabolite from the Marine Fungus Penicillium sp. SF-5292

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Ko, Wonmin; Quang, Tran Hong; Kim, Kyoung-Su; Sohn, Jae Hak; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ahn, Jong Seog; Kim, Youn-Chul; Oh, Hyuncheol

    2013-01-01

    In the course of studies on bioactive metabolites from marine fungi, a new 10-membered lactone, named penicillinolide A (1) was isolated from the organic extract of Penicillium sp. SF-5292 as a potential anti-inflammatory compound. The structure of penicillinolide A (1) was mainly determined by analysis of NMR and MS data and Mosher’s method. Penicillinolide A (1) inhibited the production of NO and PGE2 due to inhibition of the expression of iNOS and COX-2. Penicillinolide A (1) also reduced TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production, and these anti-inflammatory effects were shown to be correlated with the suppression of the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α, NF-κB nuclear translocation, and NF-κB DNA binding activity. In addition, using inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), a competitive inhibitor of HO activity, it was verified that the inhibitory effects of compound 1 on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and NF-κB DNA binding activity were partially associated with HO-1 expression through Nrf2 nuclear translocation. PMID:24225730

  18. Decolorization of different textile dyes by Penicillium simplicissimum and toxicity evaluation after fungal treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bergsten-Torralba, L.R.; Nishikawa, M.M.; Baptista, D.F.; Magalhães, D.P.; da Silva, M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the capacity of decolorization and detoxification of the textile dyes Reactive Red 198 (RR198), Reactive Blue 214 (RB214), Reactive Blue 21 (RB21) and the mixture of the three dyes (MXD) by Penicillium simplicissimum INCQS 40211. The dye RB21, a phthalocyanine, was totally decolorized in 2 days, and the others, the monoazo RR198, the diazo RB214 and MXD were decolorized after 7 days by P. simplicissimum. Initially the dye decolorization involved dye adsorption by the biomass followed by degradation. The acute toxicity after fungal treatment was monitored with the microcrustacean Daphnia pulex and measured through Effective Concentration 50% (EC50). P. simplicissimum reduced efficiently the toxicity of RB21 from moderately acutely toxic to minor acutely toxic and it also reduced the toxicity of RB214 and MXD, which remained minor acutely toxic. Nevertheless, the fungus increased the toxicity of RR198 despite of the reduction of MXD toxicity, which included this dye. Thus, P. simplicissimum INCQS 40211 was efficient to decolorize different textile dyes and the mixture of them with a significant reduction of their toxicity. In addition this investigation also demonstrated the need of toxicological assays associated to decolorization experiments. PMID:24031428

  19. Functional diversity and properties of multiple xylanases from Penicillium oxalicum GZ-2.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hanpeng; Zheng, Haiping; Li, Shuixian; Wei, Zhong; Mei, Xinlan; Ma, Hongyu; Shen, Qirong; Xu, Yangchun

    2015-01-01

    A multiple xylanase system with high levels of xylanase activity produced from Penicillium oxalicum GZ-2 using agricultural waste as a substrate has been previously reported. However, the eco-physiological properties and origin of the multiplicity of xylanases remain unclear. In the present study, eight active bands were detected using zymography, and all bands were identified as putative xylanases using MALDI-TOF-MS/MS. These putative xylanases are encoded by six different xylanase genes. To evaluate the functions and eco-physiological properties of xylanase genes, xyn10A, xyn11A, xyn10B and xyn11B were expressed in Pichia pastoris. The recombinant enzymes xyn10A and xyn10B belong to the glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 10 xylanases, while xyn11A and xyn11B belong to GH11 xylanases. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant proteins revealed that all enzymes exhibited xylanase activity against xylans but with different substrate specificities, properties and kinetic parameters. These results demonstrated that the production of multiple xylanases in P. oxalicum GZ-2 was attributed to the genetic redundancy of xylanases and the post-translational modifications, providing insight into a more diverse xylanase system for the efficient degradation of complex hemicelluloses. PMID:26224514

  20. Functional diversity and properties of multiple xylanases from Penicillium oxalicum GZ-2

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hanpeng; Zheng, Haiping; Li, Shuixian; Wei, Zhong; Mei, Xinlan; Ma, Hongyu; Shen, Qirong; Xu, Yangchun

    2015-01-01

    A multiple xylanase system with high levels of xylanase activity produced from Penicillium oxalicum GZ-2 using agricultural waste as a substrate has been previously reported. However, the eco-physiological properties and origin of the multiplicity of xylanases remain unclear. In the present study, eight active bands were detected using zymography, and all bands were identified as putative xylanases using MALDI-TOF-MS/MS. These putative xylanases are encoded by six different xylanase genes. To evaluate the functions and eco-physiological properties of xylanase genes, xyn10A, xyn11A, xyn10B and xyn11B were expressed in Pichia pastoris. The recombinant enzymes xyn10A and xyn10B belong to the glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 10 xylanases, while xyn11A and xyn11B belong to GH11 xylanases. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant proteins revealed that all enzymes exhibited xylanase activity against xylans but with different substrate specificities, properties and kinetic parameters. These results demonstrated that the production of multiple xylanases in P. oxalicum GZ-2 was attributed to the genetic redundancy of xylanases and the post-translational modifications, providing insight into a more diverse xylanase system for the efficient degradation of complex hemicelluloses. PMID:26224514

  1. Patulin is a cultivar-dependent aggressiveness factor favouring the colonization of apples by Penicillium expansum.

    PubMed

    Snini, Selma P; Tannous, Joanna; Heuillard, Pauline; Bailly, Sylviane; Lippi, Yannick; Zehraoui, Enric; Barreau, Christian; Oswald, Isabelle P; Puel, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    The blue mould decay of apples is caused by Penicillium expansum and is associated with contamination by patulin, a worldwide regulated mycotoxin. Recently, a cluster of 15 genes (patA-patO) involved in patulin biosynthesis was identified in P. expansum. blast analysis revealed that patL encodes a Cys6 zinc finger regulatory factor. The deletion of patL caused a drastic decrease in the expression of all pat genes, leading to an absence of patulin production. Pathogenicity studies performed on 13 apple varieties indicated that the PeΔpatL strain could still infect apples, but the intensity of symptoms was weaker compared with the wild-type strain. A lower growth rate was observed in the PeΔpatL strain when this strain was grown on nine of the 13 apple varieties tested. In the complemented PeΔpatL:patL strain, the ability to grow normally in apple and the production of patulin were restored. Our results clearly demonstrate that patulin is not indispensable in the initiation of the disease, but acts as a cultivar-dependent aggressiveness factor for P. expansum. This conclusion was strengthened by the fact that the addition of patulin to apple infected by the PeΔpatL mutant restored the normal fungal colonization in apple. PMID:26582186

  2. Detection of specific antibodies to an antigenic mannoprotein for diagnosis of Penicillium marneffei penicilliosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, L; Chen, D L; Lee, C; Chan, C M; Chan, K M; Vanittanakom, N; Tsang, D N; Yuen, K Y

    1998-10-01

    The disseminated and progressive fungal disease Penicillium marneffei penicilliosis is one of the most common infectious diseases in AIDS patients in Southeast Asia. To diagnose systemic penicilliosis, we developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based antibody test with Mp1p, a purified recombinant antigenic mannoprotein of P. marneffei. Evaluation of the test with guinea pig sera against P. marneffei and other pathogenic fungi indicated that this assay was specific for P. marneffei. Clinical evaluation revealed that high levels of specific antibody were detected in two immunocompetent penicilliosis patients. Furthermore, approximately 80% (14 of 17) of the documented penicilliosis patients with human immunodeficiency virus tested positive for the specific antibody. No false-positive results were found for serum samples from 90 healthy blood donors, 20 patients with typhoid fever, and 55 patients with tuberculosis, indicating a high specificity of the test. Thus, this ELISA-based test for the detection of anti-Mp1p antibody can be of significant value as a diagnostic for penicilliosis. PMID:9738061

  3. Bioaccumulation of Cu-complex reactive dye by growing pellets of Penicillium oxalicum and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xin, Baoping; Chen, Gang; Zheng, Wenchai

    2010-06-01

    In this paper bioaccumulation of Cu-complex reactive dye by growing pellets of Penicillium oxalicum and its mechanism was investigated. Shaking flasks experiment showed that 99.7% of dye removal at 400 mg/l was attained after 48 h contact. Column reactor experiment showed that air lift ferment tower was a suitable reactor for both pellets formation and dye bioaccumulation. Repeated inoculation of the dye-loaded pellets accelerated dye bioaccumulation, leading to complete dye removal within 12 h. Dye initially was adsorbed on surface of cell, followed by penetration into cytoplasm. During bioaccumulation, mycelium expanded unevenly and thickened locally in diameter, generating a chain of spindles along the mycelium. In addition, the cell walls grew loose and thickened remarkably, being 4-5 folds as thick as the control one. The loose cell wall may offer both dye accumulation space and route way for dye to enter cytoplasm. There were certain unknown active matters in cytoplasm, which played an important role in dye accumulation. Desorption experiments suggested that electrostatic attraction was mainly attributed to the dye bioaccumulation. PMID:20421123

  4. The nonylphenol biodegradation study by estuary sediment-derived fungus Penicillium simplicissimum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Liu, Ying; Dong, Han; Li, Xianguo; Zhang, Dahai

    2016-08-01

    Nonylphenols (NPs) are persistent organic pollutants (POPs) with estrogenic properties that can perform endocrine-disrupting activities. By using high-concentration NP as environmental selection pressure, one NP biodegradation strain named NPF-4 was isolated and purified from estuary sediment of the Moshui River. It was identified as Penicillium simplicissimum (PS1) by appearance and 18S rDNA analysis. In different culture situations, the strain mass growth and biodegradation ability were evaluated. Within 4-n-nonylphenol (4-n-NP) initial concentration of 20 mg L(-1), it could be degraded 53.76, 90.08, and 100.00 % at 3, 7, and 14 days, respectively. In feeding experiments, it showed that NPF-4 could use 4-n-NP as a sole carbon source. Based on seven products/intermediates detected with GC and LC-MS, a novel biopathway for 4-n-NP biodegradation was proposed, in which sequential hydroxylation, oxidation, and decarboxylation at terminal β-C atom may occur for 4-n-NP detoxification, even complete mineralization in the end. PMID:27094271

  5. Identification and functional analysis of Penicillium digitatum genes putatively involved in virulence towards citrus fruit.

    PubMed

    López-Pérez, Mario; Ballester, Ana-Rosa; González-Candelas, Luis

    2015-04-01

    The fungus Penicillium digitatum, the causal agent of green mould rot, is the most destructive post-harvest pathogen of citrus fruit in Mediterranean regions. In order to identify P. digitatum genes up-regulated during the infection of oranges that may constitute putative virulence factors, we followed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA macroarray hybridization approach. The origin of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was determined by comparison against the available genome sequences of both organisms. Genes coding for fungal proteases and plant cell wall-degrading enzymes represent the largest categories in the subtracted cDNA library. Northern blot analysis of a selection of P. digitatum genes, including those coding for proteases, cell wall-related enzymes, redox homoeostasis and detoxification processes, confirmed their up-regulation at varying time points during the infection process. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation was used to generate knockout mutants for two genes encoding a pectin lyase (Pnl1) and a naphthalene dioxygenase (Ndo1). Two independent P. digitatum Δndo1 mutants were as virulent as the wild-type. However, the two Δpnl1 mutants analysed were less virulent than the parental strain or an ectopic transformant. Together, these results provide a significant advance in our understanding of the putative determinants of the virulence mechanisms of P. digitatum. PMID:25099378

  6. Fertility depression among cheese-making Penicillium roqueforti strains suggests degeneration during domestication.

    PubMed

    Ropars, Jeanne; Lo, Ying-Chu; Dumas, Emilie; Snirc, Alodie; Begerow, Dominik; Rollnik, Tanja; Lacoste, Sandrine; Dupont, Joëlle; Giraud, Tatiana; López-Villavicencio, Manuela

    2016-09-01

    Genetic differentiation occurs when gene flow is prevented, due to reproductive barriers or asexuality. Investigating the early barriers to gene flow is important for understanding the process of speciation. Here, we therefore investigated reproductive isolation between different genetic clusters of the fungus Penicillium roqueforti, used for maturing blue cheeses, and also occurring as food spoiler or in silage. We investigated premating and postmating fertility between and within three genetic clusters (two from cheese and one from other substrates), and we observed sexual structures under scanning electron microscopy. All intercluster types of crosses showed some fertility, suggesting that no intersterility has evolved between domesticated and wild populations despite adaptation to different environments and lack of gene flow. However, much lower fertility was found in crosses within the cheese clusters than within the noncheese cluster, suggesting reduced fertility of cheese strains, which may constitute a barrier to gene flow. Such degeneration may be due to bottlenecks during domestication and/or to the exclusive clonal replication of the strains in industry. This study shows that degeneration has occurred rapidly and independently in two lineages of a domesticated species. Altogether, these results inform on the processes and tempo of degeneration and speciation. PMID:27470007

  7. A Simple Route for Purifying Extracellular Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)-depolymerase from Penicillium pinophilum.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidou, Elpiniki; Konidaris, Constantinos; Baklavaridis, Apostolos; Zuburtikudis, Ioannis; Achilias, Dimitris; Mitlianga, Paraskevi

    2014-01-01

    This work proposes the purification of an active and efficient enzyme, extracellular poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)-depolymerase, suitable for industrial applications. This is achieved by the application of an easy, fast, and cheap route, skipping the chromatography step. Chromatography with one or two columns is a common step in the purification procedure, which however renders the isolation of the enzyme a time consuming and an expensive process. A strain of the fungus Penicillium pinophilum (ATCC 9644) is used for the isolation of extracellular PHB-depolymerase. The molecular weight of the purified enzyme is about 35 kDa and is estimated by gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE, 12% polyacrylamide). The enzymatic activity of the isolated enzyme is determined to be 3.56-fold similar to that found by other researchers that have used chromatography for the isolation. The as-isolated enzyme disintegrates the poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) films successfully, as it is demonstrated by the biodegradation test results provided here. PMID:25328684

  8. Patulin distribution in Fuji and Golden apples contaminated with Penicillium expansum.

    PubMed

    Marín, S; Morales, H; Hasan, H A H; Ramos, A J; Sanchis, V

    2006-12-01

    This work assesses the extent of patulin contamination in Penicillium expansum-infected apples stored at room temperature for short periods of time and its relationship with apple variety (Golden or Fuji), degree of ripeness and size of lesions. Inoculated apples were incubated at 20 degrees C. Patulin was determined in both sound and decayed tissue from cylindrical samples taken around the lesions and cut into 0.5-cm thick sections. Higher accumulation of patulin occurred in Golden apples, with less ripened apples showing higher concentrations. Total accumulated patulin was similar or higher in 4-cm compared to 2-cm lesioned apples, although a decrease in patulin concentration was observed in older lesion sections. Patulin accumulation occurred over a short period of time at room temperature, thus the stand-by period before processing should be minimised. Of total patulin, 2-6% migrated to the surrounding sound tissue, thus trimming tissue around the rotten part may be a good preventive practice for apple derivative production. PMID:17118875

  9. Mycosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using extract of endophytic fungi, Penicillium species of Glycosmis mauritiana, and its antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and tyrokinase inhibitory activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindappa, M.; Farheen, H.; Chandrappa, C. P.; Channabasava; Rai, Ravishankar V.; Raghavendra, Vinay B.

    2016-09-01

    Silver nanoparticles were synthesized using endophytic fungal species, Penicillium species from Glycosmis mautitiana. Phytochemicals, namely tannins, saponins, terpenoids and flavonoids, were identified in Penicillium species extracts, and act as agents of reducing and capping in the conversion of silver nanoparticles into nanoparticles. Using SEM, UV-spectroscopy and XRD, the Penicillium species silver nanoparticles (PsAgNPs) were characterized. The PsAgNPs are shown to be strong antioxidants (DDPH and FRAP), have demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties by three different methods in vitro and strongly inhibited the activity of xanthine oxidase, lipoxygenase and tyrosine kinase. E. coli and P. aeruginosa bacterial species were strongly inhibited by PsAgNPs activity at maximum levels and SEM picture of P. aeruginosa confirms these effects and that they were shrunken due to the toxic effect of PsAgNPs.

  10. Penicillium griseofulvum F1959, high-production strain of pyripyropene a, specific inhibitor of acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase 2.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Ho; Rho, Mun-Chual; Lee, Seung Woong; Choi, Ji Na; Lee, Hee Jeong; Bae, Kyung Sook; Kim, Koanhoi; Kim, Young Kook

    2008-10-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) catalyzes cholesterol esterification and plays an important role in the intestinal absorption of cholesterol, hepatic production of lipoproteins, and accumulation of cholesteryl ester within cells. During the course of screening to find ACAT inhibitors from microbial sources, the present authors isolated pyripyropene A from Penicillium griseofulvum F1959. Pyripyropene A, an ACAT2-specific inhibitor, has already been produced from Aspergillus fumigatus. Yet, Aspergillus fumigatus is a pathogen and only produces a limited amount of pyripyropene A, making the isolation of pyripyropene A troublesome. In contrast, Penicillium griseofulvum F1959 was found to produce approximately 28 times more pyripyropene A than Aspergillus fumigatus, plus this report also describes the ideal conditions for the production of pyripyropene A by Penicillium griseofulvum F1959 and its subsequent purification. PMID:18955816

  11. Cold, pH and salt tolerant Penicillium spp. inhabit the high altitude soils in Himalaya, India.

    PubMed

    Dhakar, Kusum; Sharma, Avinash; Pandey, Anita

    2014-04-01

    Twenty five fungal cultures (Penicillium spp.), isolated from soil samples from the high altitudes in the Indian Himalayan region, have been characterized following polyphasic approach. Colony morphology performed on five different media gave varying results; potato dextrose agar being the best for the vegetative growth and sporulation as well. Microscopic observations revealed 18 isolates to be biverticillate and 7 monoverticillate. Based on the phenotypic characters (colony morphology and microscopy), all the isolates were designated to the genus Penicillium. Exposure to low temperature resulted in enhanced sporulation in 23 isolates, while it ceased in case of two. The fungal isolates produced watery exudates in varying amount that in many cases increased at low temperature. All the isolates could grow between 4 and 37 °C, (optimum 24 °C), hence considered psychrotolerant. While all the isolates could tolerate pH from 2 to 14 (optimum 5-9), 7 isolates tolerated pH 1.5 as well. While all the fungal isolates tolerated salt concentration above 10 %; 10 isolates showed tolerance above 20 %. Based on ITS region (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) analysis the fungal isolates belonged to 25 different species of Penicillium (showing similarity between 95 and 100 %). Characters like tolerance for low temperature, wide range of pH, and high salt concentration, and enhancement in sporulation and production of secondary metabolites such as watery exudates at low temperature can be attributed to the ecological resilience possessed by these fungi for survival under low temperature environment of mountain ecosystem. PMID:24233773

  12. Antifungal activity of TiO2 photocatalysis against Penicillium expansum in vitro and in fruit tests.

    PubMed

    Maneerat, Chamorn; Hayata, Yasuyoshi

    2006-03-15

    The antifungal activity of TiO2 photocatalytic reaction in the form of TiO2 powder and TiO2 coated on a plastic film against Penicillium expansum was investigated in vitro and in fruit tests. The mixture of P. expansum conidial suspension and TiO2 powder was added to potato dextrose agar (PDA) plates for vitro test. The TiO2 photocatalytic reaction reduced conidial germination of the fungal pathogen. It was found that the ability of the TiO2 photocatalytic reaction to suppress P. expansum growth correlated to the amount of TiO2 added. Lower numbers of viable colonies of P. expansum were observed with increasing amount of TiO2. Regardless of the kind of selected fruit inoculated with P. expansum, both TiO2 powder and TiO2-coated film exhibited antifungal activity to control fruit rot. Development of Penicillium rot in apple was significantly (P = 0.05) retarded by the TiO2 photocatalytic reaction. Similarly the TiO2 photocatalytic reaction was the only treatment where no tomato fruit rot was noticeable after 1 week of storage. TiO2-coated film also decreased brown lesions and Penicillium rot infection in lemons. The mean severity fruit rot scores (browning and softening flesh) were 3.2 and 1.9 for uncoated and TiO2-coated film, respectively. Our findings suggest that "TiO2 photocatalytic reaction" shows antifungal activity against P. expansum which may have potential for postharvest disease control. PMID:16269195

  13. Sex in Cheese: Evidence for Sexuality in the Fungus Penicillium roqueforti

    PubMed Central

    Ropars, Jeanne; Dupont, Joëlle; Fontanillas, Eric; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C.; Malagnac, Fabienne; Coton, Monika; Giraud, Tatiana; López-Villavicencio, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    Although most eukaryotes reproduce sexually at some moment of their life cycle, as much as a fifth of fungal species were thought to reproduce exclusively asexually. Nevertheless, recent studies have revealed the occurrence of sex in some of these supposedly asexual species. For industrially relevant fungi, for which inoculums are produced by clonal-subcultures since decades, the potentiality for sex is of great interest for strain improvement strategies. Here, we investigated the sexual capability of the fungus Penicillium roqueforti, used as starter for blue cheese production. We present indirect evidence suggesting that recombination could be occurring in this species. The screening of a large sample of strains isolated from diverse substrates throughout the world revealed the existence of individuals of both mating types, even in the very same cheese. The MAT genes, involved in fungal sexual compatibility, appeared to evolve under purifying selection, suggesting that they are still functional. The examination of the recently sequenced genome of the FM 164 cheese strain enabled the identification of the most important genes known to be involved in meiosis, which were found to be highly conserved. Linkage disequilibria were not significant among three of the six marker pairs and 11 out of the 16 possible allelic combinations were found in the dataset. Finally, the detection of signatures of repeat induced point mutations (RIP) in repeated sequences and transposable elements reinforces the conclusion that P. roqueforti underwent more or less recent sex events. In this species of high industrial importance, the induction of a sexual cycle would open the possibility of generating new genotypes that would be extremely useful to diversify cheese products. PMID:23185400

  14. Voriconazole as therapy for systemic Penicillium marneffei infections in AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Schlamm, Haran T

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the triazole anti-fungal agent, voriconazole, as therapy for systemic Penicillium marneffei infections in patients with advanced HIV infection. Patients with systemic P. marneffei infection were enrolled into a study of voriconazole for the treatment of less common, emerging, or refractory fungal infections. Patients were eligible for inclusion in the study on the basis that no anti-fungal agents have received regulatory approval specifically for P. marneffei infections. Patients were treated in the hospital setting with intravenous voriconazole (6 mg/kg every 12 hours on Day 1 and then 4 mg/kg every 12 hours for at least 3 days, after which patients could switch to oral therapy at 200 mg twice a day) or as outpatients with oral voriconazole (400 mg twice a day on Day 1 and then 200 mg twice a day) for a maximum of 12 weeks. Eleven patients received treatment with voriconazole. Two received short courses of intravenous therapy followed by the oral formulation; nine were treated with oral voriconazole only. At the end of therapy, eight of the nine evaluable patients had favorable response to therapy, based on mycological and clinical findings. There were no relapses of P. marneffei infection in the six patients who were seen at follow-up within 4 weeks of the end of therapy. Treatment with voriconazole was well tolerated, with no discontinuations caused by drug-related adverse events. The results of this study suggest that voriconazole is an effective, well-tolerated, and convenient option for the treatment of systemic infections with P. marneffei. PMID:17690411

  15. Oxidative stress induces the biosynthesis of citrinin by Penicillium verrucosum at the expense of ochratoxin.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Heydt, Markus; Stoll, Dominic; Schütz, Peter; Geisen, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Penicillium verrucosum is a fungus that can produce ochratoxin A and citrinin, two structurally related nephrotoxic mycotoxins. P. verrucosum usually occurs on wheat but can occasionally also be found in NaCl rich habitats such as salted cheeses or olives, indicating that this fungus can adapt to different environments. The ratio of ochratoxin A to citrinin produced by P. verrucosum is shifted to one of either mycotoxin at the expense of the other dependent on the environmental conditions. High NaCl concentrations shift secondary metabolite biosynthesis towards ochratoxin A production. P. verrucosum copes with NaCl stress by increased ochratoxin A biosynthesis, ensuring chloride homeostasis. Ochratoxin A carries chlorine in its molecule and can excrete chlorine from the cell. It was further shown that the regulation of ochratoxin A by high NaCl conditions is mediated by the HOG MAP kinase signal transduction pathway. Here it is shown that high oxidative stress conditions, evoked for example by increasing concentrations of Cu(2+) cations in the growth medium, shift secondary metabolite biosynthesis of P. verrucosum from ochratoxin A to citrinin. The production of citrinin normalizes the oxidative status of the fungal cell under oxidative stress conditions leading to an adaptation to these environmental conditions and protects against increased oxidative stress caused by increased Cu(2+) concentrations. Moreover citrinin also protects against light of short wavelength, which may also increase the oxidative status of the environment. The biosynthesis of citrinin is apparently regulated by a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway, because increasing amounts of external cAMP reduce citrinin biosynthesis in a concentration dependent manner. These conditions lead to the cross-regulation of the ochratoxin A/citrinin secondary metabolite pair and support the adaptation of P. verrucosum to different environments. PMID:25279858

  16. Purification and characterization of two arabinofuranosidases from solid-state cultures of the fungus Penicillium capsulatum.

    PubMed Central

    Filho, E X; Puls, J; Coughlan, M P

    1996-01-01

    Two arabinofuranosidases, termed Ara I and Ara II, from solid-state cultures of Penicillium capsulatum were purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. Each enzyme is a single subunit glycoprotein, and they have M(r)s and pIs of 64,500 and 4.15 (Ara I) and 62,700 and 4.54 (Ara II), respectively. Ara I is most active at pH 4.0 and 60 degrees C, while Ara II exhibits optimal activity at pH 4.0 and 55 degrees C. Ara I is the more thermostable, with its half-life at 70 degrees C and pH 4.0 being 17.5 min. By contrast, the half-life of Ara II is only 9 min at 60 degrees C and pH 4.0. Ara I has the lower Km and higher catalytic constant values with p-nitrophenyl-alpha-L-arabinofuranoside being used as the substrate. Arabinose, a competitive inhibitor (Ki, 16.4 mM) of Ara II, has no effect on Ara I activity at concentrations of up to 40 mM. Each enzyme catalyzes the release of arabinose from pectin, araban, and certain arabinose-containing xylans. The last activity is enhanced by pretreatment of the relevant substrates with xylanase, ferulic acid esterase, or combinations of these enzymes. Thus, arabinoxylooligosaccharides in which arabinose is the sole side chain substituent appear to be the preferred substrates. On the basis of the evidence cited above, each enzyme has been classified as an alpha-L-arabinofuranoside arabinofuranohydrolase (EC 3.2.1.79). PMID:8572693

  17. Heterologous expression of a Penicillium purpurogenum pectin lyase in Pichia pastoris and its characterization.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fuentes, Claudio; Cristina Ravanal, María; Eyzaguirre, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulose is the major component of plant cell walls and it represents a great source of renewable organic matter. One of lignocellulose constituents is pectin. Pectin is composed of two basic structures: a 'smooth' region and a 'hairy' region. The 'smooth' region (homogalacturonan) is a linear polymer of galacturonic acid residues with α-(1→4) linkages, substituted by methyl and acetyl residues. The 'hairy' region is more complex, containing xylogalacturonan and rhamnogalacturonans I and II. Among the enzymes which degrade pectin (pectinases) is pectin lyase (E.C. 4.2.2.10). This enzyme acts on highly esterified homogalacturonan, catalysing the cleavage of α-(1→4) glycosidic bonds between methoxylated residues of galacturonic acid by means of β-elimination, with the formation of 4,5-unsaturated products. In this work, the gene and cDNA of a pectin lyase from Penicillium purpurogenum have been sequenced, and the cDNA has been expressed in Pichia pastoris. The gene is 1334 pb long, has three introns and codes for a protein of 376 amino acid residues. The recombinant enzyme was purified to homogeneity and characterized. Pectin lyase has a molecular mass of 45 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE. It is active on highly esterified pectin, and decreases 40% the viscosity of pectin with a degree of esterification ≥85%. The enzyme showed no activity on polygalacturonic acid and pectin from citrus fruit 8% esterified. The optimum pH and temperature for the recombinant enzyme are 6.0 and 50 °C, respectively, and it is stable up to 50 °C when exposed for 3 h. A purified pectin lyase may be useful in biotechnological applications such as the food industry where the liberation of toxic methanol in pectin degradation should be avoided. PMID:24863479

  18. Keratinase production by endophytic Penicillium spp. Morsy1 under solid-state fermentation using rice straw.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, Mervat Morsy A

    2010-10-01

    Among all endophytic keratinolytic fungal isolates recovered from marine soft coral Dendronephthya hemprichii, Penicillium spp. Morsy1 was selected as the hyperactive keratinolytic strain under solid substrate fermentation of different agriculture and poultry wastes. The optimization of extraction process, physicochemical parameters affecting the keratinase production in solid-state fermentation, and the purified keratinase parameters were studied. Maximum keratinase activity (1,600 U g(-1), initial dry substrate) was recovered from moldy bran with 0.1% Tween 80. The optimized production conditions were rice straw as carbon source, pH of medium 6, growth temperature 26 degrees C, initial moisture content of 80% (v/w), inoculum size of 10(5) spores ml(-1), and an average particle size of the substrate 0.6 mm (3,560 U g(-1), initial dry substrate after 5 days of fermentation). Two types of keratinase (Ahm1 and Ahm2) were purified from the culture supernatant through ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-Sepharose, and gel filtration chromatography. Enzyme molecular weights were 19 kDa (Ahm1) and 40 kDa (Ahm2). The kinetic parameters of purified keratinases were optimized for the hydrolysis of azokeratin by Ahm1 (pH 7.0-8.0, stable in pH range of 6.0 to 8.0 at 50 degrees C) and Ahm2 enzymes (pH 10.0-11.0, stable in pH range of 6.0 to 11.0 at 60-65 degrees C). Whereas inhibitors of serine (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride) and cysteine (iodoacetamide) proteases had minor effects on both Ahm1 and Ahm2 activity, both keratinases were strongly inhibited by chelating agents EDTA and EGTA. These findings suggest that serine and cysteine residues are not involved in the catalytic mechanisms, and they are metalloproteases. PMID:19826961

  19. Biotransformation of β-hexachlorocyclohexane by the saprotrophic soil fungus Penicillium griseofulvum.

    PubMed

    Ceci, Andrea; Pierro, Lucia; Riccardi, Carmela; Pinzari, Flavia; Maggi, Oriana; Persiani, Anna Maria; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael; Petrangeli Papini, Marco

    2015-10-01

    β-Hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH) is a persistent organic pollutant (POP) of global concern with potentially toxic effects on humans and ecosystems. Fungal tolerance and biotransformation of toxic substances hold considerable promise in environmental remediation technologies as many fungi can tolerate extreme environmental conditions and possess efficient extracellular degradative enzymes with relatively non-specific activities. In this research, we have investigated the potential of a saprotrophic soil fungus, Penicillium griseofulvum Dierckx, isolated from soils with high concentrations of isomers of hexachlorocyclohexane, to biotransform β-HCH, the most recalcitrant isomer to microbial activity. The growth kinetics of the fungus were characterized after growth in stirred liquid Czapek-Dox medium. It was found that P. griseofulvum was able to grow in the presence of 1 mg L(-1) β-HCH and in stressful nutritional conditions at different concentrations of sucrose in the medium (0 and 5 g L(-1)). The effects of β-HCH and the toluene, used as a solvent for β-HCH addition, on P. griseofulvum were investigated by means of a Phenotype MicroArray™ technique, which suggested the activation of certain metabolic pathways as a response to oxidative stress due to the presence of the xenobiotics. Gas chromatographic analysis of β-HCH concentration confirmed biodegradation of the isomer with a minimum value of β-HCH residual concentration of 18.6%. The formation of benzoic acid derivatives as dead-end products of β-HCH biotransformation was observed and this could arise from a possible biodegradation pathway for β-HCH with important connections to fungal secondary metabolism. PMID:26071688

  20. Cellulase and Xylanase Production by Penicillium echinulatum in Submerged Media Containing Cellulose Amended with Sorbitol

    PubMed Central

    Todero Ritter, Carla Eliana; Camassola, Marli; Zampieri, Denise; Silveira, Mauricio Moura; Dillon, Aldo José Pinheiro

    2013-01-01

    The present work investigated the use of sorbitol as a soluble carbon source, in association with cellulose, to produce cellulases and xylanases in submerged cultures of Penicillium echinulatum 9A02S1. Because cellulose is an insoluble carbon source, in cellulase production, there are some problems with rheology and oxygen transfer. The submerged fermentations containing media composed of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1% (w/v) sorbitol and cellulose that were added at different times during the cultivation; 0.2% (w/v) soy bran; 0.1% (w/v) wheat bran; and a solution of salts. The highest filter paper activity (FPA) (1.95  ±  0.04 IU·mL−1) was obtained on the seventh day in the medium containing 0.5% (w/v) sorbitol and 0.5% (w/v) cellulose added 24 h after the start of cultivation. However, the CMCases showed an activity peak on the sixth day (9.99 ± 0.75 IU·mL−1) in the medium containing 0.75% (w/v) sorbitol and 0.75% (w/v) cellulose added after 12 h of cultivation. The xylanases showed the highest activity in the medium with 0.75% (w/v) sorbitol and 0.25% (w/v) cellulose added 36 h after the start of cultivation. This strategy enables the reduction of the cellulose concentration, which in high concentrations can cause rheological and oxygen transfer problems. PMID:24058733

  1. Evidence for two distinct intracellular pools of inorganic sulfate in Penicillium notatum.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, D R; Segel, I H

    1985-01-01

    A strain of Penicillium notatum unable to metabolize inorganic sulfate can accumulate sulfate internally to an apparent equilibrium concentration 10(5) greater than that remaining in the medium. The apparent Keq is near constant at all initial external sulfate concentrations below that which would eventually exceed the internal capacity of the cells. Under equilibrium conditions of zero net flux, external 35SO42- exchanges with internal, unlabeled SO42- at a rate consistent with the kinetic constants with the sulfate transport system. Efflux experiments demonstrated that sulfate occupies two distinct intracellular pools. Pool 1 is characterized by the rapid release of 35SO42- when the suspension of preloaded cells is adjusted to 10 mM azide at pH 8.4 (t 1/2, 0.38 min). 35SO42- in pool 1 also rapidly exchanges with unlabeled medium sulfate. Pool 2 is characterized by the slow release of 35SO42- induced by azide at pH 8.4 or unlabeled sulfate (t 1/2, 32 to 49 min). Early in the 35SO42- accumulation process, up to 78% of the total transported substrate is found in pool 1. At equilibrium, pool 1 accounts for only about 2% of the total accumulated 35SO42-. The kinetics of 35SO42- accumulation is consistent with the following sequential process: medium----pool 1----pool 2. Monensin (33 microns) accelerates the transfer of 35SO42- from pool 1 to pool 2. Valinomycin (0.2 microM) and tetraphenylboron- (1 mM) retard the transfer of 35SO42- from pool 1 to pool 2. At the concentrations used, neither of the ionophores nor tetraphenylboron- affect total 35SO42- uptake. Pool 2 may reside in a vacuole or other intracellular organelle. A model for the transfer of sulfate from pool 1 to pool 2 is presented. PMID:3997782

  2. Inhibitory effect of selenium against Penicillium expansum and its possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Lin; Yin, Xue-Bin; Lin, Zhi-Qing; Bañuelos, Gary S; Yuan, Lin-Xi; Liu, Ying; Li, Miao

    2014-08-01

    Some organic and inorganic salts could inhibit the growth of many pathogens. Selenium (Se), as an essential micronutrient, was effective in improving the plant resistance and antioxidant capacity at a low concentration. Penicillium expansum is one of the most important postharvest fungal pathogens, which can cause blue mold rot in various fruits and vegetables. In this study, the inhibitory effect of Se against P. expansum was evaluated. The result showed that Se strongly inhibited spore germination, germ tube elongation, and mycelial spread of P. expansum in the culture medium. The inhibitory effect was positively related to the concentration of Se used. Fluorescence microscopy observation of P. expansum conidia stained with propidium iodide (PI) indicated that the membrane integrity decreased to 37 % after the conidia were treated with Se (20 mg/l) for 9 h. With the use of an oxidant-sensitive probe 2,7-dichlorofluorescin (DCHF-DA), we found that Se at 15 mg/l could induce the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) content, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and superoxide anion (O2 (-)) production rate in P. expansum spores exposed to Se increased markedly. Compared with the control, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the content of glutathione (GSH) were reduced, confirming that damage of Se to cellular oxygen-eliminating system is the main reason. These results suggest that Se might serve as a potential alternative to synthetic fungicides for the control of the postharvest disease of fruit and vegetables caused by P. expansum. PMID:24682262

  3. A p21-activated kinase is required for conidial germination in Penicillium marneffei.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Kylie J; Andrianopoulos, Alex

    2007-11-01

    Asexual spores (conidia) are the infectious propagules of many pathogenic fungi, and the capacity to sense the host environment and trigger conidial germination is a key pathogenicity determinant. Germination of conidia requires the de novo establishment of a polarised growth axis and consequent germ tube extension. The molecular mechanisms that control polarisation during germination are poorly understood. In the dimorphic human pathogenic fungus Penicillium marneffei, conidia germinate to produce one of two cell types that have very different fates in response to an environmental cue. At 25 degrees C, conidia germinate to produce the saprophytic cell type, septate, multinucleate hyphae that have the capacity to undergo asexual development. At 37 degrees C, conidia germinate to produce the pathogenic cell type, arthroconidiating hyphae that liberate uninucleate yeast cells. This study shows that the p21-activated kinase pakA is an essential component of the polarity establishment machinery during conidial germination and polarised growth of yeast cells at 37 degrees C but is not required for germination or polarised growth at 25 degrees C. Analysis shows that the heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunit GasC and the CDC42 orthologue CflA lie upstream of PakA for germination at both temperatures, while the Ras orthologue RasA only functions at 25 degrees C. These findings suggest that although some proteins that regulate the establishment of polarised growth in budding yeast are conserved in filamentous fungi, the circuitry and downstream effectors are differentially regulated to give rise to distinct cell types. PMID:17983267

  4. Intracellular Growth Is Dependent on Tyrosine Catabolism in the Dimorphic Fungal Pathogen Penicillium marneffei

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Kylie J.; McLauchlan, Alisha; Schreider, Lena; Andrianopoulos, Alex

    2015-01-01

    During infection, pathogens must utilise the available nutrient sources in order to grow while simultaneously evading or tolerating the host’s defence systems. Amino acids are an important nutritional source for pathogenic fungi and can be assimilated from host proteins to provide both carbon and nitrogen. The hpdA gene of the dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei, which encodes an enzyme which catalyses the second step of tyrosine catabolism, was identified as up-regulated in pathogenic yeast cells. As well as enabling the fungus to acquire carbon and nitrogen, tyrosine is also a precursor in the formation of two types of protective melanin; DOPA melanin and pyomelanin. Chemical inhibition of HpdA in P. marneffei inhibits ex vivo yeast cell production suggesting that tyrosine is a key nutrient source during infectious growth. The genes required for tyrosine catabolism, including hpdA, are located in a gene cluster and the expression of these genes is induced in the presence of tyrosine. A gene (hmgR) encoding a Zn(II)2-Cys6 binuclear cluster transcription factor is present within the cluster and is required for tyrosine induced expression and repression in the presence of a preferred nitrogen source. AreA, the GATA-type transcription factor which regulates the global response to limiting nitrogen conditions negatively regulates expression of cluster genes in the absence of tyrosine and is required for nitrogen metabolite repression. Deletion of the tyrosine catabolic genes in the cluster affects growth on tyrosine as either a nitrogen or carbon source and affects pyomelanin, but not DOPA melanin, production. In contrast to other genes of the tyrosine catabolic cluster, deletion of hpdA results in no growth within macrophages. This suggests that the ability to catabolise tyrosine is not required for macrophage infection and that HpdA has an additional novel role to that of tyrosine catabolism and pyomelanin production during growth in host cells. PMID:25812137

  5. A p21-Activated Kinase Is Required for Conidial Germination in Penicillium marneffei

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Kylie J; Andrianopoulos, Alex

    2007-01-01

    Asexual spores (conidia) are the infectious propagules of many pathogenic fungi, and the capacity to sense the host environment and trigger conidial germination is a key pathogenicity determinant. Germination of conidia requires the de novo establishment of a polarised growth axis and consequent germ tube extension. The molecular mechanisms that control polarisation during germination are poorly understood. In the dimorphic human pathogenic fungus Penicillium marneffei, conidia germinate to produce one of two cell types that have very different fates in response to an environmental cue. At 25 °C, conidia germinate to produce the saprophytic cell type, septate, multinucleate hyphae that have the capacity to undergo asexual development. At 37 °C, conidia germinate to produce the pathogenic cell type, arthroconidiating hyphae that liberate uninucleate yeast cells. This study shows that the p21-activated kinase pakA is an essential component of the polarity establishment machinery during conidial germination and polarised growth of yeast cells at 37 °C but is not required for germination or polarised growth at 25 °C. Analysis shows that the heterotrimeric G protein α subunit GasC and the CDC42 orthologue CflA lie upstream of PakA for germination at both temperatures, while the Ras orthologue RasA only functions at 25 °C. These findings suggest that although some proteins that regulate the establishment of polarised growth in budding yeast are conserved in filamentous fungi, the circuitry and downstream effectors are differentially regulated to give rise to distinct cell types. PMID:17983267

  6. Leaching with Penicillium simplicissimum: Influence of metals and buffers on proton extrusion and citric acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, A.; Burgstaller, W.; Schinner, F. )

    1991-03-01

    In the presence of insoluble metal oxides (industrial filter dust, zinc oxide, synthetic mixture of metal oxides), Penicillium simplicissimum developed the ability to excrete considerable amounts of citric acid (>100 mM). Parallel with the increase of citric acid concentration in the culture broth, zinc was solubilized from zinc oxide. The adsorption of filter dust onto the mycelium (the pellets formed were less than 1 mm in diameter) was required for not only the citric acid excretion but also the leaching of zinc. When the filter dust was replaced with a synthetic mixture of metal oxides or with zinc oxide in combination with trace elements, levels of adsorption and citric acid production were observed to be similar to those in experiments where industrial filter dust was used. The two most important properties of the filter dust were its heavy-metal content and its buffering capacity. These properties were simulated by adding heavy metals in soluble form (as chlorides, sulfates, or nitrates) or soluble buffers to the medium. Both heavy metals and buffers were not able to induce a citric acid efflux. As with citric acid production by Aspergillus niger, the addition of manganese lowered citric acid excretion (by 40% with metal oxide-induced citric acid efflux and by 100% with urea-induced citric acid efflux). Copper antagonized the effect of manganese. The mechanism for the bulk of citric acid excretion by P. simplicissimum, however, seemed to be different from that described for citric acid accumulation by A. niger. Because of the inefficiency of metals in solubilized form and of soluble buffers to induce a strong citric acid efflux, adsorption of an insoluble metal compound (zinc oxide) turned out to be essential.

  7. Penicillium marneffei Infection and Recent Advances in the Epidemiology and Molecular Biology Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Cooper, Chester R.; Fisher, Matthew C.; Sirisanthana, Thira

    2006-01-01

    Penicillium marneffei infection is an important emerging public health problem, especially among patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus in the areas of endemicity in southeast Asia, India, and China. Within these regions, P. marneffei infection is regarded as an AIDS-defining illness, and the severity of the disease depends on the immunological status of the infected individual. Early diagnosis by serologic and molecular assay-based methods have been developed and are proving to be important in diagnosing infection. The occurrence of natural reservoirs and the molecular epidemiology of P. marneffei have been studied; however, the natural history and mode of transmission of the organism remain unclear. Soil exposure, especially during the rainy season, has been suggested to be a critical risk factor. Using a highly discriminatory molecular technique, multilocus microsatellite typing, to characterize this fungus, several isolates from bamboo rats and humans were shown to share identical multilocus genotypes. These data suggest either that transmission of P. marneffei may occur from rodents to humans or that rodents and humans are coinfected from common environmental sources. These putative natural cycles of P. marneffei infection need further investigation. Studies on the fungal genetics of P. marneffei have been focused on the characterization of genetic determinants that may play important roles in asexual development, mycelial-to-yeast phase transition, and the expression of antigenic determinants. Molecular studies have identified several genes involved in germination, hyphal development, conidiogenesis, and yeast cell polarity. A number of functionally important genes, such as the malate synthase- and catalase-peroxidase protein-encoding genes, have been identified as being upregulated in the yeast phase. Future investigations pertaining to the roles of these genes in host-fungus interactions may provide the key knowledge to understanding the

  8. [Gene cloning, expression and characterization of two cold-adapted lipases from Penicillium sp. XMZ-9].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaomei; Wu, Ningfeng; Fan, Yunliu

    2012-04-01

    Cold-adapted lipases are attractive biocatalysts that can be used at low temperatures as additives in food products, laundry detergents, and the organic synthesis of chiral intermediates. Cold-adapted lipases are normally found in microorganisms that survive at low temperatures. A fungi strain XMZ-9 exhibiting lipolytic activity was isolated from the soil of glaciers in Xinjiang by the screening plates using 1% tributyrin as the substrate and Victoria blue as an indicator. Based on morphological characteristics and phylogenetic comparisons of its 18S rDNA, the strain was identified as Penicillium sp. The partial nucleotide sequences of these two lipase related genes, LipA and LipB, were obtained by touchdown PCR using the degenerate primers designed according to the conservative domains of lipase. The full-length sequences of two genes were obtained by genome walking. The gene lipA contained 1 014 nucleotides, without any intron, comprising one open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 337 amino acids. The gene lipB comprised two introns (61 bp and 49 bp) and a coding region sequence of 1 122 bp encoding a polypeptide of 373 amino acids, cDNA sequences of both lipA and lipB were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant LipA was mostly expressed as inclusion bodies, and recovered lipase activity at low temperature after in vitro refolded by dilution. Differently, the recombinant LipB was expressed in the soluble form and then purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography Column. It showed high lipase activity at low temperature. These results indicated that they were cold-adapted enzymes. This study paves the way for the further research of these cold-adapted lipases for application in the industry. PMID:22803398

  9. Immobilization of a Commercial Lipase from Penicillium camembertii (Lipase G) by Different Strategies.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Adriano A; Freitas, Larissa; de Carvalho, Ana Karine F; de Oliveira, Pedro C; de Castro, Heizir F

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to select the most suitable procedure to immobilize lipase from Penicillium camembertii (Lipase G). Different techniques and supports were evaluated, including physical adsorption on hydrophobic supports octyl-agarose, poly(hydroxybutyrate) and Amberlite resin XAD-4; ionic adsorption on the anionic exchange resin MANAE-agarose and covalent attachment on glyoxyl-agarose, MANAE-agarose cross-linked with glutaraldehyde, MANAE-agarose-glutaraldehyde, and epoxy-silica-polyvinyl alcohol composite. Among the tested protocols, the highest hydrolytic activity (128.2 ± 8.10 IU·g(-1) of support) was achieved when the lipase was immobilized on epoxy-SiO(2)-PVA using hexane as coupling medium. Lipase immobilized by ionic adsorption on MANAE-agarose also gave satisfactory result, attaining 55.6 ± 2.60 IU·g(-1) of support. In this procedure, the maximum loading of immobilized enzyme was 9.3 mg·g(-1) of gel, and the highest activity (68.8 ± 2.70 IU·g(-1) of support) was obtained when 20 mg of protein·g(-1) was offered. Immobilization carried out in aqueous medium by physical adsorption on hydrophobic supports and covalent attachment on MANAE-agarose-glutaraldehyde and glyoxyl-agarose was shown to be unfeasible for Lipase G. Thermal stability tests revealed that the immobilized derivative on epoxy-SiO(2)-PVA composite using hexane as coupling medium had a slight higher thermal stability than the free lipase. PMID:21811674

  10. Signature gene expression reveals novel clues to the molecular mechanisms of dimorphic transition in Penicillium marneffei.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ence; Chow, Wang-Ngai; Wang, Gang; Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Lin, Xiaorong; Cai, James J

    2014-10-01

    Systemic dimorphic fungi cause more than one million new infections each year, ranking them among the significant public health challenges currently encountered. Penicillium marneffei is a systemic dimorphic fungus endemic to Southeast Asia. The temperature-dependent dimorphic phase transition between mycelium and yeast is considered crucial for the pathogenicity and transmission of P. marneffei, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we re-sequenced P. marneffei strain PM1 using multiple sequencing platforms and assembled the genome using hybrid genome assembly. We determined gene expression levels using RNA sequencing at the mycelial and yeast phases of P. marneffei, as well as during phase transition. We classified 2,718 genes with variable expression across conditions into 14 distinct groups, each marked by a signature expression pattern implicated at a certain stage in the dimorphic life cycle. Genes with the same expression patterns tend to be clustered together on the genome, suggesting orchestrated regulations of the transcriptional activities of neighboring genes. Using qRT-PCR, we validated expression levels of all genes in one of clusters highly expressed during the yeast-to-mycelium transition. These included madsA, a gene encoding MADS-box transcription factor whose gene family is exclusively expanded in P. marneffei. Over-expression of madsA drove P. marneffei to undergo mycelial growth at 37°C, a condition that restricts the wild-type in the yeast phase. Furthermore, analyses of signature expression patterns suggested diverse roles of secreted proteins at different developmental stages and the potential importance of non-coding RNAs in mycelium-to-yeast transition. We also showed that RNA structural transition in response to temperature changes may be related to the control of thermal dimorphism. Together, our findings have revealed multiple molecular mechanisms that may underlie the dimorphic transition in P. marneffei

  11. Effects of selected essential oils on the growth and production of ochratoxin A by Penicillium verrucosum.

    PubMed

    Jeršek, Barbara; Poklar Ulrih, Nataša; Skrt, Mihaela; Gavarić, Neda; Božin, Biljana; Smole Možina, Sonja

    2014-06-01

    Essential oils from oregano (Origanum vulgare L.), mint (Mentha piperita L.), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.), and pine (Abies alba Mill.) needles and cones, and their active substances thymol, carvacrol, menthol, and anisaldehyde were tested for antifungal activity against Penicillium verrucosum. The lowest minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were achieved for essential oil of oregano, followed by carvacrol, thymol, and menthol. These antifungal components were further investigated, as the main aim of our study was to elucidate the effect of natural antifungals on ochratoxin A production. During 21 days of exposure, the growth of P. verrucosum, and subsequently the production of ochratoxin A, was fully inhibited by thymol at ½ MIC (0.0625 mg mL-1), but menthol at ¼ and ½ MIC (0.1875 and 3750 mg mL-1) showed no growth inhibition. After 21 days of incubation, the greatest inhibitory effect on ochratoxin production (inhibition was 96.9 %) was also achieved with thymol at ¼ MIC (0.0313 mg mL-1). Essential oil of oregano (¼ MIC, 0.2930 μL mL-1) and carvacrol (½ MIC, 0.1953 μL mL-1) stimulate production of ochratoxin A at 13.9 % to 28.8 %, respectively. The observed antifungal effects depended on the agent, the concentration used, and the time of interaction between the agent and P. verrucosum. Our results indicate the possibility of using oregano essential oil as a substitute for artificial preservatives in certain foods, but further research is needed. PMID:24945417

  12. Synergistic and Dose-Controlled Regulation of Cellulase Gene Expression in Penicillium oxalicum.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhonghai; Yao, Guangshan; Wu, Ruimei; Gao, Liwei; Kan, Qinbiao; Liu, Meng; Yang, Piao; Liu, Guodong; Qin, Yuqi; Song, Xin; Zhong, Yaohua; Fang, Xu; Qu, Yinbo

    2015-09-01

    Filamentous fungus Penicillium oxalicum produces diverse lignocellulolytic enzymes, which are regulated by the combinations of many transcription factors. Here, a single-gene disruptant library for 470 transcription factors was constructed and systematically screened for cellulase production. Twenty transcription factors (including ClrB, CreA, XlnR, Ace1, AmyR, and 15 unknown proteins) were identified to play putative roles in the activation or repression of cellulase synthesis. Most of these regulators have not been characterized in any fungi before. We identified the ClrB, CreA, XlnR, and AmyR transcription factors as critical dose-dependent regulators of cellulase expression, the core regulons of which were identified by analyzing several transcriptomes and/or secretomes. Synergistic and additive modes of combinatorial control of each cellulase gene by these regulatory factors were achieved, and cellulase expression was fine-tuned in a proper and controlled manner. With one of these targets, the expression of the major intracellular β-glucosidase Bgl2 was found to be dependent on ClrB. The Bgl2-deficient background resulted in a substantial gene activation by ClrB and proved to be closely correlated with the relief of repression mediated by CreA and AmyR during cellulase induction. Our results also signify that probing the synergistic and dose-controlled regulation mechanisms of cellulolytic regulators and using it for reconstruction of expression regulation network (RERN) may be a promising strategy for cellulolytic fungi to develop enzyme hyper-producers. Based on our data, ClrB was identified as focal point for the synergistic activation regulation of cellulase expression by integrating cellulolytic regulators and their target genes, which refined our understanding of transcriptional-regulatory network as a "seesaw model" in which the coordinated regulation of cellulolytic genes is established by counteracting activators and repressors. PMID:26360497

  13. The thioredoxin system of Penicillium chrysogenum and its possible role in penicillin biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G; Argaman, A; Schreiber, R; Mislovati, M; Aharonowitz, Y

    1994-01-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum is an important producer of penicillin antibiotics. A key step in their biosynthesis is the oxidative cyclization of delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine (ACV) to isopenicillin N by the enzyme isopenicillin N synthase (IPNS). bis-ACV, the oxidized disulfide form of ACV is, however, not a substrate for IPNS. We report here the characterization of a broad-range disulfide reductase from P. chrysogenum that efficiently reduces bis-ACV to the thiol monomer. When coupled in vitro with IPNS, it converts bis-ACV to isopenicillin N and may therefore play a role in penicillin biosynthesis. The disulfide reductase consists of two protein components, a 72-kDa NADPH-dependent reductase, containing two identical subunits, and a 12-kDa general disulfide reductant. The latter reduces disulfide bonds in low-molecular-weight compounds and in proteins. The genes coding for the reductase system were cloned and sequenced. Both possess introns. A comparative analysis of their predicted amino acid sequences showed that the 12-kDa protein shares 26 to 60% sequence identity with thioredoxins and that the 36-kDa protein subunit shares 44 to 49% sequence identity with the two known bacterial thioredoxin reductases. In addition, the P. chrysogenum NADPH-dependent reductase is able to accept thioredoxin as a substrate. These results establish that the P. chrysogenum broad-range disulfide reductase is a member of the thioredoxin family of oxidoreductases. This is the first example of the cloning of a eucaryotic thioredoxin reductase gene. Images PMID:8106340

  14. Substrate cycles in Penicillium chrysogenum quantified by isotopic non-stationary flux analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Penicillium chrysogenum, the main production strain for penicillin-G, has a high content of intracellular carbohydrates, especially reduced sugars such as mannitol, arabitol, erythritol, as well as trehalose and glycogen. In previous steady state 13C wash-in experiments a delay of labeling enrichments in glycolytic intermediates was observed, which suggests turnover of storage carbohydrates. The turnover of storage pools consumes ATP which is expected to reduce the product yield for energy demanding production pathways like penicillin-G. Results In this study, a 13C labeling wash-in experiment of 1 hour was performed to systematically quantify the intracellular flux distribution including eight substrate cycles. The experiments were performed using a mixed carbon source of 85% CmolGlc/CmolGlc+EtOH labeled glucose (mixture of 90% [1-13C1] and 10% [U-13C6]) and 15% ethanol [U-13C2]. It was found, that (1) also several extracellular pools are enriched with 13C labeling rapidly (trehalose, mannitol, and others), (2) the intra- to extracellular metabolite concentration ratios were comparable for a large set of metabolites while for some carbohydrates (mannitol, trehalose, and glucose) the measured ratios were much higher. Conclusions The fast enrichment of several extracellular carbohydrates and a concentration ratio higher than the ratio expected from cell lysis (2%) indicate active (e.g. ATP consuming) transport cycles over the cellular membrane. The flux estimation indicates, that substrate cycles account for about 52% of the gap in the ATP balance based on metabolic flux analysis. PMID:23098235

  15. Determination of Penicillium mycotoxins in foods and feeds using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rundberget, Thomas; Wilkins, Alistair L

    2002-07-26

    New LC-MS (full scan) and LC-MS-MS (selected ion reaction monitoring) methods for the simultaneous determination of mycophenolic acid, griseofulvin, roquefortine C, chaetoglobosin B, verruculogen and penitrem A, and other Penicillium derived mycotoxins in food and feed samples are described. The methodologies involve sample extraction with acetonitrile-water, defatting with hexane and quantification using LC-MS with atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation or LC-MS-MS. Detector responses, for each of the methods and mycotoxins, were found to be linear over the range 10-1000 ng of mycotoxin/g of extracted food mixture material. The mean recoveries (n = 3 to 6) of the mycotoxins from spiked food mixture samples determined using MS and MS-MS detection were 87-116 and 91-112%, respectively, for mycophenolic acid, 104-109 and 91-112%, respectively, for griseofulvin, 70-85 and 75-110%, respectively, for roquefortine C, 94-109 and 81-116%, respectively, for chaetoglobosin B, 110-115 and 90-106%, respectively, for verruculogen and 78-97 and 99-108%, respectively, for penitrem A. RSDs varied from 5.6% at the 1000 ng/g level to 23.1% at the 10 ng/g level. The limits of detection for the mycotoxins using MS and MS-MS were 70 and 10 ng/g, respectively, for mycophenolic acid, 10 and 5 ng/g, respectivley, for griseofulvin, 50 and 20 ng/g, respectively, for roquefortine C, 25 and 20 ng/g, respectively, for chaetoglobosin B, 25 and 20 ng/g, respectively, for verruculogen and 10 and 5 ng/g, respectively, for penitrem A. PMID:12198847

  16. Resolving phenylalanine metabolism sheds light on natural synthesis of penicillin G in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Tânia; Solis-Escalante, Daniel; Romagnoli, Gabriele; ten Pierick, Angela; Hanemaaijer, Mark; Deshmukh, Amit T; Deshmuhk, Amit; Wahl, Aljoscha; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2012-02-01

    The industrial production of penicillin G by Penicillium chrysogenum requires the supplementation of the growth medium with the side chain precursor phenylacetate. The growth of P. chrysogenum with phenylalanine as the sole nitrogen source resulted in the extracellular production of phenylacetate and penicillin G. To analyze this natural pathway for penicillin G production, chemostat cultures were switched to [U-(13)C]phenylalanine as the nitrogen source. The quantification and modeling of the dynamics of labeled metabolites indicated that phenylalanine was (i) incorporated in nascent protein, (ii) transaminated to phenylpyruvate and further converted by oxidation or by decarboxylation, and (iii) hydroxylated to tyrosine and subsequently metabolized via the homogentisate pathway. The involvement of the homogentisate pathway was supported by the comparative transcriptome analysis of P. chrysogenum cultures grown with phenylalanine and with (NH(4))(2)SO(4) as the nitrogen source. This transcriptome analysis also enabled the identification of two putative 2-oxo acid decarboxylase genes (Pc13g9300 and Pc18g01490). cDNAs of both genes were cloned and expressed in the 2-oxo-acid-decarboxylase-free Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain CEN.PK711-7C (pdc1 pdc5 pdc6Δ aro10Δ thi3Δ). The introduction of Pc13g09300 restored the growth of this S. cerevisiae mutant on glucose and phenylalanine, thereby demonstrating that Pc13g09300 encodes a dual-substrate pyruvate and phenylpyruvate decarboxylase, which plays a key role in an Ehrlich-type pathway for the production of phenylacetate in P. chrysogenum. These results provide a basis for the metabolic engineering of P. chrysogenum for the production of the penicillin G side chain precursor phenylacetate. PMID:22158714

  17. Resolving Phenylalanine Metabolism Sheds Light on Natural Synthesis of Penicillin G in Penicillium chrysogenum

    PubMed Central

    Veiga, Tânia; Solis-Escalante, Daniel; Romagnoli, Gabriele; ten Pierick, Angela; Hanemaaijer, Mark; Deshmuhk, Amit; Wahl, Aljoscha; Pronk, Jack T.

    2012-01-01

    The industrial production of penicillin G by Penicillium chrysogenum requires the supplementation of the growth medium with the side chain precursor phenylacetate. The growth of P. chrysogenum with phenylalanine as the sole nitrogen source resulted in the extracellular production of phenylacetate and penicillin G. To analyze this natural pathway for penicillin G production, chemostat cultures were switched to [U-13C]phenylalanine as the nitrogen source. The quantification and modeling of the dynamics of labeled metabolites indicated that phenylalanine was (i) incorporated in nascent protein, (ii) transaminated to phenylpyruvate and further converted by oxidation or by decarboxylation, and (iii) hydroxylated to tyrosine and subsequently metabolized via the homogentisate pathway. The involvement of the homogentisate pathway was supported by the comparative transcriptome analysis of P. chrysogenum cultures grown with phenylalanine and with (NH4)2SO4 as the nitrogen source. This transcriptome analysis also enabled the identification of two putative 2-oxo acid decarboxylase genes (Pc13g9300 and Pc18g01490). cDNAs of both genes were cloned and expressed in the 2-oxo-acid-decarboxylase-free Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain CEN.PK711-7C (pdc1 pdc5 pdc6Δ aro10Δ thi3Δ). The introduction of Pc13g09300 restored the growth of this S. cerevisiae mutant on glucose and phenylalanine, thereby demonstrating that Pc13g09300 encodes a dual-substrate pyruvate and phenylpyruvate decarboxylase, which plays a key role in an Ehrlich-type pathway for the production of phenylacetate in P. chrysogenum. These results provide a basis for the metabolic engineering of P. chrysogenum for the production of the penicillin G side chain precursor phenylacetate. PMID:22158714

  18. Synergistic and Dose-Controlled Regulation of Cellulase Gene Expression in Penicillium oxalicum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhonghai; Yao, Guangshan; Wu, Ruimei; Gao, Liwei; Kan, Qinbiao; Liu, Meng; Yang, Piao; Liu, Guodong; Qin, Yuqi; Song, Xin; Zhong, Yaohua; Fang, Xu; Qu, Yinbo

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous fungus Penicillium oxalicum produces diverse lignocellulolytic enzymes, which are regulated by the combinations of many transcription factors. Here, a single-gene disruptant library for 470 transcription factors was constructed and systematically screened for cellulase production. Twenty transcription factors (including ClrB, CreA, XlnR, Ace1, AmyR, and 15 unknown proteins) were identified to play putative roles in the activation or repression of cellulase synthesis. Most of these regulators have not been characterized in any fungi before. We identified the ClrB, CreA, XlnR, and AmyR transcription factors as critical dose-dependent regulators of cellulase expression, the core regulons of which were identified by analyzing several transcriptomes and/or secretomes. Synergistic and additive modes of combinatorial control of each cellulase gene by these regulatory factors were achieved, and cellulase expression was fine-tuned in a proper and controlled manner. With one of these targets, the expression of the major intracellular β-glucosidase Bgl2 was found to be dependent on ClrB. The Bgl2-deficient background resulted in a substantial gene activation by ClrB and proved to be closely correlated with the relief of repression mediated by CreA and AmyR during cellulase induction. Our results also signify that probing the synergistic and dose-controlled regulation mechanisms of cellulolytic regulators and using it for reconstruction of expression regulation network (RERN) may be a promising strategy for cellulolytic fungi to develop enzyme hyper-producers. Based on our data, ClrB was identified as focal point for the synergistic activation regulation of cellulase expression by integrating cellulolytic regulators and their target genes, which refined our understanding of transcriptional-regulatory network as a “seesaw model” in which the coordinated regulation of cellulolytic genes is established by counteracting activators and repressors. PMID:26360497

  19. A novel inhibition ELISA for the detection and monitoring of Penicillium marneffei antigen in human serum.

    PubMed

    Prakit, K; Nosanchuk, J D; Pruksaphon, K; Vanittanakom, N; Youngchim, S

    2016-04-01

    The thermally dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei is a causative agent of penicilliosis marneffei, a disease considered to be an acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining illness in Southeast Asia and southern China. We have developed an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (inh-ELISA) incorporating the yeast phase specific mannoprotein-binding monoclonal antibody 4D1 for the detection of P. marneffei infection. In our sample set, the test detected antigenemia in all 45 (100 %) patients with P. marneffei, with a mean antigen concentration of 4.32 μg/ml. No cross-reactivity in this assay was found using serum from 44 additional patients with other fungal infections, such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Candida albicans, as well as 44 patients with bacterial infections, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Streptococcus suis. Additionally, no reactivity occurred using serum from 31 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients without a history of fungal infections and 113 healthy controls residing in endemic areas. To investigate the potential of the inh-ELISA for disease monitoring, we followed the reduction in antigenemia in six patients who clinically responded to itraconazole and P. marneffei was no longer isolated from their blood or tissues. In contrast, we correlated increased concentrations of antigenemia in patients with relapsed P. marneffei infection with the progression of their clinical symptoms and the isolation of P. marneffei from their clinical specimens. In summary, the P. marneffei inh-ELISA is a promising new assay for the rapid diagnosis of P. marneffei, as well as a tool for evaluating clinical response and clearance of the fungus during treatment. PMID:26838686

  20. Production, purification, and characterization of a β-glucosidase of Penicillium funiculosum NCL1.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Gurusamy; Meera, Balasubramanian; Vanitha, Chinnathambi; Rao, Mala; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2012-07-01

    Penicillium funiculosum NCL1, a filamentous fungus, produced significantly higher levels of β-glucosidase. The effect of initial pH, incubation temperature, and different carbon sources on extracellular β-glucosidase production was studied in submerged fermentation. At 30 °C with initial pH 5.0, enzyme production was increased by 48-fold upon induction with paper mill waste, as compared to commercial cellulose powder. In zymogram analysis, four isoforms of β-glucosidases were observed with wheat bran whereas a minimum of one isoform was observed with other carbon sources. A major β-glucosidase (Bgl3A) with the apparent molecular weight of ~120 kDa, induced by paper mill waste, was purified 19-fold to homogeneity, with a specific activity of 1,796 U/mg. Bgl3A was a monomeric glycoprotein with 29% of neutral carbohydrate content. It showed optimum activity at pH 4.0 and 5.0, optimum temperature at 60 °C, and exhibited a half-life of 1 h at 60 °C. K(m) of Bgl3A was found to be 0.057 mM with p-nitrophenyl β-D-glucoside and V(max) was 1,920 U/mg. The purified enzyme exhibited glucose tolerance with a K(i) of 1.5 mM. Bgl3A readily hydrolyzed glucosides with β-linkage. Bgl3A activity was enhanced (156%) by Zn²⁺ and was not affected by other metal cations and reagents. The supplementation of Bgl3A (5 U/mg) with Trichoderma reesei cellulase complex (5 FPU/mg) resulted in about 70% of enhanced glucose production, which emphasizes the industrial importance of Bgl3A. PMID:22415789

  1. Leaching with Penicillium simplicissimum: Influence of Metals and Buffers on Proton Extrusion and Citric Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Andreas; Burgstaller, Wolfgang; Schinner, Franz

    1991-01-01

    In the presence of insoluble metal oxides (industrial filter dust, zinc oxide, synthetic mixture of metal oxides), Penicillium simplicissimum developed the ability to excrete considerable amounts of citric acid (>100 mM). Parallel with the increase of citric acid concentration in the culture broth, zinc was solubilized from zinc oxide. The adsorption of filter dust onto the mycelium (the pellets formed were less than 1 mm in diameter) was required for not only the citric acid excretion but also the leaching of zinc. When the filter dust was replaced with a synthetic mixture of metal oxides or with zinc oxide in combination with trace elements, levels of adsorption and citric acid production were observed to be similar to those in experiments where industrial filter dust was used. The two most important properties of the filter dust were its heavy-metal content and its buffering capacity. These properties were simulated by adding heavy metals in soluble form (as chlorides, sulfates, or nitrates) or soluble buffers to the medium. Both heavy metals and buffers were not able to induce a citric acid efflux. As with citric acid production by Aspergillus niger, the addition of manganese lowered citric acid excretion (by 40% with metal oxide-induced citric acid efflux and by 100% with urea-induced citric acid efflux). Copper antagonized the effect of manganese. The mechanism for the bulk of citric acid excretion by P. simplicissimum, however, seemed to be different from that described for citric acid accumulation by A. niger. Because of the inefficiency of metals in solubilized form and of soluble buffers to induce a strong citric acid efflux, adsorption of an insoluble metal compound (zinc oxide) turned out to be essential. Surface phenomena possibly involving the plasma membrane H+-ATPase are thought to participate in the induction of citric acid excretion by P. simplicissimum in the presence of industrial filter dust. PMID:16348442

  2. Metabolic engineering of β-oxidation in Penicillium chrysogenum for improved semi-synthetic cephalosporin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Tânia; Gombert, Andreas K; Landes, Nils; Verhoeven, Maarten D; Kiel, Jan A K W; Krikken, Arjen M; Nijland, Jeroen G; Touw, Hesselien; Luttik, Marijke A H; van der Toorn, John C; Driessen, Arnold J M; Bovenberg, Roel A L; van den Berg, Marco A; van der Klei, Ida J; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2012-07-01

    Industrial production of semi-synthetic cephalosporins by Penicillium chrysogenum requires supplementation of the growth media with the side-chain precursor adipic acid. In glucose-limited chemostat cultures of P. chrysogenum, up to 88% of the consumed adipic acid was not recovered in cephalosporin-related products, but used as an additional carbon and energy source for growth. This low efficiency of side-chain precursor incorporation provides an economic incentive for studying and engineering the metabolism of adipic acid in P. chrysogenum. Chemostat-based transcriptome analysis in the presence and absence of adipic acid confirmed that adipic acid metabolism in this fungus occurs via β-oxidation. A set of 52 adipate-responsive genes included six putative genes for acyl-CoA oxidases and dehydrogenases, enzymes responsible for the first step of β-oxidation. Subcellular localization of the differentially expressed acyl-CoA oxidases and dehydrogenases revealed that the oxidases were exclusively targeted to peroxisomes, while the dehydrogenases were found either in peroxisomes or in mitochondria. Deletion of the genes encoding the peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase Pc20g01800 and the mitochondrial acyl-CoA dehydrogenase Pc20g07920 resulted in a 1.6- and 3.7-fold increase in the production of the semi-synthetic cephalosporin intermediate adipoyl-6-APA, respectively. The deletion strains also showed reduced adipate consumption compared to the reference strain, indicating that engineering of the first step of β-oxidation successfully redirected a larger fraction of adipic acid towards cephalosporin biosynthesis. PMID:22525490

  3. Peniphenylanes A-G from the Deep-Sea-Derived Fungus Penicillium fellutanum HDN14-323.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; Guo, Wenqiang; He, Xueqian; Che, Qian; Zhu, Tianjiao; Gu, Qianqun; Li, Dehai

    2016-06-01

    Seven new 6-methylsaligenin derivatives, including the trimeric peniphenylanes A-B (1-2) and dimeric peniphenylanes C-G (3-7), together with four known biogenetically related compounds (8-11) were discovered from the extract of the deep-sea-derived fungus Penicillium fellutanum HDN14-323. The structures of the new compounds were established through extensive analysis. Their cytotoxic activity against HeLa, HL-60, and HCT-116 cell lines was evaluated, with compound 4 exhibiting the best activity against the HeLa cell line (IC50 = 9.3 µM). PMID:27002398

  4. Prenylated indolediketopiperazine peroxides and related homologues from the marine sediment-derived fungus Penicillium brefeldianum SD-273.

    PubMed

    An, Chun-Yan; Li, Xiao-Ming; Li, Chun-Shun; Xu, Gang-Ming; Wang, Bin-Gui

    2014-02-01

    Three new indolediketopiperazine peroxides, namely, 24-hydroxyverruculogen (1), 26-hydroxyverruculogen (2), and 13-O-prenyl-26-hydroxyverruculogen (3), along with four known homologues (4-7), were isolated and identified from the culture extract of the marine sediment-derived fungus Penicillium brefeldianum SD-273. Their structures were determined based on the extensive spectroscopic analysis and compound 1 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The absolute configuration of compounds 1-3 was determined using chiral HPLC analysis of their acidic hydrolysates. Each of the isolated compounds was evaluated for antibacterial and cytotoxic activity as well as brine shrimp (Artemia salina) lethality. PMID:24473173

  5. Penicyclones A-E, Antibacterial Polyketides from the Deep-Sea-Derived Fungus Penicillium sp. F23-2.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenqiang; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Zhu, Tianjiao; Gu, Qianqun; Li, Dehai

    2015-11-25

    Five new ambuic acid analogues, penicyclones A-E (1-5), were isolated from the extract of the deep-sea-derived fungus Penicillium sp. F23-2. The structures including the absolute configurations were established by interpretation of NMR and MS data, as well as the application of ECD, X-ray crystallography, and a chemical conversion, as well as the TDDFT-ECD calculations. Penicyclones A-E (1-5) exhibited antimicrobial activity against the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus with MIC values ranging from 0.3 to 1.0 μg/mL. PMID:26540093

  6. Drimane Sesquiterpene-Conjugated Amino Acids from a Marine Isolate of the Fungus Talaromyces minioluteus (Penicillium Minioluteum)

    PubMed Central

    Ngokpol, Suthatip; Suwakulsiri, Wittaya; Sureram, Sanya; Lirdprapamongkol, Kriengsak; Aree, Thammarat; Wiyakrutta, Suthep; Mahidol, Chulabhorn; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Kittakoop, Prasat

    2015-01-01

    Four new sesquiterpene lactones (3, 4, 6 and 7) and three known compounds, purpuride (1), berkedrimane B (2) and purpuride B (5), were isolated from the marine fungus, Talaromyces minioluteus (Penicillium minioluteum). New compounds were drimane sesquiterpenes conjugated with N-acetyl-l-valine, and their structures were elucidated by analysis of spectroscopic data, as well as by single crystal X-ray analysis. The isolated compounds could not inhibit the apoptosis-regulating enzyme, caspase-3, while three of the compounds (2, 3 and 7) exhibited weak cytotoxic activity. PMID:26058010

  7. An Unusual Conformational Isomer of Verrucosidin Backbone from a Hydrothermal Vent Fungus, Penicillium sp. Y-50-10

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chengqian; Shi, Yutong; Auckloo, Bibi Nazia; Chen, Xuegang; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Tao, Xinyi; Wu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A new verrucosidin derivative, methyl isoverrucosidinol (1), was isolated from the marine fungus Penicillium sp. Y-50-10, dwelling in sulfur rich sediment in the Kueishantao hydrothermal vents off Taiwan. The structure was established by spectroscopic means including HRMS and 2D-NMR spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration was defined mainly by comparison of quantum chemical TDDFT calculated and experimental ECD spectra. Among hitherto known compounds with a verrucosidine backbone isolated from natural resource, compound 1 represents the first example of a new conformational isomer of its skeleton, exhibiting antibiotic activity against Bacillus subtilis with MIC value 32 μg/mL. PMID:27548192

  8. [Consumption of water-insoluble phenolic products of lignin pyrolysis by the strain Penicillium tardum H-2].

    PubMed

    Karetnikova, E A

    2006-01-01

    Abstract-Physiological and biochemical properties of the strain Penicillium tardum H-2, a degrader of phenolic compounds formed during lignin pyrolysis, have been characterized. The micromycete P. tardum H-2 can consume phenol, pyrocatechol, p-cresol, vanillin, and guaiacum resin. When grown in a medium containing the water-soluble fraction of lignin pyrolysis waste at concentrations from 0.5 to 2%, it consumes 62-72% of the phenolic components of the waste. According to gas-liquid chromatography, cultivation of P. tardum H-2 in a medium with liquid pyrolysis products results in a complete consumption of the phenol-cresol fraction. PMID:16521577

  9. Two new benzoquinone derivatives and two new bisorbicillinoids were isolated from a marine-derived fungus Penicillium terrestre.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weizhong; Gu, Qianqun; Zhu, Weiming; Cui, Chengbin; Fan, Guotao

    2005-07-01

    Four new compounds were isolated from a marine-derived fungus Penicillium terrestre, namely 2-(2', 3'-dihydrosorbyl)-3,6-dimethyl-5-hydroxy-1,4-benzoquinone (1), 3-acetonyl-2,6-dimethyl-5-hydroxy-1,4-benzoquinone (2), dihydrobisvertinolone (3), tetrahydrobisvertinolone (4). Their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic methods. The absolute configurations of 3 and 4 were determined by their CD spectra. Their cytotoxic effects on P388 and A-549 cell lines were preliminarily examined by the MTT method. PMID:16161481

  10. A new benzopyrans derivatives from a mangrove-derived fungus Penicillium citrinum from the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Cai-Juan; Huang, Guo-Lei; Xu, Yan; Song, Xin-Ming; Yao, Jun; Liu, Hui; Wang, Ruo-Ping; Sun, Xue-Ping

    2016-04-01

    One new benzopyran derivative (2R(*),4R(*))-3,4-dihydro-5-methoxy-2-methyl-2H-1-benzopyran-4-ol (1), together with five known compounds (2-6), were obtained from the EtOAc extract of the endophytic fungus Penicillium citrinum HL-5126 isolated from the mangrove Brguiera sexangula var. rhynchopetala collected in the South China Sea. Their structures were elucidated by the detailed analysis of comprehensive spectroscopic data. All compounds were evaluated for their antibacterial activities. Compound 6 exhibited potent inhibitory activity against Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus and Micrococcus tetragenus with the same MIC values of 6.94 μM. PMID:26930107

  11. Production of lipase by soil fungi and partial characterization of lipase from a selected strain (Penicillium wortmanii).

    PubMed

    Costa, M A; Peralta, R M

    1999-01-01

    Filamentous fungi from soil were screened for their ability to produce lipase. Among 56 filamentous fungi tested, one strain identified as Penicillium wortmanii was selected as the highest lipase producer. Maximum lipase production (12.5 U/ml) was obtained in 7-days cultures utilizing 5% (w/v) olive oil as the carbon source. Optimum pH and temperature for crude lipase were 7.0 and 45 degrees C, respectively. The enzyme was stable at 40 and 45 degrees C and it retained about 55% of its activity when heated at 50 degrees C for 1 hour. PMID:10071862

  12. Immobilization of lipase on epoxy activated (1-->3)-alpha-D-glucan isolated from Penicillium chrysongenum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianqi; Li, Hanxiang; Nie, Kaili; Tan, Tianwei

    2006-12-01

    A water-insoluble linear (1-->3)-alpha-D-glucan was isolated from Penicillium mycelia. Three kinds of epoxy-activated microspheres of this glucan were prepared as supports for Candida sp. lipase (EC3.1.1.3) immobilization. The highest immobilization yield was 36.4%. The specific activity was 26.85 U/mg, and only 4.1% of activity was lost in comparison with the free enzyme used for immobilization. The higher thermal stability, storage stability, and reusability of the immobilized lipase make it a potential candidate for wide application. PMID:17151459

  13. [Conditions for cultivation of the fungus Penicillium melinii UzLM-4 and its biosynthesis of lipases].

    PubMed

    Makhsumkhanov, A A; Iakubov, I T; Davranov, K D

    2003-01-01

    Cultivation of the fungus Penicillium melinii UzLM-4 on a Raistrick's medium of our own modification made it possible to increase the biosynthesis of lipases three to four times. The following conditions ensured a high rate of synthesis of the extracellular lipase: age of the inoculum, 15 days; concentration of the inoculum, 15 x 10(6) conidia per 100 ml medium; initial pH of the nutrient medium, 8.0; and cultivation in a shaker at 150 rpm (25 degrees C). PMID:12625042

  14. Prenylated Indolediketopiperazine Peroxides and Related Homologues from the Marine Sediment-Derived Fungus Penicillium brefeldianum SD-273

    PubMed Central

    An, Chun-Yan; Li, Xiao-Ming; Li, Chun-Shun; Xu, Gang-Ming; Wang, Bin-Gui

    2014-01-01

    Three new indolediketopiperazine peroxides, namely, 24-hydroxyverruculogen (1), 26-hydroxyverruculogen (2), and 13-O-prenyl-26-hydroxyverruculogen (3), along with four known homologues (4–7), were isolated and identified from the culture extract of the marine sediment-derived fungus Penicillium brefeldianum SD-273. Their structures were determined based on the extensive spectroscopic analysis and compound 1 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The absolute configuration of compounds 1–3 was determined using chiral HPLC analysis of their acidic hydrolysates. Each of the isolated compounds was evaluated for antibacterial and cytotoxic activity as well as brine shrimp (Artemia salina) lethality. PMID:24473173

  15. Substrate and metabolite diffusion within model medium for soft cheese in relation to growth of Penicillium camembertii.

    PubMed

    Aldarf, Mazen; Fourcade, Florence; Amrane, Abdeltif; Prigent, Yves

    2006-08-01

    Penicillium camembertii was cultivated on a jellified peptone-lactate based medium to simulate the composition of Camembert cheese. Diffusional limitations due to substrate consumption were not involved in the linear growth recorded during culture, while nitrogen (peptone) limitation accounted for growth cessation. Examination of gradients confirmed that medium neutralization was the consequence of lactate consumption and ammonium production. The diffusion of the lactate assimilated from the core to the rind and that of the ammonium produced from the rind to the core was described by means of a diffusion/reaction model involving a partial linking of consumption or production to growth. The model matched experimental data throughout growth. PMID:16491357

  16. An Unusual Conformational Isomer of Verrucosidin Backbone from a Hydrothermal Vent Fungus, Penicillium sp. Y-50-10.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chengqian; Shi, Yutong; Auckloo, Bibi Nazia; Chen, Xuegang; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Tao, Xinyi; Wu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A new verrucosidin derivative, methyl isoverrucosidinol (1), was isolated from the marine fungus Penicillium sp. Y-50-10, dwelling in sulfur rich sediment in the Kueishantao hydrothermal vents off Taiwan. The structure was established by spectroscopic means including HRMS and 2D-NMR spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration was defined mainly by comparison of quantum chemical TDDFT calculated and experimental ECD spectra. Among hitherto known compounds with a verrucosidine backbone isolated from natural resource, compound 1 represents the first example of a new conformational isomer of its skeleton, exhibiting antibiotic activity against Bacillus subtilis with MIC value 32 μg/mL. PMID:27548192

  17. Growth inhibition and stability of PgAFP from Penicillium chrysogenum against fungi common on dry-ripened meat products.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Josué; Acosta, Raquel; Rodríguez-Martín, Andrea; Bermúdez, Elena; Núñez, Félix; Asensio, Miguel A

    2015-07-16

    Dry-ripened foods favor the development of a superficial fungal population that may include toxigenic molds. To combat unwanted molds, an antifungal protein from Penicillium chrysogenum (PgAFP) can be useful. The aim of the present work was to study the antimicrobial activity of PgAFP against microorganisms common in dry-ripened foods, and to evaluate its sensitivity to proteolytic enzymes and heat treatments that may be applied to foods, as well as to different pH values. The inhibitory effect of the purified protein on 38 microbial strains grown in culture medium was determined. PgAFP sensitivity to various proteases, heat treatments, and preincubation at different pH values was tested by means of the residual activity on selected reference strains. Inhibitory activity of PgAFP against unwanted molds was tested in a dry-fermented sausage. This protein exhibited potent inhibitory activity against unwanted molds, including the main mycotoxin-producing species of Aspergillus and Penicillium of concern for dry-ripened foods. PgAFP withstood most proteases, intense heat and a wide range of pH values. PgAFP efficiently reduced counts of A. flavus and P. restrictum inoculated on a dry-fermented sausage. This protein can be of interest to control hazardous molds in dry-ripened foods. PMID:25874751

  18. Reclassification of the Penicillium roqueforti group into three species on the basis of molecular genetic and biochemical profiles.

    PubMed

    Boysen, M; Skouboe, P; Frisvad, J; Rossen, L

    1996-03-01

    Penicillium roqueforti is currently divided into two varieties, one used for cheese starter cultures, P. roqueforti var. roqueforti, and one ubiquitous patulin-producing variety, P. roqueforti var. carneum. The ribosomal regions comprising the 5.8S gene and the internal transcribed spacers, ITS I and ITS II, have been analysed from 10 isolates belonging to each variety. The 10 P. roqueforti var. carneum isolates were separated into two groups of five on the basis of 12 base-pair differences in the ITS regions. One of the groups of P. roqueforti var. carneum, in the following designated P. carneum, differed from P. roqueforti var. roqueforti, here designated P. roqueforti, in just two positions, while the other group, here called P. paneum, differed from P. roqueforti in 12 positions. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis substantiated these findings, and a comparison of secondary metabolites produced by the three groups showed that the P. roqueforti isolates all produce Penicillium Roqueforti (PR) toxin, marcfortines and fumigaclavine A, while the P. carneum isolates produce patulin, penitrem A and mycophenolic acid, as well as unidentified metabolites. P. paneum produces secondary metabolites in five chromophore families including the known mycotoxins patulin and botryodiploidin. On the basis of these findings it is proposed that P. roqueforti is reclassified into three species named P. roqueforti, P. carneum and P. paneum. PMID:8868429

  19. GH10 xylanase D from Penicillium funiculosum: biochemical studies and xylooligosaccharide production

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The filamentous fungus Penicillium funiculosum produces a range of glycoside hydrolases (GH). The XynD gene, encoding the sole P. funiculosum GH10 xylanase described so far, was cloned into the pPICZαA vector and expressed in methylotrophe yeast Pichia pastoris, in order to compare the results obtained with the P. funiculosum GH11 xylanases data. Results High level expression of recombinant XynD was obtained with a secretion of around 60 mg.L-1. The protein was purified to homogeneity using one purification step. The apparent size on SDS-PAGE was around 64 kDa and was 46 kDa by mass spectrometry thus higher than the expected molecular mass of 41 kDa. The recombinant protein was N- and O-glycosylated, as demonstrated using glycoprotein staining and deglycosylation reactions, which explained the discrepancy in molecular mass. Enzyme-catalysed hydrolysis of low viscosity arabinoxylan (LVAX) was maximal at pH 5.0 with Km(app) and kcat/Km(app) of 3.7 ± 0.2 (mg.mL-1) and 132 (s-1mg-1.mL), respectively. The activity of XynD was optimal at 80°C and the recombinant enzyme has shown an interesting high thermal stability at 70°C for at least 180 min without loss of activity. The enzyme had an endo-mode of action on xylan forming mainly xylobiose and short-chain xylooligosaccharides (XOS). The initial rate data from the hydrolysis of short XOS indicated that the catalytic efficiency increased slightly with increasing their chain length with a small difference of the XynD catalytic efficiency against the different XOS. Conclusion Because of its attractive properties XynD might be considered for biotechnological applications. Moreover, XOS hydrolysis suggested that XynD possess four catalytic subsites with a high energy of interaction with the substrate and a fifth subsite with a small energy of interaction, according to the GH10 xylanase literature data. PMID:21466666

  20. A Retrospective Analysis of 7 Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Negative Infants Infected by Penicillium marneffei.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wen; Qiu, Ye; Lu, DeCheng; Zhang, Jianquan; Zhong, Xiaoning; Liu, Guangnan

    2015-08-01

    Infection with Penicillium marneffei has rarely been reported in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative infants. We aimed to determine the epidemiological, clinical, pathological, and immunological characteristics of 7 HIV-negative infants infected by P. marneffei, and to provide insights into its diagnosis and treatment.We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 7 HIV-negative infants infected by P. marneffei who presented to the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University between January 1, 2003 and December 1, 2014. The infants' median age was 23.43 months (SD = 8.34), and all lived in Guangxi Province in China, where P. marneffei is endemic. The median time from disease onset to diagnosis was 2.29 months (SD = 2.12). Of the cases studied, 5 (71.43%) had medical histories that included frequent pneumonia or bronchopneumonia, thrush, congenital megacolon, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, and hemophagocytic syndrome. The most common symptoms were fever, cough, and anemia, followed by lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and being underweight. Four patients had slightly elevated white blood cell counts. The lymphocyte and CD4 T-cell counts were normal. The CD8 T-cell counts, serum immunoglobulin (Ig) G titer, and serum IgA titer were low in 5 patients, and the serum IgM titers were high in 3 infants. Caseous necrosis was observed in 3 patients whose lymph nodes were affected. One case who received intravenous amphotericin B and 3 cases who received intravenous voriconazole improved, and these patients were cured after continual treatment with oral voriconazole for 6 or 12 months. The remaining patients died before they received antifungal treatment.P. marneffei causes severe disease and disseminated infections, and it has high mortality rates in HIV-negative infants in endemic areas. P. marneffei susceptibility may be associated with immunodeficiencies or immune disorders. In endemic areas, clinicians should aware of disseminated

  1. Evidence for two distinct intracellular pools of inorganic sulfate in Penicillium notatum

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, D.R.; Segel, I.H.

    1985-06-01

    A strain of Penicillium notatum unable to metabolize inorganic sulfate can accumulate sulfate internally to an apparent equilibrium concentration 10/sup 5/ times greater than that remaining in the medium. The apparent K/sub eq/ is near constant at all initial external sulfate concentrations below that which would eventually exceed the internal capacity of the cells. Under equilibrium conditions of zero net flux, external /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ exchanges with internal, unlabeled SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ at a rate consistent with the kinetic constants with the sulfate transport system. Efflux experiments demonstrated that sulfate occupies two distinct intracellular pools. Pool 1 is characterized by the rapid release of /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ when the suspension of preloaded cells is adjusted to 10 mM azide at pH 8.4 (t/sub 1/2/, 0.38 min). /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ in pool 1 also rapidly exchanges with unlabeled medium sulfate. Pool 2 is characterized by the slow release of /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ induced by azide at pH 8.4 or unlabeled sulfate (t/sub 1/2/, 32 to 49 min). Early in the /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ accumulation process, up to 78% of the total transported substrate is found in pool 1. At equilibrium, pool 1 accounts for only about 2% of the total accumulated /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/. Monensin (33 ..mu..m) accelerates the transfer of /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ from pool 1 to pool 2. Valinomycin (0.2 ..mu..M) and tetraphynylboron/sup -/ (1 mM) retard the transfer of /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ from pool 1 to pool 2. Pool 2 may reside in a vacuole or other intracellular organelle. A model for the transfer of sulfate from pool 1 to pool 2 is presented.

  2. Endophytic Penicillium funiculosum LHL06 secretes gibberellin that reprograms Glycine max L. growth during copper stress

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heavy metal pollution in crop fields is one of the major issues in sustainable agriculture production. To improve crop growth and reduce the toxic effects of metals is an ideal strategy. Understanding the resilience of gibberellins producing endophytic fungi associated with crop plants in metal contaminated agriculture fields could be an important step towards reducing agrochemical pollutions. In present study, it was aimed to screen and identify metal resistant endophyte and elucidate its role in rescuing crop plant growth and metabolism during metal stress. Results Fungal endophyte, Penicillium funiculosum LHL06, was identified to possess higher growth rate in copper (Cu) and cadmium contaminated mediums as compared to other endophytes (Metarhizium anisopliae, Promicromonospora sp. and Exophiala sp.). P. funiculosum had high biosorption potential toward copper as compared to cadmium. An endophyte-metal-plant interaction was assessed by inoculating the host Glycine max L. plants with P. funiculosum during Cu (100 μM) stress. The Cu application adversely affected the biomass, chlorophyll and total protein content of non-inoculated control plants. The control plants unable to synthesis high carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen because the roots had lower access to phosphorous, potassium, sulphur and calcium during Cu treatment. Conversely, P. funiculosum-association significantly increased the plant biomass, root physiology and nutrients uptake to support higher carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen assimilation in shoot. The metal-removal potential of endophyte-inoculated plants was significantly higher than control as the endophyte-association mediated the Cu uptake via roots into shoots. The symbiosis rescued the host-plant growth by minimizing Cu-induced electrolytic leakage and lipid peroxidation while increasing reduces glutathione activities to avoid oxidative stress. P. funiculosum-association synthesized higher quantities of proline and glutamate as compared

  3. Microbial Biotransformation of Gentiopicroside by the Endophytic Fungus Penicillium crustosum 2T01Y01

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wen-Liang; Li, Wan-Kui; Han, Han; Tao, Yan-Yan; Yang, Li; Chen, Kai-Xian

    2014-01-01

    Endophytic fungi are symbiotic with plants and possess multienzyme systems showing promising metabolite potency with region selectivity and stereoselectivity. The aim of this study was to use these special microorganisms as an in vitro model to mimic the potential mammalian metabolites of a natural iridoid gentiopicroside (GPS, compound 1). The fungi isolated from a medicinal plant, Dendrobium candidum Wall. ex Lindl., were screened for their biotransformation abilities with GPS as the substrate, and one strain with high converting potency was identified as Penicillium crustosum 2T01Y01 on the basis of the sequence of the internal transcribed spacer of the ribosomal DNA region. Upon the optimized incubation of P. crustosum 2T01Y01 with the substrate, seven deglycosylated metabolites were detected by ultraperformance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/Q-TOF MS). Preparative-scale biotransformation with whole cells of the endophytic fungus resulted in the production of five metabolites, including three novel ones, 5α-(hydroxymethyl)-6β-methyl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrano[3,4-c]pyran-1(8H)-one (compound 2), (Z)-4-(1-hydroxybut-3-en-2-yl)-5,6-dihydropyran-2-one (compound 3), and (E)-4-(1-hydroxybut-3-en-2-yl)-5,6-dihydropyran-2-one (compound 4), along with two known ones, 5α-(hydroxymethyl)-6β-methyl-1H,3H-5,6-dihydropyrano[3,4-c]pyran-1(3H)-one (compound 5) and 5α-(hydroxymethyl)-6α-methyl-5,6-dihydropyrano[3,4-c]pyran-1(3H)-one (compound 6), aided by nuclear magnetic resonance and high-resolution mass spectral analyses. The other two metabolites were tentatively identified by online UPLC/Q-TOF MS as 5-hydroxymethyl-5,6-dihydroisochromen-1-one (compound 7) and 5-hydroxymethyl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydroisochromen-1-one (compound 8), and compound 8 is a new metabolite. To test the metabolic mechanism, the β-glucosidase activity of the fungus P. crustosum 2T01Y01 was assayed with ρ-nitrophenyl-β-d-glucopyranoside as a probe substrate

  4. Benzopyrone coumarin leads to an inhibition of ochratoxin biosynthesis in representatives of Aspergillus and Penicillium spp. via a type of feedback response mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mayer, L S L; Stoll, D A; Geisen, R; Schmidt-Heydt, M

    2014-04-01

    Growth and mycotoxin biosynthesis of the ochratoxin-producing fungal strains Aspergillus carbonarius, Aspergillus steynii, Penicillium verrucosum, and Penicillium nordium were analyzed on standard laboratory growth medium supplemented with different amounts of coumarin, an organic compound of the benzopyrone class. Neither the growth nor the phenotypic morphology of the filamentous fungi analyzed was affected by using coumarin concentrations equivalent to 2.5 to 25 μg/ml of medium. In contrast, the ochratoxin biosynthesis was strongly inhibited in both strains of the Aspergillus species and nearly completely inhibited in both Penicillium strains at coumarin concentrations above 8.75 μg/ml. Analyzing the transcriptional activity of the otapksPN polyketide synthase gene in P. nordicum using real-time PCR revealed a strong concentration-dependent decrease in gene expression. Taken together, the data show that ochratoxin biosynthesis in representative strains of the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium could be effectively inhibited by coumarin in a concentration-dependent manner. It could be suggested that the molecular background behind this inhibition is some kind of feedback response mechanism, based on the structural similarity of coumarin to the benzopyrone moiety of the ochratoxin molecule. PMID:24680079

  5. Experimental Microbiology of Saturated Salt Solutions and Other Harsh Environments. III. Growth of Salt-Tolerant Penicillium notatum in Boron-Rich Media 1

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Karen; Siegel, S. M.

    1967-01-01

    A stress-tolerant strain of Penicillium notatum, isolated by passage through a nutrient solution saturated with calcium acetate, was found to have a tolerance to boron in several states of oxidation. Growth in the presence of elementary boron, saturating amounts of boric acid, and with various concentrations of sodium borohydride was observed and mycelial mats were spectrographically analyzed for boron accumulation. PMID:6076112

  6. Phosphate solubilization and promotion of maize growth in a calcareous soil by Penicillium oxalicum P4 and Aspergillus niger P85

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alternative tactics for improving phosphorus nutrition in crop production are needed in China and elsewhere as the over-application of phosphatic fertilizers can adversely impact agricultural sustainability. Penicillium oxalicum P4 and Aspergillus niger P85 were isolated from a calcareous soil in C...

  7. Toxicity of ozone gas to conidia of Penicillium digitatum, P. italicum, and Botrytis cinerea and control of gray mold on table grapes.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penicillium digitatum, P. italicum, and Botrytis cinerea attack fresh fruit and cause significant postharvest decay losses and the toxicity of ozone (O3) gas at different relative humidities to control their conidia was determined. Conidia were exposed to an atmosphere containing 200 to 350 µL L-1 o...

  8. Phosphate solubilization and promotion of maize growth in a calcareous soil by penicillium oxalicum P4 and aspergillus niger P85

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alternative tactics for improving phosphorus nutrition in crop production are needed in China and elsewhere as the over-application of phosphatic fertilizers can adversely impact agricultural sustainability. Penicillium oxalicum P4 and Aspergillus niger P85 were isolated from a calcareous soil in C...

  9. Cytotoxic and antibacterial substances against multi-drug resistant pathogens from marine sponge symbiont: Citrinin, a secondary metabolite of Penicillium sp.

    PubMed Central

    Subramani, Ramesh; Kumar, Rohitesh; Prasad, Pritesh; Aalbersberg, William

    2013-01-01

    Objective To Isolate, purify, characterize, and evaluate the bioactive compounds from the sponge-derived fungus Penicillium sp. FF001 and to elucidate its structure. Methods The fungal strain FF001 with an interesting bioactivity profile was isolated from a marine Fijian sponge Melophlus sp. Based on conidiophores aggregation, conidia development and mycelia morphological characteristics, the isolate FF001 was classically identified as a Penicillium sp. The bioactive compound was identified using various spectral analysis of UV, high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectra, 1H and 13C NMR spectral data. Further minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) assay and brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay were also carried out to evaluate the biological properties of the purified compound. Results Bioassay guided fractionation of the EtOAc extract of a static culture of this Penicillium sp. by different chromatographic methods led the isolation of an antibacterial, anticryptococcal and cytotoxic active compound, which was identified as citrinin (1). Further, citrinin (1) is reported for its potent antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), rifampicin-resistant S. aureus, wild type S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium showed MICs of 3.90, 0.97, 1.95 and 7.81 µg/mL, respectively. Further citrinin (1) displayed significant activity against the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans (MIC 3.90 µg/mL), and exhibited cytotoxicity against brine shrimp larvae LD50 of 96 µg/mL. Conclusions Citrinin (1) is reported from sponge associated Penicillium sp. from this study and for its strong antibacterial activity against multi-drug resistant human pathogens including cytotoxicity against brine shrimp larvae, which indicated that sponge associated Penicillium spp. are promising sources of natural bioactive metabolites. PMID:23620853

  10. Production of Pectate Lyase by Penicillium viridicatum RFC3 in Solid-State and Submerged Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Viviani; da Silva, Roberto; Silva, Dênis; Gomes, Eleni

    2010-01-01

    Pectate lyase (PL) was produced by the filamentous fungus Penicillium viridicatum RFC3 in solid-state cultures of a mixture of orange bagasse and wheat bran (1 : 1 w/w), or orange bagasse, wheat bran and sugarcane bagasse (1 : 1 : 0.5 w/w), and in a submerged liquid culture with orange bagasse and wheat bran (3%) as the carbon source. PL production was highest (1,500 U  mL−1 or 300 Ug−1 of substrate) in solid-state fermentation (SSF) on wheat bran and orange bagasse at 96 hours. PL production in submerged fermentation (SmF) was influenced by the initial pH of the medium. With the initial pH adjusted to 4.5, 5.0, and 5.5, the peak activity was observed after 72, 48, and 24 hours of fermentation, respectively, when the pH of the medium reached the value 5.0. PL from SSF and SmF were loaded on Sephadex-G75 columns and six activity peaks were obtained from crude enzyme from SSF and designated PL I, II, III, IV, V, and VI, while five peaks were obtained from crude enzyme from SmF and labeled PL  I′, II′, III′, IV′, and VII′. Crude enzyme and fraction III from each fermentative process were tested further. The optimum pH for crude PL from either process was 5.5, while that for PL III was 8.0. The maximum activity of enzymes from SSF was observed at 35°C, but crude enzyme was more thermotolerant than PL III, maintaining its maximum activity up to 45°C. Crude enzyme from SmF and PL III′ showed thermophilic profiles of activity, with maximum activity at 60 and 55°C, respectively. In the absence of substrate, the crude enzyme from SSF was stable over the pH range 3.0–10.0 and PL III was most stable in the pH range 4.0–7.0. Crude enzyme from SmF retained 70%–80% of its maximum activity in the acid-neutral pH range (4.0–7.0), but PIII showed high stability at alkaline pH (7.5–9.5). PL from SSF was more thermolabile than that from SmF. The latter maintained 60% of its initial activity after 1 h at 55°C. The differing

  11. Penicibrocazines A–E, Five New Sulfide Diketopiperazines from the Marine-Derived Endophytic Fungus Penicillium brocae

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ling-Hong; Zhang, Peng; Li, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Bin-Gui

    2015-01-01

    Five new sulfide diketopiperazine derivatives, namely, penicibrocazines A–E (1–5), along with a known congener (6), were isolated and identified from the culture extract of Penicillium brocae MA-231, an endophytic fungus obtained from the fresh tissue of the marine mangrove plant Avicennia marina. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by detailed interpretation of NMR and mass spectroscopic data and the structures of compounds 1 and 3 were confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. All these compounds were examined for cytotoxic and antimicrobial activities. Compounds 2–6 exhibited antimicrobial activity against some of the tested strains with MIC values ranging from 0.25 to 64 μg/mL. PMID:25574740

  12. Verruculides A and B, two new protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors from an Indonesian ascidian-derived Penicillium verruculosum.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Wataru; Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Izumikawa, Yuta; Iwasaki, Kohei; Toraiwa, Kengo; Ukai, Kazuyo; Rotinsulu, Henki; Wewengkang, Defny S; Sumilat, Deiske A; Mangindaan, Remy E P; Namikoshi, Michio

    2015-08-15

    Two new merosesquiterpenes, verruculides A (1) and B (2), were isolated from a culture broth of the Indonesian ascidian-derived Penicillium verruculosum TPU1311, together with three known congeners, chrodrimanins A (3), B (4), and H (5). The structures of 1 and 2 were assigned on the basis of their spectroscopic data (1D and 2D NMR, HRMS, UV, CD, and IR). Compound 2 had a linear sesquiterpene moiety and was considered to be the derivative of the biosynthetic precursor for 1 and 3-5. Compounds 1, 3, and 5 inhibited the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) with IC50 values of 8.4, 8.5, and 14.9 μM, respectively. Compound 2 showed 40% inhibition at 23.1 μM, while 4 was not active at 20.7 μM. PMID:26115570

  13. A masquerader? Paecilomyces must be distinguished from Penicillium in fungal keratitis: a report of two contrasting cases.

    PubMed

    Sheybani, Arsham; Nguyen, Alexander T; Harocopos, George; Lubniewski, Anthony J; Huang, Andrew J W

    2015-01-01

    We describe the clinical outcomes of two contrasting cases of fungal keratitis due to Paecilomyces spp. The first case involving a 58-year-old woman was complicated by an initial laboratory misidentification as Penicillium and consequently a delay in treatment with an optimised antifungal regimen. The patient had a protracted clinical course that required a total of four penetrating keratoplasties. However, an accurate diagnosis was promptly made in the second case, a 46-year-old woman, which resulted in a satisfactory outcome after penetrating keratoplasty. Our principal aim was to highlight a diagnostic challenge relating to the accurate microbial identification of Paecilomyces spp. This can be difficult given its morphological similarity to Pencillium, and confusion over the two genera has resulted in misdiagnoses reported previously. Our report aims to raise awareness of this potential laboratory misidentification, which can affect clinical decision-making in guiding antimicrobial therapy. PMID:26286907

  14. Chemical profile of the secondary metabolites produced by a deep-sea sediment-derived fungus Penicillium commune SD-118

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Zhuo; Li, Xiaoming; Meng, Li; Li, Chunshun; Gao, Shushan; Huang, Caiguo; Wang, Bingui

    2012-03-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the crude extract from Penicillium commune SD-118, a fungus obtained from a deep-sea sediment sample, resulted in the isolation of a known antibacterial compound, xanthocillin X ( 1), and 14 other known compounds comprising three steroids ( 2-4), two ceramides ( 5 and 6), six aromatic compounds ( 7-12), and three alkaloids ( 13-15). Xanthocillin X ( 1) was isolated for the first time from a marine fungus. In the bioassay, xanthocillin X ( 1) displayed remarkable antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and significant cytotoxicity against MCF-7, HepG2, H460, Hela, Du145, and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. Meleagrin ( 15) exhibited cytotoxicity against HepG2, Hela, Du145, and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. This is the first report of the cytotoxicity of xanthocillin X ( 1).

  15. OxaD: A Versatile Indolic Nitrone Synthase from the Marine-Derived Fungus Penicillium oxalicum F30.

    PubMed

    Newmister, Sean A; Gober, Claire M; Romminger, Stelamar; Yu, Fengan; Tripathi, Ashootosh; Parra, Lizbeth Lorena L; Williams, Robert M; Berlinck, Roberto G S; Joullié, Madeleine M; Sherman, David H

    2016-09-01

    Indole alkaloids are a diverse class of natural products known for their wide range of biological activities and complex chemical structures. Rarely observed in this class are indolic nitrones, such as avrainvillamide and waikialoid, which possess potent bioactivities. Herein the oxa gene cluster from the marine-derived fungus Penicillium oxalicum F30 is described along with the characterization of OxaD, a flavin-dependent oxidase that generates roquefortine L, a nitrone-bearing intermediate in the biosynthesis of oxaline. Nitrone functionality in roquefortine L was confirmed by spectroscopic methods and 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition with methyl acrylate. OxaD is a versatile biocatalyst that converts an array of semisynthetic roquefortine C derivatives bearing indoline systems to their respective nitrones. This work describes the first implementation of a nitrone synthase as a biocatalyst and establishes a novel platform for late-stage diversification of a range of complex natural products. PMID:27505044

  16. Pre-harvest application of oxalic acid increases quality and resistance to Penicillium expansum in kiwifruit during postharvest storage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuyan; Yu, Jie; Brecht, Jeffrey K; Jiang, Tianjia; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa cv. Bruno) fruits were sprayed with 5mM oxalic acid (OA) at 130, 137, and 144 days after full blossom, and then harvested at commercial maturity [soluble solid content (SSC) around 10.0%] and stored at room temperature (20 ± 1 °C). Pre-harvest application of OA led to fruit with higher ascorbic acid content at harvest, slowed the decreases in fruit firmness and ascorbic acid content and increase in SSC during storage, and also decreased the natural disease incidence, lesion diameter, and patulin accumulation in fruit inoculated with Penicillium expansum, indicating that the OA treatment increased quality and induced disease resistance in kiwifruit. It was suggested that the increase in activities of defense-related enzymes and in levels of substances related to disease resistance might collectively contribute to resistance in kiwifruit against fungi such as P. expansum in storage. PMID:26213007

  17. The Effects of Wheat Bran Composition on the Production of Biomass-Hydrolyzing Enzymes by Penicillium decumbens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xianyun; Liu, Ziyong; Qu, Yinbo; Li, Xuezhi

    The effects of the starch, protein, and soluble oligosaccharides contents in wheat bran on the extracellular biomass-hydrolyzing enzymes activities released by Penicillium decumbens mycelia grown in batch fermentations have been examined. The results showed increased starch content correlated directly with an increase in released amylase activity but inversely with the levels of secreted cellulase and xylanase. High amounts of protein in wheat bran also reduced the activities of cellulase, xylanase and protease in the culture medium. The effects of the soluble and insoluble components of wheat bran and cello-oligosaccharides supplements on production of extracellular cellulase and xylanase were compared. The soluble cello-oligosaccharides compositions in wheat bran were proved to be one of the most significant factors for cellulase production. According to the results of this research, determining and regulating the composition of wheat bran used as a fermentation supplement may allow for improved induction of cellulase and xylanase production.

  18. Response surface method to optimize the production and characterization of lipase from Penicillium verrucosum in solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kempka, Aniela Pinto; Lipke, Nadia Lamb; da Luz Fontoura Pinheiro, Thais; Menoncin, Silvana; Treichel, Helen; Freire, Denise M G; Di Luccio, Marco; de Oliveira, Débora

    2008-02-01

    Current studies about lipase production by solid-state fermentation involve the use of agro-industrial residues towards developing cost-effective systems directed to large-scale commercialization of enzyme-catalyzed processes. In this work, lipase production and partial characterization of the crude enzymatic extracts obtained by Penicillium verrucosum using soybean bran as substrate was investigated. Different inductors were evaluated and the results showed that there is no influence of this variable on the lipase production, while temperature and initial moisture were the main factors that affected enzyme production. The optimized cultivation temperature (27.5 degrees C) and initial moisture of substrate (55%) were determined using the response surface methodology. Kinetics of lipase production was followed at the optimized growth conditions. Optimum lipase yield was 40 U/g of dry bran. The crude enzymatic extract showed optimal activity in the range from 30 to 45 degrees C and in pH 7.0. PMID:17694331

  19. Crystal structure of a triacylglycerol lipase from Penicillium expansum at 1.3 A determined by sulfur SAD

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Chuanbing; Yuan, Cai; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Jiang, Longguang; Huang, Zixiang; Lin, Lin; Huang, Mingdong

    2010-04-05

    Triacylglycerol lipases (EC 3.1.1.3) are present in many different organisms including animals, plants, and microbes. Lipases catalyze the hydrolysis of long-chain triglycerides into fatty acids and glycerol at the interface between the water insoluble substrate and the aqueous phase. Lipases can also catalyze the reverse esterification reaction to form glycerides under certain conditions. Lipases of microbial origin are of considerable commercial interest for wide variety of biotechnological applications in industries, including detergent, food, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, fine chemicals, and biodiesel. Nowadays, microbial lipases have become one of the most important industrial enzymes. PEL (Penicillium expansum lipase) is a fungal lipase from Penicillium expansum strain PF898 isolated from Chinese soil that has been subjected to several generations of mutagenesis to increase its enzymatic activity. PEL belongs to the triacylglycerol lipases family, and its catalytic characteristics have been studied. The enzyme has been used in Chinese laundry detergent industry for several years (http://www.leveking.com). However, the poor thermal stability of the enzyme limits its application. To further study and improve this enzyme, PEL was cloned and sequenced. Furthermore, it was overexpressed in Pichia pastoris. PEL contains GHSLG sequence, which is the lipase consensus sequence Gly-X1-Ser-X2-Gly, but has a low amino acid sequence identities to other lipases. The most similar lipases are Rhizomucor miehei (PML) and Rhizopus niveus (PNL) with a 21% and 20% sequence identities to PEL, respectively. Interestingly, the similarity of PEL with the known esterases is somewhat higher with 24% sequence identity to feruloyl esterase A. Here, we report the 1.3 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of PEL determined by sulfur SAD phasing. This structure not only presents a new lipase structure at high resolution, but also provides a structural platform to analyze the published

  20. PcFKH1, a novel regulatory factor from the forkhead family, controls the biosynthesis of penicillin in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Santos, Rebeca; García-Estrada, Carlos; Kosalková, Katarina; Prieto, Carlos; Santamarta, Irene; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2015-08-01

    Penicillin biosynthesis in Penicillium chrysogenum (re-identified as Penicillium rubens) is a good example of a biological process subjected to complex global regulatory networks and serves as a model to study fungal secondary metabolism. The winged-helix family of transcription factors recently described, which includes the forkhead type of proteins, is a key type of regulatory proteins involved in this process. In yeasts and humans, forkhead transcription factors are involved in different processes (cell cycle regulation, cell death control, pre-mRNA processing and morphogenesis); one member of this family of proteins has been identified in the P. chrysogenum genome (Pc18g00430). In this work, we have characterized this novel transcription factor (named PcFKH1) by generating knock-down mutants and overexpression strains. Results clearly indicate that PcFKH1 positively controls antibiotic biosynthesis through the specific interaction with the promoter region of the penDE gene, thus regulating penDE mRNA levels. PcFKH1 also binds to the pcbC promoter, but with low affinity. In addition, it also controls other ancillary genes of the penicillin biosynthetic process, such as phlA (encoding phenylacetyl CoA ligase) and ppt (encoding phosphopantetheinyl transferase). PcFKH1 also plays a role in conidiation and spore pigmentation, but it does not seem to be involved in hyphal morphology or cell division in the improved laboratory reference strain Wisconsin 54-1255. A genome-wide analysis of processes putatively coregulated by PcFKH1 and PcRFX1 (another winged-helix transcription factor) in P. chrysogenum provided evidence of the global effect of these transcription factors in P. chrysogenum metabolism. PMID:26049046

  1. Comments on "Mycobiota and Mycotoxins in Traditional Medicinal Seeds from China. Toxins 2015, 7, 3858-3875"- in Attributing Ochratoxin A Biosynthesis Within the Genus Penicillium Occurring on Natural Agricultural Produce.

    PubMed

    Mantle, Peter; Copetti, Marina Venturini; Buddie, Alan; Frisvad, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The unusual attribution of trace amounts of ochratoxin A in some Chinese food commodities to Penicillium polonicum is questioned by European experience in searches for ochratoxinogenic food-spoilage Penicillia, where mistaken attribution is now known to have been due to cryptic Penicillium verrucosum contamination. Consequently, selection of single-spore isolates is recommended as pre-requisite for attributing mycotoxin biosynthetic potential to fungi. PMID:27258309

  2. Comments on “Mycobiota and Mycotoxins in Traditional Medicinal Seeds from China. Toxins 2015, 7, 3858-3875”— in Attributing Ochratoxin A Biosynthesis Within the Genus Penicillium Occurring on Natural Agricultural Produce

    PubMed Central

    Mantle, Peter; Copetti, Marina Venturini; Buddie, Alan; Frisvad, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The unusual attribution of trace amounts of ochratoxin A in some Chinese food commodities to Penicillium polonicum is questioned by European experience in searches for ochratoxinogenic food-spoilage Penicillia, where mistaken attribution is now known to have been due to cryptic Penicillium verrucosum contamination. Consequently, selection of single-spore isolates is recommended as pre-requisite for attributing mycotoxin biosynthetic potential to fungi. PMID:27258309

  3. Rapid prediction of ochratoxin A-producing strains of Penicillium on dry-cured meat by MOS-based electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Lippolis, Vincenzo; Ferrara, Massimo; Cervellieri, Salvatore; Damascelli, Anna; Epifani, Filomena; Pascale, Michelangelo; Perrone, Giancarlo

    2016-02-01

    The availability of rapid diagnostic methods for monitoring ochratoxigenic species during the seasoning processes for dry-cured meats is crucial and constitutes a key stage in order to prevent the risk of ochratoxin A (OTA) contamination. A rapid, easy-to-perform and non-invasive method using an electronic nose (e-nose) based on metal oxide semiconductors (MOS) was developed to discriminate dry-cured meat samples in two classes based on the fungal contamination: class P (samples contaminated by OTA-producing Penicillium strains) and class NP (samples contaminated by OTA non-producing Penicillium strains). Two OTA-producing strains of Penicillium nordicum and two OTA non-producing strains of Penicillium nalgiovense and Penicillium salamii, were tested. The feasibility of this approach was initially evaluated by e-nose analysis of 480 samples of both Yeast extract sucrose (YES) and meat-based agar media inoculated with the tested Penicillium strains and incubated up to 14 days. The high recognition percentages (higher than 82%) obtained by Discriminant Function Analysis (DFA), either in calibration and cross-validation (leave-more-out approach), for both YES and meat-based samples demonstrated the validity of the used approach. The e-nose method was subsequently developed and validated for the analysis of dry-cured meat samples. A total of 240 e-nose analyses were carried out using inoculated sausages, seasoned by a laboratory-scale process and sampled at 5, 7, 10 and 14 days. DFA provided calibration models that permitted discrimination of dry-cured meat samples after only 5 days of seasoning with mean recognition percentages in calibration and cross-validation of 98 and 88%, respectively. A further validation of the developed e-nose method was performed using 60 dry-cured meat samples produced by an industrial-scale seasoning process showing a total recognition percentage of 73%. The pattern of volatile compounds of dry-cured meat samples was identified and

  4. A Tet-on and Cre-loxP Based Genetic Engineering System for Convenient Recycling of Selection Markers in Penicillium oxalicum

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Baojie; Zhang, Ruiqin; Feng, Dan; Wang, Fangzhong; Liu, Kuimei; Jiang, Yi; Niu, Kangle; Yuan, Quanquan; Wang, Mingyu; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Youming; Fang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The lack of selective markers has been a key problem preventing multistep genetic engineering in filamentous fungi, particularly for industrial species such as the lignocellulose degrading Penicillium oxalicum JUA10-1(formerly named as Penicillium decumbens). To resolve this problem, we constructed a genetic manipulation system taking advantage of two established genetic systems: the Cre-loxP system and Tet-on system in P. oxalicum JUA10-1. This system is efficient and convenient. The expression of Cre recombinase was activated by doxycycline since it was controlled by Tet-on system. Using this system, two genes, ligD and bglI, were sequentially disrupted by loxP flanked ptrA. The successful application of this procedure will provide a useful tool for genetic engineering in filamentous fungi. This system will also play an important role in improving the productivity of interesting products and minimizing by-product when fermented by filamentous fungi. PMID:27148179

  5. Diversity of Penicillium section Citrina within the fynbos biome of South Africa, including a new species from a Protea repens infructescence.

    PubMed

    Visagie, Cobus M; Seifert, Keith A; Houbraken, Jos; Samson, Robert A; Jacobs, Karin

    2014-01-01

    During a survey of the fynbos biome in the Western Cape of South Africa, 61 Penicillium species were isolated and nine belong to Penicillium section Citrina. Based on morphology and multigene phylogenies, section Citrina species were identified as P. cairnsense, P. citrinum, P. pancosmium, P. pasqualense, P. sanguifluum, P. sizovae, P. sumatrense and P. ubiquetum. One of the species displayed unique phenotypic characters and DNA sequences and is described here as P. sucrivorum. Multigene phylogenies consistently resolved the new species in a clade with P. aurantiacobrunneum, P. cairnsense, P. miczynksii, P. neomiczynskii and P. quebecense. However, ITS, β-tubulin and calmodulin gene sequences are unique for P. sucrivorum and growth rates on various media, the ability to grow at 30 C, a positive Ehrlich reaction and the absence of sclerotia on all media examined, distinguish P. sucrivorum from all of its close relatives. PMID:24871606

  6. Macrolides from a Marine-Derived Fungus, Penicillium meleagrinum var. viridiflavum, Showing Synergistic Effects with Fluconazole against Azole-Resistant Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Miki; Sugita, Takashi; Kinoshita, Kaoru; Koyama, Kiyotaka

    2016-04-22

    Two new 13-membered macrolides (1, 7), along with known 13-membered macrolides PF1163A, B, D, H, and F (2-6), were isolated from a strain of a marine-derived fungus, Penicillium meleagrinum var. viridiflavum. The structures of 1 and 7 were elucidated from spectroscopic data (NMR, MS, IR). Compounds 1-7 showed synergistic effects with fluconazole against azole-resistant Candida albicans by a checkerboard assay. PMID:27014845

  7. Verrulactone C with an unprecedented dispiro skeleton, a new inhibitor of Staphylococcus aureus enoyl-ACP reductase, from Penicillium verruculosum F375.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nyung; Sohn, Mi-Jin; Koshino, Hiroyuki; Kim, Eun-Hee; Kim, Won-Gon

    2014-01-01

    An highly quaternary and unprecedented dispiro compound, verrulactone C, with the known compound, altenuisol, were isolated from a culture broth of the fungal strain Penicillium verruculosum F375 and their structures were established by various spectral analysis. Verrulactone C and altenuisol showed FabI-selective inhibition. Especially altenuisol had the high correlation between FabI-inhibition and whole cell antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA with MICs of 8-32μg/mL. PMID:24332629

  8. [State of Fungal Lipases of Rhizopus microsporus, Penicillium sp. and Oospora lactis in Border Layers Water-Solid Phase and Factors Affecting Catalytic Properties of Enzymes].

    PubMed

    Khasanov, Kh T; Davranov, K; Rakhimov, M M

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated that a change in the catalytic activity of fungal lipases synthesized by Rhizopus microsporus, Penicillium sp. and Oospora lactis and their ability to absorb on different sorbents depended on the nature of groups on the solid phase surface in the model systems water: lipid and water: solid phase. Thus, the stability of Penicillium sp. lipases increased 85% in the presence ofsorsilen or DEAE-cellulose, and 55% of their initial activity respectively was preserved. In the presence of silica gel and CM-cellulose, a decreased rate of lipid hydrolysis by Pseudomonas sp. enzymes was observed in water medium, and the hydrolysis rate increased by 2.4 and 1.5 times respectively in the presence of aminoaerosil and polykefamid. In an aqueous-alcohol medium, aminoaerosil and polykefamid decreased the rate of substrate hydrolysis by more than 30 times. The addition of aerosil to aqueous and aqueous-alcohol media resulted in an increase in the hydrolysis rate by 1.2-1.3 times. Sorsilen stabilized Penicillium sp. lipase activity at 40, 45, 50 and 55 degrees C. Either stabilization or inactivation of lipases was observed depending on the pH of the medium and the nature of chemical groups localized on the surface of solid phase. The synthetizing activity of lipases also changed depending on the conditions. PMID:26596088

  9. Characterization of a novel 8R,11S-linoleate diol synthase from Penicillium chrysogenum by identification of its enzymatic products[S

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kyung-Chul; Seo, Min-Ju; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2016-01-01

    To identify novel fatty acid diol synthases, putative candidate sequences from Penicillium species were analyzed, and hydroxy fatty acid production by crude Penicillium enzyme extracts was assessed. Penicillium chrysogenum was found to produce an unknown dihydroxy fatty acid, a candidate gene implicated in this production was cloned and expressed, and the expressed enzyme was purified. The product obtained by the reaction of the purified enzyme with linoleic acid was identified as 8R,11S-dihydroxy-9,12(Z,Z)-octadecadienoic acid (8R,11S-DiHODE). The catalytic efficiency of this enzyme toward linoleic acid was the highest among the unsaturated fatty acids tested, indicating that this enzyme was a novel 8R,11S-linoleate diol synthase (8R,11S-LDS). A sexual stage in the life cycle of P. chrysogenum has recently been discovered, and 8R,11S-DiHODE produced by 8R,11S-LDS may constitute a precocious sexual inducer factor, responsible for regulating the sexual and asexual cycles of this fungus. PMID:26681780

  10. Plant growth-promoting fungus Penicillium spp. GP15-1 enhances growth and confers protection against damping-off and anthracnose in the cucumber.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Motaher; Sultana, Farjana; Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting fungi (PGPF) have the potential to confer several benefits to plants in terms of growth and protection against pests and pathogens. In the present study, we tested whether a PGPF isolate, Penicillium spp. GP15-1 (derived from zoysiagrass rhizospheres), stimulates growth and disease resistance in the cucumber plant. The use of the barley grain inoculum GP15-1 significantly enhanced root and shoot growth and biomass of cucumber plants. A root colonization study revealed that GP15-1 was a very rapid and efficient root colonizer and was isolated in significantly higher frequencies from the upper root parts than from the middle and lower root parts during the first 14 d of seedling growth. Inoculating the cucumber seedlings with GP15-1 significantly reduced the damping-off disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani, and the disease suppression effects of GP15-1 were considerably influenced by the inoculum potential of both GP15-1 and the pathogen. Treatment with the barley grain inoculum or a cell-free filtrate of GP15-1 increased systemic resistance against leaf infection by the anthracnose pathogen Colletotrichum orbiculare, resulting in a significant decrease in lesion number and size. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses of internal transcribed spacer sequences of the genomic DNA of GP15-1 revealed that the fungal isolate is a strain of either Penicillium neoechinulatum or Penicillium viridicatum. PMID:24671024

  11. Identification of MicroRNA-Like RNAs in Mycelial and Yeast Phases of the Thermal Dimorphic Fungus Penicillium marneffei

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Annette Y. P.; Yeung, Julian M. Y.; Bao, Jessie; Zhang, Na; Lok, Si; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2013-01-01

    Background Penicillium marneffei is the most important thermal dimorphic fungus causing systemic mycosis in China and Southeast Asia. While miRNAs are increasingly recognized for their roles in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in animals and plants, miRNAs in fungi were less well studied and their potential roles in fungal dimorphism were largely unknown. Based on P. marneffei genome sequence, we hypothesize that miRNA-like RNAs (milRNAs) may be expressed in the dimorphic fungus. Methodology/Principal Findings We attempted to identify milRNAs in P. marneffei in both mycelial and yeast phase using high-throughput sequencing technology. Small RNAs were more abundantly expressed in mycelial than yeast phase. Sequence analysis revealed 24 potential milRNA candidates, including 17 candidates in mycelial and seven in yeast phase. Two genes, dcl-1 and dcl-2, encoding putative Dicer-like proteins and the gene, qde-2, encoding Argonaute-like protein, were identified in P. marneffei. Phylogenetic analysis showed that dcl-2 of P. marneffei was more closely related to the homologues in other thermal dimorphic pathogenic fungi than to Penicillium chrysogenum and Aspergillus spp., suggesting the co-evolution of dcl-2 among the thermal dimorphic fungi. Moreover, dcl-2 demonstrated higher mRNA expression levels in mycelial than yeast phase by 7 folds (P<0.001). Northern blot analysis confirmed the expression of two milRNAs, PM-milR-M1 and PM-milR-M2, only in mycelial phase. Using dcl-1KO, dcl-2KO, dclDKO and qde-2KO deletion mutants, we showed that the biogenesis of both milRNAs were dependent on dcl-2 but not dcl-1 or qde-2. The mRNA expression levels of three predicted targets of PM-milR-M1 were upregulated in knockdown strain PM-milR-M1KD, supporting regulatory function of milRNAs. Conclusions/Significance Our findings provided the first evidence for differential expression of milRNAs in different growth phases of thermal dimorphic fungi and shed light on the

  12. A study of organic acid production in contrasts between two phosphate solubilizing fungi: Penicillium oxalicum and Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Bai, Tongshuo; Dai, Letian; Wang, Fuwei; Tao, Jinjin; Meng, Shiting; Hu, Yunxiao; Wang, Shimei; Hu, Shuijin

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate solubilizing fungi (PSF) have huge potentials in enhancing release of phosphorus from fertilizer. Two PSF (NJDL-03 and NJDL-12) were isolated and identified as Penicillium oxalicum and Aspergillus niger respectively in this study. The quantification and identification of organic acids were performed by HPLC. Total concentrations of organic acids secreted by NJDL-03 and NJDL-12 are ~4000 and ~10,000 mg/L with pH values of 3.6 and 2.4 respectively after five-days culture. Oxalic acid dominates acidity in the medium due to its high concentration and high acidity constant. The two fungi were also cultured for five days with the initial pH values of the medium varied from 6.5 to 1.5. The biomass reached the maximum when the initial pH values are 4.5 for NJDL-03 and 2.5 for NJDL-12. The organic acids for NJDL-12 reach the maximum at the initial pH = 5.5. However, the acids by NJDL-03 continue to decrease and proliferation of the fungus terminates at pH = 2.5. The citric acid production increases significantly for NJDL-12 at acidic environment, whereas formic and oxalic acids decrease sharply for both two fungi. This study shows that NJDL-12 has higher ability in acid production and has stronger adaptability to acidic environment than NJDL-03. PMID:27126606

  13. Purification and identification of a novel antifungal protein secreted by Penicillium citrinum from the Southwest Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chao; Guo, Wenbin; Chen, Xinhua

    2014-10-01

    A novel antifungal protein produced by the fungal strain Penicillium citrinum W1, which was isolated from a Southwest Indian Ocean sediment sample, was purified and characterized. The culture supernatant of P. citrinum W1 inhibited the mycelial growth of some plant pathogenic fungi. After saturation of P. citrinum W1 culture supernatants with ammonium sulfate and ion-exchange chromatography, an antifungal protein (PcPAF) was purified. The N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis showed that PcPAF might be an unknown antifungal protein. PcPAF displayed antifungal activity against Trichoderma viride, Fusarium oxysporum, Paecilomyces variotii, and Alternaria longipes at minimum inhibitory concentrations of 1.52, 6.08, 3.04, and 6.08 µg/disc, respectively. PcPAF possessed high thermostability and had a certain extent of protease and metal ion resistance. The results suggested that PcPAF may represent a novel antifungal protein with potential application in controlling plant pathogenic fungal infection. PMID:24931500

  14. Behavior of spores of Penicillium roquefortii during fed-batch bioconversion of octanoic acid into 2-heptanone

    SciTech Connect

    Larroche, C.; Besson, I.; Gros, J.B. . Lab. de Genie Chimique Biologique)

    1994-09-05

    The bioconversion of octanoic acid into 2-heptanone by spores of Penicillium roquefortii is performed using a fed-batch technique with pH control by addition of the liquid substrate itself. The early stage of this process takes place with a high bioconversion rate and high yield. These values then decrease as a result of germination and growth of the biocatalyst. An optimization strategy for the process would thus be to improve the characteristics of this first period, i.e., increase its duration and the reaction rate. An increase in duration is evidenced in two cases: (1) under oxygen limitation; and (2) when the spore content in the medium is less than 10[sup 7] spores/mL. These conditions give insufficient overall bioconversion rates; better optimization should be achieved without oxygen limitation and with high spore content. Characterization of the first period by material and bioenergetic balances suggests that an increase in the ethanol content of the medium, which acts as an energy source and a permeabilizer, and the use of a specific inhibitor of the Krebs cycle, may be a way to further improve the biocatalyst performance and stability.

  15. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Tanzawaic Acid Derivatives from a Marine-Derived Fungus Penicillium steckii 108YD142.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee Jae; Pil, Gam Bang; Heo, Soo-Jin; Lee, Hyi-Seung; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Jihoon; Won, Ho Shik

    2016-01-01

    Chemical investigation of a marine-derived fungus, Penicillium steckii 108YD142, resulted in the discovery of a new tanzawaic acid derivative, tanzawaic acid Q (1), together with four known analogues, tanzawaic acids A (2), C (3), D (4), and K (5). The structures of tanzawaic acid derivatives 1-5 were determined by the detailed analysis of 1D, 2D NMR and LC-MS data, along with chemical methods and literature data analysis. These compounds significantly inhibited nitric oxide (NO) production and the new tanzawaic acid Q (1) inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) proteins and mRNA expressions in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Additionally, compound 1 reduced the mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrated that the new tanzawaic acid derivative inhibits LPS-induced inflammation. This is the first report on the anti-inflammatory activity of tanzawaic acid Q (1). PMID:26761016

  16. Penicimenolides A-F, Resorcylic Acid Lactones from Penicillium sp., isolated from the Rhizosphere Soil of Panax notoginseng.

    PubMed

    An, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Zhang, Meng-Yue; Qian-Zhang; Deng, Xiao-Yu; Zhao, Feng; Zhu, Ling-Juan; Wang, Guan; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Yi-Xuan; Liu, Bo; Yao, Xin-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Five new 12-membered resorcylic acid lactone derivatives, penicimenolides A-E (1-5), one new ring-opened resorcylic acid lactone derivative penicimenolide F (6), and six known biogenetically related derivatives (7-12) were isolated from the culture broth of a strain of Penicillium sp. (NO. SYP-F-7919), a fungus obtained from the rhizosphere soil of Panax notoginseng collected from the Yunnan province of China. Their structures were elucidated by extensive NMR analyses, a modified Mosher's method, chemical derivatization and single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compounds 2-4 exhibited potent cytotoxicity against the U937 and MCF-7 tumour cell lines and showed moderate cytotoxic activity against the SH-SY5Y and SW480 tumour cell lines. The substitution of an acetyloxy or 2-hydroxypropionyloxy group at C-7 significantly increased the cytotoxic activity of the resorcylic acid lactone derivatives. Subsequently, the possible mechanism of compound 2 against MCF-7 cells was preliminarily investigated by in silico analysis and experimental validation, indicating compound 2 may act as a potential MEK/ERK inhibitor. Moreover, proteomics analysis was performed to explore compound 2-regulated concrete mechanism underlying MEK/ERK pathway, which is still need further study in the future. In addition, compounds 2-4 and 7 exhibited a significant inhibitory effect on NO production induced by LPS. PMID:27271722

  17. Impedimetric sensor for toxigenic Penicillium sclerotigenum detection in yam based on magnetite-poly(allylamine hydrochloride) composite.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gilcelia J L; Andrade, Cesar A S; Oliveira, Idjane S; de Melo, Celso P; Oliveira, Maria D L

    2013-04-15

    We describe a new DNA biosensor for the detection of toxigenic Penicillium sclerotigenum in pure culture or infected yams. The P. sclerotigenum detection takes place on a self-assembled monolayer of a (magnetite)/(poly(allylamine hydrochloride)) (Fe3O4-PAH) composite that serves as an anchoring layer for the DNA hybridization interaction. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to evaluate and quantify the hybridization degree. The Fe3O4-PAH composite is a good platform for the immobilization of biomolecules, due to the presence of many possible binding sites for nucleotides and to its large surface-to-volume ratio and good biocompatibility. The biosensor was capable of not only qualitatively detecting the presence of the fungus genome at low concentrations, but also shown a good quantitative impedimetric response its electrical resistance was monitored along the time of exposure. A Fe3O4-PAH-probe biosensor would require only small volumes and low concentrations of the analyte when used, for instance, in detecting P. sclerotigenum contamination of food, besides presenting many comparative advantages, such as selectivity, specificity and reproducibility, relative to alternative techniques. PMID:23465186

  18. The biosynthetic pathway for a thousand-year-old natural food colorant and citrinin in Penicillium marneffei

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Lam, Ching-Wan; Tam, Emily W. T.; Lee, Kim-Chung; Yung, Karrie K. Y.; Leung, Chris K. F.; Sze, Kong-Hung; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-01-01

    Monascorubrin and its derivatives are polyketides used as natural colorants for a wide range of food for more than one thousand years. Since the biosynthetic pathway for this ancient chemical compound is unknown and genome sequence unavailable for any Monascus species, monascorubrin production has relied on extraction from fungal cultures of Monascus species. In vitro synthesis and genetic manipulation are not possible. Here we report the polyketide gene cluster and pathway for monascorubrin biosynthesis in Penicillium marneffei, a diffusible red pigment-producing, thermal dimorphic fungus, taking advantage of available genome sequence and faster growth rate than Monascus species. We also documented that the red pigment of P. marneffei is a mixture of more than 16 chemical compounds, which are amino acid conjugates of monascorubrin and rubropunctatin, and showed that this polyketide gene cluster and pathway are also responsible for biosynthesis of ankaflavin and citrinin, a mycotoxin with nephrotoxic activity in mammals. The present study on elucidation of the biosynthetic pathway of monascorubrin is a proof-of-the-concept study that serves as a cornerstone for future studies on monascorubrin biosynthesis pathway dissection in Monascus species. PMID:25335861

  19. Optimisation of Cellulase Production by Penicillium funiculosum in a Stirred Tank Bioreactor Using Multivariate Response Surface Analysis.

    PubMed

    de Albuquerque de Carvalho, Marcelle Lins; Carvalho, Daniele Fernandes; de Barros Gomes, Edelvio; Nobuyuki Maeda, Roberto; Melo Santa Anna, Lidia Maria; de Castro, Aline Machado; Pereira, Nei

    2014-01-01

    Increasing interest in the production of second-generation ethanol necessitates the low-cost production of enzymes from the cellulolytic complex (endoglucanases, exoglucanases, and β-glucosidases), which act synergistically in cellulose breakdown. The present work aimed to optimise a bioprocess to produce these biocatalysts from the fungus Penicillium funiculosum ATCC11797. A statistical full factorial design (FFD) was employed to determine the optimal conditions for cellulase production. The optimal composition of culture media using Avicel (10 g·L(-1)) as carbon source was determined to include urea (1.2 g·L(-1)), yeast extract (1.0 g·L(-1)), KH2PO4 (6.0 g·L(-1)), and MgSO4 ·7H2O (1.2 g·L(-1)). The growth process was performed in batches in a bioreactor. Using a different FFD strategy, the optimised bioreactor operational conditions of an agitation speed of 220 rpm and aeration rate of 0.6 vvm allowed the obtainment of an enzyme pool with activities of 508 U·L(-1) for FPase, 9,204 U·L(-1) for endoglucanase, and 2,395 U·L(-1) for β-glucosidase. The sequential optimisation strategy was effective and afforded increased cellulase production in the order from 3.6 to 9.5 times higher than production using nonoptimised conditions. PMID:25057412

  20. Optimisation of Cellulase Production by Penicillium funiculosum in a Stirred Tank Bioreactor Using Multivariate Response Surface Analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Albuquerque de Carvalho, Marcelle Lins; Carvalho, Daniele Fernandes; de Barros Gomes, Edelvio; Nobuyuki Maeda, Roberto; Melo Santa Anna, Lidia Maria; de Castro, Aline Machado; Pereira, Nei

    2014-01-01

    Increasing interest in the production of second-generation ethanol necessitates the low-cost production of enzymes from the cellulolytic complex (endoglucanases, exoglucanases, and β-glucosidases), which act synergistically in cellulose breakdown. The present work aimed to optimise a bioprocess to produce these biocatalysts from the fungus Penicillium funiculosum ATCC11797. A statistical full factorial design (FFD) was employed to determine the optimal conditions for cellulase production. The optimal composition of culture media using Avicel (10 g·L−1) as carbon source was determined to include urea (1.2 g·L−1), yeast extract (1.0 g·L−1), KH2PO4 (6.0 g·L−1), and MgSO4·7H2O (1.2 g·L−1). The growth process was performed in batches in a bioreactor. Using a different FFD strategy, the optimised bioreactor operational conditions of an agitation speed of 220 rpm and aeration rate of 0.6 vvm allowed the obtainment of an enzyme pool with activities of 508 U·L−1 for FPase, 9,204 U·L−1 for endoglucanase, and 2,395 U·L−1 for β-glucosidase. The sequential optimisation strategy was effective and afforded increased cellulase production in the order from 3.6 to 9.5 times higher than production using nonoptimised conditions. PMID:25057412

  1. Time Dependency of Chemodiversity and Biosynthetic Pathways: An LC-MS Metabolomic Study of Marine-Sourced Penicillium

    PubMed Central

    Roullier, Catherine; Bertrand, Samuel; Blanchet, Elodie; Peigné, Mathilde; Robiou du Pont, Thibaut; Guitton, Yann; Pouchus, Yves François; Grovel, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    This work aimed at studying metabolome variations of marine fungal strains along their growth to highlight the importance of the parameter “time” for new natural products discovery. An untargeted time-scale metabolomic study has been performed on two different marine-derived Penicillium strains. They were cultivated for 18 days and their crude extracts were analyzed by HPLC-DAD-HRMS (High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detector-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry) each day. With the example of griseofulvin biosynthesis, a pathway shared by both strains, this work provides a new approach to study biosynthetic pathway regulations, which could be applied to other metabolites and more particularly new ones. Moreover, the results of this study emphasize the interest of such an approach for the discovery of new chemical entities. In particular, at every harvesting time, previously undetected features were observed in the LC-MS (Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry) data. Therefore, harvesting times for metabolite extraction should be performed at different time points to access the hidden metabolome. PMID:27213411

  2. [Ultrasonic and thermal inactivation of catalases from the bovine liver, the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, and the fungus Penicillium piceum].

    PubMed

    Potapovich, M V; Eremin, A N; Metelitsa, D I

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of inactivation of catalases from bovine liver (CAT), the fungus Penicillium piceum (CAT1), and the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris (CAT2) was studied in phosphate buffer (pH 5.5 or 7.4) at 45 and 50 degrees C or under the conditions of exposure to low-frequency ultrasound (LFUS; 27 kHz, 60 W/cm2). The processes were characterized by effective first-order rate constants (s(-1)): kin (total inactivation), k*in in (thermal inactivation), and k*in (us) (ultrasonic inactivation). The values of kin and k*in increased in the following order: CAT1 < CAT < CAT2. CD spectra of the enzyme solutions were recorded in the course of inactivation by high temperatures (45 and 50 degrees C) and LFUS, and the ratios of secondary structures were calculated. Processes of thermal and ultrasonic inactivation of catalases were associated with a decrease in the content of alpha helices and an increase in that of antiparallel beta structures and irregular regions (CAT1 < CAT < CAT2). We conclude that the enzymes exhibit the following rank order of resistance: CAT1 > CAT >CAT2. Judging from the characteristics of CAT1, it appears to be an optimum component for antioxidant enzyme complexes. PMID:16358747

  3. A novel low-temperature-active pectin methylesterase from Penicillium chrysogenum F46 with high efficiency in fruit firming.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xia; Tu, Tao; Wang, Liwen; Luo, Huiying; Ma, Rui; Shi, Pengjun; Meng, Kun; Yao, Bin

    2014-11-01

    A pectin methylesterase gene (pe8F46) was cloned from Penicillium chrysogenum F46 and successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris. The full-length cDNA consists of 969 bp and encodes a 322-residue polypeptide with the calculated molecular weight of 34.1 kDa. Deduced PE8F46 belongs to family 8 of carbohydrate esterases and shares 54% identity with a functionally characterised counterpart from Myceliophthora thermophile. Purified recombinant PE8F46 showed the optimal activity at pH 5.0 and 40°C, and remained 52% maximum activity even at 10°C. An orthogonal experiment was employed to determine the best conditions for firming pineapple dices. After incubation with 0.75% (w/v) PE8F46 and 0.4% calcium lactate (w/v) for 20 min, the firmness of pineapple dices was improved by 47.6%, 13.7% higher than that of a commercial pectinase complex. These results suggest that PE8F46 has application potential in the food industry. PMID:24874380

  4. Phytic Acid Enhances Biocontrol Activity of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa against Penicillium expansum Contamination and Patulin Production in Apples

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiya; Zhang, Hongyin; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zheng, Xiangfeng; Qian, Jingya

    2015-01-01

    The effect of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa in combination with phytic acid (PA) on blue mold decay and patulin contamination of apples was investigated. Results from this study show that different concentrations of PA were effective in reducing the disease incidence of apples and that PA at concentration of 4 μmol/mL, decreased the incidence of blue mold decay in apples from 86.1 to 62.5%, and showed higher control efficacy compared to untreated, control fruit during storage at 20°C. However, R. mucilaginosa combined with PA (4 μmol/mL) showed better control efficacy of blue mold decay than R. mucilaginosa used as single treatment, the disease incidence was reduced to 62.5% and lesion diameter on apples was reduced to 16.59 cm. In in vitro experiments, the addition of PA enhanced the biocontrol effect of R. mucilaginosa against the growth of Penicillium expansum and reduced patulin level when compared with either R. mucilaginosa or PA used separately. R. mucilaginosa together with PA, improved the inhibition of patulin production in wounded apples, decreasing the content of patulin by 89.6% compared to the control, under experimental conditions. Both R. mucilaginosa and R. mucilaginosa in combination with PA degraded patulin in vitro. In conclusion, the appropriate combination of R. mucilaginosa and PA may provide an effective biocontrol method for reducing postharvest decay of apples. PMID:26635764

  5. Identification of Antifungal Substances of Lactobacillus sakei subsp. ALI033 and Antifungal Activity against Penicillium brevicompactum Strain FI02

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Chang Ki; Hwang, Tae Yean

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the antifungal substances and the antifungal activity against fungi of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from kimchi. LAB from kimchi in Imsil showed antifungal activity against Penicillium brevicompactum strain FI02. LAB LI031 was identified as Lactobacillus sakei subsp. Antifungal substances contained in L. sakei subsp. ALI033 culture media were unstable at high pH levels. Both, the control and proteinase K and protease treated samples showed clear zones, suggesting that the antifungal substances produced by ALI033 were non-protein substances unaffected by protesases. Both, the control and catalase showed clear zones, suggesting that the antifungal metabolite was not H2O2. The molecular weights of the antifungal substances were ≤3,000 Da. The organic acid content of crude antifungal substances produced by L. sakei subsp. ALI033 showed high concentrations of lactic acid (502.47 mg/100 g). Therefore, these results suggest that antifungal substance produced by L. sakei subsp. ALI033 is most likely due to its ability in producing organic acid. PMID:27069906

  6. Biodegradation of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) by a new Penicillium oxalicum strain DSYD05-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Yu, Dan; Lin, Xiumei; Liu, Dongbo; Xia, Hongmei; Chen, Shan

    2012-10-01

    In this study, fungi isolated from soil were screened for their ability to form clear zones on agar plates with emulsified poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL). The most active strain, designated as DSYD05, was identified as Penicillium oxalicum on the basis of morphological characteristics and phylogenetic analysis. Mutant DSYD05-1, obtained by ultraviolet-light mutagenesis from strain DSYD05, was more effective in PCL degradation. In liquid cultures of the mutant strain with PCL emulsion, DSYD05-1 showed the highest PCL-degrading activity after 4 days of cultivation. The products of PCL degradation were analysed by mass spectrometry; the results indicated that 6-hydroxyhexanoic acid was produced and assimilated during cultivation. The degradation of PCL film by DSYD05-1 was observed by scanning electron microscopy, and was indicative of a three-stage degradation process. The degradation of amorphous parts of the film preceded that of the crystalline center and then the peripheral crystalline regions. In addition, DSYD05-1 showed a wide range of substrate specificity, with capability to degrade PCL, poly(β-hydroxybutyrate), and poly(butylene succinate), but not poly(lactic acid), indicating that the strain could have potential for application in the treatment or recycling of bio-plastic wastes. PMID:22806733

  7. Tannase Production by Penicillium Atramentosum KM under SSF and its Applications in Wine Clarification and Tea Cream Solubilization.

    PubMed

    Selwal, Manjit K; Yadav, Anita; Selwal, Krishan K; Aggarwal, N K; Gupta, Ranjan; Gautam, S K

    2011-01-01

    Tannin acyl hydrolase commonly known as tannase is an industrially important enzyme having a wide range of applications, so there is always a scope for novel tannase with better characteristics. A newly isolated tannase-yielding fungal strain identified as Penicillium atramentosum KM was used for tannase production under solid-state fermentation (SSF) using different agro residues like amla (Phyllanthus emblica), ber (Zyzyphus mauritiana), jamun (Syzygium cumini), Jamoa (Eugenia cuspidate) and keekar (Acacia nilotica) leaves. Among these substrates, maximal extracellular tannase production i.e. 170.75 U/gds and 165.56 U/gds was obtained with jamun and keekar leaves respectively at 28ºC after 96 h. A substrate to distilled water ratio of 1:2 (w/v) was found to be the best for tannase production. Supplementation of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) as nitrogen source had enhanced tannase production both in jamun and keekar leaves. Applications of the enzyme were studied in wine clarification and tea cream solubilization. It resulted in 38.05% reduction of tannic acid content in case of jamun wine, 43.59% reduction in case of grape wine and 74% reduction in the tea extract after 3 h at 35°C. PMID:24031644

  8. Combination of Pichia membranifaciens and ammonium molybdate for controlling blue mould caused by Penicillium expansum in peach fruit.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shifeng; Yuan, Yongjun; Hu, Zhichao; Zheng, Yonghua

    2010-07-15

    The potential enhancement of Pichia membranifaciens by ammonium molybdate (NH(4)Mo) to control blue mould caused by Penicillium expansum on peach fruit was investigated. Combining P. membranifaciens at 1x10(8) cell/ml with 1 mM NH(4)Mo provided a more effective control of blue mould rot than applying the yeast or NH(4)Mo alone. Addition of 1 mM NH(4)Mo significantly increased the growth of P. membranifaciens in peach wounds, but did not affect the population in nutrient yeast dextrose broth medium. The in vitro experiment showed that the combined treatment inhibited spore germination and germ tube elongation of P. expansum in comparison with the treatment of P. membranifaciens or NH(4)Mo alone. Moreover, P. membranifaciens, NH(4)Mo, and the combination of them did not impair the quality parameters including fruit firmness and content of total soluble solids, titratable acidity and vitamin C of peach fruit after 6 days of storage at 20 degrees C. These results suggested that the use of NH(4)Mo is a useful approach to improve the efficacy of P. membranifaciens for postharvest disease control in peach fruit. PMID:20605650

  9. An Ecofriendly synthesis of silver nano-bioconjugates by Penicillium citrinum (MTCC9999) and its antimicrobial effect

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This report provides for the first time a novel environment friendly extracellular synthesis of stable silver nano-bioconjugates (SNBCs) at room temperature at pH 5.0 using Penicillium citrinum MTCC 9999 biomass. The UV-Visible spectral scan of dispersed SNBCs solution showed absorption in the region 340–450 nm due to surface plasma resonance (SPR). Typical Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM) images showed that although two populations were present but most of them were in 20–30 nm range. Average zeta potential of SNBCs was −21 mV suggesting some biomolecules capped the nanoparticles imparting a net negative charge over it. FTIR analysis also showed that biomolecules were involved in stabilization. SNBCs showed strong antibacterial activity against both Gram positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli). SNBCs also showed strong antifungal activity as assessed against Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In the case of E. coli the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of SNBCs was 4 μg/ml while in B. subtilis it was 8 μg/ml. In the case of E. coli the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of SNBCs was 8 μg/ml while in B. subtilis it was 32 μg/ml. The SNBCs exerted its antibacterial and antifungal activity through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) inside the cell. PMID:23433075

  10. Increased production of cellulases and xylanases by Penicillium echinulatum S1M29 in batch and fed-batch culture.

    PubMed

    dos Reis, Laísa; Fontana, Roselei Claudete; Delabona, Priscila da Silva; da Silva Lima, Deise Juliana; Camassola, Marli; Pradella, José Geraldo da Cruz; Dillon, Aldo José Pinheiro

    2013-10-01

    The development of more productive strains of microorganisms and processes that increase enzyme levels can contribute to the economically efficient production of second generation ethanol. To this end, cellulases and xylanases were produced with the S1M29 mutant strain of Penicillium echinulatum, using different concentrations of cellulose (20, 40, and 60 g L(-1)) in batch and fed-batch processes. The highest activities of FPase (8.3 U mL(-1)), endoglucanases (37.3 U mL(-1)), and xylanases (177 U mL(-1)) were obtained in fed-batch cultivation with 40 g L(-1) of cellulose. The P. echinulatum enzymatic broth and the commercial enzyme Cellic CTec2 were tested for hydrolysis of pretreated sugar cane bagasse. Maximum concentrations of glucose and xylose were achieved after 72 h of hydrolysis. Glucose yields of 28.0% and 27.0% were obtained using the P. echinulatum enzymatic extract and Cellic CTec2, respectively. PMID:23973981

  11. Purification and characterization of a low molecular weight of beta-mannanase from Penicillium occitanis Pol6.

    PubMed

    Blibech, Monia; Ghorbel, Raoudha Ellouz; Fakhfakh, Ines; Ntarima, Patricia; Piens, Katheleen; Bacha, Abir Ben; Chaabouni, Semia Ellouz

    2010-02-01

    The highest beta-mannanase activity was produced by Penicillium occitanis Pol6 on flour of carob seed, whereas starch-containing medium gave lower enzymes titles. The low molecular weight enzyme was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and ion-exchange chromatography procedures. The purified beta-mannanase (ManIII) has been identified as a glycoprotein (carbohydrate content 5%) with an apparent molecular mass of 18 kDa. It was active at 40 degrees C and pH 4.0. It was stable for 30 min at 70 degrees C and has a broad pH stability (2.0-12.0). ManIII showed K (m), V (max), and K (cat) values of 17.94 mg/ml, 93.52 U/mg, and 28.13 s(-1) with locust bean gum as substrate, respectively. It was inhibited by mannose with a K (I) of 0.610(-3) mg/ml. ManIII was activated by CuSO4 and CaCl2 (2.5 mM). However, in presence of 2.5 mM Co2+, its activity dropped to 60% of the initial activity. Both N-terminal and internal amino acid sequences of ManIII presented no homology with mannanases of glycosides hydrolases. During incubation with locust bean gum and Ivory nut mannan, the enzyme released mainly mannotetraose, mannotriose, and mannobiose. PMID:19418261

  12. Penicillium expansum: consistent production of patulin, chaetoglobosins, and other secondary metabolites in culture and their natural occurrence in fruit products.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Birgitte; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Frisvad, Jens C

    2004-04-21

    Penicillium expansum is known for its destructive rot and patulin production in apple juice. According to the literature, P. expansum can, among other compounds, produce citrinin, ochratoxin A, patulin, penitrem A, and rubratoxin B. In this study the qualitative production of metabolites was examined using TLC (260 isolates), HPLC (85 isolates), and MS (22 isolates). The results showed that none of the 260 isolates produced ochratoxin A, penitrem A, or rubratoxin B. However, chaetoglobosin A and communesin B were produced consistently by all 260 isolates. Patulin and roquefortine C were produced by 98% of the isolates. Expansolides A/B and citrinin were detected in 91 and 85% of the isolates, respectively. Chaetoglobosins and communesins were detected in naturally infected juices and potato pulp, whereas neither patulin nor citrinin was found. Because most P. expansum isolates produce patulin, citrinin, chaetoglobosins, communesins, roquefortine C, and expansolides A and B, foods contaminated with this fungus should ideally be examined for chaetoglobosin A as well as patulin. PMID:15080656

  13. The relationship between the violet pigment PP-V production and intracellular ammonium level in Penicillium purpurogenum.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Ryo; Arai, Teppei; Matsufuji, Hiroshi; Kasumi, Takafumi; Watanabe, Taisuke; Ogihara, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Penicillium purpurogenum is the fungus that produces an azaphilone pigment. However, details about the pigment biosynthesis pathway are unknown. The violet pigment PP-V is the one of the main pigments biosynthesized by this fungus. This pigment contains an amino group in a pyran ring as its core structure. We focused on this pigment and examined the relationship between intracellular ammonium concentration and pigment production using glutamine as a nitrogen source. The intracellular ammonium level decreased about 1.5-fold in conditions favoring PP-V production. Moreover, P. purpurogenum was transferred to medium in which it commonly produces the related pigment PP-O after cultivating it in the presence or absence of glutamine to investigate whether this fungus biosynthesizes PP-V using surplus ammonium in cells. Only mycelia cultured in medium containing 10 mM glutamine produced the violet pigment, and simultaneously intracellular ammonium levels decreased under this condition. From comparisons of the amount of PP-V that was secreted with quantity of surplus intracellular ammonium, it is suggested that P. purpurogenum maintains ammonium homeostasis by excreting waste ammonium as PP-V. PMID:27368914

  14. PdbrlA, PdabaA and PdwetA control distinct stages of conidiogenesis in Penicillium digitatum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingshuang; Sun, Xuepeng; Zhu, Congyi; Xu, Qian; Ruan, Ruoxin; Yu, Dongliang; Li, Hongye

    2015-01-01

    Penicillium digitatum is one of the most important citrus postharvest pathogens worldwide. Reproduction of massive asexual spores is the primary factor contributing to the epidemic of citrus green mold. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying conidiogenesis in P. digitatum, we functionally characterized the Aspergillus nidulans orthologs of brlA, abaA and wetA. We showed that deletion of PdbrlA completely blocked formation of conidiophores, whereas deletion of PdabaA led to the formation of aberrant and non-functional phialides. The PdwetA mutant showed various defective phenotypes, such as abnormal conidia with loose cell walls, delayed germination and reduced tolerance to osmotic, detergent, heat shock and menadione stresses, but elevated resistance to H2O2. PdbrlA-influenced genes were identified by comparing global gene expression profiles between the wild-type and the PdbrlA deletion mutant during conidiation. Gene ontology analysis of these differentially expressed genes (DEGs) revealed the diverse roles of PdbrlA in metabolism, transportation and cell structure. Moreover, out of 39 genes previously reported to be involved in conidiogenesis in Aspergillus, mRNA levels of 14 genes were changed in ΔPdbrlA. Our results confirm the roles of brlA, abaA and wetA in P. digitatum conidiogenesis and provide new insights into the genetics of conidiation in filamentous fungi. PMID:25530311

  15. Penicillium oxalicum PoFlbC regulates fungal asexual development and is important for cellulase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yao, Guangshan; Li, Zhonghai; Wu, Ruimei; Qin, Yuqi; Liu, Guodong; Qu, Yinbo

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi can initiate vegetative growth on complex plant polysaccharides in nature through secreting a large amount of lignocellulose-degrading enzymes. These fungi develop a large amount of asexual spores to disperse and survive under harsh conditions, such as carbon and nitrogen depletion. Numerous studies report the presence of a cross-talk between asexual development and extracellular enzyme production, especially at the regulation level. This study identified and characterized a C2H2-type transcription factor called PoFlbC, which is an Aspergillus FlbC ortholog, in cellulolytic fungus Penicillium oxalicum. Results showed that the native level of PoFlbC was crucial for the normal growth and asexual development of P. oxalicum. Importantly, deletion of the PoflbC gene substantially reduced cellulase and hemicellulase productions. Comparative transcriptome analysis by RNA sequencing revealed a global downregulation of genes encoding cellulases, hemicellulases, and other proteins with functions in lignocellulose degradation. A similar defect was also observed in the OEPoflbC strain, suggesting that the production of cellulolytic enzymes was maintained by native expression of the PoflbC. In this study, an essential activator for both fungal asexual development and cellulase production was established in P. oxalicum. PMID:26724278

  16. The pbrB Gene Encodes a Laccase Required for DHN-Melanin Synthesis in Conidia of Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei

    PubMed Central

    Sapmak, Ariya; Boyce, Kylie J.; Andrianopoulos, Alex; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch

    2015-01-01

    Talaromyces marneffei (Basionym: Penicillium marneffei) is a significant opportunistic fungal pathogen in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus in Southeast Asia. T. marneffei cells have been shown to become melanized in vivo. Melanins are pigment biopolymers which act as a non-specific protectant against various stressors and which play an important role during virulence in fungi. The synthesis of the two most commonly found melanins in fungi, the eumelanin DOPA-melanin and the allomelanin DHN-melanin, requires the action of laccase enzymes. The T. marneffei genome encodes a number of laccases and this study describes the characterization of one of these, pbrB, during growth and development. A strain carrying a PbrB-GFP fusion shows that pbrB is expressed at high levels during asexual development (conidiation) but not in cells growing vegetatively. The pbrB gene is required for the synthesis of DHN-melanin in conidia and when deleted results in brown pigmented conidia, in contrast to the green conidia of the wild type. PMID:25866870

  17. Improvement of cellulase activity in Trichoderma reesei by heterologous expression of a beta-glucosidase gene from Penicillium decumbens.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Zhang, Jun; Zou, Gen; Wang, Chengshu; Zhou, Zhihua

    2011-09-10

    Trichoderma reesei is a well-known cellulase producer and widely applied in enzyme industry. To increase its ability to efficiently decompose cellulose, the beta-glucosidase activity of its enzyme cocktail needs to be enhanced. In this study, a beta-glucosidase I coding sequence from Penicillium decumbens was ligated with the cellobiohydrolase I (cbh1) promoter of T. reesei and introduced into the genome of T. reesei strain Rut-C30 by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. In comparison to that from the parent strain, the beta-glucosidase activity of the enzyme complexes from two selected transformants increased 6- to 8-fold and their filter paper activity (FPAs) was enhanced by 30% on average. The transformant's saccharifying ability towards pretreated cornstalk was also significantly enhanced. To further confirm the effect of heterologous beta-glucosidase on the cellulase activity of T. reesei, the heterologously expressed pBGL1 was purified and added to the enzyme complex produced by T. reesei Rut-C30. Supplementation of the Rut-C30 enzyme complex with pBGL1 brought about 80% increase of glucose yield during the saccharification of pretreated cornstalk. Our results indicated that the heterologous expression of a beta-glucosidase gene in T. reesei might produce balanced cellulase preparation. PMID:22112562

  18. Bisthiodiketopiperazines and Acorane Sesquiterpenes Produced by the Marine-Derived Fungus Penicillium adametzioides AS-53 on Different Culture Media.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Li, Xiao-Ming; Meng, Ling-Hong; Jiang, Wen-Li; Xu, Gang-Ming; Huang, Cai-Guo; Wang, Bin-Gui

    2015-06-26

    Chemical investigation of the marine-sponge-derived fungus Penicillium adametzioides AS-53 resulted in the identification of two new bisthiodiketopiperazine derivatives, adametizines A (1) and B (2), from cultivation in a liquid potato-dextrose broth (PDB) culture medium, whereas two new acorane sesquiterpenes, adametacorenols A (3) and B (4), were isolated from a rice solid culture medium. The structures of these compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration of compound 1 was determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis, and that of 3 was determined by modified Mosher's method. Compound 1 exhibited lethality against brine shrimp (Artemia salina) with an LD50 value of 4.8 μM and inhibitory activities against Staphyloccocus aureus, Aeromonas hydrophilia, Vibrio spp. V. harveyi and V. parahaemolyticus, and Gaeumannomyces graminis with minimum inhibitory concentration values of 8, 8, 32, 8, and 16 μg/mL, respectively. Chlorination at C-7 significantly increased the brine shrimp lethality and antimicrobial activity of the bisthiodiketopiperazines. PMID:26039736

  19. Penicillium purpurogenum cultures under ethanol-induced stress and its correlation with fungal adhesion and biodegrading ability.

    PubMed

    Gomaa, Ola M; Husseiny, Sherif M; Abd El Kareem, Hussein; Talaat, Riham

    2016-10-01

    Fungi are known to be affected by external environmental stimuli, resulting in different stress response effects, which in turn could be used to enhance its biodegrading ability. In a previous study, ethanol was used to manipulate cell-cell and cell-surface interaction to prevent cell loss and maximize the usage of Penicillium purpurogenum cells in the media, a correlation was drawn between ethanol oxidative stress, surface-bound proteins and fungal adhesion. The present study focuses on a more detailed study of the effect of ethanol on the same fungus. The results show that the presence of Yap1p gene and the detection of an oxidized form of glutathione (GSSG) suggest that a stress response might be involved in the adhesion process. The process of adhesion could be described as a signaling process and it is affected by the germ tube formation as an initial step in adhesion. Protein profile showed polymorphism in surface-bound proteins for cultures amended with ethanol when compared to control cultures. Ethanol also affected the DNA polymorphic profile of DNA, rendering the fungus genetically variable. P. purpurogenum produced phenol oxidase enzyme and could be used to degrade total phenols in olive mill waste water without the formation of biofilm on the surface of the containers. PMID:26936484

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Tanzawaic Acid Derivatives from a Marine-Derived Fungus Penicillium steckii 108YD142

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hee Jae; Pil, Gam Bang; Heo, Soo-Jin; Lee, Hyi-Seung; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Jihoon; Won, Ho Shik

    2016-01-01

    Chemical investigation of a marine-derived fungus, Penicillium steckii 108YD142, resulted in the discovery of a new tanzawaic acid derivative, tanzawaic acid Q (1), together with four known analogues, tanzawaic acids A (2), C (3), D (4), and K (5). The structures of tanzawaic acid derivatives 1–5 were determined by the detailed analysis of 1D, 2D NMR and LC-MS data, along with chemical methods and literature data analysis. These compounds significantly inhibited nitric oxide (NO) production and the new tanzawaic acid Q (1) inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) proteins and mRNA expressions in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Additionally, compound 1 reduced the mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrated that the new tanzawaic acid derivative inhibits LPS-induced inflammation. This is the first report on the anti-inflammatory activity of tanzawaic acid Q (1). PMID:26761016

  1. Production of an acidic and thermostable lipase of the mesophilic fungus Penicillium simplicissimum by solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Gutarra, Melissa L E; Godoy, Mateus G; Maugeri, Francisco; Rodrigues, Maria Isabel; Freire, Denise M G; Castilho, Leda R

    2009-11-01

    The production of a lipase by a wild-type Brazilian strain of Penicillium simplicissimum in solid-state fermentation of babassu cake, an abundant residue of the oil industry, was studied. The enzyme production reached about 90 U/g in 72 h, with a specific activity of 4.5 U/mg of total proteins. The crude lipase showed high activities at 35-60 degrees C and pH 4.0-6.0, with a maximum activity at 50 degrees C and pH 4.0-5.0. Enzyme stability was enhanced at pH 5.0 and 6.0, with a maximum half-life of 5.02 h at 50 degrees C and pH 5.0. Thus, this lipase shows a thermophilic and thermostable behavior, what is not common among lipases from mesophilic filamentous fungi. The crude enzyme catalysed the hydrolysis of triglycerides and p-nitrophenyl esters (C4:0-C18:0), preferably acting on substrates with medium-chain fatty acids. This non-purified lipase in addition to interesting properties showed a reduced production cost making feasible its applicability in many fields. PMID:19560339

  2. Characterization of the 5' flanking region of lipase gene from Penicillium expansum and its application in molecular breeding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian; Peng, Ying; Yu, Qingsheng; Wang, Jieliang; Tang, Kexuan

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge for further promotion of lipase productivity in Penicillium expansum PE-12 is to find a suitable promoter that can function efficiently in this industrial strain. In this study, the 5' flanking region of P. expansum lipase (Ppel) containing a putative novel promoter sequence was characterized by fusing to β-glucuronidase (GUS) and subsequently introducing into P. expansum. As a result, all the transformants showed blue color quickly after incubation in GUS detection buffer, suggesting a strong promoter activity of this fragment. Glucose repression was identified for the promoter, whereas olive oil acted as a positive regulator. Facilitated by this novel promoter, P. expansum PE-12 was genetically modified, with an improved lipase yield, via a recombinant plasmid with P. expansum lipase gene (PEL) under the control of Ppel promoter and TtrpC terminator. The highest lipase yield among the modified strains could attain 2,100 U/mL, which is more than twofold of the previous industrial strain (900 U/mL). The engineered strain through molecular breeding method as well as this new promoter has great value in lipase industry. PMID:24502561

  3. Phytic Acid Enhances Biocontrol Activity of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa against Penicillium expansum Contamination and Patulin Production in Apples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiya; Zhang, Hongyin; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zheng, Xiangfeng; Qian, Jingya

    2015-01-01

    The effect of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa in combination with phytic acid (PA) on blue mold decay and patulin contamination of apples was investigated. Results from this study show that different concentrations of PA were effective in reducing the disease incidence of apples and that PA at concentration of 4 μmol/mL, decreased the incidence of blue mold decay in apples from 86.1 to 62.5%, and showed higher control efficacy compared to untreated, control fruit during storage at 20°C. However, R. mucilaginosa combined with PA (4 μmol/mL) showed better control efficacy of blue mold decay than R. mucilaginosa used as single treatment, the disease incidence was reduced to 62.5% and lesion diameter on apples was reduced to 16.59 cm. In in vitro experiments, the addition of PA enhanced the biocontrol effect of R. mucilaginosa against the growth of Penicillium expansum and reduced patulin level when compared with either R. mucilaginosa or PA used separately. R. mucilaginosa together with PA, improved the inhibition of patulin production in wounded apples, decreasing the content of patulin by 89.6% compared to the control, under experimental conditions. Both R. mucilaginosa and R. mucilaginosa in combination with PA degraded patulin in vitro. In conclusion, the appropriate combination of R. mucilaginosa and PA may provide an effective biocontrol method for reducing postharvest decay of apples. PMID:26635764

  4. Meleagrin, a new FabI inhibitor from Penicillium chryosogenum with at least one additional mode of action.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chang Ji; Sohn, Mi-Jin; Lee, Sangku; Kim, Won-Gon

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) is a promising novel antibacterial target. We isolated a new class of FabI inhibitor from Penicillium chrysogenum, which produces various antibiotics, the mechanisms of some of them are unknown. The isolated FabI inhibitor was determined to be meleagrin by mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analyses, and its more active and inactive derivatives were chemically prepared. Consistent with their selective inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus FabI, meleagrin and its more active derivatives directly bound to S. aureus FabI in a fluorescence quenching assay, inhibited intracellular fatty acid biosynthesis and growth of S. aureus, and increased the minimum inhibitory concentration for fabI-overexpressing S. aureus. The compounds that were not effective against the FabK isoform, however, inhibited the growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae that contained only the FabK isoform. Additionally no resistant mutant to the compounds was obtained. Importantly, fabK-overexpressing Escherichia coli was not resistant to these compounds, but was resistant to triclosan. These results demonstrate that the compounds inhibited another target in addition to FabI. Thus, meleagrin is a new class of FabI inhibitor with at least one additional mode of action that could have potential for treating multidrug-resistant bacteria. PMID:24312171

  5. Meleagrin, a New FabI Inhibitor from Penicillium chryosogenum with at Least One Additional Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chang Ji; Sohn, Mi-Jin; Lee, Sangku; Kim, Won-Gon

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) is a promising novel antibacterial target. We isolated a new class of FabI inhibitor from Penicillium chrysogenum, which produces various antibiotics, the mechanisms of some of them are unknown. The isolated FabI inhibitor was determined to be meleagrin by mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analyses, and its more active and inactive derivatives were chemically prepared. Consistent with their selective inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus FabI, meleagrin and its more active derivatives directly bound to S. aureus FabI in a fluorescence quenching assay, inhibited intracellular fatty acid biosynthesis and growth of S. aureus, and increased the minimum inhibitory concentration for fabI-overexpressing S. aureus. The compounds that were not effective against the FabK isoform, however, inhibited the growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae that contained only the FabK isoform. Additionally no resistant mutant to the compounds was obtained. Importantly, fabK-overexpressing Escherichia coli was not resistant to these compounds, but was resistant to triclosan. These results demonstrate that the compounds inhibited another target in addition to FabI. Thus, meleagrin is a new class of FabI inhibitor with at least one additional mode of action that could have potential for treating multidrug-resistant bacteria. PMID:24312171

  6. Characterization of two cytochrome P450 monooxygenase genes of the pyripyropene biosynthetic gene cluster from Penicillium coprobium.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie; Okawa, Hiroto; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Oyama, Kazuhiko; Mitomi, Masaaki; Anzai, Hiroyuki

    2011-03-01

    Pyripyropenes are potent inhibitors of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase, which were initially discovered to be produced by Aspergillus fumigatus. Recently, Penicillium coprobium PF1169 has also found to produce pyripyropene A (PyA), which exhibits insecticidal properties. Pyripyropenes are natural hybrid products of both terpenoid and polyketide origin. In our research, based on data generated using the Genome Sequencer FLX for P. coprobium PF1169, we predicted the biosynthetic gene cluster of PyA by blast analysis comparing with polyketide synthase and prenyltransferase of other species. By screening the genomic fosmid library, nine open reading frames (ppb1 to ppb9) related to the biosynthesis of PyA were deduced. Among them, two cytochrome P450 monooxygenase genes (ppb3 and ppb4) were separately introduced into the model fungus A. oryzae. Bioconversion of certain predicted intermediates in the transformants has elucidated the manner of hydroxylation in the biosynthetic pathway by the expressed products of these two genes (P450-1 and P450-2). That is, P450-1 exhibits monooxygenase activity and plays the hydroxylation role at C-11 of pyripyropene E. While P450-2 plays an active role in the hydroxylation of C-7 and C-13 of pyripyropene O. PMID:21224862

  7. Penicillium verruculosum SG: a source of polyketide and bioactive compounds with varying cytotoxic activities against normal and cancer lines.

    PubMed

    Shah, Salma Gul; Shier, W Thomas; Jamaluddin; Tahir, Nawaz; Hameed, Abdul; Ahmad, Safia; Ali, Naeem

    2014-04-01

    A newly isolated fungus Penicillium verruculosum SG was evaluated for the production and characterization of bioactive colored secondary metabolites using solid-state fermentation along with their cytotoxic activities against normal and cancer cell lines. Logical fragmentation pattern following column chromatography, thin layer chromatography and liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry of crude culture filtrate of fungus revealed the presence of different polyketide pigments and other bioactive compounds. Cytotoxicity of the selected colored fractions of fungal filtrate containing different compounds revealed IC50 (μg/ml) values ranging from 5 to 100. It was significantly higher in case of orevactaene (5 + 0.44) and monascorubrine followed by pyripyropene (8 + 0.63) against cancer cell line KA3IT. Overall, these compounds considerably showed less toxicity toward normal cell lines NIH3T3, HSCT6, HEK293 and MDCK. XRD of a yellow crystalline compound (224.21 m/z) confirmed its 3-dimensional structure as phenazine 1 carboxylic acid (C13H8N2O2) (broad spectrum antibiotic), and it is first time reported in fungi. PMID:24563022

  8. Development of a real-time PCR assay for Penicillium expansum quantification and patulin estimation in apples.

    PubMed

    Tannous, Joanna; Atoui, Ali; El Khoury, André; Kantar, Sally; Chdid, Nader; Oswald, Isabelle P; Puel, Olivier; Lteif, Roger

    2015-09-01

    Due to the occurrence and spread of the fungal contaminants in food and the difficulties to remove their resulting mycotoxins, rapid and accurate methods are needed for early detection of these mycotoxigenic fungi. The polymerase chain reaction and the real time PCR have been widely used for this purpose. Apples are suitable substrates for fungal colonization mostly caused by Penicillium expansum, which produces the mycotoxin patulin during fruit infection. This study describes the development of a real-time PCR assay incorporating an internal amplification control (IAC) to specifically detect and quantify P. expansum. A specific primer pair was designed from the patF gene, involved in patulin biosynthesis. The selected primer set showed a high specificity for P. expansum and was successfully employed in a standardized real-time PCR for the direct quantification of this fungus in apples. Using the developed system, twenty eight apples were analyzed for their DNA content. Apples were also analyzed for patulin content by HPLC. Interestingly, a positive correlation (R(2) = 0.701) was found between P. expansum DNA content and patulin concentration. This work offers an alternative to conventional methods of patulin quantification and mycological detection of P. expansum and could be very useful for the screening of patulin in fruits through the application of industrial quality control. PMID:25998812

  9. Identification of Antifungal Substances of Lactobacillus sakei subsp. ALI033 and Antifungal Activity against Penicillium brevicompactum Strain FI02.

    PubMed

    Huh, Chang Ki; Hwang, Tae Yean

    2016-03-01

    This study was performed to investigate the antifungal substances and the antifungal activity against fungi of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from kimchi. LAB from kimchi in Imsil showed antifungal activity against Penicillium brevicompactum strain FI02. LAB LI031 was identified as Lactobacillus sakei subsp. Antifungal substances contained in L. sakei subsp. ALI033 culture media were unstable at high pH levels. Both, the control and proteinase K and protease treated samples showed clear zones, suggesting that the antifungal substances produced by ALI033 were non-protein substances unaffected by protesases. Both, the control and catalase showed clear zones, suggesting that the antifungal metabolite was not H2O2. The molecular weights of the antifungal substances were ≤3,000 Da. The organic acid content of crude antifungal substances produced by L. sakei subsp. ALI033 showed high concentrations of lactic acid (502.47 mg/100 g). Therefore, these results suggest that antifungal substance produced by L. sakei subsp. ALI033 is most likely due to its ability in producing organic acid. PMID:27069906

  10. Polyketides with α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activity from a Mangrove Endophytic Fungus, Penicillium sp. HN29-3B1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yayue; Yang, Qin; Xia, Guoping; Huang, Hongbo; Li, Hanxiang; Ma, Lin; Lu, Yongjun; He, Lei; Xia, Xuekui; She, Zhigang

    2015-08-28

    Five new compounds, pinazaphilones A and B (1, 2), two phenolic compounds (4, 5), and penicidone D (6), together with the known Sch 1385568 (3), (±)-penifupyrone (7), 3-O-methylfunicone (8), 5-methylbenzene-1,3-diol (9), and 2,4-dihydroxy-6-methylbenzoic acid (10) were obtained from the culture of the endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. HN29-3B1, which was isolated from a fresh branch of the mangrove plant Cerbera manghas collected from the South China Sea. Their structures were determined by analysis of 1D and 2D NMR and mass spectroscopic data. Structures of compounds 4 and 7 were further confirmed by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiment using Cu Kα radiation. The absolute configurations of compounds 1-3 were assigned by quantum chemical calculations of the electronic circular dichroic spectra. Compounds 2, 3, 5, and 7 inhibited α-glucosidase with IC50 values of 28.0, 16.6, 2.2, and 14.4 μM, respectively, and are thus more potent than the positive control, acarbose. PMID:26230970

  11. Time Dependency of Chemodiversity and Biosynthetic Pathways: An LC-MS Metabolomic Study of Marine-Sourced Penicillium.

    PubMed

    Roullier, Catherine; Bertrand, Samuel; Blanchet, Elodie; Peigné, Mathilde; Robiou du Pont, Thibaut; Guitton, Yann; Pouchus, Yves François; Grovel, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    This work aimed at studying metabolome variations of marine fungal strains along their growth to highlight the importance of the parameter "time" for new natural products discovery. An untargeted time-scale metabolomic study has been performed on two different marine-derived Penicillium strains. They were cultivated for 18 days and their crude extracts were analyzed by HPLC-DAD-HRMS (High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detector-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry) each day. With the example of griseofulvin biosynthesis, a pathway shared by both strains, this work provides a new approach to study biosynthetic pathway regulations, which could be applied to other metabolites and more particularly new ones. Moreover, the results of this study emphasize the interest of such an approach for the discovery of new chemical entities. In particular, at every harvesting time, previously undetected features were observed in the LC-MS (Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry) data. Therefore, harvesting times for metabolite extraction should be performed at different time points to access the hidden metabolome. PMID:27213411

  12. Penicimenolides A-F, Resorcylic Acid Lactones from Penicillium sp., isolated from the Rhizosphere Soil of Panax notoginseng

    PubMed Central

    An, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Zhang, Meng-Yue; Qian-Zhang; Deng, Xiao-Yu; Zhao, Feng; Zhu, Ling-Juan; Wang, Guan; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Yi-Xuan; Liu, Bo; Yao, Xin-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Five new 12-membered resorcylic acid lactone derivatives, penicimenolides A-E (1–5), one new ring-opened resorcylic acid lactone derivative penicimenolide F (6), and six known biogenetically related derivatives (7–12) were isolated from the culture broth of a strain of Penicillium sp. (NO. SYP-F-7919), a fungus obtained from the rhizosphere soil of Panax notoginseng collected from the Yunnan province of China. Their structures were elucidated by extensive NMR analyses, a modified Mosher’s method, chemical derivatization and single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compounds 2–4 exhibited potent cytotoxicity against the U937 and MCF-7 tumour cell lines and showed moderate cytotoxic activity against the SH-SY5Y and SW480 tumour cell lines. The substitution of an acetyloxy or 2-hydroxypropionyloxy group at C-7 significantly increased the cytotoxic activity of the resorcylic acid lactone derivatives. Subsequently, the possible mechanism of compound 2 against MCF-7 cells was preliminarily investigated by in silico analysis and experimental validation, indicating compound 2 may act as a potential MEK/ERK inhibitor. Moreover, proteomics analysis was performed to explore compound 2-regulated concrete mechanism underlying MEK/ERK pathway, which is still need further study in the future. In addition, compounds 2–4 and 7 exhibited a significant inhibitory effect on NO production induced by LPS. PMID:27271722

  13. Relevance of the transcription factor PdSte12 in Penicillium digitatum conidiation and virulence during citrus fruit infection.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, Laura; Teixidó, Neus; Torres, Rosario; Usall, Josep; Viñas, Inmaculada; Sánchez-Torres, Paloma

    2016-10-17

    Green mould, resulting from Penicillium digitatum, is the most important postharvest disease of citrus. In a previous study, the PdSte12 transcription factor gene was identified, and disruption mutants were obtained. In the present study, the ΔPdSte12 mutants generated through gene replacement showed significantly reduced virulence during citrus fruit infection. Virulence was affected not only in mature fruit but also in immature fruit, and disease severity was markedly reduced when the oranges were stored at 20 or 4°C. In addition, the ΔPdSte12 mutants were defective in asexual reproduction, producing few conidia. The conidiophores of these mutants had longer metulae with fewer branches at the tip of the hyphae. Gene expression analysis revealed that PdSte12 might act as a negative regulator of several transporter-encoding genes and a positive regulator of two sterol demethylases, all of which are involved in fungicide resistance and fungal virulence. Moreover, PdSte12 exhibited the negative regulation of another transcription factor PdMut3, putatively involved in fungal pathogenesis but with no effect on the MAPK SLT2 P. digitatum orthologue belonging to different transcription pathways relevant to cell integrity. These results indicate the PdSte12 transcription factor is functionally conserved in P. digitatum for infection and asexual reproduction, similar to other Ste12 fungal plant pathogens. PMID:27479695

  14. Production, purification and characterization of novel beta glucosidase from newly isolated Penicillium simplicissimum H-11 in submerged fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Hongzhi; Wang, Hui; Sun, Junde; Irfan, Muhammad; Han, Mei; Huang, Yuqian; Han, Xiaori; Yang, Qian

    2013-01-01

    β-Glucosidase is an important component of the cellulase complex. It not only hydrolyzes cellobiose and short-chain cellooligosaccharides to glucose, but also removes the inhibitory effect of cellobiose on the β-1, 4-endoglucanase and exoglucanase, thereby increasing the overall rate of cellulose biodegradation. β-glucosidasefrom culture supernatant of a fungus Penicillium simplicissimum was purified to homogeneity, by using ammonium sulfate fraction, Sephadex G-100 chromatography, and its properties were studied. The molecular mass of the enzyme was about 126.0 kDa, as identified by 12% SDS-PAGE. The optimum pH and temperature were 4.4 ~ 5.2 and 60 °C, respectively. The enzyme was stable in pH 5.2 ~ 6.4 and under 40 °C. Metal profile of the enzyme showed that Mn2+ enhances its activity, while Cu2+, Co2+and Fe3+ cause obvious inhibition. The Km and Vmax was 14.881 mg/ml and 0.364 mg ml/min against salicin as a Substrate. This enzyme had secondary protein structure as evidenced by FTIR spectrum. PMID:26609283

  15. Control of blue mold (Penicillium expansum) by fludioxonil in apples (cv Empire) under controlled atmosphere and cold storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Errampalli, Deena; Northover, John; Skog, Lisa; Brubacher, Nichole R; Collucci, Cheryl A

    2005-06-01

    A reduced risk fungicide, fludioxonil, was tested for its efficacy against blue mold caused by thiabendazole-resistant and -sensitive Penicillium expansum (Link) Thom in apples under three storage conditions. In a co-treatment, fludioxonil and inoculum were applied together to test the protective activity of the fungicide on wounds that had been aged for 1 or 2 days. The fungicide was also tested for its curative activity in post-inoculation treatment on apples that had been inoculated for 1 or 2 days. Fludioxonil was very effective as co-treatment and as post-inoculation treatment. At a concentration of 300 mg litre(-1), fludioxonil gave complete control of post-harvest blue mold caused by the thiabendazole-resistant and -sensitive P expansum for 105 days in controlled atmosphere (CA) storage at 2 (+/-1) degrees C, for 42 days in common cold storage at 4 (+/-1) degrees C and also in a shelf-life study for 6 days at 20 (+/-1) degrees C. Comparison on the effect of fludioxonil in CA storage and common cold storage showed that higher concentrations of fungicide were needed in cold storage than in CA storage. Fludioxonil at a concentration of 450 mg litre(-1), gave 98 and 92% control of blue mold of apples in the simulated shelf-life studies after CA and common cold storages, respectively. Fludioxonil has a potential to be incorporated in the fungicide resistance management strategies for control of blue mold in apples stored for 105 days. PMID:15662721

  16. PP-O and PP-V, Monascus pigment homologues, production, and phylogenetic analysis in Penicillium purpurogenum.

    PubMed

    Arai, Teppei; Kojima, Ryo; Motegi, Yoshiki; Kato, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi; Ogihara, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The production of pigments as secondary metabolites by microbes is known to vary by species and by physiological conditions within a single strain. The fungus strain Penicillium purpurogenum IAM15392 has been found to produce violet pigment (PP-V) and orange pigment (PP-O),Monascus azaphilone pigment homologues, when grown under specific culture conditions. In this study, we analysed PP-V and PP-O production capability in seven strains of P. purpurogenum in addition to strain IAM15392 under specific culture conditions. The pigment production pattern of five strains cultivated in PP-V production medium was similar to that of strain IAM15392, and all violet pigments produced by these five strains were confirmed to be PP-V. Strains that did not produce pigment were also identified. In addition, two strains cultivated in PP-O production medium produced a violet pigment identified as PP-V. The ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequences from the eight P. purpurogenum strains were sequenced and used to construct a neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree. PP-O and PP-V production of P. purpurogenum was shown to be related to phylogenetic placement based on rDNA ITS sequence. Based on these results, two hypotheses for the alteration of pigment production of P. purpurogenum in evolution were proposed. PMID:26615745

  17. Overproduction of polygalacturonase by Penicillium griseoroseum recombinant strains and functional analysis by targeted disruption of the pgg2 gene.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Janaina Aparecida; Ribeiro, João Batista; Gonçalves, Daniel Bonoto; de Queiroz, Marisa Vieira; de Araújo, Elza Fernandes

    2013-03-01

    Inactivation of the pgg2 gene, a polygalacturonase-encoding gene from Penicillium griseoroseum, reduced the total activity of polygalacturonase (PG) by 90 % in wild-type P. griseoroseum, which indicates that the pgg2 gene is the major gene responsible for PG production in this species. To increase PG production, the coding region of the pgg2 gene was cloned under the control of the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd) promoter and the terminator region of the tryptophan synthase (trpC) gene from Aspergillus nidulans (pAN52pgg2 vector). This vector was then used to transform P. griseoroseum. The transformed strains were characterized according to PG production using glucose, sucrose, or sugar cane juice as the carbon sources. The recombinant P. griseoroseum T146 strain contained an additional copy of the pgg2 gene, which resulted in a 12-fold increase in PG activity when compared with that detected in the supernatant of the control PG63 strain. The proteins secreted by the recombinant strain T146 showed a strong band at 38 kDa, which corresponds to the molecular weight of PG of the P. griseoroseum. The results demonstrate the significant biotechnological potential of recombinant P. griseoroseum T146 for use in PG production. PMID:23354503

  18. Separate effects of moisture content and water activity on the hyphal extension of Penicillium rubens on porous media.

    PubMed

    van Laarhoven, Karel A; Huinink, Hendrik P; Segers, Frank J J; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Adan, Olaf C G

    2015-12-01

    To prevent indoor fungal growth, understanding the moisture relations of fungi is a key element. Indoor moisture is quantified by the relative humidity (RH). RH controls the water activity of the indoor materials that fungi grow on, a well-studied parameter known to limit fungal growth. RH, however, also controls the amount of water present in these materials, the moisture content. The significance of the moisture content of these materials to indoor fungal growth is currently overlooked. In the work reported here, growth experiments with the indoor fungus Penicillium rubens on gypsum substrates were performed to test whether the moisture content influences growth on porous materials. Second, we report the development of a video microscopy method that for the first time quantified hyphal growth on a porous material. It is found that a higher moisture content leads to earlier colonization and higher hyphal extension rates. This is a fundamental step in unravelling the effect of RH on indoor fungal growth. The real-time monitoring of colonization of gypsum provides a new view of growth on indoor surfaces. PMID:26248303

  19. Effects of the origins of Botrytis cinerea on earthy aromas from grape broth media further inoculated with Penicillium expansum.

    PubMed

    Morales-Valle, H; Silva, L C; Paterson, R R M; Venâncio, A; Lima, N

    2011-08-01

    Earthy "off" aromas from wine and grape juice are highly detrimental to the production of quality grape products. These volatile compounds are produced on grapes by Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium expansum and/or a combination of P. expansum and B. cinerea strains. B. cinerea strains were isolated from different (a) vineyards in Spain and Portugal, (b) grape varieties (c) bunches (i.e., sound and botrytized) and (d) positions in the botrytized bunch (i.e., interior or exterior). A novel Headspace-Phase Microextraction (SPME) followed by Gas Chromatrography/Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) dedicated to analyze geosmin, methylisoborneol (MIB), 1-octen-3-ol, fenchone and fenchol in grape broth medium was used. Approximately 50% of the B. cinerea strains induced detectable geosmin. One strain accumulated significant amounts of anisoles, demonstrating that this contamination might already occur in the vineyard. Strains from the interior of Cainho grape bunches induced more geosmin and hence it may be possible to reduce this volatile in wine by avoiding using these grapes in case of B. cinerea attack. PMID:21569951

  20. Highly efficient gene targeting in Penicillium chrysogenum using the bi-partite approach in deltalig4 or deltaku70 mutants.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Paulo; Bastiaans, Jeroen; Touw, Hesselien; Kerkman, Richard; Bronkhof, Jurian; van den Berg, Marco; Offringa, Remko

    2010-10-01

    Inactivating the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway is a well established method to increase gene targeting (GT) efficiencies in filamentous fungi. In this study we have compared the effect of inactivating the NHEJ genes ku70 or lig4 on GT in the industrial penicillin producer Penicillium chrysogenum. Deletion of both genes resulted in strongly increased GT efficiencies at three different loci but not higher than 70%, implying that other, yet uncharacterized, recombination pathways are still active causing a part of the DNA to be integrated via non-homologous recombination. To further increase the GT efficiency we applied the bi-partite approach, in which the DNA fragment for integration was split in two non-functional overlapping parts that via homologous recombination invivo can form a functional selection marker. The combined NHEJ mutant and bi-partite approach further increased GT frequencies up to approximately 90%, which will enable the efficient high throughput engineering of the P. chrysogenum genome. We expect that this combined approach will function with similar high efficiencies in other filamentous fungi. PMID:20659576