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Sample records for pentosan polysulfate resulted

  1. 77 FR 58399 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Recommendations for Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ...Recommendations for Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium Capsule; Availability AGENCY: Food and...Recommendations for Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium.'' The recommendations provide specific...applications (ANDAs) for pentosan polysulfate sodium capsule. DATES: Although you can...

  2. 77 FR 58399 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Recommendations for Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... INFORMATION: I. Background In the Federal Register of June 11, 2010 (75 FR 33311; FDA-2007-D- 0433), FDA... Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium Capsule; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... industry entitled ``Bioequivalence Recommendations for Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium.'' The...

  3. 75 FR 53704 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Use of Pentosan Polysulfate To Treat Certain Conditions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ...discovery that PPS can cause regression of scarring and lesions in prostatic tissue. PPS reduces or eliminates both smooth muscle cell proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition, and so reduces the size of the prostate gland and decreases...

  4. 75 FR 53704 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Use of Pentosan Polysulfate To Treat Certain Conditions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ...This is notice, in accordance with 35 U.S.C. 209(c)(1) and 37 CFR 404.7(a)(1)(i), that the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Department of Health and Human Services, is contemplating the grant of an exclusive patent license to practice the invention embodied in U.S. Patent Application No. 10/209,331, filed July 30, 2002, which was issued as U.S. Patent 6,828,309 on December 07, 2004,......

  5. Digestibility of Sugar, Starches, and Pentosans of Roughages. 

    E-print Network

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1916-01-01

    BULLETIN NO. 196 AUGUST, 1916 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY Digestibility of Sugars, Starches, and Pentosans of Roughages POSTOFFICE: COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS AUSTIN, TEXAS : VOX BOECKMANN-JONES CO., PRINTERS, 1916: [Blank Page in Original... Bulletin] 'EXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 196 AUGUST, 1916 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY Digestibility of Sugars, Starches, and Pentosans of Roughages G. S. FRAPS, Ph. D., CHEMIST IN CHARGE; STATE CHEMIST POSTOFFICE: COLLEGE STATION...

  6. Digestibility of the Sugars, Starches, Pentosans, and Protein of Some Feeding Stuffs. 

    E-print Network

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1922-01-01

    STATION AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS W. B. BIZZELL. President BULLETIN NO. 290 FEBRUARY, 1922 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY DIGESTIBILITY OF THE SUGARS, STARCHES, PENTOSANS, AND PROTEIDS OF SOME FEEDING STUFFS B. YOUNGBLOOD, DI... .................................. Summary and Conclusions. 21 1 DIGESTIBILITY OF THE SUGARS, STARCHES, PENTOSANS, I i AND PROTEIN OF SOME FEEDING STUFFS ! I L knowledge of the composition and digestibility of the sugars, ~clles, pentosans, and otlier ingredients of feecling...

  7. An injectable hydrogel incorporating mesenchymal precursor cells and pentosan polysulphate for intervertebral disc regeneration.

    PubMed

    Frith, Jessica E; Cameron, Andrew R; Menzies, Donna J; Ghosh, Peter; Whitehead, Darryl L; Gronthos, Stan; Zannettino, Andrew C W; Cooper-White, Justin J

    2013-12-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is one of the leading causes of lower back pain and a major health problem worldwide. Current surgical treatments include excision or immobilisation, with neither approach resulting in the repair of the degenerative disc. As such, a tissue engineering-based approach in which stem cells, coupled with an advanced delivery system, could overcome this deficiency and lead to a therapy that encourages functional fibrocartilage generation in the IVD. In this study, we have developed an injectable hydrogel system based on enzymatically-crosslinked polyethylene glycol and hyaluronic acid. We examined the effects of adding pentosan polysulphate (PPS), a synthetic glycosaminoglycan-like factor that has previously been shown (in vitro and in vivo) to this gel system in order to induce chondrogenesis in mesenchymal precursor cells (MPCs) when added as a soluble factor, even in the absence of additional growth factors such as TGF-?. We show that both the gelation rate and mechanical strength of the resulting hydrogels can be tuned in order to optimise the conditions required to produce gels with the desired combination of properties for an IVD scaffold. Human immunoselected STRO-1+ MPCs were then incorporated into the hydrogels. They were shown to retain good viability after both the initial formation of the gel and for longer-term culture periods in vitro. Furthermore, MPC/hydrogel composites formed cartilage-like tissue which was significantly enhanced by the incorporation of PPS into the hydrogels, particularly with respect to the deposition of type-II-collagen. Finally, using a wild-type rat subcutaneous implantation model, we examined the extent of any immune reaction and confirmed that this matrix is well tolerated by the host. Together these data provide evidence that such a system has significant potential as both a delivery vehicle for MPCs and as a matrix for fibrocartilage tissue engineering applications. PMID:24050877

  8. Augmented anti-angiogenesis activity of polysulfated heparin-endostatin and polyethylene glycol-endostatin in alkali burn-induced corneal ulcers in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    LI, ZHAO-NA; YUAN, ZHONG-FANG; MU, GUO-YING; HU, MING; CAO, LI-JUN; ZHANG, YA-LI; GE, MING-XU

    2015-01-01

    Endostatin (ES) is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor that has the ability to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. However, its clinical application is limited by a number of disadvantages, such as poor stability, short half-life and the requirement of high doses to maintain its efficacy. The chemical modification on ES may offer a solution to these disadvantages. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of ES, polysulfated heparin-endostatin (PSH-ES) and polyethylene glycol-endostatin (PEG-ES) on the endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis associated with corneal neovascularization (CNV) and to determine their mechanisms of action. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) was used to study the effects of ES and its derivatives on endothelial cell proliferation in vitro, and rabbits were used to evaluate the effects of ES and its derivatives on CNV in vivo. In the evaluation of CNV, the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in the cornea was measured via immunohistochemistry and microvessels were counted. ES and its derivatives significantly inhibited endothelial cell proliferation in vitro (P<0.05) and suppressed CNV in vivo. Among the compounds examined, ES most effectively inhibited endothelial cell proliferation in vitro (P<0.05); however, PSH-ES and PEG-ES most effectively inhibited CNV in vivo (P<0.05). These results indicate that PSH-ES and PEG-ES are candidate anti-angiogenesis drugs. PMID:26622410

  9. Interstitial Cystitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medicine. Your doctor may have you take an oral medicine called pentosan polysulfate. This medicine helps protect the ... wall from the toxic parts of urine. Another oral medicine used to treat interstitial cystitis is an antihistamine ...

  10. In vitro hemorheological effects of parenteral agents used in peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biro, Katalin; Sandor, Barbara; Toth, Andras; Koltai, Katalin; Papp, Judit; Rabai, Miklos; Toth, Kalman; Kesmarky, Gabor

    2014-05-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a frequent manifestation of systemic atherosclerosis. In PAD hemorheological parameters were defined as risk factors in a number of studies and several therapeutic agents were tried in these conditions. Our study aims to investigate and compare the in vitro hemorheological effects of various drugs generally used in the parenteral treatment of intermittent claudication and critical limb ischemia. Blood samples of healthy male volunteers were incubated with iloprost, alprostadil, pentoxifylline, sulodexide or pentosan polysulfate at calculated therapeutic serum concentration. Hematocrit (Hct) was determined by microhematocrit centrifuge. Plasma and apparent whole blood viscosities (WBV) were evaluated by capillary viscometer. Red blood cell aggregation was measured by LORCA (laserassisted optical rotational cell analyzer) aggregometer, and LORCA ektacytometer was used for measuring erythrocyte deformability at 37°C. Iloprost, alprostadil, and pentoxifylline incubation did not have any significant effect on plasma and apparent WBV. Elongation index increased in samples incubated with alprostadil at low shear stresses 0.95 and 0.53 Pa (p < 0.05). Sulodexide significantly improved WBV and Hct/WBV ratio (p < 0.05). Incubation with pentosan polysulfate resulted in higher WBV, lower Hct/WBV ratio and deterioration in the aggregation parameters (p < 0.05). Sulodexide may have beneficial effect on a macrorheological parameter; alprostadil may improve a microrheological parameter. Hemorheological alterations could be important in PAD patients with hampered vasodilator capacity.

  11. Enzymatic solubilization of arabinoxylans from isolated rye pentosans and rye flour by different endo-xylanases and other hydrolyzing enzymes. Effect of a fungal caccase on the flour extracts oxidative gelation.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Espinoza, M C; Poulsen, C; Borch Søe, J; Zargahi, M R; Rouau, X

    2002-10-23

    Water-extractable (WEP) and water-unextractable (WUP) pentosans were isolated from a rye flour. The effect of a commercial enzyme preparation, Grindamyl S 100 (GS100), containing pentosanase activities, was investigated on WEP, WUP, a mix of WEP and WUP, and the rye flour, with the aim to monitor the solubilization and depolymerization of high molecular weight arabinoxylans and the effect on the viscosity of the reaction medium. The effects of other hydrolyzing enzymes were also tested. Three xylanases were used: xylanase 1 (Xyl-1) from Aspergillus niger, the main activity present in GS100; xylanase 2 (Xyl-2) from Talaromyces emersonii; and xylanase 3 (Xyl-3) from Bacillus subtilis. Xyl-3 was used in combination with Xyl-1, (1,4)-beta-D-arabinoxylan arabinofuranohydrolase, endo-beta-D-glucanase, or ferulate esterase from A. niger, but no synergism was observed. GS100 and xylanases increased the arabinoxylan solubilization, Xyl-3 and Xyl-1 being those that presented the best yields of extraction without extensive depolymerization of water-extractable arabinoxylans. Both xylanases were affected by an inhibitor in rye flour. Flour treated with hot ethanol was used to study the oxidative gelation of flour extracts treated with xylanases, in the presence of laccase from Pycnoporus cinnabarinus. Two doses of xylanases were tested (0.5 and 2.5 units). Only the flour extracts treated with 0.5 unit of Xyl-1 thickened. PMID:12381136

  12. 21 CFR 522.1850 - Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL... (d) Conditions of use —(1) Horses —(i) Indications for use ...lameness of the carpal and hock joints in horses. (ii) Amount —(A) Intra-articular...iii) Limitations . Do not use in horses intended for human consumption....

  13. 21 CFR 522.1850 - Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL... (d) Conditions of use —(1) Horses —(i) Indications for use ...lameness of the carpal and hock joints in horses. (ii) Amount —(A) Intra-articular...iii) Limitations . Do not use in horses intended for human consumption....

  14. 21 CFR 522.1850 - Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL... (d) Conditions of use —(1) Horses —(i) Indications for use ...lameness of the carpal and hock joints in horses. (ii) Amount —(A) Intra-articular...iii) Limitations . Do not use in horses intended for human consumption....

  15. 21 CFR 522.1850 - Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL... (d) Conditions of use —(1) Horses —(i) Indications for use. ...lameness of the carpal and hock joints in horses. (ii) Amount —(A) Intra-articular...iii) Limitations. Do not use in horses intended for human consumption....

  16. 21 CFR 522.1850 - Polysulfated glycosaminoglycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL... (d) Conditions of use —(1) Horses —(i) Indications for use ...lameness of the carpal and hock joints in horses. (ii) Amount —(A) Intra-articular...iii) Limitations . Do not use in horses intended for human consumption....

  17. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  18. Hemorrhagic radiation cystitis.

    PubMed

    Mendenhall, William M; Henderson, Randal H; Costa, Joseph A; Hoppe, Bradford S; Dagan, Roi; Bryant, Curtis M; Nichols, Romaine C; Williams, Christopher R; Harris, Stephanie E; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2015-06-01

    The optimal management of persistent hemorrhagic radiation cystitis is ill-defined. Various options are available and include oral agents (ie, sodium pentosan polysulfate), intravenous drugs (ie, WF10), topical agents (ie, formalin), hyperbaric oxygen, and endoscopic procedures (ie, electrical cautery, argon plasma coagulation, laser coagulation). In general, it is best to manage patients conservatively and intervene only when necessary with the option least likely to exacerbate the cystitis. More aggressive measures should be employed only when more conservative approaches fail. Bladder biopsies should be avoided, unless findings suggest a bladder tumor, because they may precipitate a complication. PMID:24322335

  19. Distribution and Digestibility of the Pentosans of Feeds. 

    E-print Network

    Fraps, G. S.

    1915-01-01

    ..................... . .. . Soluble hot water ... ? ....... .. .... . ...... . . . 9 . 68i 0.27 .00 0.77 9.64 .00> 0.58 *1.45 2. 9() 2 . 13 0.51 2 . 04 1.51 5.051 1.63 2.71 0.67 0.84 1. 92 1. 80 Soluble 1% hydrqchloric acid. . . . ... ?1 Soluble 1% causl1c soda....6 { 48.7 26.5 72.61 50.1 74.9 - ?gl~a~l?e? so% .al~oboi .... :::::::::::: 1 Soluble cold water ..... . ......... . Soluble hot water . ........ . . .. ... . Soluble 1% hydrochloric acid .... . . Soluble 1% caustic soda .... .... .. . Soluble...

  20. Adsorption of fibrinogen to droplets of liquid hydrophobic phases. Functionality of the bound protein and biological implications.

    PubMed

    Retzinger, G S; DeAnglis, A P; Patuto, S J

    1998-12-01

    Fibrinogen adsorbs spontaneously from aqueous media containing that protein to droplets of liquid hydrophobic phases dispersed in those same media. Examples of such phases include mineral oils, straight-chain hydrocarbons, and various plant- and animal-derived oils. Lecithin preexisting on the surface of oil droplets reduces significantly the amount of fibrinogen that can otherwise bind to them. When bound, fibrinogen remains active in the classic sense of fibrin gelation. As a consequence, oil droplets coated with fibrinogen can participate in a host of biologically important adhesive processes in which the protein would be expected to participate. Certain polyanions, eg, heparin, pentosan polysulfate, dextran sulfate, and suramin, bind to adsorbed fibrin(ogen) and prevent thrombin-dependent adhesion of fibrinogen-coated surfaces. Thus, these polyanions can be used to prevent adhesion between fibrin(ogen)-coated oil droplets and other fibrin(ogen)-coated surfaces. Potential practical applications and biological implications of these phenomena are presented and discussed. PMID:9848889

  1. LRP/LR as an alternative promising target in therapy of prion diseases, Alzheimer's disease and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vana, Karen; Zuber, Chantal; Pflanz, Heike; Kolodziejczak, Dominika; Zemora, Georgeta; Bergmann, Ann-Katrin; Weiss, Stefan

    2009-02-01

    The 37 kDa/67 kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR) represents a key player for cell adhesion, is associated with the metastatic potential of solid tumors and is required for maintenance of cell viability by preventing apoptosis. LRP/LR acts as a receptor for viruses such as Sindbis virus, Venezuelean Equine Encephalitis (VEE) virus, Adeno-associated-viruses (AAV) and Dengue Virus, the latter causing 50 to 100 million infections in humans per year. LRP/LR acts further as a receptor for prions and represents a multifunctional protein subcellularly located to the nucleus, the cytoplasm and the cell surface. The receptor represents an alternative target for therapy of viral infections, cancer and prion disorders and might play additional roles in further neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. The species barrier in prion disorders might be at least in part determined by the presence of LRP/LR in enterocytes of the intestinal epithelium. Anti-LRP/LR antibodies, siRNAs directed against LRP mRNA, polysulfated glycanes such as pentosan polysulfate and heparan mimetics and LRP decoy mutants are promising tools for blocking or downregulating the receptor and may represent alternative therapeutics for the treatment of prion disorders, Alzheimer's Disease and metastatic cancer. PMID:19200017

  2. Mechanisms Involved in the Anti-Inflammatory Action of a Polysulfated Fraction from Gracilaria cornea in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Coura, Chistiane Oliveira; Souza, Ricardo Basto; Rodrigues, José Ariévilo Gurgel; Vanderlei, Edfranck de Sousa Oliveira; de Araújo, Ianna Wivianne Fernandes; Ribeiro, Natássia Albuquerque; Frota, Annyta Fernandes; Ribeiro, Kátia Alves; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos; Pereira, Karuza Maria Alves; da Cunha, Rodrigo Maranguape Silva; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Benevides, Norma Maria Barros

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the sulfated polysaccharidic fraction obtained from red marine alga Gracilaria cornea (Gc-FI) were investigated using a paw edema model induced in rats by different inflammatory agents (carrageenan, dextran, serotonin, bradykinin, compound 48/80 or L-arginine). Gc-FI at the doses of 3, 9 or 27 mg/kg, subcutaneously - s.c., significantly inhibited rat paw edema induced by carrageenan and dextran, as confirmed by myeloperoxidase and Evans’ blue assessments, respectively. Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c.) inhibited rat paw edema induced by histamine, compound 48/80 and L-arginine. Additionally, Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c.) inhibited Cg-induced edema in animals with intact mast cells but did not inhibit that with degranulated mast cells by compound 48/80, revealing a protective role on mast cell membranes. Gc-FI down-regulated the IL-1?, TNF-? and COX-2 mRNA and protein levels compared with those of the carrageenan group, based on qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analyses. After inhibition with ZnPP IX, a specific heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor, the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI was not observed in Cg-induced paw edema, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI is, in part, dependent on the integrity of the HO-1 pathway. Gc-FI can target a combination of multiple points involved in inflammatory phenomena. PMID:25807556

  3. Research Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    Research on Global Carbon Emission and Sequestration NSFC Funded Project Made Significant Progress in Quantum Dynamics Functional Human Blood Protein Obtained from Rice How Giant Pandas Thrive on a Bamboo Diet New Evidence of Interpersonal Violence from 129,000 Years Ago Found in China Aptamer-Mediated Efficient Capture and Release of T Lymphocytes on Nanostructured Surfaces BGI Study Results on Resequencing 50 Accessions of Rice Cast New Light on Molecular Breeding BGI Reports Study Results on Frequent Mutation of Genes Encoding UMPP Components in Kidney Cancer Research on Habitat Shift Promoting Species Diversification

  4. DONUT results

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Tomoko

    2008-02-21

    The DONUT experiment succeeded in observing tau-neutrino CC interactions for the first time in 2000. The analysis using total sample is presented in this paper, based on 3.5x10{sup 17} protons on target. The number of identified {nu}{sub {tau}} CC interactions is 9 from 581 neutrino interactions located in the emulsion. The result of the first measurement of {nu}{sub {tau}} CC cross section is consistent with the expectation from the Standard Model.

  5. Intra-articular therapy in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Uthman, I; Raynauld, J; Haraoui, B

    2003-01-01

    The medical literature was reviewed from 1968–2002 using Medline and the key words "intra-articular" and "osteoarthritis" to determine the various intra-articular therapies used in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid are the most frequently used intra-articular therapies in osteoarthritis. Other intra-articular substances such as orgotein, radiation synovectomy, dextrose prolotherapy, silicone, saline lavage, saline injection without lavage, analgesic agents, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, glucosamine, somatostatin, sodium pentosan polysulfate, chloroquine, mucopolysaccharide polysulfuric acid ester, lactic acid solution, and thiotepa cytostatica have been investigated as potentially therapeutic in the treatment of arthritic joints. Despite the lack of strong, convincing, and reproducible evidence that any of the intra-articular therapies significantly alters the progression of osteoarthritis, corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid are widely used in patients who have failed other therapeutic modalities for lack of efficacy or toxicity. As a practical approach for a knee with effusion, steroid injections should be considered while the presence of symptomatic "dry" knees may favour the hyaluronic acid approach. The virtual absence of serious side effects, coupled with the perceived benefits, make these approaches attractive. PMID:12954956

  6. Steam-explosion pretreatment of wood: effect of chip size, acid, moisture content and pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Brownell, H.H.; Yu, E.K.C.; Saddler, J.N.

    1986-06-01

    Material balances for pentosan, lignin, and hexosan, during steam-explosion pretreatment of aspenwood, showed almost quantitative recovery of cellulose in the water-insoluble fraction. Dilute acid impregnation resulted in more selective hydrolysis of pentosan relative to undesirable pyrolysis, and gave a more accessible substrate for enzymatic hydrolysis. Thermocouple probes, located inside simulated aspenwood chips heated in 240 degrees C-saturated steam, showed rapid heating of air-dry wood, whereas green or impregnated wood heated slowly. Small chips, 3.2 mm in the fiber direction, whether green or air dry gave approximately equal rates of pentosan destruction and solubilization, and similar yields of glucose and of total reducing sugars on enzmatic hydrolysis with Trichoderma harzianum. Partial pyrolysis, destroying one-third of the pentosan of aspenwood at atmospheric pressure by dry steam at 276 degrees C, gave little increase in yield of reducing sugars on enzymatic hydrolysis. Treatment with saturated steam at 240 degrees C gave essentially the same yields of butanediol and ethanol on fermentation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, whether or not 80% of the steam was bled off before explosion and even if the chips remained intact, showing that explosion was unnecessary. 17 references.

  7. Cholesterol testing and results

    MedlinePLUS

    ... test results; Coronary risk profile results; Hyperlipidemia-results; Lipid disorder test results ... in your blood. You may also have a lipid (or coronary risk) profile, which includes: Total cholesterol ...

  8. History and previous results Main result

    E-print Network

    Basu, Saugata

    on a variety #12;History and previous results Main result Future work vet R e rel losed (eldF vet & R[X1 Q(x) = Hg; nd we suppose the rel dimension of V in Rk is kH kF vet & R[X1;:::;Xk] e (nite set Future work vet R e rel losed (eldF vet & R[X1;:::;Xk] e (nite set of polynomils with deg Q d0D Q P F

  9. Autonomous Soaring Flight Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on autonomous soaring flight results for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)'s is shown. The topics include: 1) Background; 2) Thermal Soaring Flight Results; 3) Autonomous Dolphin Soaring; and 4) Future Plans.

  10. Population protocols Impossibility results

    E-print Network

    Aspnes, James

    Population protocols Impossibility results Computation on graphs Computation by epidemic Conclusions Population Protocols James Aspnes Yale University January 29th, 2007 January 29th, 2007 Population Protocols #12;Population protocols Impossibility results Computation on graphs Computation by epidemic

  11. Angiopoietin-1 prevents severe bleeding complications induced by heparin-like drugs and fibroblast growth factor-2 in mice.

    PubMed

    Jerebtsova, Marina; Das, Jharna R; Tang, Pingtao; Wong, Edward; Ray, Patricio E

    2015-10-01

    Critically ill children can develop bleeding complications when treated with heparin-like drugs. These events are usually attributed to the anticoagulant activity of these drugs. However, previous studies showed that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), a heparin-binding growth factor released in the circulation of these patients, could precipitate intestinal hemorrhages in mice treated with the heparin-like drug pentosan polysulfate (PPS). Yet very little is known about how FGF-2 induces bleeding complications in combination with heparin-like drugs. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which circulating FGF-2 induces intestinal hemorrhages in mice treated with PPS. We used a well-characterized mouse model of intestinal hemorrhages induced by FGF-2 plus PPS. Adult FVB/N mice were infected with adenovirus carrying Lac-Z or a secreted form of recombinant human FGF-2, and injected with PPS, at doses that do not induce bleeding complications per se. Mice treated with FGF-2 in combination with PPS developed an intestinal inflammatory reaction that increased the permeability and disrupted the integrity of submucosal intestinal vessels. These changes, together with the anticoagulant activity of PPS, induced lethal hemorrhages. Moreover, a genetically modified form of the endothelial ligand angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1*), which has powerful antipermeability and anti-inflammatory activity, prevented the lethal bleeding complications without correcting the anticoagulant status of these mice. These findings define new mechanisms through which FGF-2 and Ang-1* modulate the outcome of intestinal bleeding complications induced by PPS in mice and may have wider clinical implications for critically ill children treated with heparin-like drugs. PMID:26276817

  12. Reversible detection of heparin and other polyanions by pulsed chronopotentiometric polymer membrane electrode.

    PubMed

    Gemene, Kebede L; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2010-03-01

    The first fully reversible polymeric membrane-based sensor for the anticoagulant heparin and other polyanions using a pulsed chronopotentiometry (pulstrode) measurement mode is reported. Polymeric membranes containing a lipophilic inert salt of the form R(+)R(-) (where R(+) and R(-) are tridodecylmethylammonium (TDMA(+)) and dinonylnaphthalene sulfonate (DNNS(-)), respectively) are used to suppress unwanted spontaneous ion extractions under zero-current equilibrium conditions. An anodic galvanostatic current pulse applied across the membrane perturbs the equilibrium lipophilic ion distribution within the membrane phase in such a way that anions/polyanions are extracted into the membrane from the sample. The membrane is then subjected to an open-circuit zero current state for a short period, and finally a 0 V vs reference electrode potentiostatic pulse is applied to restore the membrane to its initial full equilibrium condition. Potentials are sampled as average values during the last 10% of the 0.5 s open circuit phase of the measurement cycle. Fully reversible and reproducible electromotive force (emf) responses are observed for heparin, pentosan polysulfate (PPS), chondroitin sulfate (CS), and oversulfated chondroitin sulfate (OSCS), with the magnitude of the potentiometric response proportional to charge density of the polyanions. The sensor provides an emf response related to heparin concentrations in the range of 1-20 U/mL. The responses to variations in heparin levels and toward other polyanions of the pulstrode configuration are analogous to the already established single-use, nonreversible potentiometric polyion sensors based on membranes doped only with the lipophilic anion exchanger TDMA(+). PMID:20121058

  13. INTRODUCTION ABSTRACT RESULTS DISCUSSION

    E-print Network

    Gopalakrishnan, K.

    INTRODUCTION ABSTRACT RESULTS DISCUSSION REFERENCES Center for Health Services Research System. North Carolina Center for Health Statistics, Division of Public Health. Raleigh, NC. Research/Ethnicity, Percentages (* Phealth

  14. Your Kidney Test Results

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is an eGFR less than 60 Your Serum Creatinine Result: Your eGFR Result: Urine Albumin-to-Creatinine Ratio (UACR) CKD is more than 30 Your ... filtering blood. As kidney disease gets worse, the creatinine goes up and the eGFR goes down. Urine albumin checks for kidney damage. The lower the ...

  15. Getting Districtwide Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBeath, Angus

    2006-01-01

    This monograph is based on a keynote presentation by Angus McBeath at the "Getting Districtwide Results" Conference in Long Beach, California, which was co-sponsored by the Cross City Campaign for Urban School Reform and Focus on Results. The author, a former superintendent of the Edmonton Public Schools, how his school district was "forced" and…

  16. Recent results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    R. Harr

    2004-01-26

    The authors report on the recent heavy-quark results from CDF in Run IIa. They focus on a selection of mature analyses that demonstrate the capabilities of the experiment to extract interesting physics from the data. A few of the results presented have already been submitted for publication and papers are being prepared for most of the others.

  17. Vehicle Technologies Program Results

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-19

    The Vehicle Technologies Program's progress is closely monitored by both internal and external organizations. The Program's results are detailed in a wide range of documents and tools that can be accessed through the PIR website. Descriptions of these materials are provided on this program results page.

  18. Recent results from TRISTAN

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    1997-01-01

    TRISTAN results on {gamma}{gamma} physics from 1994 to 1995 are reviewed in this report. We have systematically investigated jet production, the {gamma}-structure function, and charm pair production in {gamma}{gamma} processes. The results are discussed, and future prospects are presented.

  19. NAS parallel benchmark results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, D. H.; Barszcz, E.; Dagum, L.; Simon, H. D.

    1992-01-01

    The NAS (Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation) parallel benchmarks have been developed at NASA Ames Research Center to study the performance of parallel supercomputers. The eight benchmark problems are specified in a 'pencil and paper' fashion. The performance results of various systems using the NAS parallel benchmarks are presented. These results represent the best results that have been reported to the authors for the specific systems listed. They represent implementation efforts performed by personnel in both the NAS Applied Research Branch of NASA Ames Research Center and in other organizations.

  20. Electroweak results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Waters

    2004-06-02

    Inclusive W and Z production cross-sections have been measured by CDF and certain electroweak parameters extracted with high precision from these measurements. New results on diboson production at the Tevatron are also presented.

  1. Tevatron direct photon results.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlmann, S.

    1999-09-21

    Tevatron direct photon results since DIS98 are reviewed. Two new CDF measurements are discussed, the Run Ib inclusive photon cross section and the photon + Muon cross section. Comparisons with the latest NLO QCD calculations are presented.

  2. Sensitivity and Scenario Results

    E-print Network

    Yu, Winston

    Presents the results of various scenarios using models used to study water, climate, agriculture and the economy in Pakistan's Indus Basin, and discusses the policy and investment implications. The water allocations per ...

  3. $?\\to ??$ results in nuclei

    E-print Network

    P. Camerini; E. Fragiacomo; N. Grion; R. Rui; J. T. Brack; E. F. Gibson; G. J. Hofman; E. L. Mathie; R. Meier; K. Raywood; M. E. Sevior; G. R. Smith; R. Tacik

    2001-09-11

    The Crystal Ball ($CB$) collaboration at $BNL$ has recently presented results regarding a study of the $\\pi^- A \\to \\pi^0\\pi^0 A^\\prime$ reaction on $H, D, C, Al$ and $Cu$, using a nearly 4$\\pi$ detector. Similar results, but for the $\\pi^+ A \\to \\pi^+\\pi^{\\pm} A^\\prime$ reaction on $^{2}H$, $^{12}C$, $^{40}Ca$, and $^{208}Pb$, have been published earlier by the $CHAOS$ collaboration at $TRIUMF$. In this Brief Report a comparison of the results of the two measurements is made, which shows that the $CHAOS$ and $CB$ data share relevant common features. In particular, the increase in strength as a function of A seen in the near-threshold $\\pi^+ \\pi^-$ invariant mass spectra reported by the $CHAOS$ group, is also seen in the $\\pi^0 \\pi^0$ CB data, when the results from the two groups are compared in a way which accounts for the different acceptances of the two experiments.

  4. Focus on Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driggs, Gerald

    2000-01-01

    This article describes Outcome Based Management components, including identifying highest level outcomes, targeting priorities, clarifying outcomes, maintaining stakeholder collaboration, declaring realities, producing stakeholder benefits, outlining needs, establishing rules, comparing results, productizing around outcomes, providing feedback,…

  5. Recent MEG results

    E-print Network

    G. Cavoto

    2010-12-09

    New results of a search for the ultra-rare decay $\\mu \\to e \\gamma$ by the MEG collaboration are reported in this contribution. The data were taken during 2009 and correspond to approximately 6.5 10$^{13}$ muon stopped on target. A maximum likelihood analysis sets an upper limit at 90\\% C.L. on the branching ratio, BF($\\mu \\to e \\gamma$) $< $1.5 10$^{-11}$. The results presented here are preliminary.

  6. Results from MAC

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, G.B.

    1983-05-01

    The MAC detector has been exposed at PEP to 40 pb/sup -1/ luminosity of e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions. The detector is described and recent results of a continuing analysis of hadronic cross section, lepton pair charge asymmetry, Bhabha process, two photon final state and radiative ..mu.. pairs are given. New results on flavor tagging of hadronic events with an inclusive ..mu.., and some searches for new particles are presented.

  7. New Ceres Results

    E-print Network

    A. Marin; for the CERES Collaboration

    2002-06-07

    During 1999 the CERES experiment upgraded by the new TPC was taking data from semicentral Pb+Au collisions at 40 AGeV. The analysis of the di-electron spectra shows an enhancement in the low mass region of at least the same magnitude as previously observed at full SPS energy. The results are compared to model calculations with and without medium modifications of the vector mesons. The addition of the radial TPC gives more possibilities to study hadronic observables. The results obtained for the midrapidity Lambda yield and the AntiLambda/Lambda ratio are compared to the existing systematics

  8. RLC circuits End result

    E-print Network

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    RLC circuits End result: I is largest when bottom is small Or is also called the resonance frequency (in the homework) ( )22 1 C LR I d d -+ = mE C L d d 1 = == LC d 1 RR f 2== #12;AC circuits RLC circuit ­ resistor, capacitor and inductor in series Apply alternating emf Elements are in series

  9. Recent results from MAC

    SciTech Connect

    MAC Collaboration

    1982-05-01

    Some preliminary results from the MAC detector at PEP are presented. These include measurements of the angular distribution of ..gamma gamma.., ..mu mu.. and tau tau final states, a determination of the tau lifetime, a measurement of R, and a presentation of the inclusive muon p/sub perpendicular/ distribution for hadronic events.

  10. Oliver Kullmann Main results

    E-print Network

    Kullmann, Oliver

    Oliver Kullmann Main results Complement invariance Lean clause-sets Minimal unsatisfiability SAT and Outlook SAT and the Polya Permanent Problem Oliver Kullmann Computer Science Department Swansea University SAT 2007, Lisbon, May 30, 2007 SAT: Connecting combinatorics and linear algebra #12;Oliver Kullmann

  11. QCD results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Plunkett, R.; The CDF Collaboration

    1991-10-01

    Results are presented for hadronic jet and direct photon production at {radical}{bar s} = 1800 GeV. The data are compared with next-to-leading QCD calculations. A new limit on the scale of possible composite structure of the quarks is also reported. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Sharing Research Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    There are many ways to share a collection of data and students' thinking about that data. Explaining the results of science inquiry is important--working scientists and amateurs both contribute information to the body of scientific knowledge. Students can collect data about an activity that is already happening in a classroom (e.g., the qualities…

  13. Recent BABAR Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigen, Gerald; BABAR Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    We present herein the most recent BABAR results on direct CP asymmetry measurements in B ? Xs?, on partial branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements in B ? Xs?+?-, on a search for B ? ?/??+?- decays, on a search for lepton number violation in B+ ? X-?+?'+ modes and a study of B0 ? ?? and B0 ? ?? decays.

  14. Dosimetric results on EURECA

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, G.

    1995-02-01

    Detector packages were exposed on the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA) as part of the Biostack experiment inside the Exobiology and Radiation Assembly (ERA) and at several locations around EURECA. The packages consist of different plastic nuclear track detectors, nuclear emulsions and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD`s). Evaluation of these detectors yields data on absorbed dose and particle and LET spectra. Preliminary results of absorbed dose measurements in the EURECA dosimeter packages are reported and compared to results of the LDEF experiments. The highest dose rate measured on EURECA is 63.3 plus or minus 0.4 mGy d(exp -1) behind a shielding thickness of 0.09 g cm(exp -2) in front of the detector package.

  15. Latest results from Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauber, Jan; Submitted the Planck Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This talk will present an overview of the most recent Planck data and results, with emphasis on polarization.The use of CMB polarization data from Planck confirms the best-fit Lambda-CDM model obtained with Planck temperature-only data, and improves the accuracy with which cosmological parameters are determined. The most recent results based on polarized E-mode and B-mode CMB power spectra at large angular scales will be presented, and their implications for the epoch of reionization and primordial gravitational waves.In this talk I will also present the latest analysis of polarized diffuse galactic foreground emissions based on Planck data. Both the synchrotron and dust emission maps obtained from Planck reveal new facets of the galactic interstellar medium. In particular dust emission holds the promise of providing a model of the large-scale 3D shape of the Galactic magnetic field, as well as its small scale behavior.

  16. Results from SAGE II

    SciTech Connect

    Nico, J.S.

    1994-10-01

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first nine runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 66{sub -13}{sup +18} (stat) {sub -7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result of 73{sub -16}{sup +18} (stat) {sub -7}{sup 5} (sys) SNU, the capture rate is 69{sub -11}{sup +11} (stat) {sub -7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. This represents only 52%--56% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models.

  17. Dosimetric results on EURECA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitz, G.

    1995-01-01

    Detector packages were exposed on the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA) as part of the Biostack experiment inside the Exobiology and Radiation Assembly (ERA) and at several locations around EURECA. The packages consist of different plastic nuclear track detectors, nuclear emulsions and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's). Evaluation of these detectors yields data on absorbed dose and particle and LET spectra. Preliminary results of absorbed dose measurements in the EURECA dosimeter packages are reported and compared to results of the LDEF experiments. The highest dose rate measured on EURECA is 63.3 plus or minus 0.4 mGy d(exp -1) behind a shielding thickness of 0.09 g cm(exp -2) in front of the detector package.

  18. FLITECAM: early commissioning results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logsdon, Sarah E.; McLean, Ian S.; Becklin, Eric E.; Dunham, Edward W.; Hamilton, Ryan T.; Johnson, Christopher; Milburn, Jennifer W.; Savage, Maureen L.; Shenoy, Sachindev S.; Smith, Erin C.; Vacca, William D.

    2014-07-01

    We present a status report and early commissioning results for FLITECAM, the 1-5 micron imager and spectrometer for SOFIA (the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy). In February 2014 we completed six flights with FLITECAM mounted in the FLIPO configuration, a co-mounting of FLITECAM and HIPO (High-speed Imaging Photometer for Occultations; PI Edward W. Dunham, Lowell Observatory). During these flights, the FLITECAM modes from ~1-4 ?m were characterized. Since observatory verification flights in 2011, several improvements have been made to the FLITECAM system, including the elimination of a light leak in the FLITECAM filter wheel enclosure, and updates to the observing software. We discuss both the improvements to the FLITECAM system and the results from the commissioning flights, including updated sensitivity measurements. Finally, we discuss the utility of FLITECAM in the FLIPO configuration for targeting exoplanet transits.

  19. New results from CERES

    E-print Network

    A. Marin; for the CERES Collaboration

    2004-06-03

    During the year 2000 the CERES experiment, upgraded with a radial drift TPC, took a large data sample of Pb on Au collisions at 158 AGeV triggered on the 8% most central collisions. A very detailed calibration of the radial drift TPC was since completed. Preliminary results on $e^+e^-$ pairs and $\\phi$ mesons reconstructed in the $K^+K^-$ channel are presented.

  20. Results from AMANDA

    E-print Network

    Gary C. Hill; for the AMANDA collaboration

    2001-06-05

    The AMANDA (Antarctic Muon And Neutrino Detector Array) detector, located at the South Pole station, Antarctica, was recently expanded with the addition of six new strings, completing the phase referred to as AMANDA-II. This detector has been calibrated and in operation since January 2000. The first data analyses are currently underway. In this report we present an update on the results from the AMANDA-B10 detector, which operated during the austral winter 1997.

  1. Results from SAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurashitov, J.N.; Gavrin, V.N.; Girin, S.V.

    1996-04-01

    The Russian-American Gallium Solar Neutrino Experiment (SAGE) is described. Beginning in September 1992, SAGE II data were taken with 55 tons of Ga and with significantly reduced backgrounds. The solar neutrino flux measured by 31 extractions through October 1993 is presented. The result of 69 {+-} 10 +5/{minus}7 SNU is to be compared with a Standard Solar Model prediction of 132 SNU.

  2. PMMW data collection results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, Bradley T.; Resnick, Andrew; Foster, Joseph; Albers, Charles J., Jr.; Witherspoon, Ned H.; Holloway, John H., Jr.

    1998-09-01

    Coastal Systems Station under the sponsorship of the Marine Corps Amphibious Warfare Technology Directorate are exploring the use of a Passive Millimeter Wave (PMMW) sensor for stand off airborne mine detection. In the development of any new technology application, there exist a critical need to develop a balanced modeling and measurement capability. Both will complement one another. Nichols Research has established a physics-based image modeling capability for Passive Millimeter Wave (PMMW) systems. This modeling capability has been used to estimate the performance of a PMMW mine detection system. But, in order to accurately predict the performance of a PMMW imaging system, the background clutter characteristics must be characterized and the modeling results verified against measured data. In fact, in the case of a well designed sensor, the background clutter will define the systems overall performance making accurate knowledge of the clutter statistical variations critical. However currently, there is a lack of high resolution PMMW imagery of backgrounds, due to a lack of data collection instrumentation. This paper will present the results from a preliminary PMMW data collection to provide data for the assessment of a PMMW mine detection system. The data collection results will characterize both surface and buried mine detection capabilities under a variety of conditions. It is a well-established fact that no single sensor will be capable of solving the mine detection problem. Instead, a suite of complementary sensors is required. There is however a lack of an extensive data set of sensor modalities collected in a single sample area. Therefore as a secondary objective of this data collection, several sensor modalities will be used to simultaneously collect mine and minefield data. These results will also be presented.

  3. Theoretical Results on Neutrinos

    E-print Network

    Shun Zhou

    2015-11-23

    In this talk, I first summarize our current knowledge about the fundamental properties of neutrinos and emphasize the remaining unsolved problems in neutrino physics. Then, recent theoretical results on neutrino mass models are introduced. Different approaches to understanding tiny neutrino masses, lepton flavor mixing and CP violation are presented. Finally, I report briefly some new progress in the studies of astrophysical neutrinos, including keV sterile neutrinos, supernova neutrinos and ultrahigh-energy cosmic neutrinos.

  4. GIRAFFE test results summary

    SciTech Connect

    Yokobori, S.; Arai, K.; Oikawa, H.

    1996-03-01

    A passive system can provide engineered safety features enhancing safety system reliability and plant simplicity. Toshiba has conducted the test Program to demonstrate the feasibility of the SBWR passive safety system using a full-height, integral system test facility GIRAFFE. The test facility GIRAFFE models the SBWR in full height to correctly present the gravity driving head forces with a 1/400 volume scale. The GIRAFFE test Program includes the certification tests of the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) to remove the post-accident decay heat and the gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) to replenish the reactor coolant inventory during a LOCA. The test results have confirmed the PCCS and GDCS design and in addition, have demonstrated the operation of the pCCS with the presence of a lighter-than-steam noncondensable as well as with the presence of a heavier-than-steam, noncondensable. The GIRAFFE test Program has also provided the database to qualify a best estimate thermal-hydraulic computer code TRAC. The post test analysis results have shown that TRAC can accurately predict the PCCS heat removal Performance and the containment pressure response to a LOCA. This paper summarizes the GIRAFFE test results to investigate post-LOCA PCCS heat removal performance and post-test analysis using TRAC.

  5. Double Chooz: Latest results

    E-print Network

    J. I. Crespo-Anadón; for the Double Chooz collaboration

    2014-12-11

    The latest results from the Double Chooz experiment on the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ are presented. A detector located at an average distance of 1050 m from the two reactor cores of the Chooz nuclear power plant has accumulated a live time of 467.90 days, corresponding to an exposure of 66.5 GW-ton-year (reactor power $\\times$ detector mass $\\times$ live time). A revised analysis has boosted the signal efficiency and reduced the backgrounds and systematic uncertainties compared to previous publications, paving the way for the two detector phase. The measured $\\sin^2 2\\theta_{13} = 0.090^{+0.032}_{-0.029}$ is extracted from a fit to the energy spectrum. A deviation from the prediction above a visible energy of 4 MeV is found, being consistent with an unaccounted reactor flux effect, which does not affect the $\\theta_{13}$ result. A consistent value of $\\theta_{13}$ is measured in a rate-only fit to the number of observed candidates as a function of the reactor power, confirming the robustness of the result.

  6. Certification of computational results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Gregory F.; Wilson, Dwight S.; Masson, Gerald M.

    1993-01-01

    A conceptually novel and powerful technique to achieve fault detection and fault tolerance in hardware and software systems is described. When used for software fault detection, this new technique uses time and software redundancy and can be outlined as follows. In the initial phase, a program is run to solve a problem and store the result. In addition, this program leaves behind a trail of data called a certification trail. In the second phase, another program is run which solves the original problem again. This program, however, has access to the certification trail left by the first program. Because of the availability of the certification trail, the second phase can be performed by a less complex program and can execute more quickly. In the final phase, the two results are compared and if they agree the results are accepted as correct; otherwise an error is indicated. An essential aspect of this approach is that the second program must always generate either an error indication or a correct output even when the certification trail it receives from the first program is incorrect. The certification trail approach to fault tolerance is formalized and realizations of it are illustrated by considering algorithms for the following problems: convex hull, sorting, and shortest path. Cases in which the second phase can be run concurrently with the first and act as a monitor are discussed. The certification trail approach are compared to other approaches to fault tolerance.

  7. The Viking biology results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Harold P.

    1989-01-01

    A brief review of the purposes and the results from the Viking Biology experiments is presented, in the expectation that the lessons learned from this mission will be useful in planning future approaches to the biological exploration of Mars. Since so little was then known about potential micro-environments on Mars, three different experiments were included in the Viking mission, each one based on different assumptions about what Martian organisms might be like. In addition to the Viking Biology Instrument (VBI), important corollary information was obtained from the Viking lander imaging system and from the molecular analysis experiments that were conducted using the gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GCMS) instrument. No biological objects were noted by the lander imaging instrument. The GCMS did not detect any organic compounds. A description of the tests conducted by the Gas Exchange Experiment, the Labeled Release experiment, and the Pyrolytic Release experiment is given. Results are discussed. Taken as a whole, the Viking data yielded no unequivocal evidence for a Martian biota at either landing site. The results also revealed the presence of one or more reactive oxidants in the surface material and these need to be further characterized, as does the range of micro-environments, before embarking upon future searches for extant life on Mars.

  8. Emittance exchange results

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller, R.P., III; Koeth, T.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2009-09-01

    The promise of next-generation light sources depends on the availability of ultra-low emittance electron sources. One method of producing low transverse emittance beams is to generate a low longitudinal emittance beam and exchange it with a large transverse emittance. Experiments are underway at Fermilab's A0 Photoinjector and ANL's Argonne Wakefield Accelerator using the exchange scheme of Kim and Sessler. The experiment at the A0 Photoinjector exchanges a large longitudinal emittance with a small transverse emittance. AWA expects to exchange a large transverse emittance with a small longitudinal emittance. In this paper we discuss recent results at A0 and AWA and future plans for these experiments.

  9. Recent BABAR Results

    SciTech Connect

    Eigen, Gerald

    2015-04-29

    We present herein the most recent BABAR results on direct CP asymmetry measurements in B ? Xs?, on partial branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements in B ? Xsl+l-, on a search for B ? ? / ?l+l- decays, on a search for lepton number violation in B+ ? X-l+l'+ modes and a study of B0 ??? and B0 ? ?? decays.

  10. Recent results from LHCf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menjo, H.; Adriani, O.; Berti, E.; Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M.; Castellini, G.; D'Alessandro, R.; Del Prete, M.; Haguenauer, M.; Itow, Y.; Kasahara, K.; Kawade, K.; Makino, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubayashi, E.; Mitsuka, G.; Muraki, Y.; Papini, P.; Perrot, A.-L.; Pfeiffer, D.; Ricciarini, S.; Sako, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Sugiura, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Tamura, T.; Tiberio, A.; Torii, S.; Tricomi, A.; Turner, W. C.; Zhou, Q.

    2015-08-01

    The LHCf experiment is one of the LHC forward experiments. The aim of LHCf is to provide critical calibration data of hadronic intraction models used in air shower simulations. The LHCf has completed the operations for p-p collisions with a collision energy of ?s = 0.9 and 7 TeV p-p in 2010 and for p-Pb collisions with a collision energy per nucleon of ?sNN = 5.02. The recent LHCf result of forward neutron energy spectra at 7 TeV p-p collision and forward ?0 spectra at p-Pb collisions are presented in this paper.

  11. Recent Results from HAPPEX

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Michaels

    2006-09-18

    New measurements of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic scattering of 3GeV electrons off hydrogen and helium-4 targets at theta{sub lab} = 6 degrees are reported. The helium-4 result is A = (+6.40 {+-} 0.23 (stat) {+-} 0.12 (syst)) * 10{sup -6}. The hydrogen result is A = (-1.58 {+-} 0.12 (stat) {+-} 0.04 (syst)) * 10{sup -6}. The asymmetry for hydrogen is a function of a linear combination of G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s}, the strange quark contributions to the electric and magnetic form factors of the nucleon respectively, and that for helium-4 is a function solely of G{sub E}{sup s}. The combination of the two measurements separates G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s} and provide new limits on the role of strange quarks in the nucleon charge and magnetization distributions. We extract G{sub E}{sup s} = 0.002 {+-} 0.014 {+-} 0.007 at Q{sup 2} = 0.077 GeV{sup 2} and G{sub E}{sup s} + 0.09 G{sub M}{sup s} = 0.007 {+-} 0.011 {+-} 0.006 at Q{sup 2} = 0.109 GeV{sup 2}.

  12. Double Chooz: Latest results

    E-print Network

    Crespo-Anadón, J I

    2014-01-01

    The latest results from the Double Chooz experiment on the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ are presented. A detector located at an average distance of 1050 m from the two reactor cores of the Chooz nuclear power plant has accumulated a live time of 467.90 days, corresponding to an exposure of 66.5 GW-ton-year (reactor power $\\times$ detector mass $\\times$ live time). A revised analysis has boosted the signal efficiency and reduced the backgrounds and systematic uncertainties compared to previous publications, paving the way for the two detector phase. The measured $\\sin^2 2\\theta_{13} = 0.090^{+0.032}_{-0.029}$ is extracted from a fit to the energy spectrum. A deviation from the prediction above a visible energy of 4 MeV is found, being consistent with an unaccounted reactor flux effect, which does not affect the $\\theta_{13}$ result. A consistent value of $\\theta_{13}$ is measured in a rate-only fit to the number of observed candidates as a function of the reactor power, confirming the robustness of the ...

  13. Unfavourable results in pollicisation

    PubMed Central

    Thatte, Mukund R.; Nehete, Sushil; Garude, Kirti; Mehta, Rujuta

    2013-01-01

    Pollicisation of the index finger is perhaps one of the most complex and most rewarding operations in hand and plastic surgery. It however has a steep learning curve and demands very high skill levels and experience. There are multiple pitfalls and each can result in an unfavourable result. In essence we need to: Shorten the Index, recreate the carpo metacarpal joint from the metacarpo phalangeal (MP) joint, rotate the digit by about 120° for pulp to pulp pinch, palmarly abduct by 40-50° to get a new first web gap, Shorten and readjust the tension of the extensors, re attach the intrinsics to form a thenar eminence capable of positioning the new thumb in various functional positions and finally close the flaps forming a new skin envelope. The author has performed over 75 pollicisations personally and has personal experience of some of the issues raised there. The steps mentioned therefore are an algorithm for helping the uninitiated into these choppy waters. PMID:24501467

  14. First result from Qweak

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, David S.

    2014-06-01

    Initial results are presented from the recently-completed Q{sub weak} experiment at Jefferson Lab. The goal is a precise measurement of the proton's weak charge Q{sub w}{sup p}, to yield a test of the standard model and to search for evidence of new physics. The weak charge is extracted from the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic {rvec e}p scattering at low momentum transfer, Q{sup 2} = 0.025?GeV{sup 2}. A 180 {micro} A longitudinally-polarized 1.16 GeV electron beam was scattered from a 35 cm long liquid hydrogen at small angles, 6 {degrees} < {theta} < 12 {degrees} Scattered electrons were analyzed in a toroidal magnetic field and detected using an array of eight Cerenkov detectors arranged symmetrically about the beam axis. The initial result, from 4% of the complete data set, is Q{sub W}{sup p} = 0.064 ± 0.012, in excellent agreement with the standard model expectation. Full analysis of the data is expected to yield a value for the weak charge to about 5% precision.

  15. First results from CARIBU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savard, Guy

    2011-10-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the ATLAS superconducting linac facility aims at providing low energy and reaccelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams to address key nuclear physics, astrophysics and application issues. These beams are obtained from fission fragments of a 1 Ci 252Cf source, thermalized and collected into a low-energy particle beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge breed to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. The method described is fast and universal and short-lived isotope yield scale essentially with Californium fission yields. The facility is now commissioned and operating with a 100 mCi source which has yielded extracted low-energy mass separated radioactive beams at intensities in excess of 100000 ions per second. Radioactive beams have been charge bred with an efficiency of up to 12% and reaccelerated to 6 MeV/u. Commissioning results, together with the results from first astrophysics experiments at CARIBU using the beams from the 100 mCi source will be presented. The final 1 Ci source is currently under fabrication and is expected to be installed by the end of the year. This work was supported by the US DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  16. Spacelab Science Results Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Lundquist, C. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Horwitz, J. L.; Germany, G. A.; Cruise, J. F.; Lewis, M. L.; Murphy, K. L.

    2009-01-01

    Beginning with OSTA-1 in November 1981 and ending with Neurolab in March 1998, a total of 36 Shuttle missions carried various Spacelab components such as the Spacelab module, pallet, instrument pointing system, or mission peculiar experiment support structure. The experiments carried out during these flights included astrophysics, solar physics, plasma physics, atmospheric science, Earth observations, and a wide range of microgravity experiments in life sciences, biotechnology, materials science, and fluid physics which includes combustion and critical point phenomena. In all, some 764 experiments were conducted by investigators from the U.S., Europe, and Japan. The purpose of this Spacelab Science Results Study is to document the contributions made in each of the major research areas by giving a brief synopsis of the more significant experiments and an extensive list of the publications that were produced. We have also endeavored to show how these results impacted the existing body of knowledge, where they have spawned new fields, and if appropriate, where the knowledge they produced has been applied.

  17. New Results with TECSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeder, B. T.; McCleskey, M.; Trache, L.; Alharbi, A. A.; Banu, A.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Simmons, E.; Spiridon, A.; Tribble, R. E.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Sparta, R.; Spitaleri, C.; Davinson, T.; Wallace, J.; Woods, P. J.

    2011-10-01

    The Texas A&M-Edinburgh-Catania Silicon detector Array (TECSA) is a collaborative effort to build a high-efficiency detector Si array useful for measuring reactions of interest for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure. The array consists of up to 16 Micron Semiconductor YY1 detectors that are each 300 ?m thick. Each detector has 16 annular ring sectors to measure the energy and the scattering angle of the detected particles. So far, we have conducted two experiments with TECSA at Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M Univ. In the first, we measured the d(^14C,p)^15C reaction at 11.7 MeV/u. In the second, we measured d(^26Al,p)^27Al with an ^26Al secondary beam prepared in-flight with MARS. Angular distributions were obtained for both reactions at backward angles. The protons were measured both as singles events and in coincidence with timing signals from the cyclotron RF and a scintillator to measure coincidence between the protons and the beam. Results of the data analysis for the d(^14C,p)^15C run and preliminary results from the d(^26Al,p)^27Al run will be presented. Also, prospects for the future use of this detector array will be discussed.[0pt] ^*Work supported by US DOE, INFN and STFC (UK).

  18. Organic Separation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  19. Results from TOTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, Karsten

    2013-06-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the CERN LHC is focussed on the measurement of the elastic proton-proton scattering, the total pp cross-section, and all kinds of diffractive phenomena. Detectors housed in "Roman Pots" which can be moved close to the outgoing proton beams allow to trigger on elastic and diffractive protons and to determine their parameters like the momentum loss and the transverse momentum transfer. In addition, charged particle detectors in the forward regions detect almost all inelastic events. Together with the CMS detector, a large solid angle is covered enabling precise studies of Min. Bias as well as Single Diffractive and Double Pomeron Interactions. The results will considerably help the interpretation of the Cosmic Ray Showers at highest energies and will give insight into the proton structure and the QCD theory of strong interactions. TOTEM measured the elastic pp- scattering over a large range of t (the squared momentum transfer) from 10-3 - 4 GeV2. Noneof the considered models could yield a satisfactory fit over the complete range. However, the exponential slope at low |t|-values and the position of the diffractiveminimum are well within the extrapolation from lower energies. The total pp cross-section has been determined in different ways from the extrapolation of the elasticscattering to t=0 (optical point) and the inelastic rate: (i) From the elastic scattering using the optical theorem and the CMS, (ii) luminosity independently, usingthe inelastic rate, elastic scattering and the optical theorem, (iii)? independently, by using elastic scattering, inelastic rate and the CMS luminosity. The results for the total crosssection obtained from the different methods are in excellent agreement with each other. First studies of the data on diffractive phenomena havebeen performed by correlating the momentum loss of the forward protons with the topology of the particle flux. The data look very promising and further studies will follow. Since the conference, data have also been taken with specialized optics to reach even lower |t|-values. A determination of the ? value is now in reach.The TOTEM results and the ways how they have been obtained are described in the publications [1-8] listed below.

  20. Top physics: CDF results

    SciTech Connect

    K. Bloom

    2004-06-23

    The top quark plays an important role in the grand scheme of particle physics, and is also interesting on its own merits. We present recent results from CDF on top-quark physics based on 100-200 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data. We have measured the t{bar t} cross section in different decay modes using several different techniques, and are beginning our studies of top-quark properties. New analyses for this conference include a measurement of {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} in the lepton-plus-jets channel using a neural net to distinguish signal and background events, and measurements of top-quark branching fractions.

  1. FIRE Science Results 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, David S. (editor)

    1990-01-01

    FIRE (First ISCCP Regional Experiment) is a U.S. cloud-radiation research program formed in 1984 to increase the basic understanding of cirrus and marine stratocumulus cloud systems, to develop realistic parameterizations for these systems, and to validate and improve ISCCP cloud product retrievals. Presentations of results culminating the first 5 years of FIRE research activities were highlighted. The 1986 Cirrus Intensive Field Observations (IFO), the 1987 Marine Stratocumulus IFO, the Extended Time Observations (ETO), and modeling activities are described. Collaborative efforts involving the comparison of multiple data sets, incorporation of data measurements into modeling activities, validation of ISCCP cloud parameters, and development of parameterization schemes for General Circulation Models (GCMs) are described.

  2. Dissociated methanol test results

    SciTech Connect

    Finegold, J.G.; McKinnon, J.T.

    1982-04-01

    The design and testing of an automotive fuel system that provides hydrogen-rich gases to an internal combustion engine by catalytically cracking, or dissociating, methanol on board the vehicle is described. The vaporization and dissociation of methanol absorb heat from the engine exhaust and increase the lower heating value of the fuel by approximately 22%. In addition, raising the compression ratio and burning with excess air increase the engine thermal efficiency. Engine dynamometer test results with dissociated methanol demonstrated improvement in brake thermal efficiency compared to gasoline from 30% to 100% depending on engine speed and torque. Lower speeds and torques produce the largest improvements. Maps of exhaust temperature and exhaust heat content are presented. The exhaust temperature is almost always high enough for dissociation to occur, but at lower power outputs, there is only enough exhaust energy for partial dissociation of the methanol.

  3. Multigan®: first experimental results.

    PubMed

    Maunoury, L; Pacquet, J Y; Baret, P; Donzel, X; Dubois, M; Gaubert, G; Lehérissier, P; Leroy, R; Michel, M; Villarit, A C C

    2012-02-01

    A new design of a multicharged ion source based on the MONO1000 ECRIS has been presented at the last ECR ion source (ECRIS) Workshop 2010. [L. Maunoury et al., in Proceedings of the XIXth International Workshop on ECR Ion Sources, Grenoble, France, 23-26 August 2010] This source has not only two opening at both ends but also a large space in the middle of the source enabling a direct contact with the ECR plasma. The source has been assembled mechanically and put on a test bench at the Pantechnik company. The primary tests have shown that the plasma ignition occurred at low pressure (10(-6) mbar) and low RF power (10 W). The first experimental results ( = 1.30 for Ar and 1.85 for Xe) demonstrated the potential of this ion source in production of multicharged ion beams. PMID:22380185

  4. Preliminary results with TOFPET

    SciTech Connect

    Mullani, N.A.; Gaeta, J.M.; Gould, K.L.; Hartz, R.; Philippe, E.A.; Wong, W.; Yerian, K.

    1983-02-01

    TOFPET is a high resolution whole body positron camera which uses time-of-flight information to (a) improve the signal to noise ratio of a reconstructed image and (b) improve the sensitivity of the central slices by using all the interplane coincidences. The first phase of the construction of the camera has been completed, with all the detectors operational and data collected in the list format with a VAX 11/750 computer. Some of the preliminary results obtained with TOFPET such as resolution and sensitivity, as well as, images of Rubidium-82 in a dog heart are presented. The second phase of the construction, which involves the installation of the on-line microprocessors for faster image reconstruction, is being implemented at this time and is expected to be completed by early 1983, at which time the TOFPET camera will be used for routine clinical studies.

  5. Undulator Transportation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary; Horton, Nick; Kharakh, David; Levashov, Yurii; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Poling, Ben; Reese, Ed; /SLAC

    2010-11-17

    A test was performed to determine whether transporting and handling the undulators makes any changes to their properties. This note documents the test. No significant changes to the test undulator were observed. After the LCLS undulators are tuned and fiducialized in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF), they must be transported to storage buildings and transported to the tunnel. It has been established that the undulators are sensitive to temperature. We wish to know whether the undulators are also sensitive to the vibrations and shocks of transportation. To study this issue, we performed a test in which an undulator was measured in the MMF, transported to the tunnel, brought back to the MMF, and re-measured. This note documents the test and the results.

  6. Iron Mountain Electromagnetic Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gail Heath

    2012-07-01

    Iron Mountain Mine is located seventeen miles northwest of Redding, CA. After the completion of mining in early 1960s, the mine workings have been exposed to environmental elements which have resulted in degradation in water quality in the surrounding water sheds. In 1985, the EPA plugged ore stoops in many of the accessible mine drifts in an attempt to restrict water flow through the mine workings. During this process little data was gathered on the orientation of the stoops and construction of the plugs. During the last 25 years, plugs have begun to deteriorate and allow acidic waters from the upper workings to flow out of the mine. A team from Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed geophysical surveys on a single mine drift and 3 concrete plugs. The project goal was to evaluate several geophysical methods to determine competence of the concrete plugs and orientation of the stopes.

  7. Nucleosynthesis results from INTEGRAL

    E-print Network

    G. Weidenspointner

    2006-01-15

    Since its launch in October 2002, ESA's INTEGRAL observatory has enabled significant advances to be made in the study of Galactic nucleosynthesis. In particular, the imaging Ge spectrometer SPI combines for the first time the diagnostic powers of high resolution gamma-ray line spectroscopy and moderate spatial resolution. This review summarizes the major nucleosynthesis results obtained with INTEGRAL so far. Positron annihilation in our Galaxy is being studied in unprecented detail. SPI observations yield the first sky maps in both the 511 keV annihilation line and the positronium continuum emission, and the most accurate spectrum at 511 keV to date, thereby imposing new constraints on the source(s) of Galactic positrons which still remain(s) unidentified. For the first time, the imprint of Galactic rotation on the centroid and shape of the 1809 keV gamma-ray line due to the decay of 26Al has been seen, confirming the Galactic origin of this emission. SPI also provided the most accurate determination of the gamma-ray line flux due to the decay of 60Fe. The combined results for 26Al and 60Fe have important implications for nucleosynthesis in massive stars, in particular Wolf-Rayet stars. Both IBIS and SPI are searching the Galactic plane for young supernova remnants emitting the gamma-ray lines associated with radioactive 44Ti. None have been found so far, which raises important questions concerning the production of 44Ti in supernovae, the Galactic supernova rate, and the Galaxy's chemical evolution.

  8. NAS Parallel Benchmarks Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subhash, Saini; Bailey, David H.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) were developed in 1991 at NASA Ames Research Center to study the performance of parallel supercomputers. The eight benchmark problems are specified in a pencil and paper fashion i.e. the complete details of the problem to be solved are given in a technical document, and except for a few restrictions, benchmarkers are free to select the language constructs and implementation techniques best suited for a particular system. In this paper, we present new NPB performance results for the following systems: (a) Parallel-Vector Processors: Cray C90, Cray T'90 and Fujitsu VPP500; (b) Highly Parallel Processors: Cray T3D, IBM SP2 and IBM SP-TN2 (Thin Nodes 2); (c) Symmetric Multiprocessing Processors: Convex Exemplar SPP1000, Cray J90, DEC Alpha Server 8400 5/300, and SGI Power Challenge XL. We also present sustained performance per dollar for Class B LU, SP and BT benchmarks. We also mention NAS future plans of NPB.

  9. Simpler images, better results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Britton

    1999-03-01

    The very rapid development of optical technology has followed a pattern similar to that of nuclear magnetic resonance: first, spectroscopy and then imaging. The accomplishments in spectroscopy have been significant--among them, early detection of hematomas and quantitative oximetry (assuming that time and frequency domain instruments are used). Imaging has progressed somewhat later. The first images were obtained in Japan and USA a few years ago, particularly of parietal stimulation of the human brain. Since then, rapid applications to breast and limb, together with higher resolution of the brain now make NIR imaging of functional activation and tumor detection readily available, reliable and affordable devices. The lecture has to do with the applications of imaging to these three areas, particularly to prefrontal imaging of cognitive function, of breast tumor detection, and of localized muscle activation in exercise. The imaging resolution achievable in functional activation appears to be FWHM of 4 mm. The time required for an image is a few seconds or even much less. Breast image detection at 50 microsecond(s) ec/pixel results in images obtainable in a few seconds or shorter times (bandwidths of the kHz are available). Finally, imaging of the body organs is under study in this laboratory, particularly in the in utero fetus. It appears that the photon migration theory now leads to the development of a wide number of images for human subject tissue spectroscopy and imaging.

  10. [Results of Simulation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Lattice Monte Carlo and off-lattice molecular dynamics simulations of h(sub 1)t(sub 4) and h(sub 4)t(sub l) (head/tail) amphiphile solutions have been performed as a function of surfactant concentration and temperature. The lattice and off-lattice systems exhibit quite different self-assembly behavior at equivalent thermodynamic conditions. We found that in the weakly aggregating regime (no preferred-size micelles), all models yield similar micelle size distributions at the same average aggregation number, albeit at different thermodynamic conditions (temperatures). In the strongly aggregating regime, this mapping between models (through temperature adjustment) fails, and the models exhibit qualitatively different micellization behavior. Incipient micellization in a model self-associating telechelic polymer solution results in a network with a transient elastic response that decays by a two-step relaxation: the first is due to a heterogeneous jump-diffusion process involving entrapment of end-groups within well-defined clusters and this is followed by rapid diffusion to neighboring clusters and a decay (terminal relaxation) due to cluster disintegration. The viscoelastic response of the solution manifests characteristics of a glass transition and entangled polymer network.

  11. Results of hip resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Favetti, Fabio; Casella, Filippo; Papalia, Matteo; Panegrossi, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Background The renewed popularity of resurfacing hip arthroplasty in the last 10 years has generated a remarkable quantity of scientific contributions based on mid- and short-term follow-up. More than one paper has reported a consistent early revision rate as a consequence of biological or biomechanical failure. Two major complications are commonly described with resurfacing implants: avascular necrosis and femoral-neck fracture. A close relationship between these two events has been suggested, but not firmly demonstrated, whereas cementing technique seems to be better understood as potential cause of failure. Methods We performed an in vitro study in which four different resurfacing implants were evaluated with a simulated femoral head, two types of cement, (low and high viscosity) and two cementing techniques: direct (cement apposition directly on the femoral head) and indirect (cement poured into the femoral component). Results High-viscosity cement showed homogeneous distribution over the entire femoral head. Low-viscosity cement showed a massive polar concentration with insufficient, if not absent, distribution in the equatorial zone. Conclusion Polar cement concentration could be a risk factor for early implant failure due to two effects on the femoral head: biological (excessive local exothermic reaction could cause osteocyte necrosis) and biomechanical (which could lead to uneven load distribution on the femoral head). PMID:21234563

  12. Btu accounting: Showing results

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, K.E.

    1994-10-01

    In the preceding article in this series last month, the author showed how to calculate the energy consumed to make a pound of product. To realize a payoff, however, the results must be presented in graphs or tables that clearly display what has happened. They must call attention to plant performance and ultimately lead to more efficient use of energy. Energy-consumption reporting is particularly valuable when viewed over a period of time. The author recommend compiling data annually and maintaining a ten-year performance history. Four cases are considered: individual plant performance; site performance for sites having more than one plant; company performance, for companies having more than one site; and performance based on product, for identical or similar products made at different plants or sites. Of these, individual plant performance is inherently the most useful. It also serves as the best basis for site, company and product performance reports. A key element in energy accounting is the relating of all energy consumption to a common basis. As developed last month in Part 1 in this series, the author chose Btu[sub meth] (i.e., Btu of methane equivalent, expressed as its higher heating value) for this purpose. It represents the amount of methane that would be needed to replace (in the case of fuels) or generate (in the case of steam and power) the energy being used.

  13. Climax granite test results

    SciTech Connect

    Ramspott, L.D.

    1980-01-15

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) program, is carrying out in situ rock mechanics testing in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This summary addresses only those field data taken to date that address thermomechanical modeling for a hard-rock repository. The results to be discussed include thermal measurements in a heater test that was conducted from October 1977 through July 1978, and stress and displacement measurements made during and after excavation of the canister storage drift for the Spent Fuel Test (SFT) in the Climax granite. Associated laboratory and field measurements are summarized. The rock temperature for a given applied heat load at a point in time and space can be adequately modeled with simple analytic calculations involving superposition and integration of numerous point source solutions. The input, for locations beyond about a meter from the source, can be a constant thermal conductivity and diffusivity. The value of thermal conductivity required to match the field data is as much as 25% different from laboratory-measured values. Therefore, unless we come to understand the mechanisms for this difference, a simple in situ test will be required to obtain a value for final repository design. Some sensitivity calculations have shown that the temperature field is about ten times more sensitive to conductivity than to diffusivity under the test conditions. The orthogonal array was designed to detect anisotropy. After considering all error sources, anisotropic efforts in the thermal field were less than 5 to 10%.

  14. Polarization Results from PAPER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, James E.

    2014-06-01

    Epoch of Reionization (EoR) experiments seeking a detection of the power spectrum face daunting challenges in the form of extremely bright foregrounds. One of the least well-characterized is that of polarization emission at meter wavelengths, both from our own Galaxy and from extragalactic radio sources. Faraday rotation of polarized sources produces frequency structure in the observed spectrum, and leakage of the polarized emission into estimates of Stokes I can be confused with the fluctuations due to reionization. Here we present recent results on characterizing the power spectrum of polarized emission the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER). PAPER is a focused experiment aimed at detecting the spatial power spectrum of neutral hydrogen emission during the EoR. PAPER is an interferometer operating from 100 - 200 MHz, with antennas measuring linear polarization and a correlator producing full-Stokes output. The science array is located at the site of the future Square Kilometre Array (SKA) site in South Africa, with a prototyping and test facility in Green Bank, WV. A staged build-out of PAPER South Africa (PSA) began in late 2009. PAPER has been obtaining science-grade observations since late 2011, when 32 dipoles (PSA-32) began taking data full-Stokes data, and is currently at its final size with 128 dipoles taking data since November 2013. We present power spectrum and imaging data from PSA-32 quantifying the brightness of foreground emission. We consider lessons learned from this experience in the design of the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array.

  15. Overview of MAST results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Adamek, J.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, S.; Appel, L.; Asunta, O.; Barnes, M.; Ben Ayed, N.; Bigelow, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradley, J.; Brünner, J.; Cahyna, P.; Carr, M.; Caughman, J.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C.; Chapman, S.; Chorley, J.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N.; Cooper, W. A.; Cox, M.; Crocker, N.; Crowley, B.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darrow, D.; Dendy, R.; Diallo, A.; Dickinson, D.; Diem, S.; Dorland, W.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Easy, L.; Elmore, S.; Field, A.; Fishpool, G.; Fox, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gibson, K.; Graves, J.; Gurl, C.; Guttenfelder, W.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Havlickova, E.; Hawke, J.; Hawkes, N.; Hender, T.; Henderson, S.; Highcock, E.; Hillesheim, J.; Hnat, B.; Holgate, J.; Horacek, J.; Howard, J.; Huang, B.; Imada, K.; Jones, O.; Kaye, S.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Klimek, I.; Kocan, M.; Leggate, H.; Lilley, M.; Lipschultz, B.; Lisgo, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Lomanowski, B.; Lupelli, I.; Maddison, G.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G.; McClements, K.; McMillan, B.; Meakins, A.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Milnes, J.; Morris, A. W.; Motojima, G.; Muir, D.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A.; O'Brien, M.; O'Gorman, T.; Ono, Y.; Oliver, H.; Pamela, S.; Pangione, L.; Parra, F.; Patel, A.; Peebles, W.; Peng, M.; Perez, R.; Pinches, S.; Piron, L.; Podesta, M.; Price, M.; Reinke, M.; Ren, Y.; Roach, C.; Robinson, J.; Romanelli, M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sangaroon, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Schekochihin, A.; Sharapov, S.; Sharples, R.; Shevchenko, V.; Silburn, S.; Simpson, J.; Storrs, J.; Takase, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Tanaka, H.; Taylor, D.; Taylor, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Valovic, M.; Vann, R.; Walkden, N.; Wilson, H.; Wyk, L. V.; Yamada, T.; Zoletnik, S.; MAST; MAST Upgrade Teams

    2015-10-01

    The Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) programme is strongly focused on addressing key physics issues in preparation for operation of ITER as well as providing solutions for DEMO design choices. In this regard, MAST has provided key results in understanding and optimizing H-mode confinement, operating with smaller edge localized modes (ELMs), predicting and handling plasma exhaust and tailoring auxiliary current drive. In all cases, the high-resolution diagnostic capability on MAST is complemented by sophisticated numerical modelling to facilitate a deeper understanding. Mitigation of ELMs with resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidal mode number nRMP = 2, 3, 4, 6 has been demonstrated: at high and low collisionality; for the first ELM following the transition to high confinement operation; during the current ramp-up; and with rotating nRMP = 3 RMPs. nRMP = 4, 6 fields cause less rotation braking whilst the power to access H-mode is less with nRMP = 4 than nRMP = 3, 6. Refuelling with gas or pellets gives plasmas with mitigated ELMs and reduced peak heat flux at the same time as achieving good confinement. A synergy exists between pellet fuelling and RMPs, since mitigated ELMs remove fewer particles. Inter-ELM instabilities observed with Doppler backscattering are consistent with gyrokinetic simulations of micro-tearing modes in the pedestal. Meanwhile, ELM precursors have been strikingly observed with beam emission spectroscopy (BES) measurements. A scan in beta at the L-H transition shows that pedestal height scales strongly with core pressure. Gyro-Bohm normalized turbulent ion heat flux (as estimated from the BES data) is observed to decrease with increasing tilt of the turbulent eddies. Fast ion redistribution by energetic particle modes depends on density, and access to a quiescent domain with ‘classical’ fast ion transport is found above a critical density. Highly efficient electron Bernstein wave current drive (1 A W-1) has been achieved in solenoid-free start-up. A new proton detector has characterized escaping fusion products. Langmuir probes and a high-speed camera suggest filaments play a role in particle transport in the private flux region whilst coherence imaging has measured scrape-off layer (SOL) flows. BOUT++ simulations show that fluxes due to filaments are strongly dependent on resistivity and magnetic geometry of the SOL, with higher radial fluxes at higher resistivity. Finally, MAST Upgrade is due to begin operation in 2016 to support ITER preparation and importantly to operate with a Super-X divertor to test extended leg concepts for particle and power exhaust.

  16. First Results from XENON100

    E-print Network

    Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

    First Results from XENON100 For the XENON100 Collaboration Rafael F. Lang Columbia University rafael.lang@astro.columbia.edu #12;Rafael F. Lang (Columbia): First Results from XENON100 2 The XENON Università di Bologna Jiao Tong University Shanghai #12;Rafael F. Lang (Columbia): First Results from XENON

  17. SENSORY CHEM Finfish Group Species Sample Date RESULT RESULT

    E-print Network

    SENSORY CHEM Finfish Group Species Sample Date RESULT RESULT Grouper spp snowy grouper 6/23/2010 PASS PASS Grouper spp yellowedge grouper 6/23/2010 PASS PASS Grouper spp yellowedge grouper 6/23/2010 PASS PASS Grouper spp yellowedge grouper 6/23/2010 PASS PASS Grouper spp yellowedge grouper 6

  18. Latest Electroweak Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, Mark;

    2010-05-01

    The latest results in electroweak physics from proton anti-proton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron recorded by the CDF detector are presented. The results provide constraints on parton distribution functions, the mass of the Higgs boson and beyond the Standard Model physics.

  19. Top physics results at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Vickey, Trevor; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-05-01

    The most recent results on top quark physics at CDF are reported. Measurements of cross-section and mass are presented, and the status of single top quark production searches are discussed. The results obtained from probing various top quark properties are also presented.

  20. FORWARD PHYSICS AND BRAHMS RESULTS.

    SciTech Connect

    DEBBE, R.

    2005-02-03

    We report here the BRAHMS measurements of particle production in d+Au and p+p collisions at RHIC. The results presented here are compared to previous p+A measurements at lower energies in fixed target mode. Some preliminary results on abundances of identified particles at high rapidity are also presented.

  1. Measurement Services Association Questionnaire Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Lewis J.; Gillis, Rod

    This paper presents the results of a questionnaire sent to 211 Measurement Services Association members. Sixty-four centers responded. The main purpose of the questionnaire was to find out what hardware and software are used by testing centers throughout the country. Results indicate that 52 institutions use mainframe computers, 50 use…

  2. MER ARA pyroshock test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Kurng Y.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the shock test results achieved in the MER ARA/brush motor pyroshock qualification. The results of MER flight system pyrofiring tests in comparison with the ARA shock test requirements are discussed herein. Alternate test methods were developed in an effort to qualify the critical MER equipment for adequate performance in the actual flight pyroshock condition.

  3. Weld Results SUNY Stony Brook

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    Weld Results Yan Zhan SUNY Stony Brook June 13rd, 2013 1 #12;Outline · Studied Parameters · Results Analysis ­ Contours Plots For the Weld Region ­ Axial Velocity Profile at Different Locations Near the Weld ­ Plots of Turbulent Kinetic Energy and Momentum Thickness Near the Weld ­ Line Plot Goes From Inlet

  4. Axion results: what is new?

    E-print Network

    Eduard Masso; Javier Redondo

    2006-09-27

    The PVLAS collaboration has obtained results that may be interpreted in terms of a light axion-like particle, while the CAST collaboration has not found any signal of such particles. Moreover, the PVLAS results are in gross contradiction with astrophysical bounds. We develop a particle physics model with two paraphotons and with a low energy scale in which these apparent inconsistencies are circumvented.

  5. Axion results: what is new?

    SciTech Connect

    Masso, Eduard; Redondo, Javier

    2006-11-28

    The PVLAS collaboration has obtained results that may be interpreted in terms of a light axion-like particle, while the CAST collaboration has not found any signal of such particles. Moreover, the PVLAS results are in gross contradiction with astrophysical bounds. We develop a particle physics model with two paraphotons and with a low energy scale in which these apparent inconsistencies are circumvented.

  6. PHENIX recent heavy flavor results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sanghoon

    2014-06-01

    Cold nuclear matter (CNM) effects provide an important ingredient to interpret the results from heavy-ion collisions. Such effects include nuclear shadowing, intrinsic parton transverse momentum broadening, and initial patron energy loss. The measurement of heavy quark production is a good probe to study the CNM effects particularly on gluons, since heavy quarks are mainly produced via gluon fusions at RHIC energy. The PHENIX experiment has an ability to study the CNM effects by measuring leptons from heavy-flavor decay in a broad kinematic range. Comparisons of the results measured in different rapidity regions allow us to study modification of gluon density function in the Au nucleus depending on parton fractional momentum x. In addition, comparisons to the results from heavy-ion collisions (Au + Au and Cu + Cu) measured by PHENIX provide an insight into the role of CNM effects in such collisions. Recent PHENIX results on heavy quark production are discussed in this presentation.

  7. Interpreting Results from Multiscore Batteries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastasi, Anne

    1985-01-01

    Describes the role of information on score reliabilities, significance of score differences, intercorrelations of scores, and differential validity of score patterns on the interpretation of results from multiscore batteries. (Author)

  8. Lunakhod-2: Preliminary research results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinogradov, A. P.; Sokolov, S.

    1975-01-01

    Results from the Lunakhod 2 experiment on the surface property variations and relief structure of lunar craters are presented. Tectonic fractures, iron composition of lunar rocks, magnetic measurements, lunar sky brightness, and corpuscular radiation of the lunar body were studied.

  9. Results of a Crash Test 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    and other pollutants from low temperature flue gases. Its advantages include robust operation, lower investment, lower operating cost and high removal rates. The WOWClean® system has been tested on flue gases resulting from the combustion of diverse fuels...

  10. Results of Neptunium Disposal Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    2003-10-07

    Researchers investigated the neutralization of neptunium solution from H-Canyon Tank 16.4 and the properties of the resulting slurry. This work investigated slurry properties from a single neutralization protocol and limited storage times.

  11. New Results In Axion Physics

    E-print Network

    Eduard Masso; Javier Redondo

    2006-06-14

    We comment on the recent experimental results from the PVLAS and CAST collaborations that search for axion-like particles. We propose a particle physics model in which their apparent inconsistency is circumvented.

  12. Analysis of EUVE Experiment Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horan, Stephen

    1996-01-01

    A series of tests to validate an antenna pointing concept for spin-stabilized satellites using a data relay satellite are described. These tests show that proper antenna pointing on an inertially-stabilized spacecraft can lead to significant access time through the relay satellite even without active antenna pointing. We summarize the test results, the simulations to model the effects of antenna pattern and space loss, and the expected contact times. We also show how antenna beam width affects the results.

  13. Electroweak results from the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.

    1997-01-01

    Electroweak results are presented from the CDF and DO experiments based on data collected in recent runs of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurements include the mass and width of the W boson, the production cross sections of the W and Z bosons, and the W charge asymmetry. Additional results come from studies of events with pairs of electroweak gauge bosons and include limits on anomalous couplings.

  14. Recent Results from BESIII experiment

    E-print Network

    Liaoyuan Dong; for the BESIII Collaboration

    2011-11-06

    We report some recent results on charmonium spectroscopy and hadron spectroscopy from BESIII experiment, including the measurements of the masses and widths of $h_c$, $\\eta_c$, $\\eta_c(2S)$ and some new resonances around 2 GeV. The results are based on a data sample of 106 million $\\psi^\\prime$ events and 226 million J/$\\psi$ events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider.

  15. Multivariate discriminant and iterated resultant

    E-print Network

    Jingjun Han

    2015-07-22

    In this paper, we study the relationship between iterated resultant and multivariate discriminant. We show that, for generic form $f(X_n)$ with even degree $d$, if the polynomial is squarefreed after each iteration, the multivariate discriminant $\\Delta(f)$ is a factor of the squarefreed iterated resultant. In fact, we find a factor $Hp(f,[x_1,\\ldots,x_n])$ of the squarefreed iterated resultant, and prove that the multivariate discriminant $\\Delta(f)$ is a factor of $Hp(f,[x_1,\\ldots,x_n])$. Moreover, we conjecture that $Hp(f,[x_1,\\ldots,x_n])=\\Delta(f)$ holds for generic form $f$, and show that it is true for generic trivariate form $f(x,y,z)$.

  16. New NAS Parallel Benchmarks Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarrow, Maurice; Saphir, William; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Woo, Alex; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    NPB2 (NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) Parallel Benchmarks 2) is an implementation, based on Fortran and the MPI (message passing interface) message passing standard, of the original NAS Parallel Benchmark specifications. NPB2 programs are run with little or no tuning, in contrast to NPB vendor implementations, which are highly optimized for specific architectures. NPB2 results complement, rather than replace, NPB results. Because they have not been optimized by vendors, NPB2 implementations approximate the performance a typical user can expect for a portable parallel program on distributed memory parallel computers. Together these results provide an insightful comparison of the real-world performance of high-performance computers. New NPB2 features: New implementation (CG), new workstation class problem sizes, new serial sample versions, more performance statistics.

  17. ACTS: Technology Description and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, Richard T.; Schertler, Ronald; Gargione, Frank

    2000-01-01

    The ACTS Project was originated at NASA Glenn Research Center in the early 1980's to sponsor the development and application of technology that was intended to be used by the private sector. The program was formulated with the underlying philosophy of maintaining US leadership in satellite communications while focusing technology development for efficient use of the frequency spectrum. This report chronicles the execution and results of the program from the perspective of its technology managers, from inception through hardware and system development to on-orbit experiments and demonstrations of the technology. The first eight sections of the report discuss programmatic background, the specific satellite and ground terminal technology and the results generated by the program including industry relevance. A federally funded program of this type attracted strong advocates and adversaries and the resulting impact on the project schedule is also discussed. The last two sections are a list of useful acronyms and extensive references.

  18. Data Mining Citizen Science Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borne, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    Scientific discovery from big data is enabled through multiple channels, including data mining (through the application of machine learning algorithms) and human computation (commonly implemented through citizen science tasks). We will describe the results of new data mining experiments on the results from citizen science activities. Discovering patterns, trends, and anomalies in data are among the powerful contributions of citizen science. Establishing scientific algorithms that can subsequently re-discover the same types of patterns, trends, and anomalies in automatic data processing pipelines will ultimately result from the transformation of those human algorithms into computer algorithms, which can then be applied to much larger data collections. Scientific discovery from big data is thus greatly amplified through the marriage of data mining with citizen science.

  19. Communicating Performance Assessments Results - 13609

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, Mark

    2013-07-01

    The F-Area Tank Farms (FTF) and H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and operated by Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR), Liquid Waste Operations contractor at DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS). The FTF and HTF are active radioactive waste storage and treatment facilities consisting of 51 carbon steel waste tanks and ancillary equipment such as transfer lines, evaporators and pump tanks. Performance Assessments (PAs) for each Tank Farm have been prepared to support the eventual closure of the underground radioactive waste tanks and ancillary equipment. PAs provide the technical bases and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements for final closure of the Tank Farms. The Tank Farms are subject to a number of regulatory requirements. The State regulates Tank Farm operations through an industrial waste water permit and through a Federal Facility Agreement approved by the State, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Closure documentation will include State-approved Tank Farm Closure Plans and tank-specific closure modules utilizing information from the PAs. For this reason, the State of South Carolina and the EPA must be involved in the performance assessment review process. The residual material remaining after tank cleaning is also subject to reclassification prior to closure via a waste determination pursuant to Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005. PAs are performance-based, risk-informed analyses of the fate and transport of FTF and HTF residual wastes following final closure of the Tank Farms. Since the PAs serve as the primary risk assessment tools in evaluating readiness for closure, it is vital that PA conclusions be communicated effectively. In the course of developing the FTF and HTF PAs, several lessons learned have emerged regarding communicating PA results. When communicating PA results it is important to stress that the primary goal of the PA results is to provide risk understanding, recognizing the magnitude of risk and identifying the conceptual model decisions and critical assumptions that most impact the results. Conceptual models that describe reality using simplified, mathematical approaches, and their roles in arriving at the PA results, must also be communicated. When presenting PA results, evaluations will typically be focused on a single baseline (or Base Case) to provide a foundation for discussion. The PA results are supplemented by other studies (alternate configurations, uncertainty analyses, and sensitivity analyses) which provide a breadth of modeling to supplement the Base Case. The suite of information offered by the various modeling cases and studies provides confidence that the overall risk is understood along with the underlying parameters and conditions that contribute to risk. (author)

  20. First results from SAGE II

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurashitov, J.N.; Faizov, E.L.; Gavrin, V.N.

    1994-07-01

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first five runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 76{sub {minus}18}{sup +21} (stat) {sub {minus}7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. combined with the SAGE I result, the capture rate is 74{sub {minus}12}{sup +13} (stat) {sub {minus}7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. This represents only 56%--60% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models.

  1. Recent results from BESIII experiment

    E-print Network

    Liaoyuan Dong; for the BESIII Collaboration

    2013-10-16

    In this talk, we present a selection of recent results from BESIII collaboration, including observation of the charmoniumlike states, Zc(3900), Zc(4020) and Zc(4025); observation of e+e- -> gamma X(3872); partial wave analysis of J/psi -> gamma eta eta; measurement of D+ -> mu+ nu and D0 -> K- e+ nu, pi- e+ nu. The results are based on the data samples collected with the BESIII detector at central-of-mass energies from 3.900 to 4.420 GeV, and at the energies of J/psi and psi(3770) resonances.

  2. Supersymmetry results at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Manca, Giulia; /Liverpool U.

    2005-05-01

    The Run II physics programme of the Tevatron is proceeding with more than 300 pb{sup -1} of analysis quality data, collected at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Searches for supersymmetric particles are starting to set new limits, improving over the LEP and Run I results and exploring new regions of parameter space. They present recent results in Supersymmetry with the upgraded CDF and D0 detectors and give some prospects for the future of these searches.

  3. Planck 2013 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Aussel, H.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bethermin, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Blanchard, A.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bourdin, H.; Bowyer, J. W.; Bridges, M.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carr, R.; Carvalho, P.; Casale, M.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Déchelette, T.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dick, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fabre, O.; Falgarone, E.; Falvella, M. C.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Filliard, C.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Foley, S.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Freschi, M.; Fromenteau, S.; Frommert, M.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Gallegos, J.; Galli, S.; Gandolfo, B.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Gilfanov, M.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Haissinski, J.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Hansen, M.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Ho, S.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huey, G.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Ili?, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jasche, J.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kalberla, P.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihänen, E.; Kerp, J.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lavabre, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Li, C.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lowe, S.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matsumura, T.; Matthai, F.; Maurin, L.; Mazzotta, P.; McDonald, A.; McEwen, J. D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Menegoni, E.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Millea, M.; Miniscalco, R.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; O'Sullivan, C.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Paykari, P.; Pearson, D.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Pullen, A. R.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Rahlin, A.; Räth, C.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Riazuelo, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ringeval, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Robbers, G.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rusholme, B.

    2014-11-01

    The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched 14 May 2009 and has been scanning the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously since 12 August 2009. In March 2013, ESA and the Planck Collaboration released the initial cosmology products based on the first 15.5 months of Planck data, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the mission and its performance, the processing, analysis, and characteristics of the data, the scientific results, and the science data products and papers in the release. The science products include maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and diffuse extragalactic foregrounds, a catalogue of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources, and a list of sources detected through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data and a lensing likelihood are described. Scientific results include robust support for the standard six-parameter ?CDM model of cosmology and improved measurements of its parameters, including a highly significant deviation from scale invariance of the primordial power spectrum. The Planck values for these parameters and others derived from them are significantly different from those previously determined. Several large-scale anomalies in the temperature distribution of the CMB, first detected by WMAP, are confirmed with higher confidence. Planck sets new limits on the number and mass of neutrinos, and has measured gravitational lensing of CMB anisotropies at greater than 25?. Planck finds no evidence for non-Gaussianity in the CMB. Planck's results agree well with results from the measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations. Planck finds a lower Hubble constant than found in some more local measures. Some tension is also present between the amplitude of matter fluctuations (?8) derived from CMB data and that derived from Sunyaev-Zeldovich data. The Planck and WMAP power spectra are offset from each other by an average level of about 2% around the first acoustic peak. Analysis of Planck polarization data is not yet mature, therefore polarization results are not released, although the robust detection of E-mode polarization around CMB hot and cold spots is shown graphically.

  4. ADDITIONAL BRAHMAN TENDERNESS RESEARCH RESULTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the second of two articles that summarizes recent research related to Brahman beef palatability. A progeny test of 27 Brahman bulls was conducted in the late 1990s at Brooksville. This project resulted in collection of carcass grading data and tenderness measurements from 724 purebred Brah...

  5. Recent results from DORIS II

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report contains a brief review of recent results from the ARGUS and Crystal Ball experiments at DORIS II, concentrating on UPSILON(1S) and UPSILON(2S) spectroscopy with a short foray into ..gamma gamma.. physics. 18 refs., 10 figs.

  6. HADES results in elementary reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramstein, B.; Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Arnold, O.; Atomssa, E. T.; Behnke, C.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Biernat, J.; Blanco, A.; Blume, C.; Böhmer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Chernenko, S.; Deveaux, C.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Fonte, P.; Franco, C.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gill, K.; Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Harabasz, S.; Hennino, T.; Hlavac, S.; Höhne, C.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Kardan, K.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Korcyl, G.; Kornakov, G.; Kotte, R.; Krása, A.; Krebs, E.; Kuc, H.; Kugler, A.; Kunz, T.; Kurepin, A.; Kurilkin, A.; Kurilkin, P.; Ladygin, V.; Lalik, R.; Lapidus, K.; Lebedev, A.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Mahmoud, T.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michel, J.; Müntz, C.; Münzer, R.; Naumann, L.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Petousis, V.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Rehnisch, L.; Reshetin, A.; Rost, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Scheib, T.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K.; Schuldes, H.; Sellheim, P.; Siebenson, J.; Silva, L.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Strzempek, P.; Sturm, C.; Svoboda, O.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Tsertos, H.; Vasiliev, T.; Wagner, V.; Wendisch, C.; Wirth, J.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Zanevsky, Y.; Zumbruch, P.

    2014-11-01

    Recent results obtained with the HADES experimental set-up at GSI are presented with a focus on dielectron production and strangeness in pp and quasi-free np reactions. Perspectives related to the very recent experiment using the pion beam at GSI are also discussed.

  7. State Test Results Are Predictable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tienken, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Out-of-school, community demographic and family-level variables have an important influence on student achievement as measured by large-scale standardized tests. Studies described here demonstrated that about half of the test score is accounted for by variables outside the control of teachers and school administrators. The results from these…

  8. Recent airborne laser: laser results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truesdell, Keith A.

    2007-05-01

    The Airborne Laser (ABL) uses a megawatt-class laser with state-of-the-art atmospheric compensation to destroy ballistic missiles at long ranges. The system will provide both deterrence and defense against the use of such weapons during conflicts. This paper provides an overview of recent laser test results and the risk reduction approach being utilized to ensure program success.

  9. Recent Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Demorden, L.

    1998-06-01

    We review recent results from fixed-target and collider experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron. Among the topics discussed are jet production rates, {alpha}{sub S} measurements, the {anti d}/{anti u} ratio in the proton sea, diffraction, heavy quark physics and leptoquark searches.

  10. CP Violation Results in Charm

    E-print Network

    D. Asner; for the CLEO Collaboration

    2004-08-18

    Searches for CP violation in the charm sector from the E791, FOCUS, CLEO, BABAR and BELLE experiments are presented. Most analyses consider CP violation in two-body or quasi-two-body decays. Preliminary results from CLEO and FOCUS using Dalitz-plot analyses are also presented.

  11. EO framing flight test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lareau, Andre G.

    1995-09-01

    Recon/Optical, Inc. (ROI) has pioneered the electro-optical (E-O) framing generation of sensors with the CA-260, a KS-87 form/fit camera with a wafer-scale focal plane array (FPA) containing a patented, on-chip, forward motion compensation (FMC) architecture. The technology has now matured to the state where production E-O framing cameras are form/fit replacing their former film counterparts. During this interim production phase, flight demonstrations and tests are continuing to prove that E-O framing produces high-quality imagery, is robust to various platforms and mission tactics, interoperable with existing and planned C3I architectures, affordable and available, and meets the war-fighters needs. This paper discusses flight test results of the CA-260 E-O framing sensor flown in the F-14A TARPS during September 1994. This demonstration provided some unique imagery permitting a comparison of low-light level, in-flight FMC-on versus FMC-off performance. A first-level comparison of the resulting imagery based upon predicted FMC performance and post- processing numerical analysis is presented. The results indicae that the patented FMC architecture performed as predicted, and that for low-light conditions resulting in limited SNR images, on-chip FMC can provide a significant image quality improvement over post- processing alternatives.

  12. PRELIMINARY RESULTS America's Watershed Initiative

    E-print Network

    Boynton, Walter R.

    PRELIMINARY RESULTS America's Watershed Initiative Mississippi River Watershed Report Card #12;Why develop a report card? The Mississippi River watershed is a globally important resource, providing water agricultural and industrial commodities. Management of the watershed, which includes parts of 31 states and two

  13. Seeds in space experiment results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Jim A.

    1991-01-01

    Two million seeds of 120 different varieties representing 106 species, 97 genera, and 55 plant families were flown aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The seeds were housed on the space exposed experiment developed for students (SEEDS) tray in sealed canister number six and in two small vented canisters. The tray was in the F-2 position. The seeds were germinated and the germination rates and development of the resulting plants compared to the control seed that stayed in Park Seed's seed storage facility. The initial results are presented. There was a better survival rate in the sealed canister in space than in the storage facility at Park Seed. At least some of the seeds in each of the vented canisters survived the exposure to vacuum for almost six years. The number of observed apparent mutations was very low.

  14. Top physics results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Gervasio; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2005-05-01

    The top quark is by far the most massive fundamental particle observed so far, and the study of its properties is interesting for several reasons ranging from its possible special role in electroweak symmetry breaking to its sensitivity to physics beyond the Standard Model. They present recent top physics results from CDF based on 160-320 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The t{bar t} cross section and the top mass have been measured in different decay channels and using different methods. they have searched for evidence of single top production, setting upper limits on its production rate. Other results shown in this conference include studies of the polarization of W bosons from top decays, a search for charged Higgs decaying from top, and a search for additional heavy t' quarks.

  15. ATLAS Physics Results (not Higgs)

    E-print Network

    Weidberg, A R; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    These proceedings give a review of some of the non-Higgs physics results from ATLAS. The topics covered include Standard Model, exotics and SUSY. Rather than summarizing the very large number of results available in these areas, a few analyses are picked out to emphasize some important common themes for LHC physics. The first theme is the importance of good experimental resolution to maximize the sensitivity to new physics. As all new Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) physics will suffer from Standard Model backgrounds, a very good understanding of SM processes is also essential. The other two general themes that will be discussed are the choice of optimized variables and the use of data-driven background estimates.

  16. First results from SAGE II

    SciTech Connect

    Aburashitov, J.N.; Faizov, E.L.; Gavrin, V.N.; Gusev, A.O.; Kalikhov, A.V.; Knodel, T.V.; Knyshenko, I.I.; Kornoukhov, V.N.; Mirmov, I.N.; Pshukov, A.M.; Shalagin, A.M.; Shikhin, A.A.; Timofeyev, P.V.; Veretenkin, E.P.; Vermul, V.M.; Zatsepin, G.T.; Bowles, T.J.; Nico, J.S.; Teasdale, W.A.; Wark, D.L.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Cleveland, B.T.; Daily, T.; Davis, R. Jr.; Lande, K.; Lee, C.K.; Wildenhain, P.W.; Elliott, S.R.; Cherry, M.L.

    1995-07-10

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first five runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 76{sup +21}{sub {minus}18}(stat){sup +5}{sub {minus}7}(sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result, the capture rate is 74{sup +13}{sub {minus}12}(stat){sup +5}{sub {minus}7}(sys) SNU. This represents only 56%--60% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  17. Optical Telescope Design Study Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, J.; Sankar, S.

    2015-05-01

    We report on the results of a study conducted from Nov 2012-Apr 2013 to develop a telescope design for a space-based gravitational wave detector. The telescope is needed for efficient power delivery but since it is directly in the beam path, the design is driven by the requirements for the overall displacement sensitivity of the gravitational wave observatory. Two requirements in particular, optical pathlength stability and scattered light performance, are beyond the usual specifications for good image quality encountered in traditional telescopic systems. An important element of the study was to tap industrial expertise to develop an optimized design that can be reliably manufactured. Key engineering and design trade-offs and the sometimes surprising results will be presented.

  18. Results from the B Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Bevan, A.; /Queen Mary, U. of London

    2009-01-08

    These proceedings are based on lectures given at the Helmholtz International Summer School Heavy Quark Physics at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Dubna, Russia, during August 2008. I review the current status of CP violation in B meson decays from the B factories. These results can be used, along with measurements of the sides of the Unitarity Triangle, to test the CKM mechanism. In addition I discuss experimental studies of B decays to final states with 'spin-one' particles.

  19. Cassini Imaging Results at Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEwen, A.; Turtle, E.; Perry J.; Fussner, S.; Porco, C.; West, R.; Johnson, T.; Collins, G.; DelGenio, T.; Barbara, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) images show striking albedo markings on the surface of Titan. In equatorial regions the albedo patterns have high contrast and exhibit prominent lineaments and linear/angular boundaries suggestive of tectonic influences or fracturing of brittle surficial materials. There are intriguing dark curving lines near the south pole. Here we present several working hypotheses to explain these patterns. We also briefly summarize atmospheric science results.

  20. Preliminary QCGAT program test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, R. W.; Sievers, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is conducting a program to demonstrate that large commercial engine technology can be applied to general aviation engines to reduce noise, emissions and fuel consumption and to develop new technology where required. The overall engine program, design, and technology incorporated into the QCGAT engines are described. In addition, preliminary engine test results are presented and compared to the technical requirements the engines were designed to meet.

  1. Recent results in strangeonium spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; D'Amore, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Endorf, R.; Fujii, K.; Hayashii, H.; Iwata, S.

    1988-10-01

    Data from exclusive s/bar s/ meson final states are shown. The data were obtained in a 4.1 ev/nb exposure of K/sup -/p interactions at 11 GeV/c in the LASS spectrometer at SLAC. The results from the analyses of these data is presented and the spectrum of strangeonium states is discussed. 8 refs., 8 figs.

  2. SPQR -- Spectroscopy: Prospects, Questions & Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, Michael R.

    2014-06-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in mapping out the spectrum of hadrons over the past decade with plans to make further advances in the decade ahead. Baryons and mesons, both expected and unexpected, have been found, the results of precision experiments often with polarized beams, polarized targets and sometimes polarization of the final states. All these hadrons generate poles in the complex energy plane that are consequences of strong coupling QCD. They reveal how this works.

  3. Open cherry picker simulation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The simulation program associated with a key piece of support equipment to be used to service satellites directly from the Shuttle is assessed. The Open Cherry Picker (OCP) is a manned platform mounted at the end of the remote manipulator system (RMS) and is used to enhance extra vehicular activities (EVA). The results of simulations performed on the Grumman Large Amplitude Space Simulator (LASS) and at the JSC Water Immersion Facility are summarized.

  4. Heavy Flavour results from Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Borissov, G.; /Lancaster U.

    2012-06-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments finalize the analysis of their full statistics collected in the p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper presents several new results on the properties of hadrons containing heavy b- and c-quarks obtained by both collaborations. These results include the search for the rare decays B{sup 0}, B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} (CDF), the study of CP asymmetry in B{sub s} {yields} J{psi}{phi} decay (CDF, D0), the measurement of the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry (D0), the measurement of CP asymmetry in D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays (CDF), and the new measurement of the B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} branching fraction (CDF). Both experiments still expect to produce more results on the properties of heavy flavours.

  5. Heavy Flavour results from Tevatron

    E-print Network

    G. Borissov

    2012-06-21

    The CDF and D0 experiments finalize the analysis of their full statistics collected in the $p \\bar p$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper presents several new results on the properties of hadrons containing heavy $b$- and $c$-quarks obtained by both collaborations. These results include the search for the rare decays $B^0, B^0_s \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ (CDF), the study of CP asymmetry in $B_s \\to J\\psi \\phi$ decay (CDF, D0), the measurement of the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry (D0), the measurement of CP asymmetry in $D^0 \\to K^+K^-$ and $D^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays (CDF), and the new measurement of the $B_s \\to D_s^{(*)+} D_s^{(*)-}$ branching fraction (CDF). Both experiments still expect to produce more results on the properties of heavy flavours.

  6. PACOSS program status and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, K. E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Future large space systems (LSS), both civilian and military, will have performance objectives which require stringent pointing accuracies, relatively fast retargeting times, short settling times, accurate dynamic shape requirements, or combinations thereof. Many of these structures will be large but lightweight and will exhibit a dense, low-frequency modal spectrum with significant content within the control bandwidth. Although it is possible in principle to achieve structural vibration control with purely active means, experience with complex structures has shown that the realities of plant model inaccuracies and real sensor and actuator dynamics frequently combine to produce disappointing results. It was shown that a combination of passive and active control will result in a simpler system which can be expected to be more reliable and less expensive than a corresponding system utilizing active control exclusively. The goals of the Passive and Active Control of Space Structures (PACOSS) program consist of a thorough investigation of the relative roles of passive active vibration control, and the development of validated means of vibration control. The program approach, representative system article, dynamic test article, and test status and results are outlined.

  7. Planck 2015 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    E-print Network

    Adam, R; Aghanim, N; Akrami, Y; Alves, M I R; Arnaud, M; Arroja, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Ballardini, M; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Basak, S; Battaglia, P; Battaner, E; Battye, R; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bertincourt, B; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Carvalho, P; Casaponsa, B; Castex, G; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Chluba, J; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clemens, M; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Contreras, D; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Cruz, M; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Di Valentino, E; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dunkley, J; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Eisenhardt, P R M; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Fantaye, Y; Farhang, M; Feeney, S; Fergusson, J; Fernandez-Cobos, R; Feroz, F; Finelli, F; Florido, E; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschet, C; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Frolov, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Gauthier, C; Génova-Santos, R T; Gerbino, M; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Giusarma, E; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Grainge, K J B; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Hamann, J; Handley, W; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Heavens, A; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huang, Z; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Ili_, S; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jin, T; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Karakci, A; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kiiveri, K; Kim, J; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Krachmalnicoff, N; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lacasa, F; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Langer, M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leahy, J P; Lellouch, E; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Lewis, A; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; Lindholm, V; Liu, H; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Ma, Y -Z; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Mak, D S Y; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Marchini, A; Marcos-Caballero, A; Marinucci, D; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martinelli, M; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; McEwen, J D; McGehee, P; Mei, S; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Melin, J -B; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mikkelsen, K; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Molinari, D; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Moreno, R; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Mottet, S; Müenchmeyer, M; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Narimani, A; Naselsky, P; Nastasi, A; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Negrello, M; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Olamaie, M; Oppermann, N; Orlando, E; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Pandolfi, S; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Peel, M; Peiris, H V; Pelkonen, V -M; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrott, Y C; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pogosyan, D; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Racine, B; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Roman, M; Romelli, E; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Rotti, A; Roudier, G; d'Orfeuil, B Rouillé; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Ruiz-Granados, B; Rumsey, C; Rusholme, B; Said, N; Salvatelli, V; Salvati, L; Sandri, M; Sanghera, H S; Santos, D; Saunders, R D E; Sauvé, A; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Schaefer, B M; Schammel, M P; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Serra, P; Shellard, E P S; Shimwell, T W; Shiraishi, M; Smith, K; Souradeep, T; Spencer, L D; Spinelli, M; Stanford, S A; Stern, D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Strong, A W; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutter, P; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Texier, D; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tornikoski, M; Tristram, M; Troja, A; Trombetti, T; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vassallo, T; Vidal, M; Viel, M; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Walter, B; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Wehus, I K; Welikala, N; Weller, J; White, M; White, S D M; Wilkinson, A; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zibin, J P; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched 14~May 2009 and scanned the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously between 12~August 2009 and 23~October 2013. In February~2015, ESA and the Planck Collaboration released the second set of cosmology products based on data from the entire Planck mission, including both temperature and polarization, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the main characteristics of the data and the data products in the release, as well as the associated cosmological and astrophysical science results and papers. The science products include maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, and diffuse foregrounds in temperature and polarization, catalogues of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources (including separate catalogues of Sunyaev-Zeldovich clusters and Galactic col...

  8. Some Recent Results with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Maurik Holtrop

    2010-10-01

    The CLAS is a multipurpose, large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, instrumented with detector systems sensitive to charged and neutral particles. The experimental program at CLAS is aimed at furthering our understanding of hadronic and nuclear physics, through electron and photon scattering experiments, which cover a large range of topics, including meson and baryon spectroscopy, nucleon structure through elastic and deep inelastic scattering, nuclear transparency, nuclear correlations and nuclear structure. This talk will briefly describe the detector and the collaboration that uses it and will highlight some recent results.

  9. Lightcurve Results for Eleven Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartrelle, Gordon M.

    2012-04-01

    Differential photometry techniques were used to develop lightcurves, rotation periods and amplitudes for eleven main-belt asteroids: 833 Monica, 962 Aslog, 1020 Arcadia, 1082 Pirola, 1097 Vicia, 1122 Lugduna, 1145 Robelmonte, 1253 Frisia, 1256 Normannia, 1525 Savolinna, and 2324 Janice. Ground-based observations from Badlands Observatory (BLO) in Quinn, SD, as well as the University of North Dakota Observatory (UND) in Grand Forks, ND, provided the data for the project. A search of the asteroid lightcurve database (LCDB) did not reveal any previously reported results for seven of the eleven targets in this study.

  10. RSG Deployment Case Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Owsley, Stanley L.; Dodson, Michael G.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Seim, Thomas A.; Alexander, David L.; Hawthorne, Woodrow T.

    2005-09-01

    The RSG deployment case design is centered on taking the RSG system and producing a transport case that houses the RSG in a safe and controlled manner for transport. The transport case was driven by two conflicting constraints, first that the case be as light as possible, and second that it meet a stringent list of Military Specified requirements. The design team worked to extract every bit of weight from the design while striving to meet the rigorous Mil-Spec constraints. In the end compromises were made primarily on the specification side to control the overall weight of the transport case. This report outlines the case testing results.

  11. Recent results from MAUS payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, G. H.; Staniek, S.

    1987-01-01

    Project MAUS is a part of the German material sciences program and provides autonomous payloads for the Space Shuttle. These payloads are housed in canisters which are identical with those of NASA's Get-Away-Special program. The main components of the hardware are: a standard system consisting of power supply, experiment control, data acquisition and the experiment modules containing experiment specific hardware. Up to now, three MAUS modules with experiments from the area of material sciences have been flown as GAS payloads. Results will be reported from GAS Payload Number G-27 and G-28 flown aboard STS-51G.

  12. Macular changes resulting from papilloedema.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, A T; Sanders, M D

    1980-01-01

    Six cases are presented with macular changes in association with papilloedema; 4 suffered permanent visual loss. The present paper emphasises this previously infrequent finding and discusses the haemodynamic and mechanical factors responsible. The macular changes consisted of haemorrhages situated in front, within, or behind the retina, and occasionally the results of neovascular membrane formation produced secondary visual loss. Changes in the pigment epithelium were seen in 3 cases associated with choroidal folds. Macular stars rarely produce visual loss. Recognition of these changes is important in the assessment of the visual loss in papilloedema. Images PMID:7387954

  13. Electroweak results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1995-10-01

    Results from the CDF and D{O} experiments are presented on properties of the W{plus_minus} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons using final states containing electrons and muons based on large integrated luminosities. In particular, measurements of the W{plus_minus} and Z{sup 0} production cross sections, the W-charge asymmetry and the CDF measurement of the W-mass are summarized. Gauge boson self interactions axe measured by studying di-gauge boson production and limits on anomalous gauge boson couplings axe discussed.

  14. Unfavourable results in thumb reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kumta, Samir M

    2013-05-01

    The history of thumb reconstruction parallels the history of hand surgery. The attributes that make the thumb unique, and that the reconstructive surgeon must assess and try to restore when reconstructing a thumb, are: Position, stability, strength, length, motion, sensibility and appearance. Deficiency in any of these attributes can reduce the utility of the reconstructed thumb. A detailed assessment of the patient and his requirements needs to be performed before embarking on a thumb reconstruction. Most unsatisfactory results can be attributed to wrong choice of procedure. Component defects of the thumb are commonly treated by tissue from adjacent fingers, hand or forearm. With refinements in microsurgery, the foot has become a major source of tissue for component replacement in the thumb. Bone lengthening, osteoplastic reconstruction, pollicisation, and toe to hand transfers are the commonest methods of thumb reconstruction. Unfavourable results can be classified as functional and aesthetic. Some are common to all types of procedures. However each type of reconstruction has its own unique set of problems. Meticulous planning and execution is essential to give an aesthetic and functionally useful thumb. Secondary surgeries like tendon transfers, bone grafting, debulking, arthrodesis, may be required to correct deficiencies in the reconstruction. Attention needs to be paid to the donor site as well. PMID:24501466

  15. Results from the AMANDA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Andrea

    The Antarctic Muon And Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) has been taking data since 2000 and its data acquisition system was upgraded in January 2003 to read out the complete digitized waveforms from the buried Photomultipliers (PMTs) using Transient Waveform Recorders (TWR). This system currently runs in parallel with the standard AMANDA data acquisition system. Once AMANDA is incorporated into the 1 km3 detector IceCube, only the TWR system will be kept. We report results from a first atmospheric neutrino analysis on data collected in 2003 with TWR. Good agreement in event rate and angular distribution verify the performance of the TWR system. A search of the northern hemisphere for localized event clusters shows no statistically significant excess, thus a flux limit is calculated, which is in full agreement with previous results based on the standard AMANDA data acquisition system. We also update the status of a search for diffusely distributed neutrinos with ultra high energy (UHE) using data collected by the TWR system.

  16. Results from the FDIRC prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, D. A.; Arnaud, N.; Dey, B.; Borsato, M.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Nishimura, K.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Varner, G.; Va'vra, J.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC). This detector was designed as a prototype of the particle identification system for the SuperB experiment, and comprises 1/12 of the SuperB barrel azimuthal coverage with partial electronics implementation. The prototype was tested in the SLAC Cosmic Ray Telescope (CRT) which provides 3-D muon tracking with an angular resolution of ~1.5 mrad, track position resolution of 5-6 mm, start time resolution of 70 ps, and a muon low-energy cutoff of ~2 GeV provided by an iron range stack. The quartz focusing photon camera couples to a full-size BaBar DIRC bar box and is read out by 12 Hamamatsu H8500 MaPMTs providing 768 pixels. We used IRS2 waveform digitizing electronics to read out the MaPMTs. We present several results from our on-going development activities that demonstrate that the new optics design works very well, including: (a) single photon Cherenkov angle resolutions with and without chromatic corrections, (b) S/N ratio between the Cherenkov peak and background, which consists primarily of ambiguities in possible photon paths to a given pixel, (c) dTOP=TOPmeasured-TOPexpected resolutions, and (d) performance of the detector in the presence of high-rate backgrounds. We also describe data analysis methods and point out limits of the present performance.

  17. Gravitational microlensing searches and results

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C.

    1997-05-08

    Baryonic matter, in the form of Machos (MAssive Compact Halo Objects), might be a significant constituent of the dark matter that dominates the Milky Way. This article describes how surveys for Machos exploit the gravitational microlens magnification of extragalactic stars. The experimental searches for this effect monitor millions of stars, in some cases every night, looking for magnification events. The early results of these surveys indicate that Machos make up a significant fraction of the dark matter in the Milky Way, and that these objects have stellar masses. Truly substellar objects do not contribute much to the total. Additionally, the relatively high event rate towards the Galactic bulge seems to require that the bulge be elongated, and massive.

  18. New Results on Solar Neutrinos

    E-print Network

    Alain Bellerive

    2010-12-11

    This paper reviews the constraints on the solar neutrino mixing parameters with data collected by the Homestake, SAGE, GALLEX, Kamiokande, SuperKamiokande, Borexino and SNO experiments. An emphasis will be given to the global solar neutrino analyses in terms of matter-enhanced oscillation of two and three active flavors. The results to-date, including both solar model dependent and independent measurements, indicate that electron neutrinos are changing to other active types on route to the Earth from the Sun. The total flux of solar neutrinos is found to be in very good agreement with solar model calculations. Today, solar neutrino measurements focus on greater accuracy for mixing parameters and on better sensitivity to low neutrino energies. This article also summarizes near future prospects in the field of solar neutrino physics.

  19. Some Results on Inverse Scattering

    E-print Network

    A. G. Ramm

    2007-10-19

    A review of some of the author's results in the area of inverse scattering is given. The following topics are discussed: 1) Property $C$ and applications, 2) Stable inversion of fixed-energy 3D scattering data and its error estimate, 3) Inverse scattering with ''incomplete`` data, 4) Inverse scattering for inhomogeneous Schr\\"odinger equation, 5) Krein's inverse scattering method, 6) Invertibility of the steps in Gel'fand-Levitan, Marchenko, and Krein inversion methods, 7) The Newton-Sabatier and Cox-Thompson procedures are not inversion methods, 8) Resonances: existence, location, perturbation theory, 9) Born inversion as an ill-posed problem, 10) Inverse obstacle scattering with fixed-frequency data, 11) Inverse scattering with data at a fixed energy and a fixed incident direction, 12) Creating materials with a desired refraction coefficient and wave-focusing properties.

  20. Data Assimilation Results from PLASMON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Lichtenberger, J.; Duffy, J.; Friedel, R. H.; Clilverd, M.; Heilig, B.; Vellante, M.; Manninen, J. K.; Raita, T.; Rodger, C. J.; Collier, A.; Reda, J.; Holzworth, R. H.; Ober, D. M.; Boudouridis, A.; Zesta, E.; Chi, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    VLF and magnetometer observations can be used to remotely sense the plasmasphere. VLF whistler waves can be used to measure the electron density and magnetic Field Line Resonance (FLR) measurements can be used to measure the mass density. In principle it is then possible to remotely map the plasmasphere with a network of ground-based stations which are also less expensive and more permanent than satellites. The PLASMON project, funded by the EU FP-7 program, is in the process of doing just this. A large number of ground-based observations will be input into a data assimilative framework which models the plasmasphere structure and dynamics. The data assimilation framework combines the Ensemble Kalman Filter with the Dynamic Global Core Plasma Model. In this presentation we will describe the plasmasphere model, the data assimilation approach that we have taken, PLASMON data and data assimilation results for specific events.

  1. Current MINOS Neutrino Oscillation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Habig, Alec; /Minnesota U., Duluth

    2009-07-01

    The MINOS experiment is now making precise measurements of the {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance oscillations seen in atmospheric neutrinos, tests possible disappearance to sterile {nu} by measuring the neutral current flux, and has extended our reach towards the so far unseen {theta}{sub 13} by looking for {nu}{sub e} appearance in the {nu}{sub {mu}} beam. It does so by using the intense, well-understood NuMI neutrino beam created at Fermilab and observing it 735km away at the Soudan Mine in Northeast Minnesota. High-statistics studies of the neutrino interactions themselves and the cosmic rays seen by the MINOS detectors have also been made. Results from MINOS first three years of operations will be presented.

  2. Results from the Magsat mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The results of analyses of the data gathered by Magsat on the geomagnetic field, crustal magnetic anomalies, fields arising from external current systems, and in investigations of the earth's core, mantle, and core-mantle boundary are presented. A least squares potential function showed that the geomagnetic field was 30,000-50,000 nanoteslas at the Magsat altitude, while fields from external sources were 0-1000 nanoteslas and those from crustal sources 0-50 nanoteslas. Long-wavelength magnetic anomalies were correlated with tectonic features, sometimes reflecting undulations in the Curie isotherm at other times changes in the structure of the lower crust. Detailed anomaly maps from regional data analyses are provided, and possible future spacecraft missions for improving the resolution of contours and strengths of the anomalies are described.

  3. Cryogenic Brush Seal Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Walker, James F.

    1996-01-01

    Brush seals are compliant, contact seals that have long-life, low-leakage characteristics desirable for use in rocket engine turbopumps. 50.8-mm (2.0 inch) diameter brush seals with a nominal initial radial interference of 0.127-mm (0.005 inch) were tested in liquid nitrogen at shaft speeds up to 35,000 rpm and differential pressure loads up to 1.21 MPa (175 psi) per brush. The measured leakage rate of a single brush was 2-3 times less than that measured for a 12-tooth, 0.127-mm (0.005 inch) radial clearance labyrinth seal used as a baseline. Stage effects were studied and it was found that two brush seals with a large separation distance leaked less than two brushes tightly packed together. The maximum measured groove depth on the Inconel 718 rotor was 25.4 (mu)m (0.001 inch) after 4.31 hours of shaft rotation. The Haynes-25 bristles wore approximately 25.4-76.2 (mu)m (0.001-0.003 inch) under the same conditions. Three seal runner coatings, chromium carbide, Teflon impregnated chromium, and zirconium oxide, were tested in liquid hydrogen at 35,000 and 65,000 rpm with separate 50.8 mm diameter brush seals made of Haynes-25 bristles and having a nominal initial radial interference of 129 rpm. Two bare Inconel-718 rotors were also tested as a baseline. The test results revealed significant differences between the wear characteristics of the uncoated and coated seal runners. At both speeds the brush seal with the bare Inconel-718 seal runner exhibited significant bristle wear with excessive material transferring to the runner surface. In contrast, the coated seal runners inhibited the transfer and deposit of bristle material. The chromium carbide coating showed only small quantities of bristle material transferring to its surface. The Teflon impregnated chromium coating also inhibited material transfer and provided some lubrication. This coating, however, is self-sacrificing. The Teflon remained present on the low speed runner, but it was completely removed from the high speed brush seal, which was tested considerably longer. The tests of the Teflon coating revealed the importance of using a lubricating and low friction coating for brush seals to reduce bristle and seal runner wear. The zirconium oxide coating exhibited the greatest amount of coating wear, while the brushes incurred only slight wear. Further testing of ceramics is recommended before making a final judgement on the viability of ceramic coatings for brush seals because of the contrast between the results reported by Carlile and the results presented herein. Strictly based on the results presented hereinabove, the chromium carbide and Teflon impregnated chromium coatings were considered preferable to the uncoated Inconel-718 and zirconium oxide coatings because of their good wear resistance and characteristics to inhibit bristle material wear and transfer to the seal runner.

  4. Theoretical implications of LHC results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altarelli, Guido

    2014-04-01

    We present a concise outlook of particle physics after the first LHC results at 7-8 TeV. The discovery of the Higgs boson at 126 GeV will remain as one of the major physics discoveries of our time. But also the surprising absence of any signals of new physics, if confirmed in the continuation of the LHC experiments, is going to drastically change our vision of the field. At present the indication is that nature does not too much care about our notion of naturalness. Still the argument for naturalness is a solid one and we are facing a puzzling situation. We review the established facts so far and present a tentative assessment of the open problems.

  5. Recent Charm Results From CLEO

    E-print Network

    A. Smith

    2002-06-04

    We describe two recent results using data collected with the CLEO detector at the CESR e+e- collider at energies near the Upsilon(4S). The first is a Dalitz plot analysis of the decay D0->K0spi+pi-. We observe a rich structure including the decay D0->K*+pi- which may be produced by D0-D0bar mixing or doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decays. We also search for D0-D0bar mixing in the decay D0->K*+e-nuebar. We observe no events and limit the mixing parameter R_mix to be less than 0.87% at the 95% confidence level.

  6. Recent Experimental Results from HELIOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuosmaa, A. H.

    2013-03-01

    The renewed emphasis on nuclear structure far from stability, studied with nucleon-transfer reactions that utilize radioactive beams, has led to many new and exciting results. Accompanying these developments are, however many technical challenges that confront studies of transfer reactions in inverse kinematics. Amongst these are the identification of reaction products and the resolution of states in the residual nuclei. A new device, HELIOS (the HELIcal Orbit Spectrometer) has been constructed to solve many of the problems encountered with such reactions. The device uses a uniform magnetic field produced by a large, superconducting solenoid to transport light reaction products from the target to a linear array of position-sensitive silicon detectors. In operation since August of 2008, HELIOS has been used to study a variety of (d,p) reactions with beams of stable and unstable ions with masses ranging from A=11 to 136.

  7. STAR heavy-flavor results

    E-print Network

    Jaroslav Bielcik; for the STAR Collaboration

    2009-07-16

    A summary of the heavy flavor results from the STAR experiment is presented. Both open heavy flavor as well as quarkonia measurements are presented. A strong suppression of heavy flavor non-photonic electrons is observed in central Au+Au collisions at 200GeV. Relative contribution of bottom contribution to non-photonic electron spectra in p+p collisions is extracted from data. Nuclear modification factor of J/Psi mesons at high-pT is found to be consistent with one in central Cu+Cu collisions at 200GeV. Strong signal of Upsilon(1S+2S+3S) state is observed in d+Au collisions at 200GeV.

  8. Recent ? Lepton Results from BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusiani, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    We report recent measurements on ? leptons obtained by the BABAR collaboration using the entire recorded sample of electron-positron collisions at and around the ?(4S) (about 470fb-1). The events were recorded at the PEP-II asymmetric collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The measurements include high multiplicity ? decay branching fractions with 3 or 5 charged particles in the final state, a search for the second class current the ? decay ? ? ????, ? branching fractions into final states containing two KS mesons, ? - -> h- KS 0 KS 0 (? 0) ? ? , with h = ?, K, and preliminary measurements of hadronic spectra of ? decays with three hadrons (?- ? h-h+h-?? decays, where h = ?, K). The results improve the experimental knowledge of the ? lepton properties and can be used to improve the precision tests of the Standard Model.

  9. Monsoon 1990: Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob J.; Dubois, Pascale; Guerra, Abel

    1991-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  10. Monsoon '90 - Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Guerra, Abel G.

    1992-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  11. Research Results and Information Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Research Results Monsoon behavior balanced by glaciers Research Discovers Frequent Mutations of Chromatin Significant Progress in Water Photochemistry Research Structural signature in amorphous alloy formation and plastic deformation The neural basis of Drosophila larval light/darkness preference Important roles of brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase and ceramide metabolism in leptin hypothalamic control of feeding Integrin activation and internalization on soft ECM as a mechanism of induction of stem cell differentiation by ECM elasticity Determination of electron pairing symmetry of iron-based superconductor FeSe Long-Range Topological Order in Metallic Glass Information Update List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and CNRS in 2011 List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and ESRC in 2011 List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and RS in 2011 List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and RSE in 2011 Funding of Major Program Projects in 2010 Funding of Key Program Projects in 2010

  12. Initial Blackbeard power survey results

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.; Devenport, J.; Holden, D.

    1996-06-01

    The Blackbeard broadband VHF radio receiver is in low-earth orbit aboard the ALEXIS satellite. The receiver has been used to measure the transmitted power in four VHF bands (55.2-75.8, 28.0-94.8, 132.3-152.2, and 107.7-166.0 MHz) over quiet and noisy parts of the earth. The authors present the results of the survey and discuss their implications. They find that there are remote ocean areas over which the observed spectrum is largely free of man-made interference, but that the spectrum over most of the earth is dominated by broadcast VHF signals. The signal characteristics observed over a given area are quite constant when observed at different times of day and at intervals of several weeks to months. It appears that in many cases the bulk of the signal power is coming from a small number of sources.

  13. Huygens GCMS Results from Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, Hasso B.; Demick, Jaime; Kasprzak, Wayne; Atreya, Sushil; Owen, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    The Huygens Probe executed a successful entry, descent and impact on the Saturnian moon of Titan on January 14, 2005. The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) instrument conducted isotopic and compositional measurements throughout the two and one half hour descent from 146 km altitude, and on the surface for 69 minutes until loss of signal from the orbiting Cassini spacecraft. The GCMS incorporated a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system. The gas sampling system provided continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns, a chemical scrubber and a hydrocarbon enrichment cell. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and to evaporate volatiles from the surface after impact. Data products from the GCMS included altitude profiles of the major atmospheric constituents dinitrogen (N2) and methane (CH4), isotope ratios of 14N/15N, 12C/13C, and D/H, mole fractions of radiogenic argon (40Ar) and primordial argon (36Ar), and upper limits on the mole fractions of neon, krypton and xenon, which were found to be absent. Surface measurements confirmed the presence of ethane (C2H6) and cyanogen (C2N2). Later data products expanded atmospheric profiles to include the surface response of C2N2. C2H6, acetylene (C2H2), and carbon dioxide (CO2). More recent results include the profiles of benzene (C6H6) and molecular hydrogen (H2). The GCMS data are being further analyzed to obtain higher precision results and to identify other trace species ion the atmosphere and evaporating from the surface.

  14. RESULTS OF SUPPLEMENTAL MST STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T; David Hobbs, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-07-24

    The current design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) includes an auxiliary facility, the Actinide Finishing Facility, which provides a second contact of monosodium titanate (MST) to remove soluble actinides and strontium from waste if needed. This treatment will occur after cesium removal by Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). Although the process changes and safety basis implications have not yet been analyzed, provisions also exist to recover the MST from this operation and return to the initial actinide removal step in the SWPF for an additional (third) contact with fresh waste. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) request identified the need to study the following issues involving this application of MST: Determine the effect of organics from the solvent extraction (CSSX) process on radionuclide sorption by MST; Determine the efficiency of re-using MST for multiple contacts; and Examine fissile loading on MST under conditions using a waste containing significantly elevated concentrations of plutonium, uranium, neptunium, and strontium. This report describes the results of three experimental studies conducted to address these needs: (1) Addition of high concentrations of entrained CSSX solvent had no noticeable effect, over a two week period, on the sorption of the actinides and strontium by MST in a direct comparison experiment. (2) Test results show that MST still retains appreciable capacity after being used once. For instance, reused MST--in the presence of entrained solvent--continued to sorb actinides and strontium. (3) A single batch of MST was used to sequentially contact five volumes of a simulant solution containing elevated concentrations of the radionuclides of interest. After the five contacts, we measured the following solution actinide loadings on the MST: plutonium: 0.884 {+-} 0.00539 wt % or (1.02 {+-} 0.0112) E+04 {micro}g/g MST, uranium: 12.1 {+-} 0.786 wt % or (1.40 {+-} 0.104) E+05 {micro}g/g MST, and neptunium: 0.426 {+-} 0.00406 wt % or (4.92 {+-} 0.0923) E+03 {micro}g/g MST. (4) Over the duration of an experiment with the sequential strikes, the ability of MST to sorb actinides improved with additional strikes. This trend is counter-intuitive, but is confirmed by replicate experiments for plutonium, uranium, and neptunium. Conversely, over the duration of the experiment, the ability of MST to sorb strontium decreased the more it was used. This trend is confirmed by replicate experiment.

  15. First photometry results from Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    An overview of the Gaia Photometric Processing is presented. The Gaia photometry consists of the white light (330-1050 nm) G-band, and low resolution spectrophotometry realized by two prisms dispersing all the light entering the field of view. One disperser - called BP for Blue Photometer- operates in the wavelength range 330-680 nm; the other - called RP for Red Photometer - covers the wavelength range 640-1050 nm. The light collected by BP and RP can also be integrated into two broad bands, G_BP and G_RP.This photometric data reduction is based on the overall principle of a self-calibrating system improved by iteration. The input data includes flux (G, G_BP, G_RP) and the low-resolution spectral data. The calibration models and algorithms used are described. Initial validation results are shown which indicate the photometric quality of the preliminary calibrated data. Expectations for the quality of the photometric data to be included in the first public data release (mid-2016) are discussed.

  16. Financial review: First quarter results

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    Before extraordinary items and excluding non-recurring items, first quarter investor-owned electric utility earnings per share (EPS) increased 3.9 percent over last year`s first quarter, moving up from $0.51 to $0.53. For the 12 months ending March 31, EPS were $2.13, up 3.6 percent over the previous 12 months. Total electric operating revenues for the quarter rose $2.3 billion in response to cold weather and a strong economy, which pushed sales up 3.3 percent. But total electric operating expenses rose nearly $2.5 billion. Shceduled plant outages, higher medical and pension costs, and one-time charges for workforce reduction programs combined to drive operation and maintenance expenses up 5.7 percent. Severe weather, which boosted electricity demand across the country and, in some areas, prevented acess to fuel supplies, and higher fuel prices resulted ina 6.8 percent in fuel expenses and an 11.4 percent increase in purchased power and net intrechange expenses. And placing one nuclear unit and several combustion turbines in service contributed to a 7.1 percent increase in depreciation and amortization expenses.

  17. Results from Long Baseline Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messier, Mark

    2015-04-01

    The discovery of neutrino mass in 1998 spawned a world-wide effort to better understand neutrino properties using neutrinos from the Sun, the atmosphere, reactors, and from accelerators. Neutrino experiments based at the world's accelerators have been an important component of this program as the proton accelerators provide a nearly pure beam of muon neutrinos at selected energies with which to study neutrino oscillations of muon flavor to other flavors. The underlying structure of the neutrino masses and mixings are revealed through the study of the frequency and amplitude of the flavor oscillations. The smallness of the neutrino mass splittings (~= 0 . 05 eV) means that phase differences between the mass eigenstates accumulate very slowly requiring these experiments to be conducted over great distances ranging from 250 km to 810 km separation between source and detector. Currently there are three long-baseline experiments underway, T2K at the J-PARC facility in Japan, and MINOS+ and NOvA underway at Fermilab in the United States. In this talk, I will review the fundamental physics probed by these experiments, how the experimental setups probe this physics, and summarize the recent results with a particular emphasis on the newest experiment, NOvA.

  18. EUPORIAS: plans and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buontempo, C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in our understanding and ability to forecast climate variability have meant that skilful predictions are beginning to be routinely made on seasonal to decadal (s2d) timescales. Such forecasts have the potential to be of great value to a wide range of decision-making, where outcomes are strongly influenced by variations in the climate. In 2012 the European Commission funded EUPORIAS, a four year long project to develop prototype end-to-end climate impact prediction services operating on a seasonal to decadal timescale, and assess their value in informing decision-making. EUPORIAS commenced on 1 November 2012, coordinated by the UK Met Office leading a consortium of 24 organisations representing world-class European climate research and climate service centres, expertise in impacts assessments and seasonal predictions, two United Nations agencies, specialists in new media, and commercial companies in climate-vulnerable sectors such as energy, water and tourism. The poster describes the setup of the project, its main outcome and some of the very preliminary results.

  19. First Results from SHIP Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bagryansky, P.A.

    2005-01-15

    At present, the GDT facility is being upgraded. The first stage of the upgrade is the Synthesised Hot Ion Plasmoid (SHIP) experiment. It aims, on the one hand, at the investigation of plasmas which are expected to appear in the region of high neutron production in a GDT based fusion neutron source proposed by the Budker Institute and, on the other hand, at the investigation of plasmas the parameters of which have never been achieved before in axisymmetric magnetic mirrors.The experiment is performed in a small mirror section which is installed at the end of one side of GDT. The magnetic field on axis is in the range of 0.5-2.0 Tesla and the mirror ratio is 1.2-1.4. The mirror is filled with background plasma streaming in from the central cell. This plasma component is maxwellised and has an electron temperature of about 100 eV. Two neutral beam injectors perpendicularly inject a total current of about 50 Atom Amperes of deuterium neutrals with an energy of 20 keV as a pulse with a duration of about 1 ms. Ionisation of the beams generates the high-energy ion component. The device has been equipped with several diagnostic methods which are successfully used in GDT experiments.The paper presents first results of plasma parameter measurements in SHIP experiment.

  20. SuperORRUBA Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, A. J.; Ahn, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Kozub, R. L.; Pain, S. D.

    2012-10-01

    Transfer reactions in inverse kinematics with radioactive ion beams are needed to provide nuclear structure information far from stability to aid in the development of nuclear models and in the understanding of astrophysical processes. Highly granular, low threshold detector arrays are needed to perform such experiments. The SuperORRUBA (Oak Ridge Rutgers University Barrel Array) was created to measure lower threshold reactions with better energy resolution than the original ORRUBA detectors. The new array consists of 18 silicon detectors, each with a 64 non-resistive strip front side and a 4 non-resistive strip back side. To collect the data from these 1224 channels, the ASICs (Application-Specific Integrated Circuits) are used for timing, triggering, shaping, and digitizing the signals, with each chip handling 32 channels. Utilizing the ASICs system and a triple-alpha source, SuperORRUBA detectors were tested to ensure proper function. In addition, all preamps and ASICs elements were tested. The depletion voltage of each detector was found, and the detectors were tested for any shift in gain over time. Finally, issues with crosstalk causing poor resolution on particular channels were investigated. A detailed description of the system and the test results will be presented.

  1. ALOHA Cabled Observatory: Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, B. M.; Lukas, R.; Duennebier, F. K.

    2011-12-01

    The ALOHA Cabled Observatory (ACO) was installed 6 June 2011, extending power, network communications and timing to a seafloor node and instruments at 4726 m water depth 100 km north of Oahu. The system was installed using ROV Jason operated from the R/V Kilo Moana. Station ALOHA is the field site of the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) program that has investigated temporal dynamics in biology, physics, and chemistry since 1988. HOT conducts near monthly ship-based sampling and makes continuous observations from moored instruments to document and study climate and ecosystem variability over semi-diurnal to decadal time scales. The cabled observatory system will provide the infrastructure for continuous, interactive ocean sampling enabling new measurements as well as a new mode of ocean observing that integrates ship and cabled observations. The ACO is a prototypical example of a deep observatory system that uses a retired first-generation fiber-optic telecommunications cable. Sensors provide live video, sound from local and distant sources, and measure currents, pressure, temperature, and salinity. Preliminary results will be presented and discussed.

  2. Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

    2010-12-17

    Objective The Majorana demonstrator will operate at liquid Nitrogen temperatures to ensure optimal spectrometric performance of its High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector modules. In order to transfer the heat load of the detector module, the Majorana demonstrator requires a cooling system that will maintain a stable liquid nitrogen temperature. This cooling system is required to transport the heat from the detector chamber outside the shield. One approach is to use the two phase liquid-gas equilibrium to ensure constant temperature. This cooling technique is used in a thermosyphon. The thermosyphon can be designed so the vaporization/condensing process transfers heat through the shield while maintaining a stable operating temperature. A prototype of such system has been built at PNNL. This document presents the experimental results of the prototype and evaluates the heat transfer performance of the system. The cool down time, temperature gradient in the thermosyphon, and heat transfer analysis are studied in this document with different heat load applied to the prototype.

  3. Bell Canyon test and results

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, C.L.; Hunter, T.O.

    1980-01-01

    The purposes of the Borehold Plugging Program are: to identify issues associated with sealing boreholes and shafts; to establish a data base from which to assess the importance of these issues; and to develop sealing criteria, materials, and demonstrative test for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Bell Canyon Test described in this report is one part of that program. Its purpose was to evaluate, in situ, the state of the art in borehole plugs and to identify and resolve problems encountered in evaluating a typical plug installation in anhydrite. The test results are summarized from the work of Peterson and Christensen and divided into two portions: system integrity and wellbore characterization tests prior to plug installation, and a series of tests to evaluate isolation characteristics of the 1.8-m-long plug. Conclusions of the Bell Canyon Test are: brine and fresh-water grouts, with acceptable physical properties in the fluid and hardened states, have been developed; the field data, taken together with laboratory data, suggest that the predominant flow into the test region occurs through the cement plug/borehold interface region, with lesser contributions occurring through the wellbore damage zone, the plug core, and the surrounding undisturbed anhydrite bed; and the 1.8-m-long by 20-cm-diameter grout plug, installed in anhydrite at a depth of 1370 m in the AEC-7 borehole, limits flow from the high pressure Bell Canyon aquifer to 0.6 liters/day.

  4. Cosmic radioactivity and INTEGRAL results

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, Roland

    2014-05-02

    Gamma-ray lines from radioactive decay of unstable isotopes co-produced by nucleosynthesis in massive stars and supernova have been measured since more than thirty years. Over the past ten years, INTEGRAL complemented the first sky survey made by COMPTEL. The {sup 26}A1 isotope with 1 My decay time had been first direct proof of currently-ongoing nucleosynthesis in our Galaxy. This has now become a tool to study the ?My history of specific source regions, such as massive-star groups and associations in nearby regions which can be discriminated from the galactic-plane background, and the inner Galaxy, where Doppler shifted lines add to the astronomical information about bar and spiral structure. Recent findings suggest that superbubbles show a remarkable asymmetry, on average, in the spiral arms of our galaxy. {sup 60}Fe is co-produced by the sources of {sup 26}A1, and the isotopic ratio from their nucleosynthesis encodes stellar-structure information. Annihilation gamma-rays from positrons in interstellar space show a puzzling bright and extended source region central to our Galaxy, but also may be partly related to nucleosynthesis. {sup 56}Ni and {sup 44}Ti isotope gamma-rays have been used to constrain supernova explosion mechanisms. Here we report latest results using the accumulated multi-year database of INTEGRAL observations, and discuss their astrophysical interpretations, connecting to other traces of cosmic radioactivity and to other cosmic messengers.

  5. Preliminary results of ANAIS-25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaré, J.; Cebrián, S.; Cuesta, C.; García, E.; Ginestra, C.; Martínez, M.; Oliván, M. A.; Ortigoza, Y.; Ortiz de Solórzano, A.; Pobes, C.; Puimedón, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Villar, J. A.; Villar, P.

    2014-04-01

    The ANAIS (Annual Modulation with NaI(Tl) Scintillators) experiment aims at the confirmation of the DAMA/LIBRA signal using the same target and technique at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory. 250 kg of ultrapure NaI(Tl) crystals will be used as a target, divided into 20 modules, each coupled to two photomultipliers. Two NaI(Tl) crystals of 12.5 kg each, grown by Alpha Spectra from a powder having a potassium level under the limit of our analytical techniques, form the ANAIS-25 set-up. The background contributions are being carefully studied and preliminary results are presented: their natural potassium content in the bulk has been quantified, as well as the uranium and thorium radioactive chains presence in the bulk through the discrimination of the corresponding alpha events by PSA, and due to the fast commissioning, the contribution from cosmogenic activated isotopes is clearly identified and their decay observed along the first months of data taking. Following the procedures established with ANAIS-0 and previous prototypes, bulk NaI(Tl) scintillation events selection and light collection efficiency have been also studied in ANAIS-25.

  6. Visible Nulling Coronagraph Testbed Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker; Woodruff, Robert; Vasudevan, Gopal; Rizzo, Maxime; Thompson, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) is a NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept study and a proposed NASA Discovery mission to image and characterize extrasolar giant planets in orbits with semi-major axes between 2 and 10 AU. EPIC would provide insights into the physical nature of a variety of planets in other solar systems complimenting radial velocity (RV) and astrometric planet searches. It will detect and characterize the atmospheres of planets identified by radial velocity surveys, determine orbital inclinations and masses, characterize the atmospheres around A and F stars, observed the inner spatial structure and colors of inner Spitzer selected debris disks. EPIC would be launched to heliocentric Earth trailing drift-away orbit, with a 5-year mission lifetime. The starlight suppression approach consists of a visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) that enables starlight suppression in broadband light from 480-960 nm. To demonstrate the VNC approach and advance it's technology readiness we have developed a laboratory VNC and have demonstrated white light nulling. We will discuss our ongoing VNC work and show the latest results from the VNC testbed.

  7. An overview of FTU results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, P.; Alessi, E.; Amicucci, L.; Angelini, B.; Apicella, M. L.; Apruzzese, G.; Artaserse, G.; Barbato, E.; Belli, F.; Bertocchi, A.; Bin, W.; Boncagni, L.; Botrugno, A.; Briguglio, S.; Bruschi, A.; Calabrò, G.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Centioli, C.; Cesario, R.; Cianfarani, C.; Cirant, S.; Crisanti, F.; D'Arcangelo, O.; De Angeli, M.; De Angelis, R.; Di Matteo, L.; Di Troia, C.; Esposito, B.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Fogaccia, G.; Frigione, D.; Fusco, V.; Gabellieri, L.; Galperti, C.; Garavaglia, S.; Giovannozzi, E.; Granucci, G.; Grossetti, G.; Grosso, G.; Guimarães-Filho, Z. O.; Iannone, F.; Krivska, A.; Kroegler, H.; Lazzaro, E.; Lontano, M.; Maddaluno, G.; Marchetto, C.; Marinucci, M.; Marocco, D.; Mazzitelli, G.; Mazzotta, C.; Milovanov, A.; Minelli, D.; Mirizzi, F. C.; Moro, G. A.; Napoli, F.; Nowak, S.; Orsitto, F. P.; Pacella, D.; Panaccione, L.; Panella, M.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Podda, S.; Pizzuto, A.; Pucella, G.; Ramogida, G.; Ravera, G.; Romano, A.; Sozzi, C.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O.; Viola, B.; Vitale, V.; Vlad, G.; Zanza, V.; Zerbini, M.; Zonca, F.; Aquilini, M.; Cefali, P.; Di Ferdinando, E.; Di Giovenale, S.; Giacomi, G.; Gravanti, F.; Grosso, A.; Mellera, V.; Mezzacappa, M.; Pensa, A.; Petrolini, P.; Piergotti, V.; Raspante, B.; Rocchi, G.; Sibio, A.; Tilia, B.; Torelli, C.; Tulli, R.; Vellucci, M.; Zannetti, D.

    2013-10-01

    Since the 2010 IAEA-FEC Conference, FTU has exploited improvements in cleaning procedures and in the density control system to complete a systematic exploration of access to high-density conditions in a wide range of plasma currents and magnetic fields. The line-averaged densities at the disruptive limit increased more than linearly with the toroidal field, while no dependence on plasma current was found; in fact, the maximum density of 4.3 × 1020 m-3 was reached at B = 8 T even at the minimum current of 0.5 MA, corresponding to twice the Greenwald limit. The lack of plasma current dependence was due to the increase in density peaking with the safety factor. Experiments with the 140 GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system were focused on the sawtooth (ST) period control and on the commissioning of a new launcher with real-time steering capability that will act as the front-end actuator of a real-time system for ST period control and tearing mode stabilization. Various ECRH and electron cyclotron current-drive modulation schemes were used; with the fastest one, the ST period synchronized with an 8 ms modulation period. The observed period variations were simulated using the JETTO code with a critical shear model for the crash trigger. The new launcher was of the plug-in type, allowing quick insertion and connection to the transmission line. Both beam characteristics and steering speed were in line with design expectation. Experimental results on the connection between improved coupling of lower hybrid waves in high-density plasmas and reduced wave spectral broadening were interpreted by fully kinetic, non-linear model calculations. A dual-frequency, time-of-flight diagnostic for the measurement of density profiles was developed and successfully tested. Fishbone-like instabilities driven by energetic electrons were simulated by the hybrid MHD-gyrokinetic XHMGC code.

  8. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80{degrees}C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either {open_quotes}satisfactory{close_quotes} (2-20 mpy) or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment.

  9. Overview of the FTU results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, B.; Apicella, M. L.; Apruzzese, G.; Barbato, E.; Bertocchi, A.; Bracco, G.; Bruschi, A.; Buceti, G.; Buratti, P.; Cardinali, A.; Carraro, L.; Castaldo, C.; Centioli, C.; Cesario, R.; Cirant, S.; Cocilovo, V.; Crisanti, F.; DeAngelis, R.; DeBenedetti, M.; Giruzzi, G.; DeMarco, F.; Esposito, B.; Finkenthal, M.; Frigione, D.; Gabellieri, L.; Gandini, F.; Garzotti, L.; Gatti, G.; Giovannozzi, E.; Gormezano, C.; Gravanti, F.; Granucci, G.; Grolli, M.; Iannone, F.; Kroegler, H.; Lazzaro, E.; Leigheb, M.; Maddaluno, G.; Maffia, G.; Marinucci, M.; Mattioli, M.; Mazzitelli, G.; Mirizzi, F.; Nowak, S.; Pacella, D.; Panaccione, L.; Panella, M.; Papitto, P.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Petrov, A. A.; Pieroni, L.; Podda, S.; Poli, F.; Puiatti, M. E.; Ravera, G.; Righetti, G. B.; Romanelli, F.; Romanelli, M.; Santini, F.; Sassi, M.; Saviliev, A.; Scarin, P.; Segre, S. E.; Simonetto, A.; Smeulders, P.; Sternini, E.; Sozzi, C.; Tartoni, N.; Tilia, B.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O.; Valisa, M.; Vershkov, V.; Vitale, V.; Vlad, G.; Zanza, V.; Zerbini, M.; Zonca, F.

    2003-12-01

    An overview of the Frascati tokamak upgrade (FTU) results during the period 2000-2002 is presented. Long duration internal transport barriers (ITBs) have been obtained on FTU with combined injection of lower hybrid (LH) and electron cyclotron (EC) waves in 5 T/0.5 MA discharges. The ITB phase lasts about 10 energy confinement times and is characterized by an energy confinement time up to 1.6 times the ITER97 L-mode scaling. Temperatures up to 11 keV are measured at 0.9 × 1020 m-3 central density. ITB studies using IBW injection have also been continued up to 8 T/0.8 MA. The LH system has operated at full power allowing us to complete the current drive (CD) studies at ITER-relevant densities. At these density values the electrons and ions are coupled and an increase in the ion temperature is clearly observed. A preliminary sign of enhanced CD efficiency has been obtained in the combined injection of EC and LH waves at magnetic field values lower than the resonant field for thermal EC absorption. Pellet optimization studies have been performed in order to test the conditions under which a quasi-steady-state confinement improvement can be obtained and impurity accumulation can be avoided. The confinement time in Ohmic discharges is generally in agreement with the ITER97 L-mode scaling. Transient confinement improvement is observed for a duration less than one energy confinement time. Radiation improved mode studies have been started thanks to the recently inserted boronization system, which has allowed reduction of the radiated power. Confinement improvement with neon injection has been observed in 6 T/0.9 MA discharges. Transport studies on profile stiffness and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) studies of fast reconnection and snakes will also be presented.

  10. Corral Monitoring System assessment results

    SciTech Connect

    Filby, E.E.; Haskel, K.J.

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the results of a functional and operational assessment of the Corral Monitoring Systems (CMS), which was designed to detect and document accountable items entering or leaving a monitored site. Its development was motivated by the possibility that multiple sites in the nuclear weapons states of the former Soviet Union might be opened to such monitoring under the provisions of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. The assessment was performed at three levels. One level evaluated how well the planned approach addressed the target application, and which involved tracking sensitive items moving into and around a site being monitored as part of an international treaty or other agreement. The second level examined the overall design and development approach, while the third focused on individual subsystems within the total package. Unfortunately, the system was delivered as disassembled parts and pieces, with very poor documentation. Thus, the assessment was based on fragmentary operating data coupled with an analysis of what documents were provided with the system. The system design seemed to be a reasonable match to the requirements of the target application; however, important questions about site manning and top level administrative control were left unanswered. Four weaknesses in the overall design and development approach were detected: (1) poor configuration control and management, (2) inadequate adherence to a well defined architectural standard, (3) no apparent provision for improving top level error tolerance, and (4) weaknesses in the object oriented programming approach. The individual subsystems were found to offer few features or capabilities that were new or unique, even at the conceptual level. The CMS might possibly have offered a unique combination of features, but this level of integration was never realized, and it had no unique capabilities that could be readily extracted for use in another system.

  11. Transconjunctival dacryocystorhinostomy: Long term results

    PubMed Central

    Kaynak, Pelin; Ozturker, Can; Karabulut, Gamze; Çelik, Burcu; Yilmaz, Omer Faruk; Demirok, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcomes of transconjunctival dacryocystorhinostomy (TRC-DCR) surgery in patients with epiphora due to primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction (PANDO) at second year follow-up. Methods In this retrospective, interventional study, 33 eyes of 29 patients, with epiphora due to PANDO, are included. Lower eyelid conjunctiva is incised at vestibulum inferomedially to access the lacrimal sac and nasal mucosa. Bone is perforated with burr and rongeurs and saccal and nasal flaps are anastomosed. Conjunctival wound edges are apposed and left unsutured. Intraoperative difficulties, surgical time and complications are noted. Average follow-up time was 2 years. Anatomical success was defined as patent lacrimal passages upon irrigation and functional success was defined as relief of epiphora. Results In nineteen (57.6%) eyes the surgeries were completed with the anterior and the posterior flaps sutured. In eight eyes (24.2%) only anterior flaps could be sutured. In 6 eyes (18.2%), the surgical procedure was converted to external dacryocystorhinostomy since the nasal mucosa could not be exposed adequately via transconjunctival route. The mean surgical time was 65.1 min. One patient had a millimeter long lower eyelid margin laceration in one eye (3.7%) intraoperatively due to traction for visualization of the operative site. Epiphora resolved in 25 of 27 eyes (92.5%) in whom TRC-DCR could be completed. Epiphora and failure to irrigation were noted in two eyes (7.4%) at the postoperative 4th and 8th months, respectively and required reoperation. No complications occurred, except granuloma formation at the conjunctival incision site in three eyes (11.1%). Epiphora resolved in all the six eyes of patients who underwent an external DCR (100%). Conclusion Transconjunctival dacryocystorhinostomy is a scarless dacryocystorhinostomy technique which is performed without endoscope and/or laser assistance, with 92.5% success rate comparable to external DCR at the second year follow-up without major complications. PMID:24526861

  12. Evaluation of agricultural residues for paper manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaide, L.J.; Baldovin, F.L.; Herranz, J.L.F. )

    1993-03-01

    Five agricultural residues-olive tree fellings, wheat straw, sunflower stalks, vine shoots, and cotton stalks-were evaluated for use as raw materials for paper manufacture. The untreated raw materials and their pulps were tested for hot-water solubles, 1%-NaOH solubles, alcohol-benzene extractables, ash, holocellulose, lignin, [alpha]-cellulose, and pentosans. Handsheets were tested for breaking length, stretch, burst index, and tear index. The results showed wheat straw to be the most promising material. Vine shoots showed the least promise.

  13. [Results for SHEBA/FIRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Atmospheric Research Laboratory's Radiation Measurement System (RAMS) was on the NCAR C-130 aircraft in May and July 1998, collecting radiometric data on the science flights conducted in the vicinity of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) ship. These measurements were part of the FIRE Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE ACE). Analysis of some of the data focused on the absorption, reflection, and transmittance of Arctic clouds, especially compared to model results. In order to assess the absorption of solar radiation by the clear and cloudy atmosphere in the Arctic the measurements from the radiometers were combined in pairs of above-cloud segments and below-cloud segments. To get these pairs, the data for all sixteen of the flights (8 in May and 8 in July) were examined for occurrences of low-altitude segments in proximity to high-altitude segments. The low-altitude data are then treated as measurements of the bottom of a layer and the high-altitude data are taken as measurements of the top of the layer. With measurements of the upwelling and downwelling irradiances above and below a layer one can determine the reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance of the layer. Attachment: Doelling, D.R., P. Minnis, D.A. Spangenberg, V. Chakrapani, A. Mahesh, S.K. Pope, and F.P.J. Valero, Cloud radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere during FIRE ACE derived from AVHRR data, J. Geophys. Res. 106, 15,279-15,296,2001. Minnis, P., D.R. Doelling, D.A. Spangenberg, A. Mahesh, S.K. Pope, and F.P.J. Valero, AVHRR-derived cloud radiative forcing over the ARM NSA and SHEBA site during FIRE ACE, abstract submitted to the ARM Science Team Meeting, San Antonio, TX, M a . 13-17,2000. Pope, S.K., and F.P.J. Valero, Measured and modeled radiometric fluxes in the Arctic during FIRE-ACE, presented as a poster at the American Geophysical Union meeting, San Francisco, CA, Dec. 13-17, 1999. Pope, S.K., and F.P.J. Valero, Measured and modeled radiometric fluxes in the Arctic during FIRE-ACEy paper presented at SHEBA/FIRE Workshop, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo., Apr. 17-20,2000.

  14. Overview of the FTU results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, B.; Annibaldi, S. V.; Apicella, M. L.; Apruzzese, G.; Barbato, E.; Bertocchi, A.; Bombarda, F.; Bourdelle, C.; Bruschi, A.; Buratti, P.; Calabrò, G.; Cardinali, A.; Carraro, L.; Castaldo, C.; Centioli, C.; Cesario, R.; Cirant, S.; Cocilovo, V.; Crisanti, F.; DeAngelis, R.; DeBenedetti, M.; DeMarco, F.; Esposito, B.; Frigione, D.; Gabellieri, L.; Gandini, F.; Garzotti, L.; Giovannozzi, E.; Gormezano, C.; Gravanti, F.; Granucci, G.; Hoang, G. T.; Iannone, F.; Kroegler, H.; Lazzaro, E.; Leigheb, M.; Maddaluno, G.; Maffia, G.; Marinucci, M.; Marocco, D.; Martin-Solis, J. R.; Martini, F.; Mattioli, M.; Mazzitelli, G.; Mazzotta, C.; Mirizzi, F.; Monari, G.; Nowak, S.; Orsitto, F.; Pacella, D.; Panaccione, L.; Panella, M.; Papitto, P.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Pieroni, L.; Podda, S.; Puiatti, M. E.; Ravera, G.; Regnoli, G.; Righetti, G. B.; Romanelli, F.; Romanelli, M.; Santini, F.; Sassi, M.; Saviliev, A.; Scarin, P.; Simonetto, A.; Smeulders, P.; Sternini, E.; Sozzi, C.; Tartoni, N.; Terranova, D.; Tilia, B.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O.; Valisa, M.; Vershkov, V.; Vitale, V.; Vlad, G.; Zonca, F.

    2005-10-01

    An overview of the FTU results during the period 2003-4 is presented. A prototype ITER-relevant lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) launcher, the passive active multijunction, has been successfully tested (f = 8 GHz) showing high power handling and good coupling properties and current drive comparable to those of a conventional launcher. Effective electron and ion heating (via collisions) have been achieved with the 140 GHz ECRH systems up to 1.5 MW, as well as current drive (25 kA at ne0 = 8 × 1019 m-3). The mitigation of disruptions has been studied with on-axis ECRH. Ion Bernstein wave studies have shown the importance of recycling in achieving improved confinement plasmas. Advanced tokamak scenarios are presented including repetitive pellet enhanced plasmas and electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs). Very peaked density profiles have been achieved with a low speed vertical pellet injector located at about mid-radius on the high field side. The performance is comparable to that achieved with a high-speed horizontal pellet injector. Possible reasons for this behaviour are discussed, among them the presence of an 'MHD' drift once particles reach the q = 1 surface. The effect of peaked density profiles on confinement is discussed. Electron ITBs can be produced at high density in FTU with LHCD only and with the combined use of LHCD and ECRH: Te0 = 6 keV with ne0 = 1.4 × 1020 m-3 and H97 = 1.6. Turbulence is strongly reduced. Ions are heated by collisions with ?Ti/Ti up to 35% showing that e-ITBs are not degraded by the electron-ion collisions. Particle pinch studies have been made at high densities in full current drive conditions where the Ware pinch plays no role. An anomalous inward pinch exists even at these high densities (ne0 = 1.5 × 1020 m-3). Despite the absence of energetic particles in FTU, MHD spectroscopy has revealed high frequency modes (30-80 kHz) that might have consequences for burning plasmas.

  15. Pluto System Surface Composition Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundy, William M.; Binzel, R. P.; Cook, J. C.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Earle, A. M.; Ennico, K.; Jennings, D. E.; Howett, C. J. A.; Linscott, I. R.; Lunsford, A. W.; Olkin, C. B.; Parker, A. H.; Parker, J. Wm; Protopapa, S.; Reuter, D. C.; Singer, K. N.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, S. A.; Tsang, C. C. C.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, L. A.

    2015-11-01

    This talk will present an overview of surface composition discoveries from New Horizons' exploration of the Pluto system. The emphasis will be on results that could only have been obtained thanks to the uniquely high spatial resolution provided by a spacecraft visit. The Ralph instrument is New Horizons' primary tool for investigating surface compositions in the Pluto system. Ralph consists of a near-infrared spectral imager sharing a 75 mm aperture telescope assembly with a color CCD camera system. The Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA) component of Ralph provides spectral coverage from 1.25 – 2.5 µm, at a resolving power (?/??) of 240. Ices such as CH4, N2, CO, CO2, C2H6, NH3, and H2O have uniquely diagnostic absorption bands in this wavelength region. The Multi-spectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) has 7 CCD arrays of which 4 have interference filters affixed directly on the focal plane. The filters pass wavelengths ranging from 400 through 975 nm, sensitive to coloration by tholin-type materials as well as a weak CH4 ice absorption band at 890 nm. Both Ralph components are usually operated in a scanning mode, rotating the spacecraft about its Z axis to sweep Ralph's field of view across the scene such that each point in the scene is eventually imaged at each wavelength. The width of the scanned region is 0.9 degrees divided into 256 spatial pixels for LEISA and 5.7 degrees spanned by 5000 pixels for MVIC. Over the course of the summer 2015 flyby, numerous Ralph observations targeted the various bodies in the Pluto system. As of late 2015, transmission of the data to Earth continues, but already a number of spectacular data sets are available for analysis, including LEISA scans of Pluto at 6 to 7 km/pixel and of Charon at 3 km/pixel, as well as MVIC scans of Pluto at 700 m/pixel and of Charon at 5 km/pixel. This work was supported by the NASA New Horizons Project.

  16. Recent Opportunity Microscopic Imager Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Arvidson, R. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Yingst, R.; Team, A.

    2013-12-01

    Opportunity arrived at exposures of Endeavour crater rim rocks in August 2011, on a hill dubbed 'Cape York.' These rocks have been the goal of exploration by Opportunity for the past few years because spectral evidence for phyllosilicates was observed at this location in orbital remote sensing data. As Opportunity circum¬navigated Cape York, the Microscopic Imager (MI) was used to examine the fine-scale textures of various soils and rocky outcrops. As reported previously, Opportunity discovered multiple bright linear features along the western periphery of Cape York that have been interpreted as veins of Ca sulfate deposited in fractures within the bedrock of Cape York. Opportunity then explored the northern and eastern sides of Cape York, including the area around 'Matijevic Hill' that shows evidence for phyllosilicates in CRISM data acquired from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. One of the first outcrops examined near Matijevic Hill, dubbed 'Kirkwood,' is dominated by millimeter-size spherules. Unlike the hematite-rich concretions observed by Opportunity on Meridiani Planum, the aggregated 'newberries' in the Kirkwood exposure display internal structure and resistant rims. Compositionally, the spherule-rich rock is very similar to a nearby spherule-poor outcrop dubbed 'Whitewater Lake.' Thus these spherules have a more basalt-like composition compared to the hematite-rich concretions of the Burns Formation. The origin of the Kirkwood outcrop is uncertain, but the setting on the rim of the 22-km diameter Endeavour crater suggests that perhaps impact melting was involved in lapilli formation, possibly followed by mobilization and sorting in the ejecta blanket. Alternatively, the newberries may be diagenetic iron oxide concretions that are less well cemented than the 'blueberries' of the younger sulfate-rich Burns Formation. The Whitewater Lake outcrops contain the phyllosilicate phases observed from orbit, and are the oldest materials yet investigated by Opportunity. The extremely soft bedrock exposed at a Whitewater Lake outcrop target dubbed 'Azilda' is mostly fine-grained, with dispersed 2-5 mm-diameter spherules and resistant veins. This target was easily abraded by the RAT, exposing a sandstone-like texture, but the sorting of grains is difficult to determine at MI resolution. Darker, erosion-resistant veneers, similar to desert varnishes on Earth, appear to record aqueous alteration that post-dates the formation of the Ca sulfate veins; they likely contain the nontronite that is observed by CRISM in this area. The inferred neutral pH and relatively low temperature of the fluids involved in these phases of alteration would have provided a habitable environment for life if it existed on Mars at that time. Because Opportunity can no longer directly sense phyllosilicate mineralogy with the MiniTES or Mössbauer spectrometers, it is focusing on characterizing the chemistry with the APXS and texture with the MI of potential phyllosilicate host rocks. The Athena MI continues to return useful images of Mars that are being used to study the textures of rocks and soils at Endeavour crater. Exploration by Opportunity continues, with the rover approaching 'Solander Point' and more exposures of phyllosilicates detected from orbit; the latest MI results will be presented at the conference.

  17. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, O.; Arslanbekov, R.; Atanasiu, C.; Bard, A.; Becker, G.; Becker, W.; Beckmann, M.; Behler, K.; Behringer, K.; Bergmann, A.; Bilato, R.; Bolshukin, D.; Borrass, K.; Bosch, H.-S.; Braams, B.; Brambilla, M.; Brandenburg, R.; Braun, F.; Brinkschulte, H.; Brückner, R.; Brüsehaber, B.; Büchl, K.; Buhler, A.; Bürbaumer, H.; Carlson, A.; Ciric, M.; Conway, G.; Coster, D. P.; Dorn, C.; Drube, R.; Dux, R.; Egorov, S.; Engelhardt, W.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Fantz, U.; Faugel, H.; Foley, M.; Franzen, P.; Fu, P.; Fuchs, J. C.; Gafert, J.; Gantenbein, G.; Gehre, O.; Geier, A.; Gernhardt, J.; Gubanka, E.; Gude, A.; Günter, S.; Haas, G.; Hartmann, D.; Heinemann, B.; Herrmann, A.; Hobirk, J.; Hofmeister, F.; Hohenöcker, H.; Horton, L.; Hu, L.; Jacobi, D.; Jakobi, M.; Jenko, F.; Kallenbach, A.; Kardaun, O.; Kaufmann, M.; Kendl, A.; Kim, J.-W.; Kirov, K.; Kochergov, R.; Kollotzek, H.; Kraus, W.; Krieger, K.; Kurzan, B.; Kyriakakis, G.; Lackner, K.; Lang, P. T.; Lang, R. S.; Laux, M.; Lengyel, L.; Leuterer, F.; Lorenz, A.; Maier, H.; Mank, K.; Manso, M.-E.; Maraschek, M.; Mast, K.-F.; McCarthy, P. J.; Meisel, D.; Meister, H.; Meo, F.; Merkel, R.; Mertens, V.; Meskat, J. P.; Monk, R.; Müller, H. W.; Münich, M.; Murmann, H.; Neu, G.; Neu, R.; Neuhauser, J.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Nunes, I.; Pautasso, G.; Peeters, A. G.; Pereverzev, G.; Pinches, S.; Poli, E.; Pugno, R.; Raupp, G.; Ribeiro, T.; Riedl, R.; Riondato, S.; Rohde, V.; Röhr, H.; Roth, J.; Ryter, F.; Salzmann, H.; Sandmann, W.; Sarelma, S.; Schade, S.; Schilling, H.-B.; Schlögl, D.; Schmidtmann, K.; Schneider, R.; Schneider, W.; Schramm, G.; Schweinzer, J.; Schweizer, S.; Scott, B. D.; Seidel, U.; Serra, F.; Sesnic, S.; Sihler, C.; Silva, A.; Sips, A.; Speth, E.; Stäbler, A.; Steuer, K.-H.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Strumberger, E.; Suttrop, W.; Tabasso, A.; Tanga, A.; Tardini, G.; Tichmann, C.; Treutterer, W.; Troppmann, M.; Tsois, N.; Ullrich, W.; Ulrich, M.; Varela, P.; Vollmer, O.; Wenzel, U.; Wesner, F.; Wolf, R.; Wolfrum, E.; Wunderlich, R.; Xantopoulos, N.; Yu, Q.; Zarrabian, M.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.; Zeiler, A.; Zohm, H.

    2001-10-01

    Ion and electron temperature profiles in conventional L and H mode on ASDEX Upgrade are generally stiff and limited by a critical temperature gradient length ?T/T as given by ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence. ECRH experiments indicate that electron temperature (Te) profiles are also stiff, as predicted by electron temperature gradient turbulence with streamers. Accordingly, the core and edge temperatures are proportional to each other and the plasma energy is proportional to the pedestal pressure for fixed density profiles. Density profiles are not stiff, and confinement improves with density peaking. Medium triangularity shapes (?<0.45) show strongly improved confinement up to the Greenwald density nGW and therefore higher ?values, owing to increasing pedestal pressure, and H mode density operation extends above nGW. Density profile peaking at nGW was achieved with controlled gas puffing rates, and first results from a new high field side pellet launcher allowing higher pellet velocities are promising. At these high densities, small type II ELMs provide good confinement with low divertor power loading. In advanced scenarios the highest performance was achieved in the improved H mode with HL-89P?N approx 7.2 at ? = 0.3 for five confinement times, limited by neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) at low central magnetic shear (qmin approx 1). The T profiles are still governed by ITG and trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence, and confinement is improved by density peaking connected with low magnetic shear. Ion internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges - mostly with reversed shear (qmin>1) and L mode edge - achieved HL-89P <= 2.1 and are limited to ?N <= 1.7 by internal and external ideal MHD modes. Turbulence driven transport is suppressed, in agreement with the E × B shear flow paradigm, and core transport coefficients are at the neoclassical ion transport level, where the latter was established by Monte Carlo simulations. Reactor relevant ion and electron ITBs with Te approx Ti approx 10 keV were achieved by combining ion and electron heating with NBI and ECRH, respectively. In low current discharges full non-inductive current drive was achieved in an integrated high performance H mode scenario with [`n]e = nGW, high ?p = 3.1, ?N = 2.8 and HL-89P = 1.8, which developed ITBs with qmin approx 1. Central co-ECCD at low densities allows a high current drive fraction of >80%, while counter-ECCD leads to negative central shear and formation of an electron ITB with Te(0)>12 keV. MHD phenomena, especially fishbones, contribute to achieving quasi-stationary advanced discharge conditions and trigger ITBs, which is attributed to poloidal E × B shearing driven by redistribution of resonant fast particles. But MHD instabilities also limit the operational regime of conventional (NTMs) and advanced (double tearing, infernal and external kink modes) scenarios. The onset ?N for NTM is proportional to the normalized gyroradius ?*. Complete NTM stabilization was demonstrated at ?N = 2.5 using ECCD at the island position with 10% of the total heating power. MHD limits are expected to be extended using current profile control by off-axis current drive from more tangential NBI combined with ECCD and wall stabilization. Presently, the ASDEX Upgrade divertor is being adapted to optimal performance at higher ?'s and tungsten covering of the first wall is being extended on the basis of the positive experience with tungsten on divertor and heat shield tiles.

  18. Context Representation for Web Search Results

    E-print Network

    Baeza-Yates, Ricardo

    Context Representation for Web Search Results Jesús Vegas Department of Computer Science U. Valladolid Context Representation for Web Search Results 2 Outline Intro Web search results in the web site and Future work #12;Context Representation for Web Search Results 3 Introduction Searching the web is one

  19. Chemical properties of two-year-old deciduous species

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, P.; Rolfe, G.L.; Lee, C.S.; White, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    Contents of ash, hot-water extractives, 1% sodium hydroxide extractives, alcohol-benzene extractive, lignin, holocellulose, alpha-cellulose, and pentosan were determined on two-year-old, short-rotation trees of autumn olive, black alder, black locust, eastern cottonwood, royal paulownia, silver maple, and sycamore. These plantations were established in 1978 on marginal agricultural land that was not suitable for food production in Illinois. Six comparable species of commercial lumber were also analyzed. Test results indicated that all chemical properties did vary with species, above-ground tree portions, and ages of species. The two-year-old juvenile trees had higher average extractives, holocellulose, pentosan, and ash content than did the lumber of matured wood. Black locust possessed the highest values of holocellulose and alpha-cellulose, while the eastern cottonwood had the highest extractive contents. Silver maple had the highest lignin content. Both bark and branches which consisted of about 32% of the mass weight of young trees, had a higher average lignin, extractive and ash content than those of the stemwood. Based on chemical composition, these seven juvenile deciduous species could serve as a raw material for the paper and chemical industries, as well as for energy. 19 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

  20. Symposium on Recent Results in Infrared Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P. (editor)

    1977-01-01

    Abstracts of papers presented at a symposium titled Recent Results in Infrared Astrophysics are set forth. The abstracts emphasize photometric, spectroscopic, polarization, and theoretical results on a broad range of current topics in infrared astrophysics.

  1. Four Results on Randomized Incremental Constructions

    E-print Network

    Waldmann, Uwe

    bounds are new, but eompare [DMT91, Mul91a, Mul91b, Mul91e, Sch91] for related results, in the ease complex construction, and Devillers et al [DMT91] have previously obtained the result for 2-dimensional

  2. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...results. Except as set forth in specific chemical test rules in subpart B of this part, a positive or negative test result in any of the tests required under subpart B is defined in the TSCA test guidelines published by...

  3. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...results. Except as set forth in specific chemical test rules in subpart B of this part, a positive or negative test result in any of the tests required under subpart B is defined in the TSCA test guidelines published by...

  4. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...results. Except as set forth in specific chemical test rules in subpart B of this part, a positive or negative test result in any of the tests required under subpart B is defined in the TSCA test guidelines published by...

  5. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...results. Except as set forth in specific chemical test rules in subpart B of this part, a positive or negative test result in any of the tests required under subpart B is defined in the TSCA test guidelines published by...

  6. Earth Radiation Budget Experiment - Preliminary seasonal results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Harrison, Edwin F.; Lee, Robert B., III

    1990-01-01

    Data from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and from the operational NOAA-9 satellite being placed in the archive of the earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) are discussed. The results of the ERBE data validation effort are reviewed along with ERBE solar constant observations and earth-viewing results. The latter include monthly average results for July 1985, annual average clear-sky fluxes, and annual average, zonal, and global results.

  7. university-logo Intro Algorithm Results Concl.

    E-print Network

    Aarts, Gert

    university-logo Intro Algorithm Results Concl. Strong coupling lattice QCD at finite temperature Ph. de Forcrand Trento, March 2009 = 0 QCD #12;university-logo Intro Algorithm Results Concl. QCD Forcrand Trento, March 2009 = 0 QCD #12;university-logo Intro Algorithm Results Concl. Motivation (1

  8. CDP Water Program 2015 Turkey Results

    E-print Network

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    CDP Water Program 2015 Turkey Results #12;Sponsor Foreword As Garanti Bank, we are proud to be a part of CDP Water Program, launched by Sabanci University Corporate Governance Forum, that marks a new era for water issues in Turkey. The results of 2015 CDP Global Water Report and results of Turkey hold

  9. Frame Dependence of Parton Cascade Results

    E-print Network

    Bin Zhang; Yang Pang

    1996-11-06

    Frame dependence of parton cascade results is studied for different schemes of doing cascade simulations. We show that different schemes do not always agree and results may have strong frame dependence. When the interaction range is on the order of mean free path and the collisions are done in the two particle center of mass frame, the results are not sensitive to the global frame that the collisions are ordered. Effects of different differential cross sections are also discussed.

  10. Innovation Impact: Breakthrough Research Results (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-07-01

    The Innovation Impact brochure captures key breakthrough results across NREL's primary areas of renewable energy and energy efficiency research: solar, wind, bioenergy, transportation, buildings, analysis, and manufacturing technologies.

  11. Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results

    MedlinePLUS

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ187 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results • What is cervical cancer screening? • What causes abnormal cervical cancer screening test ...

  12. Test results of ac superconducting cables

    SciTech Connect

    Forsyth, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    All the major components of an ac superconducting power transmission system have been developed. A summary of test results during the developmental stages is given. A Test Facility designed to demonstrate and evaluate cables rated for 138 kV, 1000-MVA 3-phi service is under construction. Most of the equipment has been installed and tested; results are presented.

  13. Query Transformations for Result Merging Shriphani Palakodety

    E-print Network

    Callan, Jamie

    Mellon University's entry at the TREC 2014 Federated Web Search track (FedWeb14). Federated search documents experiments to modify queries to merge results in the federated-search pipeline. Approaches from Search General Terms Algorithms, Experimentation Keywords Federated search, result merging

  14. Supporting Public Access to Research Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapinski, P. Scott; Osterbur, David; Parker, Joshua; McCray, Alexa T.

    2014-01-01

    We posed the question of what services an academic library can best provide to support the NIH Public Access Policy. We approached the answer to this question through education, collaboration, and tool-building. As a result, over the last four years we have engaged over 1,500 participants in discussions of public access to research results, forged…

  15. CP Symmetry in Particle Introduction Results

    E-print Network

    ?umer, Slobodan

    CP Symmetry in Particle Physics Introduction Results B-Factory Interpretation Exp. method Future/19Physics in Ljubljana, FMF, July 2011 j j y y #12;Introduction Why CP (A)Symmetry? Introduction Results B anti-baryons annihilated, while 1/109 baryons did not? p y anti-particles #12;Introduction Why CP (A

  16. Charmonium Spectroscopy and Production: New Results

    SciTech Connect

    Robutti, Enrico

    2005-10-12

    Recent results in charmonium spectroscopy are briefly reviewed, including new evidences for the 1P1 state (hc) and the study of the properties of the X (3872) state. Also, new results on charmonium production in B decays and e+e- {yields} (cc-bar)(cc-bar) are presented.

  17. Page 1 of 3 OUA results procedures

    E-print Network

    Mucina, Ladislav

    (TL- CS). UCs return results sheets to FLS to upload and ratify. Badged FLS notify TL-CS when the upload is done. TL-CS creates collation sheets and emails them to the UCs. School holds BOE and TL@curtin.edu.au generic email address for BOE. FLS upload results and ratify. #12;Page 2 of 3 Science and Engineering (Sc

  18. Pluto results on jets and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Pluto collaboration

    1981-02-01

    Results obtained with the PLUTO detector at PETRA are presented. Multihadron final states have been analysed with respect to clustering, energy-energy correlations and transverse momenta in jets. QCD predictions for hard gluon emission and soft gluon-quark cascades are discussed. Results on ..cap alpha../sub s/ and the gluon spin are given.

  19. LRRR Astronaut Trainer Acceptance Test Results

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    : : I 1'' LRRR Astronaut Trainer Acceptance Test Results NO. ATM 886 PAGE 1 REV. NO. OF 3 Aerospace Acceptance Test for the LRRR Astronaut Trainer. The Acceptance Plan used for this test is Internal Memorandum;.· :- I NO. REV. NO· ATM 886 LRRR Astronaut Trainer Acceptance Test Results PAGE 2 OF 3 DATE May 8, 1970

  20. 16 CFR 1610.8 - Reporting results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... following are the definitions for the test result codes, which shall be used for recording flammability results for each specimen that is burned. (1) For Plain Surface Textile Fabrics: DNIDid not ignite... Raised Surface Textile Fabrics: SF ucSurface flash, under the stop thread, but does not break the...

  1. 16 CFR 1610.8 - Reporting results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... following are the definitions for the test result codes, which shall be used for recording flammability results for each specimen that is burned. (1) For Plain Surface Textile Fabrics: DNIDid not ignite... Raised Surface Textile Fabrics: SF ucSurface flash, under the stop thread, but does not break the...

  2. Scheduling periodic jobs using imprecise results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Jen-Yao; Liu, Jane W. S.; Lin, Kwei-Jay

    1987-01-01

    One approach to avoid timing faults in hard, real-time systems is to make available intermediate, imprecise results produced by real-time processes. When a result of the desired quality cannot be produced in time, an imprecise result of acceptable quality produced before the deadline can be used. The problem of scheduling periodic jobs to meet deadlines on a system that provides the necessary programming language primitives and run-time support for processes to return imprecise results is discussed. Since the scheduler may choose to terminate a task before it is completed, causing it to produce an acceptable but imprecise result, the amount of processor time assigned to any task in a valid schedule can be less than the amount of time required to complete the task. A meaningful formulation of the scheduling problem must take into account the overall quality of the results. Depending on the different types of undesirable effects caused by errors, jobs are classified as type N or type C. For type N jobs, the effects of errors in results produced in different periods are not cumulative. A reasonable performance measure is the average error over all jobs. Three heuristic algorithms that lead to feasible schedules with small average errors are described. For type C jobs, the undesirable effects of errors produced in different periods are cumulative. Schedulability criteria of type C jobs are discussed.

  3. Sparse Differential Resultant for Laurent Differential Polynomials

    E-print Network

    Li, Wei; Gao, Xiao-Shan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we first introduce the concepts of Laurent differential polynomials and Laurent differentially essential systems, and give a criterion for Laurent differentially essential systems in terms of their supports. Then the sparse differential resultant for a Laurent differentially essential system is defined and its basic properties are proved. In particular, order and degree bounds for the sparse differential resultant are given. Based on these bounds, an algorithm to compute the sparse differential resultant is proposed, which is single exponential in terms of the order, the number of variables, and the size of the Laurent differential system.

  4. Livermore Big Trees Park: 1998 Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Queen, D; Gallegos, G; Surano, K

    2002-04-18

    This report is an in-depth study of results from environmental sampling conducted in 1998 by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at Big Trees Park in the city of Livermore. The purpose of the sampling was to determine the extent and origin of plutonium found in soil at concentrations above fallout-background levels in the park. This report describes the sampling that was conducted, the chemical and radio-chemical analyses of the samples, the quality control assessments and statistical analyses of the analytical results, and LLNL's interpretations of the results. It includes a number of data analyses not presented in LLNL's previous reports on Big Trees Park.

  5. New results on the tau lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1987-11-01

    This is a review of new results on the tau lepton. The results include precise measurements of the lifetime, measurements of the decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/2..pi../sup 0/nu/sub tau/ with much improved precision, and limits on decay modes containing eta mesons, including the second-class-current decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/eta nu/sub tau/. The implications of these new results on the discrepancy in the one-charged-particle decay modes are discussed. 52 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Experimental rotordynamic coefficient results for honeycomb seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.; Childs, Dara W.

    1988-01-01

    Test results (leakage and rotordynamic coefficients) are presented for seven honeycomb-stator smooth-rotor seals. Tests were carried out with air at rotor speeds up to 16,000 cpm and supply pressures up to 8.2 bars. Test results for the seven seals are compared, and the most stable configuration is identified based on the whirl frequency ratio. Results from tests of a smooth-rotor/smooth-stator seal, a teeth-on-stator labyrinth seal, and the most stable honeycomb seal are compared.

  7. RESOURCE COMPETITION: Ecological Result 1. Competitive Exclusion

    E-print Network

    Caraco, Thomas

    RESOURCE COMPETITION: Ecological Result 1. Competitive Exclusion One Sp Locally Extinct; Other Reaches Carrying Capacity 2. Competitive Coexistence Both Spp Extant; Diversity Maintained MECHANISMS Differently to Variation 2. Spatial Variation Competitive Refuge 3. Self-Regulation >> Interspecific

  8. RESOURCE COMPETITION: Ecological Result 1. Competitive Exclusion

    E-print Network

    Caraco, Thomas

    RESOURCE COMPETITION: Ecological Result 1. Competitive Exclusion One Sp Locally Extinct; Other Reaches Carrying Capacity 2. Competitive Coexistence Both Spp Extant; Diversity Maintained MECHANISMS Differently to Variation 2. Spatial Variation Physiological Gradient Competitive Refuge in Heterogeneous

  9. Modelling pronunciation variation: some preliminary results

    E-print Network

    Wester, Mirjam; Kessens, Judith M; Cucchiarini, Catia; Strik, Helmer

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we describe a method for improving the performance of a continuous speech recognizer by modelling pronunciation variation. Although the results obtained with this method are in line with those reported by ...

  10. Skull melting of fluorophosphate glass results

    SciTech Connect

    Wenckus, J.F.

    1982-06-07

    The results are presented of the third fluorophosphate glass skull-melting experiment which was carried out on July 30th. Details of the experimental procedures used were described in the report dated March 10, 1981.

  11. CTEPP NC DATA QA/QC RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains the method performance results. This includes field blanks, method blanks, duplicate samples, analytical duplicates, matrix spikes, and surrogate recovery standards.

    The Children’s Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (...

  12. Site Development Infrastructure Phase 4 Bid Results

    E-print Network

    Oviedo, Néstor J.

    Site Development Infrastructure Phase 4 Bid Results Project No.: 906050 Physical Planning, Design Construction 1 of 1 Bid:08/30/2012 Posted: 08/30/2012 Site Development & Infrastructure Phase 4 Merced, CA

  13. Reporting Conservation Results in the Chemical Industry 

    E-print Network

    Doerr, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    In 1974, the Manufacturing Chemists Association (MCA) developed an energy rate method for reporting the energy conservation results of the chemical industry to the Federal Energy Administration. The MCA Energy Rate Method has served as a model...

  14. 1 Experimental Results in Robust Lateral

    E-print Network

    Abstract Vehicle lateral dynamics are affected by vehicle mass, longitudin* *al velocity, vehicle as on a test vehicle. Test results for experime* *nts conducted on an instrumented track are presented Vehicles Raymond H. Byrne Chaouki T. Abdallah Peter Dorato Sandia

  15. Recent Results from the H1 Collaboration

    E-print Network

    Stefan Schmitt; for the H1 Collaboration

    2009-07-23

    An overview of recent physics results from the H1 collaboration is given. The covered areas are: rare processes and searches for new physics, structure functions and inclusive measurements, heavy flavour production, QCD and hadronic final states, diffractive scattering.

  16. Millstone Hill Thomson Scatter Results for 1969

    E-print Network

    Evans, J. V.

    1974-07-23

    This report summarizes the results for the electron-density distribution, electron and ion temperatures, and vertical ionization fluxes in the F-region obtained during 1969 using the Millstone Hill (42.6°N, 71.5°W) Thomson ...

  17. Result Demonstration: A Method That Works 

    E-print Network

    Boleman, Chris; Dromgoole, Darrell A.

    2007-05-24

    The result demonstration is one of the most effective ways to transfer research-based knowledge to agricultural producers or to any audience. This publication explains the factors affecting a learner's decision to adopt an innovation and the five...

  18. QCD Thermodynamics on the Lattice: Recent Results

    E-print Network

    Carleton DeTar

    2010-12-31

    I give a brief introduction to the goals, challenges, and technical difficulties of lattice QCD thermodynamics and present some recent results from the HotQCD collaboration for the crossover temperature, equation of state, and other observables.

  19. Recent QCD results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Pickarz, Henryk; CDF and DO collaboration

    1997-02-01

    Recent QCD results from the CDF and D0 detectors at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider are presented. An outlook for future QCD tests at the Tevatron collider is also breifly discussed. 27 refs., 11 figs.

  20. Heavy quark results at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Fein, D.K.; D0 Collaboration

    1997-01-01

    Recent results in heavy quark physics from the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider are reported. Topics included are top quark production and mass determination, bottom production and correlations, and charmonium production. 20 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Results of coronal hole research: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    An overview of the last 10 years of coronal hole research, in particular since 1970, is presented. The findings of the early investigations and the more recent results obtained with Skylab/Apollo Telescope Mount instrumentation are discussed.

  2. Results from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mitri, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory has been designed to investigate the origin and the nature of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs). Selected results concerning the measurements of the energy spectrum and the mass composition are presented.

  3. Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-07-01

    U.S. DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluated Norcal Waste Systems liquefied natural gas (LNG) waste transfer trucks. Trucks had prototype Cummins Westport ISXG engines. Report gives final evaluation results.

  4. Complexity Results on Learning by Neural Nets

    E-print Network

    Lin, Jyh-Han; Vitter, Jeffrey Scott

    1991-01-01

    We consider the computational complexity of learning by neural nets. We are inter- ested in how hard it is to design appropriate neural net architectures and to train neural nets for general and specialized learning tasks. Our main result shows...

  5. Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-05

    This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

  6. 2014 COACHE Survey Results: Tenure and Promotion

    E-print Network

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    institutions on satisfaction with four aspects of promotion and tenure 2014 COACHE Survey Results: Tenure and Promotion Overview FSU faculty who participated in the 2014 COACHE survey rated tenure and promotion more

  7. Higgs boson discovery and recent results

    E-print Network

    Martin Flechl; for the CMS collaboration

    2015-10-07

    After briefly discussing the discovery of a Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider, an overview of recent results in Higgs boson physics obtained with the CMS experiment is presented. The focus is on measurements of the properties of the recently discovered Higgs boson with a mass of about 125 GeV. A brief selection of results in searches for Higgs bosons beyond the standard model is given, and prospects of future Higgs boson measurements and searches are discussed.

  8. Rampant software errors may undermine scientific results

    PubMed Central

    Soergel, David A. W.

    2015-01-01

    The opportunities for both subtle and profound errors in software and data management are boundless, yet they remain surprisingly underappreciated. Here I estimate that any reported scientific result could very well be wrong if data have passed through a computer, and that these errors may remain largely undetected.  It is therefore necessary to greatly expand our efforts to validate scientific software and computed results. PMID:26539290

  9. Recent results on ?e e- scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. C.; Bharadwaj, V.; Brooks, G. A.; Chen, H. H.; Doe, P. J.; Hausammann, R.; Lee, W. P.; Mahler, H. J.; Potter, M. E.; Rushton, A. M.; Wang, K. C.; Bowles, T. J.; Burman, R. L.; Carlini, R. D.; Cochran, D. R. F.; Frank, J. S.; Piasetzky, E.; Sandberg, V. D.; Krahauer, D. A.; Talaga, R. L.; Lee, Presented by W. P.

    1986-10-01

    The latest results from the neutrino-electron elastic scattering experiment at the LAMPF beam stop are presented. Based on the data sample collected from September 1983 to December 1985, we observed 121±25 events consistent with ?x e- scattering, of which 99±25 events are assigned to ?e e- scattering. The resulting cross section agrees with standard electroweak theory and rules out the constructive interference between weak charge-current and neutral-current interactions.

  10. Random walk through recent CDF QCD results

    SciTech Connect

    C. Mesropian

    2003-04-09

    We present recent results on jet fragmentation, jet evolution in jet and minimum bias events, and underlying event studies. The results presented in this talk address significant questions relevant to QCD and, in particular, to jet studies. One topic discussed is jet fragmentation and the possibility of describing it down to very small momentum scales in terms of pQCD. Another topic is the studies of underlying event energy originating from fragmentation of partons not associated with the hard scattering.

  11. A generalized Dolinar receiver with inconclusive results

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahira, K.; Usuda, T. S.

    2014-12-04

    We investigate the implementation of a measurement for binary optical coherent states that minimizes the error probability with a fixed rate of an inconclusive result. We find that the optimal measurement for binary optical coherent states with any probability of an inconclusive result can be implemented using only a beam splitter, a local coherent light source, a photon detector, and a feedback circuit, even though the measurement is generally not projective.

  12. Log(s) physics results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-08

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a large, azimuthally symmetric detector designed to study {bar p}p interactions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Results are presented from data taken with a minimum bias trigger at {radical}s = 630 and 1800 GeV during the 1987 run. The topics include the current analysis of dn/d{eta} and some very preliminary results on short range pseudorapidity correlations and Bose-Einstein correlations. 7 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. NASA JSC neural network survey results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Dan

    1987-01-01

    A survey of Artificial Neural Systems in support of NASA's (Johnson Space Center) Automatic Perception for Mission Planning and Flight Control Research Program was conducted. Several of the world's leading researchers contributed papers containing their most recent results on artificial neural systems. These papers were broken into categories and descriptive accounts of the results make up a large part of this report. Also included is material on sources of information on artificial neural systems such as books, technical reports, software tools, etc.

  14. New results from AMS cosmic ray measurements

    E-print Network

    M. A. Huang

    2002-03-06

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a detector designed to search for antimatter in the cosmic rays. The physics results from the test flight in June 1998 are analyzed and published. This paper reviews the results in the five published papers of the AMS collaboration, updates the current understanding of two puzzles, albedo $e^+/e^-$ and albedo $^3$He, and disscusses the influence of albedo particles.

  15. The Lake Baikal neutrino experiment selected results

    E-print Network

    Balkanov, V A

    2000-01-01

    We review the present status of the lake Baikal Neutrino Experiment and present selected physical results gained with the consequetive stages of the stepwise increasing detector: from NT-36 to NT-96. Results cover atmospheric muons, neutrino events, very high energy neutrinos, search for neutrino events from WIMP annihilation, search for magnetic monopoles and environmental studies. We also describe an air Cherenkov array developed for the study of angular resolution of NT-200.

  16. The Lake Baikal neutrino experiment: selected results

    E-print Network

    BAIKAL Collaboration; V. Balkanov

    2000-01-10

    We review the present status of the lake Baikal Neutrino Experiment and present selected physical results gained with the consequetive stages of the stepwise increasing detector: from NT-36 to NT-96. Results cover atmospheric muons, neutrino events, very high energy neutrinos, search for neutrino events from WIMP annihilation, search for magnetic monopoles and environmental studies. We also describe an air Cherenkov array developed for the study of angular resolution of NT-200.

  17. Results on CP violation from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    S. Giagu

    2003-12-11

    The CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider is collecting a large sample of fully hadronic decays of Bottom and Charm mesons. First CP Violation measurements have been performed using the initial data, achieving results which clearly state the CDF ability in extracting significant CKM information from p{bar p} collisions. The first results on direct CP asymmetries on Charm and Bottom decays and future plans from the CDF experiment are discussed in this paper.

  18. Recent results from COMPASS muon scattering measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Capozza, Luigi [Irfu Collaboration: COMPASS Collaboration

    2012-10-23

    A sample of recent results in muon scattering measurements from the COMPASS experiment at CERN will be reviewed. These include high energy processes with longitudinally polarised proton and deuteron targets. High energy polarised measurements provide important constraints for studying the nucleon spin structure and thus permit to test the applicability of the theoretical framework of factorisation theorems and perturbative QCD. Specifically, latest results on longitudinal quark polarisation, quark helicity densities and gluon polarisation will be reviewed.

  19. Scheduling periodic jobs that allow imprecise results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Jen-Yao; Liu, Jane W. S.; Lin, Kwei-Jay

    1990-01-01

    The problem of scheduling periodic jobs in hard real-time systems that support imprecise computations is discussed. Two workload models of imprecise computations are presented. These models differ from traditional models in that a task may be terminated any time after it has produced an acceptable result. Each task is logically decomposed into a mandatory part followed by an optional part. In a feasible schedule, the mandatory part of every task is completed before the deadline of the task. The optional part refines the result produced by the mandatory part to reduce the error in the result. Applications are classified as type N and type C, according to undesirable effects of errors. The two workload models characterize the two types of applications. The optional parts of the tasks in an N job need not ever be completed. The resulting quality of each type-N job is measured in terms of the average error in the results over several consecutive periods. A class of preemptive, priority-driven algorithms that leads to feasible schedules with small average error is described and evaluated.

  20. Results of Labscale Hybrid Rocket Motor investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, B.; Frederick, R. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This work was performed to establish a labscale hybrid rocket motor test and evaluation capability at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The scope included activation of a Labscale Hybrid Motor, determination of baseline burning rates for PMMA fuel, and replication of pressure oscillations for HTPB fuel. The 0.820-in.-diam port, 10-in.-long fuel grains were burned for two seconds with gaseous oxygen. PMMA fuels were tested at oxygen fluxes from 0.047 lbm/sec sq in. to 0.378 lbm/sec sq in., and the HTPB fuel was evaluated at 0.378 lbm/sec sq in. The results showed that the labscale hybrid motor replicated previously reported PMMA fuel regression rates. The results also replicated low-frequency (less than 100 Hz) pressure oscillations that have been observed for HTPB fuels. These results establish the Labscale Hybrid Motor facility at MSFC.

  1. Some results concerning linear iterative (systolic) arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, O.H.; Palis, M.A.; Kim, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have shown some new interesting results concerning the properties, power, and limitations of various types of linear iterative (systolic) arrays. The method they employed consisted of finding sequential machine characterizations of these array models, and then using the characterizations to prove the results. Because of the absence of any concurrency and synchronization problems, the authors obtained simple proofs to results which when proved directly on the arrays would seem very difficult. The characterizations, therefore, provide a novel and promising method which can be used to analyze other systolic systems. In the future they hope to extend this methodology to the study of two-dimensional and multidimensional systolic arrays, and other systolic systems with different interconnection networks.

  2. Recent results from NA61/SHINE

    E-print Network

    Pu?awski, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    The main physics goals of the NA61/SHINE programme on strong interactions are the study of the properties of the onset of deconfinement and the search for signatures of the critical point of strongly interacting matter. These goals are pursued by performing an energy (beam momentum 13A -158A GeV/c) and system size (p+p, p+Pb, Be+Be, Ar+Sc, Xe+La) scan. This publication reviews results and plans of NA61/SHINE. In particular, recent inclusive spectra and new results on fluctuations and correlations of identified hadrons in inelastic p+p and centrality selected Be+Be interactions at the SPS energies are presented. The energy dependence of quantities inspired by the Statistical Model of the Early Stage (kink, horn and step) show unexpected behavior in p+p collisions. The NA61/SHINE results are compared with the corresponding data of other experiments and model predictions.

  3. Adaptive structures - Test hardware and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Ben K.; Fanson, James L.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Kuo, Chin-Po

    1990-01-01

    The facilities and procedures used at JPL to test adaptive structures such as the large deployable reflector (LDR) are described and preliminary results are reported. The applications of adaptive structures in future NASA missions are outlined, and the techniques which are employed to modify damping, stiffness, and isolation characteristics, as well as geometric changes, are listed. The development of adaptive structures is shown to be effective as a result of new actuators and sensors, and examples are listed for categories such as fiber optics, shape-memory materials, piezoelectrics, and electrorheological fluids. Some ground test results are described for laboratory truss structures and truss test beds, which are shown to be efficient and easy to assemble in space. Adaptive structures are shown to be important for precision space structures such as the LDR, and can alleviate ground test requirements.

  4. MiniBooNE Oscillation Results 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Djurcic, Zelimir

    2012-01-01

    The MiniBooNE neutrino oscillation search experiment at Fermilab has recently updated results from a search for {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillations, using a data sample corresponding to 8.58 x 10{sup 20} protons on target in anti-neutrino mode. This high statistics result represent an increase in statistics of 52% compared to result published in 2010. An excess of 57.7 {+-} 28.5 events is observed in the energy range 200 MeV < E{sub {nu}} < 3000 MeV. The data favor LSND-like {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillations over a background only hypothesis at 91.1% confidence level in the energy range 475 < E{sub {nu}} < 3000 MeV.

  5. Motivation Method Testing Results(1) Instabilities Results(2) Future Viscoelasticity in mantle convection

    E-print Network

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Motivation Method Testing Results(1) Instabilities Results(2) Future Viscoelasticity in mantle@karel.troja.mff.cuni.cz] 14th October 2015 Viscoelasticity in mantle convection Charles University in Prague #12;Motivation Method Testing Results(1) Instabilities Results(2) Future Content Motivation Method Testing: Elastic slab

  6. Sugar CSC CSC'2009 CSC'2009 Results Summary Short Report on the Results of the Fourth

    E-print Network

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    Sugar CSC CSC'2009 CSC'2009 Results Summary . . . .. . . Short Report on the Results of the Fourth Short Report on the Results of the Fourth International Constr #12;Sugar CSC CSC'2009 CSC'2009 Results Summary Sugar Solver .. Sugar: a SAT-based Constraint Solver Sugar is a SAT-based constraint solver based

  7. Annotating images by mining image search results.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Jing; Zhang, Lei; Li, Xirong; Ma, Wei-Ying

    2008-11-01

    Although it has been studied for years by the computer vision and machine learning communities, image annotation is still far from practical. In this paper, we propose a novel attempt at model-free image annotation, which is a data-driven approach that annotates images by mining their search results. Some 2.4 million images with their surrounding text are collected from a few photo forums to support this approach. The entire process is formulated in a divide-and-conquer framework where a query keyword is provided along with the uncaptioned image to improve both the effectiveness and efficiency. This is helpful when the collected data set is not dense everywhere. In this sense, our approach contains three steps: 1) the search process to discover visually and semantically similar search results, 2) the mining process to identify salient terms from textual descriptions of the search results, and 3) the annotation rejection process to filter out noisy terms yielded by Step 2. To ensure real-time annotation, two key techniques are leveraged-one is to map the high-dimensional image visual features into hash codes, the other is to implement it as a distributed system, of which the search and mining processes are provided as Web services. As a typical result, the entire process finishes in less than 1 second. Since no training data set is required, our approach enables annotating with unlimited vocabulary and is highly scalable and robust to outliers. Experimental results on both real Web images and a benchmark image data set show the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed algorithm. It is also worth noting that, although the entire approach is illustrated within the divide-and conquer framework, a query keyword is not crucial to our current implementation. We provide experimental results to prove this. PMID:18787241

  8. Quark Hadron Duality - Recent Jefferson Lab Results

    E-print Network

    Ioana Niculescu

    2015-09-25

    The duality between the partonic and hadronic descriptions of electron--nucleon scattering is a remarkable feature of nuclear interactions. When averaged over appropriate energy intervals the cross section at low energy which is dominated by nucleon resonances resembles the smooth behavior expected from perturbative QCD. Recent Jefferson Lab results indicate that quark-hadron duality is present in a variety of observables, not just the proton F2 structure function. An overview of recent results, especially local quark-hadron duality on the neutron, are presented here.

  9. Physics results from dynamical overlap fermion simulations

    E-print Network

    Shoji Hashimoto

    2008-11-08

    I summarize the physics results obtained from large-scale dynamical overlap fermion simulations by the JLQCD and TWQCD collaborations. The numerical simulations are performed at a fixed global topological sector; the physics results in the theta-vacuum is reconstructed by correcting the finite volume effect, for which the measurement of the topological susceptibility is crucial. Physics applications we studied so far include a calculation of chiral condensate, pion mass, decay constant, form factors, as well as (vector and axial-vector) vacuum polarization functions and nucleon sigma term.

  10. Recent QCD results from the Tevatron

    E-print Network

    Vellidis, Costas

    2015-01-01

    Four years after the shutdown of the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, the two Tevatron experiments, CDF and DZero, continue producing important results that test the theory of the strong interaction, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The experiments exploit the advantages of the data sample acquired during the Tevatron Run II, stemming from the unique pp initial state, the clean environment at the relatively low Tevatron instantaneous luminosities, and the good understanding of the data sample after many years of calibrations and optimizations. A summary of results using the full integrated luminosity is presented, focusing on measurements of prompt photon production, weak boson production associated with jets, and non-perturbative QCD processes.

  11. Relativity concept inventory: Development, analysis, and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanides, J. S.; Savage, C. M.

    2013-06-01

    We report on a concept inventory for special relativity: the development process, data analysis methods, and results from an introductory relativity class. The Relativity Concept Inventory tests understanding of relativistic concepts. An unusual feature is confidence testing for each question. This can provide additional information; for example, high confidence correlated with incorrect answers suggests a misconception. A novel aspect of our data analysis is the use of Monte Carlo simulations to determine the significance of correlations. This approach is particularly useful for small sample sizes, such as ours. Our results show a gender bias that was not present in course assessment, similar to that reported for the Force Concept Inventory.

  12. CP Violation Results from D0

    E-print Network

    J. Ellison

    2008-10-06

    We present results on CP violation from approximately 2.8 fb^{-1} of data collected by the D0 Experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. The results presented are: (i) an improved measurement of the B_s^0 CP-violating phase from a flavor-tagged analysis of B_s^0 --> J/\\psi \\phi decays; (ii) a search for direct CP violation in B^{+-} --> J/\\psi K^{+-} (\\pi^{+-}) decays from a measurement of the charge asymmetry A_{CP}(B^{+-} --> J/\\psi K^{+-}); and (iii) a search for indirect CP violation from searches for anomalous charge asymmetries in semileptonic B_s^0 decays.

  13. Model independent results for nucleon structure

    E-print Network

    Gerald A Miller

    2008-08-05

    I review recent results regarding the nucleon charge and magnetization densities as well as the shape of the nucleon. First, some phenomenolgical considerations that show that the shape of the proton is not round are discussed. Then model independent results regarding the neutron and proton charge density, and the proton magnetization density are presented. Finally, I show how the spin-dependent densities that reveal the shape of the proton can be measured via their relation with transverse momentum distributions. The present work is made possible by the recent tremendous experimental progress made at Bates, Mainz and Jefferson Laboratory.

  14. CP Violation Results from D0

    E-print Network

    Ellison, J

    2008-01-01

    We present results on CP violation from approximately 2.8 fb^{-1} of data collected by the D0 Experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. The results presented are: (i) an improved measurement of the B_s^0 CP-violating phase from a flavor-tagged analysis of B_s^0 --> J/\\psi \\phi decays; (ii) a search for direct CP violation in B^{+-} --> J/\\psi K^{+-} (\\pi^{+-}) decays from a measurement of the charge asymmetry A_{CP}(B^{+-} --> J/\\psi K^{+-}); and (iii) a search for indirect CP violation from searches for anomalous charge asymmetries in semileptonic B_s^0 decays.

  15. The spin physics results from COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Kouznetsov, O.

    2015-04-10

    COMPASS (COmmon Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy) is a fixed target experiment at CERN dedicated to studies of the spin structure of the nucleon and of the spectroscopy of hadrons. During the years 2002-2004, 2006-2007 and 2010-2011 the COMPASS collaboration has collected a large amount of data by scattering polarized 160(200) GeV/c muons on polarized {sup 6}LiD and NH{sub 3} targets. The COMPASS results on quark and gluon helicities are discussed, as well as results on transverse spin and transverse momentum effects in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering.

  16. Recent QCD results from the Tevatron

    E-print Network

    Costas Vellidis

    2015-10-10

    Four years after the shutdown of the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, the two Tevatron experiments, CDF and DZero, continue producing important results that test the theory of the strong interaction, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The experiments exploit the advantages of the data sample acquired during the Tevatron Run II, stemming from the unique pp initial state, the clean environment at the relatively low Tevatron instantaneous luminosities, and the good understanding of the data sample after many years of calibrations and optimizations. A summary of results using the full integrated luminosity is presented, focusing on measurements of prompt photon production, weak boson production associated with jets, and non-perturbative QCD processes.

  17. E-Learning: Managing for Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, James R.; Heacock, William B.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses advantages of electronic learning for business, including cost benefits, administrative benefits, and instructional benefits. Considers the increase in electronic learning to cut back on business travel since the September 11th attacks and offers guidelines to achieve business results with electronic learning, including linking learning…

  18. MIT Testing Results V.B. Graves

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    Optical Diagnostic Tool: High-Speed Camera to Fast Record Transient Phenomena · Back-illuminated laser shadow photography technique · Freeze the image of events using high speed camera (up to 1 µs pressure due to field, but no effects observed · Water vapor issues inside jet chamber resulted in addition

  19. Recent Results from Observations of Accreting Pulsars

    E-print Network

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    , CA 91125 Abstract. Since its launch in 1991, the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) has provided these observations, as well as a sampling of other recent results from CGRO and the ROSSI X­ray Timing Explorer (RXTE of CGRO, observations of accreting pulsars were carried out primarily with pointed X­ray telescopes. Since

  20. Bottomonium in the plasma: lattice results

    E-print Network

    G. Aarts; C. Allton; W. Evans; P. Giudice; T. Harris; A. Kelly; S. Kim; M. P. Lombardo; S. Ryan; J-I Skullerud

    2014-11-27

    We present results on the heavy quarkonium spectrum and spectral functions obtained by performing large-scale simulations of QCD for temperatures ranging from about 100 to 500 MeV, in the same range as those explored by LHC experiments. We discuss our method and perspectives for further improvements towards the goal of full control over the many systematic uncertainties of these studies.

  1. RESULTS OF THE SJSU ADVISING SURVEYS

    E-print Network

    Su, Xiao

    RESULTS OF THE SJSU ADVISING SURVEYS Spring 2009 #12;Survey Background The Advising Effectiveness students' and advisors' satisfaction with advising at SJSU, but also its quality. 2 surveys: The Student Survey of Academic Advising and the Survey of Academic Advisors. The surveys were administered

  2. Statistical Literacy and Sample Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlevey, Lynn; Sullivan, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Sample surveys are widely used in the social sciences and business. The news media almost daily quote from them, yet they are widely misused. Using students with prior managerial experience embarking on an MBA course, we show that common sample survey results are misunderstood even by those managers who have previously done a statistics course. In…

  3. Maine's Balance of Representation: Information and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine Department of Education, 2003

    2003-01-01

    This document, a companion to the "LAS Guide Principles and Criteria for the Adoption of Local Assessment Systems," [ED484135] presents results that are intended to provide Maine's school administrative units with an option for selecting sample performance indicators to be assessed through the Local Assessment System to meet the requirements for…

  4. Queneau Numbers --Recent Results and a Bibliography

    E-print Network

    Theune, Mariët

    Queneau Numbers -- Recent Results and a Bibliography Peter R.J. Asveld Department of Computer Science, Twente University of Technology P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, the Netherlands e-mail: p.r.j.asveld@misc.utwente.nl, P.R.J.Asveld@xs4all.nl Abstract -- Publications dealing with Queneau numbers can be divided roughly

  5. Reclassification Survey Results. SPEC Kit 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Management Studies.

    This kit presents the results of a survey conducted by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) in 1974 to investigate and document various experiences of academic and research libraries in reclassifying portions of collections or entire collections and the relationship between libraries' particular classification schemes on effective…

  6. Demand Better Results -- and Get Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Robert H.

    1974-01-01

    While most organizations could easily outstrip their current productivity, most managers don't communicate expectations of high achievement in a way that produces results. After analyzing the psychological barriers that keep managers from expecting and demanding more from their subordinates, the author outlines a five-point plan to upgrade…

  7. Recent Stirling engine loss-understanding results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, Roy C.; Thieme, Lanny G.; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1990-01-01

    For several years, NASA and other U.S. government agencies have been funding experimental and analytical efforts to improve the understanding of Stirling thermodynamic losses. NASA's objective is to improve Stirling engine design capability to support the development of new engines for space power. An overview of these efforts was last given at the 1988 IECEC. Recent results of this research are reviewed.

  8. Animation of finite element models and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipman, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    This is not intended as a complete review of computer hardware and software that can be used for animation of finite element models and results, but is instead a demonstration of the benefits of visualization using selected hardware and software. The role of raw computational power, graphics speed, and the use of videotape are discussed.

  9. Introduction Data Results Perspective Sudakov resummation effects

    E-print Network

    Huston, Joey

    be defined. Leading Twist NLO MS do not mix well! · Resummation provides a gate to nonperturbative ... comparison? #12;Introduction Data Results Perspective Global resummed fits? Soft gluon resummation to NLL contain CCFR data. · Some large-x data perturbative. Fitting NuTeV data with NLO and resummed QCD #12

  10. Selected results for LDEF thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1993-01-01

    Several different thermal control coatings were analyzed as part of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Materials Special Investigation Group activity and as part of the Space Environment Effects on Spacecraft Materials Experiment M0003. A brief discussion of the results obtained for these materials is presented.

  11. Combating Stigma Resulting from Deformity and Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard Wood Memorial for the Eradication of Leprosy, New York, NY.

    Summarized are the proceedings of a seminar concerned with methods of combating stigma resulting from facial disfigurement, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and leprosy. The purpose was to determine how theories about stigma can help in the development of new methods of public education in order to change public attitudes and reduce social stigma.…

  12. Recent work and results on sparrow project

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Neal R

    2010-12-23

    This briefing describes recent work undertaken on the Sparrow Project and results of this work. It describes experiments comparing the use of Genie with 2 classes with 3 classes for the problem of ship delineation. It also describes some preliminary work in the area of the optimization of segmentation techniques.

  13. Results of radiotherapy for Peyronie's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Niewald, Marcus . E-mail: ramnie@uniklinikum-saarland.de; Wenzlawowicz, Knut v.; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Wisser, Lothar; Derouet, Harry; Ruebe, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of radiotherapy for Peyronie's disease. Patients and Methods: In the time interval 1983-2000, 154 patients in our clinic were irradiated for Peyronie's disease. Of those, 101 had at least one complete follow-up data set and are the subject of this study. In the majority of patients, penis deviation was between 30 and 50{sup o}, there were one or two indurated foci with a diameter between 5 and 15 mm. Pain was recorded in 48/92 patients. Seventy-two of the 101 patients received radiotherapy with a total dose of 30 Gy, and 25 received 36 Gy in daily fractions of 2.0 Gy. The remaining patients received the following dosage: 34 Gy (1 patient), 38-40 Gy (3 patients). Mean duration of follow-up was 5 years. Results: The best results ever at any time during follow-up were an improvement of deviation in 47%, reduction of number of foci in 32%, reduction of size of foci in 49%, and less induration in 52%. Approximately 50% reported pain relief after radiotherapy. There were 28 patients with mild acute dermatitis and only 4 patients with mild urethritis. There were no long-term side effects. Conclusion: Our results compare well with those of other studies in the literature. In our patient cohort, radiotherapy was an effective therapy option with only very rare and mild side effects.

  14. Human Tissue Research: Who Owns the Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Allen B.

    1987-01-01

    Ownership issues in the results of research generally and of human tissue research specifically are explored. While acknowledging some uncertainty in the law, it is found that human tissue may be lawfully accessed for research and that use of human tissue does not modify the general allocation of interests. (MSE)

  15. Results from the MAC Vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.N.

    1987-05-01

    The design, construction, and performance characteristics of a high precision gaseous drift chamber made of thin walled proportional tubes are described. The device achieved an average spatial resolution of 45 ..mu..m in use for physics analysis with the MAC detector. The B-lifetime result obtained with this chamber is discussed.

  16. Recent Results from the Levitated Dipole Experiment

    E-print Network

    Recent Results from the Levitated Dipole Experiment M. E. Mauel and the LDX Team FPAAnnual Meeting Massachusetts Avenue, NW16, Cambridge, MA 02139 phone: 617-253-8100, info@psfc.mit.edu 1 #12;Outline · What must Testing a New Approach to Fusion and Laboratory Plasma Confinement 400-600 MW DT Fusion Levitated Dipole

  17. SLD liquid argon calorimeter prototype test results

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, R.; Eigen, G.; Au, Y.; Sleeman, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Brau, J.; Ludgate, G.A.; Oram, C.J.; Cook, V.; Johnson, J.

    1985-10-01

    The results of the SLD test beam program for the selection of a calorimeter radiator composition within a liquid argon system are described, with emphasis on the study of the use of uranium to obtain equalization of pion and electron responses.

  18. 16 CFR 1610.8 - Reporting results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.8 Reporting...severe; and based on this result, the textile shall be placed in the proper final classification...is burned. (1) For Plain Surface Textile Fabrics: DNIDid not ignite....

  19. 16 CFR 1610.8 - Reporting results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.8 Reporting...severe; and based on this result, the textile shall be placed in the proper final classification...is burned. (1) For Plain Surface Textile Fabrics: DNIDid not ignite....

  20. 16 CFR 1610.8 - Reporting results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.8 Reporting...severe; and based on this result, the textile shall be placed in the proper final classification...is burned. (1) For Plain Surface Textile Fabrics: DNIDid not ignite....

  1. 16 CFR 1610.8 - Reporting results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.8 Reporting...severe; and based on this result, the textile shall be placed in the proper final classification...is burned. (1) For Plain Surface Textile Fabrics: DNIDid not ignite....

  2. 16 CFR 1610.8 - Reporting results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.8 Reporting...severe; and based on this result, the textile shall be placed in the proper final classification...is burned. (1) For Plain Surface Textile Fabrics: DNIDid not ignite....

  3. THE PREDICTABILITY OF LANGUAGE LEARNING RESULTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROEMING, ROBERT F.

    IF LANGUAGE CAN BE CONSIDERED AS ONE FORM AMONG SEVERAL BY MEANS OF WHICH MEANING CAN BE CONCEIVED AND TRANSFERRED, THEN IT FOLLOWS THAT LANGUAGE TEACHING SHOULD LEAD ABOVE ALL TO THE FACILE TRANSFER OF MEANING. ACCEPTANCE OF THIS CONCEPT WILL INFLUENCE THE CHOICE OF METHODS AND MATERIALS BEST SUITED TO YIELD THIS RESULT. THE TEACHER'S PURPOSE IS…

  4. Milestone M4900: Simulant Mixing Analytical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2001-07-26

    This report addresses Milestone M4900, ''Simulant Mixing Sample Analysis Results,'' and contains the data generated during the ''Mixing of Process Heels, Process Solutions, and Recycle Streams: Small-Scale Simulant'' task. The Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for this task is BNF-003-98-0079A. A report with a narrative description and discussion of the data will be issued separately.

  5. Two Properties of the Intransitive Resultative Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyamoto, Yoichi

    1997-01-01

    The report of research on English grammar argues that the intransitive resultative construction requires head-movement of the secondary predicate to the main predicate in order to assign the theta-role to the postverbal NP in LF. Then, this construction is taken as an instance in which theta-role assignment is derivational, supporting the findings…

  6. Common Lunar Lander (CLL) Engineering Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecklein, Jonette

    1991-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on the Common Lunar Lander (CLL) engineering study results. The mission is to provide a delivery system to soft-land a 200 kg payload set at any given lunar latitude and longitude. Topics covered include the study schedule, mission goals and requirements, the CLL reference mission, costs, CLL options, and two stage performance analysis.

  7. Recent KLOE Results on Kaon Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Martini, M.

    2005-10-12

    The KLOE experiment at DA{phi}NE has collected {approx} 450 pb-1 of e+e- collisions at center of mass energy W {approx} 1.02 GeV. Final results on the BR(KS {yields} 3{pi}0), KL dominant Branching ratio, KL lifetime and the extraction of the CKM parameter Vus are presented.

  8. New enumerative results on twodimensional directed animals

    E-print Network

    Bousquet-Mélou, Mireille

    New enumerative results on two­dimensional directed animals Mireille Bousquet­M'elou \\Lambda La@labri.u­bordeaux.fr Abstract We list several open problems concerning the enumeration of directed animals on two the position generating function and the perimeter and area generating function for square lattice animals. We

  9. Lattice Animals: Rigorous Results and Wild Guesses

    E-print Network

    Grimmett, Geoffrey

    Lattice Animals: Rigorous Results and Wild Guesses S.G. Whittington and C.E. Soteros 1 must di#er by unity in exactly one coordinate. A bond animal is a connected subgraph of the lattice and a site animal is a connected section graph of the lattice. The distinction is that for each pair

  10. Validation Results for LEWICE 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.; Rutkowski, Adam

    1999-01-01

    A research project is underway at NASA Lewis to produce a computer code which can accurately predict ice growth under any meteorological conditions for any aircraft surface. This report will present results from version 2.0 of this code, which is called LEWICE. This version differs from previous releases due to its robustness and its ability to reproduce results accurately for different spacing and time step criteria across computing platform. It also differs in the extensive amount of effort undertaken to compare the results in a quantified manner against the database of ice shapes which have been generated in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The results of the shape comparisons are analyzed to determine the range of meteorological conditions under which LEWICE 2.0 is within the experimental repeatability. This comparison shows that the average variation of LEWICE 2.0 from the experimental data is 7.2% while the overall variability of the experimental data is 2.5%.

  11. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test results. 799.12 Section 799.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 799.12...

  12. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test results. 799.12 Section 799.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 799.12...

  13. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test results. 799.12 Section 799.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 799.12...

  14. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Test results. 799.12 Section 799.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 799.12...

  15. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test results. 799.12 Section 799.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS General Provisions § 799.12...

  16. Recent results on dislocations dynamics and homogenization

    E-print Network

    Monneau, Régis

    , Homogenization of the dislocation dynamics and of some particle systems with two-body interactions, preprint halRecent results on dislocations dynamics and homogenization Nicolas Forcadel , Cyril Imbert , Rgis Monneau Dislocations are defects present in crystals that are one the main explanation of the plastic

  17. Returned Solar Max hardware degradation study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triolo, Jack J.; Ousley, Gilbert W.

    1989-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Repair Mission returned with the replaced hardware that had been in low Earth orbit for over four years. The materials of this returned hardware gave the aerospace community an opportunity to study the realtime effects of atomic oxygen, solar radiation, impact particles, charged particle radiation, and molecular contamination. The results of these studies are summarized.

  18. Flexible Blackbox: Preliminary Results Peter Jarvis

    E-print Network

    St Andrews, University of

    Flexible Blackbox: Preliminary Results Peter Jarvis , Ian Miguel , and Qiang Shen Artificial degree along with its effects. In this paper, we describe how the Blackbox framework can be modified to solve the same flexible problem. Our Flexible Blackbox (FBB) system can synthesise a range of plans

  19. Exact Results in Supersymmetric Gauge Theories

    E-print Network

    Saulius Valatka

    2014-12-31

    In this thesis we discuss supersymmetric gauge theories, focusing on exact results achieved using methods of integrability. For the larger portion of the thesis we study the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory in the planar limit, a recurring topic being the Konishi anomalous dimension, which is roughly the analogue for the mass of the proton in quantum chromodynamics. The N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory is known to be integrable in the planar limit, which opens up a wealth of techniques one can employ in order to find results in this limit valid at any value of the coupling. We begin with perturbation theory where the integrability of the theory first manifests itself. Here we showcase the first exact result, the so-called slope function, which is the linear small spin expansion coefficient of the generalized Konishi anomalous dimension. We then move on to exact results mainly achieved using the novel quantum spectral curve approach, the method allowing one to find scaling dimensions of operators at arbitrary values of the coupling. As an example we find the second coefficient in the small spin expansion after the slope, which we call the curvature function. This allows us to extract non-trivial information about the Konishi operator. Methods of integrability are also applicable to other supersymmetric gauge theories such as ABJM, which in fact shares many similarities with N=4 super Yang-Mills. We briefly review these parallel developments in the last chapter of the thesis.

  20. PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF STRAWBERRY FUNGICIDE STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirteen fungicide treatments were evaluated for their disease control efficacy on the strawberry cultivar Camarosa at the Hammond Research Station, Hammond, LA during the 2002 fruiting season. Significant differences in yield occurred as a result of fungicide treatments. Highest yield was recorde...

  1. Radiative, actively cooled panel tests results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, C. P.; Nowak, R. J.; Sharpe, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    The radiative, actively cooled panel designed to withstand a uniform incident heat flux of 136 kW/sq m to a 444 K surface temperature was evaluated. The test program consisted of preliminary static thermal mechanical loading and aerothermal flow tests. Test results are briefly discussed.

  2. TIMSS 2011 International Results in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullis, Ina V. S.; Martin, Michael O.; Foy, Pierre; Arora, Alka

    2012-01-01

    The "TIMSS 2011 International Results in Mathematics" summarizes fourth and eighth grade student achievement in each of the 63 countries and 14 benchmarking entities which participated in TIMSS 2011. The report includes trends in mathematics achievement over time for participants in the previous TIMSS 1995, 1999, 2003, and 2007…

  3. DQC 2009-10 Annual Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report presents survey results of the 10 State Actions including status of all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. These State Actions include: (1) Link P-20/workforce data systems; (2) Create stable, sustained support for robust state longitudinal data systems; (3) Develop governance structures to guide data collection,…

  4. QCD results from D-Zero

    SciTech Connect

    Varelas, N.; D0 Collaboration

    1997-10-01

    We present recent results on jet production, dijet angular distributions, W+ Jets, and color coherence from p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider using the D0 detector. The data are compared to perturbative QCD calculations or to predictions of parton shower based Monte Carlo models.

  5. Exploring Alternative Approaches for Presenting Evaluation Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jeremiah; Hall, Jori; Greene, Jennifer C.; Ahn, Jeehae

    2013-01-01

    Evaluators have an obligation to present clearly the results of their evaluative efforts. Traditionally, such presentations showcase formal written and oral reports, with dispassionate language and graphs, tables, quotes, and vignettes. These traditional forms do not reach all audiences nor are they likely to include the most powerful presentation…

  6. Boolean Decision trees Problems and Results,

    E-print Network

    Saks, Michael

    Boolean Decision trees Problems and Results, Old and New Michael Saks, Rutgers University #12;· Deterministic Decision Trees · Randomized Decision Trees (RDTs) and a new lower bound · Proof of lower bound ­ Influences of boolean functions ­ Influences­Decision Tree connection theorem ­ Deducing the lower bound

  7. Contemporary Mathematics Reconciling Riemann-Roch results

    E-print Network

    Singh, Anurag

    Contemporary Mathematics Reconciling Riemann-Roch results Paul Roberts and Anurag K. Singh In honor, Peskine and Szpiro proved a Riemann-Roch formula for graded modules; we show that this agrees with the Hirzebruch-Riemann-Roch formula in the case of graded modules over polynomial rings. In 1974 Peskine

  8. Abstracts, Third Space Processing Symposium, Skylab results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Skylab experiments results are reported in abstracts of papers presented at the Third Space Processing Symposium. Specific areas of interest include: exothermic brazing, metals melting, crystals, reinforced composites, glasses, eutectics; physics of the low-g processes; electrophoresis, heat flow, and convection demonstrations flown on Apollo missions; and apparatus for containerless processing, heating, cooling, and containing materials.

  9. Multifactor Screener in OPEN: Validation Results

    Cancer.gov

    These validation results suggest that dietary exposure estimates computed from the Multifactor Screener may be useful to compare subgroup means, especially for populations consuming mainstream diets. The estimates may be less useful for populations with more ethnic diets, including Asian and possibly Latino populations.

  10. New Results in Astrodynamics Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coverstone-Carroll, V.; Hartmann, J. W.; Williams, S. N.; Mason, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Generic algorithms have gained popularity as an effective procedure for obtaining solutions to traditionally difficult space mission optimization problems. In this paper, a brief survey of the use of genetic algorithms to solve astrodynamics problems is presented and is followed by new results obtained from applying a Pareto genetic algorithm to the optimization of low-thrust interplanetary spacecraft missions.

  11. The Lake Baikal Experiment Selected Results

    E-print Network

    Dzhilkibaev, Z A

    1999-01-01

    We review the present status of the Baikal Neutrino Project. The construction and performance of the large deep underwater Cherenkov detector NT-200 with 192 PMTs, which is currently taking data in Lake Baikal, are described. Some results from intermediate detector stages are presented.

  12. The Lake Baikal Experiment: Selected Results

    E-print Network

    Baikal Collaboration; presented by Zh. Dzhilkibaev

    1999-06-15

    We review the present status of the Baikal Neutrino Project. The construction and performance of the large deep underwater Cherenkov detector NT-200 with 192 PMTs, which is currently taking data in Lake Baikal, are described. Some results from intermediate detector stages are presented.

  13. Relativity Concept Inventory: Development, Analysis, and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aslanides, J. S.; Savage, C. M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a concept inventory for special relativity: the development process, data analysis methods, and results from an introductory relativity class. The Relativity Concept Inventory tests understanding of relativistic concepts. An unusual feature is confidence testing for each question. This can provide additional information; for example,…

  14. First parallax results from URAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Norbert; Finch, Charlie T.; Jao, Wei-Chun

    2016-01-01

    The first USNO Robotic Astrometric Telescope catalog (URAT1) was released in April 2015. The catalog contains 228 million objects covering most of the sky north of declination -15 degrees for observations made between 2012 April 24 until 2014 June 21. The URAT northern observations were completed in June 2015 and all individual epoch positions with typical 10 to 70 mas errors are available for this study. The average number of observation per star is about 25.We have created a URAT parallax pipeline utilizing code from the Research Consortium On Nearby Stars (RECONS) parallax pipeline. The URAT pipeline reads in all 'good' epoch data of a given object thencalculates a mean position, proper motion and relative parallax using the JPL DE405 emphemerides.We compare results of 696 objects found in both the Hipparcos and Yale Parallax Catalog (YPC) north of -10 degrees declination which also have a URAT relative parallax. URAT results are consistent with Hipparcosand YPC data, getting meaningful results, particularly for stars with a parallax of 40 mas or larger. Typical URAT parallax errors are between 5 and 15 mas, depending on observing history. The main goal of this project is to find new nearby stars using the URAT epoch data. First results are presented for stars which previously did not have a published parallax.

  15. Test Results Untrustworthy. Point of View Essay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, David C.; Nichols, Sharon L.

    2005-01-01

    America's public schools are making harmful, irreversible decisions based on test results that--in an increasing number of cases--can't be trusted, Arizona State University's Education Policy Research Laboratory has found. The pressure of high-stakes tests is forcing school districts and state Departments of Education to take inappropriate and at…

  16. Research of Stochastic Robustness: Results and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrison, Chris

    1995-01-01

    With stochastic robustness we are creating tools to design robust compensators for practical systems. During this year, the stochastic robustness research achieved the following results: refined the search tools needed for synthesis; successfully designed robust compensators for the American Controls Conference benchmark problem; and successfully designed robust compensators for a nonlinear hypersonic aircraft model with uncertainties in 28 parameters.

  17. B-physics results from Tevatron

    E-print Network

    G. Borissov

    2013-04-08

    This review summarizes the most important results in B physics obtained at the Tevatron. They include the discovery of the new B hadrons, the measurement of their masses and lifetimes, the measurement of the oscillation frequency of $\\Bs$ meson, the search for its rare decay $\\Bs \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$, and the study of the CP asymmetry in decays and mixing of $B$ mesons.

  18. Recent ATLAS results on ttbar resonances

    E-print Network

    Kasieczka, G; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Recent ATLAS results on ttbar resonances for the Boost2012 conference. Covers arXiv:1205.5731 (di-leptonic and resolved semi-leptonic), arXiv: 1207.2409 (boosted semi-leptonic) and ATLAS-COM-CONF-2012-103 (fully hadronic).

  19. Experimental results from the small isochronous ring

    SciTech Connect

    Eduard Pozdeyev

    2005-05-01

    The Small Isochronous Ring (SIR) is a compact, low-energy storage ring designed to investigate the beam dynamics of high-intensity isochronous cyclotrons and synchrotrons at the transition energy. The ring was developed at Michigan State University (MSU) and has been operational since December 2003. It stores 20 keV hydrogen beams with a peak current of 10-20 microamps for up to 200 turns. The transverse and longitudinal profiles of extracted bunches are measured with an accuracy of approximately 1 mm. The high accuracy of the measurements makes the experimental data attractive for validation of multi-particle space charge codes. The results obtained in the ring show a fast growth of the energy spread induced by the space charge forces. The energy spread growth is accompanied by a breakup of the beam bunches into separated clusters that are involved in the vortex motion specific to the isochronous regime. The experimental results presented in the paper show a remarkable agreement with simulations performed with the code CYCO. In this paper, we discuss specifics of space charge effects in the isochronous regime, present results of experiments in SIR, and conduct a detailed comparison of the experimental data with results of simulations.

  20. 1Over for Petition Results Transfer Course

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    /year) Please review the following courses for (check all that apply): Liberal Education core and/or theme:___________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________ Evaluator's signature Date Results Key: OH=Other Humanities; Biol/L=Biological Science w/lab; CPE=Citizenship & Public Ethics; CD=Cultural Diversity; ENV=Environment; FYW=First-Year Writing; HP=Historical Perspectives

  1. RESULTS FROM THE AHS PESTICIDE EXPOSURE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Agricultural Health Study/Pesticide Exposure Study (AHS/PES) measured exposures resulting from agricultural use of 2,4-D and chlorpyrifos for a subset of applicators in the AHS cohort. Through on-farm measurements and observations, data collected in the exposure study will...

  2. National Lung Screening Trial Results: Fast Facts

    Cancer.gov

    On November 4, 2010, the NLST reported initial trial results, showing 20 percent fewer lung cancer deaths among trial participants screened with low-dose helical CT (also known as spiral CT) compared to those who got screened with chest X-rays.

  3. Recruiting for Results: Assessment Skills and the

    E-print Network

    Oakleaf, Megan

    of assessment as an area of concern in LIS education programs? Scope of assessment skills among current of high- quality programs, services, and collections" [subject specialist] "Leads planning and assessmentRecruiting for Results: Assessment Skills and the Academic Library Job Market Megan Oakleaf

  4. Presentation of Institutional Results Reports, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Higher Education, Springfield.

    "The Illinois Commitment: Partnerships, Opportunities, and Excellence" requires an annual submission of a Results Report from higher education institutions and agencies to provide evidence of progress toward the six statewide goals: economic growth, teaching and learning, affordability, access and diversity, high expectations and quality, and…

  5. Artemis: Results of the engineering feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form for the Engineering Feasibility Study of the Artemis Project, a plan to establish a permanent base on the Moon. Topics covered include the Common Lunar Lander (CLL), lunar lander engineering study results, lunar lander trajectory analysis, lunar lander conceptual design and mass properties, the lunar lander communication subsystem design, and product assurance.

  6. Electrifying results ERP data and cognitive linguistics

    E-print Network

    Coulson, Seana

    Electrifying results ERP data and cognitive linguistics Seana Coulson 1. Introduction Have you ever used to address issues in cognitive linguistics, and Section 5 points to a number of ways that this technique could be further employed by cognitive linguists. 2. EEG and ERPs Work on the cognitive

  7. Complexity Results for Boolean Constraint Satisfaction

    E-print Network

    Vollmer, Heribert

    Complexity Results for Boolean Constraint Satisfaction Problems Von der Fakultät für Elektrotechnik Korreferent: Prof. Dr. Martin Mundhenk Tag der Promotion: 29.01.2007 #12;Kurzzusammenfassung Meine Dissertation befasst sich mit Boole'schen Constraint Satisfaction Problemen (kurz: CSP). Ein Constraint besteht

  8. Latest results from FROST at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, Barry G.

    2014-06-01

    The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of a polarized photon beam incident on a polarized target in meson photoproduction experiments. At Jefferson Lab, a program of such measurements has made use of the Jefferson Lab FROzen Spin Target (FROST). An overview of preliminary results are presented.

  9. DO Results on Heavy Flavour Production

    SciTech Connect

    Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle

    2006-04-11

    This review is focused on DO results on hadron spectroscopy and on production cross sections: the contribution by DO to the understanding of the X(3872) object, the first observation of separated B** states, measurements of Bc meson properties, and eventually measurements of the inclusive {upsilon}(1S) differential cross section and of the tt-bar cross section.

  10. Results from Atmospheric Neutrinos J. G. Learned

    E-print Network

    Learned, John

    Results from Atmospheric Neutrinos J. G. Learned Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii Honolulu, HI 96822 USA Abstract. With the announcement of new evidence for muon neutrino disappearance observed by the Super­ Kamiokande experiment, the more than a decade old atmospheric neutrino

  11. New Results on Nucleon Spin Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2005-09-10

    Recent precision spin structure data from Jefferson Lab have significantly advanced our knowledge of nucleon structure in the valence quark (high-x) region and improved our understanding of higher-twist effects, spin sum rules and quark-hadron duality. First, results of a precision measurement of the neutron spin asymmetry, A{sub 1}{sup n}, in the high-x region are discussed. The new data shows clearly, for the first time, that A{sub 1}{sup n} becomes positive at high x. They provide crucial input for the global fits to world data to extract polarized parton distribution functions. Preliminary results on A{sub 1}{sup p} and A{sub 1}{sup d} in the high-x region have also become available. The up and down quark spin distributions in the nucleon were extracted. The results for {Delta}d/d disagree with the leading-order pQCD prediction assuming hadron helicity conservation. Then, results of a precision measurement of the g{sub 2}{sup n} structure function to study higher-twist effects are presented. The data show a clear deviation from the lead-twist contribution, indicating a significant higher-twist (twist-3 or higher) effect. The second moment of the spin structure functions and the twist-3 matrix element d{sub 2}{sup n} results were extracted at a high Q{sup 2} of 5 GeV{sup 2} from the measured A{sub 2}{sup n} in the high-x region in combination with existing world data and compared with a Lattice QCD calculation. Results for d{sub 2}{sup n} at low-to-intermediate Q{sup 2} from 0.1 to 0.9 GeV{sup 2} were also extracted from the JLab data. In the same Q{sup 2} range, the Q{sup 2} dependence of the moments of the nucleon spin structure functions was measured, providing a unique bridge linking the quark-gluon picture of the nucleon and the coherent hadronic picture. Sum rules and generalized forward spin polarizabilities were extracted and compared with Chiral Perturbation Theory calculations and phenomenological models. Finally, preliminary results on the resonance spin structure functions in the Q{sup 2} range from 1 to 4 GeV{sup 2} were presented, which, in combination with DIS data, will enable a detailed study of the quark-hadron duality in spin structure functions.

  12. SLS-1 flight experiments preliminary significant results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-01-01

    Spacelab Life Sciences-1 (SLS-1) is the first of a series of dedicated life sciences Spacelab missions designed to investigate the mechanisms involved in the physiological adaptation to weightlessness and the subsequent readaptation to 1 gravity (1 G). Hypotheses generated from the physiological effects observed during earlier missions led to the formulation of several integrated experiments to determine the underlying mechanisms responsible for the observed phenomena. The 18 experiments selected for flight on SLS-1 investigated the cardiovascular, cardiopulmonary, regulatory physiology, musculoskeletal, and neuroscience disciplines in both human and rodent subjects. The SLS-1 preliminary results gave insight to the mechanisms involved in the adaptation to the microgravity environment and readaptation when returning to Earth. The experimental results will be used to promote health and safety for future long duration space flights and, as in the past, will be applied to many biomedical problems encountered here on Earth.

  13. LDEF Materials Results for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F. (compiler); Gregory, John (compiler)

    1993-01-01

    These proceedings describe the application of LDEF data to spacecraft and payload design, and emphasize where space environmental effects on materials research and development is needed as defined by LDEF data. The LDEF six years of exposure of materials has proven to be by far the most comprehensive source of information ever obtained on the long-term performance of materials in the space environment. The conference provided a forum for materials scientists and engineers to review and critically assess the LDEF results from the standpoint of their relevance, significance, and impact on spacecraft design practice. The impact of the LDEF findings on materials selection and qualification, and the needs and plans for further study, were addressed from several perspectives. Many timely and needed changes and modifications in external spacecraft materials selection have occurred as a result of LDEF investigations.

  14. FINAL NEUTRINO OSCILLATION RESULTS FROM LSND

    SciTech Connect

    W. LOUIS

    2000-10-01

    The LSND experiment provides evidence for neutrino oscillations from both the primary {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {r_arrow} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillation search and the secondary {nu}{sub {mu}} {r_arrow} {nu}{sub e} oscillation search. At present, this remains the only evidence for appearance neutrino oscillations and implies that at least one neutrino has a mass greater than 0.4 eV/c{sup 2} and that neutrinos comprise more than 1% of the mass of the universe. The MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab, which is presently under construction, will provide a definitive test of the LSND results, and if the neutrino oscillation results are confirmed, will make a precision measurement of the oscillation parameters.

  15. Some exact results for the exclusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Kirone

    2011-01-01

    The asymmetric simple exclusion process (ASEP) is a paradigm for non-equilibrium physics that appears as a building block to model various low-dimensional transport phenomena, ranging from intracellular traffic to quantum dots. We review some recent results obtained for the system on a periodic ring by using the Bethe ansatz. We show that this method allows one to derive analytically many properties of the dynamics of the model such as the spectral gap and the generating function of the current. We also discuss the solution of a generalized exclusion process with N species of particles and explain how a geometric construction inspired from queuing theory sheds light on a matrix product representation technique that has been very fruitful for deriving exact results for the ASEP.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamics with Chombo: Tests and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, I. A.; Borovikov, S. N.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.

    2006-12-01

    DOE's SciDAC adaptive mesh refinement code Chombo has been modified for solution of compressible MHD flows with the application of high resolution, shock-capturing numerical schemes. The code is verified against several standard 1D and 2D MHD test flows involving multiple discontinuities, such as an Orszag--Tang vortex problem, rotor problems, blast wave interactions with dense clouds, Kelvin--Helmholtz instability, etc., and we show here. The results of several such tests are presented. We also summarize the first results obtained using a multifluid model of the solar wind -- interstellar medium interaction. It is shown that the heliopause is subject to both Rayleigh--Taylor and Kelvin--Helmholtz instabilities.

  17. More results on oscillating edge-flames

    SciTech Connect

    Buckmaster, J.; Hegab, A.; Jackson, T. L.

    2000-06-01

    We examine a simple model of a side-anchored non-premixed edge-flame in order to gain insights into the oscillations that are sometimes observed in microgravity candle burning, flame-spread over liquids, etc. Previous results describe the role played by the Lewis number of the fuel, and the Damkoehler number, and here we examine both the effects of an on-edge and off-edge convective flow, and the effects of a heat sink. The on-edge flow and the heat sink tend to destabilize and the off-edge flow tends to stabilize, results consistent with our hypothesis regarding the genesis of the oscillations. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Current results and trends in platform switching

    PubMed Central

    Salimi, Hadi; Savabi, Omid; Nejatidanesh, Farahnaz

    2011-01-01

    The platform switching (PLS) concept was introduced in the literature in 2005. The biological benefits and clinical effectiveness of the PLS technique have been established by several studies. In this article different aspects of PLS concept are discussed. Crestal bone loss, biologic width, and stress distribution in this concept are comprehensively reviewed. In this article the relative published articles from 1990 to 2011 have been evaluated by electronic search. Because of controversial results especially in immediate loading and animal studies, further modified research is needed to establish the mechanism and effect of the PLS technique. Essential changes in studies including using the control group for accurate interpretation of results and long-term observation, particularly through, randomized, prospective, multicenter trials with large numbers of participants, and implants are necessary. PMID:23372593

  19. Simulation results for the Viterbi decoding algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, B. H.; Moorehead, R. W.; Taqvi, S. Z. H.

    1972-01-01

    Concepts involved in determining the performance of coded digital communications systems are introduced. The basic concepts of convolutional encoding and decoding are summarized, and hardware implementations of sequential and maximum likelihood decoders are described briefly. Results of parametric studies of the Viterbi decoding algorithm are summarized. Bit error probability is chosen as the measure of performance and is calculated, by using digital computer simulations, for various encoder and decoder parameters. Results are presented for code rates of one-half and one-third, for constraint lengths of 4 to 8, for both hard-decision and soft-decision bit detectors, and for several important systematic and nonsystematic codes. The effect of decoder block length on bit error rate also is considered, so that a more complete estimate of the relationship between performance and decoder complexity can be made.

  20. Commissioning Results of the HZB Quadrupole Resonator

    E-print Network

    Kleindienst, Raphael; Knobloch, Jens; Kugeler, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Recent cavity results with niobium have demonstrated the necessity of a good understanding of both the BCS and residual resistance. For a complete picture and comparison with theory, it is essential that one can measure the RF properties as a function of field, temperature, frequency and ambient magnetic field. Standard cavity measurements are limited in their ability to change all parameters freely and in a controlled manner. On the other hand, most sample measurement setups operate at fairly high frequency, where the surface resistance is always BCS dominated. The quadrupole resonator, originally developed at CERN, is ideally suited for characterization of samples at typical cavity RF frequencies. We report on a modified version of the QPR with improved RF figures of merit for high-field operation. Experimental challenges in the commissioning run and alternate designs for simpler sample changes are shown alongside measurement results of a large grain niobium sample.

  1. New Results of the Konkoly Blazhko Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurcsik, J.

    2009-09-01

    During the recent years the Konkoly Blazhko Group (Pis Johanna Jurcsik and Béla Szeidl, co-workers Ádám Sódor, Zsombor Hurta and several undergraduate, graduate students) published new important results of Blazhko variables in 15 reviewed Journal articles. These results utilize multicolor CCD observations obtained with an automatic 60 cm telescope, and also previously unpublished Konkoly archive photometric data. Our light curves are the most extended multicolor data-sets ever obtained for a Blazhko variable, the observations cover each phase of the pulsation and the modulation as well. We have detected many previously unknown features of the light curve modulation, and based on the different band's observations we also revealed the underlying variations of the mean physical parameters during the Blazhko cycle. In my contribution the main achievements of the Konkoly Blazhko Group are summarised.

  2. Two results on the digraph chromatic number

    E-print Network

    Harutyunyan, Ararat

    2011-01-01

    It is known (Bollob\\'{a}s (1978); Kostochka and Mazurova (1977)) that there exist graphs of maximum degree $\\Delta$ and of arbitrarily large girth whose chromatic number is at least $c \\Delta / \\log \\Delta$. We show an analogous result for digraphs where the chromatic number of a digraph $D$ is defined as the minimum integer $k$ so that $V(D)$ can be partitioned into $k$ acyclic sets, and the girth is the length of the shortest cycle in the corresponding undirected graph. It is also shown, in the same vein as an old result of Erdos (1962), that there are digraphs with arbitrarily large chromatic number where every large subset of vertices is 2-colorable.

  3. Expert Meeting Report. Foundations Research Results

    SciTech Connect

    Ojczyk, C.; Huelman, P.; Carmody, J.

    2013-05-01

    The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership held an expert meeting on Foundations–Research Results on November 15, 2011, in Minneapolis, MN. Audience participation was actively encouraged during each presentation to uncover needs and promote dialog among researchers and industry professionals. Key results were: greater understanding of the role of moisture transport through foundation and insulation materials and its potential impact on building durability; greater understanding of the role of foundation type in the process of selecting an insulation system for energy performance and building durability; need for research to quantify the risks associated with insulation processes to better enable users to weigh costs and benefits against the existing conditions of a home; need for improved performance modeling capabilities that address variations in foundation types and soil conditions.

  4. An Overview of Recent Results from CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Hicks

    2011-12-01

    The unique capabilities of the CLAS detector to measure exclusive meson electroproduction off protons, with almost complete coverage of the final hadron phase space, has extended our knowledge of excited baryon structure. Consistent results from Np and Npp final states provide convincing evidence for reliable extraction of N* electrocouplings. Theoretical analyses of these results, using self-consistent dynamical calculations using an internal quark core and an external meson-baryon cloud suggest that meson-baryon dressing amplitudes need to be included. The meson-baryon dressing was already shown to be necessary to get agreement between calculations and data on the D resonance transition magnetic moment at low Q{sup 2}. Similarly, a new measurement of the transition magnetic moment for strange baryons also disagrees with quark models, suggesting the need for meson-baryon dressings. In the near future, the CLAS detector will be replaced with CLAS12, providing new high-precision data.

  5. Field trials results of guided wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno; van Zon, Tim; van der Leden, Edwin

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Guided wave travel time tomography is a method capable of providing an absolute wall thickness map. This method is currently making the transition from the laboratory to the field. For this purpose a dedicated data acquisition system and special purpose EMAT sensor rings have been developed. The system can be deployed for permanent monitoring and inspections. Field trials have been conducted on various pipes with different diameters, containing either liquid or gas. The main focus has been on pipe supports. The results demonstrate the successful operation of the technology in the field. Expected corrosion damage was clearly visible on the produced results enabling asset owner to make calculated decisions on the pipelines safety, maintenance and operations.

  6. DAWN Framing Camera results from Ceres orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathues, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Schäfer, M.; Le Corre, L.; Reddy, V.; Platz, T.; Russel, C. T.; Li, J.-Y.; Ammanito, E.; Buettner, I.; Christensen, U.; Hall, I.; Kelley, M.; Gutiérrez Marqués, P.; McCord, T. B.; McFadden, L. A.; Mengel, K.; Mottola, S.; O'Brien, D.; Pieters, C.

    2015-10-01

    Having completed its investigation of Vesta in late 2012, the NASA Dawn mission [1] reached its second target, the dwarf planet Ceres on March 6, 2015. During its operational phase, Dawn is scheduled to fly four polar orbits, each with a different distance to the target. The Framing Cameras (FCs) onboard the Dawn spacecraft are mapping the dwarf planet Ceres in seven colors and a clear filter [2], covering the wavelength range between 0.4 and 1.0 ?m. The FCs also conduct a number of sequences for purposes of navigation, instrument calibration, and have already performed satellite searches and three early rotational characterizations (RCs) of Ceres in February and May 2015. During the EPSC conference we intend to present the most intriguing results obtained from the Survey orbit (resolution ~400 m/pixel) as well as the first results from HAMO orbit (~140 m/pixel) focusing on the analysis of FC color data.

  7. Environmental management system objectives & targets results summary :

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, Douglas Walter

    2014-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexicos (SNL/NM) Environmental Management System is the integrated approach for members of the workforce to identify and manage environmental risks. Each Fiscal Year (FY) SNL/NM performs an analysis to identify environmental aspects, and the environmental programs associated with them are charged with the task of routinely monitoring and measuring the objectives and targets that are established to mitigate potential impacts of SNL/NMs operations on the environment. An annual summary of the results achieved towards meeting established Sandia Corporation and SNL/NM Site-specific objectives and targets provides a connection to, and rational for, annually revised environmental aspects. The purpose of this document is to summarize the results achieved and documented in FY2013.

  8. Atmospheric results from Super-Kamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendell, Roger

    2015-07-01

    Recent results from a 282 kiloton-year exposure of the Super-Kamiokande detector to atmospheric neutrinos are presented. The data when fit both by themselves and in conjunction with constraints from the T2K and reactor neutrino experiments show a weak, though insignificant, preference for the normal mass hierarchy at the level of~ 1?. Searches for 2 evidence of oscillations into a sterile neutrino have resulted in limits on the parameters governing their mixing, |U?4|2 < 0.041 and |U?4|2 < 0.18 at 90% C.L. A similar search for an indication of Lorentz-invariance violating oscillations has yielded limits three to seven orders of magnitude more stringent than existing measurements. Additionally, analyses searching for an excess of neutrinos in the atmospheric data produced from the annihilation of dark matter particles in the galaxy and sun have placed tight limits on the cross sections governing their annihilation and scattering.

  9. Experimental Results of the Small Isochronous Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Felix Martin; Richard York; Juan Rodriguez; Eduard Pozdeyev

    2004-06-01

    The Small Isochronous Ring (SIR) has been in operation since December 2003. The main purpose of this ring, developed and built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University (MSU), is to simulate the dynamics of intense beams in large accelerators. To observe the same effects, the beam power needed in SIR is orders of magnitude lower and the time scale is much longer than in the full scale machines. These differences simplify the design and operation of the accelerator. The ring measurements can be used to validate the results of space charge codes. After a variable number of turns, the injected hydrogen bunch (with energies up to 30 keV) is extracted and its longitudinal profile is measured using a fast Faraday cup. We present a summary of the design, the results of the first six months of operation and the comparison with selected space charge codes.

  10. First Results from DAMA/LIBRA

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabei, R.; Belli, P.; Montecchia, F.; Nozzoli, F.; Cappella, F.; D'Angelo, A.; Incicchitti, A.; Prosperi, D.; Cerulli, R.; Dai, C. J.; He, H. L.; Kuang, H. H.; Ma, J. M.; Sheng, X. D.; Ye, Z. P.

    2009-04-17

    The highly radiopure {approx_equal}250 kg NaI(Tl) DAMA/LIBRA set-up is running at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of the I.N.F.N.. The first result obtained by exploiting the model independent annual modulation signature for Dark Matter (DM) particles confirms the former DAMA/NaI result. The DAMA/NaI and DAMA/LIBRA data satisfy all the many peculiarities of the DM annual modulation signature; neither systematic effects nor side reactions able to account for the observed modulation amplitude and to contemporaneously satisfy all the several requirements of the DM signature are available. Considering the former DAMA/NaI and the present DAMA/LIBRA data all together (total exposure 0.82 tonxyr), the presence of Dark Matter particles in the galactic halo is supported at 8.2 {sigma} C.L.

  11. Rapid Spacecraft Development: Results and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, William A.

    2002-01-01

    The Rapid Spacecraft Development Office (RSDO) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is responsible for the management and direction of a dynamic and versatile program for the definition, competition, and acquisition of multiple indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contracts - resulting in a catalog of spacecraft buses. Five spacecraft delivery orders have been placed by the RSDO and one spacecraft has been launched. Numerous concept and design studies have been performed, most with the intent of leading to a future spacecraft acquisition. A collection of results and lessons learned is recorded to highlight management techniques, methods and processes employed in the conduct of spacecraft acquisition. Topics include working relationships under fixed price delivery orders, price and value, risk management, contingency reserves, and information restrictions.

  12. Recent B Physics Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Behari, Satyajit

    2011-07-01

    We review recent B physics results from the CDF and D0 experiments in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}(s) = 1.96 TeV. Using a data sample of 1.4-6.0 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector we present searches for New Physics in B{sub s} sector and some competitive results with B-factories in the B/charm sector. In the first category we report the BR in B{sub s} J/{Psi} f{sub 0}(980) decays and the time-integrated mixing probability ({bar {chi}}) of B mesons. In the second category BR and A{sub CP} in doubly Cabibbo-suppressed B{sup {+-}} D{sup 0} h{sup {+-}} decays and time-integrated CP violation in D{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -} are presented.

  13. The OPAL opacity code: New results

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, F.J.; Iglesias, C.A.

    1994-12-31

    The OPAL code was developed to calculate the wide range of frequency-dependent and mean opacity data needed to model laboratory experiments and stellar interiors. We use parametric potentials to generate vastly more atomic data than used in earlier opacity work for all elements with atomic number less than 35. We have also developed an improved equation of state based on an activity expansion of the grand canonical partition function. We give herein a brief description of the OPAL code and present new results that include the effect of additional heavy elements compared to our earlier carbons. The importance of very heavy elements having atomic number greater than 30 is also discussed. We present some comparisons with recent results from the Opacity Project and some directions for future work.

  14. Field trials results of guided wave tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Volker, Arno Zon, Tim van; Leden, Edwin van der

    2015-03-31

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Guided wave travel time tomography is a method capable of providing an absolute wall thickness map. This method is currently making the transition from the laboratory to the field. For this purpose a dedicated data acquisition system and special purpose EMAT sensor rings have been developed. The system can be deployed for permanent monitoring and inspections. Field trials have been conducted on various pipes with different diameters, containing either liquid or gas. The main focus has been on pipe supports. The results demonstrate the successful operation of the technology in the field. Expected corrosion damage was clearly visible on the produced results enabling asset owner to make calculated decisions on the pipelines safety, maintenance and operations.

  15. Uncalibrated Building Energy Simulation Modeling Results 

    E-print Network

    Ahmad, M.; Culp, C.H.

    2006-01-01

    &R RESEARCH OCTOBER 2006 1141 Uncalibrated Building Energy Simulation Modeling Results Mushtaq Ahmad Charles H. Culp, PhD, PE Associate Member ASHRAE Fellow ASHRAE Received June 23, 2005; accepted April 17, 2006 Uncalibrated simulations have provided useful... for calibrated simulation procedures and tools. Mushtaq Ahmad is a research engineering associate II in the Energy Systems Laboratory and Charles H. Culp is an associate professor in the Department of Architecture and associate director of the Energy Systems...

  16. Recent Higgs results from the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Brendlinger, Kurt; Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration

    2014-06-24

    This paper presents recent results on the Higgs boson from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The Collaboration reports on measurements of the signal strength, couplings, and spin of the Higgs in several decay channels. We find all measurements to be consistent with Standard Model predictions. The Higgs branching fraction to invisible particles is constrained and no evidence of physics beyond the Standard Model is found.

  17. Results from the ISIS1 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cussans, D.; Goldstein, J.; Payton, O.; Stuttard, T.; Mandry, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Stefanov, K. D.; Zhang, Z.; Banda, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Damerell, C. J. S.; Devetak, E.; Fopma, J.; Gao, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Grimes, M.; Heath, H.; Hillert, S.; Johnson, E. L.; Laing, A.; Lynch, C.; Martin, V. J.; Murray, P.; Nomerotski, A.; Thomas, S. L.; Walsh, R.; Woolliscroft, T.; Worm, S.

    2009-06-01

    The In Situ Storage Image Sensor (ISIS) is a monolithic active pixel sensor with memory cells in each pixel. The memory cells are implemented as a CCD register. A test device with parameters suitable for tracking charged particles has been constructed and characterized. The characteristics of a proof-of-principle ISIS device are described and results from using the sensor as a tracking device for high energy electrons are presented.

  18. Phase Transition Signature Results from PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.e.; PHENIX Collaboration

    2009-06-08

    The PHENIX experiment has conducted searches for the QCD critical point with measurements of multiplicity fluctuations, transverse momentum fluctuations, event-by-event kaon-to-pion ratios, elliptic flow, and correlations. Measurements have been made in several collision systems as a function of centrality and transverse momentum. The results do not show significant evidence of critical behavior in the collision systems and energies studied, although several interesting features are discussed.

  19. Lattice results on nucleon/roper properties

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2009-12-01

    In this proceeding, I review the attempts to calculate the Nucleon resonance (including Roper as first radially excited state of nucleon and other excited states) using lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The latest preliminary results from Hadron Spectrum Collaboration (HSC) with m? thickapprox 380 MeV are reported. The Sachs electric form factor of the proton and neutron and their transition with the Roper at large Q2 are also updated in this work.

  20. Recent results from the ATLAS experiment

    E-print Network

    Jackson, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN is a general purpose detector for studying proton-proton collisions at TeV energies. This talk presents the latest ATLAS physics results, based on the data collected in 2011 and 2012, summing to over 20 fb?1. The latest measurements of the Higgs boson, and studies of its properties are described. Recent searches for processes beyond the Standard Model such as Supersymmetry, and other Exotica, are also covered.

  1. Finite Element Results Visualization for Unstructured Grids

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-07-15

    GRIZ is a general-purpose post-processing application supporting interactive visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. In addition to basic pseudocolor renderings of state variables over the mesh surface, GRIZ provides modern visualization techniques such as isocontours and isosurfaces, cutting planes, vector field display, and particle traces. GRIZ accepts both command-line and mouse-driven input, and is portable to virtually any UNIX platform which provides Motif and OpenGl libraries.

  2. The WEGA Stellarator: Results and Prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Otte, M.; Andruczyk, D.; Koenig, R.; Laqua, H. P.; Lischtschenko, O.; Marsen, S.; Schacht, J.; Podoba, Y. Y.; Wagner, F.; Warr, G. B.; Holzhauer, E.; Howard, J.; Krupnik, L.; Zhezhera, A.; Urban, J.; Preinhalter, J.

    2008-03-19

    In this article an overview is given on results from magnetic flux surface measurements, applied ECR heating scenarios for 2.45 GHz and 28 GHz, fluctuation and transport studies and plasma edge biasing experiments performed in the WEGA stellarator. Examples for the development of new diagnostics and the machine control system are given that will be used at Wendelstein 7-X stellarator, which is currently under construction in Greifswald.

  3. The WEGA Stellarator: Results and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otte, M.; Andruczyk, D.; Holzhauer, E.; Howard, J.; König, R.; Krupnik, L.; Laqua, H. P.; Lischtschenko, O.; Marsen, S.; Schacht, J.; Urban, J.; Podoba, Y. Y.; Preinhalter, J.; Wagner, F.; Warr, G. B.; Zhezhera, A.

    2008-03-01

    In this article an overview is given on results from magnetic flux surface measurements, applied ECR heating scenarios for 2.45 GHz and 28 GHz, fluctuation and transport studies and plasma edge biasing experiments performed in the WEGA stellarator. Examples for the development of new diagnostics and the machine control system are given that will be used at Wendelstein 7-X stellarator, which is currently under construction in Greifswald.

  4. New Results on Xi0 Hyperon Decays

    E-print Network

    Rainer Wanke

    2007-02-09

    In the recent years many new measurements of the decay of the neutral Xi0 hyperon have been reported both by the NA48/1 and the KTeV collaboration. The results are based on data samples of more than 2 billion Xi0 decays. In this report new measurements of the Xi0 lifetime, decay asymmetries, and semileptonic decay rates are presented. The latter allow the extraction of the CKM matrix element |V_us|, complementary to kaon decays.

  5. Particle Production and Fragmentation Results from ZEUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galas, Anna

    2007-11-01

    The review of recent particle production and fragmentation results from ZEUS are presented for deep inelastic scattering (DIS) and photoproduction (PHP) at HERA. The differential cross sections, baryon to antibaryon production asymmetry, baryon to meson production ratios, strange to light hadrons ratios and also Bose-Einstein correlations have been measured using an integrated luminosity of 121 pb-1 of e±p collisions data.

  6. First Results From MAVEN's Imaging UV Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; McClintok, W. E.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Deighan, J.; Clarke, J. T.; Holsclaw, G. M.; Montmessin, F.; Lefevre, F.; Chaufray, J. Y.; Jain, S. K.; Stiepen, A.; Chaffin, M. S.; Crismani, M.; Matta, M.; Evans, J. S.; Stevens, M. H.; Yelle, R. V.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-10-01

    We report the first results from The Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile and EvolutioN (MAVEN)spacecraft orbiting Mars. The instrument is accomplishing its goals of characterizing the atmospheric composition and structure, enabling studies of atmospheric escape that will contribute to our understanding of Mars'atmospheric evolution. In addition, the instrument has made unexpected discoveries concerning meteor showers, aurora and nightglow on Mars.

  7. H1 Results in Deep Inelastic Scattering

    E-print Network

    Gregorio Bernardi

    1997-07-27

    Recent deep inelastic results from the H1 collaboration are presented. The topics covered include inclusive diffractive physics, the determination of alpha_S using the event shapes, the study of the hadronic final state at low x with single particles and with jets, the structure function measurements in particular F_2 at low Q^2 and the high Q^2 physics both in neutral and charged current.

  8. Overview of flavor physics results at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusa, Yosuke

    2015-05-01

    We will present recent topics of the flavor physics in decays of the heavy mesons at the Belle experiment. Most of the results are based on a full data set which corresponds to 772 million BB¯ pairs collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e+e- collider. We also discuss about prospects of the studies in the future B-factory experiment.

  9. Astrophysics using the Gornergrat. II - First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winnewisser, Gisbert

    1987-08-01

    First observational results obtained with the new Gornergrat 3-m radio telescope are reviewed. Findings on the distribution of various molecules along the Galactic plane in the direction of the Galactic center are described, as are findings from measurements of the frequency ratios of HCN and HNC and the line profiles of these molecules in the direction of the Taurus region. CO measurements in the direction of selected IRAS sources are also discussed.

  10. Autonomous navigation ability: FIDO test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, E.; Maurette, M.

    2000-01-01

    The FIDO platform of the JPL has been used to evaluate the ability of autonomous obstacle avoidance developed by JPL and CNES autonomous long range path planning. The test results show that only a very small amount of energy and computing time is used to implement autonomy and that the capabilities of the rover are fully used, allowing a much longer daily traverse than purely ground-planned strategies.

  11. Results from the final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.; Final Focus Test Beam Collaboration

    1994-07-01

    first experimental results from the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) are given in this report. The FFTB has been constructed as a prototype for the final focus system of a future TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider. The vertical dimension of the 47 GeV electron beam form the SLAC linac has been reduced at the focal point of the FFTB by a demagnification of 320 to a beam height of approximately 70 nanometers.

  12. Recent results from CERN-WA98

    SciTech Connect

    Stankus, P.; WA98 Collaboration

    1997-02-01

    The CERN experiment WA98 is a general-survey, open-spectrometer experiment designed to examine 160 A GeV/c Pb+A collisions at the CERN-SPS. The experiment has a broad physics agenda, as suggested by its many different subsystems. A diagram of the experiment as it stood in 1995 is shown in the report. Detectors whose results are presented here are described briefly.

  13. Results from 2010 Caliban Criticality Dosimetry Intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.

    2011-10-12

    The external dosimetry program participated in a criticality dosimetry intercomparison conducted at the Caliban facility in Valduc, France in 2010. Representatives from the dosimetry and instrumentation groups were present during testing which included irradiations of whole-body beta/gamma (HBGT) and neutron thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), a fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD), electronic alarming dosimeters, and a humanoid phantom filled with reference man concentrations of sodium. This report reviews the testing procedures, preparations, irradiations, and presents results of the tests.

  14. Status and recent results from the LHC

    E-print Network

    Kortner, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Summary of the most recent physics results from ATLAS and CMS will be given, including the Standard Model measurements and the search for new physics. In addition to the studies performed with 2011 data, several key analyses have been updated using the 8 TeV data recorded by July 2012. Special emphasis is put on the observation of a new resonance in the search for the SM Higgs boson.

  15. Solar rotation results at Mount Wilson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.; Adkins, J. M.; Boyden, J. E.; Cragg, T. A.; Gregory, T. S.; Labonte, B. J.; Padilla, S. P.; Webster, L.

    1983-01-01

    Solar rotation results from Doppler velocity measurements made at Mount Wilson over a period of more than 14 years are presented based on a single reduction procedure. The observations were made with the wavelength 5250.2 A line of Fe I, and wavelength shifts of the line were simultaneously recorded. Data from 188 rotations are presented. Measurements of scattered light along with its effect on the measured rotation rate are given.

  16. Recent Stirling engine loss - understanding results

    SciTech Connect

    Tew, R.C.; Thieme, L.G.; Dudenhoefer, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    For several years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and other US Government agencies have been funding experimental and analytical efforts to improve the understanding of Stirling thermodynamic losses. NASA`s objective is to improve Stirling engine design capability to support the development of new engines for space power. An overview of these efforts was last given at the 1988 IECEC. Recent results of this research are reviewed.

  17. Crystallization in space: Results and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelov, V. I.; Kuranova, I. P.; Zakharov, B. G.; Voloshin, A. E.

    2014-11-01

    The results of studying crystallization in space are reviewed with focus on the growth of semiconductor and protein crystals. The history of the problem is considered, the influence of microgravity on the crystal growth is investigated, and the main experimental data on crystal growth in zero gravity are analyzed. The studies performed in this field at the Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences (IC RAS), are reviewed in detail.

  18. Experimental results on advanced rotary desiccant dehumidifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathan, D.; Parsons, J.; Maclaine-cross, I.

    1986-08-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) has developed the Cyclic Test Facility (CTF) to develop and validate analytical methods for evaluating and predicting the performance of advanced rotary dehumidifiers. This paper describes the CTF, the dehumidifiers tested at the CTF, and the analytical methods used. The results reported provide an engineering data base and a design tool for evaluating rotary dehumidifiers for desiccant cooling applications.

  19. Recent results from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Gascón, Alberto; Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-07-23

    The Pierre Auger Observatory has been designed to investigate the origin and nature of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) using a hybrid detection technique. In this contribution we present some of the most recent results of the observatory, namely the upper-end of the spectrum of cosmic rays, state-of-the-art analyses on mass composition, the measurements of the proton-air cross-section, and the number of muons at ground.

  20. Low Emissions RQL Flametube Combustor Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Clarence T.; Holdeman, James D.

    2001-01-01

    The overall objective of this test program was to demonstrate and evaluate the capability of the Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor concept for HSR applications. This test program was in support of the Pratt & Whitney and GE Aircraft Engines HSR low-NOx Combustor Program. Collaborative programs with Parker Hannifin Corporation and Textron Fuel Systems resulted in the development and testing of the high-flow low-NOx rich-burn zone fuel-to-air ratio research fuel nozzles used in this test program. Based on the results obtained in this test program, several conclusions can be made: (1) The RQL tests gave low NOx and CO emissions results at conditions corresponding to HSR cruise. (2) The Textron fuel nozzle design with optimal multiple partitioning of fuel and air circuits shows potential of providing an acceptable uniform local fuel-rich region in the rich burner. (3) For the parameters studied in this test series, the tests have shown T3 is the dominant factor in the NOx formation for RQL combustors. As T3 increases from 600 to 1100 F, EI(NOx) increases approximately three fold. (4) Factors which appear to have secondary influence on NOx formation are P4, T4, infinity(sub rb), V(sub ref,ov). (5) Low smoke numbers were measured for infinity(sub rb) of 2.0 at P4 of 120 psia.

  1. Deuteron photodisintegration : new results from TJNAF.

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, D. J.; Ahmidouch, A.; Armstrong, C. S.; Arrington, J.; Cummings, W. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Hansen, J.-O.; Jackson, H. E.; Mao, H.; O'Neill, T. G.; Potterveld, D. H.; Reinhold, J.; Zeidman, B.

    1997-11-18

    The first measurements of the differential cross section from d({gamma},p)n up to 4.0 GeV were performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF, formerly CEBAF). Bremsstrahlung photons from electron beam impinging on a copper radiator and a liquid deuterium target were employed for this experiment. The experiment was performed in Hall C where the photoprotons at forward angles in the center-of-mass were detected in the High Momentum Spectrometer (HMS) and photoprotons at backward angles were detected in the Short Orbit Spectrometer (SOS). The bremsstrahlung photon energy was reconstructed from the measured proton momentum and angle using the two-body kinematics. We report the cross section results at the proton center-of-mass angles of 37{degree} and 90{degree}. These results are in good agreement with previous lower energy measurements. The 90{degree} data continue to show the constituent-counting-rule behavior up to 4 GeV. The results will be compared with models based on QCD as well as those based on meson-exchange theory.

  2. MODIS Solar Diffuser Attenuation Screen Modeling Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Xuong, Xiaoxiong; Guenther, Bruce; Barnes, William

    2004-01-01

    On-orbit calibration of the reflected solar bands on the EOS Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is accomplished by have the instrument view a high reflectance diffuse surface illuminated by the sun. For some of the spectral bands this proves to be much too bright a signal that results in the saturation of detectors designed for measuring low reflectance (ocean) surfaces signals. A mechanical attenuation device in the form of a pin hole screen is used to reduce the signals to calibrate these bands. The sensor response to solar illumination of the SD with and without the attenuation screen in place will be presented. The MODIS detector response to the solar diffuser is smooth when the attenuation screen is absent, but has structures up to a few percent when the attenuation screen is present. This structure corresponds to non-uniform illumination from the solar diffuser. Each pin hole produces a pin-hole image of the sun on the solar diffuser, and there are very many pin hole images of the sun on the solar diffuser for each MODIS detector. Even though there are very many pin-hole images of the sun on the solar diffuser, it is no longer perfectly uniformly illuminated. This non-uniformly illuminated solar diffuser produces intensity variation on the focal planes. The results of a very detailed simulation will be discussed which show how the illumination of the focal plane changes as a result of the attenuation, and the impacts on the calibration will be discussed.

  3. Solid Surface Combustion Experiment: Thick Fuel Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altenkirch, Robert A.; Bhattacharjee, Subrata; West, Jeff; Tang, Lin; Sacksteder, Kurt; Delichatsios, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    The results of experiments for spread over polymethylmethacrylate, PMMA, samples in the microgravity environment of the Space Shuttle are described. The results are coupled with modelling in an effort to describe the physics of the spread process for thick fuels in a quiescent, microgravity environment and uncover differences between thin and thick fuels. A quenching phenomenon not present for thin fuels is delineated, namely the fact that for thick fuels the possibility exists that, absent an opposing flow of sufficient strength to press the flame close enough to the fuel surface to allow the heated layer in the solid to develop, the heated layer fails to become 'fully developed.' The result is that the flame slows, which in turn causes an increase in the relative radiative loss from the flame, leading eventually to extinction. This potential inability of a thick fuel to develop a steady spread rate is not present for a thin fuel because the heated layer is the fuel thickness, which reaches a uniform temperature across the thickness relatively rapidly.

  4. Latest Results from Super-Kamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishino, Hirokazu

    We present the latest results from Super-Kamiokande (SK) for solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. SK has been operating for about 16 years, accumulating the highest statistics of the neutrino event data. The flux and energy spectrum as well as the day/night flux asymmetry of solar neutrinos have been measured precisely. We find the day/night flux asymmetry with the 2.7? significance, indicating that the electron neutrino regeneration may occur in the earth. The recent discovery of the finite ? 13 value motivates us to explore the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy, ? 23 octant and a CP-violating phase using atmospheric neutrinos. SK also has found the appearance of ? neutrinos with the 3.8? significance in the atmospheric neutrino data sample. The neutrino oscillation parameters are determined based on the solar and atmospheric neutrino measurements. SK has the highest sensitivity to the supernova relic neutrinos that have been accumulated in the universe as a result of the past supernova explosions. We report the latest result of a search for the supernova relic neutrinos. We also mention about the current R&D status of a Gd-loaded water Cherenkov detector.

  5. Spacelab Science Results Study: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    Beginning with OSTA-1 in November 1981, and ending with Neurolab in March 1998, thirty-six shuttle missions are considered Spacelab missions because they carried various Spacelab components such as the Spacelab module, the pallet, the Instrument Pointing System (IPS), or the MPESS. The experiments carried out during these flights included astrophysics, solar physics, plasma physics, atmospheric science, Earth observations, and a wide range of microgravity experiments in life sciences, biotechnology, materials science, and fluid physics which includes combustion and critical point phenomena. In all, some 764 experiments were conducted by investigators from the United States, Europe, and Japan. These experiments resulted in several thousand papers published In refereed journals, and thousands more in conference proceedings, chapters in books, and other publications. The purpose of this Spacelab Science Results Study is to document the contributions made in each of the major research areas by giving a brief synopsis of the more significant experiments and an extensive list of the publications that were produced. We have also endeavored to show how these results impacted the existing body of knowledge, where they have spawned new fields, and, if appropriate, where the knowledge they produced has been applied.

  6. The MATROSHKA Experiment - First Mission Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, Guenther

    MATROSHKA is an ESA multi-user experiment unit on the International Space Station ISS for studies of depth dose distribution of the different components of the orbital radiation field at different sites of the organs, occurring in astronauts being exposed during an EVA. To accomplish that, the facility comprises an anthropomorphic phantom to simulate the human body, active and passive detectors for space radiation dosimetry, data acquisition and processing electronics and the overall mechanical housing and support structure for the MATROSHKA components. The development and manufacture was under ESA contract by DLR, Institute for Aerospace Medicine with sub-contractors Kayser Italia (Livorno) and DTM (Modena). MATROSHKA was launched within PROGRESS on January 29, 2004 and mounted shortly afterwards outside the Russian Zvezda Module of the Station. The time of outside exposure during this mission phase was 539 days. After that, the facility was returned into the Station for passive sensor exchange. After the first passive detector set was returned to ground with Soyuz for on-ground evaluation the facility is further used inside the station during two follow-on project phases. The MATROSHKA experiment delivered a unique set of data results from the evaluation of numerous detectors, such as Thermoluminescence detectors, plastic nuclear track detectors and silicon dosemeters. This paper intends to give besides a short overview of the instrumentation used inside the MATROSHKA facility selected results from the first exposure and describes the determination of organ dose equivalents from these results

  7. Review of sodium analysis proficiency test results.

    PubMed

    Sykes, M; Parmar, B; Knaggs, M

    2011-02-01

    Proficiency testing results for sodium analysis in foods raised concerns over the proportion of laboratories achieving satisfactory z-scores. Test materials for sodium analysis include fruit juice, canned meat meal, tomato sauce, cheese and pasta meal, and snack food. Fruit juice and tomato sauce data sets are the most problematic in deriving the assigned value with sufficiently low uncertainty to provide evaluative z-scores. The standard deviation for proficiency is derived from Horwitz, with a lack of collaborative trial data for these matrices to provide other guidance. The status of accreditation for the method/matrix does not appear to influence the observed variation in results. Microwave digestion is much less commonly used than simple acid digestion. The choice of determination method appears to be entirely matrix dependent (whether flame atomic absorption spectroscopy, flame photometry or inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy). Results for juice matrix may be overestimated if flame photometry is used, due to either potassium interference or careless reporting where potassium is also determined. PMID:21240823

  8. Pore destruction resulting from mechanical thermal expression

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, S.A.; Wheeler, R.A.; Hoadley, A.F.A.

    2007-07-01

    Mechanical thermal expression (MTE) is a dewatering technology ideally suited for the dewatering of internally porous biomaterials. For such materials, the combined application of temperature and compressive force in the MTE process enhances the collapse of the porous structure, resulting in effective water removal. In this article, a comparison of the dewatering of titanium dioxide, which is an ideal incompressible, non-porous material, and lignite, which is a porous plant-based biomaterial, is presented. The comparison is based on the parameters critical to dewatering, namely the material compressibility and the permeability. With the aid of mercury porosimetry results, a detailed discussion of the pore destruction of lignite resulting from MTE processing is presented. It is illustrated that there is a well-defined relationship between the pore size distribution after MTE dewatering and the MTE temperature and pressure. The discussion is extended to an investigation of the effects of MTE processing conditions on the effective and noneffective porosity. The effective porosity is defined as the interconnected porosity, which contributes to flow through the compressed matrix, while the non-effective porosity is the remaining porosity, which does not contribute to flow. It is illustrated that there is a linear relationship in both the effective and non-effective porosity with the total porosity. The linear relationship is independent of the processing conditions. It is also shown that MTE processing collapses the effective and non-effective pores at roughly the same rate.

  9. Electronic cigarette solutions and resultant aerosol profiles.

    PubMed

    Herrington, Jason S; Myers, Colton

    2015-10-30

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are growing in popularity exponentially. Despite their ever-growing acceptance, their aerosol has not been fully characterized. The current study focused on evaluating e-cigarette solutions and their resultant aerosol for potential differences. A simple sampling device was developed to draw e-cigarette aerosol into a multi-sorbent thermal desorption (TD) tube, which was then thermally extracted and analyzed via a gas chromatography (GC) mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method. This novel application provided detectable levels of over one hundred fifteen volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) from a single 40mL puff. The aerosol profiles from four commercially available e-cigarettes were compared to their respective solution profiles with the same GC-MS method. Solution profiles produced upwards of sixty four unidentified and identified (some only tentatively) constituents and aerosol profiles produced upwards of eighty two compounds. Results demonstrated distinct analyte profiles between liquid and aerosol samples. Most notably, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and siloxanes were found in the aerosol profiles; however, these compounds were never present in the solutions. These results implicate the aerosolization process in the formation of compounds not found in solutions; have potential implications for human health; and stress the need for an emphasis on electronic cigarette aerosol testing. PMID:26422308

  10. Dark Stars: Evolution and First Pulsation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Freese, Katherine; Montgomery, Michael H.; Winget, Donald E.; Paxton, Bill

    2015-04-01

    Among the first stars to form in the Universe may be ``dark stars,'' i.e. stars of primordial composition, but powered by the heating released in the process of dark matter (DM) particle self-annihilation, which also gives the correct relic density of DM today. It has been shown in the past that a DM-powered stellar phase is feasible, due to the high DM densities in the centers of primordial minihalos and the efficiency of DM annihilation. DM could thereby be responsible for an entirely new class of stellar objects, while possible detection of the latter would provide a smoking gun for DM. We have used the stellar evolution code MESA in order to improve upon previous stellar models, which were limited to polytropes. Our more accurate models confirm earlier results which found that dark stars can be very massive (M >105M?), bright, cool and puffy objects. Once these supermassive dark stars run out of DM fuel, they collapse and could be forming the seeds for the supermassive black holes which are observed in nearby and high-redshift galaxies. I will present our results on the evolution and properties of dark stars on their way of becoming supermassive, as well as new results on possible pulsations of dark stars and predicted observational signatures.

  11. Bioreactor landfills: experimental and field results.

    PubMed

    Warith, Mostafa

    2002-01-01

    Bioreactor landfills allow a more active landfill management that recognizes the biological, chemical and physical processes involved in a landfill environment. This paper presents the results of an experimental study carried out to determine the effect of solid waste size, leachate recirculation and nutrient balance on the rate of municipal solid waste (MSW) biodegradation. Higher rates of MSW biodegradation eventually cause a reduction of the contaminant life span of the landfill and decrease in the cost of long term monitoring. The study indicated that the smaller the size of the MSW the faster the biodegradation rate of the waste. In addition, the paper presents the results of leachate recirculation on solid waste biodegradation in a full-scale landfill site, which is located in Nepean, Ontario, Canada. The leachate was recirculated into the landfilled solid waste for 8 years through infiltration lagoons. Similar results to those obtained in the laboratory scale experiments were noted. The average pH of the leachate in the early stages of recirculation was on the acidic range of the pH scale, however, the pH value was in the range of 7-8 after 2 years of leachate recirculation. The concentration of chloride remained fairly constant at about 1000 mg/l during the leachate recirculation period. A decreasing trend of the organic load, measured as biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand, was observed. Recovery of landfill air space was also noted because of the enhanced subsidence and decomposition of the solid waste. PMID:11942706

  12. Recent Results From CLEO-c

    E-print Network

    Alex Smith

    2005-05-23

    This paper describes recent preliminary results from the CLEO-c experiment using an initial ~60 pb^-1 sample of data collected in e^+e^- collisions at a center of mass energy around the mass of the psi(3770). A first measurement of the branching fraction BR(D^+ -> mu^+ nu) = (3.5 +/- 1.4 +/- 0.6)x 10^-4 and the corresponding decay constant f_D = (202 +/- 41 +/- 17) MeV has been made. Several charged and neutral D meson absolute exclusive semileptonic branching fractions have been measured, including first measurements of the branching fractions BR(D^0 -> rho^-e^+ nu) = (0.19 +/- 0.04 +/- 0.02)% and BR(D^+ -> omega e^+ nu) = (0.17 +/- 0.006 +/- 0.01)%. Estimated uncertainties for inclusive D semileptonic decay modes are also presented. Fits to single and double D tagged events are used to extract absolute branching fractions of several hadronic D decay modes and DDbar production cross sections. Most of these results from this small preliminary sample are already of greater sensitivity than previously published results.

  13. Prostate elastography: preliminary in vivo results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, S. K.; Feleppa, E. J.; Kalisz, A.; Ramchandran, S.; Ennis, R. D.; Lizzi, Frederick L.; Wuu, C.-S.; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2005-04-01

    We report preliminary results from our investigation of in vivo prostate elastography. Fewer than 50% of all prostate cancers are typically visible in current clinical imaging modalities. Elastography displays a map of strain that results when tissue is externally compressed. Thus, elastography is ideal for imaging prostate cancers because they are generally stiffer than the surrounding tissue and stiffer regions usually exhibit lower strain in elastograms. In our study, digital radio-frequency (RF) ultrasound echo data were acquired from prostate-cancer patients undergoing brachytherapy. Seed placement is guided by a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe, which is held in a mechanical fixture. The probe can be moved in XYZ directions and tilted. The probe face, in contact with the rectal wall, is used to apply a compression force to the immediately adjacent prostate. We also used a water-filled (acoustic) coupling balloon to compress the prostate by increasing the water volume inside the balloon. In each scan plane (transverse), we acquired RF data from successive scans at the scanner frame rate as the deformation force on the rectal wall was continuously increased. We computed strain using 1D RF cross-correlation analysis. The compression method based on fixture displacement produced low-noise elastograms that beautifully displayed the prostate architecture and emphasized stiff areas. Balloon-based compression also produced low-noise elastograms. Initial results demonstrate that elastography may be useful in the detection and evaluation of prostate cancers, occult in conventional imaging modalities.

  14. IMPROVED RESULTS FOR STACKELBERG SCHEDULING STRATEGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Marathe, M. V.; Kapernick, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    We continue the study initiated in [Ro01] on Stackelberg Scheduling Strategies. We are given a set of n independent parallel machines or equivalently a set of n parallel edges on which certain flow has to be sent. Each edge e is endowed with a latency function l{sub e}({center_dot}). The setting is that of a non-cooperative game: players choose edges so as minimize their individual latencies. Additionally, there is a single player who control as fraction ?? of the total flow. The goal is to find a strategy for the leader (i.e. an assignment of flow to indivual links) such that the selfish users react so as to minimize the total latency of the system. Building on the recent results in [Ro01, RT00], we show the following: 1. We devise a fully polynomial approximate scheme for the problem of finding the cheapest Stackelberg Strategy: given a performance requirement, our algorithm runs in time polynomial in n and {var_epsilon} and produces a Stackelberg strategy s, whose associated cost is within a 1 + {var_epsilon} factor of the optimum stackelberg strategy s*. The result is extended to obtain a polynomial-approximation scheme when instances are restricted to layered directed graphs in which each layer has a bounded number of vertices. 2. We then consider a two round Stackelberg strategy (denoted 2SS). In this strategy, the game consists of three rounds: a move by the leader followed by the moves of all the followers folowed again by a move by the leader who possibly reassigns some of the flows. We show that 2SS always dominates the one round scheme, and for some classes of latency functions, is guaranteed to be closer to the global social optimum. We also consider the variant where the leader plays after the selfish users have routed themselves, and observe that this dominates the one-round scheme. Extensions of the results to the special case when all the latency functions are linear are also presented. Our results extend the earlier results and answer an open question posed by Roughgarden [Ro01].

  15. March 2007 monitoring results for Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-06-01

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater is being sampled twice yearly (for a recommended period of two years) for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 11 monitoring wells and 5 piezometers (Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE (Argonne 2006a). The results of groundwater sampling and VOCs analyses in September-October 2005, March 2006, and September 2006 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b). The results have demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a broad groundwater plume that has shown little movement. This report presents the results of the groundwater sampling at Centralia in March 2007, performed in accord with the KDHE-approved Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2005b). The March 2007 sampling represents the fourth monitoring event performed under the recommended two-year monitoring program approved by the KDHE. A final sampling event under this program is scheduled for September 2007.

  16. Fast Plasma Instrument for MMS: Simulation Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Adrian, Mark L.; Lobell, James V.; Simpson, David G.; Barrie, Alex; Winkert, George E.; Yeh, Pen-Shu; Moore, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission will study small-scale reconnection structures and their rapid motions from closely spaced platforms using instruments capable of high angular, energy, and time resolution measurements. The Dual Electron Spectrometer (DES) of the Fast Plasma Instrument (FPI) for MMS meets these demanding requirements by acquiring the electron velocity distribution functions (VDFs) for the full sky with high-resolution angular measurements every 30 ms. This will provide unprecedented access to electron scale dynamics within the reconnection diffusion region. The DES consists of eight half-top-hat energy analyzers. Each analyzer has a 6 deg. x 11.25 deg. Full-sky coverage is achieved by electrostatically stepping the FOV of each of the eight sensors through four discrete deflection look directions. Data compression and burst memory management will provide approximately 30 minutes of high time resolution data during each orbit of the four MMS spacecraft. Each spacecraft will intelligently downlink the data sequences that contain the greatest amount of temporal structure. Here we present the results of a simulation of the DES analyzer measurements, data compression and decompression, as well as ground-based analysis using as a seed re-processed Cluster/PEACE electron measurements. The Cluster/PEACE electron measurements have been reprocessed through virtual DES analyzers with their proper geometrical, energy, and timing scale factors and re-mapped via interpolation to the DES angular and energy phase-space sampling measurements. The results of the simulated DES measurements are analyzed and the full moments of the simulated VDFs are compared with those obtained from the Cluster/PEACE spectrometer using a standard quadrature moment, a newly implemented spectral spherical harmonic method, and a singular value decomposition method. Our preliminary moment calculations show a remarkable agreement within the uncertainties of the measurements, with the results obtained by the Cluster/PEACE electron spectrometers. The data analyzed was selected because it represented a potential reconnection event as currently published.

  17. Seeding cumulus in Florida: new 1970 results.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J; Woodley, W L

    1971-04-01

    In the Florida single cloud experiments, the main result of the statistical analyses is that the dynamic seeding effect on rainfall is large, positive, and significant. From all the 1968 and 1970 data together, the seeding effect is estimated to be larger than a factor of 3; that is, the seeded clouds rained more than three times as much as the controls after the seeding run. On fair days, defined objectively by percentage of area covered by showers, the seeding effect is shown to be larger than the overall average, but it may be negative on rainy days. Rainy days in the tropics are about 10 percent of the days with rain, but they produce about half the total rainfall. The applicability of our single cloud results to other areas is not established but seems hopeful for many tropical and subtropical regions. It can be assessed by cloud population studies together with our numerical model (25). Guidance for the next steps toward practical rainfall enhancement and toward the understanding and modification of cloud systems in storms may be provided by our study of merger clouds. Mergers are shown often to produce more than an order of magnitude more rain than isolated clouds on the same day, probably owing to dynamic invigoration of the merged cloud circulations. Results of our first small attempt toward inducing and documenting mergers in a multiple cloud seeding experiment appear promising. Although far from statistically conclusive, they have opened a new frontier in the science and technology of dynamic cloud modification. It is also hoped that the multiple cumulus seeding experiments will help to clarify the formation of "cloud clusters" and their role in large-scale circulations, thus contributing to the focal subject of the Global Atmospheric Research Program in the tropics. PMID:17735215

  18. September 2007 monitoring results for Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-05-01

    In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater is being sampled twice yearly (for a recommended period of two years) for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 10 monitoring wells and 6 piezometers (Figure 1.1), at locations approved by the KDHE (Argonne 2006a). The results of groundwater sampling and VOCs analyses in September-October 2005, March 2006, September 2006, and March 2007 were documented previously (Argonne 2006a,b, 2007a). The results have demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination, at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a broad groundwater plume that has shown little movement. This report presents the results of the groundwater sampling at Centralia in September 2007, performed in accord with the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b). The September 2007 sampling represents the fifth and final monitoring event performed under the recommended two-year monitoring program approved by the KDHE.

  19. Previrialization: Perturbative and N-Body Results

    E-print Network

    Ewa L. Lokas; Roman Juszkiewicz; Francois R. Bouchet; Eric Hivon

    1996-02-12

    We present a series of N-body experiments which confirm the reality of the previrialization effect. We also use weakly nonlinear perturbative approach to study the phenomenon. These two approaches agree when the rms density contrast, $\\sigma$, is small; more surprisingly, they remain in agreement when $\\sigma \\approx 1$. When the slope of the initial power spectrum is $n>-1$, nonlinear tidal interactions slow down the growth of density fluctuations and the magnitude of the suppression increases when $n$ (i.e. the relative amount of small scale power) is increased. For $n<-1$ we see an opposite effect: the fluctuations grow more rapidly than in linear theory. The transition occurs at $n=-1$ when the weakly nonlinear correction to $\\sigma$ is close to zero and the growth rate is close to linear. Our results resolve recent controversy between two N-body studies of previrialization. Peebles (1990) assumed $n=0$ and found strong evidence in support of previrialization, while Evrard \\& Crone (1992), who assumed $n=-1$, reached opposite conclusions. As we show here, the initial conditions with $n=-1$ are rather special because the nonlinear effects nearly cancel out for that particular spectrum. In addition to our calculations for scale-free initial spectra, we show results for a more realistic spectrum of Peacock \\& Dodds (1994). Its slope near the scale usually adopted for normalization is close to $-1$, so $\\sigma$ is close to linear. Our results retroactively justify linear normalization at 8$h^{-1}$ Mpc, while also demonstrating the danger and limitations of this practice.

  20. Recent Results from NASA's Morphing Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Washburn, Anthony E.; Horta, Lucas G.; Bryant, Robert G.; Cox, David E.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Padula, Sharon L.; Holloway, Nancy M.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Morphing Project seeks to develop and assess advanced technologies and integrated component concepts to enable efficient, multi-point adaptability in air and space vehicles. In the context of the project, the word "morphing" is defined as "efficient, multi-point adaptability" and may include macro, micro, structural and/or fluidic approaches. The project includes research on smart materials, adaptive structures, micro flow control, biomimetic concepts, optimization and controls. This paper presents an updated overview of the content of the Morphing Project including highlights of recent research results.

  1. Kepler Mission Development Challenges and Early Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, J.; Duren, R.; Frerking, M.

    2011-01-01

    Kepler is NASA s first mission capable of detecting Earth-size planets orbiting in the habitable zone of stars other than the Sun. Kepler comprises a space telescope designed to continuously monitor the brightnesses of more than 100,000 target stars, and a ground segment to analyze the measured stellar light curves and detect the signatures of orbiting planets. In order to detect Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars Kepler was designed to provide unprecedented photometric sensitivity and stability. This paper addresses some of the technical challenges encountered during the development of the Kepler mission and the measures taken to overcome them. Early scientific results are summarized.

  2. Kepler Mission Development Challenges and Early Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, J.

    2011-01-01

    Kepler is NASA`s first mission capable of detecting Earth-size planets orbiting in the habitable zone of stars other than the sun. Kepler comprises a space telescope designed to continuously monitor the brightnesses of more than 100,000 target stars, and a ground segment to analyze the measured stellar light curves and detect the signatures of orbiting planets. In order to detect Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars Kepler was designed to provide unprecedented photometric sensitivity and stability. This paper addresses some of the technical challenges encountered during the development of the Kepler mission and the measures taken to overcome them. Early scientific results are summarized.

  3. Ammonia Results Review for Retained Gas Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2000-09-20

    This report was prepared as part of a task supporting the deployment of the retained gas sampler (RGS) system in Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks. The emphasis of this report is on presenting supplemental information about the ammonia measurements resulting from retained gas sampling of Tanks 241-AW-101, A-101, AN-105, AN-104, AN-103, U-103, S-106, BY-101, BY-109, SX-106, AX-101, S-102, S-111, U-109, and SY-101. This information provides a better understanding of the accuracy of past RGS ammonia measurements, which will assist in determining flammable and toxicological hazards.

  4. Physics results with polarized electrons at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1996-03-01

    Polarized electron beams can play an important role in the dynamics of interactions at high energies. Polarized electron beams at SLAC have been an important part of the physics program since 1970, when they were first proposed for use in testing the spin structure of the proton. Since 1992, the SLAC linear accelerator and the SLC have operated solely with polarized electrons, providing data for tests of QCD in studies of the spin structure of the nucleon and tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model. In the following sections, the performance of the source is summarized, and some of the recent results using the polarized beams are discussed.

  5. Meteorite heat capacities: Results to date

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolmagno, G.; Macke, R.; Britt, D.

    2014-07-01

    Heat capacity is an essential thermal property for modeling asteroid internal metamorphism or differentiation, and dynamical effects like YORP or Yarkovsky perturbations. We have developed a rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive method for measuring the heat capacity of meteorites at low temperature [1]. A sample is introduced into a dewar of liquid nitrogen and an electronic scale measures the amount of nitrogen boiled away as the sample is cooled from the room temperature to the liquid nitrogen temperature; given the heat of vaporization of liquid nitrogen, one can then calculate the heat lost from the sample during the cooling process. Note that heat capacity in this temperature range is a strong function of temperature, but this functional relation is essentially the same for all materials; the values we determine are equivalent to the heat capacity of the sample at 175 K. To correct for systematic errors, samples of laboratory-grade quartz are measured along with the meteorite samples. To date, more than 70 samples of more than 50 different meteorites have been measured in this way, including ordinary chondrites [1], irons [2], basaltic achondrites [3], and a limited number of carbonaceous chondrites [1]. In general, one can draw a number of important conclusions from these results. First, the heat capacity of a meteorite is a function of its mineral composition, independent of shock, metamorphism, or other physical state. Second, given this relation, heat capacity can be strongly altered by terrestrial weathering. Third, the measurement of heat capacity in small (less than 1 g) samples as done typically by commercial systems runs a serious risk of giving misleading results for samples that are heterogeneous on scales of tens of grams or more. Finally, we demonstrate that heat capacity is a useful tool for determining and classifying a sample, especially if used in conjunction with other intrinsic variables such as grain density and magnetic susceptibility. We will present an updated list of our results, incorporating our latest corrections for a variety of small but measurable systematic errors, and new results for meteorites and meteorite types not previously measured or reported.

  6. The Energetic Particle Telescope: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrard, V.; Lopez Rosson, G.; Borremans, K.; Lemaire, J.; Maes, J.; Bonnewijn, S.; Van Ransbeeck, E.; Neefs, E.; Cyamukungu, M.; Benck, S.; Bonnet, L.; Borisov, S.; Cabrera, J.; Grégoire, G.; Semaille, C.; Creve, G.; De Saedeleer, J.; Desoete, B.; Preud'homme, F.; Anciaux, M.; Helderweirt, A.; Litefti, K.; Brun, N.; Pauwels, D.; Quevrin, C.; Moreau, D.; Punkkinen, R.; Valtonen, E.; Hajdas, W.; Nieminen, P.

    2014-11-01

    The Energetic Particle Telescope (EPT) is a new compact and modular ionizing particle spectrometer that was launched on 7 May 2013 to a LEO polar orbit at an altitude of 820 km onboard the ESA satellite PROBA-V. First results show electron, proton and helium ion fluxes in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) and at high latitudes, with high flux increases during SEP (Solar Energetic Particles) events and geomagnetic storms. These observations help to improve the understanding of generation and loss processes associated to the Van Allen radiation belts.

  7. Wide Area Wind Field Monitoring Status & Results

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Marchant; Jed Simmons

    2011-09-30

    Volume-scanning elastic has been investigated as a means to derive 3D dynamic wind fields for characterization and monitoring of wind energy sites. An eye-safe volume-scanning lidar system was adapted for volume imaging of aerosol concentrations out to a range of 300m. Reformatting of the lidar data as dynamic volume images was successfully demonstrated. A practical method for deriving 3D wind fields from dynamic volume imagery was identified and demonstrated. However, the natural phenomenology was found to provide insufficient aerosol features for reliable wind sensing. The results of this study may be applicable to wind field measurement using injected aerosol tracers.

  8. Titan's organic chemistry: Results of simulation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, Carl; Thompson, W. Reid; Khare, Bishun N.

    1992-01-01

    Recent low pressure continuous low plasma discharge simulations of the auroral electron driven organic chemistry in Titan's mesosphere are reviewed. These simulations yielded results in good accord with Voyager observations of gas phase organic species. Optical constants of the brownish solid tholins produced in similar experiments are in good accord with Voyager observations of the Titan haze. Titan tholins are rich in prebiotic organic constituents; the Huygens entry probe may shed light on some of the processes that led to the origin of life on Earth.

  9. Qualification test results for the TIRS cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquardt, Eric; Gully, Wilfred; Marquardt, Jennifer; Boyle, Robert; Hale, Taylor

    2012-06-01

    Ball Aerospace has completed qualification testing of its flight Stirling-cycle mechanical cryocooler for the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), an instrument slated to fly on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) platform. The TIRS cooler, developed under subcontract to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, consists of a sophisticated and highly reliable, two-stage, fixed regenerator Stirling cryocooler and its drive electronics. The TIRS cooler provides 2 W of 38 K cooling to the TIRS detectors and 9.8 W shield cooling to 85 K for less than 225 W total input power. Performance test results are reported.

  10. Module Hipot and ground continuity test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Hipot (high voltage potential) and module frame continuity tests of solar energy conversion modules intended for deployment into large arrays are discussed. The purpose of the tests is to reveal potentially hazardous voltage conditions in installed modules, and leakage currents that may result in loss of power or cause ground fault system problems, i.e., current leakage potential and leakage voltage distribution. The tests show a combined failure rate of 36% (69% when environmental testing is included). These failure rates are believed easily corrected by greater care in fabrication.

  11. Superconducting solenoid model magnet test results

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Dimarco, J.; Feher, S.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Hess, C.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Terechkine, I.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Superconducting solenoid magnets suitable for the room temperature front end of the Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (formerly known as Proton Driver), an 8 GeV superconducting H- linac, have been designed and fabricated at Fermilab, and tested in the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. We report here results of studies on the first model magnets in this program, including the mechanical properties during fabrication and testing in liquid helium at 4.2 K, quench performance, and magnetic field measurements. We also describe new test facility systems and instrumentation that have been developed to accomplish these tests.

  12. Results from non-accelerator experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkerson, J.F.

    1992-12-31

    The diversity of non-accelerator experiments is at first look both dazzling and even daunting. However, nearly all of these experiments strive to attain the same goal, to search for new physics, beyond the current Standard Model. These measurements are also unified in the fact that their results are often dominated by systematic uncertainties. This review necessarily covers only a limited subset of non-accelerator experiments, and will concentrate on the experimental areas where there has been significant recent progress. The topics reviewed include neutrino mazes, double beta decay, solar neutrino, and long-baseline neutrino oscillation measurements.

  13. Numerical loop quantum cosmology: some recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Parampreet

    2015-04-01

    We will discuss some of the recent results obtained using numerical techniques in loop quantum cosmology. We focus on two models: an isotropic universe with a negative potential and the Bianchi-I vacuum spacetime. Quantum evolution with different kinds of states in these spacetimes shows the resolution of singularities and existence of quantum bounce. In the case of the negative potential, loop quantum universes undergo a cyclic evolution with relative fluctuations tightly bound in different cycles. In the case of the anisotropic model, the shear scalar is shown to be finite in the entire evolution. We also discuss the validity of the effective spacetime description for these spacetimes.

  14. Early Results of the ESO VLT

    E-print Network

    S. Cristiani

    1999-08-16

    The results of the FORS and ISAAC Science Verification of the FORS and ISAAC instruments at the VLT ANTU/UT1 are described. The following observations have been carried out: 1) the Cluster Deep Field MS1008.1-1224 2) the Antlia dwarf spheroidal Galaxy 3) multiple Object Spectroscopy of Lyman break galaxies in the AXAF and Hubble Deep Field South 4) ISAAC IR Spectroscopy of a gravitationally magnified galaxy at z=2.72. The data have been made public for the ESO community and, in the case of HDF-S, worldwide.

  15. Reflections on speckle: old and new results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dainty, Christopher; Chen, Mingzhou

    2011-10-01

    Speckle was re-discovered after the invention of the laser in 1960. The unpublished 1963 Stanford Electronics Laboratory report by J W Goodman was the first comprehensive derivation of the first and second order statistics of the speckle intensity. This short paper describes how the senior author came to know Professor Goodman through their mutual, and lasting, interest in laser speckle. New results in speckle continue to be discovered, and we briefly describe one of these, the elimination of phase vortices using cascade adaptive optics systems.

  16. Results from the REFLEX Cluster Survey

    E-print Network

    H. Böhringer; L. Guzzo; C. A. Collins; D. M. Neumann; S. Schindler; P. Schuecker; R. Cruddace; G. Chincarini; S. De Grandi; A. C. Edge; H. T. MacGillivray; P. Shaver; G. Vettolani; W. Voges

    1998-09-29

    Based on the ROSAT All-Sky Survey we have conducted a large redshift survey as an ESO key programme to identify and secure redshifts for the X-ray brightest clusters found in the southern hemisphere. We present first results for a highly controlled sample for a flux limit of 3 10-12 erg/s/cm+2 comprising 475 clusters (87% with redshifts). The logN-logS function of the sample shows an almost perfect Euclidian slope and a preliminary X-ray luminosity function is presented.

  17. SLAC modulator system improvements and reliability results

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, A.R.

    1998-06-01

    In 1995, an improvement project was completed on the 244 klystron modulators in the linear accelerator. The modulator system has been previously described. This article offers project details and their resulting effect on modulator and component reliability. Prior to the project, the authors had collected four operating cycles (1991 through 1995) of MTTF data. In this discussion, the '91 data will be excluded since the modulators operated at 60 Hz. The five periods following the '91 run were reviewed due to the common repetition rate at 120 Hz.

  18. Kounis syndrome resulting from anaphylaxis to diclofenac

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Akhilesh Kumar; Tomar, Gaurav Singh; Ganguly, Col. S; Kapoor, Mukul Chandra

    2013-01-01

    “Kounis syndrome” refers to acute coronary syndromes of varying degree (myocardial ischaemia to infarction) induced by mast cell activation as a result of allergic and anaphylactic reactions. ST-segment elevated myocardial infarction is a rare complication that can occur even in patients with normal coronary arteries due to anaphylactic reactions. We present a case that developed acute myocardial infarction following a diclofenac sodium-induced anaphylaxis. The patient did not have any previous coronary artery disease, but there was a temporal relationship with development of the anaphylactic reaction due to diclofenac sodium and the cardiac event. The patient was managed conservatively and the recovery was uneventful. PMID:23983288

  19. Results from the Borexino Solar Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calaprice, Frank; Galbiati, Cristiano; Wright, Alex; Ianni, Aldo

    2012-11-01

    Borexino is a low-background liquid scintillation detector currently acquiring solar and terrestrial neutrino data at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory in Italy. Since the start of operations in 2007, Borexino has produced measurements of 7Be, 8B, and pep solar neutrinos, as well as measurements of terrestrial and long-baseline reactor antineutrinos. The measurements were made possible by the development of low-background scintillator spectroscopy that enabled direct detection of sub-MeV solar neutrinos. The general design features of the detector are described together with current results and prospects for future measurements.

  20. Solar and Terrestrial Neutrino Results from Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calaprice, Frank; Borexino Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    Borexino is a low background liquid scintillation detector currently acquiring solar and terrestrial neutrino data at the LNGS underground laboratory in Italy. In the three years since the start of operations in 2007, Borexino has produced measurements of 7Be and 8B solar neutrinos, as well as measurements of terrestrial and long-baseline reactor anti-neutrinos. The measurements of sub-MeV neutrinos were possible owing to a breakthrough in low background methods. Current results and prospects for future measurements with lower background and higher accuracy are discussed in the context of exploring the transition from vacuum to matter enhanced neutrino oscillations.

  1. Results from non-accelerator experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkerson, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    The diversity of non-accelerator experiments is at first look both dazzling and even daunting. However, nearly all of these experiments strive to attain the same goal, to search for new physics, beyond the current Standard Model. These measurements are also unified in the fact that their results are often dominated by systematic uncertainties. This review necessarily covers only a limited subset of non-accelerator experiments, and will concentrate on the experimental areas where there has been significant recent progress. The topics reviewed include neutrino mazes, double beta decay, solar neutrino, and long-baseline neutrino oscillation measurements.

  2. Recent results in DIS from Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    David Gaskell

    2010-04-01

    Recent results in Deep Inelastic processes measured at Jefferson Lab are presented. In addition to the inclusive reactions typically discussed in the context of Deep Inelastic (electron) Scattering, particular emphasis is given to Deep Exclusive and semi#19;inclusive reactions. Jefferson Lab has made significant contributions to the understanding of the partonic structure of the nucleon at large x, and with its first dedicated measurements is already providing important contributions to understanding the three-dimensional structure of the nucleon via constraints on Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) and Transverse Momentum Distributions (TMDs).

  3. Recent results on meson spectroscopy from JETSET

    SciTech Connect

    Evangelista, C.; Palano, A.; Drijard, D.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Hamann, N.; Moueellie, B.; Ohlsson, S.; Perreau, J.M.; Price, M.; Eyrich, W.

    1994-09-01

    The JETSET experiment at CERN LEAR studies the process p{bar p} {yields} {phi}{phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} to search for hadronic resonances. {phi}{phi} are directly formed through the annihilation of an antiproton beam onto an internal-jet target. Preliminary results on the {phi}{phi} cross section in the energy range 2.1-2.4 GeV/c are presented from data taken in 1991. 19 refs., 18 figs.

  4. New Results from the H1 Collaboration

    E-print Network

    Andre Schoning

    2008-09-05

    After more than 15 years, the operation of the world's unique electron-proton collider HERA ended in June 2007. The data collected by the H1 experiment correspond to a total integrated luminosity of about 0.5 fb$^{-1}$. In 2007 dedicated runs were taken at lower proton beam energies to measure the longitudinal proton structure function $F_L$. In this talk new results, many of them exploiting data taken after the HERA upgrade in the year 2000, and the first measurement of $F_L$ are presented.

  5. Structure function results from H1

    E-print Network

    Zhiqing Zhang

    2002-12-17

    New structure function results from H1 are presented. The measurements cover a huge kinematical range for Q^2, the four momentum transfer squared, from 0.35, GeV^2 to 30,000, GeV^2, and for Bjorken x between \\sim 5\\cdot 10^{-6} and 0.65. At Q^2>100, GeV^2, full HERA, I data have been analyzed. The data are compared with a new QCD analysis. The impact of the HERA, I data on the parton density functions is discussed.

  6. Global Positioning System receiver evaluation results

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, R.H.

    1993-09-01

    A Sandia project currently uses an outdated Magnavox 6400 Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver as the core of its navigation system. The goal of this study was to analyze the performance of the current GPS receiver compared to newer, less expensive models and to make recommendations on how to improve the performance of the overall navigation system. This paper discusses the test methodology used to experimentally analyze the performance of different GPS receivers, the test results, and recommendations on how an upgrade should proceed. Appendices contain detailed information regarding the raw data, test hardware, and test software.

  7. CALIPSO at Four: Results and Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, Dave; Hu, Yong; Pitts, Mike; Tackett, Jason; Kittaka, Chieko; Liu, Zhaoyan; Vaughan, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols and clouds play important roles in Earth?s climate system, but limitations in our ability to observe them globally limit our understanding of the climate system and our ability to model it. The CALIPSO satellite was developed to provide new capabilities to observe aerosol and cloud from space. CALIPSO carries the first polarization-sensitive lidar to fly in space, which has now provided a four-year record of global aerosol and cloud profiles. This paper briefly summarizes the status of the CALIPSO mission, describes some of the results from CALIPSO, and presents highlights of recent improvements in data products.

  8. Mars-Analog Evaporite Experiment: Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. M.; Bullock, M. A.; Sharp, T.G.; Quinn, R.

    2005-01-01

    This research is part of a multiyear experimental investigation to understand the nature and evolution brines and evaporates on Mars. The spectacular discoveries of the MER rovers, particularly those of Opportunity at Meridiani, both illustrate the relevance, as well as guide the future direction, of this work. Here we report the initial results from our just-completed and tested evaporites apparatus, using a synthetic brine analog to our brine experiment simulating a modern Mars environment in which the brine was subjected to rapid evaporation under modern Martian conditions. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  9. New diffractive results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.

    2005-05-01

    Experimental results in diffractive processes are summarized and a few notable characteristics described in terms of Quantum Chromodynamics. Exclusive dijet production is used to establish a benchmark for future experiments in the quest for diffractive Higgs production at the Large Hadron Collider. Using new data from the Tevatron and dedicated diffractive triggers, no excess over a smooth falling distribution for exclusive dijet events could be found. Stringent upper limits on the exclusive dijet production cross section are presented. The quark/gluon composition of dijet final states is used to provide additional hints on exclusive dijet production.

  10. Exotic Ungulate Production: Summary of Survey Results

    E-print Network

    Mjelde, James W.; Conner, J. Richard; Stuth, Jerry W.; Jensen, James; Chang, Chia-Cheun; Jones, James B.

    1992-01-01

    stream_source_info Bull1703a.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 112709 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Bull1703a.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 TDOC Z TA245.7 8873... . _ _ -..r-NO~ EXotic April 1992 B-1703 U production: 1 , \\ Summary 01 Survey Results The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station J. Charles Lee, Interim Director The Texas A&M University System College Station, Texas Contents Acknowledgments...

  11. Baryon spectroscopy results at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kooten, R.; /Indiana U.

    2010-01-01

    The Tevatron at Fermilab continues to collect data at high luminosity resulting in datasets in excess of 6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The high collision energies allow for the observation of new heavy quark baryon states not currently accessible at any other facility. In addition to the ground state {Lambda}{sub b}, the spectroscopy and properties of the new heavy baryon states {Omega}{sub b}, {Xi}{sub b}, and {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*)} as measured by the CDF and D0 Collaborations are presented.

  12. STAR: Recent Results and Future Physics Program

    E-print Network

    Olga Barannikova; for the STAR Collaboration

    2009-01-05

    Two major advantages of the STAR detector - uniform azimuthal acceptance complementing extended pseudo-rapidity coverage, and the ability to identify a wide variety of the hadron species in almost all kinematic ranges - have allowed us to address successfully a set of key physics topics at RHIC. We report here selected recent results from the STAR experiment, including insights on system size effects on medium properties, hadronization mechanisms, and partonic energy loss from triggered and non-triggered probes. In conclusion, we present an outlook on the STAR new physics program in upcoming years.

  13. First Results from the SUNRISE Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Danilovic, S.; Feller, A.; Gandorfer, A.; Hirzberger, J.; Jafarzadeh, S.; Lagg, A.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Schüssler, M.; Wiegelmann, T.; Bonet, J. A.; González, M. J. M.; Pillet, V. M.; Khomenko, E.; Yelles Chaouche, L.; Iniesta, J. C. d. T.; Domingo, V.; Palacios, J.; Knölker, M.; González, N. B.; Borrero, J. M.; Berkefeld, T.; Franz, M.; Roth, M.; Schmidt, W.; Steiner, O.; Title, A. M.

    2012-05-01

    The SUNRISE balloon-borne solar observatory consists of a 1m aperture Gregory telescope, a UV filter imager, an imaging vector polarimeter, an image stabilization system, and further infrastructure. The first science flight of SUNRISE yielded high-quality data that reveal the structure, dynamics, and evolution of solar convection, oscillations, and magnetic fields at a resolution of around 100 km in the quiet Sun. Here we describe very briefly the mission and the first results obtained from the SUNRISE data, which include a number of discoveries.

  14. Enhancing Results of Microarray Hybridizations Through Microagitation

    PubMed Central

    Toegl, Andreas; Kirchner, Roland; Gauer, Christoph; Wixforth, Achim

    2003-01-01

    Protein and DNA microarrays have become a standard tool in proteomics/genomics research. In order to guarantee fast and reproducible hybridization results, the diffusion limit must be overcome. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) micro-agitation chips efficiently agitate the smallest sample volumes (down to 10 ?L and below) without introducing any dead volume. The advantages are reduced reaction time, increased signal-to-noise ratio, improved homogeneity across the microarray, and better slide-to-slide reproducibility. The SAW micromixer chips are the heart of the Advalytix ArrayBooster, which is compatible with all microarrays based on the microscope slide format. PMID:13678150

  15. Medical Radioisotope Data Survey: 2002 Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Siciliano, Edward R.

    2004-06-23

    A limited, but accurate amount of detailed information about the radioactive isotopes used in the U.S. for medical procedures was collected from a local hospital and from a recent report on the U.S. Radiopharmaceutical Markets. These data included the total number of procedures, the specific types of procedures, the specific radioisotopes used in these procedures, and the dosage administered per procedure. The information from these sources was compiled, assessed, pruned, and then merged into a single, comprehensive and consistent set of results presented in this report. (PIET-43471-TM-197)

  16. Electroweak physics results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1996-11-01

    An overview of recent electroweak physics results from the Tevatron is given. Properties of the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons using final states containing electrons and muons based on large integrated luminosities are presented. In particular, measurements of the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} production cross sections, the W-charge asymmetry and the measurement of the W-mass are summarized. Gauge boson self interactions are measured by studying gauge boson pair production and Emits on anomalous gauge boson couplings are discussed.

  17. Direct CP Violation - Recent Results from Babar

    E-print Network

    A. Satpathy

    2004-09-28

    Measurements of the CKM parameter $\\sin(2 \\beta)$ have established $CP$ violation in the $B^0$ meson system arising from the interference between mixing and decay. However, direct CP violation, arising from the interference among different terms in the decay amplitude, had not been observed so far. We report a first observation of direct CP violation in $B^{0} \\to K^{+} \\pi^{-}$ decays with the BaBar detector. Other selected results based on the search for direct CP violation in several other B decays are also presented.

  18. Recent Results of the Opera Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupilli, F.

    2014-06-01

    The OPERA experiment aims at the direct confirmation of the leading oscillation mechanism in the atmospheric sector looking for the appearance of ?? in an almost pure ?? beam (the CERN CNGS beam). In five years of physics run the experiment collected 17.97 × 1019 p.o.t. The detection of ?S produced in ?? CC interactions and of their decays is accomplished exploiting the high spatial resolution of nuclear emulsions. Furthermore OPERA has good capabilities in detecting electron neutrino interactions, setting limits on the ?? ? ?? oscillation channel. In this talk the status of the analysis will be presented together with updated results on both oscillation channels.

  19. Recent Results from the OPERA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchesneau, D.

    The OPERA experiment has been designed to perform the first detection of neutrino oscillations in the ?? ? ?? channel in direct appearance mode, through the event by event detection of the tau lepton produced in ?? charged current interactions. OPERA is a hybrid detector, made of emulsion/lead target elements and of electronic detectors, placed in the CNGS muon neutrino beam from CERN to Gran Sasso, 730 km away from the source. Neutrino interactions from the CNGS neutrino runs were recorded from 2008 until the end of 2012. We report on the data sample analysed so far and give the latest OPERA results on ?? ? ?? and ?? ? ?e oscillation searches.

  20. Description and charging results from the RSPM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizera, P. F.; Schnauss, E. R.; Vandre, R.; Mullen, E. G.

    1979-01-01

    Representative satellite materials, to be flown on STP-78-2 in 1979 on the SSPM instruments, were included as part of the AFGL Rocket payload flown from White Sands Missile Range on January 21, 1978. Potentials as high as + 1100 volts on the conductor and + or - 400 volts on the insulator were recorded by the RSPM near the minimum in the electron density vs altitude profile. In addition to the charging potentials measured during ion gun operation, sample charging currents also were recorded with time resolutions near 30 milliseconds. These results demonstrate the validity of the experiment concept of the SSPM on SCATHA.

  1. New results from the KIMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. K.; KIMS Collaboration

    2008-07-01

    The Korea Invisible Mass Search (KIMS) collaboration has performed experiments on dark matter searches and double beta decay searches at the Yangyang underground laboratory. Recent results of KIMS as well as the status of the R&D on various detectors are presented. For the WIMP search KIMS ruled out the recoil of 127I of DAMA signal region unambiguously and set the most stringent limit on spin dependent WIMP interactions in the case of pure proton coupling. New limits on neutrino-less double beta decays of 112Sn, 124Sn, 64Zn is also reported.

  2. Microwave concrete decontamination - Phase II results

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.; Foster, D. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    This report documents the results of the second phase of a four-phase development program to develop a system to decontaminate concrete using microwave energy. In the first phase of the program the feasibility of using microwaves to remove concrete surfaces was demonstrated. In the first phase experiments, concrete slabs were placed on a translator and moved beneath a stationery microwave system. The second phase demonstrated the ability to mobilize the technology to remove the surfaces from concrete floors. Phases III and IV will further develop the technology to be remotely operated and capable of removing concrete from floors as well as from vertical surfaces.

  3. Initial Results from the MAVEN IUVS Echelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, J.

    2015-10-01

    This presentation will give the present status and early results of the echelle channel in the IUVS instrument on the MAVEN spacecraft at Mars. The channel studies H, D, and O in the upper atmosphere of Mars at high spectral resolution (0.008 nm). One primary goal is to study the ratio of D/H in the martian upper atmosphere, and determine the underlying principles that control the escape of H and D into space, with relevance to the historic escape of water from Mars. Initial data indicate that the echelle channel is working well, and we detected the D emission in the first observation of the sunlit disc of Mars.

  4. Overview of LHC physics results at ICHEP

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-25

     This month LHC physics day will review the physics results presented by the LHC experiments at the 2010 ICHEP in Paris. The experimental presentations will be preceeded by the bi-weekly LHC accelerator status report.The meeting will be broadcast via EVO (detailed info will appear at the time of the meeting in the "Video Services" item on the left menu bar)For those attending, information on accommodation, access to CERN and laptop registration is available from http://cern.ch/lpcc/visits

  5. Numerical taxonomy on data: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.; Farach, M.

    1997-12-01

    The numerical taxonomy problems associated with most of the optimization criteria described above are NP - hard [3, 5, 1, 4]. In, the first positive result for numerical taxonomy was presented. They showed that if e is the distance to the closest tree metric under the L{sub {infinity}} norm. i.e., e = min{sub T} [L{sub {infinity}} (T-D)], then it is possible to construct a tree T such that L{sub {infinity}} (T-D) {le} 3e, that is, they gave a 3-approximation algorithm for this problem. We will refer to this algorithm as the Single Pivot (SP) heuristic.

  6. Landsat/4/Global Positioning System navigation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heuberger, H.; Church, L.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental GPSPAC flown on the Landsat-4 spacecraft was the first spaceborne navigation system to use the NAVSTAR Global Position System (GPS). In order to validate the accuracy and reliability of GPSPAC orbit solutions, definitive Landsat-4 ephemerides, derived from ground based tracking data, were generated and compared with GPSPAC estimates. In addition, Landsat-4 orbital solutions were reconstructed from raw GPS measurement data with a GPSPAC navigation simulator program using different Kalman filter constants. Ephemeris comparisons and simulator results are presented, as well as recommendations for the navigation filter.

  7. Overview of LHC physics results at ICHEP

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

     This month LHC physics day will review the physics results presented by the LHC experiments at the 2010 ICHEP in Paris. The experimental presentations will be preceeded by the bi-weekly LHC accelerator status report.The meeting will be broadcast via EVO (detailed info will appear at the time of the meeting in the "Video Services" item on the left menu bar)For those attending, information on accommodation, access to CERN and laptop registration is available from http://cern.ch/lpcc/visits

  8. Results of thirteen direct heat applications projects

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, F.W.

    1984-08-01

    The application of geothermal applications is being aided by twenty-three field-experiment projects. The projects provide a current experience base against which the private and municipal sectors can evaluate potential projects and on which they can base their project plans. The results of thirteen of these projects are presented with emphasis on: energy replaced, economic payback, system designs, and resource assessment and development. The thirteen projects currently replace about 58,000 barrels of oil per year and avoid an imported oil cost of $1.7 million/year. They have a future potential of 84,000 barrels/year and $2.5 million/year.

  9. Pattern preserving deposition: Experimental results and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castez, Marcos F.; Fonticelli, Mariano H.; Azzaroni, Omar; Salvarezza, Roberto C.; Solari, Hernán G.

    2005-09-01

    In this work we discuss pattern-preserving growth during metal deposition from the vapor on micro/nano-structured metal substrates. Experimental results for Cu deposition on patterned Cu substrates show pattern preserving growth or pattern destruction depending on the incident angle. We introduce a mesoscopic 1+1 dimensional model including deposition flow (directed and isotropic), surface diffusion and shadowing effects that account for the experimental growth data. Moreover, simulations on post-deposition annealing, for high aspect-ratio patterns show departures from the predictions of the linear theory for surface diffusion.

  10. ANTARES deep sea neutrino telescope results

    SciTech Connect

    Mangano, Salvatore; Collaboration: ANTARES Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ANTARES experiment is currently the largest underwater neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere. It is taking high quality data since 2007. Its main scientific goal is to search for high energy neutrinos that are expected from the acceleration of cosmic rays from astrophysical sources. This contribution reviews the status of the detector and presents several analyses carried out on atmospheric muons and neutrinos. For example it shows the results from the measurement of atmospheric muon neutrino spectrum and of atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters as well as searches for neutrinos from steady cosmic point-like sources, for neutrinos from gamma ray bursts and for relativistic magnetic monopoles.

  11. Heavy baryons - Recent and very new results

    SciTech Connect

    Peter S Cooper

    2003-01-15

    Recent results on observations, properties and decay modes of the charmed and beauty baryons will be reviewed. Candidates for several new high mass states which include a cleanly-identified daughter {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryon are seen in data from the SELEX experiment at Fermilab. These states are candidates for doubly-charmed baryons: a {Xi}{sub cc}{sup ++} state and a {Xi}{sub cc}{sup +} state. These candidates are more than 5{sigma} signals in each case at masses of 3520 and 3460 MeV respectively.

  12. The high current experiment: First results

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, Peter A.; Baca, D.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Faltens, A.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Prost, L.R.; Waldron, W.L.

    2002-05-26

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) is being assembled at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as part of the US program to explore heavy-ion beam transport at a scale representative of the low-energy end of an induction linac driver for fusion energy production. The primary mission of this experiment is to investigate aperture fill factors acceptable for the transport of space-charge dominated heavy-ion beams at high spacecharge intensity (line-charge density {approx} 0.2 {micro}C/m) over long pulse durations (>4 {micro}s). This machine will test transport issues at a driver-relevant scale resulting from nonlinear space-charge effects and collective modes, beam centroid alignment and beam steering, matching, image charges, halo, lost-particle induced electron effects, and longitudinal bunch control. We present the first experimental results carried out with the coasting K{sup +} ion beam transported through the first 10 electrostatic transport quadrupoles and associated diagnostics. Later phases of the experiment will include more electrostatic lattice periods to allow more sensitive tests of emittance growth, and also magnetic quadrupoles to explore similar issues in magnetic channels with a full driver scale beam.

  13. Results of LWR snubber aging research

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D P; Werry, E V; Blahnik, D E

    1992-05-01

    This report describes the aging research results and recommendations for snubbers used in commercial nuclear power plants. Snubbers are safety-related devices used to restrain undesirable dynamic loads at various piping and equipment locations in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Each snubber must accommodate a plant's normal thermal movements and must be capable of restraining the maximum off-normal dynamic loads, such as a seismic event or a transient, postulated for its specific location. The effects of snubber aging and the factors that contribute to the degradation of their safety performance need to be better understood. Thus, Phase II of Nuclear Plant Aging Research was conducted to enhance the understanding of snubber aging and its consequences. Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff and their subcontractors, Lake Engineering and Wyle Laboratories, visited eight sites (encompassing thirteen plants) to conduct interviews with NPP staff and to collect data on snubber aging, testing, and maintenance. The Phase II research methodology, evaluation, results, conclusions, and recommendations are described in the report. Effective methods for service-life monitoring of snubbers are included in the recommendations.

  14. Recent results of the SHIMMER mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, Christoph R.; Stevens, Michael; Siskind, David; Harlander, John; Roesler, Frederick

    The Spatial Heterodyne Imager for Mesospheric Radicals (SHIMMER) on STPSat-1 is a high resolution, UV, mesospheric limb sounder that uses the innovative optical technique of Spatial Heterodyne Spectroscopy (SHS). For extended sources, SHS enables significant size and weight savings when compared to conventional grating spectrographs with similar spectral resolution and sensitivity. SHIMMER images the limb near 309nm with a spectral resolution of 250m?, A observing the OH A2 ?+ -X2 ?(0,0) band and polar mesospheric clouds (PMC). SHIMMER data covers 2.5 years starting in April 2007. The low inclination orbit and seasonal yaw cycle allow SHIMMER to measure up to about 58° latitude in the summer hemisphere and up to about 12° in the winter hemisphere. The orbit precesses approximately 30 minutes per day, thus diurnal variations in the OH abundance and PMCs can be investigated. In this presentation we show the latest SHIMMER PMC results and we make an extensive comparison of SHIMMER OH profiles with coincident Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) data for different latitudes, local times, and seasons. We will also compare the SHIMMER OH results with measurements taken by the Middle Atmosphere High Resolution Spectrograph Investigation (MAHRSI) in 1997. In particular, we will discuss the previously reported mesospheric OH model excess and what impact the new SHIMMER data-set has on this problem.

  15. Traumatic panhypopituitarism resulting in acute adrenal crisis.

    PubMed

    Ham, Phillip Benson; Cunningham, Aaron Joseph; Mentzer, Caleb James; Ahmad, Anbar; Young, Lester S; Abuzeid, Adel M

    2015-09-01

    Pituitary function plays an integral role in the physiologic response to traumatic injury. A significant proportion of trauma patients develop partial pituitary insufficiency. While isolated deficiencies of individual pituitary hormones are common, there are few reports in the literature of traumatic pan-pituitary failure with deficiency of all major pituitary hormones. We present a case of a patient involved in a motorcycle accident who sustained a sella turcica fracture, epidural hemorrhage, subdural hemorrhage, optic nerve palsy, and bilateral abducens nerve palsies. Three days after the accident, the patient became hypotensive and progressed to cardiopulmonary arrest. He was resuscitated and had spontaneous return of circulation. Despite adequate fluid resuscitation and vasopressor support, he remained profoundly hypotensive. Following administration of hydrocortisone, his blood pressures dramatically improved. He was found to have laboratory abnormalities, suggesting deficiencies of corticotropins, somatotropins, thyrotropins, gonadotropins, prolactin, and antidiuretic hormone. This is the first reported case of a patient with traumatic total panhypopituitarism complicated by acute adrenal crises during initial postinjury hospitalization. A review of the literature with comparison with other studies of trauma patients with deficiencies in five or more axes is presented. A high level of suspicion for central adrenal insufficiency and prompt administration of corticosteroids in the setting of symptomatic pituitary trauma can result in favorable outcomes. Screening for and treating posttraumatic hypopituitarism can result in improved rehabilitation and increased quality of life for trauma patients. PMID:26307884

  16. Conformal Partial Waves: Further Mathematical Results

    E-print Network

    F. A. Dolan; H. Osborn

    2012-02-29

    Further results for conformal partial waves for four point functions for conformal primary scalar fields in conformally invariant theories are obtained. They are defined as eigenfunctions of the differential Casimir operators for the conformal group acting on two variable functions subject to appropriate boundary conditions. As well as the scale dimension $\\Delta$ and spin $\\ell$ the conformal partial waves depend on two parameters $a,b$ related to the dimensions of the operators in the four point function. Expressions for the Mellin transform of conformal partial waves are obtained in terms of polynomials of the Mellin transform variables given in terms of finite sums. Differential operators which change $a,b$ by $\\pm 1$, shift the dimension $d$ by $\\pm 2$ and also change $\\Delta,\\ell$ are found. Previous results for $d=2,4,6$ are recovered. The trivial case of $d=1$ and also $d=3$ are also discussed. For $d=3$ formulae for the conformal partial waves in some restricted cases as a single variable integral representation based on the Bateman transform are found.

  17. Charm hadroproduction results from Fermilab E-400

    SciTech Connect

    Coteus, P.; Binkley, M.; Bossi, F.; Butler, J.; Cumalat, J.P.; DiCorato, M.; Diesburg, M.; Enagonio, J.; Filaseta, J.; Frabetti, P.L.

    1987-09-01

    Results are presented from Fermilab E-400 on the production of charmed baryons and mesons at a mean energy of 640 GeV. We show evidence for the charm-strange baryon, ..xi../sub c//sup +/, and present our measurements of its mass, width, lifetime, cross section and relative branching fractions, and the A, x/sub f/, p/sub t/, and particle/antiparticle dependence of the state. We show evidence for both the ..sigma../sub c//sup 2 +/ and ..sigma../sub c//sup 0/, and present measurements of three mass differences, ..sigma../sub c//sup 2 +/ - ..sigma../sub c//sup 0/, ..sigma../sub c//sup 0/ - ..lambda../sub c//sup +/, and ..sigma../sub c//sup 2 +/ - ..lambda../sub c//sup +/. Measurements of the A dependence and particle/antiparticle ratios for ..sigma../sub c/ production are also presented. We show preliminary results on the ratio of two decay modes of the D/sup 0/, D/sup 0/ ..-->.. K/sup +/K/sup -/ and D/sup 0/ ..-->.. K/sub 0/anti K/sub 0/. The latter mode has not been previously observed. 8 refs., 10 figs.

  18. Full length prototype SSC dipole test results

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, J.; Brown, B.C.; Carson, J.; Engler, N.; Fisk, H.E.; Hanft, R.; Koepke, K.; Kuchnir, M.; Larson, E.; Lundy, R.

    1987-04-24

    Results are presented from tests of the first full length prototype SSC dipole magnet. The cryogenic behavior of the magnet during a slow cooldown to 4.5K and a slow warmup to room temperature has been measured. Magnetic field quality was measured at currents up to 2000 A. Averaged over the body field all harmonics with the exception of b/sub 2/ and b/sub 8/ are at or within the tolerances specified by the SSC Central Design Group. (The values of b/sub 2/ and b/sub 8/ result from known design and construction defects which will be be corrected in later magnets.) Using an NMR probe the average body field strength is measured to be 10.283 G/A with point to point variations on the order of one part in 1000. Data are presented on quench behavior of the magnet up to 3500 A (approximately 55% of full field) including longitudinal and transverse velocities for the first 250 msec of the quench.

  19. Planck 2013 results. XIV. Zodiacal emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colley, J.-M.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; O'Sullivan, C.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polegre, A. M.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Smoot, G. F.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Planck satellite provides a set of all-sky maps at nine frequencies from 30 GHz to 857 GHz. Planets, minor bodies, and diffuse interplanetary dust emission (IPD) are all observed. The IPD can be separated from Galactic and other emissions because Planck views a given point on the celestial sphere multiple times, through different columns of IPD. We use the Planck data to investigate the behaviour of zodiacal emission over the whole sky at sub-millimetre and millimetre wavelengths. We fit the Planck data to find the emissivities of the various components of the COBE zodiacal model - a diffuse cloud, three asteroidal dust bands, a circumsolar ring, and an Earth-trailing feature. The emissivity of the diffuse cloud decreases with increasing wavelength, as expected from earlier analyses. The emissivities of the dust bands, however, decrease less rapidly, indicating that the properties of the grains in the bands are different from those in the diffuse cloud. We fit the small amount of Galactic emission seen through the telescope's far sidelobes, and place limits on possible contamination of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) results from both zodiacal and far-sidelobe emission. When necessary, the results are used in the Planck pipeline to make maps with zodiacal emission and far sidelobes removed. We show that the zodiacal correction to the CMB maps is small compared to the Planck CMB temperature power spectrum and give a list of flux densities for small solar system bodies.

  20. Results from the GPCP algorithm intercomparison programme

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, E.E.; Manton, M.J.; Arkin, P.A.

    1996-12-01

    Three algorithm intercomparison experiments have recently been conducted as part of the Global Precipitation Climatology Project with the goal of (a) assessing the skill of current satellite rainfall algorithms, (b) understanding the differences between them, and (c) moving toward improved algorithms. The results of these experiments are summarized and intercompared in this paper. It was found that the skill of satellite rainfall algorithms depends on the regime being analyzed, with algorithms producing very good results in the tropical western Pacific and over Japan and its surrounding waters during summer, but relatively poor rainfall estimates over western Europe during late winter. Monthly rainfall was estimated most accurately by algorithms using geostationary infrared data, but algorithms using polar data [Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I)] were also able to produce good monthly rainfall estimates when data from two satellites were available. In most cases, SSM/I algorithms showed significantly greater skill than IR-based algorithms in estimating instantaneous rain rates. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. The string of variable density: Further results

    SciTech Connect

    Amore, Paolo

    2011-09-15

    We analyze the problem of calculating the solutions and the spectrum of a string with arbitrary density and fixed ends. We build a perturbative scheme which uses a basis of WKB-type functions and obtain explicit expressions for the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the string. Using this approach we show that it is possible to derive the asymptotic (high energy) behavior of the string, obtaining explicit expressions for the first three coefficients (the first two can also be obtained with the WKB method). Finally, using an iterative approach we also obtain analytical expressions for the low energy behavior of the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of a string with rapidly oscillating density, recovering (in a simpler way) results in the literature. - Highlights: > We devise a perturbative approach to finding the modes of a string with arbitrary density. > We obtain explicitly the first three coefficients of the asymptotic high energy expansion. > We apply our findings to a series of examples, obtaining both analytical and numerical results.

  2. New Results in Black Hole Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, Bernard F.

    Brief statements are given on recent results in the following areas: 1) The derivation of a variational (maximum) principle for black hole entropy, and an outline of the physically reasonable properties of the related solution for the density of states in the microcanonical equilibrium ensemble (with Jeffrey Melmed, University of Maine). 2) Analysis of topological contributions to black hole entropy in Lovelock gravity, and the corresponding thermodynamic identity (with Jonathan Z. Simon, University of Maryland). 3) Stability analysis for a shell of matter surrounding a black hole in microcanonical (thermal) equilibrium (with Gerald Horwitz, Hebrew University, Jerusalem)—results from this work can be compared with an earlier analysis of the purely mechanical stability of the shell, and with known properties of both the dynamical and thermal stability for the black hole without a shell. 4) The study of a simple ‘singularity'-free model of gravitational collapse, and an examination of the relationship between the ensuing preservation of quantum coherence and the usual perception that mixed states should be associated with the late time emission of Hawking radiation from a classically formed black hole (with Gerard ’t Hooft and Chris Stephens, University of Utrecht).

  3. AES Water Architecture Study Interim Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The mission of the Advanced Exploration System (AES) Water Recovery Project (WRP) is to develop advanced water recovery systems in order to enable NASA human exploration missions beyond low earth orbit (LEO). The primary objective of the AES WRP is to develop water recovery technologies critical to near term missions beyond LEO. The secondary objective is to continue to advance mid-readiness level technologies to support future NASA missions. An effort is being undertaken to establish the architecture for the AES Water Recovery System (WRS) that meets both near and long term objectives. The resultant architecture will be used to guide future technical planning, establish a baseline development roadmap for technology infusion, and establish baseline assumptions for integrated ground and on-orbit environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) definition. This study is being performed in three phases. Phase I of this study established the scope of the study through definition of the mission requirements and constraints, as well as indentifying all possible WRS configurations that meet the mission requirements. Phase II of this study focused on the near term space exploration objectives by establishing an ISS-derived reference schematic for long-duration (>180 day) in-space habitation. Phase III will focus on the long term space exploration objectives, trading the viable WRS configurations identified in Phase I to identify the ideal exploration WRS. The results of Phases I and II are discussed in this paper.

  4. Soft physics results from the PHENIX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esumi, ShinIchi

    2015-03-01

    High-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC-BNL and LHC-CERN provide a unique opportunity to study the properties of the high-temperature and high-density nuclear matter called the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), which is supposed to exist in the early universe or inside neutron stars. The PHENIX experiment is one of the major experiments at RHIC to study the properties of QGP, especially focusing on various particle identification capabilities including photons, leptons, and hadrons. This article summarizes the soft physics results from the PHENIX experiment, such as (1) global properties like transverse energy and multiplicity measurements as well as centrality determination, (2) transverse momentum distribution and the nuclear modification factor, which represents the modification of the spectra in A+A collisions relative to the binary-collision-scaled superposition of p+p data, (3) space-time properties with Hanbury Brown and Twiss (HBT) interferometry correlation measurement and source imaging, (4) elliptic collective expansion and higher-order harmonic event anisotropy, and (5) di-hadron correlation, jet modification, and medium response known as jet-quenching from the partonic energy loss and redistribution of the lost energy. These results are reviewed and discussed.

  5. Experimental results for absolute cylindrical wavefront testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, Patrick J.; Alatawi, Ayshah

    2014-09-01

    Applications for Cylindrical and near-cylindrical surfaces are ever-increasing. However, fabrication of high quality cylindrical surfaces is limited by the difficulty of accurate and affordable metrology. Absolute testing of such surfaces represents a challenge to the optical testing community as cylindrical reference wavefronts are difficult to produce. In this paper, preliminary results for a new method of absolute testing of cylindrical wavefronts are presented. The method is based on the merging of the random ball test method with the fiber optic reference test. The random ball test assumes a large number of interferograms of a good quality sphere with errors that are statistically distributed such that the average of the errors goes to zero. The fiber optic reference test utilizes a specially processed optical fiber to provide a clean high quality reference wave from an incident line focus from the cylindrical wave under test. By taking measurements at different rotation and translations of the fiber, an analogous procedure can be employed to determine the quality of the converging cylindrical wavefront with high accuracy. This paper presents and discusses the results of recent tests of this method using a null optic formed by a COTS cylindrical lens and a free-form polished corrector element.

  6. New results on mesons containing strange quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; D'Amore, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Endorf, R.; Fujii, K.; Hayashii, H.; Iwata, S.

    1987-01-01

    Recent results of strange and strangeonium mesons are presented. The data come from a high sensitivity study (4.1 ev/nb) of K/sup -/p interactions at 11 GeV/c using the LASS spectrometer at SLAC. The complete leading orbitally-excited K* series up through J/sup P/ = 5/sup -/ and a substantial number of the expected underlying states are observed decaying into K/sup -/..pi../sup +/, anti K/sub 3//sup 0/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/, and K eta final states, and new measurements are made of their masses, widths, and branching ratios. Production of strangeonium states via hypercharge exchange is observed into K/sub 3//sup 0/K/sub 3//sup 0/, K/sup -/K/sup +/, and K/sub 3//sup 0/K/sup + -/..pi../sup - +/ final states. The leading orbitally-excited phi series through J/sup P/ = 3/sup -/ is clearly seen and evidence is presented for additional high spin structure in the 2.2 GeV/c/sup 2/ region. No f/sub 2/(1720) is observed. The K/sub 3//sup 0/K/sup + -/..pi../sup - +/ spectrum is dominated by 1/sup +/(K* anti K + anti K* K) production in the region below 1.6 GeV/c/sup 2/. These results are compared with data on the same systems produced by different production mechanisms. 12 refs., 28 figs.

  7. Results on Tau Physics from BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Torrence, E.

    2004-10-29

    Recent results on tau physics from BABAR are reviewed. Limits on lepton-flavor violation in the tau decay process {tau}{sup -} {yields} {ell}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} are presented based on 91.6 fb{sup -1} of data. In all six decay modes considered, the numbers of events found in data are compatible with the background expectations, and upper limits on the branching fractions are set in the range (1-3) x 10{sup -7} at 90% CL. A preliminary measurement of the .ve prong branching fraction based on 110.7 fb{sup -1} of data is presented with the result {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -}2h{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (8.52 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.40) x 10{sup -4} . A preliminary measurement of the tau lifetime based on 30 fb{sup -1} of data is presented where a lifetime of 290.8 {+-} 1.5 {+-} 1.6 fs is measured.

  8. [Occupational microclimate. Results and prospects of research].

    PubMed

    Afanas'eva, R F; Bessonova, N A; Burmistrova, O V; Burmistrov, V M; Losik, T K

    2013-01-01

    The article covers results of studies conducted over last 15 years and aimed to elaboration of requirements to integral parameters of microclimate at workplace, its evaluation and regulation, prophylactic measures against body overcooling and overheating. The authors present methods to evaluate combined effects of physical factors (noise, vibration, microclimate) and to assess microclimate with consideration of factors determining body thermal load (energy expenditure, duration of stay at workplace, heat insulation of clothes and thermo-physical parameters of its materials). Mathematic models of forecasting cold and heat stress are presented, as well as requirements to heat insulation for individual protective means against cold and methods to calculate it. Regimens of work in heating and cooling conditions are specified. The authors set directions for further studies to define regulation requirements to microclimate on basis of studied patterns of body heat state formation, its evaluation criteria, epidemiologic studies results, specified prophylactic measures against overheating and overcooling with consideration of adaptation, sex, thermo-physical characteristics of individual protective means (special clothes, footwear, gauntlets, headwear). PMID:23986949

  9. Envisat Altimetry Geophysical Algorithms Verification Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milagro-Perez, M. P.; Zanife, O. Z.; Baker, S.; Benveniste, J.

    ENVISAT is ESA's largest environmental remote sensing satellite to be launched on 1st March 2002. The Altimetry mission includes an advanced Radar Altimeter 2 (RA- 2), designed to guarantee the continuity of observations started by its predecessors (ERS-1 and ERS-2), the Microwave Radiometer (MWR), the positioning instrument DORIS and the laser retro reflector (LRR). This set of instruments will allow to mon- itor the long term evolution of glaciological and oceanographic parameters, such as sea state, ocean circulation forecasting or ice sheet mass balance, that play a key role in climate changes. The Commissioning Phase, lasting 6 months after the ENVISAT launch, is dedicated, among others, to the verification of all the ground processing algorithms and to the validation of the output products, the Geophysical Data Records for distribution to users. Details of the objectives, strategy and methodology of the geophysical algo- rithms verification for the Near Real Time and Off-line operational processors and of the user products validation during this period will be presented. For each geophysical algorithm, the verification strategy, including data requirements, output (plots/maps of the relevant parameters), interfaces and expected results will be described. The prod- ucts validation strategy, i.e. evaluation of the data quality by checking the internal consistency of the products, will be depicted as well. Particularly of interest to the scientific user community, the early results obtained dur- ing the initial part of the Commissioning Phase, from the near real time user products will be shown.

  10. West Cameroon Quaternary lacustrine deposits: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maley, J.; Livingstone, D. A.; Giresse, P.; Brenac, P.; Kling, G.; Stager, C.; Thouveny, N.; Kelts, K.; Haag, M.; Fournier, M.; Bandet, Y.; Williamson, D.; Zogning, A.

    We present preliminary results from the study of a 23.50 m core (BM-6) representing the last 25 000 years. The core was collected in Barombi Mbo, an explosion crater lake formed probably during the Quaternary. The finely laminated sediment are composed mostly of dark brown to green clay rich organic matter (5-10% organic carbon). Each couplet is commonly composed of a lower unit rich in quartz, plant debris, muscovite and sponge spicules, and of a more clayey upper unit often with siderite (FeCO 3) crystals. The average periodicity for one couplet is between 6 and 20 radiocarbon years. The pollen results, which are compared with those of another forested site in Ghana, demonstrate the presence of a forest refuge in West Cameroon during the last major arid period, about 18 000 years BP. At the same time that equatorial forest was broken up, elements of montain vegetation descended to the lowlands. To provide an explanation for these phenomena marked by a drying and cooling of the climate, modern examples of extensions of montain biotopes to low altitude are described. These localized extensions are due to the persistence of cloud cover, often of stratiform type, generated over the relatively cold water of ocean upwellings. Such lowering of sea-surface temperature might be the primary regional cause of the changes of climate and vegetation that occurred in humid tropical Africa. The upwelling, presently synchronous throughout the Guinea Gulf, amplify the trade winds, which could account for the observed changes inland.

  11. Radiation exposure of LDEF: Initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.; Csige, I.; Parnell, T. A.; Watts, John W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Initial results from Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) include radiation detector measurements from four experiments; P0006, P0004, M0004, and A0015. The detectors were located on both the leading and trailing edges of the orbiter and also at the Earthside end. This allowed the directional dependence of the incoming radiation to be measured. Total absorbed doses from thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) verified the predicted spatial east-west dose dependence of a factor of approx. 2.5, due to trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). On the trailing edge of the orbiter, a range of doses from 664 to 291 rad were measured under nominal shielding of 0.42 to 8.45 g/sq cm. A second set of detectors near this locations results are also given. On the leading edge, doses of 258 to 210 rad were found under shielding of 1.25 to 2.48 g/sq cm. Initial charged particle LET (linear energy transfer) spectra, fluxes, doses, and dose equivalents, for LET in H2O greater than or = 5 keV/micron, were measured with plastic nuclear track detectors located in the four experiments. Also, preliminary data on low energy neutrons were obtained from detectors containing (6)LiF foils.

  12. Fuel-rich, catalytic reaction experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollbuhler, R. James

    1991-01-01

    Future aeropropulsion gas turbine combustion requirements call for operating at very high inlet temperatures, pressures, and large temperature rises. At the same time, the combustion process is to have minimum pollution effects on the environment. Aircraft gas turbine engines utilize liquid hydrocarbon fuels which are difficult to uniformly atomize and mix with combustion air. An approach for minimizing fuel related problems is to transform the liquid fuel into gaseous form prior to the completion of the combustion process. Experimentally obtained results are presented for vaporizing and partially oxidizing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel into burnable gaseous components. The presented experimental data show that 1200 to 1300 K reaction product gas, rich in hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and light-end hydrocarbons, is formed when flowing 0.3 to 0.6 fuel to air mixes through a catalyst reactor. The reaction temperatures are kept low enough that nitrogen oxides and carbon particles (soot) do not form. Results are reported for tests using different catalyst types and configurations, mass flowrates, input temperatures, and fuel to air ratios.

  13. 2007 NWFSC Tidal Freshwater Genetics Results

    SciTech Connect

    David Teel

    2008-03-18

    Genetic Analysis of Juvenile Chinook Salmon for inclusion in 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, lower Columbia River, 2007. Final report submitted to the Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-AC05-76RLO1830.' Genotypic data were collected for 108 Chinook salmon and used in the genetic stock identification analysis. Results of the mixture analysis are presented in Table 1. Percentage estimates for four genetic stock groups (West Cascade Tributary Fall, Willamette River Spring, Deschutes River Fall, and Upper Columbia River Summer/Fall) ranged from 11% to 43%, all with non-zero lower 95% confidence intervals. Small contributions were also estimated for the West Cascade Tributary Spring (3%) and Snake River Fall (6%) stock groups. Results of individual fish probability assignments were summed by collection date (Figure 1) and site (Figure 2). Assignment probabilities for the most likely stock group for each individual ranged from 0.51 to 1.00 with approximately 60% of the assignments greater than 0.90 (data not shown). Nearly all of the low probability assignments were fish with assignments split between the Deschutes River Fall and Upper Columbia River Summer/Fall groups.

  14. Viking labeled release biology experiment: interim results.

    PubMed

    Levin, G V; Straat, P A

    1976-12-11

    This report summarizes all results of the labeled release life detection experiment conducted on Mars prior to conjunction. Tests at both landing sites provide remarkably similar evolution of radioactive gas upon addition of a radioactive nutrient to the Mars sample. The "active" agent in the Mars sample is stable to 18 degrees C, but is substantially inactivated by heat treatment for 3 hours at 50 degrees C and completely inactivated at 160 degrees C, as would be anticipated if the active response were caused by microorganisms. Results from test and heat-sterilized control Mars samples are compared to those obtained from terrestrial soils and from a lunar sample. Possible nonbiological explanations of the Mars data are reviewed along with plans for resolution of the Mars data. Although such explanations of the labeled release data depend on ultraviolet irradiation, the labeled release response does not appear to depend on recent direct ultraviolet activation of surface material. Available facts do not yet permit a conclusion regarding the existence of life on Mars. Plans for conclusion of the experiment are discussed. PMID:17797094

  15. Fast Solar Polarimeter: First Light Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnappa, N.; Feller, A.; Iglesia, F.; Solanki, S.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate measurements of magnetic fields on the Sun are crucial to understand various physical processes that take place in the solar atmosphere such as solar eruptions, coronal heating, solar wind acceleration, etc. The Fast Solar Polarimeter (FSP) is a new instrument that is being developed to probe magnetic fields on the Sun. One of the main goals of this polarimeter is to carry out high precision spectropolarimetric observations with spatial resolution close to the telescope diffraction limit. The polarimeter is based on pnCCD technology with split frame transfer and simultaneous multi-channel readout, resulting in frame rate upto 1 kHz. The FSP prototype instrument uses a small format pnCCD of 264x264 pixels which has been developed by PNSensor and by the semiconductor lab of the Max Planck Society. The polarization modulator is based on two ferro-electric liquid crystals (FLCs) interlaced between two static retarders. The first solar observations have been carried out with this prototype during May-June, 2013 at German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) on Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. Here we present the instrument performance assessments and the first results on the magnetic field measurements. Further, we briefly discuss about the next phase of FSP which will be a dual beam system with 1k x 1k CCDs.

  16. Photoemission from glass dust grains: First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouzak, Libor; Pechal, Radim; Pavlu, Jiri; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek

    2013-04-01

    Dust grains are widely present in both interstellar space as well as on numerous space objects like the Moon or asteroids. Quite often, the dust consists of large amount of SiO2. While every object in the space is exposed to impacting particles from the Sun (photons, electrons, and ions), the dust grains become charged. Interesting phenomena (e.g., Lunar horizon glow, dust fountains, and levitation) may appear as a consequence of different conditions at the light and dark lunar sides. Although they where observed already during Apollo and Surveyor missions, these effects are still not fully understood. We present laboratory measurements carried on the single SiO2 grain of micron size caught in the electrodynamic trap and exposed to UV and electron irradiations. Analyzing the dust motion (oscilation frequency and position), we can evaluate its specific charge. In this paper, we are comparing equilibrium charge-to-mass ratios given by a secondary electron emission induced by 400 eV electrons (about a maximum of the secondary emission) and by the UV-induced photoemission from the He I lamp (? 21 eV). Initial results indicate that the resulting charge is about twice larger for photoemission.

  17. The Medical Library Association Benchmarking Network: results*

    PubMed Central

    Dudden, Rosalind Farnam; Corcoran, Kate; Kaplan, Janice; Magouirk, Jeff; Rand, Debra C.; Smith, Bernie Todd

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article presents some limited results from the Medical Library Association (MLA) Benchmarking Network survey conducted in 2002. Other uses of the data are also presented. Methods: After several years of development and testing, a Web-based survey opened for data input in December 2001. Three hundred eighty-five MLA members entered data on the size of their institutions and the activities of their libraries. The data from 344 hospital libraries were edited and selected for reporting in aggregate tables and on an interactive site in the Members-Only area of MLANET. The data represent a 16% to 23% return rate and have a 95% confidence level. Results: Specific questions can be answered using the reports. The data can be used to review internal processes, perform outcomes benchmarking, retest a hypothesis, refute a previous survey findings, or develop library standards. The data can be used to compare to current surveys or look for trends by comparing the data to past surveys. Conclusions: The impact of this project on MLA will reach into areas of research and advocacy. The data will be useful in the everyday working of small health sciences libraries as well as provide concrete data on the current practices of health sciences libraries. PMID:16636703

  18. Intercomparison results for FIFE flux aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    MacPherson, J.I. ); Grossman, R.L. ); Kelly, R.D. )

    1992-11-30

    This work is part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), an international land-surface-atmosphere experiment aimed at improving the way climate models represent energy, water, heat, and carbon exchanges, and improving the utilization of satellite based remote sensing to monitor such parameters. The authors present analysis results from intercomparison flights of the three different aircraft which participated in the FIFE data collection program. These craft provided measurements of heat momentum, carbon dioxide, and water vapor fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer, but each was instrumented differently. Fourteen wing-to-wing formation intercomparison runs were conducted during FIFE. They showed good agreement of most parameters even though the craft were flown at not normal airspeeds for this intercomparison. There was good correspondence between the NCAR King Air and NRC Twin Otter over the full wavelength range of 10m to 50km. This data showed that the 15km flight legs of FIFE could give reliable flux data using unfiltered, detrended data. Disagreements in correlated data products were shown to often be the result of analysis techniques, not instrumentation.

  19. Results with the neutron scatter camera.

    SciTech Connect

    Krenz, Kevin D.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Brennan, James S.; Mrowka, Stanley; Marleau, Peter

    2008-10-01

    We describe the design, calibration, and measurements made with the neutron scatter camera. Neutron scatter camera design allows for the determination of the direction and energy of incident neutrons by measuring the position, recoil energy, and time-of-flight (TOF) between elastic scatters in two liquid scintillator cells. The detector response and sensitive energy range (0.5-10 MeV) has been determined by detailed calibrations using a {sup 252}Cf neutron source over its field of view (FOV). We present results from several recent deployments. In a laboratory study we detected a {sup 252}Cf neutron source at a stand off distance of 30 m. A hidden neutron source was detected inside a large ocean tanker. We measured the integral flux density, differential energy distribution and angular distribution of cosmic neutron background in the fission energy range 0.5-10 MeV at Alameda, CA (sea level), Livermore, CA (174 m), Albuquerque, NM (1615 m) and Fenton Hill, NM (2630 m). The neutron backgrounds are relatively low, and non-isotropic. The camera has been ruggedized, deployed to various locations and has performed various measurements successfully. Our results show fast neutron imaging could be a useful tool for the detection of special nuclear material (SNM).

  20. Last results from the WEBT and GASP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiteri, C. M.; Villata, M.

    Born in 1997, the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT) is a network of optical, near-infrared, and radio telescopes that in concert have the capability to obtain continuous, high-temporal- density monitoring of blazars during time-limited campaigns on specific objects. The GLAST-AGILE Support Program (GASP) was organized within the WEBT to provide optical-to-radio long-term continuous monitoring of a list of selected ? -ray-loud blazars during the operation of the AGILE and GLAST satellites. We present the results of the first GASP effort, targetting the BL Lac object 0716+714 in September November 2007, when the source was detected by AGILE. In October an outburst was detected simultaneously in the optical and radio bands. We also show some results of the last WEBT campaign on the quasar-type blazar 3C 454.3 in the 2007 2008 observing season. In this period 3C 454.3 was very active, showing pronounced opti- cal outbursts, and it was detected by AGILE in July and then in November December. Moreover, several noticeable episodes of very fast (i.e. intranight) variability were observed in the optical light curves.