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Sample records for pentoxide induces pulmonary

  1. Genetic susceptibility to interstitial pulmonary fibrosis in mice induced by vanadium pentoxide (V2O5)

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Dianne M.; White, Kevin M.; Patel, Ushma; Davis, Martin J.; Veluci-Marlow, Roberta M.; Bhupanapadu Sunkesula, Solomon Raju; Bonner, James C.; Martin, Jessica R.; Gladwell, Wes; Kleeberger, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) are characterized by injury, inflammation, and scarring of alveoli, leading to impaired function. The etiology of idiopathic forms of ILD is not understood, making them particularly difficult to study due to the lack of appropriate animal models. Consequently, few effective therapies have emerged. We developed an inbred mouse model of ILD using vanadium pentoxide (V2O5), the most common form of a transition metal found in cigarette smoke, fuel ash, mineral ores, and steel alloys. Pulmonary responses to V2O5, including dose-dependent increases in lung permeability, inflammation, collagen content, and dysfunction, were significantly greater in DBA/2J mice compared to C57BL/6J mice. Inflammatory and fibrotic responses persisted for 4 mo in DBA/2J mice, while limited responses in C57BL/6J mice resolved. We investigated the genetic basis for differential responses through genetic mapping of V2O5-induced lung collagen content in BXD recombinant inbred (RI) strains and identified significant linkage on chromosome 4 with candidate genes that associate with V2O5-induced collagen content across the RI strains. Results suggest that V2O5 may induce pulmonary fibrosis through mechanisms distinct from those in other models of pulmonary fibrosis. These findings should further advance our understanding of mechanisms involved in ILD and thereby aid in identification of new therapeutic targets.—Walters, D. M., White, K. M., Patel, U., Davis, M. J., Veluci-Marlow, R. M., Bhupanapadu Sunkesula, S. R., Bonner, J. C., Martin, J. R., Gladwell, W., Kleeberger, S. R. Genetic susceptibility to interstitial pulmonary fibrosis in mice induced by vanadium pentoxide (V2O5). PMID:24285090

  2. Vanadium pentoxide induces pulmonary inflammation and tumor promotion in a strain-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Elevated levels of air pollution are associated with increased risk of lung cancer. Particulate matter (PM) contains transition metals that may potentiate neoplastic development through the induction of oxidative stress and inflammation, a lung cancer risk factor. Vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) is a component of PM derived from fuel combustion as well as a source of occupational exposure in humans. In the current investigation we examined the influence of genetic background on susceptibility to V2O5-induced inflammation and evaluated whether V2O5 functions as a tumor promoter using a 2-stage (initiation-promotion) model of pulmonary neoplasia in mice. Results A/J, BALB/cJ (BALB), and C57BL/6J (B6) mice were treated either with the initiator 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA; 10 μg/g; i.p.) or corn oil followed by 5 weekly aspirations of V2O5 or PBS and pulmonary tumors were enumerated 20 weeks following MCA treatment. Susceptibility to V2O5-induced pulmonary inflammation was assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and chemokines, transcription factor activity, and MAPK signaling were quantified in lung homogenates. We found that treatment of animals with MCA followed by V2O5 promoted lung tumors in both A/J (10.3 ± 0.9 tumors/mouse) and BALB (2.2 ± 0.36) mice significantly above that observed with MCA/PBS or V2O5 alone (P < 0.05). No tumors were observed in the B6 mice in any of the experimental groups. Mice sensitive to tumor promotion by V2O5 were also found to be more susceptible to V2O5-induced pulmonary inflammation and hyperpermeability (A/J>BALB>B6). Differential strain responses in inflammation were positively associated with elevated levels of the chemokines KC and MCP-1, higher NFκB and c-Fos binding activity, as well as sustained ERK1/2 activation in lung tissue. Conclusions In this study we demonstrate that V2O5, an occupational and environmentally relevant metal oxide, functions as an in vivo lung tumor promoter among different inbred

  3. Cation-Induced Coiling of Vanadium Pentoxide Nanobelts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Single-crystalline V2O5·xH2O nanorings and microloops were chemically assembled via an ion-induced chemical spinning route in the designed hydrothermal system. The morphology and structure of products were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) measurement, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) microanalysis and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed that the composition of nanorings and microloops is V2O5·1·1H2O. For these oxide nanorings and microloops, the cation-induced coiling growth mechanism of vanadium pentoxide nanobelts has been proposed on the basis of crystallographic structure of vanadium pentoxide. Our proposed chemical spinning process and the rational solution-phase synthesis route can also be extended to prepare novel 1D materials with layered or more complex structures. PMID:21076706

  4. Vanadium pentoxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Vanadium pentoxide ; CASRN 1314 - 62 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  5. Vanadium pentoxide-coated ultrafine titanium dioxide particles induce cellular damage and micronucleus formation in V79 cells.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, K; Cramer, H; Albrecht, C; Schins, R; Rahman, Q; Zimmermann, U; Dopp, E

    2008-01-01

    Surface-treated titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) particles coated with vanadium pentoxide (V(2)O(5)) are used industrially for selective catalytic reactions such as the removal of nitrous oxide from exhaust gases of combustion power plants (SCR process) and in biomaterials for increasing the strength of implants. In the present study, untreated ultrafine TiO(2) particles (anatase, diameter: 30-50 nm) and vanadium pentoxide (V(2)O(5))-treated anatase particles were tested for their cyto- and genotoxic effects in V79 cells (hamster lung fibroblasts). Cytotoxic effects of the particles were assessed by trypan blue exclusion, while genotoxic effects were investigated by micronucleus (MN) assay. In addition, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined by the acellular method of electron spin resonance technique (ESR) and by the cellular technique of determination of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). Our results demonstrate that V(2)O(5)-treated TiO(2) particles induce more potent cyto- and genotoxic effects than untreated particles. Further, acellular and cellular radical formation was more pronounced with V(2)O(5)-anatase than untreated anatase. Thus, data indicate that V(2)O(5)-treated TiO(2) particles were more reactive than natural anatase and capable of inducing DNA damage in mammalian cells through production of free radicals. PMID:18569605

  6. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... improve. Some drug-induced lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis, may never go away. ... Complications that may develop include: Diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis Hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) Respiratory failure

  7. Hyskon-induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Mangar, D

    1993-12-01

    Hyskon (32 percent dextran-70) (Hyskon Division, Pharmacia) is used during hysteroscopy to help visualization of the uterine surfaces. Pulmonary edema of an uncertain cause has occurred in many patients. Because this study could not be conducted in humans, we determined if Hyskon caused cardiogenic or non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema in a dog model. Dogs were randomly assigned to receive an infusion of Hyskon or whole blood to sustain left ventricular end-diastolic pressure between 20 and 23 millimeters of mercury for 60 minutes. In dogs receiving blood, there was no protein in the bronchoalveolar lavage before or after blood was given. In the Hyskon group, there was no protein in the bronchoalveolar lavage before Hyskon and 0.6 +/- 1.4 milligrams per deciliter (range of 0.1 to 3.7 milligram per deciliter) after Hyskon. The ratio of bronchoalveolar lavage protein to plasma protein after Hyskon was 8.0 +/- 18.0 percent compared with zero percent in the blood group. Hyskon altered pulmonary microvascular membrane permeability, causing alveolar flooding with plasma proteins and possibly accounting for the deterioration of oxygenation and pulmonary compliance seen in patients. These results suggest a significant noncardiogenic component of Hyskon induced pulmonary edema. PMID:7505487

  8. Drugs induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seferian, Andrei; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Savale, Laurent; Günther, Sven; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disorder characterized by progressive obliteration of the pulmonary microvasculature, resulting in elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and premature death. According to the current classification, PAH can be associated with exposure to certain drugs or toxins, particularly appetite suppressant drugs, such as aminorex, fenfluramine derivatives and benfluorex. These drugs have been confirmed to be risk factors for PAH and were withdrawn from the market. The supposed mechanism is an increase in serotonin levels, which was demonstrated to act as a growth factor for the pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. Amphetamines, phentermine and mazindol were less frequently used but are also considered as possible risk factors for PAH. Dasatinib, a dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia was associated with cases of severe PAH, in part reversible after its withdrawal. Recently several studies raised the potential endothelial dysfunction that could be induced by interferon, and few cases of PAH have been reported with interferon therapy. Other possible risk factors for PAH include: nasal decongestants, like phenylpropanolamine, dietary supplement - L-Tryptophan, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, pergolide and other drugs that could act on 5HT2B receptors. Interestingly, PAH remains a rare complication of these drugs, suggesting possible individual susceptibility and further studies are needed to identify patients at risk of drugs induced PAH. PMID:23972547

  9. Severe amiodarone induced pulmonary toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Nacca, Nicholas; Yuhico, Luke S; Pinnamaneni, Sowmya; Szombathy, Tamas

    2012-01-01

    A known complication of Amiodarone therapy is Amiodarone induced Pulmonary Toxicity (APT). Several features of this adverse effect make it difficult to diagnosis and treat. The case of a 63-year-old male with classic radiographic and histologic findings of APT is discussed. Clinical presentation, pathophysiology, diagnostic findings, and treatment strategies are reviewed. The patient was successfully managed with pulse high dose steroid therapy. PMID:23205299

  10. Pulmonary Artery Denervation Reduces Pulmonary Artery Pressure and Induces Histological Changes in an Acute Porcine Model of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Nadine D.; Chang, William; Watson, Oliver; Swift, Andrew J.; Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charlie A.; Kiely, David G.; Suvarna, S. Kim; Gunn, Julian; Lawrie, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background— Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality and limited treatment options. Recent studies have shown that pulmonary artery denervation improves pulmonary hemodynamics in an experimental model and in an early clinical trial. We aimed to evaluate the nerve distribution around the pulmonary artery, to determine the effect of radiofrequency pulmonary artery denervation on acute pulmonary hypertension induced by vasoconstriction, and to demonstrate denervation of the pulmonary artery at a histological level. Methods and Results— Histological evaluation identified a circumferential distribution of nerves around the proximal pulmonary arteries. Nerves were smaller in diameter, greater in number, and located in closer proximity to the luminal aspect of the pulmonary arterial wall beyond the pulmonary artery bifurcation. To determine the effect of pulmonary arterial denervation acute pulmonary hypertension was induced in 8 pigs by intravenous infusion of thromboxane A2 analogue. Animals were assigned to either pulmonary artery denervation, using a prototype radiofrequency catheter and generator, or a sham procedure. Pulmonary artery denervation resulted in reduced mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance and increased cardiac output. Ablation lesions on the luminal surface of the pulmonary artery were accompanied by histological and biochemical alteration in adventitial nerves and correlated with improved hemodynamic parameters. Conclusions— Pulmonary artery denervation offers the possibility of a new treatment option for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Further work is required to determine the long-term efficacy and safety. PMID:26553697

  11. Cocaine-induced pulmonary changes: HRCT findings *

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Renata Rocha; Zanetti, Gláucia; Souza, Arthur Soares; de Souza, Luciana Soares; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate HRCT scans of the chest in 22 patients with cocaine-induced pulmonary disease. Methods: We included patients between 19 and 52 years of age. The HRCT scans were evaluated by two radiologists independently, discordant results being resolved by consensus. The inclusion criterion was an HRCT scan showing abnormalities that were temporally related to cocaine use, with no other apparent causal factors. Results: In 8 patients (36.4%), the clinical and tomographic findings were consistent with "crack lung", those cases being studied separately. The major HRCT findings in that subgroup of patients included ground-glass opacities, in 100% of the cases; consolidations, in 50%; and the halo sign, in 25%. In 12.5% of the cases, smooth septal thickening, paraseptal emphysema, centrilobular nodules, and the tree-in-bud pattern were identified. Among the remaining 14 patients (63.6%), barotrauma was identified in 3 cases, presenting as pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, and hemopneumothorax, respectively. Talcosis, characterized as perihilar conglomerate masses, architectural distortion, and emphysema, was diagnosed in 3 patients. Other patterns were found less frequently: organizing pneumonia and bullous emphysema, in 2 patients each; and pulmonary infarction, septic embolism, eosinophilic pneumonia, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema, in 1 patient each. Conclusions: Pulmonary changes induced by cocaine use are varied and nonspecific. The diagnostic suspicion of cocaine-induced pulmonary disease depends, in most of the cases, on a careful drawing of correlations between clinical and radiological findings. PMID:26398752

  12. Naloxone-induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, J A; Koenigsberg, M D

    1987-11-01

    We present the case of a 68-year-old woman with acute pulmonary edema secondary to the administration of naloxone to reverse an inadvertent narcotic overdose. The patient presented following a 12-hour history of increasingly bizarre behavior and confusion. A total IV dose of 1.6 mg naloxone was administered in an attempt to reverse the suspected overconsumption of a codeine-containing cough suppressant. She immediately became agitated, tachycardic, and diaphoretic; a clinical diagnosis of acute pulmonary edema was made. Following treatment with furosemide, nitroglycerin, and morphine sulfate, the patient recovered completely without further incident. Although naloxone is thought to be a safe drug with few complications, it should not be used indiscriminantly, and the smallest doses necessary to elicit the desired response should be used. PMID:3662194

  13. Update on exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Stacey; Hinchcliff, Kenneth

    2015-04-01

    Exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) is an important disease of horses that perform high-intensity athletic activity. EIPH is an ongoing concern for the racing industry because of its high prevalence; potential impact on performance; welfare concerns; and use of prophylactic medications, such as furosemide, on race day. During the last 10 years, significant progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis and risk factors for EIPH and the impact of the disease on performance and career. This article summarizes the most recent advances in EIPH. PMID:25770069

  14. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity mimicking acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Fabiani, Iacopo; Tacconi, Danilo; Grotti, Simone; Brandini, Rossella; Salvadori, Claudia; Caremani, Marcello; Bolognese, Leonardo

    2011-05-01

    Amiodarone is a highly effective antiarrhythmic drug. Its long-term use may, however, lead to several adverse effects, with pulmonary toxicity being the most serious. The article presents the case of a 78-year-old woman with a history of cardiac surgery, who after 2 years of amiodarone therapy for prophylactic treatment of atrial fibrillation developed amiodarone pneumonitis mimicking an acute pulmonary edema. The patient failed to respond to diuretic therapy and several courses of anti-infective therapy. Differential diagnosis of different causes of pulmonary infiltrates did not demonstrate any other abnormality. Lung biopsy findings were consistent with the diagnosis of amiodarone pneumonitis. Given the widespread use of amiodarone as an antiarrhythmic agent, pneumologists and cardiologists should consider this important adverse effect as a differential diagnosis of pulmonary distress refractory to therapy in all patients treated with amiodarone who present with respiratory symptoms and pneumonia-like illness. PMID:19924000

  15. Vanadium pentoxide nanotubes by eelectrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lala, Neeta L.; Jose, R.; Yusoff, M. M.

    2012-11-01

    Nanofibers of vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) were synthesized by electrospinning a polymeric solution containing vanadium ion and with subsequent sintering. Conventionally, electrospun TNFs were produced by using a co-axial spinneret; however, TNFs in the present study were obtained by manipulating the concentration ratio of the precursor solution, distance, humidity and flow rate during electrospinning using a single spinneret and sintering with time and temperature change. On the basis of this hypothesis, nanofibers could be altered from elongated 1-D nanofibers to nanowires, nanotubes, spheres and flakes respectively. The surface morphology, structure, roughness and the crystal structure were analyzed using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The current work has demonstrated a case study for energy storage where V2O5 nanotubes when tested shows the capacitance of 190 Fg-1 in 2M KCl electrolyte indicating an example for the energy storage which may be applicable for other electrochemical devices such as Li-ion batteries, fuel cells, hydrogen storage etc.

  16. Diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis: pulmonary fibrosis in mice induced by treatment with butylated hydroxytoluene and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Haschek, W.M.; Brody, A.R.; Klein-Szanto, A.J.P.; Witschi, H.

    1981-12-01

    It is proposed that the pulmonary fibrosis induced in mice by treatment with BHT and oxygen is a good experimental model for human pulmonary fibrosis. The mechanism of synergistic and additive effects of various agents on pulmonary injury and the epithelial mesenchymal interactions occurring during the early and late phases of lung repair could be studied. This model could be used for study of the effects of various concentrations of oxygen on diffusely damaged lung and assessment of the efficacy of drugs in preventing or resolving excessive collagen accumulation in lung. In addition, the relationship between pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema could be studied.

  17. The Curious Question of Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Melissa L.; Farrell, Emily T.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.

    2011-01-01

    The question of whether pulmonary edema develops during exercise on land is controversial. Yet, the development of pulmonary edema during swimming and diving is well established. This paper addresses the current controversies that exist in the field of exercise-induced pulmonary edema on land and with water immersion. It also discusses the mechanisms by which pulmonary edema can develop during land exercise, swimming, and diving and the current gaps in knowledge that exist. Finally, this paper discusses how these fields can continue to advance and the areas where clinical knowledge is lacking. PMID:21660232

  18. The effects of oxygen induced pulmonary vasoconstriction on bedside measurement of pulmonary gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, Ulla M; Thomsen, Lars P; Rees, Stephen E; Rasmussen, Bodil S

    2016-04-01

    In patients with respiratory failure measurements of pulmonary gas exchange are of importance. The bedside automatic lung parameter estimator (ALPE) of pulmonary gas exchange is based on changes in inspired oxygen (FiO2) assuming that these changes do not affect pulmonary circulation. This assumption is investigated in this study. Forty-two out of 65 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) had measurements of mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP), cardiac output and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure thus enabling the calculation of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at each FiO2 level. The research version of ALPE was used and FiO2 was step-wise reduced a median of 0.20 and ultimately returned towards baseline values, allowing 6-8 min' steady state period at each of 4-6 levels before recording the oxygen saturation (SpO2). FiO2 reduction led to median decrease in SpO2 from 99 to 92 %, an increase in MPAP of 4 mmHg and an increase in PVR of 36 dyn s cm(-5). Changes were immediately reversed on returning FiO2 towards baseline. In this study changes in MPAP and PVR are small and immediately reversible consistent with small changes in pulmonary gas exchange. This indicates that mild deoxygenation induced pulmonary vasoconstriction does not have significant influences on the ALPE parameters in patients after CABG. PMID:25962614

  19. Upregulated Copper Transporters in Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zimnicka, Adriana M.; Tang, Haiyang; Guo, Qiang; Kuhr, Frank K.; Oh, Myung-Jin; Wan, Jun; Chen, Jiwang; Smith, Kimberly A.; Fraidenburg, Dustin R.; Choudhury, Moumita S. R.; Levitan, Irena; Machado, Roberto F.; Kaplan, Jack H.; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular remodeling and increased arterial wall stiffness are two major causes for the elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary arterial pressure in patients and animals with pulmonary hypertension. Cellular copper (Cu) plays an important role in angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling; increased Cu in vascular smooth muscle cells has been demonstrated to be associated with atherosclerosis and hypertension in animal experiments. In this study, we show that the Cu-uptake transporter 1, CTR1, and the Cu-efflux pump, ATP7A, were both upregulated in the lung tissues and pulmonary arteries of mice with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Hypoxia also significantly increased expression and activity of lysyl oxidase (LOX), a Cu-dependent enzyme that causes crosslinks of collagen and elastin in the extracellular matrix. In vitro experiments show that exposure to hypoxia or treatment with cobalt (CoCl2) also increased protein expression of CTR1, ATP7A, and LOX in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC). In PASMC exposed to hypoxia or treated with CoCl2, we also confirmed that the Cu transport is increased using 64Cu uptake assays. Furthermore, hypoxia increased both cell migration and proliferation in a Cu-dependent manner. Downregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) with siRNA significantly attenuated hypoxia-mediated upregulation of CTR1 mRNA. In summary, the data from this study indicate that increased Cu transportation due to upregulated CTR1 and ATP7A in pulmonary arteries and PASMC contributes to the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. The increased Cu uptake and elevated ATP7A also facilitate the increase in LOX activity and thus the increase in crosslink of extracellular matrix, and eventually leading to the increase in pulmonary arterial stiffness. PMID:24614111

  20. Gemcitabine-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity: A Case Report of Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Turco, Célia; Jary, Marine; Kim, Stefano; Moltenis, Mélanie; Degano, Bruno; Manzoni, Philippe; Nguyen, Thierry; Genet, Bruno; Rabier, Marie-Blanche Valnet; Heyd, Bruno; Borg, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Gemcitabine is a chemotherapeutic agent frequently used by for the treatment of several malignancies both in the adjuvant and metastatic setting. Although myelosuppression is the most adverse event of this therapy, gemcitabine might induce severe pulmonary toxicities. We describe a case of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) related to gemcitabine. CASE PRESENTATION The patient was an 83-year-old man with a metastatic pancreatic cancer who was treated by gemcitabine as first-line therapy. He was in good health and received no other chemotherapy. A dose of 1000 mg/m2 of gemcitabine was administered over a 30-minute intravenous infusion on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle. After a period of 6 months, a complete response was observed. Nevertheless, the patient developed a severe dyspnea, with arterial hypoxemia and very low lung diffusion for carbon monoxide. A CT scan showed diffuse ground glass opacities with septal lines, bilateral pleural effusion, and lymph node enlargement. On echocardiography, there was a suspicion of pulmonary hypertension with elevated systolic pulmonary artery pressure and normal left ventricular pressures. Right heart catheterization confirmed pulmonary hypertension and normal pulmonary artery occlusion pressure. Diagnosis of PVOD was made, and a gemcitabine-induced toxicity was suspected. A symptomatic treatment was started. At last follow-up, patient was in functional class I with near-normal of CT scan, arterial blood gases, and echocardiography. A gemcitabine-induced PVOD is the more likely diagnosis. PMID:26380562

  1. [Toxic and drug-induced lesions of the pulmonary parenchyma].

    PubMed

    Russi, E

    1992-05-01

    Pulmonary tissue may be damaged by certain toxins or drugs in a dose-dependent way or by a hypersensitivity reaction. Pathological changes consist of a permeability pulmonary edema, an alveolar hemorrhage, an alveolitis and finally the formation of pulmonary fibrosis. Ingestion of the weed killer paraquat may induce a rapidly progressive and lethal form of fibrosing alveolitis, the inhalation of nitrous oxides may elicit lung edema. The most common drugs causing lung damage are cytotoxic agents, often used in combination, and the noncytotoxic drugs amiodarone and nitrofurantoin. PMID:1589677

  2. Dasatinib induces lung vascular toxicity and predisposes to pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Guignabert, Christophe; Phan, Carole; Seferian, Andrei; Huertas, Alice; Tu, Ly; Thuillet, Raphaël; Sattler, Caroline; Le Hiress, Morane; Tamura, Yuichi; Jutant, Etienne-Marie; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Bouchet, Stéphane; Manéglier, Benjamin; Molimard, Mathieu; Rousselot, Philippe; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Montani, David; Humbert, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease that can be induced by dasatinib, a dual Src and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is used to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Today, key questions remain regarding the mechanisms involved in the long-term development of dasatinib-induced PAH. Here, we demonstrated that chronic dasatinib therapy causes pulmonary endothelial damage in humans and rodents. We found that dasatinib treatment attenuated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction responses and increased susceptibility to experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH) in rats, but these effects were absent in rats treated with imatinib, another BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Furthermore, dasatinib treatment induced pulmonary endothelial cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, while imatinib did not. Dasatinib treatment mediated endothelial cell dysfunction via increased production of ROS that was independent of Src family kinases. Consistent with these findings, we observed elevations in markers of endothelial dysfunction and vascular damage in the serum of CML patients who were treated with dasatinib, compared with CML patients treated with imatinib. Taken together, our findings indicate that dasatinib causes pulmonary vascular damage, induction of ER stress, and mitochondrial ROS production, which leads to increased susceptibility to PH development. PMID:27482885

  3. Paraquat induced pulmonary fibrosis in three survivors.

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, M; Patel, S B; Ewen, S W; Smith, C C; Friend, J A

    1991-01-01

    Pulmonary lesions following paraquat poisoning are believed to be almost invariably fatal. The three patients reports here survived despite persistent radiological change. One of the patients died after taking a larger dose of paraquat one year later, and at necropsy histological changes attributable to the two episodes of paraquat poisoning were apparent. Images PMID:2028434

  4. Pulmonary and generalized lysosomal storage induced by amphiphilic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Z

    1984-01-01

    Administration of amphiphilic drugs to experimental animals causes formation of myelinoid bodies in many cell types, accumulation of foamy macrophages in pulmonary alveoli and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. These changes are the result of an interaction between the drugs and phospholipids which leads to an alteration in physicochemical properties of the phospholipids. Impairment of the digestion of altered pulmonary secretions in phagosomes of macrophages results in accumulation of foam cells in pulmonary alveoli. Impairment of the metabolism of altered phospholipids removed by autophagy induces an accumulation of myelinoid bodies. The administration of amphiphilic compounds thus causes pulmonary intra-alveolar histiocytosis which is a part of a drug-induced lysosomal storage or generalized lipidosis. The accumulation of drug-lipid complexes in myelinoid bodies and in pulmonary foam cells may lead to alteration of cellular functioning and to clinical disease. Currently over 50 amphiphilic drugs are known. Unique pharmacological properties necessitate clinical use of some of these drugs. The occurrence and severity of potential clinical side effects depend on the nature of each drug, dosage and duration of treatment, simultaneous administration of other drugs and foods, individual metabolic pattern of the patient and other factors. Further studies on factors preventing and potentiating adverse effects of amphiphilic drugs are indicated. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. PMID:6376111

  5. Chemotherapy-induced pulmonary hypertension: role of alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Günther, Sven; Quarck, Rozenn; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Dorfmüller, Peter; Antigny, Fabrice; Dumas, Sébastien J; Raymond, Nicolas; Lau, Edmund; Savale, Laurent; Jaïs, Xavier; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Stenmark, Kurt; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David; Perros, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is an uncommon form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterized by progressive obstruction of small pulmonary veins and a dismal prognosis. Limited case series have reported a possible association between different chemotherapeutic agents and PVOD. We evaluated the relationship between chemotherapeutic agents and PVOD. Cases of chemotherapy-induced PVOD from the French PH network and literature were reviewed. Consequences of chemotherapy exposure on the pulmonary vasculature and hemodynamics were investigated in three different animal models (mouse, rat, and rabbit). Thirty-seven cases of chemotherapy-associated PVOD were identified in the French PH network and systematic literature analysis. Exposure to alkylating agents was observed in 83.8% of cases, mostly represented by cyclophosphamide (43.2%). In three different animal models, cyclophosphamide was able to induce PH on the basis of hemodynamic, morphological, and biological parameters. In these models, histopathological assessment confirmed significant pulmonary venous involvement highly suggestive of PVOD. Together, clinical data and animal models demonstrated a plausible cause-effect relationship between alkylating agents and PVOD. Clinicians should be aware of this uncommon, but severe, pulmonary vascular complication of alkylating agents. PMID:25497573

  6. The significance of nanoparticles in particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, James D; Baugh, John A

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to airborne nanoparticles contributes to many chronic pulmonary diseases. Nanoparticles, classified as anthropogenic and natural particles, and fibers of diameters less than 100 nm, have unrestricted access to most areas of the lung due to their size. Size relates to the deposition efficiency of the particle, with particles in the nano-range having the highest efficiencies. The deposition of nanoparticles in the lung can lead to chronic inflammation, epithelial injury, and further to pulmonary fibrosis. Cases of particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis, namely pneumoconiosis, are mostly occupationally influenced, and continue to be documented around the world. The tremendous growth of nanotechnology, however, has spurred fears of increased rates of pulmonary diseases, especially fibrosis. The severity of toxicological consequences warrants further examination of the effects of nanoparticles in humans, possible treatments and increased regulatory measures. PMID:18523535

  7. Urantide alleviates monocrotaline induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yifang; Jin, Hong; Tian, Wei; Wang, Hao; Wang, Han; Zhao, Yanping; Zhang, Zhiyi; Meng, Fanchao

    2011-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a serious disorder with poor prognosis. Urotensin II (UII) has been confirmed to be powerful vasoconstrictor than endothelin-1, which may play an important role in PAH development. The aim of this study is to observe the effects of urantide, a UII receptor antagonist, on monocrotaline (MCT) induced PAH in rats. 60 male Wistar rats were divided into six groups. For early treatment experiment, rats were divided into normal control group, MCT(4w) model group (MCT + saline × 3 wks from the 8th day of MCT injection) and urantide early treatment group (MCT + urantide 10 μg/kg/d × 3 wks, 1 week after MCT injection once). For late treatment experiment, rats were divided as controls, MCT(6w) model group (MCT + saline × 2 wks, 4 weeks after MCT injection once) and urantide late treatment group (MCT + urantide 10 μg/kg/d × 2 wks, 4 weeks after MCT injection once). At the end of experiments, mean pulmonary arterial pressures (mPAP) and mean blood pressure (MBP) of rats in each group were measured by catheterization. Right ventricular weight ratio was also weighed. Relaxation effects of urantide on intralobar pulmonary arterial rings of normal control and MCT(4w) model rats were investigated. Pulmonary artery remodeling was detected by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and immunohistochemistry analysis. Serum nitric oxide (NO) levels in all six groups were assayed by ELISA kits. Urantide markedly reduced the mPAP levels of MCT induced PAH in both early and late treatment groups. It didn't change the MBP. Urantide dose-dependently relaxed the pulmonary arterial rings of normal control and MCT(4w) model rats. Moreover, N(G)-Nitro-l-arginine Methyl Ester (l-NAME) blocked the dilation response induced by urantide. In addition, urantide inhibited the pulmonary vascular remodeling remarkably. Serum NO level elevated in both early and late treatment rats with urantide infusion. These results suggest that urantide effectively alleviated

  8. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic.

  9. Development of a tantalum pentoxide Luneberg lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, D. A.; Chubb, C. R.; Powers, J. K.; Reed, W. R.; Dalke, E. A.; Tomaschke, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    A process has been developed for the fabrication of a tantalum pentoxide waveguide Luneburg lens as the input collimator for an optical signal processing circuit on a silicon substrate, such as an integrated wavelength demultiplexer. The development of such a lens involved improvement of the deposition mask profile, reduction of surface scattering by underlaying the lens, reduction of edge scattering by using shims under the mask, and prediction and measurement of the TE-TM polarization aberration. It is shown that polarization aberration significantly affects the design of a demultiplexer system.

  10. Obaculactone protects against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingqi; Ouyang, Zijun; You, Qian; He, Shuai; Meng, Qianqian; Hu, Chunhui; Wu, Xudong; Shen, Yan; Sun, Yang; Wu, Xuefeng; Xu, Qiang

    2016-07-15

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive, degenerative and almost irreversible disease. There is hardly an effective cure for lung damage due to pulmonary fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of obaculactone in an already-assessed model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin administration. Mice were subjected to intratracheal instillation of bleomycin, and obaculactone was given orally after bleomycin instillation daily for 23days. Treatment with obaculactone ameliorated body weight loss, lung histopathology abnormalities and pulmonary collagen deposition, with a decrease of the inflammatory cell number and the cytokine level in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Moreover, obaculactone inhibited the expression of icam1, vcam1, inos and cox2, and attenuated oxidative stress in bleomycin-treated lungs. Importantly, the production of collagen I and α-SMA in lung tissues as well as the levels of TGF-β1, ALK5, p-Smad2 and p-Smad3 in lung homogenates was also reduced after obaculactone treatment. Finally, the TGF-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition via Smad-dependent and Smad-independent pathways was reversed by obaculactone. Collectively, these data suggest that obaculactone may be a promising drug candidate for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27180239

  11. EXERCISE-INDUCED PULMONARY HEMORRHAGE AFTER RUNNING A MARATHON

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report on a healthy 26-year-old male who had an exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) within 24 hours of running a marathon. There were no symptoms, abnormalities on exam, or radiographic infiltrates. He routinely participated in bronchoscopy research and the EIPH was e...

  12. Obstruction-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Chow, Ming-Jay; Zou, Yu; He, Huamei; McGowan, Francis X; Zurakowski, David; Zhang, Yanhang

    2011-11-01

    Pulmonary obstruction occurs in many common forms of congenital heart disease. In this study, pulmonary artery (PA) banding is used as a model for pulmonary stenosis. Significant remodeling of the vascular bed occurs as a result of a prolonged narrowing of the PAs, and here we quantify the biophysical and molecular changes proximal and distal to the obstruction. Main and branch PAs are harvested from banded and sham rabbits and their mechanical properties are assessed using a biaxial tensile tester. Measurements defined as initial and stiff slopes are taken, assuming a linear region at the start and end of the J-shaped stress-strain curves, along with a transitional knee point. Collagen, elastin assays, Movat's pentachrome staining, and Doppler protocols are used to quantify biochemical, structural, and physiological differences. The banded main PAs have significantly greater initial slopes while banded branch PAs have lower initial slopes; however, this change in mechanical behavior cannot be explained by the assay results as the elastin content in both main and branch PAs is not significantly different. The stiff slopes of the banded main PAs are higher, which is attributed to the significantly greater amounts of insoluble collagen. Shifting of the knee points reveals a decreased toe region in the main PAs but an opposite trend in the branch PAs. The histology results show a loss of integrity of the media, increase in ground substance, and dispersion of collagen in the banded tissue samples. This indicates other structural changes could have led to the mechanical differences in banded and normal tissue. PMID:22168741

  13. Drug-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension: a recent outbreak.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Seferian, Andrei; Savale, Laurent; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disorder characterised by progressive obliteration of the pulmonary microvasculature resulting in elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and premature death. According to the current classification PAH can be associated with exposure to certain drugs or toxins, particularly to appetite suppressant intake drugs, such as aminorex, fenfluramine derivatives and benfluorex. These drugs have been confirmed to be risk factors for PAH and were withdrawn from the market. The supposed mechanism is an increase in serotonin levels, which was demonstrated to act as a growth factor for the pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Amphetamines, phentermine and mazindol were less frequently used, but are considered possible risk factors, for PAH. Dasatinib, dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia was associated with cases of severe PAH, potentially in part reversible after dasatinib withdrawal. Recently, several studies have raised the issue of potential endothelial dysfunction that could be induced by interferon, and a few cases of PAH have been reported with interferon therapy. PAH remains a rare complication of these drugs, suggesting possible individual susceptibility, and further studies are needed to identify patients at risk of drug-induced PAH. PMID:23997051

  14. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 Knockout Abrogates Radiation Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallahan, Dennis E.; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi

    1997-06-01

    Increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; CD54) is induced by exposure to ionizing radiation. The lung was used as a model to study the role of ICAM-1 in the pathogenesis of the radiation-induced inflammation-like response. ICAM-1 expression increased in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium and not in the endothelium of larger pulmonary vessels following treatment of mice with thoracic irradiation. To quantify radiation-induced ICAM-1 expression, we utilized fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of anti-ICAM-1 antibody labeling of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells from human cadaver donors (HMVEC-L cells). Fluorochrome conjugates and UV microscopy were used to quantify the fluorescence intensity of ICAM in the irradiated lung. These studies showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Peak expression occurred at 24 h, while threshold dose was as low as 2 Gy. To determine whether ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration into the irradiated lung, the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody was administered by tail vein injection to mice following thoracic irradiation. Inflammatory cells were quantified by immunofluorescence for leukocyte common antigen (CD45). Mice treated with the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody showed attenuation of inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to ionizing radiation exposure. To verify the requirement of ICAM-1 in the inflammation-like radiation response, we utilized the ICAM-1 knockout mouse. ICAM-1 was not expressed in the lungs of ICAM-1-deficient mice following treatment with thoracic irradiation. ICAM-1 knockout mice had no increase in the inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to thoracic irradiation. These studies demonstrate a radiation dose-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium, and show that ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration

  15. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 knockout abrogates radiation induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hallahan, D E; Virudachalam, S

    1997-06-10

    Increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; CD54) is induced by exposure to ionizing radiation. The lung was used as a model to study the role of ICAM-1 in the pathogenesis of the radiation-induced inflammation-like response. ICAM-1 expression increased in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium and not in the endothelium of larger pulmonary vessels following treatment of mice with thoracic irradiation. To quantify radiation-induced ICAM-1 expression, we utilized fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of anti-ICAM-1 antibody labeling of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells from human cadaver donors (HMVEC-L cells). Fluorochrome conjugates and UV microscopy were used to quantify the fluorescence intensity of ICAM in the irradiated lung. These studies showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Peak expression occurred at 24 h, while threshold dose was as low as 2 Gy. To determine whether ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration into the irradiated lung, the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody was administered by tail vein injection to mice following thoracic irradiation. Inflammatory cells were quantified by immunofluorescence for leukocyte common antigen (CD45). Mice treated with the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody showed attenuation of inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to ionizing radiation exposure. To verify the requirement of ICAM-1 in the inflammation-like radiation response, we utilized the ICAM-1 knockout mouse. ICAM-1 was not expressed in the lungs of ICAM-1-deficient mice following treatment with thoracic irradiation. ICAM-1 knockout mice had no increase in the inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to thoracic irradiation. These studies demonstrate a radiation dose-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium, and show that ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration

  16. Molecular mechanisms of hypoxia-inducible factor-induced pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell alterations in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Veith, Christine; Schermuly, Ralph T; Brandes, Ralf P; Weissmann, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    Oxygen (O2) is essential for the viability and function of most metazoan organisms and thus is closely monitored at both the organismal and the cellular levels. However, alveoli often encounter decreased O2 levels (hypoxia), leading to activation of physiological or pathophysiological responses in the pulmonary arteries. Such changes are achieved by activation of transcription factors. The hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are the most prominent hypoxia-regulated transcription factors in this regard. HIFs bind to hypoxia-response elements (HREs) in the promoter region of target genes, whose expression and translation allows the organism, amongst other factors, to cope with decreased environmental O2 partial pressure (pO2). However, prolonged HIF activation can contribute to major structural alterations, especially in the lung, resulting in the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH). PH is characterized by a rise in pulmonary arterial pressure associated with pulmonary arterial remodelling, concomitant with a reduced intravascular lumen area. Patients with PH develop right heart hypertrophy and eventually die from right heart failure. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms of HIF regulation in PH is critical for the identification of novel therapeutic strategies. This review addresses the relationship of hypoxia and the HIF system with pulmonary arterial dysfunction in PH. We particularly focus on the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the HIF-driven pathophysiological processes. PMID:26228924

  17. HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS PROFILE FOR VANADIUM PENTOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Health and Environmental Effects Profile for vanadium pentoxide was prepared by the Office of Health and Environmental Assessment, Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office, Cincinnati, OH for the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response to support listings of hazardou...

  18. Contribution of calcium-activated chloride channel to elevated pulmonary artery pressure in pulmonary arterial hypertension induced by high pulmonary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Chen, Chuansi; Ma, Jianfa; Lao, Jinquan; Pang, Yusheng

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) induced by high pulmonary blood flow remains uncertain. In this study, we investigated the possible role and effects of CaCC in this disease. Sixty rats were randomly assigned to normal, sham, and shunt groups. Rats in the shunt group underwent abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava shunt surgery. The pulmonary artery pressure was measured by catheterization. Pathological changes, right ventricle hypertrophy index (RVHI), arterial wall area/vessel area (W/V), and arterial wall thickness/vessel external diameter (T/D) were analyzed by optical microscopy. Electrophysiological characteristics of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were investigated using patch clamp technology. After 11 weeks of shunting, PAH and pulmonary vascular structural remodeling (PVSR) developed, accompanied by increased pulmonary pressure and pathological interstitial pulmonary changes. Compared with normal and sham groups, pulmonary artery pressure, RVHI, W/V, and T/D of the shunt group rats increased significantly. Electrophysiological results showed primary CaCC characteristics. Compared with normal and sham groups, membrane capacitance and current density of PASMCs in the shunt group increased significantly, which were subsequently attenuated following chloride channel blocker niflumic acid (NFA) treatment. To conclude, CaCC contributed to PAH induced by high pulmonary blood flow and may represent a potential target for treatment of PAH. PMID:25755701

  19. Contribution of calcium-activated chloride channel to elevated pulmonary artery pressure in pulmonary arterial hypertension induced by high pulmonary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Chen, Chuansi; Ma, Jianfa; Lao, Jinquan; Pang, Yusheng

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) induced by high pulmonary blood flow remains uncertain. In this study, we investigated the possible role and effects of CaCC in this disease. Sixty rats were randomly assigned to normal, sham, and shunt groups. Rats in the shunt group underwent abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava shunt surgery. The pulmonary artery pressure was measured by catheterization. Pathological changes, right ventricle hypertrophy index (RVHI), arterial wall area/vessel area (W/V), and arterial wall thickness/vessel external diameter (T/D) were analyzed by optical microscopy. Electrophysiological characteristics of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were investigated using patch clamp technology. After 11 weeks of shunting, PAH and pulmonary vascular structural remodeling (PVSR) developed, accompanied by increased pulmonary pressure and pathological interstitial pulmonary changes. Compared with normal and sham groups, pulmonary artery pressure, RVHI, W/V, and T/D of the shunt group rats increased significantly. Electrophysiological results showed primary CaCC characteristics. Compared with normal and sham groups, membrane capacitance and current density of PASMCs in the shunt group increased significantly, which were subsequently attenuated following chloride channel blocker niflumic acid (NFA) treatment. To conclude, CaCC contributed to PAH induced by high pulmonary blood flow and may represent a potential target for treatment of PAH. PMID:25755701

  20. Inflammatory mechanisms of pulmonary injury induced by mustards.

    PubMed

    Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R; Venosa, Alessandro; Vayas, Kinal N; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2016-02-26

    Exposure of humans and animals to vesicants, including sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM), causes severe and debilitating damage to the respiratory tract. Both acute and long term pathological consequences are observed in the lung following a single exposure to these vesicants. Evidence from our laboratories and others suggest that macrophages and the inflammatory mediators they release play an important role in mustard-induced lung injury. In this paper, the pathogenic effects of SM and NM on the lung are reviewed, along with the potential role of inflammatory macrophages and mediators they release in mustard-induced pulmonary toxicity. PMID:26478570

  1. Pulmonary leukosequestration induced by hind limb ischemia.

    PubMed Central

    Anner, H; Kaufman, R P; Kobzik, L; Valeri, C R; Shepro, D; Hechtman, H B

    1987-01-01

    Lower torso ischemia leads to acute respiratory failure, an event associated with the accumulation of inflammatory cells in the lungs. This study tests whether ischemia-induced eicosanoid synthesis leads to polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) accumulation in the lungs. Anesthetized rats (N = 51) were randomized into five groups: nonischemic sham rats (N = 10); the remaining four groups were rats made ischemic for 4 hours with bilateral thigh tourniquets treated just before tourniquet release with saline vehicle (N = 17): the thromboxane (Tx) synthase inhibitor OKY-046 (Ono Pharmaceutica, Osaka, Japan) 2 mg/kg intravenously every 2 hours (N = 8); the lipoxygenase inhibitor diethylcarbamazine (DEC) (Sigma, St. Louis, MO) 0.2 mg/kg/min intravenously (N = 8); the platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist SRI (Sandoz Inc., East Hanover, NJ) 63-072 3 mg/kg intravenously every 30 minutes (N = 8). Four hours after ischemia, plasma TxB2 levels in the ischemic placebo-treated group was 3570 +/- 695 pg/mL, compared with 495 +/- 73 pg/mL in sham rats (p less than 0.001). Lung microscopy showed foci of proteinaceous exudate in alveoli and 121 +/- 10 PMN/20 high power fields (HPF) compared with 59 +/- 9 PMN/20 HPF in the sham group (p less than 0.001). One day after ischemia PMN accumulations remained elevated at 119 PMN/20 HPF. Pretreatment with OKY-046 led to reduced TxB2 levels of 149 +/- 17 pg/mL, normal lung histology, and 83 +/- 13 PMN/20 HPF, a value similar to that of the sham group and lower than that of the placebo-treated group (p less than 0.05). Treatment with DEC yielded TxB2 levels of 1419 +/- 492 pg/mL, which was lower than that of the placebo group (p less than 0.05) but higher than that of the sham group (p less than 0.05). Microscopy showed normal lungs with 79 +/- 7 PMN/20 HPF lower than the placebo group (p less than 0.05). SRI 63-072 did not inhibit Tx synthesis or leukosequestration in the lungs. Platelet counts decreased in all groups relative to sham

  2. Calcium antagonists, diltiazem and nifedipine, protect broilers against low temperature-induced pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Gao, Mingyu; Guo, Yuming; Qiao, Jian

    2010-08-01

    This study was designed to determine whether calcium antagonists, diltiazem and nifedipine, can depress low temperature-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) in broilers (also known as ascites) and to characterize their efficacy on hemodynamics and pulmonary artery function. Chicks were randomly allocated into six experimental groups and orally administered with vehicle, 5.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)/12 h nifedipine or 15.0 mg/kg BW/12 h diltiazem from 16 to 43 days of age under low temperature. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), the ascites heart index (AHI), the erythrocyte packed cell volume (PCV) and the relative percentage of medial pulmonary artery thickness were examined on days 29, 36 and 43. The data showed that administration of diltiazem protected broilers from low temperature-induced pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling. Although nifedipine prevented mPAP from increasing during the early stage, it did not suppress the development of PH during the late stage and did not keep heart rate (HR), PCV, AHI and the thickness of pulmonary small artery smooth muscle layer at the normal levels. Taken together, our results showed that diltiazem can effectively prevent low temperature-induced pulmonary hypertension in broilers with fewer side-effects and may be a potential compound for the prevention of this disease in poultry industry. PMID:20662820

  3. Hierarchically structured vanadium pentoxide-polymer hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Tritschler, Ulrich; Zlotnikov, Igor; Zaslansky, Paul; Fratzl, Peter; Schlaad, Helmut; Cölfen, Helmut

    2014-05-27

    Biomimetic composite materials consisting of vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) and a liquid crystal (LC) "gluing" polymer were manufactured exhibiting six structural levels of hierarchy, formed through LC phases. The organic matrix was a polyoxazoline with pendant cholesteryl and carboxyl units, forming a lyotropic phase with the same structural orientation extending up to hundreds of micrometers upon shearing, and binding to V2O5 via hydrogen bridges. Composites consisting of V2O5-LC polymer hybrid fibers with a pronounced layered structuring were obtained. The V2O5-LC polymer hybrid fibers consist of aligned V2O5 ribbons, composed of self-assembled V2O5 sheets, encasing a chiral nematic polymer matrix. The structures of the V2O5-LC polymer composites strongly depend on the preparation method, i.e., the phase-transfer method from aqueous to organic medium, in which the polymer forms LC phases. Notably, highly defined micro- and nanostructures were obtained when initiating the synthesis using V2O5 tactoids with preoriented nanoparticle building units, even when using isotropic V2O5 dispersions. Shear-induced hierarchical structuring of the composites was observed, as characterized from the millimeter and micrometer down to the nanometer length scales using complementary optical and electron microscopy, SAXS, μCT, and mechanical nanoindentation. PMID:24716494

  4. Niflumic Acid Attenuated Pulmonary Artery Tone and Vascular Structural Remodeling of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Induced by High Pulmonary Blood Flow In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Ma, Jianfa; Pang, Yusheng; Lao, Jinquan; Pan, Xuanren; Tang, Qiaoyun; Zhang, Feng; Su, Danyan; Qin, Suyuan; Shrestha, Arnav Prasad

    2015-10-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) play a vital role in regulating pulmonary artery tone during pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) induced by high blood flow. The role of CaCCs inhibitor niflumic acid (NFA) in vivo during this process requires further investigation. We established the PAH model by abdominal shunt surgery and treated with NFA in vivo. Fifty rats were randomly divided into normal, sham, shunt, NFA group 1 (0.2 mg/kg), and NFA group 2 (0.4 mg/kg). Pathological changes, right ventricle hypertrophy index, arterial wall area/vessel area, and arterial wall thickness/vessel external diameter were analyzed. Then contraction reactions of pulmonary arteries were measured. Finally, the electrophysiological characteristics of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells were investigated using patch-clamp technology. After 11 weeks of shunting, PAH developed, accompanied with increased right ventricle hypertrophy index, arterial wall area/vessel area, and arterial wall thickness/vessel external diameter. In the NFA treatment groups, the pressure and pathological changes were alleviated. The pulmonary artery tone in the shunt group increased, whereas it decreased after NFA treatment. The current density of CaCC was higher in the shunt group, and it was decreased in the NFA treatment groups. In conclusion, NFA attenuated pulmonary artery tone and structural remodeling in PAH induced by high pulmonary blood flow in vivo. CaCCs were involved and the augmented current density was alleviated by NFA treatment. PMID:26132368

  5. Ligustrazine effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiqi; Chen, Yuanzhuo; Li, Wenjie; Li, Congye; Zhang, Xiangyu; Peng, Hu; Gao, Chengjin

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of ligustrazine (tetramethylpyrazine, TMP) in alleviating pulmonary damage induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Twenty-four healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: the blank group, LPS group, and TMP treatment group (TMP group). The LPS group was intraperitoneally injected with LPS (20mg/kg), and the TMP group was intraperitoneally injected with LPS (20mg/kg) and ligustrazine (80mg/kg). Blood gas analysis, hematoxylin-eosin staining dye extravasation and diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) score, the wet/dry lung tissue (W/D) ratios, the expression of CD31+ vascular endothelial microparticles (EMPs), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels, and the protein expression of Rho-associated coiled-coil-forming protein kinase (ROCK) II and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) were analyzed. Compared with the blank group, the arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) declined in both 1 and 4h (P<0.01), the W/D ratio and DAD score increased (P<0.01), and the TNF-α levels in serum, CD31+ EMPs, and protein expression of ROCK II and TLR4 were significantly increased (P<0.01) in the LPS group. Compared with the LPS group, PaO2 significantly increased in the TMP group at 4h (P<0.05), while the W/D ratio and DAD score were significantly decreased in the TMP group (P<0.01). TNF-α levels, CD31+ EMPs, and protein expression of ROCK II and TLR4 were significantly decreased in the TMP group compared with the LPS group (P<0.01). This study demonstrated that TMP can alleviate LPS-induced pulmonary damage by attenuating pulmonary vascular permeability and CD31+ EMP levels in the plasma, reducing the release of the inflammatory mediator TNF-α and inhibiting the protein expression of ROCK II and TLR4. PMID:26088147

  6. Waveguide lasers in ytterbium-doped tantalum pentoxide on silicon.

    PubMed

    Aghajani, A; Murugan, G S; Sessions, N P; Apostolopoulos, V; Wilkinson, J S

    2015-06-01

    A waveguide laser in an ytterbium-doped tantalum pentoxide film is reported. The waveguide is formed of a rib of sputtered tantalum pentoxide on top of oxidized silicon with an over-cladding of silica. Emission at a wavelength of 1025 nm was achieved with an absorbed pump power threshold and slope efficiency of ≈29  mW and 27%, respectively, for a cavity formed by a high reflector mirror and an estimated 12% Fresnel reflection from the bare end-face at the output. PMID:26030554

  7. Upregulation of Transient Receptor Potential Canonical Channels Contributes to Endotoxin-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gui-Lan; Jiang, Hongni; Zou, Fangdong

    2016-01-01

    Background Septic shock is a pathologic condition caused by endotoxin-producing bacteria, and often associated with severe pulmonary hypertension. Inflammation is a major systemic response to endotoxin; however, it is unknown whether endotoxin has a direct impact on pulmonary arteries that contributes to pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Material/Methods Rat pulmonary arteries and primary pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were cultured in vitro and treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and blockers of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels. Neointimal growth and arterial stenosis were observed on cryosections of cultured pulmonary arteries. Proliferation of PASMCs was examined by a WST-1 (water-soluble tetrazolium salt) assay. Expression of TRPC genes in pulmonary arteries and PASMCs were detected and quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Results LPS significantly induced neointimal growth and stenosis of pulmonary arteries and promoted proliferation of PASMCs. TRPC channel blockers 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and SKF-96365 inhibited LPS-induced remodeling of pulmonary arteries and PASMC proliferation. Expression of TRPC1/3/4/6 was detected in pulmonary arteries and PASMCs. LPS treatment dramatically increased the expression of TRPC3 and TRPC4 at both messenger RNA and protein levels. Conclusions LPS stimulates stenosis of pulmonary arteries through enhancement of TRPC-mediated Ca2+ entry into PASMCs, which is caused by upregulation of TRPC3 and TRPC4 channels. PMID:27471122

  8. Eugenol attenuates pulmonary damage induced by diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Zin, Walter A; Silva, Ana G L S; Magalhães, Clarissa B; Carvalho, Giovanna M C; Riva, Douglas R; Lima, Crystianne C; Leal-Cardoso, Jose H; Takiya, Christina M; Valença, Samuel S; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Faffe, Débora S

    2012-03-01

    Environmentally relevant doses of inhaled diesel particles elicit pulmonary inflammation and impair lung mechanics. Eugenol, a methoxyphenol component of clove oil, presents in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Our aim was to examine a possible protective role of eugenol against lung injuries induced by diesel particles. Male BALB/c mice were divided into four groups. Mice received saline (10 μl in; CTRL group) or 15 μg of diesel particles DEP (15 μg in; DIE and DEUG groups). After 1 h, mice received saline (10 μl; CTRL and DIE groups) or eugenol (164 mg/kg; EUG and DEUG group) by gavage. Twenty-four hours after gavage, pulmonary resistive (ΔP1), viscoelastic (ΔP2) and total (ΔPtot) pressures, static elastance (Est), and viscoelastic component of elastance (ΔE) were measured. We also determined the fraction areas of normal and collapsed alveoli, amounts of polymorpho- (PMN) and mononuclear cells in lung parenchyma, apoptosis, and oxidative stress. Est, ΔP2, ΔPtot, and ΔE were significantly higher in the DIE than in the other groups. DIE also showed significantly more PMN, airspace collapse, and apoptosis than the other groups. However, no beneficial effect on lipid peroxidation was observed in DEUG group. In conclusion, eugenol avoided changes in lung mechanics, pulmonary inflammation, and alveolar collapse elicited by diesel particles. It attenuated the activation signal of caspase-3 by DEP, but apoptosis evaluated by TUNEL was avoided. Finally, it could not avoid oxidative stress as indicated by malondialdehyde. PMID:22194320

  9. Nebivolol has a beneficial effect in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pankey, Edward A; Edward, Justin A; Swan, Kevin W; Bourgeois, Camille R T; Bartow, Matthew J; Yoo, Daniel; Peak, Taylor A; Song, Bryant M; Chan, Ryan A; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Prieto, Minolfa C; Giles, Thomas D; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a rare disorder that, without treatment, is progressive and fatal within 3-4 years. Current treatment involves a diverse group of drugs that target the pulmonary vascular bed. In addition, strategies that increase nitric oxide (NO) formation have a beneficial effect in rodents and patients. Nebivolol, a selective β1 adrenergic receptor-blocking agent reported to increase NO production and stimulate β3 receptors, has vasodilator properties suggesting that it may be beneficial in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. The present study was undertaken to determine whether nebivolol has a beneficial effect in monocrotaline-induced (60 mg/kg) pulmonary hypertension in the rat. These results show that nebivolol treatment (10 mg/kg, once or twice daily) attenuates pulmonary hypertension, reduces right ventricular hypertrophy, and improves pulmonary artery remodeling in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. This study demonstrates the presence of β3 adrenergic receptor immunoreactivity in pulmonary arteries and airways and that nebivolol has pulmonary vasodilator activity. Studies with β3 receptor agonists (mirabegron, BRL 37344) and antagonists suggest that β3 receptor-mediated decreases in systemic arterial pressure occur independent of NO release. Our results suggest that nebivolol, a selective vasodilating β1 receptor antagonist that stimulates β3 adrenergic receptors and induces vasodilation by increasing NO production, may be beneficial in treating pulmonary hypertensive disorders. PMID:27172427

  10. Role of oxidative stress in thuringiensin-induced pulmonary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.-F. . E-mail: sftsai@tactri.gov.tw; Yang Chi; Liu, B.-L.; Hwang, J.-S.; Ho, S.-P. . E-mail: spho@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2006-10-15

    To understand the effect of thuringiensin on the lungs tissues, male Sprague-Dawley rats were administrated with thuringiensin by intratracheal instillation at doses 0.8, 1.6 and 3.2 mg/kg of body weight, respectively. The rats were sacrificed 4 h after treatment, and lungs were isolated and examined. Subsequently, an effective dose of 1.6 mg/kg was selected for the time course study (4, 8, 12, and 24 h). Intratracheal instillation of thuringiensin resulted in lung damage, as evidenced by increase in lung weight and decrease in alkaline phosphatase (10-54%), an enzyme localized primarily in pulmonary alveolar type II epithelial cells. Furthermore, the administration of thuringiensin caused increases in lipid peroxidation (21-105%), the indices of lung injury. In addition, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) activities of lung tissue extracts were measured to evaluate the effect of thuringiensin on antioxidant defense system. The SOD activity and GSH content in lung showed significant decreases in a dose-related manner with 11-21% and 15-37%, respectively. Those were further supported by the release of proinflammatory cytokines, as indicated by increases in IL-1{beta} (229-1017%) and TNF-{alpha} (234%) levels. Therefore, the results demonstrated that changes in the pulmonary oxidative-antioxidative status might play an important role in the thuringiensin-induced lung injury.

  11. IRIS Toxicological Review of Vanadium Pentoxide (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On September 30, 2011, the draft Toxicological Review of Vanadium Pentoxide and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and W...

  12. IRIS Toxicological Review of Vanadium Pentoxide (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This vanadium pentoxide reassessment consists of an oral reference dose (RfD), an inhalation reference concentration (RfC), an inhalation unit risk (IUR) and a cancer weight of evidence descriptor. This is the first assessment developing an RfC or IUR for this compound. This as...

  13. Metformin Reduces Bleomycin-induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun Mi; Jang, An Hee; Kim, Hyojin; Lee, Kyu Hwa; Kim, Young Whan

    2016-09-01

    Metformin has anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects. We investigated whether metformin has an inhibitory effect on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a murine model. A total of 62 mice were divided into 5 groups: control, metformin (100 mg/kg), BLM, and BLM with metformin (50 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg). Metformin was administered to the mice orally once a day from day 1. We sacrificed half of the mice on day 10 and collected the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from their left lungs. The remaining mice were sacrificed and analyzed on day 21. The right lungs were harvested for histological analyses. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers were determined via analysis of the harvested lungs on day 21. The mice treated with BLM and metformin (50 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg) showed significantly lower levels of inflammatory cells in the BALF compared with the BLM-only mice on days 10 and 21. The histological examination revealed that the metformin treatment led to a greater reduction in inflammation than the treatment with BLM alone. The mRNA levels of collagen, collagen-1, procollagen, fibronectin, and transforming growth factor-β in the metformin-treated mice were lower than those in the BLM-only mice on day 21, although statistical significance was observed only in the case of procollagen due to the small number of live mice in the BLM-only group. Additionally, treatment with metformin reduced fibrosis to a greater extent than treatment with BLM alone. Metformin suppresses the inflammatory and fibrotic processes of BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a murine model. PMID:27510385

  14. Thrombospondin-1 null mice are resistant to hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and objective Chronic hypoxia induces pulmonary hypertension in mice. Smooth muscle cell hyperplasia and medial thickening characterize the vasculature of these animals. Thrombospondin-1 null (TSP-1-/-) mice spontaneously develop pulmonary smooth muscle cell hyperplasia and medial thickening. In addition, TSP-1 produced by the pulmonary endothelium inhibits pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell growth. Based on these observations we sought to describe the pulmonary vascular changes in TSP-1-/- mice exposed to chronic hypoxia. Methods We exposed TSP-1-/- and wild type (WT) mice to a fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) of 0.1 for up to six weeks. Pulmonary vascular remodeling was evaluated using tissue morphometrics. Additionally, right ventricle systolic pressures (RVSP) and right ventricular hypertrophy by right ventricle/left ventricle + septum ratios (RV/LV+S) were measured to evaluate pulmonary hypertensive changes. Finally, acute pulmonary vasoconstriction response in both TSP-1-/- and WT mice was evaluated by acute hypoxia and U-46619 (a prostaglandin F2 analog) response. Results In hypoxia, TSP-1-/- mice had significantly lower RVSP, RV/LV+S ratios and less pulmonary vascular remodeling when compared to WT mice. TSP-1-/- mice also had significantly lower RVSP in response to acute pulmonary vasoconstriction challenges than their WT counterparts. Conclusion TSP-1-/- mice had diminished pulmonary vasoconstriction response and were less responsive to hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension than their wild type counterparts. This observation suggests that TSP-1 could play an active role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension associated with hypoxia. PMID:20441584

  15. Lysyl oxidase promotes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition during paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinfeng; Zhu, Yong; Tan, Jiuting; Meng, Xiaoxiao; Xie, Hui; Wang, Ruilan

    2016-02-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) is a copper-dependent amine oxidase that plays a critical role in pulmonary fibrosis. Our previous study demonstrated that epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was strongly associated with paraquat (PQ) induced pulmonary fibrosis. This present study was aimed to evaluate the potential involvement of LOX on EMT in the process of pulmonary fibrosis induced by PQ. We established an in vivo rat model and an in vitro cell model induced by PQ treatment and found that LOX protein expression was significantly up-regulated and collagen deposition was enhanced in rats. The EMT process was strongly found in A549 and RLE-6TN cells after PQ exposure. After inactivating LOX with an inhibitor, pulmonary fibrosis was significantly reduced and EMT was also suppressed. Additionally, small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting LOX was used to silence LOX expression to observe EMT in A549 cells. As a result, LOX could promote the progress of EMT, and inactivating LOX alleviated the EMT process in PQ-induced pulmonary fibrosis and mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) occurred after inactivating LOX in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, LOX could promote the progress of EMT and inactivating LOX alleviated EMT in PQ-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, LOX could potentially be a new candidate therapeutic target for pulmonary fibrosis induced by PQ by regulating the balance between EMT and MET. PMID:26670953

  16. Mice lacking the Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein exhibit exaggerated hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Morecroft, I; Doyle, B; Nilsen, M; Kolch, W; Mair, K; MacLean, MR

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Increased pulmonary vascular remodelling, pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance characterize the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Activation of the Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 is thought to play an important role in PAH and Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP), negatively regulates this pathway. This study investigated whether genetic deletion of RKIP (and hence ERK1/2 up-regulation) resulted in a pulmonary hypertensive phenotype in mice and investigated a role for RKIP in mitogen-regulated proliferative responses in lung fibroblasts. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Pulmonary vascular haemodynamics and remodelling were assessed in mice genetically deficient in RKIP (RKIP−/−) after 2 weeks of either normoxia or hypoxia. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry were used to examine phosphorylation of Raf-1, RKIP and ERK1/2 in mouse pulmonary arteries. In vitro, RKIP inhibition of mitogen signalling was analysed in CCL39 hamster lung fibroblasts. KEY RESULTS RKIP−/− mice demonstrated elevated indices of PAH and ERK1/2 phosphorylation compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Hypoxic RKIP−/− mice exhibited exaggerated PAH indices. Hypoxia increased phosphorylation of Raf-1, RKIP and ERK1/2 in WT mouse pulmonary arteries and Raf-1 phosphorylation in RKIP−/− mouse pulmonary arteries. In CCL39 cells, inhibition of RKIP potentiated mitogen-induced proliferation and phosphorylation of RKIP, and Raf-1. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The lack of RKIP protein resulted in a pulmonary hypertensive phenotype, exaggerated in hypoxia. Hypoxia induced phosphorylation of RKIP signalling elements in WT pulmonary arteries. RKIP inhibition potentiated mitogen-induced proliferation in lung fibroblasts. These results provide evidence for the involvement of RKIP in suppressing the development of hypoxia-induced PAH in mice. PMID:21385176

  17. Calcitriol inhibits bleomycin-induced early pulmonary inflammatory response and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in mice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhu-Xia; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Xu, Shen; Qin, Hou-Ying; Zhang, Cheng; Zhao, Hui; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Early pulmonary inflammation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) play important roles during lung fibrosis. Increasing evidence demonstrates that calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D3, has anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of calcitriol on bleomycin (BLM)-induced early pulmonary inflammation and subsequent EMT. Mice were intratracheally injected with BLM (3.0mg/kg). In three calcitriol+BLM groups, mice were intraperitoneal (i.p.) injected with different doses of calcitriol (0.2, 1.0 or 5.0 μg/kg) daily, beginning at 48 h before BLM injection. Twenty-four hours, seven and fourteen days after BLM injection, pulmonary inflammation and EMT were evaluated. As expected, BLM-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lungs was attenuated by calcitriol. BLM-induced pulmonary inflammatory cytokines were repressed by calcitriol. Moreover, BLM-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 was blocked by calcitriol. In addition, BLM-induced phosphorylation of pulmonary p38 MAPK and protein kinase B (Akt) was inhibited by calcitriol. Further analysis showed that BLM-induced α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), a marker for EMT in the lungs, was significantly attenuated by calcitriol. BLM-induced transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) up-regulation and Smad phosphorylation were attenuated by calcitriol. In conclusion, calcitriol inhibits BLM-induced early pulmonary inflammation and subsequent EMT. PMID:26520185

  18. Genistein attenuates low temperature induced pulmonary hypertension in broiler chicks by modulating endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Gao, Mingyu; Wu, Zhenlong; Guo, Yuming

    2010-12-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by high pulmonary blood pressure, vascular remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy. In the present study, we investigated whether genistein would prevent the development of low temperature-induced pulmonary hypertension in broilers. Hemodynamic parameters, vascular remodeling, the expression of endothelial nitric oxide and endothelin-1 content in lung tissue were evaluated. The results demonstrated that genistein significantly reduced pulmonary arterial hypertension and suppressed pulmonary arterial vascular remodeling without affecting broilers' performance. The beneficial effects appeared to be mediated by restoring endothelial function especially endothelial nitric oxide and endothelin-1, two critical vasoactive molecules that associated with the development of hypertension. Genistein supplementation might be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:20854807

  19. Sodium hydrosulfide prevents hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in broilers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Zhang, B K; Liu, D; Nie, W; Yuan, J M; Wang, Z; Guo, Y M

    2012-01-01

    1. The aim of the study was to determine if H(2)S is involved in the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in broilers, a condition frequently observed in a variety of cardiac and pulmonary diseases. 2. Two-week-old broilers were reared under normoxic conditions or exposed to normobaric hypoxia (6 h/day) with tissue levels of H(2)S adjusted by administering sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, 10 µmol/kg body weight/day). Mean pulmonary arterial pressure, right ventricular mass, plasma and tissue H(2)S levels, the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase (CSE) and vascular remodeling were determined at 35 d of age. 3. Exposure to hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension was characterized by elevated pulmonary pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy and vascular remodeling. This was accompanied by decreased expression of CSE and decreased concentrations of plasma and tissue H(2)S. 4. Hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension was significantly reduced by administration of NaHS but this protective effect was largely abolished by D, L-propargylglycerine, an inhibitor of CSE. 5. The results indicate that H(2)S is involved in the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Supplementing NaHS or H(2)S could be a strategy for reducing hypoxia-induced hypertension in broilers. PMID:23281754

  20. Effect of alpha and beta adrenergic blockade on epinephrine induced pulmonary insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Berk, J L; Hagen, J F; Koo, R

    1976-04-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that epinephrine causes significant pulmonary A-V shunting. This study reports the effect of alpha and beta adrenergic blockade on this shunting. Sixty-three anesthetized mongrel dogs were ventilated with a mechanical respirator. Measurements of (1) the pulmonary shunt, (2) cardiac output, (3) mean pulmonary artery, pulmonary capillary wedge and systemic pressures, and (4) pulmonary and systemic vascular resistances were obtained at 5, 15 and 30 minute intervals during the first hour and hourly for 5 hours. Fifteen dogs received no treatment. All others received epinephrine hydrochloride, 2 mug/kg/min for 5 hours. Ten received epinephrine only. Ten were pretreated with propranolol hydrochloride, 250 mug/kg, 12 with phenoxybenzamine, 1 mg/kg, and 16 with phenoxybenzamine and propranolol. Propranolol significantly decreased the epinephrine induced pulmonary shunt at all times and was the most effective drug. Phenoxybenzamine decreased the early shunting, but less than propranolol, and did not decrease the late shunting. Blockade with propranolol and phenoxybenzamine was less effective than propranolol alone. Based on the observed hemodynamic changes it was suggested that beta blockade is effective in reducing epinephrine induced pulmonary insufficiency by favorably altering the flow and distribution of pulmonary blood flow which in turn decreases epinephrine induced ventilation-perfusion inequalities and capillary hypertension both of which result in shunting. Conversely phenoxybenzamine has an unfavorable effect on the pulmonary flow. These studies support previous work in animals and man which showed that beta adrenergic stimulation is important in the pathogenesis of pulmonary insufficiency. Because the amounts of epinephrine used produce blood levels observed in critical illness, these studies add support to a relationship between the increased catecholamine stimulation of critical illness and the associated and often unexplained

  1. The Chinese Herbal Medicine Formula mKG Suppresses Pulmonary Fibrosis of Mice Induced by Bleomycin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Yao, Li-Fu; Zhao, Yang; Wei, Li-Man; Guo, Peng; Yu, Meng; Cao, Bo; Li, Tan; Chen, Hong; Zou, Zhong-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is a serious progressive lung disease and it originates from inflammation-induced parenchymal injury with excessive extracellular matrix deposition to result in the destruction of the normal lung architecture. Modified Kushen Gancao Formula (mKG), derived from traditional Chinese herbal medicine, has a prominent anti-inflammatory effect. The present study is to explore the inhibitory effects of mKG on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. mKG significantly decreased pulmonary alveolitis, fibrosis scores, and interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-17 (IL-17), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and hydroxyproline (HYP) levels in lung tissue of mice compared with BLM treatment. It markedly alleviated the increase of HYP content in the lung tissues and pathologic changes of pulmonary fibrosis caused by BLM instillation. In conclusion, mKG has an anti-fibrotic effect and might be employed as a therapeutic candidate agent for attenuating pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26891294

  2. The Chinese Herbal Medicine Formula mKG Suppresses Pulmonary Fibrosis of Mice Induced by Bleomycin

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Yao, Li-Fu; Zhao, Yang; Wei, Li-Man; Guo, Peng; Yu, Meng; Cao, Bo; Li, Tan; Chen, Hong; Zou, Zhong-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is a serious progressive lung disease and it originates from inflammation-induced parenchymal injury with excessive extracellular matrix deposition to result in the destruction of the normal lung architecture. Modified Kushen Gancao Formula (mKG), derived from traditional Chinese herbal medicine, has a prominent anti-inflammatory effect. The present study is to explore the inhibitory effects of mKG on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. mKG significantly decreased pulmonary alveolitis, fibrosis scores, and interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-17 (IL-17), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and hydroxyproline (HYP) levels in lung tissue of mice compared with BLM treatment. It markedly alleviated the increase of HYP content in the lung tissues and pathologic changes of pulmonary fibrosis caused by BLM instillation. In conclusion, mKG has an anti-fibrotic effect and might be employed as a therapeutic candidate agent for attenuating pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26891294

  3. Exposure to nickel oxide nanoparticles induces pulmonary inflammation through NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengwang; Fang, Yiliang; Lu, Yonghui; Qian, Fenghua; Ma, Qinglong; He, Mingdi; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in the manufacture and application of nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs), concerns about their adverse effects on the respiratory system are increasing. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of NiONP-induced pulmonary toxicity remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the impacts of NiONPs on pulmonary inflammation and investigated whether the NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and injury. NiONP suspensions were administered by single intratracheal instillation to rats, and inflammatory responses were evaluated at 3 days, 7 days, or 28 days after treatment. NiONP exposure resulted in sustained pulmonary inflammation accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar proteinosis, and cytokine secretion. Expression of Nlrp3 was markedly upregulated by the NiONPs, which was accompanied by overexpression of the active form of caspase-1 (p20) and interleukin (IL)-1β secretion in vivo. NiONP-induced IL-1β secretion was partially prevented by co-treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor in macrophages. Moreover, siRNA-mediated Nlrp3 knockdown completely attenuated NiONP-induced cytokine release and caspase-1 activity in macrophages in vitro. In addition, NiONP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation requires particle uptake and reactive oxygen species production. Collectively, our findings suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome participates in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and offer new strategies to combat the pulmonary toxicity induced by NiONPs. PMID:27524893

  4. Exposure to nickel oxide nanoparticles induces pulmonary inflammation through NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhengwang; Fang, Yiliang; Lu, Yonghui; Qian, Fenghua; Ma, Qinglong; He, Mingdi; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in the manufacture and application of nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs), concerns about their adverse effects on the respiratory system are increasing. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of NiONP-induced pulmonary toxicity remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the impacts of NiONPs on pulmonary inflammation and investigated whether the NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and injury. NiONP suspensions were administered by single intratracheal instillation to rats, and inflammatory responses were evaluated at 3 days, 7 days, or 28 days after treatment. NiONP exposure resulted in sustained pulmonary inflammation accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar proteinosis, and cytokine secretion. Expression of Nlrp3 was markedly upregulated by the NiONPs, which was accompanied by overexpression of the active form of caspase-1 (p20) and interleukin (IL)-1β secretion in vivo. NiONP-induced IL-1β secretion was partially prevented by co-treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor in macrophages. Moreover, siRNA-mediated Nlrp3 knockdown completely attenuated NiONP-induced cytokine release and caspase-1 activity in macrophages in vitro. In addition, NiONP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation requires particle uptake and reactive oxygen species production. Collectively, our findings suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome participates in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and offer new strategies to combat the pulmonary toxicity induced by NiONPs. PMID:27524893

  5. Protective role of interleukin-10 in Ozone-induced pulmonary inflammation**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The mechanisms underlying ozone (03)-induced pulmonary inflammation remain unclear. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that is known to inhibit inflammatory mediators. Objectives: We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying interleuken-10...

  6. Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation are Modulated by Adrenal-Derived Stress Hormones

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone exposure promotes pulmonary injury and inflammation. Previously we have characterized systemic changes that occur immediately after acute ozone exposure and are mediated by neuro-hormonal stress response pathway. Both HPA axis and sympathetic tone alterations induce the rel...

  7. Pulmonary reactions caused by welding-induced decomposed trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoegren, B.P.; Plato, N.; Alexandersson, R.; Eklund, A.; Falkenberg, C. )

    1991-01-01

    This is the report of a welder who performed argon-shielded electric arc welding in an atmosphere containing trichloroethylene. He developed immediate respiratory symptoms, pulmonary edema 12 hours after exposure, and recurring dyspnea ten days after exposure. These pulmonary reactions might be explained by inhalation of decomposition products of trichloroethylene such as dichloroacetyl chloride and phosgene.

  8. Passivated iodine pentoxide oxidizer for potential biocidal nanoenergetic applications.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jingyu; Jian, Guoqiang; Liu, Qing; Zachariah, Michael R

    2013-09-25

    Iodine pentoxide (I2O5), also known as diiodine pentoxide, is a strong oxidizer which has been recently proposed as an iodine-rich oxidizer in nanoenergetic formulations, whose combustion products lead to molecular iodine as a biocidal agent. However, its highly hygroscopic nature hinders its performance as a strong oxidizer and an iodine releasing agent and prevents its implementation. In this work, we developed a gas phase assisted aerosol spray pyrolysis which enables creation of iron oxide passivated I2O5. Transmission electron microscopy elemental imaging as well as temperature-jump mass spectrometry confirmed the core shell nature of the material and the fact that I2O5 could be encapsulated in pure unhydrated form. Combustion performance finds an optimal coating thickness that enables combustion performance similar to a high performing CuO based thermite. PMID:23988006

  9. Inducible NO synthase inhibition attenuates shear stress-induced pulmonary vasodilation in the ovine fetus.

    PubMed

    Rairigh, R L; Storme, L; Parker, T A; le Cras, T D; Kinsella, J P; Jakkula, M; Abman, S H

    1999-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that type II (inducible) nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS II) is present in the fetal lung, but its physiological roles are uncertain. Whether NOS II activity contributes to the NO-mediated fall in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) during shear stress-induced pulmonary vasodilation is unknown. We studied the hemodynamic effects of two selective NOS II antagonists [aminoguanidine (AG) and S-ethylisothiourea (EIT)], a nonselective NOS antagonist [nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA)], and a nonselective vasoconstrictor (U-46619) on PVR during partial compression of the ductus arteriosus (DA) in 20 chronically prepared fetal lambs (mean age 132 +/- 2 days, term 147 days). At surgery, catheters were placed in the left pulmonary artery (LPA) for selective drug infusion, an ultrasonic flow transducer was placed on the LPA to measure blood flow, and an inflatable vascular occluder was placed loosely around the DA for compression. On alternate days, a brief intrapulmonary infusion of normal saline (control), AG, EIT, L-NNA, or U-46619 was infused in random order into the LPA. The DA was compressed to increase mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) 12-15 mmHg above baseline values and held constant for 30 min. In control studies, DA compression reduced PVR by 42% from baseline values (P < 0.01). L-NNA treatment completely blocked the fall in PVR during DA compression. AG and EIT attenuated the decrease in PVR by 30 and 19%, respectively (P < 0.05). Nonspecific elevation in PVR by U-46619 did not affect the fall in PVR during DA compression. Immunostaining for NOS II identified this isoform in airway epithelium and vascular smooth muscle in the late-gestation ovine fetal lung. We conclude that selective NOS II antagonists attenuate but do not block shear stress-induced vasodilation in the fetal lung. We speculate that stimulation of NOS II activity, perhaps from smooth muscle cells, contributes in part to the NO-mediated fall in PVR during shear stress-induced

  10. Nitric oxide mediates bleomycin-induced angiogenesis and pulmonary fibrosis via regulation of VEGF.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Anand Krishnan V; Ramesh, Vani; Castro, Carlos A; Kaushik, Vivek; Kulkarni, Yogesh M; Wright, Clayton A; Venkatadri, Rajkumar; Rojanasakul, Yon; Azad, Neelam

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive lung disease hallmarked by increased fibroblast proliferation, amplified levels of extracellular matrix deposition and increased angiogenesis. Although dysregulation of angiogenic mediators has been implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, the specific rate-limiting angiogenic markers involved and their role in the progression of pulmonary fibrosis remains unclear. We demonstrate that bleomycin treatment induces angiogenesis, and inhibition of the central angiogenic mediator VEGF using anti-VEGF antibody CBO-P11 significantly attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo. Bleomycin-induced nitric oxide (NO) was observed to be the key upstream regulator of VEGF via the PI3k/Akt pathway. VEGF regulated other important angiogenic proteins including PAI-1 and IL-8 in response to bleomycin exposure. Inhibition of NO and VEGF activity significantly mitigated bleomycin-induced angiogenic and fibrogenic responses. NO and VEGF are key mediators of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and could serve as important targets against this debilitating disease. Overall, our data suggests an important role for angiogenic mediators in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25919965

  11. A Mechanistic Study on the Amiodarone-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shammari, Bader; Khalifa, Mohamed; Bakheet, Saleh A.; Yasser, Moustafa

    2016-01-01

    Amiodarone- (AM-) induced pulmonary toxicity (AIPT) is still a matter of research and is poorly understood. In attempting to resolve this issue, we treated Sprague-Dawley rats with AM doses of 80 mg/kg/day/i.p. for one, two, three, and four weeks. The rats were weighed at days 7, 14, 21, and 28 and bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were obtained to determine total leukocyte count (TLC). For each group, lung weighing, histopathology, and homogenization were performed. Fresh homogenates were used for determination of ATP content, lipid peroxides, GSH, catalase, SOD, GPx, GR activities, NO, and hydroxyproline levels. The results showed a significant decrease in body weight and GSH depletion together with an increase in both lung weight and lung/body weight coefficient in the first week. Considerable increases in lung hydroxyproline level with some histopathological alterations were apparent. Treatment for two weeks produced a significant increase in BAL fluid, TLC, GR activity, and NO level in lung homogenate. The loss of cellular ATP and inhibition of most antioxidative protective enzymatic system appeared along with alteration in SOD activity following daily treatment for three weeks, while, in rats treated with AM for four weeks, more severe toxicity was apparent. Histopathological diagnosis was mostly granulomatous inflammation and interstitial pneumonitis in rats treated for three and four weeks, respectively. As shown, it is obvious that slow oedema formation is the only initiating factor of AIPT; all other mechanisms may occur as a consequence. PMID:26933474

  12. Aluminum-induced pulmonary fibrosis: do fibers play a role?

    PubMed

    Gilks, B; Churg, A

    1987-07-01

    A 50-yr-old man with a history of 19 yr of work in the aluminum smelting industry, including 14 years in the potrooms, was found to have diffuse interstitial fibrosis, slightly more severe in the upper zones. He died of respiratory insufficiency 5 yr after initial presentation. Analysis of lung by electron optical techniques revealed 15,000,000,000 nonfibrous particles and 1,300,000,000 fibrous particles of aluminum oxide/g dry lung, values representing approximately a 1,000-fold increase over background exposure. The nonfibrous particles had a geometric mean diameter of 0.4 mu, and the fibers had a geometric mean length of 1.0 mu, a width of 0.06 mu, and an aspect ratio of 16. X-ray diffraction demonstrated alpha but not gamma aluminum oxide. These studies indicate that previous suggestions relating aluminum-induced fibrosis to the presence of gamma aluminum oxide are not correct. Although pulmonary fibrosis in this case may be a response to a very high total aluminum particle burden, the presence of large numbers of fibers raises the possibility that fibers play a role in aluminum fibrosis. PMID:3605831

  13. Pulmonary oedema produced by scorpion venom augments a phenyldiguanide-induced reflex response in anaesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, S B; Bagchi, S; Rai, O P; Aryya, N C

    1999-01-01

    The involvement of pulmonary oedema produced by scorpion venom in augmenting a phenyldiguanide (PDG)-induced reflex response was evaluated in urethane-anaesthetized rats. PDG-induced bradycardiac, hypotensive and apnoeic responses, expressed as time–response area, exhibited similarities before or after venom treatment. Hence, the time–response area of bradycardia was taken as a reflex parameter. Pulmonary oedema was determined by physical evaporation and histological methods. Exposure to Indian red scorpion (Buthus tamulus, BT; i.v.) venom for 30 min increased the pulmonary water content (P < 0.05; Student's t test) and augmented the PDG-induced bradycardiac reflex response by more than 2 times (P < 0.001). The increase of pulmonary water content was maximal with 100 μg kg−1 of venom and the augmentation was maximal with 10 μg kg−1. In a separate series of experiments, the venom (100 μg kg−1)-induced pulmonary oedema was confirmed by histological and physical methods. In this group also, the venom augmented the reflex to the same magnitude. Pulmonary oedema (physical and histological) and augmentation of the bradycardiac reflex response after BT venom (100 μg kg−1; i.v.) were absent in animals pretreated with aprotinin, a kallikrein-kinin inhibitor (6000 KIU; i.v.). Ondansetron (10 μg kg−1; i.v.), a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, failed to block the venom-induced pulmonary oedema (physical and histological) but blocked the venom-induced augmentation of the reflex. The results of this study indicate that the venom-induced augmentation of the PDG reflex is associated with pulmonary oedema involving kinins utilizing 5-HT3 receptors. PMID:10581322

  14. Health and environmental-effects profile for vanadium pentoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    The Health and Environmental Effects Profile for vanadium pentoxide was prepared by the Office of Health and Environmental Assessment, Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office, Cincinnati, OH for the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response to support listings of hazardous constituents of a wide range of waste streams under Section 3001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and to provide health-related limits for emergency actions under Section 101 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). Both published literature and information obtained from Agency program office files were evaluated as they pertained to potential human health, aquatic life, and environmental effects of hazardous-waste constituents. Quantitative estimates are presented, provided sufficient data are available. Existing data are insufficient to determine an Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) or a carcinogenic potency factor for vanadium pentoxide. The Reportable Quantity (RQ) value of 1, 10, 100, 1000, or 5000 pounds is used to determine the quantity of a hazardous substance for which notification is required in the event of a release as specified by CERCLA based on chronic toxicity. The RQ value for vanadium pentoxide is 100.

  15. Rosuvastatin, sildenafil and their combination in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rat.

    PubMed

    Jasińska-Stroschein, Magdalena; Owczarek, Jacek; Wesołowska, Anna; Orszulak-Michalak, Daria

    2014-09-01

    There is considerable interest in the pleiotropic effects of statins and their potential role in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. Previous experimental findings indicate that a combination of lipophilic statins with phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor, sildenafil, can offer preventive effects on rat monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. The present study is aimed to assess whether therapeutic regimen provides any benefits. Seven days after pulmonary hypertension induction, hydrophilic rosuvastatin and sildenafil were given for 14 days to male Wistar outbred rats. Right ventricular pressure, right ventricle mass and three biomarkers were evaluated after 21 days: brain natriuretic peptide, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and vascular endothelial growth factor. The present study demonstrates that administration of hydrophilic statin with sildenafil results in reduction of pulmonary vascular remodeling and right ventricular pressure. The results of biochemical measurements may suggest that statins play a positive role in right ventricle function or the process of angiogenesis in pulmonary hypertension development. PMID:25296680

  16. The Critical Role of Dynamin-Related Protein 1 in Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Vascular Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tingting; Wang, Na; Yu, Xiufeng; Shi, Jiucheng; Li, Qian; Zhang, Chen; Fu, Li; Wang, Shuang; Xing, Yan; Zheng, Xiaodong; Yu, Lei; Zhu, Daling

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a lethal disease characterized by pulmonary vascular obstruction due in part to excessive pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) migration and proliferation. The mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP1) has important influence on pulmonary vascular remodeling. However, whether DRP1 participates in the development and progression of pulmonary vascular angiogenesis has not been reported previously. To test the hypothesis that DRP1 promotes the angiogenesis via promoting the proliferation, stimulating migration, and inhibiting the apoptosis of PAECs in mitochondrial Ca(2+)-dependent manner, we performed following studies. Using hemodynamic analysis and morphometric assay, we found that DRP1 mediated the elevation of right ventricular systemic pressure (RVSP), right heart hypertrophy, and increase of pulmonary microvessels induced by hypoxia. DRP1 inhibition reversed tube network formation in vitro stimulated by hypoxia. The mitochondrial Ca(2+) inhibited by hypoxia was recovered by DRP1 silencing. Moreover, pulmonary vascular angiogenesis promoted by DRP1 was reversed by the specific mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter inhibitor Ru360. In addition, DRP1 promoted the proliferation and migration of PAECs in mitochondrial Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Besides, DRP1 decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced the DNA fragmentation, and inhibited the caspase-3 activation, which were all aggravated by Ru360. Therefore, these results indicate that the mitochondrial fission machinery promotes migration, facilitates proliferation, and prevents from apoptosis via mitochondrial Ca(2+)-dependent pathway in endothelial cells leading to pulmonary angiogenesis. PMID:25752284

  17. Carvacrol induces the apoptosis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianlong; Fan, Kai; Wang, Peng; Yu, Juan; Liu, Ruxia; Qi, Hanping; Sun, Hongli; Cao, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    The abnormal apoptosis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) is an important pathophysiological process in pulmonary vascular remodeling and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Carvacrol, an essential oil compound from oregano and thyme, has displayed antimicrobial, antitumor, and antioxidant properties. Although carvacrol has pro-apoptosis properties in tumor cells, the underlying mechanisms of carvacrol in PASMC apoptosis remain unclear. Thus, in this study, we aim to investigate the role of carvacrol in pulmonary vascular remodeling and PASMC apoptosis in hypoxia. Right Ventricular Hypertrophy Measurements and pulmonary pathomorphology data show that the ratio of the heart weight/tibia length (HW/TL), the right ventricle/left ventricle plus septum (RV/LV+S) and the medial width of the pulmonary artery increased in chronic hypoxia and were reversed by carvacrol treatment under hypoxia. Additionally, carvacrol inhibited PASMC viability, attenuated oxidative stress, induced mitochondria membrane depolarization, increased the percentage of apoptotic cells, suppressed Bcl-2 expression, decreased procaspase-3 expression, promoted caspase-3 activation, and inhibited the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt pathway. Taken together, these findings suggest that carvacrol attenuates the pulmonary vascular remodeling and promotes PASMC apoptosis by acting on, at least in part, the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. This process might provide us new insight into the development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26607464

  18. Resolution of pulmonary hypertension complication during venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia application.

    PubMed

    Ballard-Croft, Cherry; Wang, Dongfang; Jones, Cameron; Wang, Jingkun; Pollock, Robert; Jubak, Bob; Topaz, Stephen; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    2013-01-01

    We are developing a venovenous perfusion-induced systemic hyperthermia (vv-PISH) system for advanced cancer treatment. The vv-PISH system consistently delivered hyperthermia to adult healthy swine, but significant pulmonary hypertension developed during the heating phase. The goal of this study was to develop a method to prevent pulmonary hypertension. We hypothesized that pulmonary hypertension results from decreased priming solution air solubility, which causes pulmonary gas embolism. Healthy adult sheep (n = 3) were used to establish a standard vv-PISH sheep model without priming solution preheating. In subsequent sheep (n = 7), the priming solution was preheated (42-46°C) and the hyperthermia circuit flushed with CO2. All sheep survived the experiment and achieved 2 hours of 42°C hyperthermia. In the group lacking priming solution preheating, significant pulmonary hypertension (35-44 mm Hg) developed. In the sheep with priming solution preheating, pulmonary artery pressure was very stable without pulmonary hypertension. Blood electrolytes were in physiologic range, and complete blood counts were unaffected by hyperthermia. Blood chemistries revealed no significant liver or kidney damage. Our simple strategy of priming solution preheating completely resolved the problem of pulmonary hypertension as a milestone toward developing a safe and easy-to-use vv-PISH system for cancer treatment. PMID:23820278

  19. Oxidative stress-dependent activation of collagen synthesis is induced in human pulmonary smooth muscle cells by sera from patients with scleroderma-associated pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a major complication of systemic sclerosis. Although oxidative stress, intima hyperplasia and a progressive vessel occlusion appear to be clearly involved, the fine molecular mechanisms underpinning the onset and progression of systemic sclerosis-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension remain largely unknown. Here we shows for the first time that an increase of NADPH-derived reactive oxygen species production induced by sera from systemic sclerosis patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension drives collagen type I promoter activity in primary human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, suggesting that antioxidant-based therapies should be considered in the treatment of systemic sclerosis-associated vascular diseases. PMID:25085432

  20. Effect of aerosolized milrinone during drug-induced pulmonary hypertension in lambs.

    PubMed

    Gelvez, Javier; Fakioglu, Harun; Olarte, Jose L; Soliz, Amed; Totapally, Balagangadhar R; Torbati, Dan

    2004-07-01

    We tested whether aerosolized milrinone in lambs selectively reduces drug-induced acute pulmonary hypertension without reducing the mean systemic blood pressure (MSBP). Seven, 2-3-week-old lambs were anesthetized (50 mg/kg ketamine), paralyzed (0.1 mg/kg vecuronium bromide) and mechanically ventilated. A femoral artery, pulmonary artery, and jugular vein were catheterized for continuous monitoring of MSBP, mean pulmonary artery pressure, periodic gas-exchange analyses, and determination of cardiac output by thermodilution technique. An Airlife Misty nebulizer was used in a dry state to establish a stable baseline of an inspired fraction of oxygen (FiO(2)) at 0.21. Acute pulmonary hypertension with hypoxemia was then induced by increasing the mean pulmonary artery pressure up to 30-35% of the MSBP using 2-6 microg/kg/min of Thromboxane A(2) mimetic (U-46619), intravenously. The lambs were then subjected to 15 min of saline nebulization without milrinone followed by 30 min saline nebulization with a relatively high concentration of milrinone (10 mg/ml, total dose of 40 mg). Aerosolized milrinone had no effect on systemic or pulmonary artery pressure during combined acute pulmonary hypertension and hypoxemia. We speculate that our nebulization procedures failed to deliver sufficient amount of milrinone for producing a detectable hemodynamic effect. PMID:15082033

  1. Protection from Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis by Peripheral Targeting of Cannabinoid Receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Bronova, Irina; Smith, Brett; Aydogan, Bulent; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Vemuri, Kiran; Erdelyi, Katalin; Makriyannis, Alex; Pacher, Pal; Berdyshev, Evgeny V

    2015-10-01

    Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis (RIF) is a severe complication of thoracic radiotherapy that limits its dose, intensity, and duration. The contribution of the endocannabinoid signaling system in pulmonary fibrogenesis is not known. Using a well-established mouse model of RIF, we assessed the involvement of cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) in the onset and progression of pulmonary fibrosis. Female C57BL/6 mice and CB1 knockout mice generated on C57BL/6 background received 20 Gy (2 Gy/min) single-dose thoracic irradiation that resulted in pulmonary fibrosis and animal death within 15 to 18 weeks. Some C57BL/6 animals received the CB1 peripherally restricted antagonist AM6545 at 1 mg/kg intraperitoneally three times per week. Animal survival and parameters of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis were evaluated. Thoracic irradiation (20 Gy) was associated with marked pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in mice and high mortality within 15 to 18 weeks after exposure. Genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of CB1 receptors with a peripheral CB1 antagonist AM6545 markedly attenuated or delayed the lung inflammation and fibrosis and increased animal survival. Our results show that CB1 signaling plays a key pathological role in the development of radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis, and peripherally restricted CB1 antagonists may represent a novel therapeutic approach against this devastating complication of radiotherapy/irradiation. PMID:26426981

  2. Resistance of the hamster to amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity following repeated intraperitoneal administration.

    PubMed

    Leeder, R G; Evans, C D; Brien, J F; Massey, T E

    1994-10-01

    Amiodarone is an effective antidysrhythmic agent, restricted in use by the development of pulmonary toxicity. Several in vivo animal models have been used to study amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity. Intratracheal administration of amiodarone to the hamster has been used as a model for the critical amiodarone-induced pulmonary fibrosis (AIPF). In order to investigate the cellular mechanism of human AIPF, which occurs following oral or intravenous administration, an animal model of AIPF resulting from systemic administration of the drug would appear to be preferable. We have evaluated pulmonary toxicity following repeated intraperitoneal amiodarone administration to the hamster. Intraperitoneal treatment of hamsters for 1, 4, or 7 weeks with amiodarone (100 mg/kg/day) did not lead to pulmonary toxicity based on wet lung weight, hydroxyproline content, or histological examination. Furthermore, when comparing 1- and 7-week treatment groups, there was no pulmonary accumulation of either amiodarone or desethylamiodarone beyond levels found at 1 week. Therefore, failure to develop pulmonary toxicity may be due to an inability to accumulate sufficient amiodarone and/or desethylamiodarone. Intratracheal administration of amiodarone to rodents remains the only in vivo animal model for studying the mechanism(s) of AIPF. PMID:8085270

  3. Drug-induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome Accompanied by Pulmonary Lesions Exhibiting Centrilobular Nodular Shadows.

    PubMed

    Sawata, Tetsuro; Bando, Masashi; Kogawara, Haruna; Nakayama, Masayuki; Mato, Naoko; Yamasawa, Hideaki; Takemura, Tamiko; Sugiyama, Yukihiko

    2016-01-01

    A 51-year-old woman diagnosed with Crohn's disease developed drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) 12 and six weeks after starting the oral intake of mesalazine and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, respectively. Chest CT showed centrilobular nodular shadows and a transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) revealed infiltration of inflammatory cells predominantly in the small pulmonary artery walls and bronchiolar walls. Regarding pulmonary lesions of DIHS, infiltrative shadows have sometimes been reported, whereas nodular shadows have rarely been documented. This is a valuable case report for considering the mechanism underlying the development of pulmonary lesions in case of DIHS. PMID:27150872

  4. Elastase modifies bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Trajano, Larissa Alexsandra Silva Neto; Trajano, Eduardo Tavares Lima; Lanzetti, Manuella; Mendonça, Morena Scopel Amorim; Guilherme, Rafael Freitas; Figueiredo, Rodrigo Tinoco; Benjamim, Cláudia Farias; Valenca, Samuel Santos; Costa, Andréa Monte Alto; Porto, Luís Cristóvão

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is characterized by excessive accumulation of collagen in the lungs. Emphysema is characterized by loss of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and alveolar enlargement. We studied the co-participation of elastase-induced mild emphysema in bleomycin-induced PF in mice by analyzing oxidative stress, inflammation and lung histology. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: control; bleomycin (0.1U/mouse); elastase (using porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE)+bleomycin (3U/mouse 14 days before 0.1U/mouse of bleomycin; PPE+B); elastase (3U/mouse). Mice were humanely sacrificed 7, 14 and 21 days after treatment with bleomycin or vehicle. PF was observed 14 days and 21 days after bleomycin treatment but was observed after 14 days only in the PPE+B group. In the PPE+B group at 21 days, we observed many alveoli and alveolar septa with few PF areas. We also observed marked and progressive increases of collagens 7, 14 and 21 days after bleomycin treatment whereas, in the PPE+B group, collagen deposition was observed only at 14 days. There was a reduction in activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (p<0.05), catalase (p<0.01) and glutathione peroxidase (p<0.01) parallel with an increase in nitrite (p<0.01) 21 days after bleomycin treatment compared with the control group. These endpoints were also reduced (p<0.05, p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively) and increased (p<0.01) in the PPE+B group at 21 days compared with the control group. Interleukin (IL)-1β expression was upregulated (p<0.01) whereas IL-6 was downregulated (p<0.05) in the PPE+B group at 21 days compared with the control group. PF and emphysema did not coexist in our model of lung disease and despite increased levels of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers after combined stimulus (elastase and bleomycin) overall histology was improved to that of the nearest control group. PMID:26852294

  5. Impact-Driven Thermite Reactions with Iodine Pentoxide and Silver Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, R.; Bless, S.; Pantoya, M.

    2011-04-01

    Thermite reactions using aluminum (Al) fuel and either iodine pentoxide (I2O5) or silver oxide (Ag2O) were initiated by high-velocity impact or thermal initiation and examined for their flame propagation behavior. In the impact-ignition experiments, the Al-Ag2O reaction produced more energy than the Al-I2O5 reaction; in the thermal-ignition experiments, the I2O5 reaction produced higher flame propagation rates (1,305 m/s compared with 531 m/s). The energy released from impact-initiated reactions is significantly enhanced by reducing the size of the oxide particles. Results suggest that the reaction propagation mechanisms may be the same, even though ignition is spurred by two different stimuli (mechanically induced compaction versus thermal).

  6. Key Role of ROS in the Process of 15-Lipoxygenase/15-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoiccid-Induced Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Hypoxia Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yanli; Liu, Gaofeng; Sheng, Tingting; Yu, Xiufeng; Wang, Shuang; Zhu, Daling

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO) and its metabolite 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) were up-regulated in pulmonary arterial cells from both pulmonary artery hypertension patients and hypoxic rats and that these factors mediated the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) by affecting the proliferation and apoptosis of pulmonary arterial (PA) cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of the remodeling induced by 15-HETE have remained unclear. As reactive oxygen species (ROS) and 15-LO are both induced by hypoxia, it is possible that ROS are involved in the events of hypoxia-induced 15-LO expression that lead to PH. We employed immunohistochemistry, tube formation assays, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assays, and cell cycle analyses to explore the role of ROS in the process of 15-HETE-mediated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH). We found that exogenous 15-HETE facilitated the generation of ROS and that this effect was mainly localized to mitochondria. In particular, the mitochondrial electron transport chain and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 4 (Nox4) were responsible for the significant 15-HETE-stimulated increase in ROS production. Moreover, ROS induced by 15-HETE stimulated endothelial cell (EC) migration and promoted pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation under hypoxia via the p38 MAPK pathway. These results indicated that 15-HETE-regulated ROS mediated hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling (PVR) via the p38 MAPK pathway. PMID:26871724

  7. Therapeutic Benefits of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Chun; Ke, Meng-Wei; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Wann, Shue-Ren; Shu, Chih-Wen; Chiou, Kuan-Rau; Tseng, Ching-Jiunn; Pan, Hung-Wei; Mar, Guang-Yuan; Liu, Chun-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by progressive increases in vascular resistance and the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. The accumulation of inflammatory cells in the lung and elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines in the bloodstream suggest that inflammation may play a role in PAH. In this study, the benefits of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and iPSC-conditioned medium (iPSC CM) were explored in monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH rats. We demonstrated that both iPSCs and iPSC CM significantly reduced the right ventricular systolic pressure and ameliorated the hypertrophy of the right ventricle in MCT-induced PAH rats in models of both disease prevention and disease reversal. In the prevention of MCT-induced PAH, iPSC-based therapy led to the decreased accumulation of inflammatory cells and down-regulated the expression of the IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12α, IL-12β, IL-23 and IFNγ genes in lung specimens, which implied that iPSC-based therapy may be involved in the regulation of inflammation. NF-κB signaling is essential to the inflammatory cascade, which is activated via the phosphorylation of the NF-κB molecule. Using the chemical inhibitor specifically blocked the phosphorylation of NF-κB, and in vitro assays of cultured human M1 macrophages implied that the anti-inflammation effect of iPSC-based therapy may contribute to the disturbance of NF-κB activation. Here, we showed that iPSC-based therapy could restore the hemodynamic function of right ventricle with benefits for preventing the ongoing inflammation in the lungs of MCT-induced PAH rats by regulating NF-κB phosphorylation. PMID:26840075

  8. Thymosin Beta 4 Protects Mice from Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Ventricular Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liling; Gupta, Sudhiranjan

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive vascular disease of pulmonary arteries that impedes ejection of blood by the right ventricle. As a result there is an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary arterial pressure causing right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) and RV failure. The pathology of PAH involves vascular cell remodeling including pulmonary arterial endothelial cell (PAEC) dysfunction and pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation. Current therapies are limited to reverse the vascular remodeling. Investigating a key molecule is required for development of new therapeutic intervention. Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is a ubiquitous G-actin sequestering protein with diverse biological function and promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory responses. However, it remains unknown whether Tβ4 has any protective role in PH. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the whether Tβ4 can be used as a vascular-protective agent. In monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PH mouse model, we showed that mice treated with Tβ4 significantly attenuated the systolic pressure and RVH, compared to the MCT treated mice. Our data revealed for the first time that Tβ4 selectively targets Notch3-Col 3A-CTGF gene axis in preventing MCT-induced PH and RVH. Our study may provide pre-clinical evidence for Tβ4 and may consider as vasculo-protective agent for the treatment of PH induced RVH. PMID:25412097

  9. ECMO for pulmonary rescue in an adult with amiodarone-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Benassi, Filippo; Molardi, Alberto; Righi, Elena; Santangelo, Rosaria; Meli, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Amiodarone is a highly effective antiarrhythmic agent. Unfortunately amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity is described for medium-long term therapy. We describe a case of a 65-year-old man admitted to our department for breathlessness and with a history of recurrent episodes of atrial fibrillation for which he had been receiving amiodarone (200 mg/day) since 2008. Despite diuretic therapy, along with aspirin, statins and antibiotics the patient continued to complain of severe dyspnea and had a moderate fever. Thus, diagnostic hypotheses different from acute cardiac failure were considered, in particular non-cardiogenic causes of pulmonary infiltrates. Following suspicion of amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity, the drug was discontinued and corticosteroid therapy was initiated. Due to the deterioration of the clinical picture, we proceeded to intubation. After few hours from intubation we were forced to institute a veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation due to the worsening of pulmonary function. The patient's clinical condition improved which allowed us to remove the ECMO after 15 days of treatment. Indications for use of ECMO have expanded considerably. To our knowledge this is the first successful, reported article of a veno-venous ECMO used to treat amiodarone-induced toxicity in an adult. In patients with severe but potentially reversible pulmonary toxicity caused by amiodarone, extracorporeal life support can maintain pulmonary function and vital organ perfusion at the expense of low morbidity, while allowing time for drug clearance. PMID:24604330

  10. The unusual symmetric reopening effect induced by pulmonary surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Eiichiro; Giannetti, Matthew J.; Van Houten, Matthew J.; Forouzan, Omid; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the stability of a finger of air as it propagates into a liquid-filled model of a liquid-filled model of a pulmonary bifurcation. We seek to elucidate the stability characteristics of the reopening of daughter airways, an event that may be important to the treatment of acute lung disease. To do so, we investigated the symmetry of reopening under conditions of nearly constant surface tension with 1) purified H2O or 2) an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate). Dynamic surface tension was investigated using pulmonary surfactant (Infasurf) with and without the presence of albumin. Flow visualization was accomplished using a microparticle image velocimetry (μ-PIV)/shadowgraph system through which we measured 1) the propagation velocity of the finger of air that reopens each daughter branch, and 2) the instantaneous and averaged velocity field of liquid phase surrounding the tip of the propagating bubble. Only pulmonary surfactant demonstrated the ability of maintaining a nearly symmetric propagation in the daughter channels, which is likely to lead to homogeneous airway reopening. In contrast, when pulmonary surfactant was inactivated by albumin or when the system was held at a nearly constant surface tension, reopening occurred asymmetrically. Our analysis suggests that Infasurf's dynamic surface tension qualities are important to stabilize the removal of liquid obstructions. This demonstrates a new important function of pulmonary surfactant for airway reopening of a multibranched network. PMID:24458752

  11. The Effects of Aquaporin-1 in Pulmonary Edema Induced by Fat Embolism Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiwei; Tian, Kun; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Rong; Shang, Jiawei; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Aizhong

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of aquaporin1 (AQP1) in the pathologic process of pulmonary edema induced by fat embolism syndrome (FES) and the effects of a free fatty acid (FFA) mixture on AQP1 expression in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). In vivo, edema was more serious in FES mice compared with the control group. The expression of AQP1 and the wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (W/D) in the FES group were significantly increased compared with the control group. At the same time, inhibition of AQP1 decreased the pathological damage resulting from pulmonary edema. Then we performed a study in vitro to investigate whether AQP1 was induced by FFA release in FES. The mRNA and protein level of AQP1 were increased by FFAs in a dose- and time-dependent manner in PMVECs. In addition, the up-regulation of AQP1 was blocked by the inhibitor of p38 kinase, implicating the p38 MAPK pathway as involved in the FFA-induced AQP1 up-regulation in PMVECs. Our results demonstrate that AQP1 may play important roles in pulmonary edema induced by FES and can be regarded as a new therapy target for treatment of pulmonary edema induced by FES. PMID:27455237

  12. The Effects of Aquaporin-1 in Pulmonary Edema Induced by Fat Embolism Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiwei; Tian, Kun; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Rong; Shang, Jiawei; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Aizhong

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of aquaporin1 (AQP1) in the pathologic process of pulmonary edema induced by fat embolism syndrome (FES) and the effects of a free fatty acid (FFA) mixture on AQP1 expression in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). In vivo, edema was more serious in FES mice compared with the control group. The expression of AQP1 and the wet-to-dry lung weight ratio (W/D) in the FES group were significantly increased compared with the control group. At the same time, inhibition of AQP1 decreased the pathological damage resulting from pulmonary edema. Then we performed a study in vitro to investigate whether AQP1 was induced by FFA release in FES. The mRNA and protein level of AQP1 were increased by FFAs in a dose- and time-dependent manner in PMVECs. In addition, the up-regulation of AQP1 was blocked by the inhibitor of p38 kinase, implicating the p38 MAPK pathway as involved in the FFA-induced AQP1 up-regulation in PMVECs. Our results demonstrate that AQP1 may play important roles in pulmonary edema induced by FES and can be regarded as a new therapy target for treatment of pulmonary edema induced by FES. PMID:27455237

  13. Lack of Bcr and Abr Promotes Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Min; Arutyunyan, Anna; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Background Bcr and Abr are GTPase activating proteins that specifically downregulate activity of the small GTPase Rac in restricted cell types in vivo. Rac1 is expressed in smooth muscle cells, a critical cell type involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. The molecular mechanisms that underlie hypoxia-associated pulmonary hypertension are not well-defined. Methodology/Principal Findings Bcr and abr null mutant mice were compared to wild type controls for the development of pulmonary hypertension after exposure to hypoxia. Also, pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells from those mice were cultured in hypoxia and examined for proliferation, p38 activation and IL-6 production. Mice lacking Bcr or Abr exposed to hypoxia developed increased right ventricular pressure, hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Perivascular leukocyte infiltration in the lungs was increased, and under hypoxia bcr−/− and abr−/− macrophages generated more reactive oxygen species. Consistent with a contribution of inflammation and oxidative stress in pulmonary hypertension-associated vascular damage, Bcr and Abr-deficient animals showed elevated endothelial leakage after hypoxia exposure. Hypoxia-treated pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells from Bcr- or Abr-deficient mice also proliferated faster than those of wild type mice. Moreover, activated Rac1, phosphorylated p38 and interleukin 6 were increased in these cells in the absence of Bcr or Abr. Inhibition of Rac1 activation with Z62954982, a novel Rac inhibitor, decreased proliferation, p38 phosphorylation and IL-6 levels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells exposed to hypoxia. Conclusions Bcr and Abr play a critical role in down-regulating hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension by deactivating Rac1 and, through this, reducing both oxidative stress generated by leukocytes as well as p38 phosphorylation, IL-6 production and proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. PMID:23152932

  14. Inhaled tezosentan reduces pulmonary hypertension in endotoxin-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Persson, Björn P; Rossi, Patrik; Weitzberg, Eddie; Oldner, Anders

    2009-10-01

    The vasoconstrictive and proinflammatory peptide endothelin 1 (ET-1) is highly involved in the pathogenesis of sepsis and associated lung injury. Systemic administration of ET-receptor antagonists has been beneficial in experimental pulmonary hypertension. We wanted to study the effects of inhaled tezosentan, a dual endothelin-receptor antagonist on endotoxin-induced pulmonary hypertension, deterioration of gas exchange, and edema formation. After 2 h of endotoxemia, 28 anesthetized, mechanically ventilated pigs were randomized to either inhaled tezosentan 0.5 mg x kg (TEZO(0.5), n = 7), 0.05 mg x kg (TEZO(0.05), n = 7), intravenous 0.5 mg x kg (TEZO(iv), n = 7), or control (n = 7). Cardiopulmonary hemodynamics and gas-exchange parameters were recorded as well as extravascular lung water and pulmonary capillary pressure. In addition, plasma levels of tezosentan and ET-1 were analyzed. The protocol lasted for 5 h. Endotoxin-induced pulmonary hypertension (mean pulmonary artery pressure) was efficiently reduced by all treatments (TEZO(0.5) 24 +/- 2, TEZO(0.05) 27 +/- 2, TEZO(iv) 26 +/- 1, and control 37 +/- 2 mmHg at 4 h). TEZO(0.5) and TEZO(iv) also reduced pulmonary capillary pressure. All treatments led to a modest reduction in extravascular lung water, whereas no effects were noted on oxygenation or systemic circulation. Despite similar effects on pulmonary hypertension systemic treatment resulted in significantly higher plasma levels of ET-1 (twofold) and tezosentan (10- to 100-fold). Inhalation of the dual ET-receptor antagonist tezosentan was feasible and efficiently counteracted endotoxin-induced pulmonary hypertension. These effects were obtained with only minor systemic uptake of tezosentan and without affecting circulating levels of plasma ET-1 as compared with intravenous administration. PMID:19197226

  15. Heme biosynthesis modulation via δ-aminolevulinic acid administration attenuates chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Alhawaj, Raed; Patel, Dhara; Kelly, Melissa R.; Sun, Dong

    2015-01-01

    This study examines how heme biosynthesis modulation with δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) potentially functions to prevent 21-day hypoxia (10% oxygen)-induced pulmonary hypertension in mice and the effects of 24-h organoid culture with bovine pulmonary arteries (BPA) with the hypoxia and pulmonary hypertension mediator endothelin-1 (ET-1), with a focus on changes in superoxide and regulation of micro-RNA 204 (miR204) expression by src kinase phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3). The treatment of mice with ALA attenuated pulmonary hypertension (assessed through echo Doppler flow of the pulmonary valve, and direct measurements of right ventricular systolic pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy), increases in pulmonary arterial superoxide (detected by lucigenin), and decreases in lung miR204 and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2) expression. ALA treatment of BPA attenuated ET-1-induced increases in mitochondrial superoxide (detected by MitoSox), STAT3 phosphorylation, and decreases in miR204 and SOD2 expression. Because ALA increases BPA protoporphyrin IX (a stimulator of guanylate cyclase) and cGMP-mediated protein kinase G (PKG) activity, the effects of the PKG activator 8-bromo-cGMP were examined and found to also attenuate the ET-1-induced increase in superoxide. ET-1 increased superoxide production and the detection of protoporphyrin IX fluorescence, suggesting oxidant conditions might impair heme biosynthesis by ferrochelatase. However, chronic hypoxia actually increased ferrochelatase activity in mouse pulmonary arteries. Thus, a reversal of factors increasing mitochondrial superoxide and oxidant effects that potentially influence remodeling signaling related to miR204 expression and perhaps iron availability needed for the biosynthesis of heme by the ferrochelatase reaction could be factors in the beneficial actions of ALA in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25659899

  16. Rapidly reversible alterations of pulmonary epithelial permeability induced by smoking

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, G.R.; Uszler, J.M.; Effros, R.M.; Reid, E.

    1983-01-01

    A radioaerosol procedure using /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA (diethylene triamine penta acetate) was used to evaluate the permeability of the pulmonary epithelium in smokers and nonsmokers. The average clearance of this indicator from the lungs of smokers without significant airway obstruction exceeded that found in normal subjects by an average factor of more than five. This abnormality was observed throughout all lung regions. /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA clearance decreased rapidly during the week after smoking was discontinued. It is concluded that smoking results in a rapidly reversible increase in pulmonary epithelial permeability.

  17. Changes in pulmonary arterial wall mechanical properties and lumenal architecture with induced vascular remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molthen, Robert C.; Heinrich, Amy E.; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2004-04-01

    To explore and quantify pulmonary arterial remodeling we used various methods including micro-CT, high-resolution 3-dimensional x-ray imaging, to examine the structure and function of intact pulmonary vessels in isolated rat lungs. The rat is commonly used as an animal model for studies of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and the accompanying vascular remodeling, where vascular remodeling has been defined primarily by changes in the vessel wall composition in response to hypertension inducing stimuli such as chronic hypoxic exposure (CHE) or monocrotaline (MCT) injection. Little information has been provided as to how such changes affect the vessel wall mechanical properties or the lumenal architecture of the pulmonary arterial system that actually account for the hemodynamic consequences of the remodeling. In addition, although the link between primary forms of pulmonary hypertension and inherited genetics is well established, the role that genetic coding plays in hemodynamics and vascular remodeling is not. Therefore, we are utilizing Fawn-Hooded (FH), Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Brown Norway (BN)rat strains along with unique imaging methods to parameterize both vessel distensibility and lumenal morphometry using a principal pulmonary arterial pathway analysis based on self-consistency. We have found for the hypoxia model, in addition to decreased body weight, increased hematocrit, increased right ventricular hypertrophy, the distensibility of the pulmonary arteries is shown to decrease significantly in the presence of remodeling.

  18. The Effect of TIP on Pneumovirus-Induced Pulmonary Edema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Elske; Bem, Reinout A.; Bos, Albert P.; Lutter, Rene; van Woensel, Job B. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary edema plays a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced respiratory failure. In this study we determined whether treatment with TIP (AP301), a synthetic cyclic peptide that mimics the lectin-like domain of human TNF, decreases pulmonary edema in a mouse model of severe human RSV infection. TIP is currently undergoing clinical trials as a therapy for pulmonary permeability edema and has been shown to decrease pulmonary edema in different lung injury models. Methods C57BL/6 mice were infected with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) and received TIP or saline (control group) by intratracheal instillation on day five (early administration) or day seven (late administration) after infection. In a separate set of experiments the effect of multiple dose administration of TIP versus saline was tested. Pulmonary edema was determined by the lung wet-to-dry (W/D) weight ratio and was assessed at different time-points after the administration of TIP. Secondary outcomes included clinical scores and lung cellular response. Results TIP did not have an effect on pulmonary edema in different dose regimens at different time points during PVM infection. In addition, TIP administration did not affect clinical severity scores or lung cellular response. Conclusion In this murine model of severe RSV infection TIP did not affect pulmonary edema nor course of disease. PMID:25047452

  19. Sol-gel derived PZT films doped with vanadium pentoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Hongfang; Guo Qing; Zhao Zhiman; Cao Guozhong

    2009-11-15

    The present research investigated the sol-gel preparation, dielectric and ferroelectric properties of PZT films doped with 5 mol% vanadium oxide. Stable PZTV sols can be readily formed, and homogeneous, micrometer thick and pinhole-free PZTV films were obtained by using spin coating followed with rapid annealing. The X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that no parasitic or secondary phases were formed in the sol-gel PZT films with the addition of vanadium oxide. The material doped with vanadium pentoxide showed enhanced dielectric constant and remanent polarization with reduced loss tangent and coercive field.

  20. Keratinocyte growth factor protects against elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice.

    PubMed

    Plantier, Laurent; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Antico Arciuch, Valeria G; Antico, Valeria G; Boyer, Laurent; De Coster, Cécile; Marchal, Joëlle; Bachoual, Rafik; Mailleux, Arnaud; Boczkowski, Jorge; Crestani, Bruno

    2007-11-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is characterized by persistent inflammation and progressive alveolar destruction. The keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) favorably influences alveolar maintenance and repair and possesses anti-inflammatory properties. We aimed to determine whether exogenous KGF prevented or corrected elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema in vivo. Treatment with 5 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1) KGF before elastase instillation prevented pulmonary emphysema. This effect was associated with 1) a sharp reduction in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid total protein and inflammatory cell recruitment, 2) a reduction in the pulmonary expression of the chemokines CCL2 (or monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) and CXCL2 (or macrophage inflammatory protein-2alpha) and of the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, 3) a reduction in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 activity at day 3, and 4) a major reduction in DNA damage detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) in alveolar cells at day 7. Treatment with KGF after elastase instillation had no effect on elastase-induced emphysema despite the conserved expression of the KGF receptor in the lungs of elastase-instilled animals as determined by immunohistochemistry. In vitro, KGF abolished the elastase-induced increase in CCL2, CXCL2, and ICAM-1 mRNA in the MLE-12 murine alveolar epithelial cell line. We conclude that KGF pretreatment protected against elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation, activation of MMPs, alveolar cell DNA damage, and subsequent emphysema in mice. PMID:17766584

  1. Swimming-induced immersion pulmonary edema while snorkeling can be rapidly life-threatening: case reports.

    PubMed

    Cochard, G; Henckes, A; Deslandes, S; Noël-Savina, E; Bedossa, M; Gladu, G; Ozier, Y

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that immersion pulmonary edema can be life-threatening for divers using a self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba). Swimming-induced pulmonary edema in otherwise healthy individuals is not an object of dispute but its real severity is not well known and is probably underestimated. We report two cases of life-threatening acute respiratory distress while swimming and snorkeling, one of which is well documented for swimming-induced pulmonary edema. The interest of these case reports lies in the suddenness of these life-threatening events. Such accidents can mimic a loss of consciousness due to cardiac dysrhythmia and lead to drowning. In the case of swimming-induced pulmonary edema, the prognosis is far better than for a cardiac disorder, but it is also dependent on the efficiency of the supervision. Swimmers, divers, race organizers and supervising physicians should be given knowledge of this pathology and its potentially acute occurrence. Adequate organizational dispositions are mandatory to prevent swimming-induced pulmonary edema-related deaths. PMID:24224285

  2. 4-Phenylbutyric Acid Induces Protection against Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Long, Mei; Wang, Jie; Liu, Fen; Gai, Min-Tao; Aierken, Alidan; Li, Ming-Yuan; Li, Qian; Wu, Lei-Qi; Ma, Yi-Tong; Hujiaaihemaiti, Minawaer

    2016-01-01

    Background Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology of various pulmonary diseases via the activation of the unfolded protein response. However, the role of ER stress in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains unclear. The well-known chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) inhibits ER stress signaling. We hypothesized that known chemical chaperones, including 4-PBA, would inhibit the activation of ER stress and prevent and/or reverse PAH. Methods and Results Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: a normal control group (NORMAL group), a PAH group, and two PAH model plus 4-PBA treatment groups. The latter two groups included rats receiving 4-PBA by gavage each day as a preventive measure (the PRE group, with PBA starting on the day of PAH induction and continuing for 4 weeks) or as a reversal measure (the REV group, with PBA starting on the third week of PAH induction and continuing for 2 weeks). The PAH model was induced by intraperitoneally administering monocrotaline. The mean pulmonary artery pressure and mean right ventricular pressure were lower in the REV and PRE groups than in the NORMAL group. Furthermore, 4-PBA improved pulmonary arterial remodeling and suppressed the expression of ER stress indicators. Conclusion Our findings indicate that PAH induces ER stress and provokes pulmonary arterial and right ventricular remodeling. Additionally, we show that attenuation of ER stress has the potential to be an effective therapeutic strategy for protecting pulmonary arteries. PMID:27304885

  3. Preventive effects of vitamin D treatment on bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zongmei; Yu, Xiaoting; Fang, Xia; Liang, Aibin; Yu, Zhang; Gu, Pan; Zeng, Yu; He, Jian; Zhu, Hailong; Li, Shuai; Fan, Desheng; Han, Fei; Zhang, Lanjing; Yi, Xianghua

    2015-01-01

    Patients with pulmonary fibrosis often have low vitamin D levels, the effects of which are largely unknown. We here report that early vitamin D supplementation significantly reduced the severity of pulmonary fibrosis and inflammatory cell accumulationin in the bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis mouse model on supplementary days 14, 21 and 28 (P < 0.001). Vitamin D supplementation also prevented some ultrastructural changes in response to bleomycin administration, including basement membrane thickening, interstitial fibrin deposition and microvilli flattening or disappearance on days 14, 21 and 28, and lamellar body swelling or vacuolation on days 21 and 28. The bleomycin group had rising hydroxyproline level on days 14, 21 and 28, whereas the vitamin D treatment group showed consistently lower hydroxyproline level but still higher than that of the control group (P < 0.001). Our immunohistochemistry and densitometry analyses showed less staining for α-smooth muscle actin, a myofibroblast marker, in the vitamin D group compared to the bleomycin group (P < 0.001). Thus, vitamin D treatment could prevent bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis by delaying or suppressing ultrastructural changes, as well as attenuating hydroxyproline accumulation and inhibiting myofibroblastic proliferation. These data further our understanding of the roles of vitamin D in pulmonary fibrogenesis and in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:26627341

  4. Hypoxia inducible factor signaling and experimental persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn

    PubMed Central

    Wedgwood, Stephen; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan; Schumacker, Paul T.; Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) activity are increased in a lamb model of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). These events can trigger hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) signaling in response to hypoxia, which has been shown to contribute to pulmonary vascular remodeling in rodent models of pulmonary hypertension. However, the role of HIF signaling in chronic intrauterine pulmonary hypertension is not well understood. Aim: To determine if HIF signaling is increased in the lamb model of PPHN, and to identify the underlying mechanisms. Results: PPHN was induced in lambs by antenatal ligation of the ductus arteriosus at 128 days gestation. After 9 days, lungs and pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) were isolated from control and PPHN lambs. HIF-1α expression was increased in PPHN lungs and HIF activity was increased in PPHN PASMC relative to controls. Hypoxia increased HIF activity to a greater degree in PPHN vs. control PASMC. Control PASMC were exposed to cyclic stretch at 1 Hz and 15% elongation for 24 h, as an in vitro model of vascular stress. Stretch increased HIF activity, which was attenuated by inhibition of mitochondrial complex III and NFκB. Conclusion: Increased HIF signaling in PPHN is triggered by stretch, via mechanisms involving mitochondrial ROS and NFκB. Hypoxia substantially amplifies HIF activity in PPHN vascular cells. Targeting these signaling molecules may attenuate and reverse pulmonary vascular remodeling associated with PPHN. PMID:25814954

  5. Fractal Dimension in Quantifying Experimental-Pulmonary-Hypertension-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Sabela, Ana Karênina Dias de Almeida; Mariano, Thaoan Bruno; Ozaki, Guilherme Akio Tamura; Castoldi, Robson Chacon; do Carmo, Edna Maria; Carvalho, Robson Francisco; Tomasi, Loreta Casquel; Okoshi, Katashi; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2016-01-01

    Background Right-sided heart failure has high morbidity and mortality, and may be caused by pulmonary arterial hypertension. Fractal dimension is a differentiated and innovative method used in histological evaluations that allows the characterization of irregular and complex structures and the quantification of structural tissue changes. Objective To assess the use of fractal dimension in cardiomyocytes of rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension, in addition to providing histological and functional analysis. Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups: control (C; n = 8) and monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (M; n = 8). Five weeks after pulmonary arterial hypertension induction with monocrotaline, echocardiography was performed and the animals were euthanized. The heart was dissected, the ventricles weighed to assess anatomical parameters, and histological slides were prepared and stained with hematoxylin/eosin for fractal dimension analysis, performed using box-counting method. Data normality was tested (Shapiro-Wilk test), and the groups were compared with non-paired Student t test or Mann Whitney test (p < 0.05). Results Higher fractal dimension values were observed in group M as compared to group C (1.39 ± 0.05 vs. 1.37 ± 0.04; p < 0.05). Echocardiography showed lower pulmonary artery flow velocity, pulmonary acceleration time and ejection time values in group M, suggesting function worsening in those animals. Conclusion The changes observed confirm pulmonary-arterial-hypertension-induced cardiac dysfunction, and point to fractal dimension as an effective method to evaluate cardiac morphological changes induced by ventricular dysfunction. PMID:27223643

  6. Hypoxia-induced Deoxycytidine Kinase Contributes to Epithelial Proliferation in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Tingting; Poth, Jens M.; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Garcia-Morales, Luis J.; Melicoff, Ernestina; Luo, Fayong; Chen, Ning-yuan; Evans, Christopher M.; Bunge, Raquel R.; Bruckner, Brian A.; Loebe, Matthias; Volcik, Kelly A.; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a deadly lung disease with few therapeutic options. Apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells, followed by abnormal tissue repair characterized by hyperplastic epithelial cell formation, is a pathogenic process that contributes to the progression of pulmonary fibrosis. However, the signaling pathways responsible for increased proliferation of epithelial cells remain poorly understood. Objectives: To investigate the role of deoxycytidine kinase (DCK), an important enzyme for the salvage of deoxynucleotides, in the progression of pulmonary fibrosis. Methods: DCK expression was examined in the lungs of patients with IPF and mice exposed to bleomycin. The regulation of DCK expression by hypoxia was studied in vitro and the importance of DCK in experimental pulmonary fibrosis was examined using a DCK inhibitor and alveolar epithelial cell-specific knockout mice. Measurements and Main Results: DCK was elevated in hyperplastic alveolar epithelial cells of patients with IPF and in mice exposed to bleomycin. Increased DCK was localized to cells associated with hypoxia, and hypoxia directly induced DCK in alveolar epithelial cells in vitro. Hypoxia-induced DCK expression was abolished by silencing hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and treatment of bleomycin-exposed mice with a DCK inhibitor attenuated pulmonary fibrosis in association with decreased epithelial cell proliferation. Furthermore, DCK expression, and proliferation of epithelial cells and pulmonary fibrosis was attenuated in mice with conditional deletion of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α in the alveolar epithelium. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the induction of DCK after hypoxia plays a role in the progression of pulmonary fibrosis by contributing to alveolar epithelial cell proliferation. PMID:25358054

  7. Early Detection of Schistosoma Egg-Induced Pulmonary Granulomas in a Returning Traveler.

    PubMed

    Coron, Noémie; Le Govic, Yohann; Kettani, Sami; Pihet, Marc; Hemery, Sandrine; de Gentile, Ludovic; Chabasse, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a French traveler who developed acute pulmonary schistosomiasis 2 months after visiting Benin. He presented with a 1-month history of fever, cough, and thoracic pain. Initial investigations revealed hypereosinophilia and multiple nodular lesions on chest computed tomography scan. Lung biopsies were performed 2 months later because of migrating chest infiltrates and increasing eosinophilia. Histological examination showed schistosomal egg-induced pulmonary granulomas with ova exhibiting a prominent terminal spine, resembling Schistosoma haematobium. However, egg shells were Ziehl-Neelsen positive, raising the possibility of a Schistosoma intercalatum or a Schistosoma guineensis infection. Moreover, involvement of highly infectious hybrid species cannot be excluded considering the atypical early pulmonary oviposition. This case is remarkable because of the rarity of pulmonary schistosomiasis, its peculiar clinical presentation and difficulties in making species identification. It also emphasizes the need to consider schistosomiasis diagnosis in all potentially exposed travelers with compatible symptoms. PMID:26787142

  8. Hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension augments lung injury and airway reactivity caused by ozone exposure.

    PubMed

    Zychowski, Katherine E; Lucas, Selita N; Sanchez, Bethany; Herbert, Guy; Campen, Matthew J

    2016-08-15

    Ozone (O3)-related cardiorespiratory effects are a growing public health concern. Ground level O3 can exacerbate pre-existing respiratory conditions; however, research regarding therapeutic interventions to reduce O3-induced lung injury is limited. In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypoxia-associated pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is a frequent comorbidity that is difficult to treat clinically, yet associated with increased mortality and frequency of exacerbations. In this study, we hypothesized that established HPH would confer vulnerability to acute O3 pulmonary toxicity. Additionally, we tested whether improvement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity via rho-kinase inhibition could mitigate pulmonary inflammation and injury. To determine if O3 exacerbated HPH, male C57BL/6 mice were subject to either 3 weeks continuous normoxia (20.9% O2) or hypoxia (10.0% O2), followed by a 4-h exposure to either 1ppm O3 or filtered air (FA). As an additional experimental intervention fasudil (20mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally prior to and after O3 exposures. As expected, hypoxia significantly increased right ventricular pressure and hypertrophy. O3 exposure in normoxic mice caused lung inflammation but not injury, as indicated by increased cellularity and edema in the lung. However, in hypoxic mice, O3 exposure led to increased inflammation and edema, along with a profound increase in airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Fasudil administration resulted in reduced O3-induced lung injury via the enhancement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity. These results indicate that increased pulmonary vascular pressure may enhance lung injury, inflammation and edema when exposed to pollutants, and that enhancement of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity may alleviate such vulnerability. PMID:27286659

  9. miR-29 inhibits bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jun; Meng, Xiao-Ming; Huang, Xiao R; Chung, Arthur Ck; Feng, Yu-Lin; Hui, David Sc; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Sung, Joseph Jy; Lan, Hui Y

    2012-06-01

    Loss of microRNA-29 (miR-29) is known to be a mechanism of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-mediated pulmonary fibrosis, but the therapeutic implication of miR-29 for pulmonary fibrosis remains unexplored. The present study investigated whether miR-29 had therapeutic potential for lung disease induced by bleomycin in mice. In addition, the signaling mechanisms that regulated miR-29 expression were investigated in vivo and in vitro. We found that miR-29 was a downstream target gene of Smad3 and negatively regulated by TGF-β/Smad signaling in fibrosis. This was evidenced by the findings that mice or pulmonary fibroblasts null for Smad3 were protected against bleomycin or TGF-β1-induced loss of miR-29 along with fibrosis in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, overexpression of miR-29 could in turn negatively regulated TGF-β and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression and Smad3 signaling. Therefore, Sleeping Beauty (SB)-mediated miR-29 gene transfer into normal and diseased lung tissues was capable of preventing and treating pulmonary fibrosis including inflammatory macrophage infiltration induced by bleomycin in mice. In conclusion, miR-29 is negatively regulated by TGF-β/Smad3 and has a therapeutic potential for pulmonary fibrosis. SB-mediated miR-29 gene therapy is a non-invasive therapeutic strategy for lung disease associated with fibrosis. PMID:22395530

  10. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) reverses experimental pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Abdul G; Arnold, Nadine D; Chamberlain, Janet; Pickworth, Josephine A; Paiva, Claudia; Dawson, Sarah; Cross, Simon; Long, Lu; Zhao, Lan; Morrell, Nicholas W; Crossman, David C; Newman, Christopher M H; Kiely, David G; Francis, Sheila E; Lawrie, Allan

    2012-10-22

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease characterized by the progressive narrowing and occlusion of small pulmonary arteries. Current therapies fail to fully reverse this vascular remodeling. Identifying key pathways in disease pathogenesis is therefore required for the development of new-targeted therapeutics. We have previously reported tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) immunoreactivity within pulmonary vascular lesions from patients with idiopathic PAH and animal models. Because TRAIL can induce both endothelial cell apoptosis and smooth muscle cell proliferation in the systemic circulation, we hypothesized that TRAIL is an important mediator in the pathogenesis of PAH. We demonstrate for the first time that TRAIL is a potent stimulus for pulmonary vascular remodeling in human cells and rodent models. Furthermore, antibody blockade or genetic deletion of TRAIL prevents the development of PAH in three independent rodent models. Finally, anti-TRAIL antibody treatment of rodents with established PAH reverses pulmonary vascular remodeling by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis, improves hemodynamic indices, and significantly increases survival. These preclinical investigations are the first to demonstrate the importance of TRAIL in PAH pathogenesis and highlight its potential as a novel therapeutic target to direct future translational therapies. PMID:23071256

  11. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) reverses experimental pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Abdul G.; Arnold, Nadine D.; Chamberlain, Janet; Pickworth, Josephine A.; Paiva, Claudia; Dawson, Sarah; Cross, Simon; Long, Lu; Zhao, Lan; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Crossman, David C.; Newman, Christopher M.H.; Kiely, David G.; Francis, Sheila E.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease characterized by the progressive narrowing and occlusion of small pulmonary arteries. Current therapies fail to fully reverse this vascular remodeling. Identifying key pathways in disease pathogenesis is therefore required for the development of new-targeted therapeutics. We have previously reported tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) immunoreactivity within pulmonary vascular lesions from patients with idiopathic PAH and animal models. Because TRAIL can induce both endothelial cell apoptosis and smooth muscle cell proliferation in the systemic circulation, we hypothesized that TRAIL is an important mediator in the pathogenesis of PAH. We demonstrate for the first time that TRAIL is a potent stimulus for pulmonary vascular remodeling in human cells and rodent models. Furthermore, antibody blockade or genetic deletion of TRAIL prevents the development of PAH in three independent rodent models. Finally, anti-TRAIL antibody treatment of rodents with established PAH reverses pulmonary vascular remodeling by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis, improves hemodynamic indices, and significantly increases survival. These preclinical investigations are the first to demonstrate the importance of TRAIL in PAH pathogenesis and highlight its potential as a novel therapeutic target to direct future translational therapies. PMID:23071256

  12. Aloe vera affects changes induced in pulmonary tissue of mice caused by cigarette smoke inhalation.

    PubMed

    Koul, Ashwani; Bala, Shashi; Yasmeen; Arora, Neha

    2015-09-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the influence of Aloe vera (AV) on changes induced in pulmonary tissue of cigarette smoke (CS) inhaling mice. CS inhalation for 4 weeks caused pulmonary damage as evident by histoarchitectural alterations and enhanced serum and tissue lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities. CS inhalation also led to increased mucin production as revealed by mucicarmine and Alcian Blue-Periodic Acid Schiff (AB-PAS) staining. Studies on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (balf) of CS exposed animals revealed structural changes in phospholipids and increase in surface tension when compared with control counterparts. These changes were accompanied by enhanced nitric oxide (NO) levels, citrulline levels, peroxidative damage, and differential modulation of antioxidant defense system. AV administration (seven weeks, 500 mg/kg b.w. daily) to CS inhaling mice led to modulation of CS induced pulmonary changes as revealed by lesser degree of histoarchitectural alterations, lesser mucin production, decreased NO levels, citrulline levels, peroxidative damage, and serum LDH activity. AV treatment to CS inhaling mice was associated with varying response to antioxidant defense system, however balf of CS + AV treated animals did not exhibit appreciable changes when compared with that of CS exposed animals. These observations suggest that AV has the potential to modulate CS induced changes in the pulmonary tissue which could have implications in management of CS associated pulmonary diseases, however, further investigations are required to explore its complete mechanism of action. PMID:24615921

  13. Molecular insights into the progression of crystalline silica-induced pulmonary toxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sellamuthu, Rajendran; Umbright, Christina; Roberts, Jenny R.; Cumpston, Amy; McKinney, Walter; Chen, Bean T.; Frazer, David; Li, Shengqiao; Kashon, Michael; Joseph, Pius

    2015-01-01

    Identification of molecular target(s) and mechanism(s) of silica-induced pulmonary toxicity is important for the intervention and/or prevention of diseases associated with exposure to silica. Rats were exposed to crystalline silica by inhalation (15 mg m−3, 6 h per day, 5 days) and global gene expression profile was determined in the lungs by microarray analysis at 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 weeks following termination of silica exposure. The number of significantly differentially expressed genes (>1.5-fold change and <0.01 false discovery rate P-value) detected in the lungs during the post-exposure time intervals analyzed exhibited a steady increase in parallel with the progression of silica-induced pulmonary toxicity noticed in the rats. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of a representative set of 10 genes confirmed the microarray findings. The number of biological functions, canonical pathways and molecular networks significantly affected by silica exposure, as identified by the bioinformatics analysis of the significantly differentially expressed genes detected during the post-exposure time intervals, also exhibited a steady increase similar to the silica-induced pulmonary toxicity. Genes involved in oxidative stress, inflammation, respiratory diseases, cancer, and tissue remodeling and fibrosis were significantly differentially expressed in the rat lungs; however, unresolved inflammation was the single most significant biological response to pulmonary exposure to silica. Excessive mucus production, as implicated by significant overexpression of the pendrin coding gene, SLC26A4, was identified as a potential novel mechanism for silica-induced pulmonary toxicity. Collectively, the findings of our study provided insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of crystalline silica-induced pulmonary toxicity in the rat. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:22431001

  14. Nanometer sized tantalum pentoxide fibers prepared by electrospinning

    SciTech Connect

    Dharmaraj, N.; Kim, H.Y.

    2006-03-09

    Novel, porous tantalum pentoxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) nanofibers with 150-250 nm diameter were obtained by high temperature calcination of the as-electrospun tantalum pentoxide/poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) composite fibers prepared by sol-gel processing and electrospinning technique. Surface analysis, structure and elemental composition of these as-electrospun and as-calcinated Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanofibers have been studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) and FT-IR. High-resolution FE-SEM images showed the porous nature of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanofibers. EDX analysis revealed the perfect stoichiometry of the nanofibers as Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}. A linear correlation was noted between the calcination temperature and orthorhombic crystalline phase evolution of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}.

  15. Vanadium pentoxide nanoparticles mimic vanadium haloperoxidases and thwart biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Natalio, Filipe; André, Rute; Hartog, Aloysius F; Stoll, Brigitte; Jochum, Klaus Peter; Wever, Ron; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2012-08-01

    Marine biofouling--the colonization of small marine microorganisms on surfaces that are directly exposed to seawater, such as ships' hulls--is an expensive problem that is currently without an environmentally compatible solution. Biofouling leads to increased hydrodynamic drag, which, in turn, causes increased fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Tributyltin-free antifouling coatings and paints based on metal complexes or biocides have been shown to efficiently prevent marine biofouling. However, these materials can damage the environment through metal leaching (for example, of copper and zinc) and bacteria resistance. Here, we show that vanadium pentoxide nanowires act like naturally occurring vanadium haloperoxidases to prevent marine biofouling. In the presence of bromide ions and hydrogen peroxide, the nanowires catalyse the oxidation of bromide ions to hypobromous acid (HOBr). Singlet molecular oxygen ((1)O(2)) is formed and this exerts strong antibacterial activity, which prevents marine biofouling without being toxic to marine biota. Vanadium pentoxide nanowires have the potential to be an alternative approach to conventional anti-biofouling agents. PMID:22751222

  16. Vanadium pentoxide nanoparticles mimic vanadium haloperoxidases and thwart biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natalio, Filipe; André, Rute; Hartog, Aloysius F.; Stoll, Brigitte; Jochum, Klaus Peter; Wever, Ron; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2012-08-01

    Marine biofouling--the colonization of small marine microorganisms on surfaces that are directly exposed to seawater, such as ships' hulls--is an expensive problem that is currently without an environmentally compatible solution. Biofouling leads to increased hydrodynamic drag, which, in turn, causes increased fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Tributyltin-free antifouling coatings and paints based on metal complexes or biocides have been shown to efficiently prevent marine biofouling. However, these materials can damage the environment through metal leaching (for example, of copper and zinc) and bacteria resistance. Here, we show that vanadium pentoxide nanowires act like naturally occurring vanadium haloperoxidases to prevent marine biofouling. In the presence of bromide ions and hydrogen peroxide, the nanowires catalyse the oxidation of bromide ions to hypobromous acid (HOBr). Singlet molecular oxygen (1O2) is formed and this exerts strong antibacterial activity, which prevents marine biofouling without being toxic to marine biota. Vanadium pentoxide nanowires have the potential to be an alternative approach to conventional anti-biofouling agents.

  17. Role of posterior hypothalamus in hypobaric hypoxia induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R K; Choudhary, R C; Reddy, M K; Ray, A; Ravi, K

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of posterior hypothalamus and central neurotransmitters in the pulmonary edema due to hypobaric hypoxia, rats were placed in a high altitude simulation chamber (barometric pressure-294.4 mmHg) for 24 h. Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia resulted in increases in mean arterial blood pressure, renal sympathetic nerve activity, right ventricular systolic pressure, lung wet to dry weight ratio and Evans blue dye leakage. There was a significant attenuation in these responses to hypobaric hypoxia (a) after lesioning posterior hypothalamus and (b) after chronic infusion of GABAA receptor agonist muscimol into posterior hypothalamus. No such attenuation was evident with the chronic infusion of the nitric oxide donor SNAP into the posterior hypothalamus. It is concluded that in hypobaric hypoxia, there is over-activity of posterior hypothalamic neurons probably due to a local decrease in GABA-ergic inhibition which increases the sympathetic drive causing pulmonary hypertension and edema. PMID:25448396

  18. /sup 67/Ga scanning in talc-induced pulmonary granulomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.G.; Aguirre, A.; Weaver, A.

    1980-04-01

    We describe a case of pulmonary granulomatosis in a user who habitually injected methylphenidate (Ritalin) intravenously; symptomatic and objective improvement occurred with corticosteroid therapy. A scan of the lungs using raioactive /sup 67/Ga showed an increased concentration of /sup 67/Ga throughout both lungs. There was a reduction in abnormal accumulation of /sup 67/Ga, improvement in the arterial oxygen pressure and the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide, and a reduction in the infiltrate on the chest x-ray film two months after the institution of therapy. Before treatment the patient's symptoms and arterial deoxygenation increased despite the cessation of her drug abuse, thus raising the question of a self-perpetuating inflammatory process in a case of pulmonary deposition of talc.

  19. Agranulocytosis Induced by Ethambutol in a Patient with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung Min; Chung, So Hee; Kim, Ju Ri; Kim, Jin Young; Jung, Sun Young; Cho, Yongseon

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of agranulocytosis caused by ethambutol in a 79-year-old man with pulmonary tuberculosis. He was referred for fever and skin rash developed on 21th day after antituberculosis drugs (isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide) intake. Complete blood count at the time of diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis was normal. On the seventh admission day, agranulocytosis was developed with absolute neutrophil count of 70/µL. We discontinued all antituberculosis drugs, and then treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Three days later, the number of white blood cell returned to normal. We administered isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol in order with an interval. However, fever and skin rash developed again when adding ethambutol, so we discontinued ethambutol. After these symptoms disappeared, we added rifampicin and ethambutol in order with an interval. However after administering ethambutol, neutropenia developed, so we discontinued ethambutol again. He was cured with isoniazid, rifampicin, and pyrazinamide for 9 months. PMID:25861347

  20. Ulinastatin attenuates pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx damage and inhibits endothelial heparanase activity in LPS-induced ARDS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lipeng; Huang, Xiao; Kong, Guiqing; Xu, Haixiao; Li, Jiankui; Hao, Dong; Wang, Tao; Han, Shasha; Han, Chunlei; Sun, Yeying; Liu, Xiangyong; Wang, Xiaozhi

    2016-09-16

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a syndrome of acute respiratory failure characterized by major pathologic mechanisms of increased microvascular permeability and inflammation. The glycocalyx lines on the endothelial surface, which determines the vascular permeability, and heparanase play pivotal roles in the degradation of heparan sulfate (HS). HS is the major component of the glycocalyx. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of Ulinastatin (UTI) on vascular permeability and pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In our study, C57BL/6 mice and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were stimulated with LPS to induce injury models. After 6 h of LPS stimulation, pulmonary pathological changes, pulmonary edema, and vascular permeability were notably attenuated by UTI. UTI inhibited LPS-induced endothelial glycocalyx destruction and significantly decreased the production of HS as determined by ELISA and immunofluorescence. UTI also reduced the active form of heparanase (50 kDa) expression and heparanase activity. Moreover, lysosome pH was investigated because heparanase (65 kDa) can be reduced easily in its active form at 50 kDa in a low pH environment within lysosome. Results showed that UTI could inhibit LPS-induced pH elevation in lysosome. In conclusion, UTI protects pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx integrity and inhibits heparanase activity during LPS-induced ARDS. PMID:27498004

  1. Brain natriuretic peptide levels in six basic underwater demolitions/SEAL recruits presenting with swimming induced pulmonary edema (SIPE).

    PubMed

    Shearer, Damon; Mahon, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Swimming induced pulmonary edema (SIPE) is associated with both SCUBA diving and strenuous surface swimming; however, the majority of reported cases and clinically observed cases tend to occur during or after aggressive surface swimming. Capillary stress failure appears to be central to the pathophysiology of this disorder. Regional pulmonary capillaries are exposed to relatively high pressures secondary to increased vascular volume, elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance, and regional differences in perfusion secondary to forces of gravity and high cardiac output. Acute pulmonary edema can be classified as either cardiogenic or noncardiogenic or both. Cardiogenic pulmonary edema occurs when the pulmonary capillary hydrostatic pressure exceeds plasma oncotic pressure. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema occurs when pulmonary capillary permeability is increased. Given the pathophysiology noted above, SIPE can be described as a cardiogenic pulmonary edema, at least in part, since an increased transalveolar pressure gradient has been implicated in the pathogenesis of SIPE. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is used in the clinical setting to differentiate cardiac from pulmonary sources of dyspnea, specifically to diagnose cardiogenic pulmonary edema. During clinical management, BNP levels were drawn on six BUD/S recruits simultaneously presenting with pulmonary complaints consistent with SIPE, after an extended surface bay swim. This paper analyzes that data after de-identification and reviews the pathophysiology and clinical management of SIPE. PMID:19739476

  2. Variability in Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation in Healthy and Cardiovascular Compromised Rat Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The molecular bases for variability in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injury due to underlying cardiovascular (CVD) and/or metabolic diseases are unknown. We hypothesized that healthy and genetic CVD-prone rat models will exhibit exacerbated response to acute ozone exposure depe...

  3. METAL-INDUCED LATE PULMONARY INJURY IS REDUCED BY OZONE (O3) COEXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    METAL-INDUCED LATE PULMONARY INJURY IS REDUCED BY OZONE (O3) COEXPOSURE. UP Kodavanti, MCJ Schladweiler, WP Watkinson, JP Nolan, PA Evansky, ER Lappi, G Ross, JH Richards, and DL Costa. NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC USA.
    Ambient ...

  4. URBAN PARTICLE-INDUCED PULMONARY ARTERY CONSTRUCTION IS MEDIATED BY SUPEROXIDE PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    URBAN PARTICLE-INDUCED PULMONARY ARTERY CONSTRICTION IS MEDIATED BY SUPEROXIDE PRODUCTION.Jacqueline D. Carter, Zhuowei Li, Lisa A. Dailey, Yuh-Chin T. Huang. CEMALB, University of North Carolina, and ORD, US EPA, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

    Exposure to particulate matter...

  5. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Induce Pulmonary and Vascular Response Following Intratracheal Instillation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon-based nanotubes have been shown to induce varying degrees of pulmonary response in rodents influenced by the dose, the extent of agglomeration, the chemistry of the suspension solution, and the functional properties. We hypothesized that low concentrations of non-modified ...

  6. DIESEL AND CARBON PARTICLES ENHANCE HOUSE DUST MITE-INDUCED PULMONARY HYPERSENSITIVITY IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel and Carbon Particles Enhance House Dust Mite-Induced Pulmonary Hypersensitivity in Brown Norway Rats. P. Singh1, M.J. Daniels2, D. Winsett2, J. Richards2, K. Crissman2, M. Madden2 and M.I. Gilmour2. 1NCSU, Raleigh, NC and 2 USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    Ep...

  7. A 45-Year-Old Man With Recurrent Dyspnea and Hemoptysis during Exercise: Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage/Edema

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Sung; Lee, Minhyeok; Kwon, Oh Jung; Jeong, Inbeom; Son, Ji Woong; Na, Moon Jun

    2015-01-01

    A 45-year-old man presented with dyspnea and hemoptysis during exercise. A chest computed tomography (CT) revealed multifocal diffuse patchy ground glass opacity and interlobular septal thickening in both the lungs. Permeability pulmonary edema or pulmonary hemorrhage was suspected. Serologic studies for autoimmune disorders and vasculitis were negative. There was no laboratory evidence of coagulopathy, other hematopoietic disease or infectious disease. Considering correlation with exercise, we diagnosed exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) or exercise-induced pulmonary edema (EIPE). The patient was managed with antifibrinolytics, antibiotics, and antitussive agent. After a week, follow-up chest CT revealed completely resolved pulmonary hemorrhage. About 2 months after the first event, he visited again with dyspnea and hemoptysis during running. In the present study, we report a case of recurrent pulmonary hemorrhage after exercise. PMID:26508928

  8. Chronic Normobaric Hypoxia Induces Pulmonary Hypertension in Rats: Role of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Fan, Junming; Fan, Xiaofang; Li, Yang; Ding, Lu; Zheng, Qingqing; Guo, Jinbin; Xia, Dongmei; Xue, Feng; Wang, Yongyu; Liu, Shufang; Gong, Yongsheng

    2016-03-01

    Junming Fan, Xiaofang Fan, Yang Li, Lu Ding, Qingqing Zheng, Jinbin Guo, Dongmei Xia, Feng Xue, Yongyu Wang, Shufang Liu, and Yongsheng Gong. Chronic normobaric hypoxia induces pulmonary hypertension in rats: role of NF-κB. High Alt Med Biol 17:43-49, 2016.-To investigate whether nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation is involved in chronic normobaric hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH), rats were treated with saline or an NF-κB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, 150 mg/kg, sc, twice daily), and exposed to normoxia or chronic normobaric hypoxia with a fraction of inspired oxygen of ∼0.1 for 14 days. Lung tissue levels of NF-κB activity, and interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNAs, were determined, and mean pulmonary arterial pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart function were evaluated. Compared to the normoxia exposure group, rats exposed to chronic normobaric hypoxia showed an increased NF-κB activity, measured by increased nuclear translocation of p50 and p65 proteins, an increased inflammatory gene expression in the lungs, elevated mean pulmonary arterial blood pressure and mean right ventricular pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, as assessed by right ventricle-to-left ventricle plus septum weight ratio, and right heart dysfunction. Treatment of hypoxia-exposed rats with PDTC inhibited NF-κB activity, decreased pulmonary arterial blood pressure and right ventricular pressure, and ameliorated right ventricular hypertrophy and right heart dysfunction. Hypoxia exposure increased protein kinase C activity and promoted pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation in vitro. Our data suggest that NF-κB activation may contribute to chronic normobaric hypoxia-induced PH. PMID:26788753

  9. Early Amiodarone-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Uzung; Marinelli, Laura; Ali, Sayed; Huberfeld, Seymour; Barrera, Rafael; Chang, John B

    2016-09-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic drug that has been commonly used to treat supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. This drug is an iodine-containing compound that tends to accumulate in several organs, including the lungs. Especially, its main metabolically active metabolite desethylamiodarone can adversely affect many organs. A very well-known severe complication of amiodarone therapy is the amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity. This article presents the case study of an 82-year-old male patient with acute amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity. The patient underwent endovascular aneurysm repair for rapidly increasing abdominal aortic aneurysm. During the postoperative period the patient developed rapid atrial fibrillation and amiodarone therapy was initiated. Subsequently, the patient went into acute respiratory failure and was requiring high supplemental oxygen support and a chest X-ray revealed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. During the hospital course the patient required mechanical ventilator support. With discontinuation of amiodarone, supportive therapy and steroid treatment patient symptoms significantly improved. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity must be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients on the medication with progressive or acute respiratory symptoms. Early discontinuation of amiodarone and aggressive corticosteroid therapy should be considered as a viable treatment strategy. PMID:27574388

  10. Loss of Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Attenuates Murine Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Flechsig, Paul; Hartenstein, Bettina; Teurich, Sybille; Dadrich, Monika; Hauser, Kai; Abdollahi, Amir; Groene, Hermann-Josef; Angel, Peter; Huber, Peter E.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Pulmonary fibrosis is a disorder of the lungs with limited treatment options. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a family of proteases that degrade extracellular matrix with roles in fibrosis. Here we studied the role of MMP13 in a radiation-induced lung fibrosis model using a MMP13 knockout mouse. Methods and Materials: We investigated the role of MMP13 in lung fibrosis by investigating the effects of MMP13 deficiency in C57Bl/6 mice after 20-Gy thoracic irradiation (6-MV Linac). The morphologic results in histology were correlated with qualitative and quantitative results of volume computed tomography (VCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and clinical outcome. Results: We found that MMP13 deficient mice developed less pulmonary fibrosis than their wildtype counterparts, showed attenuated acute pulmonary inflammation (days after irradiation), and a reduction of inflammation during the later fibrogenic phase (5-6 months after irradiation). The reduced fibrosis in MMP13 deficient mice was evident in histology with reduced thickening of alveolar septi and reduced remodeling of the lung architecture in good correlation with reduced features of lung fibrosis in qualitative and quantitative VCT and MRI studies. The partial resistance of MMP13-deficient mice to fibrosis was associated with a tendency towards a prolonged mouse survival. Conclusions: Our data indicate that MMP13 has a role in the development of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Further, our findings suggest that MMP13 constitutes a potential drug target to attenuate radiation-induced lung fibrosis.

  11. Atomized paclitaxel liposome inhalation treatment of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Zhu, W P; Cai, X J; Chen, M

    2016-01-01

    We sought to determine the efficacy of atomized paclitaxel liposome inhalation treatment of pulmonary fibrosis in a bleomycin-induced rat model. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: healthy control, pulmonary fibrosis without treatment, paclitaxel liposome inhalation-treated, and intravenous paclitaxel liposome-treated. Fibrosis was induced by bleomycin injection. A total of 20 mg/kg paclitaxel liposome was administered by inhalation every other day for a total of 10 doses. The intravenous group received 5 mg/kg paclitaxel liposome on days 1, 7, 14, and 21. We observed the general condition, weight change, survival index, and pathological changes in the lung tissue of the rats. Quantitative analysis of collagen types I and III and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression in the lungs was also performed. The paclitaxel liposome inhalation and intravenous delivery methods improved survival index and pulmonary fibrosis Ashcroft score, and decreased the thickness of the alveolar interval. No obvious difference was found between the two groups. Compared with the untreated group, paclitaxel liposome inhalation and intravenous injection significantly reduced the levels of collagen types I and III and TGF-β1 expression equally. In conclusion, atomized paclitaxel liposome inhalation protects against severe pulmonary fibrosis in a bleomycin-induced rat model. This delivery method has less systemic side effects and increased safety over intravenous injection. PMID:27173212

  12. Proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in the development of ascites syndrome in broilers induced by low ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Qiao, J; Zhao, L H; Li, K; Wang, H; Xu, T; Tian, Y; Gao, M; Wang, X

    2007-12-01

    Pulmonary vascular remodelling, mainly characterized by arterial medial thickening, is an important pathological feature of broiler ascites syndrome (AS). Since vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) form the major cellular component of arterial medial layer, we speculate that VSMC proliferation is one of the causes of pulmonary arterial medial thickening in ascitic broilers. Hence, the present study was designed to investigate the role of VSMC proliferation in pulmonary vascular remodelling in development of AS induced by low ambient temperature. Broilers in control group (22 +/- 1.5 degrees C) and low temperature group (11 +/- 2 degrees C) were sampled every week at 15-50 days of age. Proliferative indexes of VSMC in pulmonary arteries were assessed with proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and the relative medial thickness (RMT) and relative wall area (RWA), as indexes of pulmonary vascular remodelling, were examined by computer-image analysing system. The results showed that the high incidence (18.75%) of AS was induced by low temperature, and a significantly increased VSMC proliferation was observed in pulmonary arteries in the low temperature group at 22-50 days of age (P < 0.05). In addition, RMT and RWA in pulmonary arteries were significantly elevated in the low temperature group from 36 days of age (P < 0.05), indicating that pulmonary vascular remodelling occurred following VSMC proliferation in AS. Our data suggest that proliferation of VSMC may facilitate pulmonary vascular remodelling and have a pivotal role in AS induced by low ambient temperature. PMID:18045340

  13. Characterization on RF magnetron sputtered niobium pentoxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Usha, N.; Sivakumar, R.; Sanjeeviraja, C.

    2014-10-15

    Niobium pentoxide (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) thin films with amorphous nature were deposited on microscopic glass substrates at 100°C by rf magnetron sputtering technique. The effect of rf power on the structural, morphological, optical, and vibrational properties of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} films have been investigated. Optical study shows the maximum average transmittance of about 87% and the optical energy band gap (indirect allowed) changes between 3.70 eV and 3.47 eV. AFM result indicates the smooth surface nature of the samples. Photoluminescence measurement showed the better optical quality of the deposited films. Raman spectra show the LO-TO splitting of Nb-O stretching of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} films.

  14. Endothelin-1 and endothelin-3 induce chemotaxis and replication of pulmonary artery fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Peacock, A J; Dawes, K E; Shock, A; Gray, A J; Reeves, J T; Laurent, G J

    1992-11-01

    The remodeling of pulmonary vessels that occurs in association with pulmonary hypertension involves, in part, thickening of the adventitia. The stimulus for this process is not understood. One explanation is that endothelial cells secrete a growth factor that expands the local population of fibroblasts by acting as a chemoattractant and mitogen. Endothelins are a family of potent newly discovered vasoactive peptides. One of these compounds, endothelin-1 (ET-1), is secreted by endothelial cells and is known to constrict pulmonary vessels. Another, endothelin-3 (ET-3), is not secreted by endothelial cells and is less potent as a pulmonary vasoconstrictor. We hypothesized that the endothelins may have the capacity both to constrict these vessels and to initiate fibroblast chemotaxis and replication. Here we investigated the effects of both ET-1 and ET-3 on the chemotaxis and replication of fibroblasts derived from pulmonary vessels. Cells were isolated from rat pulmonary arteries, cultured in medium and 10% newborn calf serum, and used between passages 2 and 5. Chemotaxis was assessed using a modified Boyden chamber with a polycarbonate filter (pore size, 8 microns) separating cells in the upper chambers from endothelin in the lower chambers. Replication was assessed both by direct cell counts and by a colorimetric assay based on uptake and subsequent release of methylene blue. Both ET-1 and ET-3 induced chemotaxis of pulmonary artery fibroblasts and did so in a dose-dependent fashion. The maxima for both peptides occurred at a concentration of about 10(-7) M, when chemotaxis was greatest for ET-1 (22 +/- 1.4 versus 14 +/- 1.8 cells/grid [mean +/- SEM], (P < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1419025

  15. Acetaminophen Use: An Unusual Cause of Drug-Induced Pulmonary Eosinophilia

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Pierre, Mathieu D.; Moran-Mendoza, Onofre

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary eosinophilia (PE) can be found in very diverse pathological processes. Several medications have also been associated with this entity. Acetaminophen is a medication commonly used in multiple different drug formulations, many of which are available without a prescription. It has however been associated with pulmonary eosinophilia (eosinophilic pneumonia) in a few cases in Japan. We describe the case of a 68-year-old Caucasian female who presented with new persistent dry cough and dyspnea on exertion after she started using up to 4 grams of acetaminophen on a daily basis. Chest imaging revealed peripheral lower lung zone ground glass and reticular opacities, and increased eosinophils were present on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). The patient's symptoms markedly improved upon acetaminophen cessation, and significantly decreased eosinophils were seen on repeat BAL. To our knowledge, this is the first case of likely acetaminophen-induced pulmonary eosinophilia reported outside Japan. PMID:27445539

  16. Inhibition of chlorine-induced pulmonary inflammation and edema by mometasone and budesonide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jing; Mo, Yiqun; Schlueter, Connie F.; Hoyle, Gary W.

    2013-10-15

    Chlorine gas is a widely used industrial compound that is highly toxic by inhalation and is considered a chemical threat agent. Inhalation of high levels of chlorine results in acute lung injury characterized by pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, and decrements in lung function. Because inflammatory processes can promote damage in the injured lung, anti-inflammatory therapy may be of potential benefit for treating chemical-induced acute lung injury. We previously developed a chlorine inhalation model in which mice develop epithelial injury, neutrophilic inflammation, pulmonary edema, and impaired pulmonary function. This model was used to evaluate nine corticosteroids for the ability to inhibit chlorine-induced neutrophilic inflammation. Two of the most potent corticosteroids in this assay, mometasone and budesonide, were investigated further. Mometasone or budesonide administered intraperitoneally 1 h after chlorine inhalation caused a dose-dependent inhibition of neutrophil influx in lung tissue sections and in the number of neutrophils in lung lavage fluid. Budesonide, but not mometasone, reduced the levels of the neutrophil attractant CXCL1 in lavage fluid 6 h after exposure. Mometasone or budesonide also significantly inhibited pulmonary edema assessed 1 day after chlorine exposure. Chlorine inhalation resulted in airway hyperreactivity to inhaled methacholine, but neither mometasone nor budesonide significantly affected this parameter. The results suggest that mometasone and budesonide may represent potential treatments for chemical-induced lung injury. - Highlights: • Chlorine causes lung injury when inhaled and is considered a chemical threat agent. • Corticosteroids may inhibit lung injury through their anti-inflammatory actions. • Corticosteroids inhibited chlorine-induced pneumonitis and pulmonary edema. • Mometasone and budesonide are potential rescue treatments for chlorine lung injury.

  17. Attenuation of the extract from Moringa oleifera on monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang-Hu; Chen, Yi-Jui; Yang, Chao-Hsun; Liu, Kuo-Wei; Chang, Junn-Liang; Pan, Shwu-Fen; Lin, Tzer-Bin; Chen, Mei-Jung

    2012-02-29

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an extract from Moringa oleifera (MO) on the development of monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) in Wistar rats. An ethanol extraction was performed on dried MO leaves, and HPLC analysis identified niaziridin and niazirin in the extract. PH was induced with a single subcutaneous injection of MCT (60 mg/kg) which resulted in increases in pulmonary arterial blood pressure (Ppa) and in thickening of the pulmonary arterial medial layer in the rats. Three weeks after induction, acute administration of the MO extract to the rats decreased Ppa in a dose-dependent manner that reached statistical significance at a dose of 4.5 mg of freeze-dried extract per kg body weight. The reduction in Ppa suggested that the extract directly relaxed the pulmonary arteries. To assay the effects of chronic administration of the MO extract on PH, control, MCT and MCT+MO groups were designated. Rats in the control group received a saline injection; the MCT and MCT+MO groups received MCT to induce PH. During the third week after MCT treatment, the MCT+MO group received daily i.p. injections of the MO extract (4.5 mg of freeze-dried extract/kg of body weight). Compared to the control group, the MCT group had higher Ppa and thicker medial layers in the pulmonary arteries. Chronic treatments with the MO extract reversed the MCT-induced changes. Additionally, the MCT group had a significant elevation in superoxide dismutase activity when normalized by the MO extract treatments. In conclusion, the MO extract successfully attenuated the development of PH via direct vasodilatation and a potential increase in antioxidant activity. PMID:22242951

  18. Differential Activation of Airway Eosinophils Induces IL-13 Mediated Allergic Th2 Pulmonary Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, EA; Doyle, AD; Colbert, DC; Zellner, KR; Protheroe, CA; LeSuer, WE; Lee, NA.; Lee, JJ

    2015-01-01

    Background Eosinophils are hallmark cells of allergic Th2 respiratory inflammation. However, the relative importance of eosinophil activation and the induction of effector functions such as the expression of IL-13 to allergic Th2 pulmonary disease remain to be defined. Methods Wild type or cytokine deficient (IL-13−/− or IL-4−/−) eosinophils treated with cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-4, IL-33) were adoptively transferred into eosinophil-deficient recipient mice subjected to allergen provocation using established models of respiratory inflammation. Allergen-induced pulmonary changes were assessed. Results In contrast to the transfer of untreated blood eosinophils to the lungs of recipient eosinophildeficient mice, which induced no immune/inflammatory changes either in the lung or lung draining lymph nodes (LDLNs), pretreatment of blood eosinophils with GM-CSF prior to transfer elicited trafficking of these eosinophils to LDLNs. In turn, these LDLN eosinophils elicited the accumulation of dendritic cells and CD4+ T cells to these same LDLNs without inducing pulmonary inflammation. However, exposure of eosinophils to GM-CSF, IL-4 and IL-33 prior to transfer induced not only immune events in the LDLN, but also allergen-mediated increases in airway Th2 cytokine/chemokine levels, the subsequent accumulation of CD4+ T cells as well as alternatively activated (M2) macrophages, and the induction of pulmonary histopathologies. Significantly, this allergic respiratory inflammation was dependent on eosinophil-derived IL-13 whereas IL-4 expression by eosinophils had no significant role. Conclusion The data demonstrate the differential activation of eosinophils as a function of cytokine exposure and suggest that eosinophil-specific IL-13 expression by activated cells is a necessary component of the subsequent allergic Th2 pulmonary pathologies. PMID:26009788

  19. Protective Role of Andrographolide in Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Tao; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Min; Chen, Hongying; Jin, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic devastating disease with poor prognosis. Multiple pathological processes, including inflammation, epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), apoptosis, and oxidative stress, are involved in the pathogenesis of IPF. Recent findings suggested that nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is constitutively activated in IPF and acts as a central regulator in the pathogenesis of IPF. The aim of our study was to reveal the value of andrographolide on bleomycin-induced inflammation and fibrosis in mice. The indicated dosages of andrographolide were administered in mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. On day 21, cell counts of total cells, macrophages, neutrophils and lymphocytes, alone with TNF-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured. HE staining and Masson’s trichrome (MT) staining were used to observe the histological alterations of lungs. The Ashcroft score and hydroxyproline content of lungs were also measured. TGF-β1 and α-SMA mRNA and protein were analyzed. Activation of NF-κB was determined by western blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). On day 21 after bleomycin stimulation, andrographolide dose-dependently inhibited the inflammatory cells and TNF-α in BALF. Meanwhile, our data demonstrated that the Ashcroft score and hydroxyproline content of the bleomycin-stimulated lung were reduced by andrographolide administration. Furthermore, andrographloide suppressed TGF-β1 and α-SMA mRNA and protein expression in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Meanwhile, andrographolide significantly dose-dependently inhibited the ratio of phospho-NF-κB p65/total NF-κB p65 and NF-κB p65 DNA binding activities. Our findings indicate that andrographolide compromised bleomycin-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis possibly through inactivation of NF-κB. Andrographolide holds promise as a novel drug to treat the devastating disease of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24300094

  20. 17(R)-resolvin D1 ameliorates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yatomi, Masakiyo; Hisada, Takeshi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Koga, Yasuhiko; Ono, Akihiro; Kamide, Yosuke; Seki, Kaori; Aoki-Saito, Haruka; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Sunaga, Noriaki; Kaira, Kyoichi; Dobashi, Kunio; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-12-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a destructive inflammatory disease with limited therapeutic options. Inflammation plays an integral role in the development of pulmonary fibrosis. Unresolved inflammatory responses can lead to substantial tissue injury, chronic inflammation, and fibrosis. The resolvins are a family of endogenous ω-3 fatty acid derived-lipid mediators of inflammation resolution. Resolvin D1 (RvD1) displays potent anti-inflammatory, pro-resolving activity, without causing immunosuppression. Its epimer, 17(R)-resolvin D1 (17(R)-RvD1), exhibits equivalent functionality to RvD1. In addition, 17(R)-RvD1 is resistant to rapid inactivation by eicosanoid oxidoreductases. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that 17(R)-RvD1 can provide a therapeutic benefit in IPF by reducing inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis, while leaving the normal immune response intact. Mice were exposed to bleomycin (BLM) via micro-osmotic pump to induce pulmonary fibrosis, and were then treated with 17(R)-RvD1 or vehicle by intraperitoneal injection. Administration of 17(R)-RvD1 from the start of BLM treatment attenuated neutrophil alveolar infiltration, lung collagen content, and Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and type I collagen mRNA expression, along with subsequent reduction in histologically detectable fibrosis. The 17(R)-RvD1-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells was inhibited by an antagonist of lipoxin A4 receptor/formyl peptide receptor 2 (ALX/FPR2). The administration of 17(R)-RvD1 at the later fibrotic stage also improved the lung failure. These results suggest that 17(R)-RvD1 attenuates pulmonary fibrosis by promoting the resolution of neutrophilic inflammation and also provides pulmonary restoration. These data highlight the therapeutic potential of 17(R)-RvD1 in the management of this intractable disease. PMID:26660549

  1. Biomarker expression in lung of rabbit with pulmonary fibrosis induced by ammonium perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng-hong; Guo, Hui-xia; Lin, Ming-fang; Chen, Zhi-ze; Zhou, Xuan; Peng, Kai-liang

    2011-04-01

    Ammonium perchlorate (AP), an oxidizer, has been used in solid propellants. Although AP exposure has been suspected as a risk factor for the development of pulmonary fibrosis, data are still inconclusive. To evaluate the pulmonary toxicity and the potential pulmonary fibrosis caused by occupational exposure to this compound, 25 male rabbits were randomly allocated into five groups to receive AP or bleomycin or saline by intratracheal injection. All rabbits were sacrificed and total RNA from the lungs was extracted. Expressions of types I and III collagens, transforming growth factor-β(1) (TGF-β(1)) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) messenger RNA (mRNA) were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expressions of type I and III collagen mRNA in low, moderate and high dose AP groups were significantly higher (p < 0.01 or p < 0.05) than that in the saline group. There was also a significant increased level of TGF-β(1) and TNF-α mRNA in the three AP groups compared with saline control group (p < 0.01 or p < 0.05). These results reveal that AP can increase gene expressions of types I, III collagens, TGF-β(1) and TNF-α in lung of rabbits exposed to AP. The overexpression of these biomarkers were considered as effective indicator linking to the development of pulmonary fibrosis and finally demonstrated that AP has potential to induce pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:20937628

  2. Platelet-activating factor induces selective pulmonary arterial hyperreactivity in isolated perfused rabbit lungs.

    PubMed

    Ohar, J A; Waller, K S; Dahms, T E

    1993-07-01

    The role of vasoreactivity in PAF-induced pulmonary hypertension (PHT) was assessed in isolated, perfused rabbit lungs. We evaluated the steady-state pulmonary vascular response to five vasoconstrictors: PGF2 alpha, norepinephrine, angiotensin II, PAF, and KCl. Pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) were significantly greater in lungs of rabbits treated with PAF for 28 days than in control rabbits in response to PGF2 alpha and norepinephrine. When resistance was partitioned by the vascular occlusion method, at baseline the vascular resistance was equally distributed between arterial and venous segments in both experimental groups. Arterial resistance accounted for approximately 76% of PVR during norepinephrine injection and 60% of PVR during PGF2 alpha injection in PAF-treated lungs. Whereas arterial resistance accounted for approximately 63% of PVR during norepinephrine injection and 52% of PVR during PGF2 alpha injection in control lungs, there was no significant difference in the response to angiotensin II, acute PAF, and KCl in lungs from chronic PAF-treated rabbits compared with responses in control rabbit lungs, though the pressor response to acute PAF tended to be blunted in PAF-treated lungs. Chronic PAF treatment results in enhanced pulmonary arterial reactivity to selected autacoids in isolated perfused lungs. PMID:8317792

  3. Gadolinium chloride attenuates sepsis-induced pulmonary apoptosis and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kishta, Osama A; Goldberg, Peter; Husain, Sabah N A

    2012-01-01

    Gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), a Kupffer cells inhibitor, attenuates acute lung injury; however, the mechanisms behind this effect are not completely elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that GdCl3 acts through the inhibition of lung parenchymal cellular apoptosis. Two groups of rats were injected intraperitoneally with saline or E. coli lipopolysaccharide. In two additional groups, rats were injected with GdCl3 24 hrs prior to saline or LPS administration. At 12 hrs, lung injury, inflammation, and apoptosis were studied. Lung water content, myeloperoxidase activity, pulmonary apoptosis and mRNA levels of interleukin-1 β , -2, -5, -6, -10 and TNF- α rose significantly in LPS-injected animals. Pretreatment with GdCl3 significantly reduced LPS-induced elevation of pulmonary water content, myeloperoxidase activity, cleaved caspase-3 intensity, and attenuated pulmonary TUNEL-positive cells. GdCl3 pre-treatment upregulated IL-1 β , -2 and -10 pulmonary gene expression without significantly affecting the others. These results suggest that GdCl3 attenuates acute lung injury through its effects on pulmonary parenchymal apoptosis. PMID:24049647

  4. Grouping nanomaterials to predict their potential to induce pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Braakhuis, Hedwig M; Oomen, Agnes G; Cassee, Flemming R

    2016-05-15

    The rapidly expanding manufacturing, production and use of nanomaterials have raised concerns for both worker and consumer safety. Various studies have been published in which induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation exposure to nanomaterials has been described. Nanomaterials can vary in aspects such as size, shape, charge, crystallinity, chemical composition, and dissolution rate. Currently, efforts are made to increase the knowledge on the characteristics of nanomaterials that can be used to categorise them into hazard groups according to these characteristics. Grouping helps to gather information on nanomaterials in an efficient way with the aim to aid risk assessment. Here, we discuss different ways of grouping nanomaterials for their risk assessment after inhalation. Since the relation between single intrinsic particle characteristics and the severity of pulmonary inflammation is unknown, grouping of nanomaterials by their intrinsic characteristics alone is not sufficient to predict their risk after inhalation. The biokinetics of nanomaterials should be taken into account as that affects the dose present at a target site over time. The parameters determining the kinetic behaviour are not the same as the hazard-determining parameters. Furthermore, characteristics of nanomaterials change in the life-cycle, resulting in human exposure to different forms and doses of these nanomaterials. As information on the biokinetics and in situ characteristics of nanomaterials is essential but often lacking, efforts should be made to include these in testing strategies. Grouping nanomaterials will probably be of the most value to risk assessors when information on intrinsic characteristics, life-cycle, biokinetics and effects are all combined. PMID:26603513

  5. Arginase inhibition protects against hypoxia‑induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenjin; Sun, Bolin; Song, Xuepeng; Zheng, Yanbo; Wang, Ligang; Wang, Tao; Liu, Sheng

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to determine the role of arginase (Arg) in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In vitro, human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMCs) were cultured under hypoxic conditions with, or without, the Arg inhibitor, S‑(2‑boronoethyl)‑l‑cysteine (BEC), for 48 h, following which the proliferation of the HPASMCs was determined using MTT and cell counting assays. For the in vivo investigation, 30 male rats were randomly divided into the following three groups (n=10 per group): i) control group, ii) PAH group and iii) BEC group, in which the right ventricle systolic pressure (RVSP) of the rats was assessed. The levels of cyclin D1, cyclin‑dependent kinase (CDK)4 and p27 were measured in vitro and in vivo. The phosphorylation levels of Akt and extracellular‑related kinase (ERK) were also measured in HPASMCs. In vitro, compared with the hypoxia group, Arg inhibition reduced HPASMC proliferation and reduced the expression levels of cyclin D1, CDK4, phosphorylated (p‑)Akt and p‑ERK. By contrast, Arg inhibition increased the expression of p27. In vivo, compared with the control group, the expression levels of cyclin D1 and CDK4 were reduced in the PAH group, however, the expression of p27 and the RVSP increased. In the BEC group, the opposite effects were observed. Therefore, it was suggested that Arg inhibition may reduce the RVSP of PAH rats and reduce HPASMC proliferation by decreasing the expression levels of cyclin D1 and CDK4, increasing the expression of p27, and partly reducing the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK. PMID:26126810

  6. Curcumin attenuates elastase- and cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masaru; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Ito, Yoko; Nagai, Katsura; Odajima, Nao; Moriyama, Chinatsu; Nasuhara, Yasuyuki; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2009-04-01

    Curcumin, a yellow pigment obtained from turmeric (Curcumina longa), is a dietary polyphenol that has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. The effect of curcumin against the development of pulmonary emphysema in animal models is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether curcumin is able to attenuate the development of pulmonary emphysema in mice. Nine-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were treated with intratracheal porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) or exposed to mainstream cigarette smoke (CS) (60 min/day for 10 consecutive days or 5 days/wk for 12 wk) to induce pulmonary inflammation and emphysema. Curcumin (100 mg/kg) or vehicle was administrated daily by oral gavage 1 h and 24 h before intratracheal PPE treatment and daily thereafter throughout a 21-day period in PPE-exposed mice and 1 h before each CS exposure in CS-exposed mice. As a result, curcumin treatment significantly inhibited PPE-induced increase of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid at 6 h and on day 1 after PPE administration, with an increase in antioxidant gene expression at 6 h and significantly attenuated PPE-induced air space enlargement on day 21. It was also found that curcumin treatment significantly inhibited CS-induced increase of neutrophils and macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after 10 consecutive days of CS exposure and significantly attenuated CS-induced air space enlargement after 12 wk of CS exposure. In conclusion, oral curcumin administration attenuated PPE- and CS-induced pulmonary inflammation and emphysema in mice. PMID:19168576

  7. Activation of AMPK Prevents Monocrotaline-Induced Extracellular Matrix Remodeling of Pulmonary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shaojun; Han, Dong; Zhang, Yonghong; Xie, Xinming; Ke, Rui; Zhu, Yanting; Liu, Lu; Song, Yang; Yang, Lan; Li, Manxiang

    2016-01-01

    Background The current study was performed to investigate the effect of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) – activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation on the extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling of pulmonary arteries in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and to address its potential mechanisms. Material/Methods PAH was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of monocrotaline (MCT) into Sprague-Dawley rats. Metformin (MET) was administered to activate AMPK. Immunoblotting was used to determine the phosphorylation and expression of AMPK and expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1). Gelatin zymography was performed to determine the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9. Results Activation of AMPK by MET significantly reduced the right ventricle systolic pressure and the right ventricular hypertrophy in MCT-induced rat PAH model, and partially inhibited the ECM remodeling of pulmonary arteries. These effects were coupled with the decrease of MMP-2/9 activity and TIMP-1 expression. Conclusions This study suggests that activation of AMPK benefits PAH by inhibiting ECM remodeling of pulmonary arteries. Enhancing AMPK activity might have potential value in clinical treatment of PAH. PMID:26978596

  8. [Progress on pathogenesis and treatment of paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Shao, Xue; Chen, Jiang-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Paraquat (PQ) is a highly effective herbicide with contact toxicity. PQ mainly accumulates in the lungs after absorption into the blood circulation. The respiratory function failure caused by PQ-induced lung injury, especially the irreversible pulmonary fibrosis in late phase, is the leading cause of death in patients with PQ poisoning. The mechanism of PQ poisoning is still unclear. Now it is speculated that oxidative stress and inflammation injury are the main pathogenic mechanisms, and abnormal gene expression, mitochondrial damage, loss of pulmonary surfactant, cytokine network and unbalanced matrix metalloproteinases/tissue inhibitors may be also involved in the pathogenesis. In addition to reducing poison absorption and increasing its removal, the current clinical treatment is mainly composed of antioxidant and anti-immune response, but has poor therapeutic effects. Although many novel methods of treatment have been proposed, most of them are still in the experimental stage. It is a hot spot to clarify the mechanism of PQ poisoning and to seek safe and effective treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. This article reviews the research progress on pathogenesis and treatment of PQ-induced pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25644573

  9. Role of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in Schistosoma-induced experimental pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract There is significant evidence that Th2 (T helper 2)-mediated inflammation supports the pathogenesis of both human and experimental animal models of pulmonary hypertension (PH). A key immune regulator is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is produced by Th2 inflammation and can itself contribute to Th2 pulmonary responses. In this study, we interrogated the role of VEGF signaling in a murine model of schistosomiasis-induced PH with a phenotype of significant intrapulmonary Th2 inflammation, vascular remodeling, and elevated right ventricular pressures. We found that VEGF receptor blockade partially suppressed the levels of the Th2 inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 in both the lung and the liver after Schistosoma mansoni exposure and suppressed pulmonary vascular remodeling. These findings suggest that VEGF positively contributes to schistosomiasis-induced vascular inflammation and remodeling, and they also provide evidence for a VEGF-dependent signaling pathway necessary for pulmonary vascular remodeling and inflammation in this model. PMID:25006448

  10. “A small leak will sink a great ship”: hypoxia-inducible factor and group III pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Andrew J.; Scott, Edward W.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension complicating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, also known as secondary pulmonary hypertension, represents a major source of morbidity and mortality in affected patients. While the study of primary pulmonary arterial hypertension has yielded several therapies, the same is not true for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. Recent studies have indicated an important role of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) – a regulatory protein that is vital in adaptation to hypoxic conditions – in the development of secondary pulmonary hypertension. HIF influences development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension through alteration in voltage-gated potassium channels and homeostatic calcium regulation, resulting in disruption of endothelial cell-cell communication, and eventual vascular remodeling. This article summarizes salient literature related to HIF and secondary pulmonary hypertension, in addition to proposing a final common pathway in known mechanistic pathways that result in endothelial barrier integrity loss – vascular “leak” – primarily through a shared endothelial-epithelial signaling protein family, CCN.

  11. Morphine blocks the Mesobuthus tamulus venom-induced augmentation of phenyldiguanide reflex and pulmonary edema in anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Akella, Aparna; Tiwari, Anil K.; Rai, Om P.; Deshpande, Shripad B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Pulmonary edema, a manifestation of scorpion envenomation syndrome, is attributed to cardiogenic or noncardiogenic factors. Morphine is a drug used for cardiogenic pulmonary edema and its effect on Mesobuthus tamulus (MBT) venom-induced changes is not known. Therefore, we hypothesized that morphine blocks the MBT venom-induced augmentation of phenyldiguanide (PDG) reflex and pulmonary edema. Materials and Methods: Experiments were performed on anesthetized adult female rats. Trachea and jugular vein were cannulated, and the electrocardiographic potentials were recorded by connecting needle electrodes in limb lead II configuration. PDG (10 ΅g/kg, IV, bolus injection) responses were elicited by bolus injection initially, after saline/morphine (1 mg/kg) and after injecting MBT venom (100 μg/kg). The time-response area of the PDG-induced bradycardiac response after treatment was calculated as % of the initial PDG response area. At the end of experiments, lungs were excised for determination of pulmonary water content. Results: PDG produced bradycardiac response that lasted for >60 s. MBT venom augmented the PDG reflex response by 2.5 times. In morphine pretreated group, augmentation of bradycardiac response induced by MBT venom was absent. MBT venom increased the pulmonary water content, and the increase was absent in morphine pretreated animals. Conclusion: The results reveal that morphine prevents the MBT venom-induced augmentation of PDG reflex response and pulmonary edema. Thus, morphine can be useful in scorpion envenomation syndrome associated with pulmonary edema. PMID:26997727

  12. Effects of NOX1 on fibroblastic changes of endothelial cells in radiation‑induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seo-Hyun; Kim, Miseon; Lee, Hae-June; Kim, Eun-Ho; Kim, Chun-Ho; Lee, Yoon-Jin

    2016-05-01

    Lung fibrosis is a major complication in radiation‑induced lung damage following thoracic radiotherapy, while the underlying mechanism has remained to be elucidated. The present study performed immunofluorescence and immunoblot assays on irradiated human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) with or without pre‑treatment with VAS2870, a novel NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitor, or small hairpin (sh)RNA against NOX1, ‑2 or ‑4. VAS2870 reduced the cellular reactive oxygen species content induced by 5 Gy radiation in HPAECs and inhibited phenotypic changes in fibrotic cells, including increased alpha smooth muscle actin and vimentin, and decreased CD31 and vascular endothelial cadherin expression. These fibrotic changes were significantly inhibited by treatment with NOX1 shRNA, but not by NOX2 or NOX4 shRNA. Next, the role of NOX1 in pulmonary fibrosis development was assessed in the lung tissues of C57BL/6J mice following thoracic irradiation using trichrome staining. Administration of an NOX1‑specific inhibitor suppressed radiation‑induced collagen deposition and fibroblastic changes in the endothelial cells (ECs) of these mice. The results suggested that radiation‑induced pulmonary fibrosis may be efficiently reduced by specific inhibition of NOX1, an effect mediated by reduction of fibrotic changes of ECs. PMID:27053172

  13. Effects of NOX1 on fibroblastic changes of endothelial cells in radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, SEO-HYUN; KIM, MISEON; LEE, HAE-JUNE; KIM, EUN-HO; KIM, CHUN-HO; LEE, YOON-JIN

    2016-01-01

    Lung fibrosis is a major complication in radiation-induced lung damage following thoracic radiotherapy, while the underlying mechanism has remained to be elucidated. The present study performed immunofluorescence and immunoblot assays on irradiated human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) with or without pre-treatment with VAS2870, a novel NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitor, or small hairpin (sh)RNA against NOX1, -2 or -4. VAS2870 reduced the cellular reactive oxygen species content induced by 5 Gy radiation in HPAECs and inhibited phenotypic changes in fibrotic cells, including increased alpha smooth muscle actin and vimentin, and decreased CD31 and vascular endothelial cadherin expression. These fibrotic changes were significantly inhibited by treatment with NOX1 shRNA, but not by NOX2 or NOX4 shRNA. Next, the role of NOX1 in pulmonary fibrosis development was assessed in the lung tissues of C57BL/6J mice following thoracic irradiation using trichrome staining. Administration of an NOX1-specific inhibitor suppressed radiation-induced collagen deposition and fibroblastic changes in the endothelial cells (ECs) of these mice. The results suggested that radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis may be efficiently reduced by specific inhibition of NOX1, an effect mediated by reduction of fibrotic changes of ECs. PMID:27053172

  14. Antagonism of Stem Cell Factor/c-kit Signaling Attenuates Neonatal Chronic Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Young, Karen C; Torres, Eneida; Hehre, Dorothy; Wu, Shu; Suguihara, Cleide; Hare, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that c-kit positive cells are present in the remodeled pulmonary vasculature bed of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). Whether stem cell factor (SCF)/ c-kit regulated pathways potentiate pulmonary vascular remodeling is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that attenuated c-kit signaling would decrease chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling by decreasing pulmonary vascular cell mitogenesis. Methods Neonatal FVB/NJ mice treated with non-immune IgG (PL), or c-kit neutralizing antibody (ACK2) as well as c-kit mutant mice (WBB6F1- Kit W− v/ +) and their congenic controls, were exposed to normoxia (FiO2=0.21) or hypoxia (FiO2=0.12) for two weeks. Following this exposure, right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), pulmonary vascular cell proliferation and remodeling were evaluated. Results As compared to chronically hypoxic controls, c-kit mutant mice had decreased RVSP, RVH, pulmonary vascular remodeling and proliferation. Consistent with these findings, administration of ACK2 to neonatal mice with chronic hypoxia-induced PH decreased RVSP, RVH, pulmonary vascular cell proliferation and remodeling. This attenuation in PH was accompanied by decreased extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Conclusion SCF/c-kit signaling may potentiate chronic hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling by modulating ERK activation. Inhibition of c-kit activity may be a potential strategy to alleviate PH. PMID:26705118

  15. Neutrophilic oxidative stress mediates organic dust-induced pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Toby K; Chen, Michael; Allard, Benoit; Larsson, Kjell; Martin, James G; Adner, Mikael

    2016-01-15

    Airway exposure to organic dust (OD) from swine confinement facilities induces airway inflammation dominated by neutrophils and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). One important neutrophilic innate defense mechanism is the induction of oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that neutrophils exacerbate airway dysfunction following OD exposure by increasing oxidant burden. BALB/C mice were given intranasal challenges with OD or PBS (1/day for 3 days). Mice were untreated or treated with a neutrophil-depleting antibody, anti-Ly6G, or the antioxidant dimethylthiourea (DMTU) prior to OD exposure. Twenty-four hours after the final exposure, we measured airway responsiveness in response to methacholine (MCh) and collected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid to assess pulmonary inflammation and total antioxidant capacity. Lung tissue was harvested to examine the effect of OD-induced antioxidant gene expression and the effect of anti-Ly6G or DMTU. OD exposure induced a dose-dependent increase of airway responsiveness, a neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation, and secretion of keratinocyte cytokine. Depletion of neutrophils reduced OD-induced AHR. DMTU prevented pulmonary inflammation involving macrophages and neutrophils. Neutrophil depletion and DMTU were highly effective in preventing OD-induced AHR affecting large, conducting airways and tissue elastance. OD induced an increase in total antioxidant capacity and mRNA levels of NRF-2-dependent antioxidant genes, effects that are prevented by administration of DMTU and neutrophil depletion. We conclude that an increase in oxidative stress and neutrophilia is critical in the induction of OD-induced AHR. Prevention of oxidative stress diminishes neutrophil influx and AHR, suggesting that mechanisms driving OD-induced AHR may be dependent on neutrophil-mediated oxidant pathways. PMID:26545900

  16. Lung transcriptional profiling: insights into the mechanisms of ozone-induced pulmonary injury in Wistar Kyoto rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized in rats; however, mechanistic understanding of the pathways involved is limited. We hypothesized that acute exposure of healthy rats to ozone will cause transcriptional alterations, and comprehensive ana...

  17. Dynamic optical limiting experiments on vanadium dioxide and vanadium pentoxide thin films irradiated by a laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Weiping; Luo Yongquan; Zhang Dayong; Luo Fei

    2006-05-10

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) and vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) thin films are irradiated by a near-infrared continuous-wave laser beam and the dynamic optical limiting performance is measured. The temperature varying with time of the films induced by a laser beam is also recorded by an IR thermal sensor. Under the irradiation of a laser beam with an intensity of 255 W/cm2 and a spot diameter of 2 mm, the laser beam transmittance of the VO2 film decreases from 47% before phase transition to 28% after phase transition, and the response time is {approx}200 ms; the laser beam transmittance of the V2O5 film decreases from 51% before phase transition to 24% after phase transition, and the response time is {approx}40 ms. The optical limiting is realized by this laser heating-induced phase transition.

  18. Involvement of calcium-sensing receptors in hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension by promoting phenotypic modulation of small pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xue; Li, Hong-Xia; Shao, Hong-Jiang; Li, Guang-Wei; Sun, Jian; Xi, Yu-Hui; Li, Hong-Zhu; Wang, Xin-Yan; Wang, Li-Na; Bai, Shu-Zhi; Zhang, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Li; Yang, Guang-Dong; Wu, Ling-Yun; Wang, Rui; Xu, Chang-Qing

    2014-11-01

    Phenotype modulation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) plays an important role during hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension (PAH). We had previously shown that calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is expressed in rat PASMCs. However, little is known about the role of CaSR in phenotypic modulation of PASMCs in hypoxia-induced PAH as well as the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we investigated whether CaSR induces the proliferation of PASMCs in small pulmonary arteries from both rats and human with PAH. PAH was induced by exposing rats to hypoxia for 7-21 days. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), right ventricular hypertrophy index (RVI), the percentage of medial wall thickness to the external diameter (WT %), and cross-sectional total vessel wall area to the total area (WA %) of small pulmonary arteries were determined by hematoxylin and eosin (HE), masson trichrome and Weigert's staining. The protein expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-3, CaSR, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK), and smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype marker proteins in rat small pulmonary arteries, including calponin, SMα-actin (SMAα), and osteopontin (OPN), were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, respectively. In addition, immunohistochemistry was applied to paraffin-embedded human tissues from lungs of normal human and PAH patients with chronic heart failure (PAH/CHF). Compared with the control group, mPAP, RVI, WT % and WA % in PAH rats were gradually increased with the prolonged hypoxia. At the same time, the expressions of CaSR, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-3, PCNA, OPN, and p-ERK were markedly increased, while the expressions of SMAα and calponin were significantly reduced in lung tissues or small pulmonary arteries of PAH rats. Neomycin (an agonist of CaSR) enhanced but NPS2390 (an

  19. Impact-driven, pulmonary emboli of osseous fat in exercise-induced bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    Simkin, Peter A; Snitily, Brian K

    2015-11-01

    Exercise induced bronchospasm (EIB) affects approximately 10% of normal individuals with higher prevalence rates among children, obese adults, and competitive athletes. Although hyperpnea with dry air is the best known cause, the problem is multifactorial with atopy, asthma and chlorine all playing established roles. To date, no clear mechanism has connected musculoskeletal loading with the ensuing pulmonary compromise. This paper reviews evidence that impact-driven pulses in subchondral bone pressure may push osseous fat cells into the local venous sinusoids. The resultant showers of microemboli must then travel to the lung where lysis of membrane phospholipids leads to leukotriene formation with resultant inflammation and bronchial hypersensitivity. Concurrently, the same emboli deliver triglyceride fuels for further physical activity. Thus, pulmonary microemboli derived from osseous fat may resolve the seeming paradox of athletic excellence in persons afflicted with exercise-induced bronchospasm. PMID:26328480

  20. Elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema: insights from experimental models.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Mariana A; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2011-12-01

    Several distinct stimuli can be used to reproduce histological and functional features of human emphysema, a leading cause of disability and death. Since cigarette smoke is the main cause of emphysema in humans, experimental researches have attempted to reproduce this situation. However, this is an expensive and cumbersome method of emphysema induction, and simpler, more efficacious alternatives have been sought. Among these approaches, elastolytic enzymes have been widely used to reproduce some characteristics of human cigarette smoke-induced disease, such as: augmentation of airspaces, inflammatory cell influx into the lungs, and systemic inflammation. Nevertheless, the use of elastase-induced emphysema models is still controversial, since the disease pathways involved in elastase induction may differ from those occurring in smoke-induced emphysema. This indicates that the choice of an emphysema model may impact the results of new therapies or drugs being tested. The aim of this review is to compare the mechanisms of disease induction in smoke and elastase emphysema models, to describe the differences among various elastase models, and to establish the advantages and disadvantages of elastase-induced emphysema models. More studies are required to shed light on the mechanisms of elastase-induced emphysema. PMID:22159348

  1. Targeted activation of endothelin-1 exacerbates hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Satwiko, Muhammad Gahan; Ikeda, Koji; Nakayama, Kazuhiko; Yagi, Keiko; Hocher, Berthold; Hirata, Ken-ichi; Emoto, Noriaki

    2015-09-25

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a fatal disease that eventually results in right heart failure and death. Current pharmacologic therapies for PAH are limited, and there are no drugs that could completely cure PAH. Enhanced activity of endothelin system has been implicated in PAH severity and endothelin receptor antagonists have been used clinically to treat PAH. However, there is limited experimental evidence on the direct role of enhanced endothelin system activity in PAH. Here, we investigated the correlation between endothelin-1 (ET-1) and PAH using ET-1 transgenic (ETTG) mice. Exposure to chronic hypoxia increased right ventricular pressure and pulmonary arterial wall thickness in ETTG mice compared to those in wild type mice. Of note, ETTG mice exhibited modest but significant increase in right ventricular pressure and vessel wall thickness relative to wild type mice even under normoxic conditions. To induce severe PAH, we administered SU5416, a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor, combined with exposure to chronic hypoxia. Treatment with SU5416 modestly aggravated hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy, and pulmonary arterial vessel wall thickening in ETTG mice in association with increased interleukin-6 expression in blood vessels. However, there was no sign of obliterative endothelial cell proliferation and plexiform lesion formation in the lungs. These results demonstrated that enhanced endothelin system activity could be a causative factor in the development of PAH and provided rationale for the inhibition of endothelin system to treat PAH. - Highlights: • Role of endothelin-1 in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) was investigated. • The endothelin-1 transgenic (ETTG) and wild type (WT) mice were analyzed. • ETTG mice spontaneously developed PAH under normoxia conditions. • SU5416 further aggravated PAH in ETTG mice. • Enhanced endothelin system activity could be a causative factor in

  2. Role of ASIC1 in the development of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nitta, Carlos H.; Osmond, David A.; Herbert, Lindsay M.; Beasley, Britta F.; Resta, Thomas C.; Walker, Benjimen R.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia (CH) associated with respiratory disease results in elevated pulmonary vascular intracellular Ca2+ concentration, which elicits enhanced vasoconstriction and promotes vascular arterial remodeling and thus has important implications in the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) contributes to this elevated intracellular Ca2+ concentration and has also been linked to acute hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV). Since our laboratory has recently demonstrated an important role for acid-sensing ion channel 1 (ASIC1) in mediating SOCE, we hypothesized that ASIC1 contributes to both HPV and the development of CH-induced PH. To test this hypothesis, we examined responses to acute hypoxia in isolated lungs and assessed the effects of CH on indexes of PH, arterial remodeling, and vasoconstrictor reactivity in wild-type (ASIC1+/+) and ASIC1 knockout (ASIC1−/−) mice. Restoration of ASIC1 expression in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells from ASIC1−/− mice rescued SOCE, confirming the requirement for ASIC1 in this response. HPV responses were blunted in lungs from ASIC1−/− mice. Both SOCE and receptor-mediated Ca2+ entry, along with agonist-dependent vasoconstrictor responses, were diminished in small pulmonary arteries from control ASIC−/− mice compared with ASIC+/+ mice. The effects of CH to augment receptor-mediated vasoconstrictor and SOCE responses in vessels from ASIC1+/+ mice were not observed after CH in ASIC1−/− mice. In addition, ASIC1−/− mice exhibited diminished right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, and arterial remodeling in response to CH compared with ASIC1+/+ mice. Taken together, these data demonstrate an important role for ASIC1 in both HPV and the development of CH-induced PH. PMID:24186095

  3. Pneumonectomy combined with SU5416 induces severe pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Happé, C M; de Raaf, M A; Rol, N; Schalij, I; Vonk-Noordegraaf, A; Westerhof, N; Voelkel, N F; de Man, F S; Bogaard, H J

    2016-06-01

    The SU5416 + hypoxia (SuHx) rat model is a commonly used model of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. While it is known that exposure to hypoxia can be replaced by another type of hit (e.g., ovalbumin sensitization) it is unknown whether abnormal pulmonary blood flow (PBF), which has long been known to invoke pathological changes in the pulmonary vasculature, can replace the hypoxic exposure. Here we studied if a combination of SU5416 administration combined with pneumonectomy (PNx), to induce abnormal PBF in the contralateral lung, is sufficient to induce severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in rats. Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to SuPNx protocol (SU5416 + combined with left pneumonectomy) or standard SuHx protocol, and comparisons between models were made at week 2 and 6 postinitiation. Both SuHx and SuPNx models displayed extensive obliterative vascular remodeling leading to an increased right ventricular systolic pressure at week 6 Similar inflammatory response in the lung vasculature of both models was observed alongside increased endothelial cell proliferation and apoptosis. This study describes the SuPNx model, which features severe PAH at 6 wk and could serve as an alternative to the SuHx model. Our study, together with previous studies on experimental models of pulmonary hypertension, shows that the typical histopathological findings of PAH, including obliterative lesions, inflammation, increased cell turnover, and ongoing apoptosis, represent a final common pathway of a disease that can evolve as a consequence of a variety of insults to the lung vasculature. PMID:27036867

  4. The Preventive Effect of Atorvastatin on Paraquat-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in the Rats

    PubMed Central

    Khodayar, Mohammad Javad; Kiani, Milad; Hemmati, Ali Asghar; Rezaie, Anahita; Zerafatfard, Mohammad Rahim; Rashidi Nooshabadi, Mohammad Reza; Goudarzi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Pulmonary fibrosis is a potentially lethal inflammatory disease and there has been no effective medication for this progressive disease up to now. As a model, different therapeutic approaches have been applied for paraquat-induced pulmonary injury and fibrosis. Atorvastatin besides cholesterol-lowering effects possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties. The current study was designed to investigate the preventive anti-fibrotic effects of atorvastatin on paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats. Methods: The rats were randomly divided into five experimental groups. Group I, control group (saline), group II received a single oral dose of 20 mg/kg paraquat with no treatment and III, IV and V groups received atorvastatin at the doses of 10, 20, and 40 mg/kg/day orally one week before and three weeks after paraquat administration, respectively. The rats were sacrificed 21 days after paraquat. Lung hydroxyproline and serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) were determined and lung indices and semi-quantitative histopathological changes were evaluated. Results: Paraquat could significantly increase the serum MDA and lung hydroxyproline levels. Elevated content of tissue hydroxyproline and serum levels of malondialdehyde induced by paraquat, attenuated by atorvastatin at the doses of 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg. Furthermore, histopathological findings and the amount of lung indices showed the beneficial preventive role of atorvastatin in rat pulmonary fibrosis induced by paraquat. Conclusion: In conclusion, the present data show that atorvastatin alleviate the toxic effects of paraquat under the experimental circumstances and may be a useful agent in cases who are in contact or poisoned with paraquat. PMID:25436189

  5. Gender differences in ozone-induced pulmonary and metabolic health effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    SOT 2015 abstractGender differences in ozone-induced pulmonary and metabolic health effectsU.P. Kodavanti1, V.L. Bass2, M.C. Schladweiler1, C.J. Gordon3, K.A. Jarema3, P. Phillips3, A.D. Ledbetter1, D.B. Miller4, S. Snow5, J.E. Richards1. 1 EPHD, NHEERL, USEPA, Research Triangle ...

  6. Effect of chronic sodium nitrite therapy on monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pankey, Edward A; Badejo, Adeleke M; Casey, David B; Lasker, George F; Riehl, Russel A; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Nossaman, Bobby D; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2012-06-30

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a rare disorder that without treatment is progressive and often fatal within 3 years. The treatment of PH involves the use of a diverse group of drugs and lung transplantation. Although nitrite was once thought to be an inactive metabolite of endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO), there is increasing evidence that nitrite may be useful in the treatment of PH, but the mechanism by which nitrite exerts its beneficial effect remains uncertain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic sodium nitrite treatment in a PH model in the rat. Following induction of PH with a single injection of monocrotaline, 60 mg; daily ip injections of sodium nitrite (3mg/kg) starting on day 14 and continuing for 21 days, resulted in a significantly lower pulmonary arterial pressure on day 35 when compared to values in untreated animals with monocrotaline-induced PH. In monocrotaline-treated rats, daily treatment with ip nitrite injections for 21 days decreased right ventricular mass and pathologic changes in small pulmonary arteries. Nitrite therapy did not change systemic arterial pressure or cardiac output when values were measured on day 35. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure in response to iv injections of sodium nitroprusside, sodium nitrite, and BAY 41-8543 were not different in rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension and rats with chronic nitrite therapy when compared to responses in animals in which pulmonary arterial pressure was increased with U46619. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the mechanisms that convert nitrite to vasoactive NO, activate soluble guanylyl cyclase and mediate the vasodilator response to NO or an NO derivative are not impaired. The present data are consistent with the results of a previous study in monocrotaline-induced PH in which systemic arterial pressure and cardiac output were not evaluated and are consistent with the hypothesis that nitrite is

  7. Effect of Chronic Sodium Nitrite Therapy on Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pankey, Edward A.; Badejo, Adeleke M.; Casey, David B.; Lasker, George F.; Riehl, Russel A.; Murthy, Subramanyam N.; Nossaman, Bobby D.; Kadowitz, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a rare disorder that without treatment is progressive and often fatal within 3 years. The treatment of PH involves the use of a diverse group of drugs and lung transplantation. Although nitrite was once thought to be an inactive metabolite of endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO), there is increasing evidence that nitrite may be useful in the treatment of PH, but the mechanism by which nitrite exerts its beneficial effect remains uncertain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic sodium nitrite treatment in a PH model in the rat. Following induction of PH with a single injection of monocrotaline, 60 mg; daily ip injections of sodium nitrite (3 mg/kg) starting on day 14 and continuing for 21 days, resulted in a significantly lower pulmonary arterial pressure on day 35 when compared to values in untreated animals with monocrotaline-induced PH. In monocrotaline-treated rats, daily treatment with ip nitrite injections for 21 days decreased right ventricular mass and pathologic changes in small pulmonary arteries. Nitrite therapy did not change systemic arterial pressure or cardiac output when values were measured on day 35. The decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure in response to iv injections of sodium nitroprusside, sodium nitrite, and BAY 41-8543 were not different in rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension and rats with chronic nitrite therapy when compared to responses in animals in which pulmonary arterial pressure was increased with U46619. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the mechanisms that convert nitrite to vasoactive NO, activate soluble guanylyl cyclase and mediate the vasodilator response to NO or an NO derivative are not impaired. The present data are consistent with the results of a previous study in monocrotaline-induced PH in which systemic arterial pressure and cardiac output were not evaluated and are consistent with the hypothesis that nitrite is

  8. Silibinin attenuates methotrexate-induced pulmonary injury by targeting oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    KALEMCI, SERDAR; TOPAL, YASAR; CELIK, SERKAN YASAR; YILMAZ, NIGAR; BEYDILLI, HALIL; KOSAR, MEHMET ILKAY; DIRICAN, NIGAR; ALTUNTAS, IRFAN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the protective effect of silibinin against methotrexate (MTX)-induced pulmonary toxicity. Rats were divided into four groups (MTX, MTX + silibinin, silibinin and control. MTX was injected intraperitoneally (i.p) into female Wistar rats (10 mg/kg/day for 3 days), which resulted in significant increases in the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and oxidant enzymes, including nitric oxide and myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, significant reductions were detected in the serum activity levels of the antioxidative enzymes, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase, when compared with the control group. However, administration of silibinin (100 mg/kg/day for 10 days, i.p.) was shown to ameliorate the MTX-induced pulmonary toxicity, as indicated by the normalization of the oxidative stress parameters. Furthermore, silibinin treatment was demonstrated to reduce the histopathological changes associated with MTX. In conclusion, silibinin exhibited protective effects against MTX-induced pulmonary toxicity, which may be attributed to its antioxidant activity. PMID:26622344

  9. Inhibition of pulmonary adenoma in diethylnitrosamine-induced rats by Rhizoma paridis saponins.

    PubMed

    Man, Shuli; Li, Jing; Fan, Wei; Chai, Hongyan; Liu, Zhen; Gao, Wenyuan

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays, people pay more and more attention to the natural products based on their multiple targets in the antitumor treatment. In our previous research, Rhizoma paridis saponins (RPS) were regarded as potent anticancer agent that elicits programmed cell death and inhibits metastases in murine lung adenocarcinoma in vivo. In the present study, we set up a rat model of diethylnitrosamine (DEN) induced pulmonary adenoma to evaluate the antitumor effects of RPS again. After 20 weeks treatment, rats were sacrificed in order to perform histopathological examinations, blood biochemistry, immunohistochemistry, western blot, PCR and metabonomics. As a result, DEN induced pulmonary adenoma generation in the lungs and damaged hepatocytes and hepatoma formation in the livers. RPS effectively attenuated hepatotoxic and inhibited pulmonary adenoma through down-regulating expression of MMP-9 and up-regulating level of TIMP-2 in DEN-induced rats. Meanwhile, RPS remarkably decreased energy metabolism, and glycine, serine and threonine metabolism to block the tumor growth. In conclusion, RPS would be a potent anticancer agent used in the prospective application. PMID:26196122

  10. Structural and functional prevention of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension by individualized exercise training in mice.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, Norbert; Peters, Dorothea M; Klöpping, Christina; Krüger, Karsten; Pilat, Christian; Katta, Susmitha; Seimetz, Michael; Ghofrani, Hossein A; Schermuly, Ralph T; Witzenrath, Martin; Seeger, Werner; Grimminger, Friedrich; Mooren, Frank C

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a disease with a poor prognosis characterized by a vascular remodeling process and an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. While a variety of reports demonstrated that exercise training exerts beneficial effects on exercise performance and quality of life in PH patients, it is not known how physical exercise affects vascular remodeling processes occurring in hypoxia-induced PH. Therefore, we investigated the effect of individualized exercise training on the development of hypoxia-induced PH in mice. Training effects were compared with pharmacological treatment with the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor Sildenafil or a combination of training plus Sildenafil. Trained mice who received Sildenafil showed a significantly improved walking distance (from 88.9 ± 8.1 to 146.4 ± 13.1 m) and maximum oxygen consumption (from 93.3 ± 2.9 to 105.5 ± 2.2% in combination with Sildenafil, to 102.2 ± 3.0% with placebo) compared with sedentary controls. Right ventricular systolic pressure, measured by telemetry, was at the level of healthy normoxic animals, whereas right heart hypertrophy did not benefit from training. Most interestingly, the increase in small pulmonary vessel muscularization was prevented by training. Respective counterregulatory processes were detected for the nitric oxide-soluble guanylate cyclase-phosphodiesterase system. We conclude that individualized daily exercise can prevent vascular remodeling in hypoxia-induced PH. PMID:24705723

  11. Hypoxia-inducible factors in human pulmonary arterial hypertension: a link to the intrinsic myeloid abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Farha, Samar; Asosingh, Kewal; Xu, Weiling; Sharp, Jacqueline; George, Deepa; Comhair, Suzy; Park, Margaret; Tang, W H Wilson; Loyd, James E; Theil, Karl; Tubbs, Raymond; Hsi, Eric; Lichtin, Alan; Erzurum, Serpil C

    2011-03-31

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a proliferative vasculopathy characterized by high circulating CD34(+)CD133(+) proangiogenic progenitors, and endothelial cells that have pathologic expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 α (HIF-1α). Here, CD34(+)CD133(+) progenitor cell numbers are shown to be higher in PAH bone marrow, blood, and pulmonary arteries than in healthy controls. The HIF-inducible myeloid-activating factors erythropoietin, stem cell factor (SCF), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) are also present at higher than normal levels in PAH blood, and related to disease severity. Primary endothelial cells harvested from human PAH lungs produce greater HGF and progenitor recruitment factor stromal-derived factor 1 α (SDF-1α) than control lung endothelial cells, and thus may contribute to bone marrow activation. Even though PAH patients had normal numbers of circulating blood elements, hematopoietic alterations in myeloid and erythroid lineages and reticulin fibrosis identified a subclinical myeloproliferative process. Unexpectedly, evaluation of bone marrow progenitors and reticulin in nonaffected family members of patients with familial PAH revealed similar myeloid abnormalities. Altogether, the results show that PAH is linked to myeloid abnormalities, some of which may be related to increased production of HIF-inducible factors by diseased pulmonary vasculature, but findings in nonaffected family suggest myeloid abnormalities may be intrinsic to the disease process. PMID:21258008

  12. Hypoxia-inducible factors in human pulmonary arterial hypertension: a link to the intrinsic myeloid abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Asosingh, Kewal; Xu, Weiling; Sharp, Jacqueline; George, Deepa; Comhair, Suzy; Park, Margaret; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Loyd, James E.; Theil, Karl; Tubbs, Raymond; Hsi, Eric; Lichtin, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a proliferative vasculopathy characterized by high circulating CD34+CD133+ proangiogenic progenitors, and endothelial cells that have pathologic expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 α (HIF-1α). Here, CD34+CD133+ progenitor cell numbers are shown to be higher in PAH bone marrow, blood, and pulmonary arteries than in healthy controls. The HIF-inducible myeloid-activating factors erythropoietin, stem cell factor (SCF), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) are also present at higher than normal levels in PAH blood, and related to disease severity. Primary endothelial cells harvested from human PAH lungs produce greater HGF and progenitor recruitment factor stromal-derived factor 1 α (SDF-1α) than control lung endothelial cells, and thus may contribute to bone marrow activation. Even though PAH patients had normal numbers of circulating blood elements, hematopoietic alterations in myeloid and erythroid lineages and reticulin fibrosis identified a subclinical myeloproliferative process. Unexpectedly, evaluation of bone marrow progenitors and reticulin in nonaffected family members of patients with familial PAH revealed similar myeloid abnormalities. Altogether, the results show that PAH is linked to myeloid abnormalities, some of which may be related to increased production of HIF-inducible factors by diseased pulmonary vasculature, but findings in nonaffected family suggest myeloid abnormalities may be intrinsic to the disease process. PMID:21258008

  13. [Role of endogenous hydrogen sulfide in pulmonary hypertension induced by lipopolysaccharide].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Wei, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Meng, Xiang-Yan; Xian, Xiao-Hui

    2008-04-25

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the role of endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in pulmonary arterial hypertension induced by endotoxin. Adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control group (0.5 mL/kg body weight of normal saline, i.v.), lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated group (5 mg/kg body weight of LPS, i.v.), LPS + NaHS (5 mg/kg body weight of LPS, i.v., and 28 μmol/kg body weight of NaHS, i.p.) and LPS + PPG group (5 mg/kg body weight of LPS, i.v., and 30 μmol/kg body weight of PPG, i.p.). Rats were anesthetized with 20% urethane (1 g/kg body weight, i.p.). A polyethylene catheter was inserted into the pulmonary artery through the right external jugular vein to measure the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) for 7 h, and then the pulmonary artery was isolated rapidly by the method described previously. Pulmonary arterial activity was detected. H2S concentration and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) activity in pulmonary artery tissues were determined by biochemical method. CSE mRNA expression was detected by competitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Compared with control, LPS significantly increased mPAP [(1.82±0.29) kPa vs (1.43±0.26) kPa, P<0.01], decreased H2S production [(26.33±7.84) vs (42.92±8.73) pmol/g wet tissue per minute, P<0.01), and reduced endothelium-dependent relaxation response [(75.72±7.22)% vs (86.40±4.40) %, P<0.01) induced by ACh (1×10(-6) mol/L). These effects were partly reversed by co-administration of NaHS and enhanced by co-administration of PPG. Both CSE activity and CSE mRNA expression were consistent with H2S production. It is suggested that the inhibitory effect of LPS on endothelium-dependent relaxation results in pulmonary hypertension, which might be mediated through H(2)S. PMID:18425308

  14. Adiponectin Attenuates Lung Fibroblasts Activation and Pulmonary Fibrosis Induced by Paraquat

    PubMed Central

    He, Ya-rong; Lau, Wayne Bond; Zeng, Zhi; Liang, Zong-an

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is one of the most common complications of paraquat (PQ) poisoning, which demands for more effective therapies. Accumulating evidence suggests adiponectin (APN) may be a promising therapy against fibrotic diseases. In the current study, we determine whether the exogenous globular APN isoform protects against pulmonary fibrosis in PQ-treated mice and human lung fibroblasts, and dissect the responsible underlying mechanisms. BALB/C mice were divided into control group, PQ group, PQ + low-dose APN group, and PQ + high-dose APN group. Mice were sacrificed 3, 7, 14, and 21 days after PQ treatment. We compared pulmonary histopathological changes among different groups on the basis of fibrosis scores, TGF-β1, CTGF and α-SMA pulmonary content via Western blot and real-time quantitative fluorescence-PCR (RT-PCR). Blood levels of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 were determined by ELISA. Human lung fibroblasts WI-38 were divided into control group, PQ group, APN group, and APN receptor (AdipoR) 1 small-interfering RNA (siRNA) group. Fibroblasts were collected 24, 48, and 72 hours after PQ exposure for assay. Cell viability and apoptosis were determined via Kit-8 (CCK-8) and fluorescein Annexin V-FITC/PI double labeling. The protein and mRNA expression level of collagen type III, AdipoR1, and AdipoR2 were measured by Western blot and RT-PCR. APN treatment significantly decreased the lung fibrosis scores, protein and mRNA expression of pulmonary TGF-β1, CTGF and α-SMA content, and blood MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05). Pretreatment with APN significantly attenuated the reduced cell viability and up-regulated collagen type III expression induced by PQ in lung fibroblasts, (p<0.05). APN pretreatment up-regulated AdipoR1, but not AdipoR2, expression in WI-38 fibroblasts. AdipoR1 siRNA abrogated APN-mediated protective effects in PQ-exposed fibroblasts. Taken together, our data suggests APN protects against PQ-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a dose

  15. Adiponectin attenuates lung fibroblasts activation and pulmonary fibrosis induced by paraquat.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rong; Cao, Yu; He, Ya-rong; Lau, Wayne Bond; Zeng, Zhi; Liang, Zong-an

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is one of the most common complications of paraquat (PQ) poisoning, which demands for more effective therapies. Accumulating evidence suggests adiponectin (APN) may be a promising therapy against fibrotic diseases. In the current study, we determine whether the exogenous globular APN isoform protects against pulmonary fibrosis in PQ-treated mice and human lung fibroblasts, and dissect the responsible underlying mechanisms. BALB/C mice were divided into control group, PQ group, PQ + low-dose APN group, and PQ + high-dose APN group. Mice were sacrificed 3, 7, 14, and 21 days after PQ treatment. We compared pulmonary histopathological changes among different groups on the basis of fibrosis scores, TGF-β1, CTGF and α-SMA pulmonary content via Western blot and real-time quantitative fluorescence-PCR (RT-PCR). Blood levels of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 were determined by ELISA. Human lung fibroblasts WI-38 were divided into control group, PQ group, APN group, and APN receptor (AdipoR) 1 small-interfering RNA (siRNA) group. Fibroblasts were collected 24, 48, and 72 hours after PQ exposure for assay. Cell viability and apoptosis were determined via Kit-8 (CCK-8) and fluorescein Annexin V-FITC/PI double labeling. The protein and mRNA expression level of collagen type III, AdipoR1, and AdipoR2 were measured by Western blot and RT-PCR. APN treatment significantly decreased the lung fibrosis scores, protein and mRNA expression of pulmonary TGF-β1, CTGF and α-SMA content, and blood MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05). Pretreatment with APN significantly attenuated the reduced cell viability and up-regulated collagen type III expression induced by PQ in lung fibroblasts, (p<0.05). APN pretreatment up-regulated AdipoR1, but not AdipoR2, expression in WI-38 fibroblasts. AdipoR1 siRNA abrogated APN-mediated protective effects in PQ-exposed fibroblasts. Taken together, our data suggests APN protects against PQ-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a dose

  16. Regulation of macroautophagy in amiodarone-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mahavadi, Poornima; Knudsen, Lars; Venkatesan, Shalini; Henneke, Ingrid; Hegermann, Jan; Wrede, Christoph; Ochs, Matthias; Ahuja, Saket; Chillappagari, Shashi; Ruppert, Clemens; Seeger, Werner; Korfei, Martina; Guenther, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Amiodarone (AD) is an iodinated benzofuran derivative, especially known for its antiarrhythmic properties. It exerts serious side-effects even in patients receiving low doses. AD is well-known to induce apoptosis of type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECII), a mechanism that has been suggested to play an important role in AD-induced lung fibrosis. The precise molecular mechanisms underlying this disease are, however, still unclear. Because of its amphiphilic nature, AD becomes enriched in the lysosomal compartments, affecting the general functions of these organelles. Hence, in this study, we aimed to assess the role of autophagy, a lysosome-dependent homeostasis mechanism, in driving AECII apoptosis in response to AD. In vitro, AD-treated MLE12 and primary AECII cells showed increased proSP-C and LC3B positive vacuolar structures and underwent LC3B-dependent apoptosis. In addition, AD-induced autophagosome-lysosome fusion and increased autophagy flux were observed. In vivo, in C57BL/6 mice, LC3B was localised at the limiting membrane of lamellar bodies, which were closely connected to the autophagosomal structures in AECIIs. Our data suggest that AD causes activation of macroautophagy in AECIIs and extensive autophagy-dependent apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells. Targeting the autophagy pathway may therefore represent an attractive treatment modality in AD-induced lung fibrosis. PMID:27499909

  17. Regulation of macroautophagy in amiodarone‐induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mahavadi, Poornima; Knudsen, Lars; Venkatesan, Shalini; Henneke, Ingrid; Hegermann, Jan; Wrede, Christoph; Ochs, Matthias; Ahuja, Saket; Chillappagari, Shashi; Ruppert, Clemens; Seeger, Werner; Korfei, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Amiodarone (AD) is an iodinated benzofuran derivative, especially known for its antiarrhythmic properties. It exerts serious side‐effects even in patients receiving low doses. AD is well‐known to induce apoptosis of type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECII), a mechanism that has been suggested to play an important role in AD‐induced lung fibrosis. The precise molecular mechanisms underlying this disease are, however, still unclear. Because of its amphiphilic nature, AD becomes enriched in the lysosomal compartments, affecting the general functions of these organelles. Hence, in this study, we aimed to assess the role of autophagy, a lysosome‐dependent homeostasis mechanism, in driving AECII apoptosis in response to AD. In vitro, AD‐treated MLE12 and primary AECII cells showed increased proSP‐C and LC3B positive vacuolar structures and underwent LC3B‐dependent apoptosis. In addition, AD‐induced autophagosome‐lysosome fusion and increased autophagy flux were observed. In vivo, in C57BL/6 mice, LC3B was localised at the limiting membrane of lamellar bodies, which were closely connected to the autophagosomal structures in AECIIs. Our data suggest that AD causes activation of macroautophagy in AECIIs and extensive autophagy‐dependent apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells. Targeting the autophagy pathway may therefore represent an attractive treatment modality in AD‐induced lung fibrosis.

  18. Combined inhibition of TGFβ and PDGF signaling attenuates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Dadrich, Monika; Nicolay, Nils H.; Flechsig, Paul; Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Hoeltgen, Line; Roeder, Falk; Hauser, Kai; Tietz, Alexandra; Jenne, Jürgen; Lopez, Ramon; Roehrich, Manuel; Wirkner, Ute; Lahn, Michael; Huber, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Radiotherapy (RT) is a mainstay for the treatment of lung cancer, but the effective dose is often limited by the development of radiation-induced pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) play crucial roles in the development of these diseases, but the effects of dual growth factor inhibition on pulmonary fibrosis development remain unclear. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were treated with 20 Gy to the thorax to induce pulmonary fibrosis. PDGF receptor inhibitors SU9518 and SU14816 (imatinib) and TGFβ receptor inhibitor galunisertib were applied individually or in combinations after RT. Lung density and septal fibrosis were measured by high-resolution CT and MRI. Lung histology and gene expression analyses were performed and Osteopontin levels were studied. Results: Treatment with SU9518, SU14816 or galunisertib individually attenuated radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and decreased radiological and histological signs of lung damage. Combining PDGF and TGFβ inhibitors showed to be feasible and safe in a mouse model, and dual inhibition significantly attenuated radiation-induced lung damage and extended mouse survival compared to blockage of either pathway alone. Gene expression analysis of irradiated lung tissue showed upregulation of PDGF and TGFβ-dependent signaling components by thoracic irradiation, and upregulation patterns show crosstalk between downstream mediators of the PDGF and TGFβ pathways. Conclusion: Combined small-molecule inhibition of PDGF and TGFβ signaling is a safe and effective treatment for radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in mice and may offer a novel approach for treatment of fibrotic lung diseases in humans. Translational statement: RT is an effective treatment modality for cancer with limitations due to acute and chronic toxicities, where TGFβ and PDGF play a key role. Here, we show that a combined

  19. Combined inhibition of TGFβ and PDGF signaling attenuates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dadrich, Monika; Nicolay, Nils H; Flechsig, Paul; Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Hoeltgen, Line; Roeder, Falk; Hauser, Kai; Tietz, Alexandra; Jenne, Jürgen; Lopez, Ramon; Roehrich, Manuel; Wirkner, Ute; Lahn, Michael; Huber, Peter E

    2016-05-01

    Background : Radiotherapy (RT) is a mainstay for the treatment of lung cancer, but the effective dose is often limited by the development of radiation-induced pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) play crucial roles in the development of these diseases, but the effects of dual growth factor inhibition on pulmonary fibrosis development remain unclear. Methods : C57BL/6 mice were treated with 20 Gy to the thorax to induce pulmonary fibrosis. PDGF receptor inhibitors SU9518 and SU14816 (imatinib) and TGFβ receptor inhibitor galunisertib were applied individually or in combinations after RT. Lung density and septal fibrosis were measured by high-resolution CT and MRI. Lung histology and gene expression analyses were performed and Osteopontin levels were studied. Results : Treatment with SU9518, SU14816 or galunisertib individually attenuated radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and decreased radiological and histological signs of lung damage. Combining PDGF and TGFβ inhibitors showed to be feasible and safe in a mouse model, and dual inhibition significantly attenuated radiation-induced lung damage and extended mouse survival compared to blockage of either pathway alone. Gene expression analysis of irradiated lung tissue showed upregulation of PDGF and TGFβ-dependent signaling components by thoracic irradiation, and upregulation patterns show crosstalk between downstream mediators of the PDGF and TGFβ pathways. Conclusion : Combined small-molecule inhibition of PDGF and TGFβ signaling is a safe and effective treatment for radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in mice and may offer a novel approach for treatment of fibrotic lung diseases in humans. Translational statement : RT is an effective treatment modality for cancer with limitations due to acute and chronic toxicities, where TGFβ and PDGF play a key role. Here, we show that a combined inhibition of

  20. Effects of buthionine sulfoximine on the development of ozone-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, J D; Pickrell, J A; Harkema, J R; McLaughlin, S I; Hahn, F F; Henderson, R F

    1988-10-01

    The capacity of reduced glutathione (GSH) to protect lung tissue against ozone-induced pulmonary fibrosis was investigated. Male B6C3F1 mice were exposed to 0, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 ppm ozone for 23 hr/day for 14 days. During exposures and/or for a period of 90 days after exposures, subgroups of mice at each exposure level were given drinking water containing 30 mM L-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO) to lower in vivo levels of GSH. These BSO treatments reduced blood glutamylcysteine synthetase (GCS) activity (regulatory enzyme for GSH biosynthesis) and lung nonprotein sulfhydryl (NPSH) levels in nonexposed animals by approximately half. In contrast, ozone exposures increased blood GCS activity and lung NPSH levels in a concentration-dependent manner, with smaller increases in the BSO-treated mice. Immediately after exposures, an ozone-related inflammatory response was seen in lungs, but no histopathological signs of developing fibrosis were evident. Ninety days later, mice exposed to 1 ppm ozone and not treated with BSO had modest evidence of pulmonary fibrosis. Mice exposed to 1 ppm ozone and treated with BSO during this post-exposure period (regardless of BSO treatment during exposures) showed histopathological evidence of exacerbated pulmonary fibrosis, compared to similarly exposed mice not treated with BSO postexposure. These results indicated that interference with the body's normal defense mechanisms against oxidant damage, including suppression of GSH biosynthesis, exacerbates the subsequent development of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:2901982

  1. CD4(+)CD25(hi)Foxp3(+) Cells Exacerbate Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Birjandi, Shirin Z; Palchevskiy, Vyacheslav; Xue, Ying Ying; Nunez, Stefanie; Kern, Rita; Weigt, S Sam; Lynch, Joseph P; Chatila, Talal A; Belperio, John A

    2016-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a fatal lung disease with a median survival of 2 to 5 years. A decade of studies has downplayed inflammation contributing to its pathogenesis. However, these studies preceded the discovery of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and all of their functions. On the basis of human studies demonstrating Tregs can decrease graft-versus-host disease and vasculitides, there is consideration of their use to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We hypothesized that Treg therapy would attenuate the fibroplasia involved in a preclinical murine model of pulmonary fibrosis. IL-2 complex was used in vivo to expand CD4(+)CD25(hi)Foxp3(+) cells in the lung during intratracheal bleomycin challenge; however, this unexpectedly led to an increase in lung fibrosis. More important, this increase in fibrosis was a lymphocyte-dependent process. We corroborated these results using a CD4(+)CD25(hi)Foxp3(+) cellular-based therapy. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that CD4(+)CD25(hi)Foxp3(+) cells undergo alterations during bleomycin challenge and the IL-2 complex had no effect on profibrotic (eg, transforming growth factor-β) or type 17 immune response cytokines; however, there was a marked down-regulation of the type 1 and augmentation of the type 2 immune response cytokines from the lungs. Collectively, our animal studies show that a specific lung injury can induce Treg alterations, which can augment pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27317904

  2. Puerarin Induces Mitochondria-Dependent Apoptosis in Hypoxic Human Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chan; Chen, Chun; Wang, Zhiyi; Wang, Liangxing; Yang, Lehe; Ding, Minjiao; Ding, Cheng; Sun, Yu; Lin, Quan; Huang, Xiaoying; Du, Xiaohong; Zhao, Xiaowei; Wang, Chuangyi

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary vascular medial hypertrophy in hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is caused in part by decreased apoptosis in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Puerarin, an isoflavone purified from the Chinese medicinal herb kudzu, ameliorates chronic hypoxic PAH in animal models. Here we investigated the effects of puerarin on apoptosis of hypoxic human PASMCs (HPASMCs), and to determine the possible underlying mechanisms. Methodology/Principal Findings HPASMCs were cultured for 24 h in normoxia or hypoxia (5% O2) conditions with and without puerarin. Cell number and viability were determined with a hemacytometer or a cell counting kit. Apoptosis was detected with a TUNEL test, rhodamine-123 (R-123) fluorescence, a colorimetric assay, western blots, immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR. Hypoxia inhibited mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and promoted HPASMC growth. In contrast, after puerarin (50 µM or more) intervention, cell growth was inhibited and apoptosis was observed. Puerarin-induced apoptosis in hypoxic HPASMCs was accompanied by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, caspase-9 activation, and Bcl-2 down-regulation with concurrent Bax up-regulation. Conclusions/Significance Puerarin promoted apoptosis in hypoxic HPASMCs by acting on the mitochondria-dependent pathway. These results suggest a new mechanism of puerarin relevant to the management of clinical hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22457823

  3. Oxidant and enzymatic antioxidant status (gene expression and activity) in the brain of chickens with cold-induced pulmonary hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanpour, Hossein; Khalaji-Pirbalouty, Valiallah; Nasiri, Leila; Mohebbi, Abdonnaser; Bahadoran, Shahab

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate oxidant and antioxidant status of the brain (hindbrain, midbrain, and forebrain) in chickens with cold-induced pulmonary hypertension, the measurements of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, antioxidant capacity, enzymatic activity, and gene expression (for catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutases) were done. There were high lipid peroxidation/protein oxidation and low antioxidant capacity in the hindbrain of cold-induced pulmonary hypertensive chickens compared to control ( P < 0.05). In the hypertensive chickens, superoxide dismutase activity was decreased (forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain), while catalase activity was increased (forebrain and midbrain) ( P < 0.05). Glutathione peroxidase activity did not change. Relative gene expression of catalase and superoxide dismutases (1 and 2) was downregulated, while glutathione peroxidase was upregulated in the brain of the cold-induced pulmonary hypertensive chickens. Probably, these situations in the oxidant and antioxidant status of the brain especially hindbrain may change its function at cardiovascular center and sympathetic nervous system to exacerbate pulmonary hypertension.

  4. Inactivation of p53 Is Sufficient to Induce Development of Pulmonary Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jacquin, S.; Rincheval, V.; Mignotte, B.; Richard, S.; Humbert, M.; Mercier, O.; Londoño-Vallejo, A.; Fadel, E.; Eddahibi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PA-SMCs) in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) show similarities to cancer cells. Due to the growth-suppressive and pro-apoptotic effects of p53 and its inactivation in cancer, we hypothesized that the p53 pathway could be altered in PAH. We therefore explored the involvement of p53 in the monocrotaline (MCT) rat model of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and the pathophysiological consequences of p53 inactivation in response to animal treatment with pifithrin-α (PFT, an inhibitor of p53 activity). Methods and Results PH development was assessed by pulmonary arterial pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy and arterial wall thickness. The effect of MCT and PFT on lung p53 pathway expression was evaluated by western blot. Fourteen days of daily PFT treatment (2.2 mg/kg/day), similar to a single injection of MCT (60 mg/kg), induced PH and aggravated MCT-induced PH. In the first week after MCT administration and prior to PH development, p53, p21 and MDM2 protein levels were significantly reduced; whereas PFT administration effectively altered the protein level of p53 targets. Anti-apoptotic and pro-proliferative effects of PFT were revealed by TUNEL and MTT assays on cultured human PA-SMCs treated with 50 μM PFT. Conclusions Pharmacological inactivation of p53 is sufficient to induce PH with a chronic treatment by PFT, an effect related to its anti-apoptotic and pro-proliferative properties. The p53 pathway was down-regulated during the first week in the rat MCT model. These in vivo experiments implicate the p53 pathway at the initiation stages of PH pathogenesis. PMID:26121334

  5. Hypoxia induces hypersensitivity and hyperreactivity to thromboxane receptor agonist in neonatal pulmonary arterial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Hinton, M; Mellow, L; Halayko, A J; Gutsol, A; Dakshinamurti, S

    2006-02-01

    PPHN, caused by perinatal hypoxia or inflammation, is characterized by an increased thromboxane-prostacyclin ratio and pulmonary vasoconstriction. We examined effects of hypoxia on myocyte thromboxane responsiveness. Myocytes from 3rd-6th generation pulmonary arteries of newborn piglets were grown to confluence and synchronized in contractile phenotype by serum deprivation. On the final 3 days of culture, myocytes were exposed to 10% O2 for 3 days; control myocytes from normoxic piglets were cultured in 21% O2. PPHN was induced in newborn piglets by 3-day hypoxic exposure (Fi(O2) 0.10); pulmonary arterial myocytes from these animals were maintained in normoxia. Ca2+ mobilization to thromboxane mimetic U-46619 and ATP was quantified using fura-2 AM. Three-day hypoxic exposure in vitro results in increased basal [Ca2+]i, faster and heightened peak Ca2+ response, and decreased U-46619 EC50. These functional changes persist in myocytes exposed to hypoxia in vivo but cultured in 21% O2. Blockade of Ca2+ entry and store refilling do not alter peak U-46619 Ca2+ responses in hypoxic or normoxic myocytes. Blockade of ryanodine-sensitive or IP3-gated intracellular Ca2+ channels inhibits hypoxic augmentation of peak U-46619 response. Ca2+ response to ryanodine alone is undetectable; ATP-induced Ca2+ mobilization is unaltered by hypoxia, suggesting no independent increase in ryanodine-sensitive or IP3-linked intracellular Ca2+ pool mobilization. We conclude hypoxia has a priming effect on neonatal pulmonary arterial myocytes, resulting in increased resting Ca2+, thromboxane hypersensitivity, and hyperreactivity. We postulate that hypoxia increases agonist-induced TP-R-linked IP3 pathway activation. Myocyte thromboxane hyperresponsiveness persists in culture after removal from the initiating hypoxic stimulus, suggesting altered gene expression. PMID:16214814

  6. Asbestos-induced pulmonary fibrosis is augmented in 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Cheresh, Paul; Morales-Nebreda, Luisa; Kim, Seok-Jo; Yeldandi, Anjana; Williams, David B; Cheng, Yuan; Mutlu, Gökhan M; Budinger, G R Scott; Ridge, Karen; Schumacker, Paul T; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Kamp, David W

    2015-01-01

    Asbestos causes asbestosis and malignancies by mechanisms that are not fully established. Alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) injury and repair are crucial determinants of the fibrogenic potential of noxious agents such as asbestos. We previously showed that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediate asbestos-induced AEC intrinsic apoptosis and that mitochondrial human 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1), a DNA repair enzyme, prevents oxidant-induced AEC apoptosis. We reasoned that OGG1 deficiency augments asbestos-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Compared with intratracheal instillation of PBS (50 μl) or titanium dioxide (100 μg/50 μl), crocidolite or Libby amphibole asbestos (100 μg/50 μl) each augmented pulmonary fibrosis in wild-type C57BL/6J (WT) mice after 3 weeks as assessed by histology, fibrosis score, lung collagen via Sircol, and type 1 collagen expression; these effects persisted at 2 months. Compared with WT mice, Ogg1 homozygous knockout (Ogg1(-/-)) mice exhibit increased pulmonary fibrosis after crocidolite exposure and apoptosis in cells at the bronchoalveolar duct junctions as assessed via cleaved caspase-3 immunostaining. AEC involvement was verified by colocalization studies using surfactant protein C. Asbestos increased endoplasmic reticulum stress in the lungs of WT and Ogg1(-/-) mice. Compared with WT, alveolar type 2 cells isolated from Ogg1(-/-) mice have increased mtDNA damage, reduced mitochondrial aconitase expression, and increased P53 and cleaved caspase-9 expression, and these changes were enhanced 3 weeks after crocidolite exposure. These findings suggest an important role for AEC mtDNA integrity maintained by OGG1 in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis that may represent a novel therapeutic target. PMID:24918270

  7. Correlation between friction and thickness of vanadium-pentoxide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekyeong

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the correlation between friction and thickness of vanadium-pentoxide nanowires (V2O5 NWs) by using friction/atomic force microscopy (FFM/AFM). We observed that the friction signal generally increased with thickness in the FFM/AFM image of the V2O5 NWs. We constructed a two-dimensional (2D) correlation distribution of the frictional force and the thickness of the V2O5 NWs and found that they are strongly correlated; i.e., thicker NWs had higher friction. We also generated a histogram for the correlation factors obtained from each distribution and found that the most probable factor is ~0.45. Furthermore, we found that the adhesion force between the tip and the V2O5 NWs was about -3 nN, and that the friction increased with increasing applied load for different thicknesses of V2O5 NWs. Our results provide an understanding of tribological and nanomechanical studies of various one-dimensional NWs for future fundamental research.

  8. Chronic biliary obstruction induces pulmonary intravascular phagocytosis and endotoxin sensitivity in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S W; Ohara, N

    1994-01-01

    Endotoxin sensitivity varies among animal species and appears to correlate with the presence of pulmonary intravascular macrophage (PIM). In rats, which lack PIM, we investigated the hypothesis that chronic cholestatic liver injury leads to induction of PIM and endotoxin sensitivity. Rats were randomized to either common bile duct ligation (BDL) or sham-surgery and studied at 1 wk (acute cholestasis), 2 wk (cholestasis, early cirrhosis), and 4 wk (cholestasis, established cirrhosis) after surgery. Intravascularly injected fluorescent latex microspheres (1 micron diameter) were taken up by large phagocytic cells in lung parenchyma of BDL rats (at 2 and 4 wk), while no uptake was observed in lungs from control rats. Electronmicroscopy revealed accumulation of large, mononuclear, macrophage-like cells containing ingested latex particles within the pulmonary capillaries. Pulmonary intravascular phagocytosis, as reflected in lung uptake of 99mTc microaggregated albumin (Microlite, mean particle diameter = 1 micron), averaged 0.7 +/- 0.1% (mean +/- SEM) of total injected dose in 13 control rats and progressively increased with time after BDL (1 wk, 1.7 +/- 0.2%; 2 wk, 10.0 +/- 3.0%; 4 wk 35.1 +/- 5.9%). Rats with biliary cirrhosis were markedly sensitive to the lethal effects of low dose endotoxin and demonstrated marked lung edema at the time of death. Furthermore, the lung uptake of intravascular 125I-lipopolysaccharide was increased five-fold in cirrhotic rats. We conclude that chronic biliary obstruction leads to the induction of pulmonary intravascular phagocytes and enhances endotoxin sensitivity in rats. Pulmonary intravascular phagocytosis in patients with advanced cirrhosis may account for their increased susceptibility to sepsis-induced adult respiratory distress syndrome. Images PMID:7962547

  9. Calcilytics enhance sildenafil-induced antiproliferation in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Aya; Yagi, Satomi; Ohara, Naoki; Tsukamoto, Kikuo

    2016-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a progressive and fatal disease of the pulmonary artery resulting from currently unidentified etiology. IPAH is pathologically characterized as sustained vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling of the pulmonary artery. Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors have been clinically used in the treatment of IPAH. Recently, we have shown that Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) antagonists, or calcilytics, inhibit excessive cell proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from IPAH patients. In this study, the additive or synergistic effect of calcilytics on antiproliferation following PDE5 inhibition was examined in IPAH-PASMCs by MTT assay. Treatment with sildenafil blocked the excessive cell proliferation of IPAH-PASMCs in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 16.9μM. However, sildenafil (0.03-100μM) did not affect the cell growth of PASMCs from normal subjects and patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). Co-treatment with 0.3μM NPS2143, a calcilytic, additively enhanced the antiproliferative effect induced by sildenafil (3 or 30μM) in IPAH-PASMCs. Additionally, the inhibitory effect of calcilytics, NPS2143 or Calhex 231 (1 or 10μM), on excessive cell proliferation of IPAH-PASMCs was synergistic increased in the presence of 1μM sildenafil. Similar results were obtained by BrdU incorporation assay. These findings reveal that calcilytics additively/synergistically enhance the antiproliferative activity mediated by PDE5 inhibition, suggesting that a combination therapy of a PDE5 inhibitor with a calcilytic may be useful as a novel therapeutic approach for IPAH. PMID:27164419

  10. Impact of interleukin-6 on hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and lung inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Savale, Laurent; Tu, Ly; Rideau, Dominique; Izziki, Mohamed; Maitre, Bernard; Adnot, Serge; Eddahibi, Saadia

    2009-01-01

    Background Inflammation may contribute to the pathogenesis of various forms of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Recent studies in patients with idiopathic PH or PH associated with underlying diseases suggest a role for interleukin-6 (IL-6). Methods To determine whether endogenous IL-6 contributes to mediate hypoxic PH and lung inflammation, we studied IL-6-deficient (IL-6-/-) and wild-type (IL-6+/+) mice exposed to hypoxia for 2 weeks. Results Right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricle hypertrophy, and the number and media thickness of muscular pulmonary vessels were decreased in IL-6-/- mice compared to wild-type controls after 2 weeks' hypoxia, although the pressure response to acute hypoxia was similar in IL-6+/+ and IL-6-/- mice. Hypoxia exposure of IL-6+/+ mice led to marked increases in IL-6 mRNA and protein levels within the first week, with positive IL-6 immunostaining in the pulmonary vessel walls. Lung IL-6 receptor and gp 130 (the IL-6 signal transducer) mRNA levels increased after 1 and 2 weeks' hypoxia. In vitro studies of cultured human pulmonary-artery smooth-muscle-cells (PA-SMCs) and microvascular endothelial cells revealed prominent synthesis of IL-6 by PA-SMCs, with further stimulation by hypoxia. IL-6 also markedly stimulated PA-SMC migration without affecting proliferation. Hypoxic IL-6-/- mice showed less inflammatory cell recruitment in the lungs, compared to hypoxic wild-type mice, as assessed by lung protein levels and immunostaining for the specific macrophage marker F4/80, with no difference in lung expression of adhesion molecules or cytokines. Conclusion These data suggest that IL-6 may be actively involved in hypoxia-induced lung inflammation and pulmonary vascular remodeling in mice. PMID:19173740

  11. Passion fruit peel extract attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Chilakapati, Shanmuga Reddy; Serasanambati, Mamatha; Manikonda, Pavan Kumar; Chilakapati, Damodar Reddy; Watson, Ronald Ross

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive fatal lung disease characterized by excessive collagen deposition, with no effective treatments. We investigated the efficacy of natural products with high anti-inflammatory activity, such as passion fruit peel extract (PFPE), in a mouse model of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis (PF). C57BL/6J mice were subjected to a single intratracheal instillation of bleomycin to induce PF. Daily PFPE treatment significantly reduced loss of body mass and mortality rate in mice compared with those treated with bleomycin. While bleomycin-induced PF resulted in elevated total numbers of inflammatory cells, macrophages, lymphocytes, and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid on both days 7 and 21, PFPE administration significantly attenuated these phenomena compared with bleomycin group. On day 7, the decreased superoxide dismutase and myeloperoxidase activities observed in the bleomycin group were significantly restored with PFPE treatment. On day 21, enhanced hydroxyproline deposition in the bleomycin group was also suppressed by PFPE administration. PFPE treatment significantly attenuated extensive inflammatory cell infiltration and accumulation of collagen in lung tissue sections of bleomycin-induced mice on days 7 and 21, respectively. Our results indicate that administration of PFPE decreased bleomycin-induced PF because of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. PMID:24933624

  12. Chop Deficiency Protects Mice Against Bleomycin-induced Pulmonary Fibrosis by Attenuating M2 Macrophage Production.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yingying; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Zhijun; He, Long; Zhu, Jianghui; Zhang, Meng; He, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Zhenshun; Ao, Qilin; Cao, Yong; Yang, Ping; Su, Yunchao; Zhao, Jianping; Zhang, Shu; Yu, Qilin; Ning, Qin; Xiang, Xudong; Xiong, Weining; Wang, Cong-Yi; Xu, Yongjian

    2016-05-01

    C/EBP homologous protein (Chop) has been shown to have altered expression in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), but its exact role in IPF pathoaetiology has not been fully addressed. Studies conducted in patients with IPF and Chop(-/-) mice have dissected the role of Chop and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in pulmonary fibrosis pathogenesis. The effect of Chop deficiency on macrophage polarization and related signalling pathways were investigated to identify the underlying mechanisms. Patients with IPF and mice with bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis were affected by the altered Chop expression and ER stress. In particular, Chop deficiency protected mice against BLM-induced lung injury and fibrosis. Loss of Chop significantly attenuated transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production and reduced M2 macrophage infiltration in the lung following BLM induction. Mechanistic studies showed that Chop deficiency repressed the M2 program in macrophages, which then attenuated TGF-β secretion. Specifically, loss of Chop promoted the expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 and suppressors of cytokine signaling 3, and through which Chop deficiency repressed signal transducer and activator of transcription 6/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma signaling, the essential pathway for the M2 program in macrophages. Together, our data support the idea that Chop and ER stress are implicated in IPF pathoaetiology, involving at least the induction and differentiation of M2 macrophages. PMID:26883801

  13. Astilbin alleviates LPS-induced ARDS by suppressing MAPK signaling pathway and protecting pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx.

    PubMed

    Kong, Guiqing; Huang, Xiao; Wang, Lipeng; Li, Yan; Sun, Ting; Han, Shasha; Zhu, Weiwei; Ma, Mingming; Xu, Haixiao; Li, Jiankui; Zhang, Xiaohua; Liu, Xiangyong; Wang, Xiaozhi

    2016-07-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating disorder that is characterized by increased vascular endothelial permeability and inflammation. Unfortunately, no effective treatment beyond supportive care is available for ARDS. Astilbin, a flavonoid compound isolated from Rhizoma Smilacis Glabrae, has been used for anti-hepatic, anti-arthritic, and anti-renal injury treatments. This study examined the effects of Astilbin on pulmonary inflammatory activation and endothelial cell barrier dysfunction caused by Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Endothelial cells from human umbilical veins or male Kunming mice were pretreated with Astilbin 24h before LPS stimulation. Results showed that Astilbin significantly attenuated the pulmonary histopathological changes and neutrophil infiltration 6h after the LPS challenge. Astilbin suppressed the activities of myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde, as well as the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in vivo and in vitro. As indices of pulmonary edema, lung wet-to-dry weight ratios, were markedly decreased by Astilbin pretreatment. Western blot analysis also showed that Astilbin inhibited LPS-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in lung tissues. Furthermore, Astilbin significantly inhibited the activity of heparanase and reduced the production of heparan sulfate in the blood serum as determined by ELISA. These findings indicated that Astilbin can alleviate LPS-induced ARDS, which potentially contributed to the suppression of MAPK pathway activation and the degradation of endothelial glycocalyx. PMID:27111514

  14. Exercise-induced interstitial pulmonary edema at sea-level in young and old healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bryan J.; Carlson, Alex R.; Miller, Andrew D.; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    We asked whether aged adults are more susceptible to exercise-induced pulmonary edema relative to younger individuals. Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO), alveolar-capillary membrane conductance (Dm) and pulmonary-capillary blood volume (Vc) were measured before and after exhaustive discontinuous incremental exercise in 10 young (YNG; 27±3 yr) and 10 old (OLD; 69±5 yr) males. In YNG subjects, Dm increased (11±7%, P=0.031), Vc decreased (−10±9%, P=0.01) and DLCO was unchanged (30.5±4.1 vs. 29.7±2.9 ml/min/mmHg, P=0.44) pre- to post-exercise. In OLD subjects, DLCO and Dm increased (11±14%, P=0.042; 16±14%, P=0.025) but Vc was unchanged (58±23 vs. 56±23 ml, P=0.570) pre- to post-exercise. Group-mean Dm/Vc was greater after vs. before exercise in the YNG and OLD subjects. However, Dm/Vc was lower post-exercise in 2 of the 10 YNG (−7±4%) and 2 of the 10 OLD subjects (−10±5%). These data suggest that exercise decreases interstitial lung fluid in most YNG and OLD subjects, with a small number exhibiting evidence for exercise-induced pulmonary edema. PMID:24200644

  15. Inhibitory effects of amines from Citrus reticulata on bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, XIAN-MEI; CAO, ZHEN-DONG; XIAO, NA; SHEN, QI; LI, JIAN-XIN

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, fatal lung disease for which, thus far, there are no effective treatments. The pericarp of Citrus reticulata, as a traditional herbal drug, has been used for the clinical treatment of lung-related diseases in China for many years. In the present study, the amines from the pericarp of Citrus reticulata were isolated, and their hydrochlorides were prepared. The results of screening using cultured human embryonic lung fibroblasts (hELFs) revealed that, of the amines, 4-methoxyphenethylamine hydrochloride (designated as amine hydrochloride 1) possessed the most potent inhibitory effect. Further in vivo experiments using a rat model of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis demonstrated that the oral administration of amine hydrochloride 1 significantly lowered the hydroxyproline content in both serum and lung tissue, and alleviated pulmonary alveolitis and fibrosis. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that amine hydrochloride 1 exerted its inhibitory effect against IPF through the downregulation of lung transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 protein expression. Our results demonstrated that amine hydrochloride 1 prevented the development of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis in rats. Thus, our data suggest that the amines from the pericarp of Citrus reticulata have therapeutic potential for use in the treatment of IPF. PMID:26675886

  16. Assessment of acute radiation-induced pulmonary changes using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Mah, K; Poon, P Y; Van Dyk, J; Keane, T; Majesky, I F; Rideout, D F

    1986-01-01

    In a prospective study of acute radiation-induced pulmonary changes, CT scans of 54 patients were performed before and at preselected times during the 6 months following fractionated radiation therapy of the thorax. The CT films were evaluated independently by three diagnostic radiologists and 36 patients were scored as having postirradiation pulmonary findings. The average interobserver agreement for this scoring was approximately 85%. The end point was observed as an increase in lung density within the irradiated volume on a follow-up CT examination. All 36 patients demonstrated lung opacities in an irregular, homogeneous, or nonhomogeneous pattern within the radiation beam boundaries. In addition, the following characteristics were observed at various frequencies in these 36 patients: extension of the changes across anatomic tissue boundaries (50%), air bronchograms (25%), loss of lung volume (15%), and pleural thickening (15%). Confinement of the findings within the irradiated volume was the only specific characteristic of postirradiation changes. In two patients the changes appeared as sharply defined, nodular opacities and were considered to be atypical of radiation damage. These were subsequently confirmed to be metastases. Prospective assessment of an adequate number of patients has helped to establish the CT appearance of acute radiation-induced pulmonary effects and, hence, to minimize its confusion with malignancies and other abnormalities. PMID:3745541

  17. Intermedin/adrenomedullin-2 is a hypoxia-induced endothelial peptide that stabilizes pulmonary microvascular permeability

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Muhammad; Paddenberg, Renate; Quanz, Karin; Chang, Chia L.; Park, Jae-Il; Gries, Barbara; Rafiq, Amir; Faulhammer, Petra; Goldenberg, Anna; Papadakis, Tamara; Noll, Thomas; Hsu, Sheau Y. T.; Weissmann, Norbert; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a pivotal role of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) signaling pathway in preventing damage of the lung by stabilizing pulmonary barrier function. Intermedin (IMD), also termed adrenomedullin-2, is the most recently identified peptide targeting this receptor. Here we investigated the effect of hypoxia on the expression of IMD in the murine lung and cultured murine pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMEC) as well as the role of IMD in regulating vascular permeability. Monoclonal IMD antibodies were generated, and transcript levels were assayed by quantitative RT-PCR. The promoter region of IMD gene was analyzed, and the effect of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α on IMD expression was investigated in HEK293T cells. Isolated murine lungs and a human lung microvascular endothelial cell monolayer model were used to study the effect of IMD on vascular permeability. IMD was identified as a pulmonary endothelial peptide by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Hypoxia caused an upregulation of IMD mRNA in the murine lung and PMEC. As shown by these results, HIF-1α enhances IMD promoter activity. Our functional studies showed that IMD abolished the increase in pressure-induced endothelial permeability. Moreover, IMD decreased basal and thrombin-induced hyperpermeability of an endothelial cell monolayer in a receptor-dependent manner and activated PKA in these cells. In conclusion, IMD is a novel hypoxia-induced gene and a potential interventional agent for the improvement of endothelial barrier function in systemic inflammatory responses and hypoxia-induced vascular leakage. PMID:19684198

  18. A Comparative Study of Induced Sputum and Bronchial Washings in Diagnosing Sputum Smear Negative Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mandava, Venu; Namballa, Usha Rani; Makala, Sravani

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis is one of the most important public health problem worldwide. Detecting patients with active pulmonary Koch’s disease is an important component of tuberculosis control programs. However, at times in patients even with a compatible clinical picture, sputum smears do not reveal acid-fast bacilli and smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis remains a common problem. Aim The present study is aimed to compare the results of induced sputum and bronchial washings smear in patients suspected to have sputum smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis. Materials and Methods A prospective study conducted from August 2014 to July 2015, comprising 120 patients fulfilling study criteria. Patients with respiratory symptoms and chest roentgenogram suspicious of pulmonary tuberculosis with no previous history of anti-tuberculosis treatment and two spontaneous sputum smear samples negative for acid fast bacilli were included. Patients with active haemoptysis and sputum positive were excluded from the study. Sputum induction was done by using 5-10 ml of 3% hypertonic saline through ultrasonic nebulizer taking safety precautions. All the patient underwent fibreoptic bronchoscopy after six hours fasting on the same day. About 20 ml of normal saline instilled into the suspected pathology area and washings were taken with gentle suction. The sample processing and fluorescent staining for acid fast bacilli was done in a designated microscopy lab. Results Out of 120 sputum smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis patients, induced sputum smear examination detected acid fast bacilli in 76 patients (63.3%) and acid fast bacilli detected from bronchial washings in 94 patients (78.3%). Smear positivity was higher in cavitary and infiltrative lesions as compared to consolidation and infrahilar pattern disease. Conclusion Even though both induced sputum and bronchial washings procedures were valuable for the diagnosis of sputum smear negative, sputum induction with hypertonic

  19. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John H.

    2005-01-01

    The modern era in cardiopulmonary medicine began in the 1940s, when Cournand and Richards pioneered right-heart catheterization. Until that time, no direct measurement of central vascular pressure had been performed in humans. Right-heart catheterization ignited an explosion of insights into function and dysfunction of the pulmonary circulation, cardiac performance, ventilation–perfusion relationships, lung–heart interactions, valvular function, and congenital heart disease. It marked the beginnings of angiocardiography with its diagnostic implications for diseases of the left heart and peripheral circulation. Pulmonary hypertension was discovered to be the consequence of a large variety of diseases that either raised pressure downstream of the pulmonary capillaries, induced vasoconstriction, increased blood flow to the lung, or obstructed the pulmonary vessels, either by embolism or in situ fibrosis. Hypoxic vasoconstriction was found to be a major cause of acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension, and surprising vasoreactivity of the pulmonary vascular bed was discovered to be present in many cases of severe pulmonary hypertension, initially in mitral stenosis. Diseases as disparate as scleroderma, cystic fibrosis, kyphoscoliosis, sleep apnea, and sickle cell disease were found to have shared consequences in the pulmonary circulation. Some of the achievements of Cournand and Richards and their scientific descendents are discussed in this article, including success in the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and management of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:15994464

  20. Exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage in a nonathlete: case report and review of physiology.

    PubMed

    Diwakar, Amit; Schmidt, Gregory A

    2014-04-01

    The integrity of the pulmonary blood-gas barrier is vulnerable to intense exercise in elite athletes, similar to the phenomenon of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage in thoroughbred racehorses. A 50-year-old previously healthy man presented with acute onset shortness of breath, dry cough, and hypoxemia after engaging in an extremely vigorous game of handball. CT scan of the chest showed diffuse patchy air-space disease. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. Infectious etiologies and bleeding diatheses were excluded by laboratory testing. Serological tests for ANCA-associated vasculitis, lupus, and Goodpasture's disease also were negative. A transthoracic echocardiogram was normal. The patient recovered completely on supportive therapy in less than 72 h. This case demonstrates strenuous exercise as a cause of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a previously healthy male with no apparent underlying cardiopulmonary disease. PMID:24532148

  1. Pulmonary Aluminosis Diagnosed with In-air Microparticle Induced X-ray Emission Analysis of Particles.

    PubMed

    Chino, Haruka; Hagiwara, Eri; Sugisaki, Midori; Baba, Tomonori; Koga, Yasuhiko; Hisada, Takeshi; Kaira, Kyoichi; Okudela, Koji; Takemura, Tamiko; Dobashi, Kunio; Ogura, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We herein present a case of pulmonary aluminosis diagnosed with in-air microparticle induced X-ray emission (in-air micro-PIXE) analysis. The diagnosis of pulmonary aluminosis was supported by the occupational exposure to aluminum, ground glass opacity and ill-defined centrilobular nodular opacities seen in high resolution CT, and respiratory bronchioles accompanied by pigmented dust by histological examination by in-air micro-PIXE analysis of the lung tissues. The possibility of developing this rare condition should not be underestimated in workers at high-risk jobs. This is an important report showing the usefulness of an in-air micro-PIXE analysis for the early diagnosis of aluminosis. PMID:26278298

  2. Polyhexamethylene guanidine phosphate aerosol particles induce pulmonary inflammatory and fibrotic responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha Ryong; Lee, Kyuhong; Park, Chang We; Song, Jeong Ah; Shin, Da Young; Park, Yong Joo; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2016-03-01

    Polyhexamethylene guanidine (PHMG) phosphate was used as a disinfectant for the prevention of microorganism growth in humidifiers, without recognizing that a change of exposure route might cause significant health effects. Epidemiological studies reported that the use of humidifier disinfectant containing PHMG-phosphate can provoke pulmonary fibrosis. However, the pulmonary toxicity of PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles is unknown yet. This study aimed to elucidate the toxicological relationship between PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles and pulmonary fibrosis. An in vivo nose-only exposure system and an in vitro air-liquid interface (ALI) co-culture model were applied to confirm whether PHMG-phosphate induces inflammatory and fibrotic responses in the respiratory tract. Seven-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles for 3 weeks and recovered for 3 weeks in a nose-only exposure chamber. In addition, three human lung cells (Calu-3, differentiated THP-1 and HMC-1 cells) were cultured at ALI condition for 12 days and were treated with PHMG-phosphate at set concentrations and times. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, airway barrier injuries and inflammatory and fibrotic responses were evaluated in vivo and in vitro. The rats exposed to PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles in nanometer size showed pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis including inflammatory cytokines and fibronectin mRNA increase, as well as histopathological changes. In addition, PHMG-phosphate triggered the ROS generation, airway barrier injuries and inflammatory responses in a bronchial ALI co-culture model. Those results demonstrated that PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles cause pulmonary inflammatory and fibrotic responses. All features of fibrogenesis by PHMG-phosphate aerosol particles closely resembled the pathology of fibrosis that was reported in epidemiological studies. Finally, we expected that PHMG-phosphate infiltrated into the lungs in the form

  3. Dihydroartemisinin supresses inflammation and fibrosis in bleomycine-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongxia; Yuan, Wendan; Lv, Changjun; Li, Naie; Liu, Tongshen; Wang, Liang; Sun, Yufei; Qiu, Xueshan; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a respiratory disease with a high mortality rate and its pathogenesis involves multiple mechanisms including epithelial cell injury, fibroblast proliferation, inflammation, and collagen coagulation. The treatment regimens still fail to recover this disease. We have previously found that dihydroartemisinin inhibits the development of pulmonary fibrosis in rats. This study aimed to determine the mechanisms of dihydroartemisinin in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The experimental rats were divided into six groups as normal saline control group (NS group), bleomycin group (BLM group), dihydroartemisinin-1, -2, or -3 group (DHA-1, DHA-2 and DHA-3 group) and dexamethasone group (DXM group). In BLM group, rats were treated with intratracheal instillation of bleomycin. NS group received the same volume of saline instead of bleomycin. In DHA-1, DHA-2 and DHA-3 group, in addition to intratracheal instillation of bleomycin, respectively, dihydroartemisinin (25 mg/kg, 50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg daily) was administrated by intraperitoneal instillation. In DXM group, rats were treated with intraperitoneal instillation of dexamethasone as control. Immunocytochemical assay, reverse transcription PCR and western blot were used for detecting the expression of TGF-β1, TNF-α, α-SMA and NF-κB in lung tissues. What’s more, morphological change and collagen deposition were analyzed by hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson staining. Collagen synthesis was detected by hydroxyproline chromatometry. Results showed that dihydroartemisinin significantly decreased the amount of inflammatory cytokines and collagen synthesis, and inhibited fibroblast proliferation in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis (P < 0.001). This study provides experimental evidence that dihydroartemisinin could decrease cytokines, alveolar inflammation and attenuates lung injury and fibrosis. PMID:25973011

  4. Concentrated ambient air particles induce vasoconstriction of small pulmonary arteries in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Batalha, Joao R F; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Clarke, Robert W; Coull, Brent A; Stearns, Rebecca C; Lawrence, Joy; Murthy, G G Krishna; Koutrakis, Petros; Godleski, John J

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether short-term exposures to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) alter the morphology of small pulmonary arteries in normal rats and rats with chronic bronchitis (CB). Sprague-Dawley male rats were exposed to CAPs, using the Harvard Ambient Particle Concentrator, or to particle-free air (sham) under identical conditions during 3 consecutive days (5 hr/day) in six experimental sets. CB was induced by exposure to 276 +/- 9 ppm of sulfur dioxide (5 hr/day, 5 days/week, 6 weeks). Physicochemical characterization of CAPs included measurements of particle mass, size distribution, and composition. Rats were sacrificed 24 hr after the last CAPs exposure. Histologic slides were prepared from random sections of lung lobes and coded for blinded analysis. The lumen/wall area (L/W) ratio was determined morphometrically on transverse sections of small pulmonary arteries. When all animal data (normal and CB) were analyzed together, the L/W ratios decreased as concentrations of fine particle mass, silicon, lead, sulfate, elemental carbon, and organic carbon increased. In separate univariate analyses of animal data, the association for sulfate was significant only in normal rats, whereas silicon was significantly associated in both CB and normal rats. In multivariate analyses including all particle factors, the association with silicon remained significant. Our results indicate that short-term CAPs exposures (median, 182.75 micro g/m3; range, 73.50-733.00 micro g/m3) can induce vasoconstriction of small pulmonary arteries in normal and CB rats. This effect was correlated with specific particle components and suggests that the pulmonary vasculature might be an important target for ambient air particle toxicity. PMID:12460797

  5. Acute radiation-induced pulmonary damage: a clinical study on the response to fractionated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Mah, K; Van Dyk, J; Keane, T; Poon, P Y

    1987-02-01

    Acute radiation-induced pulmonary damage can be a significant cause of morbidity in radiation therapy of the thorax. A prospective, clinical study was conducted to obtain dose-response data on acute pulmonary damage caused by fractionated radiation therapy. The endpoint was a visible increase in lung density within the irradiated volume on a computed tomographic (CT) examination as observed independently by three diagnostic radiologists. Fifty-four patients with various malignancies of the thorax completed the study. CT chest scans were taken before and at preselected times following radiotherapy. To represent different fractionation schedules of equivalent biological effect, the estimated single dose (ED) model, ED = D X N-0.377 X T-0.058 was used in which D was the average lung dose within the high dose region in cGy, N was the number of fractions, and T was the overall treatment time in days. Patients were grouped according to ED and the percent incidence of pulmonary damage for each group was determined. Total average lung doses ranged from 29.8 Gy to 53.6 Gy given in 10 to 30 fractions over a range of 12 to 60 days. Five patient groups with incidence ranging from 30% (ED of 930) to 90% (ED of 1150) were obtained. The resulting dose-response curve predicted a 50% incidence level at an ED value (ED50) of 1000 +/- 40 ED units. This value represents fractionation schedules equivalent to a total average lung dose of 32.9 Gy given in 15 fractions over 19 days. Over the linear portion of the dose-response curve, a 5% increase in ED (or total dose if N and T remain constant), predicts a 12% increase in the incidence of acute radiation-induced pulmonary damage. PMID:3818385

  6. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  7. Regulatory T Cells Promote β-Catenin–Mediated Epithelium-to-Mesenchyme Transition During Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Shanshan; Pan, Xiujie; Xu, Long; Yang, Zhihua; Guo, Renfeng; Gu, Yongqing; Li, Ruoxi; Wang, Qianjun; Xiao, Fengjun; Du, Li; Zhou, Pingkun; Zhu, Maoxiang

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis results from thoracic radiation therapy and severely limits radiation therapy approaches. CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}FoxP3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) as well as epithelium-to-mesenchyme transition (EMT) cells are involved in pulmonary fibrosis induced by multiple factors. However, the mechanisms of Tregs and EMT cells in irradiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the influence of Tregs on EMT in radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Methods and Materials: Mice thoraxes were irradiated (20 Gy), and Tregs were depleted by intraperitoneal injection of a monoclonal anti-CD25 antibody 2 hours after irradiation and every 7 days thereafter. Mice were treated on days 3, 7, and 14 and 1, 3, and 6 months post irradiation. The effectiveness of Treg depletion was assayed via flow cytometry. EMT and β-catenin in lung tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry. Tregs isolated from murine spleens were cultured with mouse lung epithelial (MLE) 12 cells, and short interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of β-catenin in MLE 12 cells was used to explore the effects of Tregs on EMT and β-catenin via flow cytometry and Western blotting. Results: Anti-CD25 antibody treatment depleted Tregs efficiently, attenuated the process of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis, hindered EMT, and reduced β-catenin accumulation in lung epithelial cells in vivo. The coculture of Tregs with irradiated MLE 12 cells showed that Tregs could promote EMT in MLE 12 cells and that the effect of Tregs on EMT was partially abrogated by β-catenin knockdown in vitro. Conclusions: Tregs can promote EMT in accelerating radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. This process is partially mediated through β-catenin. Our study suggests a new mechanism for EMT, promoted by Tregs, that accelerates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  8. Leflunomide Induces Pulmonary and Hepatic CYP1A Enzymes via Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ananddeep; Zhang, Shaojie; Paramahamsa, Maturu; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Shivanna, Binoy

    2015-12-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) plays a crucial role in normal physiologic homeostasis. Additionally, aberrant AhR signaling leads to several pathologic states in the lung and liver. Activation of AhR transcriptionally induces phase I (CYP1A) detoxifying enzymes. Although the effects of the classic AhR ligands such as 3-methylcholanthrene and dioxins on phase 1 enzymes are well studied in rodent lung, liver, and other organs, the toxicity profiles limit their use as therapeutic agents in humans. Hence, there is a need to identify and investigate nontoxic AhR ligands not only to understand the AhR biology but also to develop the AhR as a clinically relevant therapeutic target. Leflunomide is a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug in humans that is known to have AhR agonist activity in vitro. Whether it activates AhR and induces phase 1 enzymes in vivo is unknown. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that leflunomide will induce pulmonary and hepatic CYP1A enzymes in C57BL/6J wild-type mice, but not in AhR-null mice. We performed real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses for CYP1A1/2 mRNA expression, western blot assays for CYP1A1/2 protein expression, and ethoxyresorufinO-deethylase assay for CYP1A1 catalytic activity. Leflunomide increased CYP1A1/A2 mRNA, protein, and enzymatic activities in wild-type mice. In contrast, leflunomide failed to increase pulmonary and hepatic CYP1A enzymes in AhR-null mice. In conclusion, we provide evidence that leflunomide induces pulmonary and hepatic CYP1A enzymes via the AhR. PMID:26417045

  9. Stanniocalcin-1 ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shih-En; Wu, Chin-Pyng; Wu, Shu-Yu; Peng, Chung-Kan; Perng, Wann-Cherng; Kang, Bor-Hwang; Chu, Shi-Jye; Huang, Kun-Lun

    2014-06-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) is an endogenous glycoprotein whose anti-inflammatory effects occur through induction of uncoupling proteins to reduce oxidative stress. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that exogenous recombinant human STC1 (rhSTC1) protects against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury in mice. Anesthetized C57BL/6 mice underwent intratracheal spraying of LPS (20 µg/10 g body wt), and lung injury was assessed 24h later by analyzing pulmonary edema, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and lung histopathology. Lung inflammation, oxidative stress, and expression of STC1 and its downstream uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) were analyzed at specific time points. Expression of UCP2 was suppressed initially but was subsequently upregulated after STC1 elevation in response to intratracheal administration of LPS. Intratracheal rhSTC1 treatment 1h before or after LPS spraying significantly attenuated pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, cell apoptosis, and acute lung injury. Pretreatment with STC1 short interfering RNA 48 h before LPS spraying inhibited the expression of STC1 and UCP2 and significantly increased the extent of lung injury. These findings suggest that STC1 is an endogenous stress protein that may counteract LPS-induced lung injury by inhibiting the inflammatory cascade and inducing antioxidant and antiapoptotic mechanisms. However, the potential clinical application of STC1 and the direct linkage between UCP2 and LPS-induced lung injury remain to be further investigated. PMID:24685991

  10. Immune Modulatory Effects of IL-22 on Allergen-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ping; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Yuqi; Kolls, Jay K.; Zheng, Tao; Zhu, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    IL-22 is a Th17/Th22 cytokine that is increased in asthma. However, recent animal studies showed controversial findings in the effects of IL-22 in allergic asthma. To determine the role of IL-22 in ovalbumin-induced allergic inflammation we generated inducible lung-specific IL-22 transgenic mice. Transgenic IL-22 expression and signaling activity in the lung were determined. Ovalbumin (OVA)-induced pulmonary inflammation, immune responses, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) were examined and compared between IL-22 transgenic mice and wild type controls. Following doxycycline (Dox) induction, IL-22 protein was readily detected in the large (CC10 promoter) and small (SPC promoter) airway epithelial cells. IL-22 signaling was evidenced by phosphorylated STAT3. After OVA sensitization and challenge, compared to wild type littermates, IL-22 transgenic mice showed decreased eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and in lung tissue, decreased mucus metaplasia in the airways, and reduced AHR. Among the cytokines and chemokines examined, IL-13 levels were reduced in the BAL fluid as well as in lymphocytes from local draining lymph nodes of IL-22 transgenic mice. No effect was seen on the levels of serum total or OVA-specific IgE or IgG. These findings indicate that IL-22 has immune modulatory effects on pulmonary inflammatory responses in allergen-induced asthma. PMID:25254361

  11. The HMGB1-RAGE axis mediates traumatic brain injury-induced pulmonary dysfunction in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Daniel J; Gracon, Adam S A; Ripsch, Matthew S; Fisher, Amanda J; Cheon, Bo M; Pandya, Pankita H; Vittal, Ragini; Capitano, Maegan L; Kim, Youngsong; Allette, Yohance M; Riley, Amanda A; McCarthy, Brian P; Territo, Paul R; Hutchins, Gary D; Broxmeyer, Hal E; Sandusky, George E; White, Fletcher A; Wilkes, David S

    2014-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in systemic inflammatory responses that affect the lung. This is especially critical in the setting of lung transplantation, where more than half of donor allografts are obtained postmortem from individuals with TBI. The mechanism by which TBI causes pulmonary dysfunction remains unclear but may involve the interaction of high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein with the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). To investigate the role of HMGB1 and RAGE in TBI-induced lung dysfunction, RAGE-sufficient (wild-type) or RAGE-deficient (RAGE(-/-)) C57BL/6 mice were subjected to TBI through controlled cortical impact and studied for cardiopulmonary injury. Compared to control animals, TBI induced systemic hypoxia, acute lung injury, pulmonary neutrophilia, and decreased compliance (a measure of the lungs' ability to expand), all of which were attenuated in RAGE(-/-) mice. Neutralizing systemic HMGB1 induced by TBI reversed hypoxia and improved lung compliance. Compared to wild-type donors, lungs from RAGE(-/-) TBI donors did not develop acute lung injury after transplantation. In a study of clinical transplantation, elevated systemic HMGB1 in donors correlated with impaired systemic oxygenation of the donor lung before transplantation and predicted impaired oxygenation after transplantation. These data suggest that the HMGB1-RAGE axis plays a role in the mechanism by which TBI induces lung dysfunction and that targeting this pathway before transplant may improve recipient outcomes after lung transplantation. PMID:25186179

  12. Electrical and optical properties of thin films of hydrated vanadium pentoxide featuring electrochromic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovleva, D. S.; Malinenko, V. P.; Pergament, A. L.; Stefanovich, G. B.

    2007-12-01

    Thin films of hydrated vanadium pentoxide (V2O5 · nH2O) exhibit the phenomenon of electrochromism, whereby a film reversibly changes its color under the action of an applied electric field. A specific feature of this phenomenon is that it takes place in a “dry” planar system, in the absence of an electrolyte, which makes this system promising for various applications. We have studied changes in the optical and electrical properties of hydrated vanadium pentoxide films under the conditions of electrochromic coloration.

  13. ERK5 negatively regulates tobacco smoke-induced pulmonary epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhaofeng; Xie, Wei; Wu, Rui; Geng, Hao; Zhao, Li; Xie, Chunfeng; Li, Xiaoting; Huang, Cong; Zhu, Jianyun; Zhu, Mingming; Zhu, Weiwei; Wu, Jieshu; Geng, Shanshan; Zhong, Caiyun

    2015-01-01

    As the primary cause of lung cancer, tobacco smoke (TS) promotes the initiation and progression of lung tumorigenesis. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial process involved in cell malignant transformation. The role of ERK5, the lesser studied member of MAPKs family, in regulating TS-triggered pulmonary EMT has not been investigated. Normal human bronchial epithelial cells and BALB/c mice were used as in vitro and in vivo TS exposure models. Exposure of normal human bronchial epithelial cells to TS for 7 days induced morphological change, enhanced migratory and invasive capacities, reduced epithelial marker expression and increased mesenchymal marker expression. Importantly, we demonstrated for the first time that ERK5 negatively regulated TS-mediated lung epithelial EMT, as evidenced by the findings that TS suppressed ERK5 activation, and that TS-triggered EMT was mimicked with ERK5 inhibition and reversed by ERK5 overexpression. The negative regulation of ERK5 on pulmonary EMT was further confirmed in mice exposed to TS for 12 weeks. Taken together, our data suggest that ERK5 negatively regulates TS-mediated pulmonary EMT. These findings provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms of TS-associated lung tumorigenesis and may open up new avenues in the search for potential target of lung cancer intervention. PMID:25965818

  14. Etanercept reduces late endotoxin-induced pulmonary hypertension in the pig.

    PubMed

    Mutschler, D; Wikström, G; Lind, L; Larsson, A; Lagrange, A; Eriksson, M

    2006-09-01

    To evaluate whether etanercept, a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-blocking agent, may counteract hemodynamic deterioration in endotoxemic shock, we designed a prospective, randomized placebo-controlled trial with parallel groups, consisting of 13 pigs aged 10-14 weeks receiving general anesthesia. Five pigs were given 25 mg of etanercept, 1 h before the start of a 4-h continuous infusion of endotoxin. Another 5 pigs were given the corresponding volume of saline, 1 h before the start of a 4-h continuous infusion of endotoxin. Three pigs were given 25 mg of etanercept, 1 hr before the start of a 4-h continuous infusion of saline. At 1 h of endotoxemia, mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) and pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) increased identically in both groups of pigs receiving endotoxin. Thereafter, two distinct different patterns in hemodynamics were observed. TNF-blocked pigs showed significantly lower MPAP and PVRI compared to controls. In the etanercept-treated endotoxemic pigs, Doppler analysis of the diastolic mitral inflow demonstrated a significantly increased E/A-ratio (early mitral wave inflow was divided by the atrial wave) at 2 h. The TNFblocking agent etanercept normalized two hemodynamic features of endotoxin-induced septic shock in pigs: (1) the sustained pulmonary hypertension and (2) diastolic dysfunction. PMID:16978070

  15. Antifibrotic effects of CXCR4 antagonist in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Makino, Hideki; Aono, Yoshinori; Azuma, Momoyo; Kishi, Masami; Yokota, Yuki; Kinoshita, Katsuhiro; Takezaki, Akio; Kishi, Jun; Kawano, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Uehara, Hisanori; Izumi, Keisuke; Sone, Saburo; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Circulating fibrocytes had been reported to migrate into the injured lungs, and contribute to fibrogenesis via chemokine-chemokine receptor systems including CXCL12-CXCR4 axis. Here we hypothesized that blockade of CXCR4 might inhibit the migration of fibrocytes to the injured lungs and the subsequent pulmonary fibrosis. To explore the antifibrotic effects of blockade of CXCR4, we used a specific antagonist for CXCR4, AMD3100, in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis model in mice. Administration of AMD3100 significantly improved the loss of body weight of mice treated with bleomycin, and inhibited the fibrotic lesion in subpleural areas of the lungs. The quantitative analysis demonstrated that treatment with AMD3100 reduced the collagen content and fibrotic score (Aschcroft score) in the lungs. Although AMD3100 did not affect cell classification in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid on day 7, the percentage of lymphocytes was reduced by AMD3100 on day 14. AMD3100 directly inhibited the migration of human fibrocytes in response to CXCL12 in vitro, and reduced the trafficking of fibrocytes into the lungs treated with bleocmycin in vivo. These results suggest that the blockade of CXCR4 might be useful strategy for therapy of patients with pulmonary fibrosis via inhibiting the migration of circulating fibrocytes. PMID:23614921

  16. Calorie Restriction Attenuates Monocrotaline-induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Mingge; Lei, Jingyi; Qu, Yinxian; Zhang, Huan; Xin, Weichuan; Ma, Feng; Liu, Shuwen; Li, Zhichao; Jin, Faguang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Calorie restriction (CR) is one of the most effective nonpharmacological interventions protecting against cardiovascular disease, such as hypertension in the systemic circulation. However, whether CR could attenuate pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is largely unknown. The PAH model was developed by subjecting the rats to a single subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline. CR lowered mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) and reduced vascular remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy in PAH rats. Meanwhile, CR attenuated endothelial dysfunction as evidenced by increased relaxation in response to acetylcholine. The beneficial effects of CR were associated with restored sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) expression and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation and reduced eNOS acetylation in pulmonary arteries of PAH rats. To further clarify the role of SIRT1 in the protective effects of CR, adenoviral vectors for overexpression of SIRT1 were administered intratracheally at 1 day before monocrotaline injection. Overexpression of SIRT1 exhibited similar beneficial effects on mPAP and endothelial function, and increased eNOS phosphorylation and reduced eNOS acetylation in the absence of CR. Moreover, SIRT1 overexpression attenuated the increase in mPAP in hypoxia-induced PAH animals. Overall, the present data demonstrate that CR may serve as an effective treatment of PAH, and targeting the SIRT1/eNOS pathway may improve treatment of PAH. PMID:25636073

  17. Evidence of local exercise-induced systemic oxidative stress in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    PubMed

    Couillard, A; Koechlin, C; Cristol, J P; Varray, A; Prefaut, C

    2002-11-01

    Chronic inactivity may not be the sole factor involved in the myopathy of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. One hypothesis is that exercise-induced oxidative stress that leads to muscle alterations may also be involved. This study investigated whether exercise localised to a peripheral muscle group would induce oxidative stress in COPD patients. Eleven COPD patients (FEV1 1.15+/-0.4 L (mean+/-SD)) and 12 healthy age-matched subjects with a similar low quantity of physical activity performed endurance exercise localised to a peripheral muscle group, the quadriceps of the dominant leg. The authors measured plasma levels of thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARs) as an index of oxidative stress, the release in superoxide anion (O2*-) by stimulated phagocytes as an oxidant, and blood vitamin E as one antioxidant. Quadriceps endurance was significantly lower in the COPD patients compared with healthy subjects (136+/-16 s versus 385+/-69 s (mean+/-SEM), respectively). A significant increase in TBARs 6 h after quadriceps exercise was only found in the COPD patients. In addition, significantly higher O2*- release and lower blood vitamin E levels were found in COPD patients than in controls at rest. This blood vitamin E level was significantly correlated with the resting level of plasma TBARs in the COPD patients. This study mainly showed that quadriceps exercise induced systemic oxidative stress in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and that vitamin E levels were decreased in these patients at rest. The exact relevance of these findings to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease myopathy needs to be elucidated. PMID:12449164

  18. Role of inducible nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide in lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-gamma-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, Patti C; Millecchia, Lyndell M; Castranova, Vincent

    2004-02-15

    Exposure of mice to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increases nitric oxide (NO) production, which is proposed to play a role in the resulting pulmonary damage and inflammation. To determine the role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-induced NO in this lung reaction, the responses of inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout (iNOS KO) versus C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice to aspirated LPS + IFN-gamma were compared. Male mice (8-10 weeks) were exposed to LPS (1.2 mg/kg) + IFN-gamma (5000 U/mouse) or saline. At 24 or 72 h postexposure, lungs were lavaged with saline and the acellular fluid from the first bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was analyzed for total antioxidant capacity (TAC), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, albumin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). The cellular fraction of the total BAL was used to determine alveolar macrophage (AM) and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) counts, and AM zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence (AM-CL). Pulmonary responses 24 h postexposure to LPS + IFN-gamma were characterized by significantly decreased TAC, increased BAL AMs and PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2, and enhanced AM-CL to the same extent in both WT and iNOS KO mice. Responses 72 h postexposure were similar; however, significant differences were found between WT and iNOS KO mice. iNOS KO mice demonstrated a greater decline in total antioxidant capacity, greater BAL PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2, and an enhanced AM-CL compared to the WT. These data suggest that the role of iNOS-derived NO in the pulmonary response to LPS + IFN-gamma is anti-inflammatory, and this becomes evident over time. PMID:14962504

  19. Role of Cardiovascular Disease-associated iron overload in Libby amphibole-induced acute pulmonary injury and inflammation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by asbestos is thought to be mediated through redox-cycling of fiber-bound and bioavailable iron (Fe). We hypothesized that Libby amphibole (LA)-induced cute lung injury will be exacerbated in rat models of cardiovascular disease (CVD)-associated Fe-ove...

  20. CHRONIC PULMONARY LPS TOLERANCE INDUCES SELECTIVE IMMUNOSUPPRESSION WHILE MAINTAINING THE NEUTROPHILIC RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sudha; Kim, Jiyoun; Remick, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    LPS challenge causes potent activation of innate immunity. Because LPS is ubiquitously present in ambient air, repeated inhalation may lead to activation of the pulmonary immune response. If this activation is unregulated, chronic LPS inhalation would lead to persistent inflammation and organ damage. We hypothesized that the lung uses the mechanism of LPS tolerance to maintain the balance between hypoinflammatory and hyperinflammatory states. We developed a model of chronic pulmonary LPS tolerance induced by pulmonary exposure to 1 μg LPS for 4 consecutive days. Mice were challenged with 10 μg of LPS 24 h later. TNF-α protein was significantly decreased in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of tolerant versus nontolerant mice, whereas IL-6 levels were significantly increased in the tolerant group. Tolerant mice were also protected from airway hyperresponsiveness. M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor mRNA was significantly decreased in the lungs of tolerant mice, suggesting a mechanism for the decreased airway hyperresponsiveness. CXCL2 was significantly reduced in tolerant mice, but CXCL1 was equivalent between groups. No difference was seen in neutrophil recruitment to the alveolar space. Interestingly, LPS tolerance does not confer cross-tolerance to the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 stimulus Pam3Cys. TNF-α and IL-6 concentrations were significantly increased in LPS-tolerant mice challenged with Pam3Cys; however, chemokine concentrations were unaffected. Our data show that repeated LPS inhalation results in differential regulation of cytokines but does not inhibit neutrophil recruitment. This unrestricted neutrophil recruitment may represent a mechanism by which individuals may be protected from pulmonary bacterial infection and pneumonia. PMID:19487981

  1. Hydroxysafflor Yellow A Attenuates Bleomycin-induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ming; Wu, Yan; Wang, Lin; Zang, Baoxia; Tan, Li

    2016-04-01

    Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) is an active component of Carthamus tinctorius L., and we want to investigate whether HSYA attenuates pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin (BLM) in mice. The mice received a BLM via oropharyngeal aspiration, and HSYA was intraperitoneally injected. Arterial blood gas analysis was performed. Morphological changes and hydroxyproline content were measured. mRNA expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), connective tissue growth factor, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and collagen I was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. α-SMA-positive cells in lung tissues were detected by immunohistochemical staining. A549 cell was cultured, and morphological changes were observed after TGF-β1 and HSYA treatment. mRNA expression was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Phosphorylation of Smad3 was evaluated by western blotting. HSYA decreased the lung consolidation area and collagen deposition in mice with pulmonary fibrosis. The blood gas changes due to BLM were attenuated by HSYA. HSYA also alleviated the BLM-induced increase of TGF-β1, connective tissue growth factor, α-SMA, and collagen I mRNA levels. HSYA treatment inhibited the increase of α-SMA expression, Smad3 phosphorylation, the morphological changes in lung tissue. HSYA inhibits Smad3 phosphorylation and elevated expression of collagen I mRNA in epithelial-mesenchymal transition induced by TGF-β1. PMID:26777519

  2. Protective effects of methylsulfonylmethane on hemodynamics and oxidative stress in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Sadollah; Najafi, Moslem; Hamzeiy, Hossein; Maleki-Dizaji, Nasrin; Pezeshkian, Masoud; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayon; Darabi, Masoud; Mostafalou, Sara; Bohlooli, Shahab; Garjani, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is naturally occurring organic sulfur that is known as a potent antioxidant/anti-inflammatory compound. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of MSM on hemodynamics functions and oxidative stress in rats with monocrotaline- (MCT-) induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 38-days treatment. MSM was administered to rats at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg/day doses 10 days before a single dose of 60 mg/kg, IP, MCT. Hemodynamics of ventricles were determined by Powerlab AD instrument. Blood samples were obtained to evaluate changes in the antioxidative system including activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and the level of reduced glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Improvements in cardiopulmonary hemodynamics were observed in the MSM-treated pulmonary arterial hypertensive rats, with a significant reduction in right ventricular systolic pressure (RSVP) and an increase in the mean arterial pressure (MAP). The values of CAT, SOD, GSH-px activities, and GSH were significantly lower in MCT-induced PAH (P < 0.01), but they were recovered to control levels of MSM-treated groups. Our present results suggest that long-term administration of the MSM attenuates MCT-induced PAH in rats through modulation of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense. PMID:23118745

  3. Primary breast cancer induces pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability and promotes metastasis via the VEGF-PKC pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Man; Qin, Chengyong; Han, Mingyong

    2016-06-01

    The lung is one of the most frequent target organs for breast cancer metastasis. When breast cancer cells from a primary tumor do not colonize the lung, which we named the premetastatic phase, the microenvironment of the lung has already been influenced by the primary tumor. However, little is known about the exact premetastatic alteration and regulatory mechanisms of the lung. Here, we used 4T1 cells (a mouse breast cancer cell line which can specifically metastasize to the lung) to build a mouse breast cancer model. We found that primary breast tumor induced increased pulmonary vascular permeability in the premetastatic phase, which facilitated the leakage of rhodamine-dextran and the extravasation of intravenous therapy injected cancer cells. Furthermore, tight junctions (TJs) were disrupted, and the expression of zonula occludens-1(ZO-1), one of the most important components of tight junctions, was decreased in the premetastatic lung. In addition, elevated serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was involved in the destabilization of tight junctions and the VEGF antagonist bevacizumab reversed the primary tumor-induced vascular hyperpermeability. Moreover, activation of the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway disrupted the integrity of TJs and accordingly, the disruption could be alleviated by blocking VEGF. Taken together, these data demonstrate that primary breast cancer may induce tight junction disruptions in the premetastatic lung via the VEGF-PKC pathway and promote pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability before metastasis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26152457

  4. Diesel exhaust induced pulmonary and cardiovascular impairment: The role of hypertension intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Kodavanti, Urmila P.; Thomas, Ronald F.; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Schladweiler, Mette C.; Bass, Virginia; Krantz, Q. Todd; King, Charly; Nyska, Abraham; Richards, Judy E.; Andrews, Debora; Gilmour, M. Ian

    2013-04-15

    Exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) and associated gases is linked to cardiovascular impairments; however, the susceptibility of hypertensive individuals is poorly understood. The objectives of this study were (1) to determine cardiopulmonary effects of gas-phase versus whole-DE and (2) to examine the contribution of systemic hypertension in pulmonary and cardiovascular effects. Male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats were treated with hydralazine to reduce blood pressure (BP) or L-NAME to increase BP. Spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats were treated with hydralazine to reduce BP. Control and drug-pretreated rats were exposed to air, particle-filtered exhaust (gas), or whole DE (1500 μg/m{sup 3}), 4 h/day for 2 days or 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Acute and 4-week gas and DE exposures increased neutrophils and γ-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT) activity in lavage fluid of WKY and SH rats. DE (4 weeks) caused pulmonary albumin leakage and inflammation in SH rats. Two-day DE increased serum fatty acid binding protein-3 (FABP-3) in WKY. Marked increases occurred in aortic mRNA after 4-week DE in SH (eNOS, TF, tPA, TNF-α, MMP-2, RAGE, and HMGB-1). Hydralazine decreased BP in SH while L-NAME tended to increase BP in WKY; however, neither changed inflammation nor BALF γ-GT. DE-induced and baseline BALF albumin leakage was reduced by hydralazine in SH rats and increased by L-NAME in WKY rats. Hydralazine pretreatment reversed DE-induced TF, tPA, TNF-α, and MMP-2 expression but not eNOS, RAGE, and HMGB-1. ET-1 was decreased by HYD. In conclusion, antihypertensive drug treatment reduces gas and DE-induced pulmonary protein leakage and expression of vascular atherogenic markers. - Highlights: ► Acute diesel exhaust exposure induces pulmonary inflammation in healthy rats. ► In hypertensive rats diesel exhaust effects are seen only after long term exposure. ► Normalizing blood pressure reverses lung protein leakage caused by diesel exhaust. ► Normalizing blood pressure reverses

  5. Targeting mitochondrial reactive oxygen species to modulate hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Adesina, Sherry E; Kang, Bum-Yong; Bijli, Kaiser M; Ma, Jing; Cheng, Juan; Murphy, Tamara C; Michael Hart, C; Sutliff, Roy L

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by increased pulmonary vascular remodeling, resistance, and pressures. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to PH-associated vascular dysfunction. NADPH oxidases (Nox) and mitochondria are major sources of superoxide (O(2)(•-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in pulmonary vascular cells. Hypoxia, a common stimulus of PH, increases Nox expression and mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) production. The interactions between these two sources of ROS generation continue to be defined. We hypothesized that mitochondria-derived O(2)(•-) (mtO(2)(•-)) and H(2)O(2) (mtH(2)O(2)) increase Nox expression to promote PH pathogenesis and that mitochondria-targeted antioxidants can reduce mtROS, Nox expression, and hypoxia-induced PH. Exposure of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells to hypoxia for 72 h increased mtO(2)(•-) and mtH(2)O(2). To assess the contribution of mtO(2)(•-) and mtH(2)O(2) to hypoxia-induced PH, mice that overexpress superoxide dismutase 2 (Tg(hSOD2)) or mitochondria-targeted catalase (MCAT) were exposed to normoxia (21% O(2)) or hypoxia (10% O(2)) for three weeks. Compared with hypoxic control mice, MCAT mice developed smaller hypoxia-induced increases in RVSP, α-SMA staining, extracellular H(2)O(2) (Amplex Red), Nox2 and Nox4 (qRT-PCR and Western blot), or cyclinD1 and PCNA (Western blot). In contrast, Tg(hSOD2) mice experienced exacerbated responses to hypoxia. These studies demonstrate that hypoxia increases mtO(2)(•-) and mtH(2)O(2). Targeting mtH(2)O(2) attenuates PH pathogenesis, whereas targeting mtO(2)(•-) exacerbates PH. These differences in PH pathogenesis were mirrored by RVSP, vessel muscularization, levels of Nox2 and Nox4, proliferation, and H(2)O(2) release. These studies suggest that targeted reductions in mtH(2)O(2) generation may be particularly effective in preventing hypoxia-induced PH. PMID:26073127

  6. Secreted Phosphoprotein 1 and Sex-Specific Differences in Silica-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Latoche, Joseph D.; Ufelle, Alexander Chukwuma; Fazzi, Fabrizio; Ganguly, Koustav; Leikauf, George D.; Fattman, Cheryl L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fibrotic lung diseases occur predominantly in males, and reports describe better survival in affected females. Male mice are more sensitive to silica-induced lung fibrosis than silica-treated female mice. Secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1, also known as osteopontin) increases in pulmonary fibrosis, and Spp1 transcription may be regulated by estrogen or estrogen receptor–related receptors. Objective: We determined whether differences in silica-induced SPP1 levels contribute to sex differences in lung fibrosis. Methods: Male and female mice were treated with 0.2 g/kg intratracheal silica, and lung injury was assessed 1, 3, or 14 days post-exposure. Gene-targeted (Spp1–/–) mice, control Spp1+/+ (C57BL/6J) mice, ovariectomized (OVX) female mice, and estrogen-treated male mice were treated with silica, and lung injury was assessed. Results: Silica-induced SPP1 in lung tissue, bronchoalveolar lavage, and serum increased more in male than in female mice. Following silica treatment, bronchoalveolar lavage cell infiltrates decreased in female Spp1–/– mice compared with female Spp1+/+ mice, and lung hydroxyproline decreased in male Spp1–/– mice compared with male Spp1+/+ mice. OVX female mice had increased lung SPP1 expression in response to silica compared with silica-treated sham female mice. Silica-induced lung collagen and hydroxyproline (markers of fibrosis), and SPP1 levels decreased in estrogen-treated males compared with untreated males. Conclusion: These findings suggest that sex-specific differences in SPP1 levels contribute to the differential sensitivity of male and female mice to the development of silica-induced fibrosis. Citation: Latoche JD, Ufelle AC, Fazzi F, Ganguly K, Leikauf GD, Fattman CL. 2016. Secreted phosphoprotein 1 and sex-specific differences in silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Environ Health Perspect 124:1199–1207; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1510335 PMID:26955063

  7. MCPIP1 mediates silica-induced cell migration in human pulmonary fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haijun; Dai, Xiaoniu; Cheng, Yusi; Fang, Shencun; Zhang, Yingming; Wang, Xingang; Zhang, Wei; Liao, Hong; Yao, Honghong; Chao, Jie

    2016-01-15

    Silicosis is a systemic disease caused by inhaling silicon dioxide (SiO2). Phagocytosis of SiO2 in the lungs initiates an inflammatory cascade that results in fibroblast proliferation and migration followed by fibrosis. According to previous data from our laboratory, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) plays a critical role in fibroblast proliferation and migration in conventional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures. The present study aimed to explore the downstream cascade of MCP-1 in both 2D and three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models of silicosis. Experiments using primary cultured adult human pulmonary fibroblasts (HPF-a) demonstrated the following: 1) SiO2 treatment induces expression of MCP-1-induced protein (MCPIP1) in a time- and dose-dependent manner in both 2D and 3D cultures; 2) the MAPK and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways are involved in SiO2-induced MCPIP1 expression; and 3) MCPIP1 induction mediates the SiO2-induced increase in cell migration in both 2D and 3D cultures. The effect of MCP-1 in silicosis occurs mainly through MCPIP1, which, in turn, mediates the observed SiO2-induced increase in pulmonary fibroblast migration. However, the time frame for MCPIP1 induction differed between 2D and 3D cultures, indicating that, compared with conventional 2D cell culture systems, 3D culture may be useful for analyses of fibroblast physiology under conditions that more closely resemble in vivo environments. Our study determined the link between fibroblast-derived MCPIP1 and SiO2-induced cell migration, and this finding provides novel evidence of the potential of MCPIP1 in the development of novel therapeutic strategies for silicosis. PMID:26608530

  8. Impact of a CXCL12/CXCR4 Antagonist in Bleomycin (BLM) Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis and Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Induced Hepatic Fibrosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Leola N.; Schreiner, Petra; Ng, Betina Y. Y.; Lo, Bernard; Hughes, Michael R.; Scott, R. Wilder; Gusti, Vionarica; Lecour, Samantha; Simonson, Eric; Manisali, Irina; Barta, Ingrid; McNagny, Kelly M.; Crawford, Jason; Webb, Murray; Underhill, T. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 has been implicated in attenuation of bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic injury. In pulmonary fibrosis, published reports suggest that collagen production in the injured lung is derived from fibrocytes recruited from the circulation in response to release of pulmonary CXCL12. Conversely, in hepatic fibrosis, resident hepatic stellate cells (HSC), the key cell type in progression of fibrosis, upregulate CXCR4 expression in response to activation. Further, CXCL12 induces HSC proliferation and subsequent production of collagen I. In the current study, we evaluated AMD070, an orally bioavailable inhibitor of CXCL12/CXCR4 in alleviating BLM-induced pulmonary and CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice. Similar to other CXCR4 antagonists, treatment with AMD070 significantly increased leukocyte mobilization. However, in these two models of fibrosis, AMD070 had a negligible impact on extracellular matrix deposition. Interestingly, our results indicated that CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling has a role in improving mortality associated with BLM induced pulmonary injury, likely through dampening an early inflammatory response and/or vascular leakage. Together, these findings indicate that the CXCL12-CXCR4 signaling axis is not an effective target for reducing fibrosis. PMID:26998906

  9. Impact of a CXCL12/CXCR4 Antagonist in Bleomycin (BLM) Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis and Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Induced Hepatic Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chow, Leola N; Schreiner, Petra; Ng, Betina Y Y; Lo, Bernard; Hughes, Michael R; Scott, R Wilder; Gusti, Vionarica; Lecour, Samantha; Simonson, Eric; Manisali, Irina; Barta, Ingrid; McNagny, Kelly M; Crawford, Jason; Webb, Murray; Underhill, T Michael

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 has been implicated in attenuation of bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic injury. In pulmonary fibrosis, published reports suggest that collagen production in the injured lung is derived from fibrocytes recruited from the circulation in response to release of pulmonary CXCL12. Conversely, in hepatic fibrosis, resident hepatic stellate cells (HSC), the key cell type in progression of fibrosis, upregulate CXCR4 expression in response to activation. Further, CXCL12 induces HSC proliferation and subsequent production of collagen I. In the current study, we evaluated AMD070, an orally bioavailable inhibitor of CXCL12/CXCR4 in alleviating BLM-induced pulmonary and CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice. Similar to other CXCR4 antagonists, treatment with AMD070 significantly increased leukocyte mobilization. However, in these two models of fibrosis, AMD070 had a negligible impact on extracellular matrix deposition. Interestingly, our results indicated that CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling has a role in improving mortality associated with BLM induced pulmonary injury, likely through dampening an early inflammatory response and/or vascular leakage. Together, these findings indicate that the CXCL12-CXCR4 signaling axis is not an effective target for reducing fibrosis. PMID:26998906

  10. TNF potentiates PAF-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction in the rat: role of neutrophils and thromboxane A2.

    PubMed

    Chang, S W

    1994-12-01

    Both tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) are released during sepsis and are important mediators of septic lung injury. I investigated the interactions of TNF and PAF on vasoactive responses in the pulmonary circulation. In isolated rat lungs perfused with a cell- and plasma-free physiological salt solution, PAF (0.01- and 0.1-micrograms boluses) caused transient dose-dependent pulmonary arterial and venous constrictions. In vivo pretreatment of the rats with TNF (0.02 or 0.2 mg/kg i.v.) 1 h before lung isolation increased lung myeloperoxidase activity and markedly enhanced PAF-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction without affecting the pressor responses to angiotensin II or hypoxia. In contrast, pretreatment with lipopolysaccharide (10 mg/kg), which increased lung myeloperoxidase to the same extent as TNF, caused only a modest enhancement of PAF-induced vasoconstriction associated with reduced pressor responses to angiotensin II and hypoxia. Ex vivo perfusion of isolated lungs with TNF for 1 h did not affect PAF vasoconstriction. The TNF-induced potentiation of PAF vasoconstriction was not altered by depletion of circulating neutrophils with vinblastine but was blocked by Dazmegrel, a thromboxane synthase inhibitor. Thus, TNF potentiates PAF-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction by an in vivo mechanism that is neutrophil independent but thromboxane dependent. This TNF-PAF interaction likely contributes to the development of pulmonary hypertension during sepsis. PMID:7896627

  11. Arginase inhibition prevents bleomycin-induced pulmonary hypertension, vascular remodeling, and collagen deposition in neonatal rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Grasemann, Hartmut; Dhaliwal, Rupinder; Ivanovska, Julijana; Kantores, Crystal; McNamara, Patrick J; Scott, Jeremy A; Belik, Jaques; Jankov, Robert P

    2015-03-15

    Arginase is an enzyme that limits substrate L-arginine bioavailability for the production of nitric oxide by the nitric oxide synthases and produces L-ornithine, which is a precursor for collagen formation and tissue remodeling. We studied the pulmonary vascular effects of arginase inhibition in an established model of repeated systemic bleomycin sulfate administration in neonatal rats that results in pulmonary hypertension and lung injury mimicking the characteristics typical of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. We report that arginase expression is increased in the lungs of bleomycin-exposed neonatal rats and that treatment with the arginase inhibitor amino-2-borono-6-hexanoic acid prevented the bleomycin-induced development of pulmonary hypertension and deposition of collagen. Arginase inhibition resulted in increased L-arginine and L-arginine bioavailability and increased pulmonary nitric oxide production. Arginase inhibition also normalized the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and reduced bleomycin-induced nitrative stress while having no effect on bleomycin-induced inflammation. Our data suggest that arginase is a promising target for therapeutic interventions in neonates aimed at preventing lung vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25595650

  12. Effects of lung recruitment maneuvers on splanchnic organ perfusion during endotoxin-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Daudel, Fritz; Gorrasi, José; Bracht, Hendrik; Brandt, Sebastian; Krejci, Vladimir; Jakob, Stephan M; Takala, Jukka; Rothen, Hans Ulrich

    2010-11-01

    Lung recruitment maneuvers (RMs), used to reopen atelectatic lung units and to improve oxygenation during mechanical ventilation, may result in hemodynamic impairment. We hypothesize that pulmonary arterial hypertension aggravates the consequences of RMs in the splanchnic circulation. Twelve anesthetized pigs underwent laparotomy and prolonged postoperative ventilation. Systemic, regional, and organ blood flows were monitored. After 6 h (= baseline), a recruitment maneuver was performed with sustained inflation of the lungs. Thereafter, the pigs were randomly assigned to group C (control, n = 6) or group E with endotoxin-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (n = 6). Endotoxemia resulted in a normotensive and hyperdynamic state and a deterioration of the oxygenation index by 33%. The RM was then repeated in both groups. Pulmonary artery pressure increased during lipopolysaccharide infusion from 17 ± 2 mmHg (mean ± SD) to 31 ± 10 mmHg and remained unchanged in controls (P < 0.05). During endotoxemia, RM decreased aortic pulse pressure from 37 ± 14 mmHg to 27 ± 13 mmHg (mean ± SD, P = 0.024). The blood flows of the renal artery, hepatic artery, celiac trunk, superior mesenteric artery, and portal vein decreased to 71% ± 21%, 69% ± 20%, 76% ± 16%, 79% ± 18%, and 81% ± 12%, respectively, of baseline flows before RM (P < 0.05 all). Organ perfusion of kidney cortex, kidney medulla, liver, and jejunal mucosa in group E decreased to 65% ± 19%, 77% ± 13%, 66% ± 26%, and 71% ± 12%, respectively, of baseline flows (P < 0.05 all). The corresponding recovery to at least 90% of baseline regional blood flow and organ perfusion lasted 1 to 5 min. Importantly, the decreases in regional blood flows and organ perfusion and the time to recovery of these flows did not differ from the controls. In conclusion, lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension does not aggravate the RM-induced significant but short-lasting decreases in systemic, regional, and

  13. Pulmonary gas exchange during histamine-induced bronchoconstriction in asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Burke, T V; Küng, M; Burki, N K

    1989-10-01

    Bronchial provocation for testing airway hyperreactivity is now well-established. However, the effects of histamine-induced bronchoconstriction on pulmonary gas exchange in man have not been systematically studied. We empirically noted marked decreases in PaO2 in some asthmatic subjects following induced bronchoconstriction. Nine subjects with mild, stable asthma were studied, each on two separate days. The first determined the dose of inhaled histamine necessary to decrease FEV1 by 20 percent and the relationship to lung volume and to pulmonary resistance by the interrupter technique (Rint). On the second day arterial blood gases, ventilation, Rint, and the anatomic (VDan) and physiologic (VDphys) dead spaces were measured simultaneously. There was a significant (p less than 0.05), profound fall in PaO2 (mean, -21.8 mm Hg) and in P(A-a)O2 (mean +14.7 mm Hg) within 5 min after bronchoconstriction, associated with a significant (p less than 0.05) increase in respiratory frequency (mean +5.1 min-1); and decrease in tidal volume (mean, -0.3 L). The ratio VDphys/VT increased significantly (p less than 0.05; mean change, +0.08) even though VDan and VDphys did not. Bronchoconstriction induced the broadening of ventilation (V)/perfusion (Q) ratios, with, most likely, an increase in areas of high V/Q. Histamine-induced bronchoconstriction in mild asthma results in a marked fall in PaO2 due to induced V/Q inequality. Therefore, histamine airway challenge should be used with caution in patients with any preexisting hypoxemia. PMID:2791669

  14. Hypoxic preconditioning with cobalt ameliorates hypobaric hypoxia induced pulmonary edema in rat.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Dhananjay; Saxena, Saurabh; Purushothaman, Jayamurthy; Shrivastava, Kalpana; Singh, Mrinalini; Shukla, Shirish; Malhotra, Vineet Kumar; Mustoori, Sairam; Bansal, Anju

    2011-04-10

    Exposure to high altitude results in hypobaric hypoxia which is considered as an acute physiological stress and often leads to high altitude maladies such as high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE). The best way to prevent high altitude injuries is hypoxic preconditioning which has potential clinical usefulness and can be mimicked by cobalt chloride. Preconditioning with cobalt has been reported to provide protection in various tissues against ischemic injury. However, the effect of preconditioning with cobalt against high altitude induced pulmonary edema has not been investigated in vivo. Therefore, in the present study, rats pretreated with saline or cobalt (12.5mg/kg body weight) for 7days were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia of 9142m for 5h at 24°C. Formation of pulmonary edema was assessed by measuring transvascular leakage of sodium fluorescein dye and lung water content. Total protein content, albumin content, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cytokine levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Expression of HO-1, MT, NF-κB DNA binding activity and lung tissue pathology were evaluated to determine the effect of preconditioning on HAPE. Hypobaric hypoxia induced increase in transvascular leakage of sodium fluorescein dye, lung water content, lavage total protein, albumin, VEGF levels, pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, tissue expression of cell adhesion molecules and NF-κB DNA binding activity were reduced significantly after hypoxic preconditioning with cobalt. Expression of anti-inflammatory protein HO-1, MT, TGF-β and IL-6 were increased after hypoxic preconditioning. These data suggest that hypoxic preconditioning with cobalt has protective effect against HAPE. PMID:21296072

  15. Pulmonary oxygen toxicity in rats treated with cytochrome P-450 inducers

    SciTech Connect

    Ebel, R.E.; Barlow, R.L.; Gregory, E.M.

    1987-05-01

    Pulmonary oxygen toxicity is assumed to result from damage caused by superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -/) hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) and/or hydroxyl radical (OH) produced by the partial reduction of molecular oxygen (O/sub 2/). The microsomal cytochrome P-450 (P-450) monooxygenase system is known to produce O/sub 2//sup -/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. They have studied the influence of monooxygenase induction using phenobarbital (PB) and ..beta..-naphthoflavone (..beta..-NF) on O/sub 2/ toxicity in the rat. PB- or ..beta..-NF induce hepatic P-450 but only ..beta..-NF induces pulmonary P-450. Pulmonary microsomes produced O/sub 2//sup -/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ at rates (expressed per mg microsomal protein) which did not vary as a function of pretreatment. Rats were exposed to 100% O/sub 2/ for up to 3 days. After 3 days of O/sub 2/, lung weights were about 50% above controls regardless of pretreatment. The microsomal monooxygenase enzymes (P-450, b/sub 5/ and NADPH P-450 reductase) were quantified in liver and lung. Lung microsomal P-450 was reduced after 3 days of O/sub 2/ exposure regardless of pretreatment. The protective enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) peroxidase) and non-protein sulfhydryl groups (NPSH) were also quantified in lung and liver samples. Lung NPSH and GSH peroxidase were increased after 3 days of O/sub 2/ exposure regardless of pretreatment while SOD was increased in controls and PB- but not ..beta..-NF-treated rats. Three of 14 ..beta..-NF-treated rats died during O/sub 2/ exposure while no animals in the control or PB-treated groups died.

  16. Inhaled Diesel Emissions Generated with Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Fuel Additive Induce Adverse Pulmonary and Systemic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Samantha J.; McGee, John; Miller, Desinia B.; Bass, Virginia; Schladweiler, Mette C.; Thomas, Ronald F.; Krantz, Todd; King, Charly; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Richards, Judy; Weinstein, Jason P.; Conner, Teri; Willis, Robert; Linak, William P.; Nash, David; Wood, Charles E.; Elmore, Susan A.; Morrison, James P.; Johnson, Crystal L.; Gilmour, Matthew Ian; Kodavanti, Urmila P.

    2014-01-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe results in greater adverse pulmonary effects compared with DE. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to filtered air, DE, or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days. N-acetyl glucosaminidase activity was increased in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of rats exposed to DECe but not DE. There were also marginal but insignificant increases in several other lung injury biomarkers in both exposure groups (DECe > DE for all). To further characterize DECe toxicity, rats in a second study were exposed to filtered air or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days or 4 weeks. Tissue analysis indicated a concentration- and time-dependent accumulation of lung and liver cerium followed by a delayed clearance. The gas-phase and high concentration of DECe increased lung inflammation at the 2-day time point, indicating that gas-phase components, in addition to particles, contribute to pulmonary toxicity. This effect was reduced at 4 weeks except for a sustained increase in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity. Histopathology and transmission electron microscopy revealed increased alveolar septa thickness due to edema and increased numbers of pigmented macrophages after DECe exposure. Collectively, these findings indicate that DECe induces more adverse pulmonary effects on a mass basis than DE. In addition, lung accumulation of cerium, systemic translocation to the liver, and delayed clearance are added concerns to existing health effects of DECe. PMID:25239632

  17. Inhaled diesel emissions generated with cerium oxide nanoparticle fuel additive induce adverse pulmonary and systemic effects.

    PubMed

    Snow, Samantha J; McGee, John; Miller, Desinia B; Bass, Virginia; Schladweiler, Mette C; Thomas, Ronald F; Krantz, Todd; King, Charly; Ledbetter, Allen D; Richards, Judy; Weinstein, Jason P; Conner, Teri; Willis, Robert; Linak, William P; Nash, David; Wood, Charles E; Elmore, Susan A; Morrison, James P; Johnson, Crystal L; Gilmour, Matthew Ian; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2014-12-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe results in greater adverse pulmonary effects compared with DE. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to filtered air, DE, or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days. N-acetyl glucosaminidase activity was increased in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of rats exposed to DECe but not DE. There were also marginal but insignificant increases in several other lung injury biomarkers in both exposure groups (DECe > DE for all). To further characterize DECe toxicity, rats in a second study were exposed to filtered air or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days or 4 weeks. Tissue analysis indicated a concentration- and time-dependent accumulation of lung and liver cerium followed by a delayed clearance. The gas-phase and high concentration of DECe increased lung inflammation at the 2-day time point, indicating that gas-phase components, in addition to particles, contribute to pulmonary toxicity. This effect was reduced at 4 weeks except for a sustained increase in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity. Histopathology and transmission electron microscopy revealed increased alveolar septa thickness due to edema and increased numbers of pigmented macrophages after DECe exposure. Collectively, these findings indicate that DECe induces more adverse pulmonary effects on a mass basis than DE. In addition, lung accumulation of cerium, systemic translocation to the liver, and delayed clearance are added concerns to existing health effects of DECe. PMID:25239632

  18. The Endothelial Prolyl-4-Hydroxylase Domain 2/Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2 Axis Regulates Pulmonary Artery Pressure in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kapitsinou, Pinelopi P; Rajendran, Ganeshkumar; Astleford, Lindsay; Michael, Mark; Schonfeld, Michael P; Fields, Timothy; Shay, Sheila; French, Jaketa L; West, James; Haase, Volker H

    2016-05-15

    Hypoxia-inducible factors 1 and 2 (HIF-1 and -2) control oxygen supply to tissues by regulating erythropoiesis, angiogenesis and vascular homeostasis. HIFs are regulated in response to oxygen availability by prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD) proteins, with PHD2 being the main oxygen sensor that controls HIF activity under normoxia. In this study, we used a genetic approach to investigate the endothelial PHD2/HIF axis in the regulation of vascular function. We found that inactivation of Phd2 in endothelial cells specifically resulted in severe pulmonary hypertension (∼118% increase in right ventricular systolic pressure) but not polycythemia and was associated with abnormal muscularization of peripheral pulmonary arteries and right ventricular hypertrophy. Concurrent inactivation of either Hif1a or Hif2a in endothelial cell-specific Phd2 mutants demonstrated that the development of pulmonary hypertension was dependent on HIF-2α but not HIF-1α. Furthermore, endothelial HIF-2α was required for the development of increased pulmonary artery pressures in a model of pulmonary hypertension induced by chronic hypoxia. We propose that these HIF-2-dependent effects are partially due to increased expression of vasoconstrictor molecule endothelin 1 and a concomitant decrease in vasodilatory apelin receptor signaling. Taken together, our data identify endothelial HIF-2 as a key transcription factor in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26976644

  19. IL‑33/ST2 pathway in a bleomycin‑induced pulmonary fibrosis model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiao; Zheng, Jinxu; Song, Ping; Zhou, Yanjuan; Guan, Shuhong

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the interleukin (IL)‑33/ST2 pathway in a model of acute pulmonary fibrosis, and to examine the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. The pulmonary fibrosis model was established by a single exposure to bleomycin (BLM group) endotracheally to represent idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and a control (Cont) group was treated with the same volume of saline. The degrees of acute injury, inflammation and fibrosis were detected using hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's staining. The IL‑33, ST2, myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88) and tumor necrosis factor receptor‑associated factor 6 (TRAF6) proteins were detected using Western blotting. The serum levels of IL‑4 and IL‑13 were detected using an enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay. The results indicated that, compared with the Cont group, there were significant differences in the alveolitis scores in the BLM group on days 3, 7, 14 and 28 (P<0.01). The grades of fibrosis were also significantly different on days 7, 14 and 28 (P<0.01). On examining the dynamic protein expression levels of IL‑33, ST2, MyD88 and TRAF6, the expression of IL‑33 in the BLM group increased initially, and then decreased gradually following a peak on day 7. The significant differences between the BLM and Cont groups were observed on days 3 and 7 (P<0.05). Compared with the Cont group, the protein levels of ST2, MyD88 and TRAF6 in the BLM group exhibited an increasing trend from day 3, with significant differences, compared with the Cont group, on days 3, 7, 14 and 28 (P<0.05). On examination of the serum levels of IL‑4 and IL‑13 in each group, the levels of IL‑4 and IL‑13 in BLM group remained higher from day 7, with peaks on day 28, and were significantly different, compared with the Cont group, on days 7, 14 and 28 (P<0.05). In conclusion, the IL‑33/ST2 signaling pathway was found to be involved in the rodent model of pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin

  20. Activated Wnt signaling induces myofibroblast differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, contributing to pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaorui; Wang, Cong; Shi, Chaowen; Sun, Fangfang; Xu, Xiaomeng; Qian, Weiping; Nie, Shinan; Han, Xiaodong

    2014-05-01

    Acute lung injury may lead to fibrogenesis. However, no treatment is currently available. This study was conducted to determine the effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in a model of HCl-induced acute lung injury in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1 and its receptor CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)4 have been shown to participate in mobilizing MSCs. Adenovirus carrying the CXCR4 gene was used to transfect MSCs in order to increase the engraftment numbers of MSCs at injured sites. Histological examination data demonstrated that the engraftment of MSCs did not attenuate lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis. The results showed that engraftment of MSCs almost differentiated into myofibroblasts, but rarely differentiated into lung epithelial cells. Additionally, it was demonstrated that activated canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling in injured lung tissue regulated the myofibroblast differentiation of MSCs in vivo. The in vitro study results demonstrated that activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling stimulated MSCs to express myofibroblast markers; however, this process was attenuated by Wnt antagonist DKK1. Therefore, the results demonstrated that the aberrant activation of Wnt signaling induces the myofibroblast differentiation of engrafted MSCs, thus contributing to pulmonary fibrosis following lung injury. PMID:24573542

  1. Electrons and phonons in layered and monolayer vanadium pentoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, Walter R. L.

    Vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) is a layered material with the potential for interesting new properties when made in 2D mono- or few-layer form. Its band structure is characterized by a split-off conduction band. The lowest conduction band is separated from the rest of the conduction bands by about 1 eV and consists of V-dxy orbitals, non-bonding to the oxygens by symmetry. This narrow band has dispersion essentially along the direction of chains occurring in the layer. When this band becomes half-filled by doping, spin-splitting occurs accompanied by an antiferromagnetic coupling between nearest neighbors along the chain direction. This situation is well known to occur in the so-called ladder compound NaV2O5 , which was extensively studied in the late 90s as a potential spin-Peierls or charge ordering compound. However, the monolayer form of V2O5 may allow for other ways to control the doping by gating, removing vanadyl oxygens, adsorption of alkali metals, nanoribbon formation, etc. Our calculations predict a switch from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic coupling for doping slightly less than half filling of the split-off band. In this talk we will discuss our recent work on the electronic band structure of both bulk and monolayer V2O5 as well as the phonons. We find that the quasi-particle self-consistent GW method strongly overestimates the band gap. Lattice polarization corrections of the screening are required because of the large LO/TO phonon frequency ratios. Excitonic effects may also be expected to be fairly large. We find that some of the vibrational modes, notably the vanadyl-oxygen bond stretch perpendicular to the layer, unexpectedly shows a strong blue shift. This is explained in terms of reduced screening affecting the long-range dipole components of the force constants. Supported by AFOSR and DOE. Work done with Churna Bhandari, Mark van Schilfgaarde and Andre Schleiffe.

  2. 77 FR 5797 - Draft Toxicological Review of Vanadium Pentoxide: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... vanadium pentoxide assessment in Federal Register Notices published September 30, 2011, (76 FR 60827) and November 9, 2011 (76 FR 69736). DATES: The peer review panel meeting on the draft assessment for Vanadium... Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20460; telephone: (703) 347-8561; facsimile: (703) 347- 8691). If...

  3. Storage of potassium ions in layered vanadium pentoxide nanofiber electrodes for aqueous pseudocapacitors.

    PubMed

    Yeager, Matthew P; Du, Wenxin; Bishop, Brendan; Sullivan, Matthew; Xu, Wenqian; Su, Dong; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Hanson, Jonathan; Teng, Xiaowei

    2013-12-01

    Spaced out: This paper investigates potassium-ion storage in vanadium pentoxide nanofibers (VNFs, K0.33 V2 O5 ) with a layered architecture. In situ XRD experiments reveal that the interplanar space of VNF expands/contracts upon extraction/insertion of potassium ions during the redox process. PMID:24124048

  4. Omeprazole Attenuates Pulmonary Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation and Potentiates Hyperoxia-Induced Developmental Lung Injury in Newborn Mice.

    PubMed

    Shivanna, Binoy; Zhang, Shaojie; Patel, Ananddeep; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Welty, Stephen E; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2015-11-01

    Hyperoxia contributes to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in human preterm infants and a similar lung phenotype characterized by alveolar simplification in newborn mice. Omeprazole (OM) is a proton pump inhibitor that is used to treat humans with gastric acid related disorders. OM-mediated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation attenuates acute hyperoxic lung injury (HLI) in adult mice. Whether OM activates pulmonary AhR and protects C57BL/6J newborn mice against hyperoxia-induced developmental lung (alveolar and pulmonary vascular simplification, inflammation, and oxidative stress) injury (HDLI) is unknown. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that OM will activate pulmonary AhR and mitigate HDLI in newborn mice. Newborn mice were treated daily with i.p. injections of OM at doses of 10 (OM10) or 25 (OM25) mg/kg while being exposed to air or hyperoxia (FiO2 of 85%) for 14 days, following which their lungs were harvested to determine alveolarization, pulmonary vascularization, inflammation, oxidative stress, vascular injury, and AhR activation. To our surprise, hyperoxia-induced alveolar and pulmonary vascular simplification, inflammation, oxidative stress, and vascular injury were augmented in OM25-treated animals. These findings were associated with attenuated pulmonary vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 expression and decreased pulmonary AhR activation in the OM25 group. We conclude that contrary to our hypothesis, OM decreases functional activation of pulmonary AhR and potentiates HDLI in newborn mice. These observations are consistent with our previous findings, which suggest that AhR activation plays a protective role in HDLI in newborn mice. PMID:26272953

  5. Blocking follistatin-like 1 attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yingying; Geng, Yan; Li, Lian; Li, Xiaohe; Yan, Xiaohua; Fang, Yinshan; Li, Xinxin; Dong, Siyuan; Liu, Xue; Li, Xue; Yang, Xiuhong; Zheng, Xiaohong; Xie, Ting; Liang, Jiurong; Dai, Huaping; Liu, Xinqi; Yin, Zhinan; Noble, Paul W; Jiang, Dianhua; Ning, Wen

    2015-02-01

    Progressive tissue fibrosis is a cause of major morbidity and mortality. Pulmonary fibrosis is an epithelial-mesenchymal disorder in which TGF-β1 plays a central role in pathogenesis. Here we show that follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1) differentially regulates TGF-β and bone morphogenetic protein signaling, leading to epithelial injury and fibroblast activation. Haplodeletion of Fstl1 in mice or blockage of FSTL1 with a neutralizing antibody in mice reduced bleomycin-induced fibrosis in vivo. Fstl1 is induced in response to lung injury and promotes the accumulation of myofibroblasts and subsequent fibrosis. These data suggest that Fstl1 may serve as a novel therapeutic target for treatment of progressive lung fibrosis. PMID:25584011

  6. Blocking follistatin-like 1 attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yingying; Geng, Yan; Li, Lian; Li, Xiaohe; Yan, Xiaohua; Fang, Yinshan; Li, Xinxin; Dong, Siyuan; Liu, Xue; Li, Xue; Yang, Xiuhong; Zheng, Xiaohong; Xie, Ting; Liang, Jiurong; Dai, Huaping; Liu, Xinqi; Yin, Zhinan; Noble, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive tissue fibrosis is a cause of major morbidity and mortality. Pulmonary fibrosis is an epithelial-mesenchymal disorder in which TGF-β1 plays a central role in pathogenesis. Here we show that follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1) differentially regulates TGF-β and bone morphogenetic protein signaling, leading to epithelial injury and fibroblast activation. Haplodeletion of Fstl1 in mice or blockage of FSTL1 with a neutralizing antibody in mice reduced bleomycin-induced fibrosis in vivo. Fstl1 is induced in response to lung injury and promotes the accumulation of myofibroblasts and subsequent fibrosis. These data suggest that Fstl1 may serve as a novel therapeutic target for treatment of progressive lung fibrosis. PMID:25584011

  7. Common and distinct mechanisms of induced pulmonary fibrosis by particulate and soluble chemical fibrogenic agents

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jie; Yu, Xiaoqing; Porter, Dale W.; Battelli, Lori A.; Kashon, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis results from the excessive deposition of collagen fibers and scarring in the lungs with or without an identifiable cause. The mechanism(s) underlying lung fibrosis development is poorly understood, and effective treatment is lacking. Here we compared mouse lung fibrosis induced by pulmonary exposure to prototypical particulate (crystalline silica) or soluble chemical (bleomycin or paraquat) fibrogenic agents to identify the underlying mechanisms. Young male C57BL/6J mice were given silica (2 mg), bleomycin (0.07 mg), or paraquat (0.02 mg) by pharyngeal aspiration. All treatments induced significant inflammatory infiltration and collagen deposition, manifesting fibrotic foci in silica-exposed lungs or diffuse fibrosis in bleomycin or paraquat-exposed lungs on day 7 post-exposure, at which time the lesions reached their peaks and represented a junction of transition from an acute response to chronic fibrosis. Lung genomewide gene expression was analyzed, and differential gene expression was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblotting for representative genes to demonstrate their induced expression and localization in fibrotic lungs. Canonical signaling pathways, gene ontology, and upstream transcription networks modified by each agent were identified. In particular, these inducers elicited marked proliferative responses; at the same time, silica preferentially activated innate immune functions and the defense against foreign bodies, whereas bleomycin and paraquat boosted responses related to cell adhesion, platelet activation, extracellular matrix remodeling, and wound healing. This study identified, for the first time, the shared and unique genes, signaling pathways, and biological functions regulated by particulate and soluble chemical fibrogenic agents during lung fibrosis, providing insights into the mechanisms underlying human lung fibrotic diseases. PMID:26345256

  8. Thromboxane-induced actin polymerization in hypoxic neonatal pulmonary arterial myocytes involves Cdc42 signaling.

    PubMed

    Fediuk, Jena; Sikarwar, Anurag S; Nolette, Nora; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala

    2014-12-01

    In hypoxic pulmonary arterial (PA) myocytes, challenge with thromboxane mimetic U46619 induces marked actin polymerization and contraction, phenotypic features of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). Rho GTPases regulate the actin cytoskeleton. We previously reported that U46619-induced actin polymerization in hypoxic PA myocytes occurs independently of the RhoA pathway and hypothesized involvement of the Cdc42 pathway. PA myocytes grown in normoxia or hypoxia for 72 h were stimulated with U46619, then analyzed for Rac/Cdc42 activation by affinity precipitation, phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) activity by phospho-Akt, phospho-p21-activated kinase (PAK) by immunoblot, and association of Cdc42 with neuronal Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome protein (N-WASp) by immunoprecipitation. The effect of Rac or PAK inhibition on filamentous actin was quantified by laser-scanning cytometry and by cytoskeletal fractionation; effects of actin-modifying agents were measured by isometric myography. Basal Cdc42 activity increased in hypoxia, whereas Rac activity decreased. U46619 challenge increased Cdc42 and Rac activity in hypoxic cells, independently of PI3K. Hypoxia increased phospho-PAK, unaltered by U46619. Association of Cdc42 with N-WASp decreased in hypoxia but increased after U46619 exposure. Hypoxia doubled filamentous-to-globular ratios of α- and γ-actin isoforms. Jasplakinolide stabilized γ-filaments, increasing force; cytochalasin D depolymerized all actin isoforms, decreasing force. Rac and PAK inhibition decreased filamentous actin in tissues although without decrease in force. Rho inhibition decreased myosin phosphorylation and force. Hypoxia induces actin polymerization in PA myocytes, particularly increasing filamentous α- and γ-actin, contributing to U46619-induced contraction. Hypoxic PA myocytes challenged with a thromboxane mimetic polymerize actin via the Cdc42 pathway, reflecting increased Cdc42 association with N-WASp. Mechanisms

  9. Agonist of growth hormone-releasing hormone reduces pneumolysin-induced pulmonary permeability edema

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Rudolf; Sridhar, Supriya; Rick, Ferenc G.; Gorshkov, Boris; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Yang, Guang; Oseghale, Aluya; Verin, Alexander D.; Chakraborty, Trinad; Matthay, Michael A.; Zemskov, Evgeny A.; White, Richard; Block, Norman L.; Schally, Andrew V.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive treatment with antibiotics in patients infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae induces release of the bacterial virulence factor pneumolysin (PLY). Days after lungs are sterile, this pore-forming toxin can still induce pulmonary permeability edema in patients, characterized by alveolar/capillary barrier dysfunction and impaired alveolar liquid clearance (ALC). ALC is mainly regulated through Na+ transport by the apically expressed epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and the basolaterally expressed Na+/K+-ATPase in type II alveolar epithelial cells. Because no standard treatment is currently available to treat permeability edema, the search for novel therapeutic candidates is of high priority. We detected mRNA expression for the active receptor splice variant SV1 of the hypothalamic polypeptide growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), as well as for GHRH itself, in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HL-MVEC). Therefore, we have evaluated the effect of the GHRH agonist JI-34 on PLY-induced barrier and ALC dysfunction. JI-34 blunts PLY-mediated endothelial hyperpermeability in monolayers of HL-MVEC, in a cAMP-dependent manner, by means of reducing the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. In human airway epithelial H441 cells, PLY significantly impairs Na+ uptake, but JI-34 restores it to basal levels by means of increasing cAMP levels. Intratracheal instillation of PLY into C57BL6 mice causes pulmonary alveolar epithelial and endothelial hyperpermeability as well as edema formation, all of which are blunted by JI-34. These findings point toward a protective role of the GHRH signaling pathway in PLY-induced permeability edema. PMID:22308467

  10. Phospholipase D signaling in serotonin-induced mitogenesis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Fanburg, B L

    2008-09-01

    We have previously reported the participation of mitogen-activated protein, Rho, and phosphoinositide-3 (PI3) kinases in separate pathways in serotonin (5-HT)-induced proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs). In this study, we investigated the possible participation of phospholipase D (PLD) and phosphatidic acid (PA) in this growth process. 5-HT stimulated a time-dependent increase in [(3)H]phosphatidylbutanol and PA generation. Exposure of SMCs to 1-butanol or overexpression of an inactive mutant of human PLD1R898R blocked 5-HT-induced proliferation. Furthermore, 1-butanol inhibited 5-HT activation of S6K1 and S6 protein, downstream effectors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), by 80 and 72%, respectively, and partially blocked activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) by 30% but had no effect on other associated signaling pathways. Exogenous PA caused cellular proliferation and revitalized cyclin D1 expression by 5-HT of the 1-butanol-treated cells. PA also reproduced activations by 5-HT of mTOR, S6K1, and ERK. Transfection with inactive human PLD1 reduced 5-HT-induced activation of S6K1 by approximately 50%. Inhibition of 5-HT receptor 2A (R 2A) with ketaserin blocked PLD activation by 5-HT. Inhibition with PI3-kinase inhibitor failed to block either activation of PLD by 5-HT or PA-dependent S6K1 phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that ligation of the 5-HTR 2A by 5-HT initiates PLD activation in SMCs, and that its product, PA, is an early signaling molecule in 5-HT-induced pulmonary artery SMC proliferation. Signaling by PA produces its downstream effects primarily through the mTOR/S6K1 pathway and to a lesser extent through the ERK pathway. Hydrolysis of cell membrane lipid may be important in vascular effects of 5-HT. PMID:18621911