Science.gov

Sample records for pennsylvania womens health

  1. Pregnancy Intention and Health Behaviors: Results from the Central Pennsylvania Women's Health Study Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Weisman, Carol S.; Hillemeier, Marianne M.; Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla; Camacho, Fabian T.; Dyer, Anne-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to determine whether intention for future pregnancy affects selected preconception health behaviors that may impact pregnancy outcomes. Methods Analyses are based on data from a population-based cohort study of women ages 18−45 residing in Central Pennsylvania. A subsample of 847 non-pregnant women with reproductive capacity comprise the analytic sample. We determined the associations between intention for future pregnancy and the pattern in the following health behaviors over a 2-year period: nutrition (fruit and vegetable consumption), folic acid supplementation, physical activity, binge drinking, smoking, and vaginal douching. Multivariable analyses controlled for pregnancy-related variables, health status, health care utilization, and sociodemographic variables. Results At baseline, 9% of women were considering pregnancy in the next year, 37% of women were considering pregnancy some other time in the future, and 53% of women were not considering future pregnancy. In multivariable analyses, there were no associations between intention for future pregnancy and maintaining healthy behavior or improving behavior for any of the seven longitudinal health behaviors studied. Conclusions The importance of nutrition, folic acid supplementation, physical activity, avoiding binge drinking, not smoking, and avoiding vaginal douching in the preconception period needs to be emphasized by health care providers and policy makers. PMID:19214724

  2. The "Health Belief Model" Applied to Two Preventive Health Behaviors Among Women from a Rural Pennsylvania County. AE & RS 115.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazen, Mary E.

    In order to test the usefulnes of the Health Belief Model (a model designed to measure health practices, attitudes, and knowledge), a survey of Potter County, Pennsylvania was conducted, and 283 responses from adult females without chronic illnesses were analyzed. The dependent variables employed were regulating diet and getting regular exercise.…

  3. Rural Women of Pennsylvania: A Demographic Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornwell, Gretchen T.; Thorsen, Jenny S.

    Data from the 1980, 1970, and 1960 censuses were used to describe Pennsylvania's rural women and to compare them with urban women and, in some instances, men. In Pennsylvania in 1980, just 1 rural woman in 25 lived on a farm. These women were more educated, more active in the labor force, and somewhat better paid than their counterparts in 1960…

  4. Women's Health

    MedlinePlus

    Women have unique health issues. And some of the health issues that affect both men and women can affect women differently. Unique issues ... and men also have many of the same health problems. But these problems can affect women differently. ...

  5. Women's History Week in Pennsylvania. March 3-9, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Bertha S., Comp.

    The materials in this resource handbook are for the use of Pennsylvania teachers in developing classroom activities during National Women's History Week. The focus is on women who were notably active in government and politics (primarily, but not necessarily in Pennsylvania). The following women are profiled: Hallie Quinn Brown; Mary Ann Shadd…

  6. Women's health

    MedlinePlus

    ... use at a later date Egg donation Sperm banking Counseling for couples who are dealing with infertility or loss of a baby BLADDER CARE SERVICES The women's health services team can also help diagnose and ...

  7. Training Programs to Strengthen Pennsylvania's Public Health Response

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, R. Elliott; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Mactavish, Lindsay E.; Pollock, Timothy R.; Weand, Crystal L.; Polachek, Catherine; Reynolds, Stanley M.; Ostroff, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes Pennsylvania's 9-year experience in implementing training programs to strengthen public health response to emerging infectious diseases. During the biannual 3-5-day-long Pennsylvania Public Health Institute (PHI) events, which have been held since 2000, courses have covered topics such as emerging infectious disease outbreaks, monitoring of antimicrobial-resistant pathogens in retail food, and zoonotic diseases commonly associated with companion animals. Core competency courses include the legal basis for public health and epidemiology for nonepidemiologists. Emerging infectious disease seminars offered to clinicians since 2005 have focused on the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Complementing the PHI, the Pennsylvania Department of Health's monthly Epidemiology Journal Club offers additional interactions with presenters from academic institutions and federal agencies. Lunch-time forums also provide a venue for health department staff to share their work with colleagues. Innovative use of modern communication technology increases participation of frontline health workers in Journal Club events, and video conference capability offers flexibility in the selection of presenters. Pennsylvania's experience over the past 9 years demonstrates that with political will, commitment from content experts, and adequate administrative support, modest state and federal resources can be used to sustain public health training programs tailored to local needs. PMID:19635002

  8. Using women's health research to develop women leaders in academic health sciences: the National Centers of Excellence in Women's Health.

    PubMed

    Carnes, M; VandenBosche, G; Agatisa, P K; Hirshfield, A; Dan, A; Shaver, J L; Murasko, D; McLaughlin, M

    2001-01-01

    While the number of women entering U.S. medical schools has risen substantially in the past 25 years, the number of women in leadership positions in academic medicine is disproportionately small. The traditional pathway to academic leadership is through research. Women's health research is an ideal venue to fill the pipeline with talented women physicians and scientists who may become academic leaders in positions where they can promote positive change in women's health as well as mentor other women. The Office on Women's Health (OWH) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has contracted with 18 academic medical centers to develop National Centers of Excellence in Women's Health. Emphasizing the integral link between women's health and women leaders, each of the Centers of Excellence must develop a leadership plan for women in academic medicine as part of the contract requirements. This paper describes the training programs in women's health research that have developed at five of the academic medical centers: the University of Wisconsin, Magee Women's Hospital, the University of Maryland, Medical College of Pennsylvania Hahnemann University, and the University of Illinois at Chicago. We discuss some of the challenges faced for both initiation and future viability of these programs as well as criteria by which these programs will be evaluated for success. PMID:11224943

  9. [Health for women; women for health].

    PubMed

    1992-12-01

    This document describes a proposed new health policy for Colombian women. The rationale for the new policy, known as "Health for women, women for health", is discussed, and the general and specific objectives, program description, actions and strategies are presented for each of 5 subprograms. The subprograms cover health promotion and self-care for women, reproductive and sexual health care, prevention of abuse and services for women and children who are victims of violence, mental health, and occupational health Changes in Colombian society and living conditions and in the role of women over the past few decades have been reflected in changing epidemiologic profiles, life expectancy, and demands placed on health services. The Health for women, women for health policy takes into account social discrimination against women and its impact on female health. The subprogram of health promotion and self-care is intended to complement, reinforce, and broaden preventive interventions already offered by the health services. The subprogram will require a mobile interdisciplinary team to conduct educational campaigns and to coordinate activities. Promotional actions include staff training in a gender focus on health and health policy for women, development of a health manual for women, and a mass media campaign on self-care for women. The subprogram for reproductive health and sexuality will reorient existing maternal health services away from their emphasis on increasing coverage of prenatal care, promoting births in health facilities, and actions to reduce infant mortality and toward services appropriate to the different phases of the female reproductive cycle. The subprogram will include provision of family planning services, preventing and managing high risk pregnancies, providing adequate care in maternity centers for labor and delivery, and preventing avoidable maternal deaths. Reviewing and revising existing legislation to protect reproductive health is among proposed

  10. Examining the Efficacy of Management for Pennsylvania School Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobi, Wendy J.

    2010-01-01

    In Pennsylvania, certified school nurses were governed by the same educational rules and administrative directives as teachers. School nurses were supervised and evaluated by non-nurse managers who had no knowledge of the scope of school nurse practice. A focus of the study was to examine the efficacy of management for school health programs. The…

  11. Minority Women's Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... migrant issues Access to health care Language barriers Human trafficking Taking care of your health Immunizations and screenings Sharing family health history Health before pregnancy More... Government in action on minority women's health Minority partnerships ...

  12. Gender, Markets, and the Expansion of Women's Education at the University of Pennsylvania, 1913-1940

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manekin, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    In the fall of 2001, with posters, tote bags, speakers, and balloons, the University of Pennsylvania launched its celebration of "125 Years of Women at Penn." Exhibits illustrating the experiences of women students appeared around campus and on the Web, while banners trumpeting the contributions of Penn women waved from lightposts. The festive…

  13. Women's Health Topics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women's Health 10903 New Hampshire Avenue WO32-2333 Silver Spring, MD 20993 More in Women's Health Topics ... Food and Drug Administration 10903 New Hampshire Avenue Silver Spring, MD 20993 1-888-INFO-FDA (1- ...

  14. WOMEN-S HEALTH USA 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    Women's Health USA 2002, the first annual report on the health status of America's women is presented by the HRSA's Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) and the Office of Women's Health. This first edition of the Women's Health USA data book brings together key facts and figur...

  15. A Plan for Affirmative Action to Eliminate Discrimination Against Women at the University of Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia.

    This Affirmative Action Plan was designed to eliminate discrimination against women at the University of Pennsylvania. Thirteen steps are recommended: (1) issue a public statement recognizing the existence of discrimination against women at the University; (2) instruct the committee on the budget and inform the President's and Provost's staff…

  16. Women for women's health: Uganda.

    PubMed

    Andrews, C M

    1996-01-01

    The primary health care model targets social, political, and economic environments as key determinants of health for populations, as well as for individuals. If nursing in Uganda is to make a difference in health care outcomes and in the health of all Ugandans, nurses must look broadly at situations and be educated to practice primary health care nursing. After 14 years of civil war, Uganda is finally experiencing a period of reconstruction and rehabilitation: the whole infrastructure is undergoing a face-lift. Ugandan nurses recognize that their educational preparation has stagnated for many years and that it was not only the political unrest in their country that put them behind professionally. They realize that, given the new directions set by the government, they must become prepared to implement primary health care. They are demanding a university education so they may take their place alongside other health care providers prepared at the university level. Some of the most convincing arguments for a university program for nurses came from doctors at the university who spoke about the need to raise the standards of nursing practice, the quality of teachers, and the morale of practitioners. One nurse said: "If we lose hope for a BScN program, I think all the nurses will quit and we won't have any new students going into the profession." This program is designed to improve the health and well-being of all Ugandans, especially the most vulnerable groups of women and children in rural areas, through strengthening and expanding health services by targeting the educational preparation of nurses. Health planners in Uganda envision the professional nurse as key to the implementation of the national health policy of primary health care. University-educated nurses should be able to assess problems, make clinically sound decisions, and act appropriately within the scope of nursing practice. They should be able to interact and consult collegially with other health care

  17. The StrongWomen-Healthy Hearts program in Pennsylvania: RE-AIM analysis.

    PubMed

    Folta, Sara C; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Seguin, Rebecca A; Goldberg, Jeanne P; Corbin, Marilyn A; Wiker, Nancy; Gauker, Jodi; Chui, Kenneth; Nelson, Miriam E

    2015-03-01

    Dissemination of evidence-based programs is needed to reduce CVD risk among midlife and older women. The aim of this study is to examine the public health impact of StrongWomen-Healthy Hearts in Pennsylvania using the RE-AIM framework. Reach, adoption, implementation, and maintenance were assessed using qualitative and quantitative measures; effectiveness was assessed using a pretest-posttest within-participants design. Reach into the target population was 5 in 100,000. Compared to the target population, a greater percentage of participants were white, married, middle-class, and had a graduate degree. Effectiveness was demonstrated (weight loss -2.0 kg, p < 0.001). Adoption among trained leaders was high (83.3 %), as was fidelity in implementation (average score 9.3 of 10). No leaders maintained the program. To increase impact of the StrongWomen-Healthy Hearts Program, it will be important to lower the costs and modify the recruitment and training strategies to better reach low-income and minority women. Such strategies may also improve program maintenance. PMID:25729458

  18. Promoting women's health.

    PubMed

    Doyal, L

    1991-01-01

    The male-dominated medical establishment continues to make health promotion policies for women. Women must have access to a more accurate information base about women's health and the link between their health and socioeconomic roles. They must be full partners in formulating and implementing health promotion strategies. Yet, such a database does not exist due to systemic bias in research. For example, research shows alcoholism affects men and women differently, but prevention and treatment strategies and evaluation of their outcomes do not take this into account. Further, men do not understand subjective aspects of female conditions. In addition, even though women provide most care in our society, health promotion policies do not incorporate their knowledge. Moreover, care of the sick can damage the health of the care giver. Statistics on women's health are lacking, e.g., exhaustion and depression as consequences of child care and housework, especially among poor women. Developed countries continue to use maternal mortality as a means of measuring reproductive hazard, but maternal death is a rarity. In fact, a reproductive mortality rate would be more applicable, which would include deaths from abortions, pregnancy, and contraception. Besides, birth control has real disadvantages, e.g., a painful medical procedure is needed to insert IUDs and they increase the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. Paid employment has positive and negative effects depending on whether women are alone or have a partner and have children, their income, and educational level. Women in industry face considerable health hazards, e.g., textile workers at increased risk of several lung diseases. Appropriate expenditure on health and social services and sound economic policies at the central level will benefit women's health. Besides, when society values and supports all aspects of women's work and roles, women's health will achieve its potential. PMID:1817541

  19. Democracy and Women's Health

    PubMed Central

    Safaei, Jalil

    2009-01-01

    New research on broader determinants of health has culminated into the new paradigm of social determinants of health. The fundamental view that underlies this new paradigm is that socioeconomic and political contexts in which people live have significant bearing upon their health and well-being. Unlike a wealth of research on socioeconomic determinants, few studies have focused on the role of political factors. Some of these studies examine the role of political determinants on health through their mediation with the labour environments and systems of welfare state. A few others study the relationship between polity regimes and population health more directly. However, none of them has a focus on women's health. This study explores the interactions, both direct and indirect, between democracy and women's health. In doing so, it identifies some of the main health vulnerabilities for women and explains, through a conceptual model, how democracy and respect for human rights interacts with women's health. PMID:21836777

  20. Women's lives, mothers' health.

    PubMed

    Chauliac, M; Masse-raimbault, A M

    1985-01-01

    This document dealing with women's lives and the health of mothers identifies factors conditioning the health and nutritional status of women and girls (life expectancy at birth, maternal mortality rate, and the birthrate); considers nutritional requirements of pregnant and lactating women, weight gain during preganncy, mothers' age and number of children and interbirth interval, maternal nutritional status and breastfeeding, anemia, work and women's health, pregnancy in adolescents, abortion, the growth of small girls and its effect on future pregnancies, and sexual mutilations; and reports on actions aimed at improving the health of women as well as health problems facing rural women. The 3 key concepts of this reflection on women's lives are: women's health should be taken into account as well as children's health; the development of the whole human being should be respected, implying ongoing surveillance of the health status of women and of their children; and the overall living conditions of women within the family and society must be analyzed at the different phases of their life, so as to encourage integrated actions rather than various uncoordinated efforts. Women's health status, like the health status of everyone, depends on a multitude of socioeconomic and sanitational factors. A figure illustrates several of the many interrelations between the various factors which influence the nutritional status of all individuals. Women of childbearing age are at greater risk than other population groups, due to their reproductive function and their ability to nurse children: pregnancy, like lactation, generates metabolic changes and increases nutritional needs. Delivery itself presents a series of risks for the woman's health, and only regular surveillance of pregnancy may prevent many of these. A woman's health status and, most of all her nutritional status during pregnancy and delivery, condition her future health and ability to assume her many tasks as well as

  1. Migration and women's health.

    PubMed

    Adanu, Richard M K; Johnson, Timothy R B

    2009-08-01

    Women have been migrating at similar rates to men for the past 40 years, and comprised about half of all migrants in 2005. Women and children are most affected by displacement as a result of wars and human trafficking. In some cases, the health of female migrants is improved via integration into better health systems in the host country. More often, however, the health of female migrants is affected negatively. Women are doubly disadvantaged because they are discriminated against as women and as migrants. Female migrants are also highly vulnerable to acts of sexual abuse, rape, and violence. This is especially true for women in refugee camps, whose reproductive health needs are often overlooked. To improve the health of female migrants it is important to develop and implement policies that recognize and insist on the respect of the rights of migrants. PMID:19539929

  2. The Importance of Public Health Agency Independence: Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling in Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Public health often deals with inconvenient truths. These are best communicated and acted on when public health agencies are independent of the organizations or individuals for whom the truths are inconvenient. The importance of public health independence is exemplified by the lack of involvement of the Pennsylvania Department of Health in responding to health concerns about shale gas drilling. Pennsylvania Department of Health involvement has been forestalled by the state governor, who has intensely supported shale gas development. PMID:24328620

  3. Heart Health for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs of a heart attack. 1. Eat a heart healthy diet. The nutrition facts on the food label can help you make ... heart health for women . (PDF 190KB) Get the facts about heart attacks in women . Learn More About Heart Disease: ...

  4. Minority Women's Health: Latinas

    MedlinePlus

    ... left navigation Minority Women's Health African-Americans Latinas Asian-Americans Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders American Indians/ ... Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin. Latinos may be any race. This ...

  5. Women, disadvantage and health.

    PubMed

    Luddy, G

    2007-09-01

    This paper addresses the issue of disadvantage and health and how gender also affects health inequalities. Socio-economic status has been found to influence access to many social determinants of health, such as education and employment, food and nutrition, work opportunities, and housing. Socio-economic status has also been found to greatly impact on a person's access to effective healthcare in Ireland. Ireland has one of the widest gaps between rich and poor in Europe. Women in less well-off socio-economic groups are at the greatest disadvantage with regard to health and have been found to be at greater risk of developing poor health. The health of disadvantaged women is compromised by: lack of education, lack of information, and lack of awareness of factors that contribute to disease. These issues are explored in the paper with special focus on cancer, mental health, cardiovascular disease and sexual health. PMID:17955712

  6. Health maintenance in women.

    PubMed

    Riley, Margaret; Dobson, Margaret; Jones, Elizabeth; Kirst, Nell

    2013-01-01

    The health maintenance examination is an opportunity to focus on disease prevention and health promotion. The patient history should include screening for tobacco use, alcohol misuse, intimate partner violence, and depression. Premenopausal women should receive preconception counseling and contraception as needed, and all women planning or capable of pregnancy should take 400 to 800 mcg of folic acid per day. High-risk sexually active women should be counseled on reducing the risk of sexually transmitted infections, and screened for chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis. All women should be screened for human immunodeficiency virus. Adults should be screened for obesity and elevated blood pressure. Women 20 years and older should be screened for dyslipidemia if they are at increased risk of coronary heart disease. Those with sustained blood pressure greater than 135/80 mm Hg should be screened for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Women 55 to 79 years of age should take 75 mg of aspirin per day when the benefits of stroke reduction outweigh the increased risk of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Women should begin cervical cancer screening by Papanicolaou test at 21 years of age, and if results have been normal, screening may be discontinued at 65 years of age or after total hysterectomy. Breast cancer screening with mammography may be considered in women 40 to 49 years of age based on patients' values, and potential benefits and harms. Mammography is recommended biennially in women 50 to 74 years of age. Women should be screened for colorectal cancer from 50 to 75 years of age. Osteoporosis screening is recommended in women 65 years and older, and in younger women with a similar risk of fracture. Adults should be immunized at recommended intervals according to guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. PMID:23317023

  7. Maintaining women's oral health.

    PubMed

    McCann, A L; Bonci, L

    2001-07-01

    Women must adopt health-promoting strategies for both general health and the oral cavity, because the health of a woman's body and oral cavity are bidirectional. For general health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should actively advise women to minimize alcohol use, abstain from or cease smoking, stay physically active, and choose the right foods to nourish both the body and mind. For oral health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should advise women on how to prevent or control oral infections, particularly dental caries and periodontal diseases. Specifically, women need to know how to remove plaque from the teeth mechanically, use appropriate chemotherapeutic agents and dentifrices, use oral irrigation, and control halitosis. Dental practitioners also need to stress the importance of regular maintenance visits for disease prevention. Adolescent women are more prone to gingivitis and aphthous ulcers when they begin their menstrual cycles and need advice about cessation of tobacco use, mouth protection during athletic activities, cleaning orthodontic appliances, developing good dietary habits, and avoiding eating disorders. Women in early to middle adulthood may be pregnant or using oral contraceptives with concomitant changes in oral tissues. Dental practitioners need to advise them how to take care of the oral cavity during these changes and how to promote the health of their infants, including good nutrition. Older women experience the onset of menopause and increased vulnerability to osteoporosis. They may also experience xerostomia and burning mouth syndrome. Dental practitioners need to help women alleviate these symptoms and encourage them to continue good infection control and diet practices. PMID:11486666

  8. Abstracting women: essentialism in women's health research.

    PubMed

    McCormick, J; Kirkham, S R; Hayes, V

    1998-01-01

    Women's desire to take control of their own bodies creates a natural affinity between the projects of feminism and women's health research. Feminists have used the categories of woman/women, gender, and sex as foundation terms to designate the subject of feminist theories. Universal categories, which have been exposed as essentialist by postmodern and poststructural critiques, create falsely unified subject positions that fail to account for the diversity of women and also fail to acknowledge the situated interests of the dominant groups whose perspectives they reflect. Because it adopts these same categories, research in women's health is also permeated with this essentialized understanding, whether or not it is overtly feminist. In this paper, we point out the dangers of the unreflective use of woman/women, gender, and sex in women's health research. We conclude, that for political purposes, however, a carefully considered "strategic essentialism" can be warranted in research aimed at improving women's health. PMID:9849195

  9. Women's Health USA, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Maternal and Child Health and Resources Development.

    This book provides a collection of current and historical data on some of the most pressing health challenges facing women, their families, and their communities. It is intended to be a concise reference for policymakers and program managers at the federal, state, and local levels. The book brings together the latest available data from various…

  10. Women, work, and health.

    PubMed

    Hatch, M; Moline, J

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Bureau of National Affairs has conducted several surveys asking women to rate the seriousness of 11 hazards thought to affect female workers. In 1995 the women respondents ranked them in the following order: 1) stress, 2) repetitive motions, 3) AIDS, 4) violence, 5) VDTs, 6) indoor air pollution, 7) hepatitis, 8) injury on the job, 9) reproductive hazards, 10) tuberculosis, and 11) other infectious diseases. A parallel list of 11 hazards thought to affect male workers would look very different. The purpose of this paper is to explore why this is so and what it implies for the occupational health research agenda. PMID:9219662

  11. Health screening - women - over age 65

    MedlinePlus

    Health maintenance visit - women - over age 65; Physical exam - women - over age 65; Yearly exam - women - over age 65; Checkup - women - over age 65; Women's health - over age 65; Preventive care exam - women - over ...

  12. Women Veterans Health Care: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Program Overview » Outreach Materials » FAQs Women Veterans Health Care Menu Menu Womens Health Women Veterans Health Care ... can I call for more help? What health care services are available to women Veterans? A full ...

  13. Women's Health. Report of the Public Health Service Task Force on Women's Health Issues. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    This report identifies a broad spectrum of issues affecting women's health and is divided into four sections: (1) social factors affecting women's health; (2) women's physical health and well-being; (3) health concerns of older women; and (4) issues related to alcohol, drug use and abuse, and the mental health of women. The Public Health Service…

  14. Health screening - women - ages 18 to 39

    MedlinePlus

    Health maintenance visit - women - ages 18 to 39; Physical exam - women - ages 18 to 39; Yearly exam - ... 39; Checkup - women - ages 18 to 39; Women's health - ages 18 to 39; Preventive care - women - ages ...

  15. Health screening - women - ages 40 to 64

    MedlinePlus

    Health maintenance visit - women - ages 40 to 64; Physical exam - women - ages 40 to 64; Yearly exam - ... 64; Checkup - women - ages 40 to 64; Women's health - ages 40 to 64; Preventive care - women - ages ...

  16. Course Plan for Women's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Linda A.

    In view of women's misconceptions about their bodies, their sexuality, their mental health, and the health care system, this three-credit evening community college course on women's health needs and concerns was designed. Course objectives include recording and analyzing the effects of nutrition, sleep, exercise, and stress on various body…

  17. School Psychologists' Report of School-Based Mental Health Service Programs across Pennsylvania School Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Ajani Yanea

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the mental health needs and services of children and adolescents within Pennsylvania school communities; this included a focus upon evidence-based counseling approaches. Relationships were analyzed between population density, SES status, grade level and the type of mental health issues serviced. Survey data from 314 respondents…

  18. Health Services and Women's Oral Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mullane, Denis; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Data on the relative levels of men's and women's dental health are scarce, but the available data do indicate differences in tooth loss and health-related behavior patterns. Better methods for recording and reporting this information are recommended. (MSE)

  19. Women's health: beyond reproductive years.

    PubMed

    Laskar, Ananya Ray

    2011-01-01

    With changing demographic profile India has more older women than men as life expectancy for women is 67.57 as against 65.46 for men. Gender differences in the aging process reflect biological, economic, and social differences. Both social and health needs of the older women are unique and distinctive as they are vulnerable. The social problems revolve around widowhood, dependency, illiteracy and lack of awareness about the policies and programmes from which they can benefit. Among the medical problems, vision (cataract) and degenerative joint disease top the list, followed by neurological problems. Lifestyle diseases form another single-most important group of health problems in the elderly women. The risk of cardiovascular disease doubles with the outcome being poorer than men. The most common causes of death among women above the age of 60 years are stroke, ischemic heart disease and COPD. Hypertensive heart disease and lower respiratory tract infections contribute to mortality in these women. Common malignancies viz. Cervical, breast and uterus in women are specific to them and account for a sizeable morbidity and mortality. In a study done at Lady Hardinge medical college in Delhi, Hypertension (39.6%) and obesity (12-46.8%) were very common in postmenopausal women. Half or more women had high salt and fat intake, low fruit and vegetable intake and stress. There is a need to recognize the special health needs of the women beyond the reproductive age, to be met through strengthening and reorienting the public health services at all levels starting from primary health care to secondary till tertiary care level with adequate referral linkages. All policies and programs need to have a gender perspective. At present there is lack of sensitization and appropriate training of the health personnel in dealing with the needs of elderly. Women too need to be aware to adopt healthy lifestyle and seek timely care. PMID:22298132

  20. Theoretical underpinnings for women's health.

    PubMed

    McBride, A B; McBride, W L

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical framework for considerations of women's health is proposed, the central premise of which is that "women's health" at the core means taking women's lived experience as the starting point for all health efforts. Elaboration of this thesis involves: (1) surveying our philosophical roots for an understanding of what the lived experience means, (2) exploring the methodological consequences of a focus on the lived experience, and (3) applying these insights to the situations of woman as mother and of the overweight woman. PMID:7052984

  1. Young black women: defining health.

    PubMed

    Hargrove, H J; Keller, C

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elicit a definition of health as described by young Black women and to characterize the factors related to their definitions of health. The research questions were: (a) How do young Black women define health and (b) what factors are related to their definition of health? Using interviews and open-ended questions, an exploratory descriptive design examined the factors which contribute to the definition of health. Twenty-two young Black women between the ages of 21 and 40 comprised the sample. A wide range of incomes, occupations, educational levels, marital status, and family sizes were represented. The informants defined health as comprising those characteristics, behaviors, and/or activities which include: (a) having or avoiding a disease, (b) the presence or absence of obesity, (c) experiencing and reducing stress, (d) good and bad health habits, (e) eating good and bad foods, and (f) engaging (or not) in exercise. PMID:8106873

  2. Health Issues Facing Black Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Inez Smith

    Black women in the United States experience a high incidence of serious health problems and, as a group, receive insufficient and inadequate medical care. The death rate for black women suffering from breast cancer has increased substantially since 1950. Also of great concern is the high incidence of cervical cancer in low income black women…

  3. What to Ask: Women's Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... page Join our e-newsletter! Resources What to Ask: Women’s Health Tools and Tips Many older women ... healthcare professional. The following are questions you can ask your healthcare professional about gynecological issues. Do I ...

  4. Field Survey of Health Perception and Complaints of Pennsylvania Residents in the Marcellus Shale Region

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Pouné; Propert, Kathleen Joy; Powers, Martha; Emmett, Edward; Green-McKenzie, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Pennsylvania Marcellus Shale region residents have reported medical symptoms they believe are related to nearby Unconventional Natural Gas Development (UNGD). Associations between medical symptoms and UNGD have been minimally explored. The objective of this descriptive study is to explore whether shale region Pennsylvania residents perceive UNGD as a health concern and whether they attribute health symptoms to UNGD exposures. A questionnaire was administered to adult volunteers with medical complaints in a primary-care medical office in a county where UNGD was present. Participants were asked whether they were concerned about health effects from UNGD, and whether they attributed current symptoms to UNGD or to some other environmental exposure. There were 72 respondents; 22% perceived UNGD as a health concern and 13% attributed medical symptoms to UNGD exposures. Overall, 42% attributed one or more of their medical symptoms to environmental causes, of which UNGD was the most frequent. A medical record review conducted on six participants who attributed their medical symptoms to UNGD revealed that only one of these records documented both the symptoms in question and the attribution to UNGD. The results of this pilot study suggest that there is substantial concern about adverse health effects of UNGD among Pennsylvania Marcellus Shale residents, and that these concerns may not be adequately represented in medical records. Further efforts to determine the relationship between UNGD and health are recommended in order to address community concerns. PMID:25003172

  5. Women's Health Insurance Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... with incomes less than 138% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) regardless of their family or disability ... 1.5 million uninsured women with incomes below poverty in 2014 who had been expected to qualify ...

  6. Cholesterol and Women's Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... for cardiovascular disease that are unique to women? Polycystic ovary syndrome , high blood pressure disorders that occur during pregnancy, ... to and from the liver through the blood. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  7. Acceptability of mobile health interventions to reduce inactivity-related health risk in central Pennsylvania adults

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chih-Hsiang; Maher, Jaclyn P.; Conroy, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient physical activity and excessive sedentary behavior elevate health risk. Mobile applications (apps) provide one mode for delivering interventions to modify these behaviors and reduce health risk. The purpose of this study was to characterize the need for and acceptability of health behavior interventions among rural adults and evaluate the interest in and the value of app-based interventions in this population. Central Pennsylvania adults with smartphones (N = 258) completed a brief web survey in October–November 2012. Most adults report one or both inactivity-related behavioral risk factors, would use a free app to modify those risk behaviors, and would pay a small amount for that app. Low-cost, efficacious apps to increase physical activity or reduce sedentary behavior should be promoted in public health practice. User experience should be at the forefront of this process to increase value and minimize burden in the service of long-term engagement, behavior change, and health risk reduction. PMID:26844135

  8. Acceptability of mobile health interventions to reduce inactivity-related health risk in central Pennsylvania adults.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Hsiang; Maher, Jaclyn P; Conroy, David E

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient physical activity and excessive sedentary behavior elevate health risk. Mobile applications (apps) provide one mode for delivering interventions to modify these behaviors and reduce health risk. The purpose of this study was to characterize the need for and acceptability of health behavior interventions among rural adults and evaluate the interest in and the value of app-based interventions in this population. Central Pennsylvania adults with smartphones (N = 258) completed a brief web survey in October-November 2012. Most adults report one or both inactivity-related behavioral risk factors, would use a free app to modify those risk behaviors, and would pay a small amount for that app. Low-cost, efficacious apps to increase physical activity or reduce sedentary behavior should be promoted in public health practice. User experience should be at the forefront of this process to increase value and minimize burden in the service of long-term engagement, behavior change, and health risk reduction. PMID:26844135

  9. Women's Safety and Health Issues at Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIOSH NIOSH Women's Safety and Health Issues at Work Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir America's work ... while also balancing the traditional parenting responsibilities. 1 Work-related health challenges facing women Women face different ...

  10. Functional Foods for Women's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeman, Alice K.

    2002-01-01

    Describes functional foods for women's health (foods or food ingredients that provide health benefits beyond basic nutrition), explaining that both whole and modified foods can be included as functional foods. The paper discusses the history, regulation, and promotion of functional foods; consumer interest in functional foods; how to incorporate…

  11. Women's Health Checkup

    MedlinePlus

    Regular health exams and tests can help find problems before they start. They also can help find problems early, when your ... better. As a woman, you need some special exams and screenings. During your checkup, your health care ...

  12. Women's Health Checkup

    MedlinePlus

    Regular health exams and tests can help find problems before they start. They also can help find problems early, ... special exams and screenings. During your checkup, your health care provider will usually do: A pelvic exam - ...

  13. Osteoporosis and Women's Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... down by the body (a process called bone turnover). Your highest bone mass (size and thickness) is reached between ages 20 and 25, and it declines after that. After menopause, however, women begin to lose bone at an even faster rate. Osteoporosis develops when your body cannot replace bone ...

  14. Childbearing and Women's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouvier-Colle, Marie-Helene; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A maternal death is defined as the death of a woman while she is pregnant or within 42 days of the end of her pregnancy from any cause related to or aggravated by the pregnancy or its management, but not from accidental or incidental causes. No one knows exactly how many women die from bearing children because data is imprecise in most countries.…

  15. Women and Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... to other mental disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder , research has not found differences in rates that ... Featured Health Topics Anxiety Disorders Depression Eating Disorders Bipolar Disorder (Manic-Depressive Illness) Schizophrenia Borderline Personality Disorder Suicide ...

  16. Women's Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... a group that has the same age, race, religion, cultural background as you, or one that speaks ... mental health problems, like depression or having a history of trauma or abuse. If you or someone ...

  17. Women's health and feminist politics.

    PubMed

    Faure, D

    1994-06-01

    The Sempreviva Organizacao Feminista (SOF) has aimed since 1963 to improve women's health in low-income communities in southeastern Brazil. There is concern for the whole person in all stages of a woman's life, not just the reproductive one commonly addressed in population control programs. SOF has linked gender, health, and poverty and contributed to social movements to improve conditions. SOF's constituency is about 90% women aged 20-40 years, with 2-5 children, and a lack of education. About 70% remain in the home caring for their families, and 25% are employed formally or informally. The women's fertility rates are high and they desire to limit childbearing. Most women are unaware of their own reproductive physiology and had not discussed sex with their parents before marriage. Active membership by 1971 was 7600 members. SOF's present aims are to strengthen the women's movement, to develop feminist approaches to health issues, to implement a women's health program, and to incorporate gender issued into other social movements. The present goals evolved out of the initial program of offering health services and family planning in a suburb of Sao Paulo. After break with their funding agency in 1967, over the refusal to promote female sterilization, they found funding by the World Council of Churches and others, which opened the doors to improvement in the quality of care. Meetings held every 2 years provide a forum for involvement of grassroots groups. The National Feminist Network for Health and Reproductive Rights provides the integrating mechanism for feminist nongovernmental groups and pressures the national government for reforms that will benefit women. SOF is just one of the grassroots organizations that offers collective and innovative experiences and empowerment. Social movements in the south and west of Sao Paulo have become more organized and demanded better public health policy or improvements in sanitation and waste disposal. SOF is currently

  18. Women, catastrophe and mental health.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Beverley; Taylor, Mel; McAndrew, Virginia

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of catastrophic experience, its relationship to the range of acute and prolonged stressors to which women may be exposed and the broad impacts on their mental health and well-being. It identifies catastrophe in terms of multiple accumulated stresses including death, loss, victimization, demoralization, shame, stigmatization, helplessness and identity. Catastrophic experiences include personal violence in domestic circumstances of intimate partner abuse, sexual assault and child physical and sexual abuse. Women's experiences of loss through the violent deaths of children and loved ones may also have such enduring impacts. Terrorism victimizes men and women in this way, with the enduring impacts for women in terms of threat of ongoing attacks as well as acute effects and their aftermath. The catastrophes of war, conflict, genocide, sexual exploitation and refugee status differentially affect large numbers of women, directly and through their concerns for the care of their children and loved ones. Ultimate catastrophes such as Hiroshima and the Holocaust are discussed but with recognition of the very large numbers of women currently experiencing catastrophe in ongoing ways that may be silent and unrecognized. This is significant for clinical care and population impacts, and in the losses for women across such contexts. PMID:18058439

  19. Women's Health and Complexity Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Eileen

    2000-01-01

    Explores how changes in conceptual frameworks in science, from reductionism to complexity; an outgrowth of the chaos theory that views parts in relation to one another, the entity they form, and the environment, must inform the development of an academic discipline in women's health. (SLD)

  20. A Guide for Preparing the Application for Program Approval for Certification of Nursing Assistants for Long Term Care Agencies and Home Health Aides in Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaincott, Helen K.

    The purpose of this guide is to assist health care agencies and educational institutions to prepare an application for approval by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and the Pennsylvania Department of Health to train nursing aides for long-term care and home health agencies. Types of materials provided include definitions, a sample…

  1. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 86-226-1769, Montgomery Hospital, Norristown, Pennsylvania. [Glutaraldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    In response to a request from Montgomery Hospital, Norristown, Pennsylvania, an evaluation was made of possible worker exposures to glutaraldehyde while disinfecting respiratory therapy equipment, bronchoscopes, physical therapy whirlpool tubs, surgical instruments, and anesthesia equipment parts. The author concludes that a health hazard existed from glutaraldehyde during disinfection and sterilizing procedures. The author recommends substitution of less-hazardous materials for glutaraldehyde where possible, construction of a work station with adequate local exhaust ventilation for glutaraldehyde use, installation of a dilution ventilation system in the whirlpool facilities, and use of personal protective clothing when handling glutaraldehyde.

  2. School Nurses on the Front Line: Challenges in Meeting the Diverse Health Needs of Rural Pennsylvania School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillemeier, Marianne M.; Davis, Lisa A.; Smith, Carol A.

    2007-01-01

    School nurses are the health professionals most consistently involved with the health needs of children, particularly in rural areas where primary care providers are less likely to be located. To understand the scope and effectiveness of nursing services for school districts throughout Pennsylvania, the researchers conducted a study in 2005 to:…

  3. Women's cardiovascular health in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Sliwa, Karen

    2012-03-01

    The predominant pattern of cardiovascular diseases in sub-Saharan Africa is that of poverty-related conditions (rheumatic heart valve disease, untreated congenital heart disease, tuberculous pericarditis) and diseases of unclear aetiology with a higher prevalence in this part of the world (peripartum cardiomyopathy, endomyocardial fibrosis). However, the prevalence of the traditional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and marked obesity is high in a number of sub-Saharan settings, although they vary considerably among countries, urban/rural locations and specific subpopulations. In urban settings, hypertensive heart disease with systolic and diastolic function contributes substantially to morbidity. Awareness of the general public and health workers about the burden of cardiovascular diseases in women must be increased, and risk factor control programmes must be included in the health research agenda on the African continent. Improvement in health services with coordination of maternal health services and non-communicable diseases is also needed. This review focuses on the current knowledge of cardiovascular healthcare of women in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly their propensity for various forms of heart disease, access to healthcare, treatment received within the respective healthcare system, response to therapy and mortality. It highlights the gaps in knowledge and the paucity of data in most of these aspects. PMID:22350029

  4. Pakistan's health policy: appropriateness and relevance to women's health needs.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Narjis; Nishtar, Sania

    2008-12-01

    The interface between national health policy and women's health needs is complex in developing countries like Pakistan. This paper aims to assess if Pakistan's national health policy 2001 is relevant and appropriate to women's health needs. Through review of existing data on women, a profile of women's health needs was developed which was transformed into framework of analysis. This framework indicates that Pakistani women's health needs are determined by gender disparities in health and health-related sectors. Comparison of national health policy with women's health needs framework reveals that although policy focuses on women's health through prioritization of gender equity, it is however addressed as an isolated theme without acknowledging the vital role gender inequalities in health and health-related sectors play in defining women's health needs. Moreover, gender equity is translated as provision of reproductive health services to married mothers, ignoring various critical overarching issues of women's life such as sexual abuse, violence, induced abortion, etc. Health systems strengthening strategies are though suggested but these fails to recognize main obstacles of utilization of healthcare services by women including non-availability of female healthcare providers and gender-based obstacles to healthcare utilization such as illiteracy, lack of empowerment to make decisions related to health, etc. In order to be relevant and appropriate to women's health needs the policy should: (1) use gender equity in health and health-related sectors as an approach to develop a healthy policy (2) expand the focus from reproductive health to life cycle approach to address all issues around women's life (3) strengthen health systems through creation of gender equity among all cadres of health providers (4) tailoring health interventions to counter gender-based obstacles to utilization of healthcare services and (5) dissemination interventions for behavior change. PMID

  5. A synopsis of 30 years of major accomplishments by the Pennsylvania Department of Health in Environmental Health (Part 1 of 2): the 1980s.

    PubMed

    Logue, James N; Sivarajah, Kandiah

    2010-12-01

    This article reviews significant environmental health projects conducted by the Pennsylvania Department of Health, particularly the Division of Environmental Health, during the 1980s. The authors describe lessons learned from dealing with health concerns related to the Vietnam War, Three Mile Island, hazardous waste sites, and radon, as well as emerging issues during that decade. PMID:21189788

  6. Dimensions of Women's Health across the Lifespan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vamos, Cheryl A.; Vamos, Sandra D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This teaching strategy provides students with an opportunity to promote women's health literacy via construction of a creative health information booklet. Students will be able to: (1) Identify health issues that affect women during one particular lifespan stage; (2) Categorize issues according to the seven dimensions of health; (3)…

  7. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-238-1814, Kountry Kreations, Towanda, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, G.A.

    1987-07-01

    In response to a request from the Pennsylvania Department of Health, an evaluation was made of complaints associated with handling imported grape vine wreaths at the Kountry Kreations in Towanda, Pennsylvania. Kountry Kreations produced decorative craft items for the wholesale market. The wreaths were imported from Taiwan. Complaints from employees included headache, sore throat, watering eyes, extreme tiredness, blurry vision, sore neck, nausea, upset stomach, chills, loss of concentration, rapid heartbeat, rash, and leg twitches. Various aliphatic hydrocarbons, alkyl substituted benzenes, naphthalenes, and styrene were detected nor was there evidence of methylene bromide. The author concludes that a potential health hazard existed due to improper ventilation at the facility. The introduction of fresh, outside air was insufficient and the inadequate containment of contaminant producing processes were the major contributors to the problem. The author recommends worker education of the hazards associated with craft materials and proper work habits. Specific mention was made that the glue-melting pots be operated in the temperature range specified by the manufacturer of the adhesives.

  8. Women in Pennsylvania's Family Literacy Programs: Effects of Participant Characteristics on Extent of Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askov, Eunice N.; Kassab, Cathy; Weirauch, Drucilla

    2005-01-01

    Using the database from the Pennsylvania statewide evaluation of family literacy programs, researchers studied types of participation in the adult education component engaged in by various subgroups of clientele. Adult education achievement (as measured by standardized tests) was related to the intensity of participation and less so to duration…

  9. International Women and Health Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's International and Communication Service, Carouge (Switzerland).

    Information on women and health from around the world is provided in this guide. So far, no country has formal mechanisms through which women themselves can create the policies and practices so critical to their own health and that of their families. A major purpose of the guide is to assist the many women's initiatives attempting to change this…

  10. Women's Health Among the Chumash

    PubMed Central

    Adams, James D.; Garcia, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    Plants were, and still are, widely used for a number of conditions affecting women in California. This article discusses traditional remedies of the Chumash for dysmenorrhea, premenstrual syndrome, feminine hygiene, heavy menstruation, urinary tract infections, parturition, lactation, infant care, menopause, sexually transmitted diseases, fertility, contraception and abortions. Many plants are presented including Artemisia douglasiana, Paeonia californica, Trichostema lanatum, Salvia apiana, Ephedra viridis, Leymus condensatus, Vitis californica, Eschscholzia californica, Rosa californica, Scirpus acutus, Anemopsis californica and Phoradendron macrophyllum. By providing the specific uses of plants for specific diseases and discussing chemistry, efficacy and safety concerns for each plant, we hope that this article gives direction to women seeking to use plants in their health care. PMID:16550233

  11. Women's health among the Chumash.

    PubMed

    Adams, James D; Garcia, Cecilia

    2006-03-01

    Plants were, and still are, widely used for a number of conditions affecting women in California. This article discusses traditional remedies of the Chumash for dysmenorrhea, premenstrual syndrome, feminine hygiene, heavy menstruation, urinary tract infections, parturition, lactation, infant care, menopause, sexually transmitted diseases, fertility, contraception and abortions. Many plants are presented including Artemisia douglasiana, Paeonia californica, Trichostema lanatum, Salvia apiana, Ephedra viridis, Leymus condensatus, Vitis californica, Eschscholzia californica, Rosa californica, Scirpus acutus, Anemopsis californica and Phoradendron macrophyllum. By providing the specific uses of plants for specific diseases and discussing chemistry, efficacy and safety concerns for each plant, we hope that this article gives direction to women seeking to use plants in their health care. PMID:16550233

  12. [Harmful practices affecting women's health].

    PubMed

    1990-07-01

    The harmful practices discussed in this article are based on case histories form the Central Maternity in Niamey, yet these practices universally affect women throughout Africa. Nutritional taboos are aimed at certain diseases such as measles, diarrhea, dysentery, malnutrition and anemia and consumption of foods rich in proteins and lipids are forbidden. Children are forbidden from eating eggs; pregnant women are forbidden from eating fruits and vegetables because of the fear of hemorrhaging from the sugar content in the fruit; camel meat is forbidden for fear of extending the pregnancy. Female circumcision, a dangerous practice, especially during childbirth, causes many medical problems that remain permanent. Adolescent pregnancy and marriages are practiced to avoid delinquency among children; yet such practices take place because of arranged marriages for a dowry to young men or to older rich men and these forced marriages to adolescents are the causes of increases in divorce, prostitution and desertion. These young marriages have serious consequences on the health status of the mother and the infant, often leading to maternal and infant death. The high level of fertility in Niger is a response to the social structure of the family. It is a patrilineal system that encourages women to have many children, especially sons. In Niger, pregnancy is surrounded by supernatural and mysterious forces, where a child is the intervention for ancestral spirits. In Islam a child is considered a "Gift of God". A woman is expected to work until the delivery of her baby otherwise she is jeered by her neighbors. During delivery women are not expected to cry or show any pain for fear of dishonoring her family irregardless of any medical compilations she faces. Women in Africa are exploited as free labor, deteriorate and age rapidly, are generally illiterate and are not protected under any laws. PMID:12342832

  13. Health Conditions Common in African American Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... health. Return to top Health conditions common in African-American women Asthma Breast cancer Cancer Cervical cancer Diabetes Glaucoma and cataracts Heart disease High blood pressure High cholesterol HIV/AIDS Infant death Kidney disease Lupus Mental health ...

  14. Minority Women's Health: HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS more than women of other races include: Poverty — One in 4 African-American women lives in poverty, which is strongly linked to HIV risk. People living in poverty also get lower-quality health care in general, ...

  15. Health assessment for Shriver's Corner, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD980830889. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-12

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry has been requested by the Environmental Protection Agency to address the necessity for an immediate removal action of soil containing contaminants at the Shriver's Corner Site, Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania. Thallium soil concentrations exceed the level that may be of public health significance. The soil sample from station 04 demonstrated a lead concentration of 1540 mg/kg. Elevated blood lead concentrations in children have been demonstrated by the Centers for Disease Control to increase when soil concentrations are greater than 500-1000 parts per million (ppm or mg/kg). The Shriver's Corner Site is of public health concern due to the potential for direct contact with contaminated soil. However, if access to the site is restricted exposure to the contaminants of concern would be eliminated and an immediate removal action would not be necessary to mitigate exposure.

  16. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 91-0366-2453, Delaware County Resource Recovery Facility, Chester, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Esswein, E.J.; Tepper, A.

    1994-09-01

    In response to a confidential request, an investigation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at the Delaware County Resource Recovery Facility (SIC-4053), Chester, Pennsylvania. The facility was a waste to energy incinerator employing 91 persons. The facility incinerated municipal solid waste and refuse derived fuel to produce electrical power. The request was made in response to concern regarding exposure to lead (7439921), incinerator ash dust, and heat stress. Health concerns included ear, nose and throat problems, eye irritation, and skin rash. The authors conclude that a possible occupational health hazard existed due to heat exposure in some areas of the facility. The presence of metal in dust on workers' hands and surfaces presented a risk of ingestion.

  17. Health assessment for Middletown Air Field, Middletown, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD980538763. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    The Middletown Air Field is located southeast of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Past waste disposal activities at the Middletown Air Field have resulted in contamination of the groundwater aquifer with trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and other volatile organic chemicals (VOCs). Since 1983, the selective pumping of wells and periodic monitoring of water from the wells and distribution system have maintained VOC concentrations in finished water below acceptable health-based values. It is not possible to assess potential health effects that may have resulted from exposure to VOCs in potable water prior to 1983 because of the lack of data. Additional studies are needed to determine whether there is any human exposure to contamination sources from private potable wells or through other routes of exposure.

  18. Health assessment for Malvern Trichloroethylene, Malvern, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD014353445. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-19

    The Malvern Trichloroethylene (TCE) Site (MTS) is in Malvern(Chester County) Pennsylvania. From 1952 to 1976 drums containing various wastes including volatile organic compounds and PCBs were dumped on-site. Preliminary on-site groundwater sampling results have identified TCE (ND to 1,330 ppm), perchloroethylene (PCE) (7 to 1,170 ppm), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) (12 to 2,230 ppm), and tetrachloroethylene (ND to 22,000 ppb). In addition, PCBs were identified in soil (1,350 ppm) and in drums. The site is considered to be of public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of human exposure to hazardous substances.

  19. The health plight of rural women.

    PubMed

    Richardson, H

    1987-01-01

    All poor women have difficulty obtaining needed health services due to their poorer health status and lesser ability to pay for services. Rural poor women have additional conditions imposed on them by the isolation of the rural environment from resources commonly available in urban areas, such as public transportation to services and the availability of a wide range of health resources. Strategies to address the health plight of rural women must first and foremost address their poverty. Strategies must also include a coherent national and state rural health policy that recognizes rural health as a distinct part of the larger health system. PMID:3448824

  20. Outcomes management in women's health.

    PubMed

    Houston, S; Fleschler, R

    1997-01-01

    Outcomes management uses a quality and research approach to reducing costs in health care. Populations may be targeted for high volumes or their potential for cost savings. Outcomes are identified and measured through data collection and analysis. System and care processes that drive these outcomes are analyzed. Tenets related to outcomes management include questioning practice, administrative and physician involvement; recognizing that change is necessary; accepting uncontrollable factors; and valuing the outcomes management process. Resources necessary for managing outcomes include the use of collaborative practice teams, outcomes assessment, information systems, and educational support services. The women's health population can benefit from an outcomes management effort by improving and standardizing care for mothers and infants across the continuum. There is the opportunity to affect the wellness of this population even before the pregnancy occurs. PMID:9170599

  1. Health Education Needs: A Survey of Rural Adults in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, 1975. An Interim Report. Rural Health Staff Papers - Paper Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leadley, Samuel M.

    In June 1975, 53 men and 56 women living on commercial farms in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania were interviewed regarding their behaviors, beliefs, and attitudes related to preventing cancer and coronary heart disease. Respondents represented about 23% of all adults living on commercial farms in the county. A commercial farm was defined as…

  2. Health Education Needs: A Survey of Rural Adults in Fulton County, Pennsylvania, 1975. An Interim Report. Rural Health Staff Papers - Paper Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leadley, Samuel M.

    In June 1975, 47 men and 43 women living on commercial farms in Fulton County, Pennsylvania were interviewed regarding their behaviors, beliefs, and attitudes related to preventing cancer and coronary heart disease. Respondents represented about 39% of all adults living on commercial farms in the county. A commercial farm was defined as one that…

  3. Health Education Needs: A Survey of Rural Adults in Juniata County, Pennsylvania, 1975. An Interim Report. Rural Health Staff Papers - Paper Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leadley, Samuel M.

    In June 1975, 62 men and 64 women living on commercial farms in Juniata County, Pennsylvania were interviewed regarding their behaviors, beliefs, and attitudes related to preventing cancer and coronary heart disease. Respondents represented about 22% of all adults living on commercial farms in the county. A commercial farm was defined as one that…

  4. Health Education Needs: A Survey of Rural Adults in Butler County, Pennsylvania, 1975. An Interim Report. Rural Health Staff Papers - Paper Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leadley, Samuel M.; Taranto, Angelo A.

    In July and August 1975, 17 men and 63 women living in rural areas in Butler County, Pennsylvania were interviewed as to their behaviors, beliefs, and attitudes related to preventing cancer and coronary heart disease. Respondents represented about 12% of all adults living on commercial farms and 5% of all rural nonfarm adults in the county. A…

  5. Empowering women: participatory approaches in women's health and development projects.

    PubMed

    Manderson, L; Mark, T

    1997-01-01

    The authors describe the experience of NGOs (nongovernmental organizations) and community-based organizations in implementing projects aimed at improving women's health. The study included 16 projects, reflecting Australian NGO experiences in Africa, China, Southeast Asia, the Pacific, and South America. They illustrate the value of participatory approaches in determining needs and priorities, and the value of the continued involvement of women in implementation, monitoring, and evaluation. Approaches that succeeded in increasing women's access to and use of health services addressed gender issues, set realistic and achievable objectives, and recognized and enhanced the roles and status of women. PMID:9119780

  6. Reported health conditions in animals residing near natural gas wells in southwestern Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Slizovskiy, I B; Conti, L A; Trufan, S J; Reif, J S; Lamers, V T; Stowe, M H; Dziura, J; Rabinowitz, P M

    2015-01-01

    Natural gas extraction activities, including the use of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, may pose potential health risks to both human and animal populations in close proximity to sites of extraction activity. Because animals may have increased exposure to contaminated water and air as well as increased susceptibility to contaminant exposures compared to nearby humans, animal disease events in communities living near natural gas extraction may provide "sentinel" information useful for human health risk assessment. Community health evaluations as well as health impact assessments (HIAs) of natural gas exploration should therefore consider the inclusion of animal health metrics in their assessment process. We report on a community environmental health survey conducted in an area of active natural gas drilling, which included the collection of health data on 2452 companion and backyard animals residing in 157 randomly-selected households of Washington County, Pennsylvania (USA). There were a total of 127 reported health conditions, most commonly among dogs. When reports from all animals were considered, there were no significant associations between reported health condition and household proximity to natural gas wells. When dogs were analyzed separately, we found an elevated risk of 'any' reported health condition in households less than 1km from the nearest gas well (OR = 3.2, 95% CI 1.07-9.7), with dermal conditions being the most common of canine disorders. While these results should be considered hypothesis generating and preliminary, they suggest value in ongoing assessments of pet dogs as well as other animals to better elucidate the health impacts of natural gas extraction on nearby communities. PMID:25734823

  7. Women and health: power through perseverance.

    PubMed

    Leuning, C

    1994-07-01

    Health among the world's women is becoming more precarious as people are thrown into mad competition for scarce global resources. Patriarchal institutions continue to dominate the quest for power over earth, self, and others. This paper discusses five major issues related to women's health status today. Each issue raises questions for nurses to ponder as we try to address the widespread prejudice against women and health. Finally, the paper points to avenues that are being opened in nursing to address women's health concerns. PMID:8027192

  8. Health assessment for Hunterstown Road, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD009862939. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-05

    Hunterstown Road, a State Lead National Priority List site, is located near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. A Responsible Party cleanup in 1984 removed drums and sludges from the lagoon area. In January 1985, the Environmental Protection Agency installed a fence around the excavation area to prevent access. Although the data provided are few and of poor quality, this limited information (lead less than 8,000 ppm and copper less than 2,000 ppm) does not indicate any evidence that the site presents an imminent and significant threat to public health. There is evidence that surface water, in the vicinity of surface and subsurface drums located at some distance from the site, is contaminated with volatile organic chemicals (trichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethane, and trans-1,2-dichloroethene) at significant concentrations (greater than 1 ppm). However, this contamination does not appear to be coming from the fenced area of the site.

  9. Health hazard evaluation report, HETA-87-250-1888, GTE Products Corporation, Williamsport, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, G.A.; Richardson, F.D.

    1988-04-01

    In response to a request from the Electronic Components Divsion of the GTE Corporation, Williamsport, Pennsylvania, an evaluation was made of possible hazardous working conditions resulting from exposure to rosin pyrolysis products, Freon, methylene chloride, and other chemicals. Workers in the Standard Electronic Module assembly and testing area reported dizziness; headache; eye, nose and throat irritation; memory loss and mood changes. Air sampling was conducted for formaldehyde, total aldehydes, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. Medical interviews were conducted with 23 workers; many reported symptoms consistent with exposure to agents with neurotoxic and irritant characteristics. The authors conclude that a potential health hazard existed from inadequate ventilation; chemicals used in the area are capable of precipitating symptoms reported by workers. The authors recommend that measures be taken to reduce or eliminate exposures to methylene chloride, improve housekeeping and ventilation, and institute medical surveillance.

  10. Women's health: time for a redefinition.

    PubMed Central

    Simkin, R J

    1995-01-01

    Traditionally, women's health has been defined in mainly biologic terms. The various contexts within which women's health can be considered have been ignored, and many people have been unable to recognize the need for such a clinical entity as "women's health" in the first place. It is time for a change in attitudes and approaches. We need a more inclusive definition of women's health, one that takes into account social, cultural, spiritual, emotional and physical aspects of well-being. Case histories that have recently received media attention and statistics on the impact of poverty and violence on women also show how urgently a redefinition of "women's health" is needed. Regardless of whether "women's health" will always have to be viewed as a separate discipline or whether it can be brought within mainstream medical practice, it is clear that, by altering their perception of women's health and of the problems unique to women, physicians can improve both health care and medical education to the benefit of all members of our society. PMID:7859195

  11. Incorporating lesbian and bisexual women into women veterans' health priorities.

    PubMed

    Lehavot, Keren; Simpson, Tracy L

    2013-07-01

    Relative to the general population, lesbian and bisexual (LB) women are overrepresented in the military and are significantly more likely to have a history of military service compared to all adult women. Due to institutional policies and stigma associated with a gay or lesbian identity, very little empirical research has been done on this group of women veterans. Available data suggest that compared to heterosexual women veterans, LB women veterans are likely to experience heightened levels of prejudice and discrimination, victimization, including greater incidence of rape, as well as adverse health and substance use disorders. They are also likely to encounter a host of unique issues when accessing health care, including fears of insensitive care and difficulty disclosing sexual orientation to Veterans Health Administration (VHA) providers. Training of staff and providers, education efforts, outreach activities, and research on this subpopulation are critical to ensure equitable and high quality service delivery. PMID:23807073

  12. Increasing women in leadership in global health.

    PubMed

    Downs, Jennifer A; Reif, Lindsey K; Hokororo, Adolfine; Fitzgerald, Daniel W

    2014-08-01

    Globally, women experience a disproportionate burden of disease and death due to inequities in access to basic health care, nutrition, and education. In the face of this disparity, it is striking that leadership in the field of global health is highly skewed towards men and that global health organizations neglect the issue of gender equality in their own leadership. Randomized trials demonstrate that women in leadership positions in governmental organizations implement different policies than men and that these policies are more supportive of women and children. Other studies show that proactive interventions to increase the proportion of women in leadership positions within businesses or government can be successful. Therefore, the authors assert that increasing female leadership in global health is both feasible and a fundamental step towards addressing the problem of women's health. In this Perspective, the authors contrast the high proportion of young female trainees who are interested in academic global health early in their careers with the low numbers of women successfully rising to global health leadership roles. The authors subsequently explore reasons for female attrition from the field of global health and offer practical strategies for closing the gender gap in global health leadership. The authors propose solutions aimed to promote female leaders from both resource-wealthy and resource-poor countries, including leadership training grants, mentorship from female leaders in global professions, strengthening health education in resource-poor countries, research-enabling grants, and altering institutional policies to support women choosing a global health career path. PMID:24918761

  13. Health Literacy and Women's Health-Related Behaviors in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shoou-Yih D.; Tsai, Tzu-I; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Ken N.

    2012-01-01

    Extant health literacy research is unclear about the contribution of health literacy to health behaviors and is limited regarding women's health issues. The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the association between health literacy and five health behaviors (Pap smear screening, annual physical checkup, smoking, checking food…

  14. Refugee women's health: collaborative inquiry with refugee women in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Pavlish, Carol

    2005-01-01

    A collaborative capacity building experience in a Rwandan refugee camp with refugee women from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is described in this article. In service to the American Refugee Committee, I taught 13 refugee women how to plan and facilitate focus group sessions with the larger community of refugee women. The facilitators then conducted 18 focus group sessions gathering data from 100 refugee women. Thematic results included the health implications of poverty, the struggle to survive, the overburden of daily work, ambivalence about family planning, and the lack of freedom to express themselves. PMID:16263661

  15. Women's health is a community issue.

    PubMed

    Irvin, A

    1997-01-01

    When a member of the Community Life Project in Nigeria led a group of women in a discussion about HIV/AIDS, the women reported that they understood that condom use is the best means of protection but that they were unable to negotiate condom use with their husbands. Even if the women were economically independent, they would rather face the risk of HIV/AIDS than divorce. Thus, efforts to improve women's health have not generated much change on the local level. This can also be seen by the facts that current programs have failed to reduce the numbers of women dying from pregnancy-related causes each year, nearly 3000 women die from tuberculosis each day, women suffer occupational health risks, and domestic violence is an important determinant of health problems for women. Because women lack power in many societies, efforts to effect individual change may be blocked by a woman's particular circumstances. Thus, the involvement of entire communities is necessary to improve the conditions affecting women's health. Community-level discussions may open the door for couples to discuss sexuality and gender-based issues as well as safer sex behavior. Despite the important role they can play, women's community health groups face stiff challenges because of a lack of knowledge or training and because of the difficulty in overcoming gender-based discrimination. The Hesperian Foundation's publication, "Where Women Have No Doctor," is an excellent resource for understanding how poverty and gender issues affect women's health. The book contains practical information, promotes a model of community-based responses to problems with social origins, and shares experiences of grassroots groups world-wide. PMID:12292725

  16. Increasing Women in Leadership in Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Jennifer A.; Reif, Lindsey K.; Hokororo, Adolfine; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Globally, women experience a disproportionate burden of disease and death due to inequities in access to basic health care, nutrition, and education. In the face of this disparity, it is striking that leadership in the field of global health is highly skewed towards men and that global health organizations neglect the issue of gender equality in their own leadership. Randomized trials demonstrate that women in leadership positions in governmental organizations implement different policies than men and that these policies are more supportive of women and children. Other studies show that proactive interventions to increase the proportion of women in leadership positions within businesses or government can be successful. Therefore, the authors assert that increasing female leadership in global health is both feasible and a fundamental step towards addressing the problem of women’s health. In this article, the authors contrast the high proportion of young female trainees who are interested in academic global health early in their careers with the low numbers of women successfully rising to global health leadership roles. The authors subsequently explore reasons for female attrition from the field of global health and offer practical strategies for closing the gender gap in global health leadership. The authors propose solutions aimed to promote female leaders from both resource-wealthy and resource-poor countries, including leadership training grants, mentorship from female leaders in global professions, strengthening health education in resource-poor countries, research-enabling grants, and altering institutional policies to support women choosing a global health career path. PMID:24918761

  17. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 90-202-2116, Shamokin Elementary School, Shamokin, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.; Wilcox, T.; Burr, G.

    1991-05-01

    In response to a request from the management of the school system in Shamokin, Pennsylvania, an evaluation was undertaken of possible hazardous working conditions at the Shamokin Elementary School (SIC-8211). Health and comfort complaints had included tiredness, irritated eyes, and dry throat. Real time carbon-dioxide (124389), respirable particulate, temperature and relative humidity measurements were made in a selection of rooms throughout the day of the survey. Symptom questionnaires were distributed to all of the teachers and followup interviews were conducted. Supply air flow rates to the classrooms varied widely. Average carbon-dioxide levels ranged from about 800 parts per million (ppm) to over 900ppm. Morning readings of 475 to 1000ppm and afternoon readings of 723 to 1125ppm were noted. Average respirable particulate levels were 0.03mg/cu m. Average temperatures were 73 degrees-F in the morning, rising to 76 degrees in the afternoon. Average humidities began at 22% and rose to 27% in the afternoon. Of 51 teachers, 38 frequently experienced two or more building related health complaints. According to the authors, no obvious health hazards were identified. The imbalanced air and faulty control systems appear to have caused overheating of some areas which can result in thermal comfort problems. Low humidity levels are also believed to have exacerbated these problems. The authors recommend measures to solve the problems for the mechanical systems and to relieve occupant symptoms.

  18. Health assessment for Hellertown Manufacturing, Hellertown, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD002390748. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-29

    The Hellertown Manufacturing Site (HMS) is a former spark plug manufacturing facility located in Hellertown (Northampton), Pennsylvania. Between 1930 and 1976, the HMS operated a series of five unlined lagoons that were used for the disposal of zinc and chromium plating wastes and cleaners, and cutting oil water generated by the facility. The five lagoons were closed out in 1976 by backfilling with the waste sludges remaining in the lagoons. On-site contaminants of concern include chromium and cyanide from sludge lagoons. ATSDR is unable to determine the potential public health threat to area residents based on the limited amount of sampling performed. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substance via direct contact and possibly through inhalation. ATSDR is unable to comment on other potential human exposure pathways without additional on-site soil sampling and off-site soil, groundwater, and surface water information.

  19. Women, health, and knowledge: travels through and beyond foreign parts.

    PubMed

    Oakley, A

    1993-01-01

    The meanings of health for women as a social group are discussed. It is argued that women's perspectives on health give central importance to the concepts of self-determination, coping, power, and control. Health for women is bound up with their experiences in everyday life. Women are also primary health care providers. Medicine, however, dominates women's bodies in ways that conflict with women's own perspectives on their health: In "developed" societies, medical intervention now poses a major threat to women's health. By concentrating on quantitative methodology, most researchers studying women's health have ignored these important meanings of health to women. PMID:8407624

  20. Spirituality and Health for Women of Color

    PubMed Central

    Musgrave, Catherine F.; Allen, Carol Easley; Allen, Gregory J.

    2002-01-01

    Spirituality among African American and Hispanic women has been associated with a variety of positive health outcomes. The purposes of this commentary are (1) to define spirituality, comparing it with religiosity, and briefly examine the historical, cultural, and contextual roots of spirituality among women of color; (2) to explore research data that support a relationship between spirituality and health, particularly among women of color; and (3) to present several examples of how spirituality may enhance public health interventions designed to promote health and prevention. PMID:11919051

  1. Public health assessment for Malvern Tce Site, Malvern, Chester County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. Cerclis No. PAD014353445. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-06

    The Chemclene (Malvern TCE) site is a National Priorities List (NPL) site in Chester County, Pennsylvania, 5.5 miles south of Phoenixville. Over the years, careless waste handling and waste burial have contaminated soil and groundwater with trichloroethene (TCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA), and tetrachloroethene (PCE). Based upon the information reviewed, the Pennsylvania Department of Health and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry have concluded that this site is a public health hazard because past exposures through the use of contaminated well water were at levels of public health concern. Human exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) may still be occurring through the use of private well water, and the potential for exposure from the nearby public well exists should the contaminant plume reach that well.

  2. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-232-1948, Consolidated Freightways, Pocono Summit, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Blade, L.M.; Savery, H.

    1989-02-01

    A study was made of possible hazardous working conditions at Consolidated Freightways, Pocono Summit, Pennsylvania. The request concerned potential exposure of dock workers to exhaust emissions from diesel-powered forklift trucks brought about by the health complaints of several of the workers there. Twenty-one workers were identified as symptomatic of exposure to diesel exhaust fumes. This included at least half of the midnight shift. Upper respiratory tract irritation was mentioned by all of these workers. Some reported eye irritation, cough productive of black-tinged sputum, and sore throat. These symptoms lessened during periods away from work. Airborne concentrations of all components measured at the site were well below the applicable exposure limits. A potential health hazard associated with exposure to diesel engine exhaust existed. The authors recommend that whenever a forklift truck is to be left unattended for more than the shortest of periods, the motor should be turned off. The newer forklifts should be used on a shift before the older, less emission controlled, lifts. Roof exhaust fans ordered are to be installed at the facility and their effectiveness evaluated.

  3. Women and Heart Health Awareness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Preparedness & Response Environmental Health Healthy Living Injury, Violence & Safety Life Stages & Populations Travelers' Health Workplace Safety & Health Features Media Sign up for Features Get Email Updates To ...

  4. Women's health research: public policy and sociology.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, J D; Figert, A E

    1995-01-01

    In the space of just a few years, the amount and nature of scientific research on women's health has emerged as a major policy issue being addressed at the highest levels of the federal government and in the mainstream media. This debate has engaged members of Congress, the National Institutes of Health, and other federal agencies, and medical, scientific, health, and women's organizations. Sociologists have made significant contributions to both the process by which the women's health research issue has ascended to public awareness and the content of its agenda. Many of these contributions go unrecognized and other potential contributions by medical sociologists remain unrealized. In order to advance both science and practice in women's health--by ensuring the inclusion of the sociological perspective--we encourage sociologists to participate more directly in the policy debates. PMID:7560844

  5. Health literacy and women's health-related behaviors in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shoou-Yih D; Tsai, Tzu-I; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Ken N

    2012-04-01

    Extant health literacy research is unclear about the contribution of health literacy to health behaviors and is limited regarding women's health issues. The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the association between health literacy and five health behaviors (Pap smear screening, annual physical checkup, smoking, checking food expiration dates, and monitoring physical changes) in women and to test whether the association is mediated by health knowledge. A national sample of 1,754 female adults in Taiwan was included in the study. Result showed that health literacy was positively and independently related to checking food expiration dates and monitoring physical changes, and that health literacy was not related to physical checkup and Pap smear screening. Interestingly, women with high health literacy were more likely to be a current smoker. Study findings suggest that efforts to improve health promotion behaviors in women should consider health literacy as an important factor and that the effect of health literacy on health prevention behaviors may vary by women's access to care. PMID:21742948

  6. Oral Health in a Sample of Pregnant Women from Northern Appalachia (2011–2015)

    PubMed Central

    Neiswanger, Katherine; McNeil, Daniel W.; Foxman, Betsy; Govil, Manika; Cooper, Margaret E.; Weyant, Robert J.; Shaffer, John R.; Crout, Richard J.; Simhan, Hyagriv N.; Beach, Scott R.; Chapman, Stella; Zovko, Jayme G.; Brown, Linda J.; Strotmeyer, Stephen J.; Maurer, Jennifer L.; Marazita, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Chronic poor oral health has a high prevalence in Appalachia, a large region in the eastern USA. The Center for Oral Health Research in Appalachia (COHRA) has been enrolling pregnant women and their babies since 2011 in the COHRA2 study of genetic, microbial, and environmental factors involved in oral health in Northern Appalachia. Methods. The COHRA2 protocol is presented in detail, including inclusion criteria (healthy, adult, pregnant, US Caucasian, English speaking, and nonimmunocompromised women), recruiting (two sites: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia, USA), assessments (demographic, medical, dental, psychosocial/behavioral, and oral microbial samples and DNA), timelines (longitudinal from pregnancy to young childhood), quality control, and retention rates. Results. Preliminary oral health and demographic data are presented in 727 pregnant women, half from the greater Pittsburgh region and half from West Virginia. Despite similar tooth brushing and flossing habits, COHRA2 women in West Virginia have significantly worse oral health than the Pittsburgh sample. Women from Pittsburgh are older and more educated and have less unemployment than the West Virginia sample. Conclusions. We observed different prevalence of oral health and demographic variables between pregnant women from West Virginia (primarily rural) and Pittsburgh (primarily urban). These observations suggest site-specific differences within Northern Appalachia that warrant future studies. PMID:26089906

  7. Integrating Work and Family: Women's Health Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killien, Marcia

    An exploratory study examined the relationship between individual, family, and work variables and working mothers' health. The study also investigated the relationship between health management strategies and health. A cross-sectional survey design was used to gather data from 85 women who were married, employed 20 hours a week or more, and had…

  8. HIV and Sexual Health Education for Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyman, Christine; Engstrom, Eric L.

    1996-01-01

    Explores women's issues in HIV prevention and sexual health promotion centers in regard to the biological, psychological, developmental, and social conditions and constraints in women's lives. Concludes that multiple models of HIV-prevention education and behavioral counseling will be needed to address the complex heterogeneity of roles, stages of…

  9. Gender-Specific Health Challenges Facing Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Specific Health Challenges Facing Women Questions and Answers Science Advances Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page Get email updates Order publications Volunteer for Clinical Studies Help improve ...

  10. Women and statin use: a women's health advocacy perspective.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Harriet; Allard, Danielle

    2008-08-01

    This paper is based on a longer report on the benefits, safety and modalities of information representation with regard to women and statin use, situated within the historical context of Women's Health Movement which has advocated for unbiased, appropriate medical research and prescribing for women based on the goals of full-disclosure, informed consent, evidence-based medicine and gender-based analysis. The evidence base for prescribing statins for women, especially for primary prevention is weak, yet Canadian data suggest that half of all prescriptions are for women. Safety meta-analyses do not disaggregate for women; do not consider female vulnerability to statin induced muscle problems, and women-centred concerns such as breast-cancer, miscarriage or birth defects are under-researched. Many trials have not published their non-cardiac serious adverse event data. These factors suggest that the standards of full-disclosure, informed consent, evidence-based prescribing and gender-based analysis are not being met and women should proceed with caution. PMID:18609063

  11. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-033-1576, Airco Carbon, St. Marys, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Hartle, R.W.; Morawetz, J.S.

    1985-09-01

    Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), total particulates, and respirable free silica at the Airco Company (SIC-3624), Saint Marys, Pennsylvania in January, 1984. The evaluation was requested confidentially because of concern over exposures to soot, coal tar pitch volatiles, and sand in the car bottom and sagger bake operations. Forty-three employees were interviewed. Two of 19 total particulate samples exceeded the OSHA standard of 15 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m3), 17.3 and 32.7 mg/m3. Benzene soluble fractions ranged from 0.5 to 5.0 mg/m3. The OSHA standard for benzene soluble fractions is 0.2 mg/m3. Two of seven samples of silica were above the limit of detection, 0.09 and 0.06 mg/m3. In bulk samples, the benzene soluble fractions ranged from 0.44 to 860 mg/gram and the PAH content from 0 to 26,124 micrograms per gram. Employees working in the bake areas reported a significant excess incidence of symptoms such as skin, nose and eye irritation, cough, sore or dry throat, chest tightness, and breathing difficulty. The authors conclude that a health hazard exists at the facility. Recommendations include enclosing vehicles used in moving electrodes, cleaning up spilled dust, and controlling fumes emitted from the sagger kilns.

  12. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-270-2080, Harrisburg Steam Generation Facility, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, T.A.

    1990-11-01

    In response to a request from the City of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, a health hazard evaluation was conducted at the Harrisburg Steam Generation Facility (HSGF)(SIC-4953) concerning possible exposure to fly ash, combustion products and asbestos (1332214). The facility was a waste to energy site where municipal refuse was incinerated at approximately 1400 degrees-F. The steam generated was either sold directly or converted to electricity via an on site turbine. Employees used hard hats, safety shoes and glasses, work clothes and single use disposable dust and mist respirators. There was a potential for exposure to fly ash for employees working in the boiler and basement areas. Total particulate exposures ranged from 5 to llmg/m3 for laborers. The concentration of lead (7439921) exceeded the standards set by OSHA permissible exposure level of 0.05mg/kg in three of the personal breathing zone air samples. Amosite (12172735) and chrysotile (12001295) asbestos were identified in bulk samples of insulation and asbestos taken from a settled dust sample in the boiler area. Surface wipe samples indicated the possibility of hand to mouth contact with fly ash, particularly in the break and locker rooms. The author concludes that there is a need for reducing worker exposure to fly ash particulate. The author recommends engineering and work practice controls to reduce particulate exposures, increased cleaning and maintenance activities; and further evaluation of asbestos contamination at the facility.

  13. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 91-118-2213, Cocalico School District, Denver, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.

    1992-05-01

    In response to a request from the Cocalico School District (SIC-1542) of Denver, Pennsylvania, an evaluation was undertaken of a solvent odor in the Adamstown Elementary School building. A solvent primarily composed of terpenes had been used to remove floor tile mastic during the removal of asbestos tiles from the school rooms. Staff and students had experienced eye and throat irritation, nausea, and headaches. Efforts had been made to reduce the odor, and students had been relocated to another building. Twelve area air samples were collected to measure the concentrations of volatile organic compounds in various locations of the building. All concentrations were significantly below required limits. The source appeared to be from products used in construction and renovation projects. The author concludes that the concentrations of individual volatile organic compounds at the time of the survey did not represent a health hazard. The total volatile organic compound concentration could cause symptoms of eye, nose and throat irritation. The author recommends measures to prevent elevated levels of volatile organic compounds after renovations.

  14. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-248-1694, Wasson Elementary School, Dubois, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, R.; Aw, T.C.

    1986-05-01

    The DuBois area school district DuBois, Pennsylvania requested an evaluation due to complaints of bloody nose, dry eyes, upper respiratory irritation, and headaches among students and faculty at the Wasson Elementary School. All 24 teachers were involved in a questionnaire that focused on medical histories and symptoms related to working in the school. Environmental air samples revealed trace concentrations of organic vapors, primarily toluene and C9 to C12 hydrocarbons. Carbon-dioxide levels measured 200 parts per million (ppm) outside and up to 800 ppm inside, suggesting that the amount of fresh air coming into the building was inadequate. The distribution of that air within the building was inadequate. The authors conclude that the health complaints were related to poor indoor air quality caused by deficiencies in the ventilation system. The heating/cooling system had many deficiencies related to design, installation, and maintenance. The authors recommended improvements to be made in the system, including cleaning air filters, adjusting dampers, leaving classroom doors open, using fans to promote mixing of outside air, and setting thermostats at the same setting.

  15. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 91-191-2217, Sporting Hill Elementary, Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.

    1992-05-01

    In response to community concerns that an odor at the Sporting Hill Elementary (SIC-1542) located in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania was causing headaches, stomachaches, dizziness, and respiratory problems for the staff and students, an investigation was made to determine the source of the problem. A solvent had been used to remove tile mastic and a carpet adhesive had been used to install new carpet during the remodelling of the school. Air quality samples were taken and analyzed which indicated that the source of the odor was primarily the solvent used to remove the tile mastic. The area air concentrations of total volatile organic compounds ranged from nondetectable to 2.1mg/cu m. The concentrations as measured were far below the acceptable limit for trimethylbenzene which was used as a surrogate to compare the levels as there was no occupational guideline specifically for the chemical mixture used in the remover. The author concludes that, while the concentration present on the day of the study was not sufficient to cause a health hazard, the concentration was in the range of that which may cause occupants of the building to experience eye nose and throat irritation. The author recommends measures which may prevent similar problems associated with renovations.

  16. Health-hazard evaluation report No. MHETA 88-249-1931, Community Savings Association, Finleyville, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, W.T.; Costa, C.

    1988-09-01

    In response to a request from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, an evaluation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at the Finleyville Branch of the Community Savings Association (SIC-6036), located in Finleyville, Pennsylvania. Employees had been sensitized to a fungus and were experiencing nausea, headache, fatigue, sinus congestion, and difficulty in breathing even after action to control the fungus had been taken. The first allergic reaction was noted in October of 1986 with four more cases developing by December 5 of that same year. During early February of 1987 the wall in the storeroom was scraped, cleaned, and painted with a fungal-resistant paint. On March 16 the office was closed early due to three full-time employees suffering the aforementioned symptoms plus dermatological symptoms of an allergic reaction. Additional control efforts were likewise unsuccessful. Analysis indicated that exposure to microorganisms and an inadequate supply of fresh air were likely the causes of the symptoms experienced by these workers. The authors recommend that the ventilation, heating, and air conditioning unit be operated according to ASHRAE standards; that the storeroom wall be maintained free of microbial growth and that files in open boxes be cleaned and placed in enclosed cabinets, and humidity be adjusted.

  17. Mental health and older women.

    PubMed Central

    Liptzin, B

    1987-01-01

    The number of elderly women is growing in absolute numbers and in proportion to the U. S. population. Current epidemiologic research indicates that the most frequent psychiatric disorders among older women are phobias, severe cognitive impairment, dysthymia, and major depressive episode without grief. The rates of all of these disorders, except for cognitive impairment, are lower for older than for younger women. The rates of psychiatric disorders in older women are higher than in older men, except for alcohol abuse-dependence, which is higher in men. Depression is a common psychiatric problem in older women. The differential diagnosis includes other medical disorders, drug effects, normal grief, and early dementia. Older depressed women may present with physical complaints rather than complaints of depression, and thus be misdiagnosed. Treatment consists of psychotherapy, antidepressant medication, and activities to improve self-esteem. Dementia affects 4 percent of elderly women over age 65, and 20 percent of those over age 85. The most common cause is Alzheimer's disease. Current research is focusing on abnormalities in the cholinergic system in the brain. A careful psychiatric evaluation may identify medical conditions, including depression, which can be treated and can lead to improvements in the patient's functioning. PMID:3120218

  18. A common pathway toward women's health.

    PubMed

    Chibber, K S; Kaplan, R L; Padian, N S; Anderson, S J; Ling, P M; Acharya, N; Van Dyke, C; Krishnan, S

    2008-01-01

    This paper calls for an alternate approach to studying the aetiology of women's health conditions. Instead of the long-established disease-specific, compartmentalized approach, it recommends focusing on risk exposures that allows for the identification of multiple disease conditions that stem from the same risk factors. Identifying common risk factors and the related pathways to adverse health outcomes can lead to the development of interventions that would favourably affect more than one disease condition. The utility of such an approach is illustrated by a review of literature from across the globe on the association between gender inequity-related exposures and women's health (namely, three health conditions: sexually transmitted infections [STIs], including Human Immunodeficiency Virus [HIV], blindness, and depression; as well as two risk behaviours: eating disorders and tobacco use). The review demonstrates how women's health cannot be viewed independently from the larger social, economic, and political context in which women are situated. Promoting women's health necessitates more comprehensive approaches, such as gender-sensitization of other family members, and the development of more creative and flexible mechanisms of healthcare delivery, that acknowledge the gender inequity-related constraints that women face in their daily lives. PMID:19288357

  19. Not Far Enough: Women vs. Smoking. A Workshop for Women's Group and Women's Health Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    Highlights from a series of papers on the role of smoking in women's disease and death, women's smoking behavior, and the role of the tobacco industry are included in this document. Conference participants included public health and women's organizations. Brief summaries of the papers introduce the document. An outline of network strategies…

  20. What Is Women's Endocrine Health?

    MedlinePlus

    ... healthy lifestyle and harness the power to prevent endocrine disorders, the Power of Prevention. Childhood Childhood is a ... frequent at this time. Learning how to prevent endocrine disorders during this age is pivotal. Young Women At ...

  1. Personal health among midlife women hospital employees.

    PubMed

    Angard, N; Chez, R A; Young, C

    1998-12-01

    We hypothesized that women employees working in a hospital environment would be particularly attuned to aspects of personal health, well-being, and disease prevention. We performed an observational study at a local hospital, offering free assessments in its outpatient women's wellness screening program to women employees aged 39-60 years. Data from the first 60 women to enroll in the program are presented as a test of our hypothesis. Undiagnosed hypertension, abnormal lipid profiles, glucose intolerance, alcohol abuse, abnormal cervical cytology, breast masses, depression, or combinations of these were found in 49 of the 60 women. Twenty-one women were obese. Most women with abnormal findings did not follow specific personalized recommendations for remedial follow-up, including referral to a specialist. An important percentage of midlife women employees at this hospital exhibited unhealthful personal behaviors, had unrecognized disease, and did not use recommended health screening practices. The data emphasize the benefit for employees who participate in medical facility worksite health promotion programs. PMID:9929862

  2. Women prisoners, mental health, violence and abuse.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Morag

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the specific experiences of women in prison, focusing on previous (and continuing) physical and mental abuse, the consequent health care requirements of women prisoners, the policy response and the availability of suitable health care in prisons across the EU. It draws from an extensive review of the literature on women prisoners across Europe that was part of an on-going European Project funded by the DAPHNE programme of the European Commission, entitled 'DAPHNE Strong'. It also uses the field research from the project collected via surveys and in-depth interviews with key personnel in organisations that work with women prisoners or ex-prisoners and staff with a strategic overview of activity from the ministries of justice, police, prison service and women's support organisations. There are probably many more women prisoners with a history of domestic abuse than is officially recognised. Many of the women prison population who have experienced violence and abuse mask this by problematic drug or alcohol use as well as self-injury. These are key areas that training for prison staff needs to address. The availability of services for this group of women is inconsistent within and between countries of the EU. The political will to address the situation of women in prison, as distinct from the norms applied to men, is variable and it seems to take the determined efforts of active lobby groups to make inroads into an area of latent inertia. PMID:23642339

  3. Women and Health Care: A Bibliography With Selected Annotation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruzek, Sheryl K.

    This bibliography provides a comprehensive historical review of the literature on women and health care. The materials presented address the following areas of concern: (1) basic issues in health care for women; (2) special health concerns and needs of women; (3) sexuality and mental health; (4) women's projects designed to improve their health…

  4. Four perspectives of women's health. Workshop participants talk about women's health issues in four countries. [Malaysia].

    PubMed

    Kaur, P

    1994-01-01

    The program officer of the SIEC Project of the Federation of Family Planning Associations, Malaysia (FFPA,M) granted an interview to JOICFP News during JOICFP's IEC Workshop for the Production of Video Script for Women's Health in Tokyo, Japan. FFPA,M provides comprehensive reproductive health services, including family planning services, pap smear screenings, breast examination, annual medical checkups, and premarital and marital counseling for women. Around 50% of married women use family planning. More than 90% of contraceptive users are familiar with at least one family planning method. FFPA,M is focusing on marginalized women. As Malaysia industrializes, rural-urban migration occurs. Young women comprise many of the new factory workers. FFPA,M provides family life education for these women and strives to help them achieve reproductive health and rights. The enthusiasm for women's issues exhibited at the workshop by both male and female participants pleased FFPA,M's program officer. PMID:12318571

  5. Soy Foods for Enhancing Women's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fly, Alyce D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the forms of soy available as food ingredients and foods, the components in soy that may be important to women's health, the FDA health claim permitted for soy foods and ingredients, and research studies examining the role of soy in reducing cholesterol, cancer risk, osteoporosis, and symptoms of menopause. (Contains references.) (SM)

  6. A Remedy for Women's Health Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bibel, Barbara

    1993-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of 38 current women's health books that indicates essential purchases for libraries interested in developing a core collection. Topics addressed include general information; gynecological health; premenstrual syndrome; heart disease; cancer; menopause; sexuality; and a sidebar that includes relevant books in…

  7. Asian Pacific American Women's Health Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pian, Canta

    This paper discusses the adjustment and acculturation problems of Asian Pacific American women and how these problems relate to their health concerns. Information presented in the article is based on the observations of health service providers to the Asian community. The paper suggests that the diversity of Asian Americans (age, ethnic group, and…

  8. Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter during Pregnancy and Risk of Preterm Birth among Women in New Jersey, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, 2000–2005

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Julie L.; Messer, Lynne C.; Poole, Charles; Lobdell, Danelle T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) has been variably associated with preterm birth (PTB). Objective: We classified PTB into four categories (20–27, 28–31, 32–34, and 35–36 weeks completed gestation) and estimated risk differences (RDs) for each category in association with a 1-μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 exposure during each week of gestation. Methods: We assembled a cohort of singleton pregnancies that completed ≥ 20 weeks of gestation during 2000–2005 using live birth certificate data from three states (Pennsylvania, Ohio, and New Jersey) (n = 1,940,213; 8% PTB). We estimated mean PM2.5 exposures for each week of gestation from monitor-corrected Community Multi-Scale Air Quality modeling data. RDs were estimated using modified Poisson linear regression and adjusted for maternal race/ethnicity, marital status, education, age, and ozone. Results: RD estimates varied by exposure window and outcome period. Average PM2.5 exposure during the fourth week of gestation was positively associated with all PTB outcomes, although magnitude varied by PTB category [e.g., for a 1-μg/m3 increase, RD = 11.8 (95% CI: –6, 29.2); RD = 46 (95% CI: 23.2, 68.9); RD = 61.1 (95% CI: 22.6, 99.7); and RD = 28.5 (95% CI: –39, 95.7) for preterm births during 20–27, 28–31, 32–34, and 35–36 weeks, respectively]. Exposures during the week of birth and the 2 weeks before birth also were positively associated with all PTB categories. Conclusions: Exposures beginning around the time of implantation and near birth appeared to be more strongly associated with PTB than exposures during other time periods. Because particulate matter exposure is ubiquitous, evidence of effects of PM2.5 exposure on PTB, even if small in magnitude, is cause for concern. Citation: Rappazzo KM, Daniels JL, Messer LC, Poole C, Lobdell DT. 2014. Exposure to fine particulate matter during pregnancy and risk of preterm birth among women in New Jersey, Ohio, and

  9. [Health conditions of immigrant women in Italy].

    PubMed

    Spinelli, A; Baglio, G; Lispi, L; Guasticchi, G

    2005-01-01

    The number of immigrant women in Italy has increased from 260,000 in 1991 to at least 750,000 in 2003. This article describes the health situation of these women, in particular it deals with reproductive health. Immigrant women are generally young, in good health and they go to the health services mainly for pregnancy, delivery, spontaneous and induced abortion. Forty-eight per cent of acute hospital admissions and 56 per cent of day hospital admissions in 2002 were related to reproduction. Among foreign citizens, the induced abortion rate is three times higher than that reported among Italians, while the risk of spontaneous abortion is similar (97 per thousand and 101 per thousand, respectively). In general, the data show that immigrant women in Italy live in deprived social conditions, which can influence their reproductive choices and their access to health services. In order to take account of their particular needs, it is necessary to modify the health services and plan public health interventions especially for the prevention of induced abortion. PMID:16041925

  10. Women's health in urban Mali: Social Predictors and Health Itineraries

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Riley M; Vala-Haynes, Emily; Valeggia, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Social and marital factors may influence women's health outcomes. This is of particular relevance in sub-Saharan Africa, where women's health indicators lag behind the rest of the world. Our study examines the impact of social mediators of women's health during key events (pregnancy and illness) in urban Mali. In this cross-sectional study, we interviewed 324 women aged 15-80, living in Bamako, the capital city, in 1999. We used mixed quantitative and qualitative methods to obtain detailed histories of pregnancy and illness during specific time periods preceding the survey. We examined the role of marital factors (polygyny, widowhood), social factors (sources of support and scales derived for social network and social power), and household wealth on women's therapeutic itineraries. We compared the sociodemographic characteristics of our sample with those of the 2001 Mali Demographic and Health Survey and used their data on contraception to enrich analyses. We found that most pregnant women delivered in a health center and most women sought medical care during an illness event. Household wealth influenced illness reporting, and financial concerns were obstacles to medical care. Polygyny was associated with lower prevalence of contraceptive use, lower social power, as well as with less support received during pregnancy from women's husbands and in-laws. Widowhood appeared to increase susceptibility to illness, while decreasing resort to biomedical care. Our social composite scores highlighted differences in healthcare utilization in an urban setting with near-uniform access to biomedical care. We validate the utility of locally-derived composite scores, which may provide a deeper understanding into the social mediation of health outcomes for women. PMID:22818488

  11. Polygyny and Women's Health in Rural Mali

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Riley M; Vala-Haynes, Emily; Valeggia, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Women's social networks and social power are increasingly seen as important factors modulating their health in sub-Saharan Africa. Polygyny, a common marital structure in many societies, mediates important intra-household relationships by requiring both competition and cooperation among co-wives. Using mixed methods, semi-structured questionnaires were administered to 298 women aged 15 to 84 living in the Kolondiéba region of rural Mali in 1999, and supplemented by detailed interviews with 40 women. Three categories of outcome were explored: illness experience, therapeutic itinerary, and social support received. Quantitative data were analyzed using regression analysis and qualitative data using a grounded theory approach. In quantitative analyses, controlling for age and household wealth index, senior wives were less likely to be escorted to a healer by their husbands during illness than were junior wives or monogamous women. Polygynous women were also less likely to obtain a treatment for which there was a monetary fee. Fewer than one third of polygynous women reported the assistance of a co-wife during illness in any given task. In qualitative analyses, women further related varied mechanisms through which polygyny impacted their health trajectories. These ranged from strongly supportive relationships, to jealousy because of unequal health or fertility, bias in emotional and material support provided by husbands, and accusations of wrong-doing and witchcraft. This study highlights the need for more prospective mixed methods analyses to further clarify the impact of polygyny on women's health-related experiences and behaviors in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:23480408

  12. Women and migration: a public health issue.

    PubMed

    Carballo, M; Grocutt, M; Hadzihasanovic, A

    1996-01-01

    The need to migrate is usually a function of the complex interaction of economic, social, familial and political factors. Among the most important, however, are the denial of access to education, employment, goods and services and the lack of respect for basic human rights. Because in many societies women are marginalized from these rights, migration to more economically and educationally open societies can often help improve their personal situation and their professional opportunities. On the other hand, because the status of women is usually linked to their role and status within the family and is defined in relationship to their male partners, migration can place women in situations where they experience stress and anxiety due to the loss of their traditional social entourage and environment. Their social integration in new settings may be equally limited by their initial lack of education and occupational experience. The higher vulnerability of women to sexual abuse and violence also places them at risk of STDs, including HIV, and a range of post-traumatic stress disorders associated with sexual violence. Their reproductive health needs often go unnoticed and unprotected even in well organized refugee and migrant situations, and the insensitivity of health staff to the needs of women is often more pronounced in refugee and migrant contexts than it is in general. Health monitoring of women in all migration-related situations has to be given greater priority. Similarly, much more attention at a health policy level is called for if the rights of women refugees and migrants are to be protected, and their contribution to health and social development is to be acknowledged and promoted. PMID:9050196

  13. Minority Women's Health: American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health > American Indians/Alaska Natives Minority Women's Health American Indians/Alaska Natives Related information How to Talk to ... disease. Return to top Health conditions common in American Indian and Alaska Native women Accidents Alcoholism and drug ...

  14. Divorce and Women's Risk of Health Insurance Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavelle, Bridget; Smock, Pamela J.

    2012-01-01

    This article bridges the literatures on the economic consequences of divorce for women with that on marital transitions and health by focusing on women's health insurance. Using a monthly calendar of marital status and health insurance coverage from 1,442 women in the Survey of Income and Program Participation, we examine how women's health…

  15. Investigation of potential health effects associated with well water chemical contamination in Londonderry Township, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Logue, J N; Stroman, R M; Reid, D; Hayes, C W; Sivarajah, K

    1985-01-01

    A community health survey was conducted by the Pennsylvania Department of Health in Londonderry Township, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, in response to concerns about potential health effects associated with residential exposure to chemical contaminants in well water. The data indicate that there were no observable adverse health effects in the exposed group of residents, compared with the control group, which could be ascribed to long-term, low-level exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE) and other volatile organic chemicals. Significantly more individuals in the exposed group than in the control group experienced eye irritation, diarrhea, and sleepiness during the 12-month period prior to the survey. This indicated the possibility of an association of contaminated water with the manifestation of symptoms. It is hypothesized that the increased rate of symptoms observed in the exposed group, when compared to the control group, may have been caused by one or more of the following factors: (1) effect of TCE at a threshold level higher than 28 ppb, (2) effect of a single chemical entity other than TCE, and (3) additive or synergistic effects of several chemicals. It is also possible that there are factors other than water contaminants associated with the recorded symptoms, e.g., stress, that may have had an important influence in the exposed group but not in the control group. PMID:4026385

  16. Violence against women: an emerging health problem.

    PubMed

    Jewkes, R

    2000-11-01

    As well as being a violation of human rights, violence against women can be regarded as an 'emerging health problem' of the late twentieth century not because it is new, but because its prevalence and role in the aetiology of ill health has only recently been widely recognized. In this paper we discuss the epidemiology and health impact of violence against women, drawing particularly on data from research in South Africa. Here the prevalence of abuse is between 20% and 30%, which is in keeping with estimates for other countries and research has shown that 1% of women are raped each year. Gender-based violence is an appreciable cause of mortality from homicide and suicide. It is also associated with a range of other health problems, particularly injuries, HIV and sexually transmitted diseases, pregnancy complications and mental health problems. Available estimates suggest that it is associated with considerable costs to the health sector. Roles for the health sector in breaking cycles of abuse are increasingly being recognized and there is a need for appropriate interventions, based on screening, homicide and suicide risk assessment, documentation, information giving and referral to be implemented more widely in health facilities. PMID:11195267

  17. What Health Issues or Conditions Are Specific to Women Only?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What health issues or conditions are specific to women only? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Women experience ...

  18. College Health for Young Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... important for me to know about before I go to college? Filling out your college enrollment health ... this information with other important papers when you go to college. Your immunizations must be up-to- ...

  19. Funding women's health work -- no easy answers.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, J

    1998-01-01

    This article discusses a community's solution to improving women's health in Guatemala. Indigenous women from the highland community of Cajola formed the Asociacion Pro-Bienestar de la Mujer Mam (APBMM). The APBMM identified a need for women health promoters and good, low-cost medicines. The Instituto de Educacion Integral para la Salud y el Desarrollo (IDEI) helped train 16 women as health communicators or promoters in 1996. The health communicators learned about setting up community medicine distribution. The mayor bypassed APBMM's efforts to set up medicine distribution and set up a community pharmacy himself. Someone else opened a private pharmacy. The 200-member group was frustrated and redirected their energies to making natural herbal medicines, such as eucalyptus rub. The group set up a community medicine chest in the IDEI medical clinic and sold modern medicine, homemade vapor rubs, and syrups. The group was joined by midwives and other volunteers and began educating mothers about treatment of diarrhea and respiratory diseases. The Drogueria Estatal, which distributes medicines nationally to nongovernmental groups, agreed to sell high quality, low cost medicine to the medicine chest, which was renamed Venta Social de Medicamentos (VSM). The health communicators are working on three potential income generation projects: VSM, the production and sale of traditional medicines and educational materials, and an experimental greenhouse to grow medicinal plants and research other crops that can be grown in the highlands. PMID:12348709

  20. Public health assessment for Butz Landfill, Jackson Township, Monroe County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. Cerclis No. PAD981034705. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-29

    The Butz Landfill in Jackson Township, Monroe County, Pennsylvania, was added to the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) National Priorities List (NPL) in March 1989. Groundwater contamination downgradient of the site, with subsequent contamination of private residential wells by volatile organic compounds (VOCs), eventually led EPA to construct a potable public water supply. The major contaminants found in the private wells are 1,1-dichloroethene (1,1-DCE), 1,2-dichloroethene (1,2-DCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and tetrachloroethene (PCE). The site posed a past public health hazard because people were exposed to contaminated groundwater.

  1. Women's Health Issues in the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Richard T.

    1999-01-01

    Women have been an integral part of US space crews since Sally Ride's mission in 1983, and a total of 40 women have been selected as US astronauts. The first Russian female cosmonaut flew in 1963. This presentation examines the health care and reproductive aspects of flying women in space. In addition, the reproductive implications of delaying one's childbearing for an astronaut career and the impact of new technology such as assisted reproductive techniques are examined. The reproductive outcomes of the US female astronauts who have become pregnant following space flight exposure are also presented. Since women have gained considerable operational experience on the Shuttle, Mir and during EVA, the unique operational considerations for preflight certification, menstruation control and hygiene, contraception, and urination are discussed. Medical and surgical implications for women on long-duration missions to remote locations are still evolving, and enabling technologies for health care delivery are being developed. There has been considerable progress in the development of microgravity surgical techniques, including laparoscopy, thoracoscopy, and laparotomy. The concepts of prevention of illness, conversion of surgical conditions to medically treatable conditions and surgical intervention for women on long duration space flights are considered.

  2. The Maternal Health Clinic: Improving women's cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graeme N

    2015-06-01

    Women's cardiovascular health is a national priority that should be addressed through improving cardiovascular awareness and prevention. Given the costs of treating cardiovascular disease and screening for it, novel and innovative ways to identify women who should undergo risk screening and intervention, including lifestyle modification, is critical to achieve this goal. Pregnancy is seen as a vascular stress test in that the development of common pregnancy complications has been shown to predict a woman's risk of premature cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular disease-related mortality. Therefore, pregnancy and the postpartum period provide a new early window of opportunity to identify risk factors for the majority of women to improve their long-term health. We have translated the research findings into the Maternal Health Clinic for health maintenance and disease prevention. Women who develop one of the pregnancy-related cardiovascular risk indicators are referred for screening, counseling, and lifestyle modification. We have reported that over half of the women referred to the Maternal Health Clinic, in comparison to women who have a normal pregnancy outcome, have a high lifetime cardiovascular disease risk and three times the risk to meet the criteria for the metabolic syndrome. If these women had not attended our clinic and received early screening and intervention, they may not have been identified as having underlying risk factors until much later in life. Intervening and management later in life, when there is a potentially greater burden of atherosclerosis, does not reduce cardiovascular disease risk to the same extent as maintaining favorable risk factor levels throughout adulthood. Pregnancy complications and the postpartum period are a new early window of opportunity to reliably identify women who should undergo cardiovascular risk screening, and management that may improve subsequent pregnancy outcomes and prevent cardiovascular disease. PMID

  3. Women workers in the health service industry.

    PubMed

    Brown, C A

    1975-01-01

    The health service industry is unusual in that most of the skilled as well as unskilled workers are women, although the industry is largely controlled by men. Women are hired because they constitute an inexpensive, available, and seemingly powerless work force. Women enter health service because they have few alternatives to the low-paying, dead-end jobs found there. Health service occupations are organized like craft unions, with rigid hierarchical separations and control by the top occupation. Conflicts between men and women-between management and workers-are often played out as conflicts between occupations. Challenges to physicians come from various nursing specialties as well as from technical professions. Physicians in turn create lower-level occupations which challenge the nurses' status. Increasing industrialization alters the pattern of conflict, creating opportunities for individual bureaucratic mobility as well as favorable conditions for unionization drives. Unionism is often held back by sex, race, and professional conflicts, which must be overcome if the status of women is to be changed in the industry. PMID:1181296

  4. The impact of smoking on women's health.

    PubMed

    McAfee, Tim; Burnette, Deborah

    2014-11-01

    Abstract Despite half a century of public health efforts, smoking remains the single largest cause of preventable disease and death in the United States, killing 480,000 people a year and inflicting chronic disease on 16 million. Since the early part of the 20th century, tobacco companies' success in aggressively marketing their products to women has resulted in steady increases in smoking-related disease risk for women. Today, women smokers have caught up with their male counterparts and are just as likely to die from lung cancer, heart disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as are men who smoke. Women's risk for developing smoking-related heart disease or dying from COPD now exceeds men's risk. PMID:25260011

  5. Putting women's health in the picture.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    An Information, Education, and Communication (IEC) Workshop for the Production of Video Script on Women's Health was organized by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), and JOICFP and held in Japan from November 29, through December 4, 1993. It produced 4 different prototypes for use in Asia that reflected the range of women's health issues and cultural differences involved. Representatives of family planning (FP) associations and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), IEC experts, and health officials from both government and NGOs attended. Dr. Shizuko Sasaki spoke about various legal issues of women's health in Japan, while Colleen Cording spoke concerning the impact of social and policy changes on women's lives and health in New Zealand. Participants were then divided into 4 groups for discussion of target populations and their needs. 4 sets of illustrations were designed to stimulate discussion by instructors and were presented with 10-15 min scripts. The 4 videos included Christie and Me, Proud to Be a Girl, One Day at the Beach, and Happy to Be Me. The 1st film features a uterus as narrator who explains menstruation, sexually transmitted disease (STD), and contraception; the 2nd focuses on positive self images for girls; the 3rd, on a range of sexual topics discussed during a couple's seaside stroll; and the 4th, on a woman's love of self and cycle of life from puberty to old age. Participants are expected to produce similar material with adaptations to their specific countries from these prototypes. Participants also discussed their experiences in women's health education and methods of distributing and marketing educational materials. PMID:12318569

  6. Women's health centers and specialized services.

    PubMed

    LaFleur, E K; Taylor, S L

    1996-01-01

    More than 75% of the female respondents in this study would choose a women's health center (WHC) over a standard health facility. Women who worked outside the home perceived a greater WHC need. And almost all respondents were interested in communications from the center via a quarterly newsletter. Significant test results related to age, income, education, and work status as segmentation variables, offering WHC's an opportunity to target their patients with specialized services such as cosmetic surgery, infertility treatment, breast imaging, etc. If enough resources are allocated, a WHC can design itself to attract highly lucrative patients. Little difference was found in the opinions of women regarding the need for a WHC or the core services desired, but the specific service mix decision must be carefully considered when designing a WHC. PMID:10163055

  7. Assessment of Health Knowledge in College Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Gail; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The level of accurate health knowledge that young adult women possess regarding selected information dealing with nutrition; disease; and over-the-counter, prescription, and social drugs is discussed. Sections include the introduction, methods, results, discussion, and implications for biology teachers. (KR)

  8. Women's Health Care: A Needed Elective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCombs, Janet

    1987-01-01

    A course developed to fill a gap related to women's health issues in the University of Georgia's pharmacy curriculum is described. Specific discussion topics include pregnancy, obstetrics analgesic, drugs in breast milk, endometriosis, dysmenorrhea, and infertility. Course objectives and a course outline are appended. (Author/MLW)

  9. Women and health sciences librarianship: an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, R K

    1977-01-01

    In biomedical libraries, as in other areas of librarianship, women continue to be underrepresented in administrative positions. This paper reviews some of the factors contributing to the present situation and discusses implications and suggested courses of action for health sciences librarians. PMID:884344

  10. Young women's reproductive health survey.

    PubMed

    Lewis, H

    1987-08-12

    A survey of reproductive health issues was conducted on 15 year old Hutt Valley secondary school girls by means of a self-administered anonymous questionnaire. The prevalence of sexual intercourse in the sample was 29%. Sixteen percent of the sexually active respondents used no method of contraception. Knowledge of reproductive health facts and contraception was poor both amongst sexually experienced and inexperienced respondents. Twenty-six percent relied on peers for this information, with mothers, teachers and books being other important sources cited. Respondents requested more information on sexually transmitted diseases, contraception and sexual relationships. Most would like this information more readily accessible. Preferred sources of information mentioned were: parents, books, films/videos, family planning clinics and friends. PMID:3455514

  11. Self perceived health and mental health among women flight attendants

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, T J; Romito, P; Lauria, L; Vigiliano, V; Caldora, M; Mazzanti, C; Verdecchia, A

    2006-01-01

    Aims The authors investigated associations of work related risk factors with self perceived health as less than “good” and psychological distress among Italian women flight attendants. Methods The authors conducted a cross sectional survey on health and mental health among 1955 former and current flight attendants, using a postal questionnaire. Results More current than former flight attendants reported self perceived health as fair to poor and psychological distress measured as a GHQ‐12 score of six or more. Among current flight attendants, reporting health as fair to poor was associated with low job satisfaction (OR 1.89) and recent experiences of sexual harassment by passengers (OR 2.83). Psychological distress was associated with low job satisfaction (OR 2.38) and frequent tension with partner over childcare (OR 1.79). Conclusions Perceived health as fair to poor and psychological distress were greater among current flight attendants and were related to job characteristics and family difficulties. Perceived poor health has been shown in the literature to be related to mortality, high job strain, and early retirement, and psychological distress is associated with work absence. The effect of sexual harassment by passengers on perceived health of flight attendants may be relevant to other working women dealing with the public. The health effects of family/work conflicts, low job satisfaction, and sexual harassment should be explored more in depth, using qualitative as well as quantitative methods among working women in various occupations. PMID:16361403

  12. Excessive Alcohol Use and Risks to Women's Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spectrum Disorders (FASDs) Impaired Driving Fact Sheets - Excessive Alcohol Use and Risks to Women's Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Excessive Alcohol Use and Risks to Women’s Health Although men ...

  13. Minority Women's Health: Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Islanders Minority Women's Health Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders Related information How to Talk to Your ... Health conditions common in Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander women Accidents Alcoholism and drug abuse Asthma ...

  14. Young Transgender Women May Face Mental Health Woes

    MedlinePlus

    ... income transgender women with a history of unsafe sexual behavior struggle with at least one serious mental health ... of transgender women with a history of risky sexual behavior, the findings may not reflect mental health and ...

  15. Four perspectives of women's health. Workshop participants talk about women's health issues in four countries. [Philippines].

    PubMed

    Alvarez, R O

    1994-01-01

    The deputy director of the Institute for Social Studies and Action (ISSA) in the Philippines granted an interview to JOICFP News during JOICFP's IEC Workshop for the Production of Video Script for Women's Health in Tokyo, Japan. ISSA was formed in 1983 as a result of a federal-level administration so anxious to provide family planning that it did not consult women first and did not guarantee quality planning services. This zealousness lead to a backlash against family planning. ISSA focuses on maternal health; reproductive health of both males and females, women of reproductive age, adolescents, and postmenopausal women; and fertility management (e.g., induced abortion). Even though abortion is illegal in the Philippines, an estimated 155,000-750,000 abortions occur annually, which creates a very hazardous situation for women. ISSA is also concerned with violence against women. It advocates reproductive rights and reproductive choices. ISSA also addressed sexuality. Its activities are IEC (information, education, communication), research, and legislative monitoring and advocacy. They strive to empower women. ISSA activities are geared to work towards a social, political, and cultural environment which responds to women's needs. PMID:12318573

  16. Adopting an ethical approach to global health training: the evolution of the Botswana - University of Pennsylvania partnership.

    PubMed

    Dacso, Matthew; Chandra, Amit; Friedman, Harvey

    2013-11-01

    Global health training opportunities for medical students and residents have proliferated in recent years. These short-term elective rotations allow trainees to learn about global health issues by participating in various aspects of education and health care in resource-limited settings. Recently published consensus-based ethical guidelines have suggested considerations for the design of international electives that address the activities of host and sending sites, visiting students and residents, and sponsors.The authors analyze the value of global health training opportunities for medical students, residents, faculty, host and sending institutions, and other stakeholders from the perspective of the Botswana-University of Pennsylvania Partnership, a program that has provided global health experiences for health care trainees for more than 10 years. Drawing from the Working Group on Ethics Guidelines for Global Health Training framework, they illustrate the ethical and logistical challenges faced by the program's organizers and the solutions that they implemented alongside their host site partners. They conclude with a summary of recommendations to guide implementation of ethically sound international health electives in resource-limited settings. PMID:24072119

  17. Health assessment for Novak Sanitary Landfill, South Whitehall, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD079160842. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-30

    The Novak Sanitary Landfill Site was originally operated as a quarry. Demolition waste (e.g., scrap wood, brick, etc.) disposal may have began as early as the 1950s. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources allowed expansion of disposal activities to include municipal and industrial wastes. Identified contaminants of concern on the site include trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethene, vinyl chloride, benzene, lead, and barium in groundwater. Identified contaminants in leachate include methyl-ethyl ketone, methyl-isobutyl ketone, cadmium, chromium, arsenic, and barium. 1,1-Dichloroethene has been found in off-site wells and in a sedimentation pond. On-site soil contamination has been confirmed by sampling. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances.

  18. Four perspectives of women's health. Workshop participants talk about women's health issues in four countries. [Australia].

    PubMed

    Gourlay, P

    1994-01-01

    The director of Education and Training for the Family Planning Association of Victoria in Australia granted an interview to JOICFP News during JOICFP's IEC Workshop for the Production of Video Script for Women's Health in Tokyo, Japan. Before attending the workshop, he was concerned about what he could contribute to and get from it. He said that he learned a great deal from the other participants. He reflected on how important it is for professionals involved in family planning education to support each other. All the groups attending the workshop emphasized the need to encourage men to become responsible within relationships and to examine those relationships, the power dynamics, and the women's ability to negotiate safe sex. Men's responsibility goes beyond skill and awareness, however. It also includes social and economic justice and women's health and reproductive choices in a context generally male-centered. A big challenge for women's health advocates is examining shared responsibility. PMID:12318572

  19. Consultations for women's health problems: factors influencing women's choice of sex of general practitioner.

    PubMed Central

    van den Brink-Muinen, A; de Bakker, D H; Bensing, J M

    1994-01-01

    AIM. This study set out to examine the degree to which women choose to visit a woman doctor for women's health problems and the determinants of this choice. The differences between women and men doctors with regard to treating women's health problems were also studied. METHOD. Data from the Dutch national survey of general practice were used. All group practices with both women and men general practitioners were selected. Analyses were restricted to consultations among women aged 15-65 years about menstruation, the menopause, vaginal discharge, breast examination and cervical smear tests. RESULts. Given the size of their female practice population, women doctors saw considerably more women with women's health problems than did their male colleagues. Women were more likely to consult a woman general practitioner if she was more available (that is, working longer hours), and younger women were more likely than older women to choose women general practitioners. Sex differences in the treatment of women's health problems were small and mainly related to the verbal part of the consultation: counselling and providing information. The doctors' availability and their certainty about the working diagnosis explained differences in the verbal aspects of consultations. Women general practitioners had longer consultations than their male colleagues mainly because more health problems were presented per consultation. CONCLUSION. In order to increase the possibility of patients choosing women general practitioners, policy should be directed towards the education of more women general practitioners and women general practitioners should be encouraged to work more days a week. PMID:8204333

  20. Embodied largeness: a significant women's health issue.

    PubMed

    Carryer, J

    2001-06-01

    This paper describes a three-year long research project in which nine large-bodied women have engaged in a prolonged dialogue with the researcher about the experience of being 'obese'. The study involved an extensive review of the multidisciplinary literature that informs our understandings of body size. The literature review was shared with participants in order to support their critical understanding of their experience. An examination of a wide range of literature pertinent to the area of study reveals widespread acceptance of the notion that to be thin is to be healthy and virtuous, and to be fat is to be unhealthy and morally deficient. The experience of participants raised questions as to how nursing could best provide health-care for large women. According to the literature review, nurses have perpetuated an unhelpful and reductionist approach to their care of large women, in direct contradiction to nursing's supposed allegiance to a holistic approach to health-care. This paper suggests strategies for an improved response to women who are concerned about their large body size. PMID:11882207

  1. Health-hazard evaluation report MHETA 87-173-1882, Jeddo Highland Coal Co. , West Pittston, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Cornwell, R.J.

    1987-08-01

    An evaluation was made of working conditions at the J-44 Strip Mine (Hazelton, Pennsylvania) of the Jeddo Highland Coal Company, West Pittston, Pennsylvania. Concern was voiced over silica dust exposures for highway drill crews during overburden drilling. To reduce operator exposure during this process an enclosed cab was provided for the operator, a rubber skirt was suspended from the deck of the drill to contain the dust, and a collection system conveyed the dust to the ground away from the operator. Respiratory protection was also provided. Quartz was the only form of crystalline silica identified. Personal breathing zone samples indicated a time-weighted average respirable 8-hour dust exposure of 0.8mg/m3 which exceeded the NIOSH recommended standard of 0.05mg/m3. The mass of airborne dust particles that were 10 micrometer in aerodynamic diameter and below, were approximately 69% inside the cab and 45% outside the cab. The cab did afford about a 76% reduction in respirable-dust exposure for the operator. The author concludes that a respiratory health hazard did exist for the drill crew. Engineering controls instituted after this survey resulted in reduction in dust levels.

  2. Modesty, sexuality, and breast health in Chinese-American women.

    PubMed Central

    Mo, B

    1992-01-01

    Although breast cancer rates among Chinese women are lower than among white women, breast cancers and other breast diseases often go undetected and untreated in Chinese women. Cultural values with respect to modesty and sexuality, especially in unmarried women, partly account for a Chinese lack of attention to breast health. In addition, institutional barriers, such as an unavailability of information in Chinese languages, few female physicians, and an absence of educational campaigns, contribute to Chinese women's neglect of breast health. PMID:1413766

  3. Women's health: a new global agenda.

    PubMed

    Norton, Robyn

    2016-06-01

    Robyn Norton is co-founder and Principal Director of The George Institute for Global Health (Australia), a not-for-profit medical research institute that aims to increase the provision of safe, effective and affordable healthcare, especially for disadvantaged populations worldwide. She is Professor of Global Health and James Martin Fellow at the University of Oxford (UK), Professor of Public Health at the University of Sydney (Australia) and Honorary Professor at Peking University (China). Professor Norton is internationally regarded for her research on the causes, prevention and management of injuries and the management of various critical conditions in surgical and intensive care settings. She has had a long-standing commitment to improving women's health, particularly in resource-poor environments. PMID:27189820

  4. Stroke findings in the Women's Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Kaplan, Robert C; Salazar, Christian R

    2014-11-01

    The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) clinical trials of estrogen with or without progestin versus placebo in 27,341 postmenopausal women are the largest randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trials to look at the effect of hormone therapy on the outcomes of stroke, dementia, and cognition. Data from a parallel prospective observational study of 93,676 women examine biomarkers and risk factors associated with stroke. We summarize the results of 29 published articles in the WHI with stroke or cognition as outcomes of interest. Estrogen alone or in combination with progestin resulted in approximately 50% excess risk of ischemic stroke and in a 76% excess risk of dementia in women 65 years or older. Other risk factors for stroke identified in the WHI were panic attacks, depression, use of antidepressants (particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for hemorrhagic but not ischemic stroke), high triglycerides, low walking speed, long sleep duration, certain inflammatory factors, and systolic blood pressure variability. Hormone therapy has adverse effects on the brain as manifested by higher risks of stroke and dementia. Additional risk factors for stroke identified in WHI should be followed up to determine if reversing them would result in lower stroke rates. PMID:25321421

  5. A feminist critique of research on women's work and health.

    PubMed

    Im, E O

    2000-03-01

    Research on women's work and health largely has failed to incorporate gender into the models of the processes through which work influences well-being. In this article, the research on women's work and health is critiqued from a feminist perspective; male-oriented and ethnocentric views on women's work are negated, and gender and socioeconomic issues are highlighted and included in the picture of women's work. Male-centered and ethnocentric views and assumptions on women's work are prevalent in the whole research process, and methodological limitations due to the distorted views are indicated. Based on the critique, some implications for future research on women's work and health are proposed. PMID:10818832

  6. Maternal mortality and morbidity. Women's reproductive health in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Alloo, F

    1994-01-01

    Sexuality is a taboo for women in a patriarchal society. Tanzania has inadequate reproductive health care. Aspects of reproductive health are dealt with in safe motherhood or maternal and child health programs. Tanzania's health policy is based on women as mothers; it does not refer to women's right. For women in Tanzania, reproductive health is the right to live. Thousands of Tanzanian women die every year due to maternal complications. In an effort to contribute to the improvement of the conditions in health institutions and the advancement of women's status in the country, the Tanzania Media Women's Association (TAMWA) and the Medical Women's Association of Tanzania (MEWATA) joined in the organization of a Reproductive Health Meeting in Dar es Salaam. At the conference, major factors causing maternal mortality and morbidity, such as complications of abortion, anaemia in pregnancy, hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and puerperal sepsis, were discussed. A World Health Organization (WHO) report indicated that maternal mortality in Tanzania was 200-400/100,000 live births, while a survey conducted by MEWATA showed that maternal deaths at the Muhimbili Medical Center in the capital were 754/100,000 live births in 1991. Many maternal deaths could be prevented if hospitals were be properly equipped. Tanzanian women's poor health results in large part from their low socioeconomic status, poor nutrition, lack of income and employment. TAMWA chairperson Fatma Alloo and Dr. Kimambo (Ministry of Health) endorsed a national women's health movement to demand a government commitment to a holistic reproductive health policy. PMID:12288398

  7. Health assessment for Welsh Landfill, Honeybrook, Chester County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD980829527. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-24

    The Welsh Landfill site (AKA Welsh Road/Barkman Landfill) National Priorities List site is located near the top of Welsh Mountain, Honey Brook Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. The landfill was operated as an unpermitted solid waste disposal facility from 1963-1977 and is currently operated as a waste transfer station. Environmental pathways for the migration of site-contaminants to off-site areas include those associated with groundwater and surface and subsurface soil. Human exposure to site contaminants may occur through ingestion and dermal contact with contaminated groundwater, dusts or volatilized contaminants. The proposed remediation of the site by EPA should eliminate or significantly reduce the potential for the completion of human exposure pathways to site contaminants by capping the site and supplying public water to affected residences. This site is considered a public health hazard because of past exposure to site contaminants by individuals.

  8. Assessing perceived health promotion needs and interests of low-income older women.

    PubMed

    Bertera, E M

    1999-12-01

    This study focuses on an assessment of perceived health promotion needs and interests among predominantly older low-income women (76%) in the state of Pennsylvania. A questionnaire was completed by a convenience sample of 140 individuals attending four senior centers and two nutrition sites. In addition, 14 focus groups with an average of 8 members per group were conducted for a total of 105 people from two of the four senior centers. The health topics of greatest interest to women were exercise (57.6%), making friends (50.9%), nutrition (37.5%), losing weight (33.6%), and home safety (34.6%). Compared with women, men were significantly more interested in exercise and its effect on mood (41.3% versus 24.0%) and love and sex after 60 (44.8% versus 18.2%) and significantly less interested in nutrition (17.2% versus 37.5%). The fitness activities of greatest interest to women were walking (63.1%), back exercises (37.5%), toning to music (22.1%), and self-defense (18.2%), none of which was significantly different from the men in the sample. Results suggest that many of the key health needs perceived by low-income older women could be addressed by a combination of fitness activities and health education, especially if they are also designed to facilitate social interactions. The barriers to participation in such programs most often cited were transportation, scheduling, and cost factors. Fortunately, many communities already have the resources to offer low-cost interventions in the areas of need, such as walking groups, self-defense, and home safety. Communities interested in serving low-income older women should more closely examine the barriers and the unmet needs of this group when designing intervention programs. PMID:10643841

  9. Women's Lives, Mothers' Health. Children in the Tropics No. 159.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauliac, M.; Masse-Raimbault, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Part of a program of publications concerning the status and advancement of women coordinated in four journals by the Group for Initiatives on Women and Development, this issue of "Children in the Tropics" focuses on mothers' health. Section I describes factors conditioning the health and nutritional status of women and girls. Discussion centers on…

  10. Obstacles to Continuing Education in Health Care for Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gercke, Timothy

    A quasi-experimental research study identified obstacles to continuing education for women in the health care fields to determine if these obstacles were characteristic to continuing education for women in general. Questionnaires were distributed to 50 women health care providers within one hospital in a small community in Arizona and to 50…

  11. Health-hazard evaluation report No. HETA-87-181-0000, Graphic Packaging Corporation, Paoli, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, M.S.; Wilcox, T.G.

    1988-07-01

    An evaluation was made of working conditions at the Graphic Packaging Corporation, Paoli, Pennsylvania. Particular attention was given to workers making microwave popcorn bags who reported swelling around the eyes and dermatitis. One employee also reported an asthma attack while working on the bags. Special water-based epoxy adhesives were used for these bags as the product must withstand heating in a microwave oven. Environmental and personal breathing-zone air samples were taken and medical questionnaires were filled out. Use of the adhesive was discontinued in May of 1987 and the symptoms have disappeared. Chemical analysis of the adhesive indicated the presence of several chemicals that are potential irritants or allergic sensitizers both to skin and the respiratory tract. These irritants included formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, benzoic acid, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, p-dioxane, and ethyl acetate. Samples taken before the switchover to another adhesive was made did not indicate a hazardous level of any of these substances to be present.

  12. Health effects of air pollution due to coal combustion in the Chestnut Ridge region of Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Batterman, S.; Golomb, D.

    1985-08-01

    This study used the seventeen monitor air quality network in the Chestnut Ridge region of Pennsylvania to evaluate the effect of pollutant trends and representations on measures of exposure. Data consisted of four and five years of SO/sub 2/ and TSP measurements, respectively, and were considered in deriving exposure models. A cross-sectional study of 4071 children aged 6 to 11 years of age was conducted in the spring of 1979. Standardized children's questionnaires were distributed to the parents and returned by the children to school, where spirometry was performed. The region was divided into low, moderate and high pollution areas on the basis of the 1974-1978, 3 h, 24 h, and annual averages for SO/sub 2/. After adjusting the respiratory symptom response outcomes and the pulmonary function levels for known predictors, no significant association was noted for level of SO/sub 2/. 65 refs., 16 figs., 19 tabs.

  13. Health-hazard-evaluation report MHETA 89-362-2027, Helen Mining Company, Homer City, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, R.P.

    1990-03-01

    In response to a request from the United Mine Workers of America, an investigation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at the Helen Mining Company, Homer City, Pennsylvania. One of the tipple operators had complained of headaches, dizziness and skin rashes from working with a mixture of solvents used in the float/sink test operation. The solvents included perchloroethylene and dibromomethane. A week prior to receiving the request, the use of dibromomethane had been discontinued. Consequently, on the visit to the site, no traces of dibromomethane were found. After engineering controls were installed, only one of seven personal breathing zone samples detected any perchloroethylene, and that sample was 0.12 parts per million, at the limit of detection. The author concludes that a hazard from perchloroethylene did not exist at the time of the evaluation. The author recommends replacing the rubber/cloth type glove being used with either a Teflon or Viton glove, and enclosing the work table.

  14. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 86-356-1930, Social Security District Office, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, G.A.; Kline, M.K.

    1988-09-01

    In response to a request from the manager of the District Office of the Social Security Administration, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, an investigation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at that site. Employees had experienced headaches and nausea perhaps arising from cigarette smoke, kerosene, and gasoline fumes. There were times when both kerosene and gasoline were stored at a gas station next to the office building. Interior carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) levels ranged from 800 to 1000 parts per million. Carbon monoxide levels were negligible. Temperatures ranged from 72 to 77 degrees. Relative humidity ranged from 39 to 50%. The authors recommend that air flows and rates be adjusted, the ventilation system be cleaned and corrected, and the gas station alter its schedule. Other recommendations included making technical adjustments to some equipment and making a complaint system and safety manual available to the employees.

  15. Disparities in Health Care Quality among Minority Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3-EF Go to Online Store Disparities in Health Care Quality Among Minority Women Selected Findings From the ... race and ethnicity are combined. Return to Contents Health Care Delivery and Systems Information about health care delivery ...

  16. Contemporary paradigms for research related to women's mental health.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Shelley Anne; Letourneau, Nicole Lyn; Stoppard, Janet M

    2010-04-01

    Mental health problems are serious health concerns that affect women across diverse settings internationally. Knowledge of this population historically has been informed by research using a positivist approach. This article is a critical examination of contemporary paradigms for research related to women's mental health. We begin the article with an introduction to women's mental health, followed by an overview of the postpositivist, critical theory, and constructivist paradigms. We then present a critical examination of the benefits and limitations of these paradigms in relation to the study of women's mental health. We conclude with implications for research and practice. PMID:20390655

  17. Disabled women׳s maternal and newborn health care in rural Nepal: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Joanna; Basnet, Machhindra; Budhathoki, Bharat; Adhikari, Dhruba; Tumbahangphe, Kirti; Manandhar, Dharma; Costello, Anthony; Groce, Nora

    2014-01-01

    Objective there is little evidence about disabled women׳s access to maternal and newborn health services in low-income countries and few studies consult disabled women themselves to understand their experience of care and care seeking. Our study explores disabled women׳s experiences of maternal and newborn care in rural Nepal. Design we used a qualitative methodology, using semi-structured interviews. Setting rural Makwanpur District of central Nepal. Participants we purposively sampled married women with different impairments who had delivered a baby in the past 10 years from different topographical areas of the district. We also interviewed maternal health workers. We compared our findings with a recent qualitative study of non-disabled women in the same district to explore the differences between disabled and non-disabled women. Findings married disabled women considered pregnancy and childbirth to be normal and preferred to deliver at home. Issues of quality, cost and lack of family support were as pertinent for disabled women as they were for their non-disabled peers. Health workers felt unprepared to meet the maternal health needs of disabled women. Key conclusions and implications for practice integration of disability into existing Skilled Birth Attendant training curricula may improve maternal health care for disabled women. There is a need to monitor progress of interventions that encourage institutional delivery through the use of disaggregated data, to check that disabled women are benefiting equally in efforts to improve access to maternal health care. PMID:24768318

  18. Reproductive Health Management for the Care of Women Veterans.

    PubMed

    Zephyrin, Laurie C

    2016-02-01

    There are more than 2 million women veterans living in the United States. Many women do not identify themselves as veterans. As women's health care providers, it is important to understand and recognize the potentially complex health and social needs of women veterans and the role of military service on their lives. The reproductive health needs of women veterans may be shaped by their military experiences and coexisting medical or mental health conditions. Military sexual trauma and combat exposure are common causes of posttraumatic stress disorder and can affect overall health and well-being. Screening for military service is important in all women, and inclusion of this as a key demographic variable in research and clinical encounters can further inform health care considerations. The following key topics are addressed: who are women veterans, health and social risk factors associated with a history of military service, reproductive health across the life course, military sexual trauma and reproductive health of women veterans, how to take a military history, and the essential role of women's health providers, including obstetrician-gynecologists, in enhancing health systems and providing high-quality care to veterans. PMID:26942369

  19. CAPPD meeting: improving the health of women.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    This article discusses activities of the Canadian Association of Parliamentarians on Population and Development (CAPPD) including a meeting with representatives from Zambia, Malawi, and Burkina Faso and activities on World Population Day. The CAPPD meeting was convened with the support of the Canadian Public Health Association. The West African delegates shared their experiences and discussed constraints in improving reproductive health for women. The delegation met with the Canadian Secretary of State for Latin America and Africa. World Population Day on July 11, 1998, was spent with the Canadian International Development Agency and Action Canada on Population and Development on a mass media campaign to increase public awareness of population and sustainable development issues. These agencies also participated in the annual HOPE Beach Volleyball Tournament. A booth was set up with materials on world population growth. The chairman of CAPPD challenged Canadians to reflect and take action on the social and environmental consequences of population growth. PMID:12348870

  20. Health care expectations among urban women.

    PubMed

    Poma, P A

    1981-01-01

    Although patient participation in the health care system is increasing, assumptions are often made about patients' ideas and expectations, because these have not been systematically studied as of yet.This paper presents a summary of the results of a questionnaire answered anonymously by 265 low-income patients who received primary and gynecological care from a single specialty group in Chicago's inner city.According to the respondents (mainly young black women) one-to-one patient-physician relationships are preferred; the respondents are interested in preventive medicine; they hold traditional views about marriage and abortion; they are interested in having smaller families; and they want outside jobs and participation in their health care decisions. PMID:7265272

  1. 75 FR 53975 - Office of Women's Health Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Office of Women's Health Update AGENCY: Food and Drug... following meeting: Office of Women's Health (OWH) Update. The topics to be discussed are OWH current...

  2. Women of Color Health Data Book: Adolescents to Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, Wilhelmina A.; Lindquist, Malinda A.

    This publication recognizes the importance of women's health, and more specifically, the role of culture, ethnicity, race, socioeconomic background, geographic location, and other social and economic factors in contributing to health status. After a section that highlights important issues, section 1, "Factors Affecting the Health of Women of…

  3. Health hazard evaluation report No. HETA 90-010-2170, LTV Steel Company, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnes, G.M.; Letts, D.

    1991-12-01

    In response to a request from the United Steelworkers of America, an investigation was made of possible causative agents for allergic contact dermatitis in workers who clean the coke oven gas inlets at the LTV Steel Company (SIC-3312), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The LTV Steel coke oven facility consists of five batteries, with a total of 315 by-product ovens. Almost 3 years ago a skin problem of potential occupational origin was identified among the heaters, helpers and patchers. A list of 26 workers with skin problems was developed by the union and management and provided to NIOSH investigators. The suspected causative agent was a condensate from coke oven underfiring gas which collected on gas nozzle seats in the gas heating pipes of specific batteries. The nine employees diagnosed as having occupational allergic contact dermatitis tested positive to at least one of the coke oven gas condensate fractions. Many compounds were identified in the condensate sample. The authors conclude that the dermatitis in some workers was probably caused by contact with the coke oven gas condensates. The authors recommend measures intended to prevent contact with the condensates.

  4. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 88-207-2195, Northwest Incinerator, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnes, G.M.; Bryant, C.J.

    1992-03-01

    In response to a request from the City of Philadelphia and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, District Council 33, Local 427, an evaluation was undertaken of possible hazardous working conditions at the Northwest Incinerator (SIC-4953), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Full shift personal breathing zone and general area air samples were analyzed for polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), total dust, respirable dust, crystalline silica (14808607), and metals. Airborne concentrations of respirable nuisance dust were all well below the permissible exposure limits. Concentrations of PCDDs/PCDFs expressed as 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin (1746016) (TCDD) equivalents ranged from 0.01 to 12.8 picograms per cubic meter. There was also significant lead (7439921) surface contamination in one wipe sample. The authors conclude that possible exposures to PCDDs/PCDFs via inhalation and from surface contamination did exist. The facility ceased operations immediately after the evaluation. The authors recommend measures to cut down on exposure should the site be reopened for use or remediation.

  5. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 94-0273-2556, Bruce Mansfield Power Station, Shippingport, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Mattorano, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    In response to a request from the Plumbers and Steamfitters Union Local 47, an investigation was begun into possible exposure to arsenic and other heavy metals during the rebuilding of coal fired boilers at the Bruce Mansfield Power Station (SIC-4911), Shippingport, Pennsylvania. Metal concentrations were measured in 45 personal breathing zone (PBZ) samples; an additional 12 PBZ samples were monitored for exposure to respirable dust and silica. Eight bulk ash samples and 11 hand wipe samples were taken. The workers put in 60 hour work weeks, 10 hours a day for 6 days. Arsenic was detected in 18 samples and ranged from 0.30 to 31 micrograms/cubic meter (microg/m3) with three of the samples exceeding the adjusted OSHA permissible exposure limit of 5.6microg/m3. In 11 samples, beryllium was detected, and ranged from 0.02 to 0.04microg/m3. Cadmium was detected in seven samples and ranged from 0.17 to 2.5microg/m3. Both the beryllium and cadmium concentrations were below the allowable limits. Lead concentrations were measurable in 12 samples and ranged from 1.7 to 1.82microg/m3, with one sample exceeding the OSHA limit of 28microg/m3. Crystalline silica was below the detectable limit.

  6. The Strategic Study Group on the Status of Women: Report to the President and the Commission for Women--Recommendation Package #4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park.

    The document presents partial recommendations of a Pennsylvania State University Study Group on the Status of Women at the University. Recommendations concern: special populations, sexual harassment in the workplace, sexual violence against women, women's athletics, and health services for women students. Among specific recommendations are the…

  7. The health status of women in the world-system.

    PubMed

    Dyches, H; Rushing, B

    1993-01-01

    The health status of women is examined within the context of a global political economy. The authors present a beginning attempt to model some key macrolevel processes linked to the health of women. In particular, a structural modeling technique known as LVPLS (or "soft modeling") is used to empirically test one recent formulation of world-system theory. The findings give added emphasis to the importance of the larger economic forces that affect women's health. PMID:8500952

  8. Coordinated In-Service Activities for Health Occupations Teachers in Central Pennsylvania. Final Report. Vocational-Technical Education Research Report. Health Occupations, Monograph Number 8. Volume 16, Number 2 (Departmental Classification Number).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hole, F. Marvin; Byrd-Bredbenner, Debra Carol

    Three workshops were held in 1977 in central Pennsylvania to provide a coordinated effort to improve and expand the knowledge of health occupations teachers on the secondary and postsecondary levels. Each workshop provided five days of concentrated learning activities in one of the following areas: methods of instruction for health occupations…

  9. Discussing Women's Reproductive Health, Religion, Roles and Rights: Achieving Women's Empowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sousa, Isabela Cabral Felix de

    1995-01-01

    A health education program in Brazil trained 26 women as community health educators. Only four used their roles to foster social change. Discussing women's reproductive health in the context of religion and social values contributed to successful training; economic and political empowerment was hampered by perpetuation of traditional role…

  10. Committee Opinion No. 547: Health care for women in the military and women veterans.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    Military service is associated with unique risks to women's reproductive health. As increasing numbers of women are serving in the military, and a greater proportion of United States Veterans are women, it is essential that obstetrician-gynecologists are aware of and well prepared to address the unique health care needs of this demographic group. Obstetrician-gynecologists should ask about women's military service, know the Veteran status of their patients, and be aware of high prevalence problems (eg, posttraumatic stress disorder, intimate partner violence, and military sexual trauma) that can threaten the health and well-being of these women. Additional research examining the effect of military and Veteran status on reproductive health is needed to guide the care for this population. Moreover, partnerships between academic departments of obstetrics and gynecology and local branches of the Veterans Health Administration are encouraged as a means of optimizing the provision of comprehensive health care to this unique group of women. PMID:23168794

  11. Health-hazard evaluation report No. HETA 85-126-1932, Bryn Mawr Hospital, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, C.J.; Gorman, R.; Stewart, J.; Whong, W.Z.

    1988-09-01

    In response to a request from a group of surgeons at the Bryn Mawr Hospital, located in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, an evaluation was made of possible hazardous working conditions. The surgeons were concerned about emissions generated by electrocautery knives when performing reduction mammoplasty. Several operating room personnel were experiencing acute health effects during this procedure, which does produce a considerable amount of smoke. Symptoms included respiratory and eye irritation, headache, and nausea. Personal and area air samples were taken for hydrocarbons, nitrosamines, total particulates, benzene soluble fraction, and polynuclear aromatic compounds. Total particulate concentrations ranged from 0.4 to 2.0 mg/m3 in personal breathing zone samples and from 0.7 to 9.4 mg/m3 in area samples. During a brief demonstration of the laser cutting technique, a particulate sample was taken which measured 9.4 mg/m3, 7.4 mg/m3 of which was benzene soluble. The benzene soluble fraction exceeded the NIOSH REL and the OSHA PEL in seven of eleven samples collected. Trace amounts of hydrocarbons were identified. The major component of the samples appeared to be a compound or compounds related to fatty acid esters. Solvent extracts of airborne particles collected from the room using cauterization were mutagenic. The authors recommend that engineering ventilation controls be used, that any further acute or chronic health effects be evaluated and documented, and that exposure to electrocautery smoke be reevaluated.

  12. Women's health and women's leadership in academic medicine: hitting the same glass ceiling?

    PubMed

    Carnes, Molly; Morrissey, Claudia; Geller, Stacie E

    2008-11-01

    The term "glass ceiling" refers to women's lack of advancement into leadership positions despite no visible barriers. The term has been applied to academic medicine for over a decade but has not previously been applied to the advancement of women's health. This paper discusses (1) the historical linking of the advances in women's health with women's leadership in academic medicine, (2) the slow progress of women into leadership in academic medicine, and (3) indicators that the advancement of women's health has stalled. We make the case that deeply embedded unconscious gender-based biases and assumptions underpin the stalled advancement of women on both fronts. We conclude with recommendations to promote progress beyond the apparent glass ceiling that is preventing further advancement of women's health and women leaders. We emphasize the need to move beyond "fixing the women" to a systemic, institutional approach that acknowledges and addresses the impact of unconscious, gender-linked biases that devalue and marginalize women and issues associated with women, such as their health. PMID:18954235

  13. Women at war: implications for mental health.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Lissa; Grubbs, Kathleen; Greene, Carolyn; Trego, Lori L; McCartin, Tamarin L; Kloezeman, Karen; Morland, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the impact of deployment stressors on the mental health outcomes of women deployed to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. This pilot study examined exposure to combat experiences and military sexual harassment in a sample of 54 active duty women and assessed the impact of these stressors on post-deployment posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and depressive symptoms. Within 3 months of returning from deployment to Iraq, participants completed (a) the Combat Experiences Scale and the Sexual Harassment Scale of the Deployment Risk and Resilience Inventory, (b) the Primary Care PTSD Screen, and (c) an abbreviated version of the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale. Approximately three quarters of the sample endorsed exposure to combat experiences, and more than half of the sample reported experiencing deployment-related sexual harassment, with nearly half of the sample endorsing both stressors. Approximately one third of the sample endorsed clinical or subclinical levels of PTSD symptoms, with 11% screening positive for PTSD and 9% to 14% of the sample endorsing depressive symptoms. Regression analyses revealed that combat experiences and sexual harassment jointly accounted for significant variance in post-deployment PTSD symptoms, whereas military sexual harassment was identified as the only unique significant predictor of these symptoms. Findings from the present study lend support to research demonstrating that military sexual trauma may be more highly associated with post-deployment PTSD symptoms than combat exposure among female service members and veterans. PMID:21240736

  14. Eating disorders and women's health: an update.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Anne Marie; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2006-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and eating disorders not otherwise specified have a significant impact on the health care and childbearing outcomes of the female population. Primary care contact for gynecologic care, childbearing, or infertility can serve as a critical entry point for the initial recognition of potentially devastating disorders that may result in permanent impairment and/or chronic debilitation. This review addresses the nature and prevalence of eating disorders and the management of pregnancy complicated by an active eating disorder or a history of an eating disorder. Genetic influences and intergenerational transmission of eating disorders are discussed. Finally, the increased risk for postpartum depression among women with a current or past eating disorder is examined. Factors critical to improving pregnancy outcome and reducing the risk for exacerbation or relapse in the postpartum period are identified. PMID:16647671

  15. Building the Women's Health Research Workforce: Fostering Interdisciplinary Research Approaches in Women's Health

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Abby; Guimond, Jennifer M.; Glavin, Sarah; Geller, Stacie

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health (BIRCWH) program is a mentored institutional research career development program developed to support and foster the interdisciplinary research careers of men and women junior faculty in women's health and sex/gender factors. The number of scholars who apply for and receive National Institutes of Health (NIH) research or career development grants is one proximate indicator of whether the BIRCWH program is being successful in achieving its goals. Primary Study Objective: To present descriptive data on one metric of scholar performance—NIH grant application and funding rates. Methods/Design: Grant applications were counted if the start date was 12 months or more after the scholar's BIRCWH start date. Two types of measures were used for the outcome of interest—person-based funding rates and application-based success rates. Main Outcome Measures: Grant application, person funding, and application success rates. Results: Four hundred and ninety-three scholars had participated in BIRCWH as of November 1, 2012. Seventy-nine percent of BIRCWH scholars who completed training had applied for at least one competitive NIH grant, and 64% of those who applied had received at least one grant award. Approximately 68% of completed scholars applied for at least one research grant, and about half of those who applied were successful in obtaining at least one research award. Men and women had similar person funding rates, but women had higher application success rates for RoI grants. Limitations: Data were calculated for all scholars across a series of years; many variables can influence person funding and application success rates beyond the BIRCWH program; and lack of an appropriate comparison group is another substantial limitation to this analysis. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the BIRCWH program has been successful in bridging advanced training with establishing independent research careers

  16. New Voices in Women's Health: Perceptions of Women with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Allison A.; Gill, Carol J.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored aging and health experiences and concerns of women with intellectual and developmental disabilities, using a participatory approach that captured the direct reports of the women, in their own words and from their own perspectives. The results of a qualitative analysis of 6 focus groups, composed of 34 women with intellectual…

  17. An Exploratory Study of Women in the Health Professions Schools. Volume V: Women in Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban and Rural Systems Associates, San Francisco, CA.

    This exploratory study conducted for the Women's Action Program of HEW aimed at identifying and exploring the barriers to success that women face as school applicants and students and at describing the discrimination process, if any, that limits women's entry into the health professions. In this report on veterinary medicine, the profession is…

  18. Women's Health and Women's Leadership in Academic Medicine: Hitting the Same Glass Ceiling?

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Claudia; Geller, Stacie E.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The term “glass ceiling” refers to women's lack of advancement into leadership positions despite no visible barriers. The term has been applied to academic medicine for over a decade but has not previously been applied to the advancement of women's health. This paper discusses (1) the historical linking of the advances in women's health with women's leadership in academic medicine, (2) the slow progress of women into leadership in academic medicine, and (3) indicators that the advancement of women's health has stalled. We make the case that deeply embedded unconscious gender-based biases and assumptions underpin the stalled advancement of women on both fronts. We conclude with recommendations to promote progress beyond the apparent glass ceiling that is preventing further advancement of women's health and women leaders. We emphasize the need to move beyond “fixing the women” to a systemic, institutional approach that acknowledges and addresses the impact of unconscious, gender-linked biases that devalue and marginalize women and issues associated with women, such as their health. PMID:18954235

  19. Sisterhood Surveyed. Proceedings of the Mid-Atlantic Women's Studies Association Conference (West Chester, Pennsylvania, October 1-2, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sessa, Anne Dzamba, Ed.

    Proceedings of the 1982 conference of the Mid-Atlantic Women's Studies Association are presented. Synopses of sessions include the following topics: iconography of sisterhood, matriarchy, ethnic and cultural critiques, political perspectives, and nontraditional women students. Conference papers and authors are as follows: "Friends for Half a…

  20. 78 FR 18855 - World Trade Center Health Program Eligibility Requirements for Shanksville, Pennsylvania and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... Mandates Reform Act of 1995 F. Executive Order 12988 (Civil Justice) G. Executive Order 13132 (Federalism... 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010 amended the Public Health Service Act (PHS Act) by adding... survivors of the New York City attacks. Section 3311(a)(2)(C) of the PHS Act requires the WTC...

  1. Health Disparity among Latina Women: Comparison with Non-Latina Women

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Karen; Massey, Kelly P.

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the Latino community and focusing on the women that make up this fast-growing demographic create a better understanding of the needs and considerations for health-care professionals and social policies. It is important that national health and health-care data on the Latino ethnic group be presented by gender in order to determine areas specific to women. This review focuses on the existing health and health-care data of Latino women (Latinas). The ability to distinguish the health-care experiences of Latinas will increase the understanding of existing barriers to their health care, the initiatives needed to overcome them, and increase the overall quality of health among Latina women. PMID:27478393

  2. Health Disparity among Latina Women: Comparison with Non-Latina Women.

    PubMed

    Paz, Karen; Massey, Kelly P

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the Latino community and focusing on the women that make up this fast-growing demographic create a better understanding of the needs and considerations for health-care professionals and social policies. It is important that national health and health-care data on the Latino ethnic group be presented by gender in order to determine areas specific to women. This review focuses on the existing health and health-care data of Latino women (Latinas). The ability to distinguish the health-care experiences of Latinas will increase the understanding of existing barriers to their health care, the initiatives needed to overcome them, and increase the overall quality of health among Latina women. PMID:27478393

  3. Masked Symptoms: Mid-Life Women, Health, and Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Zelda

    2007-01-01

    Data from the Canadian Labour Force Survey (1997) reveal that relatively few mid-life women offer ill health as a reason for leaving their job or downshifting to part-time employment, implying that the role of ill health may be inconsequential in effecting changing patterns in mid-life women's labour force activity. In contrast, interviews with 30…

  4. 75 FR 26871 - National Women's Health Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-11554 Filed 5-11-10; 11:15 am] Billing code 3195-W0-P ... Proclamation 8516--National Women's Health Week, 2010 Proclamation 8517--Mother's Day, 2010 Proclamation 8518...-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 8516 of May 7, 2010 National Women's Health Week, 2010 By...

  5. Women's health education initiatives: why have they stalled?

    PubMed

    Henrich, Janet B

    2004-04-01

    Since the U.S. Congress first requested an assessment of women's health content in medical school curricula ten years ago, surveys indicate at least a two-fold increase in the number of schools with a women's health curriculum and no change in the number that offer a women's health clinical elective or rotation. Despite a marked increase in the number of schools with an office or program responsible for integration of women's health and gender-specific content into curricula, change has been modest. Reasons for this slow progress include uncertainty about the domain of women's health and what should be included in a curriculum, a lack of practical guidelines for implementation, and institutional resistance to change. The dominant factors that will influence future curriculum development are the increasing scientific knowledge base on sex and gender differences and the emerging scientific field of sex-based biology, both of which have potential to benefit the health of women. Evidence-based data on significant sex and gender differences will provide compelling reasons for schools to integrate this information into curricula, and new educational initiatives must further develop educational models to help implement change. As women's health becomes synonymous with the term "sex and gender differences," the challenge to schools is to address equally in their curricula those unique aspects of women's health that were part of the original intent of the congressional mandate. PMID:15044158

  6. Health Care Resources for Children and Pregnant Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perloff, Janet D.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews evidence about health care resources currently available to children and pregnant women in the United States. Evidence suggests that the maldistribution of resources remains a serious threat to health care access for women and children at greatest risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes and child morbidity and mortality. (SLD)

  7. Women's weekend in ninth year. PinnacleHealth, Harrisburg, PA.

    PubMed

    Herreria, J

    1997-01-01

    For nine years, PinnacleHealth has lured busy women in the Harrisburg, Pa., area away for a weekend of pampering. It's a project of PinnacleHealth's WomanCare's Resource Center. The program began with 239 women, last year the event drew 400 participants. PMID:10174494

  8. Mental Health and Service Delivery Systems for Black Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elsie H.

    1981-01-01

    Examines mental health issues, especially alcoholism, suicide, and social depression, related to the counseling of Black women. Recommends improved mental health services, counselor/clinical training programs, and additional research focusing on the causes of stress among Black women. (Author/MW)

  9. Minorities & Women in the Health Fields, 1982 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winslow, John E.

    Historical and current U.S. data are presented on women and minorities both working in health fields and preparing for these fields as students. The 96 statistical tables with accompanying text concern trends in the education and employment of minorities (Part I) and men and women (Part II) for the following health occupations: physicians,…

  10. 76 FR 27597 - National Women's Health Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-11748 Filed 5-10-11... May 11, 2011 Part V The President Proclamation 8670--National Women's Health Week, 2011 Proclamation... ] Proclamation 8670 of May 6, 2011 National Women's Health Week, 2011 By the President of the United States...

  11. Syllabi Set on Women, Health and Healing: Fourteen Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruzek, Sheryl, Comp.; And Others

    Compiled with the goal of developing social science perspectives on women's health and on topics at the intersection of social science and clinical issues, the syllabi included were developed by faculty teaching in the Women, Health and Healing Program at the University of California, San Francisco. The courses here are directed at upper division…

  12. What Health Issues or Conditions Affect Women Differently Than Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... than women are throughout their lifetime, the health effects of alcohol abuse and alcoholism (when someone shows signs of ... alcohol) are more serious in women. These health effects include an ... disease, and fetal alcohol syndrome, in which infants born to mothers who ...

  13. Mental health issues affecting homeless women: implications for intervention.

    PubMed

    Buckner, J C; Bassuk, E L; Zima, B T

    1993-07-01

    A review of the relevant literature is followed by an exploration of the complex relationship, especially for women, between homelessness and mental health. Various mental health and gender-related concerns that have implications for the design of interventions for homeless women are explored. PMID:8372905

  14. Women's Magazines' Coverage of Smoking Related Health Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Lauren

    1989-01-01

    Examines the extent to which women's magazines with a strong interest in health covered various health hazards associated with smoking. Finds that six major women's magazines have virtually no coverage of smoking and cancer. Suggests that self-censorship may have helped determine editorial content more than pressure from tobacco companies. (RS)

  15. Proximity to Natural Gas Wells and Reported Health Status: Results of a Household Survey in Washington County, Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Slizovskiy, Ilya B.; Lamers, Vanessa; Trufan, Sally J.; Holford, Theodore R.; Dziura, James D.; Peduzzi, Peter N.; Kane, Michael J.; Reif, John S.; Weiss, Theresa R.; Stowe, Meredith H.

    2014-01-01

    of specific air and water exposures, is warranted. Citation: Rabinowitz PM, Slizovskiy IB, Lamers V, Trufan SJ, Holford TR, Dziura JD, Peduzzi PN, Kane MJ, Reif JS, Weiss TR, Stowe MH. 2015. Proximity to natural gas wells and reported health status: results of a household survey in Washington County, Pennsylvania. Environ Health Perspect 123:21–26; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307732 PMID:25204871

  16. Slipping through the safety net: implications for women's health.

    PubMed

    Pearlman, D N

    1998-08-01

    The failure of the 104th Congress to pass legislation that would have provided universal health care coverage has created gaping holes in the health care safety net for the working poor. As a result, the number of Americans without health insurance, which was 37 million in 1992, could reach 50 million in 1998. Current changes in welfare policy, centered on reform of the joint federal-state program Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), have further redefined the safety net for the poor. These changes may jeopardize the health of poor women as any change in eligibility requirements for AFDC also limits eligibility for Medicaid. Given the financial and social difficulties facing poor women, a growing number of researchers are redefining what constitutes research on women's health. Research is needed on how the high rates of health problems and few health resources of poor racial/ethnic minority women affect their quality of life. PMID:10073204

  17. Role of therapeutic fasting in women's health: An overview.

    PubMed

    Nair, Pradeep M K; Khawale, Pranav G

    2016-01-01

    Fasting is a therapeutic tool practiced since millennia by different cultures and medical systems heterogeneously. PubMed and Google Scholar search engines were searched using the keywords "fasting," "intermittent fasting," "calorie restriction," "women's health," "women's disorders," "fasting and aging," and "fasting and health." All the animal and human studies which address women's health and disorders were included in the review. Fasting has shown to improve the reproductive and mental health. It also prevents as well as ameliorates cancers and musculoskeletal disorders which are common in middle-aged and elderly women. The present studies available have limitations such as majority of the studies are preclinical studies and human studies are with lesser sample size. Future studies should address this gap by designing medically supervised fasting techniques to extract better evidence. Nevertheless, fasting can be prescribed as a safe medical intervention as well as a lifestyle regimen which can improve women's health in many folds. PMID:27499591

  18. Strategies for building a multidisciplinary academic program in women's health.

    PubMed

    Brown, A J

    1999-09-01

    During the decade of the 1990s, women's health has received unprecedented attention from government, industry, marketers of healthcare, and academic medical centers. An assessment of research, education, and healthcare delivery has exposed gaps in our knowledge about gender-related issues. Recognition of gender as a rich frontier for innovation and discovery has resulted in widespread and varied responses and a commensurate increase in activity in the field. However, this diversity of effort has created the new challenge of effectively communicating strategies of response to the multiple disciplines invested in women's health. This article describes a strategy used at Duke University Medical Center to build awareness of women's health through a highly visible and successful Women's Health Seminar Series. The series serves as a focal point for broader efforts to build a comprehensive, multidisciplinary, academic program in women's health with initiatives in clinical care, research, faculty development, provider education, and community outreach. PMID:10534301

  19. Health Promotion and Health Behaviors of Diverse Ethnic/Racial Women Cosmetologists: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Thelusma, Naomi; Ralston, Penny

    2016-01-01

    Women from diverse ethnic/racial backgrounds have higher chronic disease mortality rates when compared to White non-Hispanic women. Community-based programs, such as beauty salons, have been used to reach diverse ethnic/racial women, yet little is known about diverse ethnic/racial women cosmetologists’ involvement in health promotion and their health behaviors, which is the purpose of this review. The growing beauty salon health promotion literature indicates that their roles in these studies have been varied, not only as health promoters but also as recruiters, facilitators, and in general major catalysts for investigator-initiated studies. However, the review also identified a major void in the literature in that there were few studies on health behaviors of diverse ethnic/racial women cosmetologists, especially African American women cosmetologists. Recommendations include increasing the capacity of diverse ethnic/racial women cosmetologists as community health leaders and investigating their health status, knowledge, attitudes, and practices. PMID:27199580

  20. Health status indicators for the year 2000: projections for Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.

    PubMed Central

    Carson, C A; Zucconi, S L

    1993-01-01

    A consensus set of health status indicators was released in July 1991 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for use by public health officials at the Federal, State, and local levels in identifying and monitoring issues of public health importance. These health status indicators have been projected for the Year 2000 in Allegheny County, PA, with linear regression analyses of historical data. Indications are that mortality rates for black infants, breast cancer mortality, suicide, lung cancer mortality, incidence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and the number of measles cases likely will not meet the year 2000 targets in Allegheny County. These data will prove useful in monitoring progress towards the year 2000 objectives and provide comparative data for other geographic areas of the United States with similar demographic characteristics. PMID:8265755

  1. Skirting the issue: women and international health in historical perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Birn, A E

    1999-01-01

    Over the last decades women have become central to international health efforts, but most international health agencies continue to focus narrowly on the maternal and reproductive aspects of women's health. This article explores the origins of this paradigm as demonstrated in the emergence of women's health in the Rockefeller Foundation's public health programs in Mexico in the 1920s and 1930s. These efforts bore a significant reproductive imprint; women dispensed and received services oriented to maternal and childbearing roles. Women's health and social advocacy movements in Mexico and the United States partially shaped this interest. Even more important, the emphasis on women in the Rockefeller programs proved an expedient approach to the Foundation's underlying goals: promoting bacteriologically based public health to the government, medical personnel, business interests, and peasants; helping legitimize the Mexican state; and transforming Mexico into a good political and commercial neighbor. The article concludes by showing the limits to the maternal and reproductive health model currently advocated by most donor agencies, which continue to skirt--or sidestep--major concerns that are integral to the health of women. Images p400-a p401-a p402-a p403-a PMID:10076494

  2. Skirting the issue: women and international health in historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Birn, A E

    1999-03-01

    Over the last decades women have become central to international health efforts, but most international health agencies continue to focus narrowly on the maternal and reproductive aspects of women's health. This article explores the origins of this paradigm as demonstrated in the emergence of women's health in the Rockefeller Foundation's public health programs in Mexico in the 1920s and 1930s. These efforts bore a significant reproductive imprint; women dispensed and received services oriented to maternal and childbearing roles. Women's health and social advocacy movements in Mexico and the United States partially shaped this interest. Even more important, the emphasis on women in the Rockefeller programs proved an expedient approach to the Foundation's underlying goals: promoting bacteriologically based public health to the government, medical personnel, business interests, and peasants; helping legitimize the Mexican state; and transforming Mexico into a good political and commercial neighbor. The article concludes by showing the limits to the maternal and reproductive health model currently advocated by most donor agencies, which continue to skirt--or sidestep--major concerns that are integral to the health of women. PMID:10076494

  3. Health problems among menopausal women in Udupi district (Karnataka).

    PubMed

    Souza, Leena D; Rao, Anitha C

    2012-04-01

    Menopause among women, occurring in middle age, brings in its wake, a set of health problems that needs to be handled distinctly by the care givers. A study undertaken to determine the magnitude of health problems in Udupi district of Karnataka included 100 menopausal women in the age group 45-55 years, 50 each from urban and rural pockets. Using demographic proforma, modified socio-economic scale and structured interview schedule as tools, it was concluded that menopausal health problems were more common in women in rural areas than in their urban counterparts: they were also less articulate and less aware about managing or preventing menopausal health problems. PMID:23362740

  4. Health experiences of Korean immigrant women in retirement.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Kushner, Kaysi E; Mill, Judy; Lai, Daniel W L

    2014-01-01

    In this focused ethnographic study, we explored the health experiences of 15 Korean immigrant women after retirement in an urban center in Western Canada. Almost all women began their lives in Canada without adequate personal finances, making their employment essential for supporting their families financially. Most women lived with more than two chronic diseases, attributed to long hours and difficult work conditions. They experienced improved psychological health after retiring, irrespective of positive or negative changes in their physical health. Spiritual faith and exercise were important strategies to maintain and enhance their health and to postpone and manage chronic diseases. PMID:25186924

  5. Trajectories of Mental Health over 16 Years amongst Young Adult Women: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Libby; Ware, Robert S.; Lee, Christina

    2016-01-01

    This article used data from 5,171 young women participating in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, a nationally representative longitudinal cohort study, to identify longitudinal trajectory patterns of mental health across 6 surveys over 16 years of early adulthood, from age 18-23 to age 34-39. In addition, we identified both…

  6. Incarceration and Women's Health: The Utility of Effective Health Education Programming--A Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson-James, Candace; Nunez, Ana

    2012-01-01

    The health and well-being of incarcerated women is a significant public health concern. Compared with non-incarcerated women, incarcerated women in the United States are more often from minority populations, younger (between the ages of 18 and 34 years), of low socioeconomic status, unemployed and mothers to children under 18 years of age. More…

  7. Public health assessment for crossley farm/Hereford groundwater, Hereford township, Berks County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD981740061. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The report describes an illegal waste disposal site in east central Pennsylvania and its effect on groundwater in the area surrounding the site. The Crossley Farm (Hereford Groundwater) site is in the Huffs Church community of Hereford Township, Berks County. Illegal waste disposal activities reportedly occurred at the site from the mid-1960's to mid-1970's. About 250 residents live hydrogeological downgradient of the site (within two miles) and another 200 live within one-half mile upgradient of the site. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources has collected groundwater samples in 1983 and the EPA has collected samples in 1986. The estimated exposures are to substances (trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene in particular) in groundwater at concentrations that with long-term exposure can cause adverse health effects to the population.

  8. Older Women and Lower Self-Rated Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamid, Tengku Aizan; Momtaz, Yadollah Abolfathi; Abdul Rashid, Sharifah Norazizan Syed

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have found that older women report lower self-rated health than men. However, it is not clear why older women are more likely to report poor self-rated health than older men. Data for this study came from a national cross-sectional survey, Mental Health and Quality of Life of Older Malaysians (MHQoLOM). Included in the survey were…

  9. Women's status and the health of women and men: a view from the States.

    PubMed

    Kawachi, I; Kennedy, B P; Gupta, V; Prothrow-Stith, D

    1999-01-01

    We examined the status of women in the 50 American states in relation to women's and men's levels of health. The status of women in each state was assessed by four composite indices measuring women's political participation, economic autonomy, employment and earnings, and reproductive rights. The study design was cross-sectional and ecologic. Our main outcome measures were total female and male mortality rates, female cause-specific death rates and mean days of activity limitations reported by women during the previous month. Measures of women's status were strikingly correlated with each of these health outcomes at the state level. Higher political participation by women was correlated with lower female mortality rates (r = -0.51), as well as lower activity limitations (-0.47). A smaller wage gap between women and men was associated with lower female mortality rates (-0.30) and lower activity limitations (-0.31) (all correlations, P < 0.05). Indices of women's status were also strongly correlated with male mortality rates, suggesting that women's status may reflect more general underlying structural processes associated with material deprivation and income inequality. However, the indices of women's status persisted in predicting female mortality and morbidity rates after adjusting for income inequality, poverty rates and median household income. Associations were observed for specific causes of death, including stroke, cervical cancer and homicide. We conclude that women experience higher mortality and morbidity in states where they have lower levels of political participation and economic autonomy. Living in such states has detrimental consequences for the health of men as well. Gender inequality and truncated opportunities for women may be one of the pathways by which the maldistribution of income adversely affects the health of women. PMID:10048835

  10. The health-systems response to violence against women.

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, Claudia; Hegarty, Kelsey; d'Oliveira, Ana Flavia Lucas; Koziol-McLain, Jane; Colombini, Manuela; Feder, Gene

    2015-04-18

    Health systems have a crucial role in a multisector response to violence against women. Some countries have guidelines or protocols articulating this role and health-care workers are trained in some settings, but generally system development and implementation have been slow to progress. Substantial system and behavioural barriers exist, especially in low-income and middle-income countries. Violence against women was identified as a health priority in 2013 guidelines published by WHO and the 67th World Health Assembly resolution on strengthening the role of the health system in addressing violence, particularly against women and girls. In this Series paper, we review the evidence for clinical interventions and discuss components of a comprehensive health-system approach that helps health-care providers to identify and support women subjected to intimate partner or sexual violence. Five country case studies show the diversity of contexts and pathways for development of a health system response to violence against women. Although additional research is needed, strengthening of health systems can enable providers to address violence against women, including protocols, capacity building, effective coordination between agencies, and referral networks. PMID:25467583

  11. Vitamin D - roles in women's reproductive health?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In the past few years a growing interest in vitamin D can be observed in the lay and biomedical literature due to findings demonstrating a low vitamin D status in the population. In addition to its importance for the regulation of calcium and phosphorus homeostasis recent epidemiologic studies have observed relationships between low vitamin D levels and multiple disease states. This secosteroid hormone also regulates the expression of a large number of genes in reproductive tissues implicating a role for vitamin D in female reproduction. In this report we summarize the recent evidence that vitamin D status influences female reproductive and pregnancy outcomes. Human and animal data suggest that low vitamin D status is associated with impaired fertility, endometriosis and polycystic ovary syndrome. Evidence from observational studies shows higher rates of preeclampsia, preterm birth, bacterial vaginosis and gestational diabetes in women with low vitamin D levels. However, confirmation of experimental observations establishing an association of vitamin D deficiency with adverse reproductive outcomes by high quality observational and large-scale randomized clinical trials is still lacking. The determination of optimal 25(OH)D3 levels in the reproductive period and the amount of vitamin D supplementation required to achieve those levels for the numerous actions of vitamin D throughout a woman's life would have important public health implications. PMID:22047005

  12. Implementation of a Reverse Colocation Model: Lessons from Two Community Behavioral Health Agencies in Rural Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Gerolamo, Angela M; Kim, Jung Y; Brown, Jonathan D; Schuster, James; Kogan, Jane

    2016-07-01

    This qualitative study examined the implementation of a reverse colocation pilot program that sought to integrate medical care in two community behavioral health agencies. To accomplish this, each agency hired a registered nurse, provided training for its staff to function as wellness coaches, and implemented a web-based tool for tracking consumer outcomes. The findings from two rounds of stakeholder discussions and consumer focus groups suggested that agencies successfully trained their staffs in wellness coaching, integrated nurses into agency functions, developed integrated care planning processes, and increased awareness of wellness among staff and consumers. Similar to other complex interventions, the agencies experienced challenges including difficulty establishing new procedures and communication protocols, discomfort among staff in addressing physical health concerns, difficulty building collaborative relationships with primary care providers, and modest uptake of the web-based tool. The study offers insights into the practical aspects of integrating care and makes recommendations for future efforts. PMID:24981219

  13. Health assessment for Butler Mine Tunnel, Pittston, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD980508451. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-04

    The Butler Mine Tunnel Site (BMT) is a collection and discharge point for acid mine drainage from underground coal mines. Preliminary on-site oil/groundwater sampling results have identified benzene (26 to 1,300 ppb), bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (36 to 13,000 ppb), butylbenzylphthalate (5 to 600 ppb), carbon tetrachloride (ND to 14 ppb), trichloromethane (ND to 7 ppb), 1,3-dichlorobenzene (26 to 100 ppb), diethyl phthalates (ND to 2,200 ppb), dimethylphthalate (ND to 2,400 ppb), di-n-octylphthalate (110 to 792,000 ppb), ethylbenzene (ND to 4,350 ppb), methylene chloride (ND to 795 ppb), toluene (11 to 1,300 ppb), xylene (ND to 11,400 ppb), and 4-bromophenylhexylether (ND to 20,000 ppm). The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of human exposure to hazardous substances.

  14. Health-hazard evaluation report HHE-80-022-OC, Tetley, Inc. , Williamsport, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Castellan, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    Employee exposure to tea dust was evaluated for possible respiratory health effects. Personal and area airborne dust samples, taken along with area samples quantifying airborne fungi, and a noise survey comprised the tests run at the facility. The particle size distribution of the dust was such that much would be deposited in the nose and throat. This might explain the frequent upper respiratory problems experienced by Tetley workers. Airborne fungi concentrations were not directly related to gravimetric dust concentrations. According to the author, results suggest that health problems related to occupational exposure to tea dust, and possibly also to noise, exist among workers at the facility. Results also demonstrated the effectiveness of engineering controls for reducing potential work-place exposures in that the lowest fungal count was obtained nearby the tea-bag reclaiming process, which at the time was being conducted under a specially designed ventilation hood. Noise survey results indicated that recommended NIOSH levels were being exceeded in many instances.

  15. Health hazard evaluation report No. HETA 82-272-1276, Boeing Vertol Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Chrostek, W.; Liss, G.M.; Moss, G.

    1983-03-01

    To evaluate employee health complaints, including anxiety, nausea, eye strain, and headache thought possibly related to working under high pressure sodium vapor (HPSV) lamps and working with storage boxes dipped in sulfur, air samples were collected in May and July 1982 for exposures to sulfates, sulfites, and sulfur dioxide. A calibrated photometer was used to measure illumination in units of lux. Self-administered questionnaires were completed. To further assess possible color distortion, investigators administered the Farnsworth-Munsell 100-Hue Test to 15 employees in Building 3-25. Environmental sampling found non-detectable levels of sulfite. The illumination levels in some parts of the building were far less than optimal. Although no serious adverse health effects were noted, symptoms related to the eyes and minor abnormalities of color discrimination, possibly related to HPSV lamps and exposure to sulfur containers, were detected. Recommendations to improve the lighting situation are presented.

  16. Health assessment for William Dick Lagoons, Honeybrook, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD980537773. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-30

    The William Dick Lagoon site consists of three unlined lagoons (approximately 2.5 acres total area) which previously contained over four million gallons of rinse water from cleaning chemical tank trailers. In 1970, two of the lagoons breached and released approximately 300,000 gallons of wastewater into the nearby area and a small tributary. Trichloroethylene, toluene, 4,4-DDE, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons have been reported in the soil on the site. Trichloroethylene was detected in a nearby spring, previously used as a water source by a small number of residents. Potential human exposure pathways include ingestion of contaminated water, dermal exposure to contaminated water and soil, and inhalation of contaminated dust and organics in the contaminated groundwater. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances. However, it does not appear that a human population is currently exposed to site contaminants at levels of health concern.

  17. Health Behaviours during Pregnancy in Women with Very Severe Obesity.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Shukri, Nor A; Duncan, Andrew; Denison, Fiona C; Forbes, Shareen; Walker, Brian R; Norman, Jane E; Reynolds, Rebecca M

    2015-10-01

    The health behaviours of pregnant women with very severe obesity are not known, though these women are at high risk of pregnancy complications. We carried out a prospective case-control study including 148 very severely obese (BMI >40 kg/m²) and 93 lean (BMI <25 kg/m²) pregnant women. Diet, physical activity, smoking, alcohol and folic acid consumption were assessed by questionnaire in early and late (16 and 28 weeks gestation) pregnancy. Circulating levels of iron, vitamin B12 and folate and other essential trace elements and minerals were measured in a subset at each time point. The findings biochemically confirmed that very severely obese women consumed diets that were energy-rich but poor in essential micronutrients. A third of all women met physical activity recommendations for pregnancy. A third of very severely obese women and two thirds of lean women took folic acid supplements prior to pregnancy. Very severely obese women were more likely to smoke but less likely to drink alcohol than lean women (all p < 0.05). Women with very severe obesity have low self-reported intakes and circulating levels of essential micronutrients in pregnancy and few follow current recommendations for pregnancy nutrition and lifestyle. These high-risk women represent a group to target for education about health behaviours prior to and during pregnancy. PMID:26457716

  18. Health Behaviours during Pregnancy in Women with Very Severe Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Shukri, Nor A.; Duncan, Andrew; Denison, Fiona C.; Forbes, Shareen; Walker, Brian R.; Norman, Jane E.; Reynolds, Rebecca M.

    2015-01-01

    The health behaviours of pregnant women with very severe obesity are not known, though these women are at high risk of pregnancy complications. We carried out a prospective case-control study including 148 very severely obese (BMI >40 kg/m2) and 93 lean (BMI <25 kg/m2) pregnant women. Diet, physical activity, smoking, alcohol and folic acid consumption were assessed by questionnaire in early and late (16 and 28 weeks gestation) pregnancy. Circulating levels of iron, vitamin B12 and folate and other essential trace elements and minerals were measured in a subset at each time point. The findings biochemically confirmed that very severely obese women consumed diets that were energy-rich but poor in essential micronutrients. A third of all women met physical activity recommendations for pregnancy. A third of very severely obese women and two thirds of lean women took folic acid supplements prior to pregnancy. Very severely obese women were more likely to smoke but less likely to drink alcohol than lean women (all p < 0.05). Women with very severe obesity have low self-reported intakes and circulating levels of essential micronutrients in pregnancy and few follow current recommendations for pregnancy nutrition and lifestyle. These high-risk women represent a group to target for education about health behaviours prior to and during pregnancy. PMID:26457716

  19. Effects of the 2010 Haiti Earthquake on Women's Reproductive Health.

    PubMed

    Behrman, Julia Andrea; Weitzman, Abigail

    2016-03-01

    This article explores the effects of the 2010 Haiti earthquake on women's reproductive health, using geocoded data from the 2005 and 2012 Haiti Demographic and Health Surveys. We use geographic variation in the destructiveness of the earthquake to conduct a difference-in-difference analysis. Results indicate that heightened earthquake intensity reduced use of injectables-the most widely used modern contraceptive method in Haiti-and increased current pregnancy and current unwanted pregnancy. Analysis of impact pathways suggests that severe earthquake intensity significantly increased women's unmet need for family planning and reduced their access to condoms. The earthquake also affected other factors that influence reproductive health, including women's ability to negotiate condom use in their partnerships. Our findings highlight how disruptions to health care services following a natural disaster can have negative consequences for women's reproductive health. PMID:27027990

  20. Patient Activation and Mental Health Care Experiences Among Women Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Pavao, Joanne; Wong, Ava

    2016-01-01

    We utilized a nationally representative survey of women veteran primary care users to examine associations between patient activation and mental health care experiences. A dose–response relationship was observed, with odds of high quality ratings significantly greater at each successive level of patient activation. Higher activation levels were also significantly associated with preference concordant care for gender-related preferences (use of female providers, women-only settings, and women-only groups as often as desired). Results add to the growing literature documenting better health care experiences among more activated patients, and suggest that patient activation may play an important role in promoting engagement with mental health care. PMID:25917224

  1. Patient Activation and Mental Health Care Experiences Among Women Veterans.

    PubMed

    Kimerling, Rachel; Pavao, Joanne; Wong, Ava

    2016-07-01

    We utilized a nationally representative survey of women veteran primary care users to examine associations between patient activation and mental health care experiences. A dose-response relationship was observed, with odds of high quality ratings significantly greater at each successive level of patient activation. Higher activation levels were also significantly associated with preference concordant care for gender-related preferences (use of female providers, women-only settings, and women-only groups as often as desired). Results add to the growing literature documenting better health care experiences among more activated patients, and suggest that patient activation may play an important role in promoting engagement with mental health care. PMID:25917224

  2. Intention to Consume Fruits and Vegetables Is Not a Proxy for Intake in Low-Income Women from Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohse, Barbara; Wall, Denise; Gromis, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Intention as an outcome measure for fruit and vegetable nutrition education interventions in low-income women was assessed through dietary assessment 3 weeks after a fruit and vegetable intervention in a federally funded program. Amount and variety of intake were compared to intentions expressed immediately following intervention. Findings…

  3. Latina and African American women: continuing disparities in health.

    PubMed

    Lillie-Blanton, M; Martinez, R M; Taylor, A K; Robinson, B G

    1993-01-01

    Women of all races have faced incredible challenges as they sought to realize the promises of America. For women of color, these challenges were compounded by the second-class citizenship of U.S. racial and ethnic minority population groups. In an effort to assess the quality of life experienced by Latina and African American women, this article provides descriptive information on racial/ethnic differences in women's social conditions, health status, exposure to occupational and environmental risks, and use of health services. When possible, indices are stratified by family income to limit the effects of social class on the comparison of racial differences. The authors provide evidence that Latina and African American women are more likely than nonminority women to encounter social environments (e.g., poverty, densely populated neighborhoods, hazardous work conditions) that place them at risk for ill-health and injury. Although persistent racial disparities in health are often attributed to the lifestyle behaviors of racial minority populations, they are undoubtedly a consequence of poorer social conditions as well as barriers in access to quality health services. To achieve further gains, public policies must reduce social inequalities (i.e., by gender, race, and social class) and assure greater equity in access to resources that facilitate healthier environments and lifestyles. Public health initiatives should be community-based, reflecting a shared partnership that actively engages minority women in decision-making about their lives. PMID:8375955

  4. Introduction: women, health, and healing in early modern Europe.

    PubMed

    Fissell, Mary Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Women played substantial roles in health and healing in medieval and early-modern Europe. They have been undercounted in studies that rely upon occupational labels, but when we look at caregiving and bodywork, we can see women providing a broad range of services. Although women often healed in domestic settings, neither female patients nor practitioners should be considered in isolation from larger market forces that shaped men's healing work. PMID:18344583

  5. Women still bearing the blows in reproductive health.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    Only women can experience the health threats of pregnancy and childbirth. Responsibility for the survival, growth, and development of children falls mainly on their shoulders. Sexually transmitted diseases cause more severe effects in women than men. Women are 3 times more likely to use contraceptives than men Yet female contraceptive methods are more of a threat to health an are male methods. Even though infertility occurs in both men and women, in most countries, women face its negative social and psychological effects more often than do men. Besides, almost everywhere, social and economic indicators show women to be of lower status than men. For example, female literacy rates in developing countries are 33% lower than those of male, even though leaders have known for a long time that female education improves use of health care and family planning services. Furthermore, females are at a disadvantage from birth in terms of education, nutrition, and society which places them at high risk of adverse health. Some societies even endorse method to prevent women from enjoying sexual intercourse. Premarital sex and adolescent pregnancy are increasing worldwide, which adds to women's already high burden. In Argentina, women less than 18 years of age, especially those in rural areas and little education, have higher fertility rates than those older than 18 years. They tend to be ignorant of reproductive processes, but familiar with contraceptives; yet, only 40% of sexually active adolescents had ever used them. Besides, teenage males think that concern about becoming pregnant is the female's responsibility. Indeed, women's status and reproductive health are interrelated. Ability to regulate their own fertility strengthens women's status, but if they cannot do so, they cannot go to school, be employable, or make their own decisions. PMID:12344677

  6. Health assessment for Aladdin Plating Site, Chinchilla, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD075993378. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-19

    The Aladdin Plating Site consists of a former plant, operating from 1947 to 1982, for electroplating of chromium, nickel, and copper using cyanide solutions. Electroplating wastes were deposited in two shallow surface settling ponds. To date, identified contaminants of concern include chromium, copper, cyanide, lead, nickel, antimony, and barium in on-site soil. Potential environmental pathways include waste materials, soil, air, and consumable plants and animals. Potential human exposure includes ingestion of plants or animals which have accumulated contaminants from the site; contaminated soil ingestion by children; inhalation of contaminants carried in re-entrained dust; and dermal contact with contaminated soil or waste materials. If groundwater and surface water data adequately represent potential for human health hazards from the site, these media do not constitute environmental or human exposure pathways of concern.

  7. Women and Lung Disease. Sex Differences and Global Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Harbaugh, Mary; Han, MeiLan K.; Jourdan Le Saux, Claude; Van Winkle, Laura S.; Martin, William J.; Kosgei, Rose J.; Carter, E. Jane; Sitkin, Nicole; Smiley-Jewell, Suzette M.; George, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that a number of pulmonary diseases affect women differently and with a greater degree of severity than men. The causes for such sex disparity is the focus of this Blue Conference Perspective review, which explores basic cellular and molecular mechanisms, life stages, and clinical outcomes based on environmental, sociocultural, occupational, and infectious scenarios, as well as medical health beliefs. Owing to the breadth of issues related to women and lung disease, we present examples of both basic and clinical concepts that may be the cause for pulmonary disease disparity in women. These examples include those diseases that predominantly affect women, as well as the rising incidence among women for diseases traditionally occurring in men, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Sociocultural implications of pulmonary disease attributable to biomass burning and infectious diseases among women in low- to middle-income countries are reviewed, as are disparities in respiratory health among sexual minority women in high-income countries. The implications of the use of complementary and alternative medicine by women to influence respiratory disease are examined, and future directions for research on women and respiratory health are provided. PMID:25945507

  8. Women and Lung Disease. Sex Differences and Global Health Disparities.

    PubMed

    Pinkerton, Kent E; Harbaugh, Mary; Han, MeiLan K; Jourdan Le Saux, Claude; Van Winkle, Laura S; Martin, William J; Kosgei, Rose J; Carter, E Jane; Sitkin, Nicole; Smiley-Jewell, Suzette M; George, Maureen

    2015-07-01

    There is growing evidence that a number of pulmonary diseases affect women differently and with a greater degree of severity than men. The causes for such sex disparity is the focus of this Blue Conference Perspective review, which explores basic cellular and molecular mechanisms, life stages, and clinical outcomes based on environmental, sociocultural, occupational, and infectious scenarios, as well as medical health beliefs. Owing to the breadth of issues related to women and lung disease, we present examples of both basic and clinical concepts that may be the cause for pulmonary disease disparity in women. These examples include those diseases that predominantly affect women, as well as the rising incidence among women for diseases traditionally occurring in men, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Sociocultural implications of pulmonary disease attributable to biomass burning and infectious diseases among women in low- to middle-income countries are reviewed, as are disparities in respiratory health among sexual minority women in high-income countries. The implications of the use of complementary and alternative medicine by women to influence respiratory disease are examined, and future directions for research on women and respiratory health are provided. PMID:25945507

  9. Beyond Health and Wealth: Predictors of Women's Retirement Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Christine A.; Balaswamy, Shantha

    2009-01-01

    Despite empirical support for the positive effects of health and wealth on retirement satisfaction, alternative variables also play a key role in helping to shape women's assessment of retirement. In the present study, we explore personal and psychosocial predictors of women's retirement satisfaction while controlling for financial security and…

  10. Older Women: A Population at Risk for Mental Health Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisniewski, Wendy; Cohen, Donna

    The expanding population of older women relative to older men or the "feminization of aging" is a significant demographic trend with important implications for the future. Older women are at risk for extended years of widowhood, living alone, institutionalization, poverty, and mental health problems. Although the dementias of late life appear to…