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  1. Pentosan Polysulfate

    MedlinePLUS

    ... stools red blood in stools bloody vomit vomiting material that looks like coffee grounds Pentosan polysulfate may ... to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in ...

  2. 77 FR 58399 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Recommendations for Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In the Federal Register of June 11, 2010 (75 FR 33311; FDA-2007-D- 0433... Recommendations for Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium Capsule; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance for industry entitled ``Bioequivalence Recommendations for Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium.''...

  3. Pentosan Polysulfate: A Novel Therapy for the Mucopolysaccharidoses

    PubMed Central

    Schuchman, Edward H.; Ge, Yi; Lai, Alon; Borisov, Yury; Faillace, Meghan; Eliyahu, Efrat; He, Xingxuan; Iatridis, James; Vlassara, Helen; Striker, Gary; Simonaro, Calogera M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pentosan polysulfate (PPS) is an FDA-approved, oral medication with anti-inflammatory and pro-chondrogenic properties. We have previously shown that animal models of the mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) exhibit significant inflammatory disease, contributing to cartilage degeneration. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) only partly reduced inflammation, and anti-TNF-alpha antibody therapy significantly enhanced clinical and pathological outcomes. Here we describe the use of PPS for the treatment of MPS type VI rats. Methodology/Principal Findings Treatment began during prenatal development and at 1 and 6 months of age. All animals were treated until they were 9 months old. Significant reductions in the serum and tissue levels of several inflammatory markers (e.g., TNF-alpha, MIP-1alpha and RANTES/CCL5) were observed, as was reduced expression of inflammatory markers in cultured articular chondrocytes. ADAMTS-5/aggrecanase-2 levels also were reduced in chondrocytes, consistent with an elevation of serum tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1. Marked improvements in motility and grooming behavior occurred, along with a reduction in eye and nasal secretions and a lessening of the tracheal deformities. MicroCT and radiographic analyses further revealed that the treated MPS skulls were longer and thinner, and that the teeth malocclusions, misalignments and mineral densities were improved. MicroCT analysis of the femurs and vertebrae revealed improvements in trabecular bone mineral densities, number and spacing in a subset of treated MPS animals. Biomechanical assessments of PPS-treated spines showed partially restored torsional behaviors, suggesting increased spinal stability. No improvements were observed in cortical bone or femur length. The positive changes in the PPS-treated MPS VI rats occurred despite glycosaminoglycan accumulation in their tissues. Conclusions Based on these findings we conclude that PPS could be a simple and effective therapy for MPS that might provide significant clinical benefits alone and in combination with other therapies. PMID:23365668

  4. Postmortem findings in a case of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease treated with intraventricular pentosan polysulfate

    PubMed Central

    Newman, P K; Todd, N V; Scoones, D; Mead, S; Knight, R S G; Will, R G; Ironside, J W

    2014-01-01

    Background A small number of patients with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) have been treated with intraventicular pentosan polysulfate (iPPS) and extended survival has been reported in some cases. To date, there have been no reports on the findings of postmortem examination of the brain in treated patients and the reasons for the extended survival are uncertain. We report on the neuropathological findings in a case of vCJD treated with PPS. Methods Data on survival in vCJD is available from information held at the National CJD Research and Surveillance Unit and includes the duration of illness in 176 cases of vCJD, five of which were treated with iPPS. One of these individuals, who received iPPS for 8?years and lived for 105?months, underwent postmortem examination, including neuropathological examination of the brain. Results The mean survival in vCJD is 17?months, with 40?months the maximum survival in patients not treated with PPS. In the 5 patients treated with PPS survival was 16 months, 45 months, 84 months, 105 months and 114?months. The patient who survived 105?months underwent postmortem examination which confirmed the diagnosis of vCJD and showed severe, but typical, changes, including neuronal loss, astrocytic gliosis and extensive prion protein (PrP) deposition in the brain. The patient was also given PPS for a short period by peripheral infusion and there was limited PrP immunostaining in lymphoreticular tissues such as spleen and appendix. Conclusions Treatment with iPPS did not reduce the overall neuropathological changes in the brain. The reduced peripheral immunostaining for PrP may reflect atrophy of these tissues in relation to chronic illness rather than a treatment effect. The reason for the long survival in patients treated with iPPS is unclear, but a treatment effect on the disease process cannot be excluded. PMID:24554103

  5. The preventive effect of sodium pentosan polysulfate against renal stone formation in hyperoxaluric rats.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Tatsuya; Ishii, Keiichi; Yoneda, Yukio; Kamikawa, Sadanori; Kanazawa, Toshinao; Sugimoto, Toshikado; Osswald, Hartmut

    2002-10-01

    Sodium pentosan polysulfate (SPP), a semi-synthetic glycosaminoglycan, was administered to rats with hyperoxaluria, induced by a vitamin B6 deficient diet, as a model of calcium oxalate stone formation. We studied the preventive effects of SPP on stone formation as well as its inhibitory effects on stone growth by autoradiography and radioluminography after intravenous injection of (14)C-oxalate. The rats were divided into non-treated and SPP-treated groups. The non-treated rats were divided into three groups: one group was fed a regular diet, while the other two groups were fed a vitamin B6 deficient diet for 2 and 4 weeks, respectively. The SPP-treated rats were divided into two groups: one group was intravenously injected with SPP from the start of the vitamin B6 deficient diet for a total of 4 weeks and the other group was injected with the same amount of SPP after 2 weeks of the diet for 2 weeks. (14)C-oxalate renal macroautoradiograms were prepared, and calcium oxalate deposits in the renal tissues were compared between the non-treated and SPP-treated groups. The preventive effects on calcium oxalate stone formation were clearly observed in the group injected with SPP for 4 weeks. Even in the other SPP-treated group, in which the administration of SPP was started at 2 weeks after the start of the diet when calcium oxalate stone formation was already observed, the size of the calcium oxalate deposits observed after 4 weeks was smaller than that in the non-treated group fed a vitamin B6 deficient diet for 4 weeks. In conclusion, our results show that SPP has not only preventive effects on calcium oxalate stone formation but also growth inhibitory effects on stones in hyperoxaluric rats. PMID:12389123

  6. Pentosan Polysulfate: a Novel Glycosaminoglycan-Like Molecule for Effective Treatment of Alphavirus-Induced Cartilage Destruction and Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Suan-Sin; Sheng, Kuo-Ching; Chen, Weiqiang; Forwood, Mark R.; Bucala, Richard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arthritogenic alphaviruses such as Ross River virus (RRV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV) cause large-scale epidemics of severe musculoskeletal disease and have been progressively expanding their global distribution. Since its introduction in July 2014, CHIKV now circulates in the United States. The hallmark of alphavirus disease is crippling pain and inflammation of the joints, a similar immunopathology to rheumatoid arthritis. The use of glycans as novel therapeutics is an area of research that has increased in recent years. Here, we describe the promising therapeutic potential of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-like molecule pentosan polysulfate (PPS) to alleviate virus-induced arthritis. Mouse models of RRV and CHIKV disease were used to characterize the extent of cartilage damage in infection and investigate the potential of PPS to treat disease. This was assessed using histological analysis, real-time PCR, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Alphaviral infection resulted in cartilage destruction, the severity of which was alleviated by PPS therapy during RRV and CHIKV clinical disease. The reduction in cartilage damage corresponded with a significant reduction in immune infiltrates. Using multiplex bead arrays, PPS treatment was found to have significantly increased the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 and reduced proinflammatory cytokines, typically correlated with disease severity. Furthermore, we reveal that the severe RRV-induced joint pathology, including thinning of articular cartilage and loss of proteoglycans in the cartilage matrix, was diminished with treatment. PPS is a promising new therapy for alphavirus-induced arthritis, acting to preserve the cartilage matrix, which is damaged during alphavirus infection. Overall, the data demonstrate the potential of glycotherapeutics as a new class of treatment for infectious arthritis. IMPORTANCE The hallmark of alphavirus disease is crippling pain and joint arthritis, which often has an extended duration. In the past year, CHIKV has expanded into the Americas, with approximately 1 million cases reported to date, whereas RRV continues to circulate in the South Pacific. Currently, there is no licensed specific treatment for alphavirus disease, and the increasing spread of infection highlights an urgent need for therapeutic intervention strategies. Pentosan polysulfate (PPS) is a glycan derivative that is orally bioavailable, has few toxic side effects, and is currently licensed under the name Elmiron for the treatment of cystitis in the United States. Our findings show that RRV infection damages the articular cartilage, including a loss of proteoglycans within the joint. Furthermore, treatment with PPS reduced the severity of both RRV- and CHIKV-induced musculoskeletal disease, including a reduction in inflammation and joint swelling, suggesting that PPS is a promising candidate for drug repurposing for the treatment of alphavirus-induced arthritis. PMID:26018160

  7. [The quantitative study of inhibitory effect of pentosan polysulfate and chlorophyllin on the experimental calcium oxalate stone].

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, K; Suzuki, K; Tsugawa, R

    1989-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of sodium pentosan polysulfate (SPP) and sodium copper chlorophyllin (SCC) on the formation, growth and aggregation of calcium oxalate crystals in vivo, and to measure the number and the volume of crystals formed in the rat kidney, quantitatively, with a Coulter counter TA-II. The deposition of calcium oxalate crystals in the rat kidney was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 2.5 g per Kg of body weight of hydroxy-L-proline and administration of 0.4% ethylene glycol as the drinking fluid ad libitum for 7 days. Daily excretions of urinary oxalate, calcium (ratio to urinary creatinine) and urinary volume were measured. Both kidneys were removed after protocol. The kidneys were homogenized with 0.2 M Tris-buffer (pH 8.0) and subsequently digested in soluene-100. After calcium oxalate crystals were collected, they were suspended in saline saturated with calcium oxalate. The crystal size distribution was measured with a Coulter counter TA-II. In addition, the renal calcium content was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry, and the kidneys were examined by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The crystals formed in the rats' kidneys were analyzed by infrared spectroscopy. The results were as follows: 1. There was no deposition of crystals in the kidney of the rats which were not treated. There was intratubular deposition of crystals in the kidneys of the rats injected with hydroxy-L-proline and administered 0.4% ethylene glycol. They consisted of calcium oxalate monohydrate. 2. Renal calcium content was significantly higher in the groups with induced crystals than the control group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2477580

  8. Dose Responsive Effects of Subcutaneous Pentosan Polysulfate Injection in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI Rats and Comparison to Oral Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Frohbergh, Michael; Ge, Yi; Meng, Fanli; Karabul, Nesrin; Solyom, Alexander; Lai, Alon; Iatridis, James; Schuchman, Edward H.; Simonaro, Calogera M.

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated the benefits of daily, oral pentosan polysulfate (PPS) treatment in a rat model of mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type VI. Herein we compare these effects to once weekly, subcutaneous (sc) injection. The bioavailability of injected PPS is greater than oral, suggesting better delivery to difficult tissues such as bone and cartilage. Injected PPS also effectively treats osteoarthritis in animals, and has shown success in osteoarthritis patients. Methodology/Principal Findings One-month-old MPS VI rats were given once weekly sc injections of PPS (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg, human equivalent dose (HED)), or daily oral PPS (4 mg/kg HED) for 6 months. Serum inflammatory markers and total glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were measured, as were several histological, morphological and functional endpoints. Overall, weekly sc PPS injections led to similar or greater therapeutic effects as daily oral administration. Common findings between the two treatment approaches included reduced serum inflammatory markers, improved dentition and skull lengths, reduced tracheal deformities, and improved mobility. Enhanced effects of sc treatment included GAG reduction in urine and tissues, greater endurance on a rotarod, and better improvements in articular cartilage and bone in some dose groups. Optimal therapeutic effects were observed at 2 mg/kg, sc. No drug-related increases in liver enzymes, coagulation factor abnormalities or other adverse effects were identified following 6 months of sc PPS administration. Conclusions Once weekly sc administration of PPS in MPS VI rats led to equal or better therapeutic effects than daily oral administration, including a surprising reduction in urine and tissue GAGs. No adverse effects from sc PPS administration were observed over the 6-month study period. PMID:24964042

  9. Pentosan reduces osteonecrosis of femoral head in SHRSP.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Noriaki; Kumagai, Kenji; Osaki, Makoto; Murata, Masakazu; Tomita, Masato; Hozumi, Akira; Nozaki, Yoshihiro; Niwa, Masami

    2010-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress is considered one of the main causes of steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a steroid hormone and pentosan polysulfate sodium (pentosan), a heparin analog, in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) as a model of ONFH. One hundred twenty-three 13-week-old male SHRSP/Izm rats were divided into four groups: a control group (group C), pentosan-administered group (group P), steroid-administered group (group S), and group administered pentosan plus steroid (group PS). Methylprednisolone acetate, as the steroid hormone, at a dose of 4 mg (15 mg/kg) was administered at 15 weeks of age. Pentosan at a dose of 3 mg/day/kg was continuously administered intraperitoneally from 13 weeks of age for 4 weeks. Rats were sacrificed at 17 weeks of age, and heart blood and both femora were collected. Triglyceride levels were significantly lower in group PS than in group S, indicating that pentosan improves lipid metabolism. The incidence of histologic ONFH was significantly lower in group P, at 14.8% (10/71 femoral heads), than in group C, at 30.4% (17/56 femoral heads), and significantly lower in group PS, at 40.8% (29/71 femoral heads), than in group S, at 91.3% (42/46 femoral heads), indicating that pentosan markedly inhibits ONFH. Immunohistochemical staining for oxidative stress showed that the stainability was significantly lower in group PS than in group S. Pentosan seems to reduce the incidence of ONFH in SHRSP by improving lipid metabolism and decreasing oxidative stress. PMID:21091356

  10. 75 FR 53704 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Use of Pentosan Polysulfate To Treat Certain Conditions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ...This is notice, in accordance with 35 U.S.C. 209(c)(1) and 37 CFR 404.7(a)(1)(i), that the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Department of Health and Human Services, is contemplating the grant of an exclusive patent license to practice the invention embodied in U.S. Patent Application No. 10/209,331, filed July 30, 2002, which was issued as U.S. Patent 6,828,309 on December 07, 2004,......

  11. SuFEx-based synthesis of polysulfates.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiajia; Sharpless, K Barry; Kwisnek, Luke; Oakdale, James S; Fokin, Valery V

    2014-09-01

    High-molecular-weight polysulfates are readily formed from aromatic bis(silyl ethers) and bis(fluorosulfates) in the presence of a base catalyst. The reaction is fast and proceeds well under neat conditions or in solvents, such as dimethyl formamide or N-methylpyrrolidone, to provide the desired polymers in nearly quantitative yield. These polymers are more resistant to chemical degradation than their polycarbonate analogues and exhibit excellent mechanical, optical, and oxygen-barrier properties. PMID:25100330

  12. Dermal absorption of mucopolysaccharide polysulfate (heparinoid) in human and minipig.

    PubMed

    Kumokawa, Tadao; Hirata, Kazumasa; Sato, Keiichi; Kano, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Dermal absorption of mucopolysaccharide polysulfate (MPS, the active ingredient of Hirudoid") in human and minipig was investigated by using 14C-labeled MPS. Three types of human and minipig skin samples were used: intact, dried and tape-stripped. At 24 h after application of 14C-MPS to intact human skin on a Franz cell in vitro, the radioactivity was detected in 0.98, 1.34, and 0.08% of the applied dose in stratum corneum, epidermal-dermal skin, and receptor fluid, respectively. In dried human skin, the amount of radioactivity detected was similar to that in intact human skin. By contrast, in tape-stripped human skin, higher radioactivity was detected in epidermal-dermal skin and receptor fluid (2.85 and 0.33% of the applied dose, respectively) than in intact or dried skin. Minipig skin showed 1.5 to 4.5 times greater dermal absorption of 14C-MPS, as compared with human skin. In an in vivo study with minipig, radioactivity was detected at the dosing skin site after dermal administration of 14C-MPS. The stability of 14C-MPS in human skin after dermal application was evaluated by agarose gel electrophoresis and ion-exchange chromatography. It was suggested that 14C-MPS absorbed into human skin would be stable because the chromatogram behaviors of the radioactivity on the two types of method were not shifted. Microautoradiography of human and minipig skins after 14C-MPS dosing showed that radioactivity was widely distributed in the epidermis in the area near hair follicles. The present results clearly demonstrate that MPS is stable and that a small fraction of it is percutaneously absorbed by human and minipig skin. PMID:21428242

  13. Energy utilization and growth performance of chickens fed novel wheat inbred lines selected for different pentosan levels with and without xylanase supplementation.

    PubMed

    Pirgozliev, V; Rose, S P; Pellny, T; Amerah, A M; Wickramasinghe, M; Ulker, M; Rakszegi, M; Bedo, Z; Shewry, P R; Lovegrove, A

    2015-02-01

    Different F5 recombinant inbred lines from the cross Yumai 34Ukrainka were grown in replicated trials on a single site in one harvest year at Rothamsted Research. A total of 10 samples from those lines were harvested and used in a broiler experiment. Twenty nutritionally complete meal-form diets that had 630 g/kg of wheat with different amounts of pentosan, with and without exogenous xylanase supplementation, were used to compare broiler growth performance and determine apparent metabolizable energy corrected for N retention (AMEn). We examined the relationship between the nutritive value of the wheat samples and their chemical compositions and results of quality tests. The amounts of total and water soluble pentosans in wheat samples ranged from 36.7 to 48.0 g/kg DM, and 6.7 to 11.6 g/kg DM, respectively. The mean crude oil and protein contents of the wheat samples were 10.5 and 143.9 g/kg DM, respectively. The average determined value for the kinematic viscosity was 0.0018 mPa.s, and 2.1 mPa.s for the dynamic viscosity. The AMEn of the wheat-based diets had a maximum range of 0.47 MJ/kg DM within the ten wheat samples that were tested. Xylanase supplementation improved (P<0.05) dietary AMEn, dry matter, and fat digestibility coefficients. There was a positive (P<0.05) relationship between in vitro kinematic viscosity of the wheat samples and the total pentosan content. There was a negative relationship between the total pentosan content in the wheat and broiler growth performance. An increase by 10 g of pentosan per kg of wheat reduced (P<0.001) daily feed intake and weight gain by 2.9?g and 3.5?g, respectively. The study shows that the feeding quality of wheat samples can be predicted by their total pentosan content. Supplementary xylanase improved energy and nutrient availability of all wheat samples that was independent of differences in pentosan content. PMID:25595480

  14. Anti-nutritive effect of wheat pentosans in broiler chickens: roles of viscosity and gut microflora.

    PubMed

    Choct, M; Annison, G

    1992-09-01

    1. The mechanism of the anti-nutritive activity of isolated wheat pentosans was investigated by examining the roles of digesta viscosity and gut microflora in broiler chickens. 2. Wheat pentosans were isolated by alkaline extraction and purified by sequential treatment with pancreatin, alpha-amylase and lichenase, and high-speed centrifugation. Some of the pentosans were depolymerised using a beta-xylanase, which reduced the relative viscosity of the polysaccharides 4 fold. 3. Inclusion of 35 g alkali-extractable pentosans (containing 854 g arabinoxylans/kg DM) per kg diet significantly (P less than 0.05) depressed broiler performance and the viscosity of the digesta of these birds was significantly (P less than 0.05) higher than that of controls. Addition of the same amount of depolymerised pentosans had no significant effect on bird performance and had less effect on digesta viscosity. 4. Supplementation of the diet containing wheat pentosans (30 g/kg) with procaine penicillin (150 mg/kg) did not improve bird performance. 4. It is concluded that the wheat pentosans elicit their anti-nutritive activity predominantly through increasing the viscosity of digesta. PMID:1393677

  15. Polysulfated Trehalose as a Novel Anticoagulant Agent with Dual Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Qudsia; Abid, Mohammad; Gupta, Neha; Tyagi, Tarun; Ashraf, Mohammad Z.; Jairajpuri, Mohamad Aman

    2015-01-01

    Physiological hemostatic balance is a coordinated outcome of counteracting coagulation and fibrinolytic systems. An imbalance of procoagulant and anticoagulant factors may result in life threatening thromboembolism. Presently, anticoagulant administration is the first line of therapy for the treatment of these conditions and several anticoagulants have been approved, including various forms of heparin. However, the polyanionic nature and multispecificity of heparin pose several complications. Generally, the polysulfated compounds with antithrombotic potential are thought to have feasible synthetic procedures with much less bleeding, thus having favourable safety profiles. Here we report the synthesis of a novel compound, trehalose octasulfate and the assessment of its anticoagulation potential. Molecular docking of trehalose and trehalose octasulfate with antithrombin showed a specificity switch in binding affinity on sulfation, where trehalose octasulfate interacts with critical residues of AT that are either directly involved in heparin binding or in the conformational rearrangement of AT on heparin binding. An in vitro analysis of trehalose octasulfate demonstrated prolonged clotting time. Lead compound when intravenously injected in occlusion induced thrombotic rats showed remarkable reduction in the size and weight of the clot at a low dose. Delay in coagulation time was observed by analysing blood plasma isolated from rats preinjected with trehalose octasulfate. A decrease in Adenosine 5?-Diphosphate (ADP) induced platelet aggregation indicated a probable dual anticoagulant and antiplatelet mechanism of action. To summarize, this study presents trehalose octasulfate as a novel, effective, dual acting antithrombotic agent. PMID:25866798

  16. The antiheparin effect of a heparinoid, pentosan polysulphate. Investigation of a mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Scully, M F; Kakkar, V V

    1984-01-01

    A pentosan polysulphate [a fully sulphated (1-4)-beta-D-xylopyranose with a single laterally positioned 4-O-methyl-alpha-D-glucuronic acid] has been shown to inhibit the anticoagulant activity of high-affinity heparin as observed in plasma and when using purified enzyme and inhibitor. The activity was shown to be concentration-dependent with an apparent Ki of approx. 2 microM. The antiheparin property was not shown by a number of other anionic carbohydrates when tested. The rate of thrombin inhibition at 0.33 microM-heparin was reduced from 7.1 X 10(8) M-1 X min-1 in the absence of pentosan polysulphate to 2.3 X 10(8) M-1 X min-1 at 2 microM-pentosan polysulphate and to 0.3 X 10(8)M-1 X min-1 at 20 microM. Using the random bireactant model of heparin action [Griffiths (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 13899-13902] it was observed that the pentosan polysulphate had no effect on the Km for antithrombin III (150 nM) but increased the Km for thrombin from 25 nM to 450 nM. A reduction in the inhibition rate by 17.3-fold predicted by substitution of these values into the general two-substrate reaction-rate equation was confirmed experimentally. PMID:6202294

  17. [Comparison of the antiphlogistic effect of mucopolysaccharide-polysulfate ointments with heparin-containing ointments in the UV erythema test].

    PubMed

    Raake, W

    1984-01-01

    It could be demonstrated by means of the UV erythema model that four different ointment preparations containing mucopolysaccharide polysulfate (MPS) have a marked antiinflammatory effect and inhibit the formation of erythemas to a large extent. In this trial arrangement the different preparations containing MPS were significantly superior to altogether eight commercial heparin ointments, which were tested, too. With an inhibition of 69% of the erythema induced by UV rays, Hirudoid 40000 ointment is the most effective of all preparations tested. PMID:6234898

  18. Biochemical changes in kidneys of normal and stone forming rats with sodium pentosan polysulphate.

    PubMed

    Subha, K; Baskar, R; Varalakshmi, P

    1992-02-01

    The influence of sodium pentosan polysulphate was studied on the deposition of stone forming constituents along with certain enzymes in the renal tissue of experimentally induced urolithiatic rats. Calcium, oxalate and phosphorus levels were elevated in kidneys of lithogenic rats, while SPP administration reduced these levels to near control values. The elevation in kidney LDH was significant in the stone forming groups and SPP had minimal effect. Increases in the activities of Na+, K(+)-and Ca(2+)-ATPases in the calculogenic groups was lowered considerably with SPP treatment. Inorganic pyrophosphatase activity was reduced significantly in the calculogenic as well as in the drug treated groups. Leucine aminopeptidase was decreased in the calculogenic group. SPP treatment elevated the enzyme activity in the treated groups. Reduction in kidney oxalate with SPP may prove useful in the medical management of urolithiasis. PMID:1373054

  19. Treatment of renal calcium stone disease with the synthetic glycosaminoglycan pentosan polysulphate.

    PubMed

    Fellstrm, B; Backman, U; Danielson, B; Wikstrm, B

    1994-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are potent inhibitors of calcium oxalate growth and aggregation. The synthetic GAG pentosan polysulphate (PPS) was used in the treatment of patients with renal calcium stone disease. Altogether, 121 patients were included in an open trial over a 3-year-period. The average stone episode rate and the stone operation rate were no different during treatment and in the pretreatment period. Altogether 48% of the patients were entirely stone-free during follow-up, whereas 29/56 patients who continued to form stones reported smaller stones that were more easily passed. It is concluded that there may be a role for PPS in the treatment of recurrent renal calcium stone disease, but a controlled study may be needed. PMID:7516780

  20. Polysulfated xanthones: multipathway development of a new generation of dual anticoagulant/antiplatelet agents.

    PubMed

    Correia-da-Silva, Marta; Sousa, Emlia; Duarte, Brbara; Marques, Franklim; Carvalho, Flix; Cunha-Ribeiro, Lus M; Pinto, Madalena M M

    2011-08-11

    A multipathway strategy was used to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo antithrombotic effects of a new synthetic family of sulfated small molecules. Polysulfated xanthonosides showed highly effective anticoagulation effects in vitro, both in plasma (clotting times) and in whole human blood (thromboelastography), as well as in vivo (ip administration, mice). Physicochemical properties were assessed for mangiferin heptasulfate (7), which showed high solubility and stability in water and in human plasma and no putative hepatotoxicity in vivo. Mangiferin heptasulfate (7) was found to be a direct inhibitor of FXa, while persulfated 3,6-(O-?-glucopyranosyl)xanthone (13) acted as a dual inhibitor of FXa (directly and by antithrombin III activation). By impedance aggregometry, compounds 7 and 13 exhibited the antiplatelet effect by inhibition of both arachidonic acid and ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Dual anticoagulant/antiplatelet agents, such as sulfated xanthonosides 7 and 13, are expected to lead to a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of both venous and arterial thrombosis. PMID:21732671

  1. Augmented anti-angiogenesis activity of polysulfated heparin-endostatin and polyethylene glycol-endostatin in alkali burn-induced corneal ulcers in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    LI, ZHAO-NA; YUAN, ZHONG-FANG; MU, GUO-YING; HU, MING; CAO, LI-JUN; ZHANG, YA-LI; GE, MING-XU

    2015-01-01

    Endostatin (ES) is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor that has the ability to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. However, its clinical application is limited by a number of disadvantages, such as poor stability, short half-life and the requirement of high doses to maintain its efficacy. The chemical modification on ES may offer a solution to these disadvantages. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of ES, polysulfated heparin-endostatin (PSH-ES) and polyethylene glycol-endostatin (PEG-ES) on the endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis associated with corneal neovascularization (CNV) and to determine their mechanisms of action. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) was used to study the effects of ES and its derivatives on endothelial cell proliferation in vitro, and rabbits were used to evaluate the effects of ES and its derivatives on CNV in vivo. In the evaluation of CNV, the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in the cornea was measured via immunohistochemistry and microvessels were counted. ES and its derivatives significantly inhibited endothelial cell proliferation in vitro (P<0.05) and suppressed CNV in vivo. Among the compounds examined, ES most effectively inhibited endothelial cell proliferation in vitro (P<0.05); however, PSH-ES and PEG-ES most effectively inhibited CNV in vivo (P<0.05). These results indicate that PSH-ES and PEG-ES are candidate anti-angiogenesis drugs. PMID:26622410

  2. Alterations in some risk factors and urinary enzymes in urolithiatic rats treated with sodium pentosan polysulphate.

    PubMed

    Subha, K; Varalakshmi, P

    1993-02-01

    The effect of sodium pentosan polysulphate (SPP) was investigated in calcium oxalate stone forming rats with respect to the urinary excretion of certain risk factors and enzymes. Calcium oxalate stones were induced by feeding 3% w/w sodium glycollate to the rats. Urinary calcium, oxalate, phosphorus and uric acid levels were increased in stone formers. In contrast magnesium excretion was low in this group. SPP treatment lowered oxalate and calcium levels in both controls and experimental animals. Magnesium levels were increased moderately. Increased excretion of urinary enzymes--LDH, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-GT and beta glucuronidase--in calculogenic rats indicates membranuria and damage to proximal tubules during stone formation. Decreased pyrophosphatase activity was observed in glycollate fed rats. SPP treatment decreased the excretion of the above enzymes in the treated groups. Stone formers exhibited decreased LAP and fibrinolytic (urokinase) activities. SPP being associated with fibrinolytic properties, increased the activities of the above two enzymes to that of control levels in calculogenic rats. PMID:7684293

  3. A novel, biodegradable and reversible polyelectrolyte platform for topical-colonic delivery of pentosan polysulphate.

    PubMed

    Shah, Hardik K; Conkie, Jim A; Tait, Robert C; Johnson, James R; Wilson, Clive G

    2011-02-14

    The goal of the present work was to develop a swellable hydrogel colonic delivery system, which would maximise the availability of the therapeutic agent at a site of inflammation, especially where the water is scarce. A novel method was developed to manufacture a biodegradable and reversible polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) containing chitosan and poly acrylic-acid (PAA). The PEC was analysed using FTIR and DSC, which confirmed the formation of non-permanent swollen gel-network at an alkaline pH. Pentosan polysulphate (PPS) was incorporated in a PEC and an activated partial thromboplastin time assay was developed to measure the release of PPS from PEC. In vitro studies suggested that the release of PPS was dependent on the initial drug loading and the composition of the PEC. The gel strength of the swollen network, determined using a texture analyser, was dependent on polymer composition and the amount of PPS incorporated. Bacterial enzymes were collected from the rat caecum and colon for the digestion studies and characterised for glucosidase activity, glucuronidase activity and protein content. The digestion of the reversible polyelectrolyte complexes was measured using a dinitro salicylic acid assay and an increased release of drug was also confirmed in the presence of bacterial enzymes. PMID:21093555

  4. Effects of bound versus soluble pentosan polysulphate in PEG/HA-based hydrogels tailored for intervertebral disc regeneration.

    PubMed

    Frith, Jessica E; Menzies, Donna J; Cameron, Andrew R; Ghosh, P; Whitehead, Darryl L; Gronthos, S; Zannettino, Andrew C W; Cooper-White, Justin J

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports in the literature investigating chondrogenesis in mesenchymal progenitor cell (MPC) cultures have confirmed the chondro-inductive potential of pentosan polysulphate (PPS), a highly sulphated semi-synthetic polysaccharide, when added as a soluble component to culture media under standard aggregate-assay conditions or to poly(ethylene glycol)/hyaluronic acid (PEG/HA)-based hydrogels, even in the absence of inductive factors (e.g. TGF?). In this present study, we aimed to assess whether a 'bound' PPS would have greater activity and availability over a soluble PPS, as a media additive or when incorporated into PEG/HA-based hydrogels. We achieved this by covalently pre-binding the PPS to the HA component of the gel (forming a new molecule, HA-PPS). We firstly investigated the activity of HA-PPS compared to free PPS, when added as a soluble factor to culture media. Cell proliferation, as determined by CCK8 and EdU assay, was decreased in the presence of either bound or free PPS whilst chondrogenic differentiation, as determined by DMMB assay and histology, was enhanced. In all cases, the effect of the bound PPS (HA-PPS) was more potent than that of the unbound form. These results alone suggest wider applications for this new molecule, either as a culture supplement or as a coating for scaffolds targeted at chondrogenic differentiation or maturation. We then investigated the incorporation of HA-PPS into a PEG/HA-based hydrogel system, by simply substituting some of the HA for HA-PPS. Rheological testing confirmed that incorporation of either HA-PPS or PPS did not significantly affect gelation kinetics, final hydrogel modulus or degradation rate but had a small, but significant, effect on swelling. When encapsulated in the hydrogels, MPCs retained good viability and rapidly adopted a rounded morphology. Histological analysis of both GAG and collagen deposition after 21 days showed that the incorporation of the bound-PPS into the hydrogel resulted in increased matrix formation when compared to the addition of soluble PPS to the hydrogel, or the hydrogel alone. We believe that this new generation injectable, degradable hydrogel, incorporating now a covalently bound-PPS, when combined with MPCs, has the potential to assist cartilage regeneration in a multitude of therapeutic targets, including for intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. PMID:24215733

  5. The interaction of boar sperm proacrosin with its natural substrate, the zona pellucida, and with polysulfated polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Urch, U A; Patel, H

    1991-04-01

    Boar sperm acrosin is an acrosomal protease with trypsin-like specificity, and it functions in fertilization by assisting sperm passage through the zona pellucida by limited hydrolysis of this extracellular matrix. In addition to a proteolytic active site domain, acrosin binds the zona pellucida at a separate binding domain that is lost during proacrosin autolysis. In this study, we quantitate the binding of proacrosin to the physiological substrate for acrosin, the zona pellucida, and to a non-substrate, the polysulfated polysaccharide fucoidan. Binding was analogous to sea urchin sperm bindin that binds egg jelly fucan and the vitelline envelope of sea urchin eggs. Proacrosin was found to bind to fucoidan and to the zona pellucida with binding affinities similar to bindin interaction with egg jelly fucan. These interactions were competitively inhibited by similar relative molecular mass polysulfated polymers. Since bindin and proacrosin have distinctly different amino acid sequences, their interaction with acidic sulfate esters demonstrates an example of convergent evolution wherein different macromolecules localized in analogous sperm compartments have the same biological function. From cDNA sequence analysis of proacrosin, this binding may be mediated through a consensus sequence for binding sulfated glycoconjugates. Proacrosin binding to the zona pellucida may serve as both a recognition or primary sperm receptor, as well as maintaining the sperm on the zona pellucida once the acrosome reaction has occurred. PMID:1908770

  6. Less protease-resistant PrP in a patient with sporadic CJD treated with intraventricular pentosan polysulphate.

    PubMed

    Terada, T; Tsuboi, Y; Obi, T; Doh-ura, K; Murayama, S; Kitamoto, T; Yamada, T; Mizoguchi, K

    2010-02-01

    Treatment with intraventricular pentosan polysulphate (PPS) might be beneficial in patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. We report a 68-year-old woman with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease who received continuous intraventricular PPS infusion (1-120 microg/kg/day) for 17 months starting 10 months after the onset of clinical symptoms. Treatment with PPS was well tolerated but was associated with a minor, transient intraventricular hemorrhage and a non-progressive collection of subdural fluid. The patient's overall survival time was well above the mean time expected for the illness but still within the normal range. Post-mortem examination revealed that the level of abnormal protease-resistant prion protein in the brain was markedly decreased compared with levels in brains without PPS treatment. These findings suggest that intraventricular PPS infusion might modify the accumulation of abnormal prion proteins in the brains of patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. PMID:19804470

  7. Differential effects of polysulfated polysaccharide on experimental encephalomyelitis, proliferation of autoimmune T cells, and inhibition of heparanase activity.

    PubMed

    Hershkoviz, R; Mor, F; Miao, H Q; Vlodavsky, I; Lider, O

    1995-10-01

    The extravasation of activated T lymphocytes through blood vessel walls and their migration to inflammatory loci are associated with secretion of extracellular matrix (ECM)-degrading enzymes, such as heparanase, which degrades heparan sulfate (HS) moieties of the ECM. The HS-degrading activity of heparanase was found to be inhibited by HS and heparin. Since induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) requires extravasation and migration of autoimmune T cells, degradation of ECM by heparanase is expected to be involved in induction of the disease. Herein, we examined whether laminarin sulfate, a polysulfated polysaccharide (PSS) isolated from the cell walls of seaweeds and subjected to chemical sulfation, could inhibit ECM degradation by mammalian heparanase, and could prevent EAE. PSS was a more potent inhibitor of heparanase-mediated degradation of ECM than heparin. In-vivo, PSS, injected once a week, inhibited the severity of actively-induced EAE in rats. However, inhibition of EAE was not due to an overall suppression of autoimmune T cells, since PSS enhanced the proliferation of myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific, encephalitogenic T cells. PSS-activated autoimmune T cells, but not MBP-activated cells, failed to induce EAE in recipient rats. Moreover, rats injected with PSS-activated T cells were resistant to induction of EAE by anti-MBP CD4+ T cells. Thus, PSS may have potential clinical applications in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:8579728

  8. Antithrombotic effect of a mucopolysaccharide polysulfate after systemic, topical and percutaneous application.

    PubMed

    Grg, P; Raake, W

    1987-03-01

    Antithrombotic activity of mucopolysaccharide polysulfuric acid ester (MPS) was investigated in vitro as well as in animal models of thrombosis. In vitro studies were performed by using native human blood and the haemostatometer. MPS (greater than or equal to 25 micrograms/ml) caused concentration dependent inhibition of the in vitro haemostasis (platelet reactivity). Antihaemostatic activity of epoprostenol (prostacyclin) was synergized by MPS. In vivo platelet thrombus formation was induced by laser irradiation in the microvasculature of hamster cheek pouch. The time until occlusion of the irradiated small vein and the duration of occlusion were measured. MPS administered intravenously at a dose range of 1-10 mg/kg b.w. inhibited thrombus formation and prolonged the time until occlusion of the irradiated vessel. Upon topical administration of a solution of 1, 5 or 25% MPS the occlusion time was also prolonged. Topical application of MPS as a 0.3% cream (Hirudoid) increased the occlusion time significantly. 24 h percutaneous application of 0.3% MPS cream but not the placebo on the back skin of rats resulted in a significant (p less than 0.001) inhibition of thrombus formation in the microvessels of the mesoappendix. A common finding at all modes of administration of MPS was that reperfusion of the occluded vessel occurred much earlier in MPS treated animals than in the controls. PMID:2954557

  9. Effect of ultrasound on structure and functional properties of antithrombin III and proteins of PPSB complex.

    PubMed

    Shkumatov, V M; Adzerikho, I E; Lesnikovich, J A; Cherniavsky, E A

    2004-02-01

    A combination of gel-permeation HPLC, affinity chromatography on heparin-Sepharose, gel electrophoresis, and estimation of inhibitory activity showed that effect of low-frequency ultrasound (26 W/cm(2), 37 degrees C, pH 7.4) on homogeneous antithrombin III was accompanied by formation of aggregates and a latent form of serpin. Heparin and pentosan polysulfate stabilized antithrombin III; this resulted in decrease in ultrasonic-induced formation of the aggregate and latent forms. The influence of ultrasound was not accompanied by significant changes in the contents of non-activated blood coagulation factors in the PPSB complex. PMID:15000687

  10. In vitro hemorheological effects of parenteral agents used in peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biro, Katalin; Sandor, Barbara; Toth, Andras; Koltai, Katalin; Papp, Judit; Rabai, Miklos; Toth, Kalman; Kesmarky, Gabor

    2014-05-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a frequent manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis. In PAD hemorheological parameters were defined as risk factors in a number of studies and several therapeutic agents were tried in these conditions. Our study aims to investigate and compare the in vitro hemorheological effects of various drugs generally used in the parenteral treatment of intermittent claudication and critical limb ischemia. Blood samples of healthy male volunteers were incubated with iloprost, alprostadil, pentoxifylline, sulodexide or pentosan polysulfate at calculated therapeutic serum concentration. Hematocrit (Hct) was determined by microhematocrit centrifuge. Plasma and apparent whole blood viscosities (WBV) were evaluated by capillary viscometer. Red blood cell aggregation was measured by LORCA (laserassisted optical rotational cell analyzer) aggregometer, and LORCA ektacytometer was used for measuring erythrocyte deformability at 37°C. Iloprost, alprostadil, and pentoxifylline incubation did not have any significant effect on plasma and apparent WBV. Elongation index increased in samples incubated with alprostadil at low shear stresses 0.95 and 0.53 Pa (p < 0.05). Sulodexide significantly improved WBV and Hct/WBV ratio (p < 0.05). Incubation with pentosan polysulfate resulted in higher WBV, lower Hct/WBV ratio and deterioration in the aggregation parameters (p < 0.05). Sulodexide may have beneficial effect on a macrorheological parameter; alprostadil may improve a microrheological parameter. Hemorheological alterations could be important in PAD patients with hampered vasodilator capacity.

  11. Assessment of Prospective Preventive Therapies for Chronic Wasting Disease in Mule Deer

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Lisa L.; Kocisko, David A.; Caughey, Byron; Miller, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    We compared prion infection rates among mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) receiving pentosan polysulfate, tannic acid, tetracycline HCl, or no treatment 14 days before to 14 days after (dpi) oral inoculation with tonsil tissue homogenate. All deer were infected, but the rapid disease course (230–603 dpi) suggested our challenge was overwhelming. PMID:22493139

  12. Enzymatic solubilization of arabinoxylans from isolated rye pentosans and rye flour by different endo-xylanases and other hydrolyzing enzymes. Effect of a fungal caccase on the flour extracts oxidative gelation.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Espinoza, M C; Poulsen, C; Borch Se, J; Zargahi, M R; Rouau, X

    2002-10-23

    Water-extractable (WEP) and water-unextractable (WUP) pentosans were isolated from a rye flour. The effect of a commercial enzyme preparation, Grindamyl S 100 (GS100), containing pentosanase activities, was investigated on WEP, WUP, a mix of WEP and WUP, and the rye flour, with the aim to monitor the solubilization and depolymerization of high molecular weight arabinoxylans and the effect on the viscosity of the reaction medium. The effects of other hydrolyzing enzymes were also tested. Three xylanases were used: xylanase 1 (Xyl-1) from Aspergillus niger, the main activity present in GS100; xylanase 2 (Xyl-2) from Talaromyces emersonii; and xylanase 3 (Xyl-3) from Bacillus subtilis. Xyl-3 was used in combination with Xyl-1, (1,4)-beta-D-arabinoxylan arabinofuranohydrolase, endo-beta-D-glucanase, or ferulate esterase from A. niger, but no synergism was observed. GS100 and xylanases increased the arabinoxylan solubilization, Xyl-3 and Xyl-1 being those that presented the best yields of extraction without extensive depolymerization of water-extractable arabinoxylans. Both xylanases were affected by an inhibitor in rye flour. Flour treated with hot ethanol was used to study the oxidative gelation of flour extracts treated with xylanases, in the presence of laccase from Pycnoporus cinnabarinus. Two doses of xylanases were tested (0.5 and 2.5 units). Only the flour extracts treated with 0.5 unit of Xyl-1 thickened. PMID:12381136

  13. 21 CFR 522.1850 - Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... associated lameness of the carpal and hock joints in horses. (ii) Amount(A) Intra-articular use (carpal): 250 mg once a week for 5 weeks. (B) Intramuscular use (carpal and hock): 500 mg every 4 days for...

  14. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  15. Therapies for human prion diseases

    PubMed Central

    Panegyres, Peter K; Armari, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The pathological foundation of human prion diseases is a result of the conversion of the physiological form of prion protein (PrPc) to the pathological protease resistance form PrPres. Most patients with prion disease have unknown reasons for this conversion and the subsequent development of a devastating neurodegenerative disorder. The conversion of PrPc to PrPres, with resultant propagation and accumulation results in neuronal death and amyloidogenesis. However, with increasing understanding of neurodegenerative processes it appears that protein-misfolding and subsequent propagation of these rouge proteins, is a generic phenomenon shared with diseases caused by tau, α-synucleins and β-amyloid proteins. Consequently, effective anti-prion agents may have wider implications. A number of therapeutic approaches include polyanionic, polycyclic drugs such as pentosan polysulfate (PPS), which prevent the conversion of PrPc to PrPres and might also sequester and down-regulate PrPres. Polyanionic compounds might also help to clear PrPres. Treatments aimed at the laminin receptor, which is an important accessory molecule in the conversion of PrPc to PrPres – neuroprotection, immunotherapy, siRNA and antisense approaches have provided some experimental promise. PMID:24093082

  16. LRP/LR as an alternative promising target in therapy of prion diseases, Alzheimer's disease and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vana, Karen; Zuber, Chantal; Pflanz, Heike; Kolodziejczak, Dominika; Zemora, Georgeta; Bergmann, Ann-Katrin; Weiss, Stefan

    2009-02-01

    The 37 kDa/67 kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR) represents a key player for cell adhesion, is associated with the metastatic potential of solid tumors and is required for maintenance of cell viability by preventing apoptosis. LRP/LR acts as a receptor for viruses such as Sindbis virus, Venezuelean Equine Encephalitis (VEE) virus, Adeno-associated-viruses (AAV) and Dengue Virus, the latter causing 50 to 100 million infections in humans per year. LRP/LR acts further as a receptor for prions and represents a multifunctional protein subcellularly located to the nucleus, the cytoplasm and the cell surface. The receptor represents an alternative target for therapy of viral infections, cancer and prion disorders and might play additional roles in further neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. The species barrier in prion disorders might be at least in part determined by the presence of LRP/LR in enterocytes of the intestinal epithelium. Anti-LRP/LR antibodies, siRNAs directed against LRP mRNA, polysulfated glycanes such as pentosan polysulfate and heparan mimetics and LRP decoy mutants are promising tools for blocking or downregulating the receptor and may represent alternative therapeutics for the treatment of prion disorders, Alzheimer's Disease and metastatic cancer. PMID:19200017

  17. TWIST Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, J.

    2009-12-01

    The TRIUMF Weak Interaction Symmetry Test (TWIST) has now completed its data collection period. These data represent the world's most precise measurement of the muon decay spectrum. The experiment expects to meet its ambitious goals of an order of magnitude improvement over pre-TWIST results for the muon decay parameters ?, ? and P???. Our most recent published results are presented. The measures that have been taken to reduce the systematic uncertainties for the upcoming final result are described.

  18. INTEGRAL Results

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Roland

    2005-11-22

    INTEGRAL is operational since more than two years and producing high quality data. The instruments are working almost perfectly. A selection of INTEGRAL results obtained on point sources are presented.

  19. Research Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    Research on Global Carbon Emission and Sequestration NSFC Funded Project Made Significant Progress in Quantum Dynamics Functional Human Blood Protein Obtained from Rice How Giant Pandas Thrive on a Bamboo Diet New Evidence of Interpersonal Violence from 129,000 Years Ago Found in China Aptamer-Mediated Efficient Capture and Release of T Lymphocytes on Nanostructured Surfaces BGI Study Results on Resequencing 50 Accessions of Rice Cast New Light on Molecular Breeding BGI Reports Study Results on Frequent Mutation of Genes Encoding UMPP Components in Kidney Cancer Research on Habitat Shift Promoting Species Diversification

  20. DONUT results

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Tomoko

    2008-02-21

    The DONUT experiment succeeded in observing tau-neutrino CC interactions for the first time in 2000. The analysis using total sample is presented in this paper, based on 3.5x10{sup 17} protons on target. The number of identified {nu}{sub {tau}} CC interactions is 9 from 581 neutrino interactions located in the emulsion. The result of the first measurement of {nu}{sub {tau}} CC cross section is consistent with the expectation from the Standard Model.

  1. Mass balance of pilot-scale pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse by steam explosion followed by alkaline delignification.

    PubMed

    Rocha, George J M; Martn, Carlos; da Silva, Vincius F N; Gmez, Edgardo O; Gonalves, Adilson R

    2012-05-01

    Five pilot-scale steam explosion pretreatments of sugarcane bagasse followed by alkaline delignification were explored. The solubilised lignin was precipitated with 98% sulphuric acid. Most of the pentosan (82.6%), and the acetyl group fractions were solubilised during pretreatment, while 90.2% of cellulose and 87.0% lignin were recovered in the solid fraction. Approximately 91% of the lignin and 72.5% of the pentosans contained in the steam-exploded solids were solubilised by delignification, resulting in a pulp with almost 90% of cellulose. The acidification of the black liquors allowed recovery of 48.3% of the lignin contained in the raw material. Around 14% of lignin, 22% of cellulose and 26% of pentosans were lost during the process. In order to increase material recovery, major changes, such as introduction of efficient condensers and the reduction in the number of washing steps, should be done in the process setup. PMID:22391588

  2. Mechanisms Involved in the Anti-Inflammatory Action of a Polysulfated Fraction from Gracilaria cornea in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Coura, Chistiane Oliveira; Souza, Ricardo Basto; Rodrigues, José Ariévilo Gurgel; Vanderlei, Edfranck de Sousa Oliveira; de Araújo, Ianna Wivianne Fernandes; Ribeiro, Natássia Albuquerque; Frota, Annyta Fernandes; Ribeiro, Kátia Alves; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos; Pereira, Karuza Maria Alves; da Cunha, Rodrigo Maranguape Silva; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Benevides, Norma Maria Barros

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the sulfated polysaccharidic fraction obtained from red marine alga Gracilaria cornea (Gc-FI) were investigated using a paw edema model induced in rats by different inflammatory agents (carrageenan, dextran, serotonin, bradykinin, compound 48/80 or L-arginine). Gc-FI at the doses of 3, 9 or 27 mg/kg, subcutaneously - s.c., significantly inhibited rat paw edema induced by carrageenan and dextran, as confirmed by myeloperoxidase and Evans’ blue assessments, respectively. Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c.) inhibited rat paw edema induced by histamine, compound 48/80 and L-arginine. Additionally, Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c.) inhibited Cg-induced edema in animals with intact mast cells but did not inhibit that with degranulated mast cells by compound 48/80, revealing a protective role on mast cell membranes. Gc-FI down-regulated the IL-1β, TNF-α and COX-2 mRNA and protein levels compared with those of the carrageenan group, based on qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analyses. After inhibition with ZnPP IX, a specific heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor, the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI was not observed in Cg-induced paw edema, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI is, in part, dependent on the integrity of the HO-1 pathway. Gc-FI can target a combination of multiple points involved in inflammatory phenomena. PMID:25807556

  3. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of prion-infected neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal diseases associated with the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) to the abnormal prion protein (PrPSc). Since the molecular mechanisms in pathogenesis are widely unclear, we analyzed the global phospho-proteome and detected a differential pattern of tyrosine- and threonine phosphorylated proteins in PrPSc-replicating and pentosan polysulfate (PPS)-rescued N2a cells in two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. To quantify phosphorylated proteins, we performed a SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture) analysis and identified 105 proteins, which showed a regulated phosphorylation upon PrPSc infection. Among those proteins, we validated the dephosphorylation of stathmin and Cdc2 and the induced phosphorylation of cofilin in PrPSc-infected N2a cells in Western blot analyses. Our analysis showed for the first time a differentially regulated phospho-proteome in PrPSc infection, which could contribute to the establishment of novel protein markers and to the development of novel therapeutic intervention strategies in targeting prion-associated disease. PMID:20920157

  4. Heparinase I-specific disaccharide unit of heparin is a key structure but insufficient for exerting anti-prion activity in prion-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Kenta; Wakao, Masahiro; Sato, Masaki; Hamanaka, Taichi; Nishizawa, Keiko; Funayama, Yukino; Sakasegawa, Yuji; Suda, Yasuo; Doh-ura, Katsumi

    2015-05-15

    Glycosaminoglycans reportedly play important roles in prion formation, but because of their structural complexity, the chemical structures affecting prion formation have not been fully evaluated. Here, we compared two types of low molecular weight heparins and found that heparinase I-sensitive structures influenced anti-prion activity in prion-infected cells. Surface plasmon resonance analyses showed significant binding of a representative heparinase I substrate disaccharide unit, GlcNS6S-IdoA2S, to recombinant prion protein (PrP) fragments, such as full-length PrP23-231 and N-terminal domain PrP23-89, but not to PrP89-230. This binding was competitively inhibited by heparin or pentosan polysulfate, but not by Cu(2+). These PrP binding profiles of the disaccharide unit are consistent with those previously reported for heparin. However, synthetic compounds comprising disaccharide unit alone or its multimers exhibited no anti-prion activity in prion-infected cells. Consequently, the findings suggest that the heparin disaccharide unit that binds to the N-terminal region of PrP is a key structure, but it is insufficient for exerting anti-prion activity. PMID:25839661

  5. Interstitial cystitis. Etiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review current knowledge about the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of interstitial cystitis, with special emphasis on management of this condition by family physicians. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Articles were identified through MEDLINE and review of abstracts presented at Urology and Interstitial Cystitis meetings during the last decade. Recent reviews were further searched for additional studies and trials. Data were summarized from large epidemiologic studies. Etiologic theories were extracted from current concepts and reviews of scientific studies. Diagnostic criteria described in this review are based on clinical interpretation of National Institutes of Health (NIH) research guidelines, interpretation of data from the NIH Interstitial Cystitis Cohort Study, and recent evidence on use of the potassium sensitivity test. Treatment suggestions are based on six randomized placebo-controlled clinical treatment trials and best available clinical data. MAIN MESSAGE: Interstitial cystitis affects about 0.01% to 0.5% of women. Its etiology is unknown, but might involve microbiologic, immunologic, mucosal, neurogenic, and other yet undefined agents. The diagnosis of interstitial cystitis is a diagnosis of exclusion. It is impossible to provide a purely evidence-based treatment strategy, but review of available evidence suggests that conservative supportive therapy (including diet modification); oral treatment with pentosan polysulfate, amitriptyline, or hydroxyzine; and intravesical treatments with heparinlike medications, dimethyl sulfoxide, or BCG vaccine could benefit some patients. CONCLUSION: Family physicians should have an understanding of interstitial cystitis and be able to make a diagnosis and formulate an evidence-based treatment strategy for their patients. PMID:11153410

  6. Characterizing antiprion compounds based on their binding properties to prion proteins: implications as medical chaperones.

    PubMed

    Kamatari, Yuji O; Hayano, Yosuke; Yamaguchi, Kei-ichi; Hosokawa-Muto, Junji; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    A variety of antiprion compounds have been reported that are effective in ex vivo and in vivo treatment experiments. However, the molecular mechanisms for most of these compounds remain unknown. Here we classified antiprion mechanisms into four categories: I, specific conformational stabilization; II, nonspecific stabilization; III, aggregation; and IV, interaction with molecules other than PrP(C). To characterize antiprion compounds based on this classification, we determined their binding affinities to PrP(C) using surface plasmon resonance and their binding sites on PrP(C) using NMR spectroscopy. GN8 and GJP49 bound specifically to the hot spot in PrP(C), and acted as "medical chaperones" to stabilize the native conformation. Thus, mechanisms I was predominant. In contrast, quinacrine and epigallocathechin bound to PrP(C) rather nonspecifically; these may stabilize the PrP(C) conformation nonspecifically including the interference with the intermolecular interaction following mechanism II. Congo red and pentosan polysulfate bound to PrP(C) and caused aggregation and precipitation of PrP(C), thus reducing the effective concentration of prion protein. Thus, mechanism III was appropriate. Finally, CP-60, an edarabone derivative, did not bind to PrP(C). Thus these were classified into mechanism IV. However, their antiprion activities were not confirmed in the GT + FK system, whose details remain to be elucidated. This proposed antiprion mechanisms of diverse antiprion compounds could help to elucidate their antiprion activities and facilitate effective antiprion drug discovery. PMID:23081827

  7. Characterizing antiprion compounds based on their binding properties to prion proteins: Implications as medical chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Kamatari, Yuji O; Hayano, Yosuke; Yamaguchi, Kei-ichi; Hosokawa-Muto, Junji; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    A variety of antiprion compounds have been reported that are effective in ex vivo and in vivo treatment experiments. However, the molecular mechanisms for most of these compounds remain unknown. Here we classified antiprion mechanisms into four categories: I, specific conformational stabilization; II, nonspecific stabilization; III, aggregation; and IV, interaction with molecules other than PrPC. To characterize antiprion compounds based on this classification, we determined their binding affinities to PrPC using surface plasmon resonance and their binding sites on PrPC using NMR spectroscopy. GN8 and GJP49 bound specifically to the hot spot in PrPC, and acted as medical chaperones to stabilize the native conformation. Thus, mechanisms I was predominant. In contrast, quinacrine and epigallocathechin bound to PrPC rather nonspecifically; these may stabilize the PrPC conformation nonspecifically including the interference with the intermolecular interaction following mechanism II. Congo red and pentosan polysulfate bound to PrPC and caused aggregation and precipitation of PrPC, thus reducing the effective concentration of prion protein. Thus, mechanism III was appropriate. Finally, CP-60, an edarabone derivative, did not bind to PrPC. Thus these were classified into mechanism IV. However, their antiprion activities were not confirmed in the GT + FK system, whose details remain to be elucidated. This proposed antiprion mechanisms of diverse antiprion compounds could help to elucidate their antiprion activities and facilitate effective antiprion drug discovery. PMID:23081827

  8. Is it safe to use aluminum in the treatment of pediatric hemorrhagic cystitis? A case discussion of aluminum intoxication and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bogris, Sotirios L; Johal, Navroop Singh; Hussein, Ijaz; Duffy, P G; Mushtaq, Imran

    2009-04-01

    In pediatric oncology patients, hemorrhagic cystitis can be a life-threatening complication of bone marrow transplantation, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. The treatment of this condition is often challenging and includes intravesical irrigation with aluminum, embolization, endoscopic laser coagulation, hydrostatic pressure, use of hyperbaric oxygen, instillation of formalin, prostaglandins, and oral sodium pentosan polysulfate. Although the efficacy of aluminum irrigation is well documented for the management of hemorrhagic cystitis in adults, there are limited reports describing its use in children. The potential multisystem toxic effects of aluminum are well described and the range and progression of aluminum toxicity can be devastating. We report a case of a 9-year-old girl suffering from acute lymphocytic leukemia with hemorrhagic cystitis. Although the symptoms resolved after intravesical aluminum treatment, she developed significant aluminum toxicity. We have reviewed the literature relating to aluminum toxicity in the pediatric age group and present our recommendations for the effective and safe use of aluminum in this cohort of patients. PMID:19346883

  9. Derivation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Canine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Inhibition of the TGFβ/Activin Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Frith, Jessica E.; Frith, Thomas J.R.; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Cooper-White, Justin J.; Wolvetang, Ernst J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have generated canine mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), also known as mesenchymal stem cells, from canine induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs) by small-molecule inhibition of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)/activin signaling pathway. These ciPSC-derived MSCs (ciPSC-MSCs) express the MSC markers CD73, CD90, CD105, STRO1, cPDGFRβ and cKDR, in addition to the pluripotency factors OCT4, NANOG and REX1. ciPSC-MSCs lack immunostaining for H3K27me3, suggesting that they possess two active X chromosomes. ciPSC-MSCs are highly proliferative and undergo robust differentiation along the osteo-, chondro- and adipogenic pathways, but do not form teratoma-like tissues in vitro. Of further significance for the translational potential of ciPSC-MSCs, we show that these cells can be encapsulated and maintained within injectable hydrogel matrices that, when functionalized with bound pentosan polysulfate, dramatically enhance chondrogenesis and inhibit osteogenesis. The ability to efficiently derive large numbers of highly proliferative canine MSCs from ciPSCs that can be incorporated into injectable, functionalized hydrogels that enhance their differentiation along a desired lineage constitutes an important milestone towards developing an effective MSC-based therapy for osteoarthritis in dogs, but equally provides a model system for assessing the efficacy and safety of analogous approaches for treating human degenerative joint diseases. PMID:25055193

  10. Steam-explosion pretreatment of wood: effect of chip size, acid, moisture content and pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Brownell, H.H.; Yu, E.K.C.; Saddler, J.N.

    1986-06-01

    Material balances for pentosan, lignin, and hexosan, during steam-explosion pretreatment of aspenwood, showed almost quantitative recovery of cellulose in the water-insoluble fraction. Dilute acid impregnation resulted in more selective hydrolysis of pentosan relative to undesirable pyrolysis, and gave a more accessible substrate for enzymatic hydrolysis. Thermocouple probes, located inside simulated aspenwood chips heated in 240 degrees C-saturated steam, showed rapid heating of air-dry wood, whereas green or impregnated wood heated slowly. Small chips, 3.2 mm in the fiber direction, whether green or air dry gave approximately equal rates of pentosan destruction and solubilization, and similar yields of glucose and of total reducing sugars on enzmatic hydrolysis with Trichoderma harzianum. Partial pyrolysis, destroying one-third of the pentosan of aspenwood at atmospheric pressure by dry steam at 276 degrees C, gave little increase in yield of reducing sugars on enzymatic hydrolysis. Treatment with saturated steam at 240 degrees C gave essentially the same yields of butanediol and ethanol on fermentation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, whether or not 80% of the steam was bled off before explosion and even if the chips remained intact, showing that explosion was unnecessary. 17 references.

  11. Cholesterol testing and results

    MedlinePLUS

    ... test results; Coronary risk profile results; Hyperlipidemia-results; Lipid disorder test results ... in your blood. You may also have a lipid (or coronary risk) profile, which includes: Total cholesterol ...

  12. Your Kidney Test Results

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Result: Other Important Tests Blood Pressure Serum Albumin Bicarbonate Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN) Potassium Calcium Phosphorus Results ... that helps measure how well you are eating. Bicarbonate measures the acid level in your blood. BUN ...

  13. Autonomous Soaring Flight Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on autonomous soaring flight results for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)'s is shown. The topics include: 1) Background; 2) Thermal Soaring Flight Results; 3) Autonomous Dolphin Soaring; and 4) Future Plans.

  14. Diffraction Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2012-04-01

    We present final results by the CDF II collaboration on diffractive W and Z production, report on the status of ongoing analyses on diffractive dijet production and on rapidity gaps between jets, and briefly summarize results obtained on exclusive production pointing to their relevance to calibrating theoretical models used to predict exclusive Higgs-boson production at the LHC.

  15. Recent results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    R. Harr

    2004-01-26

    The authors report on the recent heavy-quark results from CDF in Run IIa. They focus on a selection of mature analyses that demonstrate the capabilities of the experiment to extract interesting physics from the data. A few of the results presented have already been submitted for publication and papers are being prepared for most of the others.

  16. Getting Districtwide Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBeath, Angus

    2006-01-01

    This monograph is based on a keynote presentation by Angus McBeath at the "Getting Districtwide Results" Conference in Long Beach, California, which was co-sponsored by the Cross City Campaign for Urban School Reform and Focus on Results. The author, a former superintendent of the Edmonton Public Schools, how his school district was "forced" and

  17. Vehicle Technologies Program Results

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-19

    The Vehicle Technologies Program's progress is closely monitored by both internal and external organizations. The Program's results are detailed in a wide range of documents and tools that can be accessed through the PIR website. Descriptions of these materials are provided on this program results page.

  18. Recent results from TRISTAN

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    1997-01-01

    TRISTAN results on {gamma}{gamma} physics from 1994 to 1995 are reviewed in this report. We have systematically investigated jet production, the {gamma}-structure function, and charm pair production in {gamma}{gamma} processes. The results are discussed, and future prospects are presented.

  19. NIH Research to Results

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story: Traumatic Brain Injury NIH Research to Results Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For an enhanced version of this page please turn Javascript ...

  20. Electroweak results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Waters

    2004-06-02

    Inclusive W and Z production cross-sections have been measured by CDF and certain electroweak parameters extracted with high precision from these measurements. New results on diboson production at the Tevatron are also presented.

  1. Results from MAC

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, G.B.

    1983-05-01

    The MAC detector has been exposed at PEP to 40 pb/sup -1/ luminosity of e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions. The detector is described and recent results of a continuing analysis of hadronic cross section, lepton pair charge asymmetry, Bhabha process, two photon final state and radiative ..mu.. pairs are given. New results on flavor tagging of hadronic events with an inclusive ..mu.., and some searches for new particles are presented.

  2. Presenting the statistical results.

    PubMed

    Ng, K H; Peh, W C G

    2009-01-01

    Statistical methods are reported in a scientific paper to summarise the data that has been collected for a study and to enable its analysis. These methods should be described with enough detail to allow a knowledgeable reader who has access to the original data to verify the reported results. This article provides basic guidelines to aid authors in reporting the statistical aspects of the results of their studies clearly and accurately. PMID:19224078

  3. Recent Results from MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryaznevich, Mikhail

    During 2003-04 MAST has undergone significant enhancements including new divertors, a new central solenoid, error field correction coils, a new inboard gas injection system, a new NB source and several new and enhanced diagnostic systems. A selection of recent results is presented including observation of electron Bernstein wave heating, demonstration of non-solenoid start-up and the first results from error field correction studies.

  4. Unfavorable results in replantation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Abraham G.

    2013-01-01

    Reattachment of amputated parts of the body (Replantation) has become a reality since the first arm replant was carried out six decades ago. Failures were not uncommon in the beginning, leading on to the analysis of the problem and refinements in technique. Improvements in sutures, instrumentation and better microscopes further helped the surgeons to do replantation with better finesse and functional results. Evaluation of results and particularly failure and long term results help the younger surgeons to learn from the difficulties faced earlier to do better in the future. An attempt is made to list various aspects of replantation experienced by the author during the past 30 years, particularly in reference to unfavorable results, which had been occasionally total failure, or a partial failure, with poor function and cosmesis due to infection. An insensate limb with poor function is the result of inadequate or improper nerve coaptation or infection destroying the whole repair. It is apt to mention that infection is mostly the result of poor vascularity due to devitalized tissue. Difficulties arise often in identifying the viable tissue, particularly while debriding in the distal amputated part since there is no bleeding. Experience counts in this, specifically to identify the viable muscle. The factors that may lead to complications are listed with remarks to avoid them. PMID:24501462

  5. Higgs Results from CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornheim, Adolf

    2014-03-01

    The Nobel Prize in physics 2013 has been awarded to Franois Englert and Peter W. Higgs for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles which plays a crucial role in our understanding of electro-weak symmetry breaking. I will review the experimental results manifesting the discovery of the so called Higgs boson from the perspective of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) collaboration. The review is based on the final results from the proton-proton collision data at 7 TeV and 8 TeV center-of-mass energy, collected in 2011 and 2012 in the initial run of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). Results on the properties of the new particle with a mass around 125 GeV, all in agreement with the expectations for the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson, are highlighted. Latest results on the couplings between the Higgs and fermionic fields, in particular the final results of searches for a Higgs boson decaying into a b-quark or a tau-lepton pair, are presented. Non-SM Higgs searches are briefly summarized. Future perspectives for Higgs physics with CMS at LHC for the next data taking period starting in 2015 and beyond are discussed. CMS Collaboration.

  6. Recent results from PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Hollebeek, R.

    1981-10-01

    Preliminary results are presented for the data taken by the MARK II and MAC collaborations at the PEP storage ring. Results include measurements of QED processes, limits on the weak couplings g/sub V/ and g/sub A/, limits on anomalous lepton production, the measurement of the tau lifetime, scale violation in inclusive hadron production, Monte Carlo independent tests of QCD using energy-energy correlations and single jet energy moments, measurements of the properties of three jet events, and measurements of proton, neutral kaon, lambda and proton pair yields.

  7. Recent results from MAC

    SciTech Connect

    MAC Collaboration

    1982-05-01

    Some preliminary results from the MAC detector at PEP are presented. These include measurements of the angular distribution of ..gamma gamma.., ..mu mu.. and tau tau final states, a determination of the tau lifetime, a measurement of R, and a presentation of the inclusive muon p/sub perpendicular/ distribution for hadronic events.

  8. Sharing Research Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    There are many ways to share a collection of data and students' thinking about that data. Explaining the results of science inquiry is important--working scientists and amateurs both contribute information to the body of scientific knowledge. Students can collect data about an activity that is already happening in a classroom (e.g., the qualities

  9. CMS: First Results

    SciTech Connect

    Checchia, Paolo

    2010-12-22

    A summary of the LHC and CMS detector performance is given and the first CMS results are presented. In particular, emphasis will be given to low-p{sub t} QCD Physics including charged hadron spectra, the measurement of Bose-Einstein (BEC) and angular Correlations, and of underlying event properties.

  10. Implementation Challenges and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Kirk; Sorensen, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of the online and f2f summer algebra courses that were delivered in summers 2011 and 2012. These data will be used to frame the impact results presented in an earlier paper. In particular, the paper will provide a detailed picture of how the online course was structured and the types of supports provided to…

  11. Recent BABAR Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigen, Gerald; BABAR Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    We present herein the most recent BABAR results on direct CP asymmetry measurements in B ? Xs?, on partial branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements in B ? Xs?+?-, on a search for B ? ?/??+?- decays, on a search for lepton number violation in B+ ? X-?+?'+ modes and a study of B0 ? ?? and B0 ? ?? decays.

  12. Reporting Research Results Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks

    2010-01-01

    Assessment research is at its best when it packages research results and data so that they can be digested by multiple audiences. Too many assessment researchers spend all their efforts planning and executing the research project with little attention to closing the loop at the end. If assessment findings are not communicated effectively, the

  13. Sharing Research Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    There are many ways to share a collection of data and students' thinking about that data. Explaining the results of science inquiry is important--working scientists and amateurs both contribute information to the body of scientific knowledge. Students can collect data about an activity that is already happening in a classroom (e.g., the qualities…

  14. Reporting Research Results Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks

    2010-01-01

    Assessment research is at its best when it packages research results and data so that they can be digested by multiple audiences. Too many assessment researchers spend all their efforts planning and executing the research project with little attention to closing the loop at the end. If assessment findings are not communicated effectively, the…

  15. QCD results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Plunkett, R.; The CDF Collaboration

    1991-10-01

    Results are presented for hadronic jet and direct photon production at {radical}{bar s} = 1800 GeV. The data are compared with next-to-leading QCD calculations. A new limit on the scale of possible composite structure of the quarks is also reported. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Results from SAGE II

    SciTech Connect

    Nico, J.S.

    1994-10-01

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first nine runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 66{sub -13}{sup +18} (stat) {sub -7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result of 73{sub -16}{sup +18} (stat) {sub -7}{sup 5} (sys) SNU, the capture rate is 69{sub -11}{sup +11} (stat) {sub -7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. This represents only 52%--56% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models.

  17. Dosimetric results on EURECA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitz, G.

    1995-01-01

    Detector packages were exposed on the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA) as part of the Biostack experiment inside the Exobiology and Radiation Assembly (ERA) and at several locations around EURECA. The packages consist of different plastic nuclear track detectors, nuclear emulsions and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's). Evaluation of these detectors yields data on absorbed dose and particle and LET spectra. Preliminary results of absorbed dose measurements in the EURECA dosimeter packages are reported and compared to results of the LDEF experiments. The highest dose rate measured on EURECA is 63.3 plus or minus 0.4 mGy d(exp -1) behind a shielding thickness of 0.09 g cm(exp -2) in front of the detector package.

  18. Dosimetric results on EURECA

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, G.

    1995-02-01

    Detector packages were exposed on the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA) as part of the Biostack experiment inside the Exobiology and Radiation Assembly (ERA) and at several locations around EURECA. The packages consist of different plastic nuclear track detectors, nuclear emulsions and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD`s). Evaluation of these detectors yields data on absorbed dose and particle and LET spectra. Preliminary results of absorbed dose measurements in the EURECA dosimeter packages are reported and compared to results of the LDEF experiments. The highest dose rate measured on EURECA is 63.3 plus or minus 0.4 mGy d(exp -1) behind a shielding thickness of 0.09 g cm(exp -2) in front of the detector package.

  19. Cleanroom energy benchmarking results

    SciTech Connect

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang

    2001-09-01

    A utility market transformation project studied energy use and identified energy efficiency opportunities in cleanroom HVAC design and operation for fourteen cleanrooms. This paper presents the results of this work and relevant observations. Cleanroom owners and operators know that cleanrooms are energy intensive but have little information to compare their cleanroom's performance over time, or to others. Direct comparison of energy performance by traditional means, such as watts/ft{sup 2}, is not a good indicator with the wide range of industrial processes and cleanliness levels occurring in cleanrooms. In this project, metrics allow direct comparison of the efficiency of HVAC systems and components. Energy and flow measurements were taken to determine actual HVAC system energy efficiency. The results confirm a wide variation in operating efficiency and they identify other non-energy operating problems. Improvement opportunities were identified at each of the benchmarked facilities. Analysis of the best performing systems and components is summarized, as are areas for additional investigation.

  20. Latest results from Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauber, Jan; sSubmitted Planck Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This talk will present an overview of the most recent Planck data and results, with emphasis on polarization.The use of CMB polarization data from Planck confirms the best-fit Lambda-CDM model obtained with Planck temperature-only data, and improves the accuracy with which cosmological parameters are determined. The most recent results based on polarized E-mode and B-mode CMB power spectra at large angular scales will be presented, and their implications for the epoch of reionization and primordial gravitational waves.In this talk I will also present the latest analysis of polarized diffuse galactic foreground emissions based on Planck data. Both the synchrotron and dust emission maps obtained from Planck reveal new facets of the galactic interstellar medium. In particular dust emission holds the promise of providing a model of the large-scale 3D shape of the Galactic magnetic field, as well as its small scale behavior.

  1. Recent results from BESIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiao-Bin

    2014-04-01

    Selected results of BESIII are reported, including the observation of charged, charmonium-like states, the Zc(3900), Zc(4020), and Zc(4025); observation of e+e- ? ?X(3872); study of ?? system in J/? ? ???; baryon excited study in ? (3686)-> p\\bar p? 0; precise measurements of the decay constant fD from D+ ? ?+? and form-factors in D0 ? K-e+?,?-e+?.

  2. Latest CMB Measurement Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, James

    2014-01-01

    We have allocated time in this special session to capture the latest developments in balloon-borne and ground-based CMB measurements. The speaker for this oral presentation will be chosen at a later date in order to best highlight emerging results. This session also includes presentations from current CMB experiments in a parallel poster session. Time-permitting, the latest community plans for future CMB measurement facilities may also be discussed.

  3. Benthic macroinvertebrate community results

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkinson, J.J.

    1991-06-01

    As part of an extensive program to monitor the health of reservoirs in the TVA system, dredges were used to sample benthic life at 36 locations on 12 Tennessee Valley Authority reservoirs and the Tennessee River downstream from the lowest reservoir in the system. Up to ten dredge samples were collected from forebay, transition zone, and inflow locations of typical reservoirs. The survey was conducted between mid March and mid April, 1990. Results are described.

  4. Results from SAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurashitov, J.N.; Gavrin, V.N.; Girin, S.V.

    1996-04-01

    The Russian-American Gallium Solar Neutrino Experiment (SAGE) is described. Beginning in September 1992, SAGE II data were taken with 55 tons of Ga and with significantly reduced backgrounds. The solar neutrino flux measured by 31 extractions through October 1993 is presented. The result of 69 {+-} 10 +5/{minus}7 SNU is to be compared with a Standard Solar Model prediction of 132 SNU.

  5. GIRAFFE test results summary

    SciTech Connect

    Yokobori, S.; Arai, K.; Oikawa, H.

    1996-03-01

    A passive system can provide engineered safety features enhancing safety system reliability and plant simplicity. Toshiba has conducted the test Program to demonstrate the feasibility of the SBWR passive safety system using a full-height, integral system test facility GIRAFFE. The test facility GIRAFFE models the SBWR in full height to correctly present the gravity driving head forces with a 1/400 volume scale. The GIRAFFE test Program includes the certification tests of the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) to remove the post-accident decay heat and the gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) to replenish the reactor coolant inventory during a LOCA. The test results have confirmed the PCCS and GDCS design and in addition, have demonstrated the operation of the pCCS with the presence of a lighter-than-steam noncondensable as well as with the presence of a heavier-than-steam, noncondensable. The GIRAFFE test Program has also provided the database to qualify a best estimate thermal-hydraulic computer code TRAC. The post test analysis results have shown that TRAC can accurately predict the PCCS heat removal Performance and the containment pressure response to a LOCA. This paper summarizes the GIRAFFE test results to investigate post-LOCA PCCS heat removal performance and post-test analysis using TRAC.

  6. The Viking biology results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Harold P.

    1989-01-01

    A brief review of the purposes and the results from the Viking Biology experiments is presented, in the expectation that the lessons learned from this mission will be useful in planning future approaches to the biological exploration of Mars. Since so little was then known about potential micro-environments on Mars, three different experiments were included in the Viking mission, each one based on different assumptions about what Martian organisms might be like. In addition to the Viking Biology Instrument (VBI), important corollary information was obtained from the Viking lander imaging system and from the molecular analysis experiments that were conducted using the gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GCMS) instrument. No biological objects were noted by the lander imaging instrument. The GCMS did not detect any organic compounds. A description of the tests conducted by the Gas Exchange Experiment, the Labeled Release experiment, and the Pyrolytic Release experiment is given. Results are discussed. Taken as a whole, the Viking data yielded no unequivocal evidence for a Martian biota at either landing site. The results also revealed the presence of one or more reactive oxidants in the surface material and these need to be further characterized, as does the range of micro-environments, before embarking upon future searches for extant life on Mars.

  7. Certification of computational results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Gregory F.; Wilson, Dwight S.; Masson, Gerald M.

    1993-01-01

    A conceptually novel and powerful technique to achieve fault detection and fault tolerance in hardware and software systems is described. When used for software fault detection, this new technique uses time and software redundancy and can be outlined as follows. In the initial phase, a program is run to solve a problem and store the result. In addition, this program leaves behind a trail of data called a certification trail. In the second phase, another program is run which solves the original problem again. This program, however, has access to the certification trail left by the first program. Because of the availability of the certification trail, the second phase can be performed by a less complex program and can execute more quickly. In the final phase, the two results are compared and if they agree the results are accepted as correct; otherwise an error is indicated. An essential aspect of this approach is that the second program must always generate either an error indication or a correct output even when the certification trail it receives from the first program is incorrect. The certification trail approach to fault tolerance is formalized and realizations of it are illustrated by considering algorithms for the following problems: convex hull, sorting, and shortest path. Cases in which the second phase can be run concurrently with the first and act as a monitor are discussed. The certification trail approach are compared to other approaches to fault tolerance.

  8. Semimembranosus tenosynovitis: operative results.

    PubMed

    Halperin, N; Oren, Y; Hendel, D; Nathan, N

    1987-01-01

    Semimembranosus tenosynovitis is a common knee problem in the over-50 age-group, occurring mainly in women. It affects the reflected portion of the tendon of the semimembranosus muscle as well as the bursa below it. The tendon becomes inflamed as a result of friction at the entrance to the bony canal (semimembranosus groove), especially if osteophytes are present on the edges of the groove. Conservative treatment includes anti-inflammatory drugs, ultrasound, and friction massage. If necessary, nonresponders may be given local injection of 40-80 mg methylprednisolone acetate with 1% Xylocaine. Between 1979 and 1983 we operated on 16 patients who had not obtained relief even after three or four injections. The approach in each case was through a posterior medial oblique incision. The semimembranosus osteofibrotic tunnel was revealed and the fibrous sheath surrounding the tendon was excised. Good results were obtained in eight patients in whom the inflammatory process had been localized to only the semimembranosus insertion area: eight patients in whom the knee joint or the pes anserinus insertion was also involved achieved fair or poor results. The operation is not advised for young athletes because of the important function of the reflected head of the semimembranosus muscle. PMID:3632312

  9. Emittance Exchange Results

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller III,R.; Koeth, T.

    2009-05-04

    The promise of next-generation light sources depends on the availability of ultra-low emittance electron sources. One method of producing low transverse emittance beams is to generate a low longitudinal emittance beam and exchange it with a large transverse emittance. Experiments are underway at Fermilab's A0 Photoinjector and ANL's Argonne Wakefield Accelerator using the exchange scheme of Kim and Sessler. The experiment at the A0 Photoinjector exchanges a large longitudinal emittance with a small transverse emittance. AWA expects to exchange a large transverse emittance with a small longitudinal emittance. In this paper we discuss recent results at A0 and AWA and future plans for these experiments.

  10. Emittance exchange results

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller, R.P., III; Koeth, T.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2009-09-01

    The promise of next-generation light sources depends on the availability of ultra-low emittance electron sources. One method of producing low transverse emittance beams is to generate a low longitudinal emittance beam and exchange it with a large transverse emittance. Experiments are underway at Fermilab's A0 Photoinjector and ANL's Argonne Wakefield Accelerator using the exchange scheme of Kim and Sessler. The experiment at the A0 Photoinjector exchanges a large longitudinal emittance with a small transverse emittance. AWA expects to exchange a large transverse emittance with a small longitudinal emittance. In this paper we discuss recent results at A0 and AWA and future plans for these experiments.

  11. Recent BABAR Results

    SciTech Connect

    Eigen, Gerald

    2015-04-29

    We present herein the most recent BABAR results on direct CP asymmetry measurements in B → Xsγ, on partial branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements in B → Xs+-, on a search for B → π/ηℓ+- decays, on a search for lepton number violation in B+ → X-+ℓ'+ modes and a study of B0 →ωω and B0 → ωφ decays.

  12. Results of railgun experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Brooks, A.L.; Fowler, C.M.; Peterson, D.R.

    1983-04-01

    During the 1979 Megagauss II conference the hypervelocity potential of railguns and the pulsed power technology needed to power them were discussed. Since then, many laboratories have initiated railgun R and D projects for a variety of potential applications. Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories initiated a collaborative experimental railgun project which resulted in several successes in accelerating projectiles to high velocities, emphasized the limits on railgun operation, and indicated that the numerical modeling of railgun operation was in good agreement with the experiments.

  13. SPEAR results, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Scharre, D.L.

    1981-09-01

    New results from SPEAR on the inclusive photon spectrum at the psi' and on J/psi radiative transitions are presented. Evidence for an eta/sub c/' candidate is observed in the psi' inclusive photon spectrum at a mass M = 3592 +- 5 MeV. A new resonance, the theta(1640) which is observed to decay into eta eta, has been seen in radiative transitions from the J/psi. The spin-parity of the l(1440), previously observed in J/psi radiative transitions and originally identified as the E(1420), has been determined to be 0/sup -/.

  14. Recent results from LHCf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menjo, H.; Adriani, O.; Berti, E.; Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M.; Castellini, G.; D'Alessandro, R.; Del Prete, M.; Haguenauer, M.; Itow, Y.; Kasahara, K.; Kawade, K.; Makino, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubayashi, E.; Mitsuka, G.; Muraki, Y.; Papini, P.; Perrot, A.-L.; Pfeiffer, D.; Ricciarini, S.; Sako, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Sugiura, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Tamura, T.; Tiberio, A.; Torii, S.; Tricomi, A.; Turner, W. C.; Zhou, Q.

    2015-08-01

    The LHCf experiment is one of the LHC forward experiments. The aim of LHCf is to provide critical calibration data of hadronic intraction models used in air shower simulations. The LHCf has completed the operations for p-p collisions with a collision energy of ?s = 0.9 and 7 TeV p-p in 2010 and for p-Pb collisions with a collision energy per nucleon of ?sNN = 5.02. The recent LHCf result of forward neutron energy spectra at 7 TeV p-p collision and forward ?0 spectra at p-Pb collisions are presented in this paper.

  15. [Ureteroscopy. Experience and results].

    PubMed

    Delgado, G; Alvarado, A; de Solanilla, E C

    1991-09-01

    Ureteroscopy is an Endo-urological procedure which has been practiced around the world in all teaching centers of Urology. It presents obvious advantages. Our experience has been satisfactory, not only due to the coordinated and joint work, but for the results obtained in behalf of our patients who went back to their regular activities shortly after. As all the new procedures, it has a learning curve which is given after the initial training has been acquired but its performance will give expertise, same as radiologic technology and the development of new instruments with smaller diameter and accessories which allow the easier access to ureter and lithotripsy. PMID:1767038

  16. Sakhalin tender results detailed

    SciTech Connect

    Konoplyanik, A.A. )

    1992-04-20

    Given uncertainty over a final verdict for the Sakhalin Island tender announced in May 1991, upon instructions from the Russian Federation government, a government committee (GC) was constituted and headed by V. Danilov-Danilyan, Russia's Minister for Ecology and Natural Resources, to synthesize the results of and select the winner of the tender. This paper describes the GC and the measures that the GC took in order to determine what company would be permitted to conduct a feasibility study and later develop oil and gas resources off Sakhalin Island.

  17. Recent results from Tristan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piilonen, Leo

    1990-02-01

    We present results of tests of the standard model of electroweak interactions from the AMY, TOPAZ and VENUS detectors at TRISTAN operating at centre of mass energies up to 60.8 GeV. Measured asymmetries in e+e- ? ?+?-, ?+?- and b overlineb are consistent with the standard model. The hadronic event rate is higher than expected for Mz = 92 GeV/c 2, but is consistent with the standard model with Mz = 88.5 GeV/c 2, sin 2?w = 0.234, and ? MS = 0.15 GeV.

  18. Organic Separation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  19. Spacelab Science Results Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Lundquist, C. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Horwitz, J. L.; Germany, G. A.; Cruise, J. F.; Lewis, M. L.; Murphy, K. L.

    2009-01-01

    Beginning with OSTA-1 in November 1981 and ending with Neurolab in March 1998, a total of 36 Shuttle missions carried various Spacelab components such as the Spacelab module, pallet, instrument pointing system, or mission peculiar experiment support structure. The experiments carried out during these flights included astrophysics, solar physics, plasma physics, atmospheric science, Earth observations, and a wide range of microgravity experiments in life sciences, biotechnology, materials science, and fluid physics which includes combustion and critical point phenomena. In all, some 764 experiments were conducted by investigators from the U.S., Europe, and Japan. The purpose of this Spacelab Science Results Study is to document the contributions made in each of the major research areas by giving a brief synopsis of the more significant experiments and an extensive list of the publications that were produced. We have also endeavored to show how these results impacted the existing body of knowledge, where they have spawned new fields, and if appropriate, where the knowledge they produced has been applied.

  20. Early physics results.

    PubMed

    Jenni, Peter

    2012-02-28

    For the past year, experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have started exploring physics at the high-energy frontier. Thanks to the superb turn-on of the LHC, a rich harvest of initial physics results have already been obtained by the two general-purpose experiments A Toroidal LHC Apparatus (ATLAS) and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), which are the subject of this report. The initial data have allowed a test, at the highest collision energies ever reached in a laboratory, of the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particles, and to make early searches Beyond the Standard Model (BSM). Significant results have already been obtained in the search for the Higgs boson, which would establish the postulated electro-weak symmetry breaking mechanism in the SM, as well as for BSM physics such as Supersymmetry (SUSY), heavy new particles, quark compositeness and others. The important, and successful, SM physics measurements are giving confidence that the experiments are in good shape for their journey into the uncharted territory of new physics anticipated at the LHC. PMID:22253245

  1. AMT experiment results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Pinck, Deborah S.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Mobile Terminal (AMT) experiments have provided a terminal technology testbed for the evaluation of K- and Ka-band mobile satellite communications (satcom). Such a system could prove to be highly beneficial for many different commercial and government mobile satcom users. Combining ACTS' highly concentrated spotbeams with the smaller, higher-gain Ka-band antenna technology, results in a system design that can support a much higher throughput capacity than today's commercial configurations. To date, experiments in such diverse areas as emergency medical applications, enhanced Personal Communication Services (PCS), disaster recovery assistance, military applications, and general voice and data services have already been evaluated. Other applications that will be evaluated over the next year include telemedicine, ISDN, and television network return feed. Baseline AMT performance results will be presented, including Bit Error Rate (BER) curves and mobile propagation data characterizing the K- and Ka-band mobile satcom channel. In addition, observations from many of the application-specific experiments will also be provided.

  2. Basilar invagination: Surgical results

    PubMed Central

    Joaquim, Andrei F.; Ghizoni, Enrico; Giacomini, Leonardo A.; Tedeschi, Helder; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Basilar invagination (BI) is a congenital craniocervical junction (CCJ) anomaly represented by a prolapsed spine into the skull-base that can result in severe neurological impairment. Materials and Methods: In this paper, we retrospective evaluate the surgical treatment of 26 patients surgically treated for symptomatic BI. BI was classified according to instability and neural abnormalities findings. Clinical outcome was evaluated using the Nrick grade system. Results: A total of 26 patients were included in this paper. Their age ranged from 15 to 67 years old (mean 38). Of which, 10 patients were male (38%) and 16 (62%) were female. All patients had some degree of tonsillar herniation, with 25 patients treated with foramen magnum decompression. Nine patients required a craniocervical fixation. Six patients had undergone prior surgery and required a new surgical procedure for progression of neurological symptoms associated with new compression or instability. Most of patients with neurological symptoms secondary to brainstem compression had some improvement during the follow-up. There was mortality in this series, 1 month after surgery, associated with a late removal of the tracheal cannula. Conclusions: Management of BI requires can provide improvements in neurological outcomes, but requires analysis of the neural and bony anatomy of the CCJ, as well as occult instability. The complexity and heterogeneous presentation requires attention to occult instability on examination and attention to airway problems secondary to concomitant facial malformations. PMID:25210337

  3. Unfavourable results in pollicisation

    PubMed Central

    Thatte, Mukund R.; Nehete, Sushil; Garude, Kirti; Mehta, Rujuta

    2013-01-01

    Pollicisation of the index finger is perhaps one of the most complex and most rewarding operations in hand and plastic surgery. It however has a steep learning curve and demands very high skill levels and experience. There are multiple pitfalls and each can result in an unfavourable result. In essence we need to: Shorten the Index, recreate the carpo metacarpal joint from the metacarpo phalangeal (MP) joint, rotate the digit by about 120 for pulp to pulp pinch, palmarly abduct by 40-50 to get a new first web gap, Shorten and readjust the tension of the extensors, re attach the intrinsics to form a thenar eminence capable of positioning the new thumb in various functional positions and finally close the flaps forming a new skin envelope. The author has performed over 75 pollicisations personally and has personal experience of some of the issues raised there. The steps mentioned therefore are an algorithm for helping the uninitiated into these choppy waters. PMID:24501467

  4. Recent Results from HAPPEX

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Michaels

    2006-09-18

    New measurements of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic scattering of 3GeV electrons off hydrogen and helium-4 targets at theta{sub lab} = 6 degrees are reported. The helium-4 result is A = (+6.40 {+-} 0.23 (stat) {+-} 0.12 (syst)) * 10{sup -6}. The hydrogen result is A = (-1.58 {+-} 0.12 (stat) {+-} 0.04 (syst)) * 10{sup -6}. The asymmetry for hydrogen is a function of a linear combination of G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s}, the strange quark contributions to the electric and magnetic form factors of the nucleon respectively, and that for helium-4 is a function solely of G{sub E}{sup s}. The combination of the two measurements separates G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s} and provide new limits on the role of strange quarks in the nucleon charge and magnetization distributions. We extract G{sub E}{sup s} = 0.002 {+-} 0.014 {+-} 0.007 at Q{sup 2} = 0.077 GeV{sup 2} and G{sub E}{sup s} + 0.09 G{sub M}{sup s} = 0.007 {+-} 0.011 {+-} 0.006 at Q{sup 2} = 0.109 GeV{sup 2}.

  5. Recent results from ANTARES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trovato, Agata

    2015-08-01

    Operating 40 km off the coast of France since 2007, the ANTARES detector is the largest deep-sea neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere with an instrumented volume of more than 0.01 cubic kilometers. It consists of an array of 885 photomultipliers detecting the Cherenkov light induced by charged leptons produced by neutrino interactions in and around the detector. The primary goal of ANTARES is to search for astrophysical neutrinos in the TeV-PeV range. This comprises generic searches for any diffuse cosmic neutrino flux as well as more specific searches for astrophysical galactic and extragalactic sources. The search program also includes multi-messenger analyses based on time and/or space coincidences with other cosmic probes. The ANTARES observatory is sensitive to a wide-range of other phenomena, from atmospheric neutrino oscillations to dark matter annihilation. In this contribution, recent results from the ANTARES neutrino telescope will be presented.

  6. Multigan: First experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Maunoury, L.; Pacquet, J. Y.; Baret, P.; Dubois, M.; Leherissier, P.; Michel, M.; Donzel, X.; Gaubert, G.; Leroy, R.; Villarit, A. C. C.

    2012-02-15

    A new design of a multicharged ion source based on the MONO1000 ECRIS has been presented at the last ECR ion source (ECRIS) Workshop 2010. [L. Maunoury et al., in Proceedings of the XIXth International Workshop on ECR Ion Sources, Grenoble, France, 23-26 August 2010] This source has not only two opening at both ends but also a large space in the middle of the source enabling a direct contact with the ECR plasma. The source has been assembled mechanically and put on a test bench at the Pantechnik company. The primary tests have shown that the plasma ignition occurred at low pressure (10{sup -6} mbar) and low RF power (10 W). The first experimental results (= 1.30 for Ar and 1.85 for Xe) demonstrated the potential of this ion source in production of multicharged ion beams.

  7. Undulator Transportation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary; Horton, Nick; Kharakh, David; Levashov, Yurii; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Poling, Ben; Reese, Ed; /SLAC

    2010-11-17

    A test was performed to determine whether transporting and handling the undulators makes any changes to their properties. This note documents the test. No significant changes to the test undulator were observed. After the LCLS undulators are tuned and fiducialized in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF), they must be transported to storage buildings and transported to the tunnel. It has been established that the undulators are sensitive to temperature. We wish to know whether the undulators are also sensitive to the vibrations and shocks of transportation. To study this issue, we performed a test in which an undulator was measured in the MMF, transported to the tunnel, brought back to the MMF, and re-measured. This note documents the test and the results.

  8. Iron Mountain Electromagnetic Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gail Heath

    2012-07-01

    Iron Mountain Mine is located seventeen miles northwest of Redding, CA. After the completion of mining in early 1960s, the mine workings have been exposed to environmental elements which have resulted in degradation in water quality in the surrounding water sheds. In 1985, the EPA plugged ore stoops in many of the accessible mine drifts in an attempt to restrict water flow through the mine workings. During this process little data was gathered on the orientation of the stoops and construction of the plugs. During the last 25 years, plugs have begun to deteriorate and allow acidic waters from the upper workings to flow out of the mine. A team from Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed geophysical surveys on a single mine drift and 3 concrete plugs. The project goal was to evaluate several geophysical methods to determine competence of the concrete plugs and orientation of the stopes.

  9. Recent Results from Phobos

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Edmundo; Betts, R. R.; Garcia, E.; Halliwell, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Iordanova, A.; Sagerer, J.; Smith, C. E.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; George, N.; Hauer, M.; Holzman, B.; Pak, R.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.

    2007-02-12

    The PHOBOS detector is one of four heavy ion experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this paper we will review some of the results of PHOBOS from the data collected in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies up to 200 GeV. Evidence is found of the formation of a very high energy density and highly interactive system, which can not be described in terms of hadrons, and has a relatively low baryon density. There is evidence that the system formed is thermalized to a certain degree. Scaling with the number of participants and extended longitudinal scaling behavior are also observed in distributions of produced charged particles.

  10. [Vitrification: Principles and results].

    PubMed

    Griveau, J F; Lopes, M; Jouve, G; Veau, S; Ravel, C; Morcel, K

    2015-06-01

    Sperm and embryos cryopreservation is a commonly applied technique for several years. Recently authorized in France, vitrification tends to replace gradually the conventional technique of slow freezing, so upsetting the practices in the management of patients. It allows from now on the cryopreservation of oocytes and opens new perspectives in egg donation either still in fertility preservation. This review thus attempted to examine the contribution of vitrification in the freezing of oocytes and human embryos at various stages of development. If obviously vitrification appears as the current method of choice for the cryopreservation of oocytes as well as blastocysts, the results are less cut as regards embryos to early stages. No increase in adverse obstetric and perinatal outcomes in children conceived from vitrified oocytes or embryos is noted in the literature. PMID:25869444

  11. System results from FRECOPA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durin, Christian; Berthoud, Lucinda; Mandeville, Jean-Claude

    1995-01-01

    The work carried out over the past three years on FRECOPA and the LDEF has enabled a large quantity of information to be collected, part of which has already been exploited. As far as CNES is concerned, the major spin-offs of this mission mainly focus on the orbital environment and the behavior of materials in such an environment. With respect to the environment, the authors shall develop the lessons learned from expert appraisals on impacts by microparticles, which are the main feature observed in this area. As for the materials, the results show a variety of behavior when subjected to the space environment and even now constitute a wealth of information for the designing and validation of future mechanical systems. Apart from these direct spin-offs, there are repercussions on in-flight and ground testing, the calibration of test benches and improvements to simulation models.

  12. FIRE Science Results 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, David S. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    FIRE (First ISCCP Regional Experiment) is a U.S. cloud-radiation research program formed in 1984 to increase the basic understanding of cirrus and marine stratocumulus cloud systems, to develop realistic parameterizations for these systems, and to validate and improve ISCCP cloud product retrievals. Presentations of results culminating the first 5 years of FIRE research activities were highlighted. The 1986 Cirrus Intensive Field Observations (IFO), the 1987 Marine Stratocumulus IFO, the Extended Time Observations (ETO), and modeling activities are described. Collaborative efforts involving the comparison of multiple data sets, incorporation of data measurements into modeling activities, validation of ISCCP cloud parameters, and development of parameterization schemes for General Circulation Models (GCMs) are described.

  13. Top physics: CDF results

    SciTech Connect

    K. Bloom

    2004-06-23

    The top quark plays an important role in the grand scheme of particle physics, and is also interesting on its own merits. We present recent results from CDF on top-quark physics based on 100-200 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data. We have measured the t{bar t} cross section in different decay modes using several different techniques, and are beginning our studies of top-quark properties. New analyses for this conference include a measurement of {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} in the lepton-plus-jets channel using a neural net to distinguish signal and background events, and measurements of top-quark branching fractions.

  14. Recent Results from RXTE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swank, J.

    1998-05-01

    The Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer has observed a wide range of sources and is producing valuable science. Its broad-band sensitivity has been key in the observations of both compact, stellar, and nebular objects. RXTE is ideally suited for observing X-rays from both galactic and extragalactic black holes. The range of accretion rates, masses, and possibly angular momenta of stellar black hole candidates produce a variety of phenomena on which there are new results. Cygnus X-1 has temporal as well as spectral properties, sensitive to state transformations, which strongly constrain the physical picture for a whole class of sources. Quasi-periodic oscillations are characteristic of the microquasar GRS1915+105 and some are seen in other candidates. Coordinated observations have established the link betweeen accretion instabilities and emission in jets. Accretion onto the massive black holes in AGN also results in variations. These have inspired many observations of correlations with both gamma rays and long wavelengths. Most neutron star X-ray sources are in low-mass binaries where relatively low magnetic fields allow accretion disks to persist where gravity is strong. With its high time resolution and large area RXTE is the only mission that can explore the domain of millisecond oscillations. Its measurements are providing evidence about the conditions at the neutron stars and determining spins, masses, and radii. In strong field accreting pulsars, quasi-periodic modulations may be diagnostic of the disk-magnetosphere interaction and the enigmatic spin behavior of some pulsars. RXTE recently discovered the fastest young rotation-powered pulsar. Among the special objects RXTE had the opportunity to observe are the bursting pulsar and the soft-gamma-ray repeater SGR1806-20. RXTE's fast response was recently applied to the transient XTE J0421+56, which had an exceptionally fast rise and decay. This led to identification of corresponding radio and optical transients of the symbiotic star CI Cam.

  15. Viscosupplementation: techniques, indications, results.

    PubMed

    Legré-Boyer, V

    2015-02-01

    Viscosupplementation by hyaluronic acid (HA) injections is frequently used for local treatment of osteoarthritis (OA), due to ease of use and good tolerance. A profusion of linear or reticulated HA derivates are marketed, with varied characters and levels of evidence. Viscosupplementation has demonstrated moderate but significant efficacy (20%) versus placebo in terms of pain and function, with a high rate of responders (60-70%) in knee osteoarthritis. It allows reduced administration of opioid analgesics and NSAIDs, with improved risk/benefit ratio, and may delay joint replacement. Cartilage protection remains to be proven. Clinical efficacy shows 1-4 weeks' later onset than corticosteroids, but is maintained for 6 or even 12 months. Systematic association of corticosteroid and HA injection is not justified, and an interval has to be left before undertaking arthroplasty. Intra-articular injection of HA requires a skilled specialist, and may be difficult in a non-swollen joint; some tips and tricks may be helpful. In other joints than the knee, radiologic or ultrasound guidance is recommended. The efficacy of viscosupplementation is a matter of ongoing debate, after discordant findings in some meta-analyses. Some poor results may be due to inappropriate use of HA injections, poorly adapted to the patient's OA phenotype. Viscosupplementation is a treatment for chronic moderate symptomatic OA, and not for flares with joint swelling. Application in sport-related chondropathy has yet to be properly assessed. The optimal response profile remains to be determined. The ideal indication in the knee seems to be moderate femorotibial OA without swelling. Results have been generally disappointing in hip osteoarthritis but promising in OA of the ankle and shoulder (with and without rotator cuff tear). Further studies are needed to determine response profile and optimal treatment schedule, according to the joint. PMID:25596987

  16. Results from SNO

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Yuen-dat

    2001-10-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is an underground heavy water Cherenkov detector for studying solar neutrinos. SNO is capable of performing both flavor sensitive and flavor blind measurements of the solar neutrino flux. The first charged current (CC) measurement is found to be: {psi}{sub SNO}{sup CC}({nu}{sub e}) = 1.75 {+-} 0.07(stat.){sub -0.11}{sup +0.12}(sys.) {+-} 0.05 (theor.) x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and the elastic scattering fluxes (ES) is: {psi}{sub SNO}{sup ES}({nu}{sub x}) = 2.39 {+-} 0.34(stat.){sub -0.14}{sup +0.16} (sys.) x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The {psi}{sub SNO}{sup CC}({nu}{sub e}) result, when combined with the high statistics elastic scattering (ES) measurement from Super-Kamiokande, provide a strong evidence for solar neutrino flavor transformation (3.3{sigma}). The deduced total solar neutrino flux is in good agreement with standard solar model predictions. No significant distortion in the energy spectrum is observed.

  17. NAS Parallel Benchmarks Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subhash, Saini; Bailey, David H.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) were developed in 1991 at NASA Ames Research Center to study the performance of parallel supercomputers. The eight benchmark problems are specified in a pencil and paper fashion i.e. the complete details of the problem to be solved are given in a technical document, and except for a few restrictions, benchmarkers are free to select the language constructs and implementation techniques best suited for a particular system. In this paper, we present new NPB performance results for the following systems: (a) Parallel-Vector Processors: Cray C90, Cray T'90 and Fujitsu VPP500; (b) Highly Parallel Processors: Cray T3D, IBM SP2 and IBM SP-TN2 (Thin Nodes 2); (c) Symmetric Multiprocessing Processors: Convex Exemplar SPP1000, Cray J90, DEC Alpha Server 8400 5/300, and SGI Power Challenge XL. We also present sustained performance per dollar for Class B LU, SP and BT benchmarks. We also mention NAS future plans of NPB.

  18. [Results of Simulation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Lattice Monte Carlo and off-lattice molecular dynamics simulations of h(sub 1)t(sub 4) and h(sub 4)t(sub l) (head/tail) amphiphile solutions have been performed as a function of surfactant concentration and temperature. The lattice and off-lattice systems exhibit quite different self-assembly behavior at equivalent thermodynamic conditions. We found that in the weakly aggregating regime (no preferred-size micelles), all models yield similar micelle size distributions at the same average aggregation number, albeit at different thermodynamic conditions (temperatures). In the strongly aggregating regime, this mapping between models (through temperature adjustment) fails, and the models exhibit qualitatively different micellization behavior. Incipient micellization in a model self-associating telechelic polymer solution results in a network with a transient elastic response that decays by a two-step relaxation: the first is due to a heterogeneous jump-diffusion process involving entrapment of end-groups within well-defined clusters and this is followed by rapid diffusion to neighboring clusters and a decay (terminal relaxation) due to cluster disintegration. The viscoelastic response of the solution manifests characteristics of a glass transition and entangled polymer network.

  19. ALOS-2 initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankaku, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Shinichi; Shimada, Masanobu

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 (ALOS-2) was launched from Tanegashima Space Center by H-IIA rocket successfully on 24th May 2014. ALOS-2 carries the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2) as the state-of-the-art L-band SAR system which succeeds to PALSAR onboard ALOS. PALSAR-2 uses almost whole bandwidth allocated for L-band active sensor of Earth Exploration Satellites Service specified by the Radio Regulation in order to realize the high resolution observation, and also, it transmits more than 6 kW power for lower Noise Equivalent Sigma Zero using 180 TRMs driven by Gallium Nitride (GaN) amplifier which is the first use in space. Furthermore, because ALOS-2 carries the SAR system only, PALSAR-2 antenna can be mounted under the satellite body. It enables to observe right-/left-looking observation by satellite maneuvering. And the high accuracy orbit control to maintain the satellite within 500 m radius tube against the reference orbit enables high coherence for the InSAR processing. Using these new technologies, ALOS-2 has been operating to fulfill the mission requirements such as disaster monitoring and so on. This document introduces the initial result of ALOS-2 from the first year operation.

  20. Databases for LDEF results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohnhoff-Hlavacek, Gail

    1992-01-01

    One of the objectives of the team supporting the LDEF Systems and Materials Special Investigative Groups is to develop databases of experimental findings. These databases identify the hardware flown, summarize results and conclusions, and provide a system for acknowledging investigators, tracing sources of data, and future design suggestions. To date, databases covering the optical experiments, and thermal control materials (chromic acid anodized aluminum, silverized Teflon blankets, and paints) have been developed at Boeing. We used the Filemaker Pro software, the database manager for the Macintosh computer produced by the Claris Corporation. It is a flat, text-retrievable database that provides access to the data via an intuitive user interface, without tedious programming. Though this software is available only for the Macintosh computer at this time, copies of the databases can be saved to a format that is readable on a personal computer as well. Further, the data can be exported to more powerful relational databases, capabilities, and use of the LDEF databases and describe how to get copies of the database for your own research.

  1. Results from hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pondrom, L.G. )

    1990-12-14

    The present status of hadron collider physics is reviewed. The total cross section for {bar p} + p has been measured at 1.8 TeV: {sigma}{sub tot} = 72.1 {plus minus} 3.3 mb. New data confirm the UA2 observation of W/Z {yields} {bar q}q. Precision measurements of M{sub W} by UA2 and CDF give an average value M{sub W} = 80.13 {plus minus} 0.30 GeV/c{sup 2}. When combined with measurements of M{sub Z} from LEP and SLC this number gives sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} = 0.227 {plus minus} 0.006, or m{sub top} = 130{sub {minus}60}{sup +40} GeV/c{sup 2} from the EWK radiative correction term {Delta}r. Evidence for hadron colliders as practical sources of b quarks has been strengthened, while searches for t quarks have pushed the mass above M{sub W}: m{sub top} > 89 GeV/c{sup 2} 95% cl (CDF Preliminary). Searches beyond the standard model based on the missing E{sub T} signature have not yet produced any positive results. Future prospects for the discovery of the top quark in the range m{sub top} < 200 GeV/c{sup 2} look promising. 80 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Results of hip resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Favetti, Fabio; Casella, Filippo; Papalia, Matteo; Panegrossi, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Background The renewed popularity of resurfacing hip arthroplasty in the last 10 years has generated a remarkable quantity of scientific contributions based on mid- and short-term follow-up. More than one paper has reported a consistent early revision rate as a consequence of biological or biomechanical failure. Two major complications are commonly described with resurfacing implants: avascular necrosis and femoral-neck fracture. A close relationship between these two events has been suggested, but not firmly demonstrated, whereas cementing technique seems to be better understood as potential cause of failure. Methods We performed an in vitro study in which four different resurfacing implants were evaluated with a simulated femoral head, two types of cement, (low and high viscosity) and two cementing techniques: direct (cement apposition directly on the femoral head) and indirect (cement poured into the femoral component). Results High-viscosity cement showed homogeneous distribution over the entire femoral head. Low-viscosity cement showed a massive polar concentration with insufficient, if not absent, distribution in the equatorial zone. Conclusion Polar cement concentration could be a risk factor for early implant failure due to two effects on the femoral head: biological (excessive local exothermic reaction could cause osteocyte necrosis) and biomechanical (which could lead to uneven load distribution on the femoral head). PMID:21234563

  3. Simpler images, better results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Britton

    1999-03-01

    The very rapid development of optical technology has followed a pattern similar to that of nuclear magnetic resonance: first, spectroscopy and then imaging. The accomplishments in spectroscopy have been significant--among them, early detection of hematomas and quantitative oximetry (assuming that time and frequency domain instruments are used). Imaging has progressed somewhat later. The first images were obtained in Japan and USA a few years ago, particularly of parietal stimulation of the human brain. Since then, rapid applications to breast and limb, together with higher resolution of the brain now make NIR imaging of functional activation and tumor detection readily available, reliable and affordable devices. The lecture has to do with the applications of imaging to these three areas, particularly to prefrontal imaging of cognitive function, of breast tumor detection, and of localized muscle activation in exercise. The imaging resolution achievable in functional activation appears to be FWHM of 4 mm. The time required for an image is a few seconds or even much less. Breast image detection at 50 microsecond(s) ec/pixel results in images obtainable in a few seconds or shorter times (bandwidths of the kHz are available). Finally, imaging of the body organs is under study in this laboratory, particularly in the in utero fetus. It appears that the photon migration theory now leads to the development of a wide number of images for human subject tissue spectroscopy and imaging.

  4. Polarization Results from PAPER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, James E.

    2014-06-01

    Epoch of Reionization (EoR) experiments seeking a detection of the power spectrum face daunting challenges in the form of extremely bright foregrounds. One of the least well-characterized is that of polarization emission at meter wavelengths, both from our own Galaxy and from extragalactic radio sources. Faraday rotation of polarized sources produces frequency structure in the observed spectrum, and leakage of the polarized emission into estimates of Stokes I can be confused with the fluctuations due to reionization. Here we present recent results on characterizing the power spectrum of polarized emission the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER). PAPER is a focused experiment aimed at detecting the spatial power spectrum of neutral hydrogen emission during the EoR. PAPER is an interferometer operating from 100 - 200 MHz, with antennas measuring linear polarization and a correlator producing full-Stokes output. The science array is located at the site of the future Square Kilometre Array (SKA) site in South Africa, with a prototyping and test facility in Green Bank, WV. A staged build-out of PAPER South Africa (PSA) began in late 2009. PAPER has been obtaining science-grade observations since late 2011, when 32 dipoles (PSA-32) began taking data full-Stokes data, and is currently at its final size with 128 dipoles taking data since November 2013. We present power spectrum and imaging data from PSA-32 quantifying the brightness of foreground emission. We consider lessons learned from this experience in the design of the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array.

  5. Climax granite test results

    SciTech Connect

    Ramspott, L.D.

    1980-01-15

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) program, is carrying out in situ rock mechanics testing in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This summary addresses only those field data taken to date that address thermomechanical modeling for a hard-rock repository. The results to be discussed include thermal measurements in a heater test that was conducted from October 1977 through July 1978, and stress and displacement measurements made during and after excavation of the canister storage drift for the Spent Fuel Test (SFT) in the Climax granite. Associated laboratory and field measurements are summarized. The rock temperature for a given applied heat load at a point in time and space can be adequately modeled with simple analytic calculations involving superposition and integration of numerous point source solutions. The input, for locations beyond about a meter from the source, can be a constant thermal conductivity and diffusivity. The value of thermal conductivity required to match the field data is as much as 25% different from laboratory-measured values. Therefore, unless we come to understand the mechanisms for this difference, a simple in situ test will be required to obtain a value for final repository design. Some sensitivity calculations have shown that the temperature field is about ten times more sensitive to conductivity than to diffusivity under the test conditions. The orthogonal array was designed to detect anisotropy. After considering all error sources, anisotropic efforts in the thermal field were less than 5 to 10%.

  6. Overview of JET results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanelli, F.; JET-EFDA Contributors; Kamendje, R.

    2009-10-01

    Since the last IAEA conference, the scientific programme of JET has focused on the qualification of the integrated operating scenarios for ITER and on physics issues essential for the consolidation of design choices and the efficient exploitation of ITER. Particular attention has been given to the characterization of the edge plasma, pedestal energy and edge localized modes (ELMs), and their impact on plasma facing components (PFCs). Various ELM mitigation techniques have been assessed for all ITER operating scenarios using active methods such as resonant magnetic field perturbation, rapid variation of the radial field and pellet pacing. In particular, the amplitude and frequency of type I ELMs have been actively controlled over a wide parameter range (q95 = 3-4.8, ?N <= 3.0) by adjusting the amplitude of the n = 1 external perturbation field induced by error field correction coils. The study of disruption induced heat loads on PFCs has taken advantage of a new wide-angle viewing infrared system and a fast bolometer to provide a detailed account of time, localization and form of the energy deposition. Specific ITER-relevant studies have used the unique JET capability of varying the toroidal field (TF) ripple from its normal low value ?BT = 0.08% up to ?BT = 1% to study the effect of TF ripple on high confinement-mode plasmas. The results suggest that ?BT < 0.5% is required on ITER to maintain adequate confinement to allow QDT = 10 at full field. Physics issues of direct relevance to ITER include heat and toroidal momentum transport, with experiments using power modulation to decouple power input and torque to achieve first experimental evidence of inward momentum pinch in JET and determine the threshold for ion temperature gradient driven modes. Within the longer term JET programme in support of ITER, activities aiming at the modification of the JET first wall and divertor and the upgrade of the neutral beam and plasma control systems are being conducted. The procurement of all components will be completed by 2009 with the shutdown for the installation of the beryllium wall and tungsten divertor extending from summer 2009 to summer 2010.

  7. Overview of MAST results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Adamek, J.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, S.; Appel, L.; Asunta, O.; Barnes, M.; Ben Ayed, N.; Bigelow, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradley, J.; Brünner, J.; Cahyna, P.; Carr, M.; Caughman, J.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C.; Chapman, S.; Chorley, J.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N.; Cooper, W. A.; Cox, M.; Crocker, N.; Crowley, B.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darrow, D.; Dendy, R.; Diallo, A.; Dickinson, D.; Diem, S.; Dorland, W.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Easy, L.; Elmore, S.; Field, A.; Fishpool, G.; Fox, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gibson, K.; Graves, J.; Gurl, C.; Guttenfelder, W.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Havlickova, E.; Hawke, J.; Hawkes, N.; Hender, T.; Henderson, S.; Highcock, E.; Hillesheim, J.; Hnat, B.; Holgate, J.; Horacek, J.; Howard, J.; Huang, B.; Imada, K.; Jones, O.; Kaye, S.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Klimek, I.; Kocan, M.; Leggate, H.; Lilley, M.; Lipschultz, B.; Lisgo, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Lomanowski, B.; Lupelli, I.; Maddison, G.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G.; McClements, K.; McMillan, B.; Meakins, A.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Milnes, J.; Morris, A. W.; Motojima, G.; Muir, D.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A.; O'Brien, M.; O'Gorman, T.; Ono, Y.; Oliver, H.; Pamela, S.; Pangione, L.; Parra, F.; Patel, A.; Peebles, W.; Peng, M.; Perez, R.; Pinches, S.; Piron, L.; Podesta, M.; Price, M.; Reinke, M.; Ren, Y.; Roach, C.; Robinson, J.; Romanelli, M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sangaroon, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Schekochihin, A.; Sharapov, S.; Sharples, R.; Shevchenko, V.; Silburn, S.; Simpson, J.; Storrs, J.; Takase, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Tanaka, H.; Taylor, D.; Taylor, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Valovic, M.; Vann, R.; Walkden, N.; Wilson, H.; Wyk, L. V.; Yamada, T.; Zoletnik, S.; MAST; MAST Upgrade Teams

    2015-10-01

    The Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) programme is strongly focused on addressing key physics issues in preparation for operation of ITER as well as providing solutions for DEMO design choices. In this regard, MAST has provided key results in understanding and optimizing H-mode confinement, operating with smaller edge localized modes (ELMs), predicting and handling plasma exhaust and tailoring auxiliary current drive. In all cases, the high-resolution diagnostic capability on MAST is complemented by sophisticated numerical modelling to facilitate a deeper understanding. Mitigation of ELMs with resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidal mode number nRMP = 2, 3, 4, 6 has been demonstrated: at high and low collisionality; for the first ELM following the transition to high confinement operation; during the current ramp-up; and with rotating nRMP = 3 RMPs. nRMP = 4, 6 fields cause less rotation braking whilst the power to access H-mode is less with nRMP = 4 than nRMP = 3, 6. Refuelling with gas or pellets gives plasmas with mitigated ELMs and reduced peak heat flux at the same time as achieving good confinement. A synergy exists between pellet fuelling and RMPs, since mitigated ELMs remove fewer particles. Inter-ELM instabilities observed with Doppler backscattering are consistent with gyrokinetic simulations of micro-tearing modes in the pedestal. Meanwhile, ELM precursors have been strikingly observed with beam emission spectroscopy (BES) measurements. A scan in beta at the L-H transition shows that pedestal height scales strongly with core pressure. Gyro-Bohm normalized turbulent ion heat flux (as estimated from the BES data) is observed to decrease with increasing tilt of the turbulent eddies. Fast ion redistribution by energetic particle modes depends on density, and access to a quiescent domain with ‘classical’ fast ion transport is found above a critical density. Highly efficient electron Bernstein wave current drive (1 A W-1) has been achieved in solenoid-free start-up. A new proton detector has characterized escaping fusion products. Langmuir probes and a high-speed camera suggest filaments play a role in particle transport in the private flux region whilst coherence imaging has measured scrape-off layer (SOL) flows. BOUT++ simulations show that fluxes due to filaments are strongly dependent on resistivity and magnetic geometry of the SOL, with higher radial fluxes at higher resistivity. Finally, MAST Upgrade is due to begin operation in 2016 to support ITER preparation and importantly to operate with a Super-X divertor to test extended leg concepts for particle and power exhaust.

  8. National Hospice Survey Results

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, Melissa D.; Schlesinger, Mark; Barry, Colleen L.; Morrison, R. Sean; McCorkle, Ruth; Hrzeler, Rosemary; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The impact of the substantial growth in for-profit hospices in the United States on quality and hospice access has been intensely debated, yet little is known about how for-profit and nonprofit hospices differ in activities beyond service delivery. OBJECTIVE To determine the association between hospice ownership and (1) provision of community benefits, (2) setting and timing of the hospice population served, and (3) community outreach. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cross-sectional survey (the National Hospice Survey), conducted from September 2008 through November 2009, of a national random sample of 591 Medicare-certified hospices operating throughout the United States. EXPOSURES For-profit or nonprofit hospice ownership. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Provision of community benefits; setting and timing of the hospice population served; and community outreach. RESULTS A total of 591 hospices completed our survey (84% response rate). For-profit hospices were less likely than nonprofit hospices to provide community benefits including serving as training sites (55% vs 82%; adjusted relative risk [ARR], 0.67 [95% CI, 0.590.76]), conducting research (18% vs 23%; ARR, 0.67 [95% CI, 0.460.99]), and providing charity care (80% vs 82%; ARR, 0.88 [95% CI, 0.800.96]). For-profit compared with nonprofit hospices cared for a larger proportion of patients with longer expected hospice stays including those in nursing homes (30% vs 25%; P = .009). For-profit hospices were more likely to exceed Medicares aggregate annual cap (22% vs 4%; ARR, 3.66 [95% CI, 2.026.63]) and had a higher patient disenrollment rate (10% vs 6%; P < .001). For-profit were more likely than nonprofit hospices to engage in outreach to low-income communities (61% vs 46%; ARR, 1.23 [95% CI, 1.051.44]) and minority communities (59% vs 48%; ARR, 1.18 [95% CI, 1.021.38]) and less likely to partner with oncology centers (25% vs 33%; ARR, 0.59 [95% CI, 0.440.80]). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Ownership-related differences are apparent among hospices in community benefits, population served, and community outreach. Although Medicares aggregate annual cap may curb the incentive to focus on long-stay hospice patients, additional regulatory measures such as public reporting of hospice disenrollment rates should be considered as the share of for-profit hospices in the United States continues to increase. PMID:24567076

  9. Overview of MAST results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Counsell, G. F.; Akers, R. J.; Appel, L. C.; Applegate, D.; Axon, K. B.; Baranov, Y.; Brickley, C.; Bunting, C.; Buttery, R. J.; Carolan, P. G.; Challis, C.; Ciric, D.; Conway, N. J.; Cox, M.; Cunningham, G.; Darke, A.; Dnestrovskij, A.; Dowling, J.; Dudson, B.; Dunstan, M. R.; Delchambre, E.; Field, A. R.; Foster, A.; Gee, S.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Helander, P.; Hender, T. C.; Hole, M.; Howell, D. H.; Joiner, N.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Lehane, I. P.; Lisgo, S.; Lloyd, B.; Lott, F.; Maddison, G. P.; Manhood, S. J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G. J.; McClements, K. G.; Meyer, H.; Morris, A. W.; Nelson, M.; O'Brien, M. R.; Patel, A.; Pinfold, T.; Preinhaelter, J.; Price, M. N.; Roach, C. M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Sharapov, S.; Shevchenko, V.; Shibaev, S.; Stammers, K.; Storrs, J.; Sykes, A.; Tabasso, A.; Tallents, S.; Taylor, D.; Tournianski, M. R.; Turner, A.; Turri, G.; Valovic, M.; Volpe, F.; Voss, G.; Walsh, M. J.; Watkins, J. R.; Wilson, H. R.; Wisse, M.; MAST, the; NBI; ECRH Teams

    2005-10-01

    Significant progress has been made on the Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) towards a fundamental understanding of transport, stability and edge physics and addressing technological issues for future large devices. Collaborative studies of the L-H transition with NSTX and ASDEX Upgrade confirm that operation in a connected double-null configuration significantly reduces the threshold power, Pthr. The MAST data provide support for a theory for the transition based on finite ? drift wave turbulence suppression by self-generated zonal flows. Analysis of low and high field side density gradients in the H-mode pedestal provides support for an analytical model of the density pedestal width dependent on the neutral penetration depth. Adding MAST data to international confinement databases has enhanced confidence in scalings for ITER by significantly expanding the range of ? and ? explored and indicates a slightly stronger ? dependence than in current scalings. Studies of core transport have been conducted for well-diagnosed L-mode, H-mode and internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges using TRANSP, and microstability and turbulence studies have been carried out using GS2. Linear micro-stability analysis indicates that ITG modes are typically unstable on all flux surfaces with growth rates that are comparable to the equilibrium E B flow shearing rate. Mixing length estimates of transport coefficients from ITG (neglecting flow shear) give diffusion coefficients that are broadly comparable with observed thermal diffusivities. Non-linear, collisionless ETG calculations have been performed and suggest radially extended electrostatic streamers up to 100?e across in radius. Transport from ITG could easily be suppressed in regions where the E B shear flow rate, ?SE, exceeds the ITG growth rate, possibly contributing to ITBs. Toroidal rotation, driven by neutral beam torque, is the dominant contribution to ?SE via the vphiB? term in the radial electric field. Early edge localized mode activity on MAST is associated with the formation of narrow filamentary structures following field lines in the edge. These filaments rotate toroidally with the edge plasma and, away from the X-points, accelerate radially outwards from the edge up to 20 cm. Studies of disruptions on MAST demonstrate a complex evolution of core energy loss and resultant divertor power loads, including phases where the target heat flux width is broadened by a factor of 8. Observations of energetic particle modes driven by super-Alfvnic beam ions provide support for a model for the non-linear evolution of toroidal Alfvn eigenmodes (AEs) forming Bernstein-Green-Krushal waves. The AE activity reduces to low levels with increasing ?. Plasma start-up without a central solenoid and in a manner compatible with future large spherical tokamak (ST) devices has been demonstrated using breakdown at a quadrupole magnetic null. Closed flux surface plasmas with peak plasma currents up to 370 kA have been generated and sustained for 0.3 s. New error field correction coils have extended the operational space for low density plasmas and enabled scaling studies of error field induced locked mode formation in the ST.

  10. Angiopoietin-1 prevents severe bleeding complications induced by heparin-like drugs and fibroblast growth factor-2 in mice.

    PubMed

    Jerebtsova, Marina; Das, Jharna R; Tang, Pingtao; Wong, Edward; Ray, Patricio E

    2015-10-01

    Critically ill children can develop bleeding complications when treated with heparin-like drugs. These events are usually attributed to the anticoagulant activity of these drugs. However, previous studies showed that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), a heparin-binding growth factor released in the circulation of these patients, could precipitate intestinal hemorrhages in mice treated with the heparin-like drug pentosan polysulfate (PPS). Yet very little is known about how FGF-2 induces bleeding complications in combination with heparin-like drugs. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which circulating FGF-2 induces intestinal hemorrhages in mice treated with PPS. We used a well-characterized mouse model of intestinal hemorrhages induced by FGF-2 plus PPS. Adult FVB/N mice were infected with adenovirus carrying Lac-Z or a secreted form of recombinant human FGF-2, and injected with PPS, at doses that do not induce bleeding complications per se. Mice treated with FGF-2 in combination with PPS developed an intestinal inflammatory reaction that increased the permeability and disrupted the integrity of submucosal intestinal vessels. These changes, together with the anticoagulant activity of PPS, induced lethal hemorrhages. Moreover, a genetically modified form of the endothelial ligand angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1*), which has powerful antipermeability and anti-inflammatory activity, prevented the lethal bleeding complications without correcting the anticoagulant status of these mice. These findings define new mechanisms through which FGF-2 and Ang-1* modulate the outcome of intestinal bleeding complications induced by PPS in mice and may have wider clinical implications for critically ill children treated with heparin-like drugs. PMID:26276817

  11. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis: present and future treatment perspectives.

    PubMed

    Diniz, S; Dinis, P; Cruz, F; Pinto, R

    2013-12-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/Interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a debilitating chronic disease of unknown etiology. Treatment is not well defined and is still under intense investigation. The aim of this paper was to review existing literature on treatment of BPS/IC and examine current evidence on present and future perspective. PubMed database was researched and publications in English language on the topic were analyzed, emphasis was given to publications that occurred on the last five years. Mainstays of oral therapies are still empirical due to lack of knowledge on etiology of this disease. The few oral drugs that showed efficacy in placebo controlled trials are amytriptiline, pentosan polysulfate sodium, hydroxyzine and cyclosporine A. As for intravesical treatments reasonable evidence is available only for dimethyl sulfoxide and resection of visible Hunner's lesions. Reconstructive surgery can also be recommended in selected cases. Further studies into the causes and mechanisms of the disease are paramount for the development of effective treatments. Foreseeable therapeutic objectives will comprehend oral blockade of sensory nerve receptors, immune system modulation, peripheral nerve fiber inactivation/desensitization, anti-proliferative factor blockade and pain gene therapy. Identification of BPS/IC phenotypical subgroups should help delineate proper individualized treatment which will be aimed at the disease and its multiple manifestations rather than at focalized complaints. Present treatment of BPS/IC comprises pain control in conjunction with control of supposed underlying bladder disease. Based on identified possible therapeutic targets several treatment possibilities warrant further investigation. Identification of BPS/IC phenotype is a important step for correct management. PMID:24091479

  12. Reversible detection of heparin and other polyanions by pulsed chronopotentiometric polymer membrane electrode.

    PubMed

    Gemene, Kebede L; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2010-03-01

    The first fully reversible polymeric membrane-based sensor for the anticoagulant heparin and other polyanions using a pulsed chronopotentiometry (pulstrode) measurement mode is reported. Polymeric membranes containing a lipophilic inert salt of the form R(+)R(-) (where R(+) and R(-) are tridodecylmethylammonium (TDMA(+)) and dinonylnaphthalene sulfonate (DNNS(-)), respectively) are used to suppress unwanted spontaneous ion extractions under zero-current equilibrium conditions. An anodic galvanostatic current pulse applied across the membrane perturbs the equilibrium lipophilic ion distribution within the membrane phase in such a way that anions/polyanions are extracted into the membrane from the sample. The membrane is then subjected to an open-circuit zero current state for a short period, and finally a 0 V vs reference electrode potentiostatic pulse is applied to restore the membrane to its initial full equilibrium condition. Potentials are sampled as average values during the last 10% of the 0.5 s open circuit phase of the measurement cycle. Fully reversible and reproducible electromotive force (emf) responses are observed for heparin, pentosan polysulfate (PPS), chondroitin sulfate (CS), and oversulfated chondroitin sulfate (OSCS), with the magnitude of the potentiometric response proportional to charge density of the polyanions. The sensor provides an emf response related to heparin concentrations in the range of 1-20 U/mL. The responses to variations in heparin levels and toward other polyanions of the pulstrode configuration are analogous to the already established single-use, nonreversible potentiometric polyion sensors based on membranes doped only with the lipophilic anion exchanger TDMA(+). PMID:20121058

  13. Sugar cane bagasse as a possible source of fermentable carbohydrates. I. Characterization of bagasse with regard to monosaccharide, hemicellulose, and amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Du Toit, P J; Olivier, S P; van Biljon, P L

    1984-09-01

    Individual monosaccharides present in bagasse hemicellulose were determined using HPLC and other chromatographic procedures. The presence of higher oligomers of the monosaccharides could also be determined. No single procedure can separate and identify all the naturally occurring monosaccharides. The pentosan fraction of bagasse wa successfully hydrolyzed and extracted with 5% (m/v)HCl, and the rate of release of individual monosaccharides was determined. Xylose was the main component in the hydrolyzates, while glucose, arabinose, and galactose present in the side chains of the pentosans were initially released at a fast rate. This treatment resulted in obtaining 229 mg/g xylose (85% of theoretical maximum) and 44 mg/g glucose from bagasse. Only arabinose (2.8 mg/g) and galactose (0.75 mg/g) was also present in detectable quantities. A total of 309 mg monosaccharides were obtained from 1 g of bagasse by this treatment. The results indicated that hydrolysis conditions for specific plant materials depend on the composition of the specific material being utilized. A part of the pentosan fraction (77.1%) was hydrolyzed at a high rate, while 22.9% was more stable and hydrolyzed more slowly. Although 39.8% dry bagasse could be obtained in solution by treatment with dilute alkali, only about 72% of the available hemicelluloses could be extracted in this way if the bagasse was not delignified beforehand. Amino acids and peptides or proteins were also extracted to very much the same with the alkali. PMID:18553528

  14. Paradoxical Results and Item Bundles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooker, Giles; Finkelman, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Hooker, Finkelman, and Schwartzman ("Psychometrika," 2009, in press) defined a paradoxical result as the attainment of a higher test score by changing answers from correct to incorrect and demonstrated that such results are unavoidable for maximum likelihood estimates in multidimensional item response theory. The potential for these results to

  15. RESULTATIVE VERBS AND OTHER PROBLEMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HASHIMOTO, ANNE YUE

    THE SO-CALLED RESULTATIVE VERBS IN MANDARIN CHINESE ARE STUDIED WITHIN THE GENERAL FRAMEWORK OF A TRANSFORMATIONAL GRAMMAR. THE RESULTATIVE VERBS ARE GENERALLY CONSIDERED AS CONSISTING OF TWO COMPONENTS--A VERBAL COMPONENT FOLLOWED BY A RESULTATIVE OR DIRECTIONAL COMPLEMENT. OTHER PROBLEMS RELATED TO COMPLEMENTS ARE ALSO TOUCHED UPON, FOR EXAMPLE,

  16. Misleading biochemical laboratory test results

    PubMed Central

    Nanji, Amin A.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews the general and specific factors that interfere with the performance of common biochemical laboratory tests and the interpretation of their results. The clinical status of the patient, drug interactions, and in-vivo and in-vitro biochemical interactions and changes may alter the results obtained from biochemical analysis of blood constituents. Failure to recognize invalid laboratory test results may lead to injudicious and dangerous management of patients. PMID:6375845

  17. Interpretation of grease test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    Standard ASTM tests, their typical results and how those results may be interpreted by the practicing lubrication engineer or specialist in the field will be discussed. Some field experiences and examples will be given. In addition, examples of inventive non-standard field tests will be shown and described. Illustrations from the old and revised lubrication engineers handbook will be used.

  18. Top physics results at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Vickey, Trevor; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-05-01

    The most recent results on top quark physics at CDF are reported. Measurements of cross-section and mass are presented, and the status of single top quark production searches are discussed. The results obtained from probing various top quark properties are also presented.

  19. FORWARD PHYSICS AND BRAHMS RESULTS.

    SciTech Connect

    DEBBE, R.

    2005-02-03

    We report here the BRAHMS measurements of particle production in d+Au and p+p collisions at RHIC. The results presented here are compared to previous p+A measurements at lower energies in fixed target mode. Some preliminary results on abundances of identified particles at high rapidity are also presented.

  20. Measurement Services Association Questionnaire Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Lewis J.; Gillis, Rod

    This paper presents the results of a questionnaire sent to 211 Measurement Services Association members. Sixty-four centers responded. The main purpose of the questionnaire was to find out what hardware and software are used by testing centers throughout the country. Results indicate that 52 institutions use mainframe computers, 50 use

  1. Latest Electroweak Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, Mark;

    2010-05-01

    The latest results in electroweak physics from proton anti-proton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron recorded by the CDF detector are presented. The results provide constraints on parton distribution functions, the mass of the Higgs boson and beyond the Standard Model physics.

  2. Project "Freestyle": National Sites Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Frederick

    Project "Freestyle" involved the development of prototypical television and print materials intended to combat sex-role stereotyping in career-related attitudes of nine to twelve-year-old children. This paper summarizes the results of the field evaluation of three pilot programs. With the aid of graphs, it reports the results in the following

  3. Spacelab Life Sciences 1 results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seddon, Rhea

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from the experiments conducted by the first Shuttle/Spacelab mission dedicated entirely to the life sciences, the Spacelab Life Sciences 1, launched on June 5, 1991. The experiments carried out during the 9-day flight included investigations of changes in the human cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal/endocrine, blood, and vestibular systems that were brought about by microgravity. Results were also obtained from the preflight and postflight complementary experiments performed on rats, which assessed the suitability of rodents as animal models for humans. Most results verified, or expanded on, the accepted theories of adaptation to zero gravity.

  4. Contradictory results in interferon research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Several reports on immunologically related interferon research, both in the areas of basic science and clinical research, are briefly reviewed, and it is noted that in many cases the results obtained are contradictory. It is argued, however, that the contradictory results are not surprising since interferon is a biological response modifier and has been known to produce opposite results even when the same interferon prepartion is used. It is emphasized that dosage, timing, route, and other experimental conditions are essential factors in planning immunological studies with interferon. Careful planning of future experiments with interferon should be required to prevent the possible generation of effects that are opposite to those expected.

  5. Survey Results and Award Presentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valett, Jon D.

    1995-01-01

    An acknowledgement for the significant behind the scenes contributions was given to three people who had contributed to the success of the Software Engineering workshops. The rest of the presentation reports on the results of a survey sent to everyone on the workshop mailing list. The questionnaire elicited information about the state of software engineering in the respondents organization was similar to one sent 10 years before. A review of the results of the questionnaire, comparing the result to one given before is presented.

  6. Extraction of hemicellulose from ryegrass straw for the production of glucose isomerase and use of the resulting straw residue for animal feed

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.P.; Anderson, A.W.

    1980-03-01

    The hemicellulose fraction of ryegrass straw was extracted with NaOH and used for the production of glucose isomerase by Streptomyces flavogriseus. The level of hemicellulose extracted increased proportionately with increasing NaOH concentration up to about 4%, then the rate of increase slowed down. Hemicellulose extraction was facilitated by the combined application of heat and NaOH. Approximately 15% hemicellulose (12% as pentosan) could be obtained by treating straw with 4% NaOH for either 3 hours at 90/sup 0/C or 24 hour at room temperature. The highest level (3.04 units/ml culture) of intracellular glucose isomerase was obtained when the organism was grown at 30 degrees Centigrade for two days on 2% straw hemicellulose. The organism also produced a high yield of glucose isomerase on xylose or xylan. The NaOH treated straw residue, after removal of hemicellulose, had approximately 75% higher digestibility and 20% higher feed efficiency for weanling meadow voles than untreated straw, but almost the equivalent to that obtained by NaOH treatment without removal of the hemicellulose. Thus, the residue could be used as animal feed. A process for the production of glucose isomerase and animal feed from ryegrass straw was also proposed.

  7. Results of Neptunium Disposal Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    2003-10-07

    Researchers investigated the neutralization of neptunium solution from H-Canyon Tank 16.4 and the properties of the resulting slurry. This work investigated slurry properties from a single neutralization protocol and limited storage times.

  8. PHENIX recent heavy flavor results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sanghoon

    2014-06-01

    Cold nuclear matter (CNM) effects provide an important ingredient to interpret the results from heavy-ion collisions. Such effects include nuclear shadowing, intrinsic parton transverse momentum broadening, and initial patron energy loss. The measurement of heavy quark production is a good probe to study the CNM effects particularly on gluons, since heavy quarks are mainly produced via gluon fusions at RHIC energy. The PHENIX experiment has an ability to study the CNM effects by measuring leptons from heavy-flavor decay in a broad kinematic range. Comparisons of the results measured in different rapidity regions allow us to study modification of gluon density function in the Au nucleus depending on parton fractional momentum x. In addition, comparisons to the results from heavy-ion collisions (Au + Au and Cu + Cu) measured by PHENIX provide an insight into the role of CNM effects in such collisions. Recent PHENIX results on heavy quark production are discussed in this presentation.

  9. Lunakhod-2: Preliminary research results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinogradov, A. P.; Sokolov, S.

    1975-01-01

    Results from the Lunakhod 2 experiment on the surface property variations and relief structure of lunar craters are presented. Tectonic fractures, iron composition of lunar rocks, magnetic measurements, lunar sky brightness, and corpuscular radiation of the lunar body were studied.

  10. Selection of LHCb Physics Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Burkhard

    2013-05-01

    LHCb is a dedicated flavour physics experiment at the LHC searching for physics beyond the Standard Model through precision measurements of CP-violating observables and the study of very rare decays of beauty- and charm-flavoured hadrons. In this article a selection of recent LHCb results is presented. Unless otherwise stated, the results are based on an integrated luminosity of 1 fb-1 accumulated during the year 2011 at √s = 7 TeV.

  11. Analysis of EUVE Experiment Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horan, Stephen

    1996-01-01

    A series of tests to validate an antenna pointing concept for spin-stabilized satellites using a data relay satellite are described. These tests show that proper antenna pointing on an inertially-stabilized spacecraft can lead to significant access time through the relay satellite even without active antenna pointing. We summarize the test results, the simulations to model the effects of antenna pattern and space loss, and the expected contact times. We also show how antenna beam width affects the results.

  12. Results on hard diffractive production

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K.

    1995-07-01

    The results of experiments at hadron colliders probing the structure of the pomeron through hard diffraction are reviewed. Some results on deep inelastic diffractive scattering obtained a HERA are also discussed and placed in perspective. By using a properly normalized pomeron flux factor in single diffraction dissociation, as dictated by unitarity, the pomeron emerges as a combination of valence quark and gluon color singlets in a ratio suggested by asymptopia.

  13. New CDF results on diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Mesropian, Christina; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-12-01

    We report new diffraction results obtained by the CDF collaboration in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at {radical}s=1.96 TeV. The first experimental evidence of exclusive dijet and diphoton production is presented. The exclusive results are discussed in context of the exclusive Higgs production at LHC. We also present the measurement of the Q{sup 2} and t dependence of the diffractive structure function.

  14. Electroweak results from the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.

    1997-01-01

    Electroweak results are presented from the CDF and DO experiments based on data collected in recent runs of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurements include the mass and width of the W boson, the production cross sections of the W and Z bosons, and the W charge asymmetry. Additional results come from studies of events with pairs of electroweak gauge bosons and include limits on anomalous couplings.

  15. [Submitting studies without significant results].

    PubMed

    Texier, Gatan; Meynard, Jean-Baptiste; Michel, Rmy; Migliani, Ren; Boutin, Jean-Paul

    2007-03-01

    When a study finds that no exposure factor or therapy is significantly related to a given effect, researchers legitimately wonder if the results should be submitted for publication and to what journal. Clinical trials that report significant associations have a higher probability of publication, a phenomenon known as selective publication. The principal reasons of this selective publication include author self-censorship, peer-reviewing, trials not intended for publication, interpretation of the p value, cost of journal subscriptions, and policies. Subsequent reviews and meta-analyses are biased by the unavailability of nonsignificant results. Suggestions for preventing this risk include university training, trial registries, an international standard randomised controlled trial number (ISRCTN), Cochrane collaboration, and the gray literature. Journals (including electronic journals) interested in studies with nonsignificant results are listed. New technologies are changing the relations between publishers, libraries, authors and readers. PMID:17287106

  16. Data Mining Citizen Science Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borne, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    Scientific discovery from big data is enabled through multiple channels, including data mining (through the application of machine learning algorithms) and human computation (commonly implemented through citizen science tasks). We will describe the results of new data mining experiments on the results from citizen science activities. Discovering patterns, trends, and anomalies in data are among the powerful contributions of citizen science. Establishing scientific algorithms that can subsequently re-discover the same types of patterns, trends, and anomalies in automatic data processing pipelines will ultimately result from the transformation of those human algorithms into computer algorithms, which can then be applied to much larger data collections. Scientific discovery from big data is thus greatly amplified through the marriage of data mining with citizen science.

  17. Presentation of economic evaluation results.

    PubMed

    Chaikledkaew, Usa

    2014-05-01

    The first HTA guidelines for Thailand included a chapter outlining a set of guidelines on how best to report the findings of health economic evaluations, based on a review of best practice and existing guidelines on the presentation of economic evaluation results from around the world. In this second edition of HTA guidelines for Thailand, the recommendations build on the first edition by using a case study to illustrate how the guidelines can be applied in a real research context. The guidelines propose that all reporting include ten key elements: defining the scope of the study, selection of comparator(s), defining the type of economic evaluation, measurement of costs, measurement of clinical effects, handling time in economic evaluation studies, handling uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, presentation of the results, discussion of the results, and disclosure of funding and authors conflict of interest. PMID:24964702

  18. ACTS: Technology Description and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, Richard T.; Schertler, Ronald; Gargione, Frank

    2000-01-01

    The ACTS Project was originated at NASA Glenn Research Center in the early 1980's to sponsor the development and application of technology that was intended to be used by the private sector. The program was formulated with the underlying philosophy of maintaining US leadership in satellite communications while focusing technology development for efficient use of the frequency spectrum. This report chronicles the execution and results of the program from the perspective of its technology managers, from inception through hardware and system development to on-orbit experiments and demonstrations of the technology. The first eight sections of the report discuss programmatic background, the specific satellite and ground terminal technology and the results generated by the program including industry relevance. A federally funded program of this type attracted strong advocates and adversaries and the resulting impact on the project schedule is also discussed. The last two sections are a list of useful acronyms and extensive references.

  19. Planck 2013 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Aussel, H.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bethermin, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Blanchard, A.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bourdin, H.; Bowyer, J. W.; Bridges, M.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carr, R.; Carvalho, P.; Casale, M.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Déchelette, T.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dick, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fabre, O.; Falgarone, E.; Falvella, M. C.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Filliard, C.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Foley, S.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Freschi, M.; Fromenteau, S.; Frommert, M.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Gallegos, J.; Galli, S.; Gandolfo, B.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Gilfanov, M.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Haissinski, J.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Hansen, M.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Ho, S.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huey, G.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jasche, J.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kalberla, P.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihänen, E.; Kerp, J.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lavabre, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Li, C.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lowe, S.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matsumura, T.; Matthai, F.; Maurin, L.; Mazzotta, P.; McDonald, A.; McEwen, J. D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Menegoni, E.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Millea, M.; Miniscalco, R.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; O'Sullivan, C.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Paykari, P.; Pearson, D.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Pullen, A. R.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Rahlin, A.; Räth, C.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Riazuelo, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ringeval, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Robbers, G.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Sanselme, L.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Schiavon, F.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Smith, K.; Smoot, G. F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Taylor, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J.-P.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Tuttlebee, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vibert, L.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, C.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Winkel, B.; Xia, J.-Q.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched 14 May 2009 and has been scanning the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously since 12 August 2009. In March 2013, ESA and the Planck Collaboration released the initial cosmology products based on the first 15.5 months of Planck data, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the mission and its performance, the processing, analysis, and characteristics of the data, the scientific results, and the science data products and papers in the release. The science products include maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and diffuse extragalactic foregrounds, a catalogue of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources, and a list of sources detected through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data and a lensing likelihood are described. Scientific results include robust support for the standard six-parameter ΛCDM model of cosmology and improved measurements of its parameters, including a highly significant deviation from scale invariance of the primordial power spectrum. The Planck values for these parameters and others derived from them are significantly different from those previously determined. Several large-scale anomalies in the temperature distribution of the CMB, first detected by WMAP, are confirmed with higher confidence. Planck sets new limits on the number and mass of neutrinos, and has measured gravitational lensing of CMB anisotropies at greater than 25σ. Planck finds no evidence for non-Gaussianity in the CMB. Planck's results agree well with results from the measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations. Planck finds a lower Hubble constant than found in some more local measures. Some tension is also present between the amplitude of matter fluctuations (σ8) derived from CMB data and that derived from Sunyaev-Zeldovich data. The Planck and WMAP power spectra are offset from each other by an average level of about 2% around the first acoustic peak. Analysis of Planck polarization data is not yet mature, therefore polarization results are not released, although the robust detection of E-mode polarization around CMB hot and cold spots is shown graphically.

  20. Recent results from hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, H.J. )

    1990-12-10

    This is a summary of some of the many recent results from the CERN and Fermilab colliders, presented for an audience of nuclear, medium-energy, and elementary particle physicists. The topics are jets and QCD at very high energies, precision measurements of electroweak parameters, the remarkably heavy top quark, and new results on the detection of the large flux of B mesons produced at these machines. A summary and some comments on the bright prospects for the future of hadron colliders conclude the talk. 39 refs., 44 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. First results from SAGE II

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurashitov, J.N.; Faizov, E.L.; Gavrin, V.N.

    1994-07-01

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first five runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 76{sub {minus}18}{sup +21} (stat) {sub {minus}7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. combined with the SAGE I result, the capture rate is 74{sub {minus}12}{sup +13} (stat) {sub {minus}7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. This represents only 56%--60% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models.

  2. Communicating Performance Assessments Results - 13609

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, Mark

    2013-07-01

    The F-Area Tank Farms (FTF) and H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and operated by Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR), Liquid Waste Operations contractor at DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS). The FTF and HTF are active radioactive waste storage and treatment facilities consisting of 51 carbon steel waste tanks and ancillary equipment such as transfer lines, evaporators and pump tanks. Performance Assessments (PAs) for each Tank Farm have been prepared to support the eventual closure of the underground radioactive waste tanks and ancillary equipment. PAs provide the technical bases and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements for final closure of the Tank Farms. The Tank Farms are subject to a number of regulatory requirements. The State regulates Tank Farm operations through an industrial waste water permit and through a Federal Facility Agreement approved by the State, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Closure documentation will include State-approved Tank Farm Closure Plans and tank-specific closure modules utilizing information from the PAs. For this reason, the State of South Carolina and the EPA must be involved in the performance assessment review process. The residual material remaining after tank cleaning is also subject to reclassification prior to closure via a waste determination pursuant to Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005. PAs are performance-based, risk-informed analyses of the fate and transport of FTF and HTF residual wastes following final closure of the Tank Farms. Since the PAs serve as the primary risk assessment tools in evaluating readiness for closure, it is vital that PA conclusions be communicated effectively. In the course of developing the FTF and HTF PAs, several lessons learned have emerged regarding communicating PA results. When communicating PA results it is important to stress that the primary goal of the PA results is to provide risk understanding, recognizing the magnitude of risk and identifying the conceptual model decisions and critical assumptions that most impact the results. Conceptual models that describe reality using simplified, mathematical approaches, and their roles in arriving at the PA results, must also be communicated. When presenting PA results, evaluations will typically be focused on a single baseline (or Base Case) to provide a foundation for discussion. The PA results are supplemented by other studies (alternate configurations, uncertainty analyses, and sensitivity analyses) which provide a breadth of modeling to supplement the Base Case. The suite of information offered by the various modeling cases and studies provides confidence that the overall risk is understood along with the underlying parameters and conditions that contribute to risk. (author)

  3. NEUTRINO OSCILLATION RESULTS FROM LSND

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, G.B.

    2000-10-01

    The Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector took data during the years 1993 through 1998. The results of a final analysis of the data are reported here. In summary, the analysis resulted in a cleaner sample of decay-at-rest oscillation candidates and provided a strong constraint on beam related backgrounds. The oscillation probability is fitted to the correlated photon parameter in the inclusive electron sample. The fit yields an excess of 83.3 {+-} 21.2 events attributable to neutrino oscillations. This corresponds to an oscillation probability of (0.25 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.04)% for that detector and beam configuration.

  4. Spaghetti calorimeter results and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Desalvo, R.

    1992-12-31

    In the guidelines of the SPACAL-LAA project the authors have built and beam-tested a prototype of spaghetti calorimeter with full hadronic shower containment. The results proved that the spaghetti technology (lead and scintillating fibers) can perform very accurate calorimetric measurements at the 15 ns LHC or SSC crossing rate and can compete with advantage over the other calorimetric technologies. In this paper they present the experimental results obtained so far and some future development foreseen in view of a hermetic supercollider detector.

  5. Tau physics results from SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Daoudi, M.; SLD Collaboration

    1996-08-10

    Results on {tau} physics at SLD are presented. They are based on 4,316 {tau}-pair events selected from a 150 k Z{sup 0} data sample collected at the SLC. These results include measurements of the {tau} lifetime ({tau}{sub r} = 288.1 {+-} 6.1 {+-} 3.3 fs), the {tau} Michel parameters ({rho} = 0.71 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04, {zeta} = 1.03 {+-} 0.36 {+-} 0.05, and {zeta}{delta} = 0.84 {+-} 0.27 {+-} 0.05), and the {tau} neutrino helicity (h{sub {nu}} = {minus}0.81 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.03).

  6. MC-1 Nozzle Testing Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Warren; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This document is the presentation graphics which reviews the test results of the MC-1 Nozzle. The MC-1 Nozzle was originally designed for a low cost engine for an expendable booster. It was modified for use in the X-34 propulsion plant. With this design the nozzle and chamber are one piece. The presentation reviews the design goals, the materials and fabrication. The tests and results are reviewed in considerable detail. Included are pictures of the nozzle, and diagrams of the nozzle geometry

  7. Supersymmetry results at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Manca, Giulia; /Liverpool U.

    2005-05-01

    The Run II physics programme of the Tevatron is proceeding with more than 300 pb{sup -1} of analysis quality data, collected at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Searches for supersymmetric particles are starting to set new limits, improving over the LEP and Run I results and exploring new regions of parameter space. They present recent results in Supersymmetry with the upgraded CDF and D0 detectors and give some prospects for the future of these searches.

  8. Results from Numerical General Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    For several years numerical simulations have been revealing the details of general relativity's predictions for the dynamical interactions of merging black holes. I will review what has been learned of the rich phenomenology of these mergers and the resulting gravitational wave signatures. These wave forms provide a potentially observable record of the powerful astronomical events, a central target of gravitational wave astronomy. Asymmetric radiation can produce a thrust on the system which may accelerate the single black hole resulting from the merger to high relative velocity.

  9. The NEOWISE Project: Recent Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R.; McMillan, R. S.; Wright, E.; Spahr, T.

    2011-10-01

    The NEOWISE enhancement to the Wide-field Infrared Explorer (WISE) mission has resulted in detections of more than 157,000 minor planets in thermal infrared wavelength, representing an increase in the number of objects observed of nearly two orders of magnitude over the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS).[1,2] The survey encompasses near-Earth objects, comets, main belt asteroids, Hildas, Trojans, Centaurs and scattered-disk objects. We will summarize the scientific results of the survey to date, focusing on the combination of available visible and nearinfrared ancillary data with NEOWISE as well as studies of near-Earth objects.

  10. CDF experimental results on diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.

    2009-04-01

    Experimental results on diffraction from the Fermilab Tevatron collider obtained by the CDF experiment are reviewed and compared. We report on the diffractive structure function obtained from dijet production in the range 0 < Q{sup 2} < 10,000 GeV{sup 2}, and on the |t| distribution in the region 0 < |t| < 1 GeV{sup 2} for both soft and hard diffractive events up to Q{sup 2} {approx} 4,500 GeV{sup 2}. Results on single diffractive W/Z production, forward jets, and central exclusive production of both dijets and diphotons are also presented.

  11. CDF results on electroweak physics

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, H.J.; CDF Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    The second major run of the {bar p}p Fermilab Tevatron collider has just ended on June 1. The CDF detector has accumulated almost five times the data sample of its previous 1988--1989 run. We present new results on the ratio of W to Z boson production cross-sections and on the charge asymmetry in W decay. We give a progress report on the measurement of the W mass. New results from the 1988--1989 data on Drell-Yan production and on W {gamma} production are also presented.

  12. Higher Education Counts: Achieving Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Department of Higher Education (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    This brochure highlights some of the performance indicators used by Connecticut's public higher education institution to demonstrate accountability. This paper reports on the results of these goals: (1) Student Learning; (2) Learning in K-12; (3) Access and Affordability; (4) Economic Development; (5) Societal Needs; and (6) Resource Efficiency.

  13. State Test Results Are Predictable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tienken, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Out-of-school, community demographic and family-level variables have an important influence on student achievement as measured by large-scale standardized tests. Studies described here demonstrated that about half of the test score is accounted for by variables outside the control of teachers and school administrators. The results from these

  14. Recent results from DORIS II

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report contains a brief review of recent results from the ARGUS and Crystal Ball experiments at DORIS II, concentrating on UPSILON(1S) and UPSILON(2S) spectroscopy with a short foray into ..gamma gamma.. physics. 18 refs., 10 figs.

  15. ADDITIONAL BRAHMAN TENDERNESS RESEARCH RESULTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the second of two articles that summarizes recent research related to Brahman beef palatability. A progeny test of 27 Brahman bulls was conducted in the late 1990s at Brooksville. This project resulted in collection of carcass grading data and tenderness measurements from 724 purebred Brah...

  16. The Planck Mission: Early Results

    SciTech Connect

    Marco Bersanelli

    2012-03-07

    The ESA Planck space mission, launched on May 14, 2009, is dedicated to high precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the first light of the universe, both in temperature and polarization. The satellite observes the full sky from a far-Earth orbit with two cryogenic instruments in the 30-850 GHz range at the focal plane of a 1.5-meter telescope. The primary objective of Planck is to measure with unprecedented precision the key cosmological parameters and to provide accurate tests of physics in the early universe. Planck has recently completed the fifth full-sky survey. The data analysis is underway. The first cosmology results are expected in early 2013 while a number of astrophysical results have been recently delivered to the community, including galactic and extragalactic astrophysics and a rich catalogue of radio and infrared sources. These results demonstrate the excellent in-orbit performance of the instruments and give excellent prospects for the forthcoming cosmological results.

  17. Direct photon results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    CDF Collaboration

    1993-08-01

    Results using isolated direct photons measured with the CDF detector during the 1992--1993 run of the Fermilab Tevatron are presented. Photon detection and background subtraction are described. Measurement of the inclusive photon cross section as well as photon-jet cross sections are discussed and compared to next-to-leading order QCD predictions.

  18. Converting Engagement Results into Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinzie, Jillian; Pennipede, Barbara S.

    2009-01-01

    Assessment information should be actionable in that findings must be used to improve the student experience and educational effectiveness. Assessment is a worthwhile undertaking when campuses generate meaningful data, thoroughly consider and discuss evidence-based improvement initiatives, and ultimately use results to improve educational

  19. Results of Computer Based Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    This report compares the projected savings of using computer based training to conduct training for newly hired pilots to the results of that application. New Hire training, one of a number of programs conducted continuously at the United Airline Flight Operations Training Center, is designed to assure that any newly hired pilot will be able to…

  20. Recent Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Demorden, L.

    1998-06-01

    We review recent results from fixed-target and collider experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron. Among the topics discussed are jet production rates, {alpha}{sub S} measurements, the {anti d}/{anti u} ratio in the proton sea, diffraction, heavy quark physics and leptoquark searches.

  1. EO framing flight test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lareau, Andre G.

    1995-09-01

    Recon/Optical, Inc. (ROI) has pioneered the electro-optical (E-O) framing generation of sensors with the CA-260, a KS-87 form/fit camera with a wafer-scale focal plane array (FPA) containing a patented, on-chip, forward motion compensation (FMC) architecture. The technology has now matured to the state where production E-O framing cameras are form/fit replacing their former film counterparts. During this interim production phase, flight demonstrations and tests are continuing to prove that E-O framing produces high-quality imagery, is robust to various platforms and mission tactics, interoperable with existing and planned C3I architectures, affordable and available, and meets the war-fighters needs. This paper discusses flight test results of the CA-260 E-O framing sensor flown in the F-14A TARPS during September 1994. This demonstration provided some unique imagery permitting a comparison of low-light level, in-flight FMC-on versus FMC-off performance. A first-level comparison of the resulting imagery based upon predicted FMC performance and post- processing numerical analysis is presented. The results indicae that the patented FMC architecture performed as predicted, and that for low-light conditions resulting in limited SNR images, on-chip FMC can provide a significant image quality improvement over post- processing alternatives.

  2. First results from SAGE II

    SciTech Connect

    Aburashitov, J.N.; Faizov, E.L.; Gavrin, V.N.; Gusev, A.O.; Kalikhov, A.V.; Knodel, T.V.; Knyshenko, I.I.; Kornoukhov, V.N.; Mirmov, I.N.; Pshukov, A.M.; Shalagin, A.M.; Shikhin, A.A.; Timofeyev, P.V.; Veretenkin, E.P.; Vermul, V.M.; Zatsepin, G.T.; Bowles, T.J.; Nico, J.S.; Teasdale, W.A.; Wark, D.L.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Cleveland, B.T.; Daily, T.; Davis, R. Jr.; Lande, K.; Lee, C.K.; Wildenhain, P.W.; Elliott, S.R.; Cherry, M.L.

    1995-07-10

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first five runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 76{sup +21}{sub {minus}18}(stat){sup +5}{sub {minus}7}(sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result, the capture rate is 74{sup +13}{sub {minus}12}(stat){sup +5}{sub {minus}7}(sys) SNU. This represents only 56%--60% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  3. Seeds in space experiment results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Jim A.

    1991-01-01

    Two million seeds of 120 different varieties representing 106 species, 97 genera, and 55 plant families were flown aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The seeds were housed on the space exposed experiment developed for students (SEEDS) tray in sealed canister number six and in two small vented canisters. The tray was in the F-2 position. The seeds were germinated and the germination rates and development of the resulting plants compared to the control seed that stayed in Park Seed's seed storage facility. The initial results are presented. There was a better survival rate in the sealed canister in space than in the storage facility at Park Seed. At least some of the seeds in each of the vented canisters survived the exposure to vacuum for almost six years. The number of observed apparent mutations was very low.

  4. Planck 2015 results and inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, Franois R.

    2015-12-01

    The Planck mission prime objective was a very accurate and complete measurement of the temperature anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Cosmological results from the intensity data of the nominal mission of a duration of 15 months were disclosed on 21 March 2013. Fortunately, the satellite kept acquiring data for at least twice longer, and we announced in February 2015 new results based on all the data acquired, both in temperature and polarization. I provide a short overview of the latest data and findings of most interest for inflation, as a basis for the other contributions to this volume. This overview is entirely based on the published or submitted works of the Planck collaboration. xml:lang="fr"

  5. Overview of Results from MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, G.

    2004-11-01

    We present results from the diverse MAST experimental programme. Features include transport analysis of discharges with edge or internal transport barriers, and high confinement discharges, with and without ITBs, under counter-current NBI. H mode studies are extended to include confinement measurements for submission to the ITER database, as well as controlled experiments on the L/H transition to cast light on the transition process. An important aspect of exhaust studies on MAST is the measurement and control of transient and steady-state power loads, and ELMs are analysed in terms of both their dynamic structure and their impact on the first wall. During 2003-4 MAST has undergone significant enhancement including new divertors to handle increased NBI power and pulse length, error field correction coils to extend the operating space towards lower density and q, a new CXRS system and a new HFS gas injection system. Early results exploiting these new facilities are also presented.

  6. Hercules Aerospace flywheel test results

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, R.S. Jr.; Babelay, E.F. Jr.; Sutton, B.J.

    1981-06-01

    The detailed results of the spin test evaluation of the Hercules Aerospace flywheel at the Oak Ridge Flywheel Evaluation Laboratory (ORFEL) are presented. Details of the static evaluation with radiography and measures of weight, inertia, and natural frequencies are included. The flywheel was spun four times with the maximum speed being increased with each run. During the final run, the flywheel achieved 372 rps and stored 0.714 kWhr of kinetic energy at 37 Whr/kg. The ultimate speed was limited by a composite transverse strength that was somewhat lower than that used in the design of the flywheel. This resulted in internal cracking of the flywheel and, eventually, the loss of material from the outer circumference.

  7. Hercules Aerospace flywheel test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, R. S., Jr.; Babelay, E. F., Jr.; Sutton, B. J.

    1981-06-01

    The detailed results of the spin test evaluation of the Hercules Aerospace flywheel at the Oak Ridge Flywheel Evaluation Laboratory (ORFEL) are presented. Details of the static evaluation with radiography and measures of weight, inertia and natural frequencies are included. The flywheel was spun four times with the maximum speed being increased with each run. During the final run, the flywheel achieved 372 rps and stored 0.714 kWhr of kinetic energy at 37 Whr/kg. The ultimate speed was limited by a composite transverse strength that was somewhat lower than that used in the design of the flywheel. This resulted in internal cracking of the flywheel and, eventually, the loss of material from the outer circumference.

  8. Airborne laser topographic mapping results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.; Collins, J. G.; Link, L. E.; Swift, R. N.; Butler, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of terrain mapping experiments utilizing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) over forested areas are presented. The flight tests were conducted as part of a joint NASA/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (CE) investigation aimed at evaluating the potential of an airborne laser ranging system to provide cross-sectional topographic data on flood plains that are difficult and expensive to survey using conventional techniques. The data described in this paper were obtained in the Wolf River Basin located near Memphis, TN. Results from surveys conducted under winter 'leaves off' and summer 'leaves on' conditions, aspects of day and night operation, and data obtained from decidous and coniferous tree types are compared. Data processing techniques are reviewed. Conclusions relative to accuracy and present limitations of the AOL, and airborne lidar systems in general, to terrain mapping over forested areas are discussed.

  9. New charm results from FOCUS

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, Stefano; /Frascati

    2004-12-01

    New results from the photoproduction experiment FOCUS are reported: Dalitz plot analysis, semileptonic form factor ratios and excited meson spectroscopy. The author reports on three new results from the photoproduction experiment FOCUS: the first Dalitz plot analysis of charm meson decays using the K-matrix approach[ 1], new measurements of the D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {delta}(1020) {mu}{sup +}{nu} form factor ratios [2], and new measurements on L=1 excited meson spectroscopy [3], i.e., precise measurements of the masses and widths of the D*{sub 2}{sup +} and D*{sub 2}{sup 0} mesons, and evidence for broad states decaying to D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} (the first such evidence in D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}). The data for this paper were collected in the Wideband photoproduction experiment FOCUS during the Fermilab 1996-1997 fixed-target run.

  10. Forget about data, deliver results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Roland

    2015-12-01

    High-energy astrophysics space missions have pioneered and demonstrated the power of legacy data sets for generating new discoveries, especially when analysed in ways original researchers could not have anticipated. The only way to ensure that the data of present observatories can be effectively used in the future is to allow users to perform on-the-fly data analysis to produce straightforwardly scientific results for any sky position, time and energy intervals without requiring mission specific software or detailed instrumental knowledge. Providing a straightforward interface to complex data and data analysis makes the data and the process of generating science results available to the public and higher education and promotes the visibility of the investment in science to the society. This is a fundamental step to transmit the values of science and to evolve towards a knowledge society.

  11. Optical Telescope Design Study Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, J.; Sankar, S.

    2015-05-01

    We report on the results of a study conducted from Nov 2012-Apr 2013 to develop a telescope design for a space-based gravitational wave detector. The telescope is needed for efficient power delivery but since it is directly in the beam path, the design is driven by the requirements for the overall displacement sensitivity of the gravitational wave observatory. Two requirements in particular, optical pathlength stability and scattered light performance, are beyond the usual specifications for good image quality encountered in traditional telescopic systems. An important element of the study was to tap industrial expertise to develop an optimized design that can be reliably manufactured. Key engineering and design trade-offs and the sometimes surprising results will be presented.

  12. Gas company diversification: mixed results

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhardt, D.A.; Brown, M.L.

    1985-05-02

    The authors follow 21 diversified gas companies, defined as: companies that derive at least 30% but less than 90% of their operating revenues from natural gas distribution. They present 12-month (1984) results here of the three most successful and the three least successful of these companies. Most of the major diversification of these six companies were into energy-related areas, yet there was a wide difference in results. The least diversified, AlaTeen Resources, was successful by sticking to the basic business of selling gas, especially to industrial customers. NICOR, even with nonutility operations accounting for only 16% of revenues, experienced substantial losses from this phase. Risk, and certainly the potential for loss, accompanies diversification into nonutility areas - along with potential for greater reward.

  13. ATLAS physics results (not Higgs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidberg, A. R.

    2015-05-01

    These proceedings give a review of some of the non-Higgs physics results from ATLAS. The topics covered include Standard Model, exotics and SUSY. Rather than summarizing the very large number of results available in these areas, a few analyses are picked out to emphasize some important common themes for LHC physics. The first theme is the importance of good experimental resolution to maximize the sensitivity to new physics. As all new Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) physics will suffer from Standard Model backgrounds, a very good understanding of SM processes is also essential. The other two general themes that will be discussed are the choice of optimized variables and the use of data-driven background estimates.

  14. Top physics results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Gervasio; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2005-05-01

    The top quark is by far the most massive fundamental particle observed so far, and the study of its properties is interesting for several reasons ranging from its possible special role in electroweak symmetry breaking to its sensitivity to physics beyond the Standard Model. They present recent top physics results from CDF based on 160-320 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The t{bar t} cross section and the top mass have been measured in different decay channels and using different methods. they have searched for evidence of single top production, setting upper limits on its production rate. Other results shown in this conference include studies of the polarization of W bosons from top decays, a search for charged Higgs decaying from top, and a search for additional heavy t' quarks.

  15. Cassini Imaging Results at Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEwen, A.; Turtle, E.; Perry J.; Fussner, S.; Porco, C.; West, R.; Johnson, T.; Collins, G.; DelGenio, T.; Barbara, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) images show striking albedo markings on the surface of Titan. In equatorial regions the albedo patterns have high contrast and exhibit prominent lineaments and linear/angular boundaries suggestive of tectonic influences or fracturing of brittle surficial materials. There are intriguing dark curving lines near the south pole. Here we present several working hypotheses to explain these patterns. We also briefly summarize atmospheric science results.

  16. Physics results from polarized DIS.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, G. P.

    1998-03-23

    We have extracted polarized nucleon distributions from recent data at CERN, SLAC and DESY. The flavor-dependent valence and sea quark spin distributions are determined for each experiment. We take into account possible differences in the up and down sea distributions, and assume that the strange sea contribution is suppressed by mass effects. Physics results determined from different experiments are compared, including higher order corrections.

  17. Results from the B Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Bevan, A.; /Queen Mary, U. of London

    2009-01-08

    These proceedings are based on lectures given at the Helmholtz International Summer School Heavy Quark Physics at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Dubna, Russia, during August 2008. I review the current status of CP violation in B meson decays from the B factories. These results can be used, along with measurements of the sides of the Unitarity Triangle, to test the CKM mechanism. In addition I discuss experimental studies of B decays to final states with 'spin-one' particles.

  18. Recent results in strangeonium spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; D'Amore, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Endorf, R.; Fujii, K.; Hayashii, H.; Iwata, S.

    1988-10-01

    Data from exclusive s/bar s/ meson final states are shown. The data were obtained in a 4.1 ev/nb exposure of K/sup -/p interactions at 11 GeV/c in the LASS spectrometer at SLAC. The results from the analyses of these data is presented and the spectrum of strangeonium states is discussed. 8 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Direct photon results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, B.; CDF Collaboration

    1993-06-01

    Results using photons measured with the CDF detector during the 1992--93 run of the Fermilab Tevatron are presented. Photon detection and background suppression are described. Measurement of the inclusive photon cross section as well as photon-jet cross sections are discussed and compared to next-to-leading order QCD predictions. The search for excited quarks using the photon-jet mass distribution is described and a limit is derived.

  20. Electroweak results from D0

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.; D0 Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    Preliminary results from D0 are presented on properties of the W{sup {plus_minus}} and Z{sup 0} electroweak gauge bosons, using final states containing electrons and muons. In particular, preliminary measurements of the W{sup {plus_minus}} and Z{sup 0} production cross sections with decay into final states containing electrons are shown and a status report on the determination of M{sub w}/M{sub z} is given.

  1. Open cherry picker simulation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The simulation program associated with a key piece of support equipment to be used to service satellites directly from the Shuttle is assessed. The Open Cherry Picker (OCP) is a manned platform mounted at the end of the remote manipulator system (RMS) and is used to enhance extra vehicular activities (EVA). The results of simulations performed on the Grumman Large Amplitude Space Simulator (LASS) and at the JSC Water Immersion Facility are summarized.

  2. SPQR -- Spectroscopy: Prospects, Questions & Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, Michael R.

    2014-06-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in mapping out the spectrum of hadrons over the past decade with plans to make further advances in the decade ahead. Baryons and mesons, both expected and unexpected, have been found, the results of precision experiments often with polarized beams, polarized targets and sometimes polarization of the final states. All these hadrons generate poles in the complex energy plane that are consequences of strong coupling QCD. They reveal how this works.

  3. Preliminary Result from Anita Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Jiwoo; Gorham, P. W.; Barwick, S. W.; Beatty, J. J.; Besson, D. Z.; Binns, W. R.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J. M.; Connolly, A.; Dowkontt, P. F.; Duvernois, M. A.; Field, R. C.; Goldstein, D. J.; Goodhue, A.; Hast, C.; Hebert, C. L.; Hoover, S.; Israel, M. H.; Javaid, A.; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J. G.; Liewer, K. M.; Link, J. T.; Lusczek, E.; Matsuno, S.; Mercurio, B. C.; Miki, C.; Mio?inovi?, P.; Naudet, C. J.; Ng, J.; Nichol, R. J.; Palladino, K. J.; Reil, K.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Rosen, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Seckel, D.; Varner, G. S.; Walz, D.; Wu, F.

    The ANITA (ANtarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna) experiment is a balloon-borne neutrino telescope which consists of an array of 32 broad-band horn antennas. It successfully completed a 35 day flight over Antarctica during the 2006-2007 austral summer. The primary goal of ANITA is to search for astrophysical neutrinos with energies E > 1019eV by detecting radio Cherenkov signals from neutrino induced showers in the Antarctic ice. We present preliminary results from ongoing analyses of ANITA data.

  4. Heavy Flavour results from Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Borissov, G.; /Lancaster U.

    2012-06-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments finalize the analysis of their full statistics collected in the p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper presents several new results on the properties of hadrons containing heavy b- and c-quarks obtained by both collaborations. These results include the search for the rare decays B{sup 0}, B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} (CDF), the study of CP asymmetry in B{sub s} {yields} J{psi}{phi} decay (CDF, D0), the measurement of the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry (D0), the measurement of CP asymmetry in D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays (CDF), and the new measurement of the B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} branching fraction (CDF). Both experiments still expect to produce more results on the properties of heavy flavours.

  5. Recent results for Mark III

    SciTech Connect

    Brient, J.C.

    1987-12-01

    This paper presents recent results from the Mark III detector at SPEAR, in the open charm sector. The first topic discussed is the reanalysis of the direct measurement of the D hadronic branching fractions, where a detailed study has been made of the Cabibbo suppressed and multi-..pi../sup 0/'s D decays backgrounds in the double tag sample. Next, the Dalitz plot analysis of the D decays to K..pi pi.. is presented, leading to the relative fractions of three-body versus pseudoscalarvector decays. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Results from the HARP Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Catanesi, M. G.

    2008-02-21

    Hadron production is a key ingredient in many aspects of {nu} physics. Precise prediction of atmospheric {nu} fluxes, characterization of accelerator {nu} beams, quantification of {pi} production and capture for {nu}-factory designs, all of these would profit from hadron production measurements. HARP at the CERN PS was the first hadron production experiment designed on purpose to match all these requirements. It combines a large, full phase space acceptance with low systematic errors and high statistics. HARP was operated in the range from 3 GeV to 15 GeV. We briefly describe here the most recent results.

  7. RSG Deployment Case Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Owsley, Stanley L.; Dodson, Michael G.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Seim, Thomas A.; Alexander, David L.; Hawthorne, Woodrow T.

    2005-09-01

    The RSG deployment case design is centered on taking the RSG system and producing a transport case that houses the RSG in a safe and controlled manner for transport. The transport case was driven by two conflicting constraints, first that the case be as light as possible, and second that it meet a stringent list of Military Specified requirements. The design team worked to extract every bit of weight from the design while striving to meet the rigorous Mil-Spec constraints. In the end compromises were made primarily on the specification side to control the overall weight of the transport case. This report outlines the case testing results.

  8. Adrenal autoimmunity: results and developments.

    PubMed

    Peterson, P; Uibo, R; Krohn, K J

    2000-09-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (autoimmune adrenalitis) often occurs in autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndromes APS1 (APECED) and APS2. Although the genetic background and etiology of the two syndromes is remarkably different, they both result in a similar autoimmune destruction of the adrenal cortex. Recently, the defective gene in APS1, AIRE (autoimmune regulator) was identified, whereas in APS2, the major genetic factor remains to be found in the human major histocompatibility complex haplotype (HLA) region. In addition to the genetic factors, the recent findings in genetics and immunity leading to the pathogenesis of adrenal autoimmunity in polyendocrinopathy syndromes are discussed. PMID:10920386

  9. Macular changes resulting from papilloedema.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, A T; Sanders, M D

    1980-01-01

    Six cases are presented with macular changes in association with papilloedema; 4 suffered permanent visual loss. The present paper emphasises this previously infrequent finding and discusses the haemodynamic and mechanical factors responsible. The macular changes consisted of haemorrhages situated in front, within, or behind the retina, and occasionally the results of neovascular membrane formation produced secondary visual loss. Changes in the pigment epithelium were seen in 3 cases associated with choroidal folds. Macular stars rarely produce visual loss. Recognition of these changes is important in the assessment of the visual loss in papilloedema. Images PMID:7387954

  10. Some Recent Results with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Maurik Holtrop

    2010-10-01

    The CLAS is a multipurpose, large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, instrumented with detector systems sensitive to charged and neutral particles. The experimental program at CLAS is aimed at furthering our understanding of hadronic and nuclear physics, through electron and photon scattering experiments, which cover a large range of topics, including meson and baryon spectroscopy, nucleon structure through elastic and deep inelastic scattering, nuclear transparency, nuclear correlations and nuclear structure. This talk will briefly describe the detector and the collaboration that uses it and will highlight some recent results.

  11. Electroweak results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1995-10-01

    Results from the CDF and D{O} experiments are presented on properties of the W{plus_minus} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons using final states containing electrons and muons based on large integrated luminosities. In particular, measurements of the W{plus_minus} and Z{sup 0} production cross sections, the W-charge asymmetry and the CDF measurement of the W-mass are summarized. Gauge boson self interactions axe measured by studying di-gauge boson production and limits on anomalous gauge boson couplings axe discussed.

  12. Data bases for LDEF results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohnhoff-Hlavacek, Gail

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) carried 57 experiments and 10,000 specimens for some 200 LDEF experiment investigators. The external surface of LDEF had a large variety of materials exposed to the space environment which were tested preflight, during flight, and post flight. Thermal blankets, optical materials, thermal control paints, aluminum, and composites are among the materials flown. The investigations have produced an abundance of analysis results. One of the responsibilities of the Boeing Support Contract, Materials and Systems Special Investigation Group, is to collate and compile that information into an organized fashion. The databases developed at Boeing to accomplish this task is described.

  13. Recent results from MAUS payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, G. H.; Staniek, S.

    1987-01-01

    Project MAUS is a part of the German material sciences program and provides autonomous payloads for the Space Shuttle. These payloads are housed in canisters which are identical with those of NASA's Get-Away-Special program. The main components of the hardware are: a standard system consisting of power supply, experiment control, data acquisition and the experiment modules containing experiment specific hardware. Up to now, three MAUS modules with experiments from the area of material sciences have been flown as GAS payloads. Results will be reported from GAS Payload Number G-27 and G-28 flown aboard STS-51G.

  14. Lightcurve Results for Eleven Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartrelle, Gordon M.

    2012-04-01

    Differential photometry techniques were used to develop lightcurves, rotation periods and amplitudes for eleven main-belt asteroids: 833 Monica, 962 Aslog, 1020 Arcadia, 1082 Pirola, 1097 Vicia, 1122 Lugduna, 1145 Robelmonte, 1253 Frisia, 1256 Normannia, 1525 Savolinna, and 2324 Janice. Ground-based observations from Badlands Observatory (BLO) in Quinn, SD, as well as the University of North Dakota Observatory (UND) in Grand Forks, ND, provided the data for the project. A search of the asteroid lightcurve database (LCDB) did not reveal any previously reported results for seven of the eleven targets in this study.

  15. Mammographic mass classification: initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velthuizen, Robert P.; Gangadharan, Deepak

    2000-06-01

    Mammography is recognized as an important means to reduce breast cancer mortality. However, its accuracy is limited, both in sensitivity (some cancers are missed) and specificity (many non-cancer cases are referred for invasive procedures). It has been shown that computer classification of expert radiologist's findings can improve the specificity of mammography. Our project is aimed at automatically extracting measurements by computer analysis of digital mammograms, so as to provide automatic inputs for a benign/malignant classifier. We tested classification of radiological findings and found an area under the ROC curve of 0.95, comparable to what has been reported in the literature. Image measurements were taken from manual segmentations of lesions as well as from two different automatic segmentations. We found that segmentation using a fuzzy clustering method with some post-processing gives results comparable to results on manual outlines with a positive predictive value of 73%. The fuzzy clustering strategy has the potential to provide fully automatic classifications comparable to those based on expert radiological findings. This approach may dramatically reduce the false alarm rate currently seen in screening mammography.

  16. [Assessment of bariatric surgery results].

    PubMed

    Barros, Lvia Moreira; Frota, Natasha Marques; Moreira, Rosa Aparecida Nogueira; de Arajo, Thiago Moura; Caetano, Joselany fio

    2015-03-01

    The objective was to evaluate the results of bariatric surgery in patients in the late postoperative period using the Bariatric Analysis and Reporting Outcome System (BAROS). This cross-sectional study was conducted from November 2011 to June 2012 at a hospital in the state of Cear, Brazil. Data were collected from 92 patients using the BAROS protocol, which analyzes weight loss, improved comorbidities, complications, reoperations and Quality of Life (QoL). Data were analysed using the chi-squared test, Fischer's exact test and the Mann-Whitney test. There was a reduction in the Body Mass Index (47.26.8 kg/m2 in the pre-operatory and 31.35.0 kg/m2 after surgery, p<0.001). The comorbidity with the highest resolution was arterial hypertension (p<0.001), and QV improved in 94.6% of patients. The main complications were hair loss, incisional hernia and cholelithiasis. The surgery provided satisfactory weight loss and improvements in the comorbidities associated to a better QL. Use of the BAROS protocol allows nurses to plan interventions and maintain the good results. PMID:26098798

  17. Results from the FDIRC prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, D. A.; Arnaud, N.; Dey, B.; Borsato, M.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Nishimura, K.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Varner, G.; Va'vra, J.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC). This detector was designed as a prototype of the particle identification system for the SuperB experiment, and comprises 1/12 of the SuperB barrel azimuthal coverage with partial electronics implementation. The prototype was tested in the SLAC Cosmic Ray Telescope (CRT) which provides 3-D muon tracking with an angular resolution of ~1.5 mrad, track position resolution of 5-6 mm, start time resolution of 70 ps, and a muon low-energy cutoff of ~2 GeV provided by an iron range stack. The quartz focusing photon camera couples to a full-size BaBar DIRC bar box and is read out by 12 Hamamatsu H8500 MaPMTs providing 768 pixels. We used IRS2 waveform digitizing electronics to read out the MaPMTs. We present several results from our on-going development activities that demonstrate that the new optics design works very well, including: (a) single photon Cherenkov angle resolutions with and without chromatic corrections, (b) S/N ratio between the Cherenkov peak and background, which consists primarily of ambiguities in possible photon paths to a given pixel, (c) dTOP=TOPmeasured-TOPexpected resolutions, and (d) performance of the detector in the presence of high-rate backgrounds. We also describe data analysis methods and point out limits of the present performance.

  18. TMX-U experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T.C.; Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.; Clauser, J.F.; Clower, C.A.; Coensgen, F.H.; Correll, D.L.; Cummins, W.F.; Damm, C.C.; Failor, B.H.

    1983-08-31

    This paper describes results from the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U). Mirror-confined electrons with 30 to 70 keV mean energy densities of 0.5 to 2.0 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/ and average betas of 3 to 5% are produced using electron-cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH). These results are consistent with an electron Fokker-Planck code. Improved ion-cyclotron microstability is observed using neutral beam injection at 47/sup 0/ to the magnetic axis, rather than at 90/sup 0/ as in the previous experiment, TMX. Strong end plugging has been produced using a combination of ECRH gyrotrons with sloshing-ion beam injection. In these low-density central cell experiments (3 x 10/sup 11/ cm/sup -3/) the axial losses (tau/sub parallel/ = 20 to 80 ms) are smaller than the nonambipolar radial losses (tau/sub perpendicular/ = 4 to 8 ms). Plugging has been achieved with a central cell density double that of the end plugs. Although no direct measurements are yet available to determine if a thermal barrier potential dip is generated, these experiments support many theoretical features of the thermal barrier concept.

  19. Space expectations: Latest survey results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitt, David; Swan, Cathy; Swan, Peter; Woods, Arthur

    2010-11-01

    At the 59th IAC in Glasgow, a paper was presented describing two studies being carried out by Commission VI of the International Academy of Astronautics on the impact of space activities upon society. One of these studies sought to discover the hopes, aspirations and expectations of those outside the space field - the person in the street - regarding space activities. The paper reviewed the thought processes and decisions leading up to the commencement of the survey, documented the reasoning behind the questions which the public were; described the efforts to translate the questionnaire into the six Unesco languages to achieve wider participation, and provided an overview of results to date. This present paper provides an update on this Space Expectations survey as the study comes to a close. The paper briefly discusses the addition of new languages for the questionnaire and the drive to make the survey better known and encourage participation worldwide, before going on to provide a detailed analysis of the latest results of opinions. Insights include respondent's thoughts regarding the visions and costs of space activities, how much people feel part of them and whether and how they would like to be more involved.

  20. Results of the ACCESS experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Watson, Judith J.

    1987-01-01

    All basic EVA space construction tasks included in the experiment were accomplished on-orbit successfully, and the construction task time shows good correlation with neutral buoyancy data. However, the flight assembly times were slightly longer than the best times obtained in the water tank. This result was attributed by the EVA astronauts to the new, tighter tolerance truss hardware used on-orbit as opposed to the well-worn training hardware used in the neutral buoyancy and was, thus, not a space related phenomenon. The baseline experiment demonstrated that erectable structure can be assembled effectively by astronauts in EVA. The success of ACCESS confirmed the feasibility of EVA space assembly of erectable trusses and played a role in the decision to baseline the Space Station as a 5 meter erectable structure.

  1. Results from HRS at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) has been collecting data at PEP since the end of 1981 and has now accumulated 120 pb/sup -1/ of integrated luminosity. The results of analyses are presented in the following areas: (1) QED and electroweak tests, (2) scalar electron search, (3) inclusive hadron production, (4) D/sup 0/, D/sup +/ and D* production, and studies of quark fragmentation. Only the 20 pb/sup -1/ of integrated luminosity obtained during our first year of running has been completely analyzed and this provides the data sample for most of the above topics. For others a preliminary analysis of a total sample of 80 pb/sup -1/ is reported. 20 references.

  2. Research Results and Information Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Research Results Monsoon behavior balanced by glaciers Research Discovers Frequent Mutations of Chromatin Significant Progress in Water Photochemistry Research Structural signature in amorphous alloy formation and plastic deformation The neural basis of Drosophila larval light/darkness preference Important roles of brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase and ceramide metabolism in leptin hypothalamic control of feeding Integrin activation and internalization on soft ECM as a mechanism of induction of stem cell differentiation by ECM elasticity Determination of electron pairing symmetry of iron-based superconductor FeSe Long-Range Topological Order in Metallic Glass Information Update List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and CNRS in 2011 List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and ESRC in 2011 List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and RS in 2011 List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and RSE in 2011 Funding of Major Program Projects in 2010 Funding of Key Program Projects in 2010

  3. Results from KASCADE-Grande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertaina, M.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Bekk, K.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Buchholz, P.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; Di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Ghia, P. L.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Klages, H. O.; Link, K.; Łuczak, P.; Ludwig, M.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Melissas, M.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Over, S.; Palmieri, N.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schröder, F. G.; Sima, O.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.

    2012-11-01

    The KASCADE-Grande experiment, located at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany) is a multi-component extensive air-shower experiment devoted to the study of cosmic rays and their interactions at primary energies 1014-1018 eV. Main goals of the experiment are the measurement of the all-particle energy spectrum and mass composition in the 1016-1018 eV range by sampling charged (Nch) and muon (Nμ) components of the air shower. The method to derive the energy spectrum and its uncertainties, as well as the implications of the obtained result, is discussed. An overview of the analyses performed by KASCADE-Grande to derive the mass composition of the measured high-energy comic rays is presented as well.

  4. Airfreight forecasting methodology and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A series of econometric behavioral equations was developed to explain and forecast the evolution of airfreight traffic demand for the total U.S. domestic airfreight system, the total U.S. international airfreight system, and the total scheduled international cargo traffic carried by the top 44 foreign airlines. The basic explanatory variables used in these macromodels were the real gross national products of the countries involved and a measure of relative transportation costs. The results of the econometric analysis reveal that the models explain more than 99 percent of the historical evolution of freight traffic. The long term traffic forecasts generated with these models are based on scenarios of the likely economic outlook in the United States and 31 major foreign countries.

  5. Gravitational microlensing searches and results

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C.

    1997-05-08

    Baryonic matter, in the form of Machos (MAssive Compact Halo Objects), might be a significant constituent of the dark matter that dominates the Milky Way. This article describes how surveys for Machos exploit the gravitational microlens magnification of extragalactic stars. The experimental searches for this effect monitor millions of stars, in some cases every night, looking for magnification events. The early results of these surveys indicate that Machos make up a significant fraction of the dark matter in the Milky Way, and that these objects have stellar masses. Truly substellar objects do not contribute much to the total. Additionally, the relatively high event rate towards the Galactic bulge seems to require that the bulge be elongated, and massive.

  6. Cryogenic Brush Seal Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Walker, James F.

    1996-01-01

    Brush seals are compliant, contact seals that have long-life, low-leakage characteristics desirable for use in rocket engine turbopumps. 50.8-mm (2.0 inch) diameter brush seals with a nominal initial radial interference of 0.127-mm (0.005 inch) were tested in liquid nitrogen at shaft speeds up to 35,000 rpm and differential pressure loads up to 1.21 MPa (175 psi) per brush. The measured leakage rate of a single brush was 2-3 times less than that measured for a 12-tooth, 0.127-mm (0.005 inch) radial clearance labyrinth seal used as a baseline. Stage effects were studied and it was found that two brush seals with a large separation distance leaked less than two brushes tightly packed together. The maximum measured groove depth on the Inconel 718 rotor was 25.4 (mu)m (0.001 inch) after 4.31 hours of shaft rotation. The Haynes-25 bristles wore approximately 25.4-76.2 (mu)m (0.001-0.003 inch) under the same conditions. Three seal runner coatings, chromium carbide, Teflon impregnated chromium, and zirconium oxide, were tested in liquid hydrogen at 35,000 and 65,000 rpm with separate 50.8 mm diameter brush seals made of Haynes-25 bristles and having a nominal initial radial interference of 129 rpm. Two bare Inconel-718 rotors were also tested as a baseline. The test results revealed significant differences between the wear characteristics of the uncoated and coated seal runners. At both speeds the brush seal with the bare Inconel-718 seal runner exhibited significant bristle wear with excessive material transferring to the runner surface. In contrast, the coated seal runners inhibited the transfer and deposit of bristle material. The chromium carbide coating showed only small quantities of bristle material transferring to its surface. The Teflon impregnated chromium coating also inhibited material transfer and provided some lubrication. This coating, however, is self-sacrificing. The Teflon remained present on the low speed runner, but it was completely removed from the high speed brush seal, which was tested considerably longer. The tests of the Teflon coating revealed the importance of using a lubricating and low friction coating for brush seals to reduce bristle and seal runner wear. The zirconium oxide coating exhibited the greatest amount of coating wear, while the brushes incurred only slight wear. Further testing of ceramics is recommended before making a final judgement on the viability of ceramic coatings for brush seals because of the contrast between the results reported by Carlile and the results presented herein. Strictly based on the results presented hereinabove, the chromium carbide and Teflon impregnated chromium coatings were considered preferable to the uncoated Inconel-718 and zirconium oxide coatings because of their good wear resistance and characteristics to inhibit bristle material wear and transfer to the seal runner.

  7. Recent results from telescope array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Masaki

    2015-08-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) is an experiment to observe Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs). TA's recent results, the energy spectrum and anisotropy based on the 6-year surface array data, and the primary composition obtained from the shower maximum (XMAX) are reported. The spectrum demonstrates a clear dip and cutoff. The shape of the spectrum is well described by the energy loss of extra-galactic protons interacting with the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Above the cutoff, a medium-scale (20? radius) flux enhancement was observed near the Ursa-Major. A chance probability of creating this hotspot from the isotropic flux is 4.0 ?. The measured ?XMAX? is consistent with the primary being proton or light nuclei for energies 1018.2 eV-1019.2 eV.

  8. Current MINOS Neutrino Oscillation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Habig, Alec; /Minnesota U., Duluth

    2009-07-01

    The MINOS experiment is now making precise measurements of the {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance oscillations seen in atmospheric neutrinos, tests possible disappearance to sterile {nu} by measuring the neutral current flux, and has extended our reach towards the so far unseen {theta}{sub 13} by looking for {nu}{sub e} appearance in the {nu}{sub {mu}} beam. It does so by using the intense, well-understood NuMI neutrino beam created at Fermilab and observing it 735km away at the Soudan Mine in Northeast Minnesota. High-statistics studies of the neutrino interactions themselves and the cosmic rays seen by the MINOS detectors have also been made. Results from MINOS first three years of operations will be presented.

  9. Recent ? Lepton Results from BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusiani, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    We report recent measurements on ? leptons obtained by the BABAR collaboration using the entire recorded sample of electron-positron collisions at and around the ?(4S) (about 470fb-1). The events were recorded at the PEP-II asymmetric collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The measurements include high multiplicity ? decay branching fractions with 3 or 5 charged particles in the final state, a search for the second class current the ? decay ? ? ????, ? branching fractions into final states containing two KS mesons, ? - -> h- KS 0 KS 0 (? 0) ? ? , with h = ?, K, and preliminary measurements of hadronic spectra of ? decays with three hadrons (?- ? h-h+h-?? decays, where h = ?, K). The results improve the experimental knowledge of the ? lepton properties and can be used to improve the precision tests of the Standard Model.

  10. Monsoon '90 - Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Guerra, Abel G.

    1992-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  11. Monsoon 1990: Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob J.; Dubois, Pascale; Guerra, Abel

    1991-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  12. Initial Blackbeard power survey results

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.; Devenport, J.; Holden, D.

    1996-06-01

    The Blackbeard broadband VHF radio receiver is in low-earth orbit aboard the ALEXIS satellite. The receiver has been used to measure the transmitted power in four VHF bands (55.2-75.8, 28.0-94.8, 132.3-152.2, and 107.7-166.0 MHz) over quiet and noisy parts of the earth. The authors present the results of the survey and discuss their implications. They find that there are remote ocean areas over which the observed spectrum is largely free of man-made interference, but that the spectrum over most of the earth is dominated by broadcast VHF signals. The signal characteristics observed over a given area are quite constant when observed at different times of day and at intervals of several weeks to months. It appears that in many cases the bulk of the signal power is coming from a small number of sources.

  13. Data Assimilation Results from PLASMON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Lichtenberger, J.; Duffy, J.; Friedel, R. H.; Clilverd, M.; Heilig, B.; Vellante, M.; Manninen, J. K.; Raita, T.; Rodger, C. J.; Collier, A.; Reda, J.; Holzworth, R. H.; Ober, D. M.; Boudouridis, A.; Zesta, E.; Chi, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    VLF and magnetometer observations can be used to remotely sense the plasmasphere. VLF whistler waves can be used to measure the electron density and magnetic Field Line Resonance (FLR) measurements can be used to measure the mass density. In principle it is then possible to remotely map the plasmasphere with a network of ground-based stations which are also less expensive and more permanent than satellites. The PLASMON project, funded by the EU FP-7 program, is in the process of doing just this. A large number of ground-based observations will be input into a data assimilative framework which models the plasmasphere structure and dynamics. The data assimilation framework combines the Ensemble Kalman Filter with the Dynamic Global Core Plasma Model. In this presentation we will describe the plasmasphere model, the data assimilation approach that we have taken, PLASMON data and data assimilation results for specific events.

  14. SMART-1 Payload First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, B. H.; SMART-1 Science Technology Working Team

    We present first results from SMART-1's science and technology payload, with a total mass of some 19 kg, featuring many innovative instruments and advanced technologies. A miniaturised high-resolution camera (AMIE) for lunar surface imaging, a near-infrared point-spectrometer (SIR) for lunar mineralogy investigation, and a very compact X-ray spectrometer (D-CIXS) with a new type of detector and micro-collimator which will provide fluorescence spectroscopy and imagery of the Moon's surface elemental composition. The payload also includes an experiment (KaTE) aimed at demonstrating deep-space telemetry and telecommand communications in the X and Ka-bands, a radio-science experiment (RSIS), a deep space optical link (Laser-Link Experiment), using the ESA Optical Ground station in Tenerife, and the validation of a system of autonomous navigation (OBAN) based on image processing. SMART-1 lunar science investigations include studies of the chemical composition of the Moon, of geophysical processes (volcanism, tectonics, cratering, erosion, deposition of ices and volatiles) for comparative planetology, and high resolution studies in preparation for future steps of lunar exploration. The mission could address several topics such as the accretional processes that led to the formation of rocky planets, and the origin and evolution of the Earth-Moon system. The SMART-1 observations will be coordinated with Japanese missions Lunar-A and SELENE, to answer open questions about comparative planetology, the origin of the Earth --Moon system, the early evolution of life, the planetary environment and the existence of in-situ resources necessary to support human presence (e.g. water, oxygen). With their science and technology results, these missions can be considered as preparatory missions for future robotic and human exploration of the solar system.

  15. TFTR D-T results

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, D.M.

    1995-03-01

    Temperatures, densities and confinement of deuterium plasmas confined in tokamaks have been achieved within the last decade that are approaching those required for a D-T reactor. As a result, the unique phenomena present in a D-T reactor plasma can now be studied in the laboratory. Recent experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been the first magnetic fusion experiments to study plasmas with reactor fuel concentrations of tritium. The injection of {approximately} 20 MW of tritium and 14 MW of deuterium neutral beams into the TFTR produced a plasma with a T/D density ratio of {approximately} 1 and yielded a maximum fusion power of {approximately} 9.2 MW. The fusion power density in the core of the plasma was {approximately} 1.8 MW m{sup {minus}3} approximating that expected in a D-T fusion reactor. A TFTR plasma with T/D density ratio of {approximately} 1 was found to have {approximately} 20% higher energy confinement time than a comparable D plasma, indicating a confinement scaling with average ion mass, A, of {tau}{sub E} {approximately} A{sup 0.6}. The core ion temperature increased from 30 keV to 37 keV due to a 35% improvement of ion thermal conductivity. Using the electron thermal conductivity from a comparable deuterium plasma, about 50% of the electron temperature increase from 9 keV to 10.6 keV can be attributed to electron heating by the alpha particles. The {approx} 5% loss of alpha particles was consistent with classical first orbit loss without anomalous effects. Initial measurements have been made of the confined energetic alphas and the resultant alpha ash density.

  16. Huygens GCMS Results from Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, Hasso B.; Demick, Jaime; Kasprzak, Wayne; Atreya, Sushil; Owen, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    The Huygens Probe executed a successful entry, descent and impact on the Saturnian moon of Titan on January 14, 2005. The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) instrument conducted isotopic and compositional measurements throughout the two and one half hour descent from 146 km altitude, and on the surface for 69 minutes until loss of signal from the orbiting Cassini spacecraft. The GCMS incorporated a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system. The gas sampling system provided continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns, a chemical scrubber and a hydrocarbon enrichment cell. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and to evaporate volatiles from the surface after impact. Data products from the GCMS included altitude profiles of the major atmospheric constituents dinitrogen (N2) and methane (CH4), isotope ratios of 14N/15N, 12C/13C, and D/H, mole fractions of radiogenic argon (40Ar) and primordial argon (36Ar), and upper limits on the mole fractions of neon, krypton and xenon, which were found to be absent. Surface measurements confirmed the presence of ethane (C2H6) and cyanogen (C2N2). Later data products expanded atmospheric profiles to include the surface response of C2N2. C2H6, acetylene (C2H2), and carbon dioxide (CO2). More recent results include the profiles of benzene (C6H6) and molecular hydrogen (H2). The GCMS data are being further analyzed to obtain higher precision results and to identify other trace species ion the atmosphere and evaporating from the surface.

  17. Comparative Soot Diagnostics: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.; Griffin, DeVon W.; Gard, Melissa Y.

    1997-01-01

    The motivation for the Comparative Soot Diagnostics (CSD) experiment lies in the broad practical importance of understanding combustion generated particulate. Depending upon the circumstances, particulate matter can affect the durability and performance of combustion equipment, can be a pollutant, can be used to detect fires and, in the form of soot, can be the dominant source of radiant energy from flames. The nonbuoyant structure of most flames of practical interest makes understanding of soot processes in low gravity flames important to our ability to predict fire behavior on earth. These studies also have direct applications to fire safety in human-crew spacecraft, since smoke is the indicator used for automated detection in current spacecraft. In the earliest missions (Mercury, Gemini and Apollo), the crew quarters were so cramped that it was considered reasonable that the astronauts would rapidly detect any fire. The Skylab module, however, included approximately 20 UV-sensing fire detectors. The Space Shuttle has 9 particle-ionization smoke detectors in the mid-deck and flight deck and Spacelab has six additional particle-ionization smoke detectors. The designated detectors for the ISS are laser-diode, forward-scattering, smoke or particulate detectors. Current plans for the ISS call for two detectors in the open area of the module, and detectors in racks that have both cooling air flow and electrical power. Due to the complete absence of data concerning the nature of particulate and radiant emission from incipient and fully developed low-g fires, all three of these detector systems were designed based upon l-g test data and experience. As planned mission durations and complexity increase and the volume of spacecraft increases, the need for and importance of effective, crew-independent, fire detection grows significantly. To provide this level of protection, more knowledge is needed concerning low-gravity fire phenomena and, in particular, how they might be detected and suppressed. Prior to CSD, no combustion-generated particulate samples had been collected near the flame zone for well-developed microgravity flames. All of the extant data either came from drop tower tests and therefore only corresponded to the early stages of a fire or were collected far from the flame zone. The fuel sources in the drop tower tests were restricted to laminar gas-jet diffusion flames and very rapidly overheated wire insulation. The gas-jet tests indicated, through thermophoretic sampling, (2) that soot primaries and aggregates (groups of primary particles) in low-gravity may be significantly larger than those in normal gravity (1-g). This raises new scientific questions about soot processes as well as practical issues for particulate size sensitivity and detection alarm threshold levels used in on-orbit smoke detectors. Preliminary tests in the 2.2 second drop tower suggest that particulate generated by overheated wire insulation may be larger in low-g than in 1-g. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) grids downstream of the fire region in the Wire Insulation Flammability experiment as well as visual observation of long string-like aggregates, further confirm this suggestion. The combined impact of these limited results and theoretical predictions is that, as opposed to extrapolation from l-g data, direct knowledge of low-g combustion particulate is needed for more confident design of smoke detectors for spacecraft. This paper describes the operation and preliminary results of the CSD, a project conceived and developed at NASA Lewis Research Center. The CSD flight experiment was conducted in the Middeck Glovebox Facility (MGBX) on USMP-3. The project is support by NASA Headquarters Microgravity Science and Applications Division and Code Q. The results presented here are from the microgravity portion of the experiment, including the temporal response of the detectors and average sizes of the primary and aggregate particles captured on the thermophoretic probes.

  18. CC Cryostat Cooldown Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.; /Fermilab

    1987-10-16

    A cooldown of the inner vessel of the Central Calorimeter cryostat to 77K was performed during the week of October 12 in order to 'cold shock' it, i.e., to check for insulating vacuum integrity with the inner vessel cold. The conclusion from our test results is that the vessel withstood the cold shock, and the insulating vacuum remained good. Cooldown was analyzed by J.D. Fuerst in D0 note 3740.000-EN-107, dated August 19. Warmup was analyzed by T. Peterson and B.Fitzpatrick in D0 Engineering Note 3740.214-EN-110, dated September 29. Both cooldown and warmup times were in accordance with predictions. An initial pumpdown of the insulating vacuum space was done with the vessel warm on October 9. The results of that pumpdown are shown in Figure 1 superimposed on a predicted pumpdown curve generated by Brian Fitzpatrick before the test began. After 24 hours the insulating vacuum was 7 microns. After 48 and 72 hours it was 2-3 microns. At this point (October 12) valving the pumps off resulted in a rise of 6 microns in 3 hours and 20 minutes, or 1.8 microns per hour. Before beginning cooldown, the pumps were valved off and the insulating vacuum was 15 microns. Cooldown and fill began at 0900 on Tuesday, October 13. At 1650, about 8 hours later, LN{sub 2} flow to the cryostat was shut off. A total of 2600 gallons was consumed during this period based on my readings of the trailer liquid level gauge and chart. An additional 500 gallons was used (according to the same liquid level gauge) in the final blowdown of pressure in the trailer, bringing the total to 3100 gallons. Based on weight in and weight out, 21980 pounds of LN{sub 2} was used, or 3273 gallons of liquid. This is good enough agreement with my readings of the gauge that I will use the 2600 gallon number as our usage in the cryostat; therefore, the average flow rate for 8 hours was 325 gallons per hour or 5.42 gallons per minute. At the end we had 1600 gallons of stored liquid in the cryostat, so 1000 gallons were consumed in cooling it down. At this time with the pumps still valved off the insulating vacuum was 13 microns. The vacuum had improved slightly while the pumps had been valved out for the entire time; no cold leakage was observed. Over the next 64 hours while draining and warmup were completed the pumps remained valved out and the vacuum rose to 170 microns, a rate of 2.5 microns per hour, not significantly different from the 1.8 microns per hour before the cooldown test. Except for the period of time when the drain was plugged with ice, the rate of warmup agreed very well with predicted rate. Figure 2 shows the warmup of 4 resistors in the gas space and one on the top of the inner vessel in the vacuum space. The insulating vacuum remained good during the cold shock, and the rate of rise after cold shock was similar to that before. The rate of warmup was in good agreement with predictions, indicating that predicted heat transfer coefficents inside the vessel were reasonably accurate (within 50% of actual).

  19. RESULTS OF SUPPLEMENTAL MST STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T; David Hobbs, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-07-24

    The current design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) includes an auxiliary facility, the Actinide Finishing Facility, which provides a second contact of monosodium titanate (MST) to remove soluble actinides and strontium from waste if needed. This treatment will occur after cesium removal by Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). Although the process changes and safety basis implications have not yet been analyzed, provisions also exist to recover the MST from this operation and return to the initial actinide removal step in the SWPF for an additional (third) contact with fresh waste. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) request identified the need to study the following issues involving this application of MST: Determine the effect of organics from the solvent extraction (CSSX) process on radionuclide sorption by MST; Determine the efficiency of re-using MST for multiple contacts; and Examine fissile loading on MST under conditions using a waste containing significantly elevated concentrations of plutonium, uranium, neptunium, and strontium. This report describes the results of three experimental studies conducted to address these needs: (1) Addition of high concentrations of entrained CSSX solvent had no noticeable effect, over a two week period, on the sorption of the actinides and strontium by MST in a direct comparison experiment. (2) Test results show that MST still retains appreciable capacity after being used once. For instance, reused MST--in the presence of entrained solvent--continued to sorb actinides and strontium. (3) A single batch of MST was used to sequentially contact five volumes of a simulant solution containing elevated concentrations of the radionuclides of interest. After the five contacts, we measured the following solution actinide loadings on the MST: plutonium: 0.884 {+-} 0.00539 wt % or (1.02 {+-} 0.0112) E+04 {micro}g/g MST, uranium: 12.1 {+-} 0.786 wt % or (1.40 {+-} 0.104) E+05 {micro}g/g MST, and neptunium: 0.426 {+-} 0.00406 wt % or (4.92 {+-} 0.0923) E+03 {micro}g/g MST. (4) Over the duration of an experiment with the sequential strikes, the ability of MST to sorb actinides improved with additional strikes. This trend is counter-intuitive, but is confirmed by replicate experiments for plutonium, uranium, and neptunium. Conversely, over the duration of the experiment, the ability of MST to sorb strontium decreased the more it was used. This trend is confirmed by replicate experiment.

  20. Results of Deposition Scoping Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.Z.

    2003-03-04

    The processes of crystallization and solid deposit formation that led to the shutdown of the 2H evaporator operation at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and that could possibly cause similar problems in the future or in other evaporators need to be better understood. Through experimentation, thermodynamic modeling, and correlation of scaling to historical tank farm operations, progress has been made in developing guidelines as to the concentrations of silicon and aluminum that can be processed by evaporators while avoiding unacceptable levels of scale formation. However, because of limitations of the thermodynamic model and an insufficient amount of operational data at slightly supersaturated concentration levels, uncertainty still exists regarding acceptable feed concentrations. The objective of this effort is to provide information that can be used in defining acceptable levels of silicon and aluminum in evaporator feed solutions. Data collected previously showed that particle formation reactions can be rapid at evaporator temperatures for elevated silicon and aluminum concentrations. However, insufficient data exists to estimate the silicon and aluminum concentrations above which solids will form in the time frame of evaporator processing. The work described in this report was designed to determine the induction period for solutions of decreasing aluminum and silicon concentration such that the supersaturation level corresponding to a 4-h induction time for particle nucleation/growth in bulk solution can be estimated. In addition, experiments were conducted to explore the supersaturation levels that can result in deposition of solids on metal surfaces at varying aluminum-to-silicon concentration ratios. Laboratory studies of particle growth in solution were conducted at relatively low supersaturation levels. Dynamic-light-scattering (DLS) studies and deposition tests, similar to those performed in FY 2001, were conducted with solutions at relatively low supersaturation levels and at elevated temperatures to explore the formation of solids under conditions similar to those encountered in evaporator processing. The deposition of solids on stainless steel samples placed in the solutions during the experiments was simultaneously investigated. In addition, the deposition of solids on stainless steel surfaces was investigated in laboratory-scale batch evaporation experiments. Completion of this effort will aid the development of operating strategies to mitigate or avoid solid scale formation on surfaces in evaporator systems. The results are expected to benefit plant operations by helping to determine acceptable silicon and aluminum feed concentrations.

  1. TFTR D-T results

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    Temperatures, densities and confinement of deuterium plasmas confined in tokamaks have been achieved within the last decade that are approaching those required for a D-T reactor. As a result, the unique phenomena present in a D-T reactor plasma (D-T plasma confinement, alpha confinement, alpha heating and possible alpha driven instabilities) can now be studied in the laboratory. Recent experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been the first magnetic fusion experiments to study plasmas with reactor fuel concentrations of tritium. The injection of {approximately} 20 MW of tritium and 14 MW of deuterium neutral beams into the TFTR produced a plasma with a T/D density ratio of {approximately}1 and yielded a maximum fusion power of {approximately} 9.2 MW. The fusion power density in the core of the plasma was {approximately} 1.8 MW m{sup {minus}3} approximating that expected in a D-T fusion reactor. A TFTR plasma with T/D density ratio of {approximately} 1 was found to have {approximately} 20% higher energy confinement time than a comparable D plasma, indicating a confinement scaling with average ion mass, A, of {tau}{sub E} {approximately} A{sup 0.6}. The core ion temperature increased from 30 keV to 37 keV due to a 35% improvement of ion thermal conductivity. Using the electron thermal conductivity from a comparable deuterium plasma, about 50% of the electron temperature increase from 9 keV to 10.6 keV can be attributed to electron heating by the alpha particles. The {approx} 5% loss of alpha particles, as observed on detectors near the bottom edge of the plasma, was consistent with classical first orbit loss without anomalous effects. Initial measurements have been made of the confined energetic alphas and the resultant alpha ash density. At fusion power levels of 7.5 MW, fluctuations at the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode frequency were observed by the fluctuation diagnostics. However, no additional alpha loss due to the fluctuations was observed.

  2. Bell Canyon test and results

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, C.L.; Hunter, T.O.

    1980-01-01

    The purposes of the Borehold Plugging Program are: to identify issues associated with sealing boreholes and shafts; to establish a data base from which to assess the importance of these issues; and to develop sealing criteria, materials, and demonstrative test for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Bell Canyon Test described in this report is one part of that program. Its purpose was to evaluate, in situ, the state of the art in borehole plugs and to identify and resolve problems encountered in evaluating a typical plug installation in anhydrite. The test results are summarized from the work of Peterson and Christensen and divided into two portions: system integrity and wellbore characterization tests prior to plug installation, and a series of tests to evaluate isolation characteristics of the 1.8-m-long plug. Conclusions of the Bell Canyon Test are: brine and fresh-water grouts, with acceptable physical properties in the fluid and hardened states, have been developed; the field data, taken together with laboratory data, suggest that the predominant flow into the test region occurs through the cement plug/borehold interface region, with lesser contributions occurring through the wellbore damage zone, the plug core, and the surrounding undisturbed anhydrite bed; and the 1.8-m-long by 20-cm-diameter grout plug, installed in anhydrite at a depth of 1370 m in the AEC-7 borehole, limits flow from the high pressure Bell Canyon aquifer to 0.6 liters/day.

  3. ALOHA Cabled Observatory: Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, B. M.; Lukas, R.; Duennebier, F. K.

    2011-12-01

    The ALOHA Cabled Observatory (ACO) was installed 6 June 2011, extending power, network communications and timing to a seafloor node and instruments at 4726 m water depth 100 km north of Oahu. The system was installed using ROV Jason operated from the R/V Kilo Moana. Station ALOHA is the field site of the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) program that has investigated temporal dynamics in biology, physics, and chemistry since 1988. HOT conducts near monthly ship-based sampling and makes continuous observations from moored instruments to document and study climate and ecosystem variability over semi-diurnal to decadal time scales. The cabled observatory system will provide the infrastructure for continuous, interactive ocean sampling enabling new measurements as well as a new mode of ocean observing that integrates ship and cabled observations. The ACO is a prototypical example of a deep observatory system that uses a retired first-generation fiber-optic telecommunications cable. Sensors provide live video, sound from local and distant sources, and measure currents, pressure, temperature, and salinity. Preliminary results will be presented and discussed.

  4. Chromotomographic imager field demonstration results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Daniel C.; Bostick, Randy; Hawks, Michael R.; Swenson, Eric D.; Black, Jonathan T.; Cobb, Richard G.; Perram, Glen P.

    2010-04-01

    A field deployable hyperspectral imager utilizing chromotomography (CT), with a direct vision prism (DVP) as the dispersive element, has been constructed at the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT). A "shift and add" reconstruction algorithm was used to resolve spectral and spatial content of the collected data. The AFIT instrument is currently the fastest known imaging DVP based hyperspectral CT instrument of its type and is a prototype for a space-based system. The imager captured images at rates up to 900 frames per second (fps) and acquired data cube information in 55 ms, during testing. This instrument has the ability to capture spatial and spectral data of static and transient scenes. During testing, the imager captured spectral data of a rapidly evolving scene (a firecracker detonation) lasting approximately 0.12 s. Spectral results included potassium and sodium emission lines present during the explosion and an absorption feature as the fireball extinguishes. Spatial and spectral reconstruction of a scene in which an explosion occurs during the middle of the collection period is also presented in this paper. The instrument is capable of acquiring data required to identify, classify and characterize transient battlespace events, such as explosions.

  5. First Results from SHIP Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bagryansky, P.A.

    2005-01-15

    At present, the GDT facility is being upgraded. The first stage of the upgrade is the Synthesised Hot Ion Plasmoid (SHIP) experiment. It aims, on the one hand, at the investigation of plasmas which are expected to appear in the region of high neutron production in a GDT based fusion neutron source proposed by the Budker Institute and, on the other hand, at the investigation of plasmas the parameters of which have never been achieved before in axisymmetric magnetic mirrors.The experiment is performed in a small mirror section which is installed at the end of one side of GDT. The magnetic field on axis is in the range of 0.5-2.0 Tesla and the mirror ratio is 1.2-1.4. The mirror is filled with background plasma streaming in from the central cell. This plasma component is maxwellised and has an electron temperature of about 100 eV. Two neutral beam injectors perpendicularly inject a total current of about 50 Atom Amperes of deuterium neutrals with an energy of 20 keV as a pulse with a duration of about 1 ms. Ionisation of the beams generates the high-energy ion component. The device has been equipped with several diagnostic methods which are successfully used in GDT experiments.The paper presents first results of plasma parameter measurements in SHIP experiment.

  6. SuperORRUBA Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, A. J.; Ahn, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Kozub, R. L.; Pain, S. D.

    2012-10-01

    Transfer reactions in inverse kinematics with radioactive ion beams are needed to provide nuclear structure information far from stability to aid in the development of nuclear models and in the understanding of astrophysical processes. Highly granular, low threshold detector arrays are needed to perform such experiments. The SuperORRUBA (Oak Ridge Rutgers University Barrel Array) was created to measure lower threshold reactions with better energy resolution than the original ORRUBA detectors. The new array consists of 18 silicon detectors, each with a 64 non-resistive strip front side and a 4 non-resistive strip back side. To collect the data from these 1224 channels, the ASICs (Application-Specific Integrated Circuits) are used for timing, triggering, shaping, and digitizing the signals, with each chip handling 32 channels. Utilizing the ASICs system and a triple-alpha source, SuperORRUBA detectors were tested to ensure proper function. In addition, all preamps and ASICs elements were tested. The depletion voltage of each detector was found, and the detectors were tested for any shift in gain over time. Finally, issues with crosstalk causing poor resolution on particular channels were investigated. A detailed description of the system and the test results will be presented.

  7. First photometry results from Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    An overview of the Gaia Photometric Processing is presented. The Gaia photometry consists of the white light (330-1050 nm) G-band, and low resolution spectrophotometry realized by two prisms dispersing all the light entering the field of view. One disperser - called BP for Blue Photometer- operates in the wavelength range 330-680 nm; the other - called RP for Red Photometer - covers the wavelength range 640-1050 nm. The light collected by BP and RP can also be integrated into two broad bands, G_BP and G_RP.This photometric data reduction is based on the overall principle of a self-calibrating system improved by iteration. The input data includes flux (G, G_BP, G_RP) and the low-resolution spectral data. The calibration models and algorithms used are described. Initial validation results are shown which indicate the photometric quality of the preliminary calibrated data. Expectations for the quality of the photometric data to be included in the first public data release (mid-2016) are discussed.

  8. New Results on Cosmic Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Paul R.; Iliev, I. T.; Mellema, G.; Ahn, K.; Mao, Y.; Koda, J.; Pen, U.

    2012-01-01

    When the first starts began to form in the LCDM universe at high redshift, they released ionizing and dissociating UV radiation into their surroundings which influenced the formation of other stars and galaxies, near and far, and left an observable imprint on the first billion years of cosmic evolution. The theory and simulation of this process depend upon combining elements of cosmological structure formation on scales large and small with radiative transfer, gas and gravitational dynamics. Results will be presented of our latest large-scale simulations of reionization and its observable signatures, including fluctuations in the cosmic 21cm, near-IR and microwave backgrounds. We have now simulated reionization using our C2RAY method to trace the ionizing and dissociating UV radiation from the millions of galactic halo sources, through the underlying intergalactic density field, computed with our CUBEP3M N-body code with as many as 165 billion particles, in comoving volumes that range from 30 to 600 Mpc on a side. This work is supported by NSF, NASA, and the U.Texas TACC.

  9. FlareLab: early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltwisch, H.; Kempkes, P.; Mackel, F.; Stein, H.; Tenfelde, J.; Arnold, L.; Dreher, J.; Grauer, R.

    2010-12-01

    The FlareLab experiment at Bochum University has been constructed to generate and investigate plasma-filled magnetic flux tubes similar to arch-shaped solar prominences, which often result in coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In its first version, the device has been used to reproduce and extend previous studies of Bellan et al (1998 Phys. Plasmas 5 1991). Here the plasma source consists of two electrodes, which can be connected to a 1.0 kJ capacitor bank, and of a horseshoe magnet, which provides an arch-shaped guiding field. The discharge is ignited in a cloud of hydrogen gas that has been puffed into the space above the electrodes. In the first few microseconds the plasma current rises at a rate of several kA s-1, causing the plasma column to pinch along the guiding B-field and to form an expanding loop structure. The observed dynamics of the magnetic flux tubes is analysed by means of three-dimensional MHD simulations in order to determine the influence of parameters like the initial magnetic field geometry on magnetic stability. At present, FlareLab is redesigned to mimic a model that was proposed by Titov and Dmoulin (1999 Astron. Astrophys. 351 707) to investigate twisted magnetic configurations in solar flares.

  10. Results from Long Baseline Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messier, Mark

    2015-04-01

    The discovery of neutrino mass in 1998 spawned a world-wide effort to better understand neutrino properties using neutrinos from the Sun, the atmosphere, reactors, and from accelerators. Neutrino experiments based at the world's accelerators have been an important component of this program as the proton accelerators provide a nearly pure beam of muon neutrinos at selected energies with which to study neutrino oscillations of muon flavor to other flavors. The underlying structure of the neutrino masses and mixings are revealed through the study of the frequency and amplitude of the flavor oscillations. The smallness of the neutrino mass splittings (~= 0 . 05 eV) means that phase differences between the mass eigenstates accumulate very slowly requiring these experiments to be conducted over great distances ranging from 250 km to 810 km separation between source and detector. Currently there are three long-baseline experiments underway, T2K at the J-PARC facility in Japan, and MINOS+ and NOvA underway at Fermilab in the United States. In this talk, I will review the fundamental physics probed by these experiments, how the experimental setups probe this physics, and summarize the recent results with a particular emphasis on the newest experiment, NOvA.

  11. EUPORIAS: plans and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buontempo, C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in our understanding and ability to forecast climate variability have meant that skilful predictions are beginning to be routinely made on seasonal to decadal (s2d) timescales. Such forecasts have the potential to be of great value to a wide range of decision-making, where outcomes are strongly influenced by variations in the climate. In 2012 the European Commission funded EUPORIAS, a four year long project to develop prototype end-to-end climate impact prediction services operating on a seasonal to decadal timescale, and assess their value in informing decision-making. EUPORIAS commenced on 1 November 2012, coordinated by the UK Met Office leading a consortium of 24 organisations representing world-class European climate research and climate service centres, expertise in impacts assessments and seasonal predictions, two United Nations agencies, specialists in new media, and commercial companies in climate-vulnerable sectors such as energy, water and tourism. The poster describes the setup of the project, its main outcome and some of the very preliminary results.

  12. Recent results from E665

    SciTech Connect

    Kotwal, A.V.; E665 Collaboration

    1994-09-01

    Preliminary measurements of the structure functions F{sub 2}{sup p} and F{sub 2}{sup d} and the structure function ratio F{sub 2}{sup n}/F{sub 2}{sup p}, in inelastic {mu}N scattering are presented. Preliminary results on nuclear transparency ({sigma}{sup A}/A)/{sigma}{sup H} in incoherent exclusive {rho} production are also presented. The data were obtained by Fermilab experiment 665 using a 465 GeV muon beam and liquid hydrogen, deuterium and carbon, calcium and lead targets. The structure functions are measured in the range x{sub Bj} > 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} and Q{sup 2} > 0.2 GeV{sup 2}. The structure function ratio is presented as a function of x{sub Bj} for x{sub Bj} > 10{sup {minus}6}. The nuclear transparency in exclusive {rho} production is studied as a function of Q{sup 2} in the range 0.1 < Q{sup 2} < 10.0 GeV{sup 2}.

  13. Cosmic radioactivity and INTEGRAL results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Gamma-ray lines from radioactive decay of unstable isotopes co-produced by nucleosynthesis in massive stars and supernova have been measured since more than thirty years. Over the past ten years, INTEGRAL complemented the first sky survey made by COMPTEL. The 26A1 isotope with 1 My decay time had been first direct proof of currently-ongoing nucleosynthesis in our Galaxy. This has now become a tool to study the My history of specific source regions, such as massive-star groups and associations in nearby regions which can be discriminated from the galactic-plane background, and the inner Galaxy, where Doppler shifted lines add to the astronomical information about bar and spiral structure. Recent findings suggest that superbubbles show a remarkable asymmetry, on average, in the spiral arms of our galaxy. 60Fe is co-produced by the sources of 26A1, and the isotopic ratio from their nucleosynthesis encodes stellar-structure information. Annihilation gamma-rays from positrons in interstellar space show a puzzling bright and extended source region central to our Galaxy, but also may be partly related to nucleosynthesis. 56Ni and 44Ti isotope gamma-rays have been used to constrain supernova explosion mechanisms. Here we report latest results using the accumulated multi-year database of INTEGRAL observations, and discuss their astrophysical interpretations, connecting to other traces of cosmic radioactivity and to other cosmic messengers.

  14. Experimental results on evaporation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grana Otero, Jose; Parra Fabian, Ignacio

    2010-11-01

    A liquid contained in a vertical glass tube is suddenly depressurized from a high initial pressure down to one for which the stable state is vapour, so vaporization sets off at the free surface. For large enough evaporation rates, the planar vapour-liquid interface is Darrieus-Landau unstable [1], leading to the interface surface rippling close to the instability threshold. Further increasing the initial to final pressure ratio brings about evaporation waves [2,3], in which a highly corrugated front propagates downwards into the liquid. A new experimental method is presented as well as some experimental results obtained by tracking the evolution of the front with a high speed camera. In addition, a number of new phenomena related to the dynamics of bubbles growth at the walls has been uncovered. In particular, a new mode of propagation of the evaporation front is found. In this mode the front originates from below the interface, so the propagation is upwards against gravity with a curved but smooth front.[4pt] [1] F. J. Higuera, Phys. Fluids, V. 30, 679 (1987).[0pt] [2] J.E.Shepherd and B.Sturtevant, J.Fluid Mech., V.121,379 (1982).[0pt] [3] P.Reinke and G.Yadigaroglu, Int.J.Multiph. Flow, V.27,1487 (2001).

  15. Results of NSTX Heating Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mueller; M. Ono; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; M. Bitter; C. Bourdelle; D.S. Darrow; P.C. Efthimion; E.D. Fredrickson; D.A Gates; R.J. Goldston; L.R. Grisham; R.J. Hawryluk; K.W. Hill; J.C. Hosea; S.C. Jardin; H. Ji; S.M. Kaye; R. Kaita; H.W. Kugel; D.W. Johnson; B.P. LeBlanc; R. Majeski; E. Mazzucato; S.S. Medley; J.E. Menard; H.K. Park; S.F. Paul; C.K. Phillips; M.H. Redi; A.L. Rosenberg; C.H. Skinner; V.A. Soukhanovskii; B. Stratton; E.J Synakowski; G. Taylor; J.R. Wilson; S.J. Zweben; Y-K.M. Peng; R. Barry; T. Bigelow; C.E. Bush; M. Carter; R. Maingi; M. Menon; P.M. Ryan; D.W. Swain; J. Wilgen; 37 additional authors

    2002-06-18

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton is designed to assess the potential of the low-aspect-ratio spherical torus concept for magnetic plasma confinement. The plasma has been heated by up to 5 MW of neutral beam injection, NBI, at an injection energy of 90 keV and up to 6 MW of high harmonic fast wave, HHFW, at 30 MHz. NSTX has achieved beta T of 32%. A variety of MHD phenomena have been observed to limit eta. NSTX has now begun addressing E scaling, eta limits and current drive issues. During the NBI heating experiments, a broad Ti profile with Ti up to 2 keV, Ti > Te and a large toroidal rotation. Transport analysis suggests that the impurity ions have diffusivities approaching neoclassical. For L-Mode plasmas, E is up to two times the ITER-89P L-Mode scaling and exceeds the ITER-98pby2 H-Mode scaling in some cases. Transitions to H-Mode have been observed which result in an approximate doubling of tE. after the transition in some conditions. During HH FW heating, Te > Ti and Te up to 3.5 keV were observed. Current drive has been studied using coaxial helicity injection (CHI), which has produced 390 kA of toroidal current and HHFW, which has produced H-modes with significant bootstrap current fraction at low Ip, high q and high{sub etap}.

  16. Results from p p colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Huth, J.

    1991-08-01

    Recent results {bar p}p colliders are presented. From elastic scattering experiments at the Tevatron, an average value of {sigma}{sub tot} = 72.1{plus minus}2 mb is reported, along with a new measurement of {rho} = 0.13 {plus minus} 0.7. New measurements of jet direct photon and high p{sub t} W and Z production are compared to more precise, higher order predictions from perturbative QCD. Recently available data on the W mass and width give combined values for M{sub W} = 80.14{plus minus}0.27 GeV/c{sup 2}, and {Gamma}(W) =2. 14 {plus minus} 0.08 GeV. From electroweak radiative corrections and M{sub W}, one finds M{sub top} = 130{plus minus}40 GeV/c{sup 2}, with a 95% C.L. upper limit at 210 GeV/c{sup 2}. Current limits on M{sub top} are presented, along with a review of the prospects for top discovery. From jet data there is no evidence of quark substructure down to the distance scale of 1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}17} cm, nor is there evidence for supersymmetry or heavy gauge bosons at {bar p}p colliders, allowing lower limits on M{sub W}, > 520 GeV/c{sup 2} and M{sub Z} 412 GeV/c{sup 2}. 66 refs., 26 figs.

  17. Improving operations: Metrics to Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faris, Grant B.; Bryant, Larry W.

    2012-01-01

    As a result of the mission failure of the Mars Climate Orbiter (MCO) spacecraft in 1999, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) initiated the development of a Mission Operations Assurance (MOA) program to be implemented across all flight projects managed by JPL. One of the initiatives undertaken in 2001 was the collection of data on command file errors occurring in the operational phase of the mission. This paper defines command file errors and how and where they occur in the operations process. It also describes the problem reporting system (PRS) in use for mission operations at JPL. We examine the recent modifications to the PRS that enable the collection of metrics, specifically on command file errors. This paper discusses what the data show us since metrics have been collected for the operational missions conducted by JPL. We examine the evolution of an operational working group initiative to evaluate proximate, contributing, and root causes for the errors. As part of this discussion we see what the metrics have indicated over a decade. At the macro level, we can say that the aggregate command file error rate has been cut to roughly one third of the initial 2001 level by the end of 2011. Additionally, we explore efficient and innovative means to continually integrate the findings and recommendations from the working group back into the flight operations environment.

  18. Financial review: First quarter results

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    Before extraordinary items and excluding non-recurring items, first quarter investor-owned electric utility earnings per share (EPS) increased 3.9 percent over last year`s first quarter, moving up from $0.51 to $0.53. For the 12 months ending March 31, EPS were $2.13, up 3.6 percent over the previous 12 months. Total electric operating revenues for the quarter rose $2.3 billion in response to cold weather and a strong economy, which pushed sales up 3.3 percent. But total electric operating expenses rose nearly $2.5 billion. Shceduled plant outages, higher medical and pension costs, and one-time charges for workforce reduction programs combined to drive operation and maintenance expenses up 5.7 percent. Severe weather, which boosted electricity demand across the country and, in some areas, prevented acess to fuel supplies, and higher fuel prices resulted ina 6.8 percent in fuel expenses and an 11.4 percent increase in purchased power and net intrechange expenses. And placing one nuclear unit and several combustion turbines in service contributed to a 7.1 percent increase in depreciation and amortization expenses.

  19. Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

    2010-12-17

    Objective The Majorana demonstrator will operate at liquid Nitrogen temperatures to ensure optimal spectrometric performance of its High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector modules. In order to transfer the heat load of the detector module, the Majorana demonstrator requires a cooling system that will maintain a stable liquid nitrogen temperature. This cooling system is required to transport the heat from the detector chamber outside the shield. One approach is to use the two phase liquid-gas equilibrium to ensure constant temperature. This cooling technique is used in a thermosyphon. The thermosyphon can be designed so the vaporization/condensing process transfers heat through the shield while maintaining a stable operating temperature. A prototype of such system has been built at PNNL. This document presents the experimental results of the prototype and evaluates the heat transfer performance of the system. The cool down time, temperature gradient in the thermosyphon, and heat transfer analysis are studied in this document with different heat load applied to the prototype.

  20. Visible Nulling Coronagraph Testbed Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker; Woodruff, Robert; Vasudevan, Gopal; Rizzo, Maxime; Thompson, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) is a NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept study and a proposed NASA Discovery mission to image and characterize extrasolar giant planets in orbits with semi-major axes between 2 and 10 AU. EPIC would provide insights into the physical nature of a variety of planets in other solar systems complimenting radial velocity (RV) and astrometric planet searches. It will detect and characterize the atmospheres of planets identified by radial velocity surveys, determine orbital inclinations and masses, characterize the atmospheres around A and F stars, observed the inner spatial structure and colors of inner Spitzer selected debris disks. EPIC would be launched to heliocentric Earth trailing drift-away orbit, with a 5-year mission lifetime. The starlight suppression approach consists of a visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) that enables starlight suppression in broadband light from 480-960 nm. To demonstrate the VNC approach and advance it's technology readiness we have developed a laboratory VNC and have demonstrated white light nulling. We will discuss our ongoing VNC work and show the latest results from the VNC testbed.

  1. Cosmic radioactivity and INTEGRAL results

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, Roland

    2014-05-02

    Gamma-ray lines from radioactive decay of unstable isotopes co-produced by nucleosynthesis in massive stars and supernova have been measured since more than thirty years. Over the past ten years, INTEGRAL complemented the first sky survey made by COMPTEL. The {sup 26}A1 isotope with 1 My decay time had been first direct proof of currently-ongoing nucleosynthesis in our Galaxy. This has now become a tool to study the ∼My history of specific source regions, such as massive-star groups and associations in nearby regions which can be discriminated from the galactic-plane background, and the inner Galaxy, where Doppler shifted lines add to the astronomical information about bar and spiral structure. Recent findings suggest that superbubbles show a remarkable asymmetry, on average, in the spiral arms of our galaxy. {sup 60}Fe is co-produced by the sources of {sup 26}A1, and the isotopic ratio from their nucleosynthesis encodes stellar-structure information. Annihilation gamma-rays from positrons in interstellar space show a puzzling bright and extended source region central to our Galaxy, but also may be partly related to nucleosynthesis. {sup 56}Ni and {sup 44}Ti isotope gamma-rays have been used to constrain supernova explosion mechanisms. Here we report latest results using the accumulated multi-year database of INTEGRAL observations, and discuss their astrophysical interpretations, connecting to other traces of cosmic radioactivity and to other cosmic messengers.

  2. New archaeointensity results from Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spatharas, V.; Kondopoulou, D.; Eftimiadis, K.; Tsokas, G.

    2003-04-01

    A collection of ceramics, bricks and parts of kilns from Northern Greece with ages ranging from 600 BC to 700 AD have been investigated using the classical Thellier method for archaeointensity determinations. Rock magnetic properties such as Curie temperatures and IRM have been monitored for these samples to identify the magnetic carriers. These archaeointensity data combined with previous results from sites spread all over Greece were used to improve the secular variation curve of the geomagnetic field in Greece for the last 6000 years. An additional analysis of these published archaeointensity data was performed using a weighing factor, which takes into account the number, type and method used for the archaeointensity determination. This allowed thorough comparison of our data with the previously obtained ones. The so combined secular variation curve for Greece shows a maximum of 80 ?? at about 350 BC and a minimum of 60 ?? at about 300 AD. It also shows a decrease of the magnetic moment during the last 2000 years.

  3. Overview of recent HERMES results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marukyan, Hrachya

    2016-02-01

    An overview of more recent and important results from the HERMES experiment are presented in this paper. HERMES collected a wealth of data using the 27.6 GeV polarized HERA lepton beam and various polarized and unpolarized gaseous targets. This unique data set opens the door to the measurements of observables sensitive to the multidimensional structure of the nucleon. Among them are semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering measurements of azimuthal modulations sensitive to the transverse momentum distributions, such as the leading- twist Sivers and Collins distributions and distributions sensitive to the convolutions of the twist-2 and twist-3 functions. They all provide an information on the three-momentum-dependent quark distributions. Knowledge on the quark distribution as a function of longitudinal momentum and transverse position in impact-parameter space can be accessed, e.g., through exclusive ω—meson leptoproduction, particularly through the measurement of spin density matrix elements and the measurement of azimuthal modulations on transversely polarized proton target. The measurement of Bose-Einstein correlations of hadron pairs in quasi-real leptoproduction are also presented. The transverse polarization of Λ hyperons measured again in quasi-real leptoproduction regime are presented as well. Finally, the new analysis for the search on pentaquark at HERMES are mentioned.

  4. Pulmonary Vascular Angioscopy - Current Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shure, Deborah; Buchbinder, Maurice; Peterson, Kirk

    1988-06-01

    We performed angioscopy on 31 patients with suspected chronic pulmonary arterial ob-struction using three prototype angioscopes. The instruments varied in length (80, 90, and 120 cm), outside diameter (3.2 and 4 mm), and distal tip deflection (70, 90, and 180 degrees). All had a distal viewing balloon. Conventional diagnostic studies were performed and decisions about diagnosis and operability were made prior to angioscopy. An independent assessment of diagnosis and operability was then made based on the results of angioscopy. Surgical confirmation was obtained in most cases and clinical or autopsy data were obtained in the remainder. Angioscopy led to a change in the diagnosis of 6 patients (19%). Four of 25 patients with chronic pulmonary emboli were felt to be inoperable based on the angioscopic findings. Two of these 4 underwent surgery and were found to be inoperable. 21 of the remaining 25 patients were felt to have operable disease and 19 underwent surgery. In 14 of these 19 (74%), the conventional studies were either negative or equivocal with respect to operability and the decision to operate was based on angioscopic data. We conclude that good visualization of the central pulmonary arteries can be achieved with the optical balloon technique; that the procedure can be performed safely in patients with severe pulmonary hypertension; and that the information obtained by angioscopy can significantly affect clinical decisions in patients with chronic pulmonary artery obstruction.

  5. CALIPSO Overview and Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, M. P.

    2008-05-01

    The CALIPSO spacecraft was co-manifested with the CloudSat spacecraft and launched by a Boeing Delta~II rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California on April~28,~2006. CALIPSO is the acronym for Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations. CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) is a three-channel lidar on board that uses a Nd:YAG laser emitting pulses at 1064 and 532~nm. The receiver uses a 1-meter diameter telescope and photomultipliers in the two 532~nm channels; one for parallel-polarized backscatter, and the other for perpendicular-polarized backscatter. The 1064~nm channel uses an APD for measuring the total backscatter at this wavelength. CALIPSO is in a near-circular sunsynchronous polar 705-km orbit with a 1:30~PM ascending node, and is flying in formation with CloudSat, Aura, Aqua and PARASOL. CALIPSO and CloudSat are flying 15~seconds apart in the formation. This talk will present an overview of the CALIPSO mission and details of CALIOP and the rest of the payload. It will show typical results from measurements of clouds, details on cirrus cloud statistics for the first year of data, a characterization of Polar Stratospheric Clouds over the Artic and Antarctic during local winters and early springs, and some general atmospheric events like hurricanes and aerosols from minor volcanic eruptions, desert dust events, and smoke from fires and their transport. The presentation will end with a look toward the future of spaceborne lidars.

  6. Recent results in visual servoing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaumette, Franois

    2008-06-01

    Visual servoing techniques consist in using the data provided by a vision sensor in order to control the motions of a dynamic system. Such systems are usually robot arms, mobile robots, aerial robots, but can also be virtual robots for applications in computer animation, or even a virtual camera for applications in computer vision and augmented reality. A large variety of positioning tasks, or mobile target tracking, can be implemented by controlling from one to all the degrees of freedom of the system. Whatever the sensor configuration, which can vary from one on-board camera on the robot end-effector to several free-standing cameras, a set of visual features has to be selected at best from the image measurements available, allowing to control the degrees of freedom desired. A control law has also to be designed so that these visual features reach a desired value, defining a correct realization of the task. With a vision sensor providing 2D measurements, potential visual features are numerous, since as well 2D data (coordinates of feature points in the image, moments, ) as 3D data provided by a localization algorithm exploiting the extracted 2D measurements can be considered. It is also possible to combine 2D and 3D visual features to take the advantages of each approach while avoiding their respective drawbacks. From the selected visual features, the behavior of the system will have particular properties as for stability, robustness with respect to noise or to calibration errors, robot 3D trajectory, etc. The talk will present the main basic aspects of visual servoing, as well as technical advances obtained recently in the field inside the Lagadic group at INRIA/INRISA Rennes. Several application results will be also described.

  7. Corral Monitoring System assessment results

    SciTech Connect

    Filby, E.E.; Haskel, K.J.

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the results of a functional and operational assessment of the Corral Monitoring Systems (CMS), which was designed to detect and document accountable items entering or leaving a monitored site. Its development was motivated by the possibility that multiple sites in the nuclear weapons states of the former Soviet Union might be opened to such monitoring under the provisions of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. The assessment was performed at three levels. One level evaluated how well the planned approach addressed the target application, and which involved tracking sensitive items moving into and around a site being monitored as part of an international treaty or other agreement. The second level examined the overall design and development approach, while the third focused on individual subsystems within the total package. Unfortunately, the system was delivered as disassembled parts and pieces, with very poor documentation. Thus, the assessment was based on fragmentary operating data coupled with an analysis of what documents were provided with the system. The system design seemed to be a reasonable match to the requirements of the target application; however, important questions about site manning and top level administrative control were left unanswered. Four weaknesses in the overall design and development approach were detected: (1) poor configuration control and management, (2) inadequate adherence to a well defined architectural standard, (3) no apparent provision for improving top level error tolerance, and (4) weaknesses in the object oriented programming approach. The individual subsystems were found to offer few features or capabilities that were new or unique, even at the conceptual level. The CMS might possibly have offered a unique combination of features, but this level of integration was never realized, and it had no unique capabilities that could be readily extracted for use in another system.

  8. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohm, H.; Angioni, C.; Arslanbekov, R.; Atanasiu, C.; Becker, G.; Becker, W.; Behler, K.; Behringer, K.; Bergmann, A.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V.; Bolshukhin, D.; Bolzonella, T.; Borrass, K.; Brambilla, M.; Braun, F.; Buhler, A.; Carlson, A.; Conway, G. D.; Coster, D. P.; Drube, R.; Dux, R.; Egorov, S.; Eich, T.; Engelhardt, K.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Fantz, U.; Faugel, H.; Finken, K. H.; Foley, M.; Franzen, P.; Fuchs, J. C.; Gafert, J.; Fournier, K. B.; Gantenbein, G.; Gehre, O.; Geier, A.; Gernhardt, J.; Goodman, T.; Gruber, O.; Gude, A.; Gnter, S.; Haas, G.; Hartmann, D.; Heger, B.; Heinemann, B.; Herrmann, A.; Hobirk, J.; Hofmeister, F.; Hohencker, H.; Horton, L. D.; Igochine, V.; Jacchia, A.; Jakobi, M.; Jenko, F.; Kallenbach, A.; Kardaun, O.; Kaufmann, M.; Keller, A.; Kendl, A.; Kim, J.-W.; Kirov, K.; Kochergov, R.; Kollotzek, H.; Kraus, W.; Krieger, K.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Kurzan, B.; Lang, P. T.; Lasnier, C.; Lauber, P.; Laux, M.; Leonard, A. W.; Leuterer, F.; Lohs, A.; Lorenz, A.; Lorenzini, R.; Maggi, C.; Maier, H.; Mank, K.; Manso, M.-E.; Mantica, P.; Maraschek, M.; Martines, E.; Mast, K.-F.; McCarthy, P.; Meisel, D.; Meister, H.; Meo, F.; Merkel, P.; Merkel, R.; Merkl, D.; Mertens, V.; Monaco, F.; Mck, A.; Mller, H. W.; Mnich, M.; Murmann, H.; Na, Y.-S.; Neu, G.; Neu, R.; Neuhauser, J.; Nguyen, F.; Nishijima, D.; Nishimura, Y.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Nunes, I.; Pautasso, G.; Peeters, A. G.; Pereverzev, G.; Pinches, S. D.; Poli, E.; Proschek, M.; Pugno, R.; Quigley, E.; Raupp, G.; Reich, M.; Ribeiro, T.; Riedl, R.; Rohde, V.; Roth, J.; Ryter, F.; Saarelma, S.; Sandmann, W.; Savtchkov, A.; Sauter, O.; Schade, S.; Schilling, H.-B.; Schneider, W.; Schramm, G.; Schwarz, E.; Schweinzer, J.; Schweizer, S.; Scott, B. D.; Seidel, U.; Serra, F.; Sesnic, S.; Sihler, C.; Silva, A.; Sips, A. C. C.; Speth, E.; Stbler, A.; Steuer, K.-H.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Strumberger, E.; Suttrop, W.; Tabasso, A.; Tanga, A.; Tardini, G.; Tichmann, C.; Treutterer, W.; Troppmann, M.; Urano, H.; Varela, P.; Vollmer, O.; Wagner, D.; Wenzel, U.; Wesner, F.; Westerhof, E.; Wolf, R.; Wolfrum, E.; Wrsching, E.; Yoon, S.-W.; Yu, Q.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.

    2003-12-01

    Recent results from the ASDEX Upgrade experimental campaigns 2001 and 2002 are presented. An improved understanding of energy and particle transport emerges in terms of a 'critical gradient' model for the temperature gradients. Coupling this to particle diffusion explains most of the observed behaviour of the density profiles, in particular, the finding that strong central heating reduces the tendency for density profile peaking. Internal transport barriers (ITBs) with electron and ion temperatures in excess of 20 keV (but not simultaneously) have been achieved. By shaping the plasma, a regime with small type II edge localized modes (ELMs) has been established. Here, the maximum power deposited on the target plates was greatly reduced at constant average power. Also, an increase of the ELM frequency by injection of shallow pellets was demonstrated. ELM free operation is possible in the quiescent H-mode regime previously found in DIII-D which has also been established on ASDEX Upgrade. Regarding stability, a regime with benign neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) was found. During electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) stabilization of NTMs, bgrN could be increased well above the usual onset level without a reappearance of the NTM. Electron cyclotron resonance heating and ECCD have also been used to control the sawtooth repetition frequency at a moderate fraction of the total heating power. The inner wall of the ASDEX Upgrade vessel has increasingly been covered with tungsten without causing detrimental effects on the plasma performance. Regarding scenario integration, a scenario with a large fraction of noninductively driven current (geq50%), but without ITB has been established. It combines improved confinement (tgrE/tgrITER98 ap 1.2) and stability (bgrN les 3.5) at high Greenwald fraction (ne/nGW ap 0.85) in steady state and with type II ELMy edge and would offer the possibility for long pulses with high fusion power at reduced current in ITER.

  9. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80{degrees}C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either {open_quotes}satisfactory{close_quotes} (2-20 mpy) or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment.

  10. Transconjunctival dacryocystorhinostomy: Long term results

    PubMed Central

    Kaynak, Pelin; Ozturker, Can; Karabulut, Gamze; Çelik, Burcu; Yilmaz, Omer Faruk; Demirok, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcomes of transconjunctival dacryocystorhinostomy (TRC-DCR) surgery in patients with epiphora due to primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction (PANDO) at second year follow-up. Methods In this retrospective, interventional study, 33 eyes of 29 patients, with epiphora due to PANDO, are included. Lower eyelid conjunctiva is incised at vestibulum inferomedially to access the lacrimal sac and nasal mucosa. Bone is perforated with burr and rongeurs and saccal and nasal flaps are anastomosed. Conjunctival wound edges are apposed and left unsutured. Intraoperative difficulties, surgical time and complications are noted. Average follow-up time was 2 years. Anatomical success was defined as patent lacrimal passages upon irrigation and functional success was defined as relief of epiphora. Results In nineteen (57.6%) eyes the surgeries were completed with the anterior and the posterior flaps sutured. In eight eyes (24.2%) only anterior flaps could be sutured. In 6 eyes (18.2%), the surgical procedure was converted to external dacryocystorhinostomy since the nasal mucosa could not be exposed adequately via transconjunctival route. The mean surgical time was 65.1 min. One patient had a millimeter long lower eyelid margin laceration in one eye (3.7%) intraoperatively due to traction for visualization of the operative site. Epiphora resolved in 25 of 27 eyes (92.5%) in whom TRC-DCR could be completed. Epiphora and failure to irrigation were noted in two eyes (7.4%) at the postoperative 4th and 8th months, respectively and required reoperation. No complications occurred, except granuloma formation at the conjunctival incision site in three eyes (11.1%). Epiphora resolved in all the six eyes of patients who underwent an external DCR (100%). Conclusion Transconjunctival dacryocystorhinostomy is a scarless dacryocystorhinostomy technique which is performed without endoscope and/or laser assistance, with 92.5% success rate comparable to external DCR at the second year follow-up without major complications. PMID:24526861

  11. Pluto System Surface Composition Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundy, William M.; Binzel, R. P.; Cook, J. C.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Earle, A. M.; Ennico, K.; Jennings, D. E.; Howett, C. J. A.; Linscott, I. R.; Lunsford, A. W.; Olkin, C. B.; Parker, A. H.; Parker, J. Wm; Protopapa, S.; Reuter, D. C.; Singer, K. N.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, S. A.; Tsang, C. C. C.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, L. A.

    2015-11-01

    This talk will present an overview of surface composition discoveries from New Horizons' exploration of the Pluto system. The emphasis will be on results that could only have been obtained thanks to the uniquely high spatial resolution provided by a spacecraft visit. The Ralph instrument is New Horizons' primary tool for investigating surface compositions in the Pluto system. Ralph consists of a near-infrared spectral imager sharing a 75 mm aperture telescope assembly with a color CCD camera system. The Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA) component of Ralph provides spectral coverage from 1.25 - 2.5 µm, at a resolving power (λ/Δλ) of 240. Ices such as CH4, N2, CO, CO2, C2H6, NH3, and H2O have uniquely diagnostic absorption bands in this wavelength region. The Multi-spectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) has 7 CCD arrays of which 4 have interference filters affixed directly on the focal plane. The filters pass wavelengths ranging from 400 through 975 nm, sensitive to coloration by tholin-type materials as well as a weak CH4 ice absorption band at 890 nm. Both Ralph components are usually operated in a scanning mode, rotating the spacecraft about its Z axis to sweep Ralph's field of view across the scene such that each point in the scene is eventually imaged at each wavelength. The width of the scanned region is 0.9 degrees divided into 256 spatial pixels for LEISA and 5.7 degrees spanned by 5000 pixels for MVIC. Over the course of the summer 2015 flyby, numerous Ralph observations targeted the various bodies in the Pluto system. As of late 2015, transmission of the data to Earth continues, but already a number of spectacular data sets are available for analysis, including LEISA scans of Pluto at 6 to 7 km/pixel and of Charon at 3 km/pixel, as well as MVIC scans of Pluto at 700 m/pixel and of Charon at 5 km/pixel. This work was supported by the NASA New Horizons Project.

  12. Results of nonendoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy

    PubMed Central

    Preechawai, Passorn

    2012-01-01

    Background Surgical scarring on the face and disrupted anatomy in the medial canthal area following external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) can be avoided by an endonasal approach. This study examined the outcome of direct visualization endonasal DCR, performed by young surgeons and residents. Methods A retrospective case series of 75 consecutive endonasal DCRs performed under direct visualization from July 2002 to July 2004 were reviewed. Surgery was performed by surgeons and residents who had received no special training in the procedure. Full success was defined as no symptoms of tearing after surgery and anatomical patency with fluorescein flow on nasal endoscopy or patency to lacrimal syringing. Partial success was defined as a tearing decrease compared with prior to surgery and with anatomical patency, and failure was defined as no significant improvement in persistent tearing. The average follow-up duration was 26.83 16.26 (range 655) months. Results Seventy-five DCRs were performed on 63 patients (four male, 59 female) of mean age 49.44 16.63 (range 2185) years. The surgery was successful in 54/75 eyes (72%), 37/54 eyes (68.5%), and 30/42 eyes (71.4%) at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively. Partial success was achieved in 13/75 (17.3%), 9/54 (16.7%), and 9/42 (21.4%), and the failure rates were 10.7%, 14.8%, and 7.1% at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively. The overall functional success with this technique was 74.7% and the overall anatomical patency was 92.0%. There were no serious complications arising from the surgery; three minor complications were documented, ie, an incorrectly placed silicone tube in the lower canaliculus, tube prolapse, and postoperative bleeding which needed nasal packing and eventually a developed retention cyst in the nasal cavity. Conclusion Endonasal DCR under direct visualization is a simple technique with minimal complications and a low learning curve, without the necessity for expensive instruments. PMID:22927743

  13. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroth, U.; Adamek, J.; Aho-Mantila, L.; kslompolo, S.; Amdor, C.; Angioni, C.; Balden, M.; Bardin, S.; Barrera Orte, L.; Behler, K.; Belonohy, E.; Bergmann, A.; Bernert, M.; Bilato, R.; Birkenmeier, G.; Bobkov, V.; Boom, J.; Bottereau, C.; Bottino, A.; Braun, F.; Brezinsek, S.; Brochard, T.; Brdgam, M.; Buhler, A.; Burckhart, A.; Casson, F. J.; Chankin, A.; Chapman, I.; Clairet, F.; Classen, I. G. J.; Coenen, J. W.; Conway, G. D.; Coster, D. P.; Curran, D.; da Silva, F.; de Marn, P.; D'Inca, R.; Douai, D.; Drube, R.; Dunne, M.; Dux, R.; Eich, T.; Eixenberger, H.; Endstrasser, N.; Engelhardt, K.; Esposito, B.; Fable, E.; Fischer, R.; Fnfgelder, H.; Fuchs, J. C.; Gl, K.; Garca Muoz, M.; Geiger, B.; Giannone, L.; Grler, T.; da Graca, S.; Greuner, H.; Gruber, O.; Gude, A.; Guimarais, L.; Gnter, S.; Haas, G.; Hakola, A. H.; Hangan, D.; Happel, T.; Hrtl, T.; Hauff, T.; Heinemann, B.; Herrmann, A.; Hobirk, J.; Hhnle, H.; Hlzl, M.; Hopf, C.; Houben, A.; Igochine, V.; Ionita, C.; Janzer, A.; Jenko, F.; Kantor, M.; Ksemann, C.-P.; Kallenbach, A.; Klvin, S.; Kantor, M.; Kappatou, A.; Kardaun, O.; Kasparek, W.; Kaufmann, M.; Kirk, A.; Klingshirn, H.-J.; Kocan, M.; Kocsis, G.; Konz, C.; Koslowski, R.; Krieger, K.; Kubic, M.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Kurzan, B.; Lackner, K.; Lang, P. T.; Lauber, P.; Laux, M.; Lazaros, A.; Leipold, F.; Leuterer, F.; Lindig, S.; Lisgo, S.; Lohs, A.; Lunt, T.; Maier, H.; Makkonen, T.; Mank, K.; Manso, M.-E.; Maraschek, M.; Mayer, M.; McCarthy, P. J.; McDermott, R.; Mehlmann, F.; Meister, H.; Menchero, L.; Meo, F.; Merkel, P.; Merkel, R.; Mertens, V.; Merz, F.; Mlynek, A.; Monaco, F.; Mller, S.; Mller, H. W.; Mnich, M.; Neu, G.; Neu, R.; Neuwirth, D.; Nocente, M.; Nold, B.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Pautasso, G.; Pereverzev, G.; Plckl, B.; Podoba, Y.; Pompon, F.; Poli, E.; Polozhiy, K.; Potzel, S.; Pschel, M. J.; Ptterich, T.; Rathgeber, S. K.; Raupp, G.; Reich, M.; Reimold, F.; Ribeiro, T.; Riedl, R.; Rohde, V.; Rooij, G. v.; Roth, J.; Rott, M.; Ryter, F.; Salewski, M.; Santos, J.; Sauter, P.; Scarabosio, A.; Schall, G.; Schmid, K.; Schneider, P. A.; Schneider, W.; Schrittwieser, R.; Schubert, M.; Schweinzer, J.; Scott, B.; Sempf, M.; Sertoli, M.; Siccinio, M.; Sieglin, B.; Sigalov, A.; Silva, A.; Sommer, F.; Stbler, A.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Strumberger, E.; Sugiyama, K.; Suttrop, W.; Tala, T.; Tardini, G.; Teschke, M.; Tichmann, C.; Told, D.; Treutterer, W.; Tsalas, M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Varela, P.; Veres, G.; Vicente, J.; Vianello, N.; Vierle, T.; Viezzer, E.; Viola, B.; Vorpahl, C.; Wachowski, M.; Wagner, D.; Wauters, T.; Weller, A.; Wenninger, R.; Wieland, B.; Willensdorfer, M.; Wischmeier, M.; Wolfrum, E.; Wrsching, E.; Yu, Q.; Zammuto, I.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zhang, Y.; Zilker, M.; Zohm, H.

    2013-10-01

    The medium size divertor tokamak ASDEX Upgrade (major and minor radii 1.65 m and 0.5 m, respectively, magnetic-field strength 2.5 T) possesses flexible shaping and versatile heating and current drive systems. Recently the technical capabilities were extended by increasing the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) power, by installing 2 8 internal magnetic perturbation coils, and by improving the ion cyclotron range of frequency compatibility with the tungsten wall. With the perturbation coils, reliable suppression of large type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) could be demonstrated in a wide operational window, which opens up above a critical plasma pedestal density. The pellet fuelling efficiency was observed to increase which gives access to H-mode discharges with peaked density profiles at line densities clearly exceeding the empirical Greenwald limit. Owing to the increased ECRH power of 4 MW, H-mode discharges could be studied in regimes with dominant electron heating and low plasma rotation velocities, i.e. under conditions particularly relevant for ITER. The ion-pressure gradient and the neoclassical radial electric field emerge as key parameters for the transition. Using the total simultaneously available heating power of 23 MW, high performance discharges have been carried out where feed-back controlled radiative cooling in the core and the divertor allowed the divertor peak power loads to be maintained below 5 MW m-2. Under attached divertor conditions, a multi-device scaling expression for the power-decay length was obtained which is independent of major radius and decreases with magnetic field resulting in a decay length of 1 mm for ITER. At higher densities and under partially detached conditions, however, a broadening of the decay length is observed. In discharges with density ramps up to the density limit, the divertor plasma shows a complex behaviour with a localized high-density region in the inner divertor before the outer divertor detaches. Turbulent transport is studied in the core and the scrape-off layer (SOL). Discharges over a wide parameter range exhibit a close link between core momentum and density transport. Consistent with gyro-kinetic calculations, the density gradient at half plasma radius determines the momentum transport through residual stress and thus the central toroidal rotation. In the SOL a close comparison of probe data with a gyro-fluid code showed excellent agreement and points to the dominance of drift waves. Intermittent structures from ELMs and from turbulence are shown to have high ion temperatures even at large distances outside the separatrix.

  14. [Results for SHEBA/FIRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Atmospheric Research Laboratory's Radiation Measurement System (RAMS) was on the NCAR C-130 aircraft in May and July 1998, collecting radiometric data on the science flights conducted in the vicinity of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) ship. These measurements were part of the FIRE Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE ACE). Analysis of some of the data focused on the absorption, reflection, and transmittance of Arctic clouds, especially compared to model results. In order to assess the absorption of solar radiation by the clear and cloudy atmosphere in the Arctic the measurements from the radiometers were combined in pairs of above-cloud segments and below-cloud segments. To get these pairs, the data for all sixteen of the flights (8 in May and 8 in July) were examined for occurrences of low-altitude segments in proximity to high-altitude segments. The low-altitude data are then treated as measurements of the bottom of a layer and the high-altitude data are taken as measurements of the top of the layer. With measurements of the upwelling and downwelling irradiances above and below a layer one can determine the reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance of the layer. Attachment: Doelling, D.R., P. Minnis, D.A. Spangenberg, V. Chakrapani, A. Mahesh, S.K. Pope, and F.P.J. Valero, Cloud radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere during FIRE ACE derived from AVHRR data, J. Geophys. Res. 106, 15,279-15,296,2001. Minnis, P., D.R. Doelling, D.A. Spangenberg, A. Mahesh, S.K. Pope, and F.P.J. Valero, AVHRR-derived cloud radiative forcing over the ARM NSA and SHEBA site during FIRE ACE, abstract submitted to the ARM Science Team Meeting, San Antonio, TX, M a . 13-17,2000. Pope, S.K., and F.P.J. Valero, Measured and modeled radiometric fluxes in the Arctic during FIRE-ACE, presented as a poster at the American Geophysical Union meeting, San Francisco, CA, Dec. 13-17, 1999. Pope, S.K., and F.P.J. Valero, Measured and modeled radiometric fluxes in the Arctic during FIRE-ACEy paper presented at SHEBA/FIRE Workshop, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo., Apr. 17-20,2000.

  15. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, O.; Arslanbekov, R.; Atanasiu, C.; Bard, A.; Becker, G.; Becker, W.; Beckmann, M.; Behler, K.; Behringer, K.; Bergmann, A.; Bilato, R.; Bolshukin, D.; Borrass, K.; Bosch, H.-S.; Braams, B.; Brambilla, M.; Brandenburg, R.; Braun, F.; Brinkschulte, H.; Brckner, R.; Brsehaber, B.; Bchl, K.; Buhler, A.; Brbaumer, H.; Carlson, A.; Ciric, M.; Conway, G.; Coster, D. P.; Dorn, C.; Drube, R.; Dux, R.; Egorov, S.; Engelhardt, W.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Fantz, U.; Faugel, H.; Foley, M.; Franzen, P.; Fu, P.; Fuchs, J. C.; Gafert, J.; Gantenbein, G.; Gehre, O.; Geier, A.; Gernhardt, J.; Gubanka, E.; Gude, A.; Gnter, S.; Haas, G.; Hartmann, D.; Heinemann, B.; Herrmann, A.; Hobirk, J.; Hofmeister, F.; Hohencker, H.; Horton, L.; Hu, L.; Jacobi, D.; Jakobi, M.; Jenko, F.; Kallenbach, A.; Kardaun, O.; Kaufmann, M.; Kendl, A.; Kim, J.-W.; Kirov, K.; Kochergov, R.; Kollotzek, H.; Kraus, W.; Krieger, K.; Kurzan, B.; Kyriakakis, G.; Lackner, K.; Lang, P. T.; Lang, R. S.; Laux, M.; Lengyel, L.; Leuterer, F.; Lorenz, A.; Maier, H.; Mank, K.; Manso, M.-E.; Maraschek, M.; Mast, K.-F.; McCarthy, P. J.; Meisel, D.; Meister, H.; Meo, F.; Merkel, R.; Mertens, V.; Meskat, J. P.; Monk, R.; Mller, H. W.; Mnich, M.; Murmann, H.; Neu, G.; Neu, R.; Neuhauser, J.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Nunes, I.; Pautasso, G.; Peeters, A. G.; Pereverzev, G.; Pinches, S.; Poli, E.; Pugno, R.; Raupp, G.; Ribeiro, T.; Riedl, R.; Riondato, S.; Rohde, V.; Rhr, H.; Roth, J.; Ryter, F.; Salzmann, H.; Sandmann, W.; Sarelma, S.; Schade, S.; Schilling, H.-B.; Schlgl, D.; Schmidtmann, K.; Schneider, R.; Schneider, W.; Schramm, G.; Schweinzer, J.; Schweizer, S.; Scott, B. D.; Seidel, U.; Serra, F.; Sesnic, S.; Sihler, C.; Silva, A.; Sips, A.; Speth, E.; Stbler, A.; Steuer, K.-H.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Strumberger, E.; Suttrop, W.; Tabasso, A.; Tanga, A.; Tardini, G.; Tichmann, C.; Treutterer, W.; Troppmann, M.; Tsois, N.; Ullrich, W.; Ulrich, M.; Varela, P.; Vollmer, O.; Wenzel, U.; Wesner, F.; Wolf, R.; Wolfrum, E.; Wunderlich, R.; Xantopoulos, N.; Yu, Q.; Zarrabian, M.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.; Zeiler, A.; Zohm, H.

    2001-10-01

    Ion and electron temperature profiles in conventional L and H mode on ASDEX Upgrade are generally stiff and limited by a critical temperature gradient length ?T/T as given by ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence. ECRH experiments indicate that electron temperature (Te) profiles are also stiff, as predicted by electron temperature gradient turbulence with streamers. Accordingly, the core and edge temperatures are proportional to each other and the plasma energy is proportional to the pedestal pressure for fixed density profiles. Density profiles are not stiff, and confinement improves with density peaking. Medium triangularity shapes (?<0.45) show strongly improved confinement up to the Greenwald density nGW and therefore higher ?values, owing to increasing pedestal pressure, and H mode density operation extends above nGW. Density profile peaking at nGW was achieved with controlled gas puffing rates, and first results from a new high field side pellet launcher allowing higher pellet velocities are promising. At these high densities, small type II ELMs provide good confinement with low divertor power loading. In advanced scenarios the highest performance was achieved in the improved H mode with HL-89P?N approx 7.2 at ? = 0.3 for five confinement times, limited by neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) at low central magnetic shear (qmin approx 1). The T profiles are still governed by ITG and trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence, and confinement is improved by density peaking connected with low magnetic shear. Ion internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges - mostly with reversed shear (qmin>1) and L mode edge - achieved HL-89P <= 2.1 and are limited to ?N <= 1.7 by internal and external ideal MHD modes. Turbulence driven transport is suppressed, in agreement with the E B shear flow paradigm, and core transport coefficients are at the neoclassical ion transport level, where the latter was established by Monte Carlo simulations. Reactor relevant ion and electron ITBs with Te approx Ti approx 10 keV were achieved by combining ion and electron heating with NBI and ECRH, respectively. In low current discharges full non-inductive current drive was achieved in an integrated high performance H mode scenario with [`n]e = nGW, high ?p = 3.1, ?N = 2.8 and HL-89P = 1.8, which developed ITBs with qmin approx 1. Central co-ECCD at low densities allows a high current drive fraction of >80%, while counter-ECCD leads to negative central shear and formation of an electron ITB with Te(0)>12 keV. MHD phenomena, especially fishbones, contribute to achieving quasi-stationary advanced discharge conditions and trigger ITBs, which is attributed to poloidal E B shearing driven by redistribution of resonant fast particles. But MHD instabilities also limit the operational regime of conventional (NTMs) and advanced (double tearing, infernal and external kink modes) scenarios. The onset ?N for NTM is proportional to the normalized gyroradius ?*. Complete NTM stabilization was demonstrated at ?N = 2.5 using ECCD at the island position with 10% of the total heating power. MHD limits are expected to be extended using current profile control by off-axis current drive from more tangential NBI combined with ECCD and wall stabilization. Presently, the ASDEX Upgrade divertor is being adapted to optimal performance at higher ?'s and tungsten covering of the first wall is being extended on the basis of the positive experience with tungsten on divertor and heat shield tiles.

  16. Recent Opportunity Microscopic Imager Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Arvidson, R. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Yingst, R.; Team, A.

    2013-12-01

    Opportunity arrived at exposures of Endeavour crater rim rocks in August 2011, on a hill dubbed 'Cape York.' These rocks have been the goal of exploration by Opportunity for the past few years because spectral evidence for phyllosilicates was observed at this location in orbital remote sensing data. As Opportunity circum¬navigated Cape York, the Microscopic Imager (MI) was used to examine the fine-scale textures of various soils and rocky outcrops. As reported previously, Opportunity discovered multiple bright linear features along the western periphery of Cape York that have been interpreted as veins of Ca sulfate deposited in fractures within the bedrock of Cape York. Opportunity then explored the northern and eastern sides of Cape York, including the area around 'Matijevic Hill' that shows evidence for phyllosilicates in CRISM data acquired from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. One of the first outcrops examined near Matijevic Hill, dubbed 'Kirkwood,' is dominated by millimeter-size spherules. Unlike the hematite-rich concretions observed by Opportunity on Meridiani Planum, the aggregated 'newberries' in the Kirkwood exposure display internal structure and resistant rims. Compositionally, the spherule-rich rock is very similar to a nearby spherule-poor outcrop dubbed 'Whitewater Lake.' Thus these spherules have a more basalt-like composition compared to the hematite-rich concretions of the Burns Formation. The origin of the Kirkwood outcrop is uncertain, but the setting on the rim of the 22-km diameter Endeavour crater suggests that perhaps impact melting was involved in lapilli formation, possibly followed by mobilization and sorting in the ejecta blanket. Alternatively, the newberries may be diagenetic iron oxide concretions that are less well cemented than the 'blueberries' of the younger sulfate-rich Burns Formation. The Whitewater Lake outcrops contain the phyllosilicate phases observed from orbit, and are the oldest materials yet investigated by Opportunity. The extremely soft bedrock exposed at a Whitewater Lake outcrop target dubbed 'Azilda' is mostly fine-grained, with dispersed 2-5 mm-diameter spherules and resistant veins. This target was easily abraded by the RAT, exposing a sandstone-like texture, but the sorting of grains is difficult to determine at MI resolution. Darker, erosion-resistant veneers, similar to desert varnishes on Earth, appear to record aqueous alteration that post-dates the formation of the Ca sulfate veins; they likely contain the nontronite that is observed by CRISM in this area. The inferred neutral pH and relatively low temperature of the fluids involved in these phases of alteration would have provided a habitable environment for life if it existed on Mars at that time. Because Opportunity can no longer directly sense phyllosilicate mineralogy with the MiniTES or Mössbauer spectrometers, it is focusing on characterizing the chemistry with the APXS and texture with the MI of potential phyllosilicate host rocks. The Athena MI continues to return useful images of Mars that are being used to study the textures of rocks and soils at Endeavour crater. Exploration by Opportunity continues, with the rover approaching 'Solander Point' and more exposures of phyllosilicates detected from orbit; the latest MI results will be presented at the conference.

  17. SMOS first results over land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Yann; Waldteufel, Philippe; Cabot, François; Richaume, Philippe; Jacquette, Elsa; Bitar, Ahmad Al; Mamhoodi, Ali; Delwart, Steven; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2010-05-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission is ESA's (European Space Agency ) second Earth Explorer Opportunity mission, launched in November 2009. It is a joint programme between ESA CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) and CDTI (Centro para el Desarrollo Tecnologico Industrial). SMOS carries a single payload, an L-band 2D interferometric radiometer in the 1400-1427 MHz protected band. This wavelength penetrates well through the atmosphere and hence the instrument probes the Earth surface emissivity. Surface emissivity can then be related to the moisture content in the first few centimeters of soil, and, after some surface roughness and temperature corrections, to the sea surface salinity over ocean. In order to prepare the data use and dissemination, the ground segment will produce level 1 and 2 data. Level 1 consists mainly of angular brightness temperatures while level 2 consists of geophysical products. In this context, a group of institutes prepared the soil moisture and ocean salinity Algorithm Theoretical Basis documents (ATBD) to be used to produce the operational algorithm. The principle of the soil moisture retrieval algorithm is based on an iterative approach which aims at minimizing a cost function given by the sum of the squared weighted differences between measured and modelled brightness temperature (TB) data, for a variety of incidence angles. This is achieved by finding the best suited set of the parameters which drive the direct TB model, e.g. soil moisture (SM) and vegetation characteristics. Despite the simplicity of this principle, the main reason for the complexity of the algorithm is that SMOS "pixels" can correspond to rather large, inhomogeneous surface areas whose contribution to the radiometric signal is difficult to model. Moreover, the exact description of pixels, given by a weighting function which expresses the directional pattern of the SMOS interferometric radiometer, depends on the incidence angle. The goal is to retrieve soil moisture over fairly large and thus inhomogeneous areas. The retrieval is carried out at nodes of a fixed Earth surface grid. To achieve this purpose, after checking input data quality and ingesting auxiliary data, the retrieval process per se can be initiated. This cannot be done blindly as the direct model will be dependent upon surface characteristics. It is thus necessary to first assess what is the dominant land use of a node. For this, an average weighing function (MEAN_WEF) which takes into account the "antenna"pattern is run over the high resolution land use map to assess the dominant cover type. This is used to drive the decision tree which, step by step, selects the type of model to be used as per surface conditions. All this being said and done the retrieval procedure starts if all the conditions are satisfied, ideally to retrieve 3 parameters over the dominant class (the so-called rich retrieval). If the algorithm does not converge satisfactorily, a new trial is made with less floating parameters ("poorer retrieval") until either results are satisfactory or the algorithm is considered to fail. The retrieval algorithm also delivers whenever possible a dielectric constant parameter (using the-so called cardioid approach). Finally, once the retrieval converged, it is possible to compute the brightness temperature at a given fixed angle (42.5°) using the selected forward models applied to the set of parameters obtained at the end of the retrieval process. So the output product of the level 2 soil moisture algorithm should be node position, soil moisture, dielectric constants, computed brightness temperature at 42.5°, flags and quality indices. During the presentation we will describe in more details the algorithm and accompanying work in particular decision tree principle and characteristics, the auxiliary data used and the special and "exotic"cases. We will also be more explicit on the algorithm validation and verification through the data collected during the commissioning phase. The main hurdle being working in spite of spurious signals (RFI) on some areas of the globe.

  18. Sugar cane bagasse as a possible source of fermentable carbohydrates. I. Characterization of bagasse with regard to monosaccharide, hemicellulose, and amino acid composition

    SciTech Connect

    du Toit, P.J.; Olivier, S.P.; van Biljon, P.L.

    1984-01-01

    Hemicellulose fractions of plant materials have recently attracted attention as a possible source of fermentable sugars to be used via fermentation for the production of liquid fuels, mainly ethanol. Individual monosaccharides present in bagasse hemicellulose were determined using HPLC and other chromatographic procedures. The presence of higher oligomers of the monosaccharides could also be determined. The pentosan fraction of bagasse was successfully hydrolyzed and extracted with 5% (m/v) HCl, and the rate of release of individual monosaccharides was determined. Xylose was the main component in the hydrolyzates, while glucose, arabinose, and galactose present in the side chains of the pentosans were initially released at a fast rate. This treatment resulted in obtaining 229 mg/g xylose (85% of theoretical maximum) and 44 mg/g glucose from bagasse. Only arabinose (2.8 mg/g) and galactose (0.75 mg/g) was also present in detectable quantities. A total of 309 mg monosaccharides were obtained from 1 g of bagasse by this treatment. The results indicated that hydrolysis conditions for specific plant materials depend on the composition of the specific material being utilized. A part of the pentosan fraction (77.1%) was hydrolyzed at a high rate, while 22.9% was more stable and hydrolyzed more slowly. Although 39.8% dry bagasse could be obtained in solution by treatment with dilute alkali, only about 72% of the available hemicelluloses could be extracted in this way if the bagasse was not delignified beforehand. Amino acids and peptides or proteins were also extracted to very much the same extent with the alkali.

  19. Evaluation of agricultural residues for paper manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaide, L.J.; Baldovin, F.L.; Herranz, J.L.F. )

    1993-03-01

    Five agricultural residues-olive tree fellings, wheat straw, sunflower stalks, vine shoots, and cotton stalks-were evaluated for use as raw materials for paper manufacture. The untreated raw materials and their pulps were tested for hot-water solubles, 1%-NaOH solubles, alcohol-benzene extractables, ash, holocellulose, lignin, [alpha]-cellulose, and pentosans. Handsheets were tested for breaking length, stretch, burst index, and tear index. The results showed wheat straw to be the most promising material. Vine shoots showed the least promise.

  20. Measuring Satisfaction with Mammography Results Reporting

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Nancy C; Feinglass, Joe; Priyanath, Aparna; Haviley, Corrine; Sorensen, Asta V; Venta, Luz A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess factors associated with patient satisfaction with communication of mammography results and their understanding and ability to recall these results. DESIGN Cross-sectional telephone survey. SETTING Academic breast imaging center. PATIENTS Two hundred ninety-eight patients who had either a screening or diagnostic mammogram. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Survey items assessed waiting time for results, anxiety about results, satisfaction with several components of results reporting, and patients' understanding of results and recommendations. Women undergoing screening exams were more likely to be dissatisfied with the way the results were communicated than those who underwent diagnostic exams and received immediate results (20% vs 11%, P = .05). For these screening patients, waiting for more than two weeks for notification of results, difficulty getting in touch with someone to answer questions, low ratings of how clearly results were explained, and considerable or extreme anxiety about the results were all independently associated with dissatisfaction with the way the results were reported, while age and actual exam result were not. CONCLUSIONS Patients undergoing screening mammograms were more likely to be dissatisfied with the way the results were communicated than were those who underwent diagnostic mammograms. Interventions to reduce the wait time for results, reduce patients' anxiety, and improve the clarity with which the results and recommendations are given may help improve overall satisfaction with mammography result reporting. PMID:11318910

  1. Ideas for Effective Communication of Statistical Results

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson-Cook, Christine M.

    2015-03-01

    Effective presentation of statistical results to those with less statistical training, including managers and decision-makers requires planning, anticipation and thoughtful delivery. Here are several recommendations for effectively presenting statistical results.

  2. Monitoring the Future 2014 Survey Results

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Monitoring the Future 2014 Survey Results Monitoring the Future 2014 Survey Results Email Facebook Twitter View the ... rel=0 Text Description of Infographic Monitoring the Future is an annual survey of 8th, 10th, and ...

  3. Symposium on Recent Results in Infrared Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Abstracts of papers presented at a symposium titled Recent Results in Infrared Astrophysics are set forth. The abstracts emphasize photometric, spectroscopic, polarization, and theoretical results on a broad range of current topics in infrared astrophysics.

  4. How to Interpret Abnormal Pap Smear Results

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cervical Cancer | How to Interpret Abnormal Pap Smear Results What does an abnormal Pap smear mean? A ... are located in your cervix or uterus. These results mean that some of your glandular cells are ...

  5. Hospital's Experience Helps Predict Stroke Results

    MedlinePLUS

    ... news/fullstory_156216.html Hospital's Experience Helps Predict Stroke Results Death, repeat attack less likely for patients ... 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medical centers that treat many stroke patients deliver better results than hospitals with less ...

  6. 16 CFR 1610.8 - Reporting results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reporting results. 1610.8 Section 1610.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard 1610.8 Reporting results. (a) The reported result shall be...

  7. 16 CFR 1610.8 - Reporting results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reporting results. 1610.8 Section 1610.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard 1610.8 Reporting results. (a) The reported result shall be...

  8. 16 CFR 1610.8 - Reporting results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reporting results. 1610.8 Section 1610.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard 1610.8 Reporting results. (a) The reported result shall be...

  9. 16 CFR 1610.8 - Reporting results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reporting results. 1610.8 Section 1610.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard 1610.8 Reporting results. (a) The reported result shall be...

  10. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test results. 799.12 Section 799.12... results. Except as set forth in specific chemical test rules in subpart B of this part, a positive or negative test result in any of the tests required under subpart B is defined in the TSCA test...

  11. Comparing simulation results of SBML capable simulators

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Frank T.; Sauro, Herbert M.

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Simulations are an essential tool when analyzing biochemical networks. Researchers and developers seeking to refine simulation tools or develop new ones would benefit greatly from being able to compare their simulation results. Summary: We present an approach to compare simulation results between several SBML capable simulators and provide a website for the community to share simulation results. Availability: The website with simulation results and additional material can be found under: http://sys-bio.org/sbwWiki/compare. The software used to generate the simulation results is available on the website for download. Contact: fbergman@u.washington.edu PMID:18579569

  12. Peer effects in learning HIV results?

    PubMed Central

    Godlonton, Susan; Thornton, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    How do neighbors positively or negatively influence individuals living in rural Malawi to learn their HIV results? Using data of location of homes and distance to neighbors, we measure the social network effects of neighbors learning their HIV results on individuals own learning. Using the fact that neighbors were randomly offered monetary incentives of varying amounts to learn their HIV results, we find positive effects of neighbors attending clinics on others living nearby: a 10 percentage point increase of the percentage of neighbors (approximately 2.4 individuals) learning their HIV results increases the probability of learning HIV results by 1.1 percentage points. The strongest network effects are among closest neighbors; we find no effect among religious social networks. We also find a negative interaction between direct cash incentives and peers: the effect of peers doubles among those who were not offered any individual financial incentive to learn their HIV results. PMID:22081739

  13. New results on jet fragmentation at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Jindariani, Sergo; /Florida U.

    2006-12-01

    Presented are the latest results of jet fragmentation studies at the Tevatron using the CDF Run II detector. Studies include the distribution of transverse momenta (Kt) of particles jets, two-particle momentum correlations, and indirectly global event shapes in p{bar p} collisions. Results are discussed within the context of recent Next-to-Leading Log calculations as well as earlier experimental results from the Tevatron and e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders.

  14. Clinical results with cochlear prostheses. Introductory remarks.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, T

    1983-01-01

    Reports on results of cochlear prostheses have left open many questions. More information on implanted persons is needed to counterbalance the fact of small sample size and heterogeneous makeup of the implanted patient groups. The precise use of audiological and phonetic terms in reporting on postimplantation test results could help to clarify the influence of different electrode setups, electrode locations, and coding features, and to make results comparable between different centers. PMID:6575653

  15. Innovation Impact: Breakthrough Research Results (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-07-01

    The Innovation Impact brochure captures key breakthrough results across NREL's primary areas of renewable energy and energy efficiency research: solar, wind, bioenergy, transportation, buildings, analysis, and manufacturing technologies.

  16. Acceptance sampling methods for sample results verification

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, C.A.

    1993-06-01

    This report proposes a statistical sampling method for use during the sample results verification portion of the validation of data packages. In particular, this method was derived specifically for the validation of data packages for metals target analyte analysis performed under United States Environmental Protection Agency Contract Laboratory Program protocols, where sample results verification can be quite time consuming. The purpose of such a statistical method is to provide options in addition to the ``all or nothing`` options that currently exist for sample results verification. The proposed method allows the amount of data validated during the sample results verification process to be based on a balance between risks and the cost of inspection.

  17. 10 CFR 26.169 - Reporting Results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... request. The laboratory shall routinely provide quantitative values for confirmatory opiate test results...) Cocaine metabolite; (iii) Opiates (total); (A) Codeine; (B) Morphine; and (C) 6-AM; (iv) Phencyclidine;...

  18. 10 CFR 26.169 - Reporting Results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... request. The laboratory shall routinely provide quantitative values for confirmatory opiate test results...) Cocaine metabolite; (iii) Opiates (total); (A) Codeine; (B) Morphine; and (C) 6-AM; (iv) Phencyclidine;...

  19. 10 CFR 26.169 - Reporting Results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... request. The laboratory shall routinely provide quantitative values for confirmatory opiate test results...) Cocaine metabolite; (iii) Opiates (total); (A) Codeine; (B) Morphine; and (C) 6-AM; (iv) Phencyclidine;...

  20. 10 CFR 26.169 - Reporting Results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... request. The laboratory shall routinely provide quantitative values for confirmatory opiate test results...) Cocaine metabolite; (iii) Opiates (total); (A) Codeine; (B) Morphine; and (C) 6-AM; (iv) Phencyclidine;...

  1. 10 CFR 26.169 - Reporting Results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... request. The laboratory shall routinely provide quantitative values for confirmatory opiate test results...) Cocaine metabolite; (iii) Opiates (total); (A) Codeine; (B) Morphine; and (C) 6-AM; (iv) Phencyclidine;...

  2. New results on flavor production at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaro-Galtieri, A.

    1984-05-01

    This report includes results from five PEP detectors: DELCO, HRS, MAC, MARK II and TPC. All, except the TPC, are presently taking data at PEP. The TPC is being upgraded: a new superconducting coil is being installed and other improvements are being implemented. The results discussed here are either new or improved since the Cornell Conference. New results on Particle Searches and a limit on neutrino generations are discussed. New data are included on weak couplings of c and b quarks. Various new results on hadron production are reported. All data were obtained in e/sup + -/ collisions with total energy ..sqrt..s=29 GeV. 54 references.

  3. Pluto results on jets and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Pluto collaboration

    1981-02-01

    Results obtained with the PLUTO detector at PETRA are presented. Multihadron final states have been analysed with respect to clustering, energy-energy correlations and transverse momenta in jets. QCD predictions for hard gluon emission and soft gluon-quark cascades are discussed. Results on ..cap alpha../sub s/ and the gluon spin are given.

  4. Tablet PCs, Academic Results and Educational Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrer, Ferran; Belvis, Esther; Pamies, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    This article is the result of a study carried out in 2008 and 2009 by a team from the Autonomous University of Barcelona in order to evaluate the implementation of the Digital Whiteboard Program in public schools in the region of Aragon (Spain). The following pages present some of the results obtained during the study. More specifically, this

  5. Zbrowse: An interactive GWAS results browser

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The growing number of genotyped populations, the advent of high-throughput phenotyping techniques and the development of GWAS analysis software has rapidly accelerated the number of GWAS experimental results. Candidate gene discovery from these results files is often tedious, involving many manual s...

  6. Results: The Key to Continuous School Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmoker, Mike

    This book argues that all school efforts should be focused on results. It elaborates on the simple conditions that favor results, briefly discusses the theory behind the conditions, and demonstrates, using examples from schools, how other schools can begin to successfully replicate the conditions. Following the introduction, chapters 1-3 describe…

  7. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test results. 799.12 Section 799.12...) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 799.12 Test results. Except as set forth in specific chemical test rules in subpart B of this part, a positive...

  8. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test results. 799.12 Section 799.12...) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 799.12 Test results. Except as set forth in specific chemical test rules in subpart B of this part, a positive...

  9. Supporting Public Access to Research Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapinski, P. Scott; Osterbur, David; Parker, Joshua; McCray, Alexa T.

    2014-01-01

    We posed the question of what services an academic library can best provide to support the NIH Public Access Policy. We approached the answer to this question through education, collaboration, and tool-building. As a result, over the last four years we have engaged over 1,500 participants in discussions of public access to research results, forged

  10. 7 CFR 1205.29 - Reporting results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reporting results. 1205.29 Section 1205.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... Procedures for Conduct of Sign-up Period Procedures 1205.29 Reporting results. (a) Each county FSA...

  11. 7 CFR 1205.29 - Reporting results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reporting results. 1205.29 Section 1205.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... Procedures for Conduct of Sign-up Period Procedures 1205.29 Reporting results. (a) Each county FSA...

  12. 7 CFR 1205.29 - Reporting results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reporting results. 1205.29 Section 1205.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... Procedures for Conduct of Sign-up Period Procedures 1205.29 Reporting results. (a) Each county FSA...

  13. Supporting Public Access to Research Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapinski, P. Scott; Osterbur, David; Parker, Joshua; McCray, Alexa T.

    2014-01-01

    We posed the question of what services an academic library can best provide to support the NIH Public Access Policy. We approached the answer to this question through education, collaboration, and tool-building. As a result, over the last four years we have engaged over 1,500 participants in discussions of public access to research results, forged…

  14. Getting to Results. Closing the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Tory

    2008-01-01

    The "Closing the Achievement Gap" series explores the Casey Foundation's education investments and presents stories, results, and lessons learned. This publication describes efforts to develop a flexible but rigorous results measurements system that enables the Foundation and its grantees to reflect on practice and course-correct as needed to

  15. Tablet PCs, Academic Results and Educational Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrer, Ferran; Belvis, Esther; Pamies, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    This article is the result of a study carried out in 2008 and 2009 by a team from the Autonomous University of Barcelona in order to evaluate the implementation of the Digital Whiteboard Program in public schools in the region of Aragon (Spain). The following pages present some of the results obtained during the study. More specifically, this…

  16. A death resulting from trichlorotrifluoroethane poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.B.; Meyer, R.F.; Jejurikar, S.G. )

    1990-11-01

    Fatalities due to accidental exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbon in an industrial setting have been infrequently reported. The deaths in these cases have occurred within poorly ventilated, enclosed compartments or areas. A case is presented of a 16-year-old male who died as a result of exposure to trichlorotrifluoroethane while working in an open pit. Chromatographic results and tissue concentrations are presented.

  17. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test results. 799.12 Section 799.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED... results. Except as set forth in specific chemical test rules in subpart B of this part, a positive...

  18. Suicide Survivors Groups: Results of a Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubey, Charles T.; McIntosh, John L.

    1996-01-01

    Gives results of a survey on the nature of, and the services offered by, suicide survivor groups. Results indicate that most groups are sponsored by mental health or social service agencies, have operated eight to nine years on average, and have fewer than 10 people typically in attendance at meetings. Other findings are reported. (RJM)

  19. Theoretical implications of the TWIST experiment results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillairet, A.

    2010-11-01

    The TRIUMF Weak Interaction Symmetry Test (TWIST) experiment measures the momentum and direction of the positron from the decay of polarized muons with very high precision. The TWIST results represent the world's most precise measurement of the muon decay spectrum. The experiment expects to meet its ambitious goals of an order of magnitude improvement over pre-TWIST results for the muon decay parameters ?, ? and P???. Our most recent published results combined with other experiments provide improved constraints on any deviations from the standard model. These results as well as the corresponding constraints on new physics are presented. The measures that have been taken to reduce the systematic uncertainties for the upcoming final result are described.

  20. Scheduling periodic jobs using imprecise results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Jen-Yao; Liu, Jane W. S.; Lin, Kwei-Jay

    1987-01-01

    One approach to avoid timing faults in hard, real-time systems is to make available intermediate, imprecise results produced by real-time processes. When a result of the desired quality cannot be produced in time, an imprecise result of acceptable quality produced before the deadline can be used. The problem of scheduling periodic jobs to meet deadlines on a system that provides the necessary programming language primitives and run-time support for processes to return imprecise results is discussed. Since the scheduler may choose to terminate a task before it is completed, causing it to produce an acceptable but imprecise result, the amount of processor time assigned to any task in a valid schedule can be less than the amount of time required to complete the task. A meaningful formulation of the scheduling problem must take into account the overall quality of the results. Depending on the different types of undesirable effects caused by errors, jobs are classified as type N or type C. For type N jobs, the effects of errors in results produced in different periods are not cumulative. A reasonable performance measure is the average error over all jobs. Three heuristic algorithms that lead to feasible schedules with small average errors are described. For type C jobs, the undesirable effects of errors produced in different periods are cumulative. Schedulability criteria of type C jobs are discussed.

  1. Unfavourable results in acute burn management

    PubMed Central

    Bilwani, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    An etiology based classification has been devised to innumerate all possible unfavorable results (complications) which may occur during acute burn management. Various factors, right from the onset of burns, may affect the final outcome. These factors, starting from the onset of burns till the occurrence of complication, have been discussed in details. Unfavorable results in regional burns (chest, limb, eye, ear, and hand) have been discussed. Unfavorable results in various chemical burns have been described with necessary precautions to prevent. Various septic complications have been narrated and their prevention is also discussed. PMID:24501478

  2. Comparative results of 327 chemical carcinogenicity studies.

    PubMed Central

    Haseman, J K; Huff, J E; Zeiger, E; McConnell, E E

    1987-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) have carried out a number of laboratory animal carcinogenicity studies and presented the results of these experiments in a series of Technical Reports. This paper tabulates the results of the 327 NCI/NTP studies carried out to date on 308 distinct chemicals, and discusses certain issues relevant to the evaluation of carcinogenicity in these experiments. This compilation of results from NCI/NTP carcinogenicity experiments provides a large database that can be used to study structure-activity correlations, interspecies concordance, and associations between laboratory animal carcinogenicity and other toxicological effects. PMID:3691430

  3. Experimental rotordynamic coefficient results for honeycomb seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.; Childs, Dara W.

    1988-01-01

    Test results (leakage and rotordynamic coefficients) are presented for seven honeycomb-stator smooth-rotor seals. Tests were carried out with air at rotor speeds up to 16,000 cpm and supply pressures up to 8.2 bars. Test results for the seven seals are compared, and the most stable configuration is identified based on the whirl frequency ratio. Results from tests of a smooth-rotor/smooth-stator seal, a teeth-on-stator labyrinth seal, and the most stable honeycomb seal are compared.

  4. Semantic Clustering of Search Engine Results

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Sara Saad; El-Sayed, Maged F.; Hassan, Yasser F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for search engine results clustering that relies on the semantics of the retrieved documents rather than the terms in those documents. The proposed approach takes into consideration both lexical and semantics similarities among documents and applies activation spreading technique in order to generate semantically meaningful clusters. This approach allows documents that are semantically similar to be clustered together rather than clustering documents based on similar terms. A prototype is implemented and several experiments are conducted to test the prospered solution. The result of the experiment confirmed that the proposed solution achieves remarkable results in terms of precision. PMID:26933673

  5. Reconciling the CAST and PVLAS results.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, R N; Nasri, Salah

    2007-02-01

    The PVLAS experiment has recently claimed evidence for an axionlike particle in the milli-electron-volt mass range with a coupling to two photons that appears to be in contradiction with the negative results of the CAST experiment searching for solar axions. The simple axion interpretation of these two experimental results is therefore untenable and it has posed a challenge for theory. We propose a possible way to reconcile these two results by postulating the existence of an ultralight pseudoscalar particle interacting with two photons and a scalar boson and the existence of a low scale phase transition in the theory. PMID:17358829

  6. New results on the tau lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1987-11-01

    This is a review of new results on the tau lepton. The results include precise measurements of the lifetime, measurements of the decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/2..pi../sup 0/nu/sub tau/ with much improved precision, and limits on decay modes containing eta mesons, including the second-class-current decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/eta nu/sub tau/. The implications of these new results on the discrepancy in the one-charged-particle decay modes are discussed. 52 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Results of coronal hole research: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    An overview of the last 10 years of coronal hole research, in particular since 1970, is presented. The findings of the early investigations and the more recent results obtained with Skylab/Apollo Telescope Mount instrumentation are discussed.

  8. Appropriate result from an inappropriate ICD shock.

    PubMed

    Davis, Darryl R; Gollob, Michael H; Green, Martin S; Lemery, Robert; Tang, Anthony S; Birnie, David H

    2006-10-01

    A case of inappropriate detection of an ungrounded external AC current by an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is reported. The resultant ICD shock dislodged the patient from the electrical source, thus preventing injury or electrocution. PMID:17038153

  9. Scaling results for the liquid sheet radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Calfo, Frederick D.

    1989-01-01

    Surface tension forces at the edges of a thin liquid (approx 100 micrometers) sheet flow result in a triangularly shaped sheet. Such a geometry is ideal for an external flow radiator. The experimental investigation of such sheet flows was extended to large sheets (width = 23.5 cm, length = 3.5 m). Experimental L/W results are greater than the calculated results. However, more experimental results are necessary for a complete comparison. The calculated emissivity of a sheet of Dow-Corning 705 silicone oil, which is low temperature (300-400 K) candidate for a liquid sheet radiator (LSR), is greater than 0.8 for sheet thicknesses greater than 100 micrometers.

  10. Scaling results for the liquid sheet radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Calfo, Frederick D.

    Surface tension forces at the edges of a thin liquid (approx 100 micrometers) sheet flow result in a triangularly shaped sheet. Such a geometry is ideal for an external flow radiator. The experimental investigation of such sheet flows was extended to large sheets (width = 23.5 cm, length = 3.5 m). Experimental L/W results are greater than the calculated results. However, more experimental results are necessary for a complete comparison. The calculated emissivity of a sheet of Dow-Corning 705 silicone oil, which is low temperature (300-400 K) candidate for a liquid sheet radiator (LSR), is greater than 0.8 for sheet thicknesses greater than 100 micrometers.

  11. New diffraction results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Terashi, Koji; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-05-01

    We present new results from studies on diffractive dijet production and exclusive production of dijet and diphoton obtained by the CDF Collaboration in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron.

  12. Integrative Interpretation of Vocational Interest Inventory Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubinstein, Malcolm R.

    1978-01-01

    Examined effectiveness of interpretation of vocational interest inventory results. Data provide limited support for the hypotheses that integrative interpretation is most effective. Significant interactions exist between counselors and interpretation procedures. Failure to find significant differences between traditional-individual and

  13. Statistical Methods for Summarizing Independent Correlational Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viana, Marlos A. G.

    1980-01-01

    Statistical techniques for summarizing results from independent correlational studies are presented. The case in which only the sample correlation coefficients are available and the case in which the original paired data are available are both considered. (Author/JKS)

  14. Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-05

    This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

  15. SARDA HITL Simulations: System Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the 2012 SARDA human-in-the-loop simulation, and presents a summary of system performance results from the simulation, including delay, throughput and fuel consumption

  16. Localized shrinkage factors and minimax results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostal, H.

    1983-01-01

    A condition is derived under which a localized shrinkage factor estimator will be minimax. A specific localized shrinkage factor estimator is described. The nonapplicability of the derived condition to some estimators is shown. Several comments concerning these results are made.

  17. Teaching Resultative Verbs to Students of Chinese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Tsaifeng (Mazie)

    1976-01-01

    This paper summarizes some available approaches to teaching resultative verbs (RV's) and discusses their effectiveness; gives criteria for differentiating RV's from other verbs and formula for their formation. Sample drills are included. (CFM)

  18. CTEPP NC DATA QA/QC RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains the method performance results. This includes field blanks, method blanks, duplicate samples, analytical duplicates, matrix spikes, and surrogate recovery standards.

    The Childrens Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (...

  19. CTEPP NC DATA QA/QC RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains the method performance results. This includes field blanks, method blanks, duplicate samples, analytical duplicates, matrix spikes, and surrogate recovery standards.

    The Children’s Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (...

  20. Recent Radiation Test Results for Power MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Topper, Alyson D.; Casey, Megan C.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Phan, Anthony M.; Kim, Hak S.; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Single-event effect (SEE) and total ionizing dose (TID) test results are presented for various hardened and commercial power metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), including vertical planar, trench, superjunction, and lateral process designs.

  1. MedlinePlus Survey Results 2015

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/survey/index.html MedlinePlus Survey Results 2015 To use the sharing features on ... government sites in the "Information/News" category. Other survey question responses: What best describes your role in ...

  2. Recent QCD results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Pickarz, Henryk; CDF and DO collaboration

    1997-02-01

    Recent QCD results from the CDF and D0 detectors at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider are presented. An outlook for future QCD tests at the Tevatron collider is also breifly discussed. 27 refs., 11 figs.

  3. Heavy quark results at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Fein, D.K.; D0 Collaboration

    1997-01-01

    Recent results in heavy quark physics from the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider are reported. Topics included are top quark production and mass determination, bottom production and correlations, and charmonium production. 20 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-07-01

    U.S. DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluated Norcal Waste Systems liquefied natural gas (LNG) waste transfer trucks. Trucks had prototype Cummins Westport ISXG engines. Report gives final evaluation results.

  5. NASA JSC neural network survey results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Dan

    1987-01-01

    A survey of Artificial Neural Systems in support of NASA's (Johnson Space Center) Automatic Perception for Mission Planning and Flight Control Research Program was conducted. Several of the world's leading researchers contributed papers containing their most recent results on artificial neural systems. These papers were broken into categories and descriptive accounts of the results make up a large part of this report. Also included is material on sources of information on artificial neural systems such as books, technical reports, software tools, etc.

  6. Log(s) physics results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-08

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a large, azimuthally symmetric detector designed to study {bar p}p interactions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Results are presented from data taken with a minimum bias trigger at {radical}s = 630 and 1800 GeV during the 1987 run. The topics include the current analysis of dn/d{eta} and some very preliminary results on short range pseudorapidity correlations and Bose-Einstein correlations. 7 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Further Results On Finite-State Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollara, F.; Cheung, K. M.; Mceliece, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    New codes generated and analyzed. Report discusses application of general construction for finite-state (FS) codes to known block codes. Decoding algorithms and results of simulations discussed briefly. First, general construction applied to (24,12) Golay code. Next, general construction applied to (16,8) Nordstrom-Robinson code. Results presented as plots of bit-error probability versus ratio of bit energy to noise energy.

  8. Random walk through recent CDF QCD results

    SciTech Connect

    C. Mesropian

    2003-04-09

    We present recent results on jet fragmentation, jet evolution in jet and minimum bias events, and underlying event studies. The results presented in this talk address significant questions relevant to QCD and, in particular, to jet studies. One topic discussed is jet fragmentation and the possibility of describing it down to very small momentum scales in terms of pQCD. Another topic is the studies of underlying event energy originating from fragmentation of partons not associated with the hard scattering.

  9. Preliminary results of noise radar experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanowski, Mateusz; Contartese, Clara; Maslikowski, Lukasz; Baczyk, Marcin; Kulpa, Krzysztof

    2009-06-01

    The paper describes the first results of noise radar experiments carried out at Warsaw University of Technology. The radar system was built with Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components: log-periodic antennas, an arbitrary waveform generator and a two-channel spectrum analyzer. The radar operated in the continuous-wave mode, and the aim was to detect moving targets in the received signal. The paper shows the system setup as well as the numerical results obtained from the recorded signals.

  10. A Relational Model for Clinical Objective Results

    PubMed Central

    Stahlhut, Richard W.; McCallie, David P.; Waterman, Diane M.; Margulies, David M.

    1990-01-01

    Children's Hospital has chosen to develop an interface between its central, relational database and its vendor-supplied laboratory systems. We describe here the relational model for objective results which we are using in this implementation. The model presented addresses a variety of data types, permits hierarchical structuring of test results, and is flexible. The major parts of the entity-relationship model are covered, including a discussion of some of the major design decisions.

  11. Rampant software errors may undermine scientific results

    PubMed Central

    Soergel, David A. W.

    2015-01-01

    The opportunities for both subtle and profound errors in software and data management are boundless, yet they remain surprisingly underappreciated. Here I estimate that any reported scientific result could very well be wrong if data have passed through a computer, and that these errors may remain largely undetected. It is therefore necessary to greatly expand our efforts to validate scientific software and computed results. PMID:26539290

  12. A generalized Dolinar receiver with inconclusive results

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahira, K.; Usuda, T. S.

    2014-12-04

    We investigate the implementation of a measurement for binary optical coherent states that minimizes the error probability with a fixed rate of an inconclusive result. We find that the optimal measurement for binary optical coherent states with any probability of an inconclusive result can be implemented using only a beam splitter, a local coherent light source, a photon detector, and a feedback circuit, even though the measurement is generally not projective.

  13. Recent results on ?e e- scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. C.; Bharadwaj, V.; Brooks, G. A.; Chen, H. H.; Doe, P. J.; Hausammann, R.; Lee, W. P.; Mahler, H. J.; Potter, M. E.; Rushton, A. M.; Wang, K. C.; Bowles, T. J.; Burman, R. L.; Carlini, R. D.; Cochran, D. R. F.; Frank, J. S.; Piasetzky, E.; Sandberg, V. D.; Krahauer, D. A.; Talaga, R. L.; Lee, Presented by W. P.

    1986-10-01

    The latest results from the neutrino-electron elastic scattering experiment at the LAMPF beam stop are presented. Based on the data sample collected from September 1983 to December 1985, we observed 12125 events consistent with ?x e- scattering, of which 9925 events are assigned to ?e e- scattering. The resulting cross section agrees with standard electroweak theory and rules out the constructive interference between weak charge-current and neutral-current interactions.

  14. Results on CP violation from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    S. Giagu

    2003-12-11

    The CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider is collecting a large sample of fully hadronic decays of Bottom and Charm mesons. First CP Violation measurements have been performed using the initial data, achieving results which clearly state the CDF ability in extracting significant CKM information from p{bar p} collisions. The first results on direct CP asymmetries on Charm and Bottom decays and future plans from the CDF experiment are discussed in this paper.

  15. Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome: diagnostic evaluation and therapeutic response in a private urogynecology unit

    PubMed Central

    González-Ruiz, Maria Isabel; Martínez-Espinoza, Claudia J.; Monroy-Rodríguez, Fabiola; Zaragoza-Torres, Rocio M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) is a spectrum of pelvic, bladder or urethral pain, as well as irritative voiding symptoms. The term interstitial cystitis (IC) is reserved for patients with typical cystoscopic features. Diagnosis and management of this syndrome may be difficult. The aim of this study was to describe endoscopic features and our experience on the treatment of this syndrome in Urodifem de Occidente S.C., a private urogynecology unit. Methods Observational, retrospective analytic study of 25 treated patients from 33 with diagnosis of IC/PBS between January 2001 and March 2015. The diagnosis was done by clinical, cystoscopic and urodynamic approach. Treatment was based on bladder instillation of dymetilsulfoxido (DMSO), dexamethasone and heparin. Oral pentosan polysulphate was prescribed for at least 1 year. Results Cystoscopic findings showed petechial hemorrhages in 32%, Hunner’s lesions in 28%, glomerulations in 28% and bladder pain in absence of lesions in 12%. The basic treatment included one instillation once a week for 6 weeks, twice a month for 2 months and four monthly instillations. Three cases had complete remission of their symptoms, 21 had significant improvement and we have only one failure. Conclusions We recommend the combined use of DMSO instillation and pentosan polysulphate (PPS) in cases of IC/PBS. PMID:26816862

  16. Scheduling periodic jobs that allow imprecise results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Jen-Yao; Liu, Jane W. S.; Lin, Kwei-Jay

    1990-01-01

    The problem of scheduling periodic jobs in hard real-time systems that support imprecise computations is discussed. Two workload models of imprecise computations are presented. These models differ from traditional models in that a task may be terminated any time after it has produced an acceptable result. Each task is logically decomposed into a mandatory part followed by an optional part. In a feasible schedule, the mandatory part of every task is completed before the deadline of the task. The optional part refines the result produced by the mandatory part to reduce the error in the result. Applications are classified as type N and type C, according to undesirable effects of errors. The two workload models characterize the two types of applications. The optional parts of the tasks in an N job need not ever be completed. The resulting quality of each type-N job is measured in terms of the average error in the results over several consecutive periods. A class of preemptive, priority-driven algorithms that leads to feasible schedules with small average error is described and evaluated.

  17. Recent results from COMPASS on exclusive muoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandacz, Andrzej

    2016-02-01

    The 160 GeV polarised muon beam available at CERN, with positive or negative charge, makes COMPASS a unique place for GPD studies. The first GPD related COMPASS results come from exclusive vector meson production on transversely polarised protons and deuterons. The data were taken in 2003-2010 with large solid-state polarised targets, although without detection of recoil particles. Results on various transverse target spin dependent azimuthal asymmetries are presented and their relations to GPDs are discussed. The dedicated COMPASS GPD program started in 2012 with commissioning of a new long liquid hydrogen target and new detectors such as the large recoil proton detector and the large-angle electromagnetic calorimeter. It was followed by a short pilot 'DVCS run'. The performance of the setup and first results on DVCS and exclusive π0 channels have been demonstrated. The full data taking for the GPD program approved within COMPASS-II proposal is planned for 2016 and 2017.

  18. Review of Fenton Hill HDR test results

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.

    1997-01-01

    Results of recent flow testing at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, have been examined in light of their applicability to the development of commercial-scale hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs at other sites. These test results, obtained during the cumulative 11 months of reservoir flow testing between 1992 and 1995, show that there was no significant production temperature drawdown during this time and that the reservoir flow became more dispersed as flow testing proceeded. Based on these test results together with previous HDR research at Fenton Hill and elsewhere, it is concluded that a three-well geometry, with one centrally located injection well and two production wells-one at each end of the pressure-stimulated reservoir region-would provide a much more productive system for future HDR development than the two-well system tested at Fenton Hill.

  19. Traceability, Reference Systems and Result Comparability

    PubMed Central

    Panteghini, Mauro

    2007-01-01

    The standardisation of measurements is of high priority in laboratory medicine, its purpose being to achieve closer comparability of results obtained using routine measurement procedures. At present, there is international cooperation in developing reference measurement systems (reference methods, reference materials, and reference laboratory networks) for analytes of clinical significance. These reference systems will reduce, wherever possible, measurement uncertainty and promote the comparability of results. The implementation of measurement traceability through the reference system provides one of the most important tools that supports the standardisation process in laboratory medicine. It aims to achieve result comparability regardless of the measurement procedure (test kit) and the clinical laboratory where analyses are carried out. The aim of this review is to discuss some concepts related to the achievement of standardisation by the implementation of a metrologically-correct measurement system and to provide some examples that illustrate the complexity of this approach and the impact of these activities on patient care. PMID:17909614

  20. Nebraska wind resource assessment first year results

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, P.J.F.; Vilhauer, R.; Stooksbury, D.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the preliminary results from a wind resource assessment program in Nebraska sponsored by the Nebraska Power Association. During the first year the measured annual wind speed at 40 meters ranged from 6.5 - 7.5 m/s (14.6 - 16.8 mph) at eight stations across the state. The site selection process is discussed as well as an overview of the site characteristics at the monitoring locations. Results from the first year monitoring period including data recovery rate, directionality, average wind speeds, wind shear, and turbulence intensity are presented. Results from the eight sites are qualitatively compared with other midwest and west coast locations. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. MiniBooNE Oscillation Results 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Djurcic, Zelimir

    2012-01-01

    The MiniBooNE neutrino oscillation search experiment at Fermilab has recently updated results from a search for {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillations, using a data sample corresponding to 8.58 x 10{sup 20} protons on target in anti-neutrino mode. This high statistics result represent an increase in statistics of 52% compared to result published in 2010. An excess of 57.7 {+-} 28.5 events is observed in the energy range 200 MeV < E{sub {nu}} < 3000 MeV. The data favor LSND-like {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillations over a background only hypothesis at 91.1% confidence level in the energy range 475 < E{sub {nu}} < 3000 MeV.

  2. Diffraction at the Tevatron: CDF results

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-11-01

    The diffractive program of the CDF Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Collider is reviewed with emphasis on recent results from Run II at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Updated results on the x{sub B{sub j}} and Q{sup 2} dependence of the diffractive structure function obtained from dijet production, and on the slope parameter of the t-distribution of diffractive events as a function of Q{sup 2} in the range 1 GeV{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 10{sup 4} GeV{sup 2}, are presented and compared with theoretical expectations. Results on cross sections for exclusive dijet and diphoton production are also presented and used to calibrate theoretical estimates for exclusive Higgs production at the Large Hadron Collider.

  3. Results of Labscale Hybrid Rocket Motor investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, B.; Frederick, R. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This work was performed to establish a labscale hybrid rocket motor test and evaluation capability at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The scope included activation of a Labscale Hybrid Motor, determination of baseline burning rates for PMMA fuel, and replication of pressure oscillations for HTPB fuel. The 0.820-in.-diam port, 10-in.-long fuel grains were burned for two seconds with gaseous oxygen. PMMA fuels were tested at oxygen fluxes from 0.047 lbm/sec sq in. to 0.378 lbm/sec sq in., and the HTPB fuel was evaluated at 0.378 lbm/sec sq in. The results showed that the labscale hybrid motor replicated previously reported PMMA fuel regression rates. The results also replicated low-frequency (less than 100 Hz) pressure oscillations that have been observed for HTPB fuels. These results establish the Labscale Hybrid Motor facility at MSFC.

  4. Preliminary Results from the Confined Helium Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, J. A.; Swanson, D. R.; Nissen, J. A.; Williamson, P. R.; Geng, K.; Stricker, D. A.; Chui, T. C. P.; Israelson, U. E.; Larson, M.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the preliminary results from an experiment to measure the heat capacity of helium confined within a stack of evenly spaced silicon plates at temperatures very close to the superfluid transition. The resolution of the heat capacity measurements was generally about 5x10 (exp -9)K, allowing the finite size peak to be mapped in detail. In addition, wide range data containing information on the behavior of the surface specific heat was collected. The preliminary analysis shows fair agreement with theory, but some discrepancies. The results can also be combined with related ground measurements on smaller length scales to perform additional tests of scaling predictions for cross-over to lower dimensional behavior. Some results in this area are also presented.

  5. East Mountain Area 1995 air sampling results

    SciTech Connect

    Deola, R.A.

    1996-09-01

    Ambient air samples were taken at two locations in the East Mountain Area in conjunction with thermal testing at the Lurance Canyon Burn Site (LCBS). The samples were taken to provide measurements of particulate matter with a diameter less than or equal to 10 micrometers (PM{sub 10}) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This report summarizes the results of the sampling performed in 1995. The results from small-scale testing performed to determine the potentially produced air pollutants in the thermal tests are included in this report. Analytical results indicate few samples produced measurable concentrations of pollutants believed to be produced by thermal testing. Recommendations for future air sampling in the East Mountain Area are also noted.

  6. Preliminary results in surgery of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nasser, J A; Confort, C I; Ferraz, A; Bouza, A A

    1998-09-01

    The authors present the preliminary results of 20 patients selected to be operated on between January 1996 and April 1997. These patients presented one of the present indications for stereotactic posteroventral pallidotomy (PVP), such as: rigidity, akinesia/bradykinesia, gait dysfunction, drug induced dyskinesias and tremor. Every patient of this protocol was evaluated by: UPDRS score, Schwab and England scale, Hoehn and Yahr Staging Scale before and after surgery. The results in 3 months showed a remarkable improvement after PVP (P < 0.01) in all functional assessments, except for facial expression, speech and posture. The morbidity was 5%. 5 patients (25%) who were in Hoehn and Yahr 5 underwent a bilateral simultaneous PVP. In 5 patients (25%), who had tremor, during the PVP, VIM thalamotomy was added. These preliminary results, suggest that PVP is highly effective for PD symptoms. PMID:9850746

  7. Annotating images by mining image search results.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Jing; Zhang, Lei; Li, Xirong; Ma, Wei-Ying

    2008-11-01

    Although it has been studied for years by the computer vision and machine learning communities, image annotation is still far from practical. In this paper, we propose a novel attempt at model-free image annotation, which is a data-driven approach that annotates images by mining their search results. Some 2.4 million images with their surrounding text are collected from a few photo forums to support this approach. The entire process is formulated in a divide-and-conquer framework where a query keyword is provided along with the uncaptioned image to improve both the effectiveness and efficiency. This is helpful when the collected data set is not dense everywhere. In this sense, our approach contains three steps: 1) the search process to discover visually and semantically similar search results, 2) the mining process to identify salient terms from textual descriptions of the search results, and 3) the annotation rejection process to filter out noisy terms yielded by Step 2. To ensure real-time annotation, two key techniques are leveraged-one is to map the high-dimensional image visual features into hash codes, the other is to implement it as a distributed system, of which the search and mining processes are provided as Web services. As a typical result, the entire process finishes in less than 1 second. Since no training data set is required, our approach enables annotating with unlimited vocabulary and is highly scalable and robust to outliers. Experimental results on both real Web images and a benchmark image data set show the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed algorithm. It is also worth noting that, although the entire approach is illustrated within the divide-and conquer framework, a query keyword is not crucial to our current implementation. We provide experimental results to prove this. PMID:18787241

  8. Organizing Search Results with a Reference Map.

    PubMed

    Nocaj, A; Brandes, U

    2012-12-01

    We propose a method to highlight query hits in hierarchically clustered collections of interrelated items such as digital libraries or knowledge bases. The method is based on the idea that organizing search results similarly to their arrangement on a fixed reference map facilitates orientation and assessment by preserving a user's mental map. Here, the reference map is built from an MDS layout of the items in a Voronoi treemap representing their hierarchical clustering, and we use techniques from dynamic graph layout to align query results with the map. The approach is illustrated on an archive of newspaper articles. PMID:26357163

  9. Toxicity, emissions test results in for RFG

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.

    1996-01-08

    Contrary to reports in the popular press, a great deal of testing has been performed on MTBE. Toxicological experiments show no ill effects, even at low levels of exposure. There are insufficient data, however, to draw the same conclusion for other ethers. In addition, EPA`s air-quality monitors reveal greatly reduced levels of most pollutants over the past 20 or so years. And results from the Auto/Oil Air Quality Improvement Research Program indicate that reformulated gasolines will further reduce many, although probably not all, automobile exhaust emissions. This paper reviews the testing and toxicity results and procedures.

  10. Tracer Developments: Results of Experimental Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.C.; Ahn, J.H.; Bentley, H.; Moore, J.N.; Veggeberg, S.

    1986-01-21

    Tracers can be used to monitor the movement of groundwaters and geothermal fluids and they can be used as a reference to quantify changes in fluid chemistry as a result of injection. Despite their potential importance to the geothermal operator, very few tracers are presently available and of those that are, little is known about their stability or behavior at the elevated temperatures that typify resources capable of electric power generation. During the past two years the University of Utah Research Institute has been involved in tracer research and testing, largely through the DOE Injection Research Program. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the results of these laboratory and field investigations.

  11. The spin physics results from COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Kouznetsov, O.

    2015-04-10

    COMPASS (COmmon Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy) is a fixed target experiment at CERN dedicated to studies of the spin structure of the nucleon and of the spectroscopy of hadrons. During the years 2002-2004, 2006-2007 and 2010-2011 the COMPASS collaboration has collected a large amount of data by scattering polarized 160(200) GeV/c muons on polarized {sup 6}LiD and NH{sub 3} targets. The COMPASS results on quark and gluon helicities are discussed, as well as results on transverse spin and transverse momentum effects in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering.

  12. Relativity concept inventory: Development, analysis, and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanides, J. S.; Savage, C. M.

    2013-06-01

    We report on a concept inventory for special relativity: the development process, data analysis methods, and results from an introductory relativity class. The Relativity Concept Inventory tests understanding of relativistic concepts. An unusual feature is confidence testing for each question. This can provide additional information; for example, high confidence correlated with incorrect answers suggests a misconception. A novel aspect of our data analysis is the use of Monte Carlo simulations to determine the significance of correlations. This approach is particularly useful for small sample sizes, such as ours. Our results show a gender bias that was not present in course assessment, similar to that reported for the Force Concept Inventory.

  13. The Humanoid Robot LOLAExperimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favot, V.; Schwienbacher, M.; Buschmann, T.; Lohmeier, S.; Ulbrich, H.

    2010-09-01

    With the experience gathered during the development and construnction of the robot JOHNNIE, a new humanoid robot LOLA was built. Goal of this project is to realize a fast, human-like walking. Different aspects of this complex mechatronic system and the first experiments results are presented. The lightweight construction and the custom build multi-sensory joint drives with high torque brushless motors are introduced. The new decentralized electronic control/sensing network is also discuss as well as the simulation environment, the trajectory planning algorithm and the stabilizing walking control. Finally the first experiments result are presented.

  14. Chemistry of the Galactic Bulge: New Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoccali, Manuela; Hill, Vanessa; Barbuy, Beatriz; Lecureur, Aurelie; Minniti, Dante; Renzini, Alvio; Gonzalez, Oscar; Gmez, Ana; Ortolani, Sergio

    2009-06-01

    VLT-FLAMES observations provide by far the largest sample of high dispersion spectra of Bulge red giants available. Five years of work on these 900 spectra have yielded the abundances of different elements in the Milky Way Bulge, and new results on its formation. The results so far include the Bulge metallicity distribution, the Bulge metallicity gradient, the metallicity dependence on kinematics, the history of enrichment with alpha-elements, as well as the lithium abundance. The evidence collected on Milky Way Bulge chemical enrichment supports a rapid early formation scenario, and the metallicity gradient argues against formation via secular bar evolution.

  15. [Pulsar perimetry. A review and new results].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez de la Rosa, M; Gonzalez-Hernandez, M

    2013-02-01

    We present a review and update on Pulsar perimetry, which combines temporal frequency, contrast and spatial frequency stimuli. The effects of age, visual acuity, and learning on results are described. Data on threshold fluctuation, signal-to-noise ratio, and the possibility of reducing noise with filtering techniques are provided. We describe its dynamic range and the possibility of compensating for profound defects. Finally, we show the results obtained in normal patients and in those with ocular hypertension or initial glaucoma, as well as an analysis of glaucoma progression. PMID:23392836

  16. Selectivity and the production of experimental results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, A.

    1998-12-01

    The author studies possible relations between the application of selection criteria in analyzing and interpreting the results of physical experiments and the mental preconceptions and expectations of the experimenters. He presents a detailed account of five famous cases of purported experimental results and the controversies following their publication. These cases include Joseph Weber's 1969 claim to have detected gravitational radiation - possibly originating in the center of the Milky Way, and the controversy arising from the 1985 "detection" of the 17 keV (heavy) neutrino by Simpson. Extensive bibliographical references are given for each case.

  17. Combating Stigma Resulting from Deformity and Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard Wood Memorial for the Eradication of Leprosy, New York, NY.

    Summarized are the proceedings of a seminar concerned with methods of combating stigma resulting from facial disfigurement, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and leprosy. The purpose was to determine how theories about stigma can help in the development of new methods of public education in order to change public attitudes and reduce social stigma.…

  18. Event Structure and Grammatical Patterns: Resultative Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigates the nature of grammatical patterns through an in-depth study of resultative constructions in Mandarin and Thai. At the heart of the thesis lies the proposal that event structure templates--complex, meaning-based grammatical patterns--must be recognised as primary objects of linguistic analysis. As content-theoretic objects…

  19. Artemis: Results of the engineering feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form for the Engineering Feasibility Study of the Artemis Project, a plan to establish a permanent base on the Moon. Topics covered include the Common Lunar Lander (CLL), lunar lander engineering study results, lunar lander trajectory analysis, lunar lander conceptual design and mass properties, the lunar lander communication subsystem design, and product assurance.

  20. Recent work and results on sparrow project

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Neal R

    2010-12-23

    This briefing describes recent work undertaken on the Sparrow Project and results of this work. It describes experiments comparing the use of Genie with 2 classes with 3 classes for the problem of ship delineation. It also describes some preliminary work in the area of the optimization of segmentation techniques.

  1. Unfavourable results in free tissue transfer

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Ashok Raj; Patil, Rahul K.; Nahar, Sushil

    2013-01-01

    With recent advances in the instrumentation and with increased expertise the results of microvascular surgery are getting better. Complications though, cannot be completely avoided. This paper gives a brief introduction to the possible complications at various stages of free tissue transfer. With careful planning and execution and vigilant postoperative care the overall success rate can be improved. PMID:24501461

  2. Recent results from Fermilab E690

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berisso, M. C.; Christian, D. C.; Felix, J.; Gara, A.; Gottschalk, E.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartouni, E. P.; Knapp, B. C.; Kreisler, M. N.; Lee, S.; Markianos, K.; Moreno, G.; Reyes, M. A.; Sosa, M.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Wehmann, A.; Wesson, D.

    1998-05-01

    Partial wave analysis results of centrally produced mesons in the reaction pp?pslow(X)pfast, with 800 GeV/c protons incident on a liquid hydrogen target are presented. In the reactions considered in this paper the (X) system decays into: a) Ka0K??, b) KsKs, and c) ?+?-.

  3. First Run II results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    S. Donati

    2002-06-04

    In this paper we report on the first run II results from the CDF experiment. A brief description of the Tevatron collider and CDF detector upgrades and performance achieved in the first part of run II is followed by the CDF expectations in the fields of beauty, top, electroweak and Higgs physics.

  4. Some Unexpected Results Using Computer Algebra Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, Felix; Garcia, Alfonsa; Garcia, Francisco; Hoya, Sara; Rodriguez, Gerardo; de la Villa, Agustin

    2001-01-01

    Shows how teachers can often use unexpected outputs from Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) to reinforce concepts and to show students the importance of thinking about how they use the software and reflecting on their results. Presents different examples where DERIVE, MAPLE, or Mathematica does not work as expected and suggests how to use them as a…

  5. Abstracts, Third Space Processing Symposium, Skylab results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Skylab experiments results are reported in abstracts of papers presented at the Third Space Processing Symposium. Specific areas of interest include: exothermic brazing, metals melting, crystals, reinforced composites, glasses, eutectics; physics of the low-g processes; electrophoresis, heat flow, and convection demonstrations flown on Apollo missions; and apparatus for containerless processing, heating, cooling, and containing materials.

  6. Ceseb: a Report on Latest Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegedus, T.; Latkovic, O.; Markov, H.; Vince, I.; Cseki, A.; Nuspl, J.; Markova, N.; Rovithis-Livaniou, E.; Vinko, J.

    Central-East-South European Binary star study group - CESEB - is an international research team focused on the study of binary stars through combined spectral and photometric observations that can be made using the Bulgarian NAO 2m telescope and several smaller telescopes located at various places in the Central East South European region. This paper is a report on our activities and results.

  7. TIMSS 2011 International Results in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullis, Ina V. S.; Martin, Michael O.; Foy, Pierre; Arora, Alka

    2012-01-01

    The "TIMSS 2011 International Results in Mathematics" summarizes fourth and eighth grade student achievement in each of the 63 countries and 14 benchmarking entities which participated in TIMSS 2011. The report includes trends in mathematics achievement over time for participants in the previous TIMSS 1995, 1999, 2003, and 2007…

  8. Restraints on Dissemination of Research Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Dalmas A.

    1982-01-01

    The issue of constraints on the publication of research results is discussed from the perspective of clashing values: free speech versus censorship in protection of national defense. The problems of secrecy as well as of disclosure are examined. Greater conflict between academe and military interests is foreseen. (MSE)

  9. Selected results for LDEF thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1993-01-01

    Several different thermal control coatings were analyzed as part of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Materials Special Investigation Group activity and as part of the Space Environment Effects on Spacecraft Materials Experiment M0003. A brief discussion of the results obtained for these materials is presented.

  10. Benchmark Results for Delayed Neutron Data

    SciTech Connect

    Marck, S.C. van der; Meulekamp, R. Klein; Hogenbirk, A.; Koning, A.J.

    2005-05-24

    We have calculated the effective delayed neutron fraction {beta}eff for 32 benchmark configurations for which measurements have been reported. We use these results to test the delayed neutron data of JEFF-3.0, ENDF/B-VI.8, and JENDL-3.3.

  11. Statistical Literacy and Sample Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlevey, Lynn; Sullivan, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Sample surveys are widely used in the social sciences and business. The news media almost daily quote from them, yet they are widely misused. Using students with prior managerial experience embarking on an MBA course, we show that common sample survey results are misunderstood even by those managers who have previously done a statistics course. In…

  12. E-Learning: Managing for Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, James R.; Heacock, William B.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses advantages of electronic learning for business, including cost benefits, administrative benefits, and instructional benefits. Considers the increase in electronic learning to cut back on business travel since the September 11th attacks and offers guidelines to achieve business results with electronic learning, including linking learning

  13. Event Structure and Grammatical Patterns: Resultative Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigates the nature of grammatical patterns through an in-depth study of resultative constructions in Mandarin and Thai. At the heart of the thesis lies the proposal that event structure templates--complex, meaning-based grammatical patterns--must be recognised as primary objects of linguistic analysis. As content-theoretic objects

  14. THE PREDICTABILITY OF LANGUAGE LEARNING RESULTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROEMING, ROBERT F.

    IF LANGUAGE CAN BE CONSIDERED AS ONE FORM AMONG SEVERAL BY MEANS OF WHICH MEANING CAN BE CONCEIVED AND TRANSFERRED, THEN IT FOLLOWS THAT LANGUAGE TEACHING SHOULD LEAD ABOVE ALL TO THE FACILE TRANSFER OF MEANING. ACCEPTANCE OF THIS CONCEPT WILL INFLUENCE THE CHOICE OF METHODS AND MATERIALS BEST SUITED TO YIELD THIS RESULT. THE TEACHER'S PURPOSE IS

  15. SLD liquid argon calorimeter prototype test results

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, R.; Eigen, G.; Au, Y.; Sleeman, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Brau, J.; Ludgate, G.A.; Oram, C.J.; Cook, V.; Johnson, J.

    1985-10-01

    The results of the SLD test beam program for the selection of a calorimeter radiator composition within a liquid argon system are described, with emphasis on the study of the use of uranium to obtain equalization of pion and electron responses.

  16. RESULTS FROM THE AHS PESTICIDE EXPOSURE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agricultural Health Study/Pesticide Exposure Study (AHS/PES) measured exposures resulting from agricultural use of 2,4-D and chlorpyrifos for a subset of applicators in the AHS cohort. Through on-farm measurements and observations, data collected in the exposure study will...

  17. First parallax results from URAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Norbert; Finch, Charlie T.; Jao, Wei-Chun

    2016-01-01

    The first USNO Robotic Astrometric Telescope catalog (URAT1) was released in April 2015. The catalog contains 228 million objects covering most of the sky north of declination -15 degrees for observations made between 2012 April 24 until 2014 June 21. The URAT northern observations were completed in June 2015 and all individual epoch positions with typical 10 to 70 mas errors are available for this study. The average number of observation per star is about 25.We have created a URAT parallax pipeline utilizing code from the Research Consortium On Nearby Stars (RECONS) parallax pipeline. The URAT pipeline reads in all 'good' epoch data of a given object thencalculates a mean position, proper motion and relative parallax using the JPL DE405 emphemerides.We compare results of 696 objects found in both the Hipparcos and Yale Parallax Catalog (YPC) north of -10 degrees declination which also have a URAT relative parallax. URAT results are consistent with Hipparcosand YPC data, getting meaningful results, particularly for stars with a parallax of 40 mas or larger. Typical URAT parallax errors are between 5 and 15 mas, depending on observing history. The main goal of this project is to find new nearby stars using the URAT epoch data. First results are presented for stars which previously did not have a published parallax.

  18. Exploring Alternative Approaches for Presenting Evaluation Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeremiah; Hall, Jori; Greene, Jennifer C.; Ahn, Jeehae

    2013-01-01

    Evaluators have an obligation to present clearly the results of their evaluative efforts. Traditionally, such presentations showcase formal written and oral reports, with dispassionate language and graphs, tables, quotes, and vignettes. These traditional forms do not reach all audiences nor are they likely to include the most powerful presentation…

  19. National Lung Screening Trial Results: Fast Facts

    Cancer.gov

    On November 4, 2010, the NLST reported initial trial results, showing 20 percent fewer lung cancer deaths among trial participants screened with low-dose helical CT (also known as spiral CT) compared to those who got screened with chest X-rays.

  20. Latest results from FROST at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, Barry G.

    2014-06-01

    The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of a polarized photon beam incident on a polarized target in meson photoproduction experiments. At Jefferson Lab, a program of such measurements has made use of the Jefferson Lab FROzen Spin Target (FROST). An overview of preliminary results are presented.

  1. Two Properties of the Intransitive Resultative Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyamoto, Yoichi

    1997-01-01

    The report of research on English grammar argues that the intransitive resultative construction requires head-movement of the secondary predicate to the main predicate in order to assign the theta-role to the postverbal NP in LF. Then, this construction is taken as an instance in which theta-role assignment is derivational, supporting the findings

  2. Results of the MTLRS-1 upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sperber, Peter; Amberg, L.; Blenski, G.; Etling, W.; Hessels, U.; Motz, R.; Beyer, L.

    1993-01-01

    In this report, the results of the upgrade of the German Modular Transportable Laser Ranging System MTLRS-1 are summarized. A short description of the new components and their influence on the system accuracy is given. It is shown, that the single shot accuracy of the MTLRS-1 has been improved from 5 cm to 1 cm.

  3. Crystal Ball results on tau decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, S.T.

    1987-10-01

    This report reviews measurements and upper limit determinations for a number of exclusive 1-prong tau decay modes using the Crystal Ball detector. These results are important input to the apparent discrepancy between the topological and sum-of-exclusive branching fractions in 1-prong tau decays.

  4. Group Test Results, 1979-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartford Public Schools, CT.

    The underlying theme of the 1979-80 Hartford Public Schools Group test results was maintenance of the status quo. There were both gains and declines in city-wide averages: individual subtest gains in some cases, put Hartford at or above the national norm (math computation in grades 2, 3, and 4), while the reading comprehension averages in grades 7…

  5. Validation Results for LEWICE 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.; Rutkowski, Adam

    1999-01-01

    A research project is underway at NASA Lewis to produce a computer code which can accurately predict ice growth under any meteorological conditions for any aircraft surface. This report will present results from version 2.0 of this code, which is called LEWICE. This version differs from previous releases due to its robustness and its ability to reproduce results accurately for different spacing and time step criteria across computing platform. It also differs in the extensive amount of effort undertaken to compare the results in a quantified manner against the database of ice shapes which have been generated in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The results of the shape comparisons are analyzed to determine the range of meteorological conditions under which LEWICE 2.0 is within the experimental repeatability. This comparison shows that the average variation of LEWICE 2.0 from the experimental data is 7.2% while the overall variability of the experimental data is 2.5%.

  6. Milestone M4900: Simulant Mixing Analytical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2001-07-26

    This report addresses Milestone M4900, ''Simulant Mixing Sample Analysis Results,'' and contains the data generated during the ''Mixing of Process Heels, Process Solutions, and Recycle Streams: Small-Scale Simulant'' task. The Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for this task is BNF-003-98-0079A. A report with a narrative description and discussion of the data will be issued separately.

  7. Relativity Concept Inventory: Development, Analysis, and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aslanides, J. S.; Savage, C. M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a concept inventory for special relativity: the development process, data analysis methods, and results from an introductory relativity class. The Relativity Concept Inventory tests understanding of relativistic concepts. An unusual feature is confidence testing for each question. This can provide additional information; for example,

  8. Candidates of Race and Political Poll Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loge, Peter

    Researchers often consider how personal attributes affect the data gathered, and how that effect can be eliminated, or at least minimalized. This question takes on added significance in the realm of politics. Numerous studies have examined the issue of interviewer/interviewee race. The results of these studies indicate that members of one race…

  9. Instructor Quality and EMT Certification Examination Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russ-Eft, Darlene; Dickison, Phil; Levine, Roger

    2007-01-01

    The Longitudinal Emergency Medical Technician Attributes and Demographics Study (LEADS) provides a representative sampling of EMTs throughout the United States. This study examines the relationship between instructor quality and National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians certification examination outcomes. Results show significant…

  10. Research in Distance Education: Methods and Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIsaac, Marina Stock; And Others

    This paper reports research in progress. The purpose of this study was to examine the growing variety of research emerging in distance education and to suggest a method for synthesizing the results. Over 60 articles, representing both quantitative and qualitative studies published in major journals during the past two years, have been abstracted

  11. Statistical Literacy and Sample Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlevey, Lynn; Sullivan, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Sample surveys are widely used in the social sciences and business. The news media almost daily quote from them, yet they are widely misused. Using students with prior managerial experience embarking on an MBA course, we show that common sample survey results are misunderstood even by those managers who have previously done a statistics course. In

  12. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Test results. 799.12 Section 799.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS General Provisions 799.12...

  13. PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF STRAWBERRY FUNGICIDE STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirteen fungicide treatments were evaluated for their disease control efficacy on the strawberry cultivar Camarosa at the Hammond Research Station, Hammond, LA during the 2002 fruiting season. Significant differences in yield occurred as a result of fungicide treatments. Highest yield was recorde...

  14. Broadband Heterodyne SIS Spectrometer Prototype: First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, F.; LeDuc, H.; Harris, A.; Hu, S.; Sumner, M.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2004-01-01

    The broadband heterodyne SIS receiver system described elsewhere (reference 1) has been assembled and tested both in the laboratory and during two observing runs on the Cassegrain focus of the 10 meter telescope at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Here we present a brief summary of the initial results.

  15. Animation of finite element models and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipman, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    This is not intended as a complete review of computer hardware and software that can be used for animation of finite element models and results, but is instead a demonstration of the benefits of visualization using selected hardware and software. The role of raw computational power, graphics speed, and the use of videotape are discussed.

  16. Project SAVE: Evaluation of Pilot Test Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Mary Lou; Bliss, Kappie

    The long-term goal of Project SAVE (Stop Alcohol Violations Early) is to reduce underage drinking. When a major revision of the program was initiated, the pilot program was evaluated for statistically measurable changes against short-term goals. The results of that evaluation are presented here. Four elements were included in the evaluation

  17. Benefits Resulting from Holding a Paraprofessional Position.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, W. Clark; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Examines the literature concerned with paraprofessional residence hall staff especially selection, training, and evaluation, and examines benefits of paraprofessional experience. Results of the study although supporting benefits of paraprofessional experience cannot be used beyond the respondents involved. Additional studies are suggested,

  18. Results from the MAC Vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.N.

    1987-05-01

    The design, construction, and performance characteristics of a high precision gaseous drift chamber made of thin walled proportional tubes are described. The device achieved an average spatial resolution of 45 ..mu..m in use for physics analysis with the MAC detector. The B-lifetime result obtained with this chamber is discussed.

  19. Initial key word OCR filter results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casasent, David P.; Iyer, Anand K.; Ravichandran, Gopalan

    1991-02-01

    Initial simulated optical correlation filter results to locate key words in destination address blocks on machine printed United States Postal Service (USPS) envelope mail are presented. The filters used are SDF MACE G-MACE and MINACE. These filters provide sharp correlation peaks allow controlled tolerance of intra-class (pitch font) variations and improved false class rejection (using symbolic filters).

  20. Exploring Alternative Approaches for Presenting Evaluation Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeremiah; Hall, Jori; Greene, Jennifer C.; Ahn, Jeehae

    2013-01-01

    Evaluators have an obligation to present clearly the results of their evaluative efforts. Traditionally, such presentations showcase formal written and oral reports, with dispassionate language and graphs, tables, quotes, and vignettes. These traditional forms do not reach all audiences nor are they likely to include the most powerful presentation

  1. Demand Better Results -- and Get Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Robert H.

    1974-01-01

    While most organizations could easily outstrip their current productivity, most managers don't communicate expectations of high achievement in a way that produces results. After analyzing the psychological barriers that keep managers from expecting and demanding more from their subordinates, the author outlines a five-point plan to upgrade…

  2. DQC 2009-10 Annual Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report presents survey results of the 10 State Actions including status of all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. These State Actions include: (1) Link P-20/workforce data systems; (2) Create stable, sustained support for robust state longitudinal data systems; (3) Develop governance structures to guide data collection,…

  3. DO Results on Heavy Flavour Production

    SciTech Connect

    Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle

    2006-04-11

    This review is focused on DO results on hadron spectroscopy and on production cross sections: the contribution by DO to the understanding of the X(3872) object, the first observation of separated B** states, measurements of Bc meson properties, and eventually measurements of the inclusive {upsilon}(1S) differential cross section and of the tt-bar cross section.

  4. QCD results from D-Zero

    SciTech Connect

    Varelas, N.; D0 Collaboration

    1997-10-01

    We present recent results on jet production, dijet angular distributions, W+ Jets, and color coherence from p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider using the D0 detector. The data are compared to perturbative QCD calculations or to predictions of parton shower based Monte Carlo models.

  5. Results of radiotherapy for Peyronie's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Niewald, Marcus . E-mail: ramnie@uniklinikum-saarland.de; Wenzlawowicz, Knut v.; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Wisser, Lothar; Derouet, Harry; Ruebe, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of radiotherapy for Peyronie's disease. Patients and Methods: In the time interval 1983-2000, 154 patients in our clinic were irradiated for Peyronie's disease. Of those, 101 had at least one complete follow-up data set and are the subject of this study. In the majority of patients, penis deviation was between 30 and 50{sup o}, there were one or two indurated foci with a diameter between 5 and 15 mm. Pain was recorded in 48/92 patients. Seventy-two of the 101 patients received radiotherapy with a total dose of 30 Gy, and 25 received 36 Gy in daily fractions of 2.0 Gy. The remaining patients received the following dosage: 34 Gy (1 patient), 38-40 Gy (3 patients). Mean duration of follow-up was 5 years. Results: The best results ever at any time during follow-up were an improvement of deviation in 47%, reduction of number of foci in 32%, reduction of size of foci in 49%, and less induration in 52%. Approximately 50% reported pain relief after radiotherapy. There were 28 patients with mild acute dermatitis and only 4 patients with mild urethritis. There were no long-term side effects. Conclusion: Our results compare well with those of other studies in the literature. In our patient cohort, radiotherapy was an effective therapy option with only very rare and mild side effects.

  6. Earth Resources Survey Program, new results - 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    Recent results of the Earth Resources Survey Program are placed in a historical and programmatic context. In particular, the operations involved in the LANDSAT satellite series are described. The value of large-scale imagery is stressed. It is concluded that the technology of remote sensing is expanding so rapidly that a great many more advances can be expected in the near future.

  7. Maine's Balance of Representation: Information and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine Department of Education, 2003

    2003-01-01

    This document, a companion to the "LAS Guide Principles and Criteria for the Adoption of Local Assessment Systems," [ED484135] presents results that are intended to provide Maine's school administrative units with an option for selecting sample performance indicators to be assessed through the Local Assessment System to meet the requirements for

  8. Returned Solar Max hardware degradation study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triolo, Jack J.; Ousley, Gilbert W.

    1989-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Repair Mission returned with the replaced hardware that had been in low Earth orbit for over four years. The materials of this returned hardware gave the aerospace community an opportunity to study the realtime effects of atomic oxygen, solar radiation, impact particles, charged particle radiation, and molecular contamination. The results of these studies are summarized.

  9. Relativity Concept Inventory: Development, Analysis, and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aslanides, J. S.; Savage, C. M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a concept inventory for special relativity: the development process, data analysis methods, and results from an introductory relativity class. The Relativity Concept Inventory tests understanding of relativistic concepts. An unusual feature is confidence testing for each question. This can provide additional information; for example,…

  10. Summarizing Monte Carlo Results in Methodological Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwell, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    A methodological framework is provided for quantitatively integrating Type I error rates and power values for Monte Carlo studies. An example is given using Monte Carlo studies of a test of equality of variances, and the importance of relating metanalytic results to exact statistical theory is emphasized. (SLD)

  11. New Results in Astrodynamics Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coverstone-Carroll, V.; Hartmann, J. W.; Williams, S. N.; Mason, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Generic algorithms have gained popularity as an effective procedure for obtaining solutions to traditionally difficult space mission optimization problems. In this paper, a brief survey of the use of genetic algorithms to solve astrodynamics problems is presented and is followed by new results obtained from applying a Pareto genetic algorithm to the optimization of low-thrust interplanetary spacecraft missions.

  12. Recent Stirling engine loss-understanding results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy C.; Thieme, Lanny G.; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1990-01-01

    For several years, NASA and other U.S. government agencies have been funding experimental and analytical efforts to improve the understanding of Stirling thermodynamic losses. NASA's objective is to improve Stirling engine design capability to support the development of new engines for space power. An overview of these efforts was last given at the 1988 IECEC. Recent results of this research are reviewed.

  13. New Results on Nucleon Spin Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2005-09-10

    Recent precision spin structure data from Jefferson Lab have significantly advanced our knowledge of nucleon structure in the valence quark (high-x) region and improved our understanding of higher-twist effects, spin sum rules and quark-hadron duality. First, results of a precision measurement of the neutron spin asymmetry, A{sub 1}{sup n}, in the high-x region are discussed. The new data shows clearly, for the first time, that A{sub 1}{sup n} becomes positive at high x. They provide crucial input for the global fits to world data to extract polarized parton distribution functions. Preliminary results on A{sub 1}{sup p} and A{sub 1}{sup d} in the high-x region have also become available. The up and down quark spin distributions in the nucleon were extracted. The results for {Delta}d/d disagree with the leading-order pQCD prediction assuming hadron helicity conservation. Then, results of a precision measurement of the g{sub 2}{sup n} structure function to study higher-twist effects are presented. The data show a clear deviation from the lead-twist contribution, indicating a significant higher-twist (twist-3 or higher) effect. The second moment of the spin structure functions and the twist-3 matrix element d{sub 2}{sup n} results were extracted at a high Q{sup 2} of 5 GeV{sup 2} from the measured A{sub 2}{sup n} in the high-x region in combination with existing world data and compared with a Lattice QCD calculation. Results for d{sub 2}{sup n} at low-to-intermediate Q{sup 2} from 0.1 to 0.9 GeV{sup 2} were also extracted from the JLab data. In the same Q{sup 2} range, the Q{sup 2} dependence of the moments of the nucleon spin structure functions was measured, providing a unique bridge linking the quark-gluon picture of the nucleon and the coherent hadronic picture. Sum rules and generalized forward spin polarizabilities were extracted and compared with Chiral Perturbation Theory calculations and phenomenological models. Finally, preliminary results on the resonance spin structure functions in the Q{sup 2} range from 1 to 4 GeV{sup 2} were presented, which, in combination with DIS data, will enable a detailed study of the quark-hadron duality in spin structure functions.

  14. The Usefulness of Dynamically Categorizing Search Results

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Wanda; Fagan, Lawrence

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The authors' goal was to determine whether dynamic categorization, a new technique for organizing search results, is more useful than the two existing organizational techniques: relevance ranking and clustering. They define a useful tool as one that helps users learn about the kinds of information that pertain to their query, find answers to their questions efficiently and easily, and feel satisfied with their search experience. Design: Fifteen patients with breast cancer and their family members completed query-related tasks using all three tools. The authors measured the time it took the subjects to accomplish their tasks, the number of answers to the query that the subjects found in four minutes, and the number of new answers that they could recall at the end of the study. Subjects also completed a user-satisfaction questionnaire. Results: The results showed that patients with breast cancer and their family members could find significantly (P < 0.05) more answers in a fixed amount of time and were significantly (P < 0.05) more satisfied with their search experience when they used the dynamic categorization tool than when they used either the cluster tool or the ranking tool. Subjects indicated that the dynamic categorization tool provided an organization of search results that was more clear, easy to use, accurate, precise, and helpful than those of the other tools. Conclusion: The experiments indicate that dynamic categorization is an effective and useful approach for organizing search results. Tools that use this technique will help patients and their families gain quick and easy access to important medical information. PMID:11062234

  15. The SUCOZOMA program: results and challenges.

    PubMed

    Carlberg, Anders

    2005-03-01

    The research program Sustainable Coastal Zone Management (SUCOZOMA), which was started in 1996 by the Swedish Foundation of Strategic Environmental Research, was motivated by the recognition of increasingly severe global, regional and national coastal problems. The program approached the complex issues of coastal eutrophication, fishing practices, and overexploited coastal resources, with a concerted effort involving multidisciplinarity, stakeholder cooperation, and a focus on the problems perceived as most serious by the public and decision-makers. As the program was concluded in 2004 it had resulted in the completion or near-completion of 22 doctoral dissertations and approximately one hundred publications. More than 40 scientists were involved in the program. Gteborg University was the host university, but important research teams have also been located at Stockholm University, the Beijer Institute, and the Kristineberg Marine Research Station of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and within the National Board of Fisheries. During the program, networks of stakeholders were established and SUCOZOMA had contributed to numerous political and administrative processes relevant for integrated coastal zone management (ICZM). SUCOZOMA program results can be grouped into different categories. Many of the projects in the two phases of the program produced results which can be defined as technical or practical and available for direct implementation in, e.g. mussel cultivation, restoration and safeguarding of spawning areas, seal-safe fishing gear or sustainable fishing of underexploited species. Other results can be characterized as policy oriented, and the impact of these can only be fairly evaluated as new policies are put into effect. SUCOZOMA resulted in important new knowledge regarding coastal science and management, but also concerning the organization required to conduct an end-user oriented multidisciplinary program effectively. PMID:15865301

  16. Simulation results for the Viterbi decoding algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, B. H.; Moorehead, R. W.; Taqvi, S. Z. H.

    1972-01-01

    Concepts involved in determining the performance of coded digital communications systems are introduced. The basic concepts of convolutional encoding and decoding are summarized, and hardware implementations of sequential and maximum likelihood decoders are described briefly. Results of parametric studies of the Viterbi decoding algorithm are summarized. Bit error probability is chosen as the measure of performance and is calculated, by using digital computer simulations, for various encoder and decoder parameters. Results are presented for code rates of one-half and one-third, for constraint lengths of 4 to 8, for both hard-decision and soft-decision bit detectors, and for several important systematic and nonsystematic codes. The effect of decoder block length on bit error rate also is considered, so that a more complete estimate of the relationship between performance and decoder complexity can be made.

  17. An investigation of false positive dosimetry results

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, M.A.; Davis, S.A.; Goff, T.E.; Wu, C.F.

    1996-12-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a facility designed for the demonstration of the safe disposal of transuranic waste. Currently, the radiation source term is confined to sealed calibration and check sources since WIPP has not received waste for disposal. For several years the WIPP Dosimetry Group has operated a Harshaw Model 8800C reader to analyze Harshaw 8801-7776 thermoluminescent cards (3 TLD-700 and 1 TLD-600) with 8805 holder. The frequency of false positive results for quarterly dosimeter exchanges is higher than desired by the Dosimetry Group management. Initial observations suggested that exposure to intense ambient sunlight may be responsible for the majority of the false positive readings for element 3. A study was designed to investigate the possibility of light leaking through the holder and inducing a signal in element 3. This paper discusses the methods and results obtained, with special emphasis placed on recommendations to reduce the frequency of light-induced false positive readings.

  18. Viking labeled release biology experiment - Interim results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, G. V.; Straat, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    All results of the labeled-release life-detection experiment conducted on Mars prior to conjunction are summarized. Tests at both landing sites provide remarkably similar evolution of radioactive gas upon addition of a radioactive nutrient to the Mars sample. The 'active' agent in the sample is stable to 18 C, but is substantially inactivated by heat treatment for 3 hours at 50 C and completely inactivated at 160 C, as would be anticipated if the active response were caused by microorganisms. Results from test and heat-sterilized control samples are compared with those obtained from terrestrial soils and a lunar sample. Possible nonbiological explanations of the Mars data are reviewed. Although such explanations of the labeled-release data depend on UV irradiation, the labeled-release response does not appear to depend on recent direct UV activation of surface material. Available facts do not yet permit a conclusion regarding the existence of life on Mars.

  19. [Femoral angioplasty. Long-term results].

    PubMed

    Foucart, H; Carlier, C; Baudrillard, J C; Joffre, F; Ccile, J P

    1990-01-01

    A study on the long-term efficacy of femoral-popliteal angioplasty was carried out on 185 angioplasty cases over a 5 year follow-up period. A classification of data according to the type of lesion treated, revealed that results were favorable in case of stenosis (87%), short obstruction (70%) and long obstruction (35%). A special study of the outcome of treatments for stage IV arteritis was carried out. After comparing results with those obtained by other teams, the authors list the complications encountered, hematomas, and thromboses, and show their current tendency for regression. Lastly, the authors stress the advantages of angioscopy, which permits to identify the nature of the treated lesions and to predict possible complications, which are usually underrated by angiography. PMID:2145379

  20. Apollo 17 traverse gravimeter experiment /Preliminary results/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talwani, M.; Kahle, H.-G.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary results of the traverse gravimeter experiment successfully performed during the Apollo 17 mission are discussed. An earth-moon gravity tie was established. On the basis of several readings, a gravity value of 162,695 + or - 5 mgal was obtained at the lunar-module landing site in the Taurus-Littrow valley. Free-air and Bouguer corrections were applied to the gravity data. The resultant Bouguer anomaly, analyzed with a two-dimensional approximation, shows a relative gravity maximum of about 25 to 30 mgal over the Taurus-Littrow valley. This maximum is interpreted in terms of a 1-km-thick block of basalt flow with a positive density contrast of 0.8 g/cu cm relative to the highland material on either side.

  1. Early results from the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaisson, Eric J.

    1992-06-01

    Some of the most important results obtained from the Hubble Space Telescope during its first two years of operation are reviewed, with attention given to observations of objects both within and beyond the solar system. In particular, within the solar system, observations of the giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn, monitoring of the Mars atmosphere, and obtaining clear separate images of Pluto and Charon are discussed. Beyond the solar system, the results include new details of the Orion Nebula; observations of the formation of a small nebula, Homunculus, around Eta Carinae; observations of the globular cluster M15 suggesting that it does not harbor a black hole at its center; views of the remnant of SN 1987A; and evidence corroborating the existence of a huge black hole in the giant elliptical galaxy M87. Hubble observations which help to test and refine the big bang theory are also discussed.

  2. DAWN Framing Camera results from Ceres orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathues, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Schfer, M.; Le Corre, L.; Reddy, V.; Platz, T.; Russel, C. T.; Li, J.-Y.; Ammanito, E.; Buettner, I.; Christensen, U.; Hall, I.; Kelley, M.; Gutirrez Marqus, P.; McCord, T. B.; McFadden, L. A.; Mengel, K.; Mottola, S.; O'Brien, D.; Pieters, C.

    2015-10-01

    Having completed its investigation of Vesta in late 2012, the NASA Dawn mission [1] reached its second target, the dwarf planet Ceres on March 6, 2015. During its operational phase, Dawn is scheduled to fly four polar orbits, each with a different distance to the target. The Framing Cameras (FCs) onboard the Dawn spacecraft are mapping the dwarf planet Ceres in seven colors and a clear filter [2], covering the wavelength range between 0.4 and 1.0 ?m. The FCs also conduct a number of sequences for purposes of navigation, instrument calibration, and have already performed satellite searches and three early rotational characterizations (RCs) of Ceres in February and May 2015. During the EPSC conference we intend to present the most intriguing results obtained from the Survey orbit (resolution ~400 m/pixel) as well as the first results from HAMO orbit (~140 m/pixel) focusing on the analysis of FC color data.

  3. Atmospheric results from Super-Kamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendell, Roger

    2015-07-01

    Recent results from a 282 kiloton-year exposure of the Super-Kamiokande detector to atmospheric neutrinos are presented. The data when fit both by themselves and in conjunction with constraints from the T2K and reactor neutrino experiments show a weak, though insignificant, preference for the normal mass hierarchy at the level of~ 1?. Searches for 2 evidence of oscillations into a sterile neutrino have resulted in limits on the parameters governing their mixing, |U?4|2 < 0.041 and |U?4|2 < 0.18 at 90% C.L. A similar search for an indication of Lorentz-invariance violating oscillations has yielded limits three to seven orders of magnitude more stringent than existing measurements. Additionally, analyses searching for an excess of neutrinos in the atmospheric data produced from the annihilation of dark matter particles in the galaxy and sun have placed tight limits on the cross sections governing their annihilation and scattering.

  4. First Results of the Gasdynamic Mirror Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    An experimental Gasdynamic Mirror or GDM device has been constructed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to provide an initial assessment of the applicability of this technology for propulsion systems. This paper presents the first experimental results obtained from the machine. It is intended that this device operate at higher plasma densities and with much larger L/D ratios than previous mirror machines. The high L/D ratio minimizes to a large extent certain magnetic curvature effects which lead to plasma instabilities causing a loss of plasma confinement. The high plasma density results in the plasma behaving much more like a conventional fluid with a mean free path shorter than the length of the device. This characteristic helps reduce problems associated with "loss cone" microinstabilities. The device has been constructed to allow a considerable degree of flexibility in its configuration thus permitting the experiment to grow over time without necessitating a great deal of additional fabrication.

  5. New GAMS results on meson spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sadovsky, S.A.

    1994-09-01

    Results on meson spectroscopy obtained in 1993 by the GAMS Collaboration are presented. Model-independent measurements of the {omega} {yields} {eta}{gamma} decay branching ratio, as well as the observation of the X(1740) state in the K{sub s}{sup 0}K{sub s}{sup 0} decay mode, are considered. The results on the partial-wave analysis of the {omega}{pi}{sup 0} and {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} systems produced at small momentum transfer in {pi}{sup {minus}}p charge-exchange reactions are discussed. The experiments on resonant {eta}{eta}-system production on a central region of the pp interaction are also discussed. 35 refs., 11 figs.

  6. Rapid Spacecraft Development: Results and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, William A.

    2002-01-01

    The Rapid Spacecraft Development Office (RSDO) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is responsible for the management and direction of a dynamic and versatile program for the definition, competition, and acquisition of multiple indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contracts - resulting in a catalog of spacecraft buses. Five spacecraft delivery orders have been placed by the RSDO and one spacecraft has been launched. Numerous concept and design studies have been performed, most with the intent of leading to a future spacecraft acquisition. A collection of results and lessons learned is recorded to highlight management techniques, methods and processes employed in the conduct of spacecraft acquisition. Topics include working relationships under fixed price delivery orders, price and value, risk management, contingency reserves, and information restrictions.

  7. [Carotid surgery, indications, results and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Kün, P; Battino, J; Cloarec, M; Witchitz, S; Vanet, R; Mergy, R

    1985-01-01

    A series of 215 patients who had undergone 250 carotid artery operations were followed up for a mean of 30 months. Perioperative mortality was 2%, neurologic morbidity was 7% but with permanent sequelae in 1.39% of cases. Recurrence of stenosis was detected in 0.8% of patients but there were no cases of postoperative thrombosis. Indications for surgery were based on the existence of hemispheric ischemic accidents corresponding to the territory supplied by the artery operated upon, and on anatomic and evolutive arguments drawn from results of non-invasive review examinations: ultrasonography and Doppler. Results obtained: 81.9% of patients were asymptomatic after 30 months, appear to be superior to those of the natural history of carotid artery lesions. PMID:4056617

  8. An Overview of Recent Results from CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Hicks

    2011-12-01

    The unique capabilities of the CLAS detector to measure exclusive meson electroproduction off protons, with almost complete coverage of the final hadron phase space, has extended our knowledge of excited baryon structure. Consistent results from Np and Npp final states provide convincing evidence for reliable extraction of N* electrocouplings. Theoretical analyses of these results, using self-consistent dynamical calculations using an internal quark core and an external meson-baryon cloud suggest that meson-baryon dressing amplitudes need to be included. The meson-baryon dressing was already shown to be necessary to get agreement between calculations and data on the D resonance transition magnetic moment at low Q{sup 2}. Similarly, a new measurement of the transition magnetic moment for strange baryons also disagrees with quark models, suggesting the need for meson-baryon dressings. In the near future, the CLAS detector will be replaced with CLAS12, providing new high-precision data.

  9. New results on muon radiative decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocanic, Dinko

    2012-10-01

    The PIBETA and PEN experiments, a series of precise measurements of rare pion and muon decays at PSI, have acquired a substantial set of &+circ;->e^+ ?? ?, radiative muon decay (RMD), events. The measurements were made using a stopped pion beam decaying in an active target, and positron and photon detection in a segmented spherical pure-CsI electromagnetic shower calorimeter covering ??3? sr, with MWPC central tracking and particle identification. The present RMD study has resulted in approximately 30-fold improvement in the precision of the decay branching ratio for (E?> 10 MeV, and ??-e> 30^o), compared to previous work. Our 1% result is in excellent agreement with standard model theoretical predictions. Focusing on a narrower range of phase space, we were able to improve significantly the upper limit on the Michel paramter ?, which is sensitive to non-(V-A) admixtures in the weak lagrangian.

  10. First results with the Microball and Gammasphere

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.; Hua, P.F.; LaFosse, D.

    1994-12-31

    The Microball, an improved 4{pi} multi-detector array, was used recently in conjunction with Gammasphere in three experiments. Highlights of the first results are presented here. The Microball consists of 95 CsI(T{ell}) scintillation detectors with individual Si photodiode readout, arranged in 9 rings. In these first experiments the Microball performed as designed, but the results in new physics exceeded the authors` expectations. They can say with certainty that by its powerful channel selection the Microball enhanced the performance of Gammasphere by one full coincidence fold. This was possible for all exit channels involving charged particle emission, with increasing performance benefit as one progressed to lighter reaction systems. They summarize the essential characteristics of the Microball and give some performance benchmarks. A detailed description of the Microball is given.

  11. Results of laser ranging collocations during 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolenkiewicz, R.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of laser ranging collocations is to compare the ability of two satellite laser ranging systems, located in the vicinity of one another, to measure the distance to an artificial Earth satellite in orbit over the sites. The similar measurement of this distance is essential before a new or modified laser system is deployed to worldwide locations in order to gather the data necessary to meet the scientific goals of the Crustal Dynamics Project. In order to be certain the laser systems are operating properly, they are periodically compared with each other. These comparisons or collocations are performed by locating the lasers side by side when they track the same satellite during the same time or pass. The data is then compared to make sure the lasers are giving essentially the same range results. Results of the three collocations performed during 1983 are given.

  12. New Results of the Konkoly Blazhko Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurcsik, J.

    2009-09-01

    During the recent years the Konkoly Blazhko Group (Pis Johanna Jurcsik and Bla Szeidl, co-workers dm Sdor, Zsombor Hurta and several undergraduate, graduate students) published new important results of Blazhko variables in 15 reviewed Journal articles. These results utilize multicolor CCD observations obtained with an automatic 60 cm telescope, and also previously unpublished Konkoly archive photometric data. Our light curves are the most extended multicolor data-sets ever obtained for a Blazhko variable, the observations cover each phase of the pulsation and the modulation as well. We have detected many previously unknown features of the light curve modulation, and based on the different band's observations we also revealed the underlying variations of the mean physical parameters during the Blazhko cycle. In my contribution the main achievements of the Konkoly Blazhko Group are summarised.

  13. Recent B Physics Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Behari, Satyajit

    2011-07-01

    We review recent B physics results from the CDF and D0 experiments in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}(s) = 1.96 TeV. Using a data sample of 1.4-6.0 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector we present searches for New Physics in B{sub s} sector and some competitive results with B-factories in the B/charm sector. In the first category we report the BR in B{sub s} J/{Psi} f{sub 0}(980) decays and the time-integrated mixing probability ({bar {chi}}) of B mesons. In the second category BR and A{sub CP} in doubly Cabibbo-suppressed B{sup {+-}} D{sup 0} h{sup {+-}} decays and time-integrated CP violation in D{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -} are presented.

  14. More results on oscillating edge-flames

    SciTech Connect

    Buckmaster, J.; Hegab, A.; Jackson, T. L.

    2000-06-01

    We examine a simple model of a side-anchored non-premixed edge-flame in order to gain insights into the oscillations that are sometimes observed in microgravity candle burning, flame-spread over liquids, etc. Previous results describe the role played by the Lewis number of the fuel, and the Damkoehler number, and here we examine both the effects of an on-edge and off-edge convective flow, and the effects of a heat sink. The on-edge flow and the heat sink tend to destabilize and the off-edge flow tends to stabilize, results consistent with our hypothesis regarding the genesis of the oscillations. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Some exact results for the exclusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Kirone

    2011-01-01

    The asymmetric simple exclusion process (ASEP) is a paradigm for non-equilibrium physics that appears as a building block to model various low-dimensional transport phenomena, ranging from intracellular traffic to quantum dots. We review some recent results obtained for the system on a periodic ring by using the Bethe ansatz. We show that this method allows one to derive analytically many properties of the dynamics of the model such as the spectral gap and the generating function of the current. We also discuss the solution of a generalized exclusion process with N species of particles and explain how a geometric construction inspired from queuing theory sheds light on a matrix product representation technique that has been very fruitful for deriving exact results for the ASEP.

  16. Percutaneous blood laser biostimulation: first clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utz, Sergei R.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V.; Utz, Irina A.; Barabanov, Alexander Y.; Osintsev, Eugene Y.; Hamburg, A. L.; Skatin, A. L.; Sinichkin, Yurii P.

    1992-06-01

    Intravascular and percutaneous irradiation of blood by low power light of He-Ne laser (wavelength 632.8 nm) is used for therapy of a wide range of diseases. Proof and optimization of photobiostimulation of human organism depends on the results of investigations in the following areas: (1) clarification of the physical and chemical mechanisms of biostimulation; (2) development of mathematical and physical methods of laser light dosimetry within tissues; and (3) accumulation of impartial clinical information. In the paper, a short survey of the hypotheses of red laser light biostimulating effect on blood is made, the problems of dosimetry during percutaneous laser treatment of blood are discussed and some results of clinical investigations are presented.

  17. Expert Meeting Report. Foundations Research Results

    SciTech Connect

    Ojczyk, C.; Huelman, P.; Carmody, J.

    2013-05-01

    The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership held an expert meeting on Foundations–Research Results on November 15, 2011, in Minneapolis, MN. Audience participation was actively encouraged during each presentation to uncover needs and promote dialog among researchers and industry professionals. Key results were: greater understanding of the role of moisture transport through foundation and insulation materials and its potential impact on building durability; greater understanding of the role of foundation type in the process of selecting an insulation system for energy performance and building durability; need for research to quantify the risks associated with insulation processes to better enable users to weigh costs and benefits against the existing conditions of a home; need for improved performance modeling capabilities that address variations in foundation types and soil conditions.

  18. Field trials results of guided wave tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Volker, Arno Zon, Tim van; Leden, Edwin van der

    2015-03-31

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Guided wave travel time tomography is a method capable of providing an absolute wall thickness map. This method is currently making the transition from the laboratory to the field. For this purpose a dedicated data acquisition system and special purpose EMAT sensor rings have been developed. The system can be deployed for permanent monitoring and inspections. Field trials have been conducted on various pipes with different diameters, containing either liquid or gas. The main focus has been on pipe supports. The results demonstrate the successful operation of the technology in the field. Expected corrosion damage was clearly visible on the produced results enabling asset owner to make calculated decisions on the pipelines safety, maintenance and operations.

  19. Results from the B-factories review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roney, J. Michael

    2014-08-01

    Following an introduction to the two e+e- B-factories, a sample of recent results from Belle and BABAR will be reported. This review will summarize results on the CKM unitarity angles and sides, the first direct observation of T-violation, measurements of the branching fraction of B- ? ?-?? and branching ratios of BF(B- ? D(*)?-??)/BF(B- ? D(*)?- ??), searches for low mass CP-odd Higgs bosons, lepton flavor violation in ? decays, and a precision measurement of the e+e- ? K+K-(?) cross-sections, and its impact on the hadronic vacuum polarization contribution to the theoretical calculation of the muon anomalous magnetic moment. Prospects for the future will be touched on.

  20. Results from lunar laser ranging data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, J. O.; Williams, J. G.; Yoder, C. F.

    1982-01-01

    The lunar laser range data taken at McDonald Observatory between Aug. 1969 and May 1980 has been analyzed. The simple rms residual for the 2954 ranges is 31 cm. Results of the analysis include GM(earth) = 398600.45 cu km/sec sq within 0.02 cu km/sec sq and a secular acceleration of the lunar orbital mean longitude of -23.8 arcsec/sq century within 1.5 arcsec, which yields a Q of 12.3 at semidiurnal frequencies. The lunar harmonic C30 is -8.7/1,000,000 within 0.000001 and the lunar rotational dissipation of 0.0047 within 0.0005 day. Also resulting from the solution are geocentric coordinates of McDonald accurate to 30 cm, including the first value for the longitude with the new IAU constants and a dynamical equinox.

  1. Adnectin-targeted inhibitors: rationale and results.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Esha; Gong, Jun; Rimel, Bobbie; Mita, Monica

    2015-08-01

    Adnectins are a family of binding proteins derived from the 10th type III domain of human fibronectin (10Fn3), which is part of the immunoglobulin superfamily and normally binds integrin. The 10Fn3 has the potential for broad therapeutic applications given its structural stability, ability to be manipulated, and its abundance in the human body. The most commonly studied adnectin is CT-322, which is an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2. A bispecific adnectin, El-Tandem, has also been developed and binds to epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor simultaneously. Pre-clinical studies have shown promising results in relation to reducing tumor growth, decreasing microvessel density, and promoting normalization of tumor architecture. The phase I trial with CT-322 demonstrates relatively low toxicities. However, the phase II study done with CT-322 in recurrent glioblastoma does not reveal as promising results. PMID:26045129

  2. Research results and utility experience workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This workshop was sponsored by the Distributed Utility Valuation (DUV) Project-a joint effort of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Department of Energy (DOE), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Department of Energy (DOE), and Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E). The purpose of the workshop is to provide a forum for utilities, other research organizations, and regulatory agencies to share results and data on Distributed Utility (DU)-related research and applications. Up-to-date information provided insight into the various technologies available to utilities, the methods used to select the technologies, and case study results. The workshop was divided into three sessions: Planning Tools; Utility Experience; and Policy and Technology Implications. Brief summaries of the individual presentations from each session are attached as appendices.

  3. Environmental management system objectives & targets results summary :

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, Douglas Walter

    2014-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexicos (SNL/NM) Environmental Management System is the integrated approach for members of the workforce to identify and manage environmental risks. Each Fiscal Year (FY) SNL/NM performs an analysis to identify environmental aspects, and the environmental programs associated with them are charged with the task of routinely monitoring and measuring the objectives and targets that are established to mitigate potential impacts of SNL/NMs operations on the environment. An annual summary of the results achieved towards meeting established Sandia Corporation and SNL/NM Site-specific objectives and targets provides a connection to, and rational for, annually revised environmental aspects. The purpose of this document is to summarize the results achieved and documented in FY2013.

  4. SLS-1 flight experiments preliminary significant results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Spacelab Life Sciences-1 (SLS-1) is the first of a series of dedicated life sciences Spacelab missions designed to investigate the mechanisms involved in the physiological adaptation to weightlessness and the subsequent readaptation to 1 gravity (1 G). Hypotheses generated from the physiological effects observed during earlier missions led to the formulation of several integrated experiments to determine the underlying mechanisms responsible for the observed phenomena. The 18 experiments selected for flight on SLS-1 investigated the cardiovascular, cardiopulmonary, regulatory physiology, musculoskeletal, and neuroscience disciplines in both human and rodent subjects. The SLS-1 preliminary results gave insight to the mechanisms involved in the adaptation to the microgravity environment and readaptation when returning to Earth. The experimental results will be used to promote health and safety for future long duration space flights and, as in the past, will be applied to many biomedical problems encountered here on Earth.

  5. Ultraheavy cosmic rays - HEAO-3 results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, M. H.

    The instrumentation and results from the Heavy Nuclei experiment on the HEAO 3 satellite are described. Six independently analyzed dual-gap ionization chambers measured the energy loss of the cosmic rays while a Cerenkov counter with 8 independently analyzed photomultipliers viewed two sheets of Pilot 425 plastic in a white box. Trajectories of the cosmic ray nuclei were determined in multiwire ionization hodoscopes. Variations in abundances were observed to be imperfectly ordered in terms of the first ionization potential, and volatility was also ruled out as the controlling factor. A predicted drop in abundance after Ba-56 was found, along with another sharp fall above Pb-82. Only one actinide-type event was detected during the 14 mos of viewing, a result consistent with other findings but which testifies against r-process formation.

  6. FIFE, First ISLSCP Field Experiment - Results overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, F. G.; Markham, B. J.; Wang, J. R.; Huemmerich, F.; Sellers, P. J.; Strebel, D. E.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Kelly, Robert D.; Blad, Blaine L.

    1990-01-01

    Results of the analyses of the First International Satellite Land-Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment (FIFE) are described which relate to the mass and energy flux of a particular area. The extensive satellite and ground data are used to analyze the energy balance over the FIFE site, monitor the energy-budget components, study atmospheric effects on remote sensing, examine cloud cover, and investigate fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer. The results verify existing theories relating energy-balance components with surface biology and remote sensing, and satellites can be used to estimate surface-energy budgets. Some analyses provide data that contradict present theories regarding thermodynamic and biophysical methodologies for estimating surface-heat fluxes.

  7. FIFE: Analysis and results - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, F. G.; Sellers, P. J.; Markham, B.; Wang, J.; Strebel, D. E.; Macpherson, I.; Kelly, R. D.; Verma, S.; Blad, B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the first results of the data analysis carried out for the First International Satellite Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment (FIFE) conducted over a 15 x 15 km grasslands study area in the central United States. Preliminary results show that the energy and mass flux data collected at several diurnal cycles during different parts of the growing season are of high quality. It was found that the canopy radiometric brightness temperature measured in the 10.4-12.3 microns is linearly related to seasonal variations in canopy aerodynamic temperature, and, thus, may provide a useful measure of sensible heat flux from the surface. Airborne monitoring of the mass and heat flux in the atmospheric boundary layer were found to be adequate for studies of the energy and mass budgets above the test site.

  8. J series thruster thermal test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtel, R. T.; Dulgeroff, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Test experience with J series ion thrusters have indicated that the present thruster design may result in excessive temperatures in areas which utilize organic materials such as wire insulation, with the resultant outgassing and potential contamination of insulating materials. Further, it appears that thermal data obtained with earlier thruster designs, such as the 700 series thruster, may not be directly applicable to the J series design. Two J series thrusters were fitted with thermocouples and critical temperatures measured for a variety of configurations and operating parameters. Completely enclosing the thruster to reduce facility contamination significantly increased temperatures prompting the selection of a compromise geometry for life testing. The operating parameter having the largest effect on temperatures was discharge power, while beam power affected little else than extraction system temperatures. Several off-normal operating modes were also investigated. Data believed to be sufficient to effectively modify existing thermal models were obtained from the tests.

  9. Testing SPH Against Experimental Laboratory Impact Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruesch, L. S.; Asphaug, E.

    2002-09-01

    The smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code is the leading technique for modeling meteoroid collisions into asteroids with realistic geologies and shapes (e.g. Asphaug et al., Icarus 1996, "Mechanical and geological effects of impact cratering on Ida"). However, it is important to test the code against results from laboratory impact experiments whenever they become available. Recently, Housen and Holsapple (Icarus 1999, "Scale effects in strength-dominated collisions of rocky asteroids") carried out a controlled set of laboratory experiments designed to examine the dependence of a body's strength on its size, and found an inverse relationship. We are currently running a set of numerical simulations to test the validity of the SPH code by reproducing the findings of these experiments. Our results will be reported at the meeting.

  10. The OPAL opacity code: New results

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, F.J.; Iglesias, C.A.

    1994-12-31

    The OPAL code was developed to calculate the wide range of frequency-dependent and mean opacity data needed to model laboratory experiments and stellar interiors. We use parametric potentials to generate vastly more atomic data than used in earlier opacity work for all elements with atomic number less than 35. We have also developed an improved equation of state based on an activity expansion of the grand canonical partition function. We give herein a brief description of the OPAL code and present new results that include the effect of additional heavy elements compared to our earlier carbons. The importance of very heavy elements having atomic number greater than 30 is also discussed. We present some comparisons with recent results from the Opacity Project and some directions for future work.

  11. Current results and trends in platform switching

    PubMed Central

    Salimi, Hadi; Savabi, Omid; Nejatidanesh, Farahnaz

    2011-01-01

    The platform switching (PLS) concept was introduced in the literature in 2005. The biological benefits and clinical effectiveness of the PLS technique have been established by several studies. In this article different aspects of PLS concept are discussed. Crestal bone loss, biologic width, and stress distribution in this concept are comprehensively reviewed. In this article the relative published articles from 1990 to 2011 have been evaluated by electronic search. Because of controversial results especially in immediate loading and animal studies, further modified research is needed to establish the mechanism and effect of the PLS technique. Essential changes in studies including using the control group for accurate interpretation of results and long-term observation, particularly through, randomized, prospective, multicenter trials with large numbers of participants, and implants are necessary. PMID:23372593

  12. Field trials results of guided wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; van Zon, Tim; van der Leden, Edwin

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Guided wave travel time tomography is a method capable of providing an absolute wall thickness map. This method is currently making the transition from the laboratory to the field. For this purpose a dedicated data acquisition system and special purpose EMAT sensor rings have been developed. The system can be deployed for permanent monitoring and inspections. Field trials have been conducted on various pipes with different diameters, containing either liquid or gas. The main focus has been on pipe supports. The results demonstrate the successful operation of the technology in the field. Expected corrosion damage was clearly visible on the produced results enabling asset owner to make calculated decisions on the pipelines safety, maintenance and operations.

  13. Overview of Athena Microscopic Imager Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herkenhoff, K.; Squyres, S.; Arvidson, R.; Bass, D.; Bell, J., III; Bertelsen, P.; Cabrol, N.; Ehlmann, B.; Farrand, W.; Gaddis, L.

    2005-01-01

    The Athena science payload on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) includes the Microscopic Imager (MI). The MI is a fixed-focus camera mounted on an extendable arm, the Instrument Deployment Device (IDD). The MI acquires images at a spatial resolution of 31 microns/pixel over a broad spectral range (400 - 700 nm). The MI uses the same electronics design as the other MER cameras but its optics yield a field of view of 32 32 mm across a 1024 1024 pixel CCD image. The MI acquires images using only solar or skylight illumination of the target surface. The MI science objectives, instrument design and calibration, operation, and data processing were described by Herkenhoff et al. Initial results of the MI experiment on both MER rovers (Spirit and Opportunity) have been published previously. Highlights of these and more recent results are described.

  14. LDEF Materials Results for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F. (Compiler); Gregory, John (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    These proceedings describe the application of LDEF data to spacecraft and payload design, and emphasize where space environmental effects on materials research and development is needed as defined by LDEF data. The LDEF six years of exposure of materials has proven to be by far the most comprehensive source of information ever obtained on the long-term performance of materials in the space environment. The conference provided a forum for materials scientists and engineers to review and critically assess the LDEF results from the standpoint of their relevance, significance, and impact on spacecraft design practice. The impact of the LDEF findings on materials selection and qualification, and the needs and plans for further study, were addressed from several perspectives. Many timely and needed changes and modifications in external spacecraft materials selection have occurred as a result of LDEF investigations.

  15. Recent results from SPEAR. [Theta resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Wacker, K.

    1983-09-01

    The first part of this talk is an experimental review of the properties of the THETA meson. Results or upper limits come from radiative j/psi decays and ..gamma gamma.. scattering for the final states eta eta, ..pi pi.., K anti K and rho rho. In the second part, an upper limit is given for the production of low-mass particles in radiative J/psi decays. Constraints for the existence of low-mass gluonic and Higgs mesons are derived.

  16. Recent results from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Gascón, Alberto; Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-07-23

    The Pierre Auger Observatory has been designed to investigate the origin and nature of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) using a hybrid detection technique. In this contribution we present some of the most recent results of the observatory, namely the upper-end of the spectrum of cosmic rays, state-of-the-art analyses on mass composition, the measurements of the proton-air cross-section, and the number of muons at ground.

  17. ACM TOMS replicated computational results initiative

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Heroux, Michael Allen

    2015-06-03

    In this study, the scientific community relies on the peer review process for assuring the quality of published material, the goal of which is to build a body of work we can trust. Computational journals such as The ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software (TOMS) use this process for rigorously promoting the clarity and completeness of content, and citation of prior work. At the same time, it is unusual to independently confirm computational results.

  18. Results from 2010 Caliban Criticality Dosimetry Intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.

    2011-10-12

    The external dosimetry program participated in a criticality dosimetry intercomparison conducted at the Caliban facility in Valduc, France in 2010. Representatives from the dosimetry and instrumentation groups were present during testing which included irradiations of whole-body beta/gamma (HBGT) and neutron thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), a fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD), electronic alarming dosimeters, and a humanoid phantom filled with reference man concentrations of sodium. This report reviews the testing procedures, preparations, irradiations, and presents results of the tests.

  19. CO2 laser cold cathode research results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.

    1973-01-01

    The construction and processing of four test lasers are discussed, and the test results are assessed. Tests show that the best performance was obtained from cathodes made from internally oxidized Ag-Cu alloys or pure Cu. Due to the cold cathode technology developments, sealed-off 1 w CO2 lasers with gas volumes of only 50 cu cm were duplicated, and have performed satisfactorily for more than 6000 hours.

  20. Lattice results on nucleon/roper properties

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2009-12-01

    In this proceeding, I review the attempts to calculate the Nucleon resonance (including Roper as first radially excited state of nucleon and other excited states) using lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The latest preliminary results from Hadron Spectrum Collaboration (HSC) with m? thickapprox 380 MeV are reported. The Sachs electric form factor of the proton and neutron and their transition with the Roper at large Q2 are also updated in this work.

  1. Recent Stirling engine loss - understanding results

    SciTech Connect

    Tew, R.C.; Thieme, L.G.; Dudenhoefer, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    For several years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and other US Government agencies have been funding experimental and analytical efforts to improve the understanding of Stirling thermodynamic losses. NASA`s objective is to improve Stirling engine design capability to support the development of new engines for space power. An overview of these efforts was last given at the 1988 IECEC. Recent results of this research are reviewed.

  2. Results from the ISIS1 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cussans, D.; Goldstein, J.; Payton, O.; Stuttard, T.; Mandry, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Stefanov, K. D.; Zhang, Z.; Banda, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Damerell, C. J. S.; Devetak, E.; Fopma, J.; Gao, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Grimes, M.; Heath, H.; Hillert, S.; Johnson, E. L.; Laing, A.; Lynch, C.; Martin, V. J.; Murray, P.; Nomerotski, A.; Thomas, S. L.; Walsh, R.; Woolliscroft, T.; Worm, S.

    2009-06-01

    The In Situ Storage Image Sensor (ISIS) is a monolithic active pixel sensor with memory cells in each pixel. The memory cells are implemented as a CCD register. A test device with parameters suitable for tracking charged particles has been constructed and characterized. The characteristics of a proof-of-principle ISIS device are described and results from using the sensor as a tracking device for high energy electrons are presented.

  3. CHAMP Tracking and Accelerometer Data Analysis Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Luthcke, S. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Pavlis, D. E.; Colombo, O. L.; Ray, Richard D.; Thompson, B.; Nerem, R. S.; Williams, Teresa A.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CHAMP (Challenging Minisatellite Payload) mission's unique combination of sensors and orbit configuration will enable unprecedented improvements in modeling and understanding the Earth's static gravity field and its temporal variations. CHAMP is the first of two missions (GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) to be launched in the later part of '01) that combine a new generation of GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers, a high precision three axis accelerometer, and star cameras for the precision attitude determination. In order to isolate the gravity signal for science investigations, it is necessary to perform a detailed reduction and analysis of the GPS and SLR tracking data in conjunction with the accelerometer and attitude data. Precision orbit determination based on the GPS and SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging) tracking data will isolate the orbit perturbations, while the accelerometer data will be used to distinguish the surface forces from those due to the geopotential (static, and time varying). In preparation for the CHAMP and GRACE missions, extensive modifications have been made to NASA/GSFC's GEODYN orbit determination software to enable the simultaneous reduction of spacecraft tracking (e.g. GPS and SLR), three axis accelerometer and precise attitude data. Several weeks of CHAMP tracking and accelerometer data have been analyzed and the results will be presented. Precision orbit determination analysis based on tracking data alone in addition to results based on the simultaneous reduction of tracking and accelerometer data will be discussed. Results from a calibration of the accelerometer will be presented along with the results from various orbit determination strategies. Gravity field modeling status and plans will be discussed.

  4. Pioneer 11 meteoroid detection experiment - Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humes, D. H.; Alvarez, J. M.; Kinard, W. H.; Oneal, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The concentration of meteoroids of mass about 0.01 microgram in interplanetary space, in the asteroid belt, and near Jupiter has been measured. The data confirm the Pioneer 10 observation that the asteroid belt is not highly populated with small meteoroids, suggest that the high concentration of small particles around Jupiter is the result of gravitational focusing, and provide an indication of the mass distribution of meteoroids in interplanetary space.

  5. Recent Semileptonic Decay Results from FOCUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, W. E.; Focus Collaboration

    2005-05-01

    I review recent semileptonic decay results from the FOCUS collaboration. E831/FOCUS is a fixed target photoproduction experiment that ran at Fermilab during the 1996-1997 fixed target run. With a high statistics sample of reconstructed charm (over 1 million decays in the channels D?K??, D?K? and D?K???) the FOCUS collaboration has measured semileptonic branching ratios, form factors, and interference phenomena.

  6. Beam Energy Scan Results from RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, P.

    2013-09-01

    In 2010 and 2011, RHIC ran the first phase of a planned beam energy scan program to probe, among other things, the nature of the phase transition between hadrons and Quark Gluon Plasma as the matter vs anti-matter excess increases. Many experimental findings are now available from that scan. In this talk, I discuss the meaning of those results and the future plans and motivation for the second phase of the RHIC beam energy scan.

  7. Phase Transition Signature Results from PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.e.; PHENIX Collaboration

    2009-06-08

    The PHENIX experiment has conducted searches for the QCD critical point with measurements of multiplicity fluctuations, transverse momentum fluctuations, event-by-event kaon-to-pion ratios, elliptic flow, and correlations. Measurements have been made in several collision systems as a function of centrality and transverse momentum. The results do not show significant evidence of critical behavior in the collision systems and energies studied, although several interesting features are discussed.

  8. Further results on finite-state codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollara, F.; Cheung, K.-M.; Mceliece, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    A general construction for finite-state (FS) codes is applied to some well-known block codes. Subcodes of the (24,12) Golay code are used to generate two optimal FS codes with d sub free = 12 and 16. A partition of the (16,8) Nordstrom-Robinson code yields a d sub free = 10 FS code. Simulation results are shown and decoding algorithms are briefly discussed.

  9. Recent results from CERN-WA98

    SciTech Connect

    Stankus, P.; WA98 Collaboration

    1997-02-01

    The CERN experiment WA98 is a general-survey, open-spectrometer experiment designed to examine 160 A GeV/c Pb+A collisions at the CERN-SPS. The experiment has a broad physics agenda, as suggested by its many different subsystems. A diagram of the experiment as it stood in 1995 is shown in the report. Detectors whose results are presented here are described briefly.

  10. Improved results of primary total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Over the past 20 years, several changes in treatment policy and treatment options have taken place regarding hip replacement. For this reason, we wanted to investigate the results after hip replacement in terms of revision rate, during a 21-year period among hip replacements reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. Methods 110,882 primary total hip replacements were reported to the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register from 1987 through 2007. Risk of revision during the time periods 1993–1997, 1998–2002, and 2003–2007 was compared to that of the reference period 1987–1992. Adjusted Cox regression analyses were performed to compare the risk of revision in different time periods and extended analyses were done to investigate revision within the first postoperative year and after the first year. Results There was an overall reduced risk of revision in the time periods 1993–1997, 1998–2002, and 2003–2007 compared to the reference period: RR = 0.81 (95% CI 0.77–0.86), 0.51 (CI 0.47–0.55), and 0.77 (CI 0.68–0.85), respectively. The improved results were due to a marked reduction in aseptic loosening of the femoral and acetabular components in all time periods and in all subgroups of prostheses. A change in the timing of revision took place, with more early revisions and fewer late revisions in the later time periods. Revision due to dislocation and infection increased over time. Interpretation The risk of revision decreased during the study period, due to fewer cases of aseptic loosening of prosthetic components. The best results were obtained with the use of cemented prostheses. Prevention of dislocation and infection should be a major goal in the future, as revision due to these causes increased during the study period. PMID:21110699

  11. Finite Element Results Visualization for Unstructured Grids

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-07-15

    GRIZ is a general-purpose post-processing application supporting interactive visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. In addition to basic pseudocolor renderings of state variables over the mesh surface, GRIZ provides modern visualization techniques such as isocontours and isosurfaces, cutting planes, vector field display, and particle traces. GRIZ accepts both command-line and mouse-driven input, and is portable to virtually any UNIX platform which provides Motif and OpenGl libraries.

  12. Digital Array Scanned Interferometer: Sensors And Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William Hyaden; Hammer, Philip D.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Digital Array Scanned Interferometers (DASI), blend characteristics of a grating spectrometer and a two-beam interferometer for acquisition of hyperspectra. DASIs possess field widened capabilities that permit very high throughput. Aspects of DASI design, hyperspectra and data processing methods are presented. In particular, we provide data showing the important result that photon noise limited hyperspectra are achievable for DASI data acquired with a variety of FPAs.

  13. Production LHC HTS power lead test results

    SciTech Connect

    Tartaglia, M.A.; Carcagno, R.H.; Feher, S.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Rabehl, R.J.; Sylvester, C.; Zbasnik, J.; / /LBL, Berkeley

    2004-10-01

    The Fermilab Magnet test facility has built and operated a test stand to characterize the performance of HTS power leads. We report here the results of production tests of 20 pairs of 7.5 kA HTS power leads manufactured by industry for installation in feed boxes for the LHC Interaction Region quadrupole strings. Included are discussions of the thermal, electrical, and quench characteristics under ''standard'' and ''extreme'' operating conditions, and the stability of performance across thermal cycles.

  14. Highlight of Results from ATLAS at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashige, Hisaya

    The recent results on Higgs particles are reported,using 4.5 fb-1 at ?s=7 TeV and 20.3 fb-1 of pp collisions at ?s=8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. In addition, we also present status and developments of pixel trackers installed in innermost part of ATLAS detector.

  15. Recent Higgs results from the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brendlinger, Kurt; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents recent results on the Higgs boson from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The Collaboration reports on measurements of the signal strength, couplings, and spin of the Higgs in several decay channels. We find all measurements to be consistent with Standard Model predictions. The Higgs branching fraction to invisible particles is constrained and no evidence of physics beyond the Standard Model is found.

  16. Recent Results from Fermilab E690

    SciTech Connect

    Berisso, M.C.; Christian, D.C.; Felix, J.; Gara, A.; Gottschalk, E.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartouni, E.P.; Knapp, B.C.; Kreisler, M.N.; Lee, S.; Markianos, K.; Moreno, G.; Reyes, M.A.; Sosa, M.; Wang, M.H.L.S.; Wehmann, A.; Wesson, D.

    1998-01-01

    Partial wave analysis results of centrally produced mesons in the reaction pp {yields} P{sub slow}(X)P{sub fast}, with 800 GeV/c protons incident on a liquid hydrogen target are presented. In the reactions considered in this paper the (X) system decays into: a) K{sup 0}{sub s}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}, b) K{sub s}K{sub s}, and c) {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}.

  17. Autonomous navigation ability: FIDO test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, E.; Maurette, M.

    2000-01-01

    The FIDO platform of the JPL has been used to evaluate the ability of autonomous obstacle avoidance developed by JPL and CNES autonomous long range path planning. The test results show that only a very small amount of energy and computing time is used to implement autonomy and that the capabilities of the rover are fully used, allowing a much longer daily traverse than purely ground-planned strategies.

  18. Validation Results for LEWICE 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.

    2005-01-01

    A research project is underway at NASA Glenn to produce computer software that can accurately predict ice growth under any meteorological conditions for any aircraft surface. This report will present results from version 3.0 of this software, which is called LEWICE. This version differs from previous releases in that it incorporates additional thermal analysis capabilities, a pneumatic boot model, interfaces to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) flow solvers and has an empirical model for the supercooled large droplet (SLD) regime. An extensive comparison of the results in a quantifiable manner against the database of ice shapes and collection efficiency that have been generated in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) has also been performed. The complete set of data used for this comparison will eventually be available in a contractor report. This paper will show the differences in collection efficiency between LEWICE 3.0 and experimental data. Due to the large amount of validation data available, a separate report is planned for ice shape comparison. This report will first describe the LEWICE 3.0 model for water collection. A semi-empirical approach was used to incorporate first order physical effects of large droplet phenomena into icing software. Comparisons are then made to every single element two-dimensional case in the water collection database. Each condition was run using the following five assumptions: 1) potential flow, no splashing; 2) potential flow, no splashing with 21 bin drop size distributions and a lift correction (angle of attack adjustment); 3) potential flow, with splashing; 4) Navier-Stokes, no splashing; and 5) Navier-Stokes, with splashing. Quantitative comparisons are shown for impingement limit, maximum water catch, and total collection efficiency. The results show that the predicted results are within the accuracy limits of the experimental data for the majority of cases.

  19. PDX experimental results in FY82

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.M.; Bell, M.; Bol, K.; Bitter, M.; Buchenauer, D.; Budny, R.; Brau, K.; Crowley, T.; Davis, S.; Dylla, H.

    1983-08-01

    This report presents a detailed summary of the major experimental results of PDX in FY82 and represents the efforts of the entire PDX group. Topics covered include ..beta..-scaling and fishbone studies, fluctuations, disruptions, impurities and impurity transport, power handling, limiter conditioning, edge studies, plasma fueling, counter-injection, and diagnostic development. A less detailed version will appear as the FY82 PDX contribution to the PPPL Annual Report.

  20. Coaching your unit team for results.

    PubMed

    Detmer, Sarah S

    2002-09-01

    Communication and critical thinking skills are core to the coaching processes. Bringing the coaching role to the individual and team level at the bedside is the key to improved results in patient care, nurse retention, clinical performance including error reduction, negotiation, and staff empowerment. Application of coaching concepts where the nurse meets the patient insures the growth and effectiveness of a coaching culture. Clinical review, individual communication, and teamwork examples are explored as effective arenas for coaching at the unit level. PMID:12271765