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Sample records for pentobarbital induced hypnotic

  1. Flos Albiziae aqueous extract and its active constituent quercetin potentiate the hypnotic effect of pentobarbital via the serotonergic system

    PubMed Central

    YE, MENG-FEI; LIU, ZHENG; LOU, SHU-FANG; CHEN, ZHEN-YONG; YU, AI-YUE; LIU, CHUN-YAN; YU, CHAO-YANG; ZHANG, HUA-FANG; ZHANG, JIAN

    2015-01-01

    Flos albiziae (FA) is reportedly used for treatment of insomnia and anxiety in traditional medicine. The hypnotic effect of an extract of FA (FAE) and its constituent quercetin [2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-3,5,7-trihydroxy-4H-chromen-4-one, QR] was examined in mice. QR is a widely distributed natural flavonoid abundant in FA flowers and other tissues. The possible mechanisms underlying the hypnotic effects of FAE and QR were investigated using behavioral pharmacology. FAE and QR significantly potentiated pentobarbital-induced [50 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (ip)] sleep (prolonged sleeping time; shortened sleep latency) in a dose-dependent manner, and these effects were augmented by administration of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), a precursor of 5-hydroxytryptamine. With a sub-hypnotic dose of pentobarbital (28 mg/kg, ip), FAE and QR significantly increased the rate of sleep onset and were synergistic with 5-HTP (2.5 mg/kg, ip). Pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine, an inhibitor of tryptophan hydroxylase, significantly decreased sleeping time and prolonged sleep latency in pentobarbital-treated mice, whereas FAE and QR significantly reversed this effect. Data show that FAE and QR have hypnotic activity, possibly mediated by the serotonergic system. The present study offers a rationale for the use of FA in treating sleep disorders associated with serotonin system dysfunction. PMID:26623026

  2. Hypnotically induced somatosensory alterations: Toward a neurophysiological understanding of hypnotic anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Zeev-Wolf, Maor; Goldstein, Abraham; Bonne, Omer; Abramowitz, Eitan G

    2016-07-01

    Whereas numerous studies have investigated hypnotic analgesia, few have investigated hypnotic anaesthesia. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG) we investigated and localized brain responses (event-related fields and oscillatory activity) during sensory processing under hypnotic anaesthesia. Nineteen right handed neurotypical individuals with moderate-to-high hypnotizability received 100 vibrotactile stimuli to right and left index fingers in a random sequence. Thereafter a hypnotic state was induced, in which anaesthetic suggestion was applied to the left hand only. Once anaesthetic suggestion was achieved, a second, identical, session of vibrotactile stimuli was commenced. We found greater brain activity in response to the stimuli delivered to the left (attenuated) hand before hypnotic anaesthesia, than under hypnotic anaesthesia, in both the beta and alpha bands. In the beta band, the reduction of activity under hypnotic anaesthesia was found around 214-413ms post-stimuli and was located mainly in the right insula. In the alpha band, it was found around 253-500ms post-stimuli and was located mainly in the left inferior frontal gyrus. In a second experiment, attention modulation per se was ruled out as the underlying cause of the effects found. These findings may suggest that the brain mechanism underlying hypnotic anaesthesia involves top-down somatosensory inhibition and, therefore, a reduction of somatosensory awareness. The result of this mechanism is a mental state in which individuals lose bodily sensation. PMID:27212058

  3. Potentiation of pentobarbital hypnosis by Rosa damascena in mice.

    PubMed

    Rakhshandah, H; Hosseini, M

    2006-11-01

    Rosa damascena has been found to act on central nervous system including brain. It inhibits the reactivity of the hypothalamous and pituitary systems in rat. In traditional medicine hypnotic effect of Rose is also suggested. In the present study hypnotic effect of ethanolic, aqueous and chloroformic extracts of R. damascena was investigated in mice. Hypnotic method was based on potentiation of pentobarbital induced sleeping time by extracts. Three doses of extracts (100, 500 and 1000 mg/kg) were injected i.p. in comparison with diazepam (3mg/kg) as positive control and saline as negative control. After 30 min of injection of extracts, pentobarbital (30mg/kg) was injected and increase in sleeping time by extracts was recorded. The results showed that the ethanolic and aqueous extracts in 500 and 1000 mg/kg doses significantly increased pentobarbital induced sleeping time which was comparable to diazepam. The chloroformic extract had no hypnotic effect. PMID:17205713

  4. EXTRAPULMONARY EFFECTS OF NO2 AS REFLECTED BY PENTOBARBITAL-INDUCED SLEEPING TIME IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on pentobarbital(PEN)-induced sleeping time (S.T.) was investigated in mice. Acute exposure to concentrations as low as 470 micrograms NO2/cu m (0.25 ppm) caused a significant increase in PEN-induced S.T. No significant effects on PEN-induc...

  5. INCREASED SUSCEPTIBILITY TO PENTOBARBITAL FOLLOWING MOUSE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION: ROLE OF VIRAL-INDUCED INTERFERON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative roles of viral induced interferon (IFN) and viral infection of the liver in mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV)-induced depression of cytochrome P-450 (cyt P-450) levels and enhancement of pentobarbital-induced sleeping time (PEN-S...

  6. Alterations in glucose kinetics induced by pentobarbital anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Bagby, G.J.; Hargrove, D.M.; Hyde, P.M.; Spitzer, J.J. )

    1987-12-01

    Because pentobarbital is often used in investigations related to carbohydrate metabolism, the in vivo effect of this drug on glucose homeostasis was studied. Glucose kinetics assessed by the constant intravenous infusion of (6-{sup 3}H)- and (U-{sup 14}C)glucose, were determined in three groups of catheterized fasted rats: conscious, anesthetized and body temperature maintained, and anesthetized but body temperature not maintained. After induction of anesthesia, marked hypothermia developed in rats not provided with external heat. Anesthetized rats that developed hypothermia showed a decrease in mean arterial blood pressure (25%) and heart rate (40%). Likewise, the plasma lactate concentration and the rates of glucose appearance, recycling, and metabolic clearance were reduced by 30-50% in the hypothermic anesthetized rats. Changes in whole-body carbohydrate metabolism were prevented when body temperature was maintained. Because plasma pentobarbital levels were similar between the euthermic and hypothermic rats during the first 2 h of the experiment, the rapid reduction in glucose metabolism in this latter group appears related to the decrease in body temperature. The continuous infusion of epinephrine produced alterations in glucose kinetics that were not different between conscious animals and anesthetized rats with body temperature maintained. Thus pentobarbital-anesthetized rats became hypothermic when kept at room temperature and exhibited marked decreases in glucose metabolism. Such changes were absent when body temperature was maintained during anesthesia.

  7. Ursolic acid enhances pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors via GABAergic neurotransmission in mice.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Se Jin; Park, Ho Jae; Gao, Qingtao; Pena, Irene Joy Dela; Park, Se Jin; Lee, Hyung Eun; Woo, Hyun; Kim, Hee Jin; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Hong, Eunyoung; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2015-09-01

    Prunella vulgaris is widely used as a herbal medicine for cancers, inflammatory diseases, and other infections. Although it has long been used, few studies have examined its effects on central nervous system function. Here, we first observed that ethanolic extracts of P. vulgaris (EEPV) prolonged pentobarbital-induced sleep duration in mice. It is known that EEPV consists of many active components including triterpenoid (ursolic acid and oleanolic acid), which have many biological activities. Therefore, we evaluated which EEPV components induced sleep extension in pentobarbital-mediated sleeping model in mice. Surprisingly, despite their structural similarity and other common functions such as anti-inflammation, anti-cancer, and tissue protection, only ursolic acid enhanced sleep duration in pentobarbital-treated mice. These results were attenuated by bicuculline treatment, which is a GABAA receptor antagonist. The present results suggest that ursolic acid from P. vulgaris enhances sleep duration through GABAA receptor activation and could be a therapeutic candidate for insomnia treatment. PMID:26102564

  8. INFLUENCE OF OZONE ON PENTOBARBITAL-INDUCED SLEEPING TIME IN MICE, RATS, AND HAMSTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prior studies have shown that ozone (O3) increases pentobarbital (PEN)-induced sleeping time (S.T.) in female mice, rats, and hamsters. To investigate some potential mechanisms producing these effects, the authors measured zoxazolamine-induced paralysis time and thiopental- and h...

  9. Pentobarbital-Induced Myocardial Stunning in Status Epilepticus Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Molaie, Donna; Nurok, Michael; Rosengart, Axel; Lahiri, Shouri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Mild hypotension is a well-recognized complication of intravenous pentobarbital; however fulminant cardiopulmonary failure has not been previously reported. Case Report. A 28-year-old woman developed pentobarbital-induced cardiopulmonary failure that was successfully treated with maximal medical management including arteriovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. She made an excellent cardiopulmonary and neurological recovery. Discussion and Conclusion. Pentobarbital is underrecognized as a potential cause of myocardial stunning. The mechanism involves direct myocardial depression and inhibition of autonomic neuroanatomical structures including the medulla and hypothalamus. Early recognition and implementation of aggressive cardiopulmonary support are essential to optimize the likelihood of a favorable outcome. PMID:27529037

  10. Pentobarbital-Induced Myocardial Stunning in Status Epilepticus Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Kavi, Tapan; Molaie, Donna; Nurok, Michael; Rosengart, Axel; Lahiri, Shouri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Mild hypotension is a well-recognized complication of intravenous pentobarbital; however fulminant cardiopulmonary failure has not been previously reported. Case Report. A 28-year-old woman developed pentobarbital-induced cardiopulmonary failure that was successfully treated with maximal medical management including arteriovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. She made an excellent cardiopulmonary and neurological recovery. Discussion and Conclusion. Pentobarbital is underrecognized as a potential cause of myocardial stunning. The mechanism involves direct myocardial depression and inhibition of autonomic neuroanatomical structures including the medulla and hypothalamus. Early recognition and implementation of aggressive cardiopulmonary support are essential to optimize the likelihood of a favorable outcome. PMID:27529037

  11. Reduction in radiation-induced brain injury by use of pentobarbital or lidocaine protection

    SciTech Connect

    Oldfield, E.H.; Friedman, R.; Kinsella, T.; Moquin, R.; Olson, J.J.; Orr, K.; DeLuca, A.M. )

    1990-05-01

    To determine if barbiturates would protect brain at high doses of radiation, survival rates in rats that received whole-brain x-irradiation during pentobarbital- or lidocaine-induced anesthesia were compared with those of control animals that received no medication and of animals anesthetized with ketamine. The animals were shielded so that respiratory and digestive tissues would not be damaged by the radiation. Survival rates in rats that received whole-brain irradiation as a single 7500-rad dose under pentobarbital- or lidocaine-induced anesthesia was increased from between from 0% and 20% to between 45% and 69% over the 40 days of observation compared with the other two groups (p less than 0.007). Ketamine anesthesia provided no protection. There were no notable differential effects upon non-neural tissues, suggesting that pentobarbital afforded protection through modulation of ambient neural activity during radiation exposure. Neural suppression during high-dose cranial irradiation protects brain from acute and early delayed radiation injury. Further development and application of this knowledge may reduce the incidence of radiation toxicity of the central nervous system (CNS) and may permit the safe use of otherwise unsafe doses of radiation in patients with CNS neoplasms.

  12. Cerebral activity during the anesthesia-like state induced by mesopontine microinjection of pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Abulafia, Ruth; Zalkind, Vladimir; Devor, Marshall

    2009-05-27

    Microinjection of pentobarbital into a restricted region of rat brainstem, the mesopontine tegmental anesthesia area (MPTA), induces a reversible anesthesia-like state characterized by loss of the righting reflex, atonia, antinociception, and loss of consciousness as assessed by electroencephalogram synchronization. We examined cerebral activity during this state using FOS expression as a marker. Animals were anesthetized for 50 min with a series of intracerebral microinjections of pentobarbital or with systemic pentobarbital and intracerebral microinjections of vehicle. FOS expression was compared with that in awake animals microinjected with vehicle. Neural activity was suppressed throughout the cortex whether anesthesia was induced by systemic or MPTA routes. Changes were less consistent subcortically. In the zona incerta and the nucleus raphe pallidus, expression was strongly suppressed during systemic anesthesia, but only mildly during MPTA-induced anesthesia. Dissociation was seen in the tuberomammillary nucleus where suppression occurred during systemic-induced anesthesia only, and in the lateral habenular nucleus where activity was markedly increased during systemic-induced anesthesia but not following intracerebral microinjection. Several subcortical nuclei previously associated with cerebral arousal were not affected. In the MPTA itself FOS expression was suppressed during systemic anesthesia. Differences in the pattern of brain activity in the two modes of anesthesia are consistent with the possibility that anesthetic endpoints might be achieved by alternative mechanisms: direct drug action for systemic anesthesia or via ascending pathways for MPTA-induced anesthesia. However, it is also possible that systemically administered agents induce anesthesia, at least in part, by a primary action in the MPTA with cortical inhibition occurring secondarily. PMID:19474332

  13. Pentobarbital overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms of a pentobarbital overdose may include: Coma Confusion Decreased energy Delirium (confusion and agitation) Difficulty breathing Headache Large blisters Rash Sleepiness Slowed or stopped breathing Slurred speech Unsteady gait

  14. Effects of olfactory stimulation with jasmin and its component chemicals on the duration of pentobarbital-induced sleep in mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, T; Tanida, M; Uenoyama, S; Nakayama, Y

    1992-01-01

    The effect of olfactory stimulation with jasmin and its component chemicals on pentobarbital sleep time was investigated using mice. In the present study we sought to determine which component of jasmin influences pentobarbital sleep time via olfactory stimulation. Sleep time was defined as the time elapsed between intraperitoneal pentobarbital administration and the first time that the animal was able to spontaneously right itself. Sleep time was significantly decreased by olfactory stimulation with jasmin, and also by one of the fractions obtained by fractional distillation at 150 degrees C and 0.1 mmHg. The fraction which influenced the sleep time was found to consist of benzyl benzoate, isophytol, geranyl linalool, phytol and phytyl acetate, which were identified using gas chromatography with mass and infrared spectrometry. In experiments using authentic samples of these components, phytol significantly shortened the pentobarbital sleep time, while the others had no effect. We conclude that phytol is the component of jasmin which reduces the duration of pentobarbital-induced sleep. PMID:1556904

  15. The influence of pilocarpine and atropine on pentobarbital-induced nystagmus in the New Zealand white rabbit.

    PubMed

    Kairys, D J; Smith, M B

    1979-12-01

    Nystagmus, induced by intravenous pentobarbital in rabbits, increased in frequency and amplitude as a result of intravenous pilocarpine administration. In seven of nine animals anesthetized with pentobarbital but not showing eye movements, pilocarpine injection elicited nystagmus. In all rabbits, nystagmus was terminated by subsequent intravenous administration of atropine, indicating that the parasympathetic nervous system contributes to nystagmus observed in barbiturate treated animals. The results reported here are of value in their implication for an understanding of the physiologic mechanisms which underlie eye movement disorders commonly observed in barbituarate intoxicated individuals. PMID:521585

  16. Hypnotic effect of the essential oil from the leaves of Myrtus communis on mice

    PubMed Central

    Birhanie, Muluken Walle; Walle, Bizuayehu; Rebba, Kidist

    2016-01-01

    Background Myrtus communis has been suggested as a sleep aid in unconventional medicine. Moreover, previous studies have also indicated its sedative- and hypnotic-like activity. In this study, the hypnotic effect of M. communis was investigated. Methods Essential oil (EO) of M. communis (600, 800, and 1,000 mg/kg) was given orally to Swiss albino mice of both sex, and the hypnotic effect was evaluated. In addition, the EO of M. communis (500, 600, 800, and 1,000 mg/kg) was administered orally to Swiss albino mice of both sex 60 minutes prior to pentobarbital injection (50 mg/kg). Latency to sleep and sleep duration were recorded. The effect of the EO on motor coordination and muscle relaxation was evaluated using chimney and traction tests, 60 and 90 minutes after administration of the respective doses of the EO, respectively. Results There was no induction of hypnosis as the presence of the righting reflex was intact. However the EO prolonged pentobarbital-induced sleeping time and there was also 50% negative response on the chimney and traction test in a dose dependent manner. Conclusion The EO of M. communis did not produce a hypnotic effect, but it potentiated a hypnotic effect with significant central nervous system depressant activity. PMID:27574478

  17. Pentobarbital-induced apneusis in intact, vagotomized, and pneumotaxic-lesioned cats.

    PubMed

    Webber, C L; Peiss, C N

    1979-09-01

    While recording several respiratory parameters, sodium pentobarbital (PB) was infused into the inferior vena cava of spontaneously breathing, PB anesthetized cats. Three cat groups were investigated: intact control (group A); vagotomized (group B); pneumotaxic center-lesioned (group C). With a few exceptions, all cats developed PB-induced inspiratory apneusis. Groups B and C exhibited 10-sec inspiratory hold pattern at significantly lower PB levels than group A cats. All groups developed apnea at different PB levels. Ventilation was consistently depressed, predominantly by breathing frequently attenuation. Tidal volume remained comparable to control, but decreased in vagotomized cats at high PB levels. These results are interpreted to signify that (1) inspiratory inhibitory inputs are more susceptible to depression by PB than inspiratory drive mechanisms; (2) the breathing pattern of apneusis results when summed inspiratory inhibition is reduced below a critical minimum level; (3) vagal and pneumotaxic center inhibitions on inspiration are equally weighted at apneusis, but not at apnea. These results are further discussed in terms of the inspiratory off-switch model. A possible model of Biot respiration is also introduced. PMID:515561

  18. Hydroalcoholic extract of needles of Pinus eldarica enhances pentobarbital-induced sleep: possible involvement of GABAergic system

    PubMed Central

    Forouzanfar, Fatemeh; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Rakhshandeh, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Insomnia is accompanied by several health complications and the currently used soporific drugs can induce several side effects such as psychomotor impairment, amnesia, and tolerance. The present study was planned to investigate the sleep prolonging effect of Pinus eldarica. Materials and Methods: Hydroalcoholic extract (HAE) of P. eldarica, its water fraction (WF), ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) and n-butanol fraction (NBF) were injected (intraperitoneally) to mice 30 min before administration of pentobarbital. Then, the latent period and continuous sleeping time were recorded. Also, LD50 of P. eldarica extract was determined and the possible neurotoxicity of the extract was tested on neural PC12 cells. Results: The HAE and NBF decreased the latency of sleep (p<0.05) and significantly increased duration of sleep (p<0.05) induced by pentobarbital. These effects of P. eldarica were reversed by flumazenil. The LD50 value for HAE was found to be 4.8 g/Kg. HAE and its fractions did not show neurotoxic effects in cultured PC12-cell line. Conclusion: The present data indicate that P. eldarica potentiated pentobarbital hypnosis without major toxic effect. Most probably, the main components responsible for this effect are non-polar agents which are found in NBF of this plant. PMID:27516986

  19. Tolerance to ethanol and cross-tolerance to pentobarbital and barbital in four rat strains.

    PubMed

    Khanna, J M; Kalant, H; Shah, G; Chau, A

    1991-07-01

    Chronic ethanol treatment by gastric intubation conferred tolerance to ethanol-induced motor impairment and hypnosis in four different rat strains: Fischer 344, Long-Evans, Sprague-Dawley, and Wistar. Cross-tolerance to barbital was also observed in all strains after chronic treatment with ethanol. However, chronic ethanol treatment failed to produce cross-tolerance to pentobarbital-induced motor impairment and hypnosis in any of the four strains. The demonstration of cross-tolerance to barbital and the lack of it to pentobarbital after chronic ethanol treatment confirms and extends recent observations on the specificity of the site and/or mechanism of action of sedative-hypnotic drugs that differ in lipid solubility. PMID:1784599

  20. Positive effects of β-amyrin on pentobarbital-induced sleep in mice via GABAergic neurotransmitter system.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Se Jin; Park, Ho Jae; Gao, Qingtao; Lee, Hyung Eun; Park, Se Jin; Hong, Eunyoung; Jang, Dae Sik; Shin, Chan Young; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2015-09-15

    Sleep loss, insomnia, is considered a sign of imbalance of physiological rhythm, which can be used as pre-clinic diagnosis of various neuropsychiatric disorders. The aim of the present study is to understand the pharmacological actions of α- or β-amyrin, natural triterpene compound, on the sleep in mice. To analyze the sleeping behavior, we used the well-known pentobarbital-induced sleeping model after single administration of either α- or β-amyrin. The sleeping onset time was remarkably decreased and duration was prolonged by β-amyrin (1, 3, or 10mg/kg) but not by α-amyrin (1, 3, or 10mg/kg). These effects were significantly blocked by GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline. Moreover, β-amyrin increased brain GABA level compared to the vehicle administration. Overall, the present study suggests that β-amyrin would enhance the total sleeping behavior in pentobarbital-induced sleeping model via the activation of GABAergic neurotransmitter system through GABA content in the brain. PMID:26026786

  1. Potentiating effect of spinosin, a C-glycoside flavonoid of Semen Ziziphi spinosae, on pentobarbital-induced sleep may be related to postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, L-E; Cui, X-Y; Cui, S-Y; Cao, J-X; Zhang, J; Zhang, Y-H; Zhang, Q-Y; Bai, Y-J; Zhao, Y-Y

    2010-05-01

    Previous results have suggested that spinosin, a C-glycoside flavonoid of Semen Ziziphi spinosae, potentiates pentobarbital-induced sleep via the serotonergic system. The present study investigated whether spinosin potentiates pentobarbital-induced sleep via serotonin-1A (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT(1A)) receptors. The results demonstrated that spinosin significantly augmented pentobarbital (35 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced sleep in rats, reflected by reduced sleep latency and increased total sleep time, non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep time, and REM sleep time. With regard to NREM sleep duration, spinosin mainly increased slow-wave sleep (SWS). Additionally, spinosin (15mg/kg, i.g.) significantly antagonized 5-HT(1A) agonist 8-OH-DPAT (0.1mg/kg, i.p.)-induced reductions in total sleep time, NREM sleep, REM sleep, and SWS in pentobarbital-treated rats. These results suggest that spinosin may be an antagonist at postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors because these effects of 8-OH-DPAT were considered to be mediated via postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors. Moreover, co-administration of spinosin and the 5-HT(1A) antagonist 4-iodo-N-{2-[4-(methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl}-N-2-pyridinylbenzamide (p-MPPI), at doses that are ineffective when administered alone (spinosin 5mg/kg, p-MPPI 1mg/kg), had significant augmentative effects on pentobarbital-induced sleep, reflected by reduced sleep latency and increased total sleep time, NREM sleep, and REM sleep. In contrast to the attenuating effects of p-MPPI on REM sleep via presynaptic 5-HT(1A) autoreceptors, 15mg/kg spinosin significantly increased REM sleep. These results suggest that the effect of spinosin on REM sleep in pentobarbital-treated rats may be related to postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors. PMID:20171860

  2. Hypoxic ventilatory drive in dogs during thiopental, ketamine, or pentobarbital anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Hirshman, C A; McCullough, R E; Cohen, P J; Weil, J V

    1975-12-01

    The ventilatory responses to isocapnic hypoxia and hypercapnia were studied in seven chronically tracheostomized dogs awake and during anesthesia with pentobarbital (30 mg/kg, iv), ketamine, or thiopental (10 and 15 mg/kg, respectively, followed by infusion). Isocapnic hypoxic ventilatory drive (HVD) was expressed as the parameter A such that the higher the A, the greater the hypoxic drive. HVD(A) was significantly reduced from 259 +/- 28 (mean +/- SEM) in awake dogs, to 96 +/- 14 after pentobarbital, 161 +/- 27 after thiopental, and 213 +/- 23 after ketamine. Hypercapnic ventilatory drive (HCVD) as measured by S (slope of the VE-PACO2 response curve) was significantly reduced from 1.3 +/- .32 in awake dogs to 0.4 +/- .13 after pentobarbital, 0.5 +/- .12 after thiopental, and 0.6 +/- .11 after ketamine. In addition, hypercapnia-induced augmentation of hypoxic drive was markedly diminished by the two barbiturates but was unaffected by ketamine. Therefore, ketamine at this dose level afforded greater protection during exposure to hypoxia than did barbiturates. (Key words: Ventilation, hypoxic response; Hypoxia, ventilation; Oxygen, ventilatory response; Carbon dioxide, ventilatory response; Anesthetics, intravenous, ketamine; Anesthetics, intravenous, thiopental; Hypnotics, barbiturates, pentobarbital.) PMID:1190538

  3. Lotus Leaf Alkaloid Extract Displays Sedative-Hypnotic and Anxiolytic Effects through GABAA Receptor.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ming-Zhu; Chang, Qi; Zhong, Yu; Xiao, Bing-Xin; Feng, Li; Cao, Fang-Rui; Pan, Rei-Le; Zhang, Ze-Sheng; Liao, Yong-Hong; Liu, Xin-Min

    2015-10-28

    Lotus leaves have been used traditionally as both food and herbal medicine in Asia. Open-field, sodium pentobarbital-induced sleeping and light/dark box tests were used to evaluate sedative-hypnotic and anxiolytic effects of the total alkaloids (TA) extracted from the herb, and the neurotransmitter levels in the brain were determined by ultrafast liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The effects of picrotoxin, flumazenil, and bicuculline on the hypnotic activity of TA, as well as the influence of TA on Cl(-) influx in cerebellar granule cells, were also investigated. TA showed a sedative-hypnotic effect by increasing the brain level of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and the hypnotic effect could be blocked by picrotoxin and bicuculline, but could not be antagonized by flumazenil. Additionally, TA could increase Cl(-) influx in cerebellar granule cells. TA at 20 mg/kg induced anxiolytic-like effects and significantly increased the concentrations of serotonin (5-HT), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and dopamine (DA). These data demonstrated that TA exerts sedative-hypnotic and anxiolytic effects via binding to the GABAA receptor and activating the monoaminergic system. PMID:26448283

  4. Total Phenolics and Total Flavonoids Contents and Hypnotic Effect in Mice of Ziziphus mauritiana Lam. Seed Extract

    PubMed Central

    San, Aye Moh Moh; Thongpraditchote, Suchitra; Sithisarn, Pongtip; Gritsanapan, Wandee

    2013-01-01

    The seeds of Ziziphus mauritiana Lam. have been traditionally used for treatment of various complications including insomnia and anxiety. They are popularly used as sedative and hypnotic drugs in China, Korea, Myanmar, Vietnam, and other Asian countries. However, no scientific proof on hypnotic activity of Z. mauritiana seeds (ZMS) was reported. In this study, the hypnotic activity of 50% ethanolic extract from ZMS was observed on the loss of righting reflex in mice using pentobarbital-induced sleep mice method. The contents of total phenolics and total flavonoids in the extract were also determined. The results showed that the 50% ethanolic extract from ZMS contained total phenolics 27.62 ± 1.43 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g extract and total flavonoids 0.74 ± 0.03 mg quercetin equivalent (QE)/g extract. Oral administration of the extract at the dose of 200 mg/kg significantly increased the sleeping time in mice intraperitoneally administered with sodium pentobarbital (50 mg/kg body weight). These results supported the traditional use of ZMS for the treatment of insomnia. The seeds of Z. mauritiana should be further developed as an alternative sedative and/or hypnotic product. PMID:23861716

  5. Total Phenolics and Total Flavonoids Contents and Hypnotic Effect in Mice of Ziziphus mauritiana Lam. Seed Extract.

    PubMed

    San, Aye Moh Moh; Thongpraditchote, Suchitra; Sithisarn, Pongtip; Gritsanapan, Wandee

    2013-01-01

    The seeds of Ziziphus mauritiana Lam. have been traditionally used for treatment of various complications including insomnia and anxiety. They are popularly used as sedative and hypnotic drugs in China, Korea, Myanmar, Vietnam, and other Asian countries. However, no scientific proof on hypnotic activity of Z. mauritiana seeds (ZMS) was reported. In this study, the hypnotic activity of 50% ethanolic extract from ZMS was observed on the loss of righting reflex in mice using pentobarbital-induced sleep mice method. The contents of total phenolics and total flavonoids in the extract were also determined. The results showed that the 50% ethanolic extract from ZMS contained total phenolics 27.62 ± 1.43 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g extract and total flavonoids 0.74 ± 0.03 mg quercetin equivalent (QE)/g extract. Oral administration of the extract at the dose of 200 mg/kg significantly increased the sleeping time in mice intraperitoneally administered with sodium pentobarbital (50 mg/kg body weight). These results supported the traditional use of ZMS for the treatment of insomnia. The seeds of Z. mauritiana should be further developed as an alternative sedative and/or hypnotic product. PMID:23861716

  6. Gastrodiae Rhizoma Ethanol Extract Enhances Pentobarbital-Induced Sleeping Behaviors and Rapid Eye Movement Sleep via the Activation of GABA A -ergic Transmission in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Joon; Oh, Eun-Hye; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Chung, Youn Bok; Hong, Jin Tae; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2014-01-01

    This research was designed to identify whether Gastrodiae Rhizoma ethanol extract (GREE) enhances pentobarbital-induced sleep via  γ-aminobutyric acid- (GABA-) ergic systems and modulated sleep architectures in animals. GREE (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) inhibited locomotor activity in mice, in a dose-dependent manner. GREE not only prolonged total sleep time, but also reduced sleep latency time in pentobarbital (42 mg/kg)-treated mice. Subhypnotic pentobarbital (28 mg/kg, i.p.) also increased the number of total sleeping animals in concomitant administration of GREE. GREE (100 mg/kg) alone reduced the count of sleep-wake cycles in electroencephalogram. Furthermore, GREE increased total sleep time and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. From the in vitro experiments, GREE increased intracellular chloride level in primary cultured cerebellar granule cells. Protein expressions of glutamine acid decarboxylase (GAD) and GABAA receptors subtypes by western blot were increased. Therefore, our study suggested that GREE enhances pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors and increased REM via the activation of GABAA-ergic transmission in rodents. PMID:25614750

  7. Gastrodiae Rhizoma Ethanol Extract Enhances Pentobarbital-Induced Sleeping Behaviors and Rapid Eye Movement Sleep via the Activation of GABAA-ergic Transmission in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Joon; Oh, Eun-Hye; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Chung, Youn Bok; Hong, Jin Tae; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2014-01-01

    This research was designed to identify whether Gastrodiae Rhizoma ethanol extract (GREE) enhances pentobarbital-induced sleep via  γ-aminobutyric acid- (GABA-) ergic systems and modulated sleep architectures in animals. GREE (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) inhibited locomotor activity in mice, in a dose-dependent manner. GREE not only prolonged total sleep time, but also reduced sleep latency time in pentobarbital (42 mg/kg)-treated mice. Subhypnotic pentobarbital (28 mg/kg, i.p.) also increased the number of total sleeping animals in concomitant administration of GREE. GREE (100 mg/kg) alone reduced the count of sleep-wake cycles in electroencephalogram. Furthermore, GREE increased total sleep time and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. From the in vitro experiments, GREE increased intracellular chloride level in primary cultured cerebellar granule cells. Protein expressions of glutamine acid decarboxylase (GAD) and GABAA receptors subtypes by western blot were increased. Therefore, our study suggested that GREE enhances pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors and increased REM via the activation of GABAA-ergic transmission in rodents. PMID:25614750

  8. What Happens When You're Hypnotized?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Each was scanned while resting, when recalling a memory, and when exposed to a message intended to induce a hypnotic trance. People highly susceptible to hypnosis experienced three distinct brain changes while hypnotized that ...

  9. Anxiolytic and sedative-hypnotic activities of polygalasaponins from Polygala tenuifolia in mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yi; Jia, Min; Wu, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Hong; Sun, Lian-Na; Chen, Wan-Sheng; Rahman, Khalid

    2010-07-01

    In the present study, the anxiolytic and sedative-hypnotic activities of polygalasaponins extracted from Polygala tenuifolia Willdenow (Polygalaceae) were determined in mice using hole-board, elevated plus maze, open field, and sodium pentobarbital-induced hypnosis tests. Moreover, the acute toxicity of polygalasaponins was also estimated in mice. Sixty minutes after p.o. administration of polygalasaponins (40, 80, 160 mg/kg) in mice, the central crossing counts and percentage of central/total ambulation significantly increased and the number of rearings and defecations was evidently inhibited in the open field test. Polygalasaponins also increased the head-dips of mice in the hole-board test and the time spent by mice in the open arms of the X-maze, prolonged sleep duration and shortened sleep latency in the test of synergetic effect on sodium pentobarbital (45 and 25 mg/kg, respectively). Acute toxic study showed the oral median lethal dose (LD(50)) of polygalasaponins was 3.95 g/kg and 0% lethal dose 2.6 g/kg. These results suggest that polygalasaponin possesses evident anxiolytic and sedative-hypnotic activities and has a relatively safe dose range, which supports the use of Polygala tenuifolia root as an anxiolytic and sedative-hypnotic drug in folk medicine. PMID:20645780

  10. Anxiolytic and Hypnotic Effects of Aqueous and Ethanolic Extracts of Aerial Parts of Echium italicum L. in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Shahandeh, Shabnam; Shahsavand, Shabnam

    2012-01-01

    Background Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has clearly improved in recent decades. Self-administration of herbal medicines has been the most popular therapeutic alternative to standard medicine. Objectives Since the extract of Echium amoenum exhibits an anxiolytic effect, the aim of this study is to evaluate the anxiolytic and hypnotic effects in mice of the aqueous and ethanolic extracts of aerial parts of E. italicum, a member of the Boraginaceae family. Materials and Methods Mice were administered the agents intraperitoneally before the start of the experiments for evaluation of hypnotic activity (induced by sodium pentobarbital, 30 mg/kg, i.p.), anxiolytic activity (elevated plus-maze [EPM] test), locomotor activity (open field test), and motor coordination (rotarod test). Result The ethanolic and aqueous extracts of E. italicum, at doses of 1.2 and 2.1 g/kg, increased the percentage of time-spent and the percentage of arm entries in the open arms of the EPM and decreased the percentage of time-spent in the closed arms of the EPM. Moreover, both extracts decreased the pentobarbital-induced latency to sleep and significantly increased the total sleeping time induced by pentobarbital. In addition, locomotor activity was affected by aqueous extracts and ethanolic extract (at higher doses). Both extracts showed no effect in the rotarod test. Conclusions These results suggest that both ethanolic and aqueous extracts of E. italicum may have anxiolytic effects and sedative activity but no effect on muscle relaxation. PMID:24624158

  11. [Morphological studies in different avian species on artefacts induced by euthanasia with T 61 " or Pentobarbital (Narcoren)].

    PubMed

    Kummerfeld, Norbert; Legler, Marko; Wohlsein, Peter; Kummerfeld, Maren

    2012-01-01

    In mammals (e. g. macaques, dogs, cats, rats, sheep) as well as in men (suicides) euthanasia performed by intravenous injection of T 61 leads to serious lesions in lung, kidney or/and liver (endothelial damage, hyperemia, oedema, necrosis). This is caused by the solvent dimethylformamide (DMF). In this study, in contrast, in different species of birds (e. g. blackbird, carrion crow, kestrel, common buzzard, homer pigeon, common wood pigeon, mallard duck) and various modes of applications and dosages T 61, 1.0-3.0 ml/kg body mass, did not induce comparable artefacts in tissues of internal organs in the narcotized animals. Microscopically, only hyperemia and oedema of lung, kidney and/or liver were found. However, milder but similar lesions were detected also in groups of birds euthanized by pentobarbital (200 mg/kg body mass) as well as in control groups (overdosed ketamine intramusculary, 100 mg/kg body mass, and rapid exsanguination). In conclusion, euthanasia of narcotized birds performed by intravenous or intracardial injections ofT 61 seemed to be suitable. The observed lesions could therefore not be interpreted as T61 induced artefacts. PMID:22372321

  12. Influence of ozone on pentobarbital pharmacokinetics in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, J.A.; Menzel, D.B.; Mole, M.L.; Miller, F.J.; Gardner, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    It had been shown that 3- to 5-hr exposures to ambient concentrations of ozone (O/sub 3/) increase pentobarbital-induced sleeping time in female mice, hamsters, and rats without decreasing heptatic cytochrome P-450 levels or selected mixed function oxidases. To elucidate potential mechanisms involved, clearance of pentobarbital from the blood of O/sub 3/-exposed mice was examined. Pentobarbital clearance followed first-order kinetics with a one-compartment model. Mice exposed to 1960 micrograms per cu. m. (1ppm) for 5 hr had a 71% increase in the plasma half-life of pentobarbital. It therefore appears possible that pentobarbital-induced sleeping time is increased due to a decrease in hepatic metabolism of pentobarbital.

  13. Sedative-Hypnotic and Receptor Binding Studies of Fermented Marine Organisms.

    PubMed

    Joung, Hye-Young; Kang, Young Mi; Lee, Bae-Jin; Chung, Sun Yong; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Shim, Insop

    2015-09-01

    This study was performed to investigate the sedative-hypnotic activity of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-enriched fermented marine organisms (FMO), including sea tangle (FST) and oyster (FO) by Lactobacillus brevis BJ20 (L. brevis BJ20). FST and FO were tested for their binding activity of the GABAA-benzodiazepine and 5-HT2C receptors, which are well-known molecular targets for sleep aids. We also measured the sleep latency and sleep duration during pentobarbital-induced sleep in mice after oral administration of FST and FO. In GABAA and 5-HT2C receptor binding assays, FST displayed an effective concentration-dependent binding affinity to GABAA receptor, similar to the binding affinity to 5-HT2C receptor. FO exhibited higher affinity to 5-HT2C receptor, compared with the GABAA receptor. The oral administration of FST and FO produced a dose-dependent decrease in sleep latency and increase in sleep duration in pentobarbital-induced hypnosis. The data demonstrate that FST and FO possess sedative-hypnotic activity possibly by modulating GABAA and 5-HT2C receptors. We propose that FST and FO might be effective agents for treatment of insomnia. PMID:26336589

  14. Sedative-Hypnotic and Receptor Binding Studies of Fermented Marine Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Joung, Hye-Young; Kang, Young Mi; Lee, Bae-Jin; Chung, Sun Yong; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Shim, Insop

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the sedative-hypnotic activity of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-enriched fermented marine organisms (FMO), including sea tangle (FST) and oyster (FO) by Lactobacillus brevis BJ20 (L. brevis BJ20). FST and FO were tested for their binding activity of the GABAA-benzodiazepine and 5-HT2C receptors, which are well-known molecular targets for sleep aids. We also measured the sleep latency and sleep duration during pentobarbital-induced sleep in mice after oral administration of FST and FO. In GABAA and 5-HT2C receptor binding assays, FST displayed an effective concentration-dependent binding affinity to GABAA receptor, similar to the binding affinity to 5-HT2C receptor. FO exhibited higher affinity to 5-HT2C receptor, compared with the GABAA receptor. The oral administration of FST and FO produced a dose-dependent decrease in sleep latency and increase in sleep duration in pentobarbital-induced hypnosis. The data demonstrate that FST and FO possess sedative-hypnotic activity possibly by modulating GABAA and 5-HT2C receptors. We propose that FST and FO might be effective agents for treatment of insomnia. PMID:26336589

  15. Hormonal responses to exercise after partial sleep deprivation and after a hypnotic drug-induced sleep.

    PubMed

    Mougin, F; Bourdin, H; Simon-Rigaud, M L; Nguyen, N U; Kantelip, J P; Davenne, D

    2001-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the hormonal responses, which are dependent on the sleep wake cycle, to strenuous physical exercise. Exercise was performed after different nocturnal regimens: (i) a baseline night preceded by a habituation night; (ii) two nights of partial sleep deprivation caused by a delayed bedtime or by an early awakening; and (iii) two nights of sleep after administration of either a hypnotic compound (10 mg zolpidem) or a placebo. Eight well-trained male endurance athletes with a maximal oxygen uptake of 63.5 +/- 3.8 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1) (mean value +/- s(x)) were selected on the basis of their sleeping habits and their physical training. Polygraphic recordings of EEG showed that both nights with partial sleep loss led to a decrease (P< 0.01) in stage 2 and rapid eye movement sleep. A delayed bedtime also led to a decrease (P < 0.05) in stage 1 sleep. Zolpidem had no effect on the different stages of sleep. During the afternoon after an experimental night, exercise was performed on a cycle ergometer. After a 10-min warm-up, the participants performed 30 min steady-state cycling at 75% VO(2-max) followed by a progressively increased workload until exhaustion. The recovery period lasted 30 min. Plasma growth hormone, prolactin, cortisol, catecholamine and lactate concentrations were measured at rest, during exercise and after recovery. The concentration of plasma growth hormone and catecholamine were not affected by partial sleep deprivation, whereas that of plasma prolactin was higher (P < 0.05) during the trial after an early awakening. Plasma cortisol was lower (P < 0.05) during recovery after both sleep deprivation conditions. Blood lactate was higher (P < 0.05) during submaximal exercise performed after both a delayed bedtime and an early awakening. Zolpidem-induced sleep did not affect the hormonal and metabolic responses to subsequent exercise. Our results demonstrate only minor alterations in the hormonal responses to exercise

  16. Prevention of benznidazole-induced prolonging effect on the pentobarbital sleeping time of rats using different thiol-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Montalto de Mecca, M; Bernacchi, A S; Castro, J A

    2000-01-01

    Benznidazole (BZ) is a nitroimidazolic chemotherapeutic agent employed against the acute and indeterminate phase of Chagas' disease, a tropical sickness afflicting more than twenty million people in Latin America. BZ has serious toxic side effects forcing people to stop treatment. These effects were attributed to the nitroreductive metabolic activation of BZ to a hydronitroxide radical or the hydroxylamine, which would covalently bind to cellular components. One of these deleterious effects is the prolongation on the pentobarbital sleeping time of rats. This results from the covalent binding of BZ reactive metabolites, arisen during its nitroreductive metabolism, to the phospholipid component of the mixed function oxidase which biotransform the barbiturate. In this study, the potential ability of different thiol containing drugs to trap BZ reactive metabolites and to prevent BZ effect on the pentobarbital sleeping time was tested. Our HPLC studies evidenced that cysteine, N-acetylcysteine, penicillamine and glutathione were able to trap BZ reactive metabolites in vitro to produce one or two adducts. Reduced lipoic acid instead, decreased the intensity of the nitroreductive process without leading to detectable adducts. The in vivo administration of the thiol drugs, at dosage regimes available in literature, was able to markedly prevent the BZ prolongation effect on the sleeping time. Whether these thiols might prevent other BZ toxic effects without harming its chemotherapeutic actions remains to be established. PMID:11758973

  17. Role of effective composition on antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, sedative-hypnotic capacities of 6 common edible Lilium varieties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingting; Huang, Hanhan; Zhang, Yao; Li, Xia; Li, Hongfa; Jiang, Qianqian; Gao, Wenyuan

    2015-04-01

    Nine Lilium samples (belong to 6 different cultivars with different maturity stage) were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed of total phenolics (TP), total flavonoids (TF), total saponins (TS), total carbohydrates (TC, polysaccharides), and soluble proteins contents (SP), and the monomeric components were quantified utilizing high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector (HPLC-PAD) associated with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Antioxidant activity (reducing power and DPPH radical scavenging activity), anti-inflammatory (xylene-induced mouse ear edema detumescent assay and carrageenan-induced mouse paw edema detumescent assay), and sedative-hypnotic capacities (sodium pentobarbital-induced sleep assay) were comparatively evaluated in mouse model. Additionally, correlation analysis and principal component analysis were carried out to detect clustering and elucidate relationships between components' concentrations and bioactivities to clarify the role of effective composition. Lilium bulbs in later maturity stage preliminary evidenced higher saponins content, and lower phenolic acids and flavonoids content. The result demonstrated that Lilium bulbs generally had distinct antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and sedative-hypnotic capacities. Varieties statistically differed (P < 0.05) in chemical composition and bioactivities. Lilium varieties of Dongbei and Lanzhou presented potent sedative-hypnotic effect and anti-inflammatory activity. The antioxidant capacity was related to the phenolic acids and flavonoids contents, the anti-inflammatory and sedative-hypnotic capacities were related to the saponins content. This is first study presenting comprehensive description of common edible Lilium bulbs' chemical compositions, sedative-hypnotic, and anti-inflammatory capacities grown in China. It would informatively benefit the genetic selection and cultivated optimization of Lilium varieties to improve nutritional quality, and

  18. A tryptic hydrolysate from bovine milk αs1-casein enhances pentobarbital-induced sleep in mice via the GABAA receptor.

    PubMed

    Dela Peña, Irene Joy I; Kim, Hee Jin; de la Peña, June Bryan; Kim, Mikyung; Botanas, Chrislean Jun; You, Kyung Yi; Woo, Taeseon; Lee, Yong Soo; Jung, Jae-Chul; Kim, Kyung-Mi; Cheong, Jae Hoon

    2016-10-15

    Studies have shown that enzymatic hydrolysis of casein, the primary protein component of cow's milk, produces peptides with various biological activities, and some of these peptides may have sleep-promoting effects. In the present study, we evaluated the sedative and sleep-promoting effects of bovine αS1-casein tryptic hydrolysate (CH), containing a decapeptide αS1-casein known as alpha-casozepine. CH was orally administered to ICR mice at various concentrations (75, 150, 300, or 500mg/kg). An hour after administration, assessment of its sedative (open-field and rota-rod tests) and sleep-potentiating effects (pentobarbital-induced sleeping test and EEG monitoring) were conducted. Although a trend can be observed, CH treatment did not significantly alter the spontaneous locomotor activity and motor function of mice in the open-field and rota-rod tests. On the other hand, CH (150mg/kg, respectively) enhanced the sleep induced by pentobarbital sodium in mice. It also promoted slow-wave (delta) EEG activity in rats; a pattern indicative of sleep or relaxation. These behavioral results indicate that CH has sleep-promoting effects, but no or has minimal sedative effects. To elucidate the probable mechanism behind the effects of CH, we examined its action on intracellular chloride ion influx in cultured human neuroblastoma cells. CH dose-dependently increased chloride ion influx, which was blocked by co-administration of bicuculline, a competitive GABAA receptor antagonist. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that CH has sleep-promoting properties which are probably mediated through the GABAA receptor-chloride ion channel complex. PMID:27401107

  19. Rebound insomnia induced by abrupt withdrawal of hypnotics in sleep-disturbed rats.

    PubMed

    Hirase, Masahiro; Ishida, Takayuki; Kamei, Chiaki

    2008-11-12

    The present study was performed to examine whether or not rebound insomnia is caused by an abrupt withdrawal of benzodiazepine hypnotics and tandospirone in rats. Etizolam and triazolam caused a significant shortening of sleep latency, increase in non-REM sleep time, and decrease in wake time in a dose-dependent manner. Etizolam and triazolam caused a significant shortening of sleep latency during drug administration (for 7 days), whereas a significant prolongation of sleep latency was observed by the abrupt withdrawal of these drugs. Tandospirone caused a shortening of sleep latency, whereas no effect was observed on non-REM sleep time and wake time during drug administration (for 7 days). On the other hand, tandospirone showed no significant effect on sleep latency through its abrupt withdrawal, differing from etizolam and triazolam. From these findings, a rebound phenomenon in terms of sleep latency was confirmed with etizolam and triazolam in rats. Furthermore, the 5-HT(1A) agonist, tandospirone, caused no rebound phenomenon regarding sleep latency in rats. PMID:18789918

  20. Rescue of Methyl-CpG Binding Protein 2 Dysfunction-induced Defects in Newborn Neurons by Pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dongliang; Yoon, Su-In; Yang, Chih-Hao; Marcy, Guillaume; Zhao, Na; Leong, Wan-Ying; Ganapathy, Vinu; Han, Ju; Van Dongen, Antonius M J; Hsu, Kuei-Sen; Ming, Guo-Li; Augustine, George J; Goh, Eyleen L K

    2015-04-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that usually arises from mutations or deletions in methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2), a transcriptional regulator that affects neuronal development and maturation without causing cell loss. Here, we show that silencing of MeCP2 decreased neurite arborization and synaptogenesis in cultured hippocampal neurons from rat fetal brains. These structural defects were associated with alterations in synaptic transmission and neural network activity. Similar retardation of dendritic growth was also observed in MeCP2-deficient newborn granule cells in the dentate gyrus of adult mouse brains in vivo, demonstrating direct and cell-autonomous effects on individual neurons. These defects, caused by MeCP2 deficiency, were reversed by treatment with the US Food and Drug Administration-approved drug, pentobarbital, in vitro and in vivo, possibly caused by modulation of γ-aminobutyric acid signaling. The results indicate that drugs modulating γ-aminobutyric acid signaling are potential therapeutics for Rett syndrome. PMID:25753729

  1. Potentiation of morphine analgesia by subanesthetic doses of pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L; Misra, A L

    1985-03-01

    Pentobarbital pretreatment reportedly either inhibits, enhances or has no effect on morphine analgesia. The effect of subanesthetic doses of sodium pentobarbital (8-12 mg kg-1, SC) delivered via a delivery system on analgesia of morphine (5 mg kg-1, SC or 1 mg kg-1, IV) acutely administered 45 min after the sodium pentobarbital pellet implantation was assessed using the warm water (55 degrees C)-induced tail-withdrawal reflex in male Wistar rats. Significant potentiation of morphine analgesia was observed in sodium pentobarbital as compared to the placebo-pelleted animals. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors were not involved in this potentiation, which was possibly due to the activation of the descending inhibitory control pathways of nociceptive spinal tail-withdrawal reflex by a combined interaction of two drugs at spinal and supraspinal sites of action, that mediate opiate antinociception. PMID:3991755

  2. Pharmacological studies on the sedative-hypnotic effect of Semen Ziziphi spinosae (Suanzaoren) and Radix et Rhizoma Salviae miltiorrhizae (Danshen) extracts and the synergistic effect of their combinations.

    PubMed

    Fang, X Sh; Hao, J F; Zhou, H Y; Zhu, L X; Wang, J H; Song, F Q

    2010-01-01

    Semen Ziziphi spinosae (Suanzaoren in China) and Radix et Rhizoma Salviae miltiorrhizae (Danshen in China) are conventional herbal drugs in traditional Chinese medicine and have been used widely for the treatment of insomnia. In the present study, the sedative-hypnotic activity of the active fractions extracted from Suanzaoren and Danshen were studied using the method of pentobarbital-induced sleep in the mouse model. Qualitative analysis of the standardized extracts was carried out by HPLC-DAD. The results showed that the water extract of Suanzaoren (SWE) (400 and 800 mg/kg body wt.) and the ether extract of Danshen (DTT) (300 and 600 mg/kg body wt.) can shorten sleep latency significantly, increase sleeping time and prolong movement convalescence time induced by sodium pentobarbital (55 mg/kg body wt.) administration in mice. Furthermore, the combination of SWE and DTT showed significant synergistic effect (p<0.05) in decreasing sleep latency and increasing sleeping time, but not in prolonging the movement convalescence time, which might be helpful for energy recovery in the treatment of insomnia. The results suggest that SWE, DTT, and the combination of SWE and DTT possess significant sedative-hypnotic activity, which supports the popular use of Suanzaoren and Danshen for treatment of insomnia and provide the basis for new drug discovery. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that the combination of SWE and DTT may be preferable for the treatment of insomnia. PMID:19682877

  3. Mortality Risk of Hypnotics: Strengths and Limits of Evidence.

    PubMed

    Kripke, Daniel F

    2016-02-01

    Sleeping pills, more formally defined as hypnotics, are sedatives used to induce and maintain sleep. In a review of publications for the past 30 years, descriptive epidemiologic studies were identified that examined the mortality risk of hypnotics and related sedative-anxiolytics. Of the 34 studies estimating risk ratios, odds ratios, or hazard ratios, excess mortality associated with hypnotics was significant (p < 0.05) in 24 studies including all 14 of the largest, contrasted with no studies at all suggesting that hypnotics ever prolong life. The studies had many limitations: possibly tending to overestimate risk, such as possible confounding by indication with other risk factors; confusing hypnotics with drugs having other indications; possible genetic confounders; and too much heterogeneity of studies for meta-analyses. There were balancing limitations possibly tending towards underestimates of risk such as limited power, excessive follow-up intervals with possible follow-up mixing of participants taking hypnotics with controls, missing dosage data for most studies, and over-adjustment of confounders. Epidemiologic association in itself is not adequate proof of causality, but there is proof that hypnotics cause death in overdoses; there is thorough understanding of how hypnotics euthanize animals and execute humans; and there is proof that hypnotics cause potentially lethal morbidities such as depression, infection, poor driving, suppressed respiration, and possibly cancer. Combining these proofs with consistent evidence of association, the great weight of evidence is that hypnotics cause huge risks of decreasing a patient's duration of survival. PMID:26563222

  4. Interactions of cocaine with barbital, pentobarbital and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1989-01-01

    This study deals with the interactions of cocaine with barbital, pentobarbital and ethanol in nontolerant and tolerant male Sprague-Dawley rats. Cocaine hydrochloride (50 mg) pellets implanted s.c. in rats prior to the i.p. injections of sodium barbital (150 mg/kg dose once daily for 4 days) potentiated the hypothermic response 2 hr after the barbital injection, when maximum hypothermia occurred. The s.c. implantation of the same type of pellets prior to the i.p. injections of sodium pentobarbital (75 mg/kg dose once daily for 5 days) potentiated the pentobarbital hypnosis as measured by the duration of loss of the righting reflex in animals. Cocaine pellets (12.5 mg) implanted s.c. in rats potentiated the hypnosis induced by ethanol (3.2 g/kg i.p.) and the implantation of the same type of pellets (12.5, 25 mg) in ethanol-tolerant rats restored the ethanol hypnosis to levels observed in acutely treated animals. The course of tolerance development to barbital-induced hypothermia or pentobarbital hypnosis did not appear to be affected by cocaine. The possible role of central monoamines in the potentiation of barbital hypothermia and pentobarbital and ethanol hypnosis by cocaine is discussed. PMID:2774771

  5. A Selective Orexin-1 Receptor Antagonist Attenuates Stress-Induced Hyperarousal without Hypnotic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sujin; Johnson, Philip L.; Shekhar, Anantha; Fitz, Stephanie D.; Shireman, Brock T.; Lebold, Terry P.; Nepomuceno, Diane; Lord, Brian; Wennerholm, Michelle; Shelton, Jonathan; Carruthers, Nicholas; Lovenberg, Timothy; Dugovic, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Orexins (OXs) are peptides produced by perifornical (PeF) and lateral hypothalamic neurons that exert a prominent role in arousal-related processes, including stress. A critical role for the orexin-1 receptor (OX1R) in complex emotional behavior is emerging, such as overactivation of the OX1R pathway being associated with panic or anxiety states. Here we characterize a brain-penetrant, selective, and high-affinity OX1R antagonist, compound 56 [N-({3-[(3-ethoxy-6-methylpyridin-2-yl)carbonyl]-3-azabicyclo[4.1.0]hept-4-yl}methyl)-5-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidin-2-amine]. Ex vivo receptor binding studies demonstrated that, after subcutaneous administration, compound 56 crossed the blood-brain barrier and occupied OX1Rs in the rat brain at lower doses than standard OX1R antagonists GSK-1059865 [5-bromo-N-({1-[(3-fluoro-2-methoxyphenyl)carbonyl]-5-methylpiperidin-2-yl}methyl)pyridin-2-amine], SB-334867 [1-(2-methyl-1,3-benzoxazol-6-yl)-3-(1,5-naphthyridin-4-yl)urea], and SB-408124 [1-(6,8-difluoro-2-methylquinolin-4-yl)-3-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]urea]. Although compound 56 did not alter spontaneous sleep in rats and in wild-type mice, its administration in orexin-2 receptor knockout mice selectively promoted rapid eye movement sleep, demonstrating target engagement and specific OX1R blockade. In a rat model of psychological stress induced by cage exchange, the OX1R antagonist prevented the prolongation of sleep onset without affecting sleep duration. In a rat model of panic vulnerability (involving disinhibition of the PeF OX region) to threatening internal state changes (i.e., intravenous sodium lactate infusion), compound 56 attenuated sodium lactate–induced panic-like behaviors and cardiovascular responses without altering baseline locomotor or autonomic activity. In conclusion, OX1R antagonism represents a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various psychiatric disorders associated with stress or hyperarousal states. PMID:25583879

  6. A selective orexin-1 receptor antagonist attenuates stress-induced hyperarousal without hypnotic effects.

    PubMed

    Bonaventure, Pascal; Yun, Sujin; Johnson, Philip L; Shekhar, Anantha; Fitz, Stephanie D; Shireman, Brock T; Lebold, Terry P; Nepomuceno, Diane; Lord, Brian; Wennerholm, Michelle; Shelton, Jonathan; Carruthers, Nicholas; Lovenberg, Timothy; Dugovic, Christine

    2015-03-01

    Orexins (OXs) are peptides produced by perifornical (PeF) and lateral hypothalamic neurons that exert a prominent role in arousal-related processes, including stress. A critical role for the orexin-1 receptor (OX1R) in complex emotional behavior is emerging, such as overactivation of the OX1R pathway being associated with panic or anxiety states. Here we characterize a brain-penetrant, selective, and high-affinity OX1R antagonist, compound 56 [N-({3-[(3-ethoxy-6-methylpyridin-2-yl)carbonyl]-3-azabicyclo[4.1.0]hept-4-yl}methyl)-5-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidin-2-amine]. Ex vivo receptor binding studies demonstrated that, after subcutaneous administration, compound 56 crossed the blood-brain barrier and occupied OX1Rs in the rat brain at lower doses than standard OX1R antagonists GSK-1059865 [5-bromo-N-({1-[(3-fluoro-2-methoxyphenyl)carbonyl]-5-methylpiperidin-2-yl}methyl)pyridin-2-amine], SB-334867 [1-(2-methyl-1,3-benzoxazol-6-yl)-3-(1,5-naphthyridin-4-yl)urea], and SB-408124 [1-(6,8-difluoro-2-methylquinolin-4-yl)-3-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]urea]. Although compound 56 did not alter spontaneous sleep in rats and in wild-type mice, its administration in orexin-2 receptor knockout mice selectively promoted rapid eye movement sleep, demonstrating target engagement and specific OX1R blockade. In a rat model of psychological stress induced by cage exchange, the OX1R antagonist prevented the prolongation of sleep onset without affecting sleep duration. In a rat model of panic vulnerability (involving disinhibition of the PeF OX region) to threatening internal state changes (i.e., intravenous sodium lactate infusion), compound 56 attenuated sodium lactate-induced panic-like behaviors and cardiovascular responses without altering baseline locomotor or autonomic activity. In conclusion, OX1R antagonism represents a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various psychiatric disorders associated with stress or hyperarousal states. PMID:25583879

  7. [Benzodiazepine and nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masaki; Inoue, Yuichi

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of insomnia shows an age-associated increase. Especially, persons with age over 60 years frequently suffer from arousal during sleep and early-morning awakening. The reason of this phenomenon can be explained by age-related change in sleepwake regulation, comorbid diseases and psycho-social status. Benzodiazepine derivatives and benzodiazepine agonists have been widely used for treatment of insomnia. These GABA-A receptor agonist hypnotics have sedative effect, possibly causing various adverse events, i.e. falls and hip fracture, anterograde amnesia, next morning hangover especially in the elderly. When making a choice of treatment drugs for the elderly, low dose benzodiazepine hypnotics with relatively high Ω1-selectivity, and newer hypnotics including melatonic receptor agonist or orexin receptor antagonist can become important candidates considering their comorbid diseases or drug interaction with other medications. PMID:26065134

  8. INFLUENCE OF OZONE ON PENTOBARBITAL PHARMACOKINETICS IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    It had been shown that 3 to 5 hr exposures to ambient concentrations of ozone (O3) increase pentobarbital-induced sleeping time in female mice, hamsters, and rats without decreasing heptatic cytochrome P-450 levels or selected mixed function oxidases. To elucidate potential mecha...

  9. Investigation of sedative and hypnotic effects of Amygdalus communis L. extract: behavioral assessments and EEG studies on rat.

    PubMed

    Abdollahnejad, Fatemeh; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Najafi, Forough; Faizi, Mehrdad

    2016-04-01

    Amygdalus communis L. (almond) has been traditionally used as a natural medicine in the treatment of various diseases. The present research studied the sedative and hypnotic effects of the aqueous fraction of seeds of almond in rats. In order to investigate these effects, a combination of behavioral methods (open field test and loss of righting reflex test) as well as quantitative and analytic methods (EEG and EMG) were applied. The results of the open field test showed that a dose of 400 mg/kg of the almond extract significantly inhibited the locomotion activity of rats compared to normal. The results also illustrated that the almond extract affected pentobarbital-induced sleep through increasing the number of fallings asleep and prolongation of sleeping time. Analysis of EEG recordings of the animals which had received the same dose of the almond extract as the open field test demonstrated marked changes in the animals' sleep architecture. Significant prolongation of total sleeping time as well as significant increase in NREM sleep were the main observed changes compared to the normal condition. These results suggest that the aqueous extract of almond has significant sedative and hypnotic effects, which may support its therapeutic use for insomnia. PMID:26711831

  10. Furnishing hypnotic instructions with implementation intentions enhances hypnotic responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Schweiger Gallo, Inge; Pfau, Florian; Gollwitzer, Peter M

    2012-06-01

    Forming implementation intentions has been consistently shown to be a powerful self-regulatory strategy. As the self-regulation of thoughts is important for the experience of involuntariness in the hypnotic context, investigating the effectiveness of implementation intentions on the suppression of thoughts was the focus of the present study. Participants were randomly assigned to one of four conditions (hypnotic instruction plus implementation intention, hypnotic instruction, implementation intention, and control condition). Results showed that participants who received information included in the "Carleton Skill Training Program" and in addition formed implementation intentions improved their hypnotic responsiveness as compared to all of the other three groups on measures of objective responding and involuntary responding. Thus, in line with the nonstate or cognitive social-psychological view of hypnosis stating that an individual's hypnotic suggestibility is not dispositional but modifiable, our results suggest that hypnotic responsiveness can be heightened by furnishing hypnotic instructions with ad hoc implementation intentions. PMID:22487594

  11. Cerebral radioprotection by pentobarbital: Dose-response characteristics and association with GABA agonist activity

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.J.; Friedman, R.; Orr, K.; Delaney, T.; Oldfield, E.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Pentobarbital reduces cerebral radiation toxicity; however, the mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown. As an anesthetic and depressant of cerebral metabolism, pentobarbital induces its effects on the central nervous system by stimulating the binding of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to its receptor and by inhibiting postsynaptic excitatory amino acid activity. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of these actions as well as other aspects of the radioprotective activity of pentobarbital. Fischer 344 rats were separated into multiple groups and underwent two dose-response evaluations. In one set of experiments to examine the relationship of radioprotection to pentobarbital dose, a range of pentobarbital doses (0 to 75 mg/kg) were given intraperitoneally prior to a constant-level radiation dose (70 Gy). In a second series of experiments to determine the dose-response relationship of radiation protection to radiation dose, a range of radiation doses (10 to 90 Gy) were given with a single pentobarbital dose. Further groups of animals were used to evaluate the importance of the timing of pentobarbital administration, the function of the (+) and (-) isomers of pentobarbital, and the role of an alternative GABA agonist (diazepam). In addition, the potential protective effects of alternative methods of anesthesia (ketamine) and induction of cerebral hypometabolism (hypothermia) were examined. Enhancement of survival time from acute radiation injury due to high-dose single-fraction whole-brain irradiation was maximal with 60 mg/kg of pentobarbital, and occurred over the range of all doses examined between 30 to 90 Gy. Protection was seen only in animals that received the pentobarbital before irradiation. Administration of other compounds that enhance GABA binding (Saffan and diazepam) also significantly enhanced survival time.

  12. The comparative study of intravenous Ondansetron and sub-hypnotic Propofol dose in control and treatment of intrathecal Sufentanil-induced pruritus in elective caesarean surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hirmanpour, Anahita; Safavi, Mohammadreza; Honarmand, Azim; Hosseini, Akram Zavaran; Sepehrian, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Pruritus is a common and disturbing side effect of neuraxial opioids after cesarean section. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of intravenous ondansetron and sub-hypnotic dose of propofol in control and treatment of intrathecal sufentanil induced pruritus in cesarean surgery. Methods: Totally, 90 parturient with American Society of Anesthesiology physical status grade I-II, undergoing spinal anesthesia with 2.5 μg sufentanil and 10 mg bupivacaine 0.5% were enrolled to this randomized, prospective, double-blind study. The women were randomly assigned to two groups who received 8 mg ondansetron or 10 mg propofol to treat pruritus grade ≥3. The patient was evaluated after 5 min and in the lack of successful treatment, the doses of two drugs repeated and if the pruritus is on-going, the exact treatment with naloxone was done. Findings: The incidence of pruritus was 69.3%. Both groups were well-matched. The peak time pruritus was 30–75 min after injection. The percentage of individuals consumed naloxone were 6.8% and 15.9% in ondansetron and propofol groups, respectively (P = 0.18). The mean score of satisfaction (according to visual analog scale criteria) was 9.09 ± 1.1 in ondansetron group and 9.3 ± 1.07 in the propofol group (P = 0.39). Conclusion: Ondansetrone and sub-hypnotic dose of propofol are both safe and well-tolerated. Due to their same efficacy in the treatment of intrathecal sufentanil-induced pruritus, they can be widely used in clinical practice. PMID:25984542

  13. Clobazam--a new hypnotic?

    PubMed Central

    Kesson, C M; Gray, J M; Lawson, D H

    1978-01-01

    1 A double-blind randomized trial to compare the relative efficacy of the 1,5-benzodiazepine, clobazam, the 1,4-benzodiazepine nitrazepam, and placebo as hypnotics was carried out. 2 A preference technique was used and the analyses were performed sequentially. 3. The results confirmed that nitrazepam was superior to placebo as a hypnotic but failed to show that clobazam was superior to either placebo or nitrazepam in a ratio of 2:1. Thus, it seems likely that the hypnotic properties of clobazam are minimal. 4 Clobazam is not suitable for use as a hypnotic in hospitalized patients. PMID:687502

  14. Effect of chronic pentobarbital treatment on the development of cross-tolerance to ethanol and barbital.

    PubMed

    Khanna, J M; Lê, A D; Gougos, A; Kalant, H

    1988-09-01

    Recently, we reported that a chronic regimen of ethanol by intubation, which produced clear tolerance to ethanol-induced hypothermia, ataxia and sleep, produced only a marginal degree of cross-tolerance to these effects of pentobarbital. The present experiments were designed to test the reverse process by examining cross-tolerance to pentobarbital after chronic pretreatment with ethanol, chronic pentobarbital treatment by gavage conferred clear cross-tolerance to both barbital- and ethanol-induced hypothermia, ataxia and sleep. In a separate experiment, cross-tolerance to barbital- and ethanol-induced hypothermia and ataxia was demonstrated over a wide range of test doses. Determination of ethanol blood levels as well as a complete time course of absorption, distribution and elimination of ethanol suggested that pharmacokinetic alterations may play a role in the development of cross-tolerance to ethanol in pentobarbital-treated subjects. The asymmetry of cross-tolerance raises the possibility that pentobarbital and ethanol invoke tolerance by mechanisms that are not wholly identical. This possibility requires further exploration. Conceivably the actions of ethanol which mediate the measured effects form a subset of a larger range of pentobarbital actions that could provide a stronger stimulus to tolerance development. PMID:3252249

  15. Hypnotic effect of Coriandrum sativum, Ziziphus jujuba, Lavandula angustifolia and Melissa officinalis extracts in mice.

    PubMed

    Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Safaei, Azadeh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate hypnotic effect of Coriandrum sativum, Ziziphus jujuba, Lavandula angustifolia and Melissa officinalis hydroalcoholic extracts in mice to select the most effective ones for a combination formula. Three doses of the extracts (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg of C. sativum and Z. jujuba and 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg of L. angustifolia and M. officinalis) were orally administered to male Swiss mice (20-25 g) and one hour later pentobarbital (50 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected to induce sleep. Onset of sleep and its duration were measured and compared. Control animals and reference group received vehicle (10 ml/kg, p.o.) and diazepam (3 mg/kg, i.p.), respectively. C. sativum and Z. jujuba failed to change sleep parameters. L. angustifolia at doses of 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg shortened sleep onset by 7.6%, 50% and 51.5% and prolonged sleep duration by 9.9%, 43.1% and 80.2%, respectively. Compared with control group the same doses of M. officinalis also decreased sleep onset by 24.7%, 27.5% and 51.2% and prolonged sleep duration by 37.9%, 68.7% and 131.7% respectively. Combinations of L. angustifolia and M. officinalis extracts showed additive effect and it is suggested that a preparation containing both extracts may be useful for insomnia. PMID:26779267

  16. Hypnotic effect of Coriandrum sativum, Ziziphus jujuba, Lavandula angustifolia and Melissa officinalis extracts in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Safaei, Azadeh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate hypnotic effect of Coriandrum sativum, Ziziphus jujuba, Lavandula angustifolia and Melissa officinalis hydroalcoholic extracts in mice to select the most effective ones for a combination formula. Three doses of the extracts (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg of C. sativum and Z. jujuba and 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg of L. angustifolia and M. officinalis) were orally administered to male Swiss mice (20-25 g) and one hour later pentobarbital (50 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected to induce sleep. Onset of sleep and its duration were measured and compared. Control animals and reference group received vehicle (10 ml/kg, p.o.) and diazepam (3 mg/kg, i.p.), respectively. C. sativum and Z. jujuba failed to change sleep parameters. L. angustifolia at doses of 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg shortened sleep onset by 7.6%, 50% and 51.5% and prolonged sleep duration by 9.9%, 43.1% and 80.2%, respectively. Compared with control group the same doses of M. officinalis also decreased sleep onset by 24.7%, 27.5% and 51.2% and prolonged sleep duration by 37.9%, 68.7% and 131.7% respectively. Combinations of L. angustifolia and M. officinalis extracts showed additive effect and it is suggested that a preparation containing both extracts may be useful for insomnia. PMID:26779267

  17. 21 CFR 522.1704 - Sodium pentobarbital injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium pentobarbital injection. 522.1704 Section... § 522.1704 Sodium pentobarbital injection. (a)(1) Specifications. Sodium pentobarbital injection is sterile and contains in each milliliter 64.8 milligrams of sodium pentobarbital. (2) Sponsor. See...

  18. 21 CFR 522.1704 - Sodium pentobarbital injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium pentobarbital injection. 522.1704 Section... § 522.1704 Sodium pentobarbital injection. (a)(1) Specifications. Sodium pentobarbital injection is sterile and contains in each milliliter 64.8 milligrams of sodium pentobarbital. (2) Sponsor. See...

  19. Pentobarbital anesthesia modifies pulmonary vasoregulation after hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, B B; Nyhan, D P; Goll, H M; Clougherty, P W; Fehr, D M; Murray, P A

    1988-09-01

    Our objectives were 1) to investigate the extent to which the pulmonary vascular response to increasing cardiac index after a period of hypotension and hypoperfusion (defined as reperfusion) measured in conscious dogs is altered during pentobarbital sodium anesthesia, and 2) to determine whether pentobarbital anesthesia modifies autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation of the pulmonary circulation during reperfusion. Base-line and reperfusion pulmonary vascular pressure-cardiac index (P/Q) plots were generated by stepwise inflation and deflation, respectively, of an inferior vena caval occluder to vary Q in conscious and pentobarbital-anesthetized (30 mg/kg iv) dogs. During pentobarbital anesthesia, controlled ventilation (without positive end-expiratory pressure) allowed matching of systemic arterial and mixed venous blood gases to conscious values. Marked pulmonary vasoconstriction (P less than 0.01) was observed during reperfusion in pentobarbital-anesthetized but not in conscious dogs. Both sympathetic alpha-adrenergic receptor block and total ANS ganglionic block attenuated, but did not abolish, the pulmonary vasoconstriction during reperfusion in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. Neither sympathetic beta-adrenergic receptor block nor cholinergic receptor block enhanced the magnitude of the pulmonary vasoconstrictor response to reperfusion during pentobarbital anesthesia. Thus, in contrast to the conscious state, the pulmonary vascular response to reperfusion is characterized by active, non-flow-dependent pulmonary vasoconstriction during pentobarbital anesthesia. This response is primarily, but not exclusively, mediated by sympathetic alpha-adrenergic vasoconstriction and is not offset by either sympathetic beta-adrenergic or cholinergic vasodilation. These results indicate, that, compared with the conscious state, pentobarbital anesthesia modifies pulmonary vasoregulation, during reperfusion following hypotension and hypoperfusion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250

  20. Classroom Seating and Hypnotic Susceptibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sackeim, Harold A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether people who differ in behavioral and self-report measures of lateralized seating preferences also differ in hypnotic susceptibility. Only right-handed subjects were used, and the associations between hypnotic susceptibility and seating preference were examined separately for males and females.…

  1. Hypnotics and Sedatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabra, Pokar M.; Koo, Howard Y.; Marton, Laurence J.

    In recent years, most large hospitals have observed a marked increase in the admission of patients suffering from drug overdose. Overdose of narcotic drugs, such as the opiates, represent less of a problem on a day-to-day basis than do overdoses of prescribed drugs, such as sedatives and hypnotics. Clinical signs and symptoms for a narcotic drug overdose are very distinct, and in the majority of cases can be easily recognized by the attending physicians without the help of a toxicology laboratory. Loomis (1) reported that the majority of fatal poisonings owed to one, or a combination, of four agents: barbiturates, carbon monoxide, ethyl alcohol, and salicylates. Berry (2) estimated that 5-5'-disubstituted barbiturates were the second commonest cause of fatal poisoning in England, and that the frequency of their use was increasing. Other nonbarbiturate hypnotics involved in coma-producing incidents include glutethimide (Doriden®), methyprylon (Noludar®), and meprobamate (3, 4). In the last five years, diazepam (Valium®) has become one of the leading misused drugs (5).

  2. Marijuana Usage and Hypnotic Susceptibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franzini, Louis R.; McDonald, Roy D.

    1973-01-01

    Anonymous self-reported drug usage data and hypnotic susceptibility scores were obtained from 282 college students. Frequent marijuana users (more than 10 times) showed greater susceptibility to hypnosis than nonusers. (Author)

  3. Hypnotic Psychotherapy with Sex Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Sullivan; Briggs, Wanda P.; Magnus, Virginia

    2005-01-01

    The authors review the literature on the prevalence of sex offenders; multiple treatment modalities; and implications of the use of hypnotic psychotherapy, coupled with cognitive behavioral treatment programs, for treating sex offenders. (Contains 2 tables.)

  4. A suicide involving intraperitoneal injection of pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Hangartner, Sarah; Steiner, Jasmin; Dussy, Franz; Moeckli, Regula; Gerlach, Kathrin; Briellmann, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    We present an unusual case of suicide by intraperitoneal injection of pentobarbital, an overdose of zolpidem and the intake of diazepam, ethanol and other psychoactive substances. The autopsy and specimen collection were conducted in a 10 to 18 h postmortem interval. The toxicological analysis revealed a significantly higher pentobarbital concentration in femoral blood compared to cardiac blood (36 vs. 15 mg/L). On the contrary, zolpidem and diazepam concentrations in cardiac blood (2700 and 590 µg/L) were found to be significantly higher than in femoral blood (1500 and 230 µg/L). These findings point to a postmortem redistribution with a distinct gradient from areas of high drug concentrations in the gastrointestinal tract (zolpidem and diazepam) and the injection site (pentobarbital) to peripheral tissue. Ethanol concentration was 0.95 ‰ which amplified the CNS depression. The choice of this unusual suicide method was associated with the deceased's former job as a veterinarian's assistant. In veterinary medicine, the intraperitoneal injection of a lethal dose of pentobarbital is quite commonly performed to euthanise small animals. Intraperitoneal injection is rare as route of administration in humans. PMID:26174446

  5. Relative abuse liability of hypnotic drugs: a conceptual framework and algorithm for differentiating among compounds.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Roland R; Johnson, Matthew W

    2005-01-01

    Hypnotic drugs, including benzodiazepine receptor ligands, barbiturates, antihistamines, and melatonin receptor ligands, are useful in treating insomnia, but clinicians should consider the relative abuse liability of these drugs when prescribing them. Two types of problematic hypnotic self-administration are distinguished. First, recreational abuse occurs when medications are used purposefully for the subjective "high." This type of abuse usually occurs in polydrug abusers, who are most often young and male. Second, chronic quasi-therapeutic abuse is a problematic use of hypnotic drugs in which patients continue long-term use despite medical recommendations to the contrary. Relative abuse liability is defined as an interaction between the relative reinforcing effects (i.e., the capacity to maintain drug self-administration behavior, thereby increasing the likelihood of nonmedical problematic use) and the relative toxicity (i.e., adverse effects having the capacity to harm the individual and/or society). An algorithm is provided that differentiates relative likelihood of abuse and relative toxicity of 19 hypnotic compounds: pentobarbital, methaqualone, diazepam, flunitrazepam, lorazepam, GHB (gamma-hydroxybutyrate, also known as sodium oxybate), temazepam, zaleplon, eszopiclone, triazolam, zopiclone, flurazepam, zolpidem, oxazepam, estazolam, diphenhydramine, quazepam, tra-zodone, and ramelteon. Factors in the analysis include preclinical and clinical assessment of reinforcing effects, preclinical and clinical assessment of withdrawal, actual abuse, acute sedation/memory impairment, and overdose lethality. The analysis shows that both the likelihood of abuse and the toxicity vary from high to none across these compounds. The primary clinical implication of the range of differences in abuse liability is that concern about recreational abuse, inappropriate long-term use, or adverse effects should not deter physicians from prescribing hypnotics when clinically

  6. Distinct structural changes in the GABAA receptor elicited by pentobarbital and GABA.

    PubMed

    Muroi, Yukiko; Theusch, Cassandra M; Czajkowski, Cynthia; Jackson, Meyer B

    2009-01-01

    The barbiturate pentobarbital binds to gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors, and this interaction plays an important role in the anesthetic action of this drug. Depending on its concentration, pentobarbital can potentiate (approximately 10-100 microM), activate (approximately 100-800 microM), or block (approximately 1-10 mM) the channel, but the mechanisms underlying these three distinct actions are poorly understood. To investigate the drug-induced structural rearrangements in the GABA(A) receptor, we labeled cysteine mutant receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes with the sulfhydryl-reactive, environmentally sensitive fluorescent probe tetramethylrhodamine-6-maleimide (TMRM). We then used combined voltage clamp and fluorometry to monitor pentobarbital-induced channel activity and local protein movements simultaneously in real time. High concentrations of pentobarbital induced a decrease in TMRM fluorescence (F(TMRM)) of labels tethered to two residues in the extracellular domain (alpha(1)L127C and beta(2)L125C) that have been shown previously to produce an increase in F(TMRM) in response to GABA. Label at beta(2)K274C in the extracellular end of the M2 transmembrane helix reported a small but significant F(TMRM) increase during application of low modulating pentobarbital concentrations, and it showed a much greater F(TMRM) increase at higher concentrations. In contrast, GABA decreased F(TMRM) at this site. These results indicate that GABA and pentobarbital induce different structural rearrangements in the receptor, and thus activate the receptor by different mechanisms. Labels at alpha(1)L127C and beta(2)K274C change their fluorescence by substantial amounts during channel blockade by pentobarbital. In contrast, picrotoxin blockade produces no change in F(TMRM) at these sites, and the pattern of F(TMRM) signals elicited by the antagonist SR95531 differs from that produced by other antagonists. Thus, with either channel block by antagonists or

  7. Can motor imagery and hypnotic susceptibility explain Conversion Disorder with motor symptoms?

    PubMed

    Srzich, Alexander J; Byblow, Winston D; Stinear, James W; Cirillo, John; Anson, J Greg

    2016-08-01

    Marked distortions in sense of agency can be induced by hypnosis in susceptible individuals, including alterations in subjective awareness of movement initiation and control. These distortions, with associated disability, are similar to those experienced with Conversion Disorder (CD), an observation that has led to the hypothesis that hypnosis and CD share causal mechanisms. The purpose of this review is to explore the relationships among motor imagery (MI), hypnotic susceptibility, and CD, then to propose how MI ability may contribute to hypnotic responding and CD. Studies employing subjective assessments of mental imagery have found little association between imagery abilities and hypnotic susceptibility. A positive association between imagery abilities and hypnotic susceptibility becomes apparent when objective measures of imagery ability are employed. A candidate mechanism to explain motor responses during hypnosis is kinaesthetic MI, which engages a strategy that involves proprioception or the "feel" of movement when no movement occurs. Motor suppression imagery (MSI), a strategy involving inhibition of movement, may provide an alternate objective measurable phenomenon that underlies both hypnotic susceptibility and CD. Evidence to date supports the idea that there may be a positive association between kinaesthetic MI ability and hypnotic susceptibility. Additional evidence supports a positive association between hypnotic susceptibility and CD. Disturbances in kinaesthetic MI performance in CD patients indicate that MI mechanisms may also underlie CD symptoms. Further investigation of the above relationships is warranted to explain these phenomena, and establish theoretical explanations underlying sense of agency. PMID:27346334

  8. Effects of pentobarbital on upper airway patency during sleep.

    PubMed

    Eikermann, M; Eckert, D J; Chamberlin, N L; Jordan, A S; Zaremba, S; Smith, S; Rosow, C; Malhotra, A

    2010-09-01

    We hypothesised that pentobarbital would improve upper airway mechanics based on an increase in latency to arousal and amplitude of the phasic genioglossus electromyogram (EMG), and a decrease in the active upper airway critical closing pressure (P(crit)). 12 healthy subjects received pentobarbital (100 mg) or placebo in a double-blind, crossover protocol. During wakefulness, we measured the genioglossus reflex response to negative pressure pulses. During sleep, carbon dioxide was insufflated into the inspired air. Airway pressure was then decreased in a stepwise fashion until arousal from sleep. With basal breathing during sleep: flow rate was lower in volunteers given pentobarbital; end-tidal CO(2) concentration and upper airway resistance were greater; and P(crit) was unaffected (pentobarbital mean ± SD -11.7 ± 4.5 versus placebo -10.25 ± 3.6 cmH(2)O; p = 0.11). Pentobarbital increased the time to arousal (297 ± 63s versus 232 ± 67 s; p<0.05), at which time phasic genioglossus EMG was higher (6.2 ± 4.8% maximal versus 3.1 ± 3%; p<0.05) as were CO(2) levels. The increase in genioglossus EMG after CO(2) administration was greater after pentobarbital versus placebo. Pentobarbital did not affect the genioglossus negative-pressure reflex. Pentobarbital increases the time to arousal and stimulates genioglossus muscle activity, but it also increases upper airway resistance during sleep. PMID:20032012

  9. Effects of pentobarbital on upper airway patency during sleep

    PubMed Central

    Eikermann, M.; Eckert, D.J.; Chamberlin, N.L.; Jordan, A.S.; Zaremba, S.; Smith, S.; Rosow, C.; Malhotra, A.

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesised that pentobarbital would improve upper airway mechanics based on an increase in latency to arousal and amplitude of the phasic genioglossus electromyogram (EMG), and a decrease in the active upper airway critical closing pressure (Pcrit). 12 healthy subjects received pentobarbital (100 mg) or placebo in a double-blind, crossover protocol. During wakefulness, we measured the genioglossus reflex response to negative pressure pulses. During sleep, carbon dioxide was insufflated into the inspired air. Airway pressure was then decreased in a stepwise fashion until arousal from sleep. With basal breathing during sleep: flow rate was lower in volunteers given pentobarbital; end-tidal CO2 concentration and upper airway resistance were greater; and Pcrit was unaffected (pentobarbital mean±sd -11.7±4.5 versus placebo -10.25±3.6 cmH2O; p=0.11). Pentobarbital increased the time to arousal (297±63s versus 232±67 s; p<0.05), at which time phasic genioglossus EMG was higher (6.2±4.8% maximal versus 3.1±3%; p<0.05) as were CO2 levels. The increase in genioglossus EMG after CO2 administration was greater after pentobarbital versus placebo. Pentobarbital did not affect the genioglossus negative-pressure reflex. Pentobarbital increases the time to arousal and stimulates genioglossus muscle activity, but it also increases upper airway resistance during sleep. PMID:20032012

  10. Patterns of hypnotic response, revisited.

    PubMed

    Kihlstrom, John F

    2015-12-15

    It has long been speculated that there are discrete patterns of responsiveness to hypnotic suggestions, perhaps paralleling the factor structure of hypnotizability. An earlier study by Brenneman and Kihlstrom (1986), employing cluster analysis, found evidence for 12 such profiles. A new study by Terhune (2015), employing latent profile analysis, found evidence for three such patterns among highly hypnotizable subjects, and a fourth comprising subjects of medium hypnotizability. Some differences between the two studies are described. Convincing identification of discrete "types" of high hypnotizability, such as dissociative and nondissociative, may require a larger dataset than is currently available, but also data pertaining directly to divisions in conscious awareness and experienced involuntariness. PMID:26551995

  11. Pentobarbital anesthesia alters pulmonary vascular response to neural antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nyhan, D P; Goll, H M; Chen, B B; Fehr, D M; Clougherty, P W; Murray, P A

    1989-05-01

    We investigated the effects of pentobarbital sodium anesthesia on vasoregulation of the pulmonary circulation. Our specific objectives were to 1) assess the net effect of pentobarbital on the base-line pulmonary vascular pressure-to-cardiac index (P/Q) relationship compared with that measured in conscious dogs, and 2) determine whether autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation of the intact P/Q relationship is altered during pentobarbital. P/Q plots were constructed by graded constriction of the thoracic inferior vena cava, which produced stepwise decreases in Q. Pentobarbital (30 mg/kg iv) had no net effect on the base-line P/Q relationship. In contrast, changes in the conscious intact P/Q relationship in response to ANS antagonists were markedly altered during pentobarbital. Sympathetic alpha-adrenergic receptor block with prazosin caused active pulmonary vasodilation (P less than 0.01) in conscious dogs but caused vasoconstriction (P less than 0.01) during pentobarbital. Sympathetic beta-adrenergic receptor block with propranolol caused active pulmonary vasoconstriction (P less than 0.01) in both groups, but the magnitude of the vasoconstriction was attenuated (P less than 0.05) during pentobarbital at most levels of Q. Finally, cholinergic receptor block with atropine resulted in active pulmonary vasodilation (P less than 0.01) in conscious dogs, whereas vasoconstriction (P less than 0.01) was observed during pentobarbital. Thus, although pentobarbital had no net effect on the base-line P/Q relationship measured in conscious dogs, ANS regulation of the intact pulmonary vascular P/Q relationship was altered during pentobarbital anesthesia. PMID:2566280

  12. [Effect of pentobarbital on the biothermic individuality of growing rats and during instrumental conditioning in heat].

    PubMed

    Rapaport, A

    1977-01-01

    At the dosis of 12,5 mg by kg and in 30 growing white rats, pentobarbital acts by shortening the reaction time, by inducing a short period of psychomotor instrumental activity and after a latency of 5 to 20 mn by depressing the total reserve of instrumental activity acquired before this sessions under physiological serum or caffein injections state dependent larning in heat. PMID:143988

  13. Effect of an imidazobenzodiazepine, Ro15-4513, on the incoordination and hypothermia produced by ethanol and pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, P L; Tabakoff, B; Szabó, G; Suzdak, P D; Paul, S M

    1987-08-01

    The imidazobenzodiazepine, Ro15-4513, which is a partial inverse agonist at brain benzodiazepine receptors, reversed the incoordinating effect of ethanol in mice, as measured on an accelerating Rotarod. This effect was blocked by benzodiazepine receptor antagonists. In contrast, Ro15-4513 had no effect on ethanol-induced hypothermia in mice. However, Ro15-4513 reversed the hypothermic effect of pentobarbital, and, at a higher dose, also reversed the incoordinating effect of pentobarbital in mice. The data support the hypothesis that certain of the pharmacological effects of ethanol are mediated by actions at the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor-coupled chloride channel. PMID:3600196

  14. [Insomnia therapy and withdrawal of hypnotics].

    PubMed

    Garma, L; Widlöcher, D; Scherrer, J

    1982-11-18

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of a treatment prescribed, in the course of an hospital consultation for sleep pathology, to patients suffering from chronic insomnia not improved by longstanding and sustained medication with hypnotic drugs. The basis of the treatment is a progressive but total withdrawal of hypnotics in so far taken regularly. The withdrawal of hypnotics was prescribed to 79 patients: 33 aged 17 to 39 years (group 1, mean age 30) and 46 aged 40 to 70 years (group 2, mean age 51). 41 showed primary psychophysiological insomnia and 28 showed insomnia associated with psychiatric disorders. In patients of group 1, the average durations were 8 years for insomnia and 3 years for sustained hypnotic use; these durations were 15 and 5 years respectively in patients of group 2. Hypnotic drug withdrawal was achieved without placebos in 3 months in group 1 patients and 5 months in group 2 patients. 65 patients completely stopped the continual use of hypnotics. Subjective improvement of insomnia was reported by 51 of these patients (as well as by 6 patients who were given simultaneous antidepressant therapy). 16 of the 51 improved patients have resorted to hypnotics occasionally (at intervals of 10 days or more). After complete withdrawal, patients went on consulting for various lengths of time: 5 months average for group 1, 14 months average for group 2. This study of a fairly large group of insomniacs shows the frequent ineffectiveness of a sustained use of currently available hypnotics. It also shows that two times out of three the complete stop of sustained hypnotic medication proved beneficial to the patient. PMID:6297032

  15. Primate study suggests pentobarbital may help protect the brain during radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Skolnick, A.

    1990-08-01

    Radiation therapy, an often indispensable treatment for a wide range of brain tumors, is a double-edged sword, especially when used to treat children. Research reported at the 72nd Annual Meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Atlanta, Ga., now suggests that pentobarbital and perhaps other barbiturates may help protect the brain from radiation-induced damage, especially to the pituitary and hypothalmus, where such damage can lead to serious, life-long problems for children. Jeffrey J. Olson, MD, now assistant professor of neurosurgery at Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, reported the results of a study of the radioprotective effects of pentobarbital on the brain of a primate, which he and colleagues at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke recently completed.

  16. Influence of zolpidem, a novel hypnotic, on the intermediate-stage and paradoxical sleep in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gottesmann, C; Trefouret, S; Depoortere, H

    1994-02-01

    Paradoxical sleep (PS) in mice, rats, and cats is preceded and sometimes followed by a short-lasting stage characterized by cortical high-amplitude spindles and hippocampal low-frequency theta rhythm. This intermediate stage (IS) seems to correspond to a transient functional disconnection of the forebrain from the brainstem. Pentobarbital and benzodiazepines greatly extend IS at the expense of PS, which is suppressed. Zolpidem, a new imidazopyridine hypnotic, was studied at 2.5, 5, and 7.5 mg/kg IP. At 2.5 mg/kg, which is already a true hypnotic dose, it only decreased PS during the first 2 h of recording with a rebound during the following 4 h of recording. At 5 mg/kg, zolpidem increased the number and total duration of IS episodes, increased IS episodes not followed by PS, and increased PS latency of occurrence. PS amount was decreased during the first three h with a rebound in the next 3 h. At 7.5 mg/kg, the total amount of PS was also decreased. The eye movement number and theta rhythm frequency of PS were unchanged. These results show that zolpidem produces less disruption of the association between IS and PS than do previous hypnotics. PMID:8146229

  17. Hypnotically enhanced dreaming to achieve symptom reduction: a case study of 11 children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Linden, Julie H; Bhardwaj, Anuj; Anbar, Ran D

    2006-04-01

    Theories about dreams have shaped our thinking about mind-body unity and the influence of thought on the body. In this article, the authors review the sparse literature regarding the use of hypnosis with children's dreams and nightmares, summarize how hypnotically induced dreams have been used to resolve psychological symptoms, and note five themes in the literature worthy of further investigation. Building on the value of both dreams and hypnosis for working through conflicts, the authors united mind-body medicine and hypnotically induced dreaming in a pediatric pulmonary practice. A case series is presented of 11 patients who were offered an opportunity to review their reported nightmares through hypnosis in order to uncover their potential meaning. The recurrent nightmares among these patients decreased greatly in frequency or resolved following the hypnosis enhanced dream review. Thus, we demonstrate that hypnotically induced dream review may be useful in a pediatric population. PMID:16696559

  18. Suggestibility, expectancy, trance state effects, and hypnotic depth: I. Implications for understanding hypnotism.

    PubMed

    Pekala, Ronald J; Kumar, V K; Maurer, Ronald; Elliott-Carter, Nancy; Moon, Edward; Mullen, Karen

    2010-04-01

    This paper reviews the relationships between trance or altered state effects, suggestibility, and expectancy as these concepts are defined in the theorizing of Weitzenhoffer (2002), Holroyd (2003), Kirsch (1991), and others, for the purpose of demonstrating how these concepts can be assessed with the PCI-HAP (Phenomenology of Consciousness Inventory: Hypnotic Assessment Procedure; Pekala, 1995a, b). In addition, how the aforementioned variables may relate to the nature of hypnosis/hypnotism as a function of self-reported hypnotic depth are discussed, along with how the PCI-HAP may be used as a means to measure hypnotic responsivity from a more phenomenological state perspective, in contrast to more traditional behavioral trait assessment instruments like the Harvard, the Stanford C, or the HIP. A follow-up paper (Pekala, Kumar, Maurer, Elliott-Carter, Moon, & Mullen, 2010) will present research data on the PCI-HAP model and how this model can be useful for better understanding hypnotism. PMID:20499542

  19. Imagination and dissociation in hypnotic responding.

    PubMed

    Bowers, K S

    1992-10-01

    A neodissociative model of mind is better equipped than a social-psychological model to deal with the complexities of hypnosis, and of human behavior generally. It recognizes, as Coe's (1992) model does not, that behavior can be more automatically activated than strategically enacted. In particular, Coe's emphasis on human behavior as purposeful and goal directed does not distinguish between goal-directed behavior that serves a purpose, and goal-directed behavior that is performed on purpose. It is this distinction that permits goal-directed behavior to be dissociated from a person's conscious plans and intentions. In addition to offering a critique of Coe's "limited process" view of hypnosis, 4 main points are made in the interest of developing a slightly modified, neodissociation view of hypnosis. First, it is argued that goal-directed fantasies are more limited in their ability to mediate hypnotic responding than is commonly appreciated; as well, they do not seem to account for the nonvolitional quality of hypnotic responding. Second, it is argued that hypnotic ability is not unidimensional, with compliance and social influence more apt to account for the low than for the high hypnotizable's responsiveness to suggestion. Third, compared to low hypnotizables, the hypnotic responsiveness of high hypnotizables seems more likely to result from dissociated control. In other words, for high hypnotizables, hypnotic suggestions may often directly activate subsystems of cognitive control. Consequently, the need for executive initiative and effort to produce hypnotically suggested behavior is minimized, and such responses are therefore experienced as nonvolitional. Fourth and finally, while goal-directed fantasies typically accompany hypnotically suggested responses, they are in many cases more a marker of dissociated control than a mediator of suggested effects. PMID:1468834

  20. What Can a Hypnotic Induction Do?

    PubMed

    Woody, Erik; Sadler, Pamela

    2016-10-01

    In contrast to how recent definitions of hypnosis describe the induction, a work-sample perspective is advocated that characterizes the induction as an initial, stage-setting phase encompassing everything in a hypnotic session up to the first hypnotic suggestion of particular relevance to the therapeutic or research goals at hand. Four major ways are then discussed in which the induction could affect subsequent hypnotic responses: It may provide information about how subsequent behaviors are to be enacted; it may provide cues about the nature of the interpersonal interaction to be expected in hypnosis; it may provide meta-suggestions, defined as suggestive statements intended to enhance responses to subsequent hypnotic suggestions; and it may provide a clear transition to help allow new behaviors and experiences to emerge. Several ideas for future research are advanced, such as mapping hypnosis style onto the interpersonal circumplex, evaluating whether attentional-state changes measured at the end of the induction actually mediate subsequent hypnotic responsiveness, and systematically examining the impact of ritual-like aspects of inductions. PMID:27586044

  1. The effects of pentobarbital, ketamine-pentobarbital and ketamine-xylazine anesthesia in a rat myocardial ischemic reperfusion injury model.

    PubMed

    Shekarforoush, Shahnaz; Fatahi, Zahra; Safari, Fatemeh

    2016-06-01

    To achieve reliable experimental data, the side-effects of anesthetics should be eliminated. Since anesthetics exert a variety of effects on hemodynamic data and incidence of arrhythmias, the selection of anesthetic agents in a myocardial ischemic reperfusion injury model is very important. The present study was performed to compare hemodynamic variables, the incidence of ventricular arrhythmias, and infarct size during 30 min of ischemia and 120 min of reperfusion in rats using pentobarbital, ketamine-pentobarbital or ketamine-xylazine anaesthesia. A total of 30 rats were randomly divided into three groups. In group P, pentobarbital (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [IP]) was used solely; in group K-P, ketamine and pentobarbital (50 and 30 mg/kg, respectively, IP) were used in combination; and in group K-X, ketamine and xylazine (75 and 5 mg/kg, respectively, IP) were also used in combination. Hemodynamic data and occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias were recorded throughout the experiments. The ischemic area was measured by triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. The combination of ketamine-xylazine caused bradycardia and hypotension. The greatest reduction in mean arterial blood pressure during ischemia was in the P group. The most stability in hemodynamic parameters during ischemia and reperfusion was in the K-P group. The infarct size was significantly less in the K-X group. Whereas none of the rats anesthetized with ketamine-xylazine fibrillated during ischemia, ventricular fibrillation occurred in 57% of the animals anesthetized with pentobarbital or ketamine-pentobarbital. Because it offers the most stable hemodynamic parameters, it is concluded that the ketamine-pentobarbital anesthesia combination is the best anesthesia in a rat ischemia reperfusion injury model. PMID:26224732

  2. Effects of repeated high dosage of chloral hydrate and pentobarbital sodium anesthesia on hepatocellular system in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianhong; Sun, Xuehui; Sang, Guifeng

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the possible effects of repeated high dosage of chloral hydrate and pentobarbital sodium anesthesia on hepatocellular system in rats. Thirty Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: control group (group A), chloral hydrate group (group B) and pentobarbital sodium group (group C). Antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione s transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) activities and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) level as well as serum biochemical parameters alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and total bilirubin (T-BIL) were determined. Liver histopathological examinations were performed at termination. Furthermore, Bax and Bcl-2 expression, and caspase-3 activity were also evaluated. The SOD, GSH-Px, GST and CAT activities significantly decreased but TBARS levels increased in group B and C compared with group A. Hepatic injury was evidenced by a significant increase in serum ALT, AST and ALP activities in group B and C, which also confirmed by the histopathological alterations. Moreover, administration of chloral hydrate and pentobarbital sodium could induce certain hepatic apoptosis accompanied by the upregulated Bax expression, the downregulated Bcl-2 expression and Bcl-2/Bax ratio, and the increase of caspase-3 activity. Repeated high dosage of chloral hydrate and pentobarbital sodium anesthesia could produce hepatotoxicity. PMID:26379846

  3. Analgesic and hypnotic activities of Laghupanchamula: A preclinical study

    PubMed Central

    Ghildiyal, Shivani; Gautam, Manish K.; Joshi, Vinod K.; Goel, Raj K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In Ayurvedic classics, two types of Laghupanchamula -five plant roots (LP) have been mentioned containing four common plants viz. Kantakari, Brihati, Shalaparni, and Prinshniparni and the fifth plant is either Gokshura (LPG) or Eranda (LPE). LP has been documented to have Shothahara (anti-inflammatory), Shulanashka (analgesic), Jvarahara (antipyretic), and Rasayana (rejuvenator) activities. Aim: To evaluate the acute toxicity (in mice), analgesic and hypnotic activity (in rats) of 50% ethanolic extract of LPG (LPGE) and LPE (LPEE). Materials and Methods: LPEG and LPEE were prepared separately by using 50% ethanol following the standard procedures. A graded dose (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg) response study for both LPEE and LPGE was carried out for analgesic activity against rat tail flick response which indicated 500 mg/kg as the optimal effective analgesic dose. Hence, 500 mg/kg dose of LPEE and LPGE was used for hot plate test and acetic acid induced writhing model in analgesic activity and for evaluation of hypnotic activity. Results: Both the extracts did not produce any acute toxicity in mice at single oral dose of 2.0 g/kg. Both LPGE and LPEE (250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg) showed dose-dependent elevation in pain threshold and peak analgesic effect at 60 min as evidenced by increased latency period in tail-flick method by 25.1-62.4% and 38.2-79.0% respectively. LPGE and LPEE (500 mg/kg) increased reaction time in hot-plate test at peak 60 min analgesic effect by 63.2 and 85.8% and reduction in the number of acetic acid-induced writhes by 55.9 and 65.8% respectively. Both potentiated pentobarbitone-induced hypnosis as indicated by increased duration of sleep in treated rats. Conclusion: The analgesic and hypnotic effects of LP formulations authenticate their uses in Ayurvedic system of Medicine for painful conditions. PMID:25364205

  4. Brain correlates of hypnotic paralysis-a resting-state fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Pyka, M; Burgmer, M; Lenzen, T; Pioch, R; Dannlowski, U; Pfleiderer, B; Ewert, A W; Heuft, G; Arolt, V; Konrad, C

    2011-06-15

    Hypnotic paralysis has been used since the times of Charcot to study altered states of consciousness; however, the underlying neurobiological correlates are poorly understood. We investigated human brain function during hypnotic paralysis using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), focussing on two core regions of the default mode network and the representation of the paralysed hand in the primary motor cortex. Hypnotic suggestion induced an observable left-hand paralysis in 19 participants. Resting-state fMRI at 3T was performed in pseudo-randomised order awake and in the hypnotic condition. Functional connectivity analyses revealed increased connectivity of the precuneus with the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, angular gyrus, and a dorsal part of the precuneus. Functional connectivity of the medial frontal cortex and the primary motor cortex remained unchanged. Our results reveal that the precuneus plays a pivotal role during maintenance of an altered state of consciousness. The increased coupling of selective cortical areas with the precuneus supports the concept that hypnotic paralysis may be mediated by a modified representation of the self which impacts motor abilities. PMID:21497656

  5. [An analysis of subjective perception of hypnotic state].

    PubMed

    Umanskiĭ, S V; Utkin, V A

    2006-01-01

    The results of the study of hypnotic states on the basis of subjective reflections of their perceptions by patients are presented. The factor map of the features of hypnotic states formation is obtained and some variants of the course of hypnotic states are determined in light of domination of the certain factors. PMID:16457131

  6. Top-down regulation of left temporal cortex by hypnotic amusia for rhythm: a pilot study on mismatch negativity.

    PubMed

    Facco, Enrico; Ermani, Mario; Rampazzo, Patrizia; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Saladini, Marina; Zanette, Gastone; Casiglia, Edoardo; Spiegel, David

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of hypnotically induced amusia for rhythm (a condition in which individuals are unable to recognize melodies or rhythms) on mismatch negativity (MMN), 5 highly (HH) and 5 poorly (LH) hypnotizable nonmusician volunteers underwent MMN recording before and during a hypnotic suggestion for amusia. MMN amplitude was recorded using a 19-channel montage and then processed using the low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) to localize its sources. MMN amplitude was significantly decreased during hypnotic amusia (p < .04) only in HH, where the LORETA maps of MMN showed a decreased source amplitude in the left temporal lobe, suggesting a hypnotic top-down regulation of activity of these areas and that these changes can be assessed by neurophysiological investigations. PMID:24568321

  7. 21 CFR 522.380 - Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium sulfate sterile aqueous solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium... INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.380 Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium sulfate sterile aqueous solution. (a) (b)(1) Specifications. Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium...

  8. 21 CFR 522.380 - Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium sulfate sterile aqueous solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium... INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.380 Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium sulfate sterile aqueous solution. (a) (b)(1) Specifications. Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium...

  9. 21 CFR 522.380 - Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium sulfate sterile aqueous solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium... INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.380 Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium sulfate sterile aqueous solution. (a) (b)(1) Specifications. Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium...

  10. 21 CFR 522.380 - Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium sulfate sterile aqueous solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium... INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.380 Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium sulfate sterile aqueous solution. (a) (b)(1) Specifications. Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium...

  11. Insomnia in children: when are hypnotics indicated?

    PubMed

    Younus, Mohammed; Labellarte, Michael J

    2002-01-01

    Insomnia in children is a nonspecific impairing symptom that may be the result of normal developmental changes, psychosocial duress, a sleep disorder, a psychiatric disorder, other medical disorders, substance misuse, or an adverse effect of medication. Careful clinical assessment of insomnia in children may include the use of symptom rating scales, laboratory testing, or other medical assessment. Short- and long-term treatment of insomnia in children involves management of etiological factors and associated syndromes. Controlled treatment studies of pediatric insomnia are limited to <10 published studies of psychosocial and/or psychopharmacological treatment in young children. Directive parent education and behavior modification techniques have been effective in short-term treatment of insomnia in young children, and may be the preferred treatment of extrinsic insomnia, as well as an important adjunctive treatment of any insomnia symptoms. Two benzodiazepines [flurazepam and delorazepam (chlordesmethyldiazepam)], one antihistamine (niaprazine) and one phenothiazine [alimemazine (trimeprazine)] have been shown to be effective in the short-term treatment of insomnia in young children, although none of these agents have US Food and Drug Administration approval for pediatric insomnia. Short-acting benzodiazepines may have a role in the brief treatment of pediatric insomnia associated with an anxiety or mood disorder, psychosis, aggression, medication- induced activation, or anticipatory anxiety associated with a medical procedure. However, tachyphylaxis and risk of misuse preclude the long-term use of benzodiazepines for the treatment of insomnia in children. Newer hypnotics, which appear better tolerated than the benzodiazepines in studies of adults, may have a role when combined with psychosocial treatments of pediatric insomnia. Treatment of intrinsic pediatric insomnia may additionally involve chronotherapy or medical management. PMID:12038875

  12. Time-course of motor inhibition during hypnotic paralysis: EEG topographical and source analysis.

    PubMed

    Cojan, Yann; Archimi, Aurélie; Cheseaux, Nicole; Waber, Lakshmi; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2013-02-01

    Cognitive hypotheses of hypnotic phenomena have proposed that executive attentional systems may be either inhibited or overactivated to produce a selective alteration or disconnection of some mental operations. Recent brain imaging studies have reported changes in activity in both medial (anterior cingulate) and lateral (inferior) prefrontal areas during hypnotically induced paralysis, overlapping with areas associated with attentional control as well as inhibitory processes. To compare motor inhibition mechanisms responsible for paralysis during hypnosis and those recruited by voluntary inhibition, we used electroencephalography (EEG) to record brain activity during a modified bimanual Go-Nogo task, which was performed either in a normal baseline condition or during unilateral paralysis caused by hypnotic suggestion or by simulation (in two groups of participants, each tested once with both hands valid and once with unilateral paralysis). This paradigm allowed us to identify patterns of neural activity specifically associated with hypnotically induced paralysis, relative to voluntary inhibition during simulation or Nogo trials. We used a topographical EEG analysis technique to investigate both the spatial organization and the temporal sequence of neural processes activated in these different conditions, and to localize the underlying anatomical generators through minimum-norm methods. We found that preparatory activations were similar in all conditions, despite left hypnotic paralysis, indicating preserved motor intentions. A large P3-like activity was generated by voluntary inhibition during voluntary inhibition (Nogo), with neural sources in medial prefrontal areas, while hypnotic paralysis was associated with a distinctive topography activity during the same time-range and specific sources in right inferior frontal cortex. These results add support to the view that hypnosis might act by enhancing executive control systems mediated by right prefrontal areas, but

  13. Approaches in the evaluation of hypnotics

    PubMed Central

    Purpura, R. P.

    1981-01-01

    1 The evaluation of an hypnotic may be approached from the view that insomnia is a primary disease or the symptom of an underlying emotional or physical problem. 2 The two approaches have been used in the investigation of triazolam. PMID:6133533

  14. 21 CFR 522.1704 - Sodium pentobarbital injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... sterile and contains in each milliliter 64.8 milligrams of sodium pentobarbital. (2) Sponsor. See No. 000061 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (3) Conditions of use. (i) The drug is indicated for use as a... restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. (b)...

  15. Quantitation of amobarbital, butalbital, pentobarbital, phenobarbital, and secobarbital in urine, serum, and plasma using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Leonard L; Garg, Uttam

    2010-01-01

    Barbiturates are central nervous system depressants with sedative and hypnotic properties. Some barbiturates, with longer half-lives, are used as anticonvulsants. Their mechanism of action includes activation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) mediated neuronal transmission inhibition. Clinically used barbiturates include amobarbital, butalbital, pentobarbital, phenobarbital, secobarbital, and thiopental. Besides their therapeutic use, barbiturates are commonly abused. Their analysis is useful for both clinical and forensic proposes. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry is a commonly used method for the analysis of barbiturates. In the method described here, barbiturates from serum, plasma, or urine are extracted using an acidic phosphate buffer and methylene chloride. Barbital is used as an internal standard. The organic extract is dried and reconstituted with mixture of trimethylanilinium hydroxide (TMAH) and ethylacetate. The extract is injected into a gas chromatogram mass spectrometer where it undergoes "flash methylation" in the hot injection port. Selective ion monitoring and relative retention times are used for the identification and quantitation of barbiturates. PMID:20077060

  16. Cajal's brief experimentation with hypnotic suggestion.

    PubMed

    Stefanidou, Maria; Solà, Carme; Kouvelas, Elias; del Cerro, Manuel; Triarhou, Lazaros C

    2007-01-01

    Spanish histologist Santiago Ramón y Cajal, one of the most notable figures in Neuroscience, and winner, along with Camillo Golgi, of the 1906 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discoveries on the structure of the nervous system, did not escape experimenting with some of the psychiatric techniques available at the time, mainly hypnotic suggestion, albeit briefly. While a physician in his thirties, Cajal published a short article under the title, "Pains of labour considerably attenuated by hypnotic suggestion" in Gaceta Médica Catalana. That study may be Cajal's only documented case in the field of experimental psychology. We here provide an English translation of the original Spanish text, placing it historically within Cajal's involvement with some of the key scientific and philosophical issues at the time. PMID:17966053

  17. Hypnotic Induction: Enhancing Trance or Mostly Myth?

    PubMed

    Reid, David B

    2016-10-01

    Hypnosis has often, and primarily, been portrayed as a mystical means that controls and exploits vulnerable and defenseless people. Sources accused of perpetuating hypnosis myths and misconceptions have included numerous media productions and stage demonstrations at state fairs and festivals. Ironically, one largely unexamined potential culprit disseminating misinformation about hypnosis is the field of clinical hypnosis itself. This article not only questions the legitimacy of the term "hypnotic induction" and its derivatives but also explores the potential impact these terms have on the perpetuation of hypnosis myths and misconceptions. Through an examination of a selective history of hypnotic induction, the customary language of hypnosis, and information promoted by professional hypnosis societies, some of the contributing terminology is identified. Alternative terms that more appropriately embody the manifestation of trance are offered and discussed. PMID:27586043

  18. Brain Oscillations and Diurnal Variations in Hypnotic Responsiveness--A Commentary on "Diurnal Variations in Hypnotic Responsiveness: Is There an Optimal Time to be Hypnotized?".

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    A recent study published in the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis reported an interesting diurnal pattern of hypnotic responsivity; specifically, the authors found higher hypnotic responsiveness in a large sample of undergraduates in the morning and early evening. However, they did not have an explanation for this pattern of findings. This pattern is consistent, however, with the theta hypothesis of hypnotic responsivity. Further examination of the associations between brain oscillations and response to hypnosis is needed to determine if specific oscillations such as theta (a) actually facilitate response to some hypnotic suggestions, (b) merely reflect hypnotic responding, or (c) reflect another factor that itself plays a causal role in response to hypnosis. PMID:26599996

  19. Identification and differentiation of barbiturates, other sedative-hypnotics and their metabolites in urine integrated in a general screening procedure using computerized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maurer, H H

    1990-09-14

    A gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric procedure is described for the identification and differentiation of sedative-hypnotics and their metabolites in urine. The following 24 barbiturates and thirteen other hypnotics could be detected: acecarbromal, allobarbital, amobarbital, aprobarbital, barbital, brallobarbital, bromisoval, (sec)butabarbital, butalbital, butobarbital, carbromal, clomethiazole, crotylbarbital, cyclobarbital, cyclopentobarbital, diethylallylacetamide, dipropylbarbital, glutethimide, guaifenesin, ethinamate, heptabarbital, hexobarbital, meprobamate, methaqualone, metharbital, methohexital, methylphenobarbital, methyprylone, pentobarbital, phenobarbital, propallylonal, pyrithyldione, secobarbital, thiobutabarbital, thiopental, vinbarbital and vinylbital. The procedure presented is integrated in a general screening procedure (general unknown analysis) for several groups of drugs detecting over 300 drugs and over 1000 of their metabolites. It includes cleavage of conjugates by acid hydrolysis, isolation by liquid-liquid extraction, derivatization by acetylation, separation by capillary gas chromatography, and identification by computerized mass spectrometry. Using mass chromatography with the selected ions m/z 83, 117, 141, 167, 169, 207, 221 and 235, the presence of barbiturates, other hypnotics and/or their metabolites was indicated. The identity of positive signals in the reconstructed mass chromatograms was confirmed by a visual or computerized comparison of the stored full mass spectra with the reference spectra. The sample preparation, mass chromatograms, reference mass spectra and gas chromatographic retention indices are documented. PMID:2079506

  20. An unusual case of relay pentobarbital toxicosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Karyn; Jaeger, Robin; Ebel, Joseph G

    2011-09-01

    Sodium pentobarbital and phenytoin are common constituents of veterinary euthanasia solutions in the United States. Relay, or secondary, barbiturate toxicosis has been reported in carnivorous animals that have fed from the carcasses of euthanized livestock. This case report presents barbiturate toxicosis in a dog. A 2-year-old female spayed Australian shepherd presented comatose 2 h after ingesting an unknown substance on the beach. The material was retrieved from the stomach by gastric lavage and visually identified as fish or other animal tissue. The dog recovered with symptomatic and supportive therapy and was released on the third day of hospitalization. Tissue found on the beach near where the dog walked and a urine sample from the dog were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Both samples were positive for pentobarbital and phenytoin. The tissue was consistent with mammalian blubber based on gross and histological examination. Three weeks previously, a juvenile humpback whale had stranded on the beach where the dog had ingested the unknown substance. The whale had been euthanized with a barbiturate solution, necropsied, and removed from the beach. It was not definitively determined that the pentobarbital-containing blubber ingested by the dog was from the euthanized whale, but that was the most likely source. Although attempts were made to remove the whale's remains from the beach, practical considerations made complete removal challenging, if not impossible. PMID:21660622

  1. Effect of pentobarbital anesthesia on vulnerability to ventricular fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Dawson, A K; Leon, A S; Taylor, H L

    1980-09-01

    Ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT), frequently determined in dogs during pentobarbital sodium anesthesia, usually is replaced by a single repetitive extrasystole threshold (SRET) or a multiple repetitive extrasystole threshold (MRET) determination in conscious animals and in the human being. In the present study SRET, MRET, and VFT were determined initially in 39 pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized dogs. One week later these three thresholds were redetermined during anesthesia in 13 of the 39 dogs (control group). In the remaining 26 dogs (experimental group), thresholds were redetermined while the dogs were conscious. Significant changes in threshold values occurred only in the experimental group for VFT (P < 0.001) and MRET (P < 0.02). The square of the linear correlation coefficient showed conscious state MRET to be a good predictor of conscious state VFT (R2 = 0.90). Conscious state SRET and anesthetized state VFT showed less predictiveness for the conscious VFT (R2 = 0.72 and 0.51, respectively). These data indicate that MRET may be preferable to SRET as an index of VFT. The SRET, MRET, and VFT determined during pentobarbital anesthesia may not accurately reflect the value of these parameters in the conscious animal. PMID:7435588

  2. Consumer hypnotic-like suggestibility: possible mechanism in compulsive purchasing.

    PubMed

    Prete, M Irene; Guido, Gianluigi; Pichierri, Marco

    2013-08-01

    The authors hypothesize a concept, Consumer Hypnotic-Like Suggestibility (CHLS), defined as an altered state of consciousness, as a state causing a tendency to respond positively to messages aimed at inducing consumers to make unplanned purchases. This study aims to investigate the associations of CHLS with interpersonal variables and compulsive purchasing--a frequent and uncontrollable preoccupation with buying or impulses to buy. A study was conducted on a sample of 232 subjects (n = 111 men; M age = 41 yr.), through the administration of a questionnaire, which measured: CHLS, compulsive purchasing, consumer susceptibility to interpersonal influence (the necessity to enhance one's image in the opinion of others through the consumption of products), and consumer atmospherics, i.e., environmental stimuli known to influence purchasing decisions. Modeling and mediation analyses suggested that internal and external drivers--Consumer Susceptibility to Interpersonal Influence and atmospherics--are positively related to CHLS which affects compulsive purchasing. PMID:24340808

  3. Smoking Cessation: Uni-Modal and Multi-Modal Hypnotic and Non-Hypnotic Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habicht, Manuela H.

    A survey of Queensland's population in 1993 determined that 24% of the adults were smokers. National data compiled in 1992 indicated that 72% of the drug-related deaths were related to tobacco use. In light of the need for effective smoking cessation approaches, a literature review was undertaken to determine the efficacy of hypnotic and…

  4. Learning and cross drug effects: thermic effects of pentobarbital and amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Hinson, R E; Rhijnsburger, M

    1984-06-25

    The effects of environmental cues explicitly paired or unpaired with pentobarbital on the thermic effects of pentobarbital and amphetamine were investigated. Rats received 19 injections of pentobarbital in a distinctive environment and were subsequently tested for the thermic effects of pentobarbital and amphetamine in the distinctive environment, another environment previously associated only with saline, or in the colony room not previously associated with injections. Rats tested in the context of the environmental cues previously associated with pentobarbital were tolerant to the hypothermic effect of pentobarbital, but rats tested in the environment previously associated only with saline or in the colony room were not tolerant. Pentobarbital-experienced rats administered amphetamine in the context of the usual pentobarbital cues exhibited an exaggerated hyperthermic reaction compared to previously drug-naive rats administered amphetamine. Pentobarbital-experienced rats injected with amphetamine in the homeroom exhibited a smaller hyperthermic response than previously drug-naive rats administered amphetamine in the home room. These results demonstrate that an animal's response to a drug can be affected by cues paired and unpaired with drug administration. PMID:6738300

  5. Effects of hypnotic drugs on performance before and after sleep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kales, A.; Bixler, E. O.; Kales, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of various hypnotics on sleep stage parameters and on the parameters of effectiveness were evaluated along with the effects of several commonly used yet distinctly different hypnotics on daytime performance. The effects on daytime performance of two nonhypnotics commonly used in the space program were also examined.

  6. Hypnotics and the control of breathing; a review

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    1 Hypnotics are central depressants. In sufficient doses, they suppress respiration, and so their effects on respiration are important considerations in their safety. 2 The paper reviews mechanisms of respiratory control and methods of assessment, the effects of hypnotics on control of breathing and new methods of non-invasive respiratory monitoring. PMID:6140945

  7. Hypnotic responsivity of the deaf: the development of the University of Tennessee Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale for the Deaf.

    PubMed

    Repka, R J; Nash, M R

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of these two studies was to develop and test a measure that assesses the hypnotic responsivity of deaf individuals. The University of Tennessee Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale for the Deaf (UTHSS:D) is a signed, videotaped version of a standard hypnotic induction with 12 standard suggestions. Experiment 1 compared the behavioral and subjective hypnotic responsivity of deaf and hearing individuals using the UTHSS:D and the Field Depth Inventory (FDI), respectively. As compared to hearing subjects, deaf participants were found to be less responsive to hypnosis when assessed behaviorally (UTHSS:D) and equally responsive to hypnosis when assessed subjectively (FDI). Experiment 2 undertook a more comprehensive examination of the hypnotic responsivity of deaf individuals, using hearing individuals as controls. Three dimensions of hypnosis responsivity were assessed: behavioral (UTHSS:D), subjective (FDI), and interpersonal (Archaic Involvement Measure). Additionally, correlates of hypnotic responsivity (absorption, attitudes, expectations) were examined for the two groups. In Experiment 2, no significant differences were found between the deaf and hearing participant groups on any measures of hypnotic responsivity or on any measure of the correlates of hypnotic responsivity. PMID:7635582

  8. Hypnotic Taper with or without Self-Help Treatment of Insomnia: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belleville, Genevieve; Guay, Catherine; Guay, Bernard; Morin, Charles M.

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a minimal intervention focusing on hypnotic discontinuation and cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for insomnia. Fifty-three adult chronic users of hypnotics were randomly assigned to an 8-week hypnotic taper program, used alone or combined with a self-help CBT. Weekly hypnotic use decreased in both…

  9. 21 CFR 522.380 - Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.380 Chloral hydrate, pentobarbital, and magnesium sulfate. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 42.5 milligrams (mg) of chloral hydrate, 8.86 mg...

  10. 21 CFR 522.2444b - Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.2444b Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for injection. (a) Specifications. Each gram of the drug contains 750 milligrams of sodium thiopental and 250 milligrams of...

  11. 21 CFR 522.2444b - Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.2444b Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for injection. (a) Specifications. Each gram of the drug contains 750 milligrams of sodium thiopental and 250 milligrams of...

  12. 21 CFR 522.2444b - Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.2444b Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for injection. (a) Specifications. Each gram of the drug contains 750 milligrams of sodium thiopental and 250 milligrams of...

  13. 21 CFR 522.2444b - Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for... FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.2444b Sodium thiopental, sodium pentobarbital for injection. (a) Specifications. Each gram of the drug contains 750 milligrams of sodium thiopental and 250 milligrams of...

  14. Hypnosis, hypnotic suggestibility, memory, and involvement in films.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Reed; Lynn, Steven Jay; Condon, Liam

    2015-05-01

    Our research extends studies that have examined the relation between hypnotic suggestibility and experiential involvement and the role of an hypnotic induction in enhancing experiential involvement (e.g., absorption) in engaging tasks. Researchers have reported increased involvement in reading (Baum & Lynn, 1981) and music-listening (Snodgrass & Lynn, 1989) tasks during hypnosis. We predicted a similar effect for film viewing: greater experiential involvement in an emotional (The Champ) versus a non-emotional (Scenes of Toronto) film. We tested 121 participants who completed measures of absorption and trait dissociation and the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility and then viewed the two films after either an hypnotic induction or a non-hypnotic task (i.e., anagrams). Experiential involvement varied as a function of hypnotic suggestibility and film clip. Highly suggestible participants reported more state depersonalization than less suggestible participants, and depersonalization was associated with negative affect; however, we observed no significant correlation between hypnotic suggestibility and trait dissociation. Although hypnosis had no effect on memory commission or omission errors, contrary to the hypothesis that hypnosis facilitates absorption in emotionally engaging tasks, the emotional film was associated with more commission and omission errors compared with the non-emotional film. PMID:25594911

  15. Cross-evidence for hypnotic susceptibility through nonlinear measures on EEGs of non-hypnotized subjects

    PubMed Central

    Chiarucci, Riccardo; Madeo, Dario; Loffredo, Maria I.; Castellani, Eleonora; Santarcangelo, Enrica L.; Mocenni, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of hypnotic susceptibility is usually obtained through the application of psychological instruments. A satisfying classification obtained through quantitative measures is still missing, although it would be very useful for both diagnostic and clinical purposes. Aiming at investigating the relationship between the cortical brain activity and the hypnotic susceptibility level, we propose the combined use of two methodologies - Recurrence Quantification Analysis and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis - both inherited from nonlinear dynamics. Indicators obtained through the application of these techniques to EEG signals of individuals in their ordinary state of consciousness allowed us to obtain a clear discrimination between subjects with high and low susceptibility to hypnosis. Finally a neural network approach was used to perform classification analysis. PMID:25002038

  16. Cross-evidence for hypnotic susceptibility through nonlinear measures on EEGs of non-hypnotized subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarucci, Riccardo; Madeo, Dario; Loffredo, Maria I.; Castellani, Eleonora; Santarcangelo, Enrica L.; Mocenni, Chiara

    2014-07-01

    Assessment of hypnotic susceptibility is usually obtained through the application of psychological instruments. A satisfying classification obtained through quantitative measures is still missing, although it would be very useful for both diagnostic and clinical purposes. Aiming at investigating the relationship between the cortical brain activity and the hypnotic susceptibility level, we propose the combined use of two methodologies - Recurrence Quantification Analysis and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis - both inherited from nonlinear dynamics. Indicators obtained through the application of these techniques to EEG signals of individuals in their ordinary state of consciousness allowed us to obtain a clear discrimination between subjects with high and low susceptibility to hypnosis. Finally a neural network approach was used to perform classification analysis.

  17. Hypnotics' association with mortality or cancer: a matched cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Robert D; Kline, Lawrence E

    2012-01-01

    Objectives An estimated 6%–10% of US adults took a hypnotic drug for poor sleep in 2010. This study extends previous reports associating hypnotics with excess mortality. Setting A large integrated health system in the USA. Design Longitudinal electronic medical records were extracted for a one-to-two matched cohort survival analysis. Subjects Subjects (mean age 54 years) were 10 529 patients who received hypnotic prescriptions and 23 676 matched controls with no hypnotic prescriptions, followed for an average of 2.5 years between January 2002 and January 2007. Main outcome measures Data were adjusted for age, gender, smoking, body mass index, ethnicity, marital status, alcohol use and prior cancer. Hazard ratios (HRs) for death were computed from Cox proportional hazards models controlled for risk factors and using up to 116 strata, which exactly matched cases and controls by 12 classes of comorbidity. Results As predicted, patients prescribed any hypnotic had substantially elevated hazards of dying compared to those prescribed no hypnotics. For groups prescribed 0.4–18, 18–132 and >132 doses/year, HRs (95% CIs) were 3.60 (2.92 to 4.44), 4.43 (3.67 to 5.36) and 5.32 (4.50 to 6.30), respectively, demonstrating a dose–response association. HRs were elevated in separate analyses for several common hypnotics, including zolpidem, temazepam, eszopiclone, zaleplon, other benzodiazepines, barbiturates and sedative antihistamines. Hypnotic use in the upper third was associated with a significant elevation of incident cancer; HR=1.35 (95% CI 1.18 to 1.55). Results were robust within groups suffering each comorbidity, indicating that the death and cancer hazards associated with hypnotic drugs were not attributable to pre-existing disease. Conclusions Receiving hypnotic prescriptions was associated with greater than threefold increased hazards of death even when prescribed <18 pills/year. This association held in separate analyses for several commonly used

  18. Evaluation of Sedative and Hypnotic Activity of Ethanolic Extract of Scoparia dulcis Linn.

    PubMed Central

    Moniruzzaman, Md.; Atikur Rahman, Md.; Ferdous, Afia

    2015-01-01

    Scoparia dulcis Linn. (SD) is a perennial herb that has been well studied for its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, and hepatoprotective effects. However, scientific information on SD regarding the neuropharmacological effect is limited. This study evaluated the sedative and hypnotic effect of the ethanolic extract of whole plants of Scoparia dulcis (EESD). For this purpose, the whole plants of S. dulcis were extracted with ethanol following maceration process and tested for the presence of phytochemical constituents. The sedative and hypnotic activity were then investigated using hole cross, open field, hole-board, rota-rod, and thiopental sodium-induced sleeping time determination tests in mice at the doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg of EESD. Diazepam at the dose of 1 mg/kg was used as a reference drug in all the experiments. We found that EESD produced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of locomotor activity of mice both in hole cross and open field tests (P < 0.05). Besides, it also decreased rota-rod performances and the number of head dips in hole-board test. Furthermore, EESD significantly decreased the induction time to sleep and prolonged the duration of sleeping, induced by thiopental sodium. Taken together, our study suggests that EESD may possess sedative principles with potent hypnotic properties. PMID:25861372

  19. Terahertz spectroscopic study of benzodiazepine sedative hypnotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Fusheng; Shen, Jingling; Wang, Xianfeng

    2011-08-01

    Terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is used to the pure active ingredient of three benzodiazepine sedative hypnotics with similar molecular structure. The absorption spectra of them are studied in the range of 0.2~2.6THz. Based on the experiment, the theoretical simulation results of diazepam, nitrazepam and clonazepam are got by the Gaussian03 package of DFT/B3LYP/6-31G* method in single-molecule models. The experimental results show that even if the molecular structure and medicine property of them are similar, the accurate identification of them can still be done with their characteristic absorption spectra. Theoretical simulation results are well consistent with the experimental results. It demonstrates that absorption peaks of them in THz range mainly come from intra-molecular forces and are less affected by the intermolecular interaction and crystal effects.ô

  20. Hypnotic hypermnesia: the empty set of hypermnesia.

    PubMed

    Erdelyi, M H

    1994-10-01

    Although a long tradition exists suggesting that hypnosis can enhance memory (hypnotic hypermnesia), the experimental literature is quite mixed. When, however, laboratory studies are classified according to the type of stimulus and memory tests employed, a remarkable orderliness of outcomes emerges: Recall tests for high-sense stimuli (e.g., poetry, meaningful pictures) almost always produce hypermnesia, but not recognition tests for low-sense stimuli (e.g., nonsense syllables, word lists). An important methodological issue is whether the recall increments for high-sense stimuli constitute enhanced memory or enhanced reporting (laxer response criteria). Recent laboratory literatures show that, beyond response criterion effects, true memory enhancement (hypermnesia) exists. Experiments conducted over the past decade, however, demonstrate that it is repeated retrieval effort and not hypnosis that is responsible for hypermnesia: Repeated testing without hypnosis yields as much hypermnesia as with hypnosis. PMID:7960293

  1. [Hypnotic communication and hypnosis in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Wehrli, Hans

    2014-07-01

    In addition to usual medical care it is often critical to consider the patient's inner world in order to sensitively differentiate between harmful and helpful suggestive elements. The respective abilities in terms of hypnotic communication can be easily learned. Confident, empathic attention and a calm, understanding and figurative language narrowing the focus on positive emotions and positive change, which have been shown to improve the patient's chances of healing, are of particular importance. Proper clinical hypnosis goes one step further: it makes explicit use of suggestions, trance, and trance phenomena. The major clinical indications for hypnosis include psychosomatic disorders, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, depression, and pain syndromes. Hypnosis can also be employed as an adjunct for surgical therapy. PMID:24985229

  2. Confusion and hypnotics in demented patients

    PubMed Central

    Mead, M. G.; Castleden, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    Eleven elderly confused patients were given a single dose of chlormethiazole, temazepam and placebo on separate nights with-in a 10-day period. There was no statistically significant difference between the three treatments the next morning in any of the tests, which included subjective and objective measures of mental ability, orientation and hangover effect. These results mirror those previously found in normal, healthy, elderly patients, and do not therefore support the contention that hypnotics increase confusion in demented patients, or that such patients are more sensitive to their actions. Indeed, plasma drug concentrations were on average twice as high in demented as in normal elderly subjects, thus raising the possibility of decreased sensitivity in the demented group. There was little correlation between plasma concentration and pharmacological effect. PMID:6130151

  3. Quinpirole Increases Melatonin-Augmented Pentobarbital Sleep via Cortical ERK, p38 MAPK, and PKC in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sa-Ik; Kwon, Seung-Hwan; Hwang, Ji-Young; Ma, Shi-Xun; Seo, Jee-Yeon; Ko, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Lee, Seok-Yong; Jang, Choon-Gon

    2016-03-01

    Sleep, which is an essential part of human life, is modulated by neurotransmitter systems, including gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and dopamine signaling. However, the mechanisms that initiate and maintain sleep remain obscure. In this study, we investigated the relationship between melatonin (MT) and dopamine D2-like receptor signaling in pentobarbital-induced sleep and the intracellular mechanisms of sleep maintenance in the cerebral cortex. In mice, pentobarbital-induced sleep was augmented by intraperitoneal administration of 30 mg/kg MT. To investigate the relationship between MT and D2-like receptors, we administered quinpirole, a D2-like receptor agonist, to MT- and pentobarbital-treated mice. Quinpirole (1 mg/kg, i.p.) increased the duration of MT-augmented sleep in mice. In addition, locomotor activity analysis showed that neither MT nor quinpirole produced sedative effects when administered alone. In order to understand the mechanisms underlying quinpirole-augmented sleep, we measured protein levels of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and cortical protein kinases related to MT signaling. Treatment with quinpirole or MT activated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), p38 MAPK, and protein kinase C (PKC) in the cerebral cortex, while protein kinase A (PKA) activation was not altered significantl. Taken together, our results show that quinpirole increases the duration of MT-augmented sleep through ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and PKC signaling. These findingssuggest that modulation of D2-like receptors might enhance the effect of MT on sleep. PMID:26902082

  4. Quinpirole Increases Melatonin-Augmented Pentobarbital Sleep via Cortical ERK, p38 MAPK, and PKC in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sa-Ik; Kwon, Seung-Hwan; Hwang, Ji-Young; Ma, Shi-Xun; Seo, Jee-Yeon; Ko, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Lee, Seok-Yong; Jang, Choon-Gon

    2016-01-01

    Sleep, which is an essential part of human life, is modulated by neurotransmitter systems, including gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and dopamine signaling. However, the mechanisms that initiate and maintain sleep remain obscure. In this study, we investigated the relationship between melatonin (MT) and dopamine D2-like receptor signaling in pentobarbital-induced sleep and the intracellular mechanisms of sleep maintenance in the cerebral cortex. In mice, pentobarbital-induced sleep was augmented by intraperitoneal administration of 30 mg/kg MT. To investigate the relationship between MT and D2-like receptors, we administered quinpirole, a D2-like receptor agonist, to MT- and pentobarbital-treated mice. Quinpirole (1 mg/kg, i.p.) increased the duration of MT-augmented sleep in mice. In addition, locomotor activity analysis showed that neither MT nor quinpirole produced sedative effects when administered alone. In order to understand the mechanisms underlying quinpirole-augmented sleep, we measured protein levels of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and cortical protein kinases related to MT signaling. Treatment with quinpirole or MT activated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), p38 MAPK, and protein kinase C (PKC) in the cerebral cortex, while protein kinase A (PKA) activation was not altered significantly. Taken together, our results show that quinpirole increases the duration of MT-augmented sleep through ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and PKC signaling. These findings suggest that modulation of D2-like receptors might enhance the effect of MT on sleep. PMID:26902082

  5. The role of expectancy in hypnotic hypermnesia: a brief communication.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, K L; Roese, N J; Thomas, M R

    1991-10-01

    Previous research has yielded equivocal evidence of hypnotic memory enhancement. The present experiment assessed the effects of expectancy and hypnotizability on recall for videotaped material under waking and hypnotic conditions. Ss (N = 138) were informed of hypnotic induction either before (expectancy condition) or after (no expectancy condition) watching a videotaped enactment of a crime and completing an initial waking recall test (RI). Both groups then underwent hypnotic induction, and completed the test again (R2). Ss' raw recall scores were significantly greater under hypnotic than waking conditions, but this hypermnesia was not evident when scores were corrected for mere increase in rate of responding. Ss expecting later hypnosis scored significantly higher than Ss with no such expectations, but again, this difference was not evident in corrected scores. Hypnotizability of Ss was, however, related to corrected recall, with high hypnotizable Ss displaying the greatest increase in rate of responding from R1 to R2. No evidence for the hypothesized "suppression effect" underlying hypnotic hypermnesia was found. PMID:1937989

  6. Age-dependent inhibition of pentobarbital sleeping time by ozone in mice and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Canada, A.T.; Calabrese, E.J.; Leonard, D.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of age on the metabolism of pentobarbital in mice and rats was investigated following exposure to 0.3 ppm of ozone for 3.75 hr. Young animals were 2.5 months of age and the mature were 18 months. The pentobarbital sleeping time was significantly prolonged following the ozone exposure in both the mice and rats when compared with an air control. No ozone effect on sleeping time was found in the young animals. The results indicate that there may be an age-related sensitivity to the occurrence of ozone-related inhibition of pentobarbital metabolism.

  7. Inhaled toluene produces pentobarbital-like discriminative stimulus effects in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, D.C.; Coggeshall, E.; Balster, R.L.

    1985-10-07

    The abuse of volatile solvents may be due to their ability to produce an intoxication similar to that produced by classical central nervous system depressants such as the barbiturates and ethanol. To evaluate this hypothesis, mice were trained to discriminate pentobarbital from saline injections in a two-lever operant task. Stimulus generalization was examined following 20-min inhalation exposures to toluene (300-5400 ppm). In 8 of 10 subjects, pentobarbital-lever responding occurred following toluene exposure indicating an overlap in the discriminative stimulus properties of toluene and pentobarbital.

  8. Therapy of vaginismus by hypnotic desensitization.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, K

    1980-05-01

    Fear and anxiety are of tremendous importance in the production and maintenance of a symptom. Vaginismus, as a reaction of avoidance of an anxiety-producing situation, is readily amenable to treatment by systematic desensitization. This may proceed mainly in two ways: "in vitro" or "in vivo." In order to strengthen and speed up the densensitization process, we used hypnotic techniques in a dynamic approach. The "in vitro" treatment proceeds with imagery, under hypnosis, of an "anxiety hierarchy" of increasingly erotic and sexually intimate situations which will be reproduced at home with the partner, until sexual intercourse is achieved. In the "in vivo" method the patient learns self-hypnosis and then inserts in the vagina first a finger, and then Hegar dilators of gradually increasing sizes. The partner, the patient, and the physician will then successively proceed to insertion, forming a team-referred work situation. This continues until the "female superior position," practiced first with the largest dilator, is reproduced at home by intercourse. Between 1965 and 1974 we treated 71 women with this method. Good results were obtained in 16 of 18 by the "in vitro" technique and in 53 of 54 by the "in vivo" technique. One patient was referred from the "in vitro" group to the "in vivo" group. In follow-up of 2 to 5 years there was no relapse or symptom substitution. PMID:6102843

  9. Is suvorexant a better choice than alternative hypnotics?

    PubMed

    Kripke, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Suvorexant is a novel dual orexin receptor antagonist (DORA) newly introduced in the U.S. as a hypnotic, but no claim of superiority over other hypnotics has been offered.  The manufacturer argued that the 5 and 10 mg starting doses recommended by the FDA might be ineffective.  The manufacturer's main Phase III trials had not even included the 10 mg dosage, and the 5 mg dosage had not been tested at all in registered clinical trials at the time of approval.  Popular alternative hypnotics may be similarly ineffective, since the FDA has also reduced the recommended doses for zolpidem and eszopiclone.  The "not to exceed" suvorexant dosage of 20 mg does slightly increase sleep.  Because of slow absorption, suvorexant has little effect on latency to sleep onset but some small effect in suppressing wakening after sleep onset and in improving sleep efficiency. The FDA would not approve the manufacturer's preferred 40 mg suvorexant dosage, because of concern with daytime somnolence, driving impairment, and possible narcolepsy-like symptoms.  In its immediate benefits-to-risks ratio, suvorexant is unlikely to prove superior to currently available hypnotics-possibly worse-so there is little reason to prefer over the alternatives this likely more expensive hypnotic less-tested in practice.  Associations are being increasingly documented relating hypnotic usage with incident cancer, with dementia risks, and with premature death.  There is some basis to speculate that suvorexant might be safer than alternative hypnotics in terms of cancer, dementia, infections, and mortality.  These safety considerations will remain unproven speculations unless adequate long-term trials can be done that demonstrate suvorexant advantages. PMID:26594338

  10. Effects of pentobarbital on plasma glucose and free fatty acids in the rat.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furner, R. L.; Neville, E. D.; Talarico, K. S.; Feller, D. D.

    1972-01-01

    Hyperglycemia and hypolipemia were observed in rats after the injection of sodium pentobarbital. The observed changes were independent of whether the blood was collected by decapitation or by needle puncture of the aorta. The hyperglycemic response was caused by two factors including the stress of the injection per se and the pharmacological action of the drug. Hyperlipemia was observed at 5 min postinjection. However, pentobarbital decreased plasma free fatty acids by 15 min postinjection. Both the hyperglycemia and hypolipemia responses were dose dependent.

  11. The existence of a hypnotic state revealed by eye movements.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Sakari; Hyönä, Jukka; Revonsuo, Antti; Sikka, Pilleriin; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    Hypnosis has had a long and controversial history in psychology, psychiatry and neurology, but the basic nature of hypnotic phenomena still remains unclear. Different theoretical approaches disagree as to whether or not hypnosis may involve an altered mental state. So far, a hypnotic state has never been convincingly demonstrated, if the criteria for the state are that it involves some objectively measurable and replicable behavioural or physiological phenomena that cannot be faked or simulated by non-hypnotized control subjects. We present a detailed case study of a highly hypnotizable subject who reliably shows a range of changes in both automatic and volitional eye movements when given a hypnotic induction. These changes correspond well with the phenomenon referred to as the "trance stare" in the hypnosis literature. Our results show that this 'trance stare' is associated with large and objective changes in the optokinetic reflex, the pupillary reflex and programming a saccade to a single target. Control subjects could not imitate these changes voluntarily. For the majority of people, hypnotic induction brings about states resembling normal focused attention or mental imagery. Our data nevertheless highlight that in some cases hypnosis may involve a special state, which qualitatively differs from the normal state of consciousness. PMID:22039474

  12. Reversible analgesia, atonia, and loss of consciousness on bilateral intracerebral microinjection of pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Devor, M; Zalkind, V

    2001-10-01

    Concussion, asphyxia, and systemically administered general anesthetics all induce reversible depression of the organism's response to noxious stimuli as one of the elements of loss of consciousness. This is so even for barbiturate anesthetics, which have only modest analgesic efficacy at subanesthetic doses. Little is known about the neural circuits involved in this form of antinociception, although for anesthetic agents, at least, it is usually presumed that the drugs act in widely distributed regions of the nervous system. We now report the discovery of a focal zone in the brainstem mesopontine tegmentum in rats at which microinjection of minute quantities of pentobarbital induces a transient, reversible anesthetic-like state with non-responsiveness to noxious stimuli, flaccid atonia, and absence of the righting reflex. The behavioral suppression is accompanied by slow-wave EEG and, presumably, loss of consciousness. This zone, which we refer to as the mesopontine tegmental anesthesia locus (MPTA), apparently contains a barbiturate-sensitive 'switch' for both cortical and spinal activity. The very existence of the MPTA locus has implications for an understanding of the neural circuits that control motor functions and pain sensation, and for the cerebral representation of consciousness. PMID:11576749

  13. Imagery vividness, hypnotic susceptibility, and the perception of fragmented stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wallace, B

    1990-02-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the role of hypnotic susceptibility level (high or low) and imaging ability (vivid or poor) in the performance of gestalt closure tasks. In Experiment 1, subjects were required to identify fragmented stimuli in the Closure Speed Test and in the Street Test. In Experiment 2, subjects reported on fragmented stimuli that were projected to the right eye and subsequently produced an afterimage. Individuals were asked to identify the composite if possible and to report on the duration of the afterimage. In both experiments, hypnotic susceptibility level and imaging ability affected reports of gestalt closure. The greatest number of correct closures was reported by those who were both high in hypnotic susceptibility and vivid in imaging ability. In addition, in the second experiment, this group also reported the longest enduring afterimage. These results are discussed in terms of the processes required to perform in a gestalt closure task. PMID:2319447

  14. Is suvorexant a better choice than alternative hypnotics?

    PubMed Central

    Kripke, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Suvorexant is a novel dual orexin receptor antagonist (DORA) newly introduced in the U.S. as a hypnotic, but no claim of superiority over other hypnotics has been offered.  The manufacturer argued that the 5 and 10 mg starting doses recommended by the FDA might be ineffective.  The manufacturer's main Phase III trials had not even included the 10 mg dosage, and the 5 mg dosage had not been tested at all in registered clinical trials at the time of approval.  Popular alternative hypnotics may be similarly ineffective, since the FDA has also reduced the recommended doses for zolpidem and eszopiclone.  The "not to exceed" suvorexant dosage of 20 mg does slightly increase sleep.  Because of slow absorption, suvorexant has little effect on latency to sleep onset but some small effect in suppressing wakening after sleep onset and in improving sleep efficiency. The FDA would not approve the manufacturer's preferred 40 mg suvorexant dosage, because of concern with daytime somnolence, driving impairment, and possible narcolepsy-like symptoms.  In its immediate benefits-to-risks ratio, suvorexant is unlikely to prove superior to currently available hypnotics—possibly worse—so there is little reason to prefer over the alternatives this likely more expensive hypnotic less-tested in practice.  Associations are being increasingly documented relating hypnotic usage with incident cancer, with dementia risks, and with premature death.  There is some basis to speculate that suvorexant might be safer than alternative hypnotics in terms of cancer, dementia, infections, and mortality.  These safety considerations will remain unproven speculations unless adequate long-term trials can be done that demonstrate suvorexant advantages. PMID:26594338

  15. Hypnotic, anticonvulsant and anxiolytic effects of 1-nitro-2-phenylethane isolated from the essential oil of Dennettia tripetala in mice.

    PubMed

    Oyemitan, Idris Ajayi; Elusiyan, Christianah Abimbola; Akanmu, Moses Atanda; Olugbade, Tiwalade Adewale

    2013-11-15

    This study investigated the hypnotic, anti-convulsant and anxiolytic effects of 1-nitro-2-phenylethane (BPNE) obtained from the oil of Dennettia tripetala G. Baker (Annonaceae) and established its mechanism of action. The essential oil (EO) from the leaf, fruit and seed was obtained by hydrodistillation, followed by isolation of BPNE purified to 99.2% by accelerated gradient chromatography on silica, and identified by NMR and GC-MS. The pure BPNE and EO of the dried seed (93.6%) were comparatively evaluated for hypnotic, anticonvulsant and anxiolytic effects in mice. The acute toxicity of BPNE was determined and the LD50 was 490 mg/kg, intrapritonealy. The hypnotic activities of the EO and BPNE (50-400 mg/kg, i.p.) were assessed by loss of righting reflex, while sodium pentobarbitone (PBS) and diazepam (DZM) were used as positive controls. The anticonvulsant and anxiolytic effects of the EO and BPNE were evaluated in mice. Both BPNE and EO at doses ≥100 mg/kg induced spontaneous hypnosis with loss of righting reflex, significantly decreased sleep latency (SL) and also increased total sleeping time (TST) dose-dependently. They had comparable activity with NAP in TST. The BPNE exhibited higher hypnotic potency than EO at the same dose levels. The EO and BPNE offered comparable dose-related protections against PTZ- and strychnine-induced convulsions. Flumazenil (2 mg/kg) blocked the hypnotic and anticonvulsant (PTZ-convulsions) effects of both EO and BPNE. The essential oil at 5-20 mg/kg dose levels significantly (p<0.05) increased the percentage time spent and number of entries into the open arms. While at the same dose range BPNE significantly (p<0.05) increased the percentage time spent and the number of entries into the open arms respectively. The study concluded that 1-nitro-2-phenylethane exhibited dose dependent significant hypnotic, anticonvulsant and anxiolytic effects and it is the compound largely responsible for the neuropharmacological effects of the

  16. Hypnotic treatment of Sleep Terror Disorder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Koe, G G

    1989-07-01

    This case report describes the hypnotic treatment of Sleep Terror Disorder in a 16-year-old male who was resistant to other forms of treatment. In this patient, night terrors seemed to be precipitated by nocturnal noises wakening him from deep sleep. Posthypnotic suggestions reducing awareness of nocturnal sensory stimulation successfully eliminated his night terrors. PMID:2773819

  17. Hypnotic Susceptibility and Personality as Measured by the MMPI-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Wayne D.

    This study evaluated personality variables that underlie hypnotic susceptibility. It was correlational, did not require ongoing contact with participants, and included a validation study as an integral component. The subjects were 359 college students (250 in the original sample and 109 in the cross validation study) taking undergraduate courses…

  18. Pharmacological evaluation of Mallotus philippinensis (Lam.) Muell.-Arg. fruit hair extract for anti-inflammatory, analgesic and hypnotic activity

    PubMed Central

    Gangwar, Mayank; Gautam, Manish Kumar; Ghildiyal, Shivani; Nath, Gopal; Goel, Raj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Recently, we observed wound healing activity of 50% ethanol extract of Mallotus philippinensis Muell. Arg (MP) fruit hairs extract (MPE). In several intestinal infections, localized inflammation is of common occurrence and hence we evaluated the anti-inflammatory, analgesic and hypnotic activity of MPE in different rat experimental models. Materials and Methods: Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan (acute) and turpentine oil induced formalin (subacute) induced paw edema and while granuloma pouch (subacute) in rats. Analgesic and hypnotic activity of MPE was undertaken by tail-flick, hot-plate, and acetic acid-induced writhing tests while pentobarbitone-induced hypnotic potentiation in rats. Results: MPE at a dose of 200 mg/kg at 3 h after their administration showed inhibition of formalin-induced paw edema by 41.60% (P < 0.001) and carrageenan-induced paw edema by 55.30% (P < 0.001). After 7 days of treatments, MPE showed 38.0% (P < 0.001) inhibition against formalin-induced paw edema and reduced weight of turpentine-induced granuloma pouch by 29.6% (P < 0.01) and volume of exudates by 26.1% (P < 0.01), respectively. MPE (200 mg/kg) showed dose-dependent elevation in pain threshold and peak analgesic effect at 120 min as evidenced by increased latency period in tail flick method and increased reaction time in the hot-plate test while the reduction in the number of acetic acid-induced writhes by 45.7% (P < 0.001). The pentobarbitone-induced hypnosis model showed potentiation, as defined by increased duration of sleep in treated group rats as compared to control. Conclusion: Thus, the study revealed MPE is effective in reducing acute and subacute inflammation and showed effective and similar analgesic activity. This seemed to be safe in the treatment of pain and inflammation. PMID:27069718

  19. Adverse reactions to benzodiazepine hypnotics: spontaneous reporting system.

    PubMed

    Bixler, E O; Kales, A; Brubaker, B H; Kales, J D

    1987-01-01

    The rates of reported adverse drug reactions involving the central nervous system were compared among patients taking any of three benzodiazepine hypnotics: flurazepam, temazepam, and triazolam. These rates, based upon data collected through the spontaneous reporting system of the Food and Drug Administration, were controlled for the number and size of new prescriptions for each drug. In general, triazolam had much higher overall rates than did the other two drugs. Hyperexcitability and withdrawal effects were greatest for triazolam and least for flurazepam. Amnesia was reported almost exclusively with triazolam. Rates for other cognitive as well as affective and other behavioral effects were also much greater for triazolam and about equal for the other two drugs. Finally, daytime sedation was reported slightly more for flurazepam than triazolam and least for temazepam which was also reported most frequently as lacking hypnotic effect. PMID:2892212

  20. Neuro-Hypnotism: Prospects for Hypnosis and Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Kihlstrom, John F.

    2012-01-01

    The neurophysiological substrates of hypnosis have been subject to speculation since the phenomenon got its name. Until recently, much of this research has been geared toward understanding hypnosis itself, including the biological bases of individual differences in hypnotizability, state-dependent changes in cortical activity occurring with the induction of hypnosis, and the neural correlates of response to particular hypnotic suggestions (especially the clinically useful hypnotic analgesia). More recently, hypnosis has begun to be employed as a method for manipulating subjects' mental states, both cognitive and affective, to provide information about the neural substrates of experience, thought, and action. This instrumental use of hypnosis is particularly well-suited for identifying the neural correlates of conscious and unconscious perception and memory, and of voluntary and involuntary action. PMID:22748566

  1. Psychological Treatment of Insomnia in Hypnotic-Dependant Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Soeffing, James P.; Lichstein, Kenneth L.; Nau, Sidney D.; McCrae, Christina S.; Wilson, Nancy M.; Aguillard, R. Neal; Lester, Kristin W.; Bush, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    Background The existing literature does not address the question of whether cognitive-behavioral therapy would have an impact on insomnia in older adults who are chronic users of sleep medication and have current insomnia, but are also stable in their quantity of medication usage during treatment. The present report seeks to answer this question. Methods Hypnotic-dependant older adults, who were stable in their amount of medication usage and still met the criteria for chronic insomnia put forth by American Academy of Sleep Medicine, were treated using a cognitive-behavioral intervention for insomnia. The three-component treatment included relaxation training, stimulus control, and sleep hygiene instructions. Participants were randomly assigned to either the active treatment group or a comparably credible placebo control group, and were instructed not to alter their pattern of hypnotic consumption during treatment. Results The active treatment group had significantly better self-report measures of sleep at post-treatment. Statistically significant improvement was paralleled by clinically meaningful improvement for key sleep variables. As planned, there was no significant change in sleep medication usage from pre- to post-treatment. Conclusions The findings support the use of cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia in hypnotic-dependant older adults. PMID:17644419

  2. A cross-validation of two differing measures of hypnotic depth.

    PubMed

    Pekala, Ronald J; Maurer, Ronald L

    2013-01-01

    Several sets of regression analyses were completed, attempting to predict 2 measures of hypnotic depth: the self-reported hypnotic depth score and hypnoidal state score from variables of the Phenomenology of Consciousness Inventory: Hypnotic Assessment Procedure (PCI-HAP). When attempting to predict self-reported hypnotic depth, an R of .78 with Study 1 participants shrank to an r of .72 with Study 2 participants, suggesting mild shrinkage for this more attributional measure of hypnotic depth. Attempting to predict hypnoidal state (an estimate of trance) using the same procedure, yielded an R of .56, that upon cross-validation shrank to an r of .48. These and other results suggest that, although there is some variance in common, the self-reported hypnotic depth score appears to be tapping a different construct from the hypnoidal state score. PMID:23153387

  3. DIFFERENTIAL IMPACT OF HYPOTHERMIA AND PENTOBARBITAL ON BRAINSTEM AUDITORY EVOKED RESPONSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of hypothermia and pentobarbital anesthesia, alone and in combination, on the brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAERs) of rats. n experiment I, unanesthetized rats were cooled to colonic temperatures 0.5 and 1.0 degrees C...

  4. Stability-Indicating Assay for the Determination of Pentobarbital Sodium in Liquid Formulations.

    PubMed

    Ajemni, Myriam; Balde, Issa-Bella; Kabiche, Sofiane; Carret, Sandra; Fontan, Jean-Eudes; Cisternino, Salvatore; Schlatter, Joël

    2015-01-01

    A stability-indicating assay by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method was developed for the determination of pentobarbital sodium in oral formulations: a drug used for infant sedation in computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a reversed-phase C18 column, using isocratic elution and a detector set at 214 nm. The optimized mobile phase consisted of a 0.01 M potassium buffer pH 3 and methanol (40 : 60, v/v). The flow rate was 1.0 mL/min and the run time of analysis was 5 min. The linearity of the method was demonstrated in the range of 5 to 250 μg/mL pentobarbital sodium solution (r (2) = 0.999). The limit of detection and limit of quantification were 2.10 and 3.97 μg/mL, respectively. The intraday and interday precisions were less than 2.1%. Accuracy of the method ranged from 99.2 to 101.3%. Stability studies indicate that the drug is stable to sunlight and in aqueous solution. Accelerated pentobarbital sodium breakdown by strong alkaline, acidic, or oxidative stress produced noninterfering peaks. This method allows accurate and reliable determination of pentobarbital sodium for drug stability assay in pharmaceutical studies. PMID:26543481

  5. Anxiolytic, sedative, and hypnotic activities of aqueous extract of Morinda citrifolia fruit.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Sridharan; Manickam, Shanti; RajaMohammed, Meher Ali

    2014-04-01

    Morinda citrifolia (Indian mulberry or noni) fruit has been long used as a folk medicine for a wide range of health purposes as it is claimed to have analgesic, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, detoxifier, and cell-rejuvenator properties. A recent study has revealed central nervous system suppressant nature of its extract. Hence, the present study has evaluated the anxiolytic, sedative, and hypnotic effects of the aqueous extracts of Morinda citrifolia in rodents in comparison to diazepam. Anxiety was assessed by 'Isolation-induced aggression' model, sedation by 'Spontaneous locomotor activity using actophotometer' and hypnotic activity by 'Prolongation of ketamine-induced sleeping time'. Six male mice were used for each of the groups and postdose, all the six that received diazepam had shown an inhibition of aggression, whereas in the test group, five of six mice and none in the control group had shown an inhibition of aggression (P = 0.0007). Similarly, for the sedative activity, the total number of spontaneous locomotor activity at 30 min following drug administration was found to be 364.67 ± 10.74, 123.16 ± 8.33, and 196.67 ± 3.7, while at 60 min it was found to be 209 ± 12.98, 49 ± 5.78, and 92 ± 2.5 (mean ± SD) for the control, standard, and test groups of mice respectively (P < 0.001). Hypnotic activity was measured by prolongation of ketamine-induced sleeping time wherein the onset and duration of loss of righting reflex were compared among each group of mice. The time in minutes for the onset in control, standard, and test groups was 4.01 ± 0.22, 1.23 ± 0.05, and 2.23 ± 0.07, respectively. The duration of loss of righting reflex was 44.23 ± 0.59, 56.03 ± 1.34, and 50.57 ± 0.36, respectively. Both these were statistically significant (P < 0.001). However, more clinical studies are needed to assess the long-term effects of the extract in humans. PMID:24948855

  6. Further Investigation of the Relationship between Hypnotic Susceptibility and Classroom Seating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stam, Henderikus J.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    In an attempt to replicate the finds of Sackeim, Paulhus, and Weiman (1979), three classrooms of college students were tested for hypnotic susceptibility, handedness, and seating preferences. No relationships between variables were found for males. For females, relationships were inconsistent. Relationships between hypnotic susceptibility and…

  7. Mediation and Moderation of Psychological Pain Treatments: Response Expectancies and Hypnotic Suggestibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milling, Leonard S.; Reardon, John M.; Carosella, Gina M.

    2006-01-01

    The mediator role of response expectancies and the moderator role of hypnotic suggestibility were evaluated in the analogue treatment of pain. Approximately 1,000 participants were assessed for hypnotic suggestibility. Later, as part of a seemingly unrelated experiment, 188 of these individuals were randomly assigned to distraction,…

  8. The Computer-Assisted Hypnosis Scale: Standardization and Norming of a Computer-Administered Measure of Hypnotic Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Carolyn D.; Nash, Michael R.

    1995-01-01

    In a counterbalanced, within subjects, repeated measures design, 130 undergraduates were administered the Computer-Assisted Hypnosis Scale (CAHS) and the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale and were hypnotized. The CAHS was shown to be a psychometrically sound instrument for measuring hypnotic ability. (SLD)

  9. The effects of conditioning with amphetamine on the thermic effects of amphetamine and pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Hinson, R E; Streather, A; Cosburn, G

    1991-01-01

    1. Rats were injected with amphetamine (1.5 mg/kg) in the presence of a distinctive set of environmental stimuli (CS1) and saline in the presence of a different set of environmental stimuli (CS2) on different days for a total of 10 amphetamine and 20 saline injections. 2. The hyperthermic effect of amphetamine first increased but then declined to levels seen during the very first drug administration. 3. Following the conditioning phase, half the rats were injected with amphetamine in CS1 and half in CS2. Although there was little thermic effect of amphetamine injected in CS1, there was pronounced hyperthermia following amphetamine in CS2. 4. Next, pentobarbital (30 mg/kg) was administered to half the rats in CS1 and half in CS2. The hypothermic effect of pentobarbital was attenuated in CS2. PMID:1763195

  10. Spatiotemporal Changes of Neuronal Responses in the Primary Somatosensory Cortex to Noxious Tail Stimulation in Awake and Pentobarbital-Anesthetized Rats.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chung-Chih; Lee, Jye-Chang; Chiou, Ruei-Jen; Tsai, Meng-Li; Yen, Chen-Tung

    2015-10-31

    Primary somatosensory cortex (SI) is a key area in the processing of nociceptor inputs to our consciousness. To clarify the columnar and laminar organization of SI for pain processing, we compared spatiotemporal changes in neuronal activities of the primary sensorimotor cortex (SmI) of the rat in response to noxious laser heat stimulation applied to the mid-tail. Longitudinal and vertical array microelectrodes were chronically implanted in the cerebral cortex. Evoked neuronal activities, including intracortical local field potentials (LFP) and ensemble single-unit activity (SU) around SmI were simultaneously recorded. The effect of pentobarbital on the neuronal responses was evaluated in comparison with the neuronal responses in conscious animals to explore the potential substrate of nociceptive processing in the conscious state. The results from the experiment with longitudinal microelectrode arrays indicated that noxious stimulation induced a neuronal response which was spread widely around the SmI of the conscious rat, and the range of neuronal responses was limited to the tail region of the SmI under anesthesia. The results from the experiment with vertical microelectrode arrays showed the universal neuronal responses through all cortical layers of the SmI in conscious rats, and sodium pentobarbital suppressed these neuronal responses in the supragranular layers significantly relative to the deeper layers and basal activity. These results imply that a wider range of cortical activation, both in the horizontal or vertical dimension, might be important for nociceptive processing in the conscious state. PMID:26387657

  11. Effects of droperidol, pentobarbital, and ketamine on myogenic transcranial magnetic motor-evoked responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Kalkman, C J; Drummond, J C; Patel, P M; Sano, T; Chesnut, R M

    1994-12-01

    Myogenic motor-evoked responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex (tcmag-MERs) may become clinically useful for the noninvasive assessment of motor pathway conduction during surgery. However, application is hindered because most anesthetic regimens result in severe depression of tcmag-MER amplitudes. As part of our systematic attempts to identify anesthetic agents and supplements suitable for use during tcmag-MER recording, we studied the effect of bolus doses of pentobarbital (1.5 mg/kg), droperidol (0.07 mg/kg), or ketamine (1 mg/kg), administered intravenously, on compound muscle action potentials to transcranial magnetic stimulation in five healthy volunteers. The doses were chosen to be comparable with doses that might be suitable for supplementation of a nitrous oxide/opioid anesthetic technique. Droperidol administration resulted in sustained amplitude depression of both tibialis and adductor pollicis tc-MERs to 30 +/- 9% and 39 +/- 14% of baseline (P < 0.01). Tcmag-MER amplitude changes after pentobarbital were variable, ranging from no change to substantial amplitude depression (to 20% of baseline) in two subjects. In contrast, ketamine administration did not result in significant amplitude depression. In three subjects, tibialis anterior amplitude increased to 150 to 220% of control values in the first 10 minutes after ketamine. Onset latency was unchanged after any drug. These data indicate that tcmag-MERs are moderately depressed after droperidol and pentobarbital but well preserved after ketamine. Ketamine may be a more suitable supplement to opioid/nitrous oxide anesthesia than droperidol or pentobarbital. PMID:7885550

  12. Decreased sensitivity to the hypnotic effects of ethanol early in ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Silveri, M M; Spear, L P

    1998-05-01

    Sensitivity to the hypnotic effects of ethanol was examined in Sprague-Dawley male and female rats at 16, 26, 36, 46, 56, or 96 days postnatally. Following administration of 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, or 5.0 g/kg of a 17% v/v ethanol solution, sleep times were recorded and blood alcohol levels (BALs) and brain alcohol levels (BrALs) were measured upon awakening. In addition to examining ethanol sleep time during ontogeny, data were used to estimate acute tolerance (indexed by the slope of the linear regressions of waking BALs and BrALs as a function of dose) and initial brain sensitivity to ethanol (indexed by calculating the y-intercept from the linear regression of BrALs as a function of sleep time). The results showed a marked increase in sensitivity to ethanol hypnosis during ontogeny, with young animals exhibiting shorter ethanol-induced sleep times and high waking BALs and BrALs. This ontogenetic increase in ethanol sensitivity was associated with a developmental decline in acute tolerance, with acute tolerance being most pronounced at postnatal day (P) 16 and evident only up to P36. Initial sensitivity conversely increased with age, with P16 pups showing lower initial brain sensitivity to ethanol than at all other ages. Gender differences emerged in adulthood, with males sleeping significantly longer than females at P56 and P96. These findings suggest that the marked insensitivity of young animals to the hypnotic effects of ethanol is related to both pronounced acute tolerance, as well as reduced initial brain sensitivity to ethanol early in life. PMID:9622449

  13. Dose effect of pentobarbital sodium on control of breathing in cats.

    PubMed

    Siafakas, N M; Bonora, M; Duron, B; Gautier, H; Milic-Emili, J

    1983-11-01

    The dose effect of pentobarbital sodium on integrated ("moving time average") phrenic activity (EPHR), transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi), gastric pressure (Pga), changes in lung volume (V), and mechanical properties of the respiratory system was studied in six cats breathing room air. Increased pentobarbital dose from an initial value of 35 mg/kg ip, had no substantial effect on the relationship between EPHR and Pdi during both unoccluded and occluded inspirations, indicating that the diaphragmatic excitation-contraction coupling was not affected. Similarly, increased anesthetic dose had no effect on the relationship between EPHR and delta Pga during both occluded and unoccluded breaths, suggesting that the contribution of the diaphragm to the breathing movements did not change with increasing depth of anesthesia. Although the time course of phrenic activity showed substantial interanimal differences, the shape of the phrenic neurogram did not change substantially with increased pentobarbital dose in any of the cats studied. Increased anesthetic dose depressed, in the same proportion, the rate of rise of EPHR, Pdi, and V, but the mechanical properties of the respiratory system remained unchanged. The depression of ventilation with increased anesthetic dose was not proportional to the drop in central inspiratory activity, as quantified in terms of rate of rise of EPHR. PMID:6643193

  14. Effect of ketamine, pentobarbital, and morphine on Tc-99m-DISIDA hepatobiliary kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Durakovic, A.; Dubois, A.

    1985-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate hapatobiliary kinetics of Tc-99m-DISIDA in dogs after administration of anesthetic sedative or narcotic agents. Four groups of six male Beagle dogs were studied as a non-treated control group and after parenteral administration of ketamine (30 mg/kg IM), pentobarbital (25 mg/kg IV) or morphine (1 mg/kg IV). Each animal was injected with 4 mCi Tc-99m-DISIDA and hepatobiliary scintigraphic studies were obtained using a gamma camera with parallel hole multipurpose collimator and an A/sup 3/ MDS computer. The authors determined; peak activity of Tc-99m-DISIDA in the liver, visualization and peak activity of gallbladder, and intestinal visualization of Tc-99m-DISIDA. Total bilirubin, LDH, SGOT and SGPT were not modified significantly after any drug compared to control. The results showed that two commonly used anesthetics and sedatives (ketamine and pentobarbital) have dramatic and opposite effects on extrahepatic biliary kinetics. Furthermore, ketamine, but not pentobarbital, significantly accelerates intrahepatic biliary kinetics. Finally, as expected, morphine delayed extrahepatic biliary kinetics. Thus, studies of biliary kinetics should be interpreted with caution when measurements are made after administration of anesthetic, sedative or narcotic agents.

  15. Correction for Inhibition Leads to an Allosteric Co-Agonist Model for Pentobarbital Modulation and Activation of α1β3γ2L GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ziemba, Alexis M.; Forman, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pentobarbital, like propofol and etomidate, produces important general anesthetic effects through GABAA receptors. Photolabeling also indicates that pentobarbital binds to some of the same sites where propofol and etomidate act. Quantitative allosteric co-agonist models for propofol and etomidate account for modulatory and agonist effects in GABAA receptors and have proven valuable in establishing drug site characteristics and for functional analysis of mutants. We therefore sought to establish an allosteric co-agonist model for pentobarbital activation and modulation of α1β3γ2L receptors, using a novel approach to first correct pentobarbital activation data for inhibitory effects in the same concentration range. Methods Using oocyte-expressed α1β3γ2L GABAA receptors and two-microelectrode voltage-clamp, we quantified modulation of GABA responses by a low pentobarbital concentration and direct effects of high pentobarbital concentrations, the latter displaying mixed agonist and inhibitory effects. We then isolated and quantified pentobarbital inhibition in activated receptors using a novel single-sweep “notch” approach, and used these results to correct steady-state direct activation for inhibition. Results Combining results for GABA modulation and corrected direct activation, we estimated receptor open probability and optimized parameters for a Monod-Wyman-Changeux allosteric co-agonist model. Inhibition by pentobarbital was consistent with two sites with IC50s near 1 mM, while co-agonist model parameters suggest two allosteric pentobarbital agonist sites characterized by KPB ≈ 5 mM and high efficacy. The results also indicate that pentobarbital may be a more efficacious agonist than GABA. Conclusions Our novel approach to quantifying both inhibitory and co-agonist effects of pentobarbital provides a basis for future structure-function analyses of GABAA receptor mutations in putative pentobarbital binding sites. PMID:27110714

  16. Hypnotic drug risks of mortality, infection, depression, and cancer: but lack of benefit.

    PubMed

    Kripke, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of hypnotic drug risks and benefits, reassessing and updating advice presented to the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (United States FDA). Almost every month, new information appears about the risks of hypnotics (sleeping pills). This review includes new information on the growing USA overdose epidemic, eight new epidemiologic studies of hypnotics' mortality not available for previous compilations, and new emphasis on risks of short-term hypnotic prescription. The most important risks of hypnotics include excess mortality, especially overdose deaths, quiet deaths at night, infections, cancer, depression and suicide, automobile crashes, falls, and other accidents, and hypnotic-withdrawal insomnia. The short-term use of one-two prescriptions is associated with greater risk per dose than long-term use. Hypnotics are usually prescribed without approved indication, most often with specific contraindications, but even when indicated, there is little or no benefit. The recommended doses objectively increase sleep little if at all, daytime performance is often made worse, not better, and the lack of general health benefits is commonly misrepresented in advertising. Treatments such as the cognitive behavioral treatment of insomnia and bright light treatment of circadian rhythm disorders might offer safer and more effective alternative approaches to insomnia. PMID:27303633

  17. Hypnotics and mortality in an elderly general population: a 12-year prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypnotics are widely used by the elderly, and their impact on mortality remains controversial. The inconsistent findings could be due to methodological limitations, notably the lack of control for underlying sleep symptoms or illness associated with hypnotic use, for example, insomnia symptoms and excessive daytime sleepiness, depression and anxiety. Our objective was to examine the association between the use of hypnotics and mortality risk in a large cohort of community-dwelling elderly, taking into account a wide range of potential competing risks including sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle, and chronic disorders as well as underlying psychiatric disorders and sleep complaints. Methods Analyses were carried out on 6,696 participants aged 65 years or older randomly recruited from three French cities and free of dementia at baseline. Adjusted Cox proportional hazards models with delayed entry, and age of the participants as the time scale, were used to determine the association between hypnotic use and 12-year survival. Results At baseline, 21.7% of the participants regularly used at least one hypnotic. During follow-up, 1,307 persons died, 480 from cancer and 344 from cardiovascular disease. Analyses adjusted for study center, age and gender showed a significantly greater risk of all-cause and cardiovascular-related mortality with hypnotics, particularly benzodiazepines, and this increased with the number of hypnotics used. None of these associations were significant in models adjusting for sociodemographic and lifestyle characteristics, chronic disorders including cardiovascular pathologies, sleep and psychiatric disorders. Results remained unchanged when duration of past hypnotic intake or persistent versus intermittent use during follow-up were taken into account. Conclusions When controlling for a large range of potential confounders, the risk of mortality was not significantly associated with hypnotic use regardless of the type and

  18. Prenatal ethanol exposure affects temperature responses of adult rats to pentobarbital and diazepam alone and in combination with ethanol.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A N; Branch, B J; Randolph, D; Hill, M A; Kokka, N

    1987-06-01

    Long-term effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on body temperature responses to pentobarbital and diazepam and to either drug in combination with ethanol were studied in adult rats who were the offspring of dams fed a 5.0% w/v ethanol-containing liquid diet during the last 2 weeks of gestation. Adult offspring of pair-fed and chow-fed dams served as nutritional and normal controls, respectively. Pentobarbital (6.25-25.0 mg/kg) and diazepam (2.5-10.0 mg/kg) produced significantly greater dose-related hypothermic responses in females than males. Following either pentobarbital or diazepam administration female prenatally ethanol-exposed (E) rats responded with a greater fall in body temperature than the controls. Significantly greater hypothermia occurred in both male and female E rats than in controls when ethanol (1.5 g/kg) was administered together with pentobarbital or diazepam. However, the drug combinations did not produce additive effects on body temperature in any prenatal treatment group. Pentobarbital produced acute cross-tolerance to ethanol while diazepam potentiated ethanol's effect. These studies confirm and extend our previous findings of enhanced hypothermic responses to ethanol in adult rats exposed to ethanol in utero and indicate that maternal alcohol consumption produces long-term effects on the central thermoregulatory systems of offspring. PMID:3307489

  19. Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid as hypnotic. Clinical and pharmacokinetic evaluation of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid as hypnotic in man.

    PubMed

    Hoes, M J; Vree, T B; Guelen, P J

    1980-01-01

    Gamma-Hydroxybutyric acid (GOH) was administered to three groups of four patients in 50, 75 or 100 mg/kg dose respectively, and sleep effects were scored, by sleep observation and questionnaire; GOH plasma levels were determined at 75-100 mg/kg, saliva and urine excretion at 100 mg/kg. Sleep induction was rapid and irresistible, subjects awoke at plasma levels of 90 micrograms/ml; sleep scores were good for 75 mg/kg, excellent for 100 mg/kg, notably on mood. For 75 or 100 mg/kg GOH had virtually disappeared from the blood eight hours after intake; twelve hours after intake no more GOH was detectable in urine; no correlation between plasma- and saliva levels was found. Plasma levels for 100 mg/kg dose were not at an anaesthetic level. So, GOH is a safe and good hypnotic at 75 or 100 mg/kg in clinical use. PMID:7449723

  20. Hypnotic depth and response to suggestion under standardized conditions and during FMRI scanning.

    PubMed

    Oakley, David A; Deeley, Quinton; Halligan, Peter W

    2007-01-01

    Hypnosis is a potentially valuable cognitive tool for neuroimaging studies. However, understandable concern that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in particular may adversely affect hypnotic procedures remains. Measurements of hypnotic depth and responsiveness to suggestions were taken using a standardized procedure that met all the requirements for functional MRI (fMRI). Testing outside the scanning environment showed reliable and stable changes in subjective hypnotic depth, with no carryover once the hypnosis had been terminated. Within-subject comparisons showed that the magnitude and pattern of these changes and the degree of responsiveness to hypnotic suggestion were not discernibly affected by the fMRI environment. It is concluded that hypnosis can be employed as a discrete and reliable cognitive tool within fMRI neuroimaging settings. PMID:17135062

  1. The Psychophysics of Cold Pressor Pain and Its Modification through Hypnotic Suggestion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgard, Ernest R.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Earlier reports of the pain of putting hand and forearm in circulating ice water were recomputed to study how subjects scale that pain and to find appropriate measures of its reduction under hypnotic analgesia. (Editor)

  2. Hypnotic change in combat dreams of two veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Eichelman, B

    1985-01-01

    The recurrent nocturnal traumatic dreams of two veterans were dispelled with hypnosis. Dream substitutions were rehearsed in hypnotic trance and subsequently dreamed at night, and afterward the original traumatic dreams ceased. PMID:3966569

  3. Activation of alpha6-containing GABAA receptors by pentobarbital occurs through a different mechanism than activation by GABA.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Matthew T; Fisher, Janet L

    2010-03-01

    The GABA(A) receptors are ligand-gated chloride channels which are the targets for many clinically used sedatives, including the barbiturates. The barbiturate pentobarbital acts through multiple sites on the GABA(A) receptor. At low concentrations (muM), it acts as a positive allosteric modulator while at higher concentrations it can directly activate the receptor. This agonist action is influenced by the subunit composition of the receptor, and pentobarbital is a more effective agonist than GABA only at receptors containing an alpha6 subunit. The conformational change that translates GABA binding into channel opening is known to involve a lysine residue located in an extracellular domain between the 2nd and 3rd transmembrane domains. Mutations of this residue disrupt activation of the channel by GABA and have been linked to inherited epilepsy. Pentobarbital binds to the receptor at a different agonist site than GABA, but could use a common signal transduction mechanism to gate the channel. To address this question, we compared the effect of a mutating the homologous lysine residue in the alpha1 or alpha6 subunits (K278 or K277, respectively) to methionine on direct activation of recombinant GABA(A) receptors by GABA or pentobarbital. We found that this mutation reduced GABA sensitivity for both alpha1 and alpha6 subunits, but affected pentobarbital sensitivity only for the alpha1 subunit. This suggests that pentobarbital acts through a distinct signal transduction pathway at the alpha6 subunit, which may account for its greater efficacy compared to GABA at receptors containing this subunit. PMID:20109529

  4. Hypnotic drug risks of mortality, infection, depression, and cancer: but lack of benefit

    PubMed Central

    Kripke, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of hypnotic drug risks and benefits, reassessing and updating advice presented to the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (United States FDA). Almost every month, new information appears about the risks of hypnotics (sleeping pills). This review includes new information on the growing USA overdose epidemic, eight new epidemiologic studies of hypnotics’ mortality not available for previous compilations, and new emphasis on risks of short-term hypnotic prescription. The most important risks of hypnotics include excess mortality, especially overdose deaths, quiet deaths at night, infections, cancer, depression and suicide, automobile crashes, falls, and other accidents, and hypnotic-withdrawal insomnia. The short-term use of one-two prescriptions is associated with greater risk per dose than long-term use. Hypnotics are usually prescribed without approved indication, most often with specific contraindications, but even when indicated, there is little or no benefit. The recommended doses objectively increase sleep little if at all, daytime performance is often made worse, not better, and the lack of general health benefits is commonly misrepresented in advertising. Treatments such as the cognitive behavioral treatment of insomnia and bright light treatment of circadian rhythm disorders might offer safer and more effective alternative approaches to insomnia. PMID:27303633

  5. Use of benzodiazepines, hypnotics, and anxiolytics in major depressive disorder: association with chronic pain diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianchen; Ye, Wenyu; Watson, Peter; Tepper, Ping

    2010-08-01

    We examined the use of benzodiazepines (BZD), hypnotics, and anxiolytics and their associations with chronic pain diseases (CPD) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). A retrospective analysis of 153,913 MDD patients (18-64 years) in a large administrative insured claims database during the year 2006 was performed. Results showed that during the study year, 33.1% of the patients had been prescribed BZD; 16.9%, hypnotics; and 6.1%, anxiolytics. The use of BZD and hypnotics increased with age. Patients with CPD were more likely than those without CPD to use BZD (41.2% vs. 27.0%, p < 0.001), hypnotics (21.7% vs. 13.3%, p < 0.001), and anxiolytics (7.8% vs. 4.8%, p < 0.01). After adjustment for demographics and comorbidities, CPD was still significantly associated with increased use of BZD (OR = 1.62), hypnotics (OR = 1.49), and anxiolytics (OR = 1.51). Further research is needed to examine the long-term benefits and risks of BZD and hypnotics in the treatment of MDD and CPD. PMID:20699718

  6. The effects of chlorpromazine and pentobarbital on behavior maintained by electric shock or point loss avoidance in humans.

    PubMed

    Fischman, M W; Schuster, C R

    1979-01-01

    Human volunteer subjects were trained to press a lever to avoid or escape electric shock or loss of points which could be redeemed for money at the termination of the study. The effects of pentobarbital and chlorpromazine on avoidance and escape behavior were compared. Both aversive stimuli maintained behavior which was differentially sensitive to these two drugs. Chlorpromazine caused a decrease in avoidance responding at doses which had little effect on escape responding. Pentobarbital, in contrast, suppressed avoidance responding at doses which also had a suppressant effect on escape responding. PMID:120538

  7. Effects of anesthetics pentobarbital sodium and chloral hydrate on urine proteome

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mindi; Li, Xundou; Li, Menglin

    2015-01-01

    Urine can be a better source than blood for biomarker discovery since it accumulates many changes. The urine proteome is susceptible to many factors, including anesthesia. Pentobarbital sodium and chloral hydrate are commonly used anesthetics in animal experiments. This study demonstrated the effects of these two anesthetics on the rat urine proteome using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). With anesthesia, the urinary protein-to-creatinine ratio of all rats increased twofold. The relative abundance of 22 and 23 urinary proteins were changed with pentobarbital sodium or chloral hydrate anesthesia, respectively, as determined by label-free quantification. Among these changed proteins, fifteen had been considered as candidate biomarkers such as uromodulin, and sixteen had been considered stable in healthy human urine, which are more likely to be considered as potential biomarkers when changed, such as transferrin. The pattern of changed urinary proteins provides clues to the discovery of urinary proteins regulatory mechanisms. When determining a candidate biomarker, anesthetic-related effects can be excluded from future biomarker discovery studies. Since anesthetics take effects via nervous system, this study is the first to provide clues that the protein handling function of the kidney may possibly be regulated by the nervous system. PMID:25789206

  8. Hypnotic Hypersensitivity to Volatile Anesthetics and Dexmedetomidine in Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Frances Y.; Hanna, George M.; Han, Wei; Mardini, Feras; Thomas, Steven A.; Wyner, Abraham J.; Kelz, Max B.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the adrenergic system can modulate sensitivity to anesthetic-induced immobility and anesthetic-induced hypnosis as well. However, several considerations prevent the conclusion that the endogenous adrenergic ligands norepinephrine and epinephrine alter anesthetic sensitivity. METHODS Using dopamine β-hydroxylase (Dbh−/−) mice genetically engineered to lack the adrenergic ligands and their siblings with normal adrenergic levels, we test the contribution of the adrenergic ligands upon volatile anesthetic induction and emergence. Moreover, we investigate the effects of intravenous dexmedetomidine in adrenergic-deficient mice and their siblings using both righting reflex and processed electroencephalographic measures of anesthetic hypnosis. RESULTS We demonstrate that the loss of norepinephrine and epinephrine and not other neuromodulators copackaged in adrenergic neurons is sufficient to cause hypersensitivity to induction of volatile anesthesia. However, the most profound effect of adrenergic deficiency is retarding emergence from anesthesia, which takes two to three times as long in Dbh−/− mice for sevoflurane, isoflurane, and halothane. Having shown that Dbh−/− mice are hypersensitive to volatile anesthetics, we further demonstrate that their hypnotic hypersensitivity persists at multiple doses of dexmedetomidine. Dbh−/− mice exhibit up to 67% shorter latencies to loss of righting reflex and up to 545% longer durations of dexmedetomidine-induced general anesthesia. Central rescue of adrenergic signaling restores control-like dexmedetomidine sensitivity. A novel continuous electroencephalographic analysis illustrates that the longer duration of dexmedetomidine-induced hypnosis is not due to a motor confound, but occurs because of impaired anesthetic emergence. CONCLUSIONS Adrenergic signaling is essential for normal emergence from general anesthesia. Dexmedetomidine-induced general anesthesia does

  9. Damned if you do, damned if you don't? The Lundbeck case of pentobarbital, the guiding principles on business and human rights, and competing human rights responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Buhmann, Karin

    2012-01-01

    In 2011 it emerged that to induce the death penalty, United States authorities had begun giving injections of pentobarbital, a substance provided by Danish pharmaceutical company Lundbeck. Lundbeck's product pentobarbital is licensed for treatment of refractory forms of epilepsy and for usage as an anaesthetic, thus for a very different purpose. The Lundbeck case offers a difficult, but also interesting Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) dilemma between choices facing a pharmaceutical company to stop the distribution of a medical substance in order to avoid complicity in human rights violations, or to retain distribution of the substance in order not to impede access to the medicine for those patients who need it. The dilemma arose at a time when the United Nations (UN) Secretary General's Special Representative on Business and Human Rights, Professor John Ruggie, was finalizing a set of Guiding Principles to operationalize recommendations on business and human rights that he had presented to the UN Human Rights Council in 2008. The article discusses the dilemma in which Lundbeck was placed in from the perspective of the Guiding Principles on business and human rights and the 2008 Protect, Respect, Remedy UN Framework. The analysis seeks to assess what guidance may be gauged from the Guiding Principles in relation to the dilemma at hand and discusses the adequacy the Guiding Principles for dealing with acute human rights dilemmas of conflicting requirements in which a decision to avoid one type of violation risks causing violation of another human right. The article concludes by drawing up perspectives for further development of guidance on implementation of the UN Framework that could be considered by the newly established Working Group on Business and Human Rights and related UN bodies. PMID:22789041

  10. Role of Beliefs About Hypnotic States as a Moderator Variable: A Reexamination of the Relationship Between Reactance and Hypnotizability.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis that beliefs about hypnosis determine the amount of psychological reactance aroused was tested. Participants were administered a measure of trait reactance to therapist directives (Therapeutic Reactance Scale; TRS), the Beliefs about Hypnotic State Questionnaire (BHSQ-R), and behavioral and subjective scales concerning hypnotic response. Hierarchical multiple regressions revealed significant interactions between BHSQ-R subscales and TRS. The findings suggest that the arousal of psychological reactance to hypnosis is determined by individuals' trait reactance levels acting together with their interpretations of the hypnotic situation. The role of beliefs about hypnotic states as a moderator of the relationship between personality and hypnotizability was discussed. PMID:26894421

  11. Possibilities and problems with identification and determination of "new" hypnotics.

    PubMed

    Ondra, Peter; Zedníková, Katerina; Matlach, Radek

    2005-12-01

    Authors discuss problems with identification and determination of flunitrazepam and zolpidem in biological material (BM). Over the recent years, these two structurally different substances have become the most frequently used as well as abused hypnotic drugs. This study presents applicability of immunochemical methods in the screening of flunitrazepam, one of the most commonly prescribed drugs among the benzodiazepines. Herein described techniques, a liquid-liquid (L-L) extraction, solid phase extraction (SPE) and the so-called "freeze out" method are used for isolation of the above mentioned compounds from BM. Besides the thin layer chromatography (TLC) and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) applied in qualitative analysis, the study also describes a gas chromatography with electron capture detector (GC-ECD) and gas chromatography with nitrogen phosphorus detector (GC-NPD) optimized for the determination of flunitrazepam and zolpidem in blood (serum). Successful analyses of these two substances are of major importance, especially in interpreting the results of forensic toxicological examinations. PMID:16601812

  12. The ameliorative effects of a hypnotic bromvalerylurea in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Satoshi; Nishihara, Tasuku; Kawasaki, Shun; Abe, Naoki; Kuwabara, Jun; Choudhury, Mohammed E; Takahashi, Hisaaki; Yano, Hajime; Nagaro, Takumi; Watanabe, Yuji; Aibiki, Mayuki; Tanaka, Junya

    2015-04-01

    Sepsis is a severe pathologic event, frequently causing death in critically ill patients. However, there are no approved drugs to treat sepsis, despite clinical trials of many agents that have distinct targets. Therefore, a novel effective treatment should be developed based on the pathogenesis of sepsis. We recently observed that an old hypnotic drug, bromvalerylurea (BU) suppressed expression of many kinds of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators in LPS- or interferon-γ activated alveolar and peritoneal macrophages (AMs and PMs). Taken the anti-inflammatory effects of BU on macrophages, we challenged it to septic rats that had been subjected to cecum-ligation and puncture (CLP). BU was subcutaneously administered to septic rats twice per day. Seven days after CLP treatment, 85% of septic rats administrated vehicle had died, whereas administration of BU reduce the rate to 50%. Septic rats showed symptoms of multi-organ failure; respiratory, circulatory and renal system failures as revealed by histopathological analyses, blood gas test and others. BU ameliorated these symptoms. BU also prevented elevated serum-IL-6 level as well as IL-6 mRNA expression in septic rats. Collectively, BU might be a novel agent to ameliorate sepsis by preventing the onset of MOF. PMID:25732089

  13. Antidepressants, anxiolytics, and hypnotics in pregnancy and lactation

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Daya; Gandotra, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Untreated perinatal depression and anxiety disorders are known to have significant negative impact on both maternal and fetal health. Dilemmas still remain regarding the use and safety of psychotropics in pregnant and lactating women suffering from perinatal depression and anxiety disorders. The aim of the current paper was to review the existing evidence base on the exposure and consequences of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and hypnotics in women during pregnancy and lactation and to make recommendations for clinical decision making in management of these cases. Materials and Methods: We undertook a bibliographic search of Medline/PubMed (1972 through 2014), Science Direct (1972 through 2014), Archives of Indian Journal of Psychiatry databases was done. References of retrieved articles, reference books, and dedicated websites were also checked. Results and Conclusions: The existing evidence base is extensive in studying multiple outcomes of the antidepressant or anxiolytic exposure in neonates, and some of the findings appear conflicting. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the most researched antidepressants in pregnancy and lactation. The available literature is criticized mostly on the lack of rigorous well designed controlled studies as well as lacunae in the methodologies, interpretation of statistical information, knowledge transfer, and translation of information. Research in this area in the Indian context is strikingly scarce. Appropriate risk-benefit analysis of untreated mental illness versus medication exposure, tailor-made to each patient's past response and preference within in the context of the available evidence should guide clinical decision making. PMID:26330654

  14. Hypnotic modulation of resting state fMRI default mode and extrinsic network connectivity.

    PubMed

    Demertzi, A; Soddu, A; Faymonville, M-E; Bahri, M A; Gosseries, O; Vanhaudenhuyse, A; Phillips, C; Maquet, P; Noirhomme, Q; Luxen, A; Laureys, S

    2011-01-01

    Resting state fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) acquisitions are characterized by low-frequency spontaneous activity in a default mode network (encompassing medial brain areas and linked to self-related processes) and an anticorrelated "extrinsic" system (encompassing lateral frontoparietal areas and modulated via external sensory stimulation). In order to better determine the functional contribution of these networks to conscious awareness, we here sought to transiently modulate their relationship by means of hypnosis. We used independent component analysis (ICA) on resting state fMRI acquisitions during normal wakefulness, under hypnotic state, and during a control condition of autobiographical mental imagery. As compared to mental imagery, hypnosis-induced modulation of resting state fMRI networks resulted in a reduced "extrinsic" lateral frontoparietal cortical connectivity, possibly reflecting a decreased sensory awareness. The default mode network showed an increased connectivity in bilateral angular and middle frontal gyri, whereas its posterior midline and parahippocampal structures decreased their connectivity during hypnosis, supposedly related to an altered "self" awareness and posthypnotic amnesia. In our view, fMRI resting state studies of physiological (e.g., sleep or hypnosis), pharmacological (e.g., sedation or anesthesia), and pathological modulation (e.g., coma or related states) of "intrinsic" default mode and anticorrelated "extrinsic" sensory networks, and their interaction with other cerebral networks, will further improve our understanding of the neural correlates of subjective awareness. PMID:21854971

  15. Oxytocin impedes the effect of the word blindness post-hypnotic suggestion on Stroop task performance.

    PubMed

    Parris, Benjamin A; Dienes, Zoltan; Bate, Sarah; Gothard, Stace

    2014-07-01

    The ability to enhance sensitivity to relevant (post)hypnotic suggestions has implications for creating clinically informed analogues of psychological and neuropsychological conditions and for the use of hypnotic interventions in psychological and medical conditions. The aim of this study was to test the effect of oxytocin inhalation on a post-hypnotic suggestion that previously has been shown to improve the selectivity of attention in the Stroop task. In a double-blind placebo-controlled between-subjects study, medium hypnotizable individuals performed the Stroop task under normal conditions and when they had been given a post-hypnotic suggestion that they would perceive words as meaningless symbols. In line with previous research, Stroop interference was substantially reduced by the suggestion in the placebo condition. However, contrary to expectations, oxytocin impeded the effect of the word blindness suggestion on performance. The results are explained in terms of the requirement for the re-implementation of the word blindness suggestion on a trial-by-trial basis and the need to sustain activation of the suggestion between trials. The findings contrast with a recent study showing a beneficial effect of oxytocin on sensitivity to (post)hypnotic suggestions but are consistent with findings showing a detrimental effect of oxytocin on memory processes. PMID:23620599

  16. Meperidine-acepromazine-pentobarbital anesthesia in cats: reversal by 4-aminopyridine and yohimbine.

    PubMed

    Hatch, R C; Zahner, J M; Booth, N H

    1984-12-01

    Groups of atropinized cats (6/group) were given IM meperidine (5.5 mg/kg of body weight) plus acepromazine (0.25 mg/kg). Forty minutes later, the cats were anesthetized to disappearance of pedal reflexes with 1% pentobarbital IV. Volume of anesthetic was recorded. Five minutes later, the cats were given IV saline solution (2 ml; control group), the antagonists 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; 0.5 mg/kg), yohimbine (0.4 mg/kg), or a combination of 0.5 mg of 4-AP/kg plus 0.4 mg of yohimbine/kg. Mean arousal time (MAT), walk time (MWT), respiratory rate, and heart rate were measured. Emergence phenomena also were recorded. Meperidine plus acepromazine caused mydriasis and mild sedation without ataxia or marked protrusion of the 3rd eyelid. The cats did not resist restraint for venipuncture. The pooled mean dosage level of pentobarbital required for anesthesia was 12.3 mg/kg. Control group MAT and MWT were 66.2 minutes and 126 minutes, respectively. Marked residual sedation lasted several hours. In cats given 4-AP plus yohimbine, MAT and MWT were decreased to 4.4 minutes and 36.5 minutes, respectively. These values were not significantly shorter than those same values in cats given 4-AP or yohimbine alone (P greater than 0.05), but the combination of 4-AP plus yohimbine produced a qualitatively better reversal of anesthesia than did 4-AP or yohimbine alone. Emergence was smooth in all 4 groups; mild-to-moderate residual sedation lasted 2 to 4 hours in the principals. Relapses, drug side effects, and behavioral aberrations were not observed. Mean respiratory rates and heart rates decreased during anesthesia but these values were not excessively depressed or stimulated at any time. Cardiac irregularities were not detected by palpation or auscultation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6524759

  17. Intravenous Hypnotic Regimens in Patients With Liver Disease; A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Safari, Saeid; Rahmani, Farzad; Jafari Rouhi, Asghar; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2015-01-01

    Context: The liver as an important organ in the body has many essential functions in physiological processes. One of the major activities of liver is drug metabolism. Hepatic dysfunction affecting hepatic physiological activities, especially drug metabolism can cause many problems during anesthesia and administration of different drugs to patients. Evidence Acquisition: Studies on hepatic disorders and hypnotic anesthetics prescribed in hepatic disorders were included in this review. For this purpose, reliable databases were used. Results: Anesthesia should be performed with caution in patients with hepatic dysfunction and drugs with long half-life should be avoided in these patients. Conclusions: A review of the literature on the use of hypnotic drugs in patients with liver dysfunction showed that some hypnotic drugs used during anesthesia could be safely used in patients with impaired liver function. In these patients, certain drugs should be used with caution. PMID:25793176

  18. A Comparison of Hypnotic Induction, Task Motivation, and a "Cold Start" Control Group on Hypnotizability.

    PubMed

    Krystek, Stephen; Kumar, V K

    2016-10-01

    Groups of participants (N = 164) were randomly assigned to three conditions: Group 1 received a trance induction, Group 2 received task-motivational instructions, and Group 3-"cold start" control-was simply told, "We will begin the hypnosis procedure now." All participants received the Creative Imagination Scale suggestions and then completed the Creative Imagination Scale and Inventory Scale of Hypnotic Depth. The three conditions did not differ significantly either on the Creative Imagination Scale or in reported hypnotic depth. These results are consistent with prior studies which show that trance induction and task-motivational yield similar results, but they are inconsistent inasmuch as the trance induction and task-motivational groups did not differ from the control group. These results, however, are predictable from socio-cognitive perspectives that the context of hypnosis itself can elicit hypnotic behaviors. PMID:27586049

  19. An Update on the Use of Sedative-Hypnotic Medications in Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Creado, Shane; Plante, David T

    2016-09-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common clinical problem experienced by patients with a wide range of psychiatric disorders. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that insomnia is a comorbid process that affects the course and treatment of a number of forms of mental illness. The efficacy and safety of sedative-hypnotic medications have largely been established in patients who do not have comorbid psychiatric disorders, underscoring the need for further research in this sphere. This review summarizes pertinent findings in the recent literature that have examined the role of hypnotic medication in the treatment of psychiatric illness, and highlights potential areas that may prove fruitful avenues of future research. PMID:27417512

  20. Norms for the Korean version of the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A.

    PubMed

    Pyun, Young Don; Kim, Yun Joo

    2009-01-01

    The Korean Version of the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A (HGSHS:K) was adapted and studied in order to determine Korean norms. In total, 271 subjects (175 males and 96 females) participated in the study. Comparisons are made between the Korean samples and previously published international samples. The normative data from the Korean sample on the HGSHS:K are generally congruent, including means and standard deviations, with data from international reference samples. However, the pass rate on the hallucination item on the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A, was significantly different from that of the American sample. Females showed higher overall scores than males. PMID:19031236

  1. Gilles de la Tourette's criminal women: the many faces of fin de siècle hypnotism.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Walusinski, Olivier

    2010-09-01

    Gilles de la Tourette is now known for the disease which now bears his name, but his activities in the management of hysterics and in hypnotism, which gained him most of his lifetime reputation, have been largely forgotten. As one of the closest followers of Jean-Martin Charcot, he always remained faithful to his mentor's views, and was one of the most vehement defenders of La Salpêtrière school during the quarrel with Hippolyte Bernheim and the Nancy school on the question of the specificity of hypnotic susceptibility in hysteria. This controversy became critical during medico-legal assessment of crimes supposedly committed under hypnotic suggestion. Gilles de la Tourette's involvement in criminal hypnotism was striking, as shown by his own experiments, the most famous of which being his suggested poisoning of a colleague by Blanche Wittman, the celebrated Charcot's hysteric patient in the 1887 Brouillet's painting. Gilles de la Tourette also acted as expert in murder trials, and his Epilogue in the Gouffé's trunk case, where he affirmed that no murder in real life could be due to hypnotism, and considered that Gabrielle Bompard, the murderer's accomplice, was not under hypnotic suggestion, had a considerable impact. Finally, he was confronted to the issue of murder under hypnotism in his private life, since in 1893, a former patient, Rose Kamper, came and shot him in the head at his home, claiming that hypnotism sessions had changed her own person, and that she had been hypnotized "at distance". These acts from three very different "hysterical" women highlight the Salpêtrière's theories on hypnotism and their inner contradictions in the fin de siècle ambiance, a few years before Joseph Babinski renewed the concepts on hysteria. PMID:20413214

  2. Activity of the hypnotics, flunitrazepam and triazolam, in man

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, A. N.; Stone, Barbara M.

    1980-01-01

    1 Effects of flunitrazepam and triazolam (0.25 and 0.5 mg) on sleep and on performance were studied in six healthy adult males. Sleep was assessed by electroencephalography and analogue scales, and performance by a visuo-motor coordination task. 2 Over the same dose range triazolam had a more pronounced effect than flunitrazepam. Total sleep time was increased by 0.25 and 0.5 mg triazolam, and by 0.5 mg flunitrazepam. Both drugs decreased awake activity and drowsy sleep, though the effect of flunitrazepam was limited to the 0.5 mg dose and restricted to the first 6 h after sleep onset. There were no changes in slow wave sleep. 3 Latency to the first period of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was increased with 0.5 mg triazolam, and when doses were combined (0.25-0.5 mg) the latencies with both drugs were increased. Both doses of triazolam reduced the duration and percentage of REM sleep during the early part of the night, though the whole night duration of REM sleep was not changed. 4 After the morning ingestion of 0.25 mg flunitrazepam performance was impaired for 2.0 h, but there were no residual effects when 0.25 or 0.5 mg were taken at night. With the morning ingestion of 0.25 mg triazolam performance was impaired from 0.5 to at least 5.0 h after ingestion. There were no residual effects with 0.25 mg overnight, but with 0.5 mg triazolam there was an effect on performance 10 h after ingestion with recovery within 1.5 h (11.5 h of ingestion). 5 Triazolam (0.25 mg) and 0.5 mg flunitrazepam provide useful hypnotic activity when impaired performance the next day is to be avoided. The activity of 0.5 mg triazolam is accompanied by only limited residual sequelae compared with some other benzodiazepines of comparable efficacy, and so may prove to be useful when a more powerful effect is required. PMID:6101959

  3. Hypnotic Depth and the Incidence of Emergence Agitation and Negative Postoperative Behavioral Changes

    PubMed Central

    Faulk, Debra J.; Twite, Mark D.; Zuk, Jeannie; Pan, Zhaoxing; Wallen, Brett; Friesen, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Emergence agitation (EA) and negative postoperative behavioral changes (NPOBC) are common in children, though the etiology remains unclear. We investigated whether longer times under deep hypnosis as measured by Bispectral Index™ (BIS) monitoring would positively correlate with a greater incidence of EA in the post anesthesia care unit (PACU) and a greater occurrence of NPOBC in children after discharge. Methods We enrolled 400 children, ages 1–12 years old, scheduled for dental procedures under general anesthesia. All children were induced with high concentration sevoflurane and BIS monitoring was continuous from induction through recovery in the PACU. A BIS reading <45 was considered deep hypnosis. The presence of EA was assessed in the PACU using the Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium Scale (PAED). NPOBC were assessed using the Post-Hospital Behavior Questionnaire (PHBQ), completed by parents 3–5 days post-operatively. Data were analyzed using logistic regression, with a p<0.05 considered statistically significant. Results The incidence of EA was 27% (99/369) and the incidence of NPOBC was 8.8% (28/318). No significant differences in the incidence of EA or NPOBC were seen with respect to length of time under deep hypnosis as measured by a BIS value of less than 45. Conclusion Our data revealed no significant correlation between the length of time under deep hypnosis (BIS<45) and the incidence of EA or NPOBC. Within this population, these behavioral disturbances do not appear to be related to the length of time under a deep hypnotic state as measured by the BIS. PMID:19968807

  4. Role of histaminergic neurons in hypnotic modulation of brain processing of visceral perception.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, S; Hattori, T; Kanazawa, M; Kano, M; Fukudo, S

    2007-10-01

    Modulating visceral sensation of the body is important to the understanding of emotion formation. Molecules that act during hypnosis and modify visceral pain perception are not known. We tested our hypothesis that hypnotic suggestion changes electrophysiological processing of visceroafferent signals in the human brain and that these conditions are in part dependent on histaminergic neurons. Twelve healthy male subjects were studied on two separate days: a day of treatment with histamine H1 receptor antagonist (d-chlorpheniramine 100 microg kg(-1), intravenously) and another day of that with placebo (saline, the same amount) in a randomized order. We recorded cortical evoked potentials to 100 rectal electrical stimuli after neutral, hyperalgesic or analgesic hypnotic suggestions as given to modulate the visceral perception. Analgesic suggestion reduced the amplitude of the deepest positive peak of viscerosensory evoked potential. Administration of histamine H1 antagonist diminished the attenuation of viscerosensory evoked potential by analgesic suggestion. Our results suggest that central pain modulatory system in the brain is activated by hypnotic suggestion and that brain histamine is a mediator in the hypnotic modulation of visceral sensory pathway as well as in the control of consciousness level. These findings lead us to possible new treatment for control of visceral perception. PMID:17883434

  5. Achievement Motivation, Socialization, and Hypnotic Susceptibility Among Youths from Four Israeli Subcultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotenberg, Mordechai; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The impact of child rearing practices on achievement motivation, hypnotic susceptibility, and brain wave patterns of children from Israeli subcultures are examined. Of the four subgroups studied, although they differed in school performance, their need achievement scores were similiar. (Author/DEP)

  6. The Role of Expectancy in Eliciting Hypnotic Responses as a Function of Type of Induction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirsch, Irving; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examined the relationship between expectancy and suggestibility in hypnosis as a function of type of induction (N=100). Results showed subjects were able to predict their responses to a cognitive skill induction with great accuracy but were not very accurate in predicting responses to a hypnotic trance induction. (JAC)

  7. Experiential Response to Auditory and Visual Hallucination Suggestions in Hypnotic Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanos, Nicholas P.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The effects of several attitudinal, cognitive skill, and personality variables in response to auditory and visual hallucination suggestions to hypnotic subjects are assessed. Cooperative attitudes toward hypnosis and involvement in everyday imaginative activities (absorption) correlated with response to auditory and visual hallucination…

  8. Psychological Treatment of Hypnotic-Dependent Insomnia in a Primarily Older Adult Sample

    PubMed Central

    Lichstein, Kenneth L.; Nau, Sidney D.; Wilson, Nancy M.; Aguillard, R. Neal; Lester, Kristin W.; Bush, Andrew J.; McCrae, Christina S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study tested cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) in hypnotic-dependent, late middle-age and older adults with insomnia. Method Seventy volunteers age 50 and older were randomized to CBT plus drug withdrawal, placebo biofeedback (PL) plus drug withdrawal, or drug withdrawal (MED) only. The CBT and PL groups received eight, 45 minute weekly treatment sessions. The drug withdrawal protocol comprised slow tapering monitored with about six biweekly, 30 minute sessions. Assessment including polysomnography (PSG), sleep diaries, hypnotic consumption, daytime functioning questionnaires, and drug screens collected at baseline, posttreatment, and 1-year follow-up. Results Only the CBT group showed significant sleep diary improvement, sleep onset latency significantly decreased at posttreatment. For all sleep diary measures for all groups, including MED, sleep trended to improvement from baseline to follow-up. Most PSG sleep variables did not significantly change. There were no significant between group differences in medication reduction. Compared to baseline, the three groups decreased hypnotic use at posttreatment, down 84%, and follow-up, down 66%. There was no evidence of withdrawal side-effects. Daytime functioning, including anxiety and depression, improved by posttreatment. Rigorous methodological features, including documentation of strong treatment implementation and the presence of a credible placebo, elevated the confidence due these findings. Conclusions Gradual drug withdrawal was associated with substantial hypnotic reduction at posttreatment and follow-up, and withdrawal side-effects were absent. When supplemented with CBT, participants accrued incremental self-reported, but not PSG, sleep benefits. PMID:24121096

  9. Protracted ethanol withdrawal in rats: Tolerance to the anxiolytic effects of diazepam and pentobarbital but not phenobarbital

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Prather, P.L. )

    1990-02-26

    Anxiety is a common symptom during ethanol withdrawal contributing to its continuous abuse and alcoholism. Ethanol withdrawal in rats produces an interoceptive discriminative stimulus (IDS) similar to that produced by the anxiogenic drug pentylenetetrazol (PTZ). This stimulus peaks at 12 hours after last dose of ethanol and thereafter the IDS is detected for several days (protracted withdrawal) by sensitization to a probe drug. previously, the authors have shown that during the protracted withdrawal, the IDS is enhanced by GABA receptor antagonists suggesting alteration of brain GABA systems. This report provides further evidence that chronic ethanol alters GABAergic systems. Rats were trained to discriminate PTZ (20 mg/kg, ip) from saline. Diazepam, pentobarbital and phenobarbital blocked the PTZ-IDS dose dependently. Ethanol, 4.5% w/v, was then given in a nutritionally complete diet for a week. On termination of the ethanol diet, rats exhibited signs and symptoms of withdrawal which returned to baseline within 3 days. During the protracted withdrawal period, the authors then redetermined the blockade of the PTZ-IDS. Significant tolerance was observed to the effectiveness of diazepam and pentobarbital, but not to phenobarbital. Since diazepam and pentobarbital produce significantly more enhancement of GABAergic activity than does phenobarbital, these data further suggest alteration of brain GABAergic systems during protracted withdrawal from ethanol.

  10. The Use of Hypnotics and Mortality - A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Tzuo-Yun; Zeng, Ya-Fang; Tang, Gau-Jun; Kao, Hui-Chuan; Chiu, Hsien-Jane; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Ho, Hsiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background Sleep disorders, especially chronic insomnia, have become major health problem worldwide and, as a result, the use of hypnotics is steadily increasing. However, few studies with a large sample size and long-term observation have been conducted to investigate the relationship between specific hypnotics and mortality. Methods We conducted this retrospective cohort study using data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. Information from claims data including basic characteristics, the use of hypnotics, and survival from 2000 to 2009 for 1,320,322 individuals were included. The use of hypnotics was divided into groups using the defined daily dose and the cumulative length of use. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated from a Cox proportional hazards model, with two different matching techniques to examine the associations. Results Compared to the non-users, both users of benzodiazepines (HR = 1.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.78–1.85) and mixed users (HR = 1.44; 95% CI = 1.42–1.47) had a higher risk of death, whereas the users of other non-benzodiazepines users showed no differences. Zolpidem users (HR = 0.73; 95% CI = 0.71–0.75) exhibited a lower risk of mortality in the adjusted models. This pattern remained similar in both matching techniques. Secondary analysis indicated that zolpidem users had a reduced risk of major cause-specific mortality except cancer, and that this protective effect was dose-responsive, with those using for more than 1 year having the lowest risk. Conclusions The effects of different types of hypnotics on mortality were diverse in this large cohort with long-term follow-up based on representative claims data in Taiwan. The use of zolpidem was associated with a reduced risk of mortality. PMID:26709926

  11. Network actions of pentobarbital in the rat mesopontine tegmentum on sensory inflow through the spinothalamic tract.

    PubMed

    Namjoshi, Dhananjay R; McErlane, Shelly A; Taepavarapruk, Niwat; Soja, Peter J

    2009-08-01

    The recent discovery of a barbiturate-sensitive "general anesthesia switch" mechanism localized in the rat brain stem mesopontine tegmental anesthesia area (MPTA) has challenged the current view of the nonspecific actions of general anesthetic agents in the CNS. In this study we provide electrophysiological evidence that the antinociception, which accompanies the behavioral state resembling general anesthesia following pentobarbital (PB) microinjections into the MPTA of awake rats, could be accompanied by the attenuation of sensory transmission through the spinothalamic tract (STT). Following bilateral microinjections of PB into the MPTA spontaneous firing rate (SFR), antidromic firing index (FI), and sciatic (Sc) as well as sural (Su) nerve-evoked responses (ER) of identified lumbar STT neurons in the isoflurane-anesthetized rat were quantified using extracellular recording techniques. Microinjections of PB into the MPTA significantly suppressed the SFR (47%), magnitudes of Sc- (26%) and Su-ER (36%), and FI (41%) of STT neurons. Microinjections of PB-free vehicle control did not alter any of the above-cited electrophysiological parameters. The results from this study suggest that antinociception, which occurs during the anesthesia-like state following PB microinjections into the MPTA, may be due, in part, to (in)direct inhibition of STT neurons via switching mechanism(s) located in the MPTA. This study provides a provenance for investigating electrophysiologically the actions on STT neurons of other current agents used clinically to maintain the state of general anesthesia. PMID:19458144

  12. Pentobarbital Toxicity after Self-Administration of Euthasol Veterinary Euthanasia Medication.

    PubMed

    Crellin, Steven Jason; Katz, Kenneth D

    2016-01-01

    Suicide attempt via sodium pentobarbital is uncommon. A 48-year-old woman with a history of depression and prior suicide attempt was found unresponsive by her veterinarian spouse near a syringe containing pink solution. Upon EMS' arrival, the patient was experiencing apnea, hypoxemia, and miotic pupils; her blood glucose level measured 73 mg/dL. She was bradycardic and administered atropine with transient improvement in heart rate and transported to an emergency department; 2 mg of intravenous naloxone was administered without effect. She was endotracheally intubated via rapid sequence intubation. Rapid urine drug screening detected both benzodiazepines and barbiturates. The patient was transferred to an intensive care unit where she demonstrated a nearly absent radial pulse. Emergent fasciotomy to the left forearm and carpal tunnel was performed for acute compartment syndrome; "Euthasol" had been self-administered into the antecubital fossa. Expanded toxicological analysis via liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy detected caffeine, atropine, 7-aminoclonazepam, phenytoin, citalopram, and naproxen. The patient's coma resolved over 48 hours and she was successfully extubated without complication. Emergency physicians must closely monitor patients exposed to veterinary euthanasia agents who develop central nervous system and respiratory depression, hypothermia, bradycardia, hypotension, or skin injury. Consultation with a regional poison center and medical toxicologist is recommended. PMID:26881149

  13. Pentobarbital Toxicity after Self-Administration of Euthasol Veterinary Euthanasia Medication

    PubMed Central

    Crellin, Steven Jason; Katz, Kenneth D.

    2016-01-01

    Suicide attempt via sodium pentobarbital is uncommon. A 48-year-old woman with a history of depression and prior suicide attempt was found unresponsive by her veterinarian spouse near a syringe containing pink solution. Upon EMS' arrival, the patient was experiencing apnea, hypoxemia, and miotic pupils; her blood glucose level measured 73 mg/dL. She was bradycardic and administered atropine with transient improvement in heart rate and transported to an emergency department; 2 mg of intravenous naloxone was administered without effect. She was endotracheally intubated via rapid sequence intubation. Rapid urine drug screening detected both benzodiazepines and barbiturates. The patient was transferred to an intensive care unit where she demonstrated a nearly absent radial pulse. Emergent fasciotomy to the left forearm and carpal tunnel was performed for acute compartment syndrome; “Euthasol” had been self-administered into the antecubital fossa. Expanded toxicological analysis via liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy detected caffeine, atropine, 7-aminoclonazepam, phenytoin, citalopram, and naproxen. The patient's coma resolved over 48 hours and she was successfully extubated without complication. Emergency physicians must closely monitor patients exposed to veterinary euthanasia agents who develop central nervous system and respiratory depression, hypothermia, bradycardia, hypotension, or skin injury. Consultation with a regional poison center and medical toxicologist is recommended. PMID:26881149

  14. Treatment outcome expectancies and hypnotic susceptibility as moderators of pain reduction in patients with chronic tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Spinhoven, P; ter Kuile, M M

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether hypnotic susceptibility (a) predicts pain reduction posttreatment and at follow-up independent of generic expectations of treatment outcome and mode of treatment and (b) predicts persistence of pain reduction during the follow-up period. In 169 patients with chronic tension-type headaches randomly allocated to either self-hypnosis or autogenic training, pain reduction posttreatment and at follow-up was significantly associated with hypnotic susceptibility independent of generic expectations of treatment outcome and treatment condition. Moreover, it was found that early responders obtained significantly higher hypnotic susceptibility scores than nonresponders, although there were no significant differences in hypnotic susceptibility between late responders in comparison to early and nonresponders. However, almost one fourth of those who were nonresponders posttreatment did respond at follow-up. PMID:10902294

  15. A comparison of the clinical effectiveness of various acupuncture points in reducing anxiety to facilitate hypnotic induction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dominic P; Lu, Gabriel P

    2013-01-01

    This study determined if any acupuncture point (acupoint) known for its calming effects also aided hypnotic induction. Hypnosis was offered to 108 patients requiring minor surgical or dental procedures. All had a history of panic attacks and surgical or dental phobias that complicated or prevented treatment. Unpleasant intruding thoughts of imminent invasive treatments handicapped their ability to accept hypnotic induction; however, acupuncture therapy was proposed to the consenting patient to facilitate hypnotic induction and augment its effects. Each patient received one selected acupoint for acupuncture therapy. Of the 6 acupoints used (LI 4, H 7, SP 6, P 6, GV 24, and Ext-hn-21), GV 24 was best at enhancing hypnotic induction whereas LI 4 produced the best muscular relaxation and P 6 for reducing tension. PMID:23679111

  16. Study of Sedative-Hypnotic Effects of Aloe vera L. Aqueous Extract through Behavioral Evaluations and EEG Recording in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahnejad, Fatemeh; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud; Nasoohi, Sanaz; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Faizi, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the sedative and hypnotic effects of the aqueous extract of Aloe vera on rats. In order to evaluate the overall hypnotic effects of the Aloe vera extract, open field and loss of righting reflex tests were primarily used. The sedative and hypnotic effects of the extract were then confirmed by detection of remarkable raise in the total sleeping time through analysis of electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings of animals. Analysis of the EEG recordings showed that there is concomitant change in Rapid Eye Movement (REM) and None Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep in parallel with the prolonged total sleeping time. Results of the current research show that the extract has sedative-hypnotic effects on both functional and electrical activities of the brain. PMID:27610170

  17. Study of Sedative-Hypnotic Effects of Aloe vera L. Aqueous Extract through Behavioral Evaluations and EEG Recording in Rats.

    PubMed

    Abdollahnejad, Fatemeh; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud; Nasoohi, Sanaz; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Faizi, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the sedative and hypnotic effects of the aqueous extract of Aloe vera on rats. In order to evaluate the overall hypnotic effects of the Aloe vera extract, open field and loss of righting reflex tests were primarily used. The sedative and hypnotic effects of the extract were then confirmed by detection of remarkable raise in the total sleeping time through analysis of electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings of animals. Analysis of the EEG recordings showed that there is concomitant change in Rapid Eye Movement (REM) and None Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep in parallel with the prolonged total sleeping time. Results of the current research show that the extract has sedative-hypnotic effects on both functional and electrical activities of the brain. PMID:27610170

  18. Influence of self-induced hypnosis on thermal responses during immersion in 25 degrees C water.

    PubMed

    Mittleman, K D; Doubt, T J; Gravitz, M A

    1992-08-01

    The efficacy of self-induced post-hypnotic suggestion to improve thermogenic responses to head-out immersion in 25 degrees C water was evaluated in 12 males. An on-line computerized system permitted the change in body heat storage to be used as the independent variable and immersion time as the dependent variable. Test-retest reliability was good, exhibiting a coefficient of variation of less than 5% for exposure time. Immersion profiles consisted of the following: rest until 200 kJ of heat were lost, leg exercise at VO2 approximately 1.5 L.min-1 to regain 200 kJ, rest until 100 kJ were lost, and repeat the exercise to regain 100 kJ. A control immersion was done prior to two 1-h hypnotic training sessions. A second immersion (hypnotic) occurred within 24 h after training. There were no differences in rates of heat production, heat loss, mean skin temperature, or rectal temperature between control and hypnotic immersions. Individual hypnotic susceptibility scores did not correlate with changes in thermal status. Ratings of perceived exertion during exercise were similar for both immersions, but perceived sensation of cold was lower during the second rest period of the hypnotic immersion. Three subjects used images of warm environments during their hypnotic immersion and lost heat at a faster rate than during control immersions. These results indicate that brief hypnotic training did not enhance the thermogenic response to cool water immersion. PMID:1510642

  19. Self-administration of cocaine-pentobarbital mixtures by rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Woolverton, W L; Wang, Zhixia

    2009-03-01

    A number of experiments have evaluated self-administration of the combination of a stimulant and an opioid. Less is known about the combination of a stimulant and a CNS depressant. The present experiment was designed to examine self-administration of the mixture of cocaine and pentobarbital (PB). Rhesus monkeys (n=4) prepared with i.v. catheters were allowed to self-administer cocaine or saline under a progressive-ratio schedule. When responding was stable, doses of cocaine and PB, alone or in combination, were made available in test sessions. Cocaine functioned as a positive reinforcer in a dose-related manner in all monkeys. PB functioned as a relatively weaker reinforcer in one of four monkeys. Self-administration of intermediate doses of cocaine (0.025-0.1mg/kg per injection) was decreased when mixed with PB (0.05-0.2mg/kg per injection); full maximum responding was re-established when cocaine dose was increased. The magnitude of the shift to the right in the cocaine dose-response function was directly related to PB dose. When PB was given as an i.v. pretreatment there was no effect on cocaine self-administration up to a sedative dose of PB (5.6 mg/kg), suggesting that responding was not non-specifically suppressed by PB. Thus, simultaneous self-administration of PB diminished the potency but not the strength of cocaine as a reinforcer, potentially encouraging self-administration of larger doses of cocaine. PMID:19054630

  20. The neural correlates of movement intentions: A pilot study comparing hypnotic and simulated paralysis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Vera U; Seitz, Jochen; Schönfeldt-Lecuona, Carlos; Höse, Annett; Abler, Birgit; Hole, Günter; Goebel, Rainer; Walter, Henrik

    2015-09-01

    The distinct feeling of wanting to act and thereby causing our own actions is crucial to our self-perception as free human agents. Disturbances of the link between intention and action occur in several disorders. Little is known, however, about the neural correlates of wanting or intending to act. To investigate these for simple voluntary movements, we used a paradigm involving hypnotic paralysis and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Eight healthy women were instructed to sequentially perform left and right hand movements during a normal condition, as well as during simulated weakness, simulated paralysis and hypnotic paralysis of the right hand. Right frontopolar cortex was selectively hypoactivated for attempted right hand movement during simulated paralysis while it was active in all other conditions. Since simulated paralysis was the only condition lacking an intention to move, the activation in frontopolar cortex might be related to the intention or volition to move. PMID:26036837

  1. Chinese medicines with sedative-hypnotic effects and their active components.

    PubMed

    Shi, Man-Man; Piao, Jin-Hua; Xu, Xi-Lin; Zhu, Liang; Yang, Li; Lin, Fu-Lan; Chen, Jian; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2016-10-01

    The main pharmacological effects of sedative agents are sedation, hypnosis, antianxiety, and antidepression. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has a long history of clinical experience in treating insomnia. This review focuses mainly on the role of active ingredients from TCM in the treatment of insomnia. Single herbs and their active ingredients from TCM with hypnotic effects are summarized through reviewing the relevant literature published in the past 20 y. The active ingredients are divided into alkaloids, terpenoids, and volatile oils, flavonoids, lignanoids and coumarins, saponins, and others. Current studies on TCM in treating insomnia are described from the aspects of active ingredients, sources, experimental models and methods, results, and mechanisms. In addition, Chinese compound prescriptions developed from a variety of single herbs with sedative-hypnotic effects are introduced. The acting pathways of TCM are covered from the perspectives of regulating central neurotransmitters, influencing sleep-related cytokines, and improving the structure of the central nervous system. PMID:26866454

  2. Anxiety Reduction Among Breast-Cancer Survivors Receiving Hypnotic Relaxation Therapy for Hot Flashes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Alisa J; Marcus, Joel; Hickman, Kimberly; Barton, Debra; Elkins, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety is common among breast-cancer survivors. This analysis examined the effect of a hypnotic relaxation therapy, developed to reduce hot flashes, on anxiety levels of female breast-cancer survivors. Anxiety was assessed using a numeric analog scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety subscale. Significant reductions in anxiety were found from pre- to postintervention for each weekly session and were predictive of overall reductions in anxiety from baseline to after the last intervention. In this analysis, hypnotizability did not significantly predict for anxiety reductions measured before and after each session or from baseline to exit. These data provide initial support for the use of hypnotic relaxation therapy to reduce anxiety among breast-cancer survivors. PMID:27585723

  3. The Non-Benzodiazepine Hypnotic Zolpidem Impairs Sleep-Dependent Cortical Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Seibt, Julie; Aton, Sara J.; Jha, Sushil K.; Coleman, Tammi; Dumoulin, Michelle C.; Frank, Marcos G.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: The effects of hypnotics on sleep-dependent brain plasticity are unknown. We have shown that sleep enhances a canonical model of in vivo cortical plasticity, known as ocular dominance plasticity (ODP). We investigated the effects of 3 different classes of hypnotics on ODP. Design: Polysomnographic recordings were performed during the entire experiment (20 h). After a baseline sleep/wake recording (6 h), cats received 6 h of monocular deprivation (MD) followed by an i.p. injection of triazolam (1–10 mg/kg i.p.), zolpidem (10 mg/kg i.p.), ramelteon (0.1–1 mg/kg i.p.), or vehicle (DMSO i.p.). They were then allowed to sleep ad lib for 8 h, after which they were prepared for optical imaging of intrinsic cortical signals and single-unit electrophysiology. Setting: Basic neurophysiology laboratory Patients or Participants: Cats (male and female) in the critical period of visual development (postnatal days 28–41) Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: Zolpidem reduced cortical plasticity by ∼50% as assessed with optical imaging of intrinsic cortical signals. This was not due to abnormal sleep architecture because triazolam, which perturbed sleep architecture and sleep EEGs more profoundly than zolpidem, had no effect on plasticity. Ramelteon minimally altered sleep and had no effect on ODP. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that alterations in sleep architecture do not necessarily lead to impairments in sleep function. Conversely, hypnotics that produce more “physiological” sleep based on polysomnography may impair critical brain processes, depending on their pharmacology. Citation: Seibt J; Aton SJ; Jha SK; Coleman T; Dumoulin MC; Frank MG. The non-benzodiazepine hypnotic zolpidem impairs sleep-dependent cortical plasticity. SLEEP 2008;31(10):1381–1391. PMID:18853935

  4. Adverse Respiratory Events Associated With Hypnotics Use in Patients of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wei-Sheng; Lai, Ching-Yuan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Insomnia is prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We conducted a population-based case-control study to evaluate the effects of hypnotics on the risk of adverse respiratory events in patients with COPD. The case-control study was investigated using data retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients with newly diagnosed adverse respiratory events (pneumonia, COPD with acute exacerbation, acute respiratory failure, and cardiopulmonary arrest) were included in the case group. Patients with COPD and no history of adverse respiratory events were randomly selected for the control group, which was frequency-matched with the case group according to index date, age (per 10 years), and sex. Patients who had used hypnotics within 1 month meant active users. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of were calculated using univariable and multivariable logistic regression models. Most of the study participants were male (71.6%), and the mean ages of the participants in the case and control groups were 69.2 (±12.4) and 67.5 (±12.3) years, respectively. After potential confounding factors were adjusting for, the adjusted ORs of adverse respiratory events were 12.0 for active users of benzodiazepines (95% CI, 8.11–17.6) and 10.5 for active users of nonbenzodiazepines (95% CI, 7.68–14.2) compared with the adjusted ORs of those who never used hypnotics. The results of this epidemiological study suggested that hypnotics increased the risk of adverse respiratory events in patients with COPD. PMID:26166105

  5. A concurrent validity study between the Hypnotic Induction Profile (HIP) and the Stanford Hypnotic Clinical Scale for Adults (SHCS:A) in an inpatient sample: a brief report.

    PubMed

    Gritzalis, Nicoletta; Oster, Marc; Frischholz, Edward J

    2009-10-01

    The Hypnotic Induction Profile (HIP) is a brief, standardized assessment of hypnotizability which takes 5-10 minutes to administer. The Stanford Hypnotic Clinical Scale for Adults (SHCS:A) is a different clinical measure of hypnotizability that takes about 20-25 minutes to administer. Although both scales purport to measure the same thing, they were based on different theories of hypnosis and constructed using different psychometric techniques. The present investigation is a concurrent validation study comparing scores on the two instruments in a sample of 24 inpatients. The correlation between the SHCS:A and HIP Induction score was 0.41 (p < .01). However, the Eye Roll Sign (ERS) did not correlate significantly with either the SHCS:A (.04, ns) or the HIP-IND score (-.05, ns). These results indicate that while scores on the HIP and SHCS:A are significantly correlated the inter-correlations are not high enough to consider them as interchangeable measures. Implications of these findings for future research are discussed. PMID:19862895

  6. An Intersubjective View of Empathy and Hypnotic Trance: Response to Wickramasekera II.

    PubMed

    Henning, Janna A

    2016-01-01

    In response to Wickramasekera II's description of his empathic involvement theory of hypnosis in "Mysteries of hypnosis and the self are revealed by the psychology and neuroscience of empathy" (Wickramasekera II, 2015), Henning offers further reflections on what empathy might be and what it allows therapists to do, particularly in conditions of hypnotic trance. She defines her intersubjective view of hypnotic trance as an experience in which client and therapist mutually engage in a shared state of consciousness, and a mutual bidirectional or multidirectional exchange of verbal and nonverbal, as well as conscious and unconscious, material occurs, and which may include shared taking on of roles and expectations in each party, as suggested by the other, particularly when both client and therapist are highly hypnotizable. Research on the concept of "mutual hypnosis," or co-trance, is reviewed, and barriers to scholarly discussions about intersubjectivity in therapy relationships are described. Concepts from other disciplines and traditions, including quantum physics, transpersonal psychology, contemplative Christianity, and shamanistic practices and trance in other cultures are then offered to clarify the processes of intersubjectivity, and perspectives about empathy and hypnotic co-trance are offered from the context of the author's own clinical work as a trauma therapist. Finally, suggestions are provided for future research approaches and methods to further explore and understand these phenomena. PMID:26675153

  7. Selective histamine H1 antagonism: novel hypnotic and pharmacologic actions challenge classical notions of antihistamines.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Stephen M

    2008-12-01

    Numerous "antihistamines" as well as various psychotropic medications with antihistamine properties are widely utilized to treat insomnia. Over-the-counter sleep aids usually contain an antihistamine and various antidepressants and antipsychotics with antihistamine properties have sedative-hypnotic actions. Although widely used for the treatment of insomnia, many agents that block the histamine H1 receptor are also widely considered to have therapeutic limitations, including the development of next-day carryover sedation, as well as problems with chronic use, such as the development of tolerance to sedative-hypnotic actions and weight gain. Although these clinical actions are classically attributed to blockade of the H1 receptor, recent findings with H1 selective agents and H1 selective dosing of older agents are challenging these notions and suggest that some of the clinical limitations of current H1-blocking agents at their currently utilized doses could be attributable to other properties of these drugs, especially to their simultaneous actions on muscarinic, cholinergic, and adrenergic receptors. Selective H1 antagonism is emerging as a novel approach to the treatment of insomnia, without tolerance, weight gain, or the need for the restrictive prescription scheduling required of other hypnotics. PMID:19179941

  8. A preconscious neural mechanism of hypnotically altered colors: a double case study.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, Mika; Kirjanen, Svetlana; Revonsuo, Antti; Kallio, Sakari

    2013-01-01

    Hypnotic suggestions may change the perceived color of objects. Given that chromatic stimulus information is processed rapidly and automatically by the visual system, how can hypnotic suggestions affect perceived colors in a seemingly immediate fashion? We studied the mechanisms of such color alterations by measuring electroencephalography in two highly suggestible participants as they perceived briefly presented visual shapes under posthypnotic color alternation suggestions such as "all the squares are blue". One participant consistently reported seeing the suggested colors. Her reports correlated with enhanced evoked upper beta-band activity (22 Hz) 70-120 ms after stimulus in response to the shapes mentioned in the suggestion. This effect was not observed in a control condition where the participants merely tried to simulate the effects of the suggestion on behavior. The second participant neither reported color alterations nor showed the evoked beta activity, although her subjective experience and event-related potentials were changed by the suggestions. The results indicate a preconscious mechanism that first compares early visual input with a memory representation of the suggestion and consequently triggers the color alteration process in response to the objects specified by the suggestion. Conscious color experience is not purely the result of bottom-up processing but it can be modulated, at least in some individuals, by top-down factors such as hypnotic suggestions. PMID:23940663

  9. Are extrasynaptic GABAA receptors important targets for sedative/hypnotic drugs?

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Catriona M; McGee, Thomas P; MacKenzie, Georgina; Troyano-Cuturi, Kevin; Rodriguez, Pablo Mateos; Kutsarova, Elena; Diamanti, Efthymia; Hosie, Alastair M; Franks, Nicholas P; Brickley, Stephen G

    2012-01-01

    High-affinity extrasynaptic GABAA receptors are persistently activated by the low ambient GABA levels that are known to be present in the extracellular space. The resulting tonic conductance generates a form of shunting inhibition that is capable of altering cellular and network behaviour. It has been suggested that this tonic inhibition will be enhanced by neurosteroids, anti-epileptics, and sedative/hypnotic drugs. However, we show that the ability of sedative/hypnotic drugs to enhance tonic inhibition in the mouse cerebellum will critically depend upon ambient GABA levels. For example, we show that the intravenous anaesthetic propofol only enhances tonic inhibition when ambient GABA levels are below 100 nM. More surprisingly, the actions of the sleep promoting drug THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisothiazolo-[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) are attenuated at ambient GABA levels of just 20 nM. In contrast, our data suggests that neurosteroid enhancement of tonic inhibition will be greater at high ambient GABA concentrations. We present a model that takes into account realistic estimates of ambient GABA levels and predicted extrasynaptic GABAA numbers when considering the ability of sedative/hypnotic drugs to enhance tonic inhibition. These issues will be important when considering drug strategies designed to target extrasynaptic GABAA receptors in the treatment of sleep disorders and other neurological conditions. PMID:22423109

  10. Sedative and Hypnotic Activities of the Methanolic and Aqueous Extracts of Lavandula officinalis from Morocco.

    PubMed

    Alnamer, Rachad; Alaoui, Katim; Bouidida, El Houcine; Benjouad, Abdelaziz; Cherrah, Yahia

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the sedative and hypnotic activities of the methanolic and aqueous extract of Lavandula officinalis L. on central nervous system (CNS). In this study, the effect of the methanolic and aqueous extracts of this plant was investigated in a battery of behavioural models in mice. Stems and flowers of Lavandula officinalis L. have several therapeutic applications in folk medicine in curing or managing a wide range of diseases, including insomnia. The methanolic extract produced significant sedative effect at the doses of 200, 400, and 600 mg/kg (by oral route), compared to reference substance diazepam (DZP), and an hypnotic effect at the doses of 800 and 1000 mg/kg while the treatment of mice with the aqueous extract at the doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg via oral pathway significantly reduced in both the reestablishment time and number of head dips during the traction and hole-board tests. In conclusion, these results suggest that the methanolic and aqueous extracts of Lavandula officinalis possess potent sedative and hypnotic activities, which supported its therapeutic use for insomnia. PMID:22162677

  11. Nuances and Uncertainties Regarding Hypnotic Inductions: Toward a Theoretically Informed Praxis.

    PubMed

    Terhune, Devin B; Cardeña, Etzel

    2016-10-01

    Although most definitions of hypnosis consider inductions as the initial stage in a hypnosis protocol, knowledge of inductions remains poor and uninformed by recent developments in theory and research. It is frequently argued that inductions play a critical role in hypnotic responding or, by contrast, are largely interchangeable and unimportant. Drawing on the literature on suggestibility, spontaneous phenomenology, neurophysiology, and cognition, this article argues that the value of inductions, as well as the potential value of inductions, is more nuanced and uncertain. Certain components of standard inductions appear to be efficacious in enhancing suggestibility, whereas others do not have any clear benefits. The impact of inductions on suggestibility seems to vary across suggestions and modes of assessment with the sources of this variability being unknown. Considering these effects, and the broader impact of inductions on spontaneous conscious states and cognition, through the lens of heterogeneity in high hypnotic suggestibility and componential models of hypnotic suggestibility may offer novel research avenues in this area. The article concludes by arguing for the practical and theory-driven optimization of inductions. PMID:27586045

  12. "Don't know" responding to answerable and unanswerable questions during misleading and hypnotic interviews.

    PubMed

    Scoboria, Alan; Mazzoni, Giuliana; Kirsch, Irving

    2008-09-01

    "Don't know" (DK) responses to interview questions are conceptually heterogeneous, and may represent uncertainty or clear statements about the contents of memory. A study examined the subjective intent of DK responses in relation to the objective status of information queried, in the context of memory distorting procedures. Participants viewed a video and responded to answerable and unanswerable questions phrased in misleading or nonmisleading formats, while hypnotized or not hypnotized. Subjective meanings of DK responses were queried, and a recognition measure assessed the contents of memory. Lower DK and accuracy rates were consistently associated with unanswerable and misleading questions. One-third of DK responses were statements that the information had no not presented. When these were recoded, accuracy estimates for answerable questions decreased and more so for hypnotized participants. These results demonstrate that DK responses convey different types of information, thus accuracy estimates in studies that permit DK responses may be misestimated. Robust risks associated with asking unanswerable questions and asking questions at all were observed. Implications for working with DK responses during interviews are discussed. PMID:18808279

  13. Effects of a Hypnotic Induction and an Unpleasantness-Focused Analgesia Suggestion on Pain Catastrophizing to an Experimental Heat Stimulus: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Tomonori; Nakae, Aya; Sasaki, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Pain catastrophizing is associated with greater levels of pain. While many studies support the efficacy of hypnosis for pain, the effect on pain catastrophizing remains unclear. The present study evaluated the effect of hypnosis on pain catastrophizing using experimental heat stimulation. Twenty-two pain patients engaged in 3 conditions: baseline (no suggestion), hypnotic induction, and hypnotic induction plus analgesia suggestion. Participants with higher baseline pain showed a significant reduction in rumination following hypnotic induction plus analgesia suggestion and significant reductions in pain due to both the hypnotic induction alone and the hypnotic induction plus analgesia suggestion. The findings suggest that unpleasantness-focused hypnotic analgesia reduces pain via its effect on the rumination component of pain catastrophizing. PMID:27585727

  14. (1)H MRS in the rat brain under pentobarbital anesthesia: accurate quantification of in vivo spectra in the presence of propylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Iltis, Isabelle; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Du, Fei; Koski, Dee M; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Ugurbil, Kâmil; Chen, Wei; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2008-03-01

    Commercial solutions for pentobarbital anesthesia typically contain water H spectra. The purpose of the present study was to measure the concentration of metabolites in the rat brain in vivo under pentobarbital anesthesia using 1H MRS. Resonances of PG, but not ethanol, were observed in the rat brain. Chemical shifts and J-coupling constants for PG were measured at 37 degrees C and pH 7.1 and used for spectral simulation. Inclusion of the simulated PG spectrum in the basis set for LCModel analysis enabled accurate fitting of in vivo spectra. This work demonstrates that concentration of brain metabolites can be reliably measured using 1H spectroscopy under pentobarbital anesthesia. The chemical shifts and J-coupling values reported here can be used to simulate the spectrum of PG at any field strength, with various pulse sequences. PMID:18224694

  15. Suppression of parasympathetic reflex vasodilatation in the lower lip of the cat by isoflurane, propofol, ketamine and pentobarbital: implications for mechanisms underlying the production of anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Izumi, H; Sato, M; Karita, K; Iwatsuki, N

    1998-10-01

    We have compared the effects of isoflurane, propofol, ketamine and pentobarbital on parasympathetic reflex vasodilatation to investigate their involvement in GABA-mediated synaptic inhibition, enhancement of which is thought to underlie the action of many anaesthetic agents. In cats anaesthetized with urethane-alpha-chloralose, parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the ipsilateral lower lip was elicited by electrical stimulation of the central cut end of the lingual nerve. Isoflurane and pentobarbital both produced marked dose-dependent inhibition of this vasodilator response. In contrast, propofol and ketamine had no effect on parasympathetic reflex vasodilation. Administration of a GABA antagonist (picrotoxin) reversed the inhibition produced by isoflurane (previous results) and pentobarbital (present study). Our results suggest that isoflurane and pentobarbitone inhibit parasympathetic reflex vasodilatation via a GABA-mediated mechanism, but that propofol and ketamine have no such effect. Our results with propofol cast doubt on its presumed mechanism of action as an anaesthetic. PMID:9924233

  16. Pregnancy and pentobarbital anaesthesia modify hepatic synthesis of acylglycerol glycerol and glycogen from gluconeogenic precursors during fasting in rats.

    PubMed

    Zorzano, A; Herrera, E

    1988-12-01

    1. Incorporation of gluconeogenic precursors into blood glucose and hepatic glycogen and acylglycerol glycerol was examined in 24 h-fasted virgin rats by using a flooding procedure for substrate administration. At 10 min after their intravenous injection, the conversion of alanine or glycerol into liver glycogen or acylglycerol glycerol was proportional to glucose synthesis. 2. In 24 h-fasted 21-day-pregnant rats, the incorporation of alanine and glycerol into hepatic acylglycerol glycerol was markedly enhanced compared with the control group. In addition, during fasting at late pregnancy, the proportion of substrates directed to acylglycerol glycerol as compared with the fraction incorporated into glucose was augmented. 3. In pentobarbital-treated fasted rats, the incorporation of both alanine and pyruvate into circulating glucose and into hepatic glycogen and acylglycerol glycerol was increased. Pentobarbital treatment increased the proportion of substrates incorporated into liver glycogen, compared with the fraction appearing in circulating glucose. These changes were concomitant with a marked accumulation of glycogen. 4. The data indicate that, during fasting, gluconeogenesis provides glucose as well as hepatic glycogen and acylglycerol glycerol, independently of whether the substrates enter gluconeogenesis at the level of pyruvate or dihydroxyacetone phosphate. PMID:3223926

  17. Imperceptible signs: remnants of magnétisme in scientific discourses on hypnotism in late nineteenth-century France.

    PubMed

    Hajek, Kim M

    2015-01-01

    In 1880s France, hypnotism enjoyed unique medico-scientific legitimacy. This was in striking contrast to preceding decades when its precursor, magnétisme animal, was rejected by the medical/academic establishment as a disreputable, supernaturally tinged practice. Did the legitimation of hypnotism result from researchers repudiating any reference to the wondrous? Or did strands of magnetic thinking persist? This article interrogates the relations among hypnotism, magnétisme, and the domain of the wondrous through close analysis of scientific texts on hypnotism. In question is the notion that somnambulist subjects possessed hyperacute senses, enabling them to perceive usually imperceptible signs, and thus inadvertently to denature researchers' experiments (a phenomenon known as unconscious suggestion). The article explores researchers' uncritical and unanimous acceptance of these ideas, arguing that they originate in a holdover from magnétisme. This complicates our understanding of the continuities and discontinuities between science and a precursor "pseudo-science," and, more narrowly, of the notorious Salpêtrière-Nancy "battle" over hypnotism. PMID:26362719

  18. NEUROPEPTIDE MODULATION OF CHEMICALLY INDUCED SKIN IRRITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was designed to demonstrate that the early symptoms of chemically-induced skin irritation are neurally mediated. everal approaches were used to affect nerve transmission in adult Balb/c female mice. hese included general anesthesia (i.e., sodium pentobarbital), systemi...

  19. A single dose of hypnotic corrects sleep and EEG abnormalities in symptomatic Huntington's disease mice.

    PubMed

    Kantor, Sandor; Varga, Janos; Morton, A Jennifer

    2016-06-01

    Sleep and electroencephalogram abnormalities are prominent early features of Huntington's disease (HD) that typically appear before the onset of characteristic motor symptoms. The changes in sleep and electroencephalogram seen in HD patients are largely recapitulated in mouse models of HD such as transgenic R6/2 lines. To test whether or not drugs with hypnotic properties can correct the sleep and electroencephalogram abnormalities seen in HD mice, we treated male wild-type (WT; N = 7) and R6/2 mice (N = 9) acutely with intraperitoneal injections of vehicle, zolpidem (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg) or amitriptyline (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg), and then monitored their sleep-wake behavior. In R6/2 mice, both zolpidem and amitriptyline suppressed the abnormally high REM sleep amount and electroencephalographic gamma (30-46 Hz) oscillations in a dose-dependent manner. Amitriptyline's effect on sleep was similar in both genotypes, whereas zolpidem showed significant genotype differences. Zolpidem exerted a strong hypnotic effect in WT mice by increasing electroencephalographic delta power, doubling the mean bout duration and the total amount of non-rapid eye movement sleep. However, no such effect was seen in R6/2 mice. Our study demonstrates that the pathophysiological changes seen in sleep and electroencephalogram are not 'hard-wired' in HD brain and can be reversed even at late stages of the disease. The diminished hypnotic effect of zolpidem suggests that the GABAergic control of sleep-wake states is impaired in HD mice. A better understanding of the neurochemical basis underlying these abnormalities should lead to more effective and rational therapies for HD. PMID:26805423

  20. Effect of anxiolytic and hypnotic drug prescriptions on mortality hazards: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Hannah Louise; Croft, Peter; Singh, Swaran; Crome, Ilana; Bashford, James; Frisher, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that people taking anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs are at increased risk of premature mortality, using primary care prescription records and after adjusting for a wide range of potential confounders. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting 273 UK primary care practices contributing data to the General Practice Research Database. Participants 34 727 patients aged 16 years and older first prescribed anxiolytic or hypnotic drugs, or both, between 1998 and 2001, and 69 418 patients with no prescriptions for such drugs (controls) matched by age, sex, and practice. Patients were followed-up for a mean of 7.6 years (range 0.1-13.4 years). Main outcome All cause mortality ascertained from practice records. Results Physical and psychiatric comorbidities and prescribing of non-study drugs were significantly more prevalent among those prescribed study drugs than among controls. The age adjusted hazard ratio for mortality during the whole follow-up period for use of any study drug in the first year after recruitment was 3.46 (95% confidence interval 3.34 to 3.59) and 3.32 (3.19 to 3.45) after adjusting for other potential confounders. Dose-response associations were found for all three classes of study drugs (benzodiazepines, Z drugs (zaleplon, zolpidem, and zopiclone), and other drugs). After excluding deaths in the first year, there were approximately four excess deaths linked to drug use per 100 people followed for an average of 7.6 years after their first prescription. Conclusions In this large cohort of patients attending UK primary care, anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs were associated with significantly increased risk of mortality over a seven year period, after adjusting for a range of potential confounders. As with all observational findings, however, these results are prone to bias arising from unmeasured and residual confounding. PMID:24647164

  1. EFFECT OF OZONE ON DRUG-INDUCED SLEEPING TIME IN MICE PRETREATED WITH MIXED-FUNCTION OXIDASE INDUCERS AND INHIBITORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies were conducted to investigate the effect of ozone in prolonging pentobarbital (PEN)-induced sleeping time (S.T.). Since ozone is a common air pollutant, an ozone-induced alteration of mechanisms of drug action could have public health implications. It was shown that a 5-h...

  2. Hypnotic induction is followed by state-like changes in the organization of EEG functional connectivity in the theta and beta frequency bands in high-hypnotically susceptible individuals

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, Graham A.; Burgess, Adrian P.

    2014-01-01

    Altered state theories of hypnosis posit that a qualitatively distinct state of mental processing, which emerges in those with high hypnotic susceptibility following a hypnotic induction, enables the generation of anomalous experiences in response to specific hypnotic suggestions. If so then such a state should be observable as a discrete pattern of changes to functional connectivity (shared information) between brain regions following a hypnotic induction in high but not low hypnotically susceptible participants. Twenty-eight channel EEG was recorded from 12 high susceptible (highs) and 11 low susceptible (lows) participants with their eyes closed prior to and following a standard hypnotic induction. The EEG was used to provide a measure of functional connectivity using both coherence (COH) and the imaginary component of coherence (iCOH), which is insensitive to the effects of volume conduction. COH and iCOH were calculated between all electrode pairs for the frequency bands: delta (0.1–3.9 Hz), theta (4–7.9 Hz) alpha (8–12.9 Hz), beta1 (13–19.9 Hz), beta2 (20–29.9 Hz) and gamma (30–45 Hz). The results showed that there was an increase in theta iCOH from the pre-hypnosis to hypnosis condition in highs but not lows with a large proportion of significant links being focused on a central-parietal hub. There was also a decrease in beta1 iCOH from the pre-hypnosis to hypnosis condition with a focus on a fronto-central and an occipital hub that was greater in high compared to low susceptibles. There were no significant differences for COH or for spectral band amplitude in any frequency band. The results are interpreted as indicating that the hypnotic induction elicited a qualitative change in the organization of specific control systems within the brain for high as compared to low susceptible participants. This change in the functional organization of neural networks is a plausible indicator of the much theorized “hypnotic-state.” PMID:25104928

  3. Hypnotic intervention in a 7-year-old thumbsucker: a case study.

    PubMed

    Grayson, David N

    2012-01-01

    Thumbsucking is a common habit among younger children. Usually, the child outgrows this habit by age 6. When a child over the age of 6 continues to suck his or her thumb, it can be a cause of potential harm due to peer pressure, ridicule, and shunning. It can also lead to malocclusions requiring eventual orthodontic interventions. In this case study, the author demonstrates a hypnotic intervention in a 7-year-old girl. Validation of her habit and imaging a role model sucking her thumb were employed in trance. Using this approach, the child was able to end her dependence on thumbsucking in 1 session. PMID:22443022

  4. Hypnotizability and opinions about hypnosis in a clinical trial for the hypnotic control of pain and anxiety during pregnancy termination.

    PubMed

    Dufresne, Alexandra; Rainville, Pierre; Dodin, Sylvie; Barré, Patrick; Masse, Benoît; Verreault, René; Marc, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    This descriptive study evaluates the hypnoanalgesic experience's effect on participants' hypnotizability and opinions about hypnosis and identifies factors associated with hypnotizability. Hypnotizability was assessed using the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form A in 290 women 1 month after their participation in a randomized clinical trial evaluating hypnotic intervention for pain/anxiety versus standard care during pregnancy termination. Opinions were collected before and after the intervention. The regression model describing hypnotizability (F = 13.55; p < .0001; R(2) = 0.20) retained 5 variables but not the intervention group. The variable explaining most of total variance (62.9%) was the level of perceived automaticity/involuntariness. Opinions about hypnosis were modified by the hypnotic experience compared to standard care but were not associated with hypnotizability. Exposure to hypnoanalgesia did not influence hypnotizability but modifies significantly the opinions about hypnosis. Consistent with previous findings, perceived automaticity appears to best predict hypnotizability. PMID:20183740

  5. Observed differences in learning ability of heart rate self-regulation as a function of hypnotic susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    Three groups of eight male and female subjects (aged 20-27 yr) categorized by low and high hypnotic susceptibility were taught to control their heart rates by means of an appropriate autogenic therapy/biofeedback technique. The experimental groups were trained by autogenic therapy and biofeedback, while the control group received only biofeedback. Significant differences are observed in all psychological test scores between subjects of high and low hypnotic susceptibility. The results confirm that (1) there are qualitative and quantitative differences between the performance of individuals with high and low hypnotic susceptibility; (2) interindividual-variability tests yield data relevant to individual performance in visceral learning tasks; (3) the combined autogenic therapy/biofeedback/verbal feedback technique is suitable for conditioning large stable autonomic responses in humans; and (4) this kind of conditioning is effective in eliminating or alleviating physiological reactions to some environmental stressors.

  6. Perceiving Time Differences When You Should Not: Applying the El Greco Fallacy to Hypnotic Time Distortions.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jean-Rémy; Sackur, Jérôme; Anlló, Hernan; Naish, Peter; Dienes, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    The way we experience and estimate time - subjective time - does not systematically correspond to objective time (the physical duration of an event). Many factors can influence subjective time and lead to mental dilation or compression of objective time. The emotional valence of stimuli or the levels of attention or expectancy are known to modulate subjective time even though objective time is constant. Hypnosis too is known to alter people's perception of time. However, it is not known whether hypnotic time distortions are intrinsic perceptual effects, based for example on the changing rate of an internal clock, or rather the result of a response to demand characteristics. Here we distinguished the theories using the logic of the El Greco fallacy. When participants initially had to compare the duration of two successive events -with the same duration - while in "trance," they responded that the second event was on average longer than the first event. As both events were estimated in "trance," if hypnosis had impacted on an internal clock, they should have been affected to the same extent. Conversely, when only the first event was in "trance," there was no difference in perceived duration. The findings conform to an El Greco fallacy effect and challenge theories of hypnotic time distortion arguing that "trance" itself changes subjective time. PMID:27625623

  7. Perceiving Time Differences When You Should Not: Applying the El Greco Fallacy to Hypnotic Time Distortions

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jean-Rémy; Sackur, Jérôme; Anlló, Hernan; Naish, Peter; Dienes, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    The way we experience and estimate time – subjective time – does not systematically correspond to objective time (the physical duration of an event). Many factors can influence subjective time and lead to mental dilation or compression of objective time. The emotional valence of stimuli or the levels of attention or expectancy are known to modulate subjective time even though objective time is constant. Hypnosis too is known to alter people’s perception of time. However, it is not known whether hypnotic time distortions are intrinsic perceptual effects, based for example on the changing rate of an internal clock, or rather the result of a response to demand characteristics. Here we distinguished the theories using the logic of the El Greco fallacy. When participants initially had to compare the duration of two successive events —with the same duration — while in “trance,” they responded that the second event was on average longer than the first event. As both events were estimated in “trance,” if hypnosis had impacted on an internal clock, they should have been affected to the same extent. Conversely, when only the first event was in “trance,” there was no difference in perceived duration. The findings conform to an El Greco fallacy effect and challenge theories of hypnotic time distortion arguing that “trance” itself changes subjective time. PMID:27625623

  8. Hypnotic Seminar.

    PubMed

    Haley, Jay

    2015-01-01

    In this transcription of a lecture given in 2000, Jay Haley begins by answering the question, "What is hypnosis?"  Haley reviews the circumstances of Gregory Bateson encouraging him to meet with Milton Erickson to discuss the history of hypnosis and the paradoxical nature of trance induction. Haley expresses many original thoughts about multiple personalities, regression to past lives, and how to handle memories that historically may be false. Sophisticated and subtle, this is Haley at his best. PMID:26305134

  9. Hypnotically assisted diaphragmatic exercises in the treatment of stuttering: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Yalcin; Alladin, Assen

    2012-01-01

    This preliminary study investigates the combined effect of intensive hypnotherapy and diaphragmatic exercises in the management of stuttering. Fifty-nine clients with stuttering were trained to practice abdominal weightlifting to strengthen their respiratory muscles and to improve their diaphragmatic movements. The weightlifting exercises involved lifting a dumbbell (2.0-4.0 kg) with the abdomen for 2 hours daily for 8 consecutive days. Hypnotherapy was utilized to alleviate anxiety, to boost self-confidence, and to increase motivation for weightlifting exercise. The pre- and postmeasures were statistically significant (p < .001). Results of the study provide support for the effectiveness of hypnotically assisted diaphragmatic training in the management of stuttering but should be further studied in controlled trials. PMID:22443525

  10. Conscious/Unconscious Dissociation Induction: Increasing Hypnotic Performance With "Resistant" Clients.

    PubMed

    Lankton, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    Milton H. Erickson promoted several approaches to psychotherapy using hypnosis. In the last decades of his life, his work moved away from the use of redundant suggestion and a predominance of direct suggestion in favor of indirect suggestion. In addition, he frequently employed a type of storytelling (that has come to be called therapeutic metaphor) to indirectly convey learning. Another change that occurred during the last decade was his definition of the cause of a symptom. However, there were two important areas of his work that he did not change during his career. These two components of his work he did not change were his definition of a cure and the importance of a naturalistic induction. This article concerns his naturalistic approach to hypnotic induction and especially his use of conscious/unconscious dissociation in the induction process and how indirect suggestion and therapeutic binds can be used to facilitate that type of induction and a cure. PMID:27586046

  11. Use of Neurofeedback to Enhance Response to Hypnotic Analgesia in Individuals With Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P; Gianas, Ann; George, Holly R; Sherlin, Leslie H; Kraft, George H; Ehde, Dawn M

    2016-01-01

    This proof of principle study examined the potential benefits of EEG neurofeedback for increasing responsiveness to self-hypnosis training for chronic pain management. The study comprised 20 individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) who received 5 sessions of self-hypnosis training--1 face-to-face session and 4 prerecorded sessions. Participants were randomly assigned to have the prerecorded sessions preceded by either (a) EEG biofeedback (neurofeedback) training to increase left anterior theta power (NF-HYP) or (b) a relaxation control condition (RLX-HYP). Eighteen participants completed all treatment sessions and assessments. NF-HYP participants reported greater reductions in pain than RLX-HYP participants. The findings provide support for the potential treatment-enhancing effects of neurofeedback on hypnotic analgesia and also suggest that effective hypnosis treatment can be provided very efficiently. PMID:26599991

  12. The center core in ego state therapy and other hypnotically facilitated psychotherapies.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Claire

    2013-07-01

    Center core phenomena have been utilized in the practice of ego state therapy and other forms of hypnotically facilitated psychotherapy for nearly 40 years. Despite the frequency with which they are employed, many confusions, contradictions, and questions remain concerning them. In this article relevant center core phenomena literature is reviewed and an essential differentiation between two different kinds of center core phenomena is clarified. Psychodynamic explanations are offered for the therapeutic benefits of archetypal center core experiences such as inner strength and inner wisdom. The information provided offers clinicians a sturdier platform from which to decide whether to incorporate center core experiences into clinical practice. The persistent question of whether center core phenomena are ego states is revisited and addressed. PMID:24660338

  13. [Attitude and perceived control of the elderly towards the consumption of anxiolytic, sedative and hypnotic medications].

    PubMed

    Guindon, Marilyn; Cappeliez, Philippe

    2011-03-01

    This study examines the importance of variables from the Theory of Planned Behaviour (i.e., attitudes toward behaviour, subjective norms, and perceived control) for the prediction of consumption of anxiolytic and sedative-hypnotic (ASH) medications in a sample of older persons, aged 69 years on average, 62 consumers and 92 non-consumers. A favourable attitude toward ASH and a sense of having less control regarding these drugs predict both current usage and intention to continue. Perceived control predicts intention to start consumption of ASH in current non-consumers. This study underlines the importance of considering the role of the older person's decisional power in the consumption of these medications. PMID:21470438

  14. Evaluating hypnotic memory enhancement (hypermnesia and reminiscence) using multitrial forced recall.

    PubMed

    Dinges, D F; Whitehouse, W G; Orne, E C; Powell, J W; Orne, M T; Erdelyi, M H

    1992-09-01

    Two experiments investigated whether hypnosis enhances memory retrieval per se or merely increases a person's willingness to report recollections. Both experiments assessed immediate and delayed (i.e., 1 week) recall for pictorial stimuli. In Experiment 1, following an initial waking baseline recall, subjects of high or low hypnotic ability completed a series of recall trials conducted either in hypnosis or in the walking condition. The classic hypermnesia effect was obtained, but with no supplemental contribution of hypnosis. In Experiment 2, hypnosis was introduced only after 6 waking-recall trials. Hypnosis again failed to enhance retrieval of new correct items, although it increased the production of new incorrect recall among hypnotizable individuals. The findings provide no evidence for alleged hypermnesic properties of hypnosis. PMID:1402714

  15. Seeing Blue As Red: A Hypnotic Suggestion Can Alter Visual Awareness of Colors.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Sakari; Koivisto, Mika

    2016-01-01

    Some highly hypnotizable individuals have reported changes in objects' color with suggestions given in normal waking state. However, it is not clear whether this occurs only in their imagination. The authors show that, although subjects could imagine colors, a posthypnotic suggestion was necessary for seeing altered colors, even for a hypnotic virtuoso. She reported posthypnotic color alterations also selectively in response to specific target shapes in briefly presented object arrays. Surprisingly, another highly hypnotizable person showed a very different pattern of results. The control participants could not simulate virtuosos' results by applying cognitive strategies. The results imply that hypnosis can alter the functioning of automatic visual processes but only in some of the most hypnotizable individuals. PMID:27267673

  16. Hypnotic analgesia for combat-related spinal cord injury pain: a case study.

    PubMed

    Stoelb, Brenda L; Jensen, Mark P; Tackett, M Jan

    2009-01-01

    A U.S. Army soldier stationed in Iraq developed myriad pain problems after sustaining a high-level spinal cord injury (SCI) from a gunshot wound. These problems were negatively impacting his ability to participate fully in his physical rehabilitation and care. Ten sessions of self-hypnosis training were administered to the patient over a 5-week period to help him address these problems. Both the patient and his occupational therapist reported a substantial reduction in pain over the course of treatment, which allowed the patient to actively engage in his therapies. Six months post treatment, the patient reported continued use of the hypnosis strategies taught, which effectively reduced his experience of pain. This case study demonstrates the efficacy of hypnotic analgesia treatment for U.S. military veterans who are experiencing pain problems due to traumatic or combat-related SCIs. PMID:19216212

  17. The Importance of Residual Effects When Choosing a Hypnotic: The Unique Profile of Zaleplon.

    PubMed

    Zammit, Gary K.; Kramer, Jeffrey A.

    2001-04-01

    BACKGROUND: Insomnia is a prevalent medical disorder that has significant effects on occupational performance, health, and quality of life. Insomnia places an enormous burden on society through increased visits to physicians, loss of productivity in the workplace, and an increased rate of accidents. An estimated sum of $100 million is spent each year on direct treatment of unresolved insomnia. Physicians need to initiate early effective treatment to prevent development of chronic insomnia and its associated morbidity. Institution of good sleep hygiene practices may be useful in some patients but may not be adequate for resolution of all sleep problems. Behavioral treatments, while effective and durable, are time consuming and not widely utilized in clinical practice. Pharmacotherapy includes benzodiazepine hypnotics, but concerns regarding adverse effects (e.g., residual sedation) prompted the search for safer options. DATA SOURCES: Published and presented studies containing clinical data on zaleplon, a new nonbenzodiazepine sleep medication, were identified via MEDLINE, Current Contents (ISI database), bibliographic reviews, and consultation with sleep specialists. RESULTS: Zaleplon effectively shortens sleep onset time and improves the quality of sleep in patients with insomnia. Whether administered at bedtime or later at night, zaleplon is devoid of residual sedative effects that impair next-day functioning. Follow-up studies evaluating the long-term efficacy and safety of zaleplon showed that decreased time to sleep onset was maintained during therapy lasting up to 52 weeks, without a withdrawal syndrome after discontinuation. CONCLUSION: Insomnia is recurrent and unpredictable in nature. Despite the long-term morbidity of this sleep disorder, research evidence and practice guidelines have not explored long-term use of hypnotics. Many patients could benefit from long-term drug therapy with a sleep medication that is devoid of residual effects and can be taken

  18. Sedative and hypnotic drugs--fatal and non-fatal reference blood concentrations.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Anna Kristina; Söderberg, Carl; Espnes, Ketil Arne; Ahlner, Johan; Eriksson, Anders; Reis, Margareta; Druid, Henrik

    2014-03-01

    In postmortem investigations of fatal intoxications it is often challenging to determine which drug/s caused the death. To improve the interpretation of postmortem blood concentrations of sedative and hypnotic drugs and/or clonazepam, all medico-legal autopsies in Sweden - where these drugs had been detected in femoral vein blood during 1992-2006 - were identified in the databases of the National Board of Forensic Medicine. For each drug, concentrations in postmortem control cases - where the cause of death was not intoxication and where incapacitation by drugs could be excluded - were compiled as well as the levels found in living subjects; drugged driving cases and therapeutic drug monitoring cases. Subsequently, fatal intoxications were assessed with regards to the primary substances contributing to death, and blood levels were compiled for single and multiple drug intoxications. The postmortem femoral blood levels are reported for 16 sedative and hypnotic drugs, based on findings in 3560 autopsy cases. The cases were classified as single substance intoxications (N=498), multiple substance intoxications (N=1555) and postmortem controls (N=1507). Each autopsy case could be represented more than once in the group of multiple intoxications and among the postmortem controls if more than one of the included substances were detected. The concentration ranges for all groups are provided. Overlap in concentrations between fatal intoxications and reference groups was seen for most substances. However, the concentrations found in single and multiple intoxications were significantly higher than concentrations found in postmortem controls for all substances except alprazolam and triazolam. Concentrations observed among drugged drivers were similar to the concentrations observed among the therapeutic drug monitoring cases. Flunitrazepam was the substance with the highest number of single intoxications, when related to sales. In summary, this study provides reference drug

  19. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry for timely response in regulatory analyses: identification of pentobarbital in dog food.

    PubMed

    Heller, D N

    2000-07-01

    A limited liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/ MS) data set was acquired under conditions which called for timely response without benefit of a fully developed method. Quality assurance elements verified that an LC/ MS procedure developed in a short-time was sufficiently under control to meet its purpose. LC/MS was used to rule out a potential problem with a gas chromatography (GC)/MS method that had been developed for regulatory purposes. The LC/MS data set showed that signals identified by GC/MS as diagnostic of pentobarbital (PB) were not artifacts of derivatization or GC analysis. Samples of dry dog food identified by GC/MS as containing PB were also shown by LC/MS to contain PB. The LC/MS method would not be recommended as a substitute for GC/MS, primarily because of poorer sensitivity. Although the data set is limited, and justifiably represents only the starting point for conventional method development, the purpose at hand was served adequately. This work demonstrates the utility of LC/MS for rapid regulatory response, provided there is a framework of quality assurance checks. PMID:10905297

  20. Functional sites involved in modulation of the GABAA receptor channel by the intravenous anesthetics propofol, etomidate and pentobarbital.

    PubMed

    Maldifassi, Maria C; Baur, Roland; Sigel, Erwin

    2016-06-01

    GABAA receptors are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and are the target for many clinically important drugs. Among the many modulatory compounds are also the intravenous anesthetics propofol and etomidate, and barbiturates. The mechanism of receptor modulation by these compounds is of mayor relevance. The site of action of these compounds has been located to subunit interfaces in the intra-membrane region of the receptor. In α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors there are five such interfaces, two β+/α- and one each of α+/β-, α+/γ- and γ+/β- subunit interfaces. We have used reporter mutations located in the second trans-membrane region in different subunits to probe the effects of changes at these subunit interfaces on modulation by propofol, etomidate and pentobarbital. We provide evidence for the fact that each of these compounds either modulates through a different set of subunit interfaces or through the same set of subunit interfaces to a different degree. As a GABAA receptor pentamer harbors two β+/α- subunit interfaces, we used concatenated receptors to dissect the contribution of individual interfaces and show that only one of these interfaces is important for receptor modulation by etomidate. PMID:26767954

  1. Crime, hysteria and belle époque hypnotism: the path traced by Jean-Martin Charcot and Georges Gilles de la Tourette.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, Julien; Walusinski, Olivier; Veyrunes, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Hysteria and hypnotism became a favorite topic of studies in the fin de siècle neurology that emerged from the school organized at La Salpêtrière by Jean-Martin Charcot, where he had arrived in 1861. Georges Gilles de la Tourette started working with Charcot in 1884 and probably remained his most faithful student, even after his mentor's death in 1893. This collaboration was particularly intense on 'criminal hypnotism', an issue on which Hippolyte Bernheim and his colleagues from the Nancy School challenged the positions taken by the Salpêtrière School. Bernheim claimed that hypnotism was not a diagnostic feature of hysteria and that there were real-life examples of murders suggested under hypnosis, while hypnosis susceptibility was identified with hysteria by Charcot and Gilles de la Tourette, who saw rape as the only crime associated with hypnotism. The quarrel was particularly virulent during a series of famous criminal cases which took place between 1888 and 1890. At the time, it was considered that La Salpêtrière had succeeded over Nancy, since the role of hypnotism was discarded during these famous trials. However, the theories of Charcot and Gilles de la Tourette were also damaged by the fight, which probably triggered the conceptual evolution leading to Joseph Babinski's revision of hysteria in 1901. Gilles de la Tourette's strong and public interest in hypnotism nearly cost him his life, when a young woman who claimed to have been hypnotized against her will shot him in the head at his own home in 1893. It was subsequently shown that hypnotism had nothing to do with it. The delusional woman was interned at Sainte-Anne for mental disturbance, thus escaping trial. Ironically, Gilles de la Tourette may have been partly responsible, since he had been one of the strongest proponents of placing mentally-ill criminals in asylums instead of prisons. PMID:19602893

  2. Zolpidem induced hyponatremia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Priya S, Shanmuga; Dl, Britto; T, Saravanan

    2014-09-01

    Zolpidem is a non-benzodiazepine hypnotic that acts by binding to (GABAA) receptor. This is a case report of a patient with chronic insomnia for which he had initially been receiving benzodiazepine hypnotic alprazolam and for the past three years, he had switched himself to non-benzodiazepine hypnotic, zolpidem and had progressively increased the dose to 20 mg. The patient presented with history of drowsiness, nausea and vomiting of short duration. Investigations revealed that the patient had hyponatremia. Decreased serum sodium, elevated urine sodium with normal urine osmolarity was detected. Therefore, we report this as a case of drug induced syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) as other likely causes were ruled out by appropriate investigations. The causality assessment was done according to the WHO scale and found to be "Probable". PMID:25386461

  3. Visual field asymmetry in facial affect perception: moderating effects of hypnosis, hypnotic susceptibility level, absorption, and sustained attentional abilities.

    PubMed

    Crawford, H J; Harrison, D W; Kapelis, L

    1995-05-01

    Effects of hypnotic level, affect valence and cerebral asymmetry on reaction time (RT) in the discrimination of Ekman and Friesen's (1978) stimuli of angry and happy faces were studied in counterbalanced conditions of waking and hypnosis. Assessed previously on two hypnotic susceptibility scales [Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility; Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSSC)], non-depressed subjects were 16 low (0-4 SHSSC) and 17 highly (10-12 SHSSC) hypnotizable, right-handed college students. Subjects were required to identify affects of faces, presented tachistoscopically to left (LVF) or right (RVF) visual fields, by using a forced-choice RT paradigm. Highs were significantly faster than lows in angry and happy affect recognition. Hypnosis had no significant effects. For highs only, angry emotional valence was identified faster when presented to the right hemisphere (LVF), but there were no significant hemispheric effects for happy emotional valence. For lows there were no hemispheric differences. Gender was a nonsignificant factor. Significant correlations showed that faster reaction times to angry and happy stimuli, in both LVF and RVF in waking and hypnosis, were obtained by subjects who reported more deeply absorbed and extremely focused and sustained attention on the Tellegen (1982) Absorption Scale and a subscale of the Differential Attentional Processes Inventory (Grumbles & Crawford, 1981). Vividness of Visual Imagery Questionnaire (Marks, 1973) and Affect Intensity Measure (Larsen, 1985), in general, did not correlate with RTs. The potential role of the fronto-limbic attentional system in the recognition of external visual sensory affect is discussed. PMID:7591508

  4. Abrupt changes in pentobarbital sensitivity in preBötzinger complex region, hypoglossal motor nucleus, nucleus tractus solitariius, and cortex during rat transitional period (P10–P15)

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Sara M. F.; Johnson, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    On postnatal days P10–P15 in rat medulla, neurotransmitter receptor subunit composition shifts towards a more mature phenotype. Since medullary GABAARs regulate cardiorespiratory function, abrupt alterations in GABAergic synaptic inhibition could disrupt homeostasis. We hypothesized that GABAARs on medullary neurons become more resistant to positive allosteric modulation during P10–P15. Medullary and cortical slices from P10–P20 rats were used to record spontaneous action potentials in pre-Botzinger Complex (preBötC-region), hypoglossal (XII) motor nucleus, nucleus tractus solitariius (NTS), and cortex during exposure to pentobarbital (positive allosteric modulator of GABAARs). On P14, pentobarbital resistance abruptly increased in preBötC-region and decreased in NTS, but these changes in pentobarbital resistance were not present on P15. Pentobarbital resistance decreased in XII motor nucleus during P11–P15 with a nadir at P14. Abrupt changes in pentobarbital resistance indicate changes in GABAergic receptor composition and function that may compensate for potential increased GABAergic inhibition and respiratory depression that occurs during this key developmental transitional period. PMID:25550216

  5. Effect of hypnotic suggestion on fibromyalgic pain: comparison between hypnosis and relaxation.

    PubMed

    Castel, Antoni; Pérez, Magdalena; Sala, José; Padrol, Anna; Rull, Maria

    2007-05-01

    The main aims of this experimental study are: (1) to compare the relative effects of analgesia suggestions and relaxation suggestions on clinical pain, and (2) to compare the relative effect of relaxation suggestions when they are presented as "hypnosis" and as "relaxation training". Forty-five patients with fibromyalgia were randomly assigned to one of the following experimental conditions: (a) hypnosis with relaxation suggestions; (b) hypnosis with analgesia suggestions; (c) relaxation. Before and after the experimental session, the pain intensity was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the sensory and affective dimensions were measured with the McGill Pain Questionnaire. The results showed: (1) that hypnosis followed by analgesia suggestions has a greater effect on the intensity of pain and on the sensory dimension of pain than hypnosis followed by relaxation suggestions; (2) that the effect of hypnosis followed by relaxation suggestions is not greater than relaxation. We discuss the implications of the study on our understanding of the importance of suggestions used in hypnosis and of the differences and similarities between hypnotic relaxation and relaxation training. PMID:16889999

  6. Effects of different cyclodextrins on the morphology, loading and release properties of poly (DL-lactide-co-glycolide)-microparticles containing the hypnotic agent etizolam.

    PubMed

    Lopedota, A; Cutrignelli, A; Trapani, A; Boghetich, G; Denora, N; Laquintana, V; Trapani, G; Liso, G

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into the feasibility of using microparticles (MPs) constituted by the biodegradable poly (DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and a number of cyclodextrins (CDs) as an orally sustained delivery system of the hypnotic agent etizolam (ETZ). A further aim of the work was to investigate the effects of different CDs on the morphology, loading, and release properties of the MPs prepared. For these purposes, ETZ alone, and ETZ/CD-PLGA loaded MPs were prepared by the W/O/W emulsion-solvent evaporation method. It was found that the release of ETZ in vitro was more prolonged over three days with a kinetic constant proportional to t(1/2). It was also demonstrated that the CDs in these MPs are able to modulate several properties such as morphology, drug loading, and release properties. In fact, marked differences in shape, surface, and encapsulation efficiencies were noted depending on the presence, hydrophilicity, and charge of the CD employed. The obtained results induce us to consider the present ETZ-containing formulations as new valuable tools for the treatment of different insomnia categories. PMID:17454433

  7. Hypnotics and the Occurrence of Bone Fractures in Hospitalized Dementia Patients: A Matched Case-Control Study Using a National Inpatient Database

    PubMed Central

    Tamiya, Hiroyuki; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matusi, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Ogawa, Sumito; Akishita, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Preventing falls and bone fractures in hospital care is an important issue in geriatric medicine. Use of hypnotics is a potential risk factor for falls and bone fractures in older patients. However, data are lacking on the association between use of hypnotics and the occurrence of bone fracture. Methods We used a national inpatient database including 1,057 hospitals in Japan and included dementia patients aged 50 years or older who were hospitalized during a period of 12 months between April 2012 and March 2013. The primary outcome was the occurrence of bone fracture during hospitalization. Use of hypnotics was compared between patients with and without bone fracture in this matched case-control study. Results Of 140,494 patients, 830 patients suffered from in-hospital fracture. A 1:4 matching with age, sex and hospital created 817 cases with fracture and 3,158 matched patients without fracture. With adjustment for the Charlson comorbidity index, emergent admission, activities of daily living, and scores for level walking, a higher occurrence of fractures were seen with short-acting benzodiazepine hypnotics (odds ratio, 1.43; 95% confidence interval, 1.19–1.73; P<0.001), ultrashort-acting non-benzodiazepine hypnotics (1.66; 1.37–2.01; P<0.001), hydroxyzine (1.45; 1.15–1.82, P=0.001), risperidone and perospirone (1.37; 1.08–1.73; P=0.010). Other drug groups were not significantly associated with the occurrence of in-hospital fracture. Conclusions Short-acting benzodiazepine hypnotics and ultrashort-acting non-benzodiazepine hypnotics may increase risk of bone fracture in hospitalized dementia patients. PMID:26061231

  8. Effect of pentobarbital anaesthesia on intestinal absorption and hepatic first-pass metabolism of oxacillin in rats, evaluated by portal-systemic concentration difference.

    PubMed

    Ueda, S; Yamaoka, K; Nakagawa, T

    1999-05-01

    The effects of anaesthesia on intestinal drug absorption and hepatic first-pass metabolism in rats were investigated by observing the difference in the drug concentration between portal and systemic bloods. Oxacillin and pentobarbital were selected as a model drug and as an anaesthetic, respectively. Rats were divided into a conscious control group and an anaesthetized group. All rats were cannulated simultaneously in the portal vein and in the femoral artery, and oxacillin was orally administered after its intra-arterial injection (double dosing). For the anaesthetized group, pentobarbital was intrasubcutaneously administered twice, first before intra-arterial injection and again before oral administration of oxacillin. The arterial blood alone was sampled from the cannula in the femoral artery before oral administration, whereas the arterial and portal bloods were simultaneously sampled from both cannulated sites after oral administration. Oxacillin concentrations in plasma were assayed by HPLC. The anaesthesia increased the absolute bioavailability (F), the mean absorption time (MAT) and the hepatic recovery ratio (F(H)), but caused little change in the local absorption ratio into the portal system (Fa) and the total clearance (CL). The hepatic clearance (CL(H)) was significantly decreased, resulting in an apparent small change in CL-CL(H) which is considered to be renal clearance. By this method, it was shown directly that an increase in F due to pentobarbital anaesthesia was attributable to the significant increase in F(H). It is expected that the method is useful not only to evaluate the effect of anaesthesia on the first-pass effect, but also to assess the effect of co-administration of drugs on first-pass metabolism. PMID:10411218

  9. Effects of several benzodiazepines, alone and in combination with flumazenil, in rhesus monkeys trained to discriminate pentobarbital from saline.

    PubMed

    Woolverton, W L; Nader, M A

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to further investigate the relationship between the DS effects of PB and those of benzodiazepines (BZs) and to begin to collect pharmacological information concerning receptor mechanisms involved in this behavioral effect of BZs. Rhesus monkeys (n = 3), trained to discriminate pentobarbital (PB; 10 mg/kg, IG) from saline under a discrete-trials shock avoidance procedure, were given IG diazepam (0.3-10 mg/kg), chlordiazepoxide (1.0-30 mg/kg), or etizolam (0.3-10 mg/kg) alone and in combination with flumazenil (0.01-1.7 mg/kg, IM). Flumazenil was administered 10 min prior to the administration of saline, PB or the BZs. All three BZs fully substituted for PB in all monkeys. Diazepam was the most potent with a mean ED50 of 0.81 mg/kg (SEM = 0.04) while chlordiazepoxide was the least potent (mean ED50 = 5.78 mg/kg, SEM = 1.22 mg/kg). The ED50 for etizolam was 1.22 mg/kg (SEM = 0.37 mg/kg). Pretreatment with flumazenil (0.01-1.0 mg/kg) resulted in a dose-related parallel shift to the right in the dose-response function for PB-appropriate responding in all monkeys for all three BZs. The mean (n = 3) pKB value with 0.1 mg/kg flumazenil was 6.51 (SEM = 0.42) for diazepam and 6.57 (SEM = 0.17) for chlordiazepoxide. This value could not be calculated for etizolam because only one monkey was tested with 0.1 mg/kg flumazenil. However, the mean pKB for etizolam considering all monkeys and all doses of flumazenil was 6.58 (SEM = 0.47). Apparent pA2 values for flumazenil with diazepam were 6.02 for one monkey and 7.11 for another. All three BZs tended to increase average latency to respond. Apparent pKB and pA2 analysis may prove useful for elucidating receptor mechanisms involved in the behavioral effects of BZs. PMID:8748392

  10. Enhanced tonic inhibition influences the hypnotic and amnestic actions of the intravenous anesthetics etomidate and propofol

    PubMed Central

    Kretschmannova, Karla; Hines, Rochelle M.; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Terunuma, Miho; Tretter, Verena; Jurd, Rachel; Kelz, Max B.; Moss, Stephen J.; Davies, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous anesthetics exert a component of their actions via potentiating inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by γ-aminobutyric type-A receptors (GABAARs). Phasic and tonic inhibition are mediated by distinct populations of GABAARs, with the majority of phasic inhibition by subtypes composed of α1-3βγ2 subunits, while tonic inhibition is dependent on subtypes assembled from α4-6βδ subunits. To explore the contribution that these distinct forms of inhibition play in mediating intravenous anesthesia we have used mice in which tyrosine residues 365/7 within the γ2 subunit are mutated to phenyalanines (Y365/7F). Here we demonstrate that this mutation leads to increased accumulation of the α4 subunit containing GABAARs in the thalamus and dentate gyrus of female Y365/7F but not male Y365/7F mice. Y365/7F mice exhibited a gender specific enhancement of tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus that was more sensitive to modulation by the anesthetic etomidate, together with a deficit in long-term potentiation. Consistent with this, female Y365/7F, but not male Y365/7F mice exhibited a dramatic increase in the duration of etomidate and propofol mediated hypnosis. Moreover, the amnestic actions of etomidate were selectively potentiated in female Y365/7F mice. Collectively these observations suggest potentiation of tonic inhibition mediated by α4 subunit containing GABAARs contributes to the hypnotic and amnestic actions of the intravenous anesthetics, etomidate and propofol. PMID:23616535

  11. Enhanced tonic inhibition influences the hypnotic and amnestic actions of the intravenous anesthetics etomidate and propofol.

    PubMed

    Kretschmannova, Karla; Hines, Rochelle M; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Terunuma, Miho; Tretter, Verena; Jurd, Rachel; Kelz, Max B; Moss, Stephen J; Davies, Paul A

    2013-04-24

    Intravenous anesthetics exert a component of their actions via potentiating inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by γ-aminobutyric type-A receptors (GABAARs). Phasic and tonic inhibition is mediated by distinct populations of GABAARs, with the majority of phasic inhibition by subtypes composed of α1-3βγ2 subunits, whereas tonic inhibition is dependent on subtypes assembled from α4-6βδ subunits. To explore the contribution that these distinct forms of inhibition play in mediating intravenous anesthesia, we have used mice in which tyrosine residues 365/7 within the γ2 subunit are mutated to phenyalanines (Y365/7F). Here we demonstrate that this mutation leads to increased accumulation of the α4 subunit containing GABAARs in the thalamus and dentate gyrus of female Y365/7F but not male Y365/7F mice. Y365/7F mice exhibited a gender-specific enhancement of tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus that was more sensitive to modulation by the anesthetic etomidate, together with a deficit in long-term potentiation. Consistent with this, female Y365/7F, but not male Y365/7F, mice exhibited a dramatic increase in the duration of etomidate- and propofol-mediated hypnosis. Moreover, the amnestic actions of etomidate were selectively potentiated in female Y365/7F mice. Collectively, these observations suggest that potentiation of tonic inhibition mediated by α4 subunit containing GABAARs contributes to the hypnotic and amnestic actions of the intravenous anesthetics, etomidate and propofol. PMID:23616535

  12. Effects of d-amphetamine, WIN 35,428, pentobarbital and morphine on schedule-controlled responding in two inbred rat strains that differ in locomotor stimulatory effects of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Witkin, J.M.; Goldberg, S.R.

    1992-10-01

    Behavioral effects of d-amphetamine, the cocaine analog, WIN 35,428, morphine, and pentobarbital were compared in NBR/NIH and F344CR1BR rats. Either nose-poke or lever-press responding was maintained under 3-min fixed-interval schedules of food presentation. The effects of morphine, WIN 35,428 and pentobarbital depended upon the rat strain studied: morphine increased nose-poke responding in NBR but not F344 rats; significant strain x dose interactions were observed with WIN 35,428; and pentobarbital was more potent in decreasing nose-poke responding in NBR than in F344 rats. No strain differences were observed in the behavioral effects of d-amphetamine. There were also prominent differences in the effects of drugs that were related to the nature of the response requirement. In both rat strains, nose-poke responding was affected differently than lever-press responding by morphine, d-amphetamine, and WIN 35,428. Pentobarbital produced effects that were independent of the specified response topography. A global underlying difference in these rat strains cannot be identified at present to account for the diversity of findings. The behavioral effects of these drugs appear to be influenced by a host of interactive factors including the drug, strain of animal, the baseline response rate and physical dimensions of the response. PMID:11224148

  13. Preliminary study of relationships between hypnotic susceptibility and personality disorder functioning styles in healthy volunteers and personality disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hypnotic susceptibility is one of the stable characteristics of individuals, but not closely related to the personality traits such as those measured by the five-factor model in the general population. Whether it is related to the personality disorder functioning styles remains unanswered. Methods In 77 patients with personality disorders and 154 healthy volunteers, we administered the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form C (SHSSC) and the Parker Personality Measure (PERM) tests. Results Patients with personality disorders showed higher passing rates on SHSSC Dream and Posthypnotic Amnesia items. No significant correlation was found in healthy volunteers. In the patients however, SHSSC Taste hallucination (β = 0.26) and Anosmia to Ammonia (β = -0.23) were significantly correlated with the PERM Borderline style; SHSSC Posthypnotic Amnesia was correlated with the PERM Schizoid style (β = 0.25) but negatively the PERM Narcissistic style (β = -0.23). Conclusions Our results provide limited evidence that could help to understand the abnormal cognitions in personality disorders, such as their hallucination and memory distortions. PMID:21801440

  14. Is pentobarbital safe and efficacious in the treatment of super-refractory status epilepticus: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Seizures refractory to third-line therapy are also labeled super-refractory status epilepticus (SRSE). These seizures are extremely difficult to control and associated with poor outcome. We aimed to characterize efficacy and side-effects of continuous infusions of pentobarbital (cIV-PTB) treating SRSE. Methods We retrospectively reviewed continuous electroencephalography (cEEG) reports for all adults with RSE treated with cIV-PTB between May 1997 and April 2010 at our institution. Patients with post-anoxic SE and those receiving cIV-PTB for reasons other than RSE were excluded. We collected baseline information, cEEG findings, side-effects and functional outcome at discharge and one year. Results Thirty one SRSE patients treated with cIV-PTB for RSE were identified. Mean age was 48 years old (interquartile range (IQR) 28,63), 26% (N = 8) had a history of epilepsy. Median SE duration was 6.5 days (IQR 4,11) and the mean duration of cIV-PTB was 6 days (IQR 3,14). 74% (N = 23) presented with convulsive SE. Underlying etiology was acute symptomatic seizures in 52% (N = 16; 12/16 with encephalitis), remote 30% (N = 10), and unknown 16% (N = 5). cIV-PTB controlled seizures in 90% (N = 28) of patients but seizures recurred in 48% (N = 15) while weaning cIV-PTB, despite the fact that suppression-burst was attained in 90% (N = 28) of patients and persisted >72 hours in 56% (N = 17). Weaning was successful after adding phenobarbital in 80% (12/15 of the patients with withdrawal seizures). Complications during or after cIV-PTB included pneumonia (32%, N = 10), hypotension requiring pressors (29%, N = 9), urinary tract infection (13%, N = 4), and one patient each with propylene glycol toxicity and cardiac arrest. One-third (35%, N = 11) had no identified new complication after starting cIV-PTB. At one year after discharge, 74% (N = 23) were dead or in a state of unresponsive wakefulness, 16% (N = 5

  15. A Multifaceted GABAA Receptor Modulator: Functional Properties and Mechanism of Action of the Sedative-Hypnotic and Recreational Drug Methaqualone (Quaalude)

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Harriet; Bader, Benjamin M.; Ehnert, Corina; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Bunch, Lennart; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Schroeder, Olaf H.-U.; Bastlund, Jesper F.; Gramowski-Voß, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we have elucidated the functional characteristics and mechanism of action of methaqualone (2-methyl-3-o-tolyl-4(3H)-quinazolinone, Quaalude), an infamous sedative-hypnotic and recreational drug from the 1960s–1970s. Methaqualone was demonstrated to be a positive allosteric modulator at human α1,2,3,5β2,3γ2S GABAA receptors (GABAARs) expressed in Xenopus oocytes, whereas it displayed highly diverse functionalities at the α4,6β1,2,3δ GABAAR subtypes, ranging from inactivity (α4β1δ), through negative (α6β1δ) or positive allosteric modulation (α4β2δ, α6β2,3δ), to superagonism (α4β3δ). Methaqualone did not interact with the benzodiazepine, barbiturate, or neurosteroid binding sites in the GABAAR. Instead, the compound is proposed to act through the transmembrane β(+)/α(–) subunit interface of the receptor, possibly targeting a site overlapping with that of the general anesthetic etomidate. The negligible activities displayed by methaqualone at numerous neurotransmitter receptors and transporters in an elaborate screening for additional putative central nervous system (CNS) targets suggest that it is a selective GABAAR modulator. The mode of action of methaqualone was further investigated in multichannel recordings from primary frontal cortex networks, where the overall activity changes induced by the compound at 1–100 μM concentrations were quite similar to those mediated by other CNS depressants. Finally, the free methaqualone concentrations in the mouse brain arising from doses producing significant in vivo effects in assays for locomotion and anticonvulsant activity correlated fairly well with its potencies as a modulator at the recombinant GABAARs. Hence, we propose that the multifaceted functional properties exhibited by methaqualone at GABAARs give rise to its effects as a therapeutic and recreational drug. PMID:26056160

  16. A Multifaceted GABAA Receptor Modulator: Functional Properties and Mechanism of Action of the Sedative-Hypnotic and Recreational Drug Methaqualone (Quaalude).

    PubMed

    Hammer, Harriet; Bader, Benjamin M; Ehnert, Corina; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Bunch, Lennart; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Schroeder, Olaf H-U; Bastlund, Jesper F; Gramowski-Voß, Alexandra; Jensen, Anders A

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, we have elucidated the functional characteristics and mechanism of action of methaqualone (2-methyl-3-o-tolyl-4(3H)-quinazolinone, Quaalude), an infamous sedative-hypnotic and recreational drug from the 1960s-1970s. Methaqualone was demonstrated to be a positive allosteric modulator at human α1,2,3,5β2,3γ2S GABAA receptors (GABAARs) expressed in Xenopus oocytes, whereas it displayed highly diverse functionalities at the α4,6β1,2,3δ GABAAR subtypes, ranging from inactivity (α4β1δ), through negative (α6β1δ) or positive allosteric modulation (α4β2δ, α6β2,3δ), to superagonism (α4β3δ). Methaqualone did not interact with the benzodiazepine, barbiturate, or neurosteroid binding sites in the GABAAR. Instead, the compound is proposed to act through the transmembrane β((+))/α((-)) subunit interface of the receptor, possibly targeting a site overlapping with that of the general anesthetic etomidate. The negligible activities displayed by methaqualone at numerous neurotransmitter receptors and transporters in an elaborate screening for additional putative central nervous system (CNS) targets suggest that it is a selective GABAAR modulator. The mode of action of methaqualone was further investigated in multichannel recordings from primary frontal cortex networks, where the overall activity changes induced by the compound at 1-100 μM concentrations were quite similar to those mediated by other CNS depressants. Finally, the free methaqualone concentrations in the mouse brain arising from doses producing significant in vivo effects in assays for locomotion and anticonvulsant activity correlated fairly well with its potencies as a modulator at the recombinant GABAARs. Hence, we propose that the multifaceted functional properties exhibited by methaqualone at GABAARs give rise to its effects as a therapeutic and recreational drug. PMID:26056160

  17. Integrating the Forensic Sciences in Wildlife Case Investigations: A Case Report of Pentobarbital and Phenytoin Toxicosis in a Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Viner, T C; Hamlin, B C; McClure, P J; Yates, B C

    2016-09-01

    The application of medical knowledge to the purpose of law is the foundation of forensic pathology. A forensic postmortem examination often involves the expertise of multiple scientific disciplines to reconstruct the full story surrounding the death of an animal. Wildlife poses additional challenges in forensic investigations due to little or no associated history, and the disruptive effects of decomposition. To illustrate the multidisciplinary nature of wildlife forensic medicine, the authors outline a case of secondary pentobarbital/phenytoin toxicosis in a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). The eagle was the single fatality in a group of 8 birds that fed on euthanized domestic cat remains that had been improperly disposed of in a landfill. Cooperation between responding law enforcement officers, pathologists, and other forensic scientists led to the successful diagnosis and resolution of the case. PMID:27030371

  18. Endogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptor active neurosteroids and the sedative/hypnotic action of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB): a study in GHB-S (sensitive) and GHB-R (resistant) rat lines.

    PubMed

    Barbaccia, Maria Luisa; Carai, Mauro A M; Colombo, Giancarlo; Lobina, Carla; Purdy, Robert H; Gessa, Gian Luigi

    2005-07-01

    In the rat brain, gamma-hydroxybutyric-acid (GHB) increases the concentrations of 3alpha-hydroxy,5alpha-pregnan-20-one (allopregnanolone, 3alpha,5alpha-THP) and 3alpha,21-dihydroxy,5alpha-pregnan-20-one (allotetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone/3alpha,5alphaTHDOC), two neurosteroids acting as positive allosteric modulators of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptors. This study was aimed at assessing whether neurosteroids play a role in GHB-induced loss of righting reflex (LORR). Basal and GHB-stimulated brain concentrations of endogenous 3alpha,5alpha-THP and 3alpha,5alpha-THDOC were analyzed in two rat lines, GHB-sensitive (GHB-S) and GHB-resistant (GHB-R), selectively bred for opposite sensitivity to GHB-induced sedation/hypnosis. Basal neurosteroid concentrations were similar in brain cortex of the two rat lines. However, in male GHB-S rats, administration of GHB (1000 mg/kg, i.p., 30 min) increased brain cortical concentrations of 3alpha,5alpha-THP and 3alpha,5alpha-THDOC 7- and 2.5-fold, respectively, whilst male GHB-R animals displayed only a 4- and 2-fold increase, respectively. In GHB-S rats this increase lasted up to 90 min and declined 180 min following GHB administration, a time course that matches LORR onset and duration. In contrast, in GHB-R rats, which failed to show GHB-induced LORR, brain cortical 3alpha,5alpha-THP and 3alpha,5alpha-THDOC had returned to control values within 90 min. At onset of LORR, a similar increase in brain cortical levels of 3alpha,5alpha-THP and 3alpha,5alpha-THDOC (2-3-fold) was observed in GHB-S female rats and in the few female GHB-R rats that lost the righting reflex after GHB administration, but not in female GHB-R rats failing to show LORR. Sub-hypnotic doses (7.5 and 12.5 mg/kg, i.p.) of pregnanolone, administered 10 min before GHB, dose-dependently facilitated the expression of GHB-induced LORR in GHB-R male rats. These results suggest that the GHB-induced increases of brain 3alpha,5alpha-THP and 3alpha,5alpha

  19. Risk of Psychiatric Disorders in Patients with Chronic Insomnia and Sedative-Hypnotic Prescription: A Nationwide Population-Based Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kuo-Hsuan; Li, Chung-Yi; Kuo, Shu-Yu; Sithole, Trevor; Liu, Wen-Wei; Chung, Min-Huey

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Previous epidemiological studies have established insomnia as a major risk factor for mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. However, the associations between insomnia with sedative-hypnotic prescriptions and various psychiatric disorders have not been thoroughly examined. The current study involved evaluating the risk of psychiatric disorders, namely schizophrenia, mood, anxiety, somatoform, and substance-related disorders, over a 6-y follow-up period in three groups: patients with insomnia and sedative-hypnotic prescriptions (Inso-Hyp), those with insomnia and without sedative-hypnotic prescriptions (Inso-NonHyp), and those with neither insomnia nor sedative-hypnotic prescriptions (NonInso-NonHyp). Methods: We used a historical cohort study design to compare the risk of psychiatric disorders among the three groups. Data regarding these patients were derived from reimbursement claims recorded in Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to compare the 6-y risk of subsequent psychiatric disorders among the Inso-Hyp, Inso-NonHyp, and NonInso-NonHyp groups. Results: Compared with the Inso-NonHyp and NonInso-NonHyp group patients, the Inso-Hyp group patients exhibited a higher risk of psychiatric disorders, particularly bipolar disorders (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 7.60; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.31–10.89 and AHR: 14.69; 95% CI: 11.11–19.43, respectively). Moreover, among the Inso-Hyp patient group, insomnia prescribed with benzodiazepine, a longer duration of sedative-hypnotic action, and higher doses of sedativehypnotics were significantly associated with a higher risk of depressive and anxiety disorders. Conclusion: The Inso-Hyp group exhibited a higher risk of developing psychiatric disorders than did the Inso-NonHyp and NonInso-NonHyp groups. The results regarding patients with insomnia and sedative-hypnotic prescriptions associated with the risk of psychiatric disorders

  20. Screening of central functions of amino acids and their metabolites for sedative and hypnotic effects using chick models.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2015-09-01

    The chick has a practical advantage in the screening process in that chicks require only small quantities of drugs. The chick separation stress paradigm has traditionally been recognized as a valid form of anxiolytic screening. Further, chick behavior involving standing motionless with eyes closed or sitting motionless with head drooped is nearly always associated with electrophysiological sleep. When centrally administered, some DNA-encoded L-α-amino acids, as well as some DNA-non-encoded amino acids, such as metabolites of L-α-amino acids, D-amino acid and β-amino acid, have shown sedative and/or hypnotic effects in chicks. The effects of some of these amino acids have subsequently been confirmed in humans. In conclusion, the chick model is convenient and useful for screening central functions of amino acids and their metabolites for hypnosis and sedation. PMID:26101060

  1. Pain-reduction strategies in hypnotic context and hypnosis: ERPs and SCRs during a secondary auditory task.

    PubMed

    De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Bellusci, Anna; Gallo, Carlo; Magurano, Maria Rosaria; Chen, Andrew C N

    2004-10-01

    Pain-rating scores were obtained from 10 high, 10 medium, and 10 low hypnotizable subjects who were holding a painful cold bottle in their left hands and were exposed to pain reduction treatments while they were performing a secondary oddball task. All subjects received suggestions of dissociative imagery and focused analgesia as cognitive strategies for pain reduction. The following measures were obtained for tone targets of the auditory oddball task: (a) reaction time; (b) P300 peak amplitude of the event-related potentials; (c) skin conductance levels and skin conductance responses. Focused analgesia produced the most pain reduction in high, but not medium or low, hypnotizable subjects who showed shorter reaction times, higher central and parietal P300 peaks, and higher skin conductance responses. These findings were discussed vis-a-vis the dissociated-control model assuming that capacity demands of hypnotic suggestion are low. PMID:15590503

  2. [Hypno-analysis: On the integration of hypnotic elements in individual uncovering psychotherapy in patients with anxiety disorder].

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, R

    2001-01-01

    Following a short history of the development of the therapeutic techniques of psychoanalysis as derived from the basic rules of hypnosis, the apparent contradictions between the two approaches are called into question, with particular reference to the importance and efficacy of suggestion and suggestibility in both methods. How the integration of hypnotic interventions can both intensify and at the same time shorten the process of analytic therapy is demonstrated by two vignettes. The range of indications for the use of hypnosis as a complementary measure is currently restricted to the analysis of resistance and of the making conscious of past traumatic experiences that are involved in the psychogenesis of anxiety disorders. Particular importance is attached to the careful establishment of the indication and then psychoanalytic working-through of the accompanying transference-countertransference-dynamics following the completion of the hypno-analytic phase and in the course of the ongoing uncovering therapeutic process. PMID:11568865

  3. Effect of pretreatment with pentobarbital on the extent of (/sup 14/C) incorporation from (U-/sup 14/C)glucose into various rat brain glycolytic intermediates: relevance to regulation at hexokinase and phosphofructokinase

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.P.; Mayer, S.; Braun, L.D.; Geiger, P.; Oldendorf, W.H.

    1988-04-01

    In the present investigation we monitored the incorporation of (14C) from (U-14C)glucose into various rat brain glycolytic intermediates of conscious and pentobarbital-anesthetized animals. Labeled glucose was delivered to brain by single bolus intracarotid injection and brain tissue was subsequently prepared at 15, 30, and 45 sec by freeze-blowing. Glycolytic intermediates were then separated by column chromatography. Our results showed a gradual decrease with time of 14C-labeled glucose which gave a calculated rate for glucose metabolism of 0.86 mumol/min/g and 0.56 mumol/min/g in conscious and anesthetized animals, respectively. Compared to the results obtained using conscious animals the administration of pentobarbital not only resulted in a significant attenuation of the rate of glucose metabolism but also caused a similar reduction in the amount of 14C incorporated into several glycolytic intermediates. These intermediates included: glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 6-phosphate, fructose 1,6 diphosphate, dihydroxyacetone phosphate and post glycolytic compounds. In addition, pretreatment with pentobarbital resulted in a 75% increase in the endogenous concentration of glucose, 10% increase in glucose 6-phosphate, no change in fructose 6-phosphate and 42% decrease in lactate compared to levels in brains obtained from conscious animals. These results are discussed in relation to control of glycolysis through coupled regulation at hexokinase-phosphofructokinase.

  4. Respiratory depression in rats induced by alcohol and barbiturate and rescue by ampakine CX717

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jun; Ding, Xiuqing

    2012-01-01

    Barbiturate use in conjunction with alcohol can result in severe respiratory depression and overdose deaths. The mechanisms underlying the additive/synergistic actions were unresolved. Current management of ethanol-barbiturate-induced apnea is limited to ventilatory and circulatory support coupled with drug elimination. Based on recent preclinical and clinical studies of opiate-induced respiratory depression, we hypothesized that ampakine compounds may provide a treatment for other types of drug-induced respiratory depression. The actions of alcohol, pentobarbital, bicuculline, and the ampakine CX717, alone and in combination, were measured via 1) ventral root recordings from newborn rat brain stem-spinal cord preparations and 2) plethysmographic recordings from unrestrained newborn and adult rats. We found that ethanol caused a modest suppression of respiratory drive in vitro (50 mM) and in vivo (2 g/kg ip). Pentobarbital induced an ∼50% reduction in respiratory frequency in vitro (50 μM) and in vivo (28 mg/kg for pups and 56 mg/kg for adult rats ip). However, severe life-threatening apnea was induced by the combination of the agents in vitro and in vivo via activation of GABAA receptors, which was exacerbated by hypoxic (8% O2) conditions. Administration of the ampakine CX717 alleviated a significant component of the respiratory depression in vitro (50–150 μM) and in vivo (30 mg/kg ip). Bicuculline also alleviated ethanol-/pentobarbital-induced respiratory depression but caused seizure activity, whereas CX717 did not. These data demonstrated that ethanol and pentobarbital together caused severe respiratory depression, including lethal apnea, via synergistic actions that blunt chemoreceptive responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia and suppress central respiratory rhythmogenesis. The ampakine CX717 markedly reduced the severity of respiratory depression. PMID:22837171

  5. Respiratory depression in rats induced by alcohol and barbiturate and rescue by ampakine CX717.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Ding, Xiuqing; Greer, John J

    2012-10-01

    Barbiturate use in conjunction with alcohol can result in severe respiratory depression and overdose deaths. The mechanisms underlying the additive/synergistic actions were unresolved. Current management of ethanol-barbiturate-induced apnea is limited to ventilatory and circulatory support coupled with drug elimination. Based on recent preclinical and clinical studies of opiate-induced respiratory depression, we hypothesized that ampakine compounds may provide a treatment for other types of drug-induced respiratory depression. The actions of alcohol, pentobarbital, bicuculline, and the ampakine CX717, alone and in combination, were measured via 1) ventral root recordings from newborn rat brain stem-spinal cord preparations and 2) plethysmographic recordings from unrestrained newborn and adult rats. We found that ethanol caused a modest suppression of respiratory drive in vitro (50 mM) and in vivo (2 g/kg ip). Pentobarbital induced an ∼50% reduction in respiratory frequency in vitro (50 μM) and in vivo (28 mg/kg for pups and 56 mg/kg for adult rats ip). However, severe life-threatening apnea was induced by the combination of the agents in vitro and in vivo via activation of GABA(A) receptors, which was exacerbated by hypoxic (8% O(2)) conditions. Administration of the ampakine CX717 alleviated a significant component of the respiratory depression in vitro (50-150 μM) and in vivo (30 mg/kg ip). Bicuculline also alleviated ethanol-/pentobarbital-induced respiratory depression but caused seizure activity, whereas CX717 did not. These data demonstrated that ethanol and pentobarbital together caused severe respiratory depression, including lethal apnea, via synergistic actions that blunt chemoreceptive responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia and suppress central respiratory rhythmogenesis. The ampakine CX717 markedly reduced the severity of respiratory depression. PMID:22837171

  6. Effects of sedative and hypnotic drug combinations on transcranial magnetic motor evoked potential, bispectral index and ARX-derived auditory evoked potential index in dogs.

    PubMed

    Van Soens, Iris; Struys, Michel M; Polis, Ingeborgh E; Tshamala, Mulenda; Nollet, Heidi; Bhatti, Sofie F; Van Ham, Luc M

    2009-08-01

    Relationships between onset latency and peak-to-peak amplitude of magnetic motor evoked potentials (MMEP) after transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), together with the electroencephalographic parameters bispectral analysis index (BIS) and the autoregressive model with exogenous input (ARX)-derived auditory evoked potential index (AAI) were explored during different sedative and hypnotic drug combinations in six dogs. TMS was performed under sedation with acepromazine/methadone or medetomidine and after a single bolus injection of propofol or etomidate. Data for BIS and AAI were continuously collected during the periods of treatment with the hypnotic drugs. Changes in BIS and AAI during both periods were not statistically correlated with changes in onset latencies and peak-to-peak amplitudes of MMEP after TMS. Therefore, both electroencephalographic techniques are of limited use in titrating sedation and anaesthesia during TMS in the dog. PMID:18682332

  7. [From alcohol to liquid ecstasy (GHB)--a survey of old and modern knockout agents. Part 2: benzodiazepines and other sedatives/hypnotic drugs].

    PubMed

    Schütz, Harald; Jansen, Malin; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2011-01-01

    Owing to the rapid progress in the development of synthetic pharmaceuticals, the classical knockout drugs such as chloroform and diethyl ether have been superseded by highly effective sedative and hypnotic drugs (e. g. methyprylone, clozapine and especially benzodiazepines). These are frequently given to the victim unnoticed by adding them to an alcoholic drink. In this way, alcohol still plays an important role as an interaction partner. The article presents relevant case examples together with their criminalistic background. PMID:22276365

  8. Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Patients With Nonapnea Sleep Disorders in Using Different Types of Hypnotics: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Ling; Yeh, Mei-Chang; Harnod, Tomor; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-09-01

    There has been insufficient evidence on whether exposure to hypnotics affects the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The aim of this study was to examine patients with nonapnea sleep disorders using zolpidem, benzodiazepines (BZDs), or a combination of both, and their risk of T2DM. This was a population-based retrospective cohort study using data from 1997 to 2011. Data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database were employed for this study. A total of 45,602 patients with nonapnea sleep disorders and use of hypnotics were identified as the study cohort. The control cohort comprised 40,799 age- and sex-matched patients. We conducted a Cox proportional hazard regression analysis to estimate the effects of hypnotics on risk of T2DM. The overall incidence of T2DM was 20.1 per 1000 person-years for patients using zolpidem, which was significantly higher than that of the control group (11.9 per 1000 person-years). Overall, patients with nonapnea sleep disorders using zolpidem had a higher risk of T2DM compared with patients not using zolpidem and the control cohort (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.35-1.48). We also observed a significantly higher risk of T2DM in patients with both zolpidem and BZD use (adjusted HR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.64-1.91) than that of those without zolpidem use and BZD use. Compared with patients not using hypnotics, patients using zolpidem had a higher risk of developing T2DM; the risk was particularly pronounced in those using both zolpidem and BZDs. PMID:26402831

  9. ‘Looking as Little Like Patients as Persons Well Could’: Hypnotism, Medicine and the Problem of the Suggestible Subject in Late Nineteenth-Century Britain

    PubMed Central

    Chettiar, Teri

    2012-01-01

    During the late nineteenth century, many British physicians rigorously experimented with hypnosis as a therapeutic practice. Despite mounting evidence attesting to its wide-ranging therapeutic uses publicised in the 1880s and 1890s, medical hypnosis remained highly controversial. After a decade and a half of extensive medical discussion and debate surrounding the adoption of hypnosis by mainstream medical professionals – including a thorough inquiry organised by the British Medical Association – it was decisively excluded from serious medical consideration by 1900. This essay examines the complex question of why hypnosis was excluded from professional medical practice by the end of the nineteenth century. Objections to its medical adoption rarely took issue with its supposed effectiveness in producing genuine therapeutic and anaesthetic results. Instead, critics’ objections were centred upon a host of social and moral concerns regarding the patient’s state of suggestibility and weakened ‘will-power’ while under the physician’s hypnotic ‘spell’. The problematic question of precisely how far hypnotic ‘rapport’ and suggestibility might depart from the Victorian liberal ideal of rational individual autonomy lay at the heart of these concerns. As this essay demonstrates, the hypnotism debate was characterised by a tension between physicians’ attempts to balance their commitment to restore patients to health and pervasive middle-class concerns about the rapid and ongoing changes transforming British society at the turn of the century. PMID:23002303

  10. Prescription trajectories and effect of total hip arthroplasty on the use of analgesics, hypnotics, antidepressants, and anxiolytics: results from a population of total hip arthroplasty patients.

    PubMed

    Blågestad, Tone; Nordhus, Inger H; Grønli, Janne; Engesæter, Lars B; Ruths, Sabine; Ranhoff, Anette H; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Pallesen, Ståle

    2016-03-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been shown to reduce pain and improve function. In addition, it is suggested that THA improves sleep and alleviates symptoms of anxiety and depression. Patients with chronic pain are frequent users of analgesic and psychotropic drugs and thereby risk adverse drug events. The impact of THA on such drug use has not been thoroughly investigated. Based on merged data from the Norwegian Prescription Database and the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register, this study sought to investigate redeemed medications in a complete population (N = 39,688) undergoing THA in 2005 to 2011. User rates and redeemed drug volume of analgesics (nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids, and nonopioids) and psychotropics (hypnotics, anxiolytics, and antidepressants) were calculated for 4 quarters before and 4 quarters after surgery. We analysed preoperative prescription trends (Q1 vs Q4), postoperative prescription (Q4 vs Q5), and long-term effect of surgery (Q4 vs Q8). Before surgery, use of all drug groups increased from Q1 to Q4. Use of opioids, nonopioids, and hypnotics dramatically increased from Q4 to Q5. Long-term (Q4 vs Q8) surgery reduced prescriptions of analgesics, hypnotics, and anxiolytics, but not antidepressants. Overall, the present results extend the positive effects of THA to include reduced reliance on medication to alleviate symptoms. PMID:26588693

  11. Combined use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and sedatives/hypnotics during pregnancy: risk of relatively severe congenital malformations or cardiac defects. A register study

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Margareta; Källén, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the proposed synergistic teratogenic effect of use of selective serotonin receptor inhibitors (SSRI) together with sedatives or hypnotics, primarily benzodiazepines, during pregnancy. Design Cohort study of congenital malformations after maternal use of SSRI, sedatives/hypnotics or the combination of the two drug categories. Setting Swedish national health registers. Participants A total of 10 511 infants born of women who had used SSRI drugs but no other central nervous system (CNS)-active drug, 1000 infants born of women who had used benzodiazepines and no other CNS-active drug, and 406 infants whose mothers had used both SSRI and benzodiazepines but no other CNS-active drug. Results None of the three groups showed a higher risk for any relatively severe congenital malformation or any cardiac defect when comparison was made with the general population risk (adjusted risk ratio (RR) for the combination of SSRI and benzodiazepines and a relatively severe malformation=1.17 (95% CI 0.70 to 1.73). Similar results were obtained for the combination of SSRI with other sedative/hypnotic drugs. Conclusions The previously stated increased risk associated with the combined use of these drug categories, notably for a cardiac defect, could not be replicated. PMID:23427202

  12. First Trimester Exposure to Anxiolytic and Hypnotic Drugs and the Risks of Major Congenital Anomalies: A United Kingdom Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Lu; West, Joe; Gibson, Jack E.; Fiaschi, Linda; Sokal, Rachel; Doyle, Pat; Hubbard, Richard; Smeeth, Liam; Tata, Laila J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite their widespread use the effects of taking benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine hypnotics during pregnancy on the risk of major congenital anomaly (MCA) are uncertain. The objectives were to estimate absolute and relative risks of MCAs in children exposed to specific anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs taken in the first trimester of pregnancy, compared with children of mothers with depression and/or anxiety but not treated with medication and children of mothers without diagnosed mental illness during pregnancy. Methods We identified singleton children born to women aged 15–45 years between 1990 and 2010 from a large United Kingdom primary care database. We calculated absolute risks of MCAs for children with first trimester exposures of different anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs and used logistic regression with a generalised estimating equation to compare risks adjusted for year of childbirth, maternal age, smoking, body mass index, and socioeconomic status. Results Overall MCA prevalence was 2.7% in 1,159 children of mothers prescribed diazepam, 2.9% in 379 children with temazepam, 2.5% in 406 children with zopiclone, and 2.7% in 19,193 children whose mothers had diagnosed depression and/or anxiety but no first trimester drug exposures. When compared with 2.7% in 351,785 children with no diagnosed depression/anxiety nor medication use, the adjusted odds ratios were 1.02 (99% confidence interval 0.63–1.64) for diazepam, 1.07 (0.49–2.37) for temazepam, 0.96 (0.42–2.20) for zopiclone and 1.27 (0.43–3.75) for other anxiolytic/hypnotic drugs and 1.01 (0.90–1.14) for un-medicated depression/anxiety. Risks of system-specific MCAs were generally similar in children exposed and not exposed to such medications. Conclusions We found no evidence for an increase in MCAs in children exposed to benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine hypnotics in the first trimester of pregnancy. These findings suggest that prescription of these drugs during early

  13. Intraoperative electrically elicited stapedius reflex threshold is related to the dosage of hypnotic drugs in general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Arthur; Berger, Frank Andreas; Weber, Benno Paul; Grouven, Ulrich; Niclaus, Oliver; Lüllwitz, Ekkehard; Schultz, Barbara

    2003-12-01

    Today cochlear implantation is a widely used means of treatment in deafness and severe hearing disorders in adults, children, and infants. Postoperative fitting of the externally worn speech processor is very important for successful use of the cochlear implant. However, especially in infants and young children, this fitting process can be difficult because of limited communication capabilities. The use of intraoperatively obtained stapedius reflex thresholds has been proposed for postoperative speech processor fitting, but the influence of anesthetics on threshold values needs to be taken into account. In a retrospective study with 20 patients between 3 and 43 years of age, a highly significant correlation between the dosage of methohexital and the mean stapedius reflex threshold value could be shown (r = 0.65, p = .002). We conclude that more reliable threshold values can be obtained by reducing the dosage of hypnotics to achieve a lighter level of hypnosis during stapedius reflex measurement. To achieve a light, but still sufficient level of hypnosis, electroencephalographic monitoring including automatic interpretation of the complex raw signal should be used. PMID:14703109

  14. Using Hypnotic Suggestion to Model Loss of Control and Awareness of Movements: An Exploratory fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, David A.; Bell, Vaughan; Koppel, Cristina; Mehta, Mitul A.; Halligan, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    The feeling of voluntary control and awareness of movement is fundamental to our notions of selfhood and responsibility for actions, yet can be lost in neuropsychiatric syndromes (e.g. delusions of control, non-epileptic seizures) and culturally influenced dissociative states (e.g. attributions of spirit possession). The brain processes involved remain poorly understood. We used suggestion and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate loss of control and awareness of right hand movements in 15 highly hypnotically suggestible subjects. Loss of perceived control of movements was associated with reduced connectivity between supplementary motor area (SMA) and motor regions. Reduced awareness of involuntary movements was associated with less activation in parietal cortices (BA 7, BA 40) and insula. Collectively these results suggest that the sense of voluntary control of movement may critically depend on the functional coupling of SMA with motor systems, and provide a potential neural basis for the narrowing of awareness reported in pathological and culturally influenced dissociative phenomena. PMID:24205198

  15. Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography with Tandem Mass Spectrometry for the Quantitation of Seventeen Sedative Hypnotics in Six Common Toxicological Matrices.

    PubMed

    Mata, Dani C; Davis, John F; Figueroa, Ariana K; Stanford, Mary June

    2016-01-01

    An ultra performance liquid chromatography triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method for the quantification of 14 benzodiazepines and three sedative hypnotics is presented. The fast and inexpensive assay was developed for California's Orange County Crime Lab for use in antemortem (AM) and postmortem casework. The drugs were rapidly cleaned up from AM blood, postmortem blood, urine, liver, brain and stomach contents using DPX(®) Weak Anion Exchange (DPX WAX) tips fitted on a pneumatic extractor, which can process up to 48 samples at one time. Assay performance was determined for validation based on recommendations by the Scientific Working Group for Forensic Toxicology for linearity, limit of quantitation, limit of detection, bias, precision (within run and between run), dilution integrity, carry-over, selectivity, recovery, ion suppression and extracted sample stability. Linearity was verified using the therapeutic and toxic ranges of all 17 analytes. Final verification of the method was confirmed by four analysts using 20 blind matrix matched samples. All results were within 20% of each other and the expected value. PMID:26374882

  16. The hypnotic zolpidem increases the synchrony of BOLD signal fluctuations in widespread brain networks during a resting paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Licata, Stephanie C.; Nickerson, Lisa D.; Lowen, Steven B.; Trksak, George H.; MacLean, Robert R.; Lukas, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Networks of brain regions having synchronized fluctuations of the blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) time-series at rest, or “resting state networks” (RSNs), are emerging as a basis for understanding intrinsic brain activity. RSNs are topographically consistent with activity-related networks subserving sensory, motor, and cognitive processes, and studying their spontaneous fluctuations following acute drug challenge may provide a way to understand better the neuroanatomical substrates of drug action. The present within-subject double-blind study used BOLD fMRI at 3T to investigate the functional networks influenced by the non-benzodiazepine hypnotic zolpidem (Ambien®). Zolpidem is a positive modulator of γ-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptors, and engenders sedative effects that may be explained in part by how it modulates intrinsic brain activity. Healthy participants (n= 12) underwent fMRI scanning 45 min after acute oral administration of zolpidem (0, 5, 10, or 20 mg), and changes in BOLD signal were measured while participants gazed at a static fixation point (i.e., at rest). Data were analyzed using group independent component analysis (ICA) with dual regression and results indicated that compared to placebo, the highest dose of zolpidem increased functional connectivity within a number of sensory, motor, and limbic networks. These results are consistent with previous studies showing an increase in functional connectivity at rest following administration of the positive GABAA receptor modulators midazolam and alcohol, and suggest that investigating how zolpidem modulates intrinsic brain activity may have implications for understanding the etiology of its powerful sedative effects. PMID:23296183

  17. To what extent is it possible to dissociate the anxiolytic and sedative/hypnotic properties of GABAA receptors modulators?

    PubMed

    Chagraoui, A; Skiba, M; Thuillez, C; Thibaut, F

    2016-11-01

    The relatively common view indicates a possible dissociation between the anxiolytic and sedative/hypnotic properties of benzodiazepines (BZs). Indeed, GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subtypes have specific cerebral distribution in distinct neural circuits. Thus, GABAAR subtype-selective drugs may be expected to perform distinct functions. However, standard behavioral test assays provide limited direction towards highlighting new action mechanisms of ligands targeting GABAARs. Automated behavioral tests, lack sensitivity as some behavioral characteristics or subtle behavioral changes of drug effects or that are not considered in the overall analysis (Ohl et al., 2001) and observation-based analyses are not always performed. In addition, despite the use of genetically engineered mice, any possible dissociation between the anxiolytic and sedative properties of BZs remains controversial. Moreover, the involvement the different subtypes of GABAAR subtypes in the anxious behavior and the mechanism of action of anxiolytic agents remains unclear since there has been little success in the pharmacological investigations so far. This raises the question of the involvement of the different subunits in anxiolytic-like and/or sedative effects; and the actual implication of these subunits, particularly, α-subunits in the modulation of sedation and/or anxiety-related disorders. This present review was prompted by several conflicting studies on the degree of involvement of these subunits in anxiolytic-like and/or sedative effects. To this end, we explored the GABAergic system, particularly, the role of different subunits containing synaptic GABAARs. We report herein the targeting gene encoding the different subunits and their contribution in anxiolytic-like and/or sedative actions, as well as, the mechanism underlying tolerance to BZs. PMID:27495357

  18. Effect of Sub hypnotic Doses of Propofol and Midazolam for Nausea and Vomiting During Spinal Anesthesia for Cesarean Section

    PubMed Central

    Rasooli, Sousan; Moslemi, Farnaz; Khaki, Arash

    2014-01-01

    Background: Spinal anesthesia has been associated with intraoperative nausea and vomiting (IONV), especially during cesarean section, which is attributed to several mechanisms. Objectives: In the present study, therapeutic and preventive properties of sub hypnotic dose midazolam and propofol and their effects on the occurrence and severity of intraoperative nausea and vomiting during elective cesarean section under spinal anesthesia were evaluated. Patients and Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled clinical trial, 90 parturients, ASA class I and II, aged 20-30 years, who undergone spinal anesthesia for cesarean section were randomly allocated to one of three groups receiving midazolam (1 mg bolus and 0.1 mg/kg/hr, n=30), propofol (20 mg bolus and 0.1 mg/kg/hr, n = 30), and placebo (saline, n=30) intravenously (IV) immediately after umbilical cord clamping. Bupivacaine hydrochloride (10 mg) was used for induction of the anesthesia. Patients’ hemodynamics was monitored at 3-minute intervals. Furthermore, intraoperative and post-delivery emetic episodes, severity of emesis, scores of sedation and ephedrine consumption were recorded. Results: The incidence of nausea, retching, and vomiting was significantly higher in the control group compared to propofol and midazolam groups. Overall, PONV (postoperative nausea and vomiting) in midazolam group was as low as propofol group without any significant hemodynamic changes as seen in placebo group or even with propofol group. Conclusions: Subhypnotic doses of midazolam or propofol are effective in the prevention of nausea and vomiting during and after cesarean section with spinal anesthesia and does not significantly influence hemodynamic of the patients. PMID:25346896

  19. Understanding and reducing the prescription of hypnotics and sedatives at the interface of hospital care and general practice: a protocol for a mixed-methods study

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Stephanie; Weiß, Vivien; Straube, Kati; Nau, Roland; Grimmsmann, Thomas; Himmel, Wolfgang; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hypnotics and sedatives, especially benzodiazepines and Z-drugs, are frequently prescribed for longer periods than recommended—in spite of potential risks for patients. Any intervention to improve this situation has to take into account the interplay between different actors, interests and needs. The ultimate goal of this study is to develop—together with the professionals involved—ideas for reducing the use of hypnotics and sedatives and then to implement and evaluate adequate interventions in the hospital and at the primary and secondary care interface. Methods and analysis The study will take place in a regional hospital in northern Germany and in some general practices in this region. We will collect data from doctors, nurses, patients and a major social health insurer to define the problem from multiple perspectives. These data will be explored and discussed with relevant stakeholders to develop interventions. The interventions will be implemented and, in a final step, evaluated. Both quantitative and qualitative data, including surveys, interviews, chart reviews and secondary analysis of social health insurance data, will be collected to obtain a full understanding of the frequency and the reasons for using hypnotics and sedatives. Ethics and dissemination Approval has been granted from the ethics review committee of the University Medical Center Göttingen, Germany. Results will be disseminated to researchers, clinicians and policy makers in peer-reviewed journal articles and conference publications. One or more dissemination events will be held locally during continuous professional development events for local professionals, including (but not confined to) the study participants. PMID:27496238

  20. CNS depressant activities of roots of Coccos nucifera in mice.

    PubMed

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Sarkar, Abhijit; Gain, Sumanta; Jana, Sandip; Mandal, Soumit

    2011-01-01

    The ethanol extract of Coccos nucifera (EECN) was tested for possible pharmacological effects on experimental animals. EECN significantly potentiated the sleeping time of mice induced by standard hypnotics viz. pentobarbital sodium, diazepam, and meprobamate in a dose dependent manner. EECN showed significant analgesic properties as evidenced by the significant reduction in the number of writhes and stretches induced in mice by 1.2% acetic acid solution. It also potentiated analgesia induced by morphine and pethidine in mice. Pretreatment with EECN caused significant protection against pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions. The behavioral studies on mice indicate CNS depressant activity of the ethanol extract of C. nucifera. PMID:21485298

  1. CNS activities of ethanol extract of aerial parts of Hygrophila difformis in mice.

    PubMed

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Samanta, Krishanu

    2011-01-01

    The ethanol extract of aerial parts of Hygrophila difformis (EEHD) was tested for possible pharmacological effects on experimental animals. EEHD significantly potentiated the sleeping time of mice induced by standard hypnotics, viz. pentobarbital sodium, diazepam, and meprobamate in a dose dependent manner. EEHD showed significant analgesic properties as evidenced by the significant reduction in the number of writhes and stretches induced in mice by 1.2% acetic acid solution. It also potentiated analgesia induced by morphine and pethidine in mice. Pretreatment with EEHD caused significant protection against strychnine and leptazol-induced convulsions. The behavioral studies on mice indicate CNS depressant activity of the ethanol extract of H. difformis. PMID:21485704

  2. A mouse model mimicking human first night effect for the evaluation of hypnotics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Xu, Xin-Hong; Qu, Wei-Min; Lazarus, Michael; Urade, Yoshihiro; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2014-01-01

    In humans, a first night effect (FNE) is characterized by increased sleep latency and decreased total sleep time in an unfamiliar environment, but the mechanism and treatment options for this universally experienced acute insomnia are unclear. We continuously recorded electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) and measured plasma corticosterone levels to develop a mouse FNE model by inducing acute insomnia in mice that have been placed in unfamiliar cage environments. The sleep latency of mice 'moved to clean cages' (MCC) was longer than that for mice 'moved to dirty ones' (MDC). As compared to MDC mice, MCC mice showed stronger decreases in the amount of non-rapid eye movement (non-REM, NREM) and REM sleep, with a lower power density of NREM sleep, increased fragmentation and decreased stage transitions from NREM sleep to wake, and higher variation in plasma corticosterone levels. Treatment of MCC mice with zolpidem, diazepam, raclopride, pyrilamine, except SCH23390 shortened NREM sleep latency. In addition, zolpidem significantly increased NREM and REM sleep with the increase in slow wave activity (1.00-2.75 Hz), while raclopride significantly increased NREM and REM sleep without changing the EEG power density in MCC mice, whereas diazepam increased sleep with a drastic decrease in power density of the frequency band between 1.00 and 4.00 Hz, diazepam also increased the frequency band between 9.75 and 24.75 Hz during NREM sleep. These results indicate that a MCC mouse can mimic a FNE phenotype of humans and that zolpidem and raclopride may be useful drugs to prevent acute insomnia, including FNE. PMID:24316349

  3. Serotoninergic involvement in ethanol-induced alterations of thermoregulation in long-sleep and short-sleep mice.

    PubMed

    French, T A; Weiner, N

    1991-11-01

    The effect of ethanol and pentobarbital on in vivo tryptophan hydroxylase activity and its relationship to drug-induced alterations of thermoregulation was examined in long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice. Serotonin function was measured in both the presence and absence of ethanol or pentobarbital in six discrete brain regions. Differences in basal levels of serotonin, 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid or in vivo tryptophan hydroxylase (TpH) activity were found only in the hypothalamus and dorsal raphe nuclei (SS slightly higher). Ethanol (4.2 g/kg i.p) caused significant reductions in in vivo TpH activity in the dorsal and pontine-medullary raphe nuclei and hypothalamus (putative thermoregulatory areas) in both LS (50-60% decrease) and SS (15-30% decrease) mice, but it had no effect on TpH activity in the striatum, cortex or hippocampus. The greater degree of ethanol-induced reduction in TpH activity in LS mice was associated with a greater degree of hypothermia (LS, 4.2 degrees C vs SS, 2.0 degrees C). Pentobarbital had equivalent effects in LS and SS mice on TpH activity in central nervous system thermoregulatory areas (decreases of 40-60%) and on body temperature (decreases of 6.8-7.5 degrees C). When the mice were given ethanol at an elevated environmental temperature (34 degrees C) the hypothermia was almost abolished completely, but depressant effects on TpH activity remained, suggesting that ethanol-induced decreases in TpH activity were direct effects and not secondary to hypothermia. Alterations in ethanol or pentobarbital elimination did not appear to account for the observed differences.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1941631

  4. Synthesis, Anticonvulsant, Sedative and Anxiolytic Activities of Novel Annulated Pyrrolo[1,4]benzodiazepines

    PubMed Central

    Sorra, Kumaraswamy; Chen, Chien-Shu; Chang, Chi-Fen; Pusuluri, Srinivas; Mukkanti, Khagga; Wu, Chi-Rei; Chuang, Ta-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Four new pentacyclic benzodiazepine derivatives (PBDTs 13–16) were synthesized by conventional thermal heating and microwave-assisted intramolecular cyclocondensation. Their anticonvulsant, sedative and anxiolytic activities were evaluated by drug-induced convulsion models, a pentobarbital-induced hypnotic model and an elevated plus maze in mice. PBDT 13, a triazolopyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepin-8-one fused with a thiadiazolone ring, exhibited the best anticonvulsant, sedative and anxiolytic effects in our tests. There was no significant difference in potency between PBDT 13 and diazepam, and we proposed that the action mechanism of PBDT 13 could be similar to that of diazepam via benzodiazepine receptors. PMID:25238414

  5. Use of Hypnotic Techniques in Children and Adolescents with Chronic Pain: Do the Ages of Patients or Years of Practice and Theoretical Orientation of Clinicians Matter?

    PubMed

    Tomé-Pires, Catarina; Solé, Ester; Racine, Mélanie; de la Vega, Rocío; Castarlenas, Elena; Jensen, Mark P; Miró, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Hypnosis is known to be effective in the treatment of pediatric pain. To better understand which strategies might be most useful, more knowledge is needed regarding the strategies that are actually used by experienced clinicians and the factors that influence their use. To address this knowledge gap, 35 health care professionals completed an online survey on the use of hypnosis in the management of pediatric chronic pain. The findings indicate that clinicians vary their use of hypnotic strategies primarily as a function of a patient's age but not as a function of theoretical orientation or amount of experience. The findings may be useful for guiding clinicians in their selection of strategies and suggestions when working with children with pain. PMID:27585730

  6. Topiramate-induced somnambulism in a migraineur: a probable idiosyncratic adverse effect.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Thomas; Sarma, G R K; Nadig, Raghunandan; Varghese, Raji

    2012-04-15

    Somnambulism (sleepwalking) is a disorder of arousal that falls under "parasomnia" group and is more common in children. These phenomena occur as primary sleep events or secondary to systemic disease or can be drug induced. Medications that can cause sleepwalking include neuroleptics, hypnotics, lithium, amitriptyline, and β-blockers. This report presents an unusual adverse effect of topiramate on sleep in a patient with migraine. PMID:22505867

  7. Psychedelic drugs, hippie counterculture, speed and phenobarbital treatment of sedative-hypnotic dependence: a journey to the Haight Ashbury in the Sixties.

    PubMed

    Wesson, Donald R

    2011-01-01

    The 1960s were a time of social upheaval, wars, vibrant creativity and missed opportunity. Mainstream culture and a psychedelic drug-using counterculture shared a belief in "better living through chemistry'," but they disagreed about the particular chemistry. The Vietnam war and the cold war with the Soviet Union, racial discrimination, and gender roles fueled political activism. "Yes we can" was not a slogan of the time but political activists clearly believed they could change the beliefs, attitudes and behavior of mainstream culture; and they did. Hippie counterculture on the other hand was largely alienated and strove primarily to develop a separate culture with its own mores, beliefs and lifestyles. Although there was some overlap between hippies and activists, hippies didn't generally have the same sense of political empowerment. Hippie enclaves developed in New York; Boston; Seattle; Austin, Texas and elsewhere; but the epicenter was arguably the Haight-Asbury District of San Francisco. Psychedelic drugs, marijuana and the Vietnam war were among many wedge issues. This paper conjures up a personal history related to the evolution of the hippie counterculture, changing drug use patterns in the Haight-Ashbury, and the origins of a technique of withdrawing patients from barbiturates and other sedative-hypnotics using phenobarbital variously known as the "Phenobarbital Withdrawal Protocol, or the "Smith and Wesson Protocol." PMID:21858961

  8. Zolpidem-induced amnesia and somnambulism: rare occurrences?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jui-Hsiu; Yang, Pinchen; Chen, Cheng-Chung; Chung, Weilum; Tang, Tze-Chun; Wang, Shing-Yaw; Liu, Jong-Kang

    2009-01-01

    Zolpidem, a non-benzodiazepine hypnotic of the imidazopyridine class, is very effective in treating insomnia with previous claims of little adverse effects. However, zolpidem-induced somnambulism and amnesic sleep-related behavioral problems were begun to be reported in literature but no systemic investigation has been undertaken in non-Western cultures. In our current retrospective survey, 5.1% (13 out of 255) of Taiwanese patients reported change in sleep-related behavior as adverse effects. This serves as a reminder for clinicians to inquire regarding any unusual behavior of parasomniac activities when prescribing zolpidem. PMID:18819779

  9. Topiramate-Induced Somnambulism in a Migraineur: A Probable Idiosyncratic Adverse Effect

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Thomas; Sarma, G. R. K.; Nadig, Raghunandan; Varghese, Raji

    2012-01-01

    Somnambulism (sleepwalking) is a disorder of arousal that falls under “parasomnia” group and is more common in children. These phenomena occur as primary sleep events or secondary to systemic disease or can be drug induced. Medications that can cause sleepwalking include neuroleptics, hypnotics, lithium, amitriptyline, and β-blockers.1 This report presents an unusual adverse effect of topiramate on sleep in a patient with migraine. Citation: Mathew T; Sarma GRK; Nadig R; Varghese R. Topiramate-induced somnambulism in a migraineur: a probable idiosyncratic adverse effect. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(2):197-198. PMID:22505867

  10. Relevance of anaesthesia for dofetilide-induced torsades de pointes in α1-adrenoceptor-stimulated rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Vincze, D; Farkas, A S; Rudas, L; Makra, P; Csík, N; Leprán, I; Forster, T; Csanády, M; Papp, J G; Varró, A; Farkas, A

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: No information is available concerning the effects of anaesthetics in the most frequently used in vivo pro-arrhythmia model. Accordingly, in this study we examined the effect of pentobarbital, propofol or α-chloralose anaesthesia on the pro-arrhythmic activity of the class III anti-arrhythmic dofetilide in α1-adrenoceptor-stimulated rabbits. Experimental approach: Rabbits anaesthetized intravenously with pentobarbital, propofol or α-chloralose were infused simultaneously with the α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine (15 μg kg−1 min−1, i.v.) and dofetilide (0.04 mg kg−1 min−1, i.v.). The electrocardiographic QT interval, the T peak–T end interval and certain QT variability parameters were measured. The heart rate variability and the baroreflex sensitivity were utilized to assess the vagal nerve activity. The spectral power of the systolic arterial pressure was calculated in the frequency range 0.15–0.5 Hz to assess the sympathetic activity. Key results: Pentobarbital considerably reduced, whereas propofol did not significantly affect the incidence of dofetilide-induced torsades de pointes (TdP) as compared with the results with α-chloralose (40% (P=0.011) and 70% (P=0.211) vs 100%, respectively). In additional experiments, neither doubling of the rate of the dofetilide infusion nor tripling of the rate of phenylephrine infusion elevated the incidence of TdP to the level seen with α-chloralose. None of the repolarization-related parameters predicted TdP. The indices of the parasympathetic and sympathetic activity were significantly depressed in the α-chloralose and propofol anaesthesia groups. Conclusions and implications: In rabbits, anaesthetics may affect drug-induced TdP genesis differently, which must be considered when results of different studies are compared. PMID:17965737

  11. Development of an ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry method for the rapid detection and confirmation of illegal adulterated sedative-hypnotics in dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuyin; Tan, Huijie; Guo, Changchuan; Gong, Liping; Shi, Feng

    2015-01-01

    A novel method using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap) was developed and validated for the simultaneous screening, identification and quantification of sedative-hypnotics in dietary supplements. Chromatographic conditions were optimised and a full data-dependent MS(2) scan (MS/dd-MS(2)) in positive and negative ion mode was used. A single injection was sufficient to perform the simultaneous screening and identification/quantification of samples. The response showed a good linear relationship with analyte concentrations over wide ranges (e.g., 1.0-1000 ng g(-1) for diazepam) with all the determination coefficients (r(2)) > 0.9985. The method was validated, obtaining accuracy (intra- and inter-day) in the range of 94.5-105.3% and precision (intra- and inter-day) in the range of 0.4-8.9%, respectively. The detection limits (LODs) were in the range of 0.3-1.0 ng g(-1) for different analytes. Recoveries were performed and ranged from 74.1% to 90.2%, while all matrix effects were over the range of 85.4-93.6%. Finally, this method was used to detect sedative-hypnotics in commercial dietary supplements. Of a total of 45 batches of dietary supplements, only three batches were found to be positive samples with concentrations of diazepam, clonazepam and alprazolam at high levels (≥ 8.22 mg g(-1)). PMID:25906388

  12. Cognitive Factors in Hypnotic Susceptibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Robert D.; Field, Peter B.

    1971-01-01

    This research explored the influence of cognitive variables on susceptibility to hypnosis. The three variables of concern in the present study are automatization, attention, and body experience. The results are summarized. (Author)

  13. 21 CFR 522.1704 - Pentobarbital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... The drug is administered intravenously “to effect”. For general surgical anesthesia, the usual dose is... for use. The drug is indicated for use as a general anesthetic in dogs and cats. Although it may be used as a general surgical anesthetic for horses, it is usually given at a lower dose to cause...

  14. Suggestion-Induced Modulation of Semantic Priming during Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Martin; Kiefer, Markus; Bongartz, Walter; Grön, Georg; Hoenig, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging during a primed visual lexical decision task, we investigated the neural and functional mechanisms underlying modulations of semantic word processing through hypnotic suggestions aimed at altering lexical processing of primes. The priming task was to discriminate between target words and pseudowords presented 200 ms after the prime word which was semantically related or unrelated to the target. In a counterbalanced study design, each participant performed the task once at normal wakefulness and once after the administration of hypnotic suggestions to perceive the prime as a meaningless symbol of a foreign language. Neural correlates of priming were defined as significantly lower activations upon semantically related compared to unrelated trials. We found significant suggestive treatment-induced reductions in neural priming, albeit irrespective of the degree of suggestibility. Neural priming was attenuated upon suggestive treatment compared with normal wakefulness in brain regions supporting automatic (fusiform gyrus) and controlled semantic processing (superior and middle temporal gyri, pre- and postcentral gyri, and supplementary motor area). Hence, suggestions reduced semantic word processing by conjointly dampening both automatic and strategic semantic processes. PMID:25923740

  15. Endothelium attenuates ethanol induced vasoconstriction of arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Morley, D.; Bove, A.A.; Walter, J. )

    1990-02-26

    The authors have previously demonstrated that clinically relevant doses of ethanol (ETH) caused significant vasoconstriction of rabbit thoracic aorta. This study examined the role of endothelium in ethanol vasoconstriction. Thoracic aorta was harvested from 3 New Zealand White rabbits after anesthetization with sodium pentobarbital. Twelve aortic 3 mm rings were mounted in organ baths attached to force transducers and recording apparatus. Six of the twelve rings were denuded. Denudation was confirmed by challenge with acetylcholine (10-4 M). Resting tension was set at 10 grams and the rings equilibrated in 37 C Krebs-Heinsleit solution for 2 hours. Then, the response to norepinephrine (NE) was established (10-8 to 10-5 M). After reattaining resting tension, the response to ETH (500-2,500 ug/ml) was recorded. ETH produced significant vasoconstriction in both non-denuded (48{plus minus}7% of NE max) and denuded (58{plus minus}2% of NE max) arteries. Vasoconstriction was significantly higher in the denuded condition. The authors conclude that the predominant ETH action on arteries is based in vascular smooth muscle although endothelium acts to attenuate the ETH induced vasoconstrictor response.

  16. Jujuboside A, a neuroprotective agent from semen Ziziphi Spinosae ameliorates behavioral disorders of the dementia mouse model induced by Aβ 1-42.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi; Zhao, Xu; Liu, Bing; Liu, Ai-jing; Li, Huan; Mao, Xin; Wu, Bo; Bi, Kai-shun; Jia, Ying

    2014-09-01

    Semen Ziziphi Spinosae (SZS) has been used as a hypnotic-sedative medicine for thousands of years. Recently, SZS has also shown notable neuroprotective activities via anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects in dementia animals. Jujuboside A (JuA), isolated from SZS, has been proved to be a major hypnotic-sedative component of SZS. In the present study, we firstly evaluated the effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of JuA (0.02 and 0.2mg/kg) for five consecutive days on cognitive impairment induced by ICV injection of Aβ 1-42. The results showed that ICV treatment with JuA significantly mitigated learning and memory impairment in mice induced by Aβ 1-42 as measured by the Y-maze, active avoidance and Morris water maze. Furthermore, ICV treatment with JuA reduced the level of Aβ 1-42 in hippocampus, significantly inhibited the activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and NO, and decreased the amount of the increased malondialdehyde (MDA) in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of mice treated with ICV injection of Aβ 1-42. Shrinkage of nuclei, swollen and eccentrically dispersed neuronal bodies were observed in hippocampus of AD mice induced by Aβ 1-42, however, JuA noticeably improved the histopathological damage. Cumulatively, the present study indicates that JuA may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of Alzheimer' disease. PMID:24886882

  17. Desensitization of GABAergic receptors as a mechanism of zolpidem-induced somnambulism.

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Grzegorz R

    2011-08-01

    Sleepwalking is a frequently reported side effect of zolpidem which is a short-acting hypnotic drug potentiating activity of GABA(A) receptors. Paradoxically, the most commonly used medications for somnambulism are benzodiazepines, especially clonazepam, which also potentiate activity of GABA(A) receptors. It is proposed that zolpidem-induced sleepwalking can be explained by the desensitization of GABAergic receptors located on serotonergic neurons. According to the proposed model, the delay between desensitization of GABA receptors and a compensatory decrease in serotonin release constitutes the time window for parasomnias. The occurrence of sleepwalking depends on individual differences in receptor desensitization, autoregulation of serotonin release and drug pharmacokinetics. The proposed mechanism of interaction between GABAergic and serotonergic systems can be also relevant for zolpidem abuse and zolpidem-induced hallucinations. It is therefore suggested that special care should be taken when zolpidem is used in patients taking at the same time selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. PMID:21565448

  18. Inhibition of cyclophosphamide-induced teratogenesis by beta-ionone.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Carneiro, M R; De-Oliveira, A C A X; De-Carvalho, R R; Araujo, I B; Souza, C A M; Kuriyama, S N; Paumgartten, F J R

    2003-03-01

    Beta-ionone (BI) is a degraded (C 13) sesquiterpene found in plant essential oils. It has been used in the synthesis of perfume chemicals and vitamin A. Recently, it was reported that BI is a rather potent in vitro inhibitor of CYP2B1-catalysed reactions in rat liver microsomes. The present study was performed to investigate whether inhibition of CYP2B1 reactions by BI could lead to an attenuation of cyclophosphamide (CP)-induced embryotoxicity in the rat. In a preliminary experiment, a dose-dependent prolongation of pentobarbital sleeping time in male and female Wistar rats suggested that BI inhibits CYP2B1 in vivo as well. In a second experiment, rats were treated by gavage with BI (0, 250, 500, 750 or 1000 mg/kg body wt) 45 min prior to a subcutaneous injection of either CP (7.5 mg/kg body wt) or its vehicle (saline) on day 11 of pregnancy. BI alone, at the highest dose tested, caused a high proportion of resorptions. Lower doses of BI, however, clearly attenuated CP-induced embryolethality and teratogenicity. These results seem to support the view that, as far as rats are concerned, CYP2B1 plays an important role in the conversion of CP into its embryolethal and teratogenic metabolites. PMID:12565197

  19. The Gastrointestinal Irritation of Polygala Saponins and Its Potential Mechanism In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Li; Xia, Nan; Tang, PeiPei; Hong, Yi; Wang, ZiZhen; Liu, YaJie; Liu, YanJu; Liu, JianJun; Li, XiangQiong

    2015-01-01

    Processing alters the pharmacological activity and reduces the gastrointestinal toxicity of the polygalae. To investigate the effect of processing, different glycosyl substituent products were tested. Hypnotic and subhypnotic doses of pentobarbital-induced sleep tests on mice were used to evaluate the sedative activity of polygala saponins with different glycosyl substituents; isolated gut motility experiment was employed to study excitatory effects of different polygala saponins; the gastrointestinal irritation effects of different polygala saponins were compared by measuring the levels of gastric PGE2 and intestinal TNF-α on mice. When compared with control, Onjisaponin B (OJB) and tenuifolin (TEN), but not senegenin (SNG), significantly increased the number of sleeping mice and prolonged the sleeping time (P < 0.05); 80, 40, and 20 mg/L of OJB and 80 mg/L of TEN, but not SNG, obviously changed the amplitude and frequency of isolated jejunum (P < 0.05); all the three compounds significantly decreased the level of gastric PGE2 but had no obvious influences on the reduction of intestinal TNF-α level. For sedative and hypnotic effects, OJB > TEN > SNG; for the protection form gastrointestinal irritation and damages, OJB > TEN > SNG. Therefore, in processing Polygala, glycosyl breaking may be related to the decline of pharmacological activity and gastrointestinal toxicity of polygala saponins. PMID:25705699

  20. Spontaneous hypnotic age regression: case report.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, D; Rosenfeld, A

    1984-12-01

    Age regression--reliving the past as though it were occurring in the present, with age appropriate vocabulary, mental content, and affect--can occur with instruction in highly hypnotizable individuals, but has rarely been reported to occur spontaneously, especially as a primary symptom. The psychiatric presentation and treatment of a 16-year-old girl with spontaneous age regressions accessible and controllable with hypnosis and psychotherapy are described. Areas of overlap and divergence between this patient's symptoms and those found in patients with hysterical fugue and multiple personality syndrome are also discussed. PMID:6501240

  1. Effect of nicotinic acid on the sleep time and tolerance induced by ethanol in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Basilio, C.; Toro, A.; Yojay, L.

    1986-05-01

    The intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration (50 mg/kg) of nicotinic acid (NA), markedly decreased the sleep time of rats pretreated (10 min before), post-treated (10 min after) or simultaneously treated with ethanol (4 g/Kg i.p.). A similar effect was observed on the sleep time induced by pentobarbital (37 mg/Kg i.p.). Blood alcohol levels (BAL) were the same or slightly higher in the animals pretreated with NA than in the control animals pre-injected with saline. Nicotinamide and NAD had no effect. A total of three doses of ethanol, each one administered weekly or biweekly, induced tolerance, which persisted for approximately six weeks. After this period, a hypersensitivity to ethanol appeared to develop. This phenomenon was not observed when NA was pre-injected 10 min before each dose of ethanol. The sleep time of the latter animals did not change neither during the treatment period nor after six weeks without any treatment. BAL were slightly higher in NA treated than in control animals. The authors concluded that the effect of NA on the sleep time and tolerance induced by ethanol is not due to an increased rate of its metabolism and/or elimination but to a long-lasting effect that decreases the sensitivity of the nervous cells to ethanol. The mechanisms involved in the shortening of the sleep time as well as those responsible for the loss of the capacity to develop tolerance are under current investigation.

  2. Assessment of the Anti-anginal Effect of Tetramethylpyrazine Using Vasopressin-Induced Angina Model Rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xin; Nakamura, Yuji; Wada, Takeshi; Kishie, Takuya; Enkhsaikhan, Azjargal; Izumi-Nakaseko, Hiroko; Ando, Kentaro; Zhu, Bingmei; Xu, Bin; Sugiyama, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous tetramethylpyrazine has been widely used in China as a complementary and/or alternative medicine to treat patients with ischemic heart disease. We assessed the anti-anginal effect of tetramethylpyrazine (10 mg/kg, intravenously (i.v.), n=6) in comparison with that of its vehicle, saline (1 mL/kg, i.v., n=6), using vasopressin-induced angina model rats. First, Donryu rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)), and the surface lead I electrocardiogram was continuously monitored. Administration of vasopressin (0.5 IU/kg, i.v.) to the rats depressed the S-wave level of the electrocardiogram, indicating the onset of subendocardial ischemia. However, pretreatment with tetramethylpyrazine suppressed the vasopressin-induced depression of the S-wave level, which was not observed following pretreatment with its vehicle alone (saline), suggesting that tetramethylpyrazine ameliorated the vasopressin-induced subendocardial ischemia in vivo. These results may provide experimental evidence for the empirically known clinical efficacy of tetramethylpyrazine against ischemic heart disease, and could provide clues to better understanding its in vivo mechanism of action. PMID:27476945

  3. Effect of trimebutine maleate on bethanechol-induced contractions of gastrointestinal tract in conscious and anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Iizuka, M; Takaiti, O

    1983-04-01

    The effect of trimebutine maleate (TM-906) on bethanechol-induced contractions of the gastrointestinal tract in dogs was studied by means of chronically implanted force transducers, and it was compared with that of metoclopramide and atropine. During the period of motor quiescence in the fasted state of conscious dog, a bolus i.v. injection of 10 to 50 micrograms/kg bethanechol caused rhythmic contractions in the stomach and small intestine, in which an increase in basal tone was often accompanied in the distal ileum. The stomach responded to a less extent than the small intestine. Intravenous infusion of TM-906 at 3.0 mg/kg-hr for 20 to 60 min reduced the gastric contractions induced by 20 to 30 micrograms/kg bethanechol in five out of six conscious animals examined. The drug, however, enhanced the contractions of the duodenum and jejunum in a majority of the animals. Metoclopramide (1.8 mg/kg-hr) showed a tendency to potentiate the bethanechol-induced contractions in the stomach and small intestine, and atropine (0.06 mg/kg-hr) diminished them. In pentobarbital-Na anaesthetized dogs, effects of TM-906 on bethanechol-induced contractions resembled those in conscious dogs, inhibition in the stomach and potentiation in the small intestine. PMID:6136618

  4. Effect of Ethanolic Extract of Indigofera tinctoria on Chemically-Induced Seizures and Brain GABA Levels in Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Garbhapu, Asuntha; Yalavarthi, Prasannaraju; Koganti, Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Objective(s) Indigofera tinctoria Linn. of Fabaceae family is claimed to be useful to control epileptic seizures in the Indian system of folkore medicine. This study was designed to evaluate tinctoria and to verify the claim. Materials and Methods Seizures were induced in male albino rats with pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). The test group animals were administered ethanolic extract of Indigofera tinctoria (EEIT) orally. The time of onset and duration of clonic convulsions were recorded. Maximal electroshock seizures (MES) were induced in animals. The duration of hind limb tonic extension (HLTE) was recorded. GABA levels and GABA transaminase activity in brain were estimated. Results In PTZ model, EEIT significantly (P< 0.01, P< 0.001) delayed the onset of convulsions and reduced the duration of seizures in a dose dependent manner. A significant (P< 0.05) reduction in the duration of HLTE at higher doses of EEIT was observed in MES model. Increase in brain GABA levels was observed on treatment with EEIT at 500 and 1000 mg/kg doses, suggested that the plant may be acting by facilitating GABAergic transmission. A significant reduction (P< 0.05) in the activity of brain GABA transaminase was observed at higher doses. No neurotoxic signs were observed with rotarod test, pentobarbital induced sleeping time, locomotor activity and haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Conclusion The ethanolic extract of tinctoria was found to be useful to control and treat the variety of seizures. PMID:23493444

  5. Potassium-induced ventilatory reflexes originating from the dog hindlimb during rest and passive exercise.

    PubMed

    Leite-de-Barros-Neto, T; Russo, A K; Da Silva, A C; Piçarro, I C; Griggio, M A; Tarasantchi, J

    1981-10-01

    1. It has been previously shown that Ketalar-anesthetized dogs do not exhibit alterations either in ventilation or in oxygen uptake during passive motion. In the present study, the same model was used to study the effects induced by increasing extracellular K+ to the concentration achieved during active exercise. 2. The isolated hindlimbs of twelve dogs anesthetized with ketamine hydrochloride i.v., after induction with sodium pentobarbital, were perfused with control (2.8 mM KCl) and experimental (8 mM KCl) physiological solutions under resting conditions, and in passive motion. 3. Respiratory minute volume (VE), respiratory rate (f) and tidal volume (VT) were determined by collecting the expired air in a Tissot gasometer. 4. During the control perfusion, the values of VE, f and VT for passive exercise did not differ significantly from those obtained under resting conditions. However, during perfusion with 8 mM KCl, a significant increase in VE was observed, possibly due to an increase of VT under resting conditions and to an increase of f during passive exercise. 5. The results suggest that passive exercise can induce a significant increase in ventilation only when accompanied by local chemical changes such as an increase in extracellular K+. PMID:7344748

  6. Pentobarbital changes compartmental contribution to cerebral blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent, J.P.; Lawner, P.; Simeone, F.A.; Fink, E.

    1982-04-01

    Barbiturates were administered to normal dogs, establishing an isoelectric electrocorticogram. Cortical cerebral blood flows (CBF) and deeper CBF's were respectively measured by krypton-85 (85Kr) and xenon-133 (133 Xe). Following barbiturate administration, the two methods of measuring CBF showed a poor coefficient of variation (r.0.12, p less than 0.05). The cortical flows decreased less than the fast compartment flows. A shifting of percentage contribution of flow to the slow compartment (60% increase, p less than 0.001) was observed after barbiturate infusion. A selective shunting of blood flow to the slower areas may explain the lowering of intracranial pressure and protection of the deep white matter observed by many authors who use barbiturates in clinical an experimental situations.

  7. 21 CFR 522.1704 - Sodium pentobarbital injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... general anesthetic in dogs and cats. Although it may be used as a general surgical anesthetic for horses... local anesthetic. It may also be used in dogs for the symptomatic treatment of strychnine poisoning. (ii) The drug is administered intravenously “to effect”. For general surgical anesthesia, the usual dose...

  8. The neuroplastic index p-FADD/FADD and phosphoprotein PEA-15, interacting at GABAA receptor, are upregulated in brain cortex during midazolam-induced hypnosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Álvaro-Bartolomé, María; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-11-01

    Fas-associated death domain (FADD) adaptor is involved in the signaling of metabotropic G protein-coupled receptors, whose agonists stimulate its phosphoryaltion (p) increasing p-FADD/FADD ratio in brain. Whether FADD might also participate in the activation of dissimilar receptors such as the ligand-gated ion channels is not known. This study investigated the role of FADD and phosphoprotein-enriched in astrocytes of 15 kDa (PEA-15, a FADD partner) in the activation of γ-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA) receptor, which mediates the hypnotic effect of midazolam. The main findings revealed that during the time course of midazolam (60 mg/kg)-induced hypnosis in mice (about 2 h) p-FADD (and p-FADD/FADD ratio) as well as p-PEA (and its phosphorylating Akt1 kinase) were markedly increased (36-80%) in brain cortex, and these effects were partially (only p-FADD) or fully prevented by flumazenil (a neutral allosteric ligand) and FG 7142 (a partial negative allosteric ligand) acting at GABAA receptors. The upregulation of cortical p-FADD/FADD was exclusively observed in the nucleus (up to 2.8-fold), where the transciption factor NF-κB was also increased (up to 46%), and that of p-PEA/p-Akt1 only in the cytosol (up to 53%), suggesting that p-FADD/p-PEA/p-Akt1 are involved in sleep-induced neuroplasticity. Repeated treatment with midazolam (60 mg/kg, 4 days) induced behavioral (prolonged sleep latency and reduced sleeping time) and neurochemical (reduced p-FADD/p-PEA contents) tolerance. These findings indicated that p-FADD/p-PEA are novel molecules in GABAA receptor signaling and that cortical p-PEA and p-FADD, working in tandem, are involved in the complex molecular processes leading to the hypnotic effect of midazolam in mice. PMID:26282360

  9. Stimulation of insulin secretion by Viscum album (mistletoe) leaf extract in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Eno, A E; Ofem, O E; Nku, C O; Ani, E J; Itam, E H

    2008-06-01

    Twenty male white rats (250-300 g) of Wistar strain were randomly divided into two batches, the normoglycaemic batch and the streptozotocin-induced diabetic batch often rats each. Animals in each batch were further divided into two groups of five rats per group. After an overnight fast (12 hrs), animals in each group received D-glucose load (2.0 g/kg.i.v) under pentobarbital anaesthesia, with or without the crude extract (100 mg/kg/iv). Blood samples were collected intravenously at 15 min intervals for 3 hrs. for analysis of glucose, insulin and glucagon levels. From the results, the extract (100 mg/kg) did not appear to have any significant effect on the blood glucose level of normal rats, but produced about 35.3% decrease in the diabetic rats. Despite the apparent lack of action on glucose level of normal rats, the extract stimulated insulin secretion by about 92.9% (% control) in this group, and about 81.5% in the diabetic group (% control). The glucagon level was not altered by the extract in the normal rats. In the diabetic group, there was mild but significant suppression ofglucagon level after the first 1 hr. which lasted for about 50 min. We suggest that this extract from V. album leaves may possess antihyperglycaemic, insulinotropic, and possibly, mild glucagonostatic agent(s) and may therefore be a candidate for the anti-diabetic drugs. PMID:18939397

  10. Toxic effects of cadmium on LHRH-induced LH release and ovulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Varga, B; Paksy, K

    1991-01-01

    CFY rats were given 5 or 10 mg/kg bw cadmium chloride (CdCl2) or 0.9% NaCl solution (1 mL/kg) subcutaneously on the day of diestrus II. Six days later (proestrus) at 1200 h they were anesthetized with pentobarbital, 0.5 or 2 micrograms/kg LHRH was injected intravenously at 1400 h, and blood was collected for LH determination. A second group of animals pretreated with 10 mg/kg bw CdCl2 and treated with 2 or 4 micrograms/kg LHRH was allowed to recover from the anesthesia and checked for ovulation the next day (estrus). In rats treated with 10 mg/kg of CdCl2, the LH content of pituitary gland diminished, but no significant difference was found in the LH response to LHRH. In controls (ovulation blocked by anesthesia) 2 as well as 4 micrograms/kg of LHRH completely restored ovulation, while after Cd pretreatment, ovulation recovered depending on the dose of LHRH. It is concluded that Cd-induced anovulation is related to altered function of the pituitary gland and ovary, which can be restored by excess LHRH. PMID:1807553

  11. Bulbospinal neurons implicated in mesopontine-induced anesthesia are substantially collateralized.

    PubMed

    Reiner, K; Sukhotinsky, I; Devor, M

    2008-05-20

    Microinjection of pentobarbital or other gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)-R) active anesthetics into a brainstem region in the rat that we have called the mesopontine tegmental anesthesia area (MPTA) induces a general anesthesia-like state that includes suppression of locomotor activity, loss of the righting reflex, atonia, antinociception, and apparent loss of consciousness. The suppression of muscle tone and of nocifensive spinal reflexes suggests a direct or indirect effect at the level of the spinal cord itself, an inference supported by anterograde tracing from the MPTA area. We have now used single and double retrograde tracing to characterize this bulbospinal pathway further. The MPTA contains the majority of all bulbospinal neurons present at mesopontine levels (65.8%). Many of these neurons, although not all, appear to have a highly collateralized projection pattern within the spinal cord. About 40% of the MPTA neurons that project to the lumbar spinal cord also have collaterals at cervical levels, and about 60% of those with projections to the ventral horn also have projections to the dorsal horn (at cervical levels). However, the large majority projects either ipsilaterally or contralaterally. Relatively few ( approximately 13%) send collaterals to both sides of the spinal cord. The pattern of connectivity revealed appears to be consistent with a system designed primarily to modulate motor and sensory functions globally, over the entire neuraxis, rather than regionally or segmentally. PMID:18335539

  12. Effect of tramadol on lung injury induced by skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion: an experimental study*

    PubMed Central

    Takhtfooladi, Mohammad Ashrafzadeh; Jahanshahi, Amirali; Sotoudeh, Amir; Jahanshahi, Gholamreza; Takhtfooladi, Hamed Ashrafzadeh; Aslani, Kimia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether tramadol has a protective effect against lung injury induced by skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion. METHODS: Twenty Wistar male rats were allocated to one of two groups: ischemia-reperfusion (IR) and ischemia-reperfusion + tramadol (IR+T). The animals were anesthetized with intramuscular injections of ketamine and xylazine (50 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, respectively). All of the animals underwent 2-h ischemia by occlusion of the femoral artery and 24-h reperfusion. Prior to the occlusion of the femoral artery, 250 IU heparin were administered via the jugular vein in order to prevent clotting. The rats in the IR+T group were treated with tramadol (20 mg/kg i.v.) immediately before reperfusion. After the reperfusion period, the animals were euthanized with pentobarbital (300 mg/kg i.p.), the lungs were carefully removed, and specimens were properly prepared for histopathological and biochemical studies. RESULTS: Myeloperoxidase activity and nitric oxide levels were significantly higher in the IR group than in the IR+T group (p = 0.001 for both). Histological abnormalities, such as intra-alveolar edema, intra-alveolar hemorrhage, and neutrophil infiltration, were significantly more common in the IR group than in the IR+T group. CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of our histological and biochemical findings, we conclude that tramadol prevents lung tissue injury after skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:24068264

  13. The volatile anesthetic isoflurane induces ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) to protect against renal ischemia and reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mihwa; Ham, Ahrom; Kim, Joo Yun; Brown, Kevin M.; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Lee, H. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The volatile anesthetic isoflurane protects against renal ischemia and reperfusion injury by releasing renal tubular TGF-β1. Since adenosine is a powerful cytoprotective molecule, we tested whether TGF-β1 generated by isoflurane induces renal tubular ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) and adenosine to protect against renal ischemia and reperfusion injury. Isoflurane induced new CD73 synthesis and increased adenosine generation in cultured kidney proximal tubule cells and in mouse kidney. Moreover, a TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody prevented isoflurane-mediated induction of CD73 activity. Mice anesthetized with isoflurane after renal ischemia and reperfusion had significantly reduced plasma creatinine and decreased renal tubular necrosis, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis compared to pentobarbital-anesthetized mice. Isoflurane failed to protect against renal ischemia and reperfusion injury in CD73 deficient mice, in mice pretreated with a selective CD73 inhibitor or mice treated with an adenosine receptor antagonist. The TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody or the CD73 inhibitor attenuated isoflurane-mediated protection against HK-2 cell apoptosis. Thus, isoflurane causes TGF-β1-dependent induction of renal tubular CD73 and adenosine generation to protect against renal ischemia and reperfusion injury. Modulation of this pathway may have important therapeutic implications to reduce morbidity and mortality arising from ischemic acute kidney injury. PMID:23423261

  14. Blood-brain barrier alteration after microwave-induced hyperthermia is purely a thermal effect: I. Temperature and power measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Moriyama, E.; Salcman, M.; Broadwell, R.D. )

    1991-03-01

    The effect of microwave-induced hyperthermia on the blood-brain barrier was studied in 21 Sprague-Dawley rats. Under sodium pentobarbital anesthesia, animals were place in a stereotactic frame, and an interstitial microwave antenna operating at 2450 MHz was inserted in a bony groove drilled parallel to the sagittal suture. Some antennae were equipped with an external cooling jacket. Temperature measurements were made lateral to the antenna by fluoroptical thermometry, and power was calculated from the time-temperature profile. Five minutes prior to termination of microwave irradiation, horseradish peroxidase (1 mg/20 g body weight) was injected intravenously. Extravasation of horseradish peroxidase was observed in brain tissue heated above 44.3 degrees C for 30 minutes and at 42.5 degrees C for 60 minutes. Microwave irradiation failed to open the blood-brain barrier when brain temperatures were sustained below 40.3 degrees C by the cooling system. Extravasation of blood-borne peroxidase occurred at sites of maximal temperature elevation, even when these did not coincide with the site of maximum power density. The data suggest that microwave-induced hyperthermia is an effective means for opening the blood-brain barrier and that the mechanism is not related to the nonthermal effect of microwaves.

  15. Effects of adrenaline infusion on plasma lipids and noradrenaline levels in rabbits with adriamycin-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Minatoguchi, S; Uno, Y; Seishima, M; Koshiji, M; Kakami, M; Yokoyama, H; Ito, H; Fujiwara, H

    1997-07-01

    1. We investigated the acute effects of adrenaline infusion on plasma lipid levels in vehicle- and adriamycin-treated rabbits. Lipids were measured before and 30 and 60 min after the commencement of continuous intravenous administration of adrenaline (0.06 microgram/kg per min) or saline in pentobarbital-anaesthetized rabbits. 2. Adrenaline infusion significantly increased plasma free fatty acid (P < 0.05) and noradrenaline (NA) levels (P < 0.05) in vehicle-treated control rabbits, but not in adriamycin-treated rabbits. However, adrenaline had no effect on plasma total cholesterol, free cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, triglyceride or phospholipid levels. 3. Pretreatment with propranolol almost completely inhibited increased plasma free fatty acid and NA levels associated with adrenaline infusion, suggesting that adrenaline increases plasma free fatty acid and NA levels via the stimulation of beta-adrenoceptors in vehicle-treated rabbits. 4. It is suggested that both the production of plasma free fatty acids and the release of NA via the activation of beta-adrenoceptors is reduced in rabbits with adriamycin-induced cardiomyopathy. This may be related to the down-regulation of beta-adrenoceptors caused by elevated plasma NA levels induced by cardiac failure. PMID:9248663

  16. Dichloroacetate attenuates myocardial acidosis and metabolic changes induced by partial occlusion of the coronary artery in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sakai, K; Ichihara, K; Nasa, Y; Kamigaki, M; Abiko, Y

    1990-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine whether dichloroacetate, which inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase and, therefore, increases the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase, attenuates myocardial acidosis and metabolic changes induced by coronary occlusion. In dogs anesthetized with pentobarbital, the left anterior descending coronary artery was incompletely occluded to reduce the left anterior descending flow to a half to one third of the original flow (partial occlusion) to produce myocardial (regional) ischemia. Partial occlusion was continued for 90 min, and a bolus injection of saline or dichloroacetate was made intravenously 30 min after the onset of occlusion. Partial occlusion decreased myocardial pH significantly. An injection of dichloroacetate (150 mg/kg) increased myocardial pH that had been lowered by partial occlusion. Myocardial metabolites were measured in other dogs. Partial occlusion decreased the myocardial levels of adenosine triphosphate, creatine phosphate and energy charge potential, and increased that of lactate significantly, without affecting the myocardial levels of pyruvate and nonesterified fatty acids. Dichloroacetate attenuated the ischemia-induced changes in the myocardial levels of adenosine triphosphate, creatine phosphate, energy charge potential and lactate. These results indicate that dichloroacetate attenuates the myocardial acidosis and metabolic changes during coronary partial occlusion. PMID:2095718

  17. Deletion of the Wolfram syndrome-related gene Wfs1 results in increased sensitivity to ethanol in female mice.

    PubMed

    Raud, Sirli; Reimets, Riin; Loomets, Maarja; Sütt, Silva; Altpere, Alina; Visnapuu, Tanel; Innos, Jürgen; Luuk, Hendrik; Plaas, Mario; Volke, Vallo; Vasar, Eero

    2015-08-01

    Wolfram syndrome, induced by mutation in WFS1 gene, increases risk of developing mood disorders in humans. In mice, Wfs1 deficiency cause higher anxiety-like behaviour and increased response to anxiolytic-like effect of diazepam, a GABAA receptor agonist. As GABAergic system is also target for ethanol, we analysed its anxiolytic-like and sedative properties in Wfs1-deficient mice using elevated plus-maze test and tests measuring locomotor activity and coordination, respectively. Additionally loss of righting reflex test was conducted to study sedative/hypnotic properties of ethanol, ketamine and pentobarbital. To evaluate pharmacokinetics of ethanol in mice enzymatic colour test was used. Finally, gene expression of alpha subunits of GABAA receptors following ethanol treatment was studied by real-time-PCR. Compared to wild-types, Wfs1-deficient mice were more sensitive to ethanol-induced anxiolytic-like effect, but less responsive to impairment of motor coordination. Ethanol and pentobarbital, but not ketamine, caused longer duration of hypnosis in Wfs1-deficient mice. The expression of Gabra2 subunit at 30 minutes after ethanol injection was significantly increased in the frontal cortex of Wfs1-deficient mice as compared to respective vehicle-treated mice. For the temporal lobe, similar change in Gabra2 mRNA occurred at 60 minutes after ethanol treatment in Wfs1-deficient mice. No changes were detected in Gabra1 and Gabra3 mRNA following ethanol treatment. Taken together, increased anxiolytic-like effect of ethanol in Wfs1-deficient mice is probably related to altered Gabra2 gene expression. Increased anti-anxiety effect of GABAA receptor agonists in the present work and earlier studies (Luuk et al., 2009) further suggests importance of Wfs1 gene in the regulation of emotional behaviour. PMID:25725334

  18. Clopidogrel preserves whole kidney autoregulatory behavior in ANG II-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Osmond, David A.; Zhang, Shali; Pollock, Jennifer S.; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; De Miguel, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that P2Y12 receptor blockade with clopidogrel preserves renal autoregulatory ability during ANG II-induced hypertension. Clopidogrel was administered orally to male Sprague-Dawley rats chronically infused with ANG II. After 14 days of treatment, whole kidney autoregulation of renal blood flow was assessed in vivo in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats using an ultrasonic flow probe placed around the left renal artery. In ANG II-vehicle-treated rats, decreasing arterial pressure over a range from 160 to 100 mmHg resulted in a 25 ± 5% decrease in renal blood flow, demonstrating a significant loss of autoregulation with an autoregulatory index of 0.66 ± 0.15. However, clopidogrel treatment preserved autoregulatory behavior in ANG II-treated rats to levels indistinguishable from normotensive sham-operated (sham) rats (autoregulatory index: 0.04 ± 0.14). Compared with normotensive sham-vehicle-treated rats, ANG II infusion increased renal CD3-positive T cell infiltration by 66 ± 6%, induced significant thickening of the preglomerular vessels and glomerular basement membrane and increased glomerular collagen I deposition, tubulointerstitial fibrosis, damage to the proximal tubular brush border, and protein excretion. Clopidogrel significantly reduced renal infiltration of T cells by 39 ± 9% and prevented interstitial artery thickening, ANG II-induced damage to the glomerular basement membrane, deposition of collagen type I, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, despite the maintenance of hypertension. These data demonstrate that systemic P2Y12 receptor blockade with clopidogrel protects against impairment of autoregulatory behavior and renal vascular injury in ANG II-induced hypertension, possibly by reducing renal T cell infiltration. PMID:24477682

  19. Induced Abortion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Induced Abortion Patient Education FAQs Induced Abortion Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Induced Abortion FAQ043, May 2015 PDF Format Induced ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  20. General Anesthetics Inhibit LPS-Induced IL-1β Expression in Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tomoharu; Kai, Shinichi; Matsuyama, Tomonori; Adachi, Takehiko; Fukuda, Kazuhiko; Hirota, Kiichi

    2013-01-01

    Background Glial cells, including microglia and astrocytes, are considered the primary source of proinflammatory cytokines in the brain. Immune insults stimulate glial cells to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that modulate the acute systemic response, which includes fever, behavioral changes, and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation. We investigated the effect of general anesthetics on proinflammatory cytokine expression in the primary cultured glial cells, the microglial cell line BV-2, the astrocytic cell line A-1 and mouse brain. Methodology/Principal Findings Primary cultured glial cells were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in combination with general anesthetics including isoflurane, pentobarbital, midazolam, ketamine, and propofol. Following this treatment, we examined glial cell expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). LPS-induced expression of IL-1β mRNA and protein were significantly reduced by all the anesthetics tested, whereas IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression was unaffected. The anesthetics suppressed LPS-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) phosphorylation, but did not affect nuclear factor-kappaB and activator protein-1 activation. The same effect was observed with BV-2, but not with A-1 cells. In the mouse experiments, LPS was injected intraperitoneally, and isoflurane suppressed IL-1β in the brain and adrenocorticotropic hormone in plasma, but not IL-1β in plasma. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, our results indicate that general anesthetics inhibit LPS-induced IL-1β upregulation in glial cells, particularly microglia, and affects HPA axis participation in the stress response. PMID:24349401

  1. Milk whey culture with Propionibacterium freudenreichii ET-3 is effective on the colitis induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masayuki; Mogami, Orie

    2005-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether milk whey culture with Propinibacterium freudenreichii ET-3 (milk whey culture), which has been reported to have Bifidogenic activity, is effective on the colitis induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) in rats. For the induction of colitis, the colon was clamped and 0.1 M TNBS in 35% ethanol was injected into the luminal side of the clamped portion under pentobarbital anesthesia. From the next day of colitis induction, milk whey culture was administered orally at doses of 1 and 3 g/kg, twice a day for 9 days. On the 10th day, rats were sacrificed and ulcer size was measured. Milk whey culture significantly accelerated the healing of the colitis in a dose-dependent manner, but culture medium did not. To clarify the active substance, the effects of propionic acid and acetic acid contained in milk whey culture was tested. Sodium propionate significantly accelerated the healing of TNBS-induced colitis, but sodium acetate did not. The above results show that milk whey culture may become a useful prebiotic for the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease and that propionic acid may be one of the active substances contained in milk whey culture. PMID:16314691

  2. Edible oils for liver protection: hepatoprotective potentiality of Moringa oleifera seed oil against chemical-induced hepatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Said, Mansour S; Mothana, Ramzi A; Al-Yahya, Mohammed A; Al-Blowi, Ali S; Al-Sohaibani, Mohammed; Ahmed, Atallah F; Rafatullah, Syed

    2012-07-01

    In the present study, in vitro antioxidant, antioxidative stress and hepatoprotective activity of Moringa oleifera Lam. seed oil (Ben oil; BO) was evaluated against carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4) ) induced lipid peroxidation and hepatic damage in rats. The oil at 0.2 and 0.4 mL/rat was administered orally for 21 consecutive days. The substantially elevated serum enzymatic (GOT, GPT, ALP, GGT) and bilirubin levels were significantly restored towards normalization by the oil. There was a significant elevation in the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), non-protein sulfhydryl (NP-SH), and total protein (TP) contents in the liver tissue. The results obtained indicated that BO possesses potent hepatoprotective action against CCl(4) -induced hepatic damage by lowering liver marker enzymes, MDA concentration, and elevating NP-SH and TP levels in liver tissue. The biochemical observations were supplemented with histopathological examination of rat liver. The results of this study showed that treatment with Ben oil or silymarin (as a reference) appears to enhance the recovery from hepatic damage induced by CCl(4) . The pentobarbital induced narcolepsy prolongation in mice was retarded by the Ben oil. Acute toxicity test in mice showed no morbidity or mortality. In vitro DPPH radical scavenging and β-carotene-linolic acid assay tests of the BO exhibited a moderate antioxidant activity in both tests used. The possible mechanism(s) of the liver protective activity of Ben oil activity may be due to free radical scavenging potential caused by the presence of antioxidant component(s) in the oil. Consequently, BO can be used as a therapeutic regime in treatment of some hepatic disorders. PMID:22757719

  3. Evaluation of the calcium-antagonist, antidiarrhoeic and central nervous system activities of Baccharis serraefolia.

    PubMed

    Tortoriello, J; Aguilar-Santamaría, L

    1996-09-01

    Baccharis serraefolia is a widely used plant to treat diarrhoea in Mexican traditional medicine. Although the methanolic extract of this plant has shown an important dose-dependent spasmolytic activity, its underlying mechanism has not been studied. In the present work, the methanolic extract of B. serraefolia significantly delayed the onset of tonic seizures induced by strychnine and pentylenetetrazol; besides, it diminished the death rate and number of animals that exhibited convulsions. It produced potentiation of the hypnotic effect of pentobarbital. Oral administration produced an inhibition of gastrointestinal transit in mice as effective as that produced by loperamide. As to the effect on smooth muscles, the active extract produced an inhibition of contraction induced electrically, which could not be reversed by naloxone. The calcium concentration-contraction curve showed a rightward displacement when the extract was added to isolated guinea pig ileum depolarized with high K+ and cumulative concentrations of Ca2+. The results suggest that the methanolic extract does not interact with classical opiate receptors and its effects, at least that produced on smooth muscle, may be due to a probable interference with calcium influx and/or calcium release from an intra-cellular store. PMID:8887023

  4. I.v. lidocaine worsens histamine-induced bronchoconstriction in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hirota, K; Hashimoto, Y; Sato, T; Yoshioka, H; Kudo, T; Ishihara, H; Matsuki, A

    1999-01-01

    We have assessed the effect of lidocaine (lignocaine) on histamine-induced bronchoconstriction by direct visualization with a superfine fibreoptic bronchoscope. Seven mongrel dogs were anaesthetized with pentobarbital (pentobarbitone) 30 mg kg-1 followed by 2 mg kg-1 h-1 and pancuronium 200 micrograms kg-1 h-1. The trachea was intubated with a tracheal tube containing a second lumen for insertion of a 2.2-mm fibreoptic bronchoscope. This allowed estimation of the bronchial cross-sectional area (BCA) of the third bronchial bifurcation of the right lung. We used NIH image, a public domain image processing and analysis program. Bronchoconstriction was produced with a bolus dose of histamine 10 micrograms kg-1 i.v. followed by continuous infusion of 500 micrograms kg-1 h-1. After 30 min the following i.v. doses of lidocaine were given: lidocaine 0 (saline), 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 10 mg kg-1 at 10-min intervals. BCA was assessed 90 s after each dose. Arterial blood sampling was performed for measurement of plasma catecholamines. Lidocaine 1.0 and 10 mg kg-1 significantly reduced histamine-decreased BCA from 69.7 (SEM 4.1)% to 59.8 (7.3)% and 34.3 (6.8)%, respectively. Plasma concentrations of catecholamines decreased significantly after lidocaine 10 mg kg-1 i.v. In addition, there was a significant correlation between percentage decreases in plasma concentrations of epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline) and reduction in %BCA (epinephrine-BCA, P < 0.01, r = 0.674; norepinephrine-BCA, P < 0.01, r = 0.510). This study suggests that i.v. lidocaine may exacerbate histamine-induced bronchoconstriction by a sympatholytic effect. This may have therapeutic implications for patients with acute asthma or anaphylactic shock who may become dependent on circulating catecholamines. PMID:10325842

  5. Cerebroprotective drugs shorten the hypoxia-induced onset of electrical silence in unanesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Zagvazdin, Y; Bodo, M; Sarkadi, A; Szporny, L

    2000-09-01

    Pharmacological agents that delay the hypoxic arrest of neuronal electrical activity, as indicated by the suppression of electroencephalogram (EEG), have previously been thought to increase brain resistance to oxygen insufficiency. On the other hand, acceleration of the EEG suppression may offer some protection against severe hypoxia by reducing neuronal energy spending on electrogenesis. In unanesthetized rats we examined the effects of several antihypoxic drugs on the time of appearance of isoelectric EEG (tiEEG), caused by normobaric hypoxia. In addition, alterations in cerebral blood flow induced by hypoxia and by some drugs were monitored using polarographic techniques to determine if cerebrocirculatory changes play a significant role in the drug effects on tiEEG. We also assessed drug effects on behavioral recovery after hypoxia by measuring the latency of restoration of the head-withdrawal reflex upon vibrissae stimulation. Pentobarbital (30 and 60 mgkg(-1)i.p.), chloralhydrate (400 mgkg(-1)i.p.) flunarizine (50-100 mgkg(-1)p.o.), hydergine (3-50 mgkg(-1)p.o.), nicergoline (50 mgkg(-1)and 85 mgkg(-1)p.o.), sabeluzole (3 and 7.5 mgkg(-1)i.p.) and vincamine (80 mgkg(-1)p.o.) reduced tiEEG (mean 27.1 +/- 3.3 min prior to drugs). In contrast, idebenone (29-85 mgkg(-1)p.o.) and vinpocetine (29-85 mgkg(-1)p.o.) had no significant effects on tiEEG. The divergent effects on cerebral blood flow suggest an insignificant role for cerebrocirculatory changes in the drug-induced reduction of tiEEG during severe hypoxia. The drug effects on recovery of the head-withdrawal reflex (mean 4.2 +/- 1.3 min prior to drugs) varied from a delay (sabeluzole) to acceleration (flunarizine) with no correlation to the effects on tiEEG, suggesting that EEG criteria alone may not predict the course of functional recovery. PMID:10945933

  6. Acute pulmonary inflammation induced by exposure of the airways to staphylococcal enterotoxin type B in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Desouza, Ivani A. . E-mail: ivanidesouza@fcm.unicamp.br; Franco-Penteado, Carla F.; Camargo, Enilton A.; Lima, Carmen S.P.; Teixeira, Simone A.; Muscara, Marcelo N.; De Nucci, Gilberto; Antunes, Edson

    2006-11-15

    Staphylocococcus aureus is a gram-positive bacterium that produces several enterotoxins, which are responsible for most part of pathological conditions associated to staphylococcal infections, including lung inflammation. This study aimed to investigate the underlying inflammatory mechanisms involved in leukocyte recruitment in rats exposed to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). Rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium and intratracheally injected with either SEB or sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, 0.4 ml). Airways exposition to SEB (7.5-250 ng/trachea) caused a dose- and time-dependent neutrophil accumulation in BAL fluid, the maximal effects of which were observed at 4 h post-SEB exposure (250 ng/trachea). Eosinophils were virtually absent in BAL fluid, whereas mononuclear cell counts increased only at 24 h post-SEB. Significant elevations of granulocytes in bone marrow (mature and immature forms) and peripheral blood have also been detected. In BAL fluid, marked elevations in the levels of lipid mediators (LTB{sub 4} and PGE{sub 2}) and cytokines (TNF-{alpha}, IL-6 and IL-10) were observed after SEB instillation. The SEB-induced neutrophil accumulation in BAL fluid was reduced by pretreatment with dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg), the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib (3 mg/kg), the selective iNOS inhibitor compound 1400 W (5 mg/kg) and the lipoxygenase inhibitor AA-861 (200 {mu}g/kg). In separate experiments carried out with rat isolated peripheral neutrophils, SEB failed to induce neutrophil adhesion to serum-coated plates and chemotaxis. In conclusion, rat airways exposition to SEB causes a neutrophil-dependent lung inflammation at 4 h as result of the release of proinflammatory (NO, PGE{sub 2}, LTB{sub 4}, TNF-{alpha}, IL-6) and anti-inflammatory mediators (IL-10)

  7. INFLUENCE OF PHOSGENE INHALATION ON EXTRAPULMONARY EFFECTS IN MICE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results were: exposure of mice for 4 hours to phosgene concentrations ranging from 0.1 ppm to 0.5 ppm resulted in a significant increase in pentobarbital-induced sleeping time vs. air-exposed animals. Blood pentobarbital levels were measured following a 4 hr exposure to 0.5 ppm p...

  8. Slowing of the hippocampal θ-rhythm correlates with anesthetic-induced amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Perouansky, Misha; Rau, Vinuta; Ford, Tim; Oh, S. Irene; Perkins, Mark; Eger, Edmond I.; Pearce, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Temporary, antegrade amnesia is one of the core desirable endpoints of general anesthesia. Multiple lines of evidence support a role for the hippocampal θ-rhythm, a synchronized rhythmic oscillation of field potentials at 4–12 Hz, in memory formation. Previous studies have revealed a disruption of the θ-rhythm at surgical levels of anesthesia. We hypothesized that modulation of θ-rhythm would also occur at subhypnotic but amnestic concentrations. Therefore we examined the effect of three inhaled agents on properties of the θ-rhythm that are considered to be critical for the formation of hippocampus-dependent memories. Methods We studied the effects of halothane and nitrous oxide, two agents known to modulate different molecular targets (GABAergic vs. non-GABAergic, respectively), and isoflurane (both GABAergic and non-GABAergic targets), on fear-conditioned learning and θ-oscillations in freely behaving rats. Results All three anesthetics slowed θ-peak frequency in proportion to their inhibition of fear conditioning (by 1 Hz, 0.7 Hz and 0.5 Hz for 0.32% isoflurane, 60% N2O and 0.24% halothane). The anesthetics inconsistently affected other characteristics of θ-oscillations. Conclusions At sub-hypnotic amnestic concentrations, θ-oscillation frequency was the parameter most consistently affected by these three anesthetics. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that modulation of the θ-rhythm contributes to anesthetic-induced amnesia. PMID:21042201

  9. Is Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Suspended Animation General Anesthesia?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rosie Q.; McKinstry, Andrew R.; Moore, Jason T.; Caltagarone, Breanna M.; Eckenhoff, Maryellen F.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) depresses mitochondrial function and thereby metabolic rates in mice, purportedly resulting in a state of “suspended animation.” Volatile anesthetics also depress mitochondrial function, an effect that may contribute to their anesthetic properties. In this study, we ask whether H2S has general anesthetic properties, and by extension, whether mitochondrial effects underlie the state of anesthesia. We compared loss of righting reflex, electroencephalography, and electromyography in mice exposed to metabolically equipotent concentrations of halothane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, and H2S. We also studied combinations of H2S and anesthetics to assess additivity. Finally, the long-term effects of H2S were assessed by using the Morris water maze behavioral testing 2 to 3 weeks after exposures. Exposure to H2S decreases O2 consumption, CO2 production, and body temperature similarly to that of the general anesthetics, but fails to produce a loss of righting reflex or muscle atonia at metabolically equivalent concentrations. When combined, H2S antagonizes the metabolic effects of isoflurane, but potentiates the isoflurane-induced loss of righting reflex. We found no effect of prior H2S exposure on memory or learning. H2S (250 ppm), not itself lethal, produced delayed lethality when combined with subanesthetic concentrations of isoflurane. H2S cannot be considered a general anesthetic, despite similar metabolic suppression. Metabolic suppression, presumably via mitochondrial actions, is not sufficient to account for the hypnotic or immobilizing components of the anesthetic state. Combinations of H2S and isoflurane can be lethal, suggesting extreme care in the combination of these gases in clinical situations. PMID:22414854

  10. GABAA Receptor in the Thalamic Specific Relay System Contributes to the Propofol-Induced Somatosensory Cortical Suppression in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Chaoping; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Interaction with the gamma-aminobutyric-acid-type-A (GABAA) receptors is recognized as an important component of the mechanism of propofol, a sedative-hypnotic drug commonly used as anesthetic. However the contribution of GABAA receptors to the central nervous system suppression is still not well understood, especially in the thalamocortical network. In the present study, we investigated if intracerebral injection of bicuculline (a GABAA receptor antagonist) into the thalamus ventral posteromedial nucleus (VPM, a thalamus specific relay nuclei that innervated S1 mostly) could reverse propofol-induced cortical suppression, through recording the changes of both spontaneous and somatosensory neural activities in rat’s somatosensory cortex (S1). We found that after injection of bicuculline into VPM, significant increase of neural activities were observed in all bands of local field potentials (total band, 182±6%), while the amplitude of all components in somatosensory evoked potentials were also increased (negative, 121±9% and positive, 124±6%).These data support that the potentiation of GABAA receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition in a thalamic specific relay system seems to play a crucial role in propofol-induced cortical suppression in the somatosensory cortex of rats. PMID:24324778

  11. Differential involvement of 5-HT projections within the amygdala in prepulse inhibition but not in psychotomimetic drug-induced hyperlocomotion.

    PubMed

    Kusljic, Snezana; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2006-03-15

    While there is abundant evidence for a role of 5-HT and the amygdala in anxiety and depression, the role of 5-HT in this brain region in schizophrenia is less well understood. We therefore examined the effects of local 5-HT depletion in the amygdala on psychotomimetic drug-induced locomotor hyperactivity and prepulse inhibition, two animal model of aspects of schizophrenia. Pentobarbital-anaesthetized (60 mg/kg, i.p.) male Sprague-Dawley rats were stereotaxically micro-injected with 0.5 microl of a 5 microg/mul solution of the 5-HT neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) into either the basolateral (BLA) or central nucleus of amygdala (CeN). Two weeks after the surgery, rats with BLA lesions did not show changes in either psychotomimetic drug-induced locomotor hyperactivity or prepulse inhibition. In contrast, rats with CeN lesions showed significant disruption of prepulse inhibition, but no changes in psychotomimetic drug-induced locomotor hyperactivity. Neurochemical analysis and autoradiographic labelling of 5-HT transporter sites showed that a good degree of anatomical selectivity was obtained. Following administration of 5,7-DHT into the amygdala, the concentration of 5-HT was significantly reduced. Similarly, 5-HT transporter autoradiographs showed differential and selective lesions of 5-HT innervation in targeted subregions of the amygdala. These results provide evidence for differential involvement of 5-HT projections within the amygdala in prepulse inhibition but not locomotor hyperactivity. Thus, the present study supports the view that 5-HT in the amygdala may be involved in aspects of schizophrenia and a target for antipsychotic drug action. PMID:16303186

  12. Phenylephrine does not limit myocardial blood flow or oxygen delivery during isoflurane-induced hypotension in dogs.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latif, M; Kim, S J; Salem, M R; Crystal, G J

    1992-06-01

    Experiments were performed on seven fentanyl-pentobarbital-anesthetized, open-chest dogs to determine whether stimulation of coronary alpha 1-adrenergic receptors by phenylephrine causes coronary vasoconstriction and impaired myocardial oxygen delivery when phenylephrine is infused to correct isoflurane-induced hypotension. Myocardial blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres, and myocardial oxygen and lactate extraction were determined. The Fick equation was used to calculate myocardial oxygen consumption. Measurements were obtained (a) under control conditions, (b) after a 30-min inhalation of isoflurane sufficient to decrease mean aortic pressure by 30%, and (c) while maintaining administration of isoflurane, 5-10 min after restoration of mean aortic pressure by intravenous infusion of phenylephrine. Isoflurane-induced hypotension was accompanied by a baroreceptor-mediated increase in heart rate and by a decrease in myocardial oxygen consumption; however, myocardial blood flow was maintained, resulting in decreased oxygen extraction and increased coronary sinus PO2, thus implying a direct coronary vasodilating effect for isoflurane. Lactate extraction was unaffected. Phenylephrine infusion during inhalation of isoflurane returned mean aortic pressure and heart rate to their respective control values, and it did not change myocardial oxygen consumption, myocardial blood flow, myocardial oxygen extraction, coronary sinus PO2, or lactate extraction from values obtained during isoflurane alone. These latter findings are consistent with undiminished coronary vasodilation by isoflurane in the presence of phenylephrine. In conclusion, infused phenylephrine to restore aortic pressure during isoflurane administration had no vasoconstrictor effect in the coronary circulation and did not impair myocardial oxygen delivery. Apparently, the direct coronary vasodilating action of isoflurane completely nullified phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction via local alpha

  13. Biomarkers and endogenous determinants of dofetilide-induced torsades de pointes in α1-adrenoceptor-stimulated, anaesthetized rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Attila S; Rudas, László; Makra, Péter; Csík, Norbert; Leprán, István; Forster, Tamás; Csanády, Miklós; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Farkas, András

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Torsades de pointes (TdP) liability is a stochastic event, which indicates that unidentified factors have an important role in facilitating the initiation of TdP by increasing the probability of TdP occurrence. We sought to identify factors that facilitate drug-induced TdP. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We studied dofetilide-induced TdP in pentobarbital-anaesthetized, phenylephrine-sensitized rabbits, seeking biomarkers that discriminated between the animals that experienced TdP (‘TdP+’ animals) and those that did not (‘TdP−’ animals). As novel variables, the beat-to-beat variability and instability of ECG intervals were measured at preset times, irrespective of whether or not hearts were in stable sinus rhythm (‘absolute’ variability and instability). Autonomic activity was also determined. KEY RESULTS Dofetilide delayed repolarization and induced arrhythmias prior to TdP. The variability of the coupling interval and shape of arrhythmic beats before TdP were significantly greater in the ‘TdP+’ group than in the ‘TdP−’ group. Accordingly, the ‘absolute’ variability and instability of the ECG intervals were significantly elevated in the ‘TdP+’ group. Phenylephrine increased significantly the up-baroreflex sensitivity in the ‘TdP+’ group before dofetilide administration. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS ‘Preceding’ arrhythmias have characteristics that permit prediction of TdP occurrence: the more chaotic the ventricular rhythm, the greater the probability of TdP initiation. This suggests that complexity of the arrhythmic beats may play an important mechanistic role in TdP genesis. The electrical instability quantified by the novel ‘absolute’ variability and instability parameters correlates with the probability of TdP occurrence. Baroreflex may contribute to TdP genesis in vivo. PMID:20659107

  14. Increased Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase in trigeminal nociceptive neurons following propofol administration in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shoda, Emi; Kitagawa, Junichi; Suzuki, Ikuko; Nitta-Kubota, Ieko; Miyamoto, Makiko; Tsuboi, Yoshiyuki; Kondo, Masahiro; Masuda, Yuji; Oi, Yoshiyuki; Ren, Ke; Iwata, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    Although propofol (PRO) is widely used in clinic as a hypnotic agent, the underlying mechanisms of its action on pain pathways is still unknown. Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to receive PRO or pentobarbital (PEN) and were divided into two groups as LIGHT and DEEP hypnotic levels based on the EEG analysis. Rats in each hypnotic level received capsaicin injection into the face and phosphorylated extracellular regulated-kinase (pERK) immunohistochemistry were performed in subnucleus caudalis (Vc) and upper cervical spinal cord. A large number of pERK-like immunoreactive (LI) cells was observed in the trigeminal spinal subnuclei interpolaris and caudalis transition zone (Vi/Vc), middle Vc and transition zone between Vc and upper cervical spinal cord (Vc/C2) in the rats with PEN or PRO administration following capsaicin injection into the whisker pad region. The number of pERK-LI cells in Vi/Vc, middle Vc and Vc/C2 was significantly larger in rats with PRO injection than those with PEN injection. The number of pERK-LI cells was increased following an increase in the dose of PRO but not in PEN. The pERK-LI cells were dominantly distributed in the Vi/Vc, middle Vc and Vc/C2 after the bolus injections of PRO. The expression of pERK-LI cells was depressed after the intravenous lidocaine application before PRO injection. The present findings suggested that PRO induced an enhancement of the activity of trigeminal nociceptive pathways through nociceptors innervating the venous structure, as indicated by a lidocaine-sensitive increase in pERK. This may explain deep pain around the injection regions during intravenous bolus injection of PRO. Perspective: The effect of propofol administration on ERK phosphorylation in the subregions of the spinal trigeminal complex and upper cervical spinal cord neurons were precisely analyzed in rats with PRO injection. A large number of pERK-LI cells was observed following intravenous PRO administration, suggesting an enhancement of

  15. [Pharmacokinetics of lidocaine and its metabolites in dog. Comparison between normal and CCl4-induced hepatic lesion].

    PubMed

    Yamane, J

    1989-09-01

    Pharmacokinetic analysis of lidocaine (Lid) and its metabolites, monoethylglycinexylidide (MEGX) and glycinexylidide (GX), was performed in a dog bearing carbon tetrachloride (CCl4, 0.75 ml/kg ip)-induced acute hepatitis. Following pentobarbital sodium (25 mg/kg iv) anesthesia, lidocaine hydrochloride (2.5 mg/kg iv) was given and arterial blood was drawn 2, 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after administration. Lid and its metabolites in plasma were extracted with chloroform-hexane-isopropanol (60 : 30 : 10), and organic layer was dried down at 50 degrees C under N2. The residue was dissolved in 50mM phosphoric acid and subjected to HPLC analysis. 4-compartment model was introduced to analyze pharmacokinetic parameters, and which gave the most reasonable fit with actual results. Control experiment was carried out using identical dog with acute hepatitis. The following results were given: 1) Elimination of Lid was slightly depressed, but T1/2 was not altered. Plasma level of Lid was kept higher. 2) As for MEGX, the formation was depressed, and upto 23 min after Lid administration, MEGX concentration in the dog with acute hepatitis was lower than that of control, but after 23 min it was vice versa. 3) As for GX, the formation was depressed, but the elimination was not affected. In the dog with CCl4-induced hepatitis, metabolism of Lid was suppressed, and which resulted in maintaining a relatively higher levels of Lid and MEGX concentration in plasma. These results suggested that care should be taken to avoid acute poisoning with Lid especially in patients with acute hepatitis. PMID:2489793

  16. The use of music as a hypnotic suggestion.

    PubMed

    Kelly, S F

    1993-10-01

    We have known of the interaction between music and mood for many years. In this paper, I present a series of case vignettes to illustrate a method using music to affect mood. In hypnosis, I suggested that subjects imagine hearing a piece of music appropriate to a desired emotion, rather like a sound track for a movie. I suggested that the patients vividly recall this music and the accompanying feelings outside of trance when it would be desirable to help them to change their behavior by influencing their emotional state. In this way, music can be used to shape emotion. PMID:8259767

  17. Hypnotic Relaxation and Yoga to Improve Sleep and School Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perfect, Michelle M.; Smith, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Sleep insufficiency, defined as inadequate sleep duration, poor sleep quality, and daytime sleepiness, has been linked with students' learning and behavioral outcomes at school. However, there is limited research on interventions designed to improve the sleep of school-age children. In order to promote more interest on this critical topic, we…

  18. Influence of Some Hypnotist and Subject Variables on Hypnotic Susceptibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Robert P.; Land, Jay M.

    1971-01-01

    As predicted, subjects run by the objectively warmer, more competent appearing hypnosis obtained significantly higher susceptibility scores. Structured warmth produced significant differences only in subjects run by the objectively less warm hypnotists. Both structured warmth and experience affected subjects' subjective impressions of whether they…

  19. Multiple Hypnotizabilities: Differentiating the Building Blocks of Hypnotic Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Erik Z.; Barnier, Amanda J.; McConkey, Kevin M.

    2005-01-01

    Although hypnotizability can be conceptualized as involving component subskills, standard measures do not differentiate them from a more general unitary trait, partly because the measures include limited sets of dichotomous items. To overcome this, the authors applied full-information factor analysis, a sophisticated analytic approach for…

  20. The Clinical Use of Hypnotic Regression and Progression in Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    Discusses concept of time in therapy, presenting theoretical and clinical foundations to illustrate the validity of guiding patients into past lives and future lifetimes through hypnosis to resolve self-defeating sequences. (Author/TE)

  1. A Hypnotic Intervention for Anger Reduction and Shifting Perceptual Predispositions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Gerald M.

    1993-01-01

    Presents method of interventions that is designed to expedite therapy process by reducing client's tension state and providing him or her with new memory associations (affective, cognitive, proprioceptive, etc.) that allow the client to view the world from healthier perspective. Notes that intervention was developed by linking several different…

  2. Levo-tetrahydropalmatine, a natural, mixed dopamine receptor antagonist, inhibits methamphetamine self-administration and methamphetamine-induced reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaokang; Yue, Kai; Ma, Baomiao; Xing, Junqiao; Gan, Yongping; Wang, Daisong; Jin, Guozhang; Li, Chaoying

    2016-05-01

    Despite the high prevalence of methamphetamine (METH) use, no FDA-approved pharmacological treatment is currently available for individuals with a METH addiction. Levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP) is an alkaloid substance derived from corydalis and stephania that has been used in traditional Asian medicine for its analgesic, sedative and hypnotic properties. Previous pharmacological studies of l-THP indicated that it not only binds to D1 and D2 receptors but also has a low affinity for D3 receptors and may function as an antagonist. The unique pharmacological profile of l-THP suggests that it may have potential therapeutic effects on drug addiction; however, the effects of l-THP in individuals with METH addictions are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of l-THP on METH self-administration and METH-induced reinstatement. In our experiments, l-THP (1.25, 2.50 and 5.00 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased METH self-administration under the fixed-ratio 1 schedule. l-THP (2.50 and 5.00 mg/kg, i.p) also prevented the METH-induced reinstatement of METH-seeking behaviors. Interestingly, l-THP (1.25 and 2.50mg/kg, i.p) did not affect locomotor activity following METH injection (1mg/kg) suggesting that the observed effects of l-THP (2.50mg/kg) on METH-induced reinstatement were not due to motor impairments. Thus, l-THP (a natural, mixed dopamine (DA) receptor antagonist) attenuates METH self-administration and METH-induced reinstatement. PMID:26806555

  3. Inducing labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... surrounds your baby in the womb. It contains membranes or layers of tissue. One method of inducing ... break the bag of waters" or rupture the membranes. Your health care provider will do a pelvic ...

  4. Key clinical considerations for demonstrating the utility of preclinical models to predict clinical drug-induced torsades de pointes

    PubMed Central

    Sager, P T

    2008-01-01

    While the QT/QTc interval is currently the best available clinical surrogate for the development of drug-induced torsades de pointes, it is overall an imperfect biomarker. In addition to low specificity for predicting arrhythmias, other issues relevant to using QT as a biomarker include (1) an apparent dissociation, for some drugs (for example, amiodarone, sodium pentobarbital, ranolazine) between QT/QTc interval prolongation and TdP risk, (2) Lack of clarity regarding what determines the relationship between QTc prolongation and TdP risk for an individual drug, (3) QT measurement issues, including effects of heart rate and autonomic perturbations, (4) the significant circadian changes to the QT/QTc interval and (5) concerns that the development, regulatory and commercial implications of finding even a mild QT prolongation effect during clinical development has significant impact the pharmaceutical discovery pipeline. These issues would be significantly reduced, clinical development simplified and marketing approval for some drugs might be accelerated if there were a battery of preclinical tests that could reliably predict a drug's propensity to cause TdP in humans, even in the presence of QTc interval prolongation. This approach is challenging and for it to be acceptable to pharmaceutical developers, the scientific community and regulators, it would need to be scientifically well validated. A very high-negative predictive value demonstrated in a wide range of drugs with different ionic effects would be critical. This manuscript explores the issues surrounding the use of QT as a clinical biomarker and potential approaches for validating preclinical assays for this purpose against clinical data sets. PMID:18536754

  5. Key clinical considerations for demonstrating the utility of preclinical models to predict clinical drug-induced torsades de pointes.

    PubMed

    Sager, P T

    2008-08-01

    While the QT/QTc interval is currently the best available clinical surrogate for the development of drug-induced torsades de pointes, it is overall an imperfect biomarker. In addition to low specificity for predicting arrhythmias, other issues relevant to using QT as a biomarker include (1) an apparent dissociation, for some drugs (for example, amiodarone, sodium pentobarbital, ranolazine) between QT/QTc interval prolongation and TdP risk, (2) Lack of clarity regarding what determines the relationship between QTc prolongation and TdP risk for an individual drug, (3) QT measurement issues, including effects of heart rate and autonomic perturbations, (4) the significant circadian changes to the QT/QTc interval and (5) concerns that the development, regulatory and commercial implications of finding even a mild QT prolongation effect during clinical development has significant impact the pharmaceutical discovery pipeline. These issues would be significantly reduced, clinical development simplified and marketing approval for some drugs might be accelerated if there were a battery of preclinical tests that could reliably predict a drug's propensity to cause TdP in humans, even in the presence of QTc interval prolongation. This approach is challenging and for it to be acceptable to pharmaceutical developers, the scientific community and regulators, it would need to be scientifically well validated. A very high-negative predictive value demonstrated in a wide range of drugs with different ionic effects would be critical. This manuscript explores the issues surrounding the use of QT as a clinical biomarker and potential approaches for validating preclinical assays for this purpose against clinical data sets. PMID:18536754

  6. The effect of celery and parsley juices on pharmacodynamic activity of drugs involving cytochrome P450 in their metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, V; Raskovic, A; Popovic, M; Sabo, J

    2002-01-01

    Celery (Apium graveolens) and parsley (Petroselinum sativum), plants used worldwide in human nutrition, are the natural sources of methoxsalen. In this study we investigated the effect of mice pretreatment with juices of this plants on the hypnotic action of pentobarbital and analgesic action of paracetamol and aminopyrine, the drugs involving cytochrome P450 superfamily in their metabolism. In mice pretreated with celery and parsley juices a prolonged action of pentobarbital with respect to control was observed, statistical significance being attained only with parsley-pretreated animals. Both pretreatments increased and prolonged the analgesic action of aminopyrine and paracetamol, pretreatment with parsley being again more effective. Celery and parsley juices given to animals two hours before their decapitation caused a significant decrease of cytochrome P450 in the liver homogenate as compared to control. PMID:12365194

  7. [The effect of some pharmacological agents and electroshock on the level of cyclic AMP of the total mouse brain].

    PubMed

    Joanny, P; Devolx, B C; Garron, J; Giannellini, F

    1976-01-01

    Amphetamin, pentobarbital, pargyline, parachlorophenylalanine, pentetrasol and maximal electroshock all increased significantly cyclic AMP in mice whole brain conversely reserpine induced a decrease of cyclic nucleotide. All those changes were tentatively correlated toward central monoaminergic systems activation. PMID:192423

  8. The effect of anaesthesia on the haemodynamic and sympathoadrenal responses of the dog in experimental haemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Adamicza, A; Tárnoky, K; Nagy, A; Nagy, S

    1985-01-01

    Studies were carried out to demonstrate the effect of sodium pentobarbital and morphine-pentobarbital anaesthesia on the haemodynamic and sympathoadrenal responses of dogs in haemorrhagic shock. The results were compared to those of conscious dogs and of dogs receiving only morphine. The reactivity of the cardiovascular system to exogenous adrenaline was also studied in every group. Pentobarbital did not change the resting plasma level of catecholamines but reduced the increase of plasma catecholamines in shock. In the pentobarbital-anaesthetized dogs in which shock was less severe, the reactivity of blood vessels to adrenaline was higher than in conscious dogs. In the haemodynamic response to shock the increase of heart rate predominated in the conscious dogs while the rise of blood pressure was more pronounced in the pentobarbital-anaesthetized animals. Subcutaneously injected morphine decreased the heart rate and increased the plasma catecholamine and histamine levels. Morphine-pentobarbital anaesthesia decreased the resting arterial pressure and increased the plasma histamine level while the plasma catecholamines were near their initial levels. Morphine alone increased the plasma catecholamines, and the subsequent shock could not induce as high a sympathoadrenal response as in the conscious dogs. Pentobarbital administered following morphine decreased the plasma level of catecholamines nearly to the conscious level but could not inhibit the sympathoadrenal activation induced by shock. Anaesthesia is a significant additional factor in the evaluation of shock experiments carried out on anaesthetized animals. PMID:4013763

  9. Plasma infusions into porcine cerebral white matter induce early edema, oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and DNA fragmentation: implications for white matter injury with increased blood-brain-barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Kenneth R; Dean, Christopher; Beiler, Shauna; Bryan, David W; Packard, Benjamin A; Smulian, A George; Linke, Michael J; de Courten-Myers, Gabrielle M

    2005-04-01

    Plasma infused into porcine cerebral white matter induces both acute interstitial and delayed vasogenic edema. Edematous white matter contains extracellular plasma proteins and rapidly induces oxidative stress as evidenced by increased protein carbonyl formation and heme oxygenase-1 induction. We tested the hypothesis that edematous white matter would also upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and develop DNA damage. We infused autologous plasma into the frontal hemispheric white matter of pentobarbital-anesthetized pigs. We monitored and controlled physiological variables and froze brains in situ at 1, 4 or 24 hrs. We determined edema volumes by computer-assisted morphometry. We measured white matter protein carbonyl formation by immunoblotting, cytokine gene expression by standard RT-PCR methods and DNA fragmentation by agarose gel electrophoresis. White matter edema developed acutely (1 hr) after plasma infusion and increased significantly in volume between 4 and 24 hrs. Protein carbonyl formation also occurred rapidly in edematous white matter with significant elevations (3 to 4-fold) already present at 1 hr. This increase remained through 24 hrs. Pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression was also rapidly increased at 1 hr post-infusion. Evidence for DNA fragmentation began at 2 to 4 hrs, and a pattern indicative of both ongoing necrosis and apoptosis was robust by 24 hrs. Plasma protein accumulation in white matter induces acute edema development and a cascade of patho-chemical events including oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and DNA damage. These results suggest that in diseases with increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability or following intracerebral hemorrhage or traumatic brain injury, interstitial plasma can rapidly damage white matter. PMID:16181107

  10. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  11. Zolpidem withdrawal induced uncoupling of GABA(A) receptors in vitro associated with altered GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Jembrek, Maja Jazvinšćak; Vlainić, Josipa; Šuran, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Hypnotic zolpidem produces its effects via the benzodiazepine binding site in α1-containing GABAA receptors. The aim of the study was to assess the influence of duration of zolpidem treatment and its withdrawal, as well as the role of alpha1-containing GABAA receptors in the development of physical dependence and tolerance. Namely, recombinant receptors can be used to characterize mechanisms involved in different processes in the brain and to delineate the contribution of specific receptor subtypes. To address the influence of chronic zolpidem treatment we exposed HEK293 cells stably expressing alpha1beta2gamma2S recombinant GABAA receptors for seven consecutive days, while withdrawal periods lasted for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. Using radioligand binding studies we determined that chronic zolpidem treatment did not induce changes in either GABAA receptor number or in the expression of subunit mRNAs. We observed the enhancement of binding sites and upregulated expression of subunit mRNAs only following 96-hour withdrawal. Moreover, zolpidem treatment and its withdrawal (All time points) induced functional uncoupling between GABA and benzodiazepine binding sites in the GABAA receptor complex. Accordingly, it might be assumed that zolpidem withdrawal-induced uncoupling of GABAA receptors is associated with altered GABAA receptor subunit mRNA expression. The results presented here provide an insight into molecular and cellular mechanisms probably underlying adaptive changes of GABAA receptor function in response to chronic usage and withdrawal of zolpidem and perhaps the observed molecular changes could be linked to the tolerance and dependence produced upon prolonged treatment with other GABAergic drugs. PMID:26232993

  12. Anesthetic effects of a combination of medetomidine, midazolam and butorphanol on the production of offspring in Japanese field vole, Microtus montebelli.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Atsuko; Tohei, Atsushi; Ushijima, Hitoshi; Okada, Konosuke

    2016-09-01

    Pentobarbital sodium (Somnopentyl) can induce surgical anesthesia with a strong hypnotic effect that causes loss of consciousness. Animals have been known to die during experimental surgery under anesthesia with Somnopentyl, causing it to be declared inadequate as a general anesthetic for single treatment. An anesthetic combination of 0.3 mg/kg medetomidine, 4.0 mg/kg midazolam and 5.0 mg/kg butorphanol (M/M/B:0.3/4/5) was reported to induce anesthesia for a duration of around 40 min in ICR mice; similar anesthetic effects were reported in both male and female BALB/c and C57BL/6J strains of mice. However, the anesthetic effects of this combination in Japanese field vole, Microtus montebelli, remain to be evaluated. In the present study, we assessed the effects of Somnopentyl and different concentrations of anesthetic combination (M/M/B:0.3/4/5, 0.23/3/3.75 or 0.15/2/2.5) in Japanese field voles, by means of anesthetic scores. We also examined effect of these anesthetics on production of offspring. Death of the animals was observed only with Somnopentyl. The anesthetic score of Somnopentyl was lower than those of the other anesthetics, although there were no significant differences in duration, body weight and frequency of respiratory among the evaluated anesthetics. Abortion rate with Somnopentyl was significantly higher than that with the M/M/B:0.23/3/3.75 combination, although there was no significant difference in the number of offspring between two. In conclusion, results of this study provide basic information for achieving appropriate anesthetic concentrations in addition to indicating a new, safe and effective surgical anesthetic for Japanese field voles. PMID:27238159

  13. 21 CFR 522.2444b - Thiopental and pentobarbital powder for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. For total anesthesia, it is given at approximately..., and the dosage necessary for anesthesia is reduced. Usually 1/2 to 2/3 the normal amount is adequate. (2) Indications for use. It is used as an anesthetic for intravenous administration to dogs and...

  14. Impairment of locomotor activity induced by the novel N-acylhydrazone derivatives LASSBio-785 and LASSBio-786 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Silva, G.A.P.; Kummerle, A.E.; Antunes, F.; Fraga, C.A.M.; Barreiro, E.J.; Zapata-Sudo, G.; Sudo, R.T.

    2013-01-01

    The N-acylhydrazone (NAH) analogues N-methyl 2-thienylidene 3,4-benzoylhydrazine (LASSBio-785) and N-benzyl 2-thienylidene 3,4-benzoylhydrazine (LASSBio-786) were prepared from 2-thienylidene 3,4-methylenedioxybenzoylhydrazine (LASSBio-294). The ability of LASSBio-785 and LASSBio-786 to decrease central nervous system activity was investigated in male Swiss mice. LASSBio-785 or LASSBio-786 (30 mg/kg, ip) reduced locomotor activity from 209 ± 26 (control) to 140 ± 18 (P < 0.05) or 146 ± 15 crossings/min (P < 0.05), respectively. LASSBio-785 (15 or 30 mg/kg, iv) also reduced locomotor activity from 200 ± 15 to 116 ± 29 (P < 0.05) or 60 ± 16 crossings/min (P < 0.01), respectively. Likewise, LASSBio-786 (15 or 30 mg/kg, iv) reduced locomotor activity from 200 ± 15 to 127 ± 10 (P < 0.01) or 96 ± 14 crossings/min (P < 0.01), respectively. Pretreatment with flumazenil (20 mg/kg, ip) prevented the locomotor impairment induced by NAH analogues (15 mg/kg, iv), providing evidence that the benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptor is involved. This finding was supported by the structural similarity of NAH analogues to midazolam. However, LASSBio-785 showed weak binding to the BDZ receptor. LASSBio-785 or LASSBio-786 (30 mg/kg, ip, n = 10) increased pentobarbital-induced sleeping time from 42 ± 5 (DMSO) to 66 ± 6 (P < 0.05) or 75 ± 4 min (P < 0.05), respectively. The dose required to achieve 50% hypnosis (HD50) following iv injection of LASSBio-785 or LASSBio-786 was 15.8 or 9.5 mg/kg, respectively. These data suggest that both NAH analogues might be useful for the development of new neuroactive drugs for the treatment of insomnia or for use in conjunction with general anesthesia. PMID:23558854

  15. Impairment of locomotor activity induced by the novel N-acylhydrazone derivatives LASSBio-785 and LASSBio-786 in mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, G A P; Kummerle, A E; Antunes, F; Fraga, C A M; Barreiro, E J; Zapata-Sudo, G; Sudo, R T

    2013-03-01

    The N-acylhydrazone (NAH) analogues N-methyl 2-thienylidene 3,4-benzoylhydrazine (LASSBio-785) and N-benzyl 2-thienylidene 3,4-benzoylhydrazine (LASSBio-786) were prepared from 2-thienylidene 3,4-methylenedioxybenzoylhydrazine (LASSBio-294). The ability of LASSBio-785 and LASSBio-786 to decrease central nervous system activity was investigated in male Swiss mice. LASSBio-785 or LASSBio-786 (30 mg/kg, ip) reduced locomotor activity from 209 ± 26 (control) to 140 ± 18 (P < 0.05) or 146 ± 15 crossings/min (P < 0.05), respectively. LASSBio-785 (15 or 30 mg/kg, iv) also reduced locomotor activity from 200 ± 15 to 116 ± 29 (P < 0.05) or 60 ± 16 crossings/min (P < 0.01), respectively. Likewise, LASSBio-786 (15 or 30 mg/kg, iv) reduced locomotor activity from 200 ± 15 to 127 ± 10 (P < 0.01) or 96 ± 14 crossings/min (P < 0.01), respectively. Pretreatment with flumazenil (20 mg/kg, ip) prevented the locomotor impairment induced by NAH analogues (15 mg/kg, iv), providing evidence that the benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptor is involved. This finding was supported by the structural similarity of NAH analogues to midazolam. However, LASSBio-785 showed weak binding to the BDZ receptor. LASSBio-785 or LASSBio-786 (30 mg/kg, ip, n = 10) increased pentobarbital-induced sleeping time from 42 ± 5 (DMSO) to 66 ± 6 (P < 0.05) or 75 ± 4 min (P < 0.05), respectively. The dose required to achieve 50% hypnosis (HD50) following iv injection of LASSBio-785 or LASSBio-786 was 15.8 or 9.5 mg/kg, respectively. These data suggest that both NAH analogues might be useful for the development of new neuroactive drugs for the treatment of insomnia or for use in conjunction with general anesthesia. PMID:23558854

  16. Sedation and antinociception induced by a new pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyrrolo[3,4-d]pyridine derivative (LASSBio-873) is modulated by activation of muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Thaiana C F; Raimundo, Juliana M; Nascimento-Junior, Nailton M; Fraga, Carlos A M; Barreiro, Eliezer J; Sudo, Roberto T; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele

    2009-11-01

    New substances designed for the treatment of anxiety have previously been synthesized, which resulted in the identification of four new pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyrrolo[3,4-d]pyridine derivatives structurally designed by using zolpidem as lead compound. Among them, LASSBio-873 was the most potent to produce analgesic, sedative and hypnotic effects. Thus, we investigated the possible mechanisms involved in LASSBio-873-induced sedation, as well as its effects on different models of inflammatory pain. LASSBio-873 (4 mg/kg) reduced locomotor activity of mice in the open field test from 205.2+/-25.6 to 87.6+/-16.2 movements/min. Atropine, a non-selective muscarinic antagonist, prevented the LASSBio-873-induced sedation and increased locomotor activity to 192.9+/-30.2 movements/min. In the formalin test, LASSBio-873 (4 mg/kg) significantly reduced the duration of nociceptive behavior during the inflammatory phase, reducing the control reactivity from 197.6+/-14.5s to 84.4+/-10.3s. Carrageenan reduced the latency for the animal reaction from 5.1+/-0.2s (control) to 2.1+/-0.3s which was completely reverted by LASSBio-873 (6 mg/kg) to 5.6+/-0.6s. Atropine prevented the LASSBio-873-induced antinociceptive and antihyperalgesic activities, indicating the interference of the cholinergic system. LASSBio-873 is a novel prototype of drug that modulates muscarinic activity and could be used for neuropsychiatric and cognitive disorders and other conditions associated to acute and chronic pain. PMID:19635495

  17. Drug-induced hypoglycemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000310.htm Drug-induced hypoglycemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Drug-induced hypoglycemia is low blood sugar that results from medication. ...

  18. SUBSTANTIA NIGRA PARS RETICULATA IS CRUCIALLY INVOLVED IN BARBITURATE AND ETHANOL WITHDRAWAL IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Kozell, Laura B.; Buck, Kari J.

    2011-01-01

    Sedative-hypnotic CNS depressant drugs are widely prescribed to treat a variety of disorders, and are abused for their sedative and euphoric effects. Physiological dependence and associated withdrawal episodes are thought to constitute a motivational force that sustains their use/abuse and may contribute to relapse in dependent individuals. Although no animal model duplicates depressant dependence, models for specific factors, like withdrawal, are useful for identifying potential neural determinants of liability in humans. Recent analyses implicate the caudolateral substantia nigra pars reticulata (clSNr) in withdrawal following acute and repeated ethanol exposures in mice, but did not assess its impact on withdrawal from other sedative-hypnotics or whether intrinsic neurons or fibers of passage are involved. Here, we demonstrate that bilateral chemical (ibotenic acid) lesions of the clSNr attenuate barbiturate (pentobarbital) and ethanol withdrawal. Chemical lesions did not affect convulsions in response to pentylenetetrazol, which blocks GABAA receptor-mediated transmission. Our results demonstrate that the clSNr nucleus itself rather than fibers of passage is crucial to its effects on barbiturate and ethanol withdrawal. These findings support suggest that clSNr could be one of the shared neural substrates mediating withdrawal from sedative-hypnotic drugs. PMID:20974184

  19. Induction Technique: Beyond Simple Response to Suggestion.

    PubMed

    Barabasz, Arreed; Barabasz, Marianne

    2016-10-01

    The hypnotic induction is intended to induce hypnosis. This implies that what is sought is intended to go beyond what might be wrought by mere suggestion, expectancy, and social influence. The experimentally controlled research showing that the induction makes a difference and how small changes in wording of suggestions can produce orthogonal responses is briefly reviewed. This article explains the principles of induction and three critical phases of hypnotic induction in detail. An arm levitation scripted protocol demonstrating how to respond to the patient using the three phases to maximize responses to hypnotic suggestions is presented. PMID:27586048

  20. Flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on dimensional analysis; ideal fluid models; vortex-induced vibration; galloping and flutter; instability of tube and cylinder arrays; vibrations induced by oscillating flow; vibration induced by turbulence and sound; damping of structures; sound induced by vortex shedding; vibrations of a pipe containing a fluid flow; indices. It covers the analysis of the vibrations of structures exposed to fluid flows; explores applications for offshore platforms and piping; wind-induced vibration of buildings, bridges, and towers; and acoustic and mechanical vibration of heat exchangers, power lines, and process ducting.

  1. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Charlton; Subbaraman, Maria R.

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs.

  2. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, C.; Subbaraman, M.R.

    1989-06-13

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump is disclosed wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs. 11 figs.

  3. Synthesis of CNS active thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-like peptides: Biological evaluation and effect on cognitive impairment induced by cerebral ischemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Meena, Chhuttan L; Thakur, Avinash; Nandekar, Prajwal P; Sangamwar, Abhay T; Sharma, Shyam S; Jain, Rahul

    2015-09-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-like peptides were synthesized by replacing critical histidine and pGlu residues in the native peptide. The peptides were evaluated in vitro for receptor binding activity assay and in the cell functional assay; the peptides exhibit selective basal signaling agonist behavior toward TRH-R2. For example, peptides 8a, 8b, 8c, 8 f, 8 h, 8 l and 12 d activated TRH-R2 with potency (EC50) of 0.53 μM, 0.048 μM, 0.05 μM, 0.006 μM, 0.31 μM, 0.034 μM and 0.004 μM, respectively. In contrast for signaling activation of TRH-R1, the same peptide required higher concentration of 19.35 μM, 3.98 μM, 2.54 μM, 0.287 μM, 11.28 μM, 0.986 μM and 0.944 μM, respectively. The results showed that peptides were 36.5, 82.9, 50.8, 47.8, 36.3, 32.6 and 235-fold selective to TRH-R2 receptor subtype. The peptides were investigated for CNS activity at 10 μmol/kg in pentobarbital-induced sleep assay study. Peptides 8c (16.5 ± 1.4 min) and 8l (16.5 ± 2.1 min) displayed excellent CNS activity. In an in vivo study, peptide 8c did not cause significant change in the rat plasma TSH levels. The peptide 8c was further investigated for neuroprotective potential, and significantly reduced infracts volume and neurological score in the focal cerebral ischemia model in mice. Peptide 8c also significantly lowered MDA levels, indicating reduction of oxidative and enhanced percentage cell survival in CA1 region, when compared to ischemic brain. PMID:26216015

  4. Induced pluripotency with endogenous and inducible genes

    SciTech Connect

    Duinsbergen, Dirk; Eriksson, Malin; Hoen, Peter A.C. 't; Frisen, Jonas; Mikkers, Harald

    2008-10-15

    The recent discovery that two partly overlapping sets of four genes induce nuclear reprogramming of mouse and even human cells has opened up new possibilities for cell replacement therapies. Although the combination of genes that induce pluripotency differs to some extent, Oct4 and Sox2 appear to be a prerequisite. The introduction of four genes, several of which been linked with cancer, using retroviral approaches is however unlikely to be suitable for future clinical applications. Towards developing a safer reprogramming protocol, we investigated whether cell types that express one of the most critical reprogramming genes endogenously are predisposed to reprogramming. We show here that three of the original four pluripotency transcription factors (Oct4, Klf4 and c-Myc or MYCER{sup TAM}) induced reprogramming of mouse neural stem (NS) cells exploiting endogenous SoxB1 protein levels in these cells. The reprogrammed neural stem cells differentiated into cells of each germ layer in vitro and in vivo, and contributed to mouse development in vivo. Thus a combinatorial approach taking advantage of endogenously expressed genes and inducible transgenes may contribute to the development of improved reprogramming protocols.

  5. Space Station Induced Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F. (Editor); Torr, Marsha R. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the results of a conference convened May 10-11, 1988, to review plans for monitoring the Space Station induced environment, to recommend primary components of an induced environment monitoring package, and to make recommendations pertaining to suggested modifications of the Space Station External Contamination Control Requirements Document JSC 30426. The contents of this report are divided as Follows: Monitoring Induced Environment - Space Station Work Packages Requirements, Neutral Environment, Photon Emission Environment, Particulate Environment, Surface Deposition/Contamination; and Contamination Control Requirements.

  6. Mania Induced by Opipramol

    PubMed Central

    Firoz, Kazhungil; Khaleel, Asfia; Rajmohan, V; Kumar, Manoj; Raghuram, TM

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants have propensity to induce manic switch in patients with bipolar disorder. Opipramol is an atypical anxiolytic and antidepressant drug which predominantly acts on sigma receptors. Although structurally resembles tricyclic antidepressant imipramine it does not have inhibitory action on the reuptake of norepinephrine/serotonin and hence it is not presumed to cause manic switch in bipolar depression. Here, we describe a case of mania induced by opipramol, in a patient with bipolar affective disorder who was treated for moderate depressive episode with lithium and opipramol and we discuss neurochemical hypothesis of opipramol-induced mania. PMID:25722522

  7. Mania induced by opipramol.

    PubMed

    Firoz, Kazhungil; Khaleel, Asfia; Rajmohan, V; Kumar, Manoj; Raghuram, Tm

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants have propensity to induce manic switch in patients with bipolar disorder. Opipramol is an atypical anxiolytic and antidepressant drug which predominantly acts on sigma receptors. Although structurally resembles tricyclic antidepressant imipramine it does not have inhibitory action on the reuptake of norepinephrine/serotonin and hence it is not presumed to cause manic switch in bipolar depression. Here, we describe a case of mania induced by opipramol, in a patient with bipolar affective disorder who was treated for moderate depressive episode with lithium and opipramol and we discuss neurochemical hypothesis of opipramol-induced mania. PMID:25722522

  8. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Noise-Induced Hearing Loss On this page: What is noise-induced hearing ... additional information about NIHL? What is noise-induced hearing loss? Every day, we experience sound in our environment, ...

  9. Managing insomnia: an overview of insomnia and pharmacologic treatment strategies in use and on the horizon.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Thomas L; Goradia, Viral

    2013-10-01

    This review explores basic sleep physiology, the mechanism of action for each class of hypnotic agents, their clinical application based on pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic factors, and potential pharmacologic sleep-inducing mechanisms of future hypnotics. The paper challenges the reader to understand the neuroscientific basis of insomnia and use this knowledge to guide prescription of hypnotic agents. Currently indicated hypnotic agents are discussed with regard to their mechanism of drug action and clinical application. A broader discussion is developed throughout this paper regarding other non-indicated agents that may improve sleep and describing newer pharmacological treatments that may become available in the future for use in sleep disorders and their comorbid conditions. PMID:24432044

  10. Managing insomnia: an overview of insomnia and pharmacologic treatment strategies in use and on the horizon

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Thomas L; Goradia, Viral

    2013-01-01

    This review explores basic sleep physiology, the mechanism of action for each class of hypnotic agents, their clinical application based on pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic factors, and potential pharmacologic sleep-inducing mechanisms of future hypnotics. The paper challenges the reader to understand the neuroscientific basis of insomnia and use this knowledge to guide prescription of hypnotic agents. Currently indicated hypnotic agents are discussed with regard to their mechanism of drug action and clinical application. A broader discussion is developed throughout this paper regarding other non-indicated agents that may improve sleep and describing newer pharmacological treatments that may become available in the future for use in sleep disorders and their comorbid conditions. PMID:24432044

  11. Vitiligo, drug induced (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this person's face have resulted from drug-induced vitiligo. Loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, occasionally ... is the case with this individual. The typical vitiligo lesion is flat (macular) and depigmented, but maintains ...

  12. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are a common cause of liver inflammation. These ... problem. However, if you took high doses of acetaminophen , treatment should be started as soon as possible ...

  13. Gasoline-induced mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.L.; Swanson, B.Z. Jr.; Lutins, N.D.

    1980-02-01

    Gasoline-induced mucositis may become more common because of fuel shortages or increased fuel cost. Dentists should, therefore, consider this oral irritant in the differential diagnosis of oral lesions.

  14. Thrombocytopenia - drug induced

    MedlinePlus

    ... and a seizure medicine called valproic acid may lead to this problem. Other medicines that cause drug-induced thrombocytopenia include: Furosemide Gold, used to treat arthritis Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ( ...

  15. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  16. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    Wheezing - exercise-induced; Reactive airway disease - exercise ... Having asthma symptoms when you exercise does not mean you cannot or should not exercise. But be aware of your EIA triggers. Cold or dry air may ...

  17. Drug-induced nightmares.

    PubMed

    2000-12-01

    (1) A wide variety of drugs have been implicated in nightmares, often on inadequate evidence. (2) Recurrent nightmares can be induced by many drugs, and not only agents with psychotropic or neurological effects. PMID:11475499

  18. Vitiligo, drug induced (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... drug-induced vitiligo. Loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, occasionally occurs as a result of medications, as is the case with this individual. The typical vitiligo lesion is flat (macular) and depigmented, but maintains the normal skin texture.

  19. Ethionamide-induced Pellagra.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Yashashree; Shah, Ira

    2015-08-01

    Pellagra is a disorder characterized by dermatitis, diarrhea, dementia and eventually death, resulting from a deficiency of niacin or its precursor tryptophan. Ethionamide (a second-line antituberculosis agent)-induced pellagra is rarely encountered in clinical practice. Prompt diagnosis and treatment with nicotinamide can prevent life-threatening complications. To date, only three cases have been reported. We report a 13-year-old girl presenting with ethionamide-induced pellagra that resolved after the administration of niacin. PMID:25828829

  20. Isoniazid-induced alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, K. B.; Kumar, V.; Vishvkarma, S.; Shandily, R.

    2011-01-01

    Isoniazid is a safe and very effective antituberculosis drug. Antimitotic agents routinely cause alopecia. Drug-induced alopecia is usually reversible upon withdrawal of the drug. Isoniazid, thiacetazone and ethionamide are the antituberculosis drugs which have been associated with alopecia. Isoniazid-induced alopecia was observed in one case and confirmed by the finding that hair growth resumed when drug removed from the regimen. PMID:21654989

  1. Induced polarization response of microbial induced sulfideprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Slater, Lee; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-06-04

    A laboratory scale experiment was conducted to examine the use of induced polarization and electrical conductivity to monitor microbial induced sulfide precipitation under anaerobic conditions in sand filled columns. Three columns were fabricated; one for electrical measurements, one for geochemical sampling and a third non-inoculated column was used as a control. A continual upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Desulfovibrio vulgaris microbes were injected into the middle of the geochemical and electrical columns. Iron and zinc sulfides precipitated along a microbial action front as a result of sulfate reduction due by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The precipitation front initially developed near the microbial injection location, and subsequently migrated towards the nutrient inlet, as a result of chemotaxis by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Sampling during and subsequent to the experiment revealed spatiotemporal changes in the biogeochemical measurements associated with microbial sulfate reduction. Conductivity measurements were insensitive to all biogeochemical changes occurred within the column. Changes in the IP response (of up to 14 mrad)were observed to coincide in place and in time with the active microbe respiration/sulfide precipitation front as determined from geochemical sampling. The IP response is correlated with the lactate concentration gradient, an indirect measurement of microbial metabolism, suggesting the potential of IP as a method for monitoring microbial respiration/activity. Post experimental destructive sample analysis and SEM imaging verified the geochemical results and supported our hypothesis that microbe induced sulfide precipitation is directly detectable using electrical methods. Although the processes not fully understood, the IP response appears to be sensitive to this anaerobic microbial precipitation, suggesting a possible novel application for the IP method.

  2. Drug-induced panniculitides.

    PubMed

    Borroni, G; Torti, S; D'Ospina, R M; Pezzini, C

    2014-04-01

    A substantial number of all panniculitides fails to recognize a specific etiology, and that is true also for a relatively frequent type of panniculitis, such as erythema nodosum (EN). Between the recognized causative factors of panniculitides, infectious, physical agents, autoimmune mechanisms and neoplastic disorders are well known. On the contrary, the role of drugs as inducers of panniculitides is marginally considered, and their report limited to anecdotal observations, often without due histopathological support. Since the clinical and histopathological features of drug-induced panniculitides are indistinguishable from those caused by other agents, the causative relationship may be demonstrated by the history of previous drug intake and by clinical improvement after drug discontinuation. We reviewed the currently reported descriptions of drug-induced panniculitis, including a few exemplificative original observations. EN results as the most frequently reported drug-induced panniculitis. Among the causative drugs of EN a variety of medications, with disparate, or even opposite, mechanisms of action are reported, thus limiting the understanding of the pathogenesis. Common causative drugs include oral contraceptives, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiobiotics and leukotriene-modifying agents. Unfortunately, in several cases, the diagnosis of drug-induced EN is done on clinical findings alone. In those cases, the lack of histopathological support does not allow to define a precise clinicopathological correlation on etiologic grounds. Drug-induced lobular and mixed panniculitides, including eosinophilic panniculitis, are even more rarely described. Reported causative agents are glatiramer acetate, interferon beta and heparin (at sites of injections), and systemic steroids, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and BRAF with subcutaneous fat involvement at distance. In view of the recent introduction of new classes of drugs, attention should be paid to disclose their

  3. Hypnotically facilitated exposure response prevention therapy for an OIF veteran with OCD.

    PubMed

    Proescher, Eric J

    2010-07-01

    The highly stressful conditions of a war zone may exacerbate or trigger a wide variety of symptoms including Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) once a service member returns home. Service members and new veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars present to treatment with multiple psychosocial concerns and co-morbid psychiatric conditions. Evidence-based treatments including exposure based therapies are commonly recommended for use with returning veterans. Although studies support the efficacy of Exposure Response Prevention (ERP) therapy for treating OCD, eligibility for these studies limits participation to subjects who self-report a well-defined, circumscribed complaint. This approach is not typical of clinic clients who, more often than not, report multiple psychological issues. The following individual case study demonstrates how integrating hypnosis facilitated the cognitive-behavioral ERP therapy and treatment for a patient suffering from OCD. PMID:20718240

  4. Effects of misleading questions and hypnotic memory suggestion on memory reports: a signal-detection analysis.

    PubMed

    Scoboria, Alan; Mazzoni, Giuliana; Kirsch, Irving

    2006-07-01

    In 2002, the first author and colleagues reported data indicating that both hypnosis and misleading questions decreased the accuracy of memory reports and decreased "don't know" response rates, that the effects of misleading questions were significantly greater than those of hypnosis, and that the two effects were additive. Using a sample of 194 undergraduate students, the present study replicated the findings that misleading questions reduce accuracy and "don't know" responding but failed to replicate the negative effect of hypnosis on memory reports. Signal detection analysis indicated that misleading questioning produced decreased sensitivity accompanied by higher response bias, though affecting sensitivity more than producing a criterion shift. PMID:16858906

  5. I-95 phobia treated with hypnotic systematic desensitization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Alex; Iglesias, Alex; Iglesias, Adam

    2013-10-01

    Systematic desensitization and hypnosis mediated therapy share empirical evidence of efficacy in the treatment of specific phobias. However, a review of the literature indicated there is limited documentation in the employment of these modalities for treating driving related phobias (DRP). This article reports on the use of hypnosis aided systematic desensitization (HASD) in the successful treatment of a case of non-accident related driving phobia, specifically manifested on Interstate 95 (I-95). The treatment consisted of 6 office sessions of HASD along with 14 in-vivo sessions where the patient performed multiple exposures/rehearsals of the behaviors that had been successfully mastered at the office visits. The results indicated that this patient with case of (DRP) was able to resume travel on I-95 at conclusion of treatment. The patient was symptom free at follow up 6 months later. PMID:24665816

  6. 76 FR 19375 - Safety and Efficacy of Hypnotic Drugs; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... insomnia. The Division of Neurology Products (DNP) in FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research and the... pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties. DNP and PERI plan for the first day of the meeting to center...

  7. Hypnotic Enhancement of Cognitive-Behavioral Weight Loss Treatments--Another Meta-reanalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirsch, Irving

    1996-01-01

    In a meta-analysis of the effect of adding hypnosis to cognitive-behavioral treatments for weight reduction, additional data were obtained from authors of two previous studies, and computational inaccuracies in the previous meta-analyses were corrected. Discusses findings. Correlational analyses indicated that the benefits of hypnosis increased…

  8. Reduction of Adolescent Drug Abuse Through Post-Hypnotic Cue Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Roger D.

    1974-01-01

    Six adolescents, all females, who were involved in a variety of drug misuse were self-referrals for treatment. Treatment consisted of an initial comprehensive psychological examination, three intensive sessions of hypnosis and a procedure to develop cue association in situations where the girls felt tense. Results were favorable. (Author)

  9. Synthesis of some quinazolone derivatives structurally related to certain sedatives and hypnotics.

    PubMed

    Botros, S; Khalifa, M

    1976-01-01

    The preparation of certain 3-substituted derivatives of 3.4-dihydro-2-methyl-4-oxoquinazoline is described. The synthesis fo a quinazolone-barbituric acid derivative, in which the two constituting moieties are separated by methylene groups, was achieved by reacting 3-[B-haloethyl]-3.4-dihydro-2-methyl-4-oxoquinazoline with sodio malonic ester and subsequent cyclization of the ester so formed with urea. Attempts to introduce the alpha-glutaryl group at the position 3 of the quinazolone ring system via different routes were unsuccessful. PMID:959265

  10. Hypnotic sex change: creating and challenging a delusion in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Noble, J; McConkey, K M

    1995-02-01

    The authors suggested a change of sex to virtuoso, high-hypnotizable, and low-hypnotizable simulating participants in an application of the real-simulating paradigm of hypnosis. The experiences of sex change that participants reported during hypnosis were challenged through procedures of contradiction and confrontation. Behavioral and self-report data indicated that virtuosos experienced a transient delusion about their sex that was compelling and resistant to challenge. Implications are discussed for investigations of delusion through the use of hypnosis in the laboratory and for understanding delusion in the clinical setting. PMID:7897055

  11. Surreptitious observation of responses to hypnotically suggested hallucinations: a test of the compliance hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Perugini, E M; Kirsch, I; Allen, S T; Coldwell, E; Meredith, J M; Montgomery, G H; Sheehan, J

    1998-04-01

    Suggestions for arm levitation and for visual, auditory, tactile, and taste hallucinations were administered twice via audiotape to a group of high suggestible students and low suggestible simulators. During one of the administrations, participants were led to believe they were alone, but their behavior was surreptitiously recorded on videotape and observed on a video monitor. During the other administration, they were observed openly by an experimenter who had not been informed about group assignment. When unaware that they were being observed, simulators were significantly less responsive to suggestion and engaged in substantially more role-inappropriate behavior. In contrast, the responsiveness of nonsimulating students was not affected by the presence of an experimenter, and they exhibited little role-inappropriate behavior even when alone. These data indicate that the responses of suggestible individuals reflect internally generated changes in experience and are not due to simple intentional compliance (i.e., faking). PMID:9558807

  12. Memory focused interventions (MFI) as a therapeutic strategy in hypnotic psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    The prospect of utilizing memory plasticity (the constructive and transitory nature of memory) for therapeutic purposes has not been widely recognized. However, a number of theoretical and clinical venues throughout the last century have shown its potential application. Intensive research conducted during these last decades, pointed out the possibility of influencing human memory in relation to new memories and their specific components. Moreover, the research showed the feasibility of planting alternative early childhood memories and thus altering memories of personal history. Additionally, researchers found that memory is naturally very fallible due to everyday phenomena of forgetfulness, distortion and intrusion of past and present information. Throughout the course of this paper, the integrative overview of these empirical findings with the aforementioned clinical and theoretical foundations serves as a substratum in an attempt to present an integrative therapeutic approach, named Memory Focused Interventions (MFI). PMID:20187338

  13. Placebo Effect upon Complex Reaction Time When Hypnotic Suggestibility is Controlled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eskridge, Veronica L.

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of a placebo (sugar pill) accompanied by suggestions that the pill would either (1) improve performance as a stimulant or (2) cause a deterioration in performance as a depressant when the performance in question was the subjects' complex reaction time to a light stimulus. The Harvard Group Scale of…

  14. Hypnotic Overdoses and Fairy Tales: Snow White and the Uses of Disenchantment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pommereau, Xavier; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Considers explanations for women's use of less violent methods to commit suicide. Reinterprets "Snow White" and makes parallel with contemporary clinical cases to show that illusion of a nondefinitive death is often assimilated, in western culture, with step toward rebirth. (Author/NB)

  15. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics following single and repeated nightly administrations of loprazolam, a new benzodiazepine hypnotic.

    PubMed Central

    McInnes, G T; Bunting, E A; Ings, R M; Robinson, J; Ankier, S I

    1985-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of oral loprazolam and pharmacodynamic responses on the morning following nightly drug administration were examined after single and after seven consecutive 1 mg doses in six non-fasting healthy subjects. The serum concentration-time profiles for unchanged loprazolam measured by a specific high pressure liquid chromatography/gas chromatography (h.p.l.c./g.c.) method and for benzodiazepine material measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) were qualitatively similar although RIA levels were consistently higher. Approximate elimination half-life of unchanged loprazolam after single doses was 8.0 h. For RIA measured material, approximate half-life was 11.7 h following acute administration and 12.8 h after seven consecutive doses. Compared to results after single doses, maximum serum concentration and AUC were greater following 1 week's treatment. Using RIA results, the increases were 27.2% (95% CL 6.9 to 47.4%) and 35.1% (95% CL 15.8 to 54.3%) respectively and using h.p.l.c./g.c. data, 11% (95% CL - 22.6% to 44.5%) and 41% (95% CL - 50.9 to 133.0%). After repeated doses of loprazolam, there were no significant changes with respect to results after single doses in psychomotor function assessed objectively by critical flicker fusion threshold or choice reaction time, or in sleep quality or behaviour on awakening assessed subjectively by 10 cm analogue scales. Mean time to maximum serum concentration was 4.95 h with considerable inter-individual variability (range 1-12 h) and there was a lag time of 1-1.5 h before drug was detectable in blood.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2860916

  16. Clinical Report: Helping Habitual Smokers Using Flooding and Hypnotic Desensitization Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Douglas H.

    Most research in smoking cessation has shown no intervention clearly superior or successful. Of those who return to smoking after abstaining, a subgroup includes those who do so incrementally, eventually reaching their former level. An approach aimed at this subgroup, originally used in a group setting, involves intensifying the desire to smoke…

  17. "Don't Know" Responding to Answerable and Unanswerable Questions during Misleading and Hypnotic Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scoboria, Alan; Mazzoni, Giuliana; Kirsch, Irving

    2008-01-01

    "Don't know" (DK) responses to interview questions are conceptually heterogeneous, and may represent uncertainty or clear statements about the contents of memory. A study examined the subjective intent of DK responses in relation to the objective status of information queried, in the context of memory distorting procedures. Participants viewed a…

  18. A Symptom-Focused Hypnotic Approach to Accessing and Processing Previously Repressed/Dissociated Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratican, Kathleen L.

    1996-01-01

    The kinesthetic track back technique accesses the origins of current symptoms and may uncover previously repressed/dissociated material, if such material exists in the client's unconscious mind, is relevant to the symptoms, and is ready to be processed consciously. Case examples are given to illustrate proper use of this technique. (LSR)

  19. GABAA receptor pharmacology of fluorinated derivatives of the novel sedative-hypnotic pyrazolopyrimidine indiplon.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Florian; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Scheunemann, Matthias; Brust, Peter; Fischer, Steffen; Hiller, Achim; Diekers, Michael; Strecker, Karl; Wohlfarth, Kai; Allgaier, Clemens; Steinbach, Jörg; Hoepping, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    The function of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABA(A) receptors) is enhanced by various clinically important drugs including benzodiazepines that act on an allosteric site formed at the interface between the alpha and gamma subunits. In contrast to classical benzodiazepines, the novel pyrazolopyrimidine indiplon (N-methyl-N-{3-[7-(thiophene-2-carbonyl)-1,5,9-triazabicyclo[4.3.0]nona-2,4,6,8-tetraen-2-yl]phenyl}acetamide; N-methyl-N-{3-[3-(thiophene-2-carbonyl)-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-7-yl]phenyl}-acetamide) demonstrates relative binding selectivity for the alpha1 subunit containing receptor subtypes, which are the most frequently expressed in the mammalian central nervous system. To investigate the pharmacological properties at GABA(A) receptors and to promote the development of alpha1 subunit selective radiotracers for positron emission tomography imaging, we have started with the evaluation of various fluorinated indiplon derivatives. Binding affinities were determined in homogenates from newborn and adult rats suggesting an alpha1 preference of the reference compounds indiplon, zaleplon as well as for all newly synthesized indiplon derivatives. In homogenated cerebellar tissue obtained from adult rat brain, known to primarily express alpha1 containing GABA(A) receptors, the high affinity of the basic indiplon structure was only slightly affected by an elongation of the alkyl substituent of the amide N from methyl (indiplon; K(i) 3.1 nM) via ethyl (2a, N-(2-fluoro-ethyl)-N-{3-[3-(thiophene-2-carbonyl)-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-7-yl]phenyl}-acetamide; K(i) 5.4 nM) to propyl (2b, N-(3-fluoro-propyl)-N-{3-[3-(thiophene-2-carbonyl)-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-7-yl]phenyl}-acetamide; K(i) 2.4 nM). Whole cell patch-clamp recordings at neuronal and recombinant GABA(A) receptors indicated that the fluorinated derivatives 2a and 2b have a high potency at alpha1beta3gamma2L isoforms comparable to indiplon (EC(50): 105, 158, and 81 nM, respectively), with 2b displaying the most pronounced efficacy at alpha3beta3gamma2L subtypes. In conclusion, the affinity profiles and functional properties of the newly synthesised fluorinated indiplon derivatives make compounds 2a and 2b suitable for the development of [(18)F]-labelled ligands at GABA(A) receptors containing the alpha1 subunit. PMID:18035350

  20. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  1. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  2. Crystalglobulin-Induced Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vinay; El Ters, Mireille; Kashani, Kianoush; Leung, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Crystalline nephropathy refers to renal parenchymal deposition of crystals leading to kidney damage. The most common forms of crystalline nephropathy encountered in renal pathology are nephrocalcinosis and oxalate nephropathy. Less frequent types include urate nephropathy, cystinosis, dihydroxyadeninuria, and drug-induced crystalline nephropathy (e.g., caused by indinavir or triamterene). Monoclonal proteins can also deposit in the kidney as crystals and cause tissue damage. This occurs in conditions such as light chain proximal tubulopathy, crystal-storing histiocytosis, and crystalglobulinemia. The latter is a rare complication of multiple myeloma that results from crystallization of monoclonal proteins in the systemic vasculature, leading to vascular injury, thrombosis, and occlusion. In this report, we describe a case of crystalglobulin-induced nephropathy and discuss its pathophysiology and the differential diagnosis of paraprotein-induced crystalline nephropathy. PMID:25190731

  3. Methacholine induced headache.

    PubMed Central

    Carratala, C.; Gea, J. G.; Aguar, M. C.; Grau, S.; Espadaler-Medina, J. M.; Broquetas, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    A lung function technician developed episodes of headache, probably related to the use of methacholine. The headache disappeared with breathing 100% oxygen. Cholinergic agents are known to induce headaches but the mechanism remains unclear. Vascular factors could be implicated. PMID:7660351

  4. Methacholine induced headache.

    PubMed

    Carratala, C; Gea, J G; Aguar, M C; Grau, S; Espadaler-Medina, J M; Broquetas, J M

    1995-03-01

    A lung function technician developed episodes of headache, probably related to the use of methacholine. The headache disappeared with breathing 100% oxygen. Cholinergic agents are known to induce headaches but the mechanism remains unclear. Vascular factors could be implicated. PMID:7660351

  5. DRUG INDUCED CHOLESTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Padda, Manmeet S.; Sanchez, Mayra; Akhtar, Abbasi J.; Boyer, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of bile formation and cholestasis have led to new insights into the pathogenesis of drug induced cholestasis. This review summarizes their variable clinical presentations, examines the, role of transport proteins in hepatic drug clearance and toxicity and addresses the increasing importance of genetic determinants, as well as practical aspects of diagnosis and management. PMID:21480339

  6. Does formaldehyde induce aneuploidy?

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Kühner, Stefanie; Linsenmeyer, Regina; Schütz, Petra

    2011-11-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) was tested for a potential aneugenic activity in mammalian cells. We employed tests to discriminate between aneugenic and clastogenic effects in accordance with international guidelines for genotoxicity testing. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus test (CBMNT) in combination with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with a pan-centromeric probe was performed with cultured human lymphocytes and the human A549 lung cell line. FA induced micronuclei (MN) in binuclear cells of both cell types under standard in vitro test conditions following the OECD guideline 487. FISH analysis revealed that the vast majority of induced MN were centromere negative, thus indicating a clastogenic effect. A similar result was obtained for MN induced by γ-irradiation, whereas the typical aneugens colcemid (COL) and vincristine (VCR) predominantly induced centromere-positive MN. Furthermore, COL and VCR clearly enhanced the MN frequency in mononuclear lymphocytes in the CBMNT, whereas such an effect was not observed for γ-irradiation and FA. In experiments with the Chinese hamster V79 cell line, the aneugens COL and VCR clearly increased the frequency of tetraploid second division metaphases, whereas FA did not cause such an effect. Altogether, our results confirm the clastogenicity of FA in cultured mammalian cells but exclude a significant aneugenic activity. PMID:21804075

  7. Ethionamide-induced gynecomastia

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Ramakant; George, Jacob; Sharma, Arun K.; chhabra, Naveen; Jangir, Suresh K.; Mishra, Vikas

    2012-01-01

    Gynecomastia is very rare during antituberculosis chemotherapy. We describe a 38-year-old male patient who developed a painful gynecomastia following second-line drug therapy for multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis. Gynecomastia disappeared after stopping the ethionamide. A published literature on antituberculosis-induced gynecomastia is also briefly discussed. PMID:22629101

  8. Irradiation-Induced Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Birtcher, R.C.; Ewing, R.C.; Matzke, Hj.; Meldrum, A.; Newcomer, P.P.; Wang, L.M.; Wang, S.X.; Weber, W.J.

    1999-08-09

    This paper summarizes the results of the studies of the irradiation-induced formation of nanostructures, where the injected interstitials from the source of irradiation are not major components of the nanophase. This phenomena has been observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in a number of intermetallic compounds and ceramics during high-energy electron or ion irradiations when the ions completely penetrate through the specimen. Beginning with single crystals, electron or ion irradiation in a certain temperature range may result in nanostructures composed of amorphous domains and nanocrystals with either the original composition and crystal structure or new nanophases formed by decomposition of the target material. The phenomenon has also been observed in natural materials which have suffered irradiation from the decay of constituent radioactive elements and in nuclear reactor fuels which have been irradiated by fission neutrons and other fission products. The mechanisms involved in the process of this nanophase formation are discussed in terms of the evolution of displacement cascades, radiation-induced defect accumulation, radiation-induced segregation and phase decomposition, as well as the competition between irradiation-induced amorphization and recrystallization.

  9. Shrouded inducer pump

    DOEpatents

    Meng, Sen Y.

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in a pump including a shrouded inducer, the improvement comprising first and second sealing means 32,36 which cooperate with a first vortex cell 38 and a series of secondary vortex cells 40 to remove any tangential velocity components from the recirculation flow.

  10. Effects of Induced Astigmatism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Delwyn G.; Walton, Howard N.

    1968-01-01

    The relationship of astigmatism to reading and the possible detrimental effects it might have on reading were investigated. The greatest incidence of astigmatism was for the with-the-rule type ranging from .50 to 1.00 diopter. This type of astigmatism was induced in 35 seniors from the Los Angeles College of Optometry by placing cylindrical lenses…

  11. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  12. Schedule-Induced Stereotypy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Eric; Howard, Denise

    1992-01-01

    The phenomena of the induction and entrainment of adjunctive behaviors was investigated in 8 people (ages 5-51) with severe or profound mental retardation who exhibited stereotypic behaviors. Seven of the eight demonstrated evidence of schedule-induced stereotypic behavior, whereas five also showed evidence of the entrainment of these behaviors by…

  13. Geomagnetism and Induced Voltage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Biller, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory physics laboratories have seen an influx of "conceptual integrated science" over time in their classrooms with elements of other sciences such as chemistry, biology, Earth science, and astronomy. We describe a laboratory to introduce this development, as it attracts attention to the voltage induced in the human brain as it is…

  14. Drug-induced hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Badreddine, Atef; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Hmouda, Houssem

    2014-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common clinical condition that can be defined as a serum potassium concentration exceeding 5.0 mmol/L. Drug-induced hyperkalemia is the most important cause of increased potassium levels in everyday clinical practice. Drug-induced hyperkalemia may be asymptomatic. However, it may be dramatic and life threatening, posing diagnostic and management problems. A wide range of drugs can cause hyperkalemia by a variety of mechanisms. Drugs can interfere with potassium homoeostasis either by promoting transcellular potassium shift or by impairing renal potassium excretion. Drugs may also increase potassium supply. The reduction in renal potassium excretion due to inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system represents the most important mechanism by which drugs are known to cause hyperkalemia. Medications that alter transmembrane potassium movement include amino acids, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, suxamethonium, and mannitol. Drugs that impair renal potassium excretion are mainly represented by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, direct renin inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, calcineurin inhibitors, heparin and derivatives, aldosterone antagonists, potassium-sparing diuretics, trimethoprim, and pentamidine. Potassium-containing agents represent another group of medications causing hyperkalemia. Increased awareness of drugs that can induce hyperkalemia, and monitoring and prevention are key elements for reducing the number of hospital admissions, morbidity, and mortality related to drug-induced hyperkalemia. PMID:25047526

  15. Injection-induced earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, William L

    2013-07-12

    Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard. PMID:23846903

  16. Comparison of the Effects of Low-Dose Midazolam, Magnesium Sulfate, Remifentanil and Low-Dose Etomidate on Prevention of Etomidate-Induced Myoclonus in Orthopedic Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Sedighinejad, Abbas; Naderi Nabi, Bahram; Haghighi, Mohammad; Biazar, Gelareh; Imantalab, Vali; Rimaz, Siamak; Zaridoost, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background Etomidate is a potent hypnotic agent with several desirable advantages such as providing a stable cardiovascular profile with minimal respiratory adverse effects and better hemodynamic stability compared with other induction agents. This drug is associated, however, with myoclonic movements which is characterized by a sudden, brief muscle contractions as a disturbing side-effect. Objectives The present study was designed to compare the effectiveness of low- dose midazolam, magnesium sulfate, remifentanil and low-dose etomidate to suppress etomidate-induced myoclonus in orthopedic surgery. Patients and Methods A double-blind clinical trial study was conducted in an academic hospital from September 2014 to August 2015. Two hundred and eighty-four eligible patients, American society of anesthesiologists class I - II, scheduled for elective orthopedic surgery were randomly allocated into four equal groups (n = 71). They received premedication with intravenous low-dose midazolam 0.015 mg/kg, magnesium sulfate 30 mg/kg, remifentanil 1 μg/kg and low-dose etomidate 0.03 mg/kg two minutes before induction of anesthesia with 0.3 mg/kg intravenous etomidate. Then the incidence and intensity of myoclonus were evaluated on a scale of 0 - 3; 0 = no myoclonus; 1 = mild (movement at wrist); 2 = moderate (movement at arm only, elbow or shoulder); and 3 = severe, generalized response or movement in more than one extremity, within ninety seconds. Any adverse effect due to these premedication agents was recorded. Results The incidence and intensity of myoclonus were significantly lower in the low-dose etomidate group. The incidence rates of myoclonus were 51 (71.85%), 61 (85.9%), 30 (42.3%) and 41 (57.7%), and the percentages of patients who experienced grade III of myoclonus were 30 (58.8%), 32 (52.5%), 9 (30%) and 14 (34.1%) in the midazolam, magnesium sulfate, etomidate and remifentanil groups, respectively. The incidence and intensity of myoclonus were significantly

  17. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological intervention for rocuronium-induced withdrawal movement in the Korean population: a meta-analysis of 41 studies including 4,742 subjects

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Geun Joo; Lee, Sangseok; Lee, Jeoung Hyuk; Park, Seul Gi

    2014-01-01

    Background We purposed to systemically review studies investigating the prophylactic effect of both pharmacological and non-pharmacological modalities against rocuronium induced withdrawal movement (RIWM) in the Korean population. Methods Literature search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, Koreamed, KMBASE, KISS and RISS up to March 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions with placebo aimed for the Korean population were included. Outcome measures were the incidence and severity of RIWM. We conducted subgroup analyses according to each intervention method. Results Data were analyzed from 41 RCTs totaling 4,742 subjects. The overall incidence of RIWM was about 80% (range 56-100%). Incidence and severity of RIWM were significantly reduced with lidocaine (risk ratio [RR] 0.60, 95% CI 0.49-0.74; standardized mean difference [SMD] -0.74, 95% CI -1.05 to -0.44), opioids (RR 0.28, 95% CI 0.18-0.44; SMD -1.71, 95% CI -2.09 to -1.34) and hypnotics (RR 0.36, 95% CI 0.25-0.52; SMD -2.20, 95% CI -2.62 to -1.79). Regardless of tourniquet use, lidocaine showed a prophylactic effect against incidence and severity of RIWM: tourniquet (RR 0.36, 95% CI 0.21-0.62; SMD -1.51, 95% CI -2.15 to -0.86); non-tourniquet (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.47-0.71; SMD -0.74, 95% CI -1.05 to -0.44). Dilution and slow injection of rocuronium decreased incidence and severity of RIWM: dilution (RR 0.47, 95% CI 0.39-0.56; SMD -1.64, 95% CI -2.47 to -0.81); slow injection (RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.17-0.70; SMD -2.13, 95% CI -2.74 to -1.51). Conclusions The greater part of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions showed prophylactic effect against the incidence and severity of RIWM in the Korean population. PMID:25006365

  18. Exercise-induced purpura.

    PubMed

    Ramelet, Albert-Adrien

    2004-01-01

    Exercise-induced purpura (EIP) occurs on the lower legs after unusual or major muscular activity, as in marathon runners or as after long walks, especially in the mountains in hot weather. In leisure walkers, patients are otherwise healthy females. There is no relation with chronic venous disorder. Erythematous, urticarial or purpuric plaques arise on the lower leg, usually sparing the skin compressed by socks. Symptoms include itch, pain and a burning sensation. Histopathology demonstrates leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The lesions fade after some days, with frequent relapses at further muscular exercises and may be prevented in some cases by compression, intake of venoactive drugs and local application of steroids. EIP is not uncommon, even if very few descriptions have yet been published. It appears to be consecutive to venous stasis induced by an acute failure of the muscle pump of the calf and thermoregulation decompensation, after a prolonged and unusual exercise, such as running or walking in hot weather. PMID:15178910

  19. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure. PMID:25024947

  20. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-04-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure. PMID:25024947

  1. Hypoxia-Inducible Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Min; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen is vital for the existence of all multicellular organisms, acting as a signaling molecule regulating cellular activities. Specifically, hypoxia, which occurs when the partial pressure of oxygen falls below 5%, plays a pivotal role during development, regeneration, and cancer. Here we report a novel hypoxia-inducible (HI) hydrogel composed of gelatin and ferulic acid that can form hydrogel networks via oxygen consumption in a laccase-mediated reaction. Oxygen levels and gradients within the hydrogels can be accurately controlled and precisely predicted. We demonstrate that HI hydrogels guide vascular morphogenesis in vitro via hypoxia-inducible factors activation of matrix metalloproteinases and promote rapid neovascularization from the host tissue during subcutaneous wound healing. The HI hydrogel is a new class of biomaterials that may prove useful in many applications, ranging from fundamental studies of developmental, regenerative and disease processes through the engineering of healthy and diseased tissue models towards the treatment of hypoxia-regulated disorders. PMID:24909742

  2. Sepsis-induced Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailen, Manuel; Gil-Cebrian, Julián; Huertos-Ranchal, María J

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial dysfunction is one of the main predictors of poor outcome in septic patients, with mortality rates next to 70%. During the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, both ventricles can dilate and diminish its ejection fraction, having less response to fluid resuscitation and catecholamines, but typically is assumed to be reversible within 7-10 days. In the last 30 years, It´s being subject of substantial research; however no explanation of its etiopathogenesis or effective treatment have been proved yet. The aim of this manuscript is to review on the most relevant aspects of the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, discuss its clinical presentation, pathophysiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies proposed in recent years. PMID:22758615

  3. Asthma induced by enkephalin.

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, R D; Bellamy, D; Pyke, D A

    1980-01-01

    A total of 291 diabetics were studied to see whether an asthmatic reaction was associated with facial flushing induced by chlorpropamide and alcohol. Of these patients, 191 reported facial flushing, of whom 12 reported breathlessness as well. Of these 12, five also described wheezing, and respiratory function tests showed them to have asthma. Three of these five patients underwent further tests, which showed that the asthmatic reaction could be prevented by giving disodium cromoglycate and the specific opiate antagonist naloxone. One patient developed wheezing when given an enkephalin analogue with opiate-like activity. Asthma induced by chlorpropamide and alcohol was concluded to be mediated by endogenous peptides with opiate-like activity such as enkephalin. PMID:7357255

  4. Drug-induced Photosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zuba, Ewelina Bogumiła; Koronowska, Sandra; Osmola-Mańkowska, Agnieszka; Jenerowicz, Dorota

    2016-04-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is considered the main environmental physical hazard to the skin. It is responsible for photoaging, sunburns, carcinogenesis, and photodermatoses, including drug-induced photosensitivity. Drug-induced photosensitivity is an abnormal skin reaction either to sunlight or to artificial light. Drugs may be a cause of photoallergic, phototoxic, and photoaggravated dermatitis. There are numerous medications that can be implicated in these types of reactions. Recently, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been shown to be a common cause of photosensitivity. As both systemic and topical medications may promote photosensitive reactions, it is important to take into consideration the potential risk of occurrence such reactions, especially in people chronically exposed to ultraviolet radiation. PMID:27149132

  5. Anesthetic-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Norred, Carol L

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this course is to update nurse anesthetists about anesthetic-induced anaphylaxis. This course discusses the pathophysiologic process of anaphylaxis with descriptions of the allergic immune response and the mediators and mechanisms of mast cell activation. The preoperative identification of patients at high risk and the assessment of potential anesthetic triggers of a hypersensitivity and/or allergic reaction are prudent strategies to minimize the risk of anaphylaxis. Other practices recommended for clinicians include suggestions for anesthetic management to decrease threat of an allergic response in high-risk patients. Furthermore, the identification of the severity grade of hypersensitivity reactions and the appropriate treatment of perioperative anaphylaxis is discussed. In addition, postoperative and follow-up interventions, including testing for patients who have had an anesthetic-induced hypersensitivity reaction, are considered. PMID:22586882

  6. Radiation-induced schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A.B.; Reichenthal, E.; Borohov, H.

    1989-06-01

    The histopathology and clinical course of three patients with schwannomas of the brain and high cervical cord after therapeutic irradiation for intracranial malignancy and for ringworm of the scalp are described. Earlier reports in the literature indicated that radiation of the scalp may induce tumors in the head and neck. It is therefore suggested that therapeutic irradiation in these instances was a causative factor in the genesis of these tumors.

  7. Levetiracetam-induced pancytopenia.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Talal; Kay, Dana; Alqahtani, Saeed A; Makke, Yamane; Lesky, Linda; Koubeissi, Mohamad Z

    2015-01-01

    Pancytopenia is a rare side effect of levetiracetam (LEV) that is associated with severe morbidity that requires hospitalization. Here, we report a patient with a right temporoparietal tumor who underwent a temporal craniotomy with resection of the mass and was started on LEV for seizure prophylaxis per the neurosurgery local protocol. The patient developed LEV-induced pancytopenia, which was successfully managed by discontinuation of this medication. Our report aims to increase awareness of this rare cause of pancytopenia among clinicians. PMID:26744695

  8. Radiation-induced osteochondromas

    SciTech Connect

    Libshitz, H.I.; Cohen, M.A.

    1982-03-01

    Radiation-induced osteochondromas, either single or multiple, occur more commonly than is generally recognized. The incidence following irradiation for childhood malignancy is approximately 12%. Any open epiphysis is vulnerable. Age at irradiation, time of appearance following therapy, dose and type of radiation, and clinical course in 14 cases are dicussed. Due to growth of the lesion and/or pain, 3 tumors were excised. None revealed malignant degeneration.

  9. [Induced autotetraploid grape mutants].

    PubMed

    Kuliev, V M

    2011-01-01

    The methods of experimental mitotic and meiotic polyploidy in grapes are represented in the article. Results of cytological, histo-anatomical, biomorphological researches of induced autotetraploids are shown. Genetic characteristics, parameters of generative organs, quantitative and structural genome changes were studied. Comparative quantitative changes in the content of chloroplast and mitochondrion DNAs and RNAs in diploids and autotetraploids were defined. Also are shown. The biology-economic evaluation of autotetraploids on comparison with the initial grape variety is represented. PMID:21774401

  10. Fluoroscopy-induced radionecrosis.

    PubMed

    Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N; Kamangar, Faranak; Ho, Baran; Chang, Shurong; Dahle, Sara E; Schulman, Joshua M; Isseroff, R Rivkah

    2016-01-01

    Complications from radiation exposure during fluoroscopic guidance of cardiac catheterization may occur. With repeated procedures, the risk for cutaneous injuries increases. Herein, we describe a 59-year-old man with extensive coronary artery disease, who had undergone multiple revascularization procedures and developed a non-healing ulcer on his left inferior scapula. The patient's medical history, physical exam findings, and histopathology gave clues to a case of radiation-induced dermatitis and necrosis. PMID:27617939

  11. Valproate Induced Hyperammonemic Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Muraleedharan, Anupama; Gangadhar, Reneega; Das, Soumitra

    2015-01-01

    Sodium valproate induced hyperammonaemic delirium with normal liver function tests is a relatively uncommon adverse effect. It may be mistaken for psychosis or worsening of mania leading to wrong diagnosis and improper management. Plasma ammonia levels should be monitored in all patients developing altered mental status after receiving valproate therapy. This is a case series of hyperammonaemic delirium due to valproate reported to the Department of Pharmacology from Department of Psychiatry over a period of one year. PMID:26816916

  12. Remotely induced atmospheric lasing

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, Phillip; Penano, Joseph; Gordon, Daniel; Hafizi, Bahman; Scully, Marlan

    2011-05-23

    We propose and analyze a remote atmospheric lasing configuration which utilizes a combination of an ultrashort pulse laser to form a plasma filament (seed electrons) by tunneling ionization and a heater pulse which thermalizes the seed electrons. Electrons collisionally excite nitrogen molecules and induce lasing in the ultraviolet. The lasing gain is sufficiently high to reach saturation within the length of the plasma filament. A remotely generated ultraviolet source may have applications for standoff detection of biological and chemical agents.

  13. Polarization induced doped transistor

    DOEpatents

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  14. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  15. Allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, Donald W

    2014-01-01

    It was only in the late 19th century that specific allergens, pollen, animal antigens and, later, house dust mite, were identified to cause upper and lower airway disease. Early allergen challenge studies, crudely monitored before measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s became widespread in the 1950s, focused on the immediate effects but noted in passing prolonged and/or recurrent asthma symptoms. The late asthmatic response, recurrent bronchoconstriction after spontaneous resolution of the early responses occurring 3 h to 8 h or more postchallenge, has been identified and well characterized over the past 50 years. The associated allergen-induced airway hyper-responsiveness (1977) and allergen-induced airway inflammation (1985) indicate that these late sequelae are important in the mechanism of allergen-induced asthma. Allergens are now recognized to be the most important cause of asthma. A standardized allergen inhalation challenge model has been developed and is proving to be a valuable research tool in the investigation of asthma pathophysiology and of potential new pharmacological agents for the treatment of asthma. PMID:24791256

  16. Sildenafil induced priapism.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, T; Hayakawa, K; Miyaji, K; Ishikawa, H; Hata, M

    1999-11-01

    A 53 year-old Japanese man was referred to our hospital for persistent priapism, which had been induced by 200 mg (usual dose 25-50 mg) of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) three days earlier. He had a history of erectile dysfunction and had undergone penile injection therapy elsewhere; however, he had not used injection therapy this time. He obtained sildenafil personally without a doctor's prescription. He had not taken any other drugs that affect the metabolism of sildenafil, nor did he have any medical complications that might induce priapism. Since needle aspiration and irrigation were ineffective as first line therapy, surgical treatment was indicated to relieve the condition; a incision of tunica albuginea of both corpora cavernosa was made, and vigorous irrigation of saline washed out the blood clots. This is the first case report of priapism induced by sildenafil. Although this drug can be obtained through private commerce, it should be used under professional guidance as its abuse may lead to severe morbidity. PMID:11933312

  17. Glycerol-induced hyperhydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedesel, Marvin L.; Lyons, Timothy P.; Mcnamara, M. Colleen

    1991-01-01

    Maintenance of euhydration is essential for maximum work performance. Environments which induce hypohydration reduce plasma volume and cardiovascular performance progressively declines as does work capacity. Hyperhydration prior to exposure to dehydrating environments appears to be a potential countermeasure to the debilitating effects of hypohydration. The extravascular fluid space, being the largest fluid compartment in the body, is the most logical space by which significant hyperhydration can be accomplished. Volume and osmotic receptors in the vascular space result in physiological responses which counteract hyperhydration. Our hypothesis is that glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH) can accomplish extravascular fluid expansion because of the high solubility of glycerol in lipid and aqueous media. A hypertonic solution of glycerol is rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, results in mild increases in plasma osmolality and is distributed to 65 percent of the body mass. A large volume of water ingested within minutes after glycerol intake results in increased total body water because of the osmotic action and distribution of glycerol. The resulting expanded extravascular fluid space can act as a reservoir to maintain plasma volume during exposure to dehydrating environments. The fluid shifts associated with exposure to microgravity result in increased urine production and is another example of an environment which induces hypohydration. Our goal is to demonstrate that GIH will facilitate maintenance of euhydration and cardiovascular performance during space flight and upon return to a 1 g environment.

  18. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Briot, Karine; Roux, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis is the most common form of secondary osteoporosis and the first cause in young people. Bone loss and increased rate of fractures occur early after the initiation of corticosteroid therapy, and are then related to dosage and treatment duration. The increase in fracture risk is not fully assessed by bone mineral density measurements, as it is also related to alteration of bone quality and increased risk of falls. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, a treat-to-target strategy focusing on low disease activity including through the use of low dose of prednisone, is a key determinant of bone loss prevention. Bone loss magnitude is variable and there is no clearly identified predictor of the individual risk of fracture. Prevention or treatment of osteoporosis should be considered in all patients who receive prednisone. Bisphosphonates and the anabolic agent parathyroid hormone (1–34) have shown their efficacy in the treatment of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis. Recent international guidelines are available and should guide management of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis, which remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. Duration of antiosteoporotic treatment should be discussed at the individual level, depending on the subject's characteristics and on the underlying inflammation evolution. PMID:26509049

  19. Swimming pool-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Beretta, S; Vivaldo, T; Morelli, M; Carlucci, P; Zuccotti, G V

    2011-01-01

    A 13-year-old elite swimmer presented with wheezing after indoor swimming training. On the basis of her clinical history and the tests performed, exercise-induced asthma and mold-induced asthma were ruled out and a diagnosis of chlorine-induced asthma was made. PMID:21548454

  20. INFLUENCE OF OZONE ON XENOBIOTIC METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gardner et al. found that ozone (O3) exposure increased pentobarbital induced sleeping time in female CD-1 mice. The animals were exposed to 1960 micrograms O3/cu. m (1 ppm) for 3 hr/day for up to 7 days, but an effect was only observed on the second and third day of exposure. Si...

  1. INFLUENCE OF NITROGEN DIOXIDE ON XENOBIOTIC METABOLISM IN ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Potential extrapulmonary effects of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on hepatic xenobiotic metabolism were examined. Initial studies were conducted using pentobarbital (PEN) induced sleeping time (S.T.) in mice as an indicator of integrated mechanisms of xenobiotic clearance. A 3 hr. expos...

  2. Slow wave sleep-inducing effects of first generation H1-antagonists.

    PubMed

    Saitou, K; Kaneko, Y; Sugimoto, Y; Chen, Z; Kamei, C

    1999-10-01

    The present study was performed to see if first-generation histamine H1-antagonists are useful sedative-hypnotic drugs. Increases in electroencephalogram (EEG) power spectra of the delta band (0-4 Hz) at the frontal cortex and theta band (4-8 Hz) at the hippocampus in rats were used as an indexes of sleep. The H1-antagonists used in this study resulted in a decrease in sleep latency and an increase in sleep duration (slow wave sleep). The rate of REM (rapid eye movement) sleep during slow wave sleep was decreased by H1-antagonists and brotizolam. The order of potency of H1-antagonists for the reduction in sleep latency (from greatest to least) was promethazine>chlorpheniramine>diphenhydramine and pyrilamine, and that for the increase in sleep duration was chlorpheniramine>promethazine>diphenhydramine and pyrilamine. Brotizolam was more potent than these H1-antagonists, with 14-18-fold and 4-14-fold greater effects on sleep latency and duration, respectively. These results clearly show that H1-antagonists are effective in mild to moderate insomnia as sedative-hypnotic drugs. PMID:10549859

  3. Study of cavitating inducer instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. E.; Murphy, R.; Reddecliff, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An analytic and experimental investigation into the causes and mechanisms of cavitating inducer instabilities was conducted. Hydrofoil cascade tests were performed, during which cavity sizes were measured. The measured data were used, along with inducer data and potential flow predictions, to refine an analysis for the prediction of inducer blade suction surface cavitation cavity volume. Cavity volume predictions were incorporated into a linearized system model, and instability predictions for an inducer water test loop were generated. Inducer tests were conducted and instability predictions correlated favorably with measured instability data.

  4. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  5. -induced continental warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Youichi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kimoto, Masahide; Shiogama, Hideo

    2014-11-01

    In this the second of a two-part study, we examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the increasing contrast of the land-sea surface air temperature (SAT) in summertime over the Far East, as observed in recent decades and revealed in future climate projections obtained from a series of transient warming and sensitivity experiments conducted under the umbrella of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. On a global perspective, a strengthening of land-sea SAT contrast in the transient warming simulations of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models is attributed to an increase in sea surface temperature (SST). However, in boreal summer, the strengthened contrast over the Far East is reproduced only by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. In response to SST increase alone, the tropospheric warming over the interior of the mid- to high-latitude continents including Eurasia are weaker than those over the surrounding oceans, leading to a weakening of the land-sea SAT contrast over the Far East. Thus, the increasing contrast and associated change in atmospheric circulation over East Asia is explained by CO2-induced continental warming. The degree of strengthening of the land-sea SAT contrast varies in different transient warming scenarios, but is reproduced through a combination of the CO2-induced positive and SST-induced negative contributions to the land-sea contrast. These results imply that changes of climate patterns over the land-ocean boundary regions are sensitive to future scenarios of CO2 concentration pathways including extreme cases.

  6. Polyglycolic acid induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ceonzo, Kathleen; Gaynor, Anne; Shaffer, Lisa; Kojima, Koji; Vacanti, Charles A.; Stahl, Gregory L.

    2005-01-01

    Tissue and organ replacement have quickly outpaced available supply. Tissue bioengineering holds the promise for additional tissue availability. Various scaffolds are currently used, whereas polyglycolic acid (PGA), which is currently used in absorbable sutures and orthopedic pins, provides an excellent support for tissue development. Unfortunately, PGA can induce a local inflammatory response following implantation, so we investigated the molecular mechanism of inflammation in vitro and in vivo. Degraded PGA induced an acute peritonitis, characterized by neutrophil (PMN) infiltration following intraperitoneal injection in mice. Similar observations were observed using the metabolite of PGA, glycolide. Dissolved PGA or glycolide, but not native PGA, activated the classical complement pathway in human sera, as determined by classical complement pathway hemolytic assays, C3a and C5a production, C3 and immunoglobulin deposition. To investigate whether these in vitro observations translated to in vivo findings, we used genetically engineered mice. Intraperitoneal administration of glycolide or dissolved PGA in mice deficient in C1q, factor D, C1q and factor D or C2 and factor B demonstrated significantly reduced PMN infiltration compared to congenic controls (WT). Mice deficient in C6 also demonstrated acute peritonitis. However, treatment of WT or C6 deficient mice with a monoclonal antibody against C5 prevented the inflammatory response. These data suggest that the hydrolysis of PGA to glycolide activates the classical complement pathway. Further, complement is amplified via the alternative pathway and inflammation is induced by C5a generation. Inhibition of C5a may provide a potential therapeutic approach to limit the inflammation associated with PGA derived materials following implantation. PMID:16548688

  7. Fission induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of creating a plasma from fission fragments was investigated, as well as the probability of utilizing the energy of these particles to create population inversion leading to laser action. Eventually, it is hoped that the same medium could be used for both fissioning and lasing, thus avoiding inefficiences in converting one form of energy to the other. A central problem in understanding a fission induced plasma is to obtain an accurate model of the electron behavior; some calculations are presented to this end. The calculations are simple, providing a compendium of processes for reference.

  8. [Neuroleptic induced deficit syndrome].

    PubMed

    Szafrański, T

    1995-01-01

    Increasing interest in subjective aspects of therapy and rehabilitation focused the attention of psychiatrists, psychologists and psychopharmacologists on the mental side effects of neuroleptics. For the drug-related impairment of affective, cognitive and social function the name of neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS) is proposed. Patients with NIDS appear to be indifferent to the environmental stimuli, retarded and apathetic. They complain of feeling drugged and drowsy, weird, they suffer from lack of motivation, feel like "zombies". The paper presents description of NIDS and its differentiation from negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia and subjective perceiving of extrapyramidal syndromes. PMID:7652089

  9. Bupropion-induced somnambulism.

    PubMed

    Khazaal, Yasser; Krenz, Sonia; Zullino, Daniele Fabio

    2003-09-01

    Whereas there are some case reports of bupropion-induced vivid dreaming and nightmares, until now it has not been associated with somnambulism. A case is reported of a patient treated with bupropion as a smoking cessation medication, who developed somnambulism during nicotine withdrawal. Furthermore, the sleepwalking episodes were associated with eating behaviour. Amnesia was reported for all episodes. As, on one hand,bupropion is a noradrenergic and dopaminergic drug and nicotine withdrawal, on the other hand, is associated with alterations in monoaminergic functions, an interaction at the level of these neurotransmitters is suggested as the underlying mechanism. PMID:13129839

  10. Antioxidant-Induced Stress

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Cleva; Kross, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidants are among the most popular health-protecting products, sold worldwide without prescription. Indeed, there are many reports showing the benefits of antioxidants but only a few questioning the possible harmful effects of these “drugs”. The normal balance between antioxidants and free radicals in the body is offset when either of these forces prevails. The available evidence on the harmful effects of antioxidants is analyzed in this review. In summary, a hypothesis is presented that “antioxidant-induced stress” results when antioxidants overwhelm the body’s free radicals. PMID:22408440

  11. Cannabis induced asystole.

    PubMed

    Brancheau, Daniel; Blanco, Jessica; Gholkar, Gunjan; Patel, Brijesh; Machado, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis or marijuana is the most used recreational, and until recently illegal, drug in the United States. Although cannabis has medicinal use, its consumption has been linked to motor vehicle accidents in dose dependent fashion. Marijuana and other cannabinoids produce a multitude of effects on the human body that may result in these motor vehicle accidents. Some of the effects that marijuana has been known to cause include altered sensorium, diminished reflexes, and increased vagal tone. We present a case of cannabis induced asystole from hypervagotonia. PMID:26520167

  12. Cephalexin induced cholestatic jaundice.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Abhinav; Rao, Mana; Jasdanwala, Sarfaraz; Mathur, Ajay; Eng, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Cephalexin is a very commonly prescribed orally administered antibiotic which has many potential side effects. Amongst these cholestatic jaundice has been infrequently reported as an adverse reaction. We present a case of a 57-year-old male who exhibited features of cholestatic jaundice including elevated liver function tests (LFTs) after taking cephalexin and showed improvement on removal of the offending agent. During this time he was symptomatically treated with cholestyramine. Complete resolution of LFTs was seen in four weeks. Cephalexin induced cholestasis is rare and hence requires a high degree of clinical suspicion for prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25180107

  13. Alcohol induced liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, K A; McGee, J O

    1984-01-01

    Alcohol induces a variety of changes in the liver: fatty change, hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. The histopathological appearances of these conditions are discussed, with special attention to differential diagnosis. Many forms of alcoholic liver disease are associated with Mallory body formation and fibrosis. Mallory bodies are formed, at least in part, from intermediate filaments. Associated changes in intermediate filament organisation in alcoholic liver disease also occur. Their significance in the pathogenesis of hepatocyte death may be related to abnormalities in messenger RNA function. The mechanisms underlying hepatic fibrogenesis are also discussed. Images PMID:6086722

  14. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2003-04-15

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  15. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2005-11-08

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  16. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2008-09-09

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  17. Transient induced drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weihs, D.; Katz, J.

    1986-01-01

    In the present treatment of the calculation of forces on a wing that is suddenly brought into motion at a constant speed, attention is given to the unsteady potential's contribution to the force balance. Total bound vorticity is produced at the initial impulse. The results obtained are independent of wing aspect ratio; as time increases, this effect on the drag force becomes smaller as the vortex emanating from the trailing edge is left behind. The second contributor to induced drag is the spanwise vorticity shedding that results from the spanwise load distribution of three-dimensional wings. This contribution grows with time as the length of the wake grows.

  18. Induced drag of multiplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prandtl, L

    1924-01-01

    The most important part of the resistance or drag of a wing system,the induced drag, can be calculated theoretically, when the distribution of lift on the individual wings is known. The calculation is based upon the assumption that the lift on the wings is distributed along the wing in proportion to the ordinates of a semi-ellipse. Formulas and numerical tables are given for calculating the drag. In this connection, the most favorable arrangements of biplanes and triplanes are discussed and the results are further elucidated by means of numerical examples.

  19. Transient Uncoupling Induces Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Malte; Mannattil, Manu; Dutta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Sagar; Timme, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Finding conditions that support synchronization is a fertile and active area of research with applications across multiple disciplines. Here we present and analyze a scheme for synchronizing chaotic dynamical systems by transiently uncoupling them. Specifically, systems coupled only in a fraction of their state space may synchronize even if fully coupled they do not. While for many standard systems coupling strengths need to be bounded to ensure synchrony, transient uncoupling removes this bound and thus enables synchronization in an infinite range of effective coupling strengths. The presented coupling scheme therefore opens up the possibility to induce synchrony in (biological or technical) systems whose parameters are fixed and cannot be modified continuously.

  20. Transient Uncoupling Induces Synchronization.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Malte; Mannattil, Manu; Dutta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Sagar; Timme, Marc

    2015-07-31

    Finding conditions that support synchronization is a fertile and active area of research with applications across multiple disciplines. Here we present and analyze a scheme for synchronizing chaotic dynamical systems by transiently uncoupling them. Specifically, systems coupled only in a fraction of their state space may synchronize even if fully coupled they do not. While for many standard systems coupling strengths need to be bounded to ensure synchrony, transient uncoupling removes this bound and thus enables synchronization in an infinite range of effective coupling strengths. The presented coupling scheme therefore opens up the possibility to induce synchrony in (biological or technical) systems whose parameters are fixed and cannot be modified continuously. PMID:26274420

  1. Induced superconductivity in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heersche, Hubert B.; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Oostinga, Jeroen B.; Vandersypen, Lieven M. K.; Morpurgo, Alberto F.

    2007-07-01

    Graphene layers, prepared by mechanical exfoliation, were contacted by superconducting electrodes consisting of a titanium-aluminium bilayer. Quantum hall measurements in the normal state confirmed the single layer nature of the graphene samples. Proximity induced supercurrents were observed in all samples, below 1 K. Using a backgate, the Fermi energy could be swept from valence to conduction band via the Charge neutrality point, demonstrating supercurrents carried by holes and electrons, respectively. Interestingly, a finite supercurrent was also observed at the charge neutrality (or Dirac) point, where the density of carrier states vanishes. Our results demonstrate phase coherence in graphene.

  2. Disorder-induced amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Li, Mo

    1997-03-01

    Many crystalline materials undergo a crystalline-to-amorphous (c-a) phase transition when subjected to energetic particle irradiation at low temperatures. By focusing on the mean-square static atomic displacement as a generic measure of chemical and topological disorder, we are led quite naturally to a generalized version of the Lindemann melting criterion as a conceptual framework for a unified thermodynamic approach to solid-state amorphizing transformations. In its simplest form, the generalized Lindemann criterion assumes that the sum of the static and dynamic mean-square atomic displacements is constant along the polymorphous melting curve so that c-a transformations can be understood simply as melting of a critically-disordered crystal at temperatures below the glass transition temperature where the supercooled liquid can persist indefinitely in a configurationally-frozen state. Evidence in support of the generalized Lindemann melting criterion for amorphization is provided by a large variety of experimental observations and by molecular dynamics simulations of heat-induced melting and of defect-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds.

  3. Statin-induced myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Michał; Stępień, Karolina M; Tomaszewska, Joanna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2011-01-01

    Statins are considered to be safe, well tolerated and the most efficient drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, one of the main risk factor for atherosclerosis, and therefore they are frequently prescribed medications. The most severe adverse effect of statins is myotoxicity, in the form of myopathy, myalgia, myositis or rhabdomyolysis. Clinical trials commonly define statin toxicity as myalgia or muscle weakness with creatine kinase (CK) levels greater than 10 times the normal upper limit. Rhabdomyolysis is the most severe adverse effect of statins, which may result in acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation and death. The exact pathophysiology of statin-induced myopathy is not fully known. Multiple pathophysiological mechanisms may contribute to statin myotoxicity. This review focuses on a number of them. The prevention of statin-related myopathy involves using the lowest statin dose required to achieve therapeutic goals and avoiding polytherapy with drugs known to increase systemic exposure and myopathy risk. Currently, the only effective treatment of statin-induced myopathy is the discontinuation of statin use in patients affected by muscle aches, pains and elevated CK levels. PMID:22001973

  4. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  5. Cholesterol depletion induces autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jinglei; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tauchi-Sato, Kumi; Fujita, Akikazu; Fujimoto, Toyoshi . E-mail: tfujimot@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Autophagy is a mechanism to digest cells' own components, and its importance in many physiological and pathological processes is being recognized. But the molecular mechanism that regulates autophagy is not understood in detail. In the present study, we found that cholesterol depletion induces macroautophagy. The cellular cholesterol in human fibroblasts was depleted either acutely using 5 mM methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin or 10-20 {mu}g/ml nystatin for 1 h, or metabolically by 20 {mu}M mevastatin and 200 {mu}M mevalonolactone along with 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 2-3 days. By any of these protocols, marked increase of LC3-II was detected by immunoblotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy, and the increase was more extensive than that caused by amino acid starvation, i.e., incubation in Hanks' solution for several hours. The induction of autophagic vacuoles by cholesterol depletion was also observed in other cell types, and the LC3-positive membranes were often seen as long tubules, >50 {mu}m in length. The increase of LC3-II by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin was suppressed by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors and was accompanied by dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. By electron microscopy, autophagic vacuoles induced by cholesterol depletion were indistinguishable from those seen after amino acid starvation. These results demonstrate that a decrease in cholesterol activates autophagy by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  6. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, António J; Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-18

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  7. Electromagnetically Induced Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xihua; Xiao, Min

    2015-08-01

    Quantum entanglement provides an essential resource for quantum computation, quantum communication, and quantum network. How to conveniently and efficiently produce entanglement between bright light beams presents a challenging task to build realistic quantum information processing networks. Here, we present an efficient and convenient way to realize a novel quantum phenomenon, named electromagnetically induced entanglement, in the conventional Λ-type three-level atomic system driven by a strong pump field and a relatively weak probe field. Nearly perfect entanglement between the two fields can be achieved with a low coherence decay rate between the two lower levels, high pump-field intensity, and large optical depth of the atomic ensemble. The physical origin is quantum coherence between the lower doublet produced by the pump and probe fields, similar to the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency. This method would greatly facilitate the generation of nondegenerate narrow-band continuous-variable entanglement between bright light beams by using only coherent laser fields, and may find potential and broad applications in realistic quantum information processing.

  8. Electromagnetically Induced Entanglement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xihua; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Quantum entanglement provides an essential resource for quantum computation, quantum communication, and quantum network. How to conveniently and efficiently produce entanglement between bright light beams presents a challenging task to build realistic quantum information processing networks. Here, we present an efficient and convenient way to realize a novel quantum phenomenon, named electromagnetically induced entanglement, in the conventional Λ-type three-level atomic system driven by a strong pump field and a relatively weak probe field. Nearly perfect entanglement between the two fields can be achieved with a low coherence decay rate between the two lower levels, high pump-field intensity, and large optical depth of the atomic ensemble. The physical origin is quantum coherence between the lower doublet produced by the pump and probe fields, similar to the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency. This method would greatly facilitate the generation of nondegenerate narrow-band continuous-variable entanglement between bright light beams by using only coherent laser fields, and may find potential and broad applications in realistic quantum information processing. PMID:26314514

  9. [Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction].

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    Terms exercise-induced asthma (EIA) or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) are used to describe transient bronchoconstriction occurring during or immediately after vigorous exercise in some subjects. For the diagnosis of EIB it is necessary to show at least 10% decrease in FEV1 from baseline following physical exercise. The prevalence of EIB has been reported to be 12-15% in general population, 10-20% in summer olympic athletes, affecting up to 50-70% of winter athletes (particularly ski runners and skaters). There are two key theories explaining EIB: thermal and osmotic. Differential diagnosis of EIB should include chronic cardio-pulmonary diseases, vocal cord dysfunction, hyperventilation syndrome and poor physical fitness or overtraining. According to the ATS guidelines from 1999 for the diagnosis of EIB a standardized exercise on a treadmill or cycle ergometer test with stable environmental conditions regarding temperature and humidity of inhaled air, should be employed. Other laboratory tests assessing bronchial hyperresponsiveness to indirect stimuli including eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea (EVH), mannitol, hypertonic saline, AMP or measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) are also successfully used. In the prevention of EIB include both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment. In patients with poorly controlled asthma intensification of anti-inflammatory treatment can decrease the frequency and severity of EIB. Short and long acting beta2-agonists, antileukotriene drugs can be used prior to exercise to prevent EIB. PMID:21190152

  10. [Drug-induced laryngospasm].

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, T; Munakata, K

    1997-02-01

    We report a case of drug-induced laryngospasm due to Chlorpromazine. A drug-induced laryngospasm has not been previously reported in the literature. A 70-year-old male with the proximal end fracture of the femur was scheduled for the operative fixation. He had a past history of alcoholism and had underwent a long-term chlorpromazine therapy for 45 years until admission to our hospital. There have been a few reports on unexplained sudden deaths of patients receiving long-term treatment with chlorpromazine. Caution was therefore needed in general anesthesia, which was thought to be safer than epidural or spinal anesthesia in this case. Accordingly for the preparation of an emergency operation, the central venous catheterization via the internal jugular vein was performed under subcutaneous injection of lidocaine. Severe dyspnea and cyanosis occurred a few minutes after the administration of lidocaine. The specific diagnosis of laryngospasm was made by inspection of the vocal cords. Immediate oral intubation was performed and no complications ensued during and after the operation. This episode strongly suggests that one reason of the unexplained sudden deaths of patients receiving long term treatment with chlorpromazine could be laryngospasm. In conclusion, anesthesiologists should be aware of the possibility of laryngospasm under similar conditions. PMID:9071116

  11. [Radiation-induced neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Kolak, Agnieszka; Starosławska, Elzbieta; Kieszko, Dariusz; Cisek, Paweł; Patyra, Krzysztof Ireneusz; Surdyka, Dariusz; Dobrzyńska-Rutkowska, Aneta; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Burdan, Franciszek

    2013-12-01

    Radiation-induced neuropathy is commonly observed among oncological patients. Radiation can affect the nervous tissue directly or indirectly by inducing vasculopathy or dysfunction of internal organs. Symptoms may be mild and reversible (e.g., pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, drowsiness, fatigue, paresthesia) or life-threatening (cerebral oedema, increased intracranial pressure, seizures). Such complications are clinically divided into peripheral (plexopathies, neuropathies of spinal and cranial nerves) and central neuropathy (myelopathy, encephalopathy, cognitive impairment). The degree of neuronal damages primarily depends on the total and fractional radiation dose and applied therapeutic methods. The conformal and megavoltage radiotherapy seems to be the safeties ones. Diagnostic protocol includes physical examination, imaging (in particular magnetic resonance), electromyography, nerve conduction study and sometimes histological examination. Prevention and early detection of neurological complications are necessary in order to prevent a permanent dysfunction of the nervous system. Presently their treatment is mostly symptomatic, but in same cases a surgical intervention is required. An experimental and clinical data indicates some effectiveness of different neuroprotective agents (e.g. anticoagulants, vitamin E, hyperbaric oxygen, pentoxifylline, bevacizumab, methylphenidate, donepezil), which should be administered before and/or during radiotherapy. PMID:24490474

  12. Induced Seismicity Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Jarpe, S.; Harben, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many seismological aspects associated with monitoring of permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Many of these include monitoring underground gas migration through detailed tomographic studies of rock properties, integrity of the cap rock and micro seismicity with time. These types of studies require expensive deployments of surface and borehole sensors in the vicinity of the CO2 injection wells. Another problem that may exist in CO2 sequestration fields is the potential for damaging induced seismicity associated with fluid injection into the geologic reservoir. Seismic hazard monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields requires a seismic network over a spatially larger region possibly having stations in remote settings. Expensive observatory-grade seismic systems are not necessary for seismic hazard deployments or small-scale tomographic studies. Hazard monitoring requires accurate location of induced seismicity to magnitude levels only slightly less than that which can be felt at the surface (e.g. magnitude 1), and the frequencies of interest for tomographic analysis are ~1 Hz and greater. We have developed a seismo/acoustic smart sensor system that can achieve the goals necessary for induced seismicity monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields. The unit is inexpensive, lightweight, easy to deploy, can operate remotely under harsh conditions and features 9 channels of recording (currently 3C 4.5 Hz geophone, MEMS accelerometer and microphone). An on-board processor allows for satellite transmission of parameter data to a processing center. Continuous or event-detected data is kept on two removable flash SD cards of up to 64+ Gbytes each. If available, data can be transmitted via cell phone modem or picked up via site visits. Low-power consumption allows for autonomous operation using only a 10 watt solar panel and a gel-cell battery. The system has been successfully tested for long-term (> 6 months) remote operations over a wide range

  13. Drug-Induced Hematologic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mintzer, David M.; Billet, Shira N.; Chmielewski, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Drugs can induce almost the entire spectrum of hematologic disorders, affecting white cells, red cells, platelets, and the coagulation system. This paper aims to emphasize the broad range of drug-induced hematological syndromes and to highlight some of the newer drugs and syndromes. Methods. Medline literature on drug-induced hematologic syndromes was reviewed. Most reports and reviews focus on individual drugs or cytopenias. Results. Drug-induced syndromes include hemolytic anemias, methemoglobinemia, red cell aplasia, sideroblastic anemia, megaloblastic anemia, polycythemia, aplastic anemia, leukocytosis, neutropenia, eosinophilia, immune thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic syndromes, hypercoagulability, hypoprothrombinemia, circulating anticoagulants, myelodysplasia, and acute leukemia. Some of the classic drugs known to cause hematologic abnormalities have been replaced by newer drugs, including biologics, accompanied by their own syndromes and unintended side effects. Conclusions. Drugs can induce toxicities spanning many hematologic syndromes, mediated by a variety of mechanisms. Physicians need to be alert to the potential for iatrogenic drug-induced hematologic complications. PMID:19960059

  14. Cytokinin activity induced by thidiazuron.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J C; Katterman, F R

    1986-06-01

    The diphenylurea derivative thidiazuron induces a variety of cytokinin responses. Levels above 5 x 10(-9) molar and 4 x 10(-7) molar stimulate maximum soybean callus growth and radish cotyledon expansion, respectively. A wider range of dose response related effects follows thidiazuron induced tobacco plant regeneration. Analysis of soybean callus extracts strongly suggests that thidiazuron treatment creates an accumulation and/or synthesis of purine cytokinins, able to induce the growth, expansion and regeneration, mentioned above. PMID:16664878

  15. Uncertainty-induced quantum nonlocality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shao-xiong; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Chang-shui; Song, He-shan

    2014-01-01

    Based on the skew information, we present a quantity, uncertainty-induced quantum nonlocality (UIN) to measure the quantum correlation. It can be considered as the updated version of the original measurement-induced nonlocality (MIN) preserving the good computability but eliminating the non-contractivity problem. For 2×d-dimensional state, it is shown that UIN can be given by a closed form. In addition, we also investigate the maximal uncertainty-induced nonlocality.

  16. [Radiation-induced cancers].

    PubMed

    Dutrillaux, B

    1998-01-01

    The induction of malignant diseases is one of the most concerning late effects of ionising radiation. A large amount of information has been collected form atomic bomb survivors, patients after therapeutic irradiation, occupational follow-up and accidentally exposed populations. Major uncertainties persist in the (very) low dose range i.e., population and workers radioprotection. A review of the biological mechanisms leading to cancer strongly suggests that the vast majority of radiation-induced malignancies arise as a consequence of recessive mutations of tumour-suppressor genes. These mutations can be unveiled by ageing, this process being possibly furthered by constitutional or acquired genomic instability. The individual risk is likely to be very low, probably because of the usual dose level. However, the magnitude of medical exposure and the reliance of our societies on nuclear industry are so high that irreproachable decision-making processes and standards for practice are inescapable. PMID:9868399

  17. Laser induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ledingham, Ken; McCanny, Tom; Graham, Paul; Fang Xiao; Singhal, Ravi; Magill, Joe; Creswell, Alan; Sanderson, David; Allott, Ric; Neely, David; Norreys, Peter; Santala, Marko; Zepf, Matthew; Watts, Ian; Clark, Eugene; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, Michael; Dangor, Bucker; Machecek, Antonin; Wark, Justin

    1998-12-16

    Dramatic improvements in laser technology since 1984 have revolutionised high power laser technology. Application of chirped-pulse amplification techniques has resulted in laser intensities in excess of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. In the mid to late eighties, C. K. Rhodes and K. Boyer discussed the possibility of shining laser light of this intensity onto solid surfaces and to cause nuclear transitions. In particular, irradiation of a uranium target could induce electro- and photofission in the focal region of the laser. In this paper it is shown that {mu}Ci of {sup 62}Cu can be generated via the ({gamma},n) reaction by a laser with an intensity of about 10{sup 19} Wcm{sup -2}.

  18. [Designer drug induced psychosis].

    PubMed

    Fullajtar, Mate; Ferencz, Csaba

    2012-06-01

    3,4-methylene-dioxy-pyrovalerone (MDPV) is a popular designer drug in Hungary, known as MP4. We present a case of a 34-year-old man, whose first psychotic episode was observed in the presence of MP4 use. The paranoid ideas of reference and the dereistic thinking could be the consequence of drug-induced psychosis. Within 24 hours after the intoxication was over delirium set in. The patient's history included only the use of MP4, use of other kinds of drugs was negated. The drug tests were negative, amphetamine derivates were not detectable in the urine sample. It is most likely that the MP4 pill contained an amount of MDPV less than detectable. In conclusion we suggest that the clinical picture could be the consequence of regular MDPV use. PMID:22710853

  19. Induced seismicity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P.

    1997-09-18

    The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of seismicity associated with energy production. Earthquakes are known to be associated with oil, gas, and geothermal energy production. The intent is to develop physical models that predict when seismicity is likely to occur, and to determine to what extent these earthquakes can be used to infer conditions within energy reservoirs. Early work focused on earthquakes induced by oil and gas extraction. Just completed research has addressed earthquakes within geothermal fields, such as The Geysers in northern California, as well as the interactions of dilatancy, friction, and shear heating, on the generation of earthquakes. The former has involved modeling thermo- and poro-elastic effects of geothermal production and water injection. Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are used to measure deformation associated with geothermal activity, and these measurements along with seismic data are used to test and constrain thermo-mechanical models.

  20. Induced abortion in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Hull, T H; Sarwono, S W; Widyantoro, N

    1993-01-01

    Induced abortion is one of the most difficult sociomedical problems facing the Indonesian government. While well-known in traditional society, the practice was discouraged by all Indonesian religious groups, and forbidden by the Dutch colonial authorities. Although abortion was technically illegal under the criminal code, a judicial interpretation in the early 1970s permitted medical professionals to offer the procedure so long as they were discreet and careful. The numbers of medical abortions carried out in Indonesia rose dramatically, and there was evidence of matching declines in the incidence of morbidity and mortality caused by dangerous illegal procedures. Medical and community groups campaigned for a more liberal abortion law to protect legal practitioners and stamp out illegal traditional practices. Their efforts appeared to bear fruit in the draft Health Law, but when the law was passed by the legislature in late 1992, the issue was again clouded by contradictions and inconsistencies. PMID:8212094

  1. Trastuzumab-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Guglin, Maya; Cutro, Raymond; Mishkin, Joseph D

    2008-06-01

    Trastuzumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody used for the treatment of advanced breast cancer. It improves survival and increases response to chemotherapy. The major side effect of trastuzumab is cardiotoxicity manifesting as a reduction in left ventricular systolic function, either asymptomatic or with signs and symptoms of heart failure. Although reversible in most cases, cardiotoxicity frequently results in the discontinuation of trastuzumab. The objective of this review is to summarize facts about trastuzumab-induced cardiotoxicity and to highlight the areas of future investigations. We searched PubMed for trials involving trastuzumab used as an adjuvant therapy for breast cancer, including the metastatic breast cancer setting, and focused on cardiotoxicity. PMID:18514938

  2. Discreteness induced extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira; da Silva, Linaena Méricy

    2015-11-01

    Two simple models based on ecological problems are discussed from the point of view of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. It is shown how discrepant may be the results of the models that include spatial distribution with discrete interactions when compared with the continuous analogous models. In the continuous case we have, under certain circumstances, the population explosion. When we take into account the finiteness of the population, we get the opposite result, extinction. We will analyze how these results depend on the dimension d of the space and describe the phenomenon of the "Discreteness Inducing Extinction" (DIE). The results are interpreted in the context of the "paradox of sex", an old problem of evolutionary biology.

  3. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahorte, Philippe; Mondelaers, Wim

    This chapter represents the second part of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced radicals in biological matter are discussed. In part one the general aspects of the four stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) of interaction of radiation with matter in general and biological matter in particular, were discussed. Here an overview is presented of modem technologies and theoretical methods available for studying these radiation effects. The relevance is highlighted of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations with respect to obtaining structural information on bioradicals, and a survey is given of the research studies in this field. We also discuss some basic aspects of modem accelerator technologies which can be used for creating radicals and we conclude with an overview of applications of radiation processing in biology and related fields such as biomedical and environmental engineering, food technology, medicine and pharmacy.

  4. Laser-induced bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, G.D.; Lynch, R.V. III

    1981-01-01

    A project has been initiated to determine the feasibility of developing a complete airborne remote sensing system for rapidly mapping high concentration patches of bioluminescent organisms in the world's oceans. Conceptually, this system would be composed of a laser illuminator to induce bioluminescence and a low light level image intensifier for detection of light. Initial laboratory measurements consisted of using a 2-J flash lamp pulsed optical dye laser to excite bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellate Pyrocustis lunula at ambient temperature using Rhodamine 6G as the lasing dye (585 nm) and a laser pulse width of 1 microsec. After a latency period of 15-20 msec, the bioluminescence maximum occurred in the blue (480 nm is the wavelength maximum for most dinoflagellate bioluminescence) with the peaking occurring approximately 65 msec after the laser pulse. Planned experiments will investigate the effect of different excitation wavelengths and energies at various temperatures and salinities of the cultures.

  5. Sport-induced lipoma.

    PubMed

    Copcu, E

    2004-04-01

    Lipoma is the most common benign soft tissue tumour in human beings. It can be seen in all parts of the body and occupies the subcutaneous compartment predominantly. The pathogenesis of lipoma is still unknown, but trauma is one of the most implicated etiological factors. We report about two athletes with a very quickly grown lipoma on their right scapular area. One was a professional volleyball player and the other one was a table-tennis player. Both patients were right-handed. To our knowledge, there has been no report on sport-induced lipoma in the literature. We speculate that chronically minor traumas especially to the scapular area, in which fat tissue is located between the bone and the firm skin, may trigger the formation and enlargement of lipoma. PMID:15088241

  6. Gadolinium-Induced Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Todd, Derrick J; Kay, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), once believed to be safe for patients with renal disease, have been strongly associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a severe systemic fibrosing disorder that predominantly afflicts individuals with advanced renal dysfunction. We provide a historical perspective on the appearance and disappearance of NSF, including its initial recognition as a discrete clinical entity, its association with GBCA exposure, and the data supporting a causative relationship between GBCA exposure and NSF. On the basis of this body of evidence, we propose that the name gadolinium-induced fibrosis (GIF) more accurately reflects the totality of knowledge regarding this disease. Use of high-risk GBCAs, such as formulated gadodiamide, should be avoided in patients with renal disease. Restriction of GBCA use in this population has almost completely eradicated new cases of this debilitating condition. Emerging antifibrotic therapies may be useful for patients who suffer from GIF. PMID:26768242

  7. Baboon syndrome induced by hydroxyzine.

    PubMed

    Akkari, Hayet; Belhadjali, Hichem; Youssef, Monia; Mokni, Sana; Zili, Jamelediine

    2013-05-01

    Hydroxyzine-induced drug eruptions are very rare. We report here a typical case of drug-related Baboon syndrome or symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema (SDRIFE) which was induced by hydroxyzine in a 60-year-old man. The diagnosis was confirmed by positive patch and oral accidental provocation tests with hydroxyzine. Patch tests and oral provocation tests with cetirizine and levocetirizine were negative. A review of the literature identified only 17 reported cases of hydroxyzine-induced drug eruptions. To the best of our knowledge, we report here the first case of hydroxyzine-induced SDRIFE. PMID:23723506

  8. Baboon Syndrome Induced by Hydroxyzine

    PubMed Central

    Akkari, Hayet; Belhadjali, Hichem; Youssef, Monia; Mokni, Sana; Zili, Jamelediine

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyzine-induced drug eruptions are very rare. We report here a typical case of drug-related Baboon syndrome or symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema (SDRIFE) which was induced by hydroxyzine in a 60-year-old man. The diagnosis was confirmed by positive patch and oral accidental provocation tests with hydroxyzine. Patch tests and oral provocation tests with cetirizine and levocetirizine were negative. A review of the literature identified only 17 reported cases of hydroxyzine-induced drug eruptions. To the best of our knowledge, we report here the first case of hydroxyzine-induced SDRIFE. PMID:23723506

  9. Bellows flow-induced vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tygielski, P. J.; Smyly, H. M.; Gerlach, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The bellows flow excitation mechanism and results of comprehensive test program are summarized. The analytical model for predicting bellows flow induced stress is refined. The model includes the effects of an upstream elbow, arbitrary geometry, and multiple piles. A refined computer code for predicting flow induced stress is described which allows life prediction if a material S-N diagram is available.

  10. Gadolinium induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Perrin, H; Glaser, B; Pienkowski, M; Peron, J M; Payen, J L

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a sudden swelling and inflammation of the pancreas. The two most common causes are alcohol use and biliary stones. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis are rare (1.4-2%). In this present study, we present a case of recurrent acute pancreatitis induced by a specific magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) contrast agent called gadobenate dimeglumine. PMID:23395575

  11. Captopril-induced cholestatic jaundice.

    PubMed

    Hagley, M T

    1991-01-01

    I have reported a case of captopril-induced cholestatic jaundice. This drug is being used with increasing frequency, so it is important that physicians recognize this adverse effect. Captopril-induced jaundice resolves after cessation of captopril therapy. PMID:1986415

  12. Laser induced ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liedl, G.; Schuöcker, D.; Geringer, B.; Graf, J.; Klawatsch, D.; Lenz, H. P.; Piock, W. F.; Jetzinger, M.; Kapus, P.

    2007-05-01

    Nowadays, combustion engines and other combustion processes play an overwhelming and important role in everyday life. As a result, ignition of combustion processes is of great importance, too. Usually, ignition of a combustible material is defined in such a way that an ignition initiates a self-sustained reaction which propagates through the inflammable material even in the case that the ignition source has been removed. In most cases, a well defined ignition location and ignition time is of crucial importance. Spark plugs are well suited for such tasks but suffer from some disadvantages, like erosion of electrodes or restricted positioning possibilities. In some cases, ignition of combustible materials by means of high power laser pulses could be beneficial. High power lasers offer several different possibilities to ignite combustible materials, like thermal ignition, resonant ignition or optical breakdown ignition. Since thermal and resonant ignitions are not well suited on the requirements mentioned previously, only optical breakdown ignition will be discussed further. Optical breakdown of a gas within the focal spot of a high power laser allows a very distinct localization of the ignition spot in a combustible material. Since pulse duration is usually in the range of several nanoseconds, requirements on the ignition time are fulfilled easily, too. Laser peak intensities required for such an optical breakdown are in the range of 10 11 W/cm2. The hot plasma which forms during this breakdown initiates the following self-propagating combustion process. It has been shown previously that laser ignition of direct injection engines improves the fuel consumption as well as the exhaust emissions of such engines significantly. The work presented here gives a brief overview on the basics of laser induced ignition. Flame propagation which follows a successful ignition event can be distinguished into two diffrent regimes. Combustion processes within an engine are usually

  13. Discreteness inducing coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Consider two species that diffuse through space. Consider further that they differ only in initial densities and, possibly, in diffusion constants. Otherwise they are identical. What happens if they compete with each other in the same environment? What is the influence of the discrete nature of the interactions on the final destination? And what are the influence of diffusion and additive fluctuations corresponding to random migration and immigration of individuals? This paper aims to answer these questions for a particular competition model that incorporates intra and interspecific competition between the species. Based on mean field theory, the model has a stationary state dependent on the initial density conditions. We investigate how this initial density dependence is affected by the presence of demographic multiplicative noise and additive noise in space and time. There are three main conclusions: (1) Additive noise favors denser populations at the expense of the less dense, ratifying the competitive exclusion principle. (2) Demographic noise, on the other hand, favors less dense populations at the expense of the denser ones, inducing equal densities at the quasi-stationary state, violating the aforementioned principle. (3) The slower species always suffers the more deleterious effects of statistical fluctuations in a homogeneous medium.

  14. Clofibrate-Induced Antidiuresis

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Arnold M.; Howanitz, Joan; Gemert, Marcia Van; Miller, Myron

    1973-01-01

    Normal subjects and patients with antidiuretic hormone (ADH) deficiency were studied to determine the mechanism of the antidiuretic action of clofibrate. Before clofibrate treatment, the patients' ability to concentrate urine with a standardized dehydration procedure correlated with the amount of ADH which was excreted. During clofibrate administration all six patients with ADH deficiency developed an antidiuresis which was like that of ADH, since there was no change in sodium, potassium, total solute, or creatinine excretion. There was a correlation between the patients' ability to concentrate urine during dehydration and the subsequent response to clofibrate, and the excretion of ADH during dehydration correlated with the excretion of ADH on clofibrate therapy. Clofibrate-induced antidiuresis in these patients was partially overcome by ethanol and by water loading. Clofibrate interfered with the ability of patients and subjects to excrete a water load and prevented the water load from inhibiting ADH excretion in the normal subjects. These studies suggested that clofibrate was acting through endogenous ADH and this thesis was supported by the failure of clofibrate to produce an antidiuresis when injected into rats with total ADH deficiency (Brattleboro strain) although an antidiuresis was produced in water-loaded normal rats. When the drug was injected into Brattleboro rats with exogenous ADH, clofibrate either did not alter or it inhibited the action of the ADH. The data demonstrate that clofibrate has a significant ADH-like action. This action appears to be mediated through the release of endogenous ADH. Images PMID:4685079

  15. Fission-induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.; Shiu, Y. J.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility of creating a plasma from fission fragments, and to utilize the energy of the particles to create population inversion that would lead to laser action is investigated. An investigation was made of various laser materials which could be used for nuclear-pumped lasing. The most likely candidate for a fissioning material in the gaseous form is uranium hexafluoride - UF6, and experiments were performed to investigate materials that would be compatible with it. One of the central problems in understanding a fission-induced plasma is to obtain a model of the electron behavior, and some preliminary calculations are presented. In particular, the rates of various processes are discussed. A simple intuitive model of the electron energy distribution function is also shown. The results were useful for considering a mathematical model of a nuclear-pumped laser. Next a theoretical model of a (3)He-Ar nuclear-pumped laser is presented. The theory showed good qualitative agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Waterflood-induced fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Dikken, B.J.; Niko, H.

    1987-01-01

    Fracturing occurs quite often in water injection wells, with sometimes unforeseen consequences on waterflood sweep efficiency. One of the causes of fracturing is often the cooling of hot formations by cold injection water. A special version of a thermal reservoir simulator for prototype applications has thus been constructed that is capable of dealing with propagating waterflood-induces hydraulic fractures. With this simulator, fracture propagation and the effect of growing fractures on the sweep efficiency are studied. Infinite fracture conductivity is assumed. The limitation to a very high leak-off fractures justifies disregarding the changes in fracture volume. Fracture growth is calculated using the concept of a critical stress intensity factor. Both poro- and thermo-elastic changes in the horizontal stresses are calculated numerically and their influence on the fracture initiation/propagation is continuously taken into account. In addition, a model of fracture wall impairment because of filter-cake build-up due to poor quality injection water is included. Results are presented for both thermal and isothermal situations. It is observed in isothermal cases that the voidage replacement ratio (volume balance during injection) determined to a great extent the length to which the fracture eventually may grow.

  17. Opioid-induced constipation.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, Bishal; Hayashi, Naomi; Tsukuura, Hiroaki; Honda, Kazunori; Shimokata, Tomoya; Ando, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is a very troublesome, difficult to manage and a nearly universal complication of chronic opioid use to control pain associated with advanced illness. Some studies have reported that OIC is so intolerable in some patients that they skip their opioid medications and bear pain instead of OIC. Laxatives have commonly been used as a prophylaxis and treatment of OIC but they are frequently ineffective because the commonly available laxatives do not target the underlying mechanism of OIC, which is the blockade of peripheral mu-receptors. Recently, there have been a number of advances in the treatment of OIC, which any physician involved with opioid-prescribing discipline should be aware of. This review will update the new options and strategies available for treating OIC along with the relevant clinical trials. Finally, this review also provides a recommendation on the preferred way to approach a patient with OIC in the modern era as well as highlight on the importance of doctor-patient communication in this setting. PMID:26061717

  18. Laxative-induced rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Merante, Alfonso; Gareri, Pietro; Marigliano, Norma Maria; De Fazio, Salvatore; Bonacci, Elvira; Torchia, Carlo; Russo, Gaetano; Lacroce, Pasquale; Lacava, Roberto; Castagna, Alberto; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Ruotolo, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    The present study describes a case of laxative-induced rhabdomyolysis in an elderly patient. An 87-year-old woman was hospitalized for the onset of confusion, tremors, an inability to walk, and a fever that she had been experiencing for 36 hours. She often took high dosages of lactulose and sorbitol syrup as a laxative (about 70 g/day). During her physical examination, the patient was confused, drowsy, and she presented hyposthenia in her upper and lower limbs, symmetric and diffuse moderate hyporeflexia, and her temperature was 37.8°C. Laboratory tests revealed severe hyponatremia with hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypochloremia, and metabolic alkalosis. Moreover, rhabdomyolysis markers were found. The correction of hydroelectrolytic imbalances with saline, potassium and sodium chlorure, calcium gluconate was the first treatment. During her hospitalization the patient presented acute delirium, treated with haloperidol and prometazine chloridrate intramuscularly. She was discharged 12 days later, after resolution of symptoms, and normalized laboratory tests. Over-the-counter drugs such as laxatives are usually not considered dangerous; on the other hand, they may cause serum electrolytic imbalance and rhabdomyolysis. A careful monitoring of all the drugs taken by the elderly is one of the most important duties of a physician since drug interactions and their secondary effects may be fatal. PMID:20396636

  19. Undulator induced resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.; Morton, P.; Spencer, J.; Winick, H.

    1983-08-01

    Undulators appear to be nearly ideal radiation sources for use in storage rings because of their high brightness and small perturbation on stored beam characteristics. We consider the effects of higher-order magnetic field errors and show how they increase beam size and may lead to unstable growth of betatron oscillations. We have observed such effects in SPEAR at betatron tunes satisfying the equations: 3nu/sub x/ + nu/sub y/ = 21 and nu/sub x/ + 3nu/sub y/ = 21. The widths of these resonances were measured to be GAMMA = 0.008 +- 0.004. They are clearly visible on the synchrotron light monitors with a very dynamic and characteristic beam blow-up pattern (reminiscent of a Miller beer label). A model is developed which predicts the locations of resonances, their widths and the projected shapes observed on the light monitors. By inducing such high-order coupling resonances one could study such things as the beam distribution in electron rings or possibly turbulent motion in proton rings.

  20. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Brieger, D B; Mak, K H; Kottke-Marchant, K; Topol, E J

    1998-06-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a potentially serious complication of heparin therapy and is being encountered more frequently in patients with cardiovascular disease as use of anticoagulant therapy becomes more widespread. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of this immune-mediated condition has improved in recent years, with heparin-platelet factor 4 complex as the culprit antigen in most patients. New sensitive laboratory assays for the pathogenic antibody are now available and should permit an earlier, more reliable diagnosis, but their optimal application remains to be defined. For patients in whom HIT is diagnosed, immediate discontinuation of heparin infusions and elimination of heparin from all flushes and ports are mandatory. Further management of patients with HIT is problematic at present, as there are no readily available alternative anticoagulant agents in the United States with proven efficacy in acute coronary disease. The direct thrombin inhibitors appear to be the most promising alternatives to heparin, when continued use of heparin is contraindicated, and the results of several multicenter trials evaluating their application in patients with HIT are awaited. PMID:9626819