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Sample records for peptide binding specificity

  1. Sequence-Specific DNA Binding by a Short Peptide Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanian, Robert V.; McKnight, C. James; Kim, Peter S.

    1990-08-01

    A recently described class of DNA binding proteins is characterized by the "bZIP" motif, which consists of a basic region that contacts DNA and an adjacent "leucine zipper" that mediates protein dimerization. A peptide model for the basic region of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 has been developed in which the leucine zipper has been replaced by a disulfide bond. The 34-residue peptide dimer, but not the reduced monomer, binds DNA with nanomolar affinity at 4^circC. DNA binding is sequence-specific as judged by deoxyribonuclease I footprinting. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests that the peptide adopts a helical structure when bound to DNA. These results demonstrate directly that the GCN4 basic region is sufficient for sequence-specific DNA binding and suggest that a major function of the GCN4 leucine zipper is simply to mediate protein dimerization. Our approach provides a strategy for the design of short sequence-specific DNA binding peptides.

  2. Specific binding sites for muramyl peptides on murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, D.H.S.; Krueger, J.M.; Karnovsky, M.L.

    1986-03-15

    Two radiolabeled (/sup 125/I) muramyl peptide derivatives of high specific activity were prepared: a tripeptide with an iodinated C-terminal tyrosine methyl ester (Ligand I), and a muramyl tripeptide with a C-terminal lysine derivatized with Bolton-Hunter reagent (Ligand II). These were used to characterize binding of muramyl peptides to monolayers of murine macrophages. Saturable high-affinity binding to resident, caseinate-elicited, and Listeria-activated peritoneal cells was observed with both radioligands. Binding affinities varied with the state of activation of the macrophages, and K/sub D/ values ranged from 48 +/- 33 pM (for resident macrophages, Ligand I) to 1020 +/- 90 pM (for activated macrophages, Ligand II). Specific binding sites were also found on a macrophage-derived cell line. The ability of several unlabeled muramyl peptides to compete with Ligands I and II for their binding sites was tested. Competition was stereospecific and correlated with known biological activities of these compounds (i.e., immunoadjuvanticity, pyrogenicity, and somnogenicity). The sites identified here for Ligands I and II may mediate some of the effects that muramyl peptides have previously been demonstrated to have on macrophages.

  3. Epitope-specificity of recombinant antibodies reveals promiscuous peptide-binding properties

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Niclas; Wallin, Stefan; James, Peter; Borrebaeck, Carl A K; Wingren, Christer

    2012-01-01

    Protein–peptide interactions are a common occurrence and essential for numerous cellular processes, and frequently explored in broad applications within biology, medicine, and proteomics. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanism(s) of protein–peptide recognition, specificity, and binding interactions will be essential. In this study, we report the first detailed analysis of antibody–peptide interaction characteristics, by combining large-scale experimental peptide binding data with the structural analysis of eight human recombinant antibodies and numerous peptides, targeting tryptic mammalian and eukaryote proteomes. The results consistently revealed that promiscuous peptide-binding interactions, that is, both specific and degenerate binding, were exhibited by all antibodies, and the discovery was corroborated by orthogonal data, indicating that this might be a general phenomenon for low-affinity antibody–peptide interactions. The molecular mechanism for the degenerate peptide-binding specificity appeared to be executed through the use of 2–3 semi-conserved anchor residues in the C-terminal part of the peptides, in analogue to the mechanism utilized by the major histocompatibility complex–peptide complexes. In the long-term, this knowledge will be instrumental for advancing our fundamental understanding of protein–peptide interactions, as well as for designing, generating, and applying peptide specific antibodies, or peptide-binding proteins in general, in various biotechnical and medical applications. PMID:23034898

  4. Phosphorylation-dependent mineral-type specificity for apatite-binding peptide sequences.

    PubMed

    Addison, William N; Miller, Sharon J; Ramaswamy, Janani; Mansouri, Ahmad; Kohn, David H; McKee, Marc D

    2010-12-01

    Apatite-binding peptides discovered by phage display provide an alternative design method for creating functional biomaterials for bone and tooth tissue repair. A limitation of this approach is the absence of display peptide phosphorylation--a post-translational modification important to mineral-binding proteins. To refine the material specificity of a recently identified apatite-binding peptide, and to determine critical design parameters (net charge, charge distribution, amino acid sequence and composition) controlling peptide affinity for mineral, we investigated the effects of phosphorylation and sequence scrambling on peptide adsorption to four different apatites (bone-like mineral, and three types of apatite containing initially 0, 5.6 and 10.5% carbonate). Phosphorylation of the VTKHLNQISQSY peptide (VTK peptide) led to a 10-fold increase in peptide adsorption (compared to nonphosphorylated peptide) to bone-like mineral, and a 2-fold increase in adsorption to the carbonated apatite, but there was no effect of phosphorylation on peptide affinity to pure hydroxyapatite (without carbonate). Sequence scrambling of the nonphosphorylated VTK peptide enhanced its specificity for the bone-like mineral, but scrambled phosphorylated VTK peptide (pVTK) did not significantly alter mineral-binding suggesting that despite the importance of sequence order and/or charge distribution to mineral-binding, the enhanced binding after phosphorylation exceeds any further enhancement by altered sequence order. Osteoblast culture mineralization was dose-dependently inhibited by pVTK and to a significantly lesser extent by scrambled pVTK, while the nonphosphorylated and scrambled forms had no effect, indicating that inhibition of osteoblast mineralization is dependent on both peptide sequence and charge. Computational modeling of peptide-mineral interactions indicated a favorable change in binding energy upon phosphorylation that was unaffected by scrambling. In conclusion

  5. Phosphorylation-dependent mineral type specificity for apatite-binding peptide sequences

    PubMed Central

    Addison, William N.; Miller, Sharon J.; Ramaswamy, Janani; Mansouri, Ahmad; Kohn, David H.; McKee, Marc D.

    2010-01-01

    Apatite-binding peptides discovered by phage display provide an alternative design method for creating functional biomaterials for bone and tooth tissue repair. A limitation of this approach is the absence of display peptide phosphorylation – a post-translational modification important to mineral-binding proteins. To refine the material specificity of a recently identified apatite-binding peptide, and to determine critical design parameters (net charge, charge distribution, amino acid sequence and composition) controlling peptide affinity for mineral, we investigated the effects of phosphorylation and sequence scrambling on peptide adsorption to four different apatites (bone-like mineral, and three types of apatite containing initially 0, 5.6 and 10.5% carbonate). Phosphorylation of peptide VTKHLNQISQSY (pVTK) led to a 10-fold increase in peptide adsorption (compared to nonphosphorylated peptide) to bone-like mineral, and a 2-fold increase in adsorption to the carbonated apatite, but there was no effect of phosphorylation on peptide affinity to pure hydroxyapatite (without carbonate). Sequence scrambling of the nonphosphorylated VTK peptide enhanced its specificity for the bone-like mineral, but scrambled pVTK peptide did not significantly alter mineral-binding suggesting that despite the importance of sequence order and/or charge distribution to mineral binding, the enhanced binding after phosphorylation exceeds any further enhancement by altered sequence order. Osteoblast culture mineralization was dose-dependently inhibited by pVTK and to a significantly lesser extent by scrambled pVTK, while the nonphosphorylated and scrambled forms had no effect, indicating that inhibition of osteoblast mineralization is dependent on both peptide sequence and charge. Computational modeling of peptide-mineral interactions indicated a favorable change in binding energy upon phosphorylation that was unaffected by scrambling. In conclusion, phosphorylation of serine residues

  6. Sequence-specific DNA binding by glucocorticoid receptor "zinc finger peptides".

    PubMed

    Archer, T K; Hager, G L; Omichinski, J G

    1990-10-01

    Steroid hormone receptors can activate or repress transcription from responsive loci by binding to DNA. We have examined the mechanism of DNA binding by individually synthesizing the putative "zinc finger peptides" from the rat glucocorticoid receptor. Atomic absorption studies show that the peptides will bind zinc on an equimolar basis, and circular dichroism experiments demonstrate a significant alteration in secondary structure in the presence of zinc. The results from a series of experiments establish that metal ion is required for binding to DNA and that the amino-terminal zinc finger shows a significantly greater affinity for glucocorticoid response element-containing DNA over control DNA. These observations indicate that a single synthetic "zinc finger peptide" is able to bind to DNA in a sequence-specific manner. PMID:2120703

  7. Simultaneous prediction of binding free energy and specificity for PDZ domain-peptide interactions

    PubMed Central

    Crivelli, Joseph J.; Lemmon, Gordon; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Meiler, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between protein domains and linear peptides underlie many biological processes. Among these interactions, the recognition of C-terminal peptides by PDZ domains is one of the most ubiquitous. In this work, we present a mathematical model for PDZ domain-peptide interactions capable of predicting both affinity and specificity of binding based on x-ray crystal structures and comparative modeling with Rosetta. We developed our mathematical model using a large phage display dataset describing binding specificity for a wild type PDZ domain and 91 single mutants, as well as binding affinity data for a wild type PDZ domain binding to 28 different peptides. Structural refinement was carried out through several Rosetta protocols, the most accurate of which included flexible peptide docking and several iterations of side chain repacking and backbone minimization. Our findings emphasize the importance of backbone flexibility and the energetic contributions of side chain-side chain hydrogen bonds in accurately predicting interactions. We also determined that predicting PDZ domain-peptide interactions became increasingly challenging as the length of the peptide increased in the N-terminal direction. In the training dataset, predicted binding energies correlated with those derived through calorimetry and specificity switches introduced through single mutations at interface positions were recapitulated. In independent tests, our best performing protocol was capable of predicting dissociation constants well within one order of magnitude of the experimental values and specificity profiles at the level of accuracy of previous studies. To our knowledge, this approach represents the first integrated protocol for predicting both affinity and specificity for PDZ domain-peptide interactions. PMID:24305904

  8. T-cell hybridoma specific for a cytochrome c peptide: specific antigen binding and interleukin 2 production.

    PubMed Central

    Carel, S; Bron, C; Corradin, G

    1983-01-01

    T-cell hybridomas were obtained after fusion of BW 5147 thymoma and long-term cultured T cells specific for cytochrome c peptide 66-80 derivatized with a 2,4-dinitroaminophenyl (DNAP) group. The resulting hybridomas were selected for their capacity to specifically bind to soluble radiolabeled peptide antigen. One T-cell hybrid was positive for antigen binding. This hybrid T cell exhibits surface phenotypic markers of the parent antigen-specific T cells. The binding could be inhibited either by an excess of unlabeled homologous antigen or by cytochrome c peptide 11-25 derivatized with a 2-nitrophenylsulfenyl group. Several other peptide antigens tested failed to inhibit binding of the radioactive peptide. This suggests that a specific amino acid sequence, modified by a DNAP group, is the antigenic structure recognized by the putative T-cell receptor. In addition, direct interaction of DNAP-66-80 peptide with the hybridoma cell line induced production of the T-cell growth factor interleukin 2. Furthermore, supernatants derived from syngeneic macrophages pulsed with the relevant peptide also induced the antigen-specific hybridoma to produce interleukin 2. Images PMID:6192442

  9. Design of a G[center dot]C-specific DNA minor groove-binding peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Geierstanger, B.H.; Wemmer, D.E. ); Mrksich, M.; Dervan, P.B. )

    1994-10-28

    A four-ring tripeptide containing alternating imidazole and pyrrole carboxamides specifically binds six-base pair 5[prime]-(A,T)GCGC(A,T)-3[prime] sites in the minor groove of DNA. The designed peptide has a specificity completely reversed from that of the tripyrrole distamycin, which binds A,T sequences. Structural studies with nuclear magnetic resonance revealed that two peptides bound side-by-side and in an antiparallel orientation in the minor groove. Each of the four imidazoles in the 2:1 ligand-DNA complex recognized a specific guanine amino group in the GCGC core through a hydrogen bond. Targeting a designated four-base pair G[center dot]C tract by this synthetic ligand supports the generality of the 2:1 peptide-DNA motif for sequence-specific minor groove recognition of DNA. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Specific bindings of glycine peptides of distinctly different chain length on dynamic papain surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the specific bindings of peptides of 1-10 glycine residues (1-10GLY) on dynamic papain surfaces via molecular dynamics and docking simulations. Although the binding specificities of 1-5GLY on papain fluctuated little with time, the binding specificities of 6-10GLY on papain considerably fluctuated with time. Some residues had a significant impact on bindings of 6-10GLY to sites near active center of papain, and some of their residues were specific for each 6GLY, 8GLY, and 10GLY. Modification of these specific residues should allow for control of binding specificity of 6GLY, 8GLY, and 10GLY to the active center.

  11. The specificity of protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides by lactoferrin binding protein B.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Ari; Partha, Sarathy K; Adamiak, Paul; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-10-01

    A variety of Gram-negative pathogens possess host-specific lactoferrin (Lf) receptors that mediate the acquisition of iron from host Lf. The integral membrane protein component of the receptor, lactoferrin binding protein A specifically binds host Lf and is required for acquisition of iron from Lf. In contrast, the role of the bi-lobed surface lipoprotein, lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB), in Lf binding and iron acquisition is uncertain. A common feature of LbpBs from most species is the presence of clusters of negatively charged amino acids in the protein's C-terminal lobe. Recently it has been shown that the negatively charged regions from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB are responsible for protecting against an 11 amino acid cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAP), lactoferricin (Lfcin), derived from human Lf. In this study we investigated whether the LbpB confers resistance to other CAPs since N. meningitidis is likely to encounter other CAPs from the host. LbpB provided protection against the cathelicidin derived peptide, cathelicidin related antimicrobial peptide (mCRAMP), but did not confer protection against Tritrp 1 or LL37 under our experimental conditions. When tested against a range of rationally designed synthetic peptides, LbpB was shown to protect against IDR-1002 and IDR-0018 but not against HH-2 or HHC10. PMID:25038734

  12. Molecular design of specific metal-binding peptide sequences from protein fragments: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Kozísek, Milan; Svatos, Ales; Budesínský, Milos; Muck, Alexander; Bauer, Mikael C; Kotrba, Pavel; Ruml, Tomás; Havlas, Zdenek; Linse, Sara; Rulísek, Lubomír

    2008-01-01

    A novel strategy is presented for designing peptides with specific metal-ion chelation sites, based on linking computationally predicted ion-specific combinations of amino acid side chains coordinated at the vertices of the desired coordination polyhedron into a single polypeptide chain. With this aim, a series of computer programs have been written that 1) creates a structural combinatorial library containing Zi-(X)n-Zj sequences (n=0-14; Z: amino acid that binds the metal through the side chain; X: any amino acid) from the existing protein structures in the non-redundant Protein Data Bank; 2) merges these fragments into a single Z1-(X)n1 -Z2-(X)n2 -Z3-(X)n3 -...-Zj polypeptide chain; and 3) automatically performs two simple molecular mechanics calculations that make it possible to estimate the internal strain in the newly designed peptide. The application of this procedure for the most M2+-specific combinations of amino acid side chains (M: metal; see L. Rulísek, Z. Havlas J. Phys. Chem. B 2003, 107, 2376-2385) yielded several peptide sequences (with lengths of 6-20 amino acids) with the potential for specific binding with six metal ions (Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+ and Hg2+). The gas-phase association constants of the studied metal ions with these de novo designed peptides were experimentally determined by MALDI mass spectrometry by using 3,4,5-trihydroxyacetophenone as a matrix, whereas the thermodynamic parameters of the metal-ion coordination in the condensed phase were measured by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), chelatometry and NMR spectroscopy methods. The data indicate that some of the computationally predicted peptides are potential M2+-specific metal-ion chelators. PMID:18633954

  13. The further characterization of the peptide specifically binding to gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Juanjuan; Gao, Xiaojie; Duan, Wei; Lin, Fenghuei; Nie, Guochao; Xue, Qinqin; Huang, Yingzhuo; Duan, Yan; Wang, Qian; Hou, Yingchun

    2016-06-01

    Targeting peptide has been considered to be useful as a small molecule probe leading to multifunctional properties for both imaging detection and targeting therapy. Thus, the identification of novel targets is urgently needed to develop innovative agents to effectively control gastric cancer metastasis and progression. Previously, we reported a novel 12-mer peptide, GP-5 (IHKDKNAPSLVP), binding to gastric carcinoma (GC) cells specifically and sensitively, and it was screened by using a phage displayed peptide library and primarily analyzed. In this study, it was further identified via fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, tissue chip and other methods. Our results indicated that the peptide GP-5 presents a particularly high affinity and specificity to GC cells and tissues, whereas only background detection occurred with other control cancer cells, cancer tissues or normal tissues. Taken together, all results support that the peptide GP-5 is a potential candidate to be developed as a useful molecule fragment for the imaging detection and targeting therapy of GC. PMID:26808386

  14. Conversion of scFv peptide-binding specificity for crystal chaperone development

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Jennifer C.; Culver, Jeffrey A.; Drury, Jason E.; Motani, Rakesh S.; Lieberman, Raquel L.; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2012-02-07

    In spite of advances in protein expression and purification over the last decade, many proteins remain recalcitrant to structure determination by X-ray crystallography. One emerging tactic to obtain high-quality protein crystals for structure determination, particularly in the case of membrane proteins, involves co-crystallization with a protein-specific antibody fragment. Here, we report the development of new recombinant single-chain antibody fragments (scFv) capable of binding a specific epitope that can be introduced into internal loops of client proteins. The previously crystallized hexa-histidine-specific 3D5 scFv antibody was modified in the complementary determining region and by random mutagenesis, in conjunction with phage display, to yield scFvs with new biochemical characteristics and binding specificity. Selected variants include those specific for the hexa-histidine peptide with increased expression, solubility (up to 16.6 mg/ml) and sub-micromolar affinity, and those with new specificity for the EE hexa-peptide (EYMPME) and nanomolar affinity. Complexes of one such chaperone with model proteins harboring either an internal or a terminal EE tag were isolated by gel filtration. The 3.1 {angstrom} resolution structure of this chaperone reveals a binding surface complementary to the EE peptide and a {approx}52 {angstrom} channel in the crystal lattice. Notably, in spite of 85% sequence identity, and nearly identical crystallization conditions, the engineered scFv crystallizes in a different space group than the parent 3D5 scFv, and utilizes two new crystal contacts. These engineered scFvs represent a new class of chaperones that may eliminate the need for de novo identification of candidate chaperones from large antibody libraries.

  15. Peptide arrays for screening cancer specific peptides.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sahar; Mathews, Anu Stella; Byeon, Nara; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, we describe a novel method to screen peptides for specific recognition by cancer cells. Seventy peptides were synthesized on a cellulose membrane in an array format, and a direct method to study the peptide-whole cell interaction was developed. The relative binding affinity of the cells for different peptides with respect to a lead 12-mer p160 peptide, identified by phage display, was evaluated using the CyQUANT fluorescence of the bound cells. Screening allowed identification of at least five new peptides that displayed higher affinity (up to 3-fold) for MDA-MB-435 and MCF-7 human cancer cells compared to the p160 peptide. These peptides showed very little binding to the control (noncancerous) human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Three of these peptides were synthesized separately and labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to study their uptake and interaction with the cancer and control cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry. The results confirmed the high and specific affinity of an 11-mer peptide 11 (RGDPAYQGRFL) and a 10-mer peptide 18 (WXEAAYQRFL) for the cancer cells versus HUVECs. Peptide 11 binds different receptors on target cancer cells as its sequence contains multiple recognition motifs, whereas peptide 18 binds mainly to the putative p160 receptor. The peptide array-whole cell binding assay reported here is a complementary method to phage display for further screening and optimization of cancer targeting peptides for cancer therapy and diagnosis. PMID:20799711

  16. Differential receptor binding characteristics of consecutive phenylalanines in micro-opioid specific peptide ligand endomorphin-2.

    PubMed

    Honda, Takeshi; Shirasu, Naoto; Isozaki, Kaname; Kawano, Michiaki; Shigehiro, Daiki; Chuman, Yoshiro; Fujita, Tsugumi; Nose, Takeru; Shimohigashi, Yasuyuki

    2007-06-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides consist of a conserved amino acid residue of Phe(3) and Phe(4), although their binding modes for opioid receptors have not been elucidated in detail. Endomorphin-2, which is highly selective and specific for the mu opioid receptor, possesses two Phe residues at the consecutive positions 3 and 4. In order to clarify the role of Phe(3) and Phe(4) in binding to the mu receptor, we synthesized a series of analogs in which Phe(3) and Phe(4) were replaced by various amino acids. It was found that the aromaticity of the Phe-beta-phenyl groups of Phe(3) and Phe(4) is a principal determinant of how strongly it binds to the receptor, although better molecular hydrophobicity reinforces the activity. The receptor binding subsites of Phe(3) and Phe(4) of endomorphin-2 were found to exhibit different structural requirements. The results suggest that [Trp(3)]endomorphin-2 (native endomorphin-1) and endomorphin-2 bind to different receptor subclasses. PMID:17395470

  17. Specific binding sites for proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP) in the rat.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, H; Hirata, Y; Iwashina, M; Sato, K; Marumo, F

    1996-07-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM), a potent and novel vasodilator 52-residue peptide originally isolated from pheochromocytoma, is processed from a precursor molecule (preproAM) in which another unique 20-residue sequence, termed proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP), exists. Using [125I Tyr0] rat PAMP as a radioligand, we have examined PAMP binding sites in various rat tissues and cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from rat aorta. Specific binding sites for rat PAMP, although very low, were widely distributed in various rat tissues examined. The relatively more abundant sites were present in aorta and adrenal glands, followed by lung, kidney, brain, spleen, and heart. An equilibrium binding study using cultured rat VSMC revealed the presence of a single class of high-affinity [dissociation constant (Kd): 3.5 x 10(-8) M] binding sites for rat PAMP with a maximal binding capacity of 4.5 x 10(6) sites per cell. Binding studies revealed that synthetic rat PAMP(1-19)-NH2 was about 10-fold less potent, and rat PAMP(1-20)-OH and human PAMP were about 20-fold less potent than rat PAMP(1-20)-NH2. SDS-polyacylamide gel electrophoresis after affinity-labeling of membranes from various rat tissues (aorta, adrenal glands, lung) and VSMC revealed a distinct labeled band with the apparent molecular mass of 90 kDa, which was diminished by excess unlabeled rat PAMP. A nonhydrolyzable GTP analog (GTP-gammaS) dose-dependently reduced binding of [125I] rat PAMP to VSMC membranes, while ATP-gammaS had no effect. Neither cyclic AMP nor inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate formation was affected by rat PAMP in rat VSMC. The present study demonstrates for the first time that PAMP receptors are widely distributed in various rat tissues, among which aorta and adrenal glands have the most abundant sites. Our data suggest that PAMP receptors are functionally coupled to G-proteins, although its signal transduction remains obscure. The present study also shows that amidation of C-terminal residue

  18. The recognition of collagen and triple-helical toolkit peptides by MMP-13: sequence specificity for binding and cleavage.

    PubMed

    Howes, Joanna-Marie; Bihan, Dominique; Slatter, David A; Hamaia, Samir W; Packman, Len C; Knauper, Vera; Visse, Robert; Farndale, Richard W

    2014-08-29

    Remodeling of collagen by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is crucial to tissue homeostasis and repair. MMP-13 is a collagenase with a substrate preference for collagen II over collagens I and III. It recognizes a specific, well-known site in the tropocollagen molecule where its binding locally perturbs the triple helix, allowing the catalytic domain of the active enzyme to cleave the collagen α chains sequentially, at Gly(775)-Leu(776) in collagen II. However, the specific residues upon which collagen recognition depends within and surrounding this locus have not been systematically mapped. Using our triple-helical peptide Collagen Toolkit libraries in solid-phase binding assays, we found that MMP-13 shows little affinity for Collagen Toolkit III, but binds selectively to two triple-helical peptides of Toolkit II. We have identified the residues required for the adhesion of both proMMP-13 and MMP-13 to one of these, Toolkit peptide II-44, which contains the canonical collagenase cleavage site. MMP-13 was unable to bind to a linear peptide of the same sequence as II-44. We also discovered a second binding site near the N terminus of collagen II (starting at helix residue 127) in Toolkit peptide II-8. The pattern of binding of the free hemopexin domain of MMP-13 was similar to that of the full-length enzyme, but the free catalytic subunit bound none of our peptides. The susceptibility of Toolkit peptides to proteolysis in solution was independent of the very specific recognition of immobilized peptides by MMP-13; the enzyme proved able to cleave a range of dissolved collagen peptides. PMID:25008319

  19. Targeted treatment of liver metastasis from gastric cancer using specific binding peptide

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jianfeng; Tan, Gewen; Sheng, Nengquan; You, Weiqiang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer ranks the first in China among all gastrointestinal cancers in terms of incidence, and liver metastasis is the leading cause of death for patients with advanced gastric cancer. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a cytokine commonly chosen as the target for gene therapy against cancers. The specific binding peptide pd20 of gastric cancer cells with a high potential for liver metastasis was fused with human TNF to obtain the pd20-TNF gene using DNA recombinant technique. The expression of the fusion protein was induced and the protein was purified. In vitro activity test showed that the fusion protein greatly improved the membrane permeability of liver cells in nude mice with liver metastasis from gastric cancer. The tumor implantation experiment in nude mice showed that the fusion protein effectively mitigated the cancer lesions. The results provide important clues for developing the drugs for targeted treatment of liver metastasis from gastric cancer. PMID:27347305

  20. Specific DNA binding to a major histocompatibility complex enhancer sequence by a synthetic 57-residue double zinc finger peptide from a human enhancer binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Omichinski, J G; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M

    1991-04-15

    Two 57-residue peptides containing one pair of "zinc fingers" from a human enhancer binding protein were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. One peptide (MBP-DF) contained the native sequence, while the second peptide ([Abu11]MBP-DF) has an alpha-aminobutyric acid residue substituted for a nonconserved cysteine residue at position 11. The peptides were characterized by several chemical and physical methods, and their DNA binding properties were evaluated using gel retardation experiments. Spectroscopic studies demonstrated that addition of metal ions such as zinc and cobalt resulted in specific conformational changes in both peptides, indicating that cysteine-11 does not appear to be involved in metal chelation. One-dimensional 1H NMR studies indicate that a stable folded structure is formed upon addition of zinc, and the chemical shift pattern is consistent with that previously observed for one constituent single finger (Omichinski, J., Clore, G. M., Appella, E., Sakaguchi, K., and Gronenborn, A. M. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 9324-9334). Gel retardation experiments demonstrate that the peptides are capable of interacting with a 15-mer oligonucleotide comprising a portion of the major histocompatibility complex enhancer sequence and that the interaction is zinc-dependent. The dissociation constant for the [Abu11]MBP-DF peptide is 1.4 x 10(-7) M with maximal binding occurring at a zinc-to-peptide ratio of 2 to 1. The binding specificity observed with respect to related enhancer sequences exhibits the same relative order as noted previously for the whole protein. Studies with point mutants of the major histocompatibility complex enhancer binding sequence indicate that the last GC base pair in a four-guanine stretch plays a pivotal role in the interaction between the peptide and DNA. PMID:2016331

  1. Identification and binding mechanism of phage displayed peptides with specific affinity to acid-alkali treated titanium.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuhua; Tan, Jing; Wu, Baohua; Wang, Jianxin; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Acid-alkali treatment is one of means widely used for preparing bioactive titanium surfaces. Peptides with specific affinity to titanium surface modified by acid-alkali two-steps treatment were obtained via phage display technology. Out of the eight new unique peptides, titanium-binding peptide 54 displayed by monoclonal M13 phage at its pIII coat protein (TBP54-M13 phage) was proved to have higher binding affinity to the substrate. The binding interaction occurred at the domain from phenylalanine at position 1 to arginine at position 6 in the sequences of TBP54 (FAETHRGFHFSF) mainly via the reaction of these residues with the Ti surface. Together the coordination and electrostatic interactions controlled the specific binding of the phage to the substrate. The binding affinity was dependent on the surface basic hydroxyl group content. In addition, the phage showed a different interaction way with the Ti surface without acid-alkali treatment along with an impaired affinity. This study could provide more understanding of the interaction mechanism between the selected peptide and its specific substrate, and develop a promising method for the biofunctionalization of titanium. PMID:27371890

  2. HLA mismatches and hematopoietic cell transplantation: structural simulations assess the impact of changes in peptide binding specificity on transplant outcome

    PubMed Central

    Yanover, Chen; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Malkki, Mari; Gooley, Ted; Spellman, Stephen; Velardi, Andrea; Bardy, Peter; Madrigal, Alejandro; Bignon, Jean-Denis; Bradley, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The success of hematopoietic cell transplantation from an unrelated donor depends in part on the degree of Human Histocompatibility Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) matching between donor and patient. We present a structure-based analysis of HLA mismatching, focusing on individual amino acid mismatches and their effect on peptide binding specificity. Using molecular modeling simulations of HLA-peptide interactions, we find evidence that amino acid mismatches predicted to perturb peptide binding specificity are associated with higher risk of mortality in a large and diverse dataset of patient-donor pairs assembled by the International Histocompatibility Working Group in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation consortium. This analysis may represent a first step toward sequence-based prediction of relative risk for HLA allele mismatches. PMID:24482668

  3. Prediction of Surface and pH-Specific Binding of Peptides to Metal and Oxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Hendrik; Lin, Tzu-Jen; Emami, Fateme Sadat; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Naik, Rajesh; Knecht, Marc; Perry, Carole C.; Huang, Yu

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism of specific peptide adsorption onto metallic and oxidic nanostructures has been elucidated in atomic resolution using novel force fields and surface models in comparison to measurements. As an example, variations in peptide adsorption on Pd and Pt nanoparticles depending on shape, size, and location of peptides on specific bounding facets are explained. Accurate computational predictions of reaction rates in C-C coupling reactions using particle models derived from HE-XRD and PDF data illustrate the utility of computational methods for the rational design of new catalysts. On oxidic nanoparticles such as silica and apatites, it is revealed how changes in pH lead to similarity scores of attracted peptides lower than 20%, supported by appropriate model surfaces and data from adsorption isotherms. The results demonstrate how new computational methods can support the design of nanoparticle carriers for drug release and the understanding of calcification mechanisms in the human body.

  4. “De Novo” Design of Peptides with Specific Lipid-Binding Properties

    PubMed Central

    Lins, L.; Charloteaux, B.; Heinen, C.; Thomas, A.; Brasseur, R.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we describe an in silico method to design peptides that can be made of non-natural amino acids and elicit specific membrane-interacting properties. The originality of the method holds in the capacities developed to design peptides from any non-natural amino acids as easily as from natural ones, and to test the structure stability by an angular dynamics rather than the currently-used molecular dynamics. The goal of this study was to design a non-natural tilted peptide. Tilted peptides are short protein fragments able to destabilize lipid membranes and characterized by an asymmetric distribution of hydrophobic residues along their helix structure axis. The method is based on the random generation of peptides and their selection on three main criteria: mean hydrophobicity and the presence of at least one polar residue; tilted insertion at the level of the acyl chains of lipids of a membrane; and conformational stability in that hydrophobic phase. From 10,000,000 randomly-generated peptides, four met all the criteria. One was synthesized and tested for its lipid-destabilizing properties. Biophysical assays showed that the “de novo” peptide made of non-natural amino acids is helical either in solution or into lipids as tested by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and is able to induce liposome fusion. These results are in agreement with the calculations and validate the theoretical approach. PMID:16275638

  5. Novel peptide with a specific calcium-binding capacity from whey protein hydrolysate and the possible chelating mode.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Huang, Qimin; Huang, Shunli; Lin, Jiaping; Wang, Shaoyun; Huang, Yifan; Hong, Jing; Rao, Pingfan

    2014-10-22

    A novel peptide with a specific calcium-binding capacity was isolated from whey protein hydrolysates. The isolation procedures included diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) anion-exchange chromatography, Sephadex G-25 gel filtration, and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A peptide with a molecular mass of 237.99 Da was identified by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (LC-ESI/MS), and its amino acid sequence was confirmed to be Gly-Tyr. The calcium-binding capacity of Gly-Tyr reached 75.38 μg/mg, increasing by 122% when compared to the hydrolysate complex. The chelating interaction mode between the Gly-Tyr and calcium ion was investigated, indicating that the major binding sites included the oxygen atom of the carbonyl group and nitrogen of the amino or imino group. The folding and structural modification of the peptide arose along with the addition of the calcium ion. The profile of (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy demonstrated that the electron cloud density around the hydrogen nucleus in the peptide changed was caused by the calcium ion. The results of ζ potential showed that the Gly-Tyr-Ca chelate was a neutral molecule in which the calcium ion was surrounded by the specific binding sites of the peptide. Moreover, thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) and calcium-releasing assay revealed that the Gly-Tyr-Ca chelate exerted excellent thermal stability and solubility in both acidic and basic conditions, which were beneficial to calcium absorption in the gastrointestinal tract of the human body and, therefore, improved its bioavailability. These findings further the progress in the research of whey protein, suggesting the potential in making peptide-calcium chelate as a dietary supplement. PMID:25265391

  6. MHC2SKpan: a novel kernel based approach for pan-specific MHC class II peptide binding prediction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Computational methods for the prediction of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II binding peptides play an important role in facilitating the understanding of immune recognition and the process of epitope discovery. To develop an effective computational method, we need to consider two important characteristics of the problem: (1) the length of binding peptides is highly flexible; and (2) MHC molecules are extremely polymorphic and for the vast majority of them there are no sufficient training data. Methods We develop a novel string kernel MHC2SK (MHC-II String Kernel) method to measure the similarities among peptides with variable lengths. By considering the distinct features of MHC-II peptide binding prediction problem, MHC2SK differs significantly from the recently developed kernel based method, GS (Generic String) kernel, in the way of computing similarities. Furthermore, we extend MHC2SK to MHC2SKpan for pan-specific MHC-II peptide binding prediction by leveraging the binding data of various MHC molecules. Results MHC2SK outperformed GS in allele specific prediction using a benchmark dataset, which demonstrates the effectiveness of MHC2SK. Furthermore, we evaluated the performance of MHC2SKpan using various benckmark data sets from several different perspectives: Leave-one-allele-out (LOO), 5-fold cross validation as well as independent data testing. MHC2SKpan has achieved comparable performance with NetMHCIIpan-2.0 and outperformed NetMHCIIpan-1.0, TEPITOPEpan and MultiRTA, being statistically significant. MHC2SKpan can be freely accessed at http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/service/MHC2SKpan/index.html. PMID:24564280

  7. Improved pan-specific MHC class I peptide-binding predictions using a novel representation of the MHC-binding cleft environment.

    PubMed

    Carrasco Pro, S; Zimic, M; Nielsen, M

    2014-02-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a key role in cell-mediated immune responses presenting bounded peptides for recognition by the immune system cells. Several in silico methods have been developed to predict the binding affinity of a given peptide to a specific MHC molecule. One of the current state-of-the-art methods for MHC class I is NetMHCpan, which has a core ingredient for the representation of the MHC class I molecule using a pseudo-sequence representation of the binding cleft amino acid environment. New and large MHC-peptide-binding data sets are constantly being made available, and also new structures of MHC class I molecules with a bound peptide have been published. In order to test if the NetMHCpan method can be improved by integrating this novel information, we created new pseudo-sequence definitions for the MHC-binding cleft environment from sequence and structural analyses of different MHC data sets including human leukocyte antigen (HLA), non-human primates (chimpanzee, macaque and gorilla) and other animal alleles (cattle, mouse and swine). From these constructs, we showed that by focusing on MHC sequence positions found to be polymorphic across the MHC molecules used to train the method, the NetMHCpan method achieved a significant increase in the predictive performance, in particular, of non-human MHCs. This study hence showed that an improved performance of MHC-binding methods can be achieved not only by the accumulation of more MHC-peptide-binding data but also by a refined definition of the MHC-binding environment including information from non-human species. PMID:24447175

  8. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum RhopH3 protein peptides that specifically bind to erythrocytes and inhibit merozoite invasion

    PubMed Central

    Pinzón, Carlos Giovanni; Curtidor, Hernando; Reyes, Claudia; Méndez, David; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2008-01-01

    The identification of sequences involved in binding to erythrocytes is an important step for understanding the molecular basis of merozoite–erythrocyte interactions that take place during invasion of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite into host cells. Several molecules located in the apical organelles (micronemes, rhoptry, dense granules) of the invasive-stage parasite are essential for erythrocyte recognition, invasion, and establishment of the nascent parasitophorous vacuole. Particularly, it has been demonstrated that rhoptry proteins play an important role in binding to erythrocyte surface receptors, among which is the PfRhopH3 protein, which triggers important immune responses in patients from endemic regions. It has also been reported that anti-RhopH3 antibodies inhibit in vitro invasion of erythrocytes, further supporting its direct involvement in erythrocyte invasion processes. In this study, PfRhopH3 consecutive peptides were synthesized and tested in erythrocyte binding assays for identifying those regions mediating binding to erythrocytes. Fourteen PfRhopH3 peptides presenting high specific binding activity were found, whose bindings were saturable and presented nanomolar dissociation constants. These high-activity binding peptides (HABPs) were characterized by having α-helical structural elements, as determined by circular dichroism, and having receptors of a possible sialic acid-dependent and/or glycoprotein-dependent nature, as evidenced in enzyme-treated erythrocyte binding assays and further corroborated by cross-linking assay results. Furthermore, these HABPs inhibited merozoite in vitro invasion of normal erythrocytes at 200 μM by up to 60% and 90%, suggesting that some RhopH3 protein regions are involved in the P. falciparum erythrocyte invasion. PMID:18593818

  9. MetaMHCpan, A Meta Approach for Pan-Specific MHC Peptide Binding Prediction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yichang; Luo, Cheng; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Recent computational approaches in bioinformatics can achieve high performance, by which they can be a powerful support for performing real biological experiments, making biologists pay more attention to bioinformatics than before. In immunology, predicting peptides which can bind to MHC alleles is an important task, being tackled by many computational approaches. However, this situation causes a serious problem for immunologists to select the appropriate method to be used in bioinformatics. To overcome this problem, we develop an ensemble prediction-based Web server, which we call MetaMHCpan, consisting of two parts: MetaMHCIpan and MetaMHCIIpan, for predicting peptides which can bind MHC-I and MHC-II, respectively. MetaMHCIpan and MetaMHCIIpan use two (MHC2SKpan and LApan) and four (TEPITOPEpan, MHC2SKpan, LApan, and MHC2MIL) existing predictors, respectively. MetaMHCpan is available at http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/MetaMHCpan/index.php/pages/view/info . PMID:27076335

  10. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  11. Quantification of the Epitope Diversity of HIV-1-Specific Binding Antibodies by Peptide Microarrays for Global HIV-1 Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-01-01

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6,564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research. PMID:25445329

  12. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.

  13. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth ofmore » IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.« less

  14. Specific Targeting of a Naturally Presented Osteosarcoma Antigen, Papillomavirus Binding Factor Peptide, Using an Artificial Monoclonal Antibody*

    PubMed Central

    Tsukahara, Tomohide; Emori, Makoto; Murata, Kenji; Hirano, Takahisa; Muroi, Norihiro; Kyono, Masanori; Toji, Shingo; Watanabe, Kazue; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Kochin, Vitaly; Asanuma, Hiroko; Matsumiya, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Keiji; Himi, Tetsuo; Ichimiya, Shingo; Wada, Takuro; Yamashita, Toshihiko; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Sato, Noriyuki

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a rare but highly malignant tumor occurring most frequently in adolescents. The prognosis of non-responders to chemotherapy is still poor, and new treatment modalities are needed. To develop peptide-based immunotherapy, we previously identified autologous cytotoxic T lymphocyte-defined osteosarcoma antigen papillomavirus binding factor (PBF) in the context of HLA-B55 and the cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope (PBF A2.2) presented by HLA-A2. PBF and HLA class I are expressed in ∼90 and 70% of various sarcomas, respectively. However, the expression status of peptide PBF A2.2 presented by HLA-A2 on osteosarcoma cells has remained unknown because it is difficult to generate a specific probe that reacts with the HLA·peptide complex. For detection and qualification of the HLA-A*02:01·PBF A2.2 peptide complex on osteosarcoma cells, we tried to isolate a single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody directed to the HLA-*A0201·PBF A2.2 complex using a naïve scFv phage display library. As a result, scFv clone D12 with high affinity (KD = 1.53 × 10−9 m) was isolated. D12 could react with PBF A2.2 peptide-pulsed T2 cells and HLA-A2+PBF+ osteosarcoma cell lines and simultaneously demonstrated that the HLA·peptide complex was expressed on osteosarcoma cells. In conclusion, scFv clone D12 might be useful to select candidate patients for PBF A2.2 peptide-based immunotherapy and develop antibody-based immunotherapy. PMID:24962571

  15. Substrate binding and specificity of rhomboid intramembrane protease revealed by substrate–peptide complex structures

    PubMed Central

    Zoll, Sebastian; Stanchev, Stancho; Began, Jakub; Škerle, Jan; Lepšík, Martin; Peclinovská, Lucie; Majer, Pavel; Strisovsky, Kvido

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of intramembrane proteases are incompletely understood due to the lack of structural data on substrate complexes. To gain insight into substrate binding by rhomboid proteases, we have synthesised a series of novel peptidyl-chloromethylketone (CMK) inhibitors and analysed their interactions with Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG enzymologically and structurally. We show that peptidyl-CMKs derived from the natural rhomboid substrate TatA from bacterium Providencia stuartii bind GlpG in a substrate-like manner, and their co-crystal structures with GlpG reveal the S1 to S4 subsites of the protease. The S1 subsite is prominent and merges into the ‘water retention site’, suggesting intimate interplay between substrate binding, specificity and catalysis. Unexpectedly, the S4 subsite is plastically formed by residues of the L1 loop, an important but hitherto enigmatic feature of the rhomboid fold. We propose that the homologous region of members of the wider rhomboid-like protein superfamily may have similar substrate or client-protein binding function. Finally, using molecular dynamics, we generate a model of the Michaelis complex of the substrate bound in the active site of GlpG. PMID:25216680

  16. Site-specific DNA cleavage by artificial zinc finger-type nuclease with cerium-binding peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsukasa, Takako; Shiraishi, Yasuhisa; Negi, Shigeru; Imanishi, Miki; Futaki, Shiroh; Sugiura, Yukio . E-mail: sugiura@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2005-04-29

    The addition of a new function to native proteins is one of the most attractive protein-based designs. In this study, we have converted a C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-type zinc finger as a DNA-binding motif into a novel zinc finger-type nuclease by connecting two distinct zinc finger proteins (Sp1 and GLI) with a functional linker possessing DNA cleavage activity. As a DNA cleavage domain, we chose an analogue of the metal-binding loop (12 amino acid residues), peptide P1, which has been reported to exhibit a strong binding affinity for a lanthanide ion and DNA cleavage ability in the presence of Ce(IV). Our newly designed nucleases, Sp1(P1)GLI and Sp1(P1G)GLI, can strongly bind to a lanthanide ion and show a unique DNA cleavage pattern, in which certain positions between the two DNA-binding sites are specifically cleaved. The present result provides useful information for expanding the design strategy for artificial nucleases.

  17. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In all vertebrate animals, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are controlled by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules, which are highly polymorphic peptide receptors selecting and presenting endogenously derived epitopes to circulating cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTLs). The polymorp...

  18. Identification of CRISP2 from human sperm as PSP94-binding protein and generation of CRISP2-specific anti-peptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Anklesaria, Jenifer H; Kulkarni, Bhalchandra J; Pathak, Bhakti R; Mahale, Smita D

    2016-06-01

    Cysteine-rich secretory proteins (CRISPs) are mainly found in the mammalian male reproductive tract and reported to be involved at different stages of fertilization. CRISPs have been shown to interact with prostate secretory protein of 94 amino acids (PSP94) from diverse sources, and the binding of these evolutionarily conserved proteins across species is proposed to be of functional significance. Of the three mammalian CRISPs, PSP94-CRISP3 interaction is well characterized, and specific binding sites have been identified; whereas, CRISP2 has been shown to interact with PSP94 in vitro. Interestingly, human CRISP3 and CRISP2 proteins are closely related showing 71.4% identity. In this study, we identified CRISP2 as a potential binding protein of PSP94 from human sperm. Further, we generated antisera capable of specifically detecting CRISP2 and not CRISP3. In this direction, specific peptides corresponding to the least conserved ion channel regulatory region were synthesized, and polyclonal antibodies were generated against the peptide in rabbits. The binding characteristics of the anti-CRISP2 peptide antibody were evaluated using competitive ELISA. Immunoblotting experiments also confirmed that the peptide was able to generate antibodies capable of detecting the mature CRISP2 protein present in human sperm lysate. Furthermore, this anti-CRISP2 peptide antibody also detected the presence of native CRISP2 on sperm.Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27161017

  19. A heparin binding synthetic peptide from human HIP / RPL29 fails to specifically differentiate between anticoagulantly active and inactive species of heparin

    PubMed Central

    Hoke, David E; Carson, Daniel D; Höök, Magnus

    2003-01-01

    Despite extensive progress in determining structures within heparin and heparan sulfate (Hp/HS) and the discovery of numerous proteinaceous binding partners for Hp/HS so far; the only detailed characterization of a specific protein-glycosaminoglycan interaction is antithrombin III (ATIII) binding to a Hp pentasaccharide containing a unique 3-O-sulfated glucosamine residue. Previously, it was reported from our laboratories that a 16 amino acid synthetic peptide derived from the C-terminus of human HIP/RPL29 (HIP peptide-1) enriched for ATIII-dependent anticoagulant activity, presumably by specifically binding the ATIII pentasaccharide. Herein, we demonstrate that HIP peptide-1 cannot enrich ATIII-dependent anticoagulant activity from a starting pool of porcine intestinal mucosa Hp through a bio-specific interaction. However, a HIP peptide-1 column can be used to enrich for anticoagulantly active Hp from a diverse pool of glycosaminoglycans known as Hp byproducts by a mechanism of nonspecific charge interactions. Thus, HIP peptide-1 cannot recognize Hp via bio-specific interactions but binds glycosaminoglycans by non-specific charge interactions. PMID:12659638

  20. The Length Distribution of Class I-Restricted T Cell Epitopes Is Determined by Both Peptide Supply and MHC Allele-Specific Binding Preference.

    PubMed

    Trolle, Thomas; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Sidney, John; Bardet, Wilfried; Osborn, Sean C; Kaever, Thomas; Sette, Alessandro; Hildebrand, William H; Nielsen, Morten; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-02-15

    HLA class I-binding predictions are widely used to identify candidate peptide targets of human CD8(+) T cell responses. Many such approaches focus exclusively on a limited range of peptide lengths, typically 9 aa and sometimes 9-10 aa, despite multiple examples of dominant epitopes of other lengths. In this study, we examined whether epitope predictions can be improved by incorporating the natural length distribution of HLA class I ligands. We found that, although different HLA alleles have diverse length-binding preferences, the length profiles of ligands that are naturally presented by these alleles are much more homogeneous. We hypothesized that this is due to a defined length profile of peptides available for HLA binding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Based on this, we created a model of HLA allele-specific ligand length profiles and demonstrate how this model, in combination with HLA-binding predictions, greatly improves comprehensive identification of CD8(+) T cell epitopes. PMID:26783342

  1. Identification of specific calcitonin-like receptor residues important for calcitonin gene-related peptide high affinity binding

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sugato; Evanson, Janel; Harris, Erik; Lowe, Stephen L; Thomasson, Kathryn A; Porter, James E

    2006-01-01

    Background Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a vasoactive neuropeptide whose biological activity has potential therapeutic value for many vascular related diseases. CGRP is a 37 amino acid neuropeptide that signals through a G protein-coupled receptor belonging to the secretin receptor family. Previous studies on the calcitonin-like receptor (CLR), which requires co-expression of the receptor-activity-modifying protein-1 (RAMP1) to function as a CGRP receptor, have shown an 18 amino acid N-terminus sequence important for binding CGRP. Moreover, several investigations have recognized the C-terminal amidated phenylalanine (F37) of CGRP as essential for docking to the mature receptor. Therefore, we hypothesize that hydrophobic amino acids within the previously characterized 18 amino acid CLR N-terminus domain are important binding contacts for the C-terminal phenylalaninamide of CGRP. Results Two leucine residues within this previously characterized CLR N-terminus domain, when mutated to alanine and expressed on HEK293T cells stably transfected with RAMP1, demonstrated a significantly decreased binding affinity for CGRP compared to wild type receptor. Additional decreases in binding affinity for CGRP were not found when both leucine mutations were expressed in the same CLR construct. Decreased binding characteristic of these leucine mutant receptors was observed for all CGRP ligands tested that contained the necessary amidated phenylalanine at their C-terminus. However, there was no difference in the potency of CGRP to increase cAMP production by these leucine mutant receptors when compared to wild type CLR, consistent with the notion that the neuropeptide C-terminal F37 is important for docking but not activation of the receptor. This observation was conserved when modified CGRP ligands lacking the amidated F37 demonstrated similar potencies to generate cAMP at both wild type and mutant CLRs. Furthermore, these modified CGRP ligands displayed a significant

  2. Phage display allows identification of zona pellucida-binding peptides with species-specific properties: novel approach for development of contraceptive vaccines for wildlife.

    PubMed

    Samoylova, Tatiana I; Cochran, Anna M; Samoylov, Alexandre M; Schemera, Bettina; Breiteneicher, Adam H; Ditchkoff, Stephen S; Petrenko, Valery A; Cox, Nancy R

    2012-12-31

    Multiple phage-peptide constructs, where the peptides mimic sperm epitopes that bind to zona pellucida (ZP) proteins, were generated via selection from a phage display library using a novel approach. Selections were designed to allow for identification of ZP-binding phage clones with potential species-specific properties, an important feature for wildlife oral vaccines as the goal is to control overpopulation of a target species while not affecting non-target species' reproduction. Six phage-peptide antigens were injected intramuscularly into pigs and corresponding immune responses evaluated. Administration of the antigens into pigs stimulated production of anti-peptide antibodies, which were shown to act as anti-sperm antibodies. Potentially, such anti-sperm antibodies could interfere with sperm delivery or function in the male or female genital tract, leading to contraceptive effects. Staining of semen samples collected from different mammalian species, including pig, cat, dog, bull, and mouse, with anti-sera from pigs immunized with ZP-binding phage allowed identification of phage-peptide constructs with different levels of species specificity. Based on the intensity of the immune responses and specificity of these responses in different species, two of the antigens with fusion peptide sequences GEGGYGSHD and GQQGLNGDS were recognized as the most promising candidates for development of contraceptive vaccines for wild pigs. PMID:23079080

  3. pH-dependence of the specific binding of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions to the amyloid-β peptide.

    PubMed

    Ghalebani, Leila; Wahlström, Anna; Danielsson, Jens; Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S; Gräslund, Astrid

    2012-05-11

    Metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) are accumulated in Alzheimer's disease amyloid plaques. The amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide involved in the disease interacts with these metal ions at neutral pH via ligands provided by the N-terminal histidines and the N-terminus. The present study uses high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to monitor the residue-specific interactions of Cu(II) and Zn(II) with (15)N- and (13)C,(15)N-labeled Aβ(1-40) peptides at varying pH levels. At pH 7.4 both ions bind to the specific ligands, competing with one another. At pH 5.5 Cu(II) retains its specific histidine ligands, while Zn(II) seems to lack residue-specific interactions. The low pH mimics acidosis which is linked to inflammatory processes in vivo. The results suggest that the cell toxic effects of redox active Cu(II) binding to Aβ may be reversed by the protective activity of non-redox active Zn(II) binding to the same major binding site under non-acidic conditions. Under acidic conditions, the protective effect of Zn(II) may be decreased or changed, since Zn(II) is less able to compete with Cu(II) for the specific binding site on the Aβ peptide under these conditions. PMID:22525674

  4. pH-dependence of the specific binding of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions to the amyloid-{beta} peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Ghalebani, Leila; Wahlstroem, Anna; Danielsson, Jens; Waermlaender, Sebastian K.T.S.; Graeslund, Astrid

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cu(II) and Zn(II) display pH-dependent binding to the A{beta}(1-40) peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 7.4 both metal ions display residue-specific binding to the A{beta} peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 5.5 the binding specificity is lost for Zn(II). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential Cu(II) and Zn(II) binding may help explain metal-induced AD toxicity. -- Abstract: Metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) are accumulated in Alzheimer's disease amyloid plaques. The amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide involved in the disease interacts with these metal ions at neutral pH via ligands provided by the N-terminal histidines and the N-terminus. The present study uses high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to monitor the residue-specific interactions of Cu(II) and Zn(II) with {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled A{beta}(1-40) peptides at varying pH levels. At pH 7.4 both ions bind to the specific ligands, competing with one another. At pH 5.5 Cu(II) retains its specific histidine ligands, while Zn(II) seems to lack residue-specific interactions. The low pH mimics acidosis which is linked to inflammatory processes in vivo. The results suggest that the cell toxic effects of redox active Cu(II) binding to A{beta} may be reversed by the protective activity of non-redox active Zn(II) binding to the same major binding site under non-acidic conditions. Under acidic conditions, the protective effect of Zn(II) may be decreased or changed, since Zn(II) is less able to compete with Cu(II) for the specific binding site on the A{beta} peptide under these conditions.

  5. Substance P antagonist also inhibits specific binding and mitogenic effects of vasopressin and bombesin-related peptides in Swiss 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zachary, I.; Rozengurt, E.

    1986-05-29

    While vasopressin and peptides of the bombesin family bind to different receptors in quiescent Swiss 3T3 cells, the antagonist (D-Arg/sup 1/,D-Pro/sup 2/,D-Trp/sup 7,9/,Leu/sup 11/) substance P blocks the specific binding of both (/sup 3/H) vasopressin and /sup 125/I-gastrin-releasing peptide to these cells. In addition, the antagonist inhibits the mobilization of Ca/sup 2 +/ and induction of DNA synthesis by vasopressin. These results indicate that (D-Arg/sup 1/,D-Pro,D-Trp/sup 7,9/,Leu/sup 11/) substance P has the ability to interact with the receptors for three structurally unrelated peptide hormones.

  6. A small single-"finger" peptide from the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1 binds specifically to DNA as a zinc or iron complex.

    PubMed

    Omichinski, J G; Trainor, C; Evans, T; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M; Felsenfeld, G

    1993-03-01

    Sequence-specific DNA binding has been demonstrated for a synthetic peptide comprising only one of the two "finger"-like domains of the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1 (also termed Eryf-1, NF-E1, or GF-1). Quantitative analysis of gel-retardation assays yields a specific association constant of 1.2 x 10(8) M, compared with values of about 10(9) M for the full-length natural GATA-1 protein. By the use of peptides of various lengths, it was possible to delineate the smallest region necessary for specific binding. A single C-terminal finger of the double-finger motif is necessary but not sufficient for sequence-specific interaction. Basic amino acids located C-terminal to the finger (some more than 20 amino acids away) are also essential for tight binding. In addition to demonstrating that zinc is important for the formation of an active binding complex, we show that other ions, notably Fe2+, can fulfill this role. Our results make it clear that the GATA-1 metal binding motif is quite distinct from that found in the steroid hormone family and that GATA-1 is a member of a separate class of DNA binding proteins. PMID:8446581

  7. The SKW 6.4 line of human B lymphocytes specifically binds and responds to vasoactive intestinal peptide.

    PubMed

    Cheng, P P; Sreedharan, S P; Kishiyama, J L; Goetzl, E J

    1993-05-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP1-28) is a neuromediator recognized by high-affinity receptors on human lymphocytes, which inhibits T-cell proliferation and cytokine secretion, and suppresses immunoglobulin production by mitogen-stimulated mixed mononuclear leucocytes. The direct interactions of VIP1-28 with B cells were studied in the SKW 6.4 line of EBV-transformed human B cells, that express a mean (+/- SD) of 6116 +/- 969 receptors for [125I]VIP1-28 with a mean Kd of 59 nM, that decreases to 12 nM after exposure to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The secretion of IgM by SKW 6.4 B cells stimulated optimally with 100 ng/ml of PMA, but not unstimulated secretion of IgM, was suppressed significantly by 10(-12) M to 10(-9) M VIP1-28 and up to a mean maximum (+/- SD) of 40 +/- 2% by 10(-10) M VIP1-28. VIP1-28 elicited concomitant increases in intracellular cyclic AMP up to a mean maximum of 163% at 10(-10) M VIP1-28. The requirement for specific signal transduction by the occupied VIP receptors to inhibit IgM secretion was demonstrated by the lack of effect of VIP4-28 on both cyclic AMP concentration and IgM secretion, despite the equal affinity of binding of VIP4-28 and VIP1-28. The effects of VIP on immunoglobulin secretion by stimulated mixed mononuclear leucocytes thus may be due in part to a direct action on B cells. PMID:8509142

  8. The SKW 6.4 line of human B lymphocytes specifically binds and responds to vasoactive intestinal peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, P P; Sreedharan, S P; Kishiyama, J L; Goetzl, E J

    1993-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP1-28) is a neuromediator recognized by high-affinity receptors on human lymphocytes, which inhibits T-cell proliferation and cytokine secretion, and suppresses immunoglobulin production by mitogen-stimulated mixed mononuclear leucocytes. The direct interactions of VIP1-28 with B cells were studied in the SKW 6.4 line of EBV-transformed human B cells, that express a mean (+/- SD) of 6116 +/- 969 receptors for [125I]VIP1-28 with a mean Kd of 59 nM, that decreases to 12 nM after exposure to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The secretion of IgM by SKW 6.4 B cells stimulated optimally with 100 ng/ml of PMA, but not unstimulated secretion of IgM, was suppressed significantly by 10(-12) M to 10(-9) M VIP1-28 and up to a mean maximum (+/- SD) of 40 +/- 2% by 10(-10) M VIP1-28. VIP1-28 elicited concomitant increases in intracellular cyclic AMP up to a mean maximum of 163% at 10(-10) M VIP1-28. The requirement for specific signal transduction by the occupied VIP receptors to inhibit IgM secretion was demonstrated by the lack of effect of VIP4-28 on both cyclic AMP concentration and IgM secretion, despite the equal affinity of binding of VIP4-28 and VIP1-28. The effects of VIP on immunoglobulin secretion by stimulated mixed mononuclear leucocytes thus may be due in part to a direct action on B cells. PMID:8509142

  9. Bovine serum albumin as a universal suppressor of non-specific peptide binding in vials prior to nano-chromatography coupled mass-spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Sergey I; Anikanov, Nikolay A; Ivanova, Olga M; Ziganshin, Rustam H; Govorun, Vadim M

    2015-09-17

    Non-specific binding (NSB) is a well-known problem for any application that deals with ultralow analyte quantities. The modern nano-flow chromatography coupled tandem mass-spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS) works with the lowest conceivable analyte concentrations. However, while the NSB problem is widely accepted and investigated for metabolomics and single-peptide medicine-related assays, its impact is not studied for complex peptide mixtures in proteomic applications. In this work peptide NSB to a common plastic autosampler vial was studied for a model mixture of 46 synthetic peptides. A significant NSB level was demonstrated for total peptide concentrations of up to 1 mg mL(-1). Different agents were tried for NSB suppression and compatibility with nanoLC-MS/MS analysis: a chaotropic agent, an amino acid mixture, a peptide mixture and a protein solution. The first two were inefficacious. The peptide matrix blocked NSB, however, it also led to analyte ionization suppression in nanoLC-MS/MS. The protein solution (0.1% BSA) efficiently eliminated NSB, while a trap-elute nanoHPLC configuration together with a small-pore reverse-phased sorbent effectively and quantitatively extracted the model peptides and depleted protein material from the sample. Higher protein concentration partially impeded peptide extraction. Thus, the 0.1% BSA solution might be regarded as an effective non-interfering blockader of NSB for sample resuspension and storage in an autosampler prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. PMID:26398423

  10. Expression of the mouse MHC class Ib H2-T11 gene product, a paralog of H2-T23 (Qa-1) with shared peptide-binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lili; Reyes-Vargas, Eduardo; Dai, Hu; Escobar, Hernando; Rudd, Brant; Fairbanks, Jared; Ho, Alexander; Cusick, Mathew F; Kumánovics, Attila; Delgado, Julio; He, Xiao; Jensen, Peter E

    2014-08-01

    The mouse MHC class Ib gene H2-T11 is 95% identical at the DNA level to H2-T23, which encodes Qa-1, one of the most studied MHC class Ib molecules. H2-T11 mRNA was observed to be expressed widely in tissues of C57BL/6 mice, with the highest levels in thymus. To circumvent the availability of a specific mAb, cells were transduced with cDNA encoding T11 with a substituted α3 domain. Hybrid T11D3 protein was expressed at high levels similar to control T23D3 molecules on the surface of both TAP(+) and TAP(-) cells. Soluble T11D3 was generated by folding in vitro with Qa-1 determinant modifier, the dominant peptide presented by Qa-1. The circular dichroism spectrum of this protein was similar to that of other MHC class I molecules, and it was observed to bind labeled Qa-1 determinant modifier peptide with rapid kinetics. By contrast to the Qa-1 control, T11 tetramers did not react with cells expressing CD94/NKG2A, supporting the conclusion that T11 cannot replace Qa-1 as a ligand for NK cell inhibitory receptors. T11 also failed to substitute for Qa-1 in the presentation of insulin to a Qa-1-restricted T cell hybridoma. Despite divergent function, T11 was observed to share peptide-loading specificity with Qa-1. Direct analysis by tandem mass spectrometry of peptides eluted from T11D3 and T23D3 isolated from Hela cells demonstrated a diversity of peptides with a clear motif that was shared between the two molecules. Thus, T11 is a paralog of T23 encoding an MHC class Ib molecule that shares peptide-binding specificity with Qa-1 but differs in function. PMID:24958902

  11. Screening peptide array library for the identification of cancer cell-binding peptides.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kamaljit; Ahmed, Sahar; Soudy, Rania; Azmi, Sarfuddin

    2015-01-01

    The identification of cancer cell-specific ligands is a key requirement for the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents. Usually phage display system is employed to discover cancer-specific peptides through a biopanning process. Synthetic peptide array libraries can be used as a complementary method to phage display for screening and identifying cancer cell-specific ligands. Here, we describe a peptide array-whole cell binding assay to identify cancer cell-specific peptides. A peptide array library based on a lead dodecapeptide, p160, is synthesized on a functionalized cellulose membrane using solid phase chemistry and a robotic synthesizer. The relative binding affinity of the peptide library is evaluated by incubating the library with fluorescently labeled cancerous or non-cancerous cells. Thereby the assay allows picking peptides that show selective and high binding to cancerous cells. These peptides represent potential candidates for use in cancer-targeted drug delivery, imaging, and diagnosis. PMID:25616337

  12. A Structural Study of Norovirus 3C Protease Specificity: Binding of a Designed Active Site-Directed Peptide Inhibitor†

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses are the major cause of human epidemic nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a 3C cysteine protease that cleaves a 200 kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional proteins. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the Southampton norovirus 3C protease (SV3CP) bound to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor (MAPI) which has been refined at 1.7 Å resolution. The inhibitor, acetyl-Glu-Phe-Gln-Leu-Gln-X, which is based on the most rapidly cleaved recognition sequence in the 200 kDa polyprotein substrate, reacts covalently through its propenyl ethyl ester group (X) with the active site nucleophile, Cys 139. The structure permits, for the first time, the identification of substrate recognition and binding groups in a noroviral 3C protease and thus provides important new information for the development of antiviral prophylactics. PMID:21128685

  13. Peptide Binding for Bio-Based Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Bedford, N M; Munro, C J; Knecht, M R

    2016-01-01

    Peptide-based strategies represent transformative approaches to fabricate functional inorganic materials under sustainable conditions by modeling the methods exploited in biology. In general, peptides with inorganic affinity and specificity have been isolated from organisms and through biocombinatorial selection techniques (ie, phage and cell surface display). These peptides recognize and bind the inorganic surface through a series of noncovalent interactions, driven by both enthalpic and entropic contributions, wherein the biomolecules wrap the metallic nanoparticle structure. Through these interactions, modification of the inorganic surface can be accessed to drive the incorporation of significantly disordered surface metal atoms, which have been found to be highly catalytically active for a variety of chemical transformations. We have employed synthetic, site-directed mutagenesis studies to reveal localized binding effects of the peptide at the metallic nanoparticle structure to begin to identify the biological basis of control over biomimetic nanoparticle catalytic activity. The protocols described herein were used to fabricate and characterize peptide-capped nanoparticles in atomic resolution to identify peptide sequence effects on the surface structure of the materials, which can then be directly correlated to the catalytic activity to identify structure/function relationships. PMID:27586350

  14. Peptides of presenilin-1 bind the amyloid precursor protein ectodomain and offer a novel and specific therapeutic approach to reduce ß-amyloid in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Dewji, Nazneen N; Singer, S Jonathan; Masliah, Eliezer; Rockenstein, Edward; Kim, Mihyun; Harber, Martha; Horwood, Taylor

    2015-01-01

    β-Amyloid (Aβ) accumulation in the brain is widely accepted to be critical to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Current efforts at reducing toxic Aβ40 or 42 have largely focused on modulating γ-secretase activity to produce shorter, less toxic Aβ, while attempting to spare other secretase functions. In this paper we provide data that offer the potential for a new approach for the treatment of AD. The method is based on our previous findings that the production of Aβ from the interaction between the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Presenilin (PS), as part of the γ-secretase complex, in cell culture is largely inhibited if the entire water-soluble NH2-terminal domain of PS is first added to the culture. Here we demonstrate that two small, non-overlapping water-soluble peptides from the PS-1 NH2-terminal domain can substantially and specifically inhibit the production of total Aβ as well as Aβ40 and 42 in vitro and in vivo in the brains of APP transgenic mice. These results suggest that the inhibitory activity of the entire amino terminal domain of PS-1 on Aβ production is largely focused in a few smaller sequences within that domain. Using biolayer interferometry and confocal microscopy we provide evidence that peptides effective in reducing Aβ give a strong, specific and biologically relevant binding with the purified ectodomain of APP 695. Finally, we demonstrate that the reduction of Aβ by the peptides does not affect the catalytic activities of β- or γ-secretase, or the level of APP. P4 and P8 are the first reported protein site-specific small peptides to reduce Aβ production in model systems of AD. These peptides and their derivatives offer new potential drug candidates for the treatment of AD. PMID:25923432

  15. Floating gate memory with charge storage dots array formed by Dps protein modified with site-specific binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamitake, Hiroki; Uenuma, Mutsunori; Okamoto, Naofumi; Horita, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Yamashita, Ichro; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2015-05-01

    We report a nanodot (ND) floating gate memory (NFGM) with a high-density ND array formed by a biological nano process. We utilized two kinds of cage-shaped proteins displaying SiO2 binding peptide (minTBP-1) on their outer surfaces: ferritin and Dps, which accommodate cobalt oxide NDs in their cavities. The diameters of the cobalt NDs were regulated by the cavity sizes of the proteins. Because minTBP-1 is strongly adsorbed on the SiO2 surface, high-density cobalt oxide ND arrays were obtained by a simple spin coating process. The densities of cobalt oxide ND arrays based on ferritin and Dps were 6.8 × 1011 dots cm-2 and 1.2 × 1012 dots cm-2, respectively. After selective protein elimination and embedding in a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor, the charge capacities of both ND arrays were evaluated by measuring their C-V characteristics. The MOS capacitor embedded with the Dps ND array showed a wider memory window than the device embedded with the ferritin ND array. Finally, we fabricated an NFGM with a high-density ND array based on Dps, and confirmed its competent writing/erasing characteristics and long retention time.

  16. Human IgA-binding Peptides Selected from Random Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Hatanaka, Takaaki; Ohzono, Shinji; Park, Mirae; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Tsukamoto, Shogo; Sugita, Ryohei; Ishitobi, Hiroyuki; Mori, Toshiyuki; Ito, Osamu; Sorajo, Koichi; Sugimura, Kazuhisa; Ham, Sihyun; Ito, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Phage display system is a powerful tool to design specific ligands for target molecules. Here, we used disulfide-constrained random peptide libraries constructed with the T7 phage display system to isolate peptides specific to human IgA. The binding clones (A1–A4) isolated by biopanning exhibited clear specificity to human IgA, but the synthetic peptide derived from the A2 clone exhibited a low specificity/affinity (Kd = 1.3 μm). Therefore, we tried to improve the peptide using a partial randomized phage display library and mutational studies on the synthetic peptides. The designed Opt-1 peptide exhibited a 39-fold higher affinity (Kd = 33 nm) than the A2 peptide. An Opt-1 peptide-conjugated column was used to purify IgA from human plasma. However, the recovered IgA fraction was contaminated with other proteins, indicating nonspecific binding. To design a peptide with increased binding specificity, we examined the structural features of Opt-1 and the Opt-1-IgA complex using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water. The simulation results revealed that the Opt-1 peptide displayed partial helicity in the N-terminal region and possessed a hydrophobic cluster that played a significant role in tight binding with IgA-Fc. However, these hydrophobic residues of Opt-1 may contribute to nonspecific binding with other proteins. To increase binding specificity, we introduced several mutations in the hydrophobic residues of Opt-1. The resultant Opt-3 peptide exhibited high specificity and high binding affinity for IgA, leading to successful isolation of IgA without contamination. PMID:23076147

  17. Characterization of the peptide binding specificity of the HLA class I alleles B*38:01 and B*39:06.

    PubMed

    Sidney, John; Schloss, Jennifer; Moore, Carrie; Lindvall, Mikaela; Wriston, Amanda; Hunt, Donald F; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; DiLorenzo, Teresa P; Sette, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    B*38:01 and B*39:06 are present with phenotypic frequencies <2% in the general population, but are of interest as B*39:06 is the B allele most associated with type 1 diabetes susceptibility and 38:01 is most protective. A previous study derived putative main anchor motifs for both alleles based on peptide elution data. The present study has utilized panels of single amino acid substitution peptide libraries to derive detailed quantitative motifs accounting for both primary and secondary influences on peptide binding. From these analyses, both alleles were confirmed to utilize the canonical position 2/C-terminus main anchor spacing. B*38:01 preferentially bound peptides with the positively charged or polar residues H, R, and Q in position 2 and the large hydrophobic residues I, F, L, W, and M at the C-terminus. B*39:06 had a similar preference for R in position 2, but also well-tolerated M, Q, and K. A more dramatic contrast between the two alleles was noted at the C-terminus, where the specificity of B*39:06 was clearly for small residues, with A as most preferred, followed by G, V, S, T, and I. Detailed position-by-position and residue-by-residue coefficient values were generated from the panels to provide detailed quantitative B*38:01 and B*39:06 motifs. It is hoped that these detailed motifs will facilitate the identification of T cell epitopes recognized in the context of two class I alleles associated with dramatically different dispositions towards type 1 diabetes, offering potential avenues for the investigation of the role of CD8 T cells in this disease. PMID:26754738

  18. Identification of peptides that bind to irradiated pancreatic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Canhui; Liu, Xiang Y.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Lawrence, Theodore S. . E-mail: tsl@med.umich.edu

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: Peptides targeting tumor vascular cells or tumor cells themselves have the potential to be used as vectors for delivering either DNA in gene therapy or antitumor agents in chemotherapy. We wished to determine if peptides identified by phage display could be used to target irradiated pancreatic cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Irradiated Capan-2 cells were incubated with 5 x 10{sup 12} plaque-forming units of a phage display library. Internalized phage were recovered and absorbed against unirradiated cells. After five such cycles of enrichment, the recovered phage were subjected to DNA sequencing analysis and synthetic peptides made. The binding of both phage and synthetic peptides was evaluated by fluorescence staining and flow cytometry in vitro and in vivo. Results: We identified one 12-mer peptide (PA1) that binds to irradiated Capan-2 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells but not to unirradiated cells. The binding of peptide was significant after 48 h incubation with cells. In vivo experiments with Capan-2 xenografts in nude mice demonstrated that these small peptides are able to penetrate tumor tissue after intravenous injections and bind specifically to irradiated tumor cells. Conclusion: These data suggest that peptides can be identified that target tumors with radiation-induced cell markers and may be clinically useful.

  19. An extended CCR5-ECL2 peptide forms a helix that binds HIV-1 gp120 through non-specific hydrophobic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Naama; Arshava, Boris; Naider, Fred; Scherf, Tali; Anglister, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 serves as a co-receptor for the Human Immunodefficiency Virus type-1, HIV-1. The CCR5 N-terminal segment, the second extracellular loop (ECL2) and the transmembrane helices have been implicated in binding the envelope glycoprotein gp120. Peptides corresponding to the sequence of the putative ECL2 as well as peptides containing the ECL1 and ECL3 were found to inhibit HIV-1 infection. The aromatic residues in the C-terminal half of an ECL2 peptide were shown to interact with gp120. In the present study we determined that in aqueous buffer the segment Q188-Q194 in an elongated ECL2 peptide (R168 to K197) forms an amphiphilic helix, which corresponds to the beginning of the fifth transmembrane helix in the crystal structure of CCR5. Two dimensional Saturation Transfer Difference NMR spectroscopy and dynamic filtering studies revealed the involvement of Y187, F189, W190 and F193 of the helical segment, in the interaction with gp120. The crystal structure of CCR5 shows that the aromatic side chains of F189, W190 and F193 point away from the binding pocket and interact with the membrane or with an adjacent CCR5 molecule and therefore, could not interact with gp120 in the intact CCR5 receptor. We conclude that these three aromatic residues of ECL2 peptides interact with gp120 through hydrophobic interactions not representative of the interactions of the intact CCR5 receptor. The HIV-1 inhibition by ECL2 peptides as well as by ECL1 and ECL3 peptides and peptides corresponding to ECL2 of CXCR4, which serves as an alternative HIV-1 co-receptor, suggests that there is a hydrophobic surface in the envelope spike that could be a target for HIV-1 entry inhibitors. PMID:25703038

  20. Secretin: specific binding to rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Jensen, R.T.; Charlton, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; O'Donohue, T.L.; Moody, T.W.

    1983-08-01

    The binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin to rat brain membranes was investigated. Radiolabeled secretin bound with high affinity (KD . 0.2 nM) to a single class of noninteracting sites. Binding was specific, saturable, and reversible. Regional distribution studies indicated that the specific binding was greatest in the cerebellum, intermediate in the cortex, thalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus, and lowest in the midbrain and medulla/pons. Pharmacological studies indicated that only secretin, but not other peptides, inhibits binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin with high affinity. Also, certain guanine nucleotides inhibited high affinity binding. These data indicate that rat brain membranes possess high affinity binding sites specific for secretin and that with the use of (/sup 125/I) secretin the kinetics, stoichiometry, specificity, and distribution of secretin receptors can be directly investigated.

  1. Peptide Arrays for Binding Studies of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases.

    PubMed

    Klecker, Maria; Dissmeyer, Nico

    2016-01-01

    The automated SPOT (synthetic peptide arrays on membrane support technique) synthesis technology has entrenched as a rapid and robust method to generate peptide libraries on cellulose membrane supports. The synthesis method is based on conventional Fmoc chemistry building up peptides with free N-terminal amino acids starting at their cellulose-coupled C-termini. Several hundreds of peptide sequences can be assembled with this technique on one membrane comprising a strong binding potential due to high local peptide concentrations. Peptide orientation on SPOT membranes qualifies this array type for assaying substrate specificities of N-recognins, the recognition elements of the N-end rule pathway of targeted protein degradation (NERD). Pioneer studies described binding capability of mammalian and yeast enzymes depending on a peptide's N-terminus. SPOT arrays have been successfully used to describe substrate specificity of N-recognins which are the recognition elements of the N-end rule pathway of targeted protein degradation (NERD). Here, we describe the implementation of SPOT binding assays with focus on the identification of N-recognin substrates, applicable also for plant NERD enzymes. PMID:27424747

  2. Crystallographic Recognition Controls Peptide Binding for Bio-Based Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    R Coppage; J Slocik; B Briggs; A Frenkel; H Heinz; R Naik; M Knecht

    2011-12-31

    The ability to control the size, shape, composition, and activity of nanomaterials presents a formidable challenge. Peptide approaches represent new avenues to achieve such control at the synthetic level; however, the critical interactions at the bio/nano interface that direct such precision remain poorly understood. Here we present evidence to suggest that materials-directing peptides bind at specific time points during Pd nanoparticle (NP) growth, dictated by material crystallinity. As such surfaces are presented, rapid peptide binding occurs, resulting in the stabilization and size control of single-crystal NPs. Such specificity suggests that peptides could be engineered to direct the structure of nanomaterials at the atomic level, thus enhancing their activity.

  3. Targeting Species-Specific Low-Affinity 16S rRNA Binding Sites by Using Peptide Nucleic Acids for Detection of Legionellae in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Wilks, Sandra A.; Keevil, C. William

    2006-01-01

    Using fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect bacterial groups has several inherent limitations. DNA probes are generally used, targeting sites on the 16S rRNA. However, much of the 16S rRNA is highly conserved, with variable regions often located in inaccessible areas where secondary structures can restrict probe access. Here, we describe the use of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes as a superior alternative to DNA probes, especially when used for environmental samples. A complex bacterial genus (Legionella) was studied, and two probes were designed, one to detect all species and one targeted to Legionella pneumophila. These probes were developed from existing sequences and are targeted to low-binding-affinity sites on the 16S rRNA. In total, 47 strains of Legionella were tested. In all cases, the Legionella spp. PNA probe labeled cells strongly but did not bind to any non-Legionella species. Likewise, the specific L. pneumophila PNA probe labeled only strains of L. pneumophila. By contrast, the equivalent DNA probes performed poorly. To assess the applicability of this method for use on environmental samples, drinking-water biofilms were spiked with a known concentration of L. pneumophila bacteria. Quantifications of the L. pneumophila bacteria were compared using PNA hybridization and standard culture methods. The culture method quantified only 10% of the number of L. pneumophila bacteria found by PNA hybridization. This illustrates the value of this method for use on complex environmental samples, especially where cells may be in a viable but noncultivable state. PMID:16885298

  4. Peptide binding at the GLP-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Mann, R; Nasr, N; Hadden, D; Sinfield, J; Abidi, F; Al-Sabah, S; de Maturana, R López; Treece-Birch, J; Willshaw, A; Donnelly, D

    2007-08-01

    The receptor for GLP-1 [glucagon-like peptide-1-(7-36)-amide] is a member of the 'Family B' of GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) comprising an extracellular N-terminal domain containing six conserved cysteine residues (the N-domain) and a core domain (or J-domain) comprising the seven transmembrane helices and interconnecting loop regions. According to the two-domain model for peptide binding, the N-domain is primarily responsible for providing most of the peptide binding energy, whereas the core domain is responsible for binding the N-terminal region of the peptide agonists and transmitting the signal to the intracellular G-protein. Two interesting differences between the binding properties of two GLP-1 receptor agonists, GLP-1 and EX-4 (exendin-4), can be observed. First, while GLP-1 requires its full length to maintain high affinity, the eight N-terminal residues of EX-4 can be removed with little reduction in affinity. Secondly, EX-4 (but not GLP-1) can bind to the fully isolated N-domain of the receptor with an affinity matching that of the full-length receptor. In order to better understand these differences, we have studied the interaction between combinations of full-length or truncated ligands with full-length or truncated receptors. PMID:17635131

  5. Predicting binding within disordered protein regions to structurally characterised peptide-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Khan, Waqasuddin; Duffy, Fergal; Pollastri, Gianluca; Shields, Denis C; Mooney, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Disordered regions of proteins often bind to structured domains, mediating interactions within and between proteins. However, it is difficult to identify a priori the short disordered regions involved in binding. We set out to determine if docking such peptide regions to peptide binding domains would assist in these predictions.We assembled a redundancy reduced dataset of SLiM (Short Linear Motif) containing proteins from the ELM database. We selected 84 sequences which had an associated PDB structures showing the SLiM bound to a protein receptor, where the SLiM was found within a 50 residue region of the protein sequence which was predicted to be disordered. First, we investigated the Vina docking scores of overlapping tripeptides from the 50 residue SLiM containing disordered regions of the protein sequence to the corresponding PDB domain. We found only weak discrimination of docking scores between peptides involved in binding and adjacent non-binding peptides in this context (AUC 0.58).Next, we trained a bidirectional recurrent neural network (BRNN) using as input the protein sequence, predicted secondary structure, Vina docking score and predicted disorder score. The results were very promising (AUC 0.72) showing that multiple sources of information can be combined to produce results which are clearly superior to any single source.We conclude that the Vina docking score alone has only modest power to define the location of a peptide within a larger protein region known to contain it. However, combining this information with other knowledge (using machine learning methods) clearly improves the identification of peptide binding regions within a protein sequence. This approach combining docking with machine learning is primarily a predictor of binding to peptide-binding sites, and is not intended as a predictor of specificity of binding to particular receptors. PMID:24019881

  6. Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide binds to the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Douglas G. . E-mail: Douglas.G.Johns@gsk.com; Ao, Zhaohui; Heidrich, Bradley J.; Hunsberger, Gerald E.; Graham, Taylor; Payne, Lisa; Elshourbagy, Nabil; Lu, Quinn; Aiyar, Nambi; Douglas, Stephen A.

    2007-06-22

    Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP) is a newly-described natriuretic peptide which lowers blood pressure via vasodilation. The natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C) removes natriuretic peptides from the circulation, but whether DNP interacts with human NPR-C directly is unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that DNP binds to NPR-C. ANP, BNP, CNP, and the NPR-C ligands AP-811 and cANP(4-23) displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with pM-to-nM K {sub i} values. DNP displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with nM potency, which represents the first direct demonstration of binding of DNP to human NPR-C. DNP showed high pM affinity for the GC-A receptor and no affinity for GC-B (K {sub i} > 1000 nM). DNP was nearly 10-fold more potent than ANP at stimulating cGMP production in GC-A expressing cells. Blockade of NPR-C might represent a novel therapeutic approach in augmenting the known beneficial actions of DNP in cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and heart failure.

  7. Calcium Carbonate Formation by Genetically Engineered Inorganic Binding Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresswell, Carolyn Gayle

    Understanding how organisms are capable of forming (synthesize, crystallize, and organize) solid minerals into complex architectures has been a fundamental question of biomimetic materials chemistry and biomineralization for decades. This study utilizes short peptides selected using a cell surface display library for the specific polymorphs of calcium carbonate, i.e., aragonite and calcite, to identify two sets of sequences which can then be used to examine their effects in the formation, crystal structure, morphology of the CaCO3 minerals. A procedure of counter selection, along with fluorescence microscopy (FM) characterization, was adapted to insure that the sequences on the cells were specific to their respective substrate, i.e., aragonite or calcite. From the resulting two sets of sequences selected, five distinct strong binders were identified with a variety of biochemical characteristics and synthesized for further study. Protein derived peptides, using the known sequences of the proteins that are associated with calcite or aragonite, were also designed using a bioinformatics-based similarity analysis of the two sets of binders. In particular, an aragonite binding protein segment, AP7, a protein found in nacre, was chosen for this design and the resulting effects of the designed peptides and the AP7 were examined. Specifically, the binding affinities of the selected and the protein derived peptides off the cells were then tested using FM; these studies resulted in different binding characteristics of the synthesized and cellular bound peptides. Two of the peptides that displayed strong binding on the cells bound to neither of the CaCO 3 substrates and both the high and low similarity protein-derived peptides bound to both polymorphs. However, two of the peptides were found to only bind to their respective polymorph showing; these results are significant in that with this study it is demonstrated that the designed peptides based on experimental library

  8. Unusual features of Self-Peptide/MHC Binding by Autoimmune T Cell Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson,M.; Hahn, M.; Wucherpfennig, K.

    2005-01-01

    Structural studies on T cell receptors (TCRs) specific for foreign antigens demonstrated a remarkably similar topology characterized by a central, diagonal TCR binding mode that maximizes interactions with the MHC bound peptide. However, three recent structures involving autoimmune TCRs demonstrated unusual interactions with self-peptide/MHC complexes. Two TCRs from multiple sclerosis patients bind with unconventional topologies, and both TCRs are shifted toward the peptide N terminus and the MHC class II {beta} chain helix. A TCR from the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model binds in a conventional orientation, but the structure is unusual because the self-peptide only partially fills the binding site. For all three TCRs, interaction with the MHC bound self-peptide is suboptimal, and only two or three TCR loops contact the peptide. Optimal TCR binding modes confer a competitive advantage for antimicrobial T cells during an infection, whereas altered binding properties may permit survival of a subset of autoreactive T cells during thymic selection.

  9. Peptide binding to a bacterial signal peptidase visualized by peptide tethering and carrier-driven crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Yi Tian; Harris, Paul W. R.; Batot, Gaelle; Brimble, Margaret A.; Baker, Edward N.; Young, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial type I signal peptidases (SPases) are membrane-anchored serine proteases that process the signal peptides of proteins exported via the Sec and Tat secretion systems. Despite their crucial importance for bacterial virulence and their attractiveness as drug targets, only one such enzyme, LepB from Escherichia coli, has been structurally characterized, and the transient nature of peptide binding has stymied attempts to directly visualize SPase–substrate complexes. Here, the crystal structure of SpsB, the type I signal peptidase from the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, is reported, and a peptide-tethering strategy that exploits the use of carrier-driven crystallization is described. This enabled the determination of the crystal structures of three SpsB–peptide complexes, both with cleavable substrates and with an inhibitory peptide. SpsB–peptide interactions in these complexes are almost exclusively limited to the canonical signal-peptide motif Ala-X-Ala, for which clear specificity pockets are found. Minimal contacts are made outside this core, with the variable side chains of the peptides accommodated in shallow grooves or exposed faces. These results illustrate how high fidelity is retained despite broad sequence diversity, in a process that is vital for cell survival. PMID:26870377

  10. Inhibitory effect of midkine-binding peptide on tumor proliferation and migration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui-Lian; Shen, Jian-Fen; Min, Li-Shan; Ping, Jin-Liang; Lu, Yong-Liang; Dai, Li-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: To investigate the inhibitory effect of midkine-binding peptides on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) proliferation and angiogenesis of xenograft tumor. Methods: The midkine-binding peptides were panned by Ph.D.-7™ Phage Display Peptide Library Kit, and the specific binding activities of positive clones to target protein were examined by phage ELISA. The effect of midkine-binding peptides on proliferation of HUVECs was confirmed by MTT test. The xenograft tumor model was formed in BALB/c mice with the murine hepatocarcinoma cells H22 (H22). Microvessel density (MVD) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry of factor VIII staining. Results: Midkine-binding peptides have the inhibitory effects on tumor angiogenesis, a proliferation assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) indicated that particular midkine-binding peptides significantly inhibited the proliferation of the HUVECs. Midkine-binding peptides were also observed to efficiently suppress angiogenesis induced by murine hepatocarcinoma H22 cells in BALB/c nude mice. Conclusion: The midkine-binding peptides can inhibit solid tumor growth by retarding the formation of new blood vessels. The results indicate that midkine-binding peptides may represent potent anti-angiogenesis agents in vivo. PMID:26191241

  11. Method of identity analyte-binding peptides

    DOEpatents

    Kauvar, Lawrence M.

    1990-01-01

    A method for affinity chromatography or adsorption of a designated analyte utilizes a paralog as the affinity partner. The immobilized paralog can be used in purification or analysis of the analyte; the paralog can also be used as a substitute for antibody in an immunoassay. The paralog is identified by screening candidate peptide sequences of 4-20 amino acids for specific affinity to the analyte.

  12. Method of identity analyte-binding peptides

    DOEpatents

    Kauvar, L.M.

    1990-10-16

    A method for affinity chromatography or adsorption of a designated analyte utilizes a paralog as the affinity partner. The immobilized paralog can be used in purification or analysis of the analyte; the paralog can also be used as a substitute for antibody in an immunoassay. The paralog is identified by screening candidate peptide sequences of 4--20 amino acids for specific affinity to the analyte. 5 figs.

  13. Engineering new metal specificity in EF-hand peptides.

    PubMed

    Le Clainche, Loïc; Plancque, Gabriel; Amekraz, Badia; Moulin, Christophe; Pradines-Lecomte, Catherine; Peltier, Gilles; Vita, Claudio

    2003-02-01

    Peptides (33-34 amino acids long) corresponding to the helix-turn-helix (EF-hand) motif of the calcium binding site I of Paramecium tetraurelia calmodulin have been synthesized. The linear sequence was unable to acquire a native-like conformation and calcium binding. However, incorporation of a well-positioned disulfide bond bridging the two putative helical regions greatly improved the ordered structure and binding properties. Analyzed by electrospray mass spectrometry, circular dichroism and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence, such a disulfide-stabilized peptide is shown to acquire a calcium-dependent helical conformation and exhibits native-like affinity for calcium, terbium and europium ions with 30+/-1, 3.5+/-0.6 and 0.6+/-0.1 microM dissociation constants, respectively. Comparable affinities were calculated within the biological construct comprising the entire domain I of Arabidopsis taliana calmodulin. Single sequence mutation (Glu25Asp) in the binding loop of the peptide abolishes calcium affinity, but preserves lanthanide affinity, showing that metal selectivity can be modulated by specific mutations. Such disulfide-stabilized peptides represent useful models to engineer metal specificity in new calmodulin proteins, facilitating the development of new systems to monitor metal pollution in biosensors and to increase metal binding capability of bacterial and plant cells in bioremediation techniques. PMID:12589569

  14. The structural basis for function in diamond-like carbon binding peptides.

    PubMed

    Gabryelczyk, Bartosz; Szilvay, Géza R; Linder, Markus B

    2014-07-29

    The molecular structural basis for the function of specific peptides that bind to diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces was investigated. For this, a competition assay that provided a robust way of comparing relative affinities of peptide variants was set up. Point mutations of specific residues resulted in significant effects, but it was shown that the chemical composition of the peptide was not sufficient to explain peptide affinity. More significantly, rearrangements in the sequence indicated that the binding is a complex recognition event that is dependent on the overall structure of the peptide. The work demonstrates the unique properties of peptides for creating functionality at interfaces via noncovalent binding for potential applications in, for example, nanomaterials, biomedical materials, and sensors. PMID:25007096

  15. Endogenous peptide(s) inhibiting [3H]cocaine binding in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Reith, M E; Sershen, H; Lajtha, A

    1980-12-01

    The supernatant fraction of centrifuged homogenate of brain tissue contains material that inhibits the saturable binding of [3H]cocaine to crude mouse brain membranes. This material was subjected to heat treatment to remove protein; further purification was achieved by filtering through an Amicon UM-10 membrane ultrafilter and gel filtration of the ultrafiltrate on Sephadex G-25. Sensitivity to acid hydrolysis and peptidase action indicates that the inhibitory activity resides in peptide material with low molecular weight. The partially purified inhibitor has similar effects to that of cocaine on the specific binding of various ligands to opiate and nonopiate receptors in mouse brain membranes. PMID:6261176

  16. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) B27 Allotype-Specific Binding and Candidate Arthritogenic Peptides Revealed through Heuristic Clustering of Data-independent Acquisition Mass Spectrometry (DIA-MS) Data.

    PubMed

    Schittenhelm, Ralf B; Sivaneswaran, Saranjah; Lim Kam Sian, Terry C C; Croft, Nathan P; Purcell, Anthony W

    2016-06-01

    Expression of HLA-B27 is strongly associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and other spondyloarthropathies. While this is true for the majority of HLA-B27 allotypes, HLA-B*27:06 and HLA-B*27:09 are not associated with AS. These two subtypes contain polymorphisms that are ideally positioned to influence the bound peptide repertoire. The existence of disease-inducing peptides (so-called arthritogenic peptides) has therefore been proposed that are exclusively presented by disease-associated HLA-B27 allotypes. However, we have recently demonstrated that this segregation of allotype-bound peptides is not the case and that many peptides that display sequence features predicted to favor binding to disease-associated subtypes are also capable of being presented naturally by protective alleles. To further probe more subtle quantitative changes in peptide presentation, we have used a combination of data-independent acquisition (DIA) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry to quantify the abundance of 1646 HLA-B27 restricted peptides across the eight most frequent HLA-B27 allotypes (HLA-B*27:02-HLA-B*27:09). We utilized K means cluster analysis to group peptides with similar allelic binding preferences across the eight HLA-B27 allotypes, which enabled us to identify the most-stringent binding characteristics for each HLA-B27 allotype and further refined their existing consensus-binding motifs. Moreover, a thorough analysis of this quantitative dataset led to the identification of 26 peptides, which are presented in lower abundance by HLA-B*27:06 and HLA-B*27:09 compared with disease-associated HLA-B27 subtypes. Although these differences were observed to be very subtle, these 26 peptides might encompass the sought-after arthritogenic peptide(s). PMID:26929215

  17. Crystal Structures of Beryllium Fluoride-Free and Beryllium Fluoride-Bound CheY in Complex with the Conserved C-Terminal Peptide of CheZ Reveal Dual Binding Modes Specific to CheY Conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Guhaniyogi,J.; Robinson, V.; Stock, A.

    2006-01-01

    Chemotaxis, the environment-specific swimming behavior of a bacterial cell is controlled by flagellar rotation. The steady-state level of the phosphorylated or activated form of the response regulator CheY dictates the direction of flagellar rotation. CheY phosphorylation is regulated by a fine equilibrium of three phosphotransfer activities: phosphorylation by the kinase CheA, its auto-dephosphorylation and dephosphorylation by its phosphatase CheZ. Efficient dephosphorylation of CheY by CheZ requires two spatially distinct protein-protein contacts: tethering of the two proteins to each other and formation of an active site for dephosphorylation. The former involves interaction of phosphorylated CheY with the small highly conserved C-terminal helix of CheZ (CheZ{sub C}), an indispensable structural component of the functional CheZ protein. To understand how the CheZ{sub C} helix, representing less than 10% of the full-length protein, ascertains molecular specificity of binding to CheY, we have determined crystal structures of CheY in complex with a synthetic peptide corresponding to 15 C-terminal residues of CheZ (CheZ{sub 200-214}) at resolutions ranging from 2.0 Angstroms to 2.3 Angstroms. These structures provide a detailed view of the CheZC peptide interaction both in the presence and absence of the phosphoryl analog, BeF{sub 3}{sup -}. Our studies reveal that two different modes of binding the CheZ{sub 200-214} peptide are dictated by the conformational state of CheY in the complex. Our structures suggest that the CheZ{sub C} helix binds to a 'meta-active' conformation of inactive CheY and it does so in an orientation that is distinct from the one in which it binds activated CheY. Our dual binding mode hypothesis provides implications for reverse information flow in CheY and extends previous observations on inherent resilience in CheY-like signaling domains.

  18. Structure-based Design of Peptides with High Affinity and Specificity to HER2 Positive Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Yang, Xiaoliang; Li, Dan; Lian, Wenxi; Xiang, Zhichu; Wang, Weizhi; Bu, Xiangli; Lai, Wenjia; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2015-01-01

    To identify peptides with high affinity and specificity against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), a series of peptides were designed based on the structure of HER2 and its Z(HER2:342) affibody. By using a combination protocol of molecular dynamics modeling, MM/GBSA binding free energy calculations, and binding free energy decomposition analysis, two novel peptides with 27 residues, pep27 and pep27-24M, were successfully obtained. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis verified that both peptides can specifically bind to the extracellular domain of HER2 protein at cellular level. The Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) analysis showed that dissociation constants (KD) of these two peptides were around 300 nmol/L. Furthermore, fluorescence imaging of peptides against nude mice xenografted with SKBR3 cells indicated that both peptides have strong affinity and high specificity to HER2 positive tumors. PMID:26284145

  19. Structure-based Design of Peptides with High Affinity and Specificity to HER2 Positive Tumors.

    PubMed

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Yang, Xiaoliang; Li, Dan; Lian, Wenxi; Xiang, Zhichu; Wang, Weizhi; Bu, Xiangli; Lai, Wenjia; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2015-01-01

    To identify peptides with high affinity and specificity against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), a series of peptides were designed based on the structure of HER2 and its Z(HER2:342) affibody. By using a combination protocol of molecular dynamics modeling, MM/GBSA binding free energy calculations, and binding free energy decomposition analysis, two novel peptides with 27 residues, pep27 and pep27-24M, were successfully obtained. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis verified that both peptides can specifically bind to the extracellular domain of HER2 protein at cellular level. The Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) analysis showed that dissociation constants (K D) of these two peptides were around 300 nmol/L. Furthermore, fluorescence imaging of peptides against nude mice xenografted with SKBR3 cells indicated that both peptides have strong affinity and high specificity to HER2 positive tumors. PMID:26284145

  20. Glucagon-like peptide-1 binding to rat hepatic membranes.

    PubMed

    Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Delgado, E; Trapote, M A; Alcántara, A; Clemente, F; Luque, M A; Perea, A; Valverde, I

    1995-07-01

    We have found [125I]glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1(7-36)amide specific binding activity in rat liver and isolated hepatocyte plasma membranes, with an M(r) of approximately 63,000, estimated by cross-linking and SDS-PAGE. The specific binding was time- and membrane protein concentration-dependent, and equally displaced by unlabelled GLP-1(7-36)amide and by GLP-1(1-36)amide, achieving its ID50 at 3 x 10(-9) M of the peptides. GLP-1(7-36)amide did not modify the basal or the glucagon (10(-8) M)-stimulated adenylate cyclase in the hepatocyte plasma membranes. These data, together with our previous findings of a potent glycogenic effect of GLP-1(7-36)amide in isolated rat hepatocytes, led us to postulate that the insulin-like effects of this peptide on glucose liver metabolism could be mediated by a type of receptor probably different from that described for GLP-1 in pancreatic B-cells or, alternatively, by the same receptor which, in this tissue as well as in muscle, uses a different transduction system. PMID:7561616

  1. Glucagon-like peptide-1 binding to rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Delgado, E; Luque, M A; Alcántara, A; Trapote, M A; Clemente, F; Galera, C; Valverde, I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L

    1995-01-01

    We have found [125I]glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)-amide-specific binding activity in rat skeletal muscle plasma membranes, with an estimated M(r) of 63,000 by cross-linking and SDS-PAGE. The specific binding was time and membrane protein concentration dependent, and displaceable by unlabeled GLP-1(7-36)-amide with an ID50 of 3 x 10(-9) M of the peptide; GLP-1(1-36)-amide also competed, whereas glucagon and insulin did not. GLP-1(7-36)-amide did not modify the basal adenylate cyclase activity in skeletal muscle plasma membranes. These data, together with our previous finding of a potent glycogenic effect of GLP-1(7-36)-amide in rat soleus muscle, and also in isolated hepatocytes, which was not accompanied by a rise in the cell cyclic AMP content, lead use to believe that the insulin-like effects of this peptide on glucose metabolism in the muscle could be mediated by a type of receptor somehow different to that described for GLP-1 in pancreatic B cells, where GLP-1 action is mediated by the cyclic AMP-adenylate cyclase system. PMID:7784253

  2. Identification of five different Patr class I molecules that bind HLA supertype peptides and definition of their peptide binding motifs.

    PubMed

    McKinney, D M; Erickson, A L; Walker, C M; Thimme, R; Chisari, F V; Sidney, J; Sette, A

    2000-10-15

    We have sequenced the Pan troglodytes class I (Patr) molecules from three common chimpanzees and expressed them as single molecules in a class I-deficient cell line. These lines were utilized to obtain purified class I molecules to define the peptide binding motifs associated with five different Patr molecules. Based on these experiments, as well as analysis of the predicted structure of the B and F polymorphic MHC pockets, we classified five Patr molecules (Patr-A*0101, Patr-B*0901, Patr-B*0701, Patr-A*0602, and Patr-B*1301) within previously defined supertype specificities associated with HLA class I molecules (HLA-A3, -B7, -A1, and -A24 supertypes). The overlap in the binding repertoire between specific HLA and Patr class I molecules was in the range of 33 to 92%, depending on the particular Patr molecule as assessed by the binding of HIV-, hepatitis B virus-, and hepatitis C virus-derived epitopes. Finally, live cell binding assays of nine chimpanzee-derived B cell lines demonstrated that HLA supertype peptides bound to Patr class I molecules with frequencies in the 20-50% range. PMID:11035079

  3. Non-peptide ligand binding to the formyl peptide receptor FPR2--A comparison to peptide ligand binding modes.

    PubMed

    Stepniewski, Tomasz M; Filipek, Slawomir

    2015-07-15

    Ligands of the FPR2 receptor initiate many signaling pathways including activation of phospholipase C, protein kinase C, the mitogen-activated protein kinase, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B pathway. The possible actions include also calcium flux, superoxide generation, as well as migration and proliferation of monocytes. FPR2 activation may induce a pro- and anti-inflammatory effect depending on the ligand type. It is also found that this receptor is involved in tumor growth. Most of currently known FPR2 ligands are agonists since they were designed based on N-formyl peptides, which are natural agonists of formyl receptors. Since the non-peptide drugs are indispensable for effective treatment strategies, we performed a docking study of such ligands employing a generated dual template homology model of the FPR2 receptor. The study revealed different binding modes of particular classes of these drugs. Based on the obtained docking poses we proposed a detailed location of three hydrophobic pockets in orthosteric binding site of FPR2. Our model emphasizes the importance of aromatic stacking, especially with regard to residues His102(3.29) and Phe257(6.51), for binding of FPR2 ligands. We also identified other residues important for non-peptide ligand binding in the binding site of FPR2. PMID:25882522

  4. Competition-based cellular peptide binding assays for 13 prevalent HLA class I alleles using fluorescein-labeled synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Jan H; Mommaas, Bregje; Mutis, Tuna; Huijbers, Ivo; Vissers, Debby; Benckhuijsen, Willemien E; Schreuder, Geziena M Th; Offringa, Rienk; Goulmy, Els; Melief, Cornelis J M; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Drijfhout, Jan W

    2003-02-01

    We report the development, validation, and application of competition-based peptide binding assays for 13 prevalent human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles. The assays are based on peptide binding to HLA molecules on living cells carrying the particular allele. Competition for binding between the test peptide of interest and a fluorescein-labeled HLA class I binding peptide is used as read out. The use of cell membrane-bound HLA class I molecules circumvents the need for laborious biochemical purification of these molecules in soluble form. Previously, we have applied this principle for HLA-A2 and HLA-A3. We now describe the assays for HLA-A1, HLA-A11, HLA-A24, HLA-A68, HLA-B7, HLA-B8, HLA-B14, HLA-B35, HLA-B60, HLA-B61, and HLA-B62. Together with HLA-A2 and HLA-A3, these alleles cover more than 95% of the Caucasian population. Several allele-specific parameters were determined for each assay. Using these assays, we identified novel HLA class I high-affinity binding peptides from HIVpol, p53, PRAME, and minor histocompatibility antigen HA-1. Thus these convenient and accurate peptide-binding assays will be useful for the identification of putative cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes presented on a diverse array of HLA class I molecules. PMID:12559627

  5. Binding studies of antimicrobial peptides to Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Concetta; D'Andrea, Luca D; Saviano, Michele; Olivieri, Michele; Cimmino, Amelia; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is pivotal to the design of new and more active peptides. In the last few years it has become clear that the behavior of antimicrobial peptides on membrane model systems does not always translate to cells; therefore the need to develop methods aimed at capturing details of the interactions of peptides with bacterial cells is compelling. In this work we analyzed binding of two peptides, namely temporin B and TB_KKG6A, to Escherichia coli cells and to Escherichia coli LPS. Temporin B is a natural peptide active against Gram positive bacteria but inactive against Gram negative bacteria, TB_KKG6A is an analogue of temporin B showing activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. We found that binding to cells occurs only for the active peptide TB_KKG6A; stoichiometry and affinity constant of this peptide toward Escherichia coli cells were determined. PMID:27450805

  6. High-throughput identification of putative receptors for cancer-binding peptides using biopanning and microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Daniel J; Bhave, Sandeep R; Kotipatruni, Rama P; Hunn, Jeremy C; Wildman, Scott A; Hong, Charles; Dadey, David Y. A.; Muhoro, Lincoln K.; Jaboin, Jerry J; Thotala, Dinesh; Hallahan, Dennis E

    2013-01-01

    Phage-display peptide biopanning has been successfully used to identify cancer-targeting peptides in multiple models. For cancer-binding peptides, identification of the peptide receptor is necessary to demonstrate mechanism of action and to further optimize specificity and target binding. The process of receptor identification can be slow and some peptides may turn out to bind ubiquitous proteins not suitable for further drug development. In this report, we describe a high-throughput method for screening a large number of peptides in parallel to identify peptide receptors, which we have termed “reverse biopanning,” which can then be selected for further development based on their peptide receptor. To demonstrate this method, we screened a library of 39 peptides previously identified in our laboratory to bind specifically cancers after irradiation. The reverse biopanning process identified 2 peptides, RKFLMTTRYSRV and KTAKKNVFFCSV, as candidate ligands for the protein tax interacting protein 1 (TIP-1), a protein previously identified in our laboratory to be expressed in the cell surface in tumors and upregulated after exposure to ionizing radiation. We used computational modeling as the initial method for rapid validation of peptide-TIP-1 binding. Pseudo-binding energies were calculated to be −360.645 kcal/mol, −487.239 kcal/mol, and −595.328 kcal/mol for HVGGSSV, TTRYSRV, and NVFFCSV respectively, suggesting that the peptides would have at least similar, if not stronger, binding to TIP-1 compared to the known TIP-1 binding peptide HVGGSSV. We validated peptide in vitro via electrophoretic mobility shift assay, which showed strong binding of RKFLMTTRYSRV and the truncated form TTRYSRV. This method allows for the identification of many peptide receptors and subsequent selection of peptides for further drug development based on the peptide receptor. PMID:23147990

  7. Evolution of domain-peptide interactions to coadapt specificity and affinity to functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Kelil, Abdellali; Levy, Emmanuel D; Michnick, Stephen W

    2016-07-01

    Evolution of complexity in eukaryotic proteomes has arisen, in part, through emergence of modular independently folded domains mediating protein interactions via binding to short linear peptides in proteins. Over 30 years, structural properties and sequence preferences of these peptides have been extensively characterized. Less successful, however, were efforts to establish relationships between physicochemical properties and functions of domain-peptide interactions. To our knowledge, we have devised the first strategy to exhaustively explore the binding specificity of protein domain-peptide interactions. We applied the strategy to SH3 domains to determine the properties of their binding peptides starting from various experimental data. The strategy identified the majority (∼70%) of experimentally determined SH3 binding sites. We discovered mutual relationships among binding specificity, binding affinity, and structural properties and evolution of linear peptides. Remarkably, we found that these properties are also related to functional diversity, defined by depth of proteins within hierarchies of gene ontologies. Our results revealed that linear peptides evolved to coadapt specificity and affinity to functional diversity of domain-peptide interactions. Thus, domain-peptide interactions follow human-constructed gene ontologies, which suggest that our understanding of biological process hierarchies reflect the way chemical and thermodynamic properties of linear peptides and their interaction networks, in general, have evolved. PMID:27317745

  8. Evolution of domain–peptide interactions to coadapt specificity and affinity to functional diversity

    PubMed Central

    Kelil, Abdellali; Levy, Emmanuel D.; Michnick, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    Evolution of complexity in eukaryotic proteomes has arisen, in part, through emergence of modular independently folded domains mediating protein interactions via binding to short linear peptides in proteins. Over 30 years, structural properties and sequence preferences of these peptides have been extensively characterized. Less successful, however, were efforts to establish relationships between physicochemical properties and functions of domain–peptide interactions. To our knowledge, we have devised the first strategy to exhaustively explore the binding specificity of protein domain–peptide interactions. We applied the strategy to SH3 domains to determine the properties of their binding peptides starting from various experimental data. The strategy identified the majority (∼70%) of experimentally determined SH3 binding sites. We discovered mutual relationships among binding specificity, binding affinity, and structural properties and evolution of linear peptides. Remarkably, we found that these properties are also related to functional diversity, defined by depth of proteins within hierarchies of gene ontologies. Our results revealed that linear peptides evolved to coadapt specificity and affinity to functional diversity of domain–peptide interactions. Thus, domain–peptide interactions follow human-constructed gene ontologies, which suggest that our understanding of biological process hierarchies reflect the way chemical and thermodynamic properties of linear peptides and their interaction networks, in general, have evolved. PMID:27317745

  9. Probing the mechanism of material specific peptides for optical biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Sathish K.; Estephan, Elias; Martin, Marta; Cloitre, Thierry; Gergely, Csilla

    2013-05-01

    The possibility to engineer bio-nanomaterials with programmed synthesis and controlled immobilization of biomolecules through biomimetic molecular evolution approach has been demonstrated. Material specific peptides with exquisite molecular recognition function were used as a linker for the attachment of biomolecules. Exploring the origin of peptide material specificity not only opens up rational design approach with precise control over biomimetic bio-sensor design, but more importantly provides a new route of functionalizing for various material surfaces with enhanced sensitivity over classical grafting chemistry. To study the fine prints of experimentally obtained peptides, theoretical understanding of surface interactions may serve as important clues for further refinement. By taking advantage of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density functional theory (DFT), we investigated the origin of this smart recognition function through the strength of interaction of experimentally selected 12mer peptides revealing high binding affinity towards n+-Si(100). Here, we attempt for the very first time to model the interaction of the peptides (in buffer solution) with semiconductors and we calculate their binding energies at the atomic level, enabling thereby linking direct evidence to our experimental evidence. Several peptide conformations have been taken into account simultaneously upon the surface. Our studies demonstrate that the peptides possess certain recognition function and their high interaction energy with the surface makes them unique among the populations. Our work is a step towards the understanding of the interactions between peptides and semiconductor surfaces that is a highly relevant challenge in the development of novel devices with a high degree of biocompatibility as well.

  10. Mapping binding sites for the PDE4D5 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase to the N- and C-domains of beta-arrestin using spot-immobilized peptide arrays.

    PubMed

    Baillie, George S; Adams, David R; Bhari, Narinder; Houslay, Thomas M; Vadrevu, Suryakiran; Meng, Dong; Li, Xiang; Dunlop, Allan; Milligan, Graeme; Bolger, Graeme B; Klussmann, Enno; Houslay, Miles D

    2007-05-15

    Beta2-ARs (beta2-adrenoceptors) become desensitized rapidly upon recruitment of cytosolic beta-arrestin. PDE4D5 (family 4 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase, subfamily D, isoform 5) can be recruited in complex with beta-arrestin, whereupon it regulates PKA (cAMP-dependent protein kinase) phosphorylation of the beta2-AR. In the present study, we have used novel technology, employing a library of overlapping peptides (25-mers) immobilized on cellulose membranes that scan the entire sequence of beta-arrestin 2, to define the interaction sites on beta-arrestin 2 for binding of PDE4D5 and the cognate long isoform, PDE4D3. We have identified a binding site in the beta-arrestin 2 N-domain for the common PDE4D catalytic unit and two regions in the beta-arrestin 2 C-domain that confer specificity for PDE4D5 binding. Alanine-scanning peptide array analysis of the N-domain binding region identified severely reduced interaction with PDE4D5 upon R26A substitution, and reduced interaction upon either K18A or T20A substitution. Similar analysis of the beta-arrestin 2 C-domain identified Arg286 and Asp291, together with the Leu215-His220 region, as being important for binding PDE4D5, but not PDE4D3. Transfection with wild-type beta-arrestin 2 profoundly decreased isoprenaline-stimulated PKA phosphorylation of the beta2-AR in MEFs (mouse embryo fibroblasts) lacking both beta-arrestin 1 and beta-arrestin 2. This effect was negated using either the R26A or the R286A mutant form of beta-arrestin 2 or a mutant with substitution of an alanine cassette for Leu215-His220, which showed little or no PDE4D5 binding, but was still recruited to the beta2-AR upon isoprenaline challenge. These data show that the interaction of PDE4D5 with both the N- and C-domains of beta-arrestin 2 are essential for beta2-AR regulation. PMID:17288540

  11. Engineering of the function of diamond-like carbon binding peptides through structural design.

    PubMed

    Gabryelczyk, Bartosz; Szilvay, Géza R; Singh, Vivek K; Mikkilä, Joona; Kostiainen, Mauri A; Koskinen, Jari; Linder, Markus B

    2015-02-01

    The use of phage display to select material-specific peptides provides a general route towards modification and functionalization of surfaces and interfaces. However, a rational structural engineering of the peptides for optimal affinity is typically not feasible because of insufficient structure-function understanding. Here, we investigate the influence of multivalency of diamond-like carbon (DLC) binding peptides on binding characteristics. We show that facile linking of peptides together using different lengths of spacers and multivalency leads to a tuning of affinity and kinetics. Notably, increased length of spacers in divalent systems led to significantly increased affinities. Making multimers influenced also kinetic aspects of surface competition. Additionally, the multivalent peptides were applied as surface functionalization components for a colloidal form of DLC. The work suggests the use of a set of linking systems to screen parameters for functional optimization of selected material-specific peptides. PMID:25522202

  12. Cloning and tissue-specific functional characterization of the promoter of the rat diazepam binding inhibitor, a peptide with multiple biological actions.

    PubMed Central

    Kolmer, M; Alho, H; Costa, E; Pani, L

    1993-01-01

    Diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI) is a 10-kDa polypeptide that regulates mitochondrial steroidogenesis, glucose-induced insulin secretion, metabolism of acyl-CoA esters, and the action of gamma-aminobutyrate on GABAA receptors. To investigate the regulation of DBI gene expression, three positive clones were isolated from a rat genomic library. One of them contained a DBI genomic DNA fragment encompassing 4 kb of the 5' untranslated region, the first two exons, and part of the second intron of the DBI gene. Two other overlapping clones contained a processed DBI pseudogene. Several transcription initiation sites were detected by RNase protection and primer extension assays. Different tissues exhibited clear differences in the efficiencies of transcription startpoint usage. Transient expression experiments using DNA fragments of different length from the 5' untranslated region of the DBI gene showed that basal promoter activity required 146 bp of the proximal DBI sequence, whereas full activation was achieved with 423 bp of the 5' untranslated region. DNase I protection experiments with liver nuclear proteins demonstrated three protected regions at nt -387 to -333, -295 to -271, and -176 to -139 relative to the ATG initiation codon; in other tissues the pattern of protection was different. In gel shift assays the most proximal region (-176 to -139) was found to bind several general transcription factors as well as cell type-restricted nuclear proteins which may be related to specific regulatory patterns in different tissues. Thus, the DBI gene possesses some features of a housekeeping gene but also includes a variable regulation which appears to change with the function that it subserves in different cell types. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7690962

  13. Analysis of protective antigen peptide binding motifs using bacterial display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Dorsey, Brandi L.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2015-05-01

    In today's fast-paced world, a new biological threat could emerge at any time, necessitating a prompt, reliable, inexpensive detection reagent in each case. Combined with magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), bacterial display technology makes it possible to isolate selective, high affinity peptide reagents in days to weeks. Utilizing the eCPX display scaffold is also a rapid way to screen potential peptide reagents. Peptide affinity reagents for protective antigen (PA) of the biothreat Bacillus anthracis were previously discovered using bacterial display. Bioinformatics analysis resulted in the consensus sequence WXCFTC. Additionally, we have discovered PA binding peptides with a WW motif, one of which, YGLHPWWKNAPIGQR, can pull down PA from 1% human serum. The strength of these two motifs combined, to obtain a WWCFTC consensus, is assessed here using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). While monitoring binding to PA, overall expression of the display scaffold was assessed using the YPet Mona expression control tag (YPet), and specificity was assessed by binding to Streptavidin R-Phycoerythrin (SAPE). The importance of high YPet binding is highlighted as many of the peptides in one of the three replicate experiments fell below our 80% binding threshold. We demonstrate that it is preferable to discard this experiment, due to questionable expression of the peptide itself, than to try to normalize for relative expression. The peptides containing the WWCFTC consensus were of higher affinity and greater specificity than the peptides containing the WW consensus alone, validating further investigation to optimize known PA binders.

  14. Structure and Energetic Contributions of a Designed Modular Peptide-Binding Protein with Picomolar Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Simon; Tremmel, Dirk; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Reichen, Christian; Mittl, Peer R E; Plückthun, Andreas

    2016-03-16

    Natural armadillo repeat proteins (nArmRP) like importin-α or β-catenin bind their target peptides such that each repeat interacts with a dipeptide unit within the stretched target peptide. However, this modularity is imperfect and also restricted to short peptide stretches of usually four to six consecutive amino acids. Here we report the development and characterization of a regularized and truly modular peptide-specific binding protein, based on designed armadillo repeat proteins (dArmRP), binding to peptides of alternating lysine and arginine residues (KR)n. dArmRP were obtained from nArmRP through cycles of extensive protein engineering, which rendered them more uniform. This regularity is reflected in the consistent binding of dArmRP to (KR)-peptides, where affinities depend on the lengths of target peptides and the number of internal repeats in a very systematic manner, thus confirming the modularity of the interaction. This exponential dependency between affinity and recognition length suggests that each module adds a constant increment of binding energy to sequence-specific recognition. This relationship was confirmed by comprehensive mutagenesis studies that also reveal the importance of individual peptide side chains. The 1.83 Å resolution crystal structure of a dArmRP with five identical internal repeats in complex with the cognate (KR)5 peptide proves a modular binding mode, where each dipeptide is recognized by one internal repeat. The confirmation of this true modularity over longer peptide stretches lays the ground for the design of binders with different specificities and tailored affinities by the assembly of dipeptide-specific modules based on armadillo repeats. PMID:26878586

  15. Empirical methods for identifying specific peptide-protein interactions for smart reagent development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogot, Joshua M.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2012-06-01

    The current state of the art in the development of antibody alternatives is fraught with difficulties including mass production, robustness, and overall cost of production. The isolation of synthetic alternatives using peptide libraries offers great potential for recognition elements that are more stable and have improved binding affinity and target specificity. Although recent advances in rapid and automated discovery and synthetic library engineering continue to show promise for this emerging science, there remains a critical need for an improved fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of recognition. To better understand the fundamental mechanisms of binding, it is critical to be able to accurately assess binding between peptide reagents and protein targets. The development of empirical methods to analyze peptide-protein interactions is often overlooked, since it is often assumed that peptides can easily substitute for antibodies in antibody-derived immunoassays. The physico-chemical difference between peptides and antibodies represents a major challenge for developing peptides in standard immunoassays as capture or detection reagents. Analysis of peptide presents a unique challenge since the peptide has to be soluble, must be capable of target recognition, and capable of ELISA plate or SPR chip binding. Incorporating a plate-binding, hydrophilic peptide fusion (PS-tag) improves both the solubility and plate binding capability in a direct peptide ELISA format. Secondly, a solution based methods, affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method is presented as a solution-based, affinity determination method that can be used for determining both the association constants and binding kinetics.

  16. Streptavidin-binding peptides and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szostak, Jack W. (Inventor); Wilson, David S. (Inventor); Keefe, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention provides peptides with high affinity for streptavidin. These peptides may be expressed as part of fusion proteins to facilitate the detection, quantitation, and purification of proteins of interest.

  17. Streptavidin-binding peptides and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szostak, Jack W. (Inventor); Wilson, David S. (Inventor); Keefe, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The invention provides peptides with high affinity for streptavidin. These peptides may be expressed as part of fusion proteins to facilitate the detection, quantitation, and purification of proteins of interest.

  18. Peptide binding to HLA-DR1: a peptide with most residues substituted to alanine retains MHC binding.

    PubMed Central

    Jardetzky, T S; Gorga, J C; Busch, R; Rothbard, J; Strominger, J L; Wiley, D C

    1990-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) glycoproteins play an important role in the development of an effective immune response. An important MHC function is the ability to bind and present 'processed antigens' (peptides) to T cells. We show here that the purified human class II MHC molecule, HLA-DR1, binds peptides that have been shown to be immunogenic in vivo. Detergent-solubilized HLA-DR1 and a papain-cleaved form of the protein lacking the transmembrane and intracellular regions have similar peptide binding properties. A total of 39 single substitutions were made throughout an HLA-DR1 restricted hemagglutinin epitope and the results determine one amino acid in this peptide which is crucial to binding. Based on this analysis, a synthetic peptide was designed containing two residues from the original hemagglutinin epitope embedded in a chain of polyalanine. This peptide binds to HLA-DR1, indicating that the majority of peptide side chains are not required for high affinity peptide binding. Images Fig. 3. PMID:2189723

  19. Surface expression, peptide repertoire, and thermostability of chicken class I molecules correlate with peptide transporter specificity.

    PubMed

    Tregaskes, Clive A; Harrison, Michael; Sowa, Anna K; van Hateren, Andy; Hunt, Lawrence G; Vainio, Olli; Kaufman, Jim

    2016-01-19

    The chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has strong genetic associations with resistance and susceptibility to certain infectious pathogens. The cell surface expression level of MHC class I molecules varies as much as 10-fold between chicken haplotypes and is inversely correlated with diversity of peptide repertoire and with resistance to Marek's disease caused by an oncogenic herpesvirus. Here we show that the average thermostability of class I molecules isolated from cells also varies, being higher for high-expressing MHC haplotypes. However, we find roughly the same amount of class I protein synthesized by high- and low-expressing MHC haplotypes, with movement to the cell surface responsible for the difference in expression. Previous data show that chicken TAP genes have high allelic polymorphism, with peptide translocation specific for each MHC haplotype. Here we use assembly assays with peptide libraries to show that high-expressing B15 class I molecules can bind a much wider variety of peptides than are found on the cell surface, with the B15 TAPs restricting the peptides available. In contrast, the translocation specificity of TAPs from the low-expressing B21 haplotype is even more permissive than the promiscuous binding shown by the dominantly expressed class I molecule. B15/B21 heterozygote cells show much greater expression of B15 class I molecules than B15/B15 homozygote cells, presumably as a result of receiving additional peptides from the B21 TAPs. Thus, chicken MHC haplotypes vary in several correlated attributes, with the most obvious candidate linking all these properties being molecular interactions within the peptide-loading complex (PLC). PMID:26699458

  20. Surface expression, peptide repertoire, and thermostability of chicken class I molecules correlate with peptide transporter specificity

    PubMed Central

    Tregaskes, Clive A.; Harrison, Michael; Sowa, Anna K.; van Hateren, Andy; Hunt, Lawrence G.; Vainio, Olli; Kaufman, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has strong genetic associations with resistance and susceptibility to certain infectious pathogens. The cell surface expression level of MHC class I molecules varies as much as 10-fold between chicken haplotypes and is inversely correlated with diversity of peptide repertoire and with resistance to Marek’s disease caused by an oncogenic herpesvirus. Here we show that the average thermostability of class I molecules isolated from cells also varies, being higher for high-expressing MHC haplotypes. However, we find roughly the same amount of class I protein synthesized by high- and low-expressing MHC haplotypes, with movement to the cell surface responsible for the difference in expression. Previous data show that chicken TAP genes have high allelic polymorphism, with peptide translocation specific for each MHC haplotype. Here we use assembly assays with peptide libraries to show that high-expressing B15 class I molecules can bind a much wider variety of peptides than are found on the cell surface, with the B15 TAPs restricting the peptides available. In contrast, the translocation specificity of TAPs from the low-expressing B21 haplotype is even more permissive than the promiscuous binding shown by the dominantly expressed class I molecule. B15/B21 heterozygote cells show much greater expression of B15 class I molecules than B15/B15 homozygote cells, presumably as a result of receiving additional peptides from the B21 TAPs. Thus, chicken MHC haplotypes vary in several correlated attributes, with the most obvious candidate linking all these properties being molecular interactions within the peptide-loading complex (PLC). PMID:26699458

  1. PepComposer: computational design of peptides binding to a given protein surface.

    PubMed

    Obarska-Kosinska, Agnieszka; Iacoangeli, Alfredo; Lepore, Rosalba; Tramontano, Anna

    2016-07-01

    There is a wide interest in designing peptides able to bind to a specific region of a protein with the aim of interfering with a known interaction or as starting point for the design of inhibitors. Here we describe PepComposer, a new pipeline for the computational design of peptides binding to a given protein surface. PepComposer only requires the target protein structure and an approximate definition of the binding site as input. We first retrieve a set of peptide backbone scaffolds from monomeric proteins that harbor the same backbone arrangement as the binding site of the protein of interest. Next, we design optimal sequences for the identified peptide scaffolds. The method is fully automatic and available as a web server at http://biocomputing.it/pepcomposer/webserver. PMID:27131789

  2. Evaluation of Phosphatidylserine-Binding Peptides Radiolabeled with Fluorine 18 for in vivo Imaging of Apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapty, Janice Sarah

    We currently do not have a clinical method to directly assess apoptosis induced by cancer therapies. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an attractive target for imaging apoptosis since it is on the exterior of the apoptotic cells and PS externalization is an early marker of apoptosis. PS-binding peptides are an attractive option for developing an imaging probe to detect apoptosis using positron emission tomography. In this study we evaluated binding characteristics of PS-binding peptides for ability to bind to PS, radiolabeled PS-binding peptides with fluorine-18, and performed in vitro and in vivo analysis of 18F radiolabeled PS-binding peptides including biodistribution analysis and dynamic PET imaging in a murine tumor model of apoptosis. Four peptides were evaluated for PS binding characteristics using a plate based assay system, a liposome mimic of cell membrane PS presentation, and a cell assay of apoptosis. The results indicate that all four peptides bind to PS and are specific to apoptotic cells. The widely used 18 F prosthetic group N-succinimidyl-4-[18F]fluorobenzoate ([18F]SFB) and the recently developed N-[6-(4-[ 18F]fluorobenzylidene) aminooxyhexyl]maleimide ([18F]FBAM) were investigated for radiolabeling of two representative phosphatidylserine-binding peptides. The prosthetic groups were compared with respect to required reaction conditions for optimum labeling, radiolabeling yield and chemoselectivity. The N-terminus labeled product produced by reaction of [18F]SFB with binding peptide LIKKPF was produced in 18% radiochemical yield while no N-terminus labeled product could be isolated following [18F]SFB reaction with PDGLSR. When the peptides were modified by addition of a cysteine residue at the N-terminus they provided almost quantitative radiochemical yields with [18F]FBAM. Results indicate that for the peptides in this study, [18F]FBAM is a more useful prosthetic group compared to [18F]SFB due to its excellent chemo-selectivity and high radiochemical

  3. Structural studies on the forward and reverse binding modes of peptides to the chaperone DnaK.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Michael; Berthold, Nicole; Kieslich, Björn; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf; Sträter, Norbert

    2013-07-24

    Hsp70 chaperones have been implicated in assisting protein folding of newly synthesized polypeptide chains, refolding of misfolded proteins, and protein trafficking. For these functions, the chaperones need to exhibit a significant promiscuity in binding to different sequences of hydrophobic peptide stretches. To characterize the structural basis of sequence specificity and flexibility of the Escherichia coli Hsp70 chaperone DnaK, we have analyzed crystal structures of the substrate binding domain of the protein in complex with artificially designed peptides as well as small proline-rich antimicrobial peptides. The latter peptides from mammals and insects were identified to target DnaK after cell penetration. Interestingly, the complex crystal structures reveal two different peptide binding modes. The peptides can bind either in a forward or in a reverse direction to the conventional substrate binding cleft of DnaK in an extended conformation. Superposition of the two binding modes shows a remarkable similarity in the side chain orientations and hydrogen bonding pattern despite the reversed peptide orientation. The DnaK chaperone has evolved to bind peptides in both orientations in the substrate binding cleft with comparable energy without rearrangements of the protein. Optimal hydrophobic interactions with binding pockets -2 to 0 appear to be the main determinant for the orientation and sequence position of peptide binding. PMID:23562829

  4. Identification of high-affinity VEGFR3-binding peptides through a phage-displayed random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Li, Cai-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) interaction with its receptor, VEGFR-3/Flt-4, regulates lymphangiogenesis. VEGFR-3/Flt-4 expression in cancer cells has been correlated with clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, and lymphatic invasion. The objective of this study is to identify a VEGFR-3/Flt-4-interacting peptide that could be used to inhibit VEGFR-3 for ovarian cancer therapy. Methods The extracellular fragment of recombinant human VEGFR-3/Flt-4 (rhVEGFR-3/Flt-4) fused with coat protein pIII was screened against a phage-displayed random peptide library. Using affinity enrichment and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening, positive clones of phages were amplified. Three phage clones were selected after four rounds of biopanning, and the specific binding of the peptides to rhVEGFR-3 was detected by ELISA and compared with that of VEGF-D. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses of ovarian cancer tissue sections was undertaken to demonstrate the specificity of the peptides. Results After four rounds of biopanning, ELISA confirmed the specificity of the enriched bound phage clones for rhVEGFR-3. Sequencing and translation identified three different peptides. Non-competitive ELISA revealed that peptides I, II, and III had binding affinities for VEGFR-3 with Kaff (affinity constant) of 16.4±8.6 µg/mL (n=3), 9.2±2.1 µg/mL (n=3), and 174.8±31.1 µg/mL (n=3), respectively. In ovarian carcinoma tissue sections, peptide III (WHWLPNLRHYAS), which had the greatest binding affinity, also co-localized with VEGFR-3 in endothelial cells lining lymphatic vessels; its labeling of ovarian tumors in vivo was also confirmed. Conclusion These finding showed that peptide III has high specificity and activity and, therefore, may represent a potential therapeutic approach to target VEGF-VEGFR-3 signaling for the treatment or diagnosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:26197772

  5. Discovery of 12-mer peptides that bind to wood lignin

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Asako; Isozaki, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Masaharu; Takaya, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lignin, an abundant terrestrial polymer, is the only large-volume renewable feedstock composed of an aromatic skeleton. Lignin has been used mostly as an energy source during paper production; however, recent interest in replacing fossil fuels with renewable resources has highlighted its potential value in providing aromatic chemicals. Highly selective degradation of lignin is pivotal for industrial production of paper, biofuels, chemicals, and materials. However, few studies have examined natural and synthetic molecular components recognizing the heterogeneous aromatic polymer. Here, we report the first identification of lignin-binding peptides possessing characteristic sequences using a phage display technique. The consensus sequence HFPSP was found in several lignin-binding peptides, and the outer amino acid sequence affected the binding affinity of the peptides. Substitution of phenylalanine7 with Ile in the lignin-binding peptide C416 (HFPSPIFQRHSH) decreased the affinity of the peptide for softwood lignin without changing its affinity for hardwood lignin, indicating that C416 recognised structural differences between the lignins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that this peptide adopted a highly flexible random coil structure, allowing key residues to be appropriately arranged in relation to the binding site in lignin. These results provide a useful platform for designing synthetic and biological catalysts selectively bind to lignin. PMID:26903196

  6. Discovery of 12-mer peptides that bind to wood lignin.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Asako; Isozaki, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Masaharu; Takaya, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lignin, an abundant terrestrial polymer, is the only large-volume renewable feedstock composed of an aromatic skeleton. Lignin has been used mostly as an energy source during paper production; however, recent interest in replacing fossil fuels with renewable resources has highlighted its potential value in providing aromatic chemicals. Highly selective degradation of lignin is pivotal for industrial production of paper, biofuels, chemicals, and materials. However, few studies have examined natural and synthetic molecular components recognizing the heterogeneous aromatic polymer. Here, we report the first identification of lignin-binding peptides possessing characteristic sequences using a phage display technique. The consensus sequence HFPSP was found in several lignin-binding peptides, and the outer amino acid sequence affected the binding affinity of the peptides. Substitution of phenylalanine7 with Ile in the lignin-binding peptide C416 (HFPSPIFQRHSH) decreased the affinity of the peptide for softwood lignin without changing its affinity for hardwood lignin, indicating that C416 recognised structural differences between the lignins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that this peptide adopted a highly flexible random coil structure, allowing key residues to be appropriately arranged in relation to the binding site in lignin. These results provide a useful platform for designing synthetic and biological catalysts selectively bind to lignin. PMID:26903196

  7. Peptide Based Radiopharmaceuticals: Specific Construct Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P; Rhodes, B A; Sharma, S S

    1997-10-21

    The objective of this project was to develop receptor based peptides for diagnostic imaging and therapy. A series of peptides related to cell adhesion molecules (CAM) and immune regulation were designed for radiolabeling with 99mTc and evaluated in animal models as potential diagnostic imaging agents for various disease conditions such as thrombus (clot), acute kidney failure, and inflection/inflammation imaging. The peptides for this project were designed by the industrial partner, Palatin Technologies, (formerly Rhomed, Inc.) using various peptide design approaches including a newly developed rational computer assisted drug design (CADD) approach termed MIDAS (Metal ion Induced Distinctive Array of Structures). In this approach, the biological function domain and the 99mTc complexing domain are fused together so that structurally these domains are indistinguishable. This approach allows construction of conformationally rigid metallo-peptide molecules (similar to cyclic peptides) that are metabolically stable in-vivo. All the newly designed peptides were screened in various in vitro receptor binding and functional assays to identify a lead compound. The lead compounds were formulated in a one-step 99mTc labeling kit form which were studied by BNL for detailed in-vivo imaging using various animals models of human disease. Two main peptides usingMIDAS approach evolved and were investigated: RGD peptide for acute renal failure and an immunomodulatory peptide derived from tuftsin (RMT-1) for infection/inflammation imaging. Various RGD based metallopeptides were designed, synthesized and assayed for their efficacy in inhibiting ADP-induced human platelet aggregation. Most of these peptides displayed biological activity in the 1-100 µM range. Based on previous work by others, RGD-I and RGD-II were evaluated in animal models of acute renal failure. These earlier studies showed that after acute ischemic injury the renal cortex displays

  8. Biopanning and characterization of peptides with Fe3O4 nanoparticles-binding capability via phage display random peptide library technique.

    PubMed

    You, Fei; Yin, Guangfu; Pu, Ximing; Li, Yucan; Hu, Yang; Huang, Zhongbin; Liao, Xiaoming; Yao, Yadong; Chen, Xianchun

    2016-05-01

    Functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in biomedical applications. A proper functionalization of NPs can improve biocompatibility, avoid a loss of bioactivity, and further endow NPs with unique performances. Modification with vairous specific binding biomolecules from random biological libraries has been explored. In this work, two 7-mer peptides with sequences of HYIDFRW and TVNFKLY were selected from a phage display random peptide library by using ferromagnetic NPs as targets, and were verified to display strong binding affinity to Fe3O4 NPs. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, fluorescence microscopy, thermal analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of peptides on the surface of Fe3O4 NPs. Sequence analyses revealed that the probable binding mechanism between the peptide and Fe3O4 NPs might be driven by Pearson hard acid-hard base specific interaction and hydrogen bonds, accompanied with hydrophilic interactions and non-specific electrostatic attractions. The cell viability assay indicated a good cytocompatibility of peptide-bound Fe3O4 NPs. Furthermore, TVNFKLY peptide and an ovarian tumor cell A2780 specific binding peptide (QQTNWSL) were conjugated to afford a liner 14-mer peptide (QQTNWSLTVNFKLY). The binding and targeting studies showed that 14-mer peptide was able to retain both the strong binding ability to Fe3O4 NPs and the specific binding ability to A2780 cells. The results suggested that the Fe3O4-binding peptides would be of great potential in the functionalization of Fe3O4 NPs for the tumor-targeted drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia. PMID:26896661

  9. PepBind: a comprehensive database and computational tool for analysis of protein-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Das, Arindam Atanu; Sharma, Om Prakash; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh; Krishna, Ramadas; Mathur, Premendu P

    2013-08-01

    Protein-peptide interactions, where one partner is a globular protein (domain) and the other is a flexible linear peptide, are key components of cellular processes predominantly in signaling and regulatory networks, hence are prime targets for drug design. To derive the details of the protein-peptide interaction mechanism is often a cumbersome task, though it can be made easier with the availability of specific databases and tools. The Peptide Binding Protein Database (PepBind) is a curated and searchable repository of the structures, sequences and experimental observations of 3100 protein-peptide complexes. The web interface contains a computational tool, protein inter-chain interaction (PICI), for computing several types of weak or strong interactions at the protein-peptide interaction interface and visualizing the identified interactions between residues in Jmol viewer. This initial database release focuses on providing protein-peptide interface information along with structure and sequence information for protein-peptide complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Structures in PepBind are classified based on their cellular activity. More than 40% of the structures in the database are found to be involved in different regulatory pathways and nearly 20% in the immune system. These data indicate the importance of protein-peptide complexes in the regulation of cellular processes. PMID:23896518

  10. Genome-Wide Prediction and Validation of Peptides That Bind Human Prosurvival Bcl-2 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    DeBartolo, Joe; Taipale, Mikko; Keating, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death is regulated by interactions between pro-apoptotic and prosurvival members of the Bcl-2 family. Pro-apoptotic family members contain a weakly conserved BH3 motif that can adopt an alpha-helical structure and bind to a groove on prosurvival partners Bcl-xL, Bcl-w, Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and Bfl-1. Peptides corresponding to roughly 13 reported BH3 motifs have been verified to bind in this manner. Due to their short lengths and low sequence conservation, BH3 motifs are not detected using standard sequence-based bioinformatics approaches. Thus, it is possible that many additional proteins harbor BH3-like sequences that can mediate interactions with the Bcl-2 family. In this work, we used structure-based and data-based Bcl-2 interaction models to find new BH3-like peptides in the human proteome. We used peptide SPOT arrays to test candidate peptides for interaction with one or more of the prosurvival proteins Bcl-xL, Bcl-w, Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and Bfl-1. For the 36 most promising array candidates, we quantified binding to all five human receptors using direct and competition binding assays in solution. All 36 peptides showed evidence of interaction with at least one prosurvival protein, and 22 peptides bound at least one prosurvival protein with a dissociation constant between 1 and 500 nM; many peptides had specificity profiles not previously observed. We also screened the full-length parent proteins of a subset of array-tested peptides for binding to Bcl-xL and Mcl-1. Finally, we used the peptide binding data, in conjunction with previously reported interactions, to assess the affinity and specificity prediction performance of different models. PMID:24967846

  11. Human IgE binding capacity of tryptic peptides from bovine alpha-lactalbumin.

    PubMed

    Maynard, F; Jost, R; Wal, J M

    1997-08-01

    The specific IgE binding capacity of native bovine alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-La), a globular whey protein, and tryptic peptides was investigated using 19 sera from patients with cow's milk protein allergy. The specific anti-bovine alpha-La IgE titers ranged from 0.6 to 125 IU/ml. Highly purified tryptic peptides from native and disulfide-bond-reduced alpha-La were obtained by reverse phase chromatography. By ELISA technique using immobilized native protein or peptides, 11 of the 19 sera reacted exclusively with intact protein while 8 of them also presented a specific IgE response to different tryptic peptides. Polyclonal IgE population specificity was not related to anti-bovine alpha-La IgE levels. Sequence (17G-K58) and larger peptides sharing this sequence were most strongly and frequently recognized. Competitive ELISA inhibition tests confirmed this IgE-specific response and gave also clear evidence for IgE binding to smaller peptides corresponding to sequences (6C-R10):S-S:(115L-L123) and (109A-L123). IgE binding to native alpha-La and large peptides confirmed the importance of conformational epitope(s). However, in some sera reduced and S-alkylated peptide (59I-K94) exhibited a similar or higher IgE binding capacity than the native corresponding fragment, suggesting the existence of sequential epitope(s) exposed through protein denaturation. Moreover, IgE binding sequences were also located within hydrophobic regions of alpha-La and/or within parts with high sequence homology to human alpha-La. PMID:9250594

  12. ZP-binding peptides identified via phage display stimulate production of sperm antibodies in dogs.

    PubMed

    Samoylova, Tatiana I; Cox, Nancy R; Cochran, Anna M; Samoylov, Alexandre M; Griffin, Brenda; Baker, Henry J

    2010-07-01

    Zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins play a central role in sperm-oocyte binding and fertilization. Sperm protein sequences that are involved in sperm-ZP recognition and have an important role in fertilization represent attractive targets for development of contraceptive vaccines, yet are currently unknown. To identify peptide sequences that recognize and bind to ZP proteins, we developed a novel selection procedure from phage display libraries that utilizes intact oocytes surrounded by ZP proteins. The major advantage of this procedure is that ZP proteins remain in their native conformation unlike a selection protocol previously published that utilized solubilized ZP on artificial solid support. Several peptides of 7 and 12 amino acids with binding specificity to canine ZP proteins were identified. Four of them (LNSFLRS, SSWYRGA, YLPIYTIPSMVY, and NNQSPILKLSIH) plus a control ZP-binding peptide (YLPVGGLRRIGG) from the literature were synthesized and tested for antigenic properties in dogs. NNQSPILKLSIH peptide stimulated production of anti-peptide antibodies. These antibodies bind to the acrosomal region of the canine sperm cell, demonstrating ability to act as sperm antibodies. The identified ZP-binding peptides (mimicking sperm cell surface antigens) may be useful in the design of immunocontraceptive agents for dogs. PMID:20434854

  13. Prediction of MHC binding peptides and epitopes from alfalfa mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Gomase, Virendra S; Kale, Karbhari V; Chikhale, Nandkishor J; Changbhale, Smruti S

    2007-08-01

    Peptide fragments from alfalfa mosaic virus involved multiple antigenic components directing and empowering the immune system to protect the host from infection. MHC molecules are cell surface proteins, which take active part in host immune reactions and involvement of MHC class-I & II in response to almost all antigens. Coat protein of alfalfa mosaic virus contains 221 aa residues. Analysis found five MHC ligands in coat protein as 64-LSSFNGLGV-72; 86- RILEEDLIY-94; 96-MVFSITPSY-104; 100- ITPSYAGTF-108; 110- LTDDVTTED-118; having rescaled binding affinity and c-terminal cleavage affinity more than 0.5. The predicted binding affinity is normalized by the 1% fractil. The MHC peptide binding is predicted using neural networks trained on c-terminals of known epitopes. In analysis predicted MHC/peptide binding is a log transformed value related to the IC50 values in nM units. Total numbers of peptides found are 213. Predicted MHC binding regions act like red flags for antigen specific and generate immune response against the parent antigen. So a small fragment of antigen can induce immune response against whole antigen. This theme is implemented in designing subunit and synthetic peptide vaccines. The sequence analysis method allows potential drug targets to identify active sites against plant diseases. The method integrates prediction of peptide MHC class I binding; proteosomal c-terminal cleavage and TAP transport efficiency. PMID:17691913

  14. Folding and binding energy of a calmodulin-binding cell antiproliferative peptide.

    PubMed

    Almudallal, Ahmad M; Saika-Voivod, Ivan; Stewart, John M

    2015-09-01

    We carry out a computational study of a calmodulin-binding peptide shown to be effective in reducing cell proliferation. We find several folded states for two short variants of different length of the peptide and determine the location of the binding site on calmodulin, the binding free energy for the different conformers and structural details that play a role in optimal binding. Binding to a hydrophobic pocket in calmodulin occurs via an anchoring phenylalanine residue of the natively disordered peptide, and is enhanced when a neighbouring hydrophobic residue acts as a co-anchor. The shorter sequence possesses better binding to calmodulin, which is encouraging in terms of the development of non-peptide analogues as therapeutic agents. PMID:26310499

  15. Chromatographic biopanning for the selection of peptides with high specificity to Pb2+ from phage displayed peptide library.

    PubMed

    Nian, Rui; Kim, Duck Sang; Nguyen, Thuong; Tan, Lihan; Kim, Chan-Wha; Yoo, Ik-Keun; Choe, Woo-Seok

    2010-09-17

    Toxic heavy metal pollution is a global problem occurring in air, soil as well as water. There is a need for a more cost effective, renewable remediation technique, but most importantly, for a recovery method that is selective for one specific metal of concern. Phage display technology has been used as a powerful tool in the discovery of peptides capable of exhibiting specific affinity to various metals or metal ions. However, traditional phage display is mainly conducted in batch mode, resulting in only one equilibrium state hence low-efficiency selection. It is also unable to monitor the selection process in real time mode. In this study, phage display technique was incorporated with chromatography procedure with the use of a monolithic column, facilitating multiple phage-binding equilibrium states and online monitoring of the selection process in search of affinity peptides to Pb2+. In total, 17 candidate peptides were found and their specificity toward Pb2+ was further investigated with bead-based enzyme immunoassay (EIA). A highly specific Pb2+ binding peptide ThrAsnThrLeuSerAsnAsn (TNTLSNN) was obtained. Based on our knowledge, this is the first report on a new chromatographic biopanning method coupled with monolithic column for the selection of metal ion specific binding peptides. It is expected that this monolith-based chromatographic biopanning will provide a promising approach for a high throughput screening of affinity peptides cognitive of a wide range of target species. PMID:20709321

  16. Structure-based optimization of GRP78-binding peptides that enhances efficacy in cancer imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Hung; Lee, Andy Chi-Lung; Chen, I-Ju; Chang, Nai-Chuan; Wu, Han-Chung; Yu, Hui-Ming; Chang, Ya-Jen; Lee, Te-Wei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Yu, Alice L; Yu, John

    2016-07-01

    It is more challenging to design peptide drugs than small molecules through molecular docking and in silico analysis. Here, we developed a structure-based approach with various computational and analytical techniques to optimize cancer-targeting peptides for molecular imaging and therapy. We first utilized a peptide-binding protein database to identify GRP78, a specific cancer cell-surface marker, as a target protein for the lead, L-peptide. Subsequently, we used homologous modeling and molecular docking to identify a peptide-binding domain within GRP78 and optimized a series of peptides with a new protein-ligand scoring program, HotLig. Binding of these peptides to GRP78 was confirmed using an oriented immobilization technique for the Biacore system. We further examined the ability of the peptides to target cancer cells through in vitro binding studies with cell lines and clinical cancer specimens, and in vivo tumor imaging and targeted chemotherapeutic studies. MicroSPECT/CT imaging revealed significantly greater uptake of (188)Re-liposomes linked to these peptides as compared with non-targeting (188)Re-liposomes. Conjugation with these peptides also significantly increased the therapeutic efficacy of Lipo-Dox. Notably, peptide-conjugated Lipo-Dox significantly reduced stem-cell subpopulation in xenografts of breast cancer. The structure-based optimization strategy for peptides described here may be useful for developing peptide drugs for cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:27088408

  17. Comparison of the peptide binding preferences of three closely related TRAF paralogs: TRAF2, TRAF3, and TRAF5.

    PubMed

    Foight, Glenna Wink; Keating, Amy E

    2016-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) constitute a family of adapter proteins that act in numerous signaling pathways important in human biology and disease. The MATH domain of TRAF proteins binds peptides found in the cytoplasmic domains of signaling receptors, thereby connecting extracellular signals to downstream effectors. Beyond several very general motifs, the peptide binding preferences of TRAFs have not been extensively characterized, and differences between the binding preferences of TRAF paralogs are poorly understood. Here we report a screening system that we established to explore TRAF peptide-binding specificity using deep mutational scanning of TRAF-peptide ligands. We displayed single- and double-mutant peptide libraries based on the TRAF-binding sites of CD40 or TANK on the surface of Escherichia coli and screened them for binding to TRAF2, TRAF3, and TRAF5. Enrichment analysis of the library sequencing results showed differences in the permitted substitution patterns in the TANK versus CD40 backgrounds. The three TRAF proteins also demonstrated different preferences for binding to members of the CD40 library, and three peptides from that library that were analyzed individually showed striking differences in affinity for the three TRAFs. These results illustrate a previously unappreciated level of binding specificity between these close paralogs and demonstrate that established motifs are overly simplistic. The results from this work begin to outline differences between TRAF family members, and the experimental approach established herein will enable future efforts to investigate and redesign TRAF peptide-binding specificity. PMID:26779844

  18. Identification of Soft Matter Binding Peptide Ligands Using Phage Display.

    PubMed

    Günay, Kemal Arda; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-10-21

    Phage display is a powerful tool for the selection of highly affine, short peptide ligands. While originally primarily used for the identification of ligands to proteins, the scope of this technique has significantly expanded over the past two decades. Phage display nowadays is also increasingly applied to identify ligands that selectively bind with high affinity to a broad range of other substrates including natural and biological polymers as well as a variety of low-molecular-weight organic molecules. Such peptides are of interest for various reasons. The ability to selectively and with high affinity bind to the substrate of interest allows the conjugation or immobilization of, e.g., nanoparticles or biomolecules, or generally, facilitates interactions at materials interfaces. On the other hand, presentation of peptide ligands that selectively bind to low-molecular-weight organic materials is of interest for the development of sensor surfaces. The aim of this article is to highlight the opportunities provided by phage display for the identification of peptide ligands that bind to synthetic or natural polymer substrates or to small organic molecules. The article will first provide an overview of the different peptide ligands that have been identified by phage display that bind to these "soft matter" targets. The second part of the article will discuss the different characterization techniques that allow the determination of the affinity of the identified ligands to the respective substrates. PMID:26275106

  19. Interaction of hyaluronan binding peptides with glycosaminoglycans in poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Justine J; Elder, Robert M; Neumann, Alexander J; Jayaraman, Arthi; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2014-04-14

    This study investigates the incorporation of hyaluronan (HA) binding peptides into poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels as a mechanism to bind and retain hyaluronan for applications in tissue engineering. The specificity of the peptide sequence (native RYPISRPRKRC vs non-native RPSRPRIRYKC), the role of basic amino acids, and specificity to hyaluronan over other GAGs in contributing to the peptide-hyaluronan interaction were probed through experiments and simulations. Hydrogels containing the native or non-native peptide retained hyaluronan in a dose-dependent manner. Ionic interactions were the dominating mechanism. In diH2O the peptides interacted strongly with HA and chondroitin sulfate, but in phosphate buffered saline the peptides interacted more strongly with HA. For cartilage tissue engineering, chondrocyte-laden PEG hydrogels containing increasing amounts of HA binding peptide and exogenous HA had increased retention and decreased loss of cell-secreted proteoglycans in and from the hydrogel at 28 days. This new matrix-interactive hydrogel platform holds promise for tissue regeneration. PMID:24597474

  20. Competitive binding of antagonistic peptides fine-tunes stomatal patterning

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Suk; Hnilova, Marketa; Maes, Michal; Lin, Ya-Chen Lisa; Putarjunan, Aarthi; Han, Soon-Ki; Avila, Julian; U.Torii, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    During development, cells interpret complex, often conflicting signals to make optimal decisions. Plant stomata, the cellular interface between a plant and the atmosphere, develop according to positional cues including a family of secreted peptides, EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTORS (EPFs). How these signaling peptides orchestrate pattern formation at a molecular level remains unclear. Here we report that Stomagen/EPF-LIKE9 peptide, which promotes stomatal development, requires ERECTA (ER)-family receptor kinases and interferes with the inhibition of stomatal development by the EPF2-ER module. Both EPF2 and Stomagen directly bind to ER and its co-receptor TOO MANY MOUTHS. Stomagen peptide competitively replaced EPF2 binding to ER. Furthermore, application of EPF2, but not Stomagen, elicited rapid phosphorylation of downstream signaling components in vivo. Our findings demonstrate how a plant receptor agonist and antagonist define inhibitory and inductive cues to fine-tune tissue patterning on the plant epidermis. PMID:26083750

  1. Simulation of Peptide Binding to Silica and Silica Mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emami, F. S.; Heinz, H.; Berry, R. J.; Varshney, V.; Farmer, B. L.; Naik, R. R.; Patwardhan, S. V.; Perry, C. C.

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the nature of the interaction of peptides with silica surfaces and their effect on mineralization. Classical force fields (CVFF, PCFF) have been extended for silica aiming at the computation of surface properties in quantitative agreement with experiment, taking explicitly into account water molecules, pH, and surface coverage with peptides. We focus on the interaction of five short peptides (pep1, pep4, 82-4, H4, R5) identified by biopanning with regular and amorphous silica surfaces (Q3 and Q2) to understand the relation between peptide sequence and affinity to the surface. Results of the atomistic molecular dynamics simulation indicate adsorption energies, binding constants and conformational changes upon adsorption. The comparison of NMR chemical shifts in solution and on the surface in computation and experiment further aids in understanding the mechanism of binding.

  2. Fluorine substitutions in an antigenic peptide selectively modulate T-cell receptor binding in a minimally perturbing manner

    SciTech Connect

    Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Sommese, Ruth F.; Clemens, John; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Desmond, Clare; Do, Priscilla; Baker, Brian M.

    2010-08-17

    TCR (T-cell receptor) recognition of antigenic peptides bound and presented by MHC (major histocompatibility complex) molecules forms the basis of the cellular immune response to pathogens and cancer. TCRs bind peptide - MHC complexes weakly and with fast kinetics, features which have hindered detailed biophysical studies of these interactions. Modified peptides resulting in enhanced TCR binding could help overcome these challenges. Furthermore, there is considerable interest in using modified peptides with enhanced TCR binding as the basis for clinical vaccines. In the present study, we examined how fluorine substitutions in an antigenic peptide can selectively impact TCR recognition. Using a structure-guided design approach, we found that fluorination of the Tax peptide [HTLV (human T-cell lymphotropic virus)-1 Tax] enhanced binding by the Tax-specific TCR A6, yet weakened binding by the Tax-specific TCR B7. The changes in affinity were consistent with crystallographic structures and fluorine chemistry, and with the A6 TCR independent of other substitutions in the interface. Peptide fluorination thus provides a means to selectively modulate TCR binding affinity without significantly perturbing peptide composition or structure. Lastly, we probed the mechanism of fluorine's effect on TCR binding and we conclude that our results were most consistent with a 'polar hydrophobicity' mechanism, rather than a purely hydrophobic- or electrostatic-based mechanism. This finding should have an impact on other attempts to alter molecular recognition with fluorine.

  3. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Song, Jie; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  4. Peptides in headlock – a novel high-affinity and versatile peptide-binding nanobody for proteomics and microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Michael B.; Traenkle, Bjoern; Koch, Philipp A.; Emele, Felix; Weiss, Frederik; Poetz, Oliver; Stehle, Thilo; Rothbauer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Nanobodies are highly valuable tools for numerous bioanalytical and biotechnical applications. Here, we report the characterization of a nanobody that binds a short peptide epitope with extraordinary affinity. Structural analysis reveals an unusual binding mode where the extended peptide becomes part of a β-sheet structure in the nanobody. This interaction relies on sequence-independent backbone interactions augmented by a small number of specificity-determining side chain contacts. Once bound, the peptide is fastened by two nanobody side chains that clamp it in a headlock fashion. Exploiting this unusual binding mode, we generated a novel nanobody-derived capture and detection system. Matrix-coupled nanobody enables the fast and efficient isolation of epitope-tagged proteins from prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems. Additionally, the fluorescently labeled nanobody visualizes subcellular structures in different cellular compartments. The high-affinity-binding and modifiable peptide tag of this system renders it a versatile and robust tool to combine biochemical analysis with microscopic studies. PMID:26791954

  5. Synthetic Peptide Ligands of the Antigen Binding Receptor Induce Programmed Cell Death in a Human B-Cell Lymphoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renschler, Markus F.; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Dower, William J.; Levy, Ronald

    1994-04-01

    Peptide ligands for the antigen binding site of the surface immunoglobulin receptor of a human B-cell lymphoma cell line were identified with the use of filamentous phage libraries displaying random 8- and 12-amino acid peptides. Corresponding synthetic peptides bound specifically to the antigen binding site of this immunoglobulin receptor and blocked the binding of an anti-idiotype antibody. The ligands, when conjugated to form dimers or tetramers, induced cell death by apoptosis in vitro with an IC50 between 40 and 200 nM. This effect was associated with specific stimulation of intracellular protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

  6. Anti-peptide monoclonal antibody imaging of a common binding domain involved in muscle regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Van Eyk, J. E.; Caday-Malcolm, R. A.; Yu, L.; Irvin, R. T.; Hodges, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    Multiple-component regulatory protein systems function through a generalized mechanism where a single regulatory protein or ligand binds to a variety of receptors to modulate specific functions in a physiologically sensitive context. Muscle contraction is regulated by the interaction of actin with troponin I (TnI) or myosin in a Ca(2+)-sensitive manner. Actin utilizes a single binding domain (residues 1-28) to bind to residues 104-115 of TnI (Van Eyk JE, Sönnichsen FD, Sykes BD, Hodges RS, 1991, In: Rüegg JC, ed, Peptides as probes in muscle research, Heidelberg, Germany: Springer-Verlag, pp 15-31) and to myosin subfragment 1 (S1, an enzymatic fragment of myosin containing both the actin and ATP binding sites) (Van Eyk JE, Hodges RS, 1991, Biochemistry 30:11676-11682) in a Ca(2+)-sensitive manner. We have utilized an anti-TnI peptide (104-115) monoclonal antibody, Mab B4, that binds specifically to TnI, to image the common binding domain of actin and thus mimic the activity of actin including activation of the S1 ATPase activity and TnI-mediated regulation of the S1 ATPase. Mab B4 has also been utilized to identify a receptor binding domain on myosin (residues 633-644) that is recognized by actin. Interestingly, Mab B4 binds to the native protein receptors TnI and S1 with relative affinities of 100- and 25,000-fold higher than the binding affinity to the 12-residue peptide immunogen. Thus, anti-peptide monoclonal antibodies prepared against a receptor binding domain can mimic the ligand binding domain and be utilized as a powerful tool for the detailed analysis of complex multiple-component regulatory systems. PMID:7613476

  7. Selection of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-binding peptide using phage display technology

    SciTech Connect

    Soykut, Esra Acar; Dudak, Fahriye Ceyda; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2008-05-23

    In this study, peptides were selected to recognize staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) which cause food intoxication and can be used as a biological war agent. By using commercial M13 phage library, single plaque isolation of 38 phages was done and binding affinities were investigated with phage-ELISA. The specificities of the selected phage clones showing high affinity to SEB were checked by using different protein molecules which can be found in food samples. Furthermore, the affinities of three selected phage clones were determined by using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors. Sequence analysis was realized for three peptides showing high binding affinity to SEB and WWRPLTPESPPA, MNLHDYHRLFWY, and QHPQINQTLYRM amino acid sequences were obtained. The peptide sequence with highest affinity to SEB was synthesized with solid phase peptide synthesis technique and thermodynamic constants of the peptide-SEB interaction were determined by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and compared with those of antibody-SEB interaction. The binding constant of the peptide was determined as 4.2 {+-} 0.7 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} which indicates a strong binding close to that of antibody.

  8. Biochemical basis for enhanced binding of peptide dimers to X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein.

    PubMed

    Splan, Kathryn E; Allen, John E; McLendon, George L

    2007-10-23

    XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein) is involved in the mediation of programmed cell death and, therefore, is a target for the development of cancer therapeutics. Peptide mimetics based upon Smac, the natural binding partner of XIAP, and specifically, dimeric peptides, have shown great promise in drug development. In the present work, the basis for enhanced dimer efficacy has been explored. Comparisons are made between the peptide binding site on the BIR3 domain of XIAP alone (residues 238-358) and a less truncated construct that includes both BIR2 and BIR3 domains (residues 151-350). This contingency differentially enhances the binding of dimeric tetrapeptides, potentially by providing additional hydrophobic binding surface. The effect of BIR2 on the BIR3 binding site is sustained, even if the BIR2 binding site is disrupted by mutagenesis, as shown by both a fluorescent competition assay and a polarity sensitive dye, badan. FRET measurements reveal an observed separation of >or=45 A between the BIR2 and BIR3 peptide binding pockets, thereby precluding a direct simultaneous interaction of the dimer molecules with both binding domains. Furthermore, variations in the linker length between dimeric tetrapeptides did not show a predictable trend in binding affinities, suggesting that local concentration effects were also an unlikely explanation for the enhanced dimeric affinities. Taken together, the results suggest that enhanced binding of dimeric peptides likely reflects the increased hydrophobic surface area on or near the BIR3 site and have significant ramifications for the design of therapeutics that target this class of proteins. PMID:17910418

  9. Staphylococcal surface display of metal-binding polyhistidyl peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, P.; Wernerus, H.; Svedberg, M.; Staahl, S.

    2000-03-01

    Recombinant Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus carnosus strains were generated with surface-exposed chimeric proteins containing polyhistidyl peptides designed for binding to divalent metal ions. Surface accessibility of the chimeric surface proteins was demonstrated and the chimeric surface proteins were found to be functional in terms of metal binding, since the recombinant staphylococcal cells were shown to have gained Ni{sup 2+}- and Cd{sup 2+}-binding capacity, suggesting that such bacteria could find use in bioremediation of heavy metals. This is, to their knowledge, the first time that recombinant, surface-exposed metal-binding peptides have been expressed on gram-positive bacteria. Potential environmental or biosensor applications for such recombinant staphylococci as biosorbents are discussed.

  10. Inhibition of aggregation of amyloid peptides by beta-sheet breaker peptides and their binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Viet, Man Hoang; Ngo, Son Tung; Lam, Nguyen Sy; Li, Mai Suan

    2011-06-01

    The effects of beta-sheet breaker peptides KLVFF and LPFFD on the oligomerization of amyloid peptides were studied by all-atom simulations. It was found that LPFFD interferes the aggregation of Aβ(16-22) peptides to a greater extent than does KLVFF. Using the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method, we found that the former binds more strongly to Aβ(16-22). Therefore, by simulations, we have clarified the relationship between aggregation rates and binding affinity: the stronger the ligand binding, the slower the oligomerization process. The binding affinity of pentapeptides to full-length peptide Aβ(1-40) and its mature fibrils has been considered using the Autodock and MM-PBSA methods. The hydrophobic interaction between ligands and receptors plays a more important role for association than does hydrogen bonding. The influence of beta-sheet breaker peptides on the secondary structures of monomer Aβ(1-40) was studied in detail, and it turns out that, in their presence, the total beta-sheet content can be enhanced. However, the aggregation can be slowed because the beta-content is reduced in fibril-prone regions. Both pentapeptides strongly bind to monomer Aβ(1-40), as well as to mature fibrils, but KLVFF displays a lower binding affinity than LPFFD. Our findings are in accord with earlier experiments that both of these peptides can serve as prominent inhibitors. In addition, we predict that LPFFD inhibits/degrades the fibrillogenesis of full-length amyloid peptides better than KLVFF. This is probably related to a difference in their total hydrophobicities in that the higher the hydrophobicity, the lower the inhibitory capacity. The GROMOS96 43a1 force field with explicit water and the force field proposed by Morris et al. (Morris et al. J. Comput. Chem. 1998, 19, 1639 ) were employed for all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and Autodock experiments, respectively. PMID:21563780

  11. Interaction of Hyaluronan Binding Peptides with Glycosaminoglycans in Poly(ethylene glycol) Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the incorporation of hyaluronan (HA) binding peptides into poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels as a mechanism to bind and retain hyaluronan for applications in tissue engineering. The specificity of the peptide sequence (native RYPISRPRKRC vs non-native RPSRPRIRYKC), the role of basic amino acids, and specificity to hyaluronan over other GAGs in contributing to the peptide–hyaluronan interaction were probed through experiments and simulations. Hydrogels containing the native or non-native peptide retained hyaluronan in a dose-dependent manner. Ionic interactions were the dominating mechanism. In diH2O the peptides interacted strongly with HA and chondroitin sulfate, but in phosphate buffered saline the peptides interacted more strongly with HA. For cartilage tissue engineering, chondrocyte-laden PEG hydrogels containing increasing amounts of HA binding peptide and exogenous HA had increased retention and decreased loss of cell-secreted proteoglycans in and from the hydrogel at 28 days. This new matrix-interactive hydrogel platform holds promise for tissue regeneration. PMID:24597474

  12. Although divergent in residues of the peptide binding site, conserved chimpanzee Patr-AL and polymorphic human HLA-A*02 have overlapping peptide-binding repertoires.

    PubMed

    Gleimer, Michael; Wahl, Angela R; Hickman, Heather D; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Norman, Paul J; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Hammond, John A; Draghi, Monia; Adams, Erin J; Juo, Sean; Jalili, Roxana; Gharizadeh, Baback; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Garcia, K Christopher; Hildebrand, William H; Parham, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Patr-AL is an expressed, non-polymorphic MHC class I gene carried by ∼50% of chimpanzee MHC haplotypes. Comparing Patr-AL(+) and Patr-AL(-) haplotypes showed Patr-AL defines a unique 125-kb genomic block flanked by blocks containing classical Patr-A and pseudogene Patr-H. Orthologous to Patr-AL are polymorphic orangutan Popy-A and the 5' part of human pseudogene HLA-Y, carried by ∼10% of HLA haplotypes. Thus, the AL gene alternatively evolved in these closely related species to become classical, nonclassical, and nonfunctional. Although differing by 30 aa substitutions in the peptide-binding α(1) and α(2) domains, Patr-AL and HLA-A*0201 bind overlapping repertoires of peptides; the overlap being comparable with that between the A*0201 and A*0207 subtypes differing by one substitution. Patr-AL thus has the A02 supertypic peptide-binding specificity. Patr-AL and HLA-A*0201 have similar three-dimensional structures, binding peptides in similar conformation. Although comparable in size and shape, the B and F specificity pockets of Patr-AL and HLA-A*0201 differ in both their constituent residues and contacts with peptide anchors. Uniquely shared by Patr-AL, HLA-A*0201, and other members of the A02 supertype are the absence of serine at position 9 in the B pocket and the presence of tyrosine at position 116 in the F pocket. Distinguishing Patr-AL from HLA-A*02 is an unusually electropositive upper face on the α(2) helix. Stimulating PBMCs from Patr-AL(-) chimpanzees with B cells expressing Patr-AL produced potent alloreactive CD8 T cells with specificity for Patr-AL and no cross-reactivity toward other MHC class I molecules, including HLA-A*02. In contrast, PBMCs from Patr-AL(+) chimpanzees are tolerant of Patr-AL. PMID:21209280

  13. SPARC is a source of copper-binding peptides that stimulate angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lane, T F; Iruela-Arispe, M L; Johnson, R S; Sage, E H

    1994-05-01

    SPARC is a transiently expressed extracellular matrix-binding protein that alters cell shape and regulates endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. In this study, we show that SPARC mRNA and protein are synthesized by endothelial cells during angiogenesis in vivo. SPARC and peptides derived from a cationic region of the protein (amino acids 113-130) stimulated the formation of endothelial cords in vitro; moreover, these peptides stimulated angiogenesis in vivo. Mapping of the active domain demonstrated that the sequence KGHK was responsible for most of the angiogenic activity; substitution of the His residue decreased the effect. We found that proteolysis of SPARC provided a source of KGHK, GHK, and longer peptides that contained these sequences. Although the Cu(2+)-GHK complex had been identified as a mitogen/morphogen in normal human plasma, we found KGHK and longer peptides to be potent stimulators of angiogenesis. SPARC113-130 and KGHK were shown to bind Cu2+ with high affinity; however, previous incubation with Cu2+ was not required for the stimulatory activity. Since a peptide from a second cationic region of SPARC (SPARC54-73) also bound Cu2+ but had no effect on angiogenesis, the angiogenic activity appeared to be sequence specific and independent of bound Cu2+. Thus, specific degradation of SPARC, a matrix-associated protein expressed by endothelial cells during vascular remodeling, releases a bioactive peptide or peptides, containing the sequence (K)GHK, that could regulate angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:7514608

  14. SPARC is a source of copper-binding peptides that stimulate angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    SPARC is a transiently expressed extracellular matrix-binding protein that alters cell shape and regulates endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. In this study, we show that SPARC mRNA and protein are synthesized by endothelial cells during angiogenesis in vivo. SPARC and peptides derived from a cationic region of the protein (amino acids 113- 130) stimulated the formation of endothelial cords in vitro; moreover, these peptides stimulated angiogenesis in vivo. Mapping of the active domain demonstrated that the sequence KGHK was responsible for most of the angiogenic activity; substitution of the His residue decreased the effect. We found that proteolysis of SPARC provided a source of KGHK, GHK, and longer peptides that contained these sequences. Although the Cu(2+)-GHK complex had been identified as a mitogen/morphogen in normal human plasma, we found KGHK and longer peptides to be potent stimulators of angiogenesis. SPARC113-130 and KGHK were shown to bind Cu2+ with high affinity; however, previous incubation with Cu2+ was not required for the stimulatory activity. Since a peptide from a second cationic region of SPARC (SPARC54-73) also bound Cu2+ but had no effect on angiogenesis, the angiogenic activity appeared to be sequence specific and independent of bound Cu2+. Thus, specific degradation of SPARC, a matrix-associated protein expressed by endothelial cells during vascular remodeling, releases a bioactive peptide or peptides, containing the sequence (K)GHK, that could regulate angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:7514608

  15. Novel Heparan Sulfate-Binding Peptides for Blocking Herpesvirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Pranay; Martin, Emily B.; Williams, Angela; Richardson, Raphael L.; Foster, James S.; Hackenback, Nicole; Kennel, Stephen J.; Sparer, Tim E.; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection can lead to congenital hearing loss and mental retardation. Upon immune suppression, reactivation of latent HCMV or primary infection increases morbidity in cancer, transplantation, and late stage AIDS patients. Current treatments include nucleoside analogues, which have significant toxicities limiting their usefulness. In this study we screened a panel of synthetic heparin-binding peptides for their ability to prevent CMV infection in vitro. A peptide designated, p5+14 exhibited ~ 90% reduction in murine CMV (MCMV) infection. Because negatively charged, cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), serve as the attachment receptor during the adsorption phase of the CMV infection cycle, we hypothesized that p5+14 effectively competes for CMV adsorption to the cell surface resulting in the reduction in infection. Positively charged Lys residues were required for peptide binding to cell-surface HSPGs and reducing viral infection. We show that this inhibition was not due to a direct neutralizing effect on the virus itself and that the peptide blocked adsorption of the virus. The peptide also inhibited infection of other herpesviruses: HCMV and herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 in vitro, demonstrating it has broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Therefore, this peptide may offer an adjunct therapy for the treatment of herpes viral infections and other viruses that use HSPGs for entry. PMID:25992785

  16. Selection of peptides binding to metallic borides by screening M13 phage display libraries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metal borides are a class of inorganic solids that is much less known and investigated than for example metal oxides or intermetallics. At the same time it is a highly versatile and interesting class of compounds in terms of physical and chemical properties, like semiconductivity, ferromagnetism, or catalytic activity. This makes these substances attractive for the generation of new materials. Very little is known about the interaction between organic materials and borides. To generate nanostructured and composite materials which consist of metal borides and organic modifiers it is necessary to develop new synthetic strategies. Phage peptide display libraries are commonly used to select peptides that bind specifically to metals, metal oxides, and semiconductors. Further, these binding peptides can serve as templates to control the nucleation and growth of inorganic nanoparticles. Additionally, the combination of two different binding motifs into a single bifunctional phage could be useful for the generation of new composite materials. Results In this study, we have identified a unique set of sequences that bind to amorphous and crystalline nickel boride (Ni3B) nanoparticles, from a random peptide library using the phage display technique. Using this technique, strong binders were identified that are selective for nickel boride. Sequence analysis of the peptides revealed that the sequences exhibit similar, yet subtle different patterns of amino acid usage. Although a predominant binding motif was not observed, certain charged amino acids emerged as essential in specific binding to both substrates. The 7-mer peptide sequence LGFREKE, isolated on amorphous Ni3B emerged as the best binder for both substrates. Fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy confirmed the specific binding affinity of LGFREKE expressing phage to amorphous and crystalline Ni3B nanoparticles. Conclusions This study is, to our knowledge, the first to identify peptides that

  17. Identification of gliadin-binding peptides by phage display

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coeliac disease (CD) is a common and complex disorder of the small intestine caused by intolerance to wheat gluten and related edible cereals like barley and rye. Peptides originating from incomplete gliadin digestion activate the lamina propria infiltrating T cells to release proinflammatory cytokines, which in turn cause profound tissue remodelling of the small intestinal wall. There is no cure for CD except refraining from consuming gluten-containing products. Results Phage from a random oligomer display library were enriched by repeated pannings against immobilised gliadin proteins. Phage from the final panning round were plated, individual plaques picked, incubated with host bacteria, amplified to a population size of 1011 to 1012 and purified. DNA was isolated from 1000 purified phage populations and the region covering the 36 bp oligonucleotide insert from which the displayed peptides were translated, was sequenced. Altogether more than 150 different peptide-encoding sequences were identified, many of which were repeatedly isolated under various experimental conditions. Amplified phage populations, each expressing a single peptide, were tested first in pools and then one by one for their ability to inhibit binding of human anti-gliadin antibodies in ELISA assays. These experiments showed that several of the different peptide-expressing phage tested inhibited the interaction between gliadin and anti-gliadin antibodies. Finally, four different peptide-encoding sequences were selected for further analysis, and the corresponding 12-mer peptides were synthesised in vitro. By ELISA assays it was demonstrated that several of the peptides inhibited the interaction between gliadin molecules and serum anti-gliadin antibodies. Moreover, ELISA competition experiments as well as dot-blot and western blot revealed that the different peptides interacted with different molecular sites of gliadin. Conclusions We believe that several of the isolated and

  18. Novel bioluminescent binding assays for interaction studies of protein/peptide hormones with their receptors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-05-01

    Protein/peptide hormones are the largest group of endogenous signaling molecules and exert various biological functions by binding to specific cell membrane receptors. To study the interactions between these hormones and their receptors, quantitative ligand-receptor binding assays have been widely used for decades. However, the assays conventionally relied on the use of radioligands, which have some major drawbacks and can only be used in laboratories with a radioactive material license. We recently developed novel bioluminescent binding assays for several protein/peptide hormones using the brightest bioluminescent reporter known to date, nanoluciferase (NanoLuc). The NanoLuc reporter can be either chemically conjugated to an appropriate position, or genetically fused at one terminus, of protein/peptide hormones. Compared to conventional radioligands, these bioluminescent ligands have higher sensitivity, better safety, and longer shelf lives, and thus, represent a novel class of non-radioactive tracers for quantitative receptor binding assays. In the present review, we provide some general considerations and specific examples for setting up the bioluminescent binding assays. Such techniques can be applied to other protein/peptide hormones in future to facilitate their interaction studies with their receptors. PMID:27020777

  19. Peptides presenting the binding site of human CD4 for the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Julia; Kassler, Kristin; Sticht, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    Summary Based on the structure of the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120 in complex with its cellular receptor CD4, we have designed and synthesized peptides that mimic the binding site of CD4 for gp120. The ability of these peptides to bind to gp120 can be strongly enhanced by increasing their conformational stability through cyclization, as evidenced by binding assays, as well as through molecular-dynamics simulations of peptide–gp120 complexes. The specificity of the peptide–gp120 interaction was demonstrated by using peptide variants, in which key residues for the interaction with gp120 were replaced by alanine or D-amino acids. PMID:23209523

  20. Fe(2+) binding on amyloid β-peptide promotes aggregation.

    PubMed

    Boopathi, Subramaniam; Kolandaivel, Ponmalai

    2016-09-01

    The metal ions Zn(2+) , Cu(2+) , and Fe(2+) play a significant role in the aggregation mechanism of Aβ peptides. However, the nature of binding between metal and peptide has remained elusive; the detailed information on this from the experimental study is very difficult. Density functional theory (dft) (M06-2X/6-311++G (2df,2pd) +LANL2DZ) has employed to determine the force field resulting due to metal and histidine interaction. We performed 200 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation on Aβ1-42 -Zn(2+) , Aβ1-42 -Cu(2+) , and Aβ1-42 -Fe(2+) systems in explicit water with different combination of coordinating residues including the three Histidine residues in the N-terminal. The present investigation, the Aβ1-42 -Zn(2+) system possess three turn conformations separated by coil structure. Zn(2+) binding caused the loss of the helical structure of N-terminal residues which transformed into the S-shaped conformation. Zn(2+) has reduced the coil and increases the turn content of the peptide compared with experimental study. On the other hand, the Cu(2+) binds with peptide, β sheet formation is observed at the N-terminal residues of the peptide. Fe(2+) binding is to promote the formation of Glu22-Lys28 salt-bridge which stabilized the turn conformation in the Phe19-Gly25 residues, subsequently β sheets were observed at His13-Lys18 and Gly29-Gly37 residues. The turn conformation facilitates the β sheets are arranged in parallel by enhancing the hydrophobic contact between Gly25 and Met35, Lys16 and Met35, Leu17 and Leu34, Val18 and Leu34 residues. The Fe(2+) binding reduced the helix structure and increases the β sheet content in the peptide, which suggested, Fe(2+) promotes the oligomerization by enhancing the peptide-peptide interaction. Proteins 2016; 84:1257-1274. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27214008

  1. Discovery and application of peptides that bind to proteins and solid state inorganic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stearns, Linda A.

    A series of three projects was undertaken on the theme of peptide-based molecular recognition. In the first project, a messenger RNA (mRNA) display selection was carried out against the II-VI semiconductors zinc sulfide (ZnS), zinc selenide (ZnSe), and cadmium sulfide (CdS). Sequence analysis of 18-mer semiconductor-binding peptides (SBPs) following four rounds of selection indicated that the amino acid sequences were enriched in polar residues compared to the naive library, suggesting that hydrogen-bonding interactions are a dominant mode of interaction between the SBPs and their cognate inorganic surfaces. Select peptides were expressed as fusions of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to visualize their recognition of semiconductor crystals. Interpretation of the results was complicated by a high fluorescence background that was observed with certain control GFP fusions. Additional experiments, including cross-specificity binding assays, are needed to characterize the peptides that were isolated in this selection. A second project described the practical application of a known inorganic-binding and nucleating peptide. Peptide A3, which was previously isolated by phage display, was chemically conjugated to a short DNA strand using the heterobifunctional linker succinimidyl 4-[N-maleimidomethyl]cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (SMCC). The resulting peptide-DNA conjugate was hybridized to ten complementary single-stranded capture probes extending outward from the surface of an origami DNA nanotube. A gold precursor solution was added to initiate nucleation and growth of gold nanoparticles at the site of the peptide. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to visualize the gold nanoparticle-decorated nanostructures. This approach holds immense promise for organizing compositionally-diverse materials at the nanoscale. In a third project, a novel non-iterative approach to mRNA display called covalent capture was demonstrated. Using human transferrin as a target

  2. Novel bioluminescent receptor-binding assays for peptide hormones: using ghrelin as a model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Lei; Song, Ge; Liu, Ya-Li; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2015-10-01

    Peptide hormones perform important biological functions by binding specific cell membrane receptors. For hormone-receptor interaction studies, receptor-binding assays are widely used. However, conventional receptor-binding assays rely on radioactive tracers that have drawbacks. In recent studies, we established novel non-radioactive receptor-binding assays for some recombinant protein hormones based on the ultrasensitive bioluminescence of a newly developed nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) reporter. In the present work, we extended the novel bioluminescent receptor-binding assay to peptide hormones that have small size and can be conveniently prepared by chemical synthesis. Human ghrelin, a 28-amino acid peptide hormone carrying a special O-fatty acid modification, was used as a model. To prepare a bioluminescent ghrelin tracer, a chemically synthesized ghrelin analog with a unique cysteine residue at the C-terminus was site-specifically conjugated with an engineered NanoLuc with a unique exposed cysteine residue at the C-terminus via a reversible disulfide linkage. The NanoLuc-conjugated ghrelin retained high binding affinity with the ghrelin receptor GHSR1a (K d = 1.14 ± 0.13 nM, n = 3) and was able to sensitively monitor the receptor-binding of various GHSR1a ligands. The novel bioluminescent receptor-binding assay will facilitate the interaction studies of ghrelin with its receptor. We also proposed general procedures for convenient conjugation of other peptide hormones with NanoLuc for novel bioluminescent receptor-binding assays. PMID:26002812

  3. Receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide in rat anterior pituitary glands: Localization of binding to lactotropes

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, I.E.; Rorstad, O.P. )

    1990-04-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has been implicated as a physiological PRL-releasing factor; however, characterization of VIP receptors on normal pituitaries using radioligand-binding methods has been problematic. In this study we demonstrated specific receptors for VIP in anterior pituitary glands of female rats using HPLC-purified monoiodinated (Tyr(125I)10)VIP. Binding of VIP was reversible, saturable to receptor and radioligand, regulated by guanine nucleotides, and dependent on time and temperature. Scatchard analysis of competitive binding studies indicated high and low affinity binding sites, with equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) of 0.19 +/- 0.03 and 28 +/- 16 nM, respectively. The corresponding maximum numbers of binding sites were 158 +/- 34 fmol/mg and 11.7 +/- 6.9 pmol/mg. Binding was specific, as peptides with structural homology to VIP were less than 100th as potent as VIP. The rank order of potency of the peptides tested was VIP greater than rat (r) peptide histidine isoleucine = human (h) PHI greater than rGRF greater than bovine GRF = porcine PHI = VIP-(10-28) greater than hGRF greater than secretin greater than apamin greater than glucagon. Radioligand binding was associated primarily with lactotrope-enriched fractions prepared by unit gravity sedimentation of dispersed anterior pituitary cells. VIP stimulated PRL release from cultured rat anterior pituitary cells, with an ED50 of 1 nM. These results, comprising the first identification of specific VIP receptors in normal rat anterior pituitary tissue using radioligand-binding methods, provide additional support for a biological role of VIP in lactotrope function.

  4. F2L, a peptide derived from heme-binding protein, inhibits formyl peptide receptor-mediated signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ha Young; Lee, Sun Young; Shin, Eun Ha; Kim, Sang Doo; Kim, Jung Mo; Lee, Mi-Sook; Ryu, Sung Ho; Bae, Yoe-Sik . E-mail: yoesik@donga.ac.kr

    2007-08-10

    F2L is an acetylated amino-terminal peptide derived from the cleavage of the human heme-binding protein. Very recently, F2L was identified as an endogenous chemoattractant peptide acting specifically through formyl peptide receptor-like (FPRL)2. In the present study, we report that F2L stimulates chemotactic migration in human neutrophils. However, F2L inhibits formyl peptide receptor (FPR) and FPRL1 activities, resulting in the complete inhibition of intracellular calcium increases, and superoxide generation induced by N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, MMK-1, or Trp-Lys-Tyr-Met-Val-D-Met (WKYMVm) in human neutrophils. In terms of the inhibitory role of F2L on FPR- and FPRL-mediated signaling, we found that F2L competitively inhibits the binding of {sup 125}I-WKYMVm to its specific receptors, FPR and FPRL1. F2L is the first endogenous molecule that inhibits FPR- and FPRL1-mediated signaling, and is expected to be useful in the study of FPR and FPRL1 signaling and in the development of drugs to treat diseases involving the FPR family of receptors.

  5. Binding of a C-end rule peptide to neuropilin-1 receptor: A molecular modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Haspel, Nurit; Zanuy, David; Nussinov, Ruth; Teesalu, Tambet; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Aleman, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) is a receptor that plays an essential role in angiogenesis, vascular permeability and nervous system development. Previous studies have shown that peptides with an N-terminal Arg, especially peptides with the four residue consensus sequence R/K/XXR/K bind to NRP-1 cell surfaces. Peptides containing such consensus sequences promote binding and internalization into cells, while blocking the C-terminal Arg (or Lys) prevents the internalization. In this study we use molecular dynamics simulations to model the structural properties of the NRP-1 complex with a prototypic CendR peptide, RPAR. Our simulations show that RPAR binds NRP-1 through specific interactions of the RPAR C-terminus: three hydrogen bonds and a salt bridge anchor the ligand in the receptor pocket. The modeling results were used as the starting point for a systematic computational study of new RPAR analogs based on chemical modifications of its natural amino acids. Comparison of the structural properties of the new peptide - receptor complexes with the original organization suggest that some of the analogs can increase the binding affinity while reducing the natural sensitivity of RXXR to endogenous proteases. PMID:21247217

  6. Sequence-based prediction of protein-peptide binding sites using support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Taherzadeh, Ghazaleh; Yang, Yuedong; Zhang, Tuo; Liew, Alan Wee-Chung; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2016-05-15

    Protein-peptide interactions are essential for all cellular processes including DNA repair, replication, gene-expression, and metabolism. As most protein-peptide interactions are uncharacterized, it is cost effective to investigate them computationally as the first step. All existing approaches for predicting protein-peptide binding sites, however, are based on protein structures despite the fact that the structures for most proteins are not yet solved. This article proposes the first machine-learning method called SPRINT to make Sequence-based prediction of Protein-peptide Residue-level Interactions. SPRINT yields a robust and consistent performance for 10-fold cross validations and independent test. The most important feature is evolution-generated sequence profiles. For the test set (1056 binding and non-binding residues), it yields a Matthews' Correlation Coefficient of 0.326 with a sensitivity of 64% and a specificity of 68%. This sequence-based technique shows comparable or more accurate than structure-based methods for peptide-binding site prediction. SPRINT is available as an online server at: http://sparks-lab.org/. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26833816

  7. [76Br]BMK-152, a non-peptide analogue, with high affinity and low non-specific binding for the Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Type 1 Receptor (CRF1 receptor)

    PubMed Central

    Jagoda, Elaine M.; Lang, Lixin; McCullough, Karen; Contoreggi, Carlo; Kim, B. Moon; Ma, Ying; Rice, Kenner C.; Szajek, Lawrence P; Eckelman, William C.; Kiesewetter, Dale O.

    2013-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide, regulates endocrine and autonomic responses to stress through G-protein coupled receptors, CRF1 or CRF2. A PET ligand able to monitor changes in CRF1 receptor occupancy in vivo would aid in understanding the pathophysiology of stress related diseases as well as in the clinical development of non-peptide antagonists with therapeutic value. We have radiolabeled the CRF1 receptor ligand, BMK-152 ([8-(4-bromo-2,6-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,7-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5-α][1,3,5]triazin-4-yl]-N,N-bis-(2-methoxyethyl)amine; ClogP= 2.6), at both the 3 and 4 position with [76Br]. Using in vitro autoradiography saturation studies the 4-[76Br]BMK-152 exhibited high affinity binding to both rat (Kd = 0.23 ± 0.07 nM; n=3) and monkey frontal cortex (Kd = 0.31 ± 0.08 nM; n=3) consistent with CRF1 receptor regional distribution whereas with the 3-[76Br]BMK-152, the Kd's could not be determined due to high non-specific binding. In vitro autoradiography competition studies using [125I]Tyr0-o-CRF confirmed that 3-Br-BMK-152 (Ki = 24.4 ± 4.9 nM; n=3) had lower affinity (70 fold) than 4-Br-BMK-152 (Ki = 0.35 ± 0.07 nM; n=3) in monkey frontal cortex and similiar studies using [125I]Sauvagine confirmed CRF1 receptor selectivity. In vivo studies with P-glycoprotein (PGP) knockout mice (KO) and their wildtype littermates (WT) showed that the brain uptake of 3-[76Br]BMK/4-[76Br]BMK was increased < 2 fold in KO vs WT indicating that 3-[76Br]BMK-152/4-[76Br]BMK was not a Pgp substrate. Rat brain uptakes of 4-[76Br] BMK-152 from ex vivo autoradiography studies showed regional localization consistent with known published CRF1 receptor distribution and potential as a PET ligand for in vivo imaging of CRF1 receptors. PMID:21308801

  8. Prediction of Nucleotide Binding Peptides Using Star Graph Topological Indices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Munteanu, Cristian R; Fernández Blanco, Enrique; Tan, Zhiliang; Santos Del Riego, Antonino; Pazos, Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    The nucleotide binding proteins are involved in many important cellular processes, such as transmission of genetic information or energy transfer and storage. Therefore, the screening of new peptides for this biological function is an important research topic. The current study proposes a mixed methodology to obtain the first classification model that is able to predict new nucleotide binding peptides, using only the amino acid sequence. Thus, the methodology uses a Star graph molecular descriptor of the peptide sequences and the Machine Learning technique for the best classifier. The best model represents a Random Forest classifier based on two features of the embedded and non-embedded graphs. The performance of the model is excellent, considering similar models in the field, with an Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUROC) value of 0.938 and true positive rate (TPR) of 0.886 (test subset). The prediction of new nucleotide binding peptides with this model could be useful for drug target studies in drug development. PMID:27491034

  9. Tumor-Specific Peptide, Selected from a Phage Peptide Library, Enhances Antitumor Activity of Lactaptin

    PubMed Central

    Makartsova, Anna A.; Fomin, Alexandr S.; Nushtaeva, Anna A.; Koval, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    A recombinant analogue of lactaptin (RL2), a new potential anticancer molecule, induces apoptosis in cultured tumor cells. The tumor suppression efficacy of RL2 was shown against mouse hepatoma-1 cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast adenocarcinoma cells. The RL2-based therapeutic drug lactaptin is distributed evenly throughout the organism, which reduces its antitumor efficacy. In the current study, we obtained a genetic construct that allows production of the recombinant fusion protein T3-RL2, consisting of RL2 and T3 peptide (YTYDPWLIFPAN), in E. coli cells. T3 peptide was selected from a phage peptide library as a result of two screenings: in vitro using MDA-MB-231 cell culture and in vivo using a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer MDA-MB-231. It was shown that the displayed peptide T3 provides binding and internalization of phage particles by MDA-MB-231 cells and their specific accumulation in MDA-MB-231 tumor tissue. In addition, based on the nucleotide sequences coding RL2 and the known tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, we obtained genetic constructs that provide synthesis of fusion proteins RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His. We studied the cytotoxic activity of fusion proteins T3-RL2, RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His in vitro using MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human adenocarcinoma cells. The in vitro results showed that the fusion proteins inhibit proliferation of both cell cultures, and their cytotoxic activity is higher than that of RL2. In vivo experiments on the study of the antitumor efficacy of the obtained fusion proteins demonstrated that T3-RL2 protein significantly inhibits MDA-MB-231 tumor growth in a xenograft model compared with RL2, while the antitumor effect of RL2-iRGD and RL-iRGD-His proteins is comparable to the effect of RL2. PMID:27513518

  10. The impact of cell-penetrating peptides on membrane bilayer structure during binding and insertion.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Daniel J; Lee, Tzong-Hsien; Kulkarni, Ketav; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the effect of penetratin and a truncated analogue on the bilayer structure using dual polarisation interferometry, to simultaneously measure changes in mass per unit area and birefringence (an optical parameter representing bilayer order) with high sensitivity during the binding and dissociation from the membrane. Specifically, we studied penetratin (RQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), along with a shortened and biotinylated version known as R8K-biotin (RRMKWKKK(Biotin)-NH2). Overall both peptides bound only weakly to the neutral DMPC and POPC bilayers, while much higher binding was observed for the anionic DMPC/DMPG and POPC/POPG. The binding of penetratin to gel-phase DMPC/DMPG was adequately represented by a two-state model, whereas on the fluid-phase POPC/POPG it exhibited a distinctly different binding pattern, best represented by a three-state kinetic model. However, R8K-biotin did not bind well to DMPC/DMPG and showed a more transitory and superficial binding to POPC/POPG. Comparing the modelling results for both peptides binding to POPC/POPG suggests an important role for a securely bound intermediate prior to penetratin insertion and translocation. Overall these results further elucidate the mechanism of penetratin, and provide another example of the significance of the ability of DPI to measure structural changes and the use of kinetic analysis to investigate the stages of peptide-membrane interactions. PMID:27163492

  11. Application of Synthetic Peptide Arrays To Uncover Cyclic Di-GMP Binding Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Düvel, Juliane; Bense, Sarina; Möller, Stefan; Bertinetti, Daniela; Schwede, Frank; Morr, Michael; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Jänsch, Lothar; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Frank, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT High levels of the universal bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) promote the establishment of surface-attached growth in many bacteria. Not only can c-di-GMP bind to nucleic acids and directly control gene expression, but it also binds to a diverse array of proteins of specialized functions and orchestrates their activity. Since its development in the early 1990s, the synthetic peptide array technique has become a powerful tool for high-throughput approaches and was successfully applied to investigate the binding specificity of protein-ligand interactions. In this study, we used peptide arrays to uncover the c-di-GMP binding site of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa protein (PA3740) that was isolated in a chemical proteomics approach. PA3740 was shown to bind c-di-GMP with a high affinity, and peptide arrays uncovered LKKALKKQTNLR to be a putative c-di-GMP binding motif. Most interestingly, different from the previously identified c-di-GMP binding motif of the PilZ domain (RXXXR) or the I site of diguanylate cyclases (RXXD), two leucine residues and a glutamine residue and not the charged amino acids provided the key residues of the binding sequence. Those three amino acids are highly conserved across PA3740 homologs, and their singular exchange to alanine reduced c-di-GMP binding within the full-length protein. IMPORTANCE In many bacterial pathogens the universal bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP governs the switch from the planktonic, motile mode of growth to the sessile, biofilm mode of growth. Bacteria adapt their intracellular c-di-GMP levels to a variety of environmental challenges. Several classes of c-di-GMP binding proteins have been structurally characterized, and diverse c-di-GMP binding domains have been identified. Nevertheless, for several c-di-GMP receptors, the binding motif remains to be determined. Here we show that the use of a synthetic peptide array allowed the identification of a c-di-GMP binding motif of a putative c

  12. An approach to the construction of tailor-made amphiphilic peptides that strongly and selectively bind to hairpin RNA targets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Jin; Hyun, Soonsil; Kieft, Jeffrey S; Yu, Jaehoon

    2009-02-18

    The hairpin RNA motif is one of the most frequently observed secondary structures and is often targeted by therapeutic agents. An amphiphilic peptide with seven lysine and eight leucine residues and its derivatives were designed for use as ligands against RNA hairpin motifs. We hypothesized that variations in both the hydrophobic leucine-rich and hydrophilic lysine-rich spheres of these amphiphilic peptides would create extra attractive interactions with hairpin RNA targets. A series of alanine-scanned peptides were probed to identify the most influential lysine residues in the hydrophilic sphere. The binding affinities of these modified peptides with several hairpins, such as RRE, TAR from HIV, a short hairpin from IRES of HCV, and a hairpin from the 16S A-site stem from rRNA, were determined. Since the hairpin from IRES of HCV was the most susceptible to the initial series of alanine-scanned peptides, studies investigating how further variations in the peptides effect binding employed the IRES hairpin. Next, the important Lys residues were substituted by shorter chain amines, such as ornithine, to place the peptide deeper into the hairpin groove. In a few cases, a 70-fold improved binding was observed for peptides that contained the specifically located shorter amine side chains. To further explore changes in binding affinities brought about by alterations in the hydrophobic sphere, tryptophan residues were introduced in place of leucine. A few peptides with tryptophan in specific positions also displayed 70-fold improved binding affinities. Finally, double mutant peptides incorporating both specifically located shorter amine side chains in the hydrophilic region and tryptophan residues in the hydrophobic region were synthesized. The binding affinities of peptides containing the simple double modification were observed to be 80 times lower, and their binding specificities were increased 40-fold. The results of this effort provide important information about

  13. Measurement of Peptide Binding to MHC Class II Molecules by Fluorescence Polarization.

    PubMed

    Yin, Liusong; Stern, Lawrence J

    2014-01-01

    Peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) molecules is a key process in antigen presentation and CD4+ T cell epitope selection. This unit describes a fairly simple but powerful fluorescence polarization-based binding competition assay to measure peptide binding to soluble recombinant MHCII molecules. The binding of a peptide of interest to MHCII molecules is assessed based on its ability to inhibit the binding of a fluorescence-labeled probe peptide, with the strength of binding characterized as IC50 (concentration required for 50% inhibition of probe peptide binding). Data analysis related to this method is discussed. In addition, this unit includes a support protocol for fluorescence labeling peptide using an amine-reactive probe. The advantage of this protocol is that it allows simple, fast, and high-throughput measurements of binding for a large set of peptides to MHCII molecules. PMID:25081912

  14. Brain natriuretic peptide binding sites in rats: In vitro autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad, E.M.; Thibault, G.; Pelletier, S.; Genest, J.; Cantin, M. )

    1990-08-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a recently discovered family of natriuretic peptides highly homologous to atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). Quantitative in vitro autoradiography with a computerized microdensitometer demonstrated that the distribution of BNP binding sites is similar to the known distribution pattern of ANF binding sites in rat tissues. Analysis of saturation and competition curves disclosed that the maximal binding capacity for BNP-(Asp-81--Tyr-106) and ANF-(Ser-99--Tyr-126) is similar within the plexiform layer of the olfactory bulb, the choroid plexus, and the adrenal zona glomerulosa. Examination of the competition curves of BNP-(Asp-81--Tyr-106), ANF-(Ser-99--Tyr-126), and des-(Gln-116--Gly-120)ANF-(Asp-102--Cys-121)NH2 (C-ANF, a ligand highly specific for ANF-R2 receptors) for {sup 125}I-labeled BNP-(Asp-81--Tyr-106) and {sup 125}I-labeled ANF-(Ser-99--Tyr-126) binding revealed that ANF fully displaced {sup 125}I-BNP binding and, conversely, BNP completely displaced {sup 125}I-ANF binding in these tissues, whereas C-ANF partially displaced 125-BNP and 125-ANF binding. Angiotensin II, insulin, glucagon, and substance P had no influence on {sup 125}I-BNP binding in the above tissues. These results support the view that BNP and ANF share the same binding sites in rats.

  15. Rapid discovery of peptide capture candidates with demonstrated specificity for structurally similar toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Coppock, Matthew B.; Farrell, Mikella E.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2016-05-01

    Peptides have emerged as viable alternatives to antibodies for molecular-based sensing due to their similarity in recognition ability despite their relative structural simplicity. Various methods for peptide capture reagent discovery exist, including phage display, yeast display, and bacterial display. One of the primary advantages of peptide discovery by bacterial display technology is the speed to candidate peptide capture agent, due to both rapid growth of bacteria and direct utilization of the sorted cells displaying each individual peptide for the subsequent round of biopanning. We have previously isolated peptide affinity reagents towards protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis using a commercially available automated magnetic sorting platform with improved enrichment as compared to manual magnetic sorting. In this work, we focus on adapting our automated biopanning method to a more challenging sort, to demonstrate the specificity possible with peptide capture agents. This was achieved using non-toxic, recombinant variants of ricin and abrin, RiVax and abrax, respectively, which are structurally similar Type II ribosomal inactivating proteins with significant sequence homology. After only two rounds of biopanning, enrichment of peptide capture candidates binding abrax but not RiVax was achieved as demonstrated by Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) studies. Further sorting optimization included negative sorting against RiVax, proper selection of autoMACS programs for specific sorting rounds, and using freshly made buffer and freshly thawed protein target for each round of biopanning for continued enrichment over all four rounds. Most of the resulting candidates from biopanning for abrax binding peptides were able to bind abrax but not RiVax, demonstrating that short peptide sequences can be highly specific even at this early discovery stage.

  16. Specific binding of atrial natriuretic factor in brain microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Chabrier, P.E.; Roubert, P.; Braquet, P.

    1987-04-01

    Cerebral capillaries constitute the blood-brain barrier. Studies of specific receptors (neurotransmitters or hormones) located on this structure can be performed by means of radioligand-binding techniques on isolated brain microvessels. The authors examined on pure bovine cerebral microvessel preparations the binding of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), using /sup 125/I-labeled ANF. Saturation and competition experiments demonstrated the presence of a single class of ANF-binding sites with high affinity and with a binding capacity of 58 fmol/mg of protein. The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled ANF to brain microvessels is specific, reversible, and time dependent, as is shown by association-dissociation experiments. The demonstration of specific ANF-binding sites on brain microvessels supposes a physiological role of ANF on brain microvasculature. The coexistence of ANF and angiotensin II receptors on this cerebrovascular tissue suggests that the two circulating peptides may act as mutual antagonists in the regulation of brain microcirculation and/or blood-brain barrier function.

  17. Specific Binding of Atrial Natriuretic Factor in Brain Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrier, Pierre E.; Roubert, Pierre; Braquet, Pierre

    1987-04-01

    Cerebral capillaries constitute the blood--brain barrier. Studies of specific receptors (neurotransmitters or hormones) located on this structure can be performed by means of radioligand-binding techniques on isolated brain microvessels. We examined on pure bovine cerebral microvessel preparations the binding of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), using 125I-labeled ANF. Saturation and competition experiments demonstrated the presence of a single class of ANF-binding sites with high affinity (dissociation constant, ≈ 10-10 M) and with a binding capacity of 58 fmol/mg of protein. The binding of 125I-labeled ANF to brain microvessels is specific, reversible, and time dependent, as is shown by association-dissociation experiments. The demonstration of specific ANF-binding sites on brain microvessels supposes a physiological role of ANF on brain microvasculature. The coexistence of ANF and angiotensin II receptors on this cerebrovascular tissue suggests that the two circulating peptides may act as mutual antagonists in the regulation of brain microcirculation and/or blood--brain barrier function.

  18. Competitive binding of antagonistic peptides fine-tunes stomatal patterning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Suk; Hnilova, Marketa; Maes, Michal; Lin, Ya-Chen Lisa; Putarjunan, Aarthi; Han, Soon-Ki; Avila, Julian; Torii, Keiko U

    2015-06-25

    During development, cells interpret complex and often conflicting signals to make optimal decisions. Plant stomata, the cellular interface between a plant and the atmosphere, develop according to positional cues, which include a family of secreted peptides called epidermal patterning factors (EPFs). How these signalling peptides orchestrate pattern formation at a molecular level remains unclear. Here we report in Arabidopsis that Stomagen (also called EPF-LIKE9) peptide, which promotes stomatal development, requires ERECTA (ER)-family receptor kinases and interferes with the inhibition of stomatal development by the EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR 2 (EPF2)-ER module. Both EPF2 and Stomagen directly bind to ER and its co-receptor TOO MANY MOUTHS. Stomagen peptide competitively replaced EPF2 binding to ER. Furthermore, application of EPF2, but not Stomagen, elicited rapid phosphorylation of downstream signalling components in vivo. Our findings demonstrate how a plant receptor agonist and antagonist define inhibitory and inductive cues to fine-tune tissue patterning on the plant epidermis. PMID:26083750

  19. Enhanced bioaccumulation of heavy metal ions by bacterial cells due to surface display of short metal binding peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Kotrba, P.; Ruml, T.; Doleckova, L.; Lorenzo, V. de

    1999-03-01

    Metal binding peptides of sequences Gly-His-His-Pro-His-Gly (named HP) and Gly-Cys-Gly-Cys-Pro-Cys-Gly-Cys-Gly (named CP) were genetically engineered into LamB protein and expressed in Escherichia coli. The Cd{sup 2+}-to-HP and Cd{sup 2+}-to-CP stoichiometries of peptides were 1:1 and 3:1, respectively. Hybrid LamB proteins were found to be properly folded in the outer membrane of E. coli. Isolated cell envelopes of E. coli bearing newly added metal binding peptides showed an up to 1.8-fold increase in Cd{sup 2+} binding capacity. The bioaccumulation of Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} by E. coli was evaluated. Surface display of CP multiplied the ability of E. coli to bind Cd{sup 2+} from growth medium fourfold. Display of HP peptide did not contribute to an increase in the accumulation of Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}. However, Cu{sup 2+} ceased contribution of HP for Cd{sup 2+} accumulation, probably due to the strong binding of Cu{sup 2+} to HP. Thus, considering the cooperation of cell structures with inserted peptides, the relative affinities of metal binding peptide and, for example, the cell wall to metal ion should be taken into account in the rational design of peptide sequences possessing specificity for a particular metal.

  20. Enhanced Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metal Ions by Bacterial Cells Due to Surface Display of Short Metal Binding Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kotrba, Pavel; Dolečková, Lucie; de Lorenzo, Víctor; Ruml, Tomas

    1999-01-01

    Metal binding peptides of sequences Gly-His-His-Pro-His-Gly (named HP) and Gly-Cys-Gly-Cys-Pro-Cys-Gly-Cys-Gly (named CP) were genetically engineered into LamB protein and expressed in Escherichia coli. The Cd2+-to-HP and Cd2+-to-CP stoichiometries of peptides were 1:1 and 3:1, respectively. Hybrid LamB proteins were found to be properly folded in the outer membrane of E. coli. Isolated cell envelopes of E. coli bearing newly added metal binding peptides showed an up to 1.8-fold increase in Cd2+ binding capacity. The bioaccumulation of Cd2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ by E. coli was evaluated. Surface display of CP multiplied the ability of E. coli to bind Cd2+ from growth medium fourfold. Display of HP peptide did not contribute to an increase in the accumulation of Cu2+ and Zn2+. However, Cu2+ ceased contribution of HP for Cd2+ accumulation, probably due to the strong binding of Cu2+ to HP. Thus, considering the cooperation of cell structures with inserted peptides, the relative affinities of metal binding peptide and, for example, the cell wall to metal ion should be taken into account in the rational design of peptide sequences possessing specificity for a particular metal. PMID:10049868

  1. Insights into the C-terminal Peptide Binding Specificity of the PDZ Domain of Neuronal Nitric-oxide Synthase: CHARACTERIZATION OF THE INTERACTION WITH THE TIGHT JUNCTION PROTEIN CLAUDIN-3.

    PubMed

    Merino-Gracia, Javier; Costas-Insua, Carlos; Canales, María Ángeles; Rodríguez-Crespo, Ignacio

    2016-05-27

    Neuronal nitric-oxide synthase, unlike its endothelial and inducible counterparts, displays a PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1) domain located at its N terminus involved in subcellular targeting. The C termini of various cellular proteins insert within the binding groove of this PDZ domain and determine the subcellular distribution of neuronal NOS (nNOS). The molecular mechanisms underlying these interactions are poorly understood because the PDZ domain of nNOS can apparently exhibit class I, class II, and class III binding specificity. In addition, it has been recently suggested that the PDZ domain of nNOS binds with very low affinity to the C termini of target proteins, and a necessary simultaneous lateral interaction must take place for binding to occur. We describe herein that the PDZ domain of nNOS can behave as a bona fide class III PDZ domain and bind to C-terminal sequences with acidic residues at the P-2 position with low micromolar binding constants. Binding to C-terminal sequences with a hydrophobic residue at the P-2 position plus an acidic residue at the P-3 position (class II) can also occur, although interactions involving residues extending up to the P-7 position mediate this type of binding. This promiscuous behavior also extends to its association to class I sequences, which must display a Glu residue at P-3 and a Thr residue at P-2 By means of site-directed mutagenesis and NMR spectroscopy, we have been able to identify the residues involved in each specific type of binding and rationalize the mechanisms used to recognize binding partners. Finally, we have analyzed the high affinity association of the PDZ domain of nNOS to claudin-3 and claudin-14, two tight junction tetraspan membrane proteins that are essential components of the paracellular barrier. PMID:27030110

  2. SABinder: A Web Service for Predicting Streptavidin-Binding Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Juanjuan; Ru, Beibei; Zhou, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Streptavidin is sometimes used as the intended target to screen phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries for streptavidin-binding peptides (SBPs). More often in the biopanning system, however, streptavidin is just a commonly used anchoring molecule that can efficiently capture the biotinylated target. In this case, SBPs creeping into the biopanning results are not desired binders but target-unrelated peptides (TUP). Taking them as intended binders may mislead subsequent studies. Therefore, it is important to find if a peptide is likely to be an SBP when streptavidin is either the intended target or just the anchoring molecule. In this paper, we describe an SVM-based ensemble predictor called SABinder. It is the first predictor for SBP. The model was built with the feature of optimized dipeptide composition. It was observed that 89.20% (MCC = 0.78; AUC = 0.93; permutation test, p < 0.001) of peptides were correctly classified. As a web server, SABinder is freely accessible. The tool provides a highly efficient way to exclude potential SBP when they are TUP or to facilitate identification of possibly new SBP when they are the desired binders. In either case, it will be helpful and can benefit related scientific community. PMID:27610387

  3. SABinder: A Web Service for Predicting Streptavidin-Binding Peptides.

    PubMed

    He, Bifang; Kang, Juanjuan; Ru, Beibei; Ding, Hui; Zhou, Peng; Huang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Streptavidin is sometimes used as the intended target to screen phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries for streptavidin-binding peptides (SBPs). More often in the biopanning system, however, streptavidin is just a commonly used anchoring molecule that can efficiently capture the biotinylated target. In this case, SBPs creeping into the biopanning results are not desired binders but target-unrelated peptides (TUP). Taking them as intended binders may mislead subsequent studies. Therefore, it is important to find if a peptide is likely to be an SBP when streptavidin is either the intended target or just the anchoring molecule. In this paper, we describe an SVM-based ensemble predictor called SABinder. It is the first predictor for SBP. The model was built with the feature of optimized dipeptide composition. It was observed that 89.20% (MCC = 0.78; AUC = 0.93; permutation test, p < 0.001) of peptides were correctly classified. As a web server, SABinder is freely accessible. The tool provides a highly efficient way to exclude potential SBP when they are TUP or to facilitate identification of possibly new SBP when they are the desired binders. In either case, it will be helpful and can benefit related scientific community. PMID:27610387

  4. Peptide ligands specific to the oxidized form of escherichia coli thioredoxin.

    SciTech Connect

    Scholle, M. D.; Banach, B. S.; Hamdan, S. M.; Richardson, C. C.; Kay, B. K.; Biosciences Division; Amunix, Inc.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Harvard Medical School

    2008-11-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a highly conserved redox protein involved in several essential cellular processes. In this study, our goal was to isolate peptide ligands to Escherichia coli Trx that mimic protein-protein interactions, specifically the T7 polymerase-Trx interaction. To do this, we subjected Trx to affinity selection against a panel of linear and cysteine-constrained peptides using M13 phage display. A novel cyclized conserved peptide sequence, with a motif of C(D/N/S/T/G)D(S/T)-hydrophobic-C-X-hydrophobic-P, was isolated to Trx. These peptides bound specifically to the E. coli Trx when compared to the human and spirulina homologs. An alanine substitution of the active site cysteines (CGPC) resulted in a significant loss of peptide binding affinity to the Cys-32 mutant. The peptides were also characterized in the context of Trx's role as a processivity factor of the T7 DNA polymerase (gp5). As the interaction between gp5 and Trx normally takes place under reducing conditions, which might interfere with the conformation of the disulfide-bridged peptides, we made use of a 22 residue deletion mutant of gp5 in the thioredoxin binding domain (gp5{Delta}22) that bypassed the requirements of reducing conditions to interact with Trx. A competition study revealed that the peptide selectively inhibits the interaction of gp5{Delta}22 with Trx, under oxidizing conditions, with an IC50 of {approx} 10 {micro}M.

  5. Quantitative specificity-based display library screening identifies determinants of antibody-epitope binding specificity

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sejal S; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2009-01-01

    Despite the critical importance of molecular specificity in bimolecular systems, in vitro display technologies have been applied extensively for affinity maturation of peptides and antibodies without explicitly measuring the specificity of the desired interaction. We devised a general strategy to measure, screen, and evolve specificity of protein ligand interactions analogous to widely used affinity maturation strategies. The specificity of binding to target and nontarget antibodies labeled with spectrally distinct fluorophores was measured simultaneously in protein mixtures via multiparameter flow cytometry, thereby enabling screening for high target antibody specificity. Isolated antibody specific ligands exhibited varying specificity, revealing critical amino acid determinants for target recognition and nontarget avoidance in complex mixtures. Molecular specificity in the mixture was further enhanced by quantitative directed evolution, yielding a family of epitopes exhibiting improved specificities equivalent, or superior to, the native peptide antigen to which the antibody was raised. Specificity screening simultaneously favored affinity, yielding ligands with three-fold improved affinity relative to the parent epitope. Quantitative specificity screening will be useful to screen, evolve, and characterize the specificity of protein and peptide interactions for molecular recognition applications. PMID:19610073

  6. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding.

    PubMed

    Memczak, Henry; Lauster, Daniel; Kar, Parimal; Di Lella, Santiago; Volkmer, Rudolf; Knecht, Volker; Herrmann, Andreas; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Bier, Frank F; Stöcklein, Walter F M

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing. PMID:27415624

  7. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Parimal; Di Lella, Santiago; Volkmer, Rudolf; Knecht, Volker; Herrmann, Andreas; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Bier, Frank F.; Stöcklein, Walter F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing. PMID:27415624

  8. Nanoparticle Assembly and Gelatin Binding Mediated by Triple Helical Collagen Mimetic Peptide.

    PubMed

    San, Boi Hoa; Li, Yang; Tarbet, E Bart; Yu, S Michael

    2016-08-10

    Peptide-conjugated nanoparticles (NPs) have promising potential for applications in biosensing, diagnosis, and therapeutics because of their appropriate size, unique self-assembly, and specific substrate-binding properties. However, controlled assembly and selective target binding are difficult to achieve with simple peptides on NP surfaces because high surface energy makes NPs prone to self-aggregate and adhere nonspecifically. Here, we report the self-assembly and gelatin binding properties of collagen mimetic peptide (CMP) conjugated gold NPs (CMP-NPs). We show that the orientation of CMPs displayed on the NP surface can control NP assembly either by promoting or hindering triple helical folding between CMPs of neighboring NPs. We also show that CMP-NPs can specifically bind to denatured collagen by forming triple-helical hybrids between denatured collagen strands and CMPs, demonstrating their potential use for detection and selective removal of gelatin from protein mixtures. CMP conjugated NPs offer a simple and effective method for NP assembly and for targeting denatured collagens with high specificity. Therefore, they may lead to new types of functional nanomaterials for detection and study of denatured collagen associated with diseases characterized by high levels of collagen degradation. PMID:27403657

  9. α-Enolase-binding peptide enhances drug delivery efficiency and therapeutic efficacy against colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Hsun; Kuo, Yi-Huei; Hong, Ruey-Long; Wu, Han-Chung

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers and a leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Current treatment for colorectal cancer results in only limited success, and more effective therapeutic approaches are thus urgently needed. The development of new methods for early detection and effective treatments for cancer is contingent on the identification of biomarkers on the surface of cancer cells, as well as isolation of tumor-specific ligands with high binding affinity to such biomarkers. In vitro biopanning of a phage-displayed peptide library was used to identify specific peptides binding to human colorectal carcinoma cells. The targeting peptide pHCT74 showed the greatest potential for drug delivery in both in vitro and in vivo studies. The use of biotinylated peptides combined with an affinity trapping method and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identified the target protein for the pHCT74 peptide as α-enolase. In animal model studies, combined pHCT74-conjugated liposomal doxorubicin (pHCT74-LD) and pHCT74-conjugated liposomal vinorelbine (pHCT74-sLV) therapy exhibited an enhanced antitumor effect and markedly extended the survival of mice with human colorectal cancer in subcutaneous and orthotopic models. Our findings indicate that α-enolase-targeted lipid nanoparticles have great potential for application in targeted drug delivery systems for colorectal cancer therapy. PMID:26041708

  10. Role of membrane lipids in peptide hormone function: binding of enkephalins to micelles.

    PubMed Central

    Deber, C M; Behnam, B A

    1984-01-01

    In the course of their biological function, peptide hormones must be transferred from an aqueous phase to the lipid-rich environment of their membrane-bound receptor proteins. We have investigated the possible influence of phospholipids in this process, using 360-MHz 1H and 90-MHz 13C NMR spectroscopy to examine the association of the opioid peptides [Met]- and [Leu]enkephalins (Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met/Leu) with phospholipid micelles. Binding of peptides to lipid was monitored in NMR spectra by selective chemical shift movements (e.g., the Phe aromatic ring protons) and residue-specific line broadening (e.g., of Met/Leu carbonyl- and alpha-carbon resonances). Results established that the zwitterionic hormones associate hydrophobically both with a neutral lipid (lysophosphatidylcholine) and (also electrostatically) with a negative lipid (lysophosphatidylglycerol). An association constant of Ka = 3.7 X 10(1) M-1 was calculated for the hydrophobic binding of enkephalin to lysophosphatidylcholine. NMR data suggested that enkephalin binds to the lipid with Met/Leu, Phe, and likely Tyr side-chain substituents associated with nonpolar interior regions of the micelle, whereas the COOH-terminal carboxylate moiety of the peptide is located in the surface of the lipid particle. An "attraction-interaction" model is proposed for hormone-lipid association wherein negative lipids attract the hormone electrostatically, while site-specific hydrophobic contacts facilitate its entry, concentration, and orientation into the lipid phase. PMID:6320173

  11. Evaluation of Phage Display Discovered Peptides as Ligands for Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA)

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, W. Barry

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify potential ligands of PSMA suitable for further development as novel PSMA-targeted peptides using phage display technology. The human PSMA protein was immobilized as a target followed by incubation with a 15-mer phage display random peptide library. After one round of prescreening and two rounds of screening, high-stringency screening at the third round of panning was performed to identify the highest affinity binders. Phages which had a specific binding activity to PSMA in human prostate cancer cells were isolated and the DNA corresponding to the 15-mers were sequenced to provide three consensus sequences: GDHSPFT, SHFSVGS and EVPRLSLLAVFL as well as other sequences that did not display consensus. Two of the peptide sequences deduced from DNA sequencing of binding phages, SHSFSVGSGDHSPFT and GRFLTGGTGRLLRIS were labeled with 5-carboxyfluorescein and shown to bind and co-internalize with PSMA on human prostate cancer cells by fluorescence microscopy. The high stringency requirements yielded peptides with affinities KD∼1 µM or greater which are suitable starting points for affinity maturation. While these values were less than anticipated, the high stringency did yield peptide sequences that apparently bound to different surfaces on PSMA. These peptide sequences could be the basis for further development of peptides for prostate cancer tumor imaging and therapy. PMID:23935860

  12. Inorganic binding peptides designed by phage display techniques for biotechnology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chih-Wei

    Biomacromolecules play an important role in the control of hard tissue structure and function via specific molecular recognition interactions between proteins of the matrix and inorganic species of the biomineral phase. During the construction of the tissue, biomacromolecules are usually folded into a certain comformation, analogous to a "lock" for fitting with other proteins or smaller molecules as a "key". Currently, the rational design of molecular recognition in biomacro-molecules is still hard to accomplish because the protein conformation is too complex to precisely predict based on the existing conformational information of proteins found in biological systems. In the past two decades, the combinatorial approach (e.g. phage display techniques) has been used to select short binding peptides with molecular recognition to an inorganic target material without a prior knowledge of the amino acid sequence required for the specific binding. The technique has been referred to as "biopanning" because bacteriophages are used to "screen" for peptides that exhibit strong binding to a target material of interest. In this study, two diverse applications were chosen to demonstrate the utility of the biopanning approach. In one project, phage display techniques were used to pan for Indium Zinc Oxide (InZnO) binding peptides to serve as linkers between transducer devices and biosensing elements for demonstration of the feasibility of reversibly electro-activated biosensors. The amorphous InZnO, with its homogeneous surface, led to three consensus peptide sequences, AGFPNSTHSSNL, SHAPDSTWFALF, and TNSSSQFVVAIP. In addition, it was demonstrated that some selected phage clones of the InZnO binding peptides were able to be released from the InZnO surface after applying a voltage of 1400 mV on an electro-activated releasing device. In the second project, phage display techniques were used to select phage clones that bind specifically to francolite mineral in order to achieve

  13. Induction of Chitin-Binding Proteins during the Specific Attachment of the Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi to Chitin

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Michael T.; Kirchman, David L.

    1994-01-01

    Previous work has shown that attachment of Vibrio harveyi to chitin is specific and involves at least two chitin-binding peptides. However, the roles and regulation of these chitin-binding peptides in attachment are still unclear. Here we show that preincubation with the oligomeric sugars composing chitin stimulated chitinase activity, cellular attachment to chitin, and production of chitin-binding peptides. One of these peptides, a 53-kDa peptide, is produced constitutively and appears to mediate initial attachment to chitin. Synthesis of another peptide, a 150-kDa chitin-binding peptide, is induced by chitin and thus may be involved in time-dependent attachment. Coordinated regulation of attachment and degradation of chitin may give bacteria like V. harveyi a selective advantage over other bacteria in nutrient-poor aquatic environments. Images PMID:16349455

  14. Strong Electrostatic Interactions Lead to Entropically Favorable Binding of Peptides to Charged Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sprenger, K G; Pfaendtner, Jim

    2016-06-01

    Thermodynamic analyses can provide key insights into the origins of protein self-assembly on surfaces, protein function, and protein stability. However, obtaining quantitative measurements of thermodynamic observables from unbiased classical simulations of peptide or protein adsorption is challenging because of sampling limitations brought on by strong biomolecule/surface binding forces as well as time scale limitations. We used the parallel tempering metadynamics in the well-tempered ensemble (PTMetaD-WTE) enhanced sampling method to study the adsorption behavior and thermodynamics of several explicitly solvated model peptide adsorption systems, providing new molecular-level insight into the biomolecule adsorption process. Specifically studied were peptides LKα14 and LKβ15 and trpcage miniprotein adsorbing onto a charged, hydrophilic self-assembled monolayer surface functionalized with a carboxylic acid/carboxylate headgroup and a neutral, hydrophobic methyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer surface. Binding free energies were calculated as a function of temperature for each system and decomposed into their respective energetic and entropic contributions. We investigated how specific interfacial features such as peptide/surface electrostatic interactions and surface-bound ion content affect the thermodynamic landscape of adsorption and lead to differences in surface-bound conformations of the peptides. Results show that upon adsorption to the charged surface, configurational entropy gains of the released solvent molecules dominate the configurational entropy losses of the bound peptide. This behavior leads to an apparent increase in overall system entropy upon binding and therefore to the surprising and seemingly nonphysical result of an apparent increased binding free energy at elevated temperatures. Opposite effects and conclusions are found for the neutral surface. Additional simulations demonstrate that by adjusting the ionic strength of the solution

  15. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Emily B.; Williams, Angela; Heidel, Eric; Macy, Sallie; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Polybasic peptide p5 binds human light chain amyloid extracts. •The binding of p5 with amyloid involves both glycosaminoglycans and fibrils. •Heparinase treatment led to a correlation between p5 binding and fibril content. •p5 binding to AL amyloid requires electrostatic interactions. -- Abstract: In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as

  16. Learning a peptide-protein binding affinity predictor with kernel ridge regression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The cellular function of a vast majority of proteins is performed through physical interactions with other biomolecules, which, most of the time, are other proteins. Peptides represent templates of choice for mimicking a secondary structure in order to modulate protein-protein interaction. They are thus an interesting class of therapeutics since they also display strong activity, high selectivity, low toxicity and few drug-drug interactions. Furthermore, predicting peptides that would bind to a specific MHC alleles would be of tremendous benefit to improve vaccine based therapy and possibly generate antibodies with greater affinity. Modern computational methods have the potential to accelerate and lower the cost of drug and vaccine discovery by selecting potential compounds for testing in silico prior to biological validation. Results We propose a specialized string kernel for small bio-molecules, peptides and pseudo-sequences of binding interfaces. The kernel incorporates physico-chemical properties of amino acids and elegantly generalizes eight kernels, comprised of the Oligo, the Weighted Degree, the Blended Spectrum, and the Radial Basis Function. We provide a low complexity dynamic programming algorithm for the exact computation of the kernel and a linear time algorithm for it’s approximation. Combined with kernel ridge regression and SupCK, a novel binding pocket kernel, the proposed kernel yields biologically relevant and good prediction accuracy on the PepX database. For the first time, a machine learning predictor is capable of predicting the binding affinity of any peptide to any protein with reasonable accuracy. The method was also applied to both single-target and pan-specific Major Histocompatibility Complex class II benchmark datasets and three Quantitative Structure Affinity Model benchmark datasets. Conclusion On all benchmarks, our method significantly (p-value ≤ 0.057) outperforms the current state-of-the-art methods at predicting

  17. An efficient strategy to enhance binding affinity and specificity of a known isozyme inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Jee, Joo-Eun; Lim, Jaehong; Ong, Yong Siang; Oon, Jessica; Gao, Liqian; Choi, Hak Soo; Lee, Su Seong

    2016-07-12

    The binding profile of a known inhibitor, benzenesulfonamide, against a family of carbonic anhydrase isozymes was efficiently enhanced via high-throughput screening of customized combinatorial one-bead-one-compound peptide libraries modified with the inhibitor molecule. The screening of the conjugate libraries recognized subtle variations in the microenvironments of the target enzyme and thus facilitated the identification of short peptide sequences that bind selectively to a close proximity of the active site. The identified peptide portions contributed significantly to the overall binding of the conjugate peptides with greatly enhanced affinity as well as improved specificity towards the target isozyme. The interactions between the inhibitors and the isozymes were validated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), pull-down assay and enzymatic activity measurement. This high-throughput approach proved useful and efficient to enhance the binding profile of known inhibitors and may apply to developing effective inhibitors for a wide range of isozyme families. PMID:27339902

  18. A computational framework for the analysis of peptide microarray antibody binding data with application to HIV vaccine profiling.

    PubMed

    Imholte, Greg C; Sauteraud, Renan; Korber, Bette; Bailer, Robert T; Turk, Ellen T; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D; Mascola, John R; Koup, Richard A; Montefiori, David C; Gottardo, Raphael

    2013-09-30

    We present an integrated analytical method for analyzing peptide microarray antibody binding data, from normalization through subject-specific positivity calls and data integration and visualization. Current techniques for the normalization of such data sets do not account for non-specific binding activity. A novel normalization technique based on peptide sequence information quickly and effectively reduced systematic biases. We also employed a sliding mean window technique that borrows strength from peptides sharing similar sequences, resulting in reduced signal variability. A smoothed signal aided in the detection of weak antibody binding hotspots. A new principled FDR method of setting positivity thresholds struck a balance between sensitivity and specificity. In addition, we demonstrate the utility and importance of using baseline control measurements when making subject-specific positivity calls. Data sets from two human clinical trials of candidate HIV-1 vaccines were used to validate the effectiveness of our overall computational framework. PMID:23770318

  19. Predicting tissue specific transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies of gene regulation often utilize genome-wide predictions of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. Most existing prediction methods are based on sequence information alone, ignoring biological contexts such as developmental stages and tissue types. Experimental methods to study in vivo binding, including ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq, can only study one transcription factor in a single cell type and under a specific condition in each experiment, and therefore cannot scale to determine the full set of regulatory interactions in mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks. Results We developed a new computational approach, PIPES, for predicting tissue-specific TF binding. PIPES integrates in vitro protein binding microarrays (PBMs), sequence conservation and tissue-specific epigenetic (DNase I hypersensitivity) information. We demonstrate that PIPES improves over existing methods on distinguishing between in vivo bound and unbound sequences using ChIP-seq data for 11 mouse TFs. In addition, our predictions are in good agreement with current knowledge of tissue-specific TF regulation. Conclusions We provide a systematic map of computationally predicted tissue-specific binding targets for 284 mouse TFs across 55 tissue/cell types. Such comprehensive resource is useful for researchers studying gene regulation. PMID:24238150

  20. Lock and Key Binding of the HOX YPWM Peptide to the PBX Homeodomain

    SciTech Connect

    Sprules, Tara; Green, N.; Featherstone, M.; Gehring, Kalle

    2003-01-10

    HOX homeodomain proteins bind short core DNA sequences to control very specific developmental processes. DNA binding affinity and sequence selectivity are increased by the formation of cooperative complexes with the PBX homeodomain protein. A conserved YPWM motif in the HOX protein is necessary for cooperative binding with PBX. We have determined the structure of a PBX homeodomain bound to a 14-mer DNA duplex. A relaxation-optimized procedure was developed to measure DNA residual dipolar couplings at natural abundance in the 20-kDa binary complex. When the PBX homeodomain binds to DNA, a fourth alpha-helix is formed in the homeodomain. This helix rigidifies the DNA recognition helix of PBX and forms a hydrophobic binding site for the HOX YPWM peptide. The HOX peptide itself shows some structure in solution and suggests that the interaction between PBX and HOX is an example of "lock and key" binding. The NMR structure explains the requirement of DNA for the PBX-HOX interaction and the increased affinity of DNA binding.

  1. Binding kinetics of grouper nervous necrosis viruses with functionalized antimicrobial peptides by nanomechanical detection.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Shu; Chi, Shau-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Jen; Chia, Ta-Jui; Huang, Long-Sun

    2012-01-15

    We report the binding kinetics of fish-infected grouper nervous necrosis viruses (NNV) and selected antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) by nanomechanical detection. AMPs, the vital member in an innate immunity, are promising candidates in the fight against pathogens due to their broad range of antimicrobial activity and low toxicity. Grouper NNV primarily cause mass mortality of many marine cultured fish species, and two selected AMPs in this study were found to inhibit viruses by agglutinating its virions to form aggregates. The binding activity of NNVs with functionalized AMPs onto a sensing microcantilever yielded induced surface stresses, indicating high binding strength of molecular interaction. The binding affinity and kinetic rate constants of molecular recognition events calculated for NNV-AMP(TH1-5) compared to NNV-AMP(cSALF) were found to be 2.1-fold and 4.43-fold, respectively, indicating TH1-5 effectively bind with NNV more than cSALF. Moreover, a microscopic X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique was employed for further validation of pre- and post-NNV binding onto peptides-functionalized sensing surface. An increase in the spectrum and intensity of the P 2p and N 1s elements for the post-NNV binding was clearly shown to ensure the existence of phosphate groups and nitrogen-containing ring structures of specific NNV-TH1-5 interaction. Therefore, the microcantilever biosensing technique provides a potential and useful screening of AMPs for affinity to NNVs. PMID:22035974

  2. Interaction of the Heparin-Binding Consensus Sequence of β-Amyloid Peptides with Heparin and Heparin-Derived Oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khanh; Rabenstein, Dallas L

    2016-03-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques in the AD brain. Comprised primarily of the 40- and 42-residue β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, there is evidence that the heparan sulfate (HS) of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) plays a role in amyloid plaque formation and stability; however, details of the interaction of Aβ peptides with HS are not known. We have characterized the interaction of heparin and heparin-derived oligosaccharides with a model peptide for the heparin- and HS-binding domain of Aβ peptides (Ac-VHHQKLV-NH2; Aβ(12-18)), with mutants of Aβ(12-18), and with additional histidine-containing peptides. The nature of the binding interaction was characterized by NMR, binding constants and other thermodynamic parameters were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and relative binding affinities were determined by heparin affinity chromatography. The binding of Aβ(12-18) by heparin and heparin-derived oligosaccharides is pH-dependent, with the imidazolium groups of the histidine side chains interacting site-specifically within a cleft created by a trisaccharide sequence of heparin, the binding is mediated by electrostatic interactions, and there is a significant entropic contribution to the binding free energy as a result of displacement of Na(+) ions from heparin upon binding of cationic Aβ(12-18). The binding constant decreases as the size of the heparin-derived oligosaccharide decreases and as the concentration of Na(+) ion in the bulk solution increases. Structure-binding relationships characterized in this study are analyzed and discussed in terms of the counterion condensation theory of the binding of cationic peptides by anionic polyelectrolytes. PMID:26872053

  3. Engineering Photosystem I Complexes with Metal Oxide Binding Peptides for Bioelectronic Applications.

    PubMed

    Simmerman, Richard F; Zhu, Tuo; Baker, David R; Wang, Lijia; Mishra, Sanjay R; Lundgren, Cynthia A; Bruce, Barry D

    2015-10-21

    Conventional dye-sensitized solar cells comprise semiconducting anodes sensitized with complex synthetic organometallic dyes, a platinum counter electrode, and a liquid electrolyte. This work focuses on replacing synthetic dyes with a naturally occurring biological pigment-protein complex known as Photosystem I (PSI). Specifically, ZnO binding peptides (ZOBiP)-fused PSI subunits (ZOBiP-PsaD and ZOBiP-PsaE) and TiO2 binding peptides (TOBiP)-fused ferredoxin (TOBiP-Fd) have been produced recombinantly from Escherichia coli. The MOBiP-fused peptides have been characterized via western blotting, circular dichroism, MALDI-TOF, and cyclic voltammetry. ZOBiP-PSI subunits have been used to replace wild-type PsaD and PsaE, and TOBiP-Fd has been chemically cross-linked to the stromal hump of PSI. These MOBiP peptides and MOBiP-PSI complexes have been produced and incubated with various metal oxide nanoparticles, showing increased binding when compared to that of wild-type PSI complexes. PMID:26301489

  4. A combined NMR and computational approach to investigate peptide binding to a designed Armadillo repeat protein.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Christina; Christen, Martin T; Watson, Randall P; Mihajlovic, Maja; Zhou, Ting; Honegger, Annemarie; Plückthun, Andreas; Caflisch, Amedeo; Zerbe, Oliver

    2015-05-22

    The specific recognition of peptide sequences by proteins plays an important role both in biology and in diagnostic applications. Here we characterize the relatively weak binding of the peptide neurotensin (NT) to the previously developed Armadillo repeat protein VG_328 by a multidisciplinary approach based on solution NMR spectroscopy, mutational studies, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, totaling 20μs for all MD runs. We describe assignment challenges arising from the repetitive nature of the protein sequence, and we present novel approaches to address them. Partial assignments obtained for VG_328 in combination with chemical shift perturbations allowed us to identify the repeats not involved in binding. Their subsequent elimination resulted in a reduced-size binder with very similar affinity for NT, for which near-complete backbone assignments were achieved. A binding mode suggested by automatic docking and further validated by explicit solvent MD simulations is consistent with paramagnetic relaxation enhancement data collected using spin-labeled NT. Favorable intermolecular interactions are observed in the MD simulations for the residues that were previously shown to contribute to binding in an Ala scan of NT. We further characterized the role of residues within the N-cap for protein stability and peptide binding. Our multidisciplinary approach demonstrates that an initial low-resolution picture for a low-micromolar-peptide binder can be refined through the combination of NMR, protein design, docking, and MD simulations to establish its binding mode, even in the absence of crystallographic data, thereby providing valuable information for further design. PMID:25816772

  5. Mineral-binding milk proteins and peptides; occurrence, biochemical and technological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Vegarud, G E; Langsrud, T; Svenning, C

    2000-11-01

    Minerals and trace elements in cow's milk occur as inorganic ions and salts or form complexes with proteins and peptides, carbohydrates, fats and small molecules. The main mineral binder or chelators of calcium are the caseins, alphas1-casein, alphas2-casein, beta-casein and kappa-casein, but also whey proteins and lactoferrin bind specific minerals like calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, sodium and potassium. Less documented is the binding of trace elements. Peptides obtained by in vitro or in vivo hydrolysis act as mineral trappers through specific and non-specific binding sites. They may then function as carriers, chelators, of various minerals and thus enhance or inhibit bioavailability. Peptides from milk proteins have found interesting new applications in the food industry as products with improved functionality or as ingredients of dietary products, or used in pharmaceutical industry. Fortification of foods with minerals in a low concentration has for a long time been used in some countries to overcome mineral deficiency, which is an increasing problem in humans. These types of foods are being used to create a new generation of super foods in the industry today. PMID:11242452

  6. Identification of Four-Jointed Box 1 (FJX1)-Specific Peptides for Immunotherapy of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chai, San Jiun; Yap, Yoke Yeow; Foo, Yoke Ching; Yap, Lee Fah; Ponniah, Sathibalan; Teo, Soo Hwang; Cheong, Sok Ching; Patel, Vyomesh; Lim, Kue Peng

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is highly prevalent in South East Asia and China. The poor outcome is due to late presentation, recurrence, distant metastasis and limited therapeutic options. For improved treatment outcome, immunotherapeutic approaches focusing on dendritic and autologous cytotoxic T-cell based therapies have been developed, but cost and infrastructure remain barriers for implementing these in low-resource settings. As our prior observations had found that four-jointed box 1 (FJX1), a tumor antigen, is overexpressed in NPCs, we investigated if short 9–20 amino acid sequence specific peptides matching to FJX1 requiring only intramuscular immunization to train host immune systems would be a better treatment option for this disease. Thus, we designed 8 FJX1-specific peptides and implemented an assay system to first, assess the binding of these peptides to HLA-A2 molecules on T2 cells. After, ELISPOT assays were used to determine the peptides immunogenicity and ability to induce potential cytotoxicity activity towards cancer cells. Also, T-cell proliferation assay was used to evaluate the potential of MHC class II peptides to stimulate the expansion of isolated T-cells. Our results demonstrate that these peptides are immunogenic and peptide stimulated T-cells were able to induce peptide-specific cytolytic activity specifically against FJX1-expressing cancer cells. In addition, we demonstrated that the MHC class II peptides were capable of inducing T-cell proliferation. Our results suggest that these peptides are capable of inducing specific cytotoxic cytokines secretion against FJX1-expressing cancer cells and serve as a potential vaccine-based therapy for NPC patients. PMID:26536470

  7. One-step surface modification of polyurethane using affinity binding peptides for enhanced fouling resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yibing; Yu, Yong; Zhang, Liting; Qin, Peng; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Affinity binding peptides were examined for surface fabrication of synthetic polymeric materials. Peptides possessing strong binding affinities toward polyurethane (PU) were discovered via biopanning of M13 phage peptide library. The apparent binding constant (K(app)) was as high as 2.68 × 10(9) M(-1) with surface peptide density exceeded 1.8 μg/cm(2). Structural analysis showed that the ideal peptide had a high content (75%) of H-donor amino acid residues, and that intensified hydrogen bond interaction was the key driving force for the highly stable binding of peptides on PU. PU treated with such affinity peptides promises applications as low-fouling materials, as peptides increased its wettability and substantially reduced protein adsorption and cell adhesion. These results demonstrated a facile but highly efficient one-step strategy for surface property modification of polymeric materials for biotechnological applications. PMID:25732121

  8. ARSENITE BINDING TO SYNTHETIC PEPTIDES: THE EFFECT OF INCREASING LENGTH BETWEEN TWO CYSTEINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Binding of trivalent arsenicals to peptides and proteins can alter peptide/protein structure and enzyme function and thereby contribute to arsenic toxicity and carcinogenicity. We utilized radioactive 73As- labeled arsenite and vacuum filtration methodology to determine the bindi...

  9. Polypeptide binding specificities of Saccharomyces cerevisiae oligosaccharyltransferase accessory proteins Ost3p and Ost6p.

    PubMed

    Jamaluddin, M Fairuz B; Bailey, Ulla-Maja; Tan, Nikki Y J; Stark, Anthony P; Schulz, Benjamin L

    2011-05-01

    Asparagine-linked glycosylation is a common and vital co- and post-translocational modification of diverse secretory and membrane proteins in eukaryotes that is catalyzed by the multiprotein complex oligosaccharyltransferase (OTase). Two isoforms of OTase are present in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, defined by the presence of either of the homologous proteins Ost3p or Ost6p, which possess different protein substrate specificities at the level of individual glycosylation sites. Here we present in vitro characterization of the polypeptide binding activity of these two subunits of the yeast enzyme, and show that the peptide-binding grooves in these proteins can transiently bind stretches of polypeptide with amino acid characteristics complementary to the characteristics of the grooves. We show that Ost6p, which has a peptide-binding groove with a strongly hydrophobic base lined by neutral and basic residues, binds peptides enriched in hydrophobic and acidic amino acids. Further, by introducing basic residues in place of the wild type neutral residues lining the peptide-binding groove of Ost3p, we engineer binding of a hydrophobic and acidic peptide. Our data supports a model of Ost3/6p function in which they transiently bind stretches of nascent polypeptide substrate to inhibit protein folding, thereby increasing glycosylation efficiency at nearby asparagine residues. PMID:21384453

  10. Polypeptide binding specificities of Saccharomyces cerevisiae oligosaccharyltransferase accessory proteins Ost3p and Ost6p

    PubMed Central

    Jamaluddin, M Fairuz B; Bailey, Ulla-Maja; Tan, Nikki YJ; Stark, Anthony P; Schulz, Benjamin L

    2011-01-01

    Asparagine-linked glycosylation is a common and vital co- and post-translocational modification of diverse secretory and membrane proteins in eukaryotes that is catalyzed by the multiprotein complex oligosaccharyltransferase (OTase). Two isoforms of OTase are present in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, defined by the presence of either of the homologous proteins Ost3p or Ost6p, which possess different protein substrate specificities at the level of individual glycosylation sites. Here we present in vitro characterization of the polypeptide binding activity of these two subunits of the yeast enzyme, and show that the peptide-binding grooves in these proteins can transiently bind stretches of polypeptide with amino acid characteristics complementary to the characteristics of the grooves. We show that Ost6p, which has a peptide-binding groove with a strongly hydrophobic base lined by neutral and basic residues, binds peptides enriched in hydrophobic and acidic amino acids. Further, by introducing basic residues in place of the wild type neutral residues lining the peptide-binding groove of Ost3p, we engineer binding of a hydrophobic and acidic peptide. Our data supports a model of Ost3/6p function in which they transiently bind stretches of nascent polypeptide substrate to inhibit protein folding, thereby increasing glycosylation efficiency at nearby asparagine residues. PMID:21384453

  11. Relative free energy of binding between antimicrobial peptides and SDS or DPC micelles.

    PubMed

    Sayyed-Ahmad, Abdallah; Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2009-09-01

    We present relative binding free energy calculations for six antimicrobial peptide-micelle systems, three peptides interacting with two types of micelles. The peptides are the scorpion derived antimicrobial peptide (AMP), IsCT and two of its analogues. The micelles are dodecylphosphatidylcholine (DPC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) micelles. The interfacial electrostatic properties of DPC and SDS micelles are assumed to be similar to those of zwitterionic mammalian and anionic bacterial membrane interfaces, respectively. We test the hypothesis that the binding strength between peptides and the anionic micelle SDS can provide information on peptide antimicrobial activity, since it is widely accepted that AMPs function by binding to and disrupting the predominantly anionic lipid bilayer of the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. We also test the hypothesis that the binding strength between peptides and the zwitterionic micelle DPC can provide information on peptide haemolytic activities, since it is accepted that they also bind to and disrupt the zwitterionic membrane of mammalian cells. Equilibrium structures of the peptides, micelles and peptide-micelle complexes are obtained from more than 300 ns of molecular dynamics simulations. A thermodynamic cycle is introduced to compute the binding free energy from electrostatic, non-electrostatic and entropic contributions. We find relative binding free energy strengths between peptides and SDS to correlate with the experimentally measured rankings for peptide antimicrobial activities, and relative free energy binding strengths between peptides and DPC to correlate with the observed rankings for peptide haemolytic toxicities. These findings point to the importance of peptide-membrane binding strength for antimicrobial activity and haemolytic activity. PMID:21113423

  12. Prediction of peptides binding to MHC class I and II alleles by temporal motif mining

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MHC (Major Histocompatibility Complex) is a key player in the immune response of most vertebrates. The computational prediction of whether a given antigenic peptide will bind to a specific MHC allele is important in the development of vaccines for emerging pathogens, the creation of possibilities for controlling immune response, and for the applications of immunotherapy. One of the problems that make this computational prediction difficult is the detection of the binding core region in peptides, coupled with the presence of bulges and loops causing variations in the total sequence length. Most machine learning methods require the sequences to be of the same length to successfully discover the binding motifs, ignoring the length variance in both motif mining and prediction steps. In order to overcome this limitation, we propose the use of time-based motif mining methods that work position-independently. Results The prediction method was tested on a benchmark set of 28 different alleles for MHC class I and 27 different alleles for MHC class II. The obtained results are comparable to the state of the art methods for both MHC classes, surpassing the published results for some alleles. The average prediction AUC values are 0.897 for class I, and 0.858 for class II. Conclusions Temporal motif mining using partial periodic patterns can capture information about the sequences well enough to predict the binding of the peptides and is comparable to state of the art methods in the literature. Unlike neural networks or matrix based predictors, our proposed method does not depend on peptide length and can work with both short and long fragments. This advantage allows better use of the available training data and the prediction of peptides of uncommon lengths. PMID:23368521

  13. Isolation and detection of human IgA using a streptococcal IgA-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Sandin, Charlotta; Linse, Sara; Areschoug, Thomas; Woof, Jenny M; Reinholdt, Jesper; Lindahl, Gunnar

    2002-08-01

    Bacterial proteins that bind to the Fc part of IgG have found widespread use in immunology. A similar protein suitable for the isolation and detection of human IgA has not been described. Here, we show that a 50-residue synthetic peptide, designated streptococcal IgA-binding peptide (Sap) and derived from a streptococcal M protein, can be used for single-step affinity purification of human IgA. High affinity binding of IgA required the presence in Sap of a C-terminal cysteine residue, not present in the intact M protein. Passage of human serum through a Sap column caused depletion of >99% of the IgA, and elution of the column allowed quantitative recovery of highly purified IgA, for which the proportions of the IgA1 and IgA2 subclasses were the same as in whole serum. Moreover, immobilized Sap could be used for single-step purification of secretory IgA of both subclasses from human saliva, with a recovery of approximately 45%. The Sap peptide could also be used to specifically detect IgA bound to Ag. Together, these data indicate that Sap is a versatile Fc-binding reagent that may open new possibilities for the characterization of human IgA. PMID:12133959

  14. Determinants of BH3 Binding Specificity for Mcl-1 versus Bcl-x[subscript L

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Sanjib; Gullá, Stefano; Chen, T. Scott; Fire, Emiko; Grant, Robert A.; Keating, Amy E.

    2010-06-25

    Interactions among Bcl-2 family proteins are important for regulating apoptosis. Prosurvival members of the family interact with proapoptotic BH3 (Bcl-2-homology-3)-only members, inhibiting execution of cell death through the mitochondrial pathway. Structurally, this interaction is mediated by binding of the {alpha}-helical BH3 region of the proapoptotic proteins to a conserved hydrophobic groove on the prosurvival proteins. Native BH3-only proteins exhibit selectivity in binding prosurvival members, as do small molecules that block these interactions. Understanding the sequence and structural basis of interaction specificity in this family is important, as it may allow the prediction of new Bcl-2 family associations and/or the design of new classes of selective inhibitors to serve as reagents or therapeutics. In this work, we used two complementary techniques - yeast surface display screening from combinatorial peptide libraries and SPOT peptide array analysis - to elucidate specificity determinants for binding to Bcl-x{sub L} versus Mcl-1, two prominent prosurvival proteins. We screened a randomized library and identified BH3 peptides that bound to either Mcl-1 or Bcl-x{sub L} selectively or to both with high affinity. The peptides competed with native ligands for binding into the conserved hydrophobic groove, as illustrated in detail by a crystal structure of a specific peptide bound to Mcl-1. Mcl-1-selective peptides from the screen were highly specific for binding Mcl-1 in preference to Bcl-x{sub L}, Bcl-2, Bcl-w, and Bfl-1, whereas Bcl-x{sub L}-selective peptides showed some cross-interaction with related proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-w. Mutational analyses using SPOT arrays revealed the effects of 170 point mutations made in the background of a peptide derived from the BH3 region of Bim, and a simple predictive model constructed using these data explained much of the specificity observed in our Mcl-1 versus Bcl-x{sub L} binders.

  15. Computational exploration of a protein receptor binding space with student proposed peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew D; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective in silico method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The DockoMatic tutorial described herein provides a framework by which instructors can guide students through a drug screening exercise. Using receptor models derived from readily available protein crystal structures, docking programs have the ability to predict ligand binding properties, such as preferential binding orientations and binding affinities. The use of computational studies can significantly enhance complimentary wet chemical experimentation by providing insight into the important molecular interactions within the system of interest, as well as guide the design of new candidate ligands based on observed binding motifs and energetics. In this laboratory tutorial, the graphical user interface, DockoMatic, facilitates docking job submissions to the docking engine, AutoDock 4.2. The purpose of this exercise is to successfully dock a 17-amino acid peptide, α-conotoxin TxIA, to the acetylcholine binding protein from Aplysia californica-AChBP to determine the most stable binding configuration. Each student will then propose two specific amino acid substitutions of α-conotoxin TxIA to enhance peptide binding affinity, create the mutant in DockoMatic, and perform docking calculations to compare their results with the class. Students will also compare intermolecular forces, binding energy, and geometric orientation of their prepared analog to their initial α-conotoxin TxIA docking results. PMID:26537635

  16. Identification of peptide-specific TCR genes by in vitro peptide stimulation and CDR3 length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hongwei; Lin, Yanmei; Wang, Teng; Ou, Yusheng; Shen, Han; Tao, Changli; Wu, Fenglin; Zhang, Wenfeng; Bo, Huaben; Wang, Hui; Huang, Shulin

    2015-07-10

    Identification of TCR genes specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) is necessary for TCR gene modification of T cells, which is applied in anti-tumor adoptive T cell therapy (ACT). The usual identification methods are based on isolating single peptide-responding T cells and cloning the TCR gene by in vitro expansion or by single-cell RT-PCR. However, the long and exacting in vitro culture period and demanding operational requirements restrict the application of these methods. Immunoscope is an effective tool that profiles a repertoire of TCRs and identifies significantly expanded clones through CDR3 length analysis. In this study, a survivin-derived mutant peptide optimized for HLA-A2 binding was selected to load DCs and activate T cells. The monoclonal expansion of TCRA and TCRB genes was separately identified by Immunoscope analysis and following sequence identification, the properly paired TCR genes were transferred into T cells. Peptide recognition and cytotoxicity assays indicated that TCR-modified PBMCs could respond to both the mutant and wild type peptides and lyse target cells. These results show that combining Immunoscope with in vitro peptide stimulation provides an alternative and superior method for identifying specific TCR genes, which represents a significant advance for the application of TCR gene-modified T cells. PMID:25890221

  17. Dual-functioning phage-derived peptides encourage human bone marrow cell-specific attachment to mineralized biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Ramaraju, Harsha; Miller, Sharon J; Kohn, David H

    2014-08-01

    Cell instructive mineralized biomaterials are a promising alternative to conventional auto-, allo-, and xenograft therapies for the reconstruction of critical sized defects. Extracellular matrix proteins, peptide domains, and functional motifs demonstrating cell and mineral binding activity have been used to improve cell attachment. However, these strategies vary in their tissue regeneration outcomes due to lack of specificity to both regenerative cell populations and the material substrates. In order to mediate cell-specific interactions on apatite surfaces, we identified peptide sequences with high affinity towards apatite (VTKHLNQISQSY, VTK) and clonally derived human bone marrow stromal cells (DPIYALSWSGMA, DPI) using phage display. The primary aims of this study were to measure apatite binding affinity, human bone marrow stromal cell (hBMSC) adhesion strength, and peptide specificity to hBMSCs when the apatite and cell-specific peptides are combined into a dual-functioning peptide. To assess binding affinity to hydroxyapatite (HA), binding isotherms were constructed and peptide binding affinity (K1) determined. HBMSC, MC3T3 and mouse dermal fibroblast (MDF) adhesion strength on biomimetic apatite functionalized with single- and dual-functioning peptide sequences were evaluated using a centrifugation assay. DPI-VTK had the highest binding strength towards hBMSCs (p < 0.01). DPI-VTK, while promoting strong initial attachment to hBMSCs, did not encourage strong adhesions to MC3T3s or fibroblasts (p < 0.01). Taken together, phage display is a promising strategy to identify preferential cell and material binding peptide sequences that can tether specific cell populations onto specific biomaterial chemistries. PMID:25158203

  18. Signal peptide protection by specific chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Genest, Olivier; Seduk, Farida; Ilbert, Marianne; Mejean, Vincent; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal . E-mail: iobbi@ibsm.cnrs-mrs.fr

    2006-01-20

    TorD is the private chaperone of TorA, a periplasmic respiratory molybdoenzyme of Escherichia coli. In this study, it is demonstrated that TorD is required to maintain the integrity of the twin-arginine signal sequence of the cytoplasmic TorA precursors. In the absence of TorD, 35 out of the 39 amino acid residues of the signal peptide were lost and the proteolysis of the N-terminal extremity of TorA precursors was not prevented by the molybdenum cofactor insertion. We thus propose that one of the main roles of TorD is to protect the TorA signal peptide to allow translocation of the enzyme by the TAT system.

  19. Pulling peptides across nanochannels: resolving peptide binding and translocation through the hetero-oligomeric channel from Nocardia farcinica.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pratik Raj; Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Modi, Niraj; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Benz, Roland; Winterhalter, Mathias; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R

    2012-12-21

    We investigated translocation of cationic peptides through nanochannels derived from the Gram-positive bacterium Nocardia farcinica at the single-molecule level. The two subunits NfpA and NfpB form a hetero-oligomeric cation selective channel. On the basis of amino acid comparison we performed homology modeling and obtained a channel structurally related to MspA of Mycobacterium smegmatis. The quantitative single-molecule measurements provide an insight into transport processes of solutes through nanochannels. High-resolution ion conductance measurements in the presence of peptides of different charge and length revealed the kinetics of peptide binding. The observed asymmetry in peptide binding kinetics indicated a unidirectional channel insertion in the lipid bilayer. In the case of cationic peptides, the external voltage acts as a driving force that promotes the interaction of the peptide with the channel surface. At low voltage, the peptide just binds to the channel, whereas at higher voltage, the force is strong enough to pull the peptide across the channel. This allows distinguishing quantitatively between peptide binding and translocation through the channel. PMID:23121560

  20. Binding of leachable components of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and peptide on modified SPR chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szaloki, M.; Vitalyos, G.; Harfalvi, J.; Hegedus, Cs

    2013-12-01

    Many types of polymers are often used in dentistry, which may cause allergic reaction, mainly methyl methacrylate allergy due to the leachable, degradable components of polymerized dental products. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between the leachable components of PMMA and peptides by Fourier-transform Surface Plasmon Resonance (FT SPR). In our previous work binding of oligopeptides (Ph.D.-7 and Ph.D.-12 Peptide Library Kit) was investigated to PMMA surface by phage display technique. It was found that oligopeptides bounded specifically to PMMA surface. The most common amino acids were leucine and proline inside the amino acids sequences of DNA of phages. The binding of haptens, as formaldehyde and methacrylic acid, to frequent amino acids was to investigate on the modified gold SPR chip. Self assembled monolayer (SAM) modified the surface of gold chip and ensured the specific binding between the haptens and amino acids. It was found that amino acids bounded to modified SPR gold and the haptens bounded to amino acids by creating multilayer on the chip surface. By the application of phage display and SPR modern bioanalytical methods the interaction between allergens and peptides can be investigated.

  1. Testing for HLA/peptide tetramer-binding to the T cell receptor complex on human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Weder, Pauline; Schumacher, Ton N M; Spits, Hergen; Luiten, Rosalie M

    2012-01-01

    HLA/peptide tetramers are frequently used for ex vivo monitoring of disease- or vaccine-induced T cell immune responses and for T cell epitope identification. However, when low-levels HLA/peptide tetramer-positive T cell populations are encountered, it is difficult to ascertain whether this represents a true T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated interaction or background signal. To address this issue, we have developed a method for both HLA class I and class II tetramer assays to confirm tetramer-binding to the TCR/CD3 complex. Preincubation of T cells with anti-CD3 mAb SPV-T3b and subsequent crosslinking interferes with the binding of HLA/peptide tetramers to the TCR/CD3 complex and thereby indicates to what extent HLA/peptide tetramer binds through interaction with TCR/CD3 complex. SPV-T3b pretreatment results in a 2- to 10-fold decrease in tetramer-binding intensity to antigen-specific CD8+ or CD4+ T cells, whereas background reactivity of HLA/peptide tetramers containing HIV-derived peptide in HIV-negative donors remained unchanged. SPV-T3b pretreatment forms a valuable tool to verify tetramer-based detection of antigen-specific T cells during the monitoring of immune responses in clinical studies. PMID:24371571

  2. Purification of an angiotensin II binding protein by using antibodies to a peptide encoded by angiotensin II complementary RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Elton, T.S.; Dion, L.D.; Bost, K.L.; Oparil, S.; Blalock, J.E.

    1988-04-01

    The authors have generated a monospecific antibody to a synthetic peptide encoded by an RNA complementary to the mRNA for angiotensin II (AII) and determined whether this antibody recognizes the AII receptor. They demonstrate that the antibody competes specifically with /sup 125/I-labeled AII for the same binding site on rat adrenal membranes. Furthermore, they show this antibody inhibits the secretion of aldosterone from cultured rat adrenal cells, suggesting that the antibody recognizes the biologically relevant AII receptor. Finally, they demonstrate that antibody to the complementary peptide can be used to immunoaffinity-purify a protein of M/sub r/ 66,000 that specifically binds radiolabeled AII.

  3. Trastuzumab-binding peptide display by Tobacco mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Frolova, Olga Y.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Komarova, Tatiana V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Sheval, Eugene V.; Gleba, Yuri Y.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2010-11-10

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2/neu) is a target for the humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. Recently, trastuzumab-binding peptides (TBP) of HER2/neu that inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells were identified. We have now studied conditions of efficient assembly in vivo of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based particles displaying TBP on its surface. The system is based on an Agrobacterium-mediated co-delivery of binary vectors encoding TMV RNA and coat protein (CP) with TBP in its C-terminal extension into plant leaves. We show how the fusion of amino acid substituted TBP (sTBP) to CP via a flexible peptide linker can improve the manufacturability of recombinant TMV (rTMV). We also reveal that rTMV particles with exposed sTBP retained trastuzumab-binding capacity but lost an anti-HER2/neu immunogenic scaffold function. Mouse antibodies against rTMV did not recognize HER2/neu on surface of human SK-BR-3 cells.

  4. Analysis and prediction of affinity of TAP binding peptides using cascade SVM.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, Manoj; Raghava, G P S

    2004-03-01

    The generation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes from an antigenic sequence involves number of intracellular processes, including production of peptide fragments by proteasome and transport of peptides to endoplasmic reticulum through transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). In this study, 409 peptides that bind to human TAP transporter with varying affinity were analyzed to explore the selectivity and specificity of TAP transporter. The abundance of each amino acid from P1 to P9 positions in high-, intermediate-, and low-affinity TAP binders were examined. The rules for predicting TAP binding regions in an antigenic sequence were derived from the above analysis. The quantitative matrix was generated on the basis of contribution of each position and residue in binding affinity. The correlation of r = 0.65 was obtained between experimentally determined and predicted binding affinity by using a quantitative matrix. Further a support vector machine (SVM)-based method has been developed to model the TAP binding affinity of peptides. The correlation (r = 0.80) was obtained between the predicted and experimental measured values by using sequence-based SVM. The reliability of prediction was further improved by cascade SVM that uses features of amino acids along with sequence. An extremely good correlation (r = 0.88) was obtained between measured and predicted values, when the cascade SVM-based method was evaluated through jackknife testing. A Web service, TAPPred (http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/tappred/ or http://bioinformatics.uams.edu/mirror/tappred/), has been developed based on this approach. PMID:14978300

  5. Enhancing In Silico Protein-Based Vaccine Discovery for Eukaryotic Pathogens Using Predicted Peptide-MHC Binding and Peptide Conservation Scores

    PubMed Central

    Goodswen, Stephen J.; Kennedy, Paul J.; Ellis, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Given thousands of proteins constituting a eukaryotic pathogen, the principal objective for a high-throughput in silico vaccine discovery pipeline is to select those proteins worthy of laboratory validation. Accurate prediction of T-cell epitopes on protein antigens is one crucial piece of evidence that would aid in this selection. Prediction of peptides recognised by T-cell receptors have to date proved to be of insufficient accuracy. The in silico approach is consequently reliant on an indirect method, which involves the prediction of peptides binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. There is no guarantee nevertheless that predicted peptide-MHC complexes will be presented by antigen-presenting cells and/or recognised by cognate T-cell receptors. The aim of this study was to determine if predicted peptide-MHC binding scores could provide contributing evidence to establish a protein’s potential as a vaccine. Using T-Cell MHC class I binding prediction tools provided by the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource, peptide binding affinity to 76 common MHC I alleles were predicted for 160 Toxoplasma gondii proteins: 75 taken from published studies represented proteins known or expected to induce T-cell immune responses and 85 considered less likely vaccine candidates. The results show there is no universal set of rules that can be applied directly to binding scores to distinguish a vaccine from a non-vaccine candidate. We present, however, two proposed strategies exploiting binding scores that provide supporting evidence that a protein is likely to induce a T-cell immune response–one using random forest (a machine learning algorithm) with a 72% sensitivity and 82.4% specificity and the other, using amino acid conservation scores with a 74.6% sensitivity and 70.5% specificity when applied to the 160 benchmark proteins. More importantly, the binding score strategies are valuable evidence contributors to the overall in silico vaccine

  6. Structural Determinants of Binding the Seven-transmembrane Domain of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R).

    PubMed

    Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Yang, Linlin; Song, Gaojie; Dai, Antao; Cai, Xiaoqing; Feng, Yang; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Hanson, Michael A; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Stevens, Raymond C; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2016-06-17

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) belongs to the secretin-like (class B) family of G protein-coupled receptors. Members of the class B family are distinguished by their large extracellular domain, which works cooperatively with the canonical seven-transmembrane (7TM) helical domain to signal in response to binding of various peptide hormones. We have combined structure-based site-specific mutational studies with molecular dynamics simulations of a full-length model of GLP-1R bound to multiple peptide ligand variants. Despite the high sequence similarity between GLP-1R and its closest structural homologue, the glucagon receptor (GCGR), nearly half of the 62 stably expressed mutants affected GLP-1R in a different manner than the corresponding mutants in GCGR. The molecular dynamics simulations of wild-type and mutant GLP-1R·ligand complexes provided molecular insights into GLP-1R-specific recognition mechanisms for the N terminus of GLP-1 by residues in the 7TM pocket and explained how glucagon-mimicking GLP-1 mutants restored binding affinity for (GCGR-mimicking) GLP-1R mutants. Structural analysis of the simulations suggested that peptide ligand binding mode variations in the 7TM binding pocket are facilitated by movement of the extracellular domain relative to the 7TM bundle. These differences in binding modes may account for the pharmacological differences between GLP-1 peptide variants. PMID:27059958

  7. Pan-Specific Prediction of Peptide-MHC Class I Complex Stability, a Correlate of T Cell Immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Michael; Fenoy, Emilio; Harndahl, Mikkel; Kristensen, Anne Bregnballe; Nielsen, Ida Kallehauge; Nielsen, Morten; Buus, Søren

    2016-08-15

    Binding of peptides to MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules is the most selective event in the processing and presentation of Ags to CTL, and insights into the mechanisms that govern peptide-MHC-I binding should facilitate our understanding of CTL biology. Peptide-MHC-I interactions have traditionally been quantified by the strength of the interaction, that is, the binding affinity, yet it has been shown that the stability of the peptide-MHC-I complex is a better correlate of immunogenicity compared with binding affinity. In this study, we have experimentally analyzed peptide-MHC-I complex stability of a large panel of human MHC-I allotypes and generated a body of data sufficient to develop a neural network-based pan-specific predictor of peptide-MHC-I complex stability. Integrating the neural network predictors of peptide-MHC-I complex stability with state-of-the-art predictors of peptide-MHC-I binding is shown to significantly improve the prediction of CTL epitopes. The method is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCstabpan. PMID:27402703

  8. Screening and identification of a specific peptide for targeting hypoxic hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiming; Xia, Xiangwen; Wang, Yong; Li, Xin; Zhou, Guofeng; Liang, Huiming; Feng, Gansheng; Zheng, Chuansheng

    2016-08-01

    The biological behaviors of residual hepatoma cells after transarterial embolization therapy, which exist in a hypoxic or even anaerobic tumor microenvironment, differ from the tumor cells under normoxic conditions. This study aimed to use a phage display peptide library for in vivo and in vitro screening to obtain a peptide which could specifically bind to hypoxic hepatoma cells, allowing further targeted diagnosis and treatment for liver cancer. In this study, hypoxic hepatoma cells HepG2 (targeted cells), and normal liver cells HL-7702 (control cells), were utilized to perform three rounds of in vitro screening using a phage-displayed 7-mer peptide library. In addition, hypoxic HepG2 were subcutaneously injected into nude mice to establish a hepatocarcinoma model, followed by performing three rounds of in vivo screening on the phages identified from the in vitro screening. The products from the screening were further identified using ELISA and immunofluorescence staining on cells and tissues. The results indicated that the P11 positive clone had the highest binding effect with hypoxic hepatoma cells. The sequence of the exogenous insert fragment of P11 positive clone was obtained by sequencing: GSTSFSK. The binding assay indicated that GSTSFSK could specifically bind to hypoxic hepatoma cells and hepatocarcinoma tissues. This 7-mer peptide has the potential to be developed as an useful molecular to the targeting diagnosis and treatment of residual hepatoma cells after transarterial chemoembolization. PMID:27381416

  9. Surface Plasmon Resonance Binding Kinetics of Alzheimer’s Disease Amyloid β Peptide Capturing- and Plaque Binding- Monoclonal Antibodies†

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Muthu; Kandimalla, Karunya K.; Wengenack, Thomas M.; Howell, Kyle G.; Poduslo, Joseph F.

    2009-01-01

    Several different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been actively developed in the field of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) for basic science and clinical applications; however, the binding kinetics of many of the mAbs with the β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) are poorly understood. A panel of mAbs with different Aβ recognition sites, including our plaque binding antibody (IgG4.1), a peptide capturing antibody (11A50), and two classical mAbs (6E10 and 4G8) used for immunohistochemistry, were chosen to characterize their binding kinetics to monomeric and fibrillar forms of Aβ40 using surface plasmon resonance and their amyloid plaque binding ability in AD mouse brain sections using immunohistochemistry. The plaque binding antibody (IgG4.1) with epitope specificity of Aβ(2-10) showed a weaker affinity (512 nM) to monomeric Aβ40 but higher affinity (1.5 nM) to Aβ40 fibrils and labeled dense core plaques better than 6E10 by immunohistochemistry. The peptide capturing antibody (11A50) showed preferential affinity (32.5 nM) to monomeric Aβ40, but did not bind to Aβ40 fibrils, whereas antibodies 6E10 and 4G8 had moderate affinity to monomeric Aβ40 (22.3 and 30.1 nM, respectively). 4G8, which labels diffuse plaques better than 6E10, had a higher association rate constant than 6E10 but showed similar association and dissociation kinetics compared to 11A50. Enzymatic digestion of IgG4.1 to the F(ab’)24.1 fragments or their polyamine-modified derivatives that enhance blood brain barrier permeability did not affect the kinetic properties of the antigen binding site. These differences in kinetic binding to monomeric and fibrillar Aβ among various antibodies could be utilized to distinguish mAbs that might be useful for immunotherapy or amyloid plaque imaging versus those that could be utilized for bioanalytical techniques. PMID:19775170

  10. Role of Chitin-Binding Proteins in the Specific Attachment of the Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi to Chitin

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Michael T.; Kirchman, David L.

    1993-01-01

    We examined the mechanism of attachment of the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi to chitin. Wheat germ agglutinin and chitinase bind to chitin and competitively inhibited the attachment of V. harveyi to chitin, but not to cellulose. Bovine serum albumin and cellulase do not bind to chitin and had no effect on bacterial attachment to chitin. These data suggest that this bacterium recognizes specific attachment sites on the chitin particle. The level of attachment of a chitinase-overproducing mutant of V. harveyi to chitin was about twice as much as that of the uninduced wild type. Detergent-extracted cell membranes inhibited attachment and contained a 53-kDa peptide that was overproduced by the chitinase-overproducing mutant. Three peptides (40, 53, and 150 kDa) were recovered from chitin which had been exposed to membrane extracts. Polyclonal antibodies raised against extracellular chitinase cross-reacted with the 53- and 150-kDa chitin-binding peptides and inhibited attachment, probably by sterically hindering interactions between the chitin-binding peptides and chitin. The 53- and 150-kDa chitin-binding peptides did not have chitinase activity. These results suggest that chitin-binding peptides, especially the 53-kDa chitin-binding peptide and chitinase and perhaps the 150-kDa peptide, mediate the specific attachment of V. harveyi to chitin. Images PMID:16348865

  11. Oligonucleotide delivery with cell surface binding and cell penetrating Peptide amphiphile nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Mumcuoglu, Didem; Sardan, Melis; Tekinay, Turgay; Guler, Mustafa O; Tekinay, Ayse B

    2015-05-01

    A drug delivery system designed specifically for oligonucleotide therapeutics can ameliorate the problems associated with the in vivo delivery of these molecules. The internalization of free oligonucleotides is challenging, and cytotoxicity is the main obstacle for current transfection vehicles. To develop nontoxic delivery vehicles for efficient transfection of oligonucleotides, we designed a self-assembling peptide amphiphile (PA) nanosphere delivery system decorated with cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) containing multiple arginine residues (R4 and R8), and a cell surface binding peptide (KRSR), and report the efficiency of this system in delivering G-3129, a Bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotide (AON). PA/AON (peptide amphiphile/antisense oligonucleotide) complexes were characterized with regards to their size and secondary structure, and their cellular internalization efficiencies were evaluated. The effect of the number of arginine residues on the cellular internalization was investigated by both flow cytometry and confocal imaging, and the results revealed that uptake efficiency improved as the number of arginines in the sequence increased. The combined effect of cell penetration and surface binding property on the cellular internalization and its uptake mechanism was also evaluated by mixing R8-PA and KRSR-PA. R8 and R8/KRSR decorated PAs were found to drastically increase the internalization of AONs compared to nonbioactive PA control. Overall, the KRSR-decorated self-assembled PA nanospheres were demonstrated to be noncytotoxic delivery vectors with high transfection rates and may serve as a promising delivery system for AONs. PMID:25828697

  12. Oxidation Protection in Metal-Binding Peptide Motif and Its Application to Antibody for Site-Selective Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hye-Shin; Lee, Sunbae; Park, Soon Jae

    2016-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that a metal ion binding motif could serve as an efficient and robust tool for site-specific conjugation strategy. Cysteine-containing metal binding motifs were constructed as single repeat or tandem repeat peptides and their metal binding characteristics were investigated. The tandem repeats of the Cysteine-Glycine-Histidine (CGH) metal ion binding motif exhibited concerted binding to Co(II) ions, suggesting that conformational transition of peptide was triggered by the sequential metal ion binding. Evaluation of the free thiol content after reduction by reducing reagent showed that metal-ion binding elicited strong retardation of cysteine oxidation in the order of Zn(II)>Ni(II)>Co(II). The CGH metal ion binding motif was then introduced to the C-terminus of antibody heavy chain and the metal ion-dependent characteristics of oxidation kinetics were investigated. As in the case of peptides, CGH-motif-introduced antibody exhibited strong dependence on metal ion binding to protect against oxidation. Zn(II)-saturated antibody with tandem repeat of CGH motif retains the cysteine reactivity as long as 22 hour even with saturating O2 condition. Metal-ion dependent fluorophore labeling clearly indicated that metal binding motifs could be employed as an efficient tool for site-specific conjugation. Whereas Trastuzumab without a metal ion binding site exhibited site-nonspecific dye conjugation, Zn(II) ion binding to antibody with a tandem repeat of CGH motif showed that fluorophores were site-specifically conjugated to the heavy chain of antibody. We believe that this strong metal ion dependence on oxidation protection and the resulting site-selective conjugation could be exploited further to develop a highly site-specific conjugation strategy for proteins that contain multiple intrinsic cysteine residues, including monoclonal antibodies. PMID:27420328

  13. Neutron Reflectometry Studies Define Prion Protein N-terminal Peptide Membrane Binding

    PubMed Central

    Le Brun, Anton P.; Haigh, Cathryn L.; Drew, Simon C.; James, Michael; Boland, Martin P.; Collins, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP), widely recognized to misfold into the causative agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, has previously been shown to bind to lipid membranes with binding influenced by both membrane composition and pH. Aside from the misfolding events associated with prion pathogenesis, PrP can undergo various posttranslational modifications, including internal cleavage events. Alpha- and beta-cleavage of PrP produces two N-terminal fragments, N1 and N2, respectively, which interact specifically with negatively charged phospholipids at low pH. Our previous work probing N1 and N2 interactions with supported bilayers raised the possibility that the peptides could insert deeply with minimal disruption. In the current study we aimed to refine the binding parameters of these peptides with lipid bilayers. To this end, we used neutron reflectometry to define the structural details of this interaction in combination with quartz crystal microbalance interrogation. Neutron reflectometry confirmed that peptides equivalent to N1 and N2 insert into the interstitial space between the phospholipid headgroups but do not penetrate into the acyl tail region. In accord with our previous studies, interaction was stronger for the N1 fragment than for the N2, with more peptide bound per lipid. Neutron reflectometry analysis also detected lengthening of the lipid acyl tails, with a concurrent decrease in lipid area. This was most evident for the N1 peptide and suggests an induction of increased lipid order in the absence of phase transition. These observations stand in clear contrast to the findings of analogous studies of Ab and α-synuclein and thereby support the possibility of a functional role for such N-terminal fragment-membrane interactions. PMID:25418300

  14. Enhancing Peptide Ligand Binding to Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor by Covalent Bond Formation

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Bernadette V.; Beck, Heather E.; Aweda, Tolulope A.; Phinney, Brett; Holsclaw, Cynthia; Jewell, William; Tran, Diana; Day, Jeffrey J.; Peiris, Malalage N.; Nwosu, Charles; Lebrilla, Carlito; Meares, Claude F.

    2012-01-01

    Formation of a stable covalent bond between a synthetic probe molecule and a specific site on a target protein has many potential applications in biomedical science. For example, the properties of probes used as receptor-imaging ligands may be improved by increasing their residence time on the targeted receptor. Among the more interesting cases are peptide ligands, the strongest of which typically bind to receptors with micromolar dissociation constants, and which may depend on processes other than simple binding to provide images. The side chains of cysteine, histidine, or lysine are attractive for chemical attachment to improve binding to a receptor protein, and a system based on acryloyl probes attaching to engineered cysteine provides excellent positron emission tomographic images in animal models (Wei et al. (2008) J. Nucl. Med. 49, 1828-1835). In nature, lysine is a more common but less reactive residue than cysteine, making it an interesting challenge to modify. To seek practically useful cross-linking yields with naturally occurring lysine side chains, we have explored not only acryloyl but also other reactive linkers with different chemical properties. We employed a peptide-VEGF model system to discover that a 19mer peptide ligand, which carried a lysine-tagged dinitrofluorobenzene group, became attached stably and with good yield to a unique lysine residue on human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), even in the presence of 70% fetal bovine serum. The same peptide carrying acryloyl and related Michael acceptors gave low yields of attachment to VEGF, as did the chloroacetyl peptide. PMID:22537066

  15. Efficient Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Infection by a preS1-binding Peptide.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaoli; Zhou, Ming; He, Yonggang; Wan, Yanmin; Bai, Weiya; Tao, Shuai; Ren, Yanqin; Zhang, Xinxin; Xu, Jianqing; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Junqi; Hu, Kanghong; Xie, Youhua

    2016-01-01

    Entry inhibitors are promising novel antivirals against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The existing potential entry inhibitors have targeted the cellular receptor(s). In this study, we aim to develop the first entry inhibitor that inhibits HBV infection via targeting viral particles. The preS1 segment of the large envelope glycoprotein of HBV is essential for virion attachment and infection. Previously, we obtained a preS1-binding short peptide B10 by screening a phage display peptide library using the N-terminal half of preS1 (residues 1 to 60, genotype C). We report here that by means of concatenation of B10, we identified a quadruple concatemer 4B10 that displayed a markedly increased preS1-binding activity. The main binding site of 4B10 in preS1 was mapped to the receptor binding enhancing region. 4B10 blocked HBV attachment to hepatic cells and inhibited HBV infection of primary human and tupaia hepatocytes at low nanomolar concentrations. The 4B10-mediated inhibition of HBV infection is specific as it did not inhibit the infection of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentivirus or human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Moreover, 4B10 showed no binding activity to hepatic cells. In conclusion, we have identified 4B10 as a promising candidate for a novel class of HBV entry inhibitors. PMID:27384014

  16. Efficient Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Infection by a preS1-binding Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaoli; Zhou, Ming; He, Yonggang; Wan, Yanmin; Bai, Weiya; Tao, Shuai; Ren, Yanqin; Zhang, Xinxin; Xu, Jianqing; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Junqi; Hu, Kanghong; Xie, Youhua

    2016-01-01

    Entry inhibitors are promising novel antivirals against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The existing potential entry inhibitors have targeted the cellular receptor(s). In this study, we aim to develop the first entry inhibitor that inhibits HBV infection via targeting viral particles. The preS1 segment of the large envelope glycoprotein of HBV is essential for virion attachment and infection. Previously, we obtained a preS1-binding short peptide B10 by screening a phage display peptide library using the N-terminal half of preS1 (residues 1 to 60, genotype C). We report here that by means of concatenation of B10, we identified a quadruple concatemer 4B10 that displayed a markedly increased preS1-binding activity. The main binding site of 4B10 in preS1 was mapped to the receptor binding enhancing region. 4B10 blocked HBV attachment to hepatic cells and inhibited HBV infection of primary human and tupaia hepatocytes at low nanomolar concentrations. The 4B10-mediated inhibition of HBV infection is specific as it did not inhibit the infection of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentivirus or human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Moreover, 4B10 showed no binding activity to hepatic cells. In conclusion, we have identified 4B10 as a promising candidate for a novel class of HBV entry inhibitors. PMID:27384014

  17. Development of a fluorescent cardiomyocyte specific binding probe.

    PubMed

    Pes, Lara; Kim, Young; Tung, Ching-Hsuan

    2016-04-15

    Cardiomyocytes are the major component of the heart. Their dysfunction or damage could lead to serious cardiovascular diseases, which have claimed numerous lives around the world. A molecule able to recognize cardiomyocytes would have significant value in diagnosis and treatment. Recently a novel peptide termed myocyte targeting peptide (MTP), with three residues of a non-natural amino acid biphenylalanine (Bip), showed good affinity to cardiomyocytes. Its selectivity towards cardiac tissues was concluded to be due to the ability of Bip to bind cardiac troponin I. With the aim of optimizing the affinity and the specificity towards cardiac myocytes and to better understand structure-activity relationship, a library of MTP derivatives was designed. Exploiting a fluorescent tag, the selectivity of the MTP analogs to myocardium over skeletal and stomach muscle tissues was assayed by fluorescence imaging. Among the tested sequences, the peptide probe Bip2, H-Lys(FITC)-Arg-Arg-Arg-Arg-Arg-Arg-Arg-Gly-Ser-Gly-Ser-Bip-Bip-NH2, displayed the best selectivity for cardiomyocytes. PMID:26964676

  18. Delivering heparin-binding insulin-like growth factor 1 with self-assembling peptide hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Florine, Emily M; Miller, Rachel E; Liebesny, Paul H; Mroszczyk, Keri A; Lee, Richard T; Patwari, Parth; Grodzinsky, Alan J

    2015-02-01

    Heparin-binding insulin-like growth factor 1 (HB-IGF-1) is a fusion protein of IGF-1 with the HB domain of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor. A single dose of HB-IGF-1 has been shown to bind specifically to cartilage and to promote sustained upregulation of proteoglycan synthesis in cartilage explants. Achieving strong integration between native cartilage and tissue-engineered cartilage remains challenging. We hypothesize that if a growth factor delivered by the tissue engineering scaffold could stimulate enhanced matrix synthesis by both the cells within the scaffold and the adjacent native cartilage, integration could be enhanced. In this work, we investigated methods for adsorbing HB-IGF-1 to self-assembling peptide hydrogels to deliver the growth factor to encapsulated chondrocytes and cartilage explants cultured with growth factor-loaded hydrogels. We tested multiple methods for adsorbing HB-IGF-1 in self-assembling peptide hydrogels, including adsorption prior to peptide assembly, following peptide assembly, and with/without heparan sulfate (HS, a potential linker between peptide molecules and HB-IGF-1). We found that HB-IGF-1 and HS were retained in the peptide for all tested conditions. A subset of these conditions was then studied for their ability to stimulate increased matrix production by gel-encapsulated chondrocytes and by chondrocytes within adjacent native cartilage. Adsorbing HB-IGF-1 or IGF-1 prior to peptide assembly was found to stimulate increased sulfated glycosaminoglycan per DNA and hydroxyproline content of chondrocyte-seeded hydrogels compared with basal controls at day 10. Cartilage explants cultured adjacent to functionalized hydrogels had increased proteoglycan synthesis at day 10 when HB-IGF-1 was adsorbed, but not IGF-1. We conclude that delivery of HB-IGF-1 to focal defects in cartilage using self-assembling peptide hydrogels is a promising technique that could aid cartilage repair via enhanced matrix

  19. Molecular specialization of breast vasculature: A breast-homing phage-displayed peptide binds to aminopeptidase P in breast vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essler, Markus; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2002-02-01

    In vivo phage display identifies peptides that selectively home to the vasculature of individual organs, tissues, and tumors. Here we report the identification of a cyclic nonapeptide, CPGPEGAGC, which homes to normal breast tissue with a 100-fold selectivity over nontargeted phage. The homing of the phage is inhibited by its cognate synthetic peptide. Phage localization in tissue sections showed that the breast-homing phage binds to the blood vessels in the breast, but not in other tissues. The phage also bound to the vasculature of hyperplastic and malignant lesions in transgenic breast cancer mice. Expression cloning with a phage-displayed cDNA library yielded a phage that specifically bound to the breast-homing peptide. The cDNA insert was homologous to a fragment of aminopeptidase P. The homing peptide bound aminopeptidase P from malignant breast tissue in affinity chromatography. Antibodies against aminopeptidase P inhibited the in vitro binding of the phage-displayed cDNA to the peptide and the in vivo homing of phage carrying the peptide. These results indicate that aminopeptidase P is the receptor for the breast-homing peptide. This peptide may be useful in designing drugs for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer.

  20. Zn(II) and Hg(II) binding to a designed peptide that accommodates different coordination geometries.

    PubMed

    Szunyogh, Dániel; Gyurcsik, Béla; Larsen, Flemming H; Stachura, Monika; Thulstrup, Peter W; Hemmingsen, Lars; Jancsó, Attila

    2015-07-28

    Designed metal ion binding peptides offer a variety of applications in both basic science as model systems of more complex metalloproteins, and in biotechnology, e.g. in bioremediation of toxic metal ions, biomining or as artificial enzymes. In this work a peptide (HS: Ac-SCHGDQGSDCSI-NH2) has been specifically designed for binding of both Zn(II) and Hg(II), i.e. metal ions with different preferences in terms of coordination number, coordination geometry, and to some extent ligand composition. It is demonstrated that HS accommodates both metal ions, and the first coordination sphere, metal ion exchange between peptides, and speciation are characterized as a function of pH using UV-absorption-, synchrotron radiation CD-, (1)H-NMR-, and PAC-spectroscopy as well as potentiometry. Hg(II) binds to the peptide with very high affinity in a {HgS2} coordination geometry, bringing together the two cysteinates close to each end of the peptide in a loop structure. Despite the high affinity, Hg(II) is kinetically labile, exchanging between peptides on the subsecond timescale, as indicated by line broadening in (1)H-NMR. The Zn(II)-HS system displays more complex speciation, involving monomeric species with coordinating cysteinates, histidine, and a solvent water molecule, as well as HS-Zn(II)-HS complexes. In summary, the HS peptide displays conformational flexibility, contains many typical metal ion binding groups, and is able to accommodate metal ions with different structural and ligand preferences with high affinity. As such, the HS peptide may be a scaffold offering binding of a variety of metal ions, and potentially serve for metal ion sequestration in biotechnological applications. PMID:26040991

  1. Influence of the membrane dipole potential on peptide binding to lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Huan; Lazaridis, Themis

    2011-01-01

    The implicit membrane model IMM1 is extended to include the membrane dipole potential and applied to molecular dynamics simulations of the helical peptides alamethicin, WALP23, influenza hemagglutinin fusion peptide, HIV fusion peptide, magainin, and the pre-sequence of cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (p25). The results show that the orientation of the peptides in the membrane can be influenced by the dipole potential. The binding affinity of all peptides except for the hemagglutinin fusion peptide decreases upon increase of the dipole potential. The changes in both orientation and binding affinity are explained by the interaction of the dipole potential with the helix backbone dipole and ionic side-chains. In general, peptides that tend to insert the N-terminus in the membrane and/or have positively charged side chains will lose binding affinity upon increase of the dipole potential. PMID:22100997

  2. Design of a RANK-Mimetic Peptide Inhibitor of Osteoclastogenesis with Enhanced RANKL-Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Jeonghwan; Ghosh, Ambarnil; Kim, Kabsun; Ta, Hai Minh; Kim, Hyunju; Kim, Nacksung; Hwang, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2016-01-01

    The receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK) and its ligand RANKL are key regulators of osteoclastogenesis and well-recognized targets in developing treatments for bone disorders associated with excessive bone resorption, such as osteoporosis. Our previous work on the structure of the RANK-RANKL complex revealed that Loop3 of RANK, specifically the non-canonical disulfide bond at the tip, performs a crucial role in specific recognition of RANKL. It also demonstrated that peptide mimics of Loop3 were capable of interfering with the function of RANKL in osteoclastogenesis. Here, we reported the structure-based design of a smaller peptide with enhanced inhibitory efficiency. The kinetic analysis and osteoclast differentiation assay showed that in addition to the sharp turn induced by the disulfide bond, two consecutive arginine residues were also important for binding to RANKL and inhibiting osteoclastogenesis. Docking and molecular dynamics simulations proposed the binding mode of the peptide to the RANKL trimer, showing that the arginine residues provide electrostatic interactions with RANKL and contribute to stabilizing the complex. These findings provided useful information for the rational design of therapeutics for bone diseases associated with RANK/RANKL function. PMID:26923188

  3. Aqueous Peptide-TiO2 Interfaces: Isoenergetic Binding via Either Entropically or Enthalpically Driven Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Anas M; Westcott, Zayd C; Hughes, Zak E; Palafox-Hernandez, J Pablo; Giesa, Tristan; Puddu, Valeria; Buehler, Markus J; Perry, Carole C; Walsh, Tiffany R

    2016-07-20

    A major barrier to the systematic improvement of biomimetic peptide-mediated strategies for the controlled growth of inorganic nanomaterials in environmentally benign conditions lies in the lack of clear conceptual connections between the sequence of the peptide and its surface binding affinity, with binding being facilitated by noncovalent interactions. Peptide conformation, both in the adsorbed and in the nonadsorbed state, is the key relationship that connects peptide-materials binding with peptide sequence. Here, we combine experimental peptide-titania binding characterization with state-of-the-art conformational sampling via molecular simulations to elucidate these structure/binding relationships for two very different titania-binding peptide sequences. The two sequences (Ti-1, QPYLFATDSLIK; Ti-2, GHTHYHAVRTQT) differ in their overall hydropathy, yet via quartz-crystal microbalance measurements and predictions from molecular simulations, we show these sequences both support very similar, strong titania-binding affinities. Our molecular simulations reveal that the two sequences exhibit profoundly different modes of surface binding, with Ti-1 acting as an entropically driven binder while Ti-2 behaves as an enthalpically driven binder. The integrated approach presented here provides a rational basis for peptide sequence engineering to achieve the in situ growth and organization of titania nanostructures in aqueous media and for the design of sequences suitable for a range of technological applications that involve the interface between titania and biomolecules. PMID:27355097

  4. Autoradiographic localization and characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide binding sites in the rat central nervous system and adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, T.R.; Wildey, G.M.; Manaker, S.; Glembotski, C.C.

    1986-07-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP) have recently been identified in both heart and CNS. These peptides possess potent natriuretic, diuretic, and vasorelaxant activities, and are all apparently derived from a single prohormone. Specific ANP binding sites have been characterized in the adrenal zona glomerulosa and kidney cortex, and one study reported ANP binding sites in the CNS. However, a detailed examination of the localization of ANP binding sites throughout the brain has not been reported. In this study, quantitative autoradiography was employed to examine the distribution of ANP receptors in the rat CNS. The binding of (3-/sup 125/I-iodotyrosyl28) rat ANP-28 to binding sites in the rat CNS was saturable, specific for ANP-related peptides, and displayed high affinity (Kd = 600 pM). When the relative concentrations of ANP binding sites were determined throughout the rat brain, the highest levels of ANP binding were localized to the circumventricular organs, including the area postrema and subfornical organ, and the olfactory apparatus. Moderate levels of ANP binding sites were present throughout the midbrain and brain stem, while low levels were found in the forebrain, diencephalon, basal ganglia, cortex, and cerebellum. The presence of ANP binding sites in the subfornical organ and the area postrema, regions considered to be outside the blood-brain barrier, suggests that peripheral ANP levels may regulate some aspects of CNS control of salt and water balance. The possible functions of ANP binding sites in other regions of the rat brain are not known, but, like many other peptides, ANP may act as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator at these loci.

  5. Inhibition by synthetic peptides from human IgG Fc of OKT4 binding and Fc receptor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Gaarde, W.A.; McClurg, M.R.; Hahn, G.S.; Plummer, J.M.

    1986-03-05

    Synthetic peptides from the Fc region of human IgG were tested for the ability to inhibit IgG rosette formation, /sup 125/I-IgG binding to Fc receptors on lymphocytes, and expression of the T4 cell determinant. The Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptides inhibited IgG rosette formation and competitively inhibited both /sup 125/I-IgG binding to Fc receptors and OKT4 binding to the T4 cell determinant. Peptides containing D-amino acids did not inhibit IgG rosettes, OKT4 binding or /sup 125/I-IgG binding. OKT4 binding to T4 on MNC was inhibited by heat aggregated IgG but not by monomeric IgG. OKT3, OKT8 and OKT11 binding to their determinants was not altered by Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptides, aggregated IgG or monomeric IgG. These results suggest that T4 antigen, Fc receptor for IgG and the Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptide binding site are in close proximity on the cell surface and when occupied by their respective ligands may sterically hinder binding to other sites. Alternatively, Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptides may indirectly regulate cell surface expression of T4 and/or Fc receptors for IgG. These Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptides inhibit the MLR, inhibit antigen induced T cell proliferation and reverse animal models of autoimmune disease. The immunoregulatory activities of these peptides may be related to their selective action on T4 helper/inducer lymphocytes expressing Fc receptors.

  6. Binding of solvated peptide (EPLQLKM) with a graphene sheet via simulated coarse-grained approach.

    PubMed

    Sheikholeslami, Somayyeh; Pandey, R B; Dragneva, Nadiya; Floriano, Wely; Rubel, Oleg; Barr, Stephen A; Kuang, Zhifeng; Berry, Rajiv; Naik, Rajesh; Farmer, Barry

    2014-05-28

    Binding of a solvated peptide A1 ((1)E (2)P (3)L (4)Q (5)L (6)K (7)M) with a graphene sheet is studied by a coarse-grained computer simulation involving input from three independent simulated interaction potentials in hierarchy. A number of local and global physical quantities such as energy, mobility, and binding profiles and radius of gyration of peptides are examined as a function of temperature (T). Quantitative differences (e.g., the extent of binding within a temperature range) and qualitative similarities are observed in results from three simulated potentials. Differences in variations of both local and global physical quantities suggest a need for such analysis with multiple inputs in assessing the reliability of both quantitative and qualitative observations. While all three potentials indicate binding at low T and unbinding at high T, the extent of binding of peptide with the temperature differs. Unlike un-solvated peptides (with little variation in binding among residues), solvation accentuates the differences in residue binding. As a result the binding of solvated peptide at low temperatures is found to be anchored by three residues, (1)E, (4)Q, and (6)K (different from that with the un-solvated peptide). Binding to unbinding transition can be described by the variation of the transverse (with respect to graphene sheet) component of the radius of gyration of the peptide (a potential order parameter) as a function of temperature. PMID:24880319

  7. Synthetic peptides with antigenic specificity for bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Sela, M; Arnon, R; Jacob, C O

    1986-01-01

    The attachment of a diphtheria toxin-specific synthetic antigenic determinant and a synthetic adjuvant to a synthetic polymeric carrier led to production of a totally synthetic macromolecule which provoked protective antibodies against diphtheria when administered in aqueous solution. When peptides related to the B subunit of cholera toxin were synthesized and attached to tetanus toxoid, antibodies produced against the conjugate reacted in some but not all cases with intact cholera toxin and (especially with peptide CTP 3, residues 50-64) neutralized toxin reactivity, as tested by permeability in rabbit skin, fluid accumulation in ligated small intestinal loops and adenylate cyclase activation. Polymerization of the peptide without any external carrier, or conjugation with the dipalmityl lysine group, had as good an effect in enhancing the immune response as its attachment to tetanus toxoid. Prior exposure to the carrier suppressed the immune response to the epitope attached to it, whereas prior exposure to the synthetic peptide had a good priming effect when the intact toxin was given; when two different peptides were attached to the same carrier, both were expressed. Antisera against peptide CTP 3 were highly cross-reactive with the heat-labile toxin of Escherichia coli and neutralized it to the same extent as cholera toxin, which is not surprising in view of the great homology between the two proteins. A synthetic oligonucleotide coding for CTP 3 has been used to express the peptide in a form suitable for immunization. It led to a priming effect against the intact cholera toxin. PMID:2426052

  8. MHC/Peptide-Specific Interaction of the Humoral Immune System: A New Category of Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Held, Gerhard; Luescher, Immanuel F; Neumann, Frank; Papaioannou, Chrysostomos; Schirrmann, Thomas; Sester, Martina; Smola, Sigrun; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Abs bind to unprocessed Ags, whereas cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells recognize peptides derived from endogenously processed Ags presented in the context of class I MHC complexes. We screened, by ELISA, human sera for Abs reacting specifically with the influenza matrix protein (IMP)-derived peptide(58-66) displayed by HLA-A*0201 complexes. Among 653 healthy volunteers, blood donors, and women on delivery, high-titered HLA-A*0201/IMP(58-66) complex-specific IgG Abs were detected in 11 females with a history of pregnancies and in 1 male, all HLA-A*0201(-). These Abs had the same specificity as HLA-A*0201/IMP(58-66)-specific cytotoxic T cells and bound neither to HLA-A*0201 nor the peptide alone. No such Abs were detected in HLA-A*0201(+) volunteers. These Abs were not cross-reactive to other self-MHC class I alleles displaying IMP(58-66), but bound to MHC class I complexes of an HLA nonidentical offspring. HLA-A*0201/IMP(58-66) Abs were also detected in the cord blood of newborns, indicating that HLA-A*0201/IMP(58-66) Abs are produced in HLA-A*0201(-) mothers and enter the fetal blood system. That Abs can bind to peptides derived from endogenous Ags presented by MHC complexes opens new perspectives on interactions between the cellular and humoral immune system. PMID:26416277

  9. Identification of Novel HLA-A2-Restricted Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Specific Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Epitopes Predicted by the HLA-A2 Supertype Peptide-Binding Motif

    PubMed Central

    Altfeld, Marcus A.; Livingston, Brian; Reshamwala, Neha; Nguyen, Phuong T.; Addo, Marylyn M.; Shea, Amy; Newman, Mark; Fikes, John; Sidney, John; Wentworth, Peggy; Chesnut, Robert; Eldridge, Robert L.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Brander, Christian; Sax, Paul E.; Boswell, Steve; Flynn, Theresa; Buchbinder, Susan; Goulder, Philip J. R.; Walker, Bruce D.; Sette, Alessandro; Kalams, Spyros A.

    2001-01-01

    Virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses are critical in the control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and will play an important part in therapeutic and prophylactic HIV-1 vaccines. The identification of virus-specific epitopes that are efficiently recognized by CTL is the first step in the development of future vaccines. Here we describe the immunological characterization of a number of novel HIV-1-specific, HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitopes that share a high degree of conservation within HIV-1 and a strong binding to different alleles of the HLA-A2 superfamily. These novel epitopes include the first reported CTL epitope in the Vpr protein. Two of the novel epitopes were immunodominant among the HLA-A2-restricted CTL responses of individuals with acute and chronic HIV-1 infection. The novel CTL epitopes identified here should be included in future vaccines designed to induce HIV-1-specific CTL responses restricted by the HLA-A2 superfamily and will be important to assess in immunogenicity studies in infected persons and in uninfected recipients of candidate HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:11152503

  10. Bioactivation of water-soluble peptidic quantum dot through biotin-streptavidin binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dif, A.; Touchet, S.; Nagarajan, S.; Baudy-Floc'h, M.; Dahan, M.; Piehler, J.; Marchi-Artzner, V.

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the preparation of bioactive water-soluble fluorescent CdSe/ZnS semi-conductor quantum dots with a small hydrodynamic diameter of 10 nm. These quantum dots are functionalized with a biotinylated peptide that can be introduced at different ratios onto the surface of the quantum dots. Their ability to bind to streptavidin in solution is tested by using gel electrophoresis and fluorescence resonance energy transfer with a fluorescent labeled-streptavidin. The binding of these quantum dots to Agarose micrometric beads coated with streptavidin is also analyzed by fluorescent optical microscopy. A synthetic pegylated peptide is successfully used to prevent the non specific adsorption of streptavidin onto the quantum dots. A specific binding to the streptavidin results in the formation of a very stable streptavidin-quantum dot complex without any significant aggregation. The average number of streptavidin per quantum dot is found to be to 4 at the most. Such bioactivate quantum dots can be further conjugated to any biotinylated biomolecule and used in biological medium.

  11. The Recognition Specificity of the CHD1 Chromodomain with Modified Histone H3 Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Richard S. L.; Wang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Histone tail peptides comprise the flexible portion of chromatin, the substance which serves as the packaging for the eukaryotic genome. According to the histone code hypothesis, reader protein domains (chromodomains) can recognize modifications of amino acid residues within these peptides, regulating the expression of genes. We have performed simulations on models of CHD1 chromodomain complexed with a variety of histone H3 modifications. Binding free energies for both the overall complexes and individual residues within the protein and peptides were computed with MM-GBSA. The simulation results agree well with experimental data and identify several CHD1 residues that play key roles in the interaction with each of the H3 modifications. We identified one class of protein residues that bind to H3 in all of the complexes, and a second class of residues that bind only to particular H3 modifications. Additionally, we found that modifications of H3R2 and H3T3 have a dominant effect on the binding affinity; methylation of H3K4 has little effect on the interaction strength when H3R2 or H3T3 is modified. Our findings with regard to the specificity shown by the latter class of protein residues in their binding affinity to certain modifications of H3 support the histone code hypothesis. PMID:21195088

  12. Controlling Affinity Binding with Peptide-Functionalized Poly(ethylene glycol) Hydrogels**

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Chi; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2009-01-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels functionalized with peptide moieties have been widely used in regenerative medicine applications. While many studies have suggested the importance of affinity binding within PEG hydrogels, the relationships between the structures of the peptide motifs and their binding to protein therapeutics remain largely unexplored, especially in the recently developed thiol-acrylate photopolymerization systems. Herein, we employ Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and thiol-acrylate photopolymerizations to investigate how the architectures of affinity peptides in crosslinked hydrogels affect their binding to diffusible proteins. The binding between diffusible streptavidin and biotinylated peptide immobilized to PEG hydrogel network was used as a model system to reveal the interplay between affinity binding and peptide sequences/architectures. In addition, we design peptides with different structures to enhance affinity binding within PEG hydrogels and to provide tunable affinity-based controlled delivery of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). This study demonstrates the importance of affinity binding in controlling the availability of hydrogel-encapsulated proteins and provides strategies for enhancing affinity binding of protein therapeutics to bound peptide moieties in thiol-acrylate photopolymerized PEG hydrogels. The results presented herein should find useful on the design and fabrication of hydrogels to retain and sustained release of growth factors for promoting tissue regeneration. PMID:20148198

  13. Substrate specificity of papain dynamic structures for peptides consisting of 8-10 GLY residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the substrate specificity of papain dynamic structures for peptides of 8-10 glycine residues (8-10GLY) via molecular dynamics and docking simulations. The substrate specificity of papain for 8-10GLY fluctuated considerably with time. There were several residues that were different among those that had a significant impact on binding (RESIDUES_IMPACT) with 10GLY, 9GLY, and 8GLY. Modification of these different residues should allow for control of substrate specificity, providing a framework for modifying substrate specificity in papain and other enzymes.

  14. A Prevalent Peptide-Binding Domain Guides Ribosomal Natural Product Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Brandon J.; Hudson, Graham A.; Dunbar, Kyle L.; Mitchell, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are a rapidly growing natural product class. RiPP precursor peptides can undergo extensive enzymatic tailoring, yielding structurally and functionally diverse products, and their biosynthetic logic makes them attractive bioengineering targets. Recent work suggests that unrelated RiPP modifying enzymes contain structurally similar precursor peptide-binding domains. Using profile hidden Markov model comparisons, we discovered related and previously unrecognized peptide-binding domains in proteins spanning the majority of known prokaryotic RiPP classes; thus, we named this conserved domain the RiPP precursor peptide recognition element (RRE). Through binding studies, we verify the role of the RRE for three distinct RiPP classes: linear azole-containing peptides, thiopeptides, and lasso peptides. Because numerous RiPP biosynthetic enzymes act on peptide substrates, our findings have powerful predictive value as to which protein(s) drive substrate binding, laying a foundation for further characterization of RiPP biosynthetic pathways and the rational engineering of new peptide-binding activities. PMID:26167873

  15. The Hydrophobic Region of the DmsA Twin-Arginine Leader Peptide Determines Specificity with Chaperone DmsD

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The system specific chaperone DmsD plays a role in the maturation of the catalytic subunit of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase, DmsA. Pre-DmsA contains a 45-amino acid twin-arginine leader peptide that is important for targeting and translocation of folded and cofactor-loaded DmsA by the twin-arginine translocase. DmsD has previously been shown to interact with the complete twin-arginine leader peptide of DmsA. In this study, isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the thermodynamics of binding between synthetic peptides composed of different portions of the DmsA leader peptide and DmsD. Only those peptides that included the complete and contiguous hydrophobic region of the DmsA leader sequence were able to bind DmsD with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Each of the peptides that were able to bind DmsD also showed some α-helical structure as indicated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed that DmsD gained very little thermal stability upon binding any of the DmsA leader peptides tested. Together, these results suggest that a portion of the hydrophobic region of the DmsA leader peptide determines the specificity of binding and may produce helical properties upon binding to DmsD. Overall, this study demonstrates that the recognition of the DmsA twin-arginine leader sequence by the DmsD chaperone shows unexpected rules and confirms further that the biochemistry of the interaction of the chaperone with their leaders demonstrates differences in their molecular interactions. PMID:24093457

  16. SIRT3 substrate specificity determined by peptide arrays and machine learning.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian C; Settles, Burr; Hallows, William C; Craven, Mark W; Denu, John M

    2011-02-18

    Accumulating evidence suggests that reversible protein acetylation may be a major regulatory mechanism that rivals phosphorylation. With the recent cataloging of thousands of acetylation sites on hundreds of proteins comes the challenge of identifying the acetyltransferases and deacetylases that regulate acetylation levels. Sirtuins are a conserved family of NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylases that are implicated in genome maintenance, metabolism, cell survival, and lifespan. SIRT3 is the dominant protein deacetylase in mitochondria, and emerging evidence suggests that SIRT3 may control major pathways by deacetylation of central metabolic enzymes. Here, to identify potential SIRT3 substrates, we have developed an unbiased screening strategy that involves a novel acetyl-lysine analogue (thiotrifluoroacetyl-lysine), SPOT-peptide libraries, machine learning, and kinetic validation. SPOT peptide libraries based on known and potential mitochondrial acetyl-lysine sites were screened for SIRT3 binding and then analyzed using machine learning to establish binding trends. These trends were then applied to the mitochondrial proteome as a whole to predict binding affinity of all lysine sites within human mitochondria. Machine learning prediction of SIRT3 binding correlated with steady-state kinetic k(cat)/K(m) values for 24 acetyl-lysine peptides that possessed a broad range of predicted binding. Thus, SPOT peptide-binding screens and machine learning prediction provides an accurate and efficient method to evaluate sirtuin substrate specificity from a relatively small learning set. These analyses suggest potential SIRT3 substrates involved in several metabolic pathways such as the urea cycle, ATP synthesis, and fatty acid oxidation. PMID:20945913

  17. Bacterial SPOR domains are recruited to septal peptidoglycan by binding to glycan strands that lack stem peptides

    PubMed Central

    Yahashiri, Atsushi; Jorgenson, Matthew A.; Weiss, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial SPOR domains bind peptidoglycan (PG) and are thought to target proteins to the cell division site by binding to “denuded” glycan strands that lack stem peptides, but uncertainties remain, in part because septal-specific binding has yet to be studied in a purified system. Here we show that fusions of GFP to SPOR domains from the Escherichia coli cell-division proteins DamX, DedD, FtsN, and RlpA all localize to septal regions of purified PG sacculi obtained from E. coli and Bacillus subtilis. Treatment of sacculi with an amidase that removes stem peptides enhanced SPOR domain binding, whereas treatment with a lytic transglycosylase that removes denuded glycans reduced SPOR domain binding. These findings demonstrate unequivocally that SPOR domains localize by binding to septal PG, that the physiologically relevant binding site is indeed a denuded glycan, and that denuded glycans are enriched in septal PG rather than distributed uniformly around the sacculus. Accumulation of denuded glycans in the septal PG of both E. coli and B. subtilis, organisms separated by 1 billion years of evolution, suggests that sequential removal of stem peptides followed by degradation of the glycan backbone is an ancient feature of PG turnover during bacterial cell division. Linking SPOR domain localization to the abundance of a structure (denuded glycans) present only transiently during biogenesis of septal PG provides a mechanism for coordinating the function of SPOR domain proteins with the progress of cell division. PMID:26305949

  18. Specificity Profiling of Dual Specificity Phosphatase Vaccinia VH1-related (VHR) Reveals Two Distinct Substrate Binding Modes*

    PubMed Central

    Luechapanichkul, Rinrada; Chen, Xianwen; Taha, Hashem A.; Vyas, Shubham; Guan, Xiaoyan; Freitas, Michael A.; Hadad, Christopher M.; Pei, Dehua

    2013-01-01

    Vaccinia VH1-related (VHR) is a dual specificity phosphatase that consists of only a single catalytic domain. Although several protein substrates have been identified for VHR, the elements that control the in vivo substrate specificity of this enzyme remain unclear. In this work, the in vitro substrate specificity of VHR was systematically profiled by screening combinatorial peptide libraries. VHR exhibits more stringent substrate specificity than classical protein-tyrosine phosphatases and recognizes two distinct classes of Tyr(P) peptides. The class I substrates are similar to the Tyr(P) motifs derived from the VHR protein substrates, having sequences of (D/E/φ)(D/S/N/T/E)(P/I/M/S/A/V)pY(G/A/S/Q) or (D/E/φ)(T/S)(D/E)pY(G/A/S/Q) (where φ is a hydrophobic amino acid and pY is phosphotyrosine). The class II substrates have the consensus sequence of (V/A)P(I/L/M/V/F)X1–6pY (where X is any amino acid) with V/A preferably at the N terminus of the peptide. Site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modeling studies suggest that the class II peptides bind to VHR in an opposite orientation relative to the canonical binding mode of the class I substrates. In this alternative binding mode, the Tyr(P) side chain binds to the active site pocket, but the N terminus of the peptide interacts with the carboxylate side chain of Asp164, which normally interacts with the Tyr(P) + 3 residue of a class I substrate. Proteins containing the class II motifs are efficient VHR substrates in vitro, suggesting that VHR may act on a novel class of yet unidentified Tyr(P) proteins in vivo. PMID:23322772

  19. A Postgenomic Approach to Identification of Mycobacterium leprae-Specific Peptides as T-Cell Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Dockrell, Hazel M.; Brahmbhatt, Shweta; Robertson, Brian D.; Britton, Sven; Fruth, Uli; Gebre, Negussie; Hunegnaw, Mesfin; Hussain, Rabia; Manandhar, Rakesh; Murillo, Luis; Pessolani, Maria Cristina V.; Roche, Paul; Salgado, Jorge L.; Sampaio, Elizabeth; Shahid, Firdaus; Thole, Jelle E. R.; Young, Douglas B.

    2000-01-01

    To identify Mycobacterium leprae-specific human T-cell epitopes, which could be used to distinguish exposure to M. leprae from exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis or to environmental mycobacteria or from immune responses following Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination, 15-mer synthetic peptides were synthesized based on data from the M. leprae genome, each peptide containing three or more predicted HLA-DR binding motifs. Eighty-one peptides from 33 genes were tested for their ability to induce T-cell responses, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from tuberculoid leprosy patients (n = 59) and healthy leprosy contacts (n = 53) from Brazil, Ethiopia, Nepal, and Pakistan and 20 United Kingdom blood bank donors. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) secretion proved more sensitive for detection of PBMC responses to peptides than did lymphocyte proliferation. Many of the peptides giving the strongest responses in leprosy donors compared to subjects from the United Kingdom, where leprosy is not endemic, have identical, or almost identical, sequences in M. leprae and M. tuberculosis and would not be suitable as diagnostic tools. Most of the peptides recognized by United Kingdom donors showed promiscuous recognition by subjects expressing differing HLA-DR types. The majority of the novel T-cell epitopes identified came from proteins not previously recognized as immune targets, many of which are cytosolic enzymes. Fifteen of the tested peptides had ≥5 of 15 amino acid mismatches between the equivalent M. leprae and M. tuberculosis sequences; of these, eight gave specificities of ≥90% (percentage of United Kingdom donors who were nonresponders for IFN-γ secretion), with sensitivities (percentage of responders) ranging from 19 to 47% for tuberculoid leprosy patients and 21 to 64% for healthy leprosy contacts. A pool of such peptides, formulated as a skin test reagent, could be used to monitor exposure to leprosy or as an aid to early diagnosis. PMID:10992494

  20. Cell-Peptide Specific Interaction Can Inhibit Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv Infection.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Deisy Carolina; Ocampo, Marisol; Reyes, Cesar; Arévalo-Pinzón, Gabriela; Munoz, Marina; Patarroyo, Manuel Alfonso; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2016-04-01

    Studying proteins from the M. tuberculosis H37Rv envelop is important for understanding host-pathogen interaction regarding bacterial infection and survival within a host; such knowledge is indispensable regarding studies aimed at developing drugs or vaccines against tuberculosis, a disease which continues to cause more than one million deaths worldwide every year. The present work presents a study of the Rv3705c protein which has been described as being an outer protein. Several servers and bioinformatics' tools were used for predicting its location on mycobacterial surface and a 3D model of the protein was obtained which was then compared to experimental circular dichroism results for its peptides. PCR assays were used for corroborating rv3705c gene presence and transcription in a laboratory strain and immunoblotting and electron microscopy were used for confirming protein localisation on cell envelop. Receptor-ligand assays revealed two peptides having high specific binding (HABPs); peptide 38485 ((121)DRAFHRVVDRTVGTSGQTTA(140)) bound to both cell lines used as infection target (U937 and A549 epithelial cell line-derived macrophages) and 38488 ((181)RLRENVLLQAKVTQSGNAGP(200)) bound to U937 cells. It was found that peptide 38485 provided significant inhibition regarding mycobacterial entry to both cell lines in in vitro assays. These results led to proposing peptide 38485 as one of the epitopes to be used in future studies aimed at characterising the immune response of functionally important synthetic peptides which could be included in developing a synthetic anti-tuberculosis vaccine. PMID:26375297

  1. Peptide aptamers: The versatile role of specific protein function inhibitors in plant biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Monica; Mizzotti, Chiara; Masiero, Simona; Kater, Martin M; Pesaresi, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, peptide aptamers have emerged as novel molecular tools that have attracted the attention of researchers in various fields of basic and applied science, ranging from medicine to analytical chemistry. These artificial short peptides are able to specifically bind, track, and inhibit a given target molecule with high affinity, even molecules with poor immunogenicity or high toxicity, and represent a remarkable alternative to antibodies in many different applications. Their use is on the rise, driven mainly by the medical and pharmaceutical sector. Here we discuss the enormous potential of peptide aptamers in both basic and applied aspects of plant biotechnology and food safety. The different peptide aptamer selection methods available both in vivo and in vitro are introduced, and the most important possible applications in plant biotechnology are illustrated. In particular, we discuss the generation of broad-based virus resistance in crops, "reverse genetics" and aptasensors in bioassays for detecting contaminations in food and feed. Furthermore, we suggest an alternative to the transfer of peptide aptamers into plant cells via genetic transformation, based on the use of cell-penetrating peptides that overcome the limits imposed by both crop transformation and Genetically Modified Organism commercialization. PMID:25966787

  2. Selective CGRP and adrenomedullin peptide binding by tethered RAMP-calcitonin receptor-like receptor extracellular domain fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    Moad, Heather E; Pioszak, Augen A

    2013-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedullin (AM) are related peptides that are potent vasodilators. The CGRP and AM receptors are heteromeric protein complexes comprised of a shared calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) subunit and a variable receptor activity modifying protein (RAMP) subunit. RAMP1 enables CGRP binding whereas RAMP2 confers AM specificity. How RAMPs determine peptide selectivity is unclear and the receptor stoichiometries are a topic of debate with evidence for 1:1, 2:2, and 2:1 CLR:RAMP stoichiometries. Here, we describe bacterial production of recombinant tethered RAMP-CLR extracellular domain (ECD) fusion proteins and biochemical characterization of their peptide binding properties. Tethering the two ECDs ensures complex stability and enforces defined stoichiometry. The RAMP1-CLR ECD fusion purified as a monomer, whereas the RAMP2-CLR ECD fusion purified as a dimer. Both proteins selectively bound their respective peptides with affinities in the low micromolar range. Truncated CGRP(27-37) and AM(37-52) fragments were identified as the minimal ECD complex binding regions. The CGRP C-terminal amide group contributed to, but was not required for, ECD binding, whereas the AM C-terminal amide group was essential for ECD binding. Alanine-scan experiments identified CGRP residues T30, V32, and F37 and AM residues P43, K46, I47, and Y52 as critical for ECD binding. Our results identify CGRP and AM determinants for receptor ECD complex binding and suggest that the CGRP receptor functions as a 1:1 heterodimer. In contrast, the AM receptor may function as a 2:2 dimer of heterodimers, although our results cannot rule out 2:1 or 1:1 stoichiometries. PMID:24115156

  3. Probing the S1 specificity pocket of the aminopeptidases that generate antigenic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zervoudi, Efthalia; Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Georgiadou, Dimitra; Evnouchidou, Irini; Gajda, Anna; Poreba, Marcin; Salvesen, Guy S.; Drag, Marcin; Hattori, Akira; Swevers, Luc; Vourloumis, Dionisios; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis ER aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1), ER aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2) and Insulin Regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) are three homologous enzymes that play critical roles in the generation of antigenic peptides. These aminopeptidases excise amino acids from N-terminally extended precursors of antigenic peptides in order to generate the correct length epitopes for binding onto MHC class I molecules. The specificity of these peptidases can affect antigenic peptide selection, but has not yet been investigated in detail. In the present study we utilized a collection of 82 fluorogenic substrates to define a detailed selectivity profile for each of the three enzymes and to probe structural and functional features of the primary specificity (S1) pocket. Molecular modeling of the three S1 pockets reveals substrate-enzyme interactions that are critical determinants for specificity. The substrate selectivity profiles suggest that IRAP largely combines the S1 specificity of ERAP1 and ERAP2, consistent with its proposed biological function. IRAP however, does not achieve this dual specificity by simply combining structural features of ERAP1 and 2, but rather by a unique amino acid change at position 541. Our results provide insights on antigenic peptide selection and may prove valuable in designing selective inhibitors or activity markers for this class of enzymes. PMID:21314638

  4. Direct measurement of agonist binding to genetically engineered peptides of the acetylcholine receptor by selective T sub 1 NMR relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, Y.; Navon, G. ); Aronheim, A.; Gershoni, J.M. )

    1990-03-13

    Interactions of four ligands of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor with genetically engineered peptides have been studied by NMR. A recombinant cholinergic binding site was prepared as a fusion protein between a truncated form of the bacterial protein trpE and a peptide corresponding to the sequence {alpha}184-200 from the Torpedo californica receptor. This construct binds {alpha}-bungarotoxin while the trpE protein alone does not, and thus serves as a negative control. In this study agonist binding to {alpha}184-200 is demonstrated by monitoring the T{sub 1} relaxation of the ligand's protons in the presence and absence of the recombinant binding site. This binding is specific as it can be competed with {alpha}-bungarotoxin. Quantitative analyses of such competitions yielded the concentration of binding sites, which corresponded to 3.3% and 16.5% of the total protein, for partially purified and affinity-purified {alpha}184-200 constructs, respectively. The K{sub D} values for the binding of acetylcholine, nicotine, d-tubocurarine, and gallamine to the affinity-purified construct were 1.4, 1.4, 0.20, and 0.21 mM, respectively, while K{sub D}'s with the nontoxin binding protein were all above 10 mM. Thus, this is a direct demonstration that the toxin binding domain {alpha}184-200 may comprise a major component of the cholinergic agonist site.

  5. New horizons in mouse immunoinformatics: reliable in silico prediction of mouse class I histocompatibility major complex peptide binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Hattotuwagama, Channa K; Guan, Pingping; Doytchinova, Irini A; Flower, Darren R

    2004-11-21

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis is a main cornerstone of modern informatic disciplines. Predictive computational models, based on QSAR technology, of peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) binding affinity have now become a vital component of modern day computational immunovaccinology. Historically, such approaches have been built around semi-qualitative, classification methods, but these are now giving way to quantitative regression methods. The additive method, an established immunoinformatics technique for the quantitative prediction of peptide-protein affinity, was used here to identify the sequence dependence of peptide binding specificity for three mouse class I MHC alleles: H2-D(b), H2-K(b) and H2-K(k). As we show, in terms of reliability the resulting models represent a significant advance on existing methods. They can be used for the accurate prediction of T-cell epitopes and are freely available online ( http://www.jenner.ac.uk/MHCPred). PMID:15534705

  6. Phage display identification of functional binding peptides against 4-acetamidophenol (Paracetamol): an exemplified approach to target low molecular weight organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mathew W; Smith, Jonathan W; Harris, Charlotte; Brancale, Andrea; Allender, Christopher J; Gumbleton, Mark

    2007-06-22

    Peptide-phage display has been widely used to explore protein-protein interactions, however, despite the potential range of applications the use of this technology to identify peptides that bind low molecular weight organic molecules has not been explored. In this current study, we identified a phage clone (PARA-061) displaying the cyclic 7-mer peptide sequence N' AC-NPNNLSH-CGGGS C' that binds the low molecular weight organic molecule 4-acetamidophenol (4-AAP; paracetamol). To avoid occupancy of key functional groups on the target 4-AAP molecule our panning strategy was directed against insoluble complexes of 4-AAP rather than against the target linked to a stationary support or bearing an affinity tag. To augment the panning procedure we deleted phage that also bound the 4-AAP isomers, 2-AAP and 3-AAP. The identified PARA-061 peptide-phage clone displayed functional binding properties against 4-AAP in solution, able in a peptide sequence-dependant manner to prevent the in vitro hepatotoxicity of 4-AAP and reduce ( approximately 20%) the permeability of 4-AAP across a semi-permeable membrane. Molecular dynamic simulations generated a stable binding conformation between the PARA-061 peptide sequence and 4-AAP. In conclusion, we show that a phage display library can be used to identify peptide sequence-specific clones able to modulate the functional binding of a low molecular weight organic molecule. Such peptides may be expected to find utility in the next generation of hybrid polymer-based biosensing devices. PMID:17482566

  7. Differential Transit Peptide Recognition during Preprotein Binding and Translocation into Flowering Plant Plastids[W

    PubMed Central

    Chotewutmontri, Prakitchai; Reddick, L. Evan; McWilliams, David R.; Campbell, Ian M.; Bruce, Barry D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the availability of thousands of transit peptide (TP) primary sequences, the structural and/or physicochemical properties that determine TP recognition by components of the chloroplast translocon are not well understood. By combining a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments, we reveal that TP recognition is determined by sequence-independent interactions and vectorial-specific recognition domains. Using both native and reversed TPs for two well-studied precursors, small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bis-phosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, and ferredoxin, we exposed these two modes of recognition. Toc34 receptor (34-kD subunit of the translocon of the outer envelope) recognition in vitro, preprotein binding in organellar, precursor binding in vivo, and the recognition of TPs by the major stromal molecular motor Hsp70 are specific for the physicochemical properties of the TP. However, translocation in organellar and in vivo demonstrates strong specificity to recognition domain organization. This organization specificity correlates with the N-terminal placement of a strong Hsp70 recognition element. These results are discussed in light of how individual translocon components sequentially interact with the precursor during binding and translocation and helps explain the apparent lack of sequence conservation in chloroplast TPs. PMID:22829148

  8. Identification of an Orthogonal Peptide Binding Motif for Biarsenical Multiuse Affinity Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baowei; Cao, Haishi; Yan, Ping; Mayer, M. Uljana; Squier, Thomas C.

    2007-07-01

    Biarsenical multiuse affinity probes (MAPs) complexed with ethanedithiol (EDT) permit the selective cellular labeling of proteins engineered with tetracysteine motifs, but are limited by the availability of a single binding motif (i.e., CCPGCC or PG tag) that prevents the differential labeling of co-expressed proteins. To overcome this problem, we have used a high-throughput peptide screen to identify an alternate binding motif (i.e., CCKACC or KA tag), which has a similar brightness to the classical sequence upon MAP binding, but displays altered rates and affinities of association that permit the differential labeling of these peptide sequences by the red probe 4,5-bis(1,3,2-dithiarsolan-2-yl)-resorufin (ReAsH-EDT2) or its green cognate 4’,5’-bis(1,3,2-dithoarsolan-2-yl)fluorescein-(1,2-ethanedithiol)2 (FLAsH-EDT2). The utility of this labeling strategy was demonstrated following the expression of PG- and KA-tagged subunits of RNA polymerase expressed in E. coli. Specific labeling of two subunits of RNA polymerase in cellular lysates was achieved, whereby ReAsH-EDT2 is shown to selectively label the PG-tag on RNA polymerase alpha subunit prior to the labeling of the KA-tag sequence of the beta subunit of RNA polymerase with FlAsH-EDT2. These results demonstrate the ability to selectively label multiple individual proteins with orthogonal sequence tags in complex cellular lystates with spectroscopically distinct MAPs, and indicate the absolute specificity of ReAsH to target expressed proteins with essentially no nonspecific binding interactions.

  9. First Structural View of a Peptide Interacting with the Nucleotide Binding Domain of Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Swetha; Singh, Meetali; Tatu, Utpal; Suguna, Kaza

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of Hsp90 in progression of diseases like cancer, neurological disorders and several pathogen related conditions is well established. Hsp90, therefore, has emerged as an attractive drug target for many of these diseases. Several small molecule inhibitors of Hsp90, such as geldanamycin derivatives, that display antitumor activity, have been developed and are under clinical trials. However, none of these tested inhibitors or drugs are peptide-based compounds. Here we report the first crystal structure of a peptide bound at the ATP binding site of the N-terminal domain of Hsp90. The peptide makes several specific interactions with the binding site residues, which are comparable to those made by the nucleotide and geldanamycin. A modified peptide was designed based on these interactions. Inhibition of ATPase activity of Hsp90 was observed in the presence of the modified peptide. This study provides an alternative approach and a lead peptide molecule for the rational design of effective inhibitors of Hsp90 function. PMID:26599366

  10. Investigating the Binding of Peptides to Graphene Surfaces for Biosensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garley, Amanda; Saikia, Nabanita; Barr, Stephen; Leuty, Gary; Berry, Rajiv; Heinz, Hendrik

    The Air Force Research Lab is focused on developing highly selective and sensitive graphene-based sensors functionalized with peptides for biomolecule detection. To achieve this there is a need to model interfacial binding interactions between the organic and inorganic components to complement ongoing experimental investigations. It is important to characterize the binding behavior of individual amino acids, with the goal of predicting binding of large peptides. Since polarization is important in graphene systems, a new force field which includes polarizability is used. This allows for an in depth exploration of pi-pi interactions, electrostatics and van der Waals forces involved with binding. The binding strength is determined via enthalpy and free energy calculations. Additionally, structural quantities are computed, such as how aromatic rings align with the graphene surface and the arrangement of various residue substituents in relation to the surface and water layers. Computational results are useful in guiding experimental methods focused on rapidly screening optimal peptide sequence for binding.

  11. Binding of Hemagglutinin and Influenza Virus to a Peptide-Conjugated Lipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Teruhiko; Shibata, Rabi; Sato, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) plays an important role in the first step of influenza virus (IFV) infection because it initiates the binding of the virus to the sialylgalactose linkages of the receptors on the host cells. We herein demonstrate that a HA-binding peptide immobilized on a solid support is available to bind to HA and IFV. We previously obtained a HA-binding pentapeptide (Ala-Arg-Leu-Pro-Arg), which was identified by phage-display selection against HAs from random peptide libraries. This peptide binds to the receptor-binding site of HA by mimicking sialic acid. A peptide-conjugated lipid (pep-PE) was chemically synthesized from the peptide and a saturated phospholipid. A lipid bilayer composed of pep-PE and an unsaturated phospholipid (DOPC) was immobilized on a mica plate; and the interaction between HA and the pep-PE/DOPC membrane was investigated using atomic force microscopy. The binding of IFV to the pep-PE/DOPC membrane was detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time reverse transcription PCR. Our results indicate that peptide-conjugated lipids are a useful molecular device for the detection of HA and IFV. PMID:27092124

  12. Binding of Hemagglutinin and Influenza Virus to a Peptide-Conjugated Lipid Membrane.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Teruhiko; Shibata, Rabi; Sato, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) plays an important role in the first step of influenza virus (IFV) infection because it initiates the binding of the virus to the sialylgalactose linkages of the receptors on the host cells. We herein demonstrate that a HA-binding peptide immobilized on a solid support is available to bind to HA and IFV. We previously obtained a HA-binding pentapeptide (Ala-Arg-Leu-Pro-Arg), which was identified by phage-display selection against HAs from random peptide libraries. This peptide binds to the receptor-binding site of HA by mimicking sialic acid. A peptide-conjugated lipid (pep-PE) was chemically synthesized from the peptide and a saturated phospholipid. A lipid bilayer composed of pep-PE and an unsaturated phospholipid (DOPC) was immobilized on a mica plate; and the interaction between HA and the pep-PE/DOPC membrane was investigated using atomic force microscopy. The binding of IFV to the pep-PE/DOPC membrane was detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time reverse transcription PCR. Our results indicate that peptide-conjugated lipids are a useful molecular device for the detection of HA and IFV. PMID:27092124

  13. Although Divergent in Residues of the Peptide-Binding Site, Conserved Chimpanzee Patr-AL and Polymorphic Human HLA-A*02 have Overlapping Peptide-Binding Repertoires 1

    PubMed Central

    Gleimer, Michael; Wahl, Angela R.; Hickman, Heather D.; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Norman, Paul J.; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.; Hammond, John A.; Draghi, Monia; Adams, Erin J.; Juo, Sean; Jalili, Roxana; Gharizadeh, Baback; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Garcia, K. Christopher; Hildebrand, William H.; Parham, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Patr-AL is an expressed, non-polymorphic MHC class I gene carried by ∼50% of chimpanzee MHC haplotypes. Comparing Patr-AL+ and Patr-AL- haplotypes showed Patr-AL defines a unique 125kb genomic block flanked by blocks containing classical Patr-A and pseudogene Patr-H. Orthologous to Patr-AL are polymorphic orangutan Popy-A and the 5′ part of human pseudogene HLA-Y, carried by ∼10% of HLA haplotypes. Thus the AL gene alternatively evolved in these closely related species to become classical, non-classical and non-functional. Although differing by 30 amino acid substitutions in the peptide-binding α1 and α2 domains, Patr-AL and HLA-A*0201 bind overlapping repertoires of peptides; the overlap being comparable to that between the A*0201 and A*0207 subtypes differing by one substitution. Patr-AL thus has the A02 supertypic peptide-binding specificity. Patr-AL and HLA-A*0201 have similar three-dimensional structures, binding peptides in similar conformation. Although comparable in size and shape, the B and F specificity pockets of Patr-AL and HLA-A*0201 differ in both their constituent residues and contacts with peptide anchors. Uniquely shared by Patr-AL, HLA-A*0201, and other members of the A02 supertype are the absence of serine at position 9 in the B pocket and the presence of tyrosine at position 116 in the F pocket. Distinguishing Patr-AL from HLA-A*02 is an unusually electropositive upper face on the α2 helix. Stimulating PBMC from Patr-AL- chimpanzees with B cells expressing Patr-AL, produced potent alloreactive CD8 T cells with specificity for Patr-AL and no crossreactivity toward other MHC class I, including HLA-A*02. PBMC from Patr-AL+ chimpanzees are tolerant of Patr-AL. PMID:21209280

  14. Utilizing Fibronectin Integrin-Binding Specificity to Control Cellular Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bachman, Haylee; Nicosia, John; Dysart, Marilyn; Barker, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Cells communicate with the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibronectin (Fn) through integrin receptors on the cell surface. Controlling integrin–Fn interactions offers a promising approach to directing cell behavior, such as adhesion, migration, and differentiation, as well as coordinated tissue behaviors such as morphogenesis and wound healing. Recent Advances: Several different groups have developed recombinant fragments of Fn that can control epithelial to mesenchymal transition, sequester growth factors, and promote bone and wound healing. It is thought that these physiological responses are, in part, due to specific integrin engagement. Furthermore, it has been postulated that the integrin-binding domain of Fn is a mechanically sensitive switch that drives binding of one integrin heterodimer over another. Critical Issues: Although computational simulations have predicted the mechano-switch hypothesis and recent evidence supports the existence of varying strain states of Fn in vivo, experimental evidence of the Fn integrin switch is still lacking. Future Directions: Evidence of the integrin mechano-switch will enable the development of new Fn-based peptides in tissue engineering and wound healing, as well as deepen our understanding of ECM pathologies, such as fibrosis. PMID:26244106

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of the binding of peptides from HIV GP120 by heparin

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, J.A.; Rabenstein, D.L.

    1995-12-01

    Heparin has recently been shown to inhibit the growth and replication of human immunodeficiency virus, HIV. The inhibition of HIV by heparin is believed to be partly the result of its binding to envelope glycoprotein gp120 of the virus. Amino acids 307-330 of gp120 form a heparin-binding domain having the sequence: N-N-T-R-K-S-I-R-I-Q-R-G-P-G-R-A-F-V-T-I-G-K-I-G. This paper will present results on the characterization of the interaction of heparin with synthetic peptides derived from the heparin-binding domain of gp120 of HIV using one and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Information will be presented on the amino acid residues of the peptides that are involved in the binding to heparin, the nature of the interactions between heparin and these residues, and the structure of the peptides in the peptide-heparin complexes.

  16. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus; identification of M protein-binding peptide ligands with antiviral and diagnostic potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The membrane (M) protein is one of the major structural proteins of coronavirus particles. In this study, the M protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was used to biopan a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. Three phages expressing TGEV-M-binding peptides were identified and ...

  17. Conformational Contribution to Thermodynamics of Binding in Protein-Peptide Complexes through Microscopic Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Amit; Chakrabarti, J.; Ghosh, Mahua

    2013-01-01

    We extract the thermodynamics of conformational changes in biomacromolecular complexes from the distributions of the dihedral angles of the macromolecules. These distributions are obtained from the equilibrium configurations generated via all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The conformational thermodynamics data we obtained for calmodulin-peptide complexes using our methodology corroborate well with the experimentally observed conformational and binding entropies. The conformational free-energy changes and their contributions for different peptide-binding regions of calmodulin are evaluated microscopically. PMID:23528087

  18. A GBP 130 derived peptide from Plasmodium falciparum binds to human erythrocytes and inhibits merozoite invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suarez, J E; Urquiza, M; Curtidor, H; Rodriguez, L E; Ocampo, M; Torres, E; Guzman, F; Patarroyo, M E

    2000-01-01

    The malarial GBP 130 protein binds weakly to intact human erythrocytes; the binding sites seem to be located in the repeat region and this region's antibodies block the merozoite invasion. A peptide from this region (residues from 701 to 720) which binds to human erythrocytes was identified. This peptide named 2220 did not bind to sialic acid; the binding site on human erythrocyte was affected by treatment with trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. The peptide was able to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. The residues F701, K703, L705, T706, E713 (FYKILTNTDPNDEVERDNAD) were found to be critical for peptide binding to erythrocytes. PMID:10904405

  19. Proline-rich sequences that bind to Src homology 3 domains with individual specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandropoulos, K; Cheng, G; Baltimore, D

    1995-01-01

    To study the binding specificity of Src homology 3 (SH3) domains, we have screened a mouse embryonic expression library for peptide fragments that interact with them. Several clones were identified that express fragments of proteins which, through proline-rich binding sites, exhibit differential binding specificity to various SH3 domains. Src-SH3-specific binding uses a sequence of 7 aa of the consensus RPLPXXP, in which the N-terminal arginine is very important. The SH3 domains of the Src-related kinases Fyn, Lyn, and Hck bind to this sequence with the same affinity as that of the Src SH3. In contrast, a quite different proline-rich sequence from the Btk protein kinase binds to the Fyn, Lyn, and Hck SH3 domains, but not to the Src SH3. Specific binding of the Abl SH3 requires a longer, more proline-rich sequence but no arginine. One clone that binds to both Src and Abl SH3 domains through a common site exhibits reversed binding orientation, in that an arginine indispensable for binding to all tested SH3 domains occurs at the C terminus. Another clone contains overlapping yet distinct Src and Abl SH3 binding sites. Binding to the SH3 domains is mediated by a common PXXP amino acid sequence motif present on all ligands, and specificity comes about from other interactions, often ones involving arginine. The rules governing in vivo usage of particular sites by particular SH3 domains are not clear, but one binding orientation may be more specific than another. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7536925

  20. Thermodynamics of peptide binding to the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP).

    PubMed

    Neumann, Lars; Abele, Rupert; Tampé, Robert

    2002-12-13

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter TAP plays an essential role in antigen processing and immune response to infected or malignant cells. TAP translocates proteasomal degradation products from the cytosol into the endoplasmic reticulum, where MHC class I molecules are loaded with these peptides. Kinetically stable peptide-MHC complexes are transported to the cell surface for inspection by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The transport cycle of TAP is initiated by peptide binding, which is responsible for peptide selection and for stimulation of ATP-hydrolysis and subsequent translocation. Here we have analysed the driving forces for the formation of the peptide-TAP complex by kinetic and thermodynamic methods. First, the apparent peptide association and dissociation rates were determined at various temperatures. Strikingly, very high activation energies for apparent association (E(a)(ass)=106 kJmol(-1)) and dissociation (E(a)(diss)=80 kJmol(-1)) of the peptide-TAP complex were found. Next, the temperature-dependence of the peptide affinity constants was investigated by equilibrium-binding assays. Along with calculations of free enthalpy deltaG, enthalpy deltaH and entropy deltaS, a large positive change in heat capacity was resolved (deltaC degrees =23 kJmol(-1)K(-1)), indicating a fundamental structural reorganization of the TAP complex upon peptide binding. The inspection of the conformational entropy reveals that approximately one-fourth of all TAP residues is rearranged. These thermodynamic studies indicate that at physiological temperature, peptide binding is endothermic and driven by entropy. PMID:12470952

  1. Synthesis of gold structures by gold-binding peptide governed by concentration of gold ion and peptide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungok; Kim, Dong-Hun; Lee, Sylvia J; Rheem, Youngwoo; Myung, Nosang V; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2016-08-01

    Although biological synthesis methods for the production of gold structures by microorganisms, plant extracts, proteins, and peptide have recently been introduced, there have been few reports pertaining to controlling their size and morphology. The gold ion and peptide concentrations affected on the size and uniformity of gold plates by a gold-binding peptide Midas-11. The higher concentration of gold ions produced a larger size of gold structures reached 125.5 μm, but an increased amount of Midas-11 produced a smaller size of gold platelets and increased the yield percentage of polygonal gold particles rather than platelets. The mechanisms governing factors controlling the production of gold structures were primarily related to nucleation and growth. These results indicate that the synthesis of gold architectures can be controlled by newly isolated and substituted peptides under different reaction conditions. PMID:27108675

  2. Bioluminescent Ligand-Receptor Binding Assays for Protein or Peptide Hormones.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence has been widely used in biomedical research due to its high sensitivity, low background, and broad linear range. In recent studies, we applied bioluminescence to ligand-receptor binding assays for some protein or peptide hormones based on a newly developed small monomeric Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) reporter that has the so far brightest bioluminescence. The conventional ligand-receptor binding assays rely on radioligands that have drawbacks, such as radioactive hazards and short shelf lives. In contrast, the novel bioluminescent binding assays use the NanoLuc-based protein or peptide tracers that are safe, stable, and ultrasensitive. Thus, the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assay would be applied to more and more protein or peptide hormones for ligand-receptor interaction studies in future. In the present article, we provided detailed protocols for setting up the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assays using two representative protein hormones as examples. PMID:27424896

  3. Heparin binding domain of antithrombin III: Characterization using a synthetic peptide directed polyclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.W.; Dey, B.; Knauer, D.J. )

    1990-09-25

    Antithrombin III (ATIII) is a plasma-borne serine protease inhibitor that apparently forms covalent complexes with thrombin. The interaction between ATIII and thrombin is enhanced several thousandfold by the glycosaminoglycan, heparin. The authors have previously proposed that the heparin binding site of ATIII residues within a region extending from amino acid residues 114-156. Computer-assisted analysis of this region revealed the presence of a 22 amino acid domain (residues 124-145), part of which shows a strong potential for the formation of an amphipathic helix: hydrophobic on one face and highly positively charged on the other. In the presence studies, polyclonal antisera were generated against a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 124-145 in native human ATIII. Affinity-purified IgG from these antisera, as well as monovalent Fab's derived from them, specifically blocked the binding of heparin to ATIII. Additionally, occupancy of the heparin binding site by these same monovalent and bivalent IgG's at least partially substituted for heparin, accelerating linkage formation between ATIII and thrombin. These results provide the first immunological evidence that region 124-145 is directly involved in the binding of heparin to ATIII and that an antibody-induced conformational change within this region can mediate ATIII activation.

  4. An Engineered Switch in T Cell Receptor Specificity Leads to an Unusual but Functional Binding Geometry.

    PubMed

    Harris, Daniel T; Singh, Nishant K; Cai, Qi; Smith, Sheena N; Vander Kooi, Craig W; Procko, Erik; Kranz, David M; Baker, Brian M

    2016-07-01

    Utilizing a diverse binding site, T cell receptors (TCRs) specifically recognize a composite ligand comprised of a foreign peptide and a major histocompatibility complex protein (MHC). To help understand the determinants of TCR specificity, we studied a parental and engineered receptor whose peptide specificity had been switched via molecular evolution. Altered specificity was associated with a significant change in TCR-binding geometry, but this did not impact the ability of the TCR to signal in an antigen-specific manner. The determinants of binding and specificity were distributed among contact and non-contact residues in germline and hypervariable loops, and included disruption of key TCR-MHC interactions that bias αβ TCRs toward particular binding modes. Sequence-fitness landscapes identified additional mutations that further enhanced specificity. Our results demonstrate that TCR specificity arises from the distributed action of numerous sites throughout the interface, with significant implications for engineering therapeutic TCRs with novel and functional recognition properties. PMID:27238970

  5. Lassa fever virus peptides predicted by computational analysis induce epitope-specific cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte responses in HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Boesen, Agnieszka; Sundar, Krishnan; Coico, Richard

    2005-10-01

    Lassa fever is a hemorrhagic disease caused by Lassa fever virus (LV). Although the precise host defense mechanism(s) that affords protection against LV is not completely understood, cellular immunity mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) plays a pivotal role in controlling viral replication and LV infection. To date, there have been no reports mapping major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-binding CTL epitopes for LV. Using computer-assisted algorithms, we identified five HLA-A2.1-binding peptides of LV glycoprotein (GP) and two peptides from LV nucleoprotein (NP). Synthesized peptides were examined for their ability to bind to MHC class I molecules using a flow cytometric assay that measures peptide stabilization of class I. Three of the LV-GP peptides tested (LLGTFTWTL, SLYKGVYEL, and YLISIFLHL) stabilized HLA-A2. The LV-NP peptides tested failed to stabilize this HLA-A2. We then investigated the ability of the HLA-A2-binding LV-GP peptides to generate peptide-specific CTLs in HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice. Functional assays used to confirm CTL activation included gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays and intracellular cytokine staining of CD8+ T cells from peptide-primed mice. CTL assays were also performed to verify the cytolytic activity of peptide-pulsed target cells. Each of the LV-GP peptides induced CTL responses in HLA-A2-transgenic mice. MHC class I tetramers prepared using one LV-GP peptide that showed the highest cytolytic index (LLGTFTWTL) confirmed that peptide-binding CD8+ T cells were present in pooled lymphocytes harvested from peptide-primed mice. These findings provide direct evidence for the existence of LV-derived GP epitopes that may be useful in the development of protective immunogens for this hemorrhagic virus. PMID:16210487

  6. Lassa Fever Virus Peptides Predicted by Computational Analysis Induce Epitope-Specific Cytotoxic-T-Lymphocyte Responses in HLA-A2.1 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boesen, Agnieszka; Sundar, Krishnan; Coico, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Lassa fever is a hemorrhagic disease caused by Lassa fever virus (LV). Although the precise host defense mechanism(s) that affords protection against LV is not completely understood, cellular immunity mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) plays a pivotal role in controlling viral replication and LV infection. To date, there have been no reports mapping major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-binding CTL epitopes for LV. Using computer-assisted algorithms, we identified five HLA-A2.1-binding peptides of LV glycoprotein (GP) and two peptides from LV nucleoprotein (NP). Synthesized peptides were examined for their ability to bind to MHC class I molecules using a flow cytometric assay that measures peptide stabilization of class I. Three of the LV-GP peptides tested (LLGTFTWTL, SLYKGVYEL, and YLISIFLHL) stabilized HLA-A2. The LV-NP peptides tested failed to stabilize this HLA-A2. We then investigated the ability of the HLA-A2-binding LV-GP peptides to generate peptide-specific CTLs in HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice. Functional assays used to confirm CTL activation included gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays and intracellular cytokine staining of CD8+ T cells from peptide-primed mice. CTL assays were also performed to verify the cytolytic activity of peptide-pulsed target cells. Each of the LV-GP peptides induced CTL responses in HLA-A2-transgenic mice. MHC class I tetramers prepared using one LV-GP peptide that showed the highest cytolytic index (LLGTFTWTL) confirmed that peptide-binding CD8+ T cells were present in pooled lymphocytes harvested from peptide-primed mice. These findings provide direct evidence for the existence of LV-derived GP epitopes that may be useful in the development of protective immunogens for this hemorrhagic virus. PMID:16210487

  7. EWGWS insert in Plasmodium falciparum ookinete surface enolase is involved in binding of PWWP containing peptides: Implications to mosquito midgut invasion by the parasite.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Debanjan; Mishra, Pushpa; Joshi, Mamata; Thakur, Prasoon Kumar; Hosur, R V; Jarori, Gotam K

    2016-01-01

    There are multiple stages in the life cycle of Plasmodium that invade host cells. Molecular machinery involved is such host-pathogen interactions constitute excellent drug targets and/or vaccine candidates. A screen using a phage display library has previously demonstrated presence of enolase on the surface of the Plasmodium ookinete. Phage-displayed peptides that bound to the ookinete contained a conserved motif (PWWP) in their sequence. Here, direct binding of these peptides with recombinant Plasmodium falciparum enolase (rPfeno) was investigated. These peptides showed specific binding to rPfeno, but failed to bind to other enolases. Plasmodium spp enolases are distinct in having an insert of five amino acids ((104)EWGWS(108)) that is not found in host enolases. The possibility of this insert being the recognition motif for the PWWP containing peptides was examined, (i) by comparing the binding of the peptides with rPfeno and a deletion variant Δ-rPfeno lacking (104)EWGWS(108), (ii) by measuring the changes in proton chemical shifts of PWWP peptides on binding to different enolases and (iii) by inter-molecular docking experiment to locate the peptide binding site. Results from these studies showed that the pentapeptide insert of Pfeno indeed constitutes the binding site for the PWWP domain containing peptide ligands. Search for sequences homologous to phage displayed peptides among peritrophic matrix proteins resulted in identification of perlecan, laminin, peritrophin and spacran. The possibility of these PWWP domain-containing proteins in the peritrophic matrix of insect gut to interact with ookinete cell surface enolase and facilitate the invasion of mosquito midgut epithelium is discussed. PMID:26592350

  8. Identification of 14-3-3 Proteins Phosphopeptide-Binding Specificity Using an Affinity-Based Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao; Tang, Jijun; Guo, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The 14-3-3 proteins are a highly conserved family of homodimeric and heterodimeric molecules, expressed in all eukaryotic cells. In human cells, this family consists of seven distinct but highly homologous 14-3-3 isoforms. 14-3-3σ is the only isoform directly linked to cancer in epithelial cells, which is regulated by major tumor suppressor genes. For each 14-3-3 isoform, we have 1,000 peptide motifs with experimental binding affinity values. In this paper, we present a novel method for identifying peptide motifs binding to 14-3-3σ isoform. First, we propose a sampling criteria to build a predictor for each new peptide sequence. Then, we select nine physicochemical properties of amino acids to describe each peptide motif. We also use auto-cross covariance to extract correlative properties of amino acids in any two positions. Finally, we consider elastic net to predict affinity values of peptide motifs, based on ridge regression and least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO). Our method tests on the 1,000 known peptide motifs binding to seven 14-3-3 isoforms. On the 14-3-3σ isoform, our method has overall pearson-product-moment correlation coefficient (PCC) and root mean squared error (RMSE) values of 0.84 and 252.31 for N–terminal sublibrary, and 0.77 and 269.13 for C–terminal sublibrary. We predict affinity values of 16,000 peptide sequences and relative binding ability across six permutated positions similar with experimental values. We identify phosphopeptides that preferentially bind to 14-3-3σ over other isoforms. Several positions on peptide motifs are in the same amino acid category with experimental substrate specificity of phosphopeptides binding to 14-3-3σ. Our method is fast and reliable and is a general computational method that can be used in peptide-protein binding identification in proteomics research. PMID:26828594

  9. Identification of 14-3-3 Proteins Phosphopeptide-Binding Specificity Using an Affinity-Based Computational Approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Tang, Jijun; Guo, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The 14-3-3 proteins are a highly conserved family of homodimeric and heterodimeric molecules, expressed in all eukaryotic cells. In human cells, this family consists of seven distinct but highly homologous 14-3-3 isoforms. 14-3-3σ is the only isoform directly linked to cancer in epithelial cells, which is regulated by major tumor suppressor genes. For each 14-3-3 isoform, we have 1,000 peptide motifs with experimental binding affinity values. In this paper, we present a novel method for identifying peptide motifs binding to 14-3-3σ isoform. First, we propose a sampling criteria to build a predictor for each new peptide sequence. Then, we select nine physicochemical properties of amino acids to describe each peptide motif. We also use auto-cross covariance to extract correlative properties of amino acids in any two positions. Finally, we consider elastic net to predict affinity values of peptide motifs, based on ridge regression and least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO). Our method tests on the 1,000 known peptide motifs binding to seven 14-3-3 isoforms. On the 14-3-3σ isoform, our method has overall pearson-product-moment correlation coefficient (PCC) and root mean squared error (RMSE) values of 0.84 and 252.31 for N-terminal sublibrary, and 0.77 and 269.13 for C-terminal sublibrary. We predict affinity values of 16,000 peptide sequences and relative binding ability across six permutated positions similar with experimental values. We identify phosphopeptides that preferentially bind to 14-3-3σ over other isoforms. Several positions on peptide motifs are in the same amino acid category with experimental substrate specificity of phosphopeptides binding to 14-3-3σ. Our method is fast and reliable and is a general computational method that can be used in peptide-protein binding identification in proteomics research. PMID:26828594

  10. Identification of the sAPRIL Binding Peptide and Its Growth Inhibition Effects in the Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Li, Jing; He, Mei-rong

    2015-01-01

    Background A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) super family. It binds to its specific receptors and is involved in multiple processes during tumorigenesis and tumor cells proliferation. High levels of APRIL expression are closely correlated to the growth, metastasis, and 5-FU drug resistance of colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to identify a specific APRIL binding peptide (BP) able to block APRIL activity that could be used as a potential treatment for colorectal cancer. Methods A phage display library was used to identify peptides that bound selectively to soluble recombinant human APRIL (sAPRIL). The peptides with the highest binding affinity for sAPRIL were identified using ELISA. The effects of sAPRIL-BP on cell proliferation and cell cycle/apoptosis in vitro were evaluated using the CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. An in vivo mouse model of colorectal cancer was used to determine the anti-tumor efficacy of the sAPRIL-BP. Results Three candidate peptides were characterized from eight phage clones with high binding affinity for sAPRIL. The peptide with the highest affinity was selected for further characterization. The identified sAPRIL-BP suppressed tumor cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in LOVO cells in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo in a mouse colorectal challenge model, the sAPRIL-BP reduced the growth of tumor xenografts in nude mice by inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis intratumorally. Moreover, in an in vivo metastasis model, sAPRIL-BP reduced liver metastasis of colorectal cancer cells. Conclusions sAPRIL-BP significantly suppressed tumor growth in vitro and in vivo and might be a candidate for treating colorectal cancers that express high levels of APRIL. PMID:25826583

  11. The Use ofa Hydrophobic Binding Peptide Modified Lipid Nanocarrier Improving Tumor Distribution and Antitumor Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Yang, Xiucong; Lin, Zhiqiang; Gao, Shanyun; He, Bing; Mei, Bong; Wang, Dan; Yuan, Lan; Zhang, Hua; Dai, Wenbing; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    In addition to showing the specific interaction between a generalized ligand and its receptor and the electrostatic effect between positive cell-penetrating peptides and negative cell membranes, our last study demonstrated the hydrophobic interactivity between a hydrophobic binding peptide (HBP) and biomembranes to be favorable in drug delivery. To yield more evidence for this new strategy and to find more effective HBPs, here we designed and established a novel nanomedicine associated with cyclosporin A (CsA) because this peptide is electrically neutral, highly hydrophobic, very stable in vivo and safe at the given dose. First, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies showed a strong hydrophobic interaction between the CsA molecules and the lipid membrane. The lactate dehydrogenase release assay proved that CsA exhibited low toxicity to cell membranes. These facts encouraged us to explore the potential application of CsA as an HBP to actualize intracellular delivery of nanomedicines for tumor therapy. When conjugated to lipid nanocarriers, CsA significantly enhanced their binding with cells and,. consequently, increased the internalization of recoded nanomedicines into cells. The in vivo experiments further showed that the CsA-associated nanocarriers could achieve better delivery to tumor tissues and improve the tumor therapy of doxorubicin (DOX) compared to the nonmodified control; these findings were identical to the observations-in cell studies. In conclusion, CsA, a readily obtainable molecule with favorable characteristics, is indeed a good candidate for an HBP, and this study provides solid, novel evidence for the use of HBP-based nanocarriers as effective antitumor drug delivery systems. PMID:27319213

  12. Novel Interactions of the TRTK12 Peptide with S100 Protein Family Members: Specificity and Thermodynamic Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Wafer, Lucas N.; Tzul, Franco O.; Pandharipande, Pranav P.; Makhatadze, George I.

    2013-01-01

    The S100 protein family consists of small, dimeric proteins that exert their biological functions in response to changing calcium concentrations. S100B is the best studied member and has been shown to interact with over 20 binding partners in a calcium-dependent manner. The TRTK12 peptide, derived from the consensus binding sequence for S100B, has previously been found to interact with S100A1 and has been proposed to be a general binding partner of the S100 family. To test this hypothesis and gain a better understanding of the specificity of binding for the S100 proteins sixteen members of the human S100 family were screened against this peptide and its alanine variants. Novel interactions were only found with two family members: S100P and S100A2, indicating that TRTK12 selectively interacts with a small subset of the S100 proteins. Substantial promiscuity was observed in the binding site of S100B to accommodate variations in the peptide sequence, while S100A1, S100A2, and S100P exhibited larger differences in the binding constants for the TRTK12 alanine variants. This suggests that single-point substitutions can be used to selectively modulate the affinity of TRTK12 peptides for individual S100 proteins. This study has important implications for the rational drug design of inhibitors for the S100 proteins, which are involved in a variety of cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23899389

  13. A Peptide Mimetic of 5-Acetylneuraminic Acid-Galactose Binds with High Avidity to Siglecs and NKG2D

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, Laura L.; Spyroulias, Georgios A.; Jones, Norman G.; Hanson, Carl V.; Hoober, J. Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified several peptide sequences that mimicked the terminal sugars of complex glycans. Using plant lectins as analogs of lectin-type cell-surface receptors, a tetravalent form of a peptide with the sequence NPSHPLSG, designated svH1C, bound with high avidity to lectins specific for glycans with terminal 5-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac)-galactose (Gal)/N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) sequences. In this report, we show by circular dichroism and NMR spectra that svH1C lacks an ordered structure and thus interacts with binding sites from a flexible conformation. The peptide binds with high avidity to several recombinant human siglec receptors that bind preferentially to Neu5Ac(α2,3)Gal, Neu5Ac(α2,6)GalNAc or Neu5Ac(α2,8)Neu5Ac ligands. In addition, the peptide bound the receptor NKG2D, which contains a lectin-like domain that binds Neu5Ac(α2,3)Gal. The peptide bound to these receptors with a KD in the range of 0.6 to 1 μM. Binding to these receptors was inhibited by the glycoprotein fetuin, which contains multiple glycans that terminate in Neu5Ac(α2,3)Gal or Neu5Ac(α2,6)Gal, and by sialyllactose. Binding of svH1C was not detected with CLEC9a, CLEC10a or DC-SIGN, which are lectin-type receptors specific for other sugars. Incubation of neuraminidase-treated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with svH1C resulted in binding of the peptide to a subset of the CD14+ monocyte population. Tyrosine phosphorylation of siglecs decreased dramatically when peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with 100 nM svH1C. Subcutaneous, alternate-day injections of svH1C into mice induced several-fold increases in populations of several types of immune cells in the peritoneal cavity. These results support the conclusion that svH1C mimics Neu5Ac-containing sequences and interacts with cell-surface receptors with avidities sufficient to induce biological responses at low concentrations. The attenuation of inhibitory receptors suggests that svH1C has

  14. Functional and Selective Bacterial Interfaces Using Cross-Scaffold Gold Binding Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Jahnke, Justin P.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the functional and selective activity of three phage-derived gold-binding peptides on the Escherichia coli ( E. coli) bacterial cell surface display scaffold (eCPX) for the first time. Gold-binding peptides, p3-Au12 (LKAHLPPSRLPS), p8#9 (VSGSSPDS), and Midas-2 (TGTSVLIATPYV), were compared side-by-side through experiment and simulation. All exhibited strong binding to an evaporated gold film, with approximately a 4-log difference in binding between each peptide and the control sample. The increased affinity for gold was also confirmed by direct visualization of samples using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Peptide dynamics in solution were performed to analyze innate structure, and all three were found to have a high degree of flexibility. Preferential binding to gold over silicon for all three peptides was demonstrated, with up to four orders of magnitude selectivity exhibited by p3-Au12. The selectivity was also clearly evident through SEM analysis of the boundary between the gold film and silicon substrate. Functional activity of bound E. coli cells was further demonstrated by stimulating filamentation and all three peptides were characterized as prolific relative to control samples. This work shows great promise towards functional and active bacterial-hybrid gold surfaces and the potential to enable the next generation living material interfaces.

  15. The signal recognition particle binds to protein L23 at the peptide exit of the Escherichia coli ribosome

    PubMed Central

    GU, SHAN-QING; PESKE, FRANK; WIEDEN, HANS-JOACHIM; RODNINA, MARINA V.; WINTERMEYER, WOLFGANG

    2003-01-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) from Escherichia coli, composed of Ffh protein and 4.5S RNA, mediates membrane targeting of translating ribosomes displaying a signal or signal-anchor sequence. SRP binds at the peptide exit of the large ribosomal subunit. Structural details of the interaction are not known. Here, the position of Ffh or SRP on the ribosome was probed by using site-specific UV-induced crosslinking by p-azidophenacyl bromide (AzP) attached to a number of cysteine residues engineered into surface positions of Ffh. Efficient crosslinking to vacant ribosomes took place from two positions (AzP17 and AzP25) in the N domain of Ffh, both with Ffh and SRP. Both AzP17 and AzP25 were predominantly crosslinked to ribosomal protein L23 that is located at the peptide exit of the 50S subunit. The SRP receptor, FtsY, did not change the crosslink pattern, whereas the presence of a nascent signal peptide on the ribosome resulted in a second crosslink between Ffh(AzP17) and protein L23, indicating that binding to the nascent signal peptide induced a slightly different arrangement of SRP on the ribosome. These results indicate a model of the topographical arrangement of SRP at the peptide exit of the 50S ribosomal subunit. PMID:12702815

  16. The signal recognition particle binds to protein L23 at the peptide exit of the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shan-Qing; Peske, Frank; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Rodnina, Marina V; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang

    2003-05-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) from Escherichia coli, composed of Ffh protein and 4.5S RNA, mediates membrane targeting of translating ribosomes displaying a signal or signal-anchor sequence. SRP binds at the peptide exit of the large ribosomal subunit. Structural details of the interaction are not known. Here, the position of Ffh or SRP on the ribosome was probed by using site-specific UV-induced crosslinking by p-azidophenacyl bromide (AzP) attached to a number of cysteine residues engineered into surface positions of Ffh. Efficient crosslinking to vacant ribosomes took place from two positions (AzP17 and AzP25) in the N domain of Ffh, both with Ffh and SRP. Both AzP17 and AzP25 were predominantly crosslinked to ribosomal protein L23 that is located at the peptide exit of the 50S subunit. The SRP receptor, FtsY, did not change the crosslink pattern, whereas the presence of a nascent signal peptide on the ribosome resulted in a second crosslink between Ffh(AzP17) and protein L23, indicating that binding to the nascent signal peptide induced a slightly different arrangement of SRP on the ribosome. These results indicate a model of the topographical arrangement of SRP at the peptide exit of the 50S ribosomal subunit. PMID:12702815

  17. The Alzheimer's disease Aβ peptide binds to the anionic DMPS lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, Christopher; Klimov, Dmitri K

    2016-06-01

    We have applied isobaric-isothermal replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) and the all-atom explicit water model to study binding of Aβ10-40 peptide to the anionic DMPS bilayer. To provide comparison with a zwitterionic bilayer, we used our previous REMD simulations probing binding of the same peptide to the DMPC bilayer. Using two sets of simulations, we comparatively analyzed the equilibrium Aβ conformational ensemble, peptide-bilayer interactions, and changes in the bilayer structure induced by Aβ binding. Our results are six-fold. (1) Binding to the DMPS bilayer triggers the formation of stable helix in the Aβ C-terminal, although the helix-inducing effect caused by DMPS lipids is weaker than that of DMPC. (2) Compared to the DMPC-bound Aβ monomer, the anionic bilayer weakens intrapeptide interactions, particularly, formed by charged amino acids. (3) Binding of Aβ peptide to the DMPS bilayer is primarily governed by electrostatic interactions between charged amino acids and charged lipid groups. In contrast, these interactions play minor role in Aβ binding to the DMPC bilayer. (4) Aβ peptide generally resides on the DMPS bilayer surface causing relatively minor bilayer thinning. The opposite scenario applies to Aβ binding to the DMPC bilayer. (5) In contrast to DMPC simulations, Aβ largely expels anionic lipids from its binding "footprint" forming a ring of charged amino acids mixed with charged lipid groups around the peptide. (6) Aβ binding disorders proximal DMPS lipids more strongly than their DMPC counterparts. Our simulations show that Aβ monomers fail to perturb anionic or zwitterionic bilayers across both leaflets. PMID:26947182

  18. Label-Free, In-Solution Screening of Peptide Libraries for Binding to Protein Targets Using Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maaty, Walid S; Weis, David D

    2016-02-01

    There is considerable interest in the discovery of peptide ligands that bind to protein targets. Discovery of such ligands is usually approached by screening large peptide libraries. However, the individual peptides must be tethered to a tag that preserves their individual identities (e.g., phage display or one-bead one-compound). To overcome this limitation, we have developed a method for screening libraries of label-free peptides for binding to a protein target in solution as a single batch. The screening is based on decreased amide hydrogen exchange by peptides that bind to the target. Hydrogen exchange is measured by mass spectrometry. We demonstrate the approach using a peptide library derived from the Escherichia coli proteome that contained 6664 identifiable features. The library was spiked separately with a peptide spanning the calmodulin binding domain of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, 494-513) and a peptide spanning the N-terminal 20 residues of bovine ribonuclease A (S peptide). Human calmodulin and bovine ribonuclease S (RNase S) were screened against the library. Using a novel data analysis workflow, we identified the eNOS peptide as the only calmodulin binding peptide and S peptide as the only ribonuclease S binding peptide in the library. PMID:26741284

  19. Antibodies to synthetic peptides as probes for the binding site on the alpha subunit of the acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, D; Gershoni, J M; Fridkin, M; Fuchs, S

    1985-01-01

    Synthetic peptides and their respective antibodies were used in an attempt to localize and identify the ligand-binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Two peptides of the receptor alpha subunit were synthesized, the first corresponding to the NH2-terminal domain (positions 1-20) and the other, to a segment (residues 126-143) that contains the first two cysteine residues. Specific antipeptide antibodies were elicited in rabbits after immunization with the peptides conjugated to bovine serum albumin. The antipeptide antibodies thus obtained cross-reacted with the receptor and bound specifically to its alpha subunit. The antipeptide antibodies were used to test whether the peptide sequences corresponded to the alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX)-binding site. Staphylococcus aureus V8-protease digestion of the isolated receptor alpha subunit generated several fragments. Antipeptide (1-20) and antipeptide (126-143) both bound a 26-kDa fragment, whereas only antipeptide (126-143) bound a 17-kDa fragment. None of these fragments were found to bind alpha-BTX. On the other hand, alpha-BTX bound to an 18-kDa fragment that did not react with either of the antipeptide antibodies. Moreover, the 26-kDa and 17-kDa fragments were also found to contain the endoglycosidase H-susceptible oligosaccharide chain. Our results indicate that the toxin-binding site lies beyond the first possible V8 protease cleavage site after residues 126-143: i.e., Asp-152. This location is in agreement with the possibility that cysteine residues 192 and/or 193 are in close proximity to or contiguous with the ligand-binding site. Images PMID:2582416

  20. Coupling in silico and in vitro analysis of peptide-MHC binding: a bioinformatic approach enabling prediction of superbinding peptides and anchorless epitopes.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Walshe, Valerie A; Jones, Nicola A; Gloster, Simone E; Borrow, Persephone; Flower, Darren R

    2004-06-15

    The ability to define and manipulate the interaction of peptides with MHC molecules has immense immunological utility, with applications in epitope identification, vaccine design, and immunomodulation. However, the methods currently available for prediction of peptide-MHC binding are far from ideal. We recently described the application of a bioinformatic prediction method based on quantitative structure-affinity relationship methods to peptide-MHC binding. In this study we demonstrate the predictivity and utility of this approach. We determined the binding affinities of a set of 90 nonamer peptides for the MHC class I allele HLA-A*0201 using an in-house, FACS-based, MHC stabilization assay, and from these data we derived an additive quantitative structure-affinity relationship model for peptide interaction with the HLA-A*0201 molecule. Using this model we then designed a series of high affinity HLA-A2-binding peptides. Experimental analysis revealed that all these peptides showed high binding affinities to the HLA-A*0201 molecule, significantly higher than the highest previously recorded. In addition, by the use of systematic substitution at principal anchor positions 2 and 9, we showed that high binding peptides are tolerant to a wide range of nonpreferred amino acids. Our results support a model in which the affinity of peptide binding to MHC is determined by the interactions of amino acids at multiple positions with the MHC molecule and may be enhanced by enthalpic cooperativity between these component interactions. PMID:15187128

  1. Diazepam binding inhibitor is a potent cholecystokinin-releasing peptide in the intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Herzig, K H; Schön, I; Tatemoto, K; Ohe, Y; Li, Y; Fölsch, U R; Owyang, C

    1996-01-01

    Pancreatic proteases in the duodenum inhibit the release of cholecystokinin (CCK) and thus exert feedback control of pancreatic exocrine secretion. Exclusion of proteases from the duodenum either by the diversion of bile-pancreatic juice or by the addition of protease inhibitors stimulates exocrine pancreatic secretion. The mechanism by which pancreatic proteases in the duodenum regulate CCK secretion is unknown. In this study, we isolated a trypsin-sensitive peptide that is secreted intraduodenally, releases CCK, and stimulates pancreatic enzyme secretion in rats. This peptide was found to be identical to the porcine diazepam binding inhibitor by peptide sequencing and mass spectrometry analysis. Intraduodenal infusion of 200 ng of synthetic porcine diazepam binding inhibitor1-86 in rats significantly stimulated pancreatic amylase output. Infusion of the CCK antagonist MK-329 completely blocked the diazepam binding inhibitor-stimulated amylase secretion. Similarly, diazepam binding inhibitor33-52 [corrected] also stimulated CCK release and pancreatic secretion in a dose-dependent manner although it was 100 times less potent than the whole peptide. Using a perfusion system containing isolated mucosal cells from the proximal intestine of rats, porcine diazepam binding inhibitor 10(-12) M) dose dependently stimulated CCK secretion. In separate studies, it was demonstrated that luminal secretion of the diazepam binding inhibitor immunoreactivity (7.5 X 10(11) M) could be detected in rat's intestinal washing following the diversion of bile-pancreatic juice. The secretion of this peptide was inhibited by atropine. In conclusion, we have isolated and characterized a CCK-releasing peptide that has a sequence identical to the porcine diazepam binding inhibitor from pig intestinal mucosa and that stimulates CCK release when administered intraduodenally in rat. This peptide may mediate feedback regulation of pancreatic enzyme secretion. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8755579

  2. HIV-1 vaccine development: constrained peptide immunogens show improved binding to the anti-HIV-1 gp41 MAb.

    PubMed

    McGaughey, G B; Citron, M; Danzeisen, R C; Freidinger, R M; Garsky, V M; Hurni, W M; Joyce, J G; Liang, X; Miller, M; Shiver, J; Bogusky, M J

    2003-03-25

    The human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 mediates viral entry through fusion of the target cellular and viral membranes. A segment of gp41 containing the sequence Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala has previously been identified as the epitope of the HIV-1 neutralizing human monoclonal antibody 2F5 (MAb 2F5). The 2F5 epitope is highly conserved among HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. Antibodies directed at the 2F5 epitope have neutralizing effects on a broad range of laboratory-adapted HIV-1 variants and primary isolates. Recently, a crystal structure of the epitope bound to the Fab fragment of MAb 2F5 has shown that the 2F5 peptide adopts a beta-turn conformation [Pai, E. F., Klein, M. H., Chong, P., and Pedyczak, A. (2000) World Intellectual Property Organization Patent WO-00/61618]. We have designed cyclic peptides to adopt beta-turn conformations by the incorporation of a side-chain to side-chain lactam bridge between the i and i + 4 residues containing the Asp-Lys-Trp segment. Synthesis of extended, nonconstrained peptides encompassing the 2F5 epitope revealed that the 13 amino acid sequence, Glu-Leu-Leu-Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala-Ser-Leu-Trp-Asn, maximized MAb 2F5 binding. Constrained analogues of this sequence were explored to optimize 2F5 binding affinity. The solution conformations of the constrained peptides have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling techniques. The results presented here demonstrate that both inclusion of the lactam constraint and extension of the 2F5 segment are necessary to elicit optimal antibody binding activity. The ability of these peptide immunogens to stimulate a high titer, peptide-specific immune response incapable of viral neutralization is discussed in regard to developing an HIV-1 vaccine designed to elicit a 2F5-like immune response. PMID:12641452

  3. Specific central memory T cells in the bone marrow of patients immunized against tyrosinase peptides.

    PubMed

    Letsch, Anne; Keilholz, Ulrich; Kern, Florian; Asemissen, Anne Marie; Thiel, Eckhard; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    The goal of vaccination against tumors is the induction of effector T cells mediating tumor destruction and memory T cells providing long-term immunity. Several previous studies in patients vaccinated with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I peptides failed to show induction of central memory T cells, which are considered important to provide long-term memory. This study examined the subset composition and function of specific T cells generated by immunization with MHC class I binding tyrosinase peptides in combination with the adjuvants granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and keyhole limpet hemocyanin in peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) of melanoma patients. Most of the tyrosinase-specific T cells in PB had a CD45RA(+)CCR7(-) effector phenotype. In contrast to this, a large subset of tyrosinase-specific T cells in BM were memory T cells, including CD45RA(+)CCR7(-) central and CD45RA(-)CCR7(-) effector memory T cells. BM tyrosinase-specific T cells were functional, because they produced interferon-gamma and had a high proliferative potential. This study suggests that peptide vaccination can generate a fully functional memory T-cell response characterized by central and effector memory phenotypes, proliferative potential, and BM tropism. PMID:16531820

  4. Binding of small basic peptides to membranes containing acidic lipids: theoretical models and experimental results.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Tal, N; Honig, B; Peitzsch, R M; Denisov, G; McLaughlin, S

    1996-01-01

    We measured directly the binding of Lys3, Lys5, and Lys7 to vesicles containing acidic phospholipids. When the vesicles contain 33% acidic lipids and the aqueous solution contains 100 mM monovalent salt, the standard Gibbs free energy for the binding of these peptides is 3, 5, and 7 kcal/mol, respectively. The binding energies decrease as the mol% of acidic lipids in the membrane decreases and/or as the salt concentration increases. Several lines of evidence suggest that these hydrophilic peptides do not penetrate the polar headgroup region of the membrane and that the binding is mainly due to electrostatic interactions. To calculate the binding energies from classical electrostatics, we applied the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation to atomic models of the phospholipid bilayers and the basic peptides in aqueous solution. The electrostatic free energy of interaction, which arises from both a long-range coulombic attraction between the positively charged peptide and the negatively charged lipid bilayer, and a short-range Born or image charge repulsion, is a minimum when approximately 2.5 A (i.e., one layer of water) exists between the van der Waals surfaces of the peptide and the lipid bilayer. The calculated molar association constants, K, agree well with the measured values: K is typically about 10-fold smaller than the experimental value (i.e., a difference of about 1.5 kcal/mol in the free energy of binding). The predicted dependence of K (or the binding free energies) on the ionic strength of the solution, the mol% of acidic lipids in the membrane, and the number of basic residues in the peptide agree very well with the experimental measurements. These calculations are relevant to the membrane binding of a number of important proteins that contain clusters of basic residues. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:8842196

  5. Inhibition of Herpes Simplex Virus gD and Lymphotoxin-α Binding to HveA by Peptide Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Sarrias, Maria Rosa; Whitbeck, J. Charles; Rooney, Isabelle; Spruce, Lynn; Kay, Brian K.; Montgomery, Rebecca I.; Spear, Patricia G.; Ware, Carl F.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.; Lambris, John D.

    1999-01-01

    The herpesvirus entry mediator A (HveA) is a recently characterized member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family that mediates the entry of most herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) strains into mammalian cells. Studies on the interaction of HSV-1 with HveA have shown that of all the viral proteins involved in uptake, only gD has been shown to bind directly to HveA, and this binding mediates viral entry into cells. In addition to gD binding to HveA, the latter has been shown to interact with proteins of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor family, lymphotoxin-α (LT-α), and a membrane-associated protein referred to as LIGHT. To study the relationship between HveA, its natural ligands, and the viral proteins involved in HSV entry into cells, we have screened two phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries for peptide ligands of a recombinant form of HveA. Affinity selection experiments yielded two peptide ligands, BP-1 and BP-2, which could block the interaction between gD and HveA. Of the two peptides, only BP-2 inhibited HSV entry into CHO cells transfected with an HveA-expressing plasmid. When we analyzed these peptides for the ability to interfere with HveA binding to its natural ligand LT-α, we found that BP-1 inhibited the interaction of cellular LT-α with HveA. Thus, we have dissected the sites of interaction between the cell receptor, its natural ligand LT-α and gD, the virus-specific protein involved in HSV entry into cells. PMID:10364318

  6. Inhibition of peptide binding to DR molecules by a leupeptin-induced invariant chain fragment.

    PubMed

    Demotz, S; Danieli, C; Wallny, H J; Majdic, O

    1994-08-01

    Loading of peptides onto DR molecules was studied by characterizing precursors of the mature peptide-DR complexes expressed at the surface of B cells. Since invariant chain (Ii) prevents binding of peptides by DR molecules, it was speculated that analysis of complexes between DR heterodimers and proteolytic fragments of Ii offers the possibility to examine how DR molecules and peptides assemble. Using a procedure combining a two-step affinity chromatography and gel filtration, we isolated from leupeptin-treated B cells complexes between DR molecules and N-terminal Ii fragments previously called "leupeptin-induced polypeptides" (LIP; Blum and Cresswell, 1988, Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 85, 3975-3979). It was observed that the most prominent LIP fragment has a relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 16 kDa. In addition, we show that this polypeptide species does not bear N-linked glycans, indicating that this fragment does not extend beyond residue 129 of Ii. Similarly to DR alpha beta heterodimers associated with the full length 33 and 35 kDa Ii forms, DR alpha beta heterodimers associated with LIP fragments are unstable in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at ambient temperature, whereas mature DR alpha beta heterodimers are resistant to dissociation with SDS. These results are indirect evidence that LIP-DR complexes are devoid of bound peptides. This possibility was supported by showing that LIP-DR complexes fail to bind a radioiodinated tetanus toxin peptide (125I-p2), while DR molecules, which are spontaneously released from complexes with LIP fragments, bind the labeled peptide. These results demonstrate that association with LIP fragments is sufficient to prevent binding of peptides by DR molecules. This notion was further documented by showing that binding of 125I-p2 on DR heterodimers is inhibited by preparations of LIP fragment. By contrast, a soluble recombinant fragment corresponding to the extracytoplasmic region of Ii did not block 125I-p2 binding. The results

  7. Rational design of YAP WW1 domain-binding peptides to target TGFβ/BMP/Smad-YAP interaction in heterotopic ossification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Liu, Shenghe; Zhang, Wen; Sun, Luyuan

    2015-11-01

    The transforming growth factor-β/bone morphogenic protein/Smad signaling pathway has been raised as a new and promising therapeutic target of heterotopic ossification, which is mediated by recruitment of transcription coactivator Yes-associated protein (YAP) to Smad. Here, we described a successful integration of computational modeling and experimental assay to rationally design novel peptide aptamers to disrupt YAP-Smad interaction by targeting YAP WW1 domain. In the protocol, a computational genetic evolution strategy was used to improve a population of potential YAP WW1-binding peptides generated from the YAP-recognition site in Smad protein, from which several promising peptides were selected and their affinities toward YAP WW1 domain were determined using binding assay. In addition, a high-activity peptide was further optimized based on its complex structure with YAP WW1 domain to derive a number of derivative peptides with higher binding potency to the domain. We also found that a strong YAP WW1 binder should have a negatively charged N-terminus, a positively charged C-terminus and a nonpolar core to match the electrostatic distribution pattern in peptide-binding pocket of YAP WW1 domain, which may also form additional nonbonded interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridge and π-π stacking to confer stability and specificity for the domain-peptide recognition. PMID:26435515

  8. Studies on the Chitin Binding Property of Novel Cysteine-Rich Peptides from Alternanthera sessilis.

    PubMed

    Kini, Shruthi G; Nguyen, Phuong Q T; Weissbach, Sophie; Mallagaray, Alvaro; Shin, Joon; Yoon, Ho Sup; Tam, James P

    2015-11-01

    Hevein-like peptides make up a family of cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) and play a role in plants in their defense against insects and fungal pathogens. In this study, we report the isolation and characterization of six hevein-like peptides, aSG1-G3 and aSR1-R3, collectively named altides from green and red varieties of Alternanthera sessilis, a perennial herb belonging to the Amaranthaceae family. Proteomic analysis of altides revealed they contain six cysteines (6C), seven glycines, four prolines, and a conserved chitin-binding domain (SXYGY/SXFGY). Thus far, only four 6C-hevein-like peptides have been isolated and characterized; hence, our study expands the existing library of these peptides. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of altides showed its three disulfide bonds were arranged in a cystine knot motif. As a consequence of this disulfide arrangement, they are stable against thermal and enzymatic degradation. Gene cloning studies revealed altides contain a three-domain precursor with an endoplasmic reticulum signal peptide followed by a mature CRP domain and a short C-terminal tail. This indicates that the biosynthesis of altides is through the secretory pathway. (1)H NMR titration experiments showed that the 29-30-amino acid altides bind to chitin oligomers with dissociation constants in the micromolar range. Aromatic residues in the chitin-binding domain of altides were involved in the binding interaction. To the best of our knowledge, aSR1 is the smallest hevein-like peptide with a dissociation constant toward chitotriose comparable to those of hevein and other hevein-like peptides. Together, our study expands the existing library of 6C-hevein-like peptides and provides insights into their structure, biosynthesis, and interaction with chitin oligosaccharides. PMID:26467613

  9. Computation of the binding free energy of peptides to graphene in explicit water.

    PubMed

    Welch, Corrinne M; Camden, Aerial N; Barr, Stephen A; Leuty, Gary M; Kedziora, Gary S; Berry, Rajiv J

    2015-07-28

    The characteristic properties of graphene make it useful in an assortment of applications. One particular application--the use of graphene in biosensors--requires a thorough understanding of graphene-peptide interactions. In this study, the binding of glycine (G) capped amino acid residues (termed GXG tripeptides) to trilayer graphene surfaces in aqueous solution was examined and compared to results previously obtained for peptide binding to single-layer free-standing graphene [A. N. Camden, S. A. Barr, and R. J. Berry, J. Phys. Chem. B 117, 10691-10697 (2013)]. In order to understand the interactions between the peptides and the surface, binding enthalpy and free energy values were calculated for each GXG system, where X cycled through the typical 20 amino acids. When the GXG tripeptides were bound to the surface, distinct conformations were observed, each with a different binding enthalpy. Analysis of the binding energy showed the binding of peptides to trilayer graphene was dominated by van der Waals interactions, unlike the free-standing graphene systems, where the binding was predominantly electrostatic in nature. These results demonstrate the utility of computational materials science in the mechanistic explanation of surface-biomolecule interactions which could be applied to a wide range of systems. PMID:26233167

  10. Characterization of the vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor in rat submandibular gland: radioligand binding assay in membrane preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.T.; Bylund, D.B.

    1987-09-01

    The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor in membranes from rat submandibular gland was studied using radioligand binding assays with /sup 125/I-VIP and various unlabeled competing ligands. In addition to the necessity of working within the parameters under which all radioligand binding assays should be performed, binding studies with /sup 125/I-VIP, as with other peptide hormones and neurotransmitters, are subject to additional technical difficulties. Specific problems that were addressed included radioligand proteolysis, the identification of an effective protease inhibitor (leupeptin) and the deleterious effects of a commonly used inhibitor (bacitracin); avid radioligand absorption to incubation tubes that was eliminated by precoating of the tubes with a combination of polyethylenimine and an organosilane; and a disproportionate effect of increasing membrane protein concentration on affinity estimates. Under optimized conditions, the affinity (Kd) and density Bmax values for /sup 125/I-VIP obtained from saturation assays (76 pM, 2.0 pmol/mg) were in excellent agreement. Membrane protein (or receptor) levels beyond the linear portion of the receptor concentration curve are often used in radioligand binding assays. Results from /sup 125/I-VIP binding studies at elevated receptor concentrations revealed the predicted marked decrease in receptor affinity. In addition, the rank order potency of unlabeled ligands in inhibition binding assays was changed. The optimization of the assay for measuring VIP receptors in submandibular gland membrane provides a reliable method for studying the role of receptor regulation in stimulus-secretion coupling for this neuropeptide.

  11. Interaction between the Elastin Peptide VGVAPG and Human Elastin Binding Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Blanchevoye, Charlotte; Floquet, Nicolas; Scandolera, Amandine; Baud, Stéphanie; Maurice, Pascal; Bocquet, Olivier; Blaise, Sébastien; Ghoneim, Christelle; Cantarelli, Benoît; Delacoux, Frédéric; Dauchez, Manuel; Efremov, Roman G.; Martiny, Laurent; Duca, Laurent; Debelle, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    The elastin binding protein (EBP), a spliced variant of lysosomal β-galactosidase, is the primary receptor of elastin peptides that have been linked to emphysema, aneurysm and cancer progression. The sequences recognized by EBP share the XGXXPG consensus pattern found in numerous matrix proteins, notably in elastin where the VGVAPG motif is repeated. To delineate the elastin binding site of human EBP, we built a homology model of this protein and docked VGVAPG on its surface. Analysis of this model suggested that Gln-97 and Asp-98 were required for interaction with VGVAPG because they contribute to the definition of a pocket thought to represent the elastin binding site of EBP. Additionally, we proposed that Leu-103, Arg-107, and Glu-137 were essential residues because they could interact with VGVAPG itself. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments at these key positions validated our model. This work therefore provides the first structural data concerning the interaction of the VGVAPG with its cognate receptor. The present structural data should now allow the development of EBP-specific antagonists. PMID:23166321

  12. Aberrant Glycosylation of Anchor-Optimized MUC1 Peptides Can Enhance Antigen Binding Affinity and Reverse Tolerance to Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Pathangey, Latha B; Lakshminarayanan, Vani; Suman, Vera J; Pockaj, Barbara A; Mukherjee, Pinku; Gendler, Sandra J

    2016-01-01

    Cancer vaccines have often failed to live up to their promise, although recent results with checkpoint inhibitors are reviving hopes that they will soon fulfill their promise. Although mutation-specific vaccines are under development, there is still high interest in an off-the-shelf vaccine to a ubiquitous antigen, such as MUC1, which is aberrantly expressed on most solid and many hematological tumors, including more than 90% of breast carcinomas. Clinical trials for MUC1 have shown variable success, likely because of immunological tolerance to a self-antigen and to poor immunogenicity of tandem repeat peptides. We hypothesized that MUC1 peptides could be optimized, relying on heteroclitic optimizations of potential anchor amino acids with and without tumor-specific glycosylation of the peptides. We have identified novel MUC1 class I peptides that bind to HLA-A*0201 molecules with significantly higher affinity and function than the native MUC1 peptides. These peptides elicited CTLs from normal donors, as well as breast cancer patients, which were highly effective in killing MUC1-expressing MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Each peptide elicited lytic responses in greater than 6/8 of normal individuals and 3/3 breast cancer patients. The CTLs generated against the glycosylated-anchor modified peptides cross reacted with the native MUC1 peptide, STAPPVHNV, suggesting these analog peptides may offer substantial improvement in the design of epitope-based vaccines. PMID:27367740

  13. Heparin-binding peptide as a novel affinity tag for purification of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jacqueline; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Langston, Rebekah; Daily, Anna; Kight, Alicia; McNabb, David S; Henry, Ralph; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh

    2016-10-01

    Purification of recombinant proteins constitutes a significant part of the downstream processing in biopharmaceutical industries. Major costs involved in the production of bio-therapeutics mainly depend on the number of purification steps used during the downstream process. Affinity chromatography is a widely used method for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in different expression host platforms. Recombinant protein purification is achieved by fusing appropriate affinity tags to either N- or C- terminus of the target recombinant proteins. Currently available protein/peptide affinity tags have proved quite useful in the purification of recombinant proteins. However, these affinity tags suffer from specific limitations in their use under different conditions of purification. In this study, we have designed a novel 34-amino acid heparin-binding affinity tag (HB-tag) for the purification of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. HB-tag fused recombinant proteins were overexpressed in E. coli in high yields. A one-step heparin-Sepharose-based affinity chromatography protocol was developed to purify HB-fused recombinant proteins to homogeneity using a simple sodium chloride step gradient elution. The HB-tag has also been shown to facilitate the purification of target recombinant proteins from their 8 M urea denatured state(s). The HB-tag has been demonstrated to be successfully released from the fusion protein by an appropriate protease treatment to obtain the recombinant target protein(s) in high yields. Results of the two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy experiments indicate that the purified recombinant target protein(s) exist in the native conformation. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the HB-peptide sequence, exhibited high binding specificity and sensitivity to the HB-fused recombinant proteins (∼10 ng) in different crude cell extracts obtained from diverse expression hosts. In our opinion, the HB-tag provides a

  14. Enhancing tumor-specific intracellular delivering efficiency of cell-penetrating peptide by fusion with a peptide targeting to EGFR.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Long The; Yang, Xu-Zhong; Du, Xuan; Wang, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Fu-Jun; Dong, Yang; Li, Peng-Fei

    2015-05-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are well known as intracellular delivery vectors. However, unsatisfactory delivery efficiency and poor specificity are challenging barriers to CPP applications at the clinical trial stage. Here, we showed that S3, an EGFR-binding domain derived from vaccinia virus growth factor, when fused to a CPP such as HBD or TAT can substantially enhance its internalization efficiency and tumor selectivity. The uptake of S3-HBD (S3H) recombinant molecule by tumor cells was nearly 80 folds increased compared to HBD alone. By contrast, the uptake of S3H by non-neoplastic cells still remained at a low level. The specific recognition between S3 and its receptor, EGFR, as well as between HBD and heparan sulfate proteoglycans on the cell surface was essential for these improvements, suggesting a syngeneic effect between the two functional domains in conjugation. This syngeneic effect is likely similar to that of the heparin-binding epidermal growth factor, which is highly abundant particularly in metastatic tumors. The process that S3H entered cells was dependent on time, dosage, and energy, via macropinocytosis pathway. With excellent cell-penetrating efficacy and a novel tumor-targeting ability, S3H appears as a promising candidate vector for targeted anti-cancer drug delivery. PMID:25655386

  15. Peptide displacement of ( sup 3 H)5-hydroxytryptamine binding to bovine cortical membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Y.; Root-Bernstein, R.S.; Shih, J.C. )

    1990-12-01

    Chemical studies have demonstrated that peptides such as the encephalitogenic (EAE) peptide of myelin basic protein (MBP) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) can bind serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in vitro. The present research was undertaken to determine whether such binding interferes with 5-HT binding to its 5-HT1 receptors on bovine cerebral cortical membranes. EAE peptide and LHRH displaced ({sup 3}H)5-HT with IC50s of 4.0 x 10(-4) and 1.8 x 10(-3) M respectively. MBP itself also showed apparent displacing ability with an IC50 of 6.0 x 10(-5) M, though it also caused aggregation of cortical membranes that might have interfered with normal receptor binding. These results support previous suggestions that the tryptophan peptide region of MBP may act as a 5-HT receptor in the neural system. We also tested the effects of muramyl dipeptide (N-acetyl-muramyl-L-Ala-D-isoGln, MD), a bacterial cell-wall breakdown product that acts as a slow-wave sleep promoter, binds to LHRH and EAE peptide, and competes for 5-HT binding sites on macrophages. It showed no significant displacement of 5-HT binding to cortical membranes (IC50 greater than 10(-1) M), but its D-Ala analogue did (IC50 = 1.7 x 10(-3) M). Thus, it seems likely that the 5-HT-related effects of naturally occurring muramyl peptides are physiologically limited by receptor types.

  16. Deciphering the Glycolipid Code of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Amyloid Proteins Allowed the Creation of a Universal Ganglioside-Binding Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Yahi, Nouara; Fantini, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    A broad range of microbial and amyloid proteins interact with cell surface glycolipids which behave as infectivity and/or toxicity cofactors in human pathologies. Here we have deciphered the biochemical code that determines the glycolipid-binding specificity of two major amyloid proteins, Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and Parkinson's disease associated protein α-synuclein. We showed that both proteins interact with selected glycolipids through a common loop-shaped motif exhibiting little sequence homology. This 12-residue domain corresponded to fragments 34-45 of α-synuclein and 5-16 of Aβ. By modulating the amino acid sequence of α-synuclein at only two positions in which we introduced a pair of histidine residues found in Aβ, we created a chimeric α-synuclein/Aβ peptide with extended ganglioside-binding properties. This chimeric peptide retained the property of α-synuclein to recognize GM3, and acquired the capacity to recognize GM1 (an Aβ-inherited characteristic). Free histidine (but not tryptophan or asparagine) and Zn2+ (but not Na+) prevented this interaction, confirming the key role of His-13 and His-14 in ganglioside binding. Molecular dynamics studies suggested that the chimeric peptide recognized cholesterol-constrained conformers of GM1, including typical chalice-shaped dimers, that are representative of the condensed cholesterol-ganglioside complexes found in lipid raft domains of the plasma membrane of neural cells. Correspondingly, the peptide had a particular affinity for raft-like membranes containing both GM1 and cholesterol. The chimeric peptide also interacted with several other gangliosides, including major brain gangliosides (GM4, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b) but not with neutral glycolipids such as GlcCer, LacCer or asialo-GM1. It could inhibit the binding of Aβ1-42 onto neural SH-SY5Y cells and did not induce toxicity in these cells. In conclusion, deciphering the glycolipid code of amyloid proteins allowed us to create a universal

  17. High throughput peptide mapping method for analysis of site specific monoclonal antibody oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojuan; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Jia; Liu, Yan-Hui; Richardson, Daisy; Li, Huijuan; Shameem, Mohammed; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2016-08-19

    Oxidation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) often occurs on surface exposed methionine and tryptophan residues during their production in cell culture, purification, and storage, and can potentially impact the binding to their targets. Characterization of site specific oxidation is critical for antibody quality control. Antibody oxidation is commonly determined by peptide mapping/LC-MS methods, which normally require a long (up to 24h) digestion step. The prolonged sample preparation procedure could result in oxidation artifacts of susceptible methionine and tryptophan residues. In this paper, we developed a rapid and simple UV based peptide mapping method that incorporates an 8-min trypsin in-solution digestion protocol for analysis of oxidation. This method is able to determine oxidation levels at specific residues of a mAb based on the peptide UV traces within <1h, from either TBHP treated or UV light stressed samples. This is the simplest and fastest method reported thus far for site specific oxidation analysis, and can be applied for routine or high throughput analysis of mAb oxidation during various stability and degradation studies. By using the UV trace, the method allows more accurate measurement than mass spectrometry and can be potentially implemented as a release assay. It has been successfully used to monitor antibody oxidation in real time stability studies. PMID:27432793

  18. Identification of a peptide specifically targeting ovarian cancer by the screening of a phage display peptide library

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LEDAN; HU, YUE; LI, WENJU; WANG, FAN; LU, XIAOSHENG; HAN, XUEYING; LV, JIEQIANG; CHEN, JIE

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of cancer-associated mortality in terms of gynecological malignancies, and is difficult to diagnose due to the absence of reliable biomarkers. To identify ovarian cancer-specific biomarkers, the present study used a Ph.D.-7™ Phage Display Peptide Library to screen for ligands that selectively target HO-8910 ovarian cancer cells. Following 5 rounds of biopanning, the phage clone P2 was selected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and DNA sequencing, and its characteristics were additionally validated by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical assays. The results revealed the positive phage were enriched 92-fold following 5 rounds of biopanning, and the DNA sequence AAC CCG ATG ATT CGC CGC CAG (amino acid sequence, NPMIRRQ) was repeated most frequently (phage clones, P2, P3, P15, P30 and P54). Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical assays revealed that the phage clone P2 was able to bind to ovarian cancer cells and tissues, and not those of cervical cancer. In conclusion, the peptide NPMIRRQ may be a potential agent for the diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

  19. Calcium Binding to Amino Acids and Small Glycine Peptides in Aqueous Solution: Toward Peptide Design for Better Calcium Bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ning; Skibsted, Leif H

    2016-06-01

    Deprotonation of amino acids as occurs during transfer from stomach to intestines during food digestion was found by comparison of complex formation constants as determined electrochemically for increasing pH to increase calcium binding (i) by a factor of around 6 for the neutral amino acids, (ii) by a factor of around 4 for anions of the acidic amino acids aspartic and glutamic acid, and (iii) by a factor of around 5.5 for basic amino acids. Optimized structures of the 1:1 complexes and ΔHbinding for calcium binding as calculated by density functional theory (DFT) confirmed in all complexes a stronger calcium binding and shorter calcium-oxygen bond length in the deprotonated form. In addition, the stronger calcium binding was also accompanied by a binding site shift from carboxylate binding to chelation by α-amino group and carboxylate oxygen for leucine, aspartate, glutamate, alanine, and asparagine. For binary amino acid mixtures, the calcium-binding constant was close to the predicted geometric mean of the individual amino acid binding constants indicating separate binding of calcium to two amino acids when present together in solution. At high pH, corresponding to conditions for calcium absorption, the binding affinity increased in the order Lys < Arg < Cys < Gln < Gly ∼ Ala < Asn < His < Leu < Glu< Asp. In a series of glycine peptides, calcium-binding affinity was found to increase in the order Gly-Leu ∼ Gly-Gly < Ala-Gly < Gly-His ∼ Gly-Lys-Gly < Glu-Cys-Gly < Gly-Glu, an ordering confirmed by DFT calculations for the dipeptides and which also accounted for large synergistic effects in calcium binding for up to 6 kJ/mol when compared to the corresponding amino acid mixtures. PMID:27159329

  20. Specific RNA binding to ordered phospholipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Janas, Tadeusz; Janas, Teresa; Yarus, Michael

    2006-01-01

    We have studied RNA binding to vesicles bounded by ordered and disordered phospholipid membranes. A positive correlation exists between bilayer order and RNA affinity. In particular, structure-dependent RNA binding appears for rafted (liquid-ordered) domains in sphingomyelin-cholesterol-1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine vesicles. Binding to more highly ordered gel phase membranes is stronger, but much less RNA structure-dependent. All modes of RNA-membrane association seem to be electrostatic and headgroup directed. Fluorometry on 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes indicates that bound RNA broadens the gel-fluid melting transition, and reduces lipid headgroup order, as detected via fluorometric measurement of intramembrane electric fields. RNA preference for rafted lipid was visualized and confirmed using multiple fluorophores that allow fluorescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy on RNA molecules closely associated with ordered lipid patches within giant vesicles. Accordingly, both RNA structure and membrane order could modulate biological RNA–membrane interactions. PMID:16641318

  1. Chronic beryllium disease, HLA-DPB1, and the DP peptide binding groove.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Lori J; McCanlies, Erin C; Fingerlin, Tasha E; Van Dyke, Michael V; Mroz, Margaret M; Strand, Matthew; Fontenot, Andrew P; Bowerman, Natalie; Dabelea, Dana M; Schuler, Christine R; Weston, Ainsley; Maier, Lisa A

    2012-10-15

    Multiple epidemiologic studies demonstrate associations between chronic beryllium disease (CBD), beryllium sensitization (BeS), and HLA-DPB1 alleles with a glutamic acid residue at position 69 (E69). Results suggest that the less-frequent E69 variants (non-*0201/*0202 alleles) might be associated with greater risk of CBD. In this study, we sought to define specific E69-carrying alleles and their amino acid sequences in the DP peptide binding groove, as well as their relationship to CBD and BeS risk, using the largest case control study to date. We enrolled 502 BeS/CBD subjects and 653 beryllium-exposed controls from three beryllium industries who gave informed consent for participation. Non-Hispanic white cases and controls were frequency-matched by industry. HLA-DPB1 genotypes were determined using sequence-specific primer PCR. The E69 alleles were tested for association with disease individually and grouped by amino acid structure using logistic regression. The results show that CBD cases were more likely than controls to carry a non-*02 E69 allele than an *02 E69, with odds ratios (95% confidence interval) ranging from 3.1 (2.1-4.5) to 3.9 (2.6-5.9) (p < 0.0001). Polymorphic amino acids at positions 84 and 11 were associated with CBD: DD versus GG, 2.8 (1.8-4.6), p < 0.0001; GD versus GG, 2.1 (1.5-2.8), p < 0.0001; LL versus GG, 3.2 (1.8-5.6), p < 0.0001; GL versus GG, 2.8 (2.1-3.8), p < 0.0001. Similar results were found within the BeS group and CBD/BeS combined group. We conclude that the less frequent E69 alleles confer more risk for CBD than does *0201. Recent studies examining how the composition and structure of the binding pockets influence peptide binding in MHC genes, as well of studies showing the topology of the TCR to likely bind DPB1 preferentially, give plausible biological rationale for these findings. PMID:22972925

  2. The Periplasmic Bacterial Molecular Chaperone SurA Adapts Its Structure to Bind Peptides in Different Conformations to Assert a Sequence Preference for Aromatic Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.; Wang, S.; Hu, Y.-X.; McKay, D.B.

    2009-06-04

    The periplasmic molecular chaperone protein SurA facilitates correct folding and maturation of outer membrane proteins in Gram-negative bacteria. It preferentially binds peptides that have a high fraction of aromatic amino acids. Phage display selections, isothermal titration calorimetry and crystallographic structure determination have been used to elucidate the basis of the binding specificity. The peptide recognition is imparted by the first peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) domain of SurA. Crystal structures of complexes between peptides of sequence WEYIPNV and NFTLKFWDIFRK with the first PPIase domain of the Escherichia coli SurA protein at 1.3 A resolution, and of a complex between the dodecapeptide and a SurA fragment lacking the second PPIase domain at 3.4 A resolution, have been solved. SurA binds as a monomer to the heptapeptide in an extended conformation. It binds as a dimer to the dodecapeptide in an alpha-helical conformation, predicated on a substantial structural rearrangement of the SurA protein. In both cases, side-chains of aromatic residues of the peptides contribute a large fraction of the binding interactions. SurA therefore asserts a recognition preference for aromatic amino acids in a variety of sequence configurations by adopting alternative tertiary and quaternary structures to bind peptides in different conformations.

  3. Retention of Conformational Entropy upon Calmodulin Binding to Target Peptides is Driven by Transient Salt Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Straatsma, TP; Squier, Thomas C.

    2012-10-03

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a highly flexible calcium-binding protein that mediates signal transduction through an ability to differentially bind to highly variable binding sequences in target proteins. To identify how binding affects CaM motions, and its relationship to conformational entropy and target peptide sequence, we have employed fully atomistic, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of unbound CaM and CaM bound to five different target peptides. The calculated CaM conformational binding entropies correlate with experimentally derived conformational entropies with a correlation coefficient R2 of 0.95. Selected side-chain interactions with target peptides restrain interhelical loop motions, acting to tune the conformational entropy of the bound complex via widely distributed CaM motions. In the complex with the most conformational entropy retention (CaM in complex with the neuronal nitric oxide synthase binding sequence), Lys-148 at the C-terminus of CaM forms transient salt bridges alternating between Glu side chains in the N-domain, the central linker, and the binding target. Additional analyses of CaM structures, fluctuations, and CaM-target interactions illuminate the interplay between electrostatic, side chain, and backbone properties in the ability of CaM to recognize and discriminate against targets by tuning its conformational entropy, and suggest a need to consider conformational dynamics in optimizing binding affinities.

  4. Peptide Inhibitors of the amyloidogenesis of IAPP: verification of the hairpin-binding geometry hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Sivanesam, Kalkena; Shu, Irene; Huggins, Kelly N L; Tatarek-Nossol, Marianna; Kapurniotu, Aphrodite; Andersen, Niels H

    2016-08-01

    Versions of a previously discovered β-hairpin peptide inhibitor of IAPP aggregation that are stabilized in that conformation, or even forced to remain in the hairpin conformation by a backbone cyclization constraint, display superior activity as inhibitors. The cyclized hairpin, cyclo-WW2, displays inhibitory activity at substoichiometric concentrations relative to this amyloidogenic peptide. The hairpin-binding hypothesis stands confirmed. PMID:27317951

  5. Bioactive surface modification of metal oxides via catechol-bearing modular peptides: multivalent-binding, surface retention, and peptide bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen; Policastro, Gina M; Hua, Geng; Guo, Kai; Zhou, Jinjun; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Doll, Gary L; Becker, Matthew L

    2014-11-19

    A series of multivalent dendrons containing a bioactive osteogenic growth peptide (OGP) domain and surface-binding catechol domains were obtained through solid phase synthesis, and their binding affinity to hydroxyapatite, TiO2, ZrO2, CeO2, Fe3O4 and gold was characterized using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-d). Using the distinct difference in binding affinity of the bioconjugate to the metal oxides, TiO2-coated glass slides were selectively patterned with bioactive peptides. Cell culture studies demonstrated the bioavailability of the OGP and that OGP remained on the surface for at least 2 weeks under in vitro cell culture conditions. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteocalcein (OCN) markers were upregulated 3-fold and 60-fold, respectively, relative to controls at 21 days. Similarly, 3-fold more calcium was deposited using the OGP tethered dendron compared to TiO2. These catechol-bearing dendrons provide a fast and efficient method to functionalize a wide range of inorganic materials with bioactive peptides and have the potential to be used in coating orthopaedic implants and fixation devices. PMID:25343707

  6. Preliminary characterization of a light-rare-earth-element-binding peptide of a natural perennial fern Dicranopteris dichotoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiou; Shan, Xiao-Quan; Zhang, Shuzhen; Wen, Bei

    2003-05-01

    A light-rare-earth-element (LREE)-binding peptide was isolated from LREE hyperaccumulator Dicranopteris dichotomaleaves and characterized in terms of molecular weight and ultraviolet absorption spectrum. The molecular weight of the LREE-binding peptide was determined to be 2208 Da by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS). The characteristic ultraviolet absorption spectrum of the peptide was observed at 220-300 nm, suggesting that the peptide chain contained aromatic amino acids. Compared to the unique features of the phytochelatins with a low absorption at 280 nm, the LREE-binding peptide is unlikely to be a typical phytochelatin. The present study suggests that the LREE-binding peptide is probably a natural peptide in D. dichotoma, and it may play an important role in hyperaccumulation of LREEs. PMID:12734617

  7. Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 Binds the D2 Dopamine Receptor and G-protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 1 (GRK1) Peptides Using Different Modes of Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Pandalaneni, Sravan; Karuppiah, Vijaykumar; Saleem, Muhammad; Haynes, Lee P.; Burgoyne, Robert D.; Mayans, Olga; Derrick, Jeremy P.; Lian, Lu-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1) is the primordial member of the neuronal calcium sensor family of EF-hand Ca2+-binding proteins. It interacts with both the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) dopamine D2 receptor (D2R), regulating its internalization and surface expression, and the cognate kinases GRK1 and GRK2. Determination of the crystal structures of Ca2+/NCS-1 alone and in complex with peptides derived from D2R and GRK1 reveals that the differential recognition is facilitated by the conformational flexibility of the C-lobe-binding site. We find that two copies of the D2R peptide bind within the hydrophobic crevice on Ca2+/NCS-1, but only one copy of the GRK1 peptide binds. The different binding modes are made possible by the C-lobe-binding site of NCS-1, which adopts alternative conformations in each complex. C-terminal residues Ser-178–Val-190 act in concert with the flexible EF3/EF4 loop region to effectively form different peptide-binding sites. In the Ca2+/NCS-1·D2R peptide complex, the C-terminal region adopts a 310 helix-turn-310 helix, whereas in the GRK1 peptide complex it forms an α-helix. Removal of Ser-178–Val-190 generated a C-terminal truncation mutant that formed a dimer, indicating that the NCS-1 C-terminal region prevents NCS-1 oligomerization. We propose that the flexible nature of the C-terminal region is essential to allow it to modulate its protein-binding sites and adapt its conformation to accommodate both ligands. This appears to be driven by the variability of the conformation of the C-lobe-binding site, which has ramifications for the target specificity and diversity of NCS-1. PMID:25979333

  8. A set of robust fluorescent peptide probes for quantification of Cu(ii) binding affinities in the micromolar to femtomolar range.

    PubMed

    Young, Tessa R; Wijekoon, Chathuri J K; Spyrou, Benjamin; Donnelly, Paul S; Wedd, Anthony G; Xiao, Zhiguang

    2015-03-01

    Reliable quantification of copper binding affinities and identification of the binding sites provide a molecular basis for an understanding of the nutritional roles and toxic effects of copper ions. Sets of chromophoric probes are now available that can quantify Cu(i) binding affinities from nanomolar to attomolar concentrations on a unified scale under in vitro conditions. Equivalent probes for Cu(ii) are lacking. This work reports development of a set of four fluorescent dansyl peptide probes (DP1-4) that can quantify Cu(ii) binding affinities from micromolar to femtomolar concentrations, also on a unified scale. The probes were constructed by conjugation of a dansyl group to four short peptides of specific design. Each was characterised by its dissociation constant KD, its pH dependence and the nature of its binding site. One equivalent of Cu(ii) is bound by the individual probes that display different and well-separated affinities at pH 7.4 (log KD = -8.1, -10.1, -12.3 and -14.1, respectively). Intense fluorescence is emitted at λmax ∼ 550 nm upon excitation at ∼330 nm. Binding of Cu(ii) quenches the fluorescence intensity linearly until one equivalent of Cu(ii) is bound. Multiple approaches and multiple affinity standards were employed to ensure reliability. Selected examples of application to well-characterised Cu(ii) binding peptides and proteins are presented. These include Aβ16 peptides, two naturally occurring Cu(ii)-chelating motifs in human serum and cerebrospinal fluid with sequences GHK and DAHK and two copper binding proteins, CopC from Pseudomonas syringae and PcoC from Escherichia coli. Previously reported affinities are reproduced, demonstrating that peptides DP1-4 form a set of robust and reliable probes for Cu(ii) binding to peptides and protein targets. PMID:25715324

  9. Structural constraints for the binding of short peptides to claudin-4 revealed by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jun; Liao, Hailing; Clark, Robin; Wong, Mandy Sze Man; Lo, David D

    2008-11-01

    Claudin family transmembrane proteins play an important role in tight junction structure and function in epithelial cells. Among the 24 isoforms identified in mice and humans, claudin-4 and -3 serve as the receptor for Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (Cpe). The second extracellular loop (Ecl2) of claudin-4 is responsible for the binding to the C-terminal 30 amino acids of Cpe (Cpe30). To define the structural constraints for the claudin-4/Cpe30 interaction, a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) method was developed. GST fusions with claudin-4 revealed that Ecl2 with the downstream transmembrane domain of claudin-4 reconstituted the basic structural requirement for optimal binding activity to Cpe30, with affinity in the nanomolar range. Two 12-mer peptides selected by phage display against claudin-4-transfected CHO cells and a 12-mer Cpe mutant peptide also showed significant affinity for claudin-4 with this SPR assay, suggesting that a short peptide can establish stable contact with Ecl2 with nanomolar affinity. Alignment of these short peptides unveiled a common Ecl2 binding motif: . Whereas the short peptides bound native claudin-4 on transfected CHO cells in pull-down assays, only the larger Cpe30 peptide affected trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TER) in peptide-treated Caco-2BBe monolayers. Importantly, Cpe30 retained its binding to claudin-4 when fused to the C terminus of influenza hemagglutinin, demonstrating that its binding activity can be maintained in a different biochemical context. These studies may help in the design of assays for membrane receptor interactions with soluble ligands, and in applying new targeting ligands to delivering attached "cargo" proteins. PMID:18782762

  10. Suppression of cell adhesion through specific integrin crosstalk on mixed peptide-polysaccharide matrices.

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Kentaro; Fujimori, Chikara; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Kikkawa, Yamato; Nomizu, Motoyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Crosstalk of different integrins, which bind to distinct types of extracellular matrix proteins, promotes specific functions. This crosstalk has not been investigated in depth. Previously, we demonstrated that integrin-syndecan crosstalk accelerated cell adhesion. Here, we evaluated the crosstalk of two different integrins using mixed peptide-polysaccharide (chitosan or alginate) matrices. Two different integrin binding peptides, FIB1 (integrin αvβ3), EF1zz (integrin α2β1), and 531 (integrin α3β1), were mixed in various molar ratios (9:1, 4:1, 1:1) and conjugated on a polysaccharide matrix. The mixture of FIB1/EF1zz- and FIB1/531-polysaccharide matrices did not show any difference in human dermal fibroblast (HDF) adhesion against the mono polysaccharide matrices. Interestingly, the EF1zz/531-polysaccharide matrix (molar ratio = 1:4) exhibited significantly decreased cell adhesion, but other EF1zz/531-polysaccharide matrices did not show any difference. When we examined the signal transduction of the EF1zz/531(1:4), Y397 phosphorylation of FAK significantly decreased but Y514 phosphorylation of Src did not exhibit any differences. Further investigation revealed that this suppression was mediated by PI3K signaling through the activation of integrin, and PKA signaling modulated suppression of HDF attachment. These findings suggest that a mixed peptide-polysaccharide matrix using receptor specific ligands can regulate cellular functions through receptor-specific crosstalk and is a useful approach to understand receptor specific crosstalk. PMID:25453939

  11. Specific albumin binding to microvascular endothelium in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Schnitzer, J.E.; Carley, W.W.; Palade, G.E. )

    1988-03-01

    The specific binding of rat serum albumin (RSA) to confluent microvascular endothelial cells in culture derived from the vasculature of the rat epididymal fat pad was studied at 4{degree}C by radioassay and immunocytochemistry. Radioiodinated RSA ({sup 125}I-RSA) binding to the cells reached equilibrium at {approximately} 20 min incubation. Albumin binding was a slowly saturating function over concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 50 mg/ml. Specific RSA binding with a moderate apparent affinity constant of 1.0 mg/ml and with a maximum binding concentration of 90 ng/cm{sup 2} was immunolocalized with anti-RSA antibody to the outer (free) side of the enothelium. Scatchard analysis of the binding yielded a nonlinear binding curve with a concave-upward shape. Dissociation rate analysis supports negative cooperativity of albumin binding, but multiple binding sites may also be present. Albumin binding fulfilled many requirements for ligand specificity including saturability, reversibility, competibility, and dependence on both cell type and cell number. The results are discussed in terms of past in situ investigations on the localization of albumin binding to vascular endothelium and its effect on transendothelial molecular transport.

  12. Dimensionality of carbon nanomaterials determines the binding and dynamics of amyloidogenic peptides: multiscale theoretical simulations.

    PubMed

    Todorova, Nevena; Makarucha, Adam J; Hine, Nicholas D M; Mostofi, Arash A; Yarovsky, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that nanoparticles can affect the rate of protein self-assembly, possibly interfering with the development of protein misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and prion disease caused by aggregation and fibril formation of amyloid-prone proteins. We employ classical molecular dynamics simulations and large-scale density functional theory calculations to investigate the effects of nanomaterials on the structure, dynamics and binding of an amyloidogenic peptide apoC-II(60-70). We show that the binding affinity of this peptide to carbonaceous nanomaterials such as C60, nanotubes and graphene decreases with increasing nanoparticle curvature. Strong binding is facilitated by the large contact area available for π-stacking between the aromatic residues of the peptide and the extended surfaces of graphene and the nanotube. The highly curved fullerene surface exhibits reduced efficiency for π-stacking but promotes increased peptide dynamics. We postulate that the increase in conformational dynamics of the amyloid peptide can be unfavorable for the formation of fibril competent structures. In contrast, extended fibril forming peptide conformations are promoted by the nanotube and graphene surfaces which can provide a template for fibril-growth. PMID:24339760

  13. Hotspot autoimmune T cell receptor binding underlies pathogen and insulin peptide cross-reactivity.

    PubMed

    Cole, David K; Bulek, Anna M; Dolton, Garry; Schauenberg, Andrea J; Szomolay, Barbara; Rittase, William; Trimby, Andrew; Jothikumar, Prithiviraj; Fuller, Anna; Skowera, Ania; Rossjohn, Jamie; Zhu, Cheng; Miles, John J; Peakman, Mark; Wooldridge, Linda; Rizkallah, Pierre J; Sewell, Andrew K

    2016-06-01

    The cross-reactivity of T cells with pathogen- and self-derived peptides has been implicated as a pathway involved in the development of autoimmunity. However, the mechanisms that allow the clonal T cell antigen receptor (TCR) to functionally engage multiple peptide-major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC) are unclear. Here, we studied multiligand discrimination by a human, preproinsulin reactive, MHC class-I-restricted CD8+ T cell clone (1E6) that can recognize over 1 million different peptides. We generated high-resolution structures of the 1E6 TCR bound to 7 altered peptide ligands, including a pathogen-derived peptide that was an order of magnitude more potent than the natural self-peptide. Evaluation of these structures demonstrated that binding was stabilized through a conserved lock-and-key-like minimal binding footprint that enables 1E6 TCR to tolerate vast numbers of substitutions outside of this so-called hotspot. Highly potent antigens of the 1E6 TCR engaged with a strong antipathogen-like binding affinity; this engagement was governed though an energetic switch from an enthalpically to entropically driven interaction compared with the natural autoimmune ligand. Together, these data highlight how T cell cross-reactivity with pathogen-derived antigens might break self-tolerance to induce autoimmune disease. PMID:27183389

  14. Toxoplasma gondii peptide ligands open the gate of the HLA class I binding groove.

    PubMed

    McMurtrey, Curtis; Trolle, Thomas; Sansom, Tiffany; Remesh, Soumya G; Kaever, Thomas; Bardet, Wilfried; Jackson, Kenneth; McLeod, Rima; Sette, Alessandro; Nielsen, Morten; Zajonc, Dirk M; Blader, Ira J; Peters, Bjoern; Hildebrand, William

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I presentation of pathogen-derived peptide ligands is essential for CD8+ T-cell recognition of Toxoplasma gondii infected cells. Currently, little data exist pertaining to peptides that are presented after T. gondii infection. Herein we purify HLA-A*02:01 complexes from T. gondii infected cells and characterize the peptide ligands using LCMS. We identify 195 T. gondii encoded ligands originating from both secreted and cytoplasmic proteins. Surprisingly, T. gondii ligands are significantly longer than uninfected host ligands, and these longer pathogen-derived peptides maintain a canonical N-terminal binding core yet exhibit a C-terminal extension of 1-30 amino acids. Structural analysis demonstrates that binding of extended peptides opens the HLA class I F' pocket, allowing the C-terminal extension to protrude through one end of the binding groove. In summary, we demonstrate that unrealized structural flexibility makes MHC class I receptive to parasite-derived ligands that exhibit unique C-terminal peptide extensions. PMID:26824387

  15. Dimensionality of Carbon Nanomaterials Determines the Binding and Dynamics of Amyloidogenic Peptides: Multiscale Theoretical Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Hine, Nicholas D. M.; Mostofi, Arash A.; Yarovsky, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that nanoparticles can affect the rate of protein self-assembly, possibly interfering with the development of protein misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and prion disease caused by aggregation and fibril formation of amyloid-prone proteins. We employ classical molecular dynamics simulations and large-scale density functional theory calculations to investigate the effects of nanomaterials on the structure, dynamics and binding of an amyloidogenic peptide apoC-II(60-70). We show that the binding affinity of this peptide to carbonaceous nanomaterials such as C60, nanotubes and graphene decreases with increasing nanoparticle curvature. Strong binding is facilitated by the large contact area available for π-stacking between the aromatic residues of the peptide and the extended surfaces of graphene and the nanotube. The highly curved fullerene surface exhibits reduced efficiency for π-stacking but promotes increased peptide dynamics. We postulate that the increase in conformational dynamics of the amyloid peptide can be unfavorable for the formation of fibril competent structures. In contrast, extended fibril forming peptide conformations are promoted by the nanotube and graphene surfaces which can provide a template for fibril-growth. PMID:24339760

  16. Toxoplasma gondii peptide ligands open the gate of the HLA class I binding groove

    PubMed Central

    McMurtrey, Curtis; Trolle, Thomas; Sansom, Tiffany; Remesh, Soumya G; Kaever, Thomas; Bardet, Wilfried; Jackson, Kenneth; McLeod, Rima; Sette, Alessandro; Nielsen, Morten; Zajonc, Dirk M; Blader, Ira J; Peters, Bjoern; Hildebrand, William

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I presentation of pathogen-derived peptide ligands is essential for CD8+ T-cell recognition of Toxoplasma gondii infected cells. Currently, little data exist pertaining to peptides that are presented after T. gondii infection. Herein we purify HLA-A*02:01 complexes from T. gondii infected cells and characterize the peptide ligands using LCMS. We identify 195 T. gondii encoded ligands originating from both secreted and cytoplasmic proteins. Surprisingly, T. gondii ligands are significantly longer than uninfected host ligands, and these longer pathogen-derived peptides maintain a canonical N-terminal binding core yet exhibit a C-terminal extension of 1–30 amino acids. Structural analysis demonstrates that binding of extended peptides opens the HLA class I F’ pocket, allowing the C-terminal extension to protrude through one end of the binding groove. In summary, we demonstrate that unrealized structural flexibility makes MHC class I receptive to parasite-derived ligands that exhibit unique C-terminal peptide extensions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12556.001 PMID:26824387

  17. Quantitative prediction of peptide binding to HLA-DP1 protein.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Stefan; Dimitrov, Ivan; Doytchinova, Irini

    2013-01-01

    The exogenous proteins are processed by the host antigen-processing cells. Peptidic fragments of them are presented on the cell surface bound to the major hystocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules class II and recognized by the CD4+ T lymphocytes. The MHC binding is considered as the crucial prerequisite for T-cell recognition. Only peptides able to form stable complexes with the MHC proteins are recognized by the T-cells. These peptides are known as T-cell epitopes. All T-cell epitopes are MHC binders, but not all MHC binders are T-cell epitopes. The T-cell epitope prediction is one of the main priorities of immunoinformatics. In the present study, three chemometric techniques are combined to derive a model for in silico prediction of peptide binding to the human MHC class II protein HLA-DP1. The structures of a set of known peptide binders are described by amino acid z-descriptors. Data are processed by an iterative self-consisted algorithm using the method of partial least squares, and a quantitative matrix (QM) for peptide binding prediction to HLA-DP1 is derived. The QM is validated by two sets of proteins and showed an average accuracy of 86 percent. PMID:24091413

  18. Amino acid sequence of a vitamin K-dependent Ca2+-binding peptide from bovine prothrombin.

    PubMed

    Howard, J B; Fausch, M D

    1975-08-10

    The amino acid sequence of a 31-residue peptide from bovine prothrombin has been determined. This peptide has been shown to contain the vitamin K-dependent modification required for Ca2+ binding (Nelsestuen, G. L., and Suttie, J. W. (1973) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 70, 3366-3370) and the modified amino acid, gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Nelsestuen, G. L., Zytkovicz, T., and Howard, J. B. (1974) J. Biol. Chem. 249, 6347-6350). The peptide was shown to correspond to residues 12 to 42 of prothrombin. PMID:807581

  19. Antifreeze and cryoprotective activities of ice-binding collagen peptides from pig skin.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; Zhao, Ying; Zhu, Yu Bing; Xu, Fei; Yu, Jing Song; Yuan, Min

    2016-03-01

    A novel "hyperactive" ice-binding peptide from porcine collagen was prepared by alkaline protease hydrolysis and a series of column chromatography separations, and then its antifreeze and cryoprotective properties were reported. Using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the thermal hysteresis (TH) of ice-binding collagen peptides was closely related to their concentration and crystal fraction. Collagen hydrolysates with maximal TH were obtained by hydrolysis at pH 8.0, DH 15.0%, and 5% alkaline protease at 55°C. After purification by column chromatography, the AP-3 ice-binding collagen peptide (GLLGPLGPRGLL) with 1162.8Da molecular weights exhibited the highest TH (5.28°C), which can be classified as "hyperactive". Recrystallisation and melt-resistance of ice cream were improved by AP-3 ice-binding collagen peptide at 0.2% (w/v) in a similar manner to natural antifreeze proteins. Moreover, the addition of AP-3 collagen peptides in ice cream greatly elevated the glass transition temperature (Tg) to -17.64°C. PMID:26471678

  20. A polystyrene binding target-unrelated peptide isolated in the screening of phage display library.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2016-11-01

    Phage display is a powerful methodology for the identification of peptide ligands binding to any desired target. However, the selection of target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) appears as a huge problem in the screening of phage display libraries through biopanning. The phage-displayed peptide TLHPAAD has been isolated both in our laboratory and by another reserach group on completely different screening targets prompting us to hypothesize that it may be a potential TUP. In the current study, we analyzed the binding characteristics and propagation rate of phage clone displaying TLHPAAD peptide (SW-TUP clone). The results of ELISA experiment and phage recovery assay provided strong support for the notion that SW-TUP phage binds to polystyrene with a significantly higher affinity than control phage clones. Furthermore, this polystyrene binding was demonstrated to occur in a concentration- and pH-dependent mode. Characterization of the propagation profile of phage clones within a specified time course revealed no statistically significant difference between the amplification rate of SW-TUP and control phages. Our findings lead us to the conclusion that SW-TUP phage clone with the displayed peptide TLHPAAD is not a true target binder and its selection in biopanning experiments results from its bidning affinity to the polystyrene surface of the solid phase. PMID:27555439

  1. A new strategy for site-specific protein modification: analysis of a Tat peptide-TAR RNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Tamilarasu, N; Zhang, J; Hwang, S; Rana, T M

    2001-01-01

    Site-specific modification of proteins and peptides with reporter molecules provides a powerful research tool in chemistry and biology. We report the synthesis and application of a tyrosine analogue, N-alpha-Fmoc-3-acetyl-L-tyrosine, for selective modification of proteins. As a model system, we synthesized the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat peptide (amino acids 47-56) containing the arginine rich RNA-binding region and replaced the Tyr-47 with 3-acetyl-tyrosine. The acetyl-Tyr-Tat peptide was subsequently labeled with a fluorescein derivative to study RNA-protein interactions by fluorescence energy transfer experiments. Our results showed that the Tat peptide binds to the rhodamine labeled TAR RNA with a dissociation constant (KD) of 1.0 +/- 0.5 nM. This strategy of selective protein modification offers a versatile new procedure for labeling peptides of biological interest at a desired site when several nucleophilic side chains of lysine and cysteine are present. These methods would provide tools for postsynthetic peptide modification and introducing biophysical probes for structural and functional analysis of proteins. PMID:11312672

  2. Heparin-binding peptide amphiphile supramolecular architectures as platforms for angiogenesis and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Lesleyann W.

    A fascinating phenomenon in nature is the self-assembly of molecules into a functional, hierarchical structure. In the past decade, the Stupp Laboratory has developed several classes of self-assembling biomaterials, one of which is the synthetic peptide amphiphile (PA). Self-assembling PAs are attractive and versatile biomolecules that can be customized for specific applications in regenerative medicine. In particular, a heparin-binding peptide amphiphile (HBPA) containing a specific heparin-binding peptide sequence was used here to induce angiogenesis and serve as a delivery vehicle for growth factors and small hydrophobic molecules. Throughout this dissertation, the HBPA/heparin system is used in different architectures for a variety of regenerative medicine applications. In one aspect of this work, hybrid scaffolds made from HBPA/heparin gelled on a poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) fiber mesh were used to promote angiogenesis to facilitate pancreatic islet transplantation for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. Delivery of growth factors with HBPA/PLLA scafflolds increased vessel density in vivo and correlated with improved transplant outcomes in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model. Soluble HBPA nanofiber architectures were also useful for islet transplantation applications. These nanofibers were used at concentrations below gelation to deliver growth factors into the dense islet cell aggregate, promoting cell survival and angiogenesis in vitro. The nanostructures infiltrated the islets and promoted the retention of heparin and growth factors within the islet. Another interesting growth factor release system discussed here is the HBPA membrane structure. HBPA was found to self-assemble with hyaluronic acid, a large biopolymer found in the body, into macroscopic, hierarchically-ordered membranes. Heparin was incorporated into these membranes and affected the membrane's mechanical properties and growth factor release. Human mesenchymal stem cells were also shown

  3. Computational Design of the Sequence and Structure of a Protein-Binding Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Sammond, Deanne W.; Bosch, Dustin E.; Butterfoss, Glenn L.; Purbeck, Carrie; Machius, Mischa; Siderovski, David P.; Kuhlman, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The de novo design of protein-binding peptides is challenging, because it requires identifying both a sequence and a backbone conformation favorable for binding. We used a computational strategy that iterates between structure and sequence optimization to redesign the C-terminal portion of the RGS14 GoLoco motif peptide so that it adopts a new conformation when bound to Gαi1. An X-ray crystal structure of the redesigned complex closely matches the computational model, with a backbone RMSD of 1.1 Å. PMID:21388199

  4. Peptide-conjugated hapten groups are the major antigenic determinants for trinitrophenyl-specific cytotoxic T cells.

    PubMed

    von Bonin, A; Ortmann, B; Martin, S; Weltzien, H U

    1992-08-01

    Several trinitrophenyl (TNP)-specific mouse cytotoxic T cell (CTL) clones recognize TNP-conjugated peptides in association with class I MHC molecules ('hapten-peptide determinants'). However, cell modification with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) also leads to the formation of TNP determinants covalently attached to MHC molecules ('altered self'). To determine the importance of 'peptide' versus 'altered self' determinants, we used the mutant cell line RMA-S which expresses peptide-free ('empty') Kb and Db molecules at 26 degrees C. Additionally, we stabilized Kb molecules on RMA-S cells at 37 degrees C using the Kb binding heptapeptide N53-59 derived from the vesicular stomatitis virus nucleoprotein. Lacking lysine, this peptide remains unmodified by TNBS and, therefore, only allows the formation of 'altered self' TNP determinants on occupied Kb molecules. RMA-S targets, pretreated or untreated with N53-59, upon TNBS modification were only lysed poorly or not at all by four different TNP-specific CTL. In contrast, all of these clones efficiently lysed TNBS-treated, unmutated RMA cells, and three of them strongly reacted with RMA or RMA-S cells in the presence of tryptic TNP-BSA peptides. Moreover, the clone unreactive for TNP-BSA peptides also recognized TNP self-peptides extracted from TNBS-treated syngeneic spleen cells. Taken together, these data clearly show that TNP residues linked to MHC via associated peptides but not by covalent bondage represent the dominant antigenic epitopes for class I MHC-restricted, hapten-specific T cells. PMID:1384686

  5. Specific high-affinity binding sites for a synthetic gliadin heptapeptide of human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Payan, D.G.; Horvath, K.; Graf, L.

    1987-03-23

    The synthetic peptide containing residues 43-49 of ..cap alpha..-gliadin, the major protein component of gluten, has previously been shown to inhibit the production of lymphokine activities by mononuclear leukocytes. The authors demonstrate using radiolabeled ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) that human peripheral blood lymphocytes express approximately 20,000-25,000 surface receptors for this peptide, with a dissociation constant (K/sub D/) of 20 nM. In addition, binding is inhibited by naloxone and an enkephalin analog, thus confirming the functional correlate which demonstrates inhibition by these agents of ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) functional effects. Furthermore, B-lymphocytes bind specifically a greater amount of (/sup 125/I)..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) than T-lymphocytes. The lymphocyte ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) receptor may play an important role in mediating the immunological response to ..cap alpha..-gliadin. 16 references, 4 figures.

  6. Strategic mutations in the class I major histocompatibility complex HLA-A2 independently affect both peptide binding and T cell receptor recognition.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Tiffany K; Gagnon, Susan J; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L; Beck, John C; Binz, Anne-Kathrin; Turner, Richard V; Biddison, William E; Baker, Brian M

    2004-07-01

    Mutational studies of T cell receptor (TCR) contact residues on the surface of the human class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule HLA-A2 have identified a "functional hot spot" that comprises Arg(65) and Lys(66) and is involved in recognition by most peptide-specific HLA-A2-restricted TCRs. Although there is a significant amount of functional data on the effects of mutations at these positions, there is comparatively little biochemical information that could illuminate their mode of action. Here, we have used a combination of fluorescence anisotropy, functional assays, and Biacore binding experiments to examine the effects of mutations at these positions on the peptide-MHC interaction and TCR recognition. The results indicate that mutations at both position 65 and position 66 influence peptide binding by HLA-A2 to various extents. In particular, mutations at position 66 result in significantly increased peptide dissociation rates. However, these effects are independent of their effects on TCR recognition, and the Arg(65)-Lys(66) region thus represents a true "hot spot" for TCR recognition. We also made the observation that in vitro T cell reactivity does not scale with the half-life of the peptide-MHC complex, as is often assumed. Finally, position 66 is implicated in the "dual recognition" of both peptide and TCR, emphasizing the multiple roles of the class I MHC peptide-binding domain. PMID:15131131

  7. Transporter associated with antigen processing preselection of peptides binding to the MHC: a bioinformatic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini; Hemsley, Shelley; Flower, Darren R

    2004-12-01

    TAP is responsible for the transit of peptides from the cytosol to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. In an immunological context, this event is followed by the binding of peptides to MHC molecules before export to the cell surface and recognition by T cells. Because TAP transport precedes MHC binding, TAP preferences may make a significant contribution to epitope selection. To assess the impact of this preselection, we have developed a scoring function for TAP affinity prediction using the additive method, have used it to analyze and extend the TAP binding motif, and have evaluated how well this model acts as a preselection step in predicting MHC binding peptides. To distinguish between MHC alleles that are exclusively dependent on TAP and those exhibiting only a partial dependence on TAP, two sets of MHC binding peptides were examined: HLA-A*0201 was selected as a representative of partially TAP-dependent HLA alleles, and HLA-A*0301 represented fully TAP-dependent HLA alleles. TAP preselection has a greater impact on TAP-dependent alleles than on TAP-independent alleles. The reduction in the number of nonbinders varied from 10% (TAP-independent) to 33% (TAP-dependent), suggesting that TAP preselection is an important component in the successful in silico prediction of T cell epitopes. PMID:15557175

  8. Synthesis and Kinetic Analysis of Two Conformationally Restricted Peptide Substrates of Escherichia coli Penicillin-Binding Protein 5.

    PubMed

    Nemmara, Venkatesh V; Nicholas, Robert A; Pratt, R F

    2016-07-26

    Escherichia coli PBP5 (penicillin-binding protein 5) is a dd-carboxypeptidase involved in bacterial cell wall maturation. Beyond the C-terminal d-alanyl-d-alanine moiety, PBP5, like the essential high-molecular mass PBPs, has little specificity for other elements of peptidoglycan structure, at least as elicited in vitro by small peptidoglycan fragments. On the basis of the crystal structure of a stem pentapeptide derivative noncovalently bound to E. coli PBP6 (Protein Data Bank entry 3ITB ), closely similar in structure to PBP5, we have modeled a pentapeptide structure at the active site of PBP5. Because the two termini of the pentapeptide are directed into solution in the PBP6 crystal structure, we then modeled a 19-membered cyclic peptide analogue by cross-linking the terminal amines by succinylation. An analogous smaller, 17-membered cyclic peptide, in which the l-lysine of the original was replaced by l-diaminobutyric acid, could also be modeled into the active site. We anticipated that, just as the reactivity of stem peptide fragments of peptidoglycan with PBPs in vivo may be entropically enhanced by immobilization in the polymer, so too would that of our cyclic peptides with respect to their acyclic analogues in vitro. This paper describes the synthesis of the peptides described above that were required to examine this hypothesis and presents an analysis of their structures and reaction kinetics with PBP5. PMID:27420403

  9. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes that recognize decameric peptide sequences of retinoblastoma binding protein 1 (RBP-1) associated with human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, T; Cao, J; Hoon, D S B; Irie, R F

    1999-01-01

    Retinoblastoma binding protein 1 (RBP-1) is a 143-kDa nuclear phosphoprotein that promotes cell growth by inhibiting the product of retinoblastoma tumour suppressor gene (pRB). We recently found that RBP-1 contains KASIFLK, a heptameric peptide (250–256) recognized by human antibodies and overexpressed by breast cancer cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that human T-cells stimulated with RBP-1 decameric peptides containing KASIFLK can kill human breast cancer cells. These decamers, GLQKASIFLK (247–256) and KASIFLKTRV (250–259), have anchor motifs for both HLA-A2 and HLA-A3. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from 41 normal donors were stimulated by these peptides in culture media containing 15 IU ml−1 interleukin-2, 25 IU ml−1 interleukin-7 and 500 IU ml−1 granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Cytotoxic activity of the T-cells was assessed against autologous B lymphoblastoid cells pulsed with each peptide. Stimulation by GLQKASIFLK generated specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) lines from HLA-A2, A3 donors, HLA-A2 donors and HLA-A3 donors. Stimulation with KASIFLKTRV generated specific CTL lines from HLA-A2 donors. No HLA-A2−, A3− CTL line showed specific cytotoxicity against these target cells. These CTL lines were also cytotoxic against HLA-A2 and HLA-A3 breast cancer cells but not against normal fibroblastoid cell lines, normal epidermal cell lines, or a melanoma cell line. RBP-1 peptide antigens may be of clinical significance as a potential peptide vaccine against human breast cancer. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10496363

  10. Cation specific binding with protein surface charges.

    PubMed

    Hess, Berk; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2009-08-11

    Biological organization depends on a sensitive balance of noncovalent interactions, in particular also those involving interactions between ions. Ion-pairing is qualitatively described by the law of "matching water affinities." This law predicts that cations and anions (with equal valence) form stable contact ion pairs if their sizes match. We show that this simple physical model fails to describe the interaction of cations with (molecular) anions of weak carboxylic acids, which are present on the surfaces of many intra- and extracellular proteins. We performed molecular simulations with quantitatively accurate models and observed that the order K(+) < Na(+) < Li(+) of increasing binding affinity with carboxylate ions is caused by a stronger preference for forming weak solvent-shared ion pairs. The relative insignificance of contact pair interactions with protein surfaces indicates that thermodynamic stability and interactions between proteins in alkali salt solutions is governed by interactions mediated through hydration water molecules. PMID:19666545

  11. The Structural Basis of [beta]-Peptide-Specific Cleavage by the Serine Protease Cyanophycinase

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Adrienne M.; Lai, Sandy W.S.; Tavares, John; Kimber, Matthew S.

    2010-10-01

    Cyanophycin, or poly-L-Asp-multi-L-Arg, is a non-ribosomally synthesized peptidic polymer that is used for nitrogen storage by cyanobacteria and other select eubacteria. Upon synthesis, it self-associates to form insoluble granules, the degradation of which is uniquely catalyzed by a carboxy-terminal-specific protease, cyanophycinase. We have determined the structure of cyanophycinase from the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 at 1.5-{angstrom} resolution, showing that the structure is dimeric, with individual protomers resembling aspartyl dipeptidase. Kinetic characterization of the enzyme demonstrates that the enzyme displays Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a k{sub cat} of 16.5 s{sup -1} and a k{sub cat}/K{sub M} of 7.5 x 10{sup -6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirm that cyanophycinase is a serine protease and that Gln101, Asp172, Gln173, Arg178, Arg180 and Arg183, which form a conserved pocket adjacent to the catalytic Ser132, are functionally critical residues. Modeling indicates that cyanophycinase binds the {beta}-Asp-Arg dipeptide residue immediately N-terminal to the scissile bond in an extended conformation in this pocket, primarily recognizing this penultimate {beta}-Asp-Arg residue of the polymeric chain. Because binding and catalysis depend on substrate features unique to {beta}-linked aspartyl peptides, cyanophycinase is able to act within the cytosol without non-specific cleavage events disrupting essential cellular processes.

  12. Attractors in Sequence Space: Agent-Based Exploration of MHC I Binding Peptides.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Natalie; Wisniewska, Joanna M; Hiss, Jan A; Freier, Anja; Losch, Florian O; Walden, Peter; Wrede, Paul; Schneider, Gisbert

    2010-01-12

    Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) is a meta-heuristic that utilizes a computational analogue of ant trail pheromones to solve combinatorial optimization problems. The size of the ant colony and the representation of the ants' pheromone trails is unique referring to the given optimization problem. In the present study, we employed ACO to generate novel peptides that stabilize MHC I protein on the plasma membrane of a murine lymphoma cell line. A jury of feedforward neural network classifiers served as fitness function for peptide design by ACO. Bioactive murine MHC I H-2K(b) stabilizing as well as nonstabilizing octapeptides were designed, synthesized and tested. These peptides reveal residue motifs that are relevant for MHC I receptor binding. We demonstrate how the performance of the implemented ACO algorithm depends on the colony size and the size of the search space. The actual peptide design process by ACO constitutes a search path in sequence space that can be visualized as trajectories on a self-organizing map (SOM). By projecting the sequence space on a SOM we visualize the convergence of the different solutions that emerge during the optimization process in sequence space. The SOM representation reveals attractors in sequence space for MHC I binding peptides. The combination of ACO and SOM enables systematic peptide optimization. This technique allows for the rational design of various types of bioactive peptides with minimal experimental effort. Here, we demonstrate its successful application to the design of MHC-I binding and nonbinding peptides which exhibit substantial bioactivity in a cell-based assay. PMID:27463849

  13. Signal Peptide-Binding Drug as a Selective Inhibitor of Co-Translational Protein Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Vermeire, Kurt; Bell, Thomas W.; Van Puyenbroeck, Victor; Giraut, Anne; Noppen, Sam; Liekens, Sandra; Schols, Dominique; Hartmann, Enno

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, surface expression of most type I transmembrane proteins requires translation and simultaneous insertion of the precursor protein into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for subsequent routing to the cell surface. This co-translational translocation pathway is initiated when a hydrophobic N-terminal signal peptide (SP) on the nascent protein emerges from the ribosome, binds the cytosolic signal recognition particle (SRP), and targets the ribosome-nascent chain complex to the Sec61 translocon, a universally conserved protein-conducting channel in the ER-membrane. Despite their common function in Sec61 targeting and ER translocation, SPs have diverse but unique primary sequences. Thus, drugs that recognise SPs could be exploited to inhibit translocation of specific proteins into the ER. Here, through flow cytometric analysis the small-molecule macrocycle cyclotriazadisulfonamide (CADA) is identified as a highly selective human CD4 (hCD4) down-modulator. We show that CADA inhibits CD4 biogenesis and that this is due to its ability to inhibit co-translational translocation of CD4 into the lumen of the ER, both in cells as in a cell-free in vitro translation/translocation system. The activity of CADA maps to the cleavable N-terminal SP of hCD4. Moreover, through surface plasmon resonance analysis we were able to show direct binding of CADA to the SP of hCD4 and identify this SP as the target of our drug. Furthermore, CADA locks the SP in the translocon during a post-targeting step, possibly in a folded state, and prevents the translocation of the associated protein into the ER lumen. Instead, the precursor protein is routed to the cytosol for degradation. These findings demonstrate that a synthetic, cell-permeable small-molecule can be developed as a SP-binding drug to selectively inhibit protein translocation and to reversibly regulate the expression of specific target proteins. PMID:25460167

  14. Profiling the substrate specificity of protein kinases by on-bead screening of peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Thi B; Xiao, Qing; Pei, Dehua

    2013-08-20

    A robust, high-throughput method has been developed to screen one-bead-one-compound peptide libraries to systematically profile the sequence specificity of protein kinases. Its ability to provide individual sequences of the preferred substrates permits the identification of sequence contextual effects and nonpermissive residues. Application of the library method to kinases Pim1, MKK6, and Csk revealed that Pim1 and Csk are highly active toward peptide substrates and recognize specific sequence motifs, whereas MKK6 has little activity or sequence selectivity against peptide substrates. Pim1 recognizes peptide substrates of the consensus RXR(H/R)X(S/T); it accepts essentially any amino acid at the S/T-2 and S/T+1 positions, but strongly disfavors acidic residues (Asp or Glu) at the S/T-2 position and a proline residue at the S/T+1 position. The selected Csk substrates show strong sequence covariance and fall into two classes with the consensus sequences of (D/E)EPIYϕXϕ and (D/E)(E/D)S(E/D/I)YϕXϕ (where X is any amino acid and ϕ is a hydrophobic amino acid). Database searches and in vitro kinase assays identified phosphatase PTP-PEST as a Pim1 substrate and phosphatase SHP-1 as a potential Csk substrate. Our results demonstrate that the sequence specificity of protein kinases is defined not only by favorable interactions between permissive residue(s) on the substrate and their cognate binding site(s) on the kinase but also by repulsive interactions between the kinase and nonpermissive residue(s). PMID:23848432

  15. 111In- and 203Pb-Labeled Cyclic RGD Peptide Conjugate as an αvβ3 Integrin-Binding Radiotracer

    PubMed Central

    Nwe, Kido; Kim, Young-Seung; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2012-01-01

    Methodology for site-specific modification and chelate conjugation of a cyclic RGD (cRGD) peptide for the preparation of a radiotracer molecular imaging agent suitable for detecting αvβ3 integrin is described. The method involves functionalizing the peptide with an aldehyde moiety and conjugation to a 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N′,N″,N‴-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) derivative that possesses an aldehyde reactive aminooxy group. The binding assay of the 111In-labeled peptide conjugate with αvβ3 integrin showed 60% bound when four equivalents of the integrin was added, a reasonable binding affinity for a mono-valent modified RGD peptide. PMID:23162207

  16. Synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptides bind with their hydrophobic parts to drug site II of human serum albumin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many biologically active compounds bind to plasma transport proteins, and this binding can be either advantageous or disadvantageous from a drug design perspective. Human serum albumin (HSA) is one of the most important transport proteins in the cardiovascular system due to its great binding capacity and high physiological concentration. HSA has a preference for accommodating neutral lipophilic and acidic drug-like ligands, but is also surprisingly able to bind positively charged peptides. Understanding of how short cationic antimicrobial peptides interact with human serum albumin is of importance for developing such compounds into the clinics. Results The binding of a selection of short synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) to human albumin with binding affinities in the μM range is described. Competitive isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and NMR WaterLOGSY experiments mapped the binding site of the CAPs to the well-known drug site II within subdomain IIIA of HSA. Thermodynamic and structural analysis revealed that the binding is exclusively driven by interactions with the hydrophobic moieties of the peptides, and is independent of the cationic residues that are vital for antimicrobial activity. Both of the hydrophobic moieties comprising the peptides were detected to interact with drug site II by NMR saturation transfer difference (STD) group epitope mapping (GEM) and INPHARMA experiments. Molecular models of the complexes between the peptides and albumin were constructed using docking experiments, and support the binding hypothesis and confirm the overall binding affinities of the CAPs. Conclusions The biophysical and structural characterizations of albumin-peptide complexes reported here provide detailed insight into how albumin can bind short cationic peptides. The hydrophobic elements of the peptides studied here are responsible for the main interaction with HSA. We suggest that albumin binding should be taken into careful

  17. Down-regulation of poison ivy/oak-induced contact sensitivity by treatment with a class II MHC binding peptide:hapten conjugate.

    PubMed

    Gelber, C; Gemmell, L; McAteer, D; Homola, M; Swain, P; Liu, A; Wilson, K J; Gefter, M

    1997-03-01

    Immune regulation of contact sensitivity to the poison ivy/oak catechol was studied at the level of class II MHC-restricted T cell recognition of hapten:peptide conjugates. In this study we have shown that 1) T cells from C3H/HeN (H-2k) mice, immunized with a synthetic I-Ak binding peptide coupled to 3-pentadecyl-catechol (PDC; a representative catechol in urushiol), recognized peptides derived from syngeneic cells linked to the same catechol; 2) T cells from draining lymph nodes of C3H/HeN mice skin-painted with PDC proliferated in response to a peptide carrier:PDC conjugate only when it was linked at the 7th, but not the 4th or the 10th, position on the peptide carrier; and 3) tolerization studies confirmed down-regulation of PDC-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity following treatment with a single I-Ak binding peptide carrying PDC covalently bound to a lysine residue at the middle (7th) TCR contact position. Tolerization with peptide:PDC conjugate resulted in abrogation of hapten-specific T cell proliferative responses that correlated with diminished IL-2 secretion. On the basis of these data we propose that it may be sufficient to couple the hapten at a single, well-chosen position on a carrier peptide to target a relevant population of T cells involved in contact sensitivity. PMID:9036993

  18. Three-dimensional structure of a peptide extending from one end of a class I MHC binding site.

    PubMed

    Collins, E J; Garboczi, D N; Wiley, D C

    1994-10-13

    Class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules present peptides to CD8+ T cells for immunological surveillance (reviewed in ref. 1). The structures of complexes of class I MHC molecules with octamer, nonamer and decamer peptides determined until now show a common binding mode, with both peptide termini bound in conserved pockets at the ends of the peptide binding site. Length variations were accommodated by the peptide bulging or zig-zagging in the middle. Here we describe the structure of a decamer peptide which binds with the carboxy-terminal residue positioned outside the peptide binding site. Several protein side chains have rearranged to allow the peptide to exit. The structure suggests that even longer peptides could bind. The energetic effect of the altered mode of binding has been assessed by measuring the stability of the complex to thermal denaturation. Peptides bound in this novel manner are stable at physiological temperature, raising questions about their role in T-cell recognition and their production by proteolytic processing. PMID:7935798

  19. Specific binding of beta-endorphin to normal human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chenet, B.; Hollis, V. Jr.; Kang, Y.; Simpkins, C.

    1986-03-05

    Beta-endorphin (BE) exhibits peripheral functions which may not be mediated by interactions with receptors in the brain. Recent studies have demonstrated binding of BE to both opioid and non-opioid receptors on lymphocytes and monocytes. Abood has reported specific binding of /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine in erythrocytes. Using 5 x 10/sup -11/M /sup 125/I-beta-endorphin and 10/sup -5/M unlabeled BE, they have detected 50% specific binding to human erythrocytes. This finding is supported by results from immunoelectron microscopy using rabbit anti-BE antibody and biotinylated secondary antibody with avidin-biotin complexes horseradish peroxidase. Binding is clearly observed and is confined to only one side of the cells. Conclusions: (1) BE binding to human erythrocytes was demonstrated by radioreceptor assay and immunoelectron microscopy, and (2) BE binding sites exist on only one side of the cells.

  20. Arg13 of B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Reciprocally Modulates Binding to Guanylyl Cyclase but Not Clearance Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, Deborah M.; Barbieri, Kathryn A.; McGuirk, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) decreases cardiac preload and hypertrophy. As such, synthetic BNP, nesiritide, was approved for the treatment of acutely decompensated heart failure. However, two problems limit its therapeutic potential. First, ensuing hypertension decreases urine output, and second, guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A), the primary signaling receptor for BNP, is down-regulated in heart failure. Thus, alternative or chimeric natriuretic peptides maintaining the renal but lacking the vasorelaxation properties of BNP provide an alternative approach. Here, we examined the ability of single amino acid substitutions in the conserved 17-amino acid disulfide ring structure of human BNP to activate GC-A and guanylyl cyclase-B (GC-B), which is not reduced in heart failure. We hypothesized that substitution of highly conserved residues in BNP with highly conserved residues from a GC-B-specific peptide would yield BNP variants with increased and decreased potency for human GC-B and GC-A, respectively. Substitution of Leu for Arg13 (l-bnp) yielded a 5-fold more potent activator of GC-B and 7-fold less potent activator of GC-A compared with wild type. l-bnp also bound GC-A 4.5-fold less tightly than wild type. In contrast, substitution of Met for Ser21 (M-BNP) had no effect. A peptide containing both the Leu and Met substitutions behaved similarly to l-bnp. Meanwhile, wild-type and l-bnp bound the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor with similar affinities. These data indicate that Arg13 of BNP is a critical discriminator of binding to guanylyl cyclase-linked but not clearance natriuretic peptide receptors, supporting designer natriuretic peptides as an alternative to wild-type BNP for the treatment of heart failure. PMID:20530652

  1. The ATRX-ADD domain binds to H3 tail peptides and reads the combined methylation state of K4 and K9

    PubMed Central

    Dhayalan, Arunkumar; Tamas, Raluca; Bock, Ina; Tattermusch, Anna; Dimitrova, Emilia; Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Ragozin, Sergey; Jeltsch, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the ATRX protein are associated with the alpha-thalassemia and mental retardation X-linked syndrome (ATR-X). Almost half of the disease-causing mutations occur in its ATRX-Dnmt3-Dnmt3L (ADD) domain. By employing peptide arrays, chromatin pull-down and peptide binding assays, we show specific binding of the ADD domain to H3 histone tail peptides containing H3K9me3. Peptide binding was disrupted by the presence of the H3K4me3 and H3K4me2 modification marks indicating that the ATRX-ADD domain has a combined readout of these two important marks (absence of H3K4me2 and H3K4me3 and presence of H3K9me3). Disease-causing mutations reduced ATRX-ADD binding to H3 tail peptides. ATRX variants, which fail in the H3K9me3 interaction, show a loss of heterochromatic localization in cells, which indicates the chromatin targeting function of the ADD domain of ATRX. Disruption of H3K9me3 binding may be a general pathogenicity pathway of ATRX mutations in the ADD domain which may explain the clustering of disease mutations in this part of the ATRX protein. PMID:21421568

  2. MUSI: an integrated system for identifying multiple specificity from very large peptide or nucleic acid data sets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, TaeHyung; Tyndel, Marc S.; Huang, Haiming; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Bader, Gary D.; Gfeller, David; Kim, Philip M.

    2012-01-01

    Peptide recognition domains and transcription factors play crucial roles in cellular signaling. They bind linear stretches of amino acids or nucleotides, respectively, with high specificity. Experimental techniques that assess the binding specificity of these domains, such as microarrays or phage display, can retrieve thousands of distinct ligands, providing detailed insight into binding specificity. In particular, the advent of next-generation sequencing has recently increased the throughput of such methods by several orders of magnitude. These advances have helped reveal the presence of distinct binding specificity classes that co-exist within a set of ligands interacting with the same target. Here, we introduce a software system called MUSI that can rapidly analyze very large data sets of binding sequences to determine the relevant binding specificity patterns. Our pipeline provides two major advances. First, it can detect previously unrecognized multiple specificity patterns in any data set. Second, it offers integrated processing of very large data sets from next-generation sequencing machines. The results are visualized as multiple sequence logos describing the different binding preferences of the protein under investigation. We demonstrate the performance of MUSI by analyzing recent phage display data for human SH3 domains as well as microarray data for mouse transcription factors. PMID:22210894

  3. Hotspot autoimmune T cell receptor binding underlies pathogen and insulin peptide cross-reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Cole, David K.; Bulek, Anna M.; Dolton, Garry; Schauenberg, Andrea J.; Szomolay, Barbara; Trimby, Andrew; Jothikumar, Prithiviraj; Fuller, Anna; Skowera, Ania; Rossjohn, Jamie; Zhu, Cheng; Miles, John J.; Wooldridge, Linda; Rizkallah, Pierre J.; Sewell, Andrew K.

    2016-01-01

    The cross-reactivity of T cells with pathogen- and self-derived peptides has been implicated as a pathway involved in the development of autoimmunity. However, the mechanisms that allow the clonal T cell antigen receptor (TCR) to functionally engage multiple peptide–major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC) are unclear. Here, we studied multiligand discrimination by a human, preproinsulin reactive, MHC class-I–restricted CD8+ T cell clone (1E6) that can recognize over 1 million different peptides. We generated high-resolution structures of the 1E6 TCR bound to 7 altered peptide ligands, including a pathogen-derived peptide that was an order of magnitude more potent than the natural self-peptide. Evaluation of these structures demonstrated that binding was stabilized through a conserved lock-and-key–like minimal binding footprint that enables 1E6 TCR to tolerate vast numbers of substitutions outside of this so-called hotspot. Highly potent antigens of the 1E6 TCR engaged with a strong antipathogen-like binding affinity; this engagement was governed though an energetic switch from an enthalpically to entropically driven interaction compared with the natural autoimmune ligand. Together, these data highlight how T cell cross-reactivity with pathogen-derived antigens might break self-tolerance to induce autoimmune disease. PMID:27183389

  4. PeptiSite: a structural database of peptide binding sites in 4D.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Chayan; Kufareva, Irina; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Abagyan, Ruben

    2014-03-21

    We developed PeptiSite, a comprehensive and reliable database of biologically and structurally characterized peptide-binding sites, in which each site is represented by an ensemble of its complexes with protein, peptide and small molecule partners. The unique features of the database include: (1) the ensemble site representation that provides a fourth dimension to the otherwise three dimensional data, (2) comprehensive characterization of the binding site architecture that may consist of a multimeric protein assembly with cofactors and metal ions and (3) analysis of consensus interaction motifs within the ensembles and identification of conserved determinants of these interactions. Currently the database contains 585 proteins with 650 peptide-binding sites. http://peptisite.ucsd.edu/ link allows searching for the sites of interest and interactive visualization of the ensembles using the ActiveICM web-browser plugin. This structural database for protein-peptide interactions enables understanding of structural principles of these interactions and may assist the development of an efficient peptide docking benchmark. PMID:24406170

  5. Curvature sensing MARCKS-ED peptides bind to membranes in a stereo-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lei; de Jesus, Armando Jerome; Tamura, Ryo; Li, Victoria; Cheng, Kui; Yin, Hang

    2015-07-01

    Membrane curvature and lipid composition plays a critical role in interchanging of matter and energy in cells. Peptide curvature sensors are known to activate signaling pathways and promote molecular transport across cell membranes. Recently, the 25-mer MARCKS-ED peptide, which is derived from the effector domain of the myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate protein, has been reported to selectively recognize highly curved membrane surfaces. Our previous studies indicated that the naturally occurring L-MARCKS-ED peptide could simultaneously detect both phosphatidylserine and curvature. Here, we demonstrate that D-MARCKS-ED, composed by unnatural D-amino acids, has the same activities as its enantiomer, L-MARCKS-ED, as a curvature and lipid sensor. An atomistic molecular dynamics simulation suggests that D-MARCKS-ED may change from linear to a boat conformation upon binding to the membrane. Comparable enhancement of fluorescence intensity was observed between D- and L-MARCKS-ED peptides, indicating similar binding affinities. Meanwhile, circular dichroism spectra of D- and L-MARCKS-ED are almost symmetrical both in the presence and absence of liposomes. These results suggest similar behavior of artificial D- and natural L-MARCKS-ED peptides when binding to curved membranes. Our studies may contribute to further understanding of how MARCKS-ED senses membrane curvature as well as provide a new direction to develop novel membrane curvature probes. PMID:25851418

  6. The different ligand-binding modes of relaxin family peptide receptors RXFP1 and RXFP2.

    PubMed

    Scott, Daniel J; Rosengren, K Johan; Bathgate, Ross A D

    2012-11-01

    Relaxin and insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3) are peptide hormones with a number of important physiological roles in reproduction, regulation of extracellular matrix turnover, and cardiovascular function. Relaxin and INSL3 mediate their actions through the closely related G-protein coupled receptors, relaxin family peptide receptors 1 and 2 (RXFP1 and RXFP2), respectively. These receptors have large extracellular domains (ECD) that contain high-affinity ligand-binding sites within their 10 leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing modules. Although relaxin can bind and activate both RXFP1 and RXFP2, INSL3 can only bind and activate RXFP2. To investigate whether this difference is related to the nature of the high-affinity ECD binding site or to differences in secondary binding sites involving the receptor transmembrane (TM) domain, we created a suite of constructs with RXFP1/2 chimeric ECD attached to single TM helices. We show that by changing as little as one LRR, representing four amino acid substitutions, we were able to engineer a high-affinity INSL3-binding site into the ECD of RXFP1. Molecular modeling of the INSL3-RXFP2 interaction based on extensive experimental data highlights the differences in the binding mechanisms of relaxin and INSL3 to the ECD of their cognate receptors. Interestingly, when the engineered RXFP1/2 ECD were introduced into full-length RXFP1 constructs, INSL3 exhibited only low affinity and efficacy on these receptors. These results highlight critical differences both in the ECD binding and in the coordination of the ECD-binding site with the TM domain, and provide new mechanistic insights into the binding and activation events of RXFP1 and RXFP2 by their native hormone ligands. PMID:22973049

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE9 protein has high activity binding peptides which inhibit target cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Diana P; Ocampo, Marisol; Pabón, Laura; Herrera, Chonny; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Munoz, Marina; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2016-05-01

    PE/PPE proteins are involved in several processes during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection of target cells; studying them is extremely interesting as they are the only ones from the Mycobacterium genus, they abound in pathogenic species such as Mtb and their function remains yet unknown. The PE9 protein (Rv1088) was characterised, the rv1088 gene was identified by PCR in Mtb complex strains and its expression and localisation on mycobacterial surface was confirmed by Western blot and immunoelectron microscopy. Bioinformatics tools were used for predicting PE9 protein structural aspects and experimental study involved the circular dichroism of synthetic peptides. The peptides were tested in binding assays involving U937 and A549 cells; two high activity binding peptides (HABPs) were found for both cell lines (39226-(1)MSYMIATPAALTAAATDIDGI(21) and 39232-(125)YQRHFGTGGQPEFRQHSEHRR(144)), one for U937 (39231-(104)YAGAGRRQRRRRSGDGQWRLRQ(124)) and one for A549 (39230-(83)YGTGVFRRRRGRQTVTAAEHRA(103)). HABP 39232 inhibited mycobacterial entry to A549 cells (∼70%) and U937 cells (∼50%), peptides 39226 and 39231 inhibited entry to U937 cells (∼60% and 80%, respectively) and peptide 39230 inhibited entry to A549 cells (∼60%). This emphasised HABPs' functional importance in recognition between Mtb H37Rv and target cell receptors. These peptide sequences could be involved in invasion and were recognised by the host's immune system, thereby highlighting their use when designing an efficient anti-tuberculosis multiantigenic vaccine. PMID:26851205

  8. Quantitative modeling of transcription factor binding specificities using DNA shape.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tianyin; Shen, Ning; Yang, Lin; Abe, Namiko; Horton, John; Mann, Richard S; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Gordân, Raluca; Rohs, Remo

    2015-04-14

    DNA binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs) are a key component of gene regulatory processes. Underlying mechanisms that explain the highly specific binding of TFs to their genomic target sites are poorly understood. A better understanding of TF-DNA binding requires the ability to quantitatively model TF binding to accessible DNA as its basic step, before additional in vivo components can be considered. Traditionally, these models were built based on nucleotide sequence. Here, we integrated 3D DNA shape information derived with a high-throughput approach into the modeling of TF binding specificities. Using support vector regression, we trained quantitative models of TF binding specificity based on protein binding microarray (PBM) data for 68 mammalian TFs. The evaluation of our models included cross-validation on specific PBM array designs, testing across different PBM array designs, and using PBM-trained models to predict relative binding affinities derived from in vitro selection combined with deep sequencing (SELEX-seq). Our results showed that shape-augmented models compared favorably to sequence-based models. Although both k-mer and DNA shape features can encode interdependencies between nucleotide positions of the binding site, using DNA shape features reduced the dimensionality of the feature space. In addition, analyzing the feature weights of DNA shape-augmented models uncovered TF family-specific structural readout mechanisms that were not revealed by the DNA sequence. As such, this work combines knowledge from structural biology and genomics, and suggests a new path toward understanding TF binding and genome function. PMID:25775564

  9. Intranasal Delivery of NEMO-Binding Domain Peptide Prevents Memory Loss in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rangasamy, Suresh B.; Corbett, Grant T.; Roy, Avik; Modi, Khushbu K.; Bennett, David A.; Mufson, Elliott J.; Ghosh, Sankar; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Despite intense investigations, no effective therapy is available to halt its progression. We found that NF-κB was activated within the hippocampus and cortex of AD subjects and that activated forms of NF-κB negatively correlated with cognitive function monitored by Mini-Mental State Examination and global cognitive z score. Accordingly, NF-κB activation was also observed in the hippocampus of a transgenic (5XFAD) mouse model of AD. It has been shown that peptides corresponding to the NF-κB essential modifier (NEMO)-binding domain (NBD) of IκB kinase α (IKKα) or IκB kinase β (IKKβ) specifically inhibit the induction of NF-κB activation without inhibiting the basal NF-κB activity. Interestingly, after intranasal administration, wild-type NBD peptide entered into the hippocampus, reduced hippocampal activation of NF-κB, suppressed hippocampal microglial activation, lowered the burden of Aβ in the hippocampus, attenuated apoptosis of hippocampal neurons, protected plasticity-related molecules, and improved memory and learning in 5XFAD mice. Mutated NBD peptide had no such protective effect, indicating the specificity of our finding. These results suggest that selective targeting of NF-κB activation by intranasal administration of NBD peptide may be of therapeutic benefit for AD patients. PMID:26401561

  10. Intranasal Delivery of NEMO-Binding Domain Peptide Prevents Memory Loss in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Rangasamy, Suresh B; Corbett, Grant T; Roy, Avik; Modi, Khushbu K; Bennett, David A; Mufson, Elliott J; Ghosh, Sankar; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Despite intense investigations, no effective therapy is available to halt its progression. We found that NF-κB was activated within the hippocampus and cortex of AD subjects and that activated forms of NF-κB negatively correlated with cognitive function monitored by Mini-Mental State Examination and global cognitive z score. Accordingly, NF-κB activation was also observed in the hippocampus of a transgenic (5XFAD) mouse model of AD. It has been shown that peptides corresponding to the NF-κB essential modifier (NEMO)-binding domain (NBD) of IκB kinase α (IKKα) or IκB kinase β (IKKβ) specifically inhibit the induction of NF-κB activation without inhibiting the basal NF-κB activity. Interestingly, after intranasal administration, wild-type NBD peptide entered into the hippocampus, reduced hippocampal activation of NF-κB, suppressed hippocampal microglial activation, lowered the burden of Aβ in the hippocampus, attenuated apoptosis of hippocampal neurons, protected plasticity-related molecules, and improved memory and learning in 5XFAD mice. Mutated NBD peptide had no such protective effect, indicating the specificity of our finding. These results suggest that selective targeting of NF-κB activation by intranasal administration of NBD peptide may be of therapeutic benefit for AD patients. PMID:26401561

  11. Fuzzy complexes: Specific binding without complete folding.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rashmi; Raduly, Zsolt; Miskei, Marton; Fuxreiter, Monika

    2015-09-14

    Specific molecular recognition is assumed to require a well-defined set of contacts and devoid of conformational and interaction ambiguities. Growing experimental evidence demonstrates however, that structural multiplicity or dynamic disorder can be retained in protein complexes, termed as fuzziness. Fuzzy regions establish alternative contacts between specific partners usually via transient interactions. Nature often tailors the dynamic properties of these segments via post-translational modifications or alternative splicing to fine-tune affinity. Most experimentally characterized fuzzy complexes are involved in regulation of gene-expression, signal transduction and cell-cycle regulation. Fuzziness is also characteristic to viral protein complexes, cytoskeleton structure, and surprisingly in a few metabolic enzymes. A plausible role of fuzzy complexes in increasing half-life of intrinsically disordered proteins is also discussed. PMID:26226339

  12. Uroplakin Peptide-Specific Autoimmunity Initiates Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Izgi, Kenan; Altuntas, Cengiz Z.; Bicer, Fuat; Ozer, Ahmet; Sakalar, Cagri; Li, Xiaoxia; Tuohy, Vincent K.; Daneshgari, Firouz

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) is enigmatic. Autoimmunity and impaired urothelium might lead the underlying pathology. A major shortcoming in IC/PBS research has been the lack of an appropriate animal model. In this study, we show that the bladder specific uroplakin 3A-derived immunogenic peptide UPK3A 65–84, which contains the binding motif for IAd MHC class II molecules expressed in BALB/c mice, is capable of inducing experimental autoimmune cystitis in female mice of that strain. A highly antigen-specific recall proliferative response of lymph node cells to UPK3A 65–84 was observed, characterized by selectively activated CD4+ T cells with a proinflammatory Th1-like phenotype, including enhanced production of interferon γ and interleukin-2. T cell infiltration of the bladder and bladder-specific increased gene expression of inflammatory cytokines were observed. Either active immunization with UPK3A 65–84 or adoptive transfer of peptide-activated CD4+ T cells induced all of the predominant IC/PBS phenotypic characteristics, including increased micturition frequency, decreased urine output per micturition, and increased pelvic pain responses to stimulation with von Frey filaments. Our study demonstrates the creation of a more specific experimental autoimmune cystitis model that is the first inducible model for IC/PBS that manifests all of the major symptoms of this debilitating condition. PMID:23977210

  13. Truncated and Helix-Constrained Peptides with High Affinity and Specificity for the cFos Coiled-Coil of AP-1

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Tara; Ruiz-Gómez, Gloria; Hill, Timothy A.; Hoang, Huy N.; Fairlie, David P.; Mason, Jody M.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-based therapeutics feature large interacting surfaces. Protein folding endows structural stability to localised surface epitopes, imparting high affinity and target specificity upon interactions with binding partners. However, short synthetic peptides with sequences corresponding to such protein epitopes are unstructured in water and promiscuously bind to proteins with low affinity and specificity. Here we combine structural stability and target specificity of proteins, with low cost and rapid synthesis of small molecules, towards meeting the significant challenge of binding coiled coil proteins in transcriptional regulation. By iteratively truncating a Jun-based peptide from 37 to 22 residues, strategically incorporating i→i+4 helix-inducing constraints, and positioning unnatural amino acids, we have produced short, water-stable, α-helical peptides that bind cFos. A three-dimensional NMR-derived structure for one peptide (24) confirmed a highly stable α-helix which was resistant to proteolytic degradation in serum. These short structured peptides are entropically pre-organized for binding with high affinity and specificity to cFos, a key component of the oncogenic transcriptional regulator Activator Protein-1 (AP-1). They competitively antagonized the cJun–cFos coiled-coil interaction. Truncating a Jun-based peptide from 37 to 22 residues decreased the binding enthalpy for cJun by ∼9 kcal/mol, but this was compensated by increased conformational entropy (TΔS ≤7.5 kcal/mol). This study demonstrates that rational design of short peptides constrained by α-helical cyclic pentapeptide modules is able to retain parental high helicity, as well as high affinity and specificity for cFos. These are important steps towards small antagonists of the cJun-cFos interaction that mediates gene transcription in cancer and inflammatory diseases. PMID:23544065

  14. Binding sites of atrial natriuretic peptide in tree shrew adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, E.; Shigematsu, K.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    Adrenal gland binding sites for atrial natriuretic peptide-(99-126) (ANP) were quantitated in tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri) by incubation of adrenal sections with (3-(/sup 125/I)-iodotyrosyl28) atrial natriuretic peptide-(99-126), followed by autoradiography with computerized microdensitometry. In the adrenal glands, there are three types of ANP binding sites. One is located in the zona glomerulosa (BMax 84 +/- 6 fmol/mg protein; Kd 122 +/- 9 pM); the second in the zona fasciculata and reticularis (BMax 29 +/- 2 fmol/mg protein; Kd 153 +/- 6 pM) and the third in the adrenal medulla (BMax 179 +/- 1 fmol/mg protein; Kd 70 +/- 2 pM). Besides the influence of ANP on the regulation of adrenocortical mineralcorticoid and glucocorticoid secretion our findings raise the possibility for a local site of action of atrial natriuretic peptide in the regulation of adrenomedullary catecholamines in the tree shrew, primates and man.

  15. Insulin Mimetic Peptide Disrupts the Primary Binding Site of the Insulin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Callum F; Margetts, Mai B; Menting, John G; Smith, Nicholas A; Smith, Brian J; Ward, Colin W; Lawrence, Michael C

    2016-07-22

    Sets of synthetic peptides that interact with the insulin receptor ectodomain have been discovered by phage display and reported in the literature. These peptides were grouped into three classes termed Site 1, Site 2, and Site 3 based on their mutual competition of binding to the receptor. Further refinement has yielded, in particular, a 36-residue Site 2-Site 1 fusion peptide, S519, that binds the insulin receptor with subnanomolar affinity and exhibits agonist activity in both lipogenesis and glucose uptake assays. Here, we report three-dimensional crystallographic detail of the interaction of the C-terminal, 16-residue Site 1 component (S519C16) of S519 with the first leucine-rich repeat domain (L1) of the insulin receptor. Our structure shows that S519C16 binds to the same site on the L1 surface as that occupied by a critical component of the primary binding site, namely the helical C-terminal segment of the insulin receptor α-chain (termed αCT). In particular, the two phenylalanine residues within the FYXWF motif of S519C16 are seen to engage the insulin receptor L1 domain surface in a fashion almost identical to the respective αCT residues Phe(701) and Phe(705) The structure provides a platform for the further development of peptidic and/or small molecule agents directed toward the insulin receptor and/or the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor. PMID:27281820

  16. PEPTIDE BINDING AS A MODE OF ACTION FOR THE CARCINOGENICITY AND TOXICITY OF ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic exposure leads to tumors in human skin, lung, urinary bladder, kidney and liver. Three likely initial stages of arsenical-macromolecular interaction are (1) binding of trivalent arsenicals to the sulfhydryl groups of peptides and proteins, (2) arsenical-induced generation...

  17. Rapid Generation of a Nanocrystal-Labeled Peptide Library for Specific Identification of the Bacterium Clostrium Botulinum

    SciTech Connect

    Tok, J B

    2004-11-11

    Several peptide libraries containing up to 2 million unique peptide ligands have been synthesized. The peptides are attached onto a 80 micron resin and the length of these peptide ligands ranges from 5 to 9 amino acid residues. Using a novel calorimetric assay, the libraries were screened for binding to the ganglioside-binding domain of Clostridium Tetanus Toxin, a structural similar analog of the Clostridium Botulinum toxin. Several binding peptide sequences were identified, in which the detailed binding kinetics are currently underway using the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique.

  18. Creating Prebiotic Sanctuary: Self-Assembling Supramolecular Peptide Structures Bind and Stabilize RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carny, Ohad; Gazit, Ehud

    2011-04-01

    Any attempt to uncover the origins of life must tackle the known `blind watchmaker problem'. That is to demonstrate the likelihood of the emergence of a prebiotic system simple enough to be formed spontaneously and yet complex enough to allow natural selection that will lead to Darwinistic evolution. Studies of short aromatic peptides revealed their ability to self-assemble into ordered and stable structures. The unique physical and chemical characteristics of these peptide assemblies point out to their possible role in the origins of life. We have explored mechanisms by which self-assembling short peptides and RNA fragments could interact together and go through a molecular co-evolution, using diphenylalanine supramolecular assemblies as a model system. The spontaneous formation of these self-assembling peptides under prebiotic conditions, through the salt-induced peptide formation (SIPF) pathway was demonstrated. These peptide assemblies possess the ability to bind and stabilize ribonucleotides in a sequence-depended manner, thus increase their relative fitness. The formation of these peptide assemblies is dependent on the homochirality of the peptide monomers: while homochiral peptides (L-Phe-L-Phe and D-Phe-D-Phe) self-assemble rapidly in aqueous environment, heterochiral diastereoisomers (L-Phe-D-Phe and D-Phe-L-Phe) do not tend to self-assemble. This characteristic consists with the homochirality of all living matter. Finally, based on these findings, we propose a model for the role of short self-assembling peptides in the prebiotic molecular evolution and the origin of life.

  19. M13 phage peptide ZL4 exerts its targeted binding effect on schistosoma japonicum via alkaline phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Yang, Shenghui; Xiao, Jianhua; Yu, Liang; Chen, Li; Zou, Ju; Wang, Kegeng; Tan, Sijie; Yu, Zhengyang; Zeng, Qingren

    2015-01-01

    The present study was to determine the targeting effect of M13 phage peptide ZL4 (MppZL4) on Schistosoma japonicum (S.j). Mice infected with S.j were injected with MppZL4. Real-time PCR was used to detect the distribution and metabolism of MppZL4 in the livers and lungs of mice. In vivo refusion test was performed to detect the targeting of MppZL4. Western blotting was employed to determine the expression of MppZL4. Live imaging was used to detect the distribution of oligopeptide MppZL4. Immunohistochemistry was employed to determine MppZL4 location on adult S.j body surface. Gomori method was employed to detect the influence of oligopeptide MppZL4 on alkaline phosphatase activity. The distribution and metabolism of MppZL4 and M13KE are not significantly different from each other at each time point. The abundance of MppZL4 is changed as S.j migrates in mice. The targeted binding effect of MppZL4 varies at different stages. ZL4 oligopeptide targets S.j in mice. The specific binding sites of MppZL4 on S.j body are mainly located in syncytial cells. The binding sites of MppZL4 on S.j body surface might be ALP or ALP-related proteins. MppZL4 had targeted binding effect on S.j with its binding site being associated with proteins related to S.j alkaline phosphatase. S.j tegument had a specifically binding site with exogenous peptides, offering new means to explore the interactions between hosts and parasites. Additionally, MppZL4 can possibly be used as targeting molecules in worm-resistant drugs or as tracing molecules in imaging diagnosis technologies. PMID:25973009

  20. Partial characterization of specific cantharidin binding sites in mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano, M.J.; Pessah, I.N.; Matsuzawa, M.; Casida, J.E.

    1988-06-01

    The mode of action of cantharidin, the natural vesicant of blister beetles, is examined by radioligand binding studies with mouse tissues. (3H)Cantharidin undergoes specific and saturable binding with the liver cytosol, which is characterized as follows: Kd and Bmax values of 30 nM and 1.8 pmol/mg of protein, respectively; linearity with respect to protein concentration; pH optimum of 6.5 to 7.5; association and dissociation half-times of 20 min and 12 hr, respectively; and 50% inhibition by Mg2+ at 70 microM, Ca2+ at 224 microM, pyrophosphate at 27 microM, and nucleotide triphosphates at 52-81 microM. The binding site undergoes a loss of activity at 45 degrees or higher. The toxicological relevance of this specific (3H)cantharidin binding site of mouse liver cytosol is established in three ways. First, the potency of 15 active cantharidin analogs for inhibiting (3H)cantharidin binding is correlated with their acute toxicity to mice (r = 0.829). Second, 26 related compounds that are inactive in inhibiting (3H)cantharidin binding are also of little or no toxicity to mice. Finally, the binding of (3H) cantharidin to liver cytosol from mice poisoned with increasing amounts of unlabeled cantharidin is inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. (3H)Cantharidin also specifically binds to cytosol fractions of blood, brain, heart, kidney, lung, pancreas, skin, spleen, and stomach. The characteristics of the specific binding site in brain are very similar to those determined in liver with respect to Kd, Bmax, association/dissociation kinetics, and sensitivity to inhibitors. It therefore appears that the toxicity of cantharidin and related oxabicycloheptanes, including the herbicide endothal, is attributable to binding at a specific site in liver and possibly other tissues.

  1. Cross-linking of atrial natriuretic peptide to binding sites in rat olfactory bulb membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Wildey, G.M.; Glembotski, C.C.

    1986-12-01

    Binding sites for /sup 125/I-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)2 in rat olfactory bulb membranes have been studied using pharmacological and biochemical methods. Various unlabeled ANP-related peptides were tested for the ability to inhibit the binding of the radioligand in membrane binding assays. ANP(92-126) and ANP(99-126) were the most potent inhibitors tested, both exhibiting an IC50 value of 0.40 nM. ANP(103-126) and ANP(103-123) were 3 and 70 times less potent, respectively. ANP(111-126) was unable to inhibit the binding of the radioligand at a concentration of 1 microM. Several peptides unrelated to ANP were unable to inhibit the binding of the radioligand to rat olfactory bulb membranes. Membranes labeled with /sup 125/I-ANP were incubated with cross-linking agents and subjected to SDS-PAGE followed by autoradiography. A band possessing an apparent molecular mass of 116 kDa was identified. The labeling of this band was progressively decreased by increasing concentrations of unlabeled ANP(99-126) (IC50 = 0.6 nM) and by several other ANP-related peptides at nanomolar concentrations. For comparison purposes, ANP binding sites in rat aorta membranes were labeled with /sup 125/I-ANP and cross-linked using identical techniques. Three bands possessing molecular masses of 120, 72, and 62 kDa were identified. These results indicate that the ANP binding site in rat olfactory bulb membranes displays pharmacological and biochemical properties similar to peripheral ANP receptors.

  2. Analysis of Peptides and Proteins in Their Binding to GroEL

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yali; Zheng, Zhida; Ramsey, Andrew; Chen, Lingling

    2010-01-01

    The GroEL-GroES is an essential molecular chaperon system that assists protein folding in cell. Binding of various substrate proteins to GroEL is one of the key aspects in GroEL-assisted protein folding. Small peptides may mimic segments of the substrate proteins in contact with GroEL, and allow detailed structural analysis of the interactions. A model peptide SBP has been shown to bind to a region in GroEL that is important for binding of substrate proteins. Here, we investigated whether the observed GroEL-SBP interaction represented those of GroEL-substrate proteins, and whether SBP was able to mimic various aspects of substrate proteins in GroE-assisted protein folding cycle. We found that SBP competed with substrate proteins, including α-lactalbumin, rhodanese, and malate dehydrogenase, in binding to GroEL. SBP stimulated GroEL ATP hydrolysis rate in a manner similar to that of α-lactalbumin. SBP did not prevent GroES from binding to GroEL, and GroES association reduced the ATPase rates of GroEL/SBP and GroEL/α-lactalbumin to a comparable extent. Binding of both SBP and α-lactalbumin to apo GroEL was dominated by hydrophobic interaction. Interestingly, association of α-lactalbumin to GroEL/GroES was thermodynamically distinct from that to GroEL with reduced affinity and decreased contribution from hydrophobic interaction. However, SBP did not display such differential binding behaviors to apo GroEL and GroEL/GroES, likely due to the lack of a contiguous polypeptide chain that links all of the bound peptide fragments. Nevertheless, studies using peptides provide valuable information on the nature of GroEL-substrate protein interaction, which is central to understand the mechanism of GroEL-assisted protein folding. PMID:20814869

  3. Vasoactive intestinal peptide binding sites and fibers in the brain of the pigeon Columba livia: An autoradiographic and immunohistochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Hof, P.R.; Dietl, M.M.; Charnay, Y.; Martin, J.L.; Bouras, C.; Palacios, J.M.; Magistretti, P.J. )

    1991-03-15

    The distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) binding sites in the pigeon brain was examined by in vitro autoradiography on slide-mounted sections. A fully characterized monoiodinated form of VIP, which maintains the biological activity of the native peptide, was used throughout this study. The highest densities of binding sites were observed in the hyperstriatum dorsale, archistriatum, auditory field L of neostriatum, area corticoidea dorsolateralis and temporo-parieto-occipitalis, area parahippocampalis, tectum opticum, nucleus dorsomedialis anterior thalami, and in the periventricular area of the hypothalamus. Lower densities of specific binding occurred in the neostriatum, hyperstriatum ventrale and nucleus septi lateralis, dorsolateral area of the thalamus, and lateral and posteromedial hypothalamus. Very low to background levels of VIP binding were detected in the ectostriatum, paleostriatum primitivum, paleostriatum augmentatum, lobus parolfactorius, nucleus accumbens, most of the brainstem, and the cerebellum. The distribution of VIP-containing fibers and terminals was examined by indirect immunofluorescence using a polyclonal antibody against porcine VIP. Fibers and terminals were observed in the area corticoidea dorsolateralis, area parahippocampalis, hippocampus, hyperstriatum accessorium, hyperstriatum dorsale, archistriatum, tuberculum olfactorium, nuclei dorsolateralis and dorsomedialis of the thalamus, and throughout the hypothalamus and the median eminence. Long projecting fibers were visualized in the tractus septohippocampalis. In the brainstem VIP immunoreactive fibers and terminals were observed mainly in the substantia grisea centralis, fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, lemniscus lateralis, and in the area surrounding the nuclei of the 7th, 9th, and 10th cranial nerves.

  4. Specific binding of antigen onto human T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Durandy, A.; Fischer, A.; Charron, D.; Griscelli, C.

    1986-05-01

    Human T lymphocytes sensitized to Candida albicans (CA) were shown to proliferate in cultures induced with mannan, a ramified polysaccharide extracted from the cell well of CA. We presently describe that, when we used strongly labeled (/sup 3/H)mannan, antigen-specific T blast cells were able to bind the labeled mannan on their membrane. The observations that irrelevant blast cells did not bind (/sup 3/H)mannan, and that mannan-specific blast cells did not bind tritiated pneumococcal polysaccharide SIII, indicate the specificity of mannan binding. Mannan binding was reversible and saturable. Mannan binding on T blast cells was inhibited by preincubation with monoclonal antibodies to T3 but not to other T cell-related molecules. The characteristics of this receptor suggest its identity with the T cell receptor for antigen. The direct binding of mannan could be either due to a cross-linking of the receptor by multivalent mannan or to a recognition of mannan in association with HLA-DQ molecules, as suggested by partial blocking of mannan binding using anti-HLA-DQ monoclonal antibodies.

  5. Peptides from the variable region of specific antibodies are shared among lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    de Costa, Dominique; Broodman, Ingrid; Calame, Wim; Stingl, Christoph; Dekker, Lennard J M; Vernhout, René M; de Koning, Harry J; Hoogsteden, Henk C; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A E; van Klaveren, Rob J; Luider, Theo M; Vanduijn, Martijn M

    2014-01-01

    Late diagnosis of lung cancer is still the main reason for high mortality rates in lung cancer. Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease which induces an immune response to different tumor antigens. Several methods for searching autoantibodies have been described that are based on known purified antigen panels. The aim of our study is to find evidence that parts of the antigen-binding-domain of antibodies are shared among lung cancer patients. This was investigated by a novel approach based on sequencing antigen-binding-fragments (Fab) of immunoglobulins using proteomic techniques without the need of previously known antigen panels. From serum of 93 participants of the NELSON trial IgG was isolated and subsequently digested into Fab and Fc. Fab was purified from the digested mixture by SDS-PAGE. The Fab containing gel-bands were excised, tryptic digested and measured on a nano-LC-Orbitrap-Mass-spectrometry system. Multivariate analysis of the mass spectrometry data by linear canonical discriminant analysis combined with stepwise logistic regression resulted in a 12-antibody-peptide model which was able to distinguish lung cancer patients from controls in a high risk population with a sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 90%. With our Fab-purification combined Orbitrap-mass-spectrometry approach, we found peptides from the variable-parts of antibodies which are shared among lung cancer patients. PMID:24787687

  6. Caspase-3 binds diverse P4 residues in peptides as revealed by crystallography and structural modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Bin; Fu, Guoxing; Agniswamy, Johnson; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2009-03-31

    Caspase-3 recognition of various P4 residues in its numerous protein substrates was investigated by crystallography, kinetics, and calculations on model complexes. Asp is the most frequent P4 residue in peptide substrates, although a wide variety of P4 residues are found in the cellular proteins cleaved by caspase-3. The binding of peptidic inhibitors with hydrophobic P4 residues, or no P4 residue, is illustrated by crystal structures of caspase-3 complexes with Ac-IEPD-Cho, Ac-WEHD-Cho, Ac-YVAD-Cho, and Boc-D(OMe)-Fmk at resolutions of 1.9-2.6 {angstrom}. The P4 residues formed favorable hydrophobic interactions in two separate hydrophobic regions of the binding site. The side chains of P4 Ile and Tyr form hydrophobic interactions with caspase-3 residues Trp206 and Trp214 within a non-polar pocket of the S4 subsite, while P4 Trp interacts with Phe250 and Phe252 that can also form the S5 subsite. These interactions of hydrophobic P4 residues are distinct from those for polar P4 Asp, which indicates the adaptability of caspase-3 for binding diverse P4 residues. The predicted trends in peptide binding from molecular models had high correlation with experimental values for peptide inhibitors. Analysis of structural models for the binding of 20 different amino acids at P4 in the aldehyde peptide Ac-XEVD-Cho suggested that the majority of hydrophilic P4 residues interact with Phe250, while hydrophobic residues interact with Trp206, Phe250, and Trp214. Overall, the S4 pocket of caspase-3 exhibits flexible adaptation for different residues and the new structures and models, especially for hydrophobic P4 residues, will be helpful for the design of caspase-3 based drugs.

  7. Arthritogenic peptide binding to DRB1*01 alleles correlates with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Roark, Christina L; Anderson, Kirsten M; Aubrey, Michael T; Rosloniec, Edward F; Freed, Brian M

    2016-08-01

    Genetic susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is often defined by the presence of a shared epitope (QKRAA, QRRAA, or RRRAA) at positions 70-74 in HLA-DRβ1. However, DRβ1*01:01 and 01:02 contain the same QRRAA epitope, but differ considerably in their susceptibility to RA. The purpose of this study was to determine if this difference could be explained by their ability to bind three arthritogenic peptides that we have previously shown to bind to the archetypal RA-susceptible allele, DRβ1*04:01, but not to the resistant DRβ1*08:01 allele. Binding of type II collagen(258-272), citrullinated and native vimentin(66-78), and citrullinated and native α-enolase(11-25) were measured on cell lines expressing either DRβ1*01:01, *01:02 or *01:03 in association with DRα1*01:01. DRβ1*01:01 and *01:02 both exhibited a 6.5-fold preference for citrullinated vimentin(66-78) compared to native vimentin. However, DRβ1*01:01 also exhibited a 1.7-fold preference for citrullinated α-enolase(11-25) and bound collagen(258-272), while DRβ1*01:02 bound neither of these peptides. Consistent with its known resistance to RA, DRβ1*01:03 preferentially bound native vimentin(66-78) and α-enolase(11-25) over the citrullinated forms of these peptides, and also failed to bind collagen(258-272). Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to determine which amino acid residues were responsible for the differences between these alleles. Mutating position 86 in DRβ1*01:01 from glycine to the valine residue found in DRβ1*01:02 eliminated binding of both citrullinated α-enolase(11-25) and collagen(258-272), thereby recapitulating the peptide-binding profile of DRβ1*01:02. The difference in susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis between DRβ1*01:01 and *01:02 thus correlates with the effect of position 86 on the binding of these arthritogenic peptides. Consistent with their association with RA resistance, positions I67, D70 and E71 all contributed to the inability of DRβ1*01:03 to bind

  8. An apoA-I mimetic peptide containing a proline residue has greater in vivo HDL binding and anti-inflammatory ability than the 4F peptide.

    PubMed

    Wool, Geoffrey D; Vaisar, Tomas; Reardon, Catherine A; Getz, Godfrey S

    2009-09-01

    Modifying apolipoprotein (apo) A-I mimetic peptides to include a proline-punctuated alpha-helical repeat increases their anti-inflammatory properties as well as allows better mimicry of full-length apoA-I function. This study compares the following mimetics, either acetylated or biotinylated (b): 4F (18mer) and 4F-proline-4F (37mer, Pro). b4F interacts with both mouse HDL (moHDL) and LDL in vitro. b4F in vivo plasma clearance kinetics are not affected by mouse HDL level. Administration of biotinylated peptides to mice demonstrates that b4F does not associate with lipoproteins smaller than LDL in vivo, though it does associate with fractions containing free hemoglobin (Hb). In contrast, bPro specifically interacts with HDL. b4F and bPro show opposite binding responses to HDL by surface plasmon resonance. Administration of acetylated Pro to apoE(-/-) mice significantly decreases plasma serum amyloid A levels, while acetylated 4F does not have this ability. In contrast to previous reports that inferred that 4F associates with HDL in vivo, we systematically examined this potential interaction and demonstrated that b4F does not interact with HDL in vivo but rather elutes with Hb-containing plasma fractions. bPro, however, specifically binds to moHDL in vivo. In addition, the number of amphipathic alpha-helices and their linker influences the anti-inflammatory effects of apoA-I mimetic peptides in vivo. PMID:19433476

  9. An apoA-I mimetic peptide containing a proline residue has greater in vivo HDL binding and anti-inflammatory ability than the 4F peptide

    PubMed Central

    Wool, Geoffrey D.; Vaisar, Tomas; Reardon, Catherine A.; Getz, Godfrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Modifying apolipoprotein (apo) A-I mimetic peptides to include a proline-punctuated α-helical repeat increases their anti-inflammatory properties as well as allows better mimicry of full-length apoA-I function. This study compares the following mimetics, either acetylated or biotinylated (b): 4F (18mer) and 4F-proline-4F (37mer, Pro). b4F interacts with both mouse HDL (moHDL) and LDL in vitro. b4F in vivo plasma clearance kinetics are not affected by mouse HDL level. Administration of biotinylated peptides to mice demonstrates that b4F does not associate with lipoproteins smaller than LDL in vivo, though it does associate with fractions containing free hemoglobin (Hb). In contrast, bPro specifically interacts with HDL. b4F and bPro show opposite binding responses to HDL by surface plasmon resonance. Administration of acetylated Pro to apoE−/− mice significantly decreases plasma serum amyloid A levels, while acetylated 4F does not have this ability. In contrast to previous reports that inferred that 4F associates with HDL in vivo, we systematically examined this potential interaction and demonstrated that b4F does not interact with HDL in vivo but rather elutes with Hb-containing plasma fractions. bPro, however, specifically binds to moHDL in vivo. In addition, the number of amphipathic α-helices and their linker influences the anti-inflammatory effects of apoA-I mimetic peptides in vivo. PMID:19433476

  10. The Binding of Antigenic Peptides to HLA-DR Is Influenced by Interactions between Pocket 6 and Pocket 91

    PubMed Central

    James, Eddie A.; Moustakas, Antonis K.; Bui, John; Nouv, Randi; Papadopoulos, George K.; Kwok, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Peptide binding to class II MHC protein is commonly viewed as a combination of discrete anchor residue preferences for pockets 1, 4, 6/7, and 9. However, previous studies have suggested cooperative effects during the peptide binding process. Investigation of the DRB1*0901 binding motif demonstrated a clear interaction between peptide binding pockets 6 and 9. In agreement with prior studies, pockets 1 and 4 exhibited clear binding preferences. Previously uncharacterized pockets 6 and 7 accommodated a wide variety of residues. However, although it was previously reported that pocket 9 is completely permissive, several substitutions at this position were unable to bind. Structural modeling revealed a probable interaction between pockets 6 and 9 through β9Lys. Additional binding studies with doubly substituted peptides confirmed that the amino acid bound within pocket 6 profoundly influences the binding preferences for pocket 9 of DRB1*0901, causing complete permissiveness of pocket 9 when a small polar residue is anchored in pocket 6 but accepting relatively few residues when a basic residue is anchored in pocket 6. The β9Lys residue is unique to DR9 alleles. However, similar studies with doubly substituted peptides confirmed an analogous interaction effect for DRA1/B1*0301, a β9Glu allele. Accounting for this interaction resulted in improved epitope prediction. These findings provide a structural explanation for observations that an amino acid in one pocket can influence binding elsewhere in the MHC class II peptide binding groove. PMID:19648278

  11. Miniaturizing VEGF: Peptides mimicking the discontinuous VEGF receptor-binding site modulate the angiogenic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosa, Lucia; Finetti, Federica; Diana, Donatella; di Stasi, Rossella; Auriemma, Sara; Romanelli, Alessandra; Fattorusso, Roberto; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia; D’Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2016-08-01

    The angiogenic properties of VEGF are mediated through the binding of VEGF to its receptor VEGFR2. The VEGF/VEGFR interface is constituted by a discontinuous binding region distributed on both VEGF monomers. We attempted to reproduce this discontinuous binding site by covalently linking into a single molecular entity two VEGF segments involved in receptor recognition. We designed and synthesized by chemical ligation a set of peptides differing in length and flexibility of the molecular linker joining the two VEGF segments. The biological activity of the peptides was characterized in vitro and in vivo showing a VEGF-like activity. The most biologically active mini-VEGF was further analyzed by NMR to determine the atomic details of its interaction with the receptor.

  12. Miniaturizing VEGF: Peptides mimicking the discontinuous VEGF receptor-binding site modulate the angiogenic response

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Lucia; Finetti, Federica; Diana, Donatella; Di Stasi, Rossella; Auriemma, Sara; Romanelli, Alessandra; Fattorusso, Roberto; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia; D’Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The angiogenic properties of VEGF are mediated through the binding of VEGF to its receptor VEGFR2. The VEGF/VEGFR interface is constituted by a discontinuous binding region distributed on both VEGF monomers. We attempted to reproduce this discontinuous binding site by covalently linking into a single molecular entity two VEGF segments involved in receptor recognition. We designed and synthesized by chemical ligation a set of peptides differing in length and flexibility of the molecular linker joining the two VEGF segments. The biological activity of the peptides was characterized in vitro and in vivo showing a VEGF-like activity. The most biologically active mini-VEGF was further analyzed by NMR to determine the atomic details of its interaction with the receptor. PMID:27498819

  13. Miniaturizing VEGF: Peptides mimicking the discontinuous VEGF receptor-binding site modulate the angiogenic response.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Lucia; Finetti, Federica; Diana, Donatella; Di Stasi, Rossella; Auriemma, Sara; Romanelli, Alessandra; Fattorusso, Roberto; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia; D'Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The angiogenic properties of VEGF are mediated through the binding of VEGF to its receptor VEGFR2. The VEGF/VEGFR interface is constituted by a discontinuous binding region distributed on both VEGF monomers. We attempted to reproduce this discontinuous binding site by covalently linking into a single molecular entity two VEGF segments involved in receptor recognition. We designed and synthesized by chemical ligation a set of peptides differing in length and flexibility of the molecular linker joining the two VEGF segments. The biological activity of the peptides was characterized in vitro and in vivo showing a VEGF-like activity. The most biologically active mini-VEGF was further analyzed by NMR to determine the atomic details of its interaction with the receptor. PMID:27498819

  14. LINC Complexes Form by Binding of Three KASH Peptides to Domain Interfaces of Trimeric SUN Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sosa, Brian A.; Rothballer, Andrea; Kutay, Ulrike; Schwartz, Thomas U.

    2012-08-31

    Linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes span the nuclear envelope and are composed of KASH and SUN proteins residing in the outer and inner nuclear membrane, respectively. LINC formation relies on direct binding of KASH and SUN in the perinuclear space. Thereby, molecular tethers are formed that can transmit forces for chromosome movements, nuclear migration, and anchorage. We present crystal structures of the human SUN2-KASH1/2 complex, the core of the LINC complex. The SUN2 domain is rigidly attached to a trimeric coiled coil that prepositions it to bind three KASH peptides. The peptides bind in three deep and expansive grooves formed between adjacent SUN domains, effectively acting as molecular glue. In addition, a disulfide between conserved cysteines on SUN and KASH covalently links both proteins. The structure provides the basis of LINC complex formation and suggests a model for how LINC complexes might arrange into higher-order clusters to enhance force-coupling.

  15. Norwalk Virus–specific Binding to Oyster Digestive Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Loisy, Fabienne; Atmar, Robert L.; Hutson, Anne M.; Estes, Mary K.; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Pommepuy, Monique; Le Pendu, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    The primary pathogens related to shellfishborne gastroenteritis outbreaks are noroviruses. These viruses show persistence in oysters, which suggests an active mechanism of virus concentration. We investigated whether Norwalk virus or viruslike particles bind specifically to oyster tissues after bioaccumulation or addition to tissue sections. Since noroviruses attach to carbohydrates of the histo-blood group family, tests using immunohistochemical analysis were performed to evaluate specific binding of virus or viruslike particles to oyster tissues through these ligands. Viral particles bind specifically to digestive ducts (midgut, main and secondary ducts, and tubules) by carbohydrate structures with a terminal N-acetylgalactosamine residue in an α linkage (same binding site used for recognition of human histo-blood group antigens). These data show that the oyster can selectively concentrate a human pathogen and that conventional depuration will not eliminate noroviruses from oyster tissue. PMID:16707048

  16. The myeloid-binding peptide adenoviral vector enables multi-organ vascular endothelial gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhi Hong; Kaliberov, Sergey; Zhang, Jingzhu; Muz, Barbara; Azab, Abdel K; Sohn, Rebecca E; Kaliberova, Lyudmila; Du, Yingqiu; Curiel, David T; Arbeit, Jeffrey M

    2014-08-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) are ideal gene therapy targets as they provide widespread tissue access and are the first contact surfaces following intravenous vector administration. Human recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is the most frequently used gene transfer system because of its appreciable transgene payload capacity and lack of somatic mutation risk. However, standard Ad5 vectors predominantly transduce liver but not the vasculature following intravenous administration. We recently developed an Ad5 vector with a myeloid cell-binding peptide (MBP) incorporated into the knob-deleted, T4 fibritin chimeric fiber (Ad.MBP). This vector was shown to transduce pulmonary ECs presumably via a vector handoff mechanism. Here we tested the body-wide tropism of the Ad.MBP vector, its myeloid cell necessity, and vector-EC expression dose response. Using comprehensive multi-organ co-immunofluorescence analysis, we discovered that Ad.MBP produced widespread EC transduction in the lung, heart, kidney, skeletal muscle, pancreas, small bowel, and brain. Surprisingly, Ad.MBP retained hepatocyte tropism albeit at a reduced frequency compared with the standard Ad5. While binding specifically to myeloid cells ex vivo, multi-organ Ad.MBP expression was not dependent on circulating monocytes or macrophages. Ad.MBP dose de-escalation maintained full lung-targeting capacity but drastically reduced transgene expression in other organs. Swapping the EC-specific ROBO4 for the CMV promoter/enhancer abrogated hepatocyte expression but also reduced gene expression in other organs. Collectively, our multilevel targeting strategy could enable therapeutic biological production in previously inaccessible organs that pertain to the most debilitating or lethal human diseases. PMID:24955893

  17. 99mTc-UBI Biokinetics: A Specific Peptide for Infection Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Cortés, J.; Meléndez-Alafort, L.; Herrera-Rodríguez, R.; Ferro-Flores, G.; Mitsoura, E.; Martínez-Duncker, C.

    2003-09-01

    Recently, antimicrobial peptides have been proposed as new agents to distinguish between bacterial infections and sterile inflammatory processes. Based on these considerations, Ubiquicidin peptide 29-41 (UBI) has been labeled with 99mTc using a new direct method showing a radiochemical purity > 97 %, high stability in human serum, and low protein binding. In addition 99mTc-UBI showed a specific in vitro and in vivo binding to bacteria. However its biokinetic parameters have not been evaluated since it is one of the new generation radiopharmaceuticals based on peptide structures. Therefore the aim of this project was to establish the biokinetic model for 99mTc-UBI. An activity from 74 to 148 MBq was injected to patients with bone infection and 5 whole body scans were taken at 1, 30, 120, 240 min and 24 h after radiopharmaceutical administration, with a dual head scanner. Urine was collected for 24 h. An antropomorphic phantom was previously used to calculate the effect of attenuation and scattered radiation on the gamma camera acquisition images. ROIs of the selected organs in patients (kidney, liver, heart, bone, soft tissue and lesion) were drawn, and attenuation and scatter corrected. The % urine elimination at 24 h and time integrated ROIs (cpm/pixel/ROIs) were used to obtain the residence time (τ) in each tissue and to establish the biokinetic model. Pharmacokinetic data show that blood clearance is biexponential with a mean residence time in the central compartment of 0.52 h. The images showed non-accumulation in metabolic organs. More than 75 % of the injected activity was eliminated by renal clearance 4 h after 99mTc-UBI administration. The mean radiation dose calculated according to the MIRD formalism was 0.130 mGy/MBq for kidney and the effective dose was 4.29 × 10-3 mSv/MBq.

  18. Structural Stability and Binding Strength of a Designed Peptide-Carbon Nanotube Hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Roxbury, Daniel; Zhang, Shao-Qing; Mittal, Jeetain; DeGrado, William F.; Jagota, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Biological polymers hybridized with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have elicited much interest recently for applications in SWCNT-based sorting as well as biomedical imaging, sensing, and drug delivery. Recently, de novo designed peptides forming a coiled-coil structure have been engineered to selectively disperse SWCNT of a certain diameter. Here we report on a study of the binding strength and structural stability of the hybrid between such a “HexCoil-Ala” peptide and the (6,5)-SWCNT. Using the competitive binding of a surfactant, we find that affinity strength of the peptide ranks in comparison to that of two single-stranded DNA sequences as (GT)30-DNA > HexCoil-Ala > (TAT)4T-DNA. Further, using replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD), we show that the hexamer peptide complex has both similarities with and differences from the original design. While one of two distinct helix-helix interfaces of the original model was largely retained, a second interface showed much greater variability. These conformational differences allowed an aromatic tyrosine residue designed to lie along the solvent-exposed surface of the protein instead to penetrate between the two helices and directly contact the SWCNT. These insights will inform future designs of SWCNT-interacting peptides. PMID:24466357

  19. A Short Peptide That Mimics the Binding Domain of TGF-β1 Presents Potent Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Emília R.; Fujimura, Patrícia T.; Araujo, Galber R.; da Silva, Carlos A. T.; Silva, Rangel L.; Cunha, Thiago M.; Lopes-Ferreira, Mônica; Lima, Carla; Ferreira, Márcio J.; Cunha-Junior, Jair P.; Taketomi, Ernesto A.; Goulart, Luiz R.; Ueira-Vieira, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) is a pleiotropic cytokine with multiple roles in development, wound healing, and immune regulation. TGF-β1-mediated immune dysfunction may lead to pathological conditions, such as inflammation. Chronic inflammatory process is characterized by a continuous release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and the inhibition or the blockage of these cytokines signaling pathways are considered a target treatment. In this context, despite the high numbers of TGF-β-targeted pathways, the inducible regulatory T cells (iTreg) to control inflammation seems to be a promising approach. Our aim was to develop novel peptides through phage display (PhD) technology that could mimic TGF-β1 function with higher potency. Specific mimetic peptides were obtained through a PhD subtraction strategy from whole cell binding using TGF-β1 recombinant as a competitor during elution step. We have selected a peptide that seems to play an important role on cellular differentiation and modulation of TNF-α and IL-10 cytokines. The synthetic pm26TGF-β1 peptide tested in PBMC significantly down-modulated TNF-α and up-regulated IL-10 responses, leading to regulatory T cells (Treg) phenotype differentiation. Furthermore, the synthetic peptide was able to decrease leukocytes rolling in BALB/C mice and neutrophils migration during inflammatory process in C57BL/6 mice. These data suggest that this peptide may be useful for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, especially because it displays potent anti-inflammatory properties and do not exhibit neutrophils’ chemoattraction. PMID:26312490

  20. Integrated light-scattering spectroscopy, a sensitive probe for peptide-vesicle binding: application to the membrane-bound colicin E1 channel peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Strawbridge, K. B.; Palmer, L. R.; Merrill, A. R.; Hallett, F. R.

    1995-01-01

    Integrated light-scattering (ILS) spectroscopy was used to monitor the binding of the colicin E1 channel peptide to POPC:POPG large unilamellar vesicles (LUV; 60:40, mol:mol) at acidic pH (3.5). Binding conditions were chosen such that nearly all of the channel peptide was bound to the vesicles with little free peptide remaining in solution. The increase in vesicle size upon the insertion of the channel peptide was measured by performing a discrete inversion technique on data obtained from an ILS spectrometer. Vesicle size number distributions were determined for five different systems having peptide/vesicle ratios of approximately 0, 77, 154, 206, and 257. The experiment was repeated four times (twice at two different vesicle concentrations) to determine reproducibility. The relative changes in vesicle radius upon peptide binding to the membrane vesicles was remarkably reproducible even though these changes represented only a few nanometers. A comparison of vesicle size number distributions in the absence of bound peptide was made between ILS and dynamic light scattering (DLS) data and showed similar results. However, DLS was incapable of detecting the small changes due to peptide-induced vesicle swelling. The membrane-bound volume of the colicin E1 channel peptide was approximately 177 +/- 22 nm3. These data indicate that in the absence of a membrane potential (closed channel state) the colicin E1 channel peptide inserts into the membrane resulting in a significant displacement of the lipid bilayer as evidenced from the dose-dependent increase in the vesicle radius. These results indicate that ILS spectroscopy is a sensitive sizing technique that is capable of detecting relatively small changes in membrane vesicles and may have a wide application in the determination of peptide binding to membrane vesicles. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:7711234

  1. Binding Site Prediction of Proteins with Organic Compounds or Peptides Using GALAXY Web Servers.

    PubMed

    Heo, Lim; Lee, Hasup; Baek, Minkyung; Seok, Chaok

    2016-01-01

    We introduce two GALAXY web servers called GalaxySite and GalaxyPepDock that predict protein complex structures with small organic compounds and peptides, respectively. GalaxySite predicts ligands that may bind the input protein and generates complex structures of the protein with the predicted ligands from the protein structure given as input or predicted from the input sequence. GalaxyPepDock takes a protein structure and a peptide sequence as input and predicts structures for the protein-peptide complex. Both GalaxySite and GalaxyPepDock rely on available experimentally resolved structures of protein-ligand complexes evolutionarily related to the target. With the continuously increasing size of the protein structure database, the probability of finding related proteins in the database is increasing. The servers further relax the complex structures to refine the structural aspects that are missing in the available structures or that are not compatible with the given protein by optimizing physicochemical interactions. GalaxyPepDock allows conformational change of the protein receptor induced by peptide binding. The atomistic interactions with ligands predicted by the GALAXY servers may offer important clues for designing new molecules or proteins with desired binding properties. PMID:27094284

  2. Prediction of binding free energy for adsorption of antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin B on a POPC membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivcharuk, Victor; Tomberli, Bruno; Tolokh, Igor S.; Gray, C. G.

    2008-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study the interaction of a zwitterionic palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayer with the cationic antimicrobial peptide bovine lactoferricin (LFCinB) in a 100 mM NaCl solution at 310 K. The interaction of LFCinB with POPC is used as a model system for studying the details of membrane-peptide interactions, with the peptide selected because of its antimicrobial nature. Seventy-two 3 ns MD simulations, with six orientations of LFCinB at 12 different distances from a POPC membrane, are carried out to determine the potential of mean force (PMF) or free energy profile for the peptide as a function of the distance between LFCinB and the membrane surface. To calculate the PMF for this relatively large system a new variant of constrained MD and thermodynamic integration is developed. A simplified method for relating the PMF to the LFCinB-membrane binding free energy is described and used to predict a free energy of adsorption (or binding) of -1.05±0.39kcal/mol , and corresponding maximum binding force of about 20 pN, for LFCinB-POPC. The contributions of the ions-LFCinB and the water-LFCinB interactions to the PMF are discussed. The method developed will be a useful starting point for future work simulating peptides interacting with charged membranes and interactions involved in the penetration of membranes, features necessary to understand in order to rationally design peptides as potential alternatives to traditional antibiotics.

  3. Design of Compact Biomimetic Cellulose Binding Peptides as Carriers for Cellulose Catalytic Degradation.

    PubMed

    Khazanov, Netaly; Iline-Vul, Taly; Noy, Efrat; Goobes, Gil; Senderowitz, Hanoch

    2016-01-21

    The conversion of biomass into biofuels can reduce the strategic vulnerability of petroleum-based systems and at the same time have a positive effect on global climate issues. Lignocellulose is the cheapest and most abundant source of biomass and consequently has been widely considered as a source for liquid fuel. However, despite ongoing efforts, cellulosic biofuels are still far from commercial realization, one of the major bottlenecks being the hydrolysis of cellulose into simpler sugars. Inspired by the structural and functional modularity of cellulases used by many organisms for the breakdown of cellulose, we propose to mimic the cellulose binding domain (CBD) and the catalytic domain of these proteins by small molecular entities. Multiple copies of these mimics could subsequently be tethered together to enhance hydrolytic activity. In this work, we take the first step toward achieving this goal by applying computational approaches to the design of efficient, cost-effective mimetics of the CBD. The design is based on low molecular weight peptides that are amenable to large-scale production. We provide an optimized design of four short (i.e., ∼18 residues) peptide mimetics based on the three-dimensional structure of a known CBD and demonstrate that some of these peptides bind cellulose as well as or better than the full CBD. The structures of these peptides were studied by circular dichroism and their interactions with cellulose by solid phase NMR. Finally, we present a computational strategy for predicting CBD/peptide-cellulose binding free energies and demonstrate its ability to provide values in good agreement with experimental data. Using this computational model, we have also studied the dissociation pathway of the CBDs/peptides from the surface of cellulose. PMID:26691055

  4. Pharmacokinetics in rats of a long-acting human parathyroid hormone-collagen binding domain (PTH-CBD) peptide construct

    PubMed Central

    Stratford, Robert; Vu, Christopher; Sakon, Joshua; Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Gensure, Robert; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a hybrid peptide consisting of the N-terminal biologically active region of human parathyroid hormone (PTH) linked to a collagen binding domain (CBD) were evaluated in female Sprague-Dawley rats. The peptide, PTH-CBD, consists of the first 33 amino acids of PTH linked as an extension of the amino acid chain to the CBD peptide derived from ColH collagenase of Clostridium histolyticum. Serum concentrations arising from single dose administration by the subcutaneous and intravenous routes were compared to those measured following route specific mole equivalent doses of PTH(1-34). Population-based modeling demonstrated similar systemic absorption kinetics and bioavailability for both peptides. Exposure to PTH-CBD was 6-fold higher due to a systemic clearance of approximately 20% relative to PTH(1-34); however, these kinetics were consistent with >95% of a dose being eliminated from serum within 24 hours. Results obtained support continued investigation of PTH-CBD as a bone targeted anabolic agent for the treatment of post-menopausal osteoporosis. PMID:24399637

  5. Introducing folding stability into the score function for computational design of RNA-binding peptides boosts the probability of success.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xingqing; Agris, Paul F; Hall, Carol K

    2016-05-01

    A computational strategy that integrates our peptide search algorithm with atomistic molecular dynamics simulation was used to design rational peptide drugs that recognize and bind to the anticodon stem and loop domain (ASL(Lys3) ) of human tRNAUUULys3 for the purpose of interrupting HIV replication. The score function of the search algorithm was improved by adding a peptide stability term weighted by an adjustable factor λ to the peptide binding free energy. The five best peptide sequences associated with five different values of λ were determined using the search algorithm and then input in atomistic simulations to examine the stability of the peptides' folded conformations and their ability to bind to ASL(Lys3) . Simulation results demonstrated that setting an intermediate value of λ achieves a good balance between optimizing the peptide's binding ability and stabilizing its folded conformation during the sequence evolution process, and hence leads to optimal binding to the target ASL(Lys3) . Thus, addition of a peptide stability term significantly improves the success rate for our peptide design search. Proteins 2016; 84:700-711. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26914059

  6. Autoradiographic localization of peptide YY and neuropeptide Y binding sites in the medulla oblongata

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, R.A.; McDonald, T.J.; Robertson, H.A.

    1988-09-01

    Peptide YY is a highly potent emetic when given intravenously in dogs. We hypothesized that the area postrema, a small brain stem nucleus that acts as a chemoreceptive trigger zone for vomiting and lies outside the blood-brain barrier, might have receptors that PYY would bind to, in order to mediate the emetic response. We prepared (/sup 125/I)PYY and used autoradiography to show that high affinity binding sites for this ligand were highly localized in the area postrema and related nuclei of the dog medulla oblongata. Furthermore, the distribution of (/sup 125/I)PYY binding sites in the rat medulla oblongata was very similar to that in the dog; the distribution of (/sup 125/I)PYY binding sites throughout the rat brain was seen to be similar to the distribution of (/sup 125/I)NPY binding sites.

  7. In vitro proliferative responses and antibody titers specific to human acetylcholine receptor synthetic peptides in patients with myasthenia gravis and relation to HLA class II genes.

    PubMed Central

    Brocke, S; Brautbar, C; Steinman, L; Abramsky, O; Rothbard, J; Neumann, D; Fuchs, S; Mozes, E

    1988-01-01

    To investigate which parts of the acetylcholine receptor are involved in the initiation and development of myasthenia gravis (MG), peptides representing different sequences of the human acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit were synthesized. These peptides were tested for their ability to stimulate T cells of myasthenic patients and healthy control patients in proliferation assays and to bind to sera antibodies. Three of eight peptides discriminated significantly between the two groups in the proliferation assay, as well as in their ability to bind to serum antibodies. HLA-DR3 and DR5 were associated with proliferative responses to specific AChR peptides in the group of myasthenics. Acetylcholine receptor epitopes that might play a specific role in myasthenia gravis thus were demonstrated. PMID:2461962

  8. Structural specificity of mucosal-cell transport and metabolism of peptide drugs: implication for oral peptide drug delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, J. P.; Amidon, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The brush border membrane of intestinal mucosal cells contains a peptide carrier system with rather broad substrate specificity and various endo- and exopeptidase activities. Small peptide (di-/tripeptide)-type drugs with or without an N-terminal alpha-amino group, including beta-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, are transported by the peptide transporter. Polypeptide drugs are hydrolyzed by brush border membrane proteolytic enzymes to di-/tripeptides and amino acids. Therefore, while the intestinal brush border membrane has a carrier system facilitating the absorption of di-/tripeptide drugs, it is a major barrier limiting oral availability of polypeptide drugs. In this paper, the specificity of peptide transport and metabolism in the intestinal brush border membrane is reviewed.

  9. Copper(II) ions and the Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide: Affinity and stoichiometry of binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tõugu, Vello; Friedemann, Merlin; Tiiman, Ann; Palumaa, Peep

    2014-10-01

    Deposition of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides into amyloid plaques is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis this deposition is an early event and primary cause of the disease, however, the mechanisms that cause this deposition remain elusive. An increasing amount of evidence shows that the interactions of biometals can contribute to the fibrillization and amyloid formation by amyloidogenic peptides. From different anions the copper ions deserve the most attention since it can contribute not only toamyloid formation but also to its toxicity due to the generation of ROS. In this thesis we focus on the affinity and stoichiometry of copper(II) binding to the Aβ molecule.

  10. Computational Analysis of the Binding Specificities of PH Domains

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi; Liang, Zhongjie; Shen, Bairong; Hu, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains share low sequence identities but extremely conserved structures. They have been found in many proteins for cellular signal-dependent membrane targeting by binding inositol phosphates to perform different physiological functions. In order to understand the sequence-structure relationship and binding specificities of PH domains, quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and sequence-based combined with structure-based binding analysis were employed in our research. In the structural aspect, the binding specificities were shown to correlate with the hydropathy characteristics of PH domains and electrostatic properties of the bound inositol phosphates. By comparing these structure properties with sequence-based profiles of physicochemical properties, PH domains can be classified into four functional subgroups according to their binding specificities and affinities to inositol phosphates. The method not only provides a simple and practical paradigm to predict binding specificities for functional genomic research but also gives new insight into the understanding of the basis of diseases with respect to PH domain structures. PMID:26881206

  11. Modeling the Interaction between Integrin-Binding Peptide (RGD) and Rutile Surface: The Effect of Na+ on Peptide Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chunya; Skelton, Adam; Chen, Mingjun; Vlcek, Lukas; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of a single tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) adsorbing onto negatively charged hydroxylated rutile (110) surface in aqueous solution was studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results indicate that the adsorbed Na{sup +} ions play an important role in determining the binding geometry of RGD. With an initial 'horseshoe' configuration, the charged side groups (COO{sup -} and NH{sub 2}) of the peptide are able to interact with the surface through direct hydrogen bonds (H bonds) in the very early stage of adsorption. The Na{sup +} ions approach the positively charged Arg side chain, competing with the Arg side chain for adsorption to the negatively charged hydroxyl oxygen. In coordination with the structural adjustment of the peptide, the Arg residue is driven to detach from the rutile surface. In contrast, the Na+ ions in close proximity to the negatively charged Asp side chain contribute to the binding of the COO{sup -} group on the surface, helping the carboxyl oxygen not involved in COO{sup -}-surface H bonds to orientate toward the hydroxyl hydrogens. Once both carboxyl oxygens form enough H bonds with the hydroxyl hydrogens, the redundant ions move toward a more favorable adsorption site.

  12. Rational Optimization of Conformational Effects Induced By Hydrocarbon Staples in Peptides and their Binding Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lama, Dilraj; Quah, Soo T.; Verma, Chandra S.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Beuerman, Roger W.; Lane, David P.; Brown, Christopher J.

    2013-12-01

    eIF4E is frequently over-expressed in different cancers and causes increased translation of oncogenic proteins via deregulated cap-dependent translation. Inhibitors of the eIF4E:eIF4G interactions represent an approach that would normalize cap-dependent translation. Stapled peptides represent an emerging class of therapeutics that can target protein: protein interactions. We present here molecular dynamics simulations for a set of rationally designed stapled peptides in solution and in complex with eIF4E, supported with biophysical and crystallographic data. Clustering of the simulated structures revealed the favoured conformational states of the stapled peptides in their bound or free forms in solution. Identifying these populations has allowed us to design peptides with improved affinities by introducing mutations into the peptide sequence to alter their conformational distributions. These studies emphasise the effects that engineered mutations have on the conformations of free and bound peptides, and illustrate that both states must be considered in efforts to attain high affinity binding.

  13. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain.

    PubMed

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  14. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  15. Synthetic antibodies and peptides recognizing progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy-specific point mutations in polyomavirus JC capsid viral protein 1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Gorelik, Leonid; Simon, Kenneth J; Pavlenco, Alevtina; Cheung, Anne; Brickelmaier, Margot; Chen, Ling Ling; Jin, Ping; Weinreb, Paul H; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2015-01-01

    Polyomavirus JC (JCV) is the causative agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a rare and frequently fatal brain disease that afflicts a small fraction of the immune-compromised population, including those affected by AIDS and transplantation recipients on immunosuppressive drug therapy. Currently there is no specific therapy for PML. The major capsid viral protein 1 (VP1) involved in binding to sialic acid cell receptors is believed to be a key player in pathogenesis. PML-specific mutations in JCV VP1 sequences present at the binding pocket of sialic acid cell receptors, such as L55F and S269F, abolish sialic acid recognition and might favor PML onset. Early diagnosis of these PML-specific mutations may help identify patients at high risk of PML, thus reducing the risks associated with immunosuppressive therapy. As a first step in the development of such early diagnostic tools, we report identification and characterization of affinity reagents that specifically recognize PML-specific mutations in VP1 variants using phage display technology. We first identified 2 peptides targeting wild type VP1 with moderate specificity. Fine-tuning via selection of biased libraries designed based on 2 parental peptides yielded peptides with different, yet still moderate, bindinspecificities. In contrast, we had great success in identifying synthetic antibodies that recognize one of the PML-specific mutations (L55F) with high specificity from the phage-displayed libraries. These peptides and synthetic antibodies represent potential candidates for developing tailored immune-based assays for PML risk stratification in addition to complementing affinity reagents currently available for the study of PML and JCV. PMID:25879139

  16. Butelase 1 is an Asx-specific ligase enabling peptide macrocyclization and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Giang K T; Wang, Shujing; Qiu, Yibo; Hemu, Xinya; Lian, Yilong; Tam, James P

    2014-09-01

    Proteases are ubiquitous in nature, whereas naturally occurring peptide ligases, enzymes catalyzing the reverse reactions of proteases, are rare occurrences. Here we describe the discovery of butelase 1, to our knowledge the first asparagine/aspartate (Asx) peptide ligase to be reported. This highly efficient enzyme was isolated from Clitoria ternatea, a cyclic peptide-producing medicinal plant. Butelase 1 shares 71% sequence identity and the same catalytic triad with legumain proteases but does not hydrolyze the protease substrate of legumain. Instead, butelase 1 cyclizes various peptides of plant and animal origin with yields greater than 95%. With Kcat values of up to 17 s(-1) and catalytic efficiencies as high as 542,000 M(-1) s(-1), butelase 1 is the fastest peptide ligase known. Notably, butelase 1 also displays broad specificity for the N-terminal amino acids of the peptide substrate, thus providing a new tool for C terminus-specific intermolecular peptide ligations. PMID:25038786

  17. A Heparan Sulfate-Binding Cell Penetrating Peptide for Tumor Targeting and Migration Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ping-Hsueh; Chang, Pei-Lin; Wang, Wen-Ching; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2015-01-01

    As heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are known as co-receptors to interact with numerous growth factors and then modulate downstream biological activities, overexpression of HS/HSPG on cell surface acts as an increasingly reliable prognostic factor in tumor progression. Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short-chain peptides developed as functionalized vectors for delivery approaches of impermeable agents. On cell surface negatively charged HS provides the initial attachment of basic CPPs by electrostatic interaction, leading to multiple cellular effects. Here a functional peptide (CPPecp) has been identified from critical HS binding region in hRNase3, a unique RNase family member with in vitro antitumor activity. In this study we analyze a set of HS-binding CPPs derived from natural proteins including CPPecp. In addition to cellular binding and internalization, CPPecp demonstrated multiple functions including strong binding activity to tumor cell surface with higher HS expression, significant inhibitory effects on cancer cell migration, and suppression of angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, different from conventional highly basic CPPs, CPPecp facilitated magnetic nanoparticle to selectively target tumor site in vivo. Therefore, CPPecp could engage its capacity to be developed as biomaterials for diagnostic imaging agent, therapeutic supplement, or functionalized vector for drug delivery. PMID:26064887

  18. Metal-binding peptides: Their role in responses to metal stress

    SciTech Connect

    Rauser, W.E. )

    1989-04-01

    Excess metals are one stress that plants may encounter. The metals Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn are considered because of concern for their entry into the foodchain of animals and man. Studies of metal tolerant plants and cell cultures suggest three types of responses: exclusion of metal from protoplasts by binding to cell walls, differential membrane transport reducing metal exposure of enzymes, and intracellular chelation of metal in innocuous forms. One group of compounds involved in the latter response are metal-binding peptides designated phytochelatins. They are a family of small peptides composed of five kinds of amino acids, including 2 to 11 cysteines which provide thiols for selective binding of metal. Metals induce the synthesis of phytochelatins through unknown enzymes involving glutathione. In plant cell cultures the peptides bind about 90% of the intracellular Cd. In roots of young plants up to half of the metal is bound by phytochelatins. Intact plants probably use a combination of responses to deal with excess metals, phytochelatins may dominate in certain cases.

  19. Identification of the bioactive and consensus peptide motif from Momordica charantia insulin receptor-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hsin-Yi; Li, Chia-Cheng; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2016-08-01

    Many food bioactive peptides with diverse functions have been discovered by studying plant proteins. We have previously identified a 68-residue insulin receptor (IR)-binding protein (mcIRBP) from Momordica charantia that exhibits hypoglycemic effects in mice via interaction with IR. By in vitro digestion, we found that mcIRBP-19, spanning residues 50-68 of mcIRBP, enhanced the binding of insulin to IR, stimulated the phosphorylation of PDK1 and Akt, induced the expression of glucose transporter 4, and stimulated both the uptake of glucose in cells and the clearance of glucose in diabetic mice. Furthermore, mcIRBP-19 homologs were present in various plants and shared similar β-hairpin structures and IR kinase-activating abilities to mcIRBP-19. In conclusion, our findings suggested that mcIRBP-19 is a blood glucose-lowering bioactive peptide that exhibits IR-binding potentials. Moreover, we newly identified novel IR-binding bioactive peptides in various plants which belonged to different taxonomic families. PMID:26988505

  20. Common binding site for disialyllactose and tri-peptide in C-fragment of tetanus neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Seetharaman; Eswaramoorthy, Subramaniam; Kumaran, Desigan; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2005-11-01

    Clostridial neurotoxins are comprised of botulinum (BoNT) and tetanus (TeNT), which share significant structural and functional similarity. Crystal structures of the binding domain of TeNT complexed with disialyllactose (DiSia) and a tri-peptide Tyr-Glu-Trp (YEW) have been determined to 2.3 and 2.2 A, respectively. Both DiSia and YEW bind in a shallow cleft region on the surface of the molecule in the beta-trefoil domain, interacting with a set of common residues, Asp1147, Asp1214, Asn1216, and Arg1226. DiSia and YEW binding at the same site in tetanus toxin provides a putative site that could be occupied either by a ganglioside moiety or a peptide. Soaking experiments with a mixture of YEW and DiSia show that YEW competes with DiSia, suggesting that YEW can be used to block ganglioside binding. A comparison with the TeNT binding domain in complex with small molecules, BoNT/A and /B, provides insight into the different modes of ganglioside binding. PMID:16104015

  1. Arsenite binding to synthetic peptides based on the Zn finger region and the estrogen binding region of the human estrogen receptor-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchin, Kirk T. . E-mail: kitchin.kirk@epa.gov; Wallace, Kathleen

    2005-08-01

    We selected the estrogen receptor protein for study because of prior results indicating that arsenite is a 'potential nonsteroidal environmental estrogen'. We utilized radioactive {sup 73}As-labeled arsenite and vacuum filtration methodology to determine the binding affinity of arsenite to synthetic peptides. A zinc finger region containing four free sulfhydryls and the hormone binding region containing three free sulfhydryls based on the human estrogen receptor-{alpha} were studied. Peptide 15 (RYCAVCNDYASGYHYGVWSCEGCKA) bound arsenite with a K {sub d} of 2.2 {mu}M and B {sub max} (maximal binding capacity) of 89 nmol/mg protein. Peptide 10 (LECAWQGKCVEGTEHLYSMKCKNV) had a K {sub d} of 1.3 {mu}M and B {sub max} of 59 nmol/mg protein. In contrast, the monothiol peptide 19 (LEGAWQGKGVEGTEHLYSMKCKNV) bound arsenite with a higher K {sub d} of 124 {mu}M and a B {sub max} of 26 nmol/mg protein. In our studies, amino acids other than cysteine (including methionine and histidine) did not bind arsenite at all. Peptides modeled on the estrogen receptor with two or more nearby free sulfhydryls (two or five intervening amino acids) had low K {sub d} values in the 1-4 {mu}M range. Peptides containing single sulfhydryls or two sulfhydryls spaced 17 amino acids apart had higher K {sub d} values in the 100-200 {mu}M range, demonstrating lower affinity. With the exception of peptide 24 which had an unusually high B {sub max} value of 234 nmol/mg, the binding capacity of the studied peptides was proportional to the number of free cysteines. Binding of trivalent arsenicals to peptides and proteins can contribute to arsenic toxicity and carcinogenicity via altered peptide/protein structure and enzyme function.

  2. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models.

    PubMed

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-05-01

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. PMID:26912662

  3. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models*

    PubMed Central

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. PMID:26912662

  4. Specific serum binding of morphine, levorphanol and heroin

    PubMed Central

    Herndon, B. L.; Baeder, D. H.; Ringle, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Effects of repeated subcutaneous pellet implantation of a series of narcotic drugs on the serum binding of [14C]morphine was studied in rabbits. Three of the compounds, morphine, heroin and levorphanol, elicited production of a morphine-binding globulin in the implanted rabbits. This serum response did not occur with several other compounds tested, including the potent analgesic methadone, and the narcotic antagonist naloxone. The time course of production of this globulin response, as well as the specificity of the binding for the drug that induced the response are both characteristic of an immunological reaction.

  5. Coupling of importin beta binding peptide on plasmid DNA: transfection efficiency is increased by modification of lipoplex's physico-chemical properties

    PubMed Central

    Carrière, Marie; Escriou, Virginie; Savarin, Aline; Scherman, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Background Non-viral vectors for gene transfer are less immunogenic than viral vectors but also less efficient. Significant effort has focused on enhancing non-viral gene transfer efficiency by increasing nuclear import of plasmid DNA, particularly by coupling nuclear localization peptidic sequences to plasmid DNA. Results We have coupled a 62-aminoacid peptide derived from hSRP1α importin beta binding domain, called the IBB peptide to plasmid DNA by using the heterobifunctional linker N-(4-azido-2,3,5,6 tetrafluorobenzyl)-6-maleimidyl hexanamide (TFPAM-6). When covalently coupled to plasmid DNA, IBB peptide did not increase the efficiency of cationic lipid mediated transfection. The IBB peptide was still able to interact with its nuclear import receptor, importin β, but non-specifically. However, we observed a 20-fold increase in reporter gene expression with plasmid DNA / IBB peptide complexes under conditions of inefficient transfection. In which case, IBB was associated with plasmid DNA through self assembling ionic interaction. Conclusions The improvement of transfection activity was not due to an improved nuclear import of DNA, but rather by the modification of physicochemical properties of IBB peptide / plasmid complexes. IBB peptide increased lipoplex size and these larger complexes were more efficient for gene transfer. PMID:12969505

  6. A novel Omp25-binding peptide screened by phage display can inhibit Brucella abortus 2308 infection in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junbo; Guo, Fei; Huang, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Chuangfu; Liu, Ruitian; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yuanzhi; Yin, Shuanghong; Li, Zhiqiang

    2014-06-01

    Brucellosis is a globally distributed zoonotic disease affecting animals and humans, and current antibiotic and vaccine strategies are not optimal. The surface-exposed protein Omp25 is involved in Brucella virulence and plays an important role in Brucella pathogenesis during infection, suggesting that Omp25 could be a useful target for selecting potential therapeutic molecules to inhibit Brucella pathogenesis. In this study, we identified, we believe for the first time, peptides that bind specifically to the Omp25 protein of pathogens, using a phage panning technique, After four rounds of panning, 42 plaques of eluted phages were subjected to pyrosequencing. Four phage clones that bound better than the other clones were selected following confirmation by ELISA and affinity constant determination. The peptides selected could significantly inhibit Brucella abortus 2308 (S2308) internalization and intracellular growth in RAW264.7 macrophages, and significantly induce secretion of TNF-α and IL-12 in peptide- and S2308-treated cells. Any observed peptide (OP11, OP27, OP35 or OP40) could significantly inhibit S2308 infection in BALB/c mice. Moreover, the peptide OP11 was the best candidate peptide for inhibiting S2308 infection in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that peptide OP11 has potential for exploitation as a peptide drug in resisting S2308 infection. PMID:24722798

  7. Division of Labor: ER-Resident BiP Co-Chaperones Match Substrates to Fates Based on Specific Binding Sequences.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Daniel N; Clerico, Eugenia M; Gierasch, Lila M

    2016-09-01

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Behnke et al. (2016) describe a novel cell-based peptide-binding assay and use it to analyze the binding specificities of the endoplasmic reticulum Hsp70 chaperone and its co-chaperones and to probe their different roles in protein quality control. PMID:27588598

  8. Imaging site-specific peptide-targeting in tumor tissues using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lixin; Zhang, Miao; Yu, Ping

    2011-03-01

    We report imaging studies on site-specific peptide-targeting in tumor tissues using newly developed optical peptide probes and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The system used two broadband superluminescent light emission diodes with different central wavelengths. An electro-optic modulation in the reference beam was used to get full-range deep imaging inside tumor tissues. The optical probes were based on Bombesin (BBN) that is a fourteen amino acid peptide. BBN has high binding affinity to gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors overexpressed on several human cancer cell lines. Fluorescence BBN probes were developed by conjugating the last eight residues of BBN, -Q-W-A-V-G-H-L-M-(NH2), with Alexa Flour 680 or Alexa Fluor 750 dye molecules via amino acid linker -G-G-G. The SD-OCT imaging can identify normal tissue and tumor tissue through the difference in scattering coefficient, and trace the BBN conjugate probes through the absorption of the dye molecules using the twowavelength algorithm. We performed the specific uptake and receptor-blocking experiments of the optical BBN probes in severely compromised immunodeficient mouse model bearing human PC-3 prostate tumor xenografts. Tumor and muscle tissues were collected and used for SD-OCT imaging. The SD-OCT images showed fluorescence traces of the BBN probes in the peptide-targeted tumor tissues. Our results demonstrated that SD-OCT is a potential tool for preclinical and clinical early cancer detection.

  9. An echistatin C-terminal peptide activates GPIIbIIIa binding to fibrinogen, fibronectin, vitronectin and collagen type I and type IV.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, P S; Saudek, V; Owen, T J; Harbeson, S L; Bitonti, A J

    1993-01-01

    Integrin binding to proteins often involves recognition of domains containing the arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) motif. Different binding affinities and specificities of the integrin-ligand protein interactions involve additional protein domains. The n.m.r. structure of the snake-venom protein echistatin suggested that the C-terminal portion of the molecule might be important, in addition to the RGD domain, in binding to the integrin glycoprotein IIbIIIa (GPIIbIIIa) [Saudek, Atkinson and Pelton (1991) Biochem. 30, 7369-7372]. The synthetic C-terminal peptide, echistatin-(40-49), PRNPHKGPAT, (1) inhibited binding of GPIIbIIIa to immobilized echistatin (IC50 3-6 mM), but did not inhibit binding of GPIIbIIIa to immobilized fibrinogen (up to 5 mM peptide), (2) activated GPIIbIIIa binding to fibronectin and vitronectin, usual ligands for the activated integrin, (3) activated binding of GPIIbIIIa to collagen type I and type IV, proteins not usually regarded as ligands for the integrin, and (4) stimulated 125I-fibrinogen binding by human platelets. These findings argue for an interaction of this non-RGD domain in echistatin with GPIIbIIIa, leading to activation of the integrin and extension of the ligand specificity to include immobilized collagen. PMID:7687129

  10. Electrostatically induced recruitment of membrane peptides into clusters requires ligand binding at both interfaces.

    PubMed

    Antonenko, Yuri N; Horner, Andreas; Pohl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Protein recruitment to specific membrane locations may be governed or facilitated by electrostatic attraction, which originates from a multivalent ligand. Here we explored the energetics of a model system in which this simple electrostatic recruitment mechanism failed. That is, basic poly-L-lysine binding to one leaflet of a planar lipid bilayer did not recruit the triply-charged peptide (O-Pyromellitylgramicidin). Clustering was only observed in cases where PLL was bound to both channel ends. Clustering was indicated (i) by the decreased diffusional PLL mobility D(PLL) and (ii) by an increased lifetime τ(PLL) of the clustered channels. In contrast, if PLL was bound to only one leaflet, neither D(PLL) nor τ(P) changed. Simple calculations suggest that electrostatic repulsion of the unbound ends prevented neighboring OPg dimers from approaching each other. We believe that a similar mechanism may also operate in cell signaling and that it may e.g. contribute to the controversial results obtained for the ligand driven dimerization of G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:23285199

  11. Electrostatically Induced Recruitment of Membrane Peptides into Clusters Requires Ligand Binding at Both Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Protein recruitment to specific membrane locations may be governed or facilitated by electrostatic attraction, which originates from a multivalent ligand. Here we explored the energetics of a model system in which this simple electrostatic recruitment mechanism failed. That is, basic poly-L-lysine binding to one leaflet of a planar lipid bilayer did not recruit the triply-charged peptide (O-Pyromellitylgramicidin). Clustering was only observed in cases where PLL was bound to both channel ends. Clustering was indicated (i) by the decreased diffusional PLL mobility DPLL and (ii) by an increased lifetime τPLL of the clustered channels. In contrast, if PLL was bound to only one leaflet, neither DPLL nor τP changed. Simple calculations suggest that electrostatic repulsion of the unbound ends prevented neighboring OPg dimers from approaching each other. We believe that a similar mechanism may also operate in cell signaling and that it may e.g. contribute to the controversial results obtained for the ligand driven dimerization of G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:23285199

  12. Mutated Leguminous Lectin Containing a Heparin-Binding like Motif in a Carbohydrate-Binding Loop Specifically Binds to Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Abo, Hirohito; Soga, Keisuke; Tanaka, Atsuhiro; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    We previously introduced random mutations in the sugar-binding loops of a leguminous lectin and screened the resulting mutated lectins for novel specificities using cell surface display. Screening of a mutated peanut agglutinin (PNA), revealed a mutated PNA with a distinct preference for heparin. Glycan microarray analyses using the mutated lectin fused to the Fc region of human immunoglobulin, revealed that a particular sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), heparin, had the highest binding affinity for mutated PNA among 97 glycans tested, although wild-type PNA showed affinity towards Galβ1-3GalNAc and similar galactosylated glycans. Further analyses of binding specificity using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay demonstrated that the mutated PNA specifically binds to heparin, and weakly to de-2-O-sulfated heparin, but not to other GAG chains including de-6-O-sulfated and de-N-sulfated heparins. The mutated PNA had six amino acid substitutions within the eight amino acid-long sugar-binding loop. In this loop, the heparin-binding like motif comprised three arginine residues at positions 124, 128, and 129, and a histidine at position 125 was present. Substitution of each arginine or histidine residue to alanine reduced heparin-binding ability, indicating that all of these basic amino acid residues contributed to heparin binding. Inhibition assay demonstrated that heparin and dextran sulfate strongly inhibited mutated PNA binding to heparin in dose-dependent manner. The mutated PNA could distinguish between CHO cells and proteoglycan-deficient mutant cells. This is the first report establishing a novel leguminous lectin that preferentially binds to highly sulfated heparin and may provide novel GAG-binding probes to distinguish between heterogeneous GAG repeating units. PMID:26714191

  13. Expression levels of MHC class I molecules are inversely correlated with promiscuity of peptide binding.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Paul; Meziane, El Kahina; Harrison, Michael; Magiera, Łukasz; Hermann, Clemens; Mears, Laura; Wrobel, Antony G; Durant, Charlotte; Nielsen, Lise Lotte; Buus, Søren; Ternette, Nicola; Mwangi, William; Butter, Colin; Nair, Venugopal; Ahyee, Trudy; Duggleby, Richard; Madrigal, Alejandro; Roversi, Pietro; Lea, Susan M; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are at the heart of adaptive immune responses, playing crucial roles in many kinds of disease and in vaccination. We report that breadth of peptide presentation and level of cell surface expression of class I molecules are inversely correlated in both chickens and humans. This relationship correlates with protective responses against infectious pathogens including Marek's disease virus leading to lethal tumours in chickens and human immunodeficiency virus infection progressing to AIDS in humans. We propose that differences in peptide binding repertoire define two groups of MHC class I molecules strategically evolved as generalists and specialists for different modes of pathogen resistance. We suggest that differences in cell surface expression level ensure the development of optimal peripheral T cell responses. The inverse relationship of peptide repertoire and expression is evidently a fundamental property of MHC molecules, with ramifications extending beyond immunology and medicine to evolutionary biology and conservation. PMID:25860507

  14. Copper-binding peptides from human prion protein and newly designed peroxidative biocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Kadono, Takashi; Uezu, Kazuya; Kawano, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    A previous work suggested that peptides from the histidine-containing copper-binding motifs in human prion protein (PrP) function as peroxidase-like biocatalysts catalyzing the generation of superoxide anion radicals in the presence of neurotransmitters (aromatic monoamines) and phenolics such as tyrosine and tyrosyl residues on proteins. In this study, using various phenolic substrates, the phenol-dependent superoxide-generating activities of PrP-derived peptide sequences were compared. Among the peptides tested, the GGGTH pentapeptide was shown to be the most active catalyst for phenol-dependent reactions. Based on these results, we designed a series of oligoglycyl-histidines as novel peroxidative biocatalysts, and their catalytic performances including kinetics, heat tolerance, and freezing tolerance were analysed. PMID:21630593

  15. A novel peptide specifically targeting ovarian cancer identified by in vivo phage display.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chuying; Yin, Guangfu; Yan, Danhong; He, Xueling; Zhang, Li; Wei, Yan; Huang, Zhongbing

    2013-12-01

    Discovery of peptide ligands that can target human ovarian cancer and deliver chemotherapeutics offers new opportunity for cancer therapy. The advent of phage-displayed peptide library facilitated the screening of such peptides. In vivo screening that set in a microanatomic and functional context was applied in our study, and a novel peptide WSGPGVWGASVK targeting ovarian cancer was isolated. The phage clone PC3-1 displaying peptide WSGPGVWGASVK can gain effective access to accumulate in the tumor sites after intravenous injection while reducing its accumulation in normal organs. Positive immunostaining of PC3-1 was located in both sites of tumor cells and tumor blood vessels, which resulted in a diffuse binding pattern through the tumor. In vitro study results confirmed the capability of peptide WSGPGVWGASVK binding to and being internalized by both tumor cells and angiogenic endothelial cells. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the peptide bound to SKOV3 cells with Kd value of 5.43 ± 0.4 μM. Taken together, it suggested that peptide WSGPGVWGASVK is a lead candidate for delivering therapeutics to penetrate into tumors. PMID:24105738

  16. Asp residues of βDELSEED-motif are required for peptide binding in the Escherichia coli ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Tayou, Junior; Laughlin, Thomas F

    2015-04-01

    This study demonstrates the requirement of Asp-380 and Asp-386 in the βDELSEED-motif of Escherichia coli ATP synthase for peptide binding and inhibition. We studied the inhibition profiles of wild-type and mutant E. coli ATP synthase in presence of c-terminal amide bound melittin and melittin related peptide. Melittin and melittin related peptide inhibited wild-type ATPase almost completely while only partial inhibition was observed in single mutations with replacement of Asp to Ala, Gln, or Arg. Additionally, very little or no inhibition occurred among double mutants βD380A/βD386A, βD380Q/βD386Q, or βD380R/βD386R signifying that removal of one Asp residue allows limited peptide binding. Partial or substantial loss of oxidative phosphorylation among double mutants demonstrates the functional requirement of βD380 and βD386 Asp residues. Moreover, abrogation of wild-type E. coli cell growth and normal growth of mutant cells in presence of peptides provides strong evidence for the requirement of βDELSEED-motif Asp residues for peptide binding. It is concluded that while presence of one Asp residue may allow partial peptide binding, both Asp residues, βD380 and βD386, are essential for proper peptide binding and inhibition of ATP synthase. PMID:25603139

  17. Use of synthetic peptides to locate novel integrin alpha2beta1-binding motifs in human collagen III.

    PubMed

    Raynal, Nicolas; Hamaia, Samir W; Siljander, Pia R-M; Maddox, Ben; Peachey, Anthony R; Fernandez, Rafael; Foley, Loraine J; Slatter, David A; Jarvis, Gavin E; Farndale, Richard W

    2006-02-17

    A set of 57 synthetic peptides encompassing the entire triplehelical domain of human collagen III was used to locate binding sites for the collagen-binding integrin alpha(2)beta(1). The capacity of the peptides to support Mg(2+)-dependent binding of several integrin preparations was examined. Wild-type integrins (recombinant alpha(2) I-domain, alpha(2)beta(1) purified from platelet membranes, and recombinant soluble alpha(2)beta(1) expressed as an alpha(2)-Fos/beta(1)-Jun heterodimer) bound well to only three peptides, two containing GXX'GER motifs (GROGER and GMOGER, where O is hydroxyproline) and one containing two adjacent GXX'GEN motifs (GLKGEN and GLOGEN). Two mutant alpha(2) I-domains were tested: the inactive T221A mutant, which recognized no peptides, and the constitutively active E318W mutant, which bound a larger subset of peptides. Adhesion of activated human platelets to GER-containing peptides was greater than that of resting platelets, and HT1080 cells bound well to more of the peptides compared with platelets. Binding of cells and recombinant proteins was abolished by anti-alpha(2) monoclonal antibody 6F1 and by chelation of Mg(2+). We describe two novel high affinity integrin-binding motifs in human collagen III (GROGER and GLOGEN) and a third motif (GLKGEN) that displays intermediate activity. Each motif was verified using shorter synthetic peptides. PMID:16326707

  18. Structure-based characterization of the binding of peptide to the human endophilin-1 Src homology 3 domain using position-dependent noncovalent potential analysis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chunjiang; Wu, Gang; Lv, Fenglin; Tian, Feifei

    2012-05-01

    Many protein-protein interactions are mediated by a peptide-recognizing domain, such as WW, PDZ, or SH3. In the present study, we describe a new method called position-dependent noncovalent potential analysis (PDNPA), which can accurately characterize the nonbonding profile between the human endophilin-1 Src homology 3 (hEndo1 SH3) domain and its peptide ligands and quantitatively predict the binding affinity of peptide to hEndo1 SH3. In this procedure, structure models of diverse peptides in complex with the hEndo1 SH3 domain are constructed by molecular dynamics simulation and a virtual mutagenesis protocol. Subsequently, three noncovalent interactions associated with each position of the peptide ligand in the complexed state are analyzed using empirical potential functions, and the resulting potential descriptors are then correlated with the experimentally measured affinity on the basis of 1997 hEndo1 SH3-binding peptides with known activities, using linear partial least squares regression (PLS) and the nonlinear support vector machine (SVM). The results suggest that: (i) the electrostatics appears to be more important than steric properties and hydrophobicity in the formation of the hEndo1 SH3-peptide complex; (ii) P(-4) of the core decapeptide ligand with the sequence pattern P(-6)P(-5)P(-4)P(-3)P(-2)P(-1)P(0)P(1)P(2)P(3) is the most important position in terms of determining both the stability and specificity of the architecture of the complex, and; (iii) nonlinear SVM appears to be more effective than linear PLS for accurately predicting the binding affinity of a peptide ligand to hEndo1 SH3, whereas PLS models are straightforward and easy to interpret as compared to those built by SVM. PMID:21947444

  19. Predicting the Structure-Activity Relationship of Hydroxyapatite-Binding Peptides by Enhanced-Sampling Molecular Simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weilong; Xu, Zhijun; Cui, Qiang; Sahai, Nita

    2016-07-12

    Understanding the molecular structural and energetic basis of the interactions between peptides and inorganic surfaces is critical to their applications in tissue engineering and biomimetic material synthesis. Despite recent experimental progresses in the identification and functionalization of hydroxyapatite (HAP)-binding peptides, the molecular mechanisms of their interactions with HAP surfaces are yet to be explored. In particular, the traditional method of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation suffers from insufficient sampling at the peptide-inorganic interface that renders the molecular-level observation dubious. Here we demonstrate that an integrated approach combining bioinformatics, MD, and metadynamics provides a powerful tool for investigating the structure-activity relationship of HAP-binding peptides. Four low charge density peptides, previously identified by phage display, have been considered. As revealed by bioinformatics and MD, the binding conformation of the peptides is controlled by both the sequence and the amino acid composition. It was found that formation of hydrogen bonds between lysine residue and phosphate ions on the surface dictates the binding of positively charged peptide to HAP. The binding affinities of the peptides to the surface are estimated by free energy calculation using parallel-tempering metadynamics, and the results compare favorably to measurements reported in previous experimental studies. The calculation suggests that the charge density of the peptide primarily controls the binding affinity to the surface, while the backbone secondary structure that may restrain side chain orientation toward the surface plays a minor role. We also report that the application of enhanced-sampling metadynamics effects a major advantage over the steered MD method by significantly improving the reliability of binding free energy calculation. In general, our novel integration of diverse sampling techniques should contribute to the rational

  20. Isolation of an Aptamer that Binds Specifically to E. coli.

    PubMed

    Marton, Soledad; Cleto, Fernanda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio; Cardoso, Josiane

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a bacterial species found ubiquitously in the intestinal flora of animals, although pathogenic variants cause major public health problems. Aptamers are short oligonucleotides that bind to targets with high affinity and specificity, and have great potential for use in diagnostics and therapy. We used cell-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (cell-SELEX) to isolate four single stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamers that bind strongly to E. coli cells (ATCC generic strain 25922), with Kd values in the nanomolar range. Fluorescently labeled aptamers label the surface of E. coli cells, as viewed by fluorescent microscopy. Specificity tests with twelve different bacterial species showed that one of the aptamers-called P12-31-is highly specific for E. coli. Importantly, this aptamer binds to Meningitis/sepsis associated E. coli (MNEC) clinical isolates, and is the first aptamer described with potential for use in the diagnosis of MNEC-borne pathologies. PMID:27104834

  1. Site-specific control of silica mineralization on DNA using a designed peptide.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Makoto; Nagai, Kazuma; Nishiyama, Hiroto; Tsuruoka, Takaaki; Fujii, Satoshi; Endoh, Tamaki; Imai, Takahito; Tomizaki, Kin-Ya; Usui, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    We developed a site-specific method for precipitating inorganic compounds using organic compounds, DNA, and designed peptides with peptide nucleic acids (PNAs). Such a system for site-specific precipitation represents a powerful tool for use in nanobiochemistry and materials chemistry. PMID:26690695

  2. Phosphinic peptides, the first potent inhibitors of astacin, behave as extremely slow-binding inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Yiallouros, I; Vassiliou, S; Yiotakis, A; Zwilling, R; Stöcker, W; Dive, V

    1998-01-01

    A series of phosphinic pseudo-peptides varying in length and composition have been designed as inhibitors of the crayfish zinc endopeptidase astacin, the prototype of the astacin family and of the metzincin superfamily of metalloproteinases. The most efficient phosphinic peptide, fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl-Pro-Lys-PhePsi(PO2CH2)Ala-P ro-Leu-Val, binds to astacin with a Ki value of 42 nM, which is about three orders of magnitude below the corresponding values for previously used hydroxamic acid derivatives. However, the rate constants for association (kon = 96.8 M-1.s-1) and dissociation (koff = 4.1 x 10(-6) s-1) are evidence for the extremely slow binding behaviour of this compound. N-terminally or C-terminally truncated phosphinic analogues of this parent molecule are much less potent, indicating a critical role of the peptide size on the potency. In particular, omission of the N-terminal proline residue leads to a 40-fold increase in Ki which is mostly due to a 75-fold higher koff value. These findings are consistent with the previously solved crystal structure of astacin complexed with one of the phosphinic peptides, benzyloxycarbonyl-Pro-Lys-PhePsi(PO2CH2)Ala-Pro-O-methyl, Ki = 14 microM [Grams, Dive, Yiotakis, Yiallouros, Vassiliou, Zwilling, Bode and Stöcker (1996) Nature Struct. Biol. 3, 671-675]. This structure also reveals that the phosphinic group binds to the active site as a transition-state analogue. The extremely slow binding behaviour of the phosphinic peptides is discussed in the light of the conformational changes involving a unique 'tyrosine switch' in the structure of astacin upon inhibitor binding. The phosphinic peptides may provide a rational basis for the design of drugs directed towards other members of the astacin family which, like bone morphogenetic protein 1 (BMP1; i.e. the procollagen C-proteinase), have become targets of pharmacological research. PMID:9531473

  3. Specific binding of a ligand of sigma-opioid receptors - N-allylnormetazocine (SKF 10047) - with liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Samovilova, N.N.; Yarygin, K.N.; Vinogradov, V.A.

    1986-08-01

    A ligand of the sigma-opioid receptors - N-allylnormetazocine (SKF 10047) -binds specifically and reversible with rat liver membranes. In relation to a number of properties, the sites binding SKF 10047 in the liver are similar to the sigma-opioid receptors of the central nervous system. They do not interact with classical opiates (morphine, naloxone) and with opioid peptides, but bind well benzomorphans (bremazocine, SKF 10047) and a number of compounds of different chemical structures with a pronounced psychtropic action (haloperidol, imipramine, phencyclidine, etc.).

  4. Piezoresistive measurement of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide binding with microcantilever arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, N.; Maldonado, C. J.; Thundat, T.; Passian, A.

    2014-03-01

    Effective detection of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide is crucial as it could be used as a positive control to screen for highly infectious flu strains such as Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1). Piezoresistive microcantilever arrays present a pathway towards highly sensitive and label-free detection of biomolecules by transducing the antigen-antibody binding into change in resistivity via induced surface stress variation. We demonstrate a mechanical transduction of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide binding and suggest the employed technique may offer a potential platform for detection of the H1N1 virus, which could be clinically used to diagnose and provide subsequent relief.

  5. Quantitative online prediction of peptide binding to the major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Hattotuwagama, Channa K; Guan, Pingping; Doytchinova, Irini A; Zygouri, Christianna; Flower, Darren R

    2004-01-01

    With its implications for vaccine discovery, the accurate prediction of T cell epitopes is one of the key aspirations of computational vaccinology. We have developed a robust multivariate statistical method, based on partial least squares, for the quantitative prediction of peptide binding to major histocompatibility complexes (MHC), the principal checkpoint on the antigen presentation pathway. As a service to the immunobiology community, we have made a Perl implementation of the method available via a World Wide Web server. We call this server MHCPred. Access to the server is freely available from the URL: http://www.jenner.ac.uk/MHCPred. We have exemplified our method with a model for peptides binding to the common human MHC molecule HLA-B*3501. PMID:14629978

  6. RNA binding specificity of Ebola virus transcription factor VP30.

    PubMed

    Schlereth, Julia; Grünweller, Arnold; Biedenkopf, Nadine; Becker, Stephan; Hartmann, Roland K

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor VP30 of the non-segmented RNA negative strand Ebola virus balances viral transcription and replication. Here, we comprehensively studied RNA binding by VP30. Using a novel VP30:RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we tested truncated variants of 2 potential natural RNA substrates of VP30 - the genomic Ebola viral 3'-leader region and its complementary antigenomic counterpart (each ∼155 nt in length) - and a series of other non-viral RNAs. Based on oligonucleotide interference, the major VP30 binding region on the genomic 3'-leader substrate was assigned to the internal expanded single-stranded region (∼ nt 125-80). Best binding to VP30 was obtained with ssRNAs of optimally ∼ 40 nt and mixed base composition; underrepresentation of purines or pyrimidines was tolerated, but homopolymeric sequences impaired binding. A stem-loop structure, particularly at the 3'-end or positioned internally, supports stable binding to VP30. In contrast, dsRNA or RNAs exposing large internal loops flanked by entirely helical arms on both sides are not bound. Introduction of a 5´-Cap(0) structure impaired VP30 binding. Also, ssDNAs bind substantially weaker than isosequential ssRNAs and heparin competes with RNA for binding to VP30, indicating that ribose 2'-hydroxyls and electrostatic contacts of the phosphate groups contribute to the formation of VP30:RNA complexes. Our results indicate a rather relaxed RNA binding specificity of filoviral VP30, which largely differs from that of the functionally related transcription factor of the Paramyxoviridae which binds to ssRNAs as short as 13 nt with a preference for oligo(A) sequences. PMID:27315567

  7. sNebula, a network-based algorithm to predict binding between human leukocyte antigens and peptides

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Mendrick, Donna L.; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides is important to understand the functioning of the immune system. Since it is time-consuming and costly to measure the binding between large numbers of HLAs and peptides, computational methods including machine learning models and network approaches have been developed to predict HLA-peptide binding. However, there are several limitations for the existing methods. We developed a network-based algorithm called sNebula to address these limitations. We curated qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data and demonstrated the prediction performance of sNebula on this dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation and five-fold cross-validations. This algorithm can predict not only peptides of different lengths and different types of HLAs, but also the peptides or HLAs that have no existing binding data. We believe sNebula is an effective method to predict HLA-peptide binding and thus improve our understanding of the immune system. PMID:27558848

  8. sNebula, a network-based algorithm to predict binding between human leukocyte antigens and peptides.

    PubMed

    Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Mendrick, Donna L; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides is important to understand the functioning of the immune system. Since it is time-consuming and costly to measure the binding between large numbers of HLAs and peptides, computational methods including machine learning models and network approaches have been developed to predict HLA-peptide binding. However, there are several limitations for the existing methods. We developed a network-based algorithm called sNebula to address these limitations. We curated qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data and demonstrated the prediction performance of sNebula on this dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation and five-fold cross-validations. This algorithm can predict not only peptides of different lengths and different types of HLAs, but also the peptides or HLAs that have no existing binding data. We believe sNebula is an effective method to predict HLA-peptide binding and thus improve our understanding of the immune system. PMID:27558848

  9. Enhanced lubrication on tissue and biomaterial surfaces through peptide-mediated binding of hyaluronic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anirudha; Corvelli, Michael; Unterman, Shimon A.; Wepasnick, Kevin A.; McDonnell, Peter; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2014-10-01

    Lubrication is key for the efficient function of devices and tissues with moving surfaces, such as articulating joints, ocular surfaces and the lungs. Indeed, lubrication dysfunction leads to increased friction and degeneration of these systems. Here, we present a polymer-peptide surface coating platform to non-covalently bind hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural lubricant in the body. Tissue surfaces treated with the HA-binding system exhibited higher lubricity values, and in vivo were able to retain HA in the articular joint and to bind ocular tissue surfaces. Biomaterials-mediated strategies that locally bind and concentrate HA could provide physical and biological benefits when used to treat tissue-lubricating dysfunction and to coat medical devices.

  10. Analysis of substrate specificity and cyclin Y binding of PCTAIRE-1 kinase

    PubMed Central

    Shehata, Saifeldin N.; Hunter, Roger W.; Ohta, Eriko; Peggie, Mark W.; Lou, Hua Jane; Sicheri, Frank; Zeqiraj, Elton; Turk, Benjamin E.; Sakamoto, Kei

    2012-01-01

    PCTAIRE-1 (cyclin-dependent kinase [CDK] 16) is a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase that belongs to the CDK family of protein kinases. Little is known regarding PCTAIRE-1 regulation and function and no robust assay exists to assess PCTAIRE-1 activity mainly due to a lack of information regarding its preferred consensus motif and the lack of bona fide substrates. We used positional scanning peptide library technology and identified the substrate-specificity requirements of PCTAIRE-1 and subsequently elaborated a peptide substrate termed PCTAIRE-tide. Recombinant PCTAIRE-1 displayed vastly improved enzyme kinetics on PCTAIRE-tide compared to a widely used generic CDK substrate peptide. PCTAIRE-tide also greatly improved detection of endogenous PCTAIRE-1 activity. Similar to other CDKs, PCTAIRE-1 requires a proline residue immediately C-terminal to the phosphoacceptor site (+ 1) for optimal activity. PCTAIRE-1 has a unique preference for a basic residue at + 4, but not at + 3 position (a key characteristic for CDKs). We also demonstrate that PCTAIRE-1 binds to a novel cyclin family member, cyclin Y, which increased PCTAIRE-1 activity towards PCTAIRE-tide > 100-fold. We hypothesised that cyclin Y binds and activates PCTAIRE-1 in a way similar to which cyclin A2 binds and activates CDK2. Point mutants of cyclin Y predicted to disrupt PCTAIRE-1-cyclin Y binding severely prevented complex formation and activation of PCTAIRE-1. We have identified PCTAIRE-tide as a powerful tool to study the regulation of PCTAIRE-1. Our understanding of the molecular interaction between PCTAIRE-1 and cyclin Y further facilitates future investigation of the functions of PCTAIRE-1 kinase. PMID:22796189

  11. The paradox of conformational constraint in the design of Cbl(TKB)-binding peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Eric A.; Chen, Qianyi; Kizhake, Smitha; Kolar, Carol; Kang, Myungshim; Chang, Chia-en A.; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2013-01-01

    Solving the crystal structure of Cbl(TKB) in complex with a pentapeptide, pYTPEP, revealed that the PEP region adopted a poly-L-proline type II (PPII) helix. An unnatural amino acid termed a proline-templated glutamic acid (ptE) that constrained both the backbone and sidechain to the bound conformation was synthesized and incorporated into the pYTPXP peptide. We estimated imposing structural constraints onto the backbone and sidechain of the peptide and preorganize it to the bound conformation in solution will yield nearly an order of magnitude improvement in activity. NMR studies confirmed that the ptE-containing peptide adopts the PPII conformation, however, competitive binding studies showed an order of magnitude loss of activity. Given the emphasis that is placed on imposing structural constraints, we provide an example to support the contrary. These results point to conformational flexibility at the interface, which have implications in the design of potent Cbl(TKB)-binding peptides. PMID:23572190

  12. Requirement of aggregation propensity of Alzheimer amyloid peptides for neuronal cell surface binding

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, David A; McLaurin, JoAnne; Chakrabartty, Avijit

    2007-01-01

    Background Aggregation of the amyloid peptides, Aβ40 and Aβ42, is known to be involved in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we investigate the relationship between peptide aggregation and cell surface binding of three forms of Aβ (Aβ40, Aβ42, and an Aβ mutant). Results Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry with fluorescently labelled Aβ, we demonstrate a correlation between the aggregation propensity of the Alzheimer amyloid peptides and their neuronal cell surface association. We find that the highly aggregation prone Aβ42 associates with the surface of neuronal cells within one hour, while the less aggregation prone Aβ40 associates over 24 hours. We show that a double mutation in Aβ42 that reduces its aggregation propensity also reduces its association with the cell surface. Furthermore, we find that a cell line that is resistant to Aβ cytotoxicity, the non-neuronal human lymphoma cell line U937, does not bind either Aβ40 or Aβ42. Conclusion Taken together, our findings reveal that amyloid peptide aggregation propensity is an essential determinant of neuronal cell surface association. We anticipate that our approach, involving Aβ imaging in live cells, will be highly useful for evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic drugs that prevent toxic Aβ association with neuronal cells. PMID:17475015

  13. Ancestral Protein Reconstruction Yields Insights into Adaptive Evolution of Binding Specificity in Solute-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Ben E; Jackson, Colin J

    2016-02-18

    The promiscuous functions of proteins are an important reservoir of functional novelty in protein evolution, but the molecular basis for binding promiscuity remains elusive. We used ancestral protein reconstruction to experimentally characterize evolutionary intermediates in the functional expansion of the polar amino acid-binding protein family, which has evolved to bind a variety of amino acids with high affinity and specificity. High-resolution crystal structures of an ancestral arginine-binding protein in complex with l-arginine and l-glutamine show that the promiscuous binding of l-glutamine is enabled by multi-scale conformational plasticity, water-mediated interactions, and selection of an alternative conformational substate productive for l-glutamine binding. Evolution of specialized glutamine-binding proteins from this ancestral protein was achieved by displacement of water molecules from the protein-ligand interface, reducing the entropic penalty associated with the promiscuous interaction. These results provide a structural and thermodynamic basis for the co-option of a promiscuous interaction in the evolution of binding specificity. PMID:26853627

  14. Covalent Conjugation of a Peptide Triazole to HIV-1 gp120 Enables Intramolecular Binding Site Occupancy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1 gp120 glycoprotein is the main viral surface protein responsible for initiation of the entry process and, as such, can be targeted for the development of entry inhibitors. We previously identified a class of broadly active peptide triazole (PT) dual antagonists that inhibit gp120 interactions at both its target receptor and coreceptor binding sites, induce shedding of gp120 from virus particles prior to host–cell encounter, and consequently can prevent viral entry and infection. However, our understanding of the conformational alterations in gp120 by which PT elicits its dual receptor antagonism and virus inactivation functions is limited. Here, we used a recently developed computational model of the PT–gp120 complex as a blueprint to design a covalently conjugated PT–gp120 recombinant protein. Initially, a single-cysteine gp120 mutant, E275CYU-2, was expressed and characterized. This variant retains excellent binding affinity for peptide triazoles, for sCD4 and other CD4 binding site (CD4bs) ligands, and for a CD4-induced (CD4i) ligand that binds the coreceptor recognition site. In parallel, we synthesized a PEGylated and biotinylated peptide triazole variant that retained gp120 binding activity. An N-terminally maleimido variant of this PEGylated PT, denoted AE21, was conjugated to E275C gp120 to produce the AE21–E275C covalent conjugate. Surface plasmon resonance interaction analysis revealed that the PT–gp120 conjugate exhibited suppressed binding of sCD4 and 17b to gp120, signatures of a PT-bound state of envelope protein. Similar to the noncovalent PT–gp120 complex, the covalent conjugate was able to bind the conformationally dependent mAb 2G12. The results argue that the PT–gp120 conjugate is structurally organized, with an intramolecular interaction between the PT and gp120 domains, and that this structured state embodies a conformationally entrapped gp120 with an altered bridging sheet but intact 2G12 epitope. The similarities of

  15. Inhibition of mu and delta opioid receptor ligand binding by the peptide aldehyde protease inhibitor, leupeptin.

    PubMed

    Christoffers, Keith H; Khokhar, Arshia; Chaturvedi, Kirti; Howells, Richard D

    2002-04-15

    We reported recently that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in agonist-induced down regulation of mu and delta opioid receptors [J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001) 12345]. While evaluating the effects of various protease inhibitors on agonist-induced opioid receptor down regulation, we observed that while the peptide aldehyde, leupeptin (acetyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-Arginal), did not affect agonist-induced down regulation, leupeptin at submillimolar concentrations directly inhibited radioligand binding to opioid receptors. In this study, the inhibitory activity of leupeptin on radioligand binding was characterized utilizing human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cell lines expressing transfected mu, delta, or kappa opioid receptors. The rank order of potency for leupeptin inhibition of [3H]bremazocine binding to opioid receptors was mu > delta > kappa. In contrast to the effect of leupeptin, the peptide aldehyde proteasome inhibitor, MG 132 (carbobenzoxy-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucinal), had significantly less effect on bremazocine binding to mu, delta, or kappa opioid receptors. We propose that leupeptin inhibits ligand binding by reacting reversibly with essential sulfhydryl groups that are necessary for high-affinity ligand/receptor interactions. PMID:11853866

  16. Differential changes in atrial natriuretic peptide and vasopressin receptor bindings in kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, T.; Mitsui, T.; Yamamoto, I.; Katayama, E.; Ota, Z.; Ogawa, N.

    1987-01-19

    To elucidate the role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and vasopressin (VP) in a hypertensive state, ANP and VP receptor bindings in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) kidney were analyzed using the radiolabeled receptor assay (RRA) technique. Systolic blood pressure of SHR aged 12 weeks was statistically higher than that of age-matched Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of (/sup 125/I)-ANP binding to the SHR kidney membrane preparations was statistically lower than that of WKY rats, but dissociation constant (Kd) was not significantly different. On the other hand, Bmax of (/sup 3/H)-VP binding to the SHR kidney membrane preparations was statistically higher than that of WKY rats, but Kd were similar. Since the physiological action of ANP is natriuresis and VP is the most important antidiuretic hormone in mammalia, these opposite changes of ANP and VP receptor bindings in SHR kidney suggested that these peptides may play an important role in the pathophysiology of the hypertensive state, although it has not been confirmed as yet.

  17. Unraveling a Hotspot for TCR Recognition on HLA-A2: Evidence Against the Existence of Peptide-independent TCR Binding Determinants

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, Susan J.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L.; Baxter, Tiffany K.; Clemens, John R.; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Turner, Richard V.; Damirjian, Marale; Biddison, William E.; Baker, Brian M.

    2010-07-19

    T cell receptor (TCR) recognition of peptide takes place in the context of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule, which accounts for approximately two-thirds of the peptide/MHC buried surface. Using the class I MHC HLA-A2 and a large panel of mutants, we have previously shown that surface mutations that disrupt TCR recognition vary with the identity of the peptide. The single exception is Lys66 on the HLA-A2 {alpha}1 helix, which when mutated to alanine disrupts recognition for 93% of over 250 different T cell clones or lines, independent of which peptide is bound. Thus, Lys66 could serve as a peptide-independent TCR binding determinant. Here, we have examined the role of Lys66 in TCR recognition of HLA-A2 in detail. The structure of a peptide/HLA-A2 molecule with the K66A mutation indicates that although the mutation induces no major structural changes, it results in the exposure of a negatively charged glutamate (Glu63) underneath Lys66. Concurrent replacement of Glu63 with glutamine restores TCR binding and function for T cells specific for five different peptides presented by HLA-A2. Thus, the positive charge on Lys66 does not serve to guide all TCRs onto the HLA-A2 molecule in a manner required for productive signaling. Furthermore, electrostatic calculations indicate that Lys66 does not contribute to the stability of two TCR-peptide/HLA-A2 complexes. Our findings are consistent with the notion that each TCR arrives at a unique solution of how to bind a peptide/MHC, most strongly influenced by the chemical and structural features of the bound peptide. This would not rule out an intrinsic affinity of TCRs for MHC molecules achieved through multiple weak interactions, but for HLA-A2 the collective mutational data place limits on the role of any single MHC amino acid side-chain in driving TCR binding in a peptide-independent fashion.

  18. Oxpholipin 11D: An Anti-Inflammatory Peptide That Binds Cholesterol and Oxidized Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Ruchala, Piotr; Navab, Mohamad; Jung, Chun-Ling; Hama-Levy, Susan; Micew