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Sample records for peptide conformer acidity

  1. Designing amino acids to determine the local conformations of peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, A W

    1994-01-01

    The local conformations of proteins and peptides are determined by the amino acid sequence. However, the 20 amino acids encoded by the genome allow the peptide backbone to fold into many conformations, so that even for a small peptide it becomes very difficult to predict the three-dimensional structure. By using empirical conformational energy calculations, a set of amino acids has been designed that would be expected to constrain the conformation of a peptide or a protein to one or two local minima. Most of these amino acids are based on asymmetric substitutions at the C alpha atom of each residue. The H alpha atom of alanine was replaced by various groups: -OCH3, -NCH3, -SCH3, -CONH2, -CONHCH3, -CON(CH3)2, -NH.CO.CH3, -phenyl, or -o-(OCH3)phenyl. Several of these new amino acids are predicted to fold into unique peptide conformations such as right-handed alpha-helical, left-handed alpha-helical, or extended. In an attempt to produce an amino acid that favored the C(eq)7 conformation (torsion angles: phi = -70 degrees and psi = +70 degrees), an extra amide group was added to the C beta atom of the asparagine side chain. Conformationally restricted amino acids of this type could prove useful for developing new peptide pharmaceuticals, catalysts, or polymers. Images PMID:8146170

  2. Predicting Three-Dimensional Conformations of Peptides Constructed of Only Glycine, Alanine, Aspartic Acid, and Valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  3. Conformational characterization of the 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid residue in model peptides.

    PubMed

    Gatos, M; Formaggio, F; Crisma, M; Toniolo, C; Bonora, G M; Benedetti, Z; Di Blasio, B; Iacovino, R; Santini, A; Saviano, M; Kamphuis, J

    1997-01-01

    A series of N- and C-protected, monodispersed homo-oligopeptides (to the dodecamer level) from the small-ring alicyclic C alpha, alpha-dialkylated glycine 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (Ac4c) and two Ala/Ac4c tripeptides were synthesized by solution methods and fully characterized. The conformational preferences of all the model peptides were determined in deuterochloroform solution by FT-IR absorption and 1H-NMR. The molecular structures of the amino acid derivatives Z-Ac4c-OH and Z2-Ac4c-OH, the tripeptides Z-(Ac4c)3-OtBu, Z-Ac4c-(L-Ala)2-OMe and Z-L-Ala-Ac4c-L-Ala-OMe, and the tetrapeptide Z-(Ac4c)4-OtBu were determined in the crystal state by X-ray diffraction. The average geometry of the cyclobutyl moiety of the Ac4c residue was assessed and the tau(N-C alpha-C') bond angle was found to be significantly expanded from the regular tetrahedral value. The conformational data are strongly in favour of the conclusion that the Ac4c residue is an effective beta-turn and helix former. A comparison with the structural propensities of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid, the prototype of C alpha, alpha-dialkylated glycines, and the other extensively investigated members of the family of 1-aminocycloalkane-1-carboxylic acids (Acnc, with n = 3, 5-8) is made and the implications for the use of the Ac4c residue in conformationally constrained peptide analogues are briefly examined. PMID:9230476

  4. Conformations of helical Aib peptides containing a pair of L-amino acid and D-amino acid.

    PubMed

    Demizu, Yosuke; Yabuki, Yu-U; Doi, Mitsunobu; Sato, Yukiko; Tanaka, Masakazu; Kurihara, Masaaki

    2012-07-01

    A pair of L-leucine (L-Leu) and D-leucine (D-Leu) was incorporated into a-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) peptide segments. Thedominant conformations of four hexapeptides, Boc-L-Leu-Aib-Aib-Aib-Aib-L-Leu-OMe (1a), Boc-D-Leu-Aib-Aib-Aib-Aib-L-Leu-OMe(1b), Boc-Aib-Aib-L-Leu-L-Leu-Aib-Aib-OMe (2a), and Boc-Aib-Aib-D-Leu-L-Leu-Aib-Aib-OMe (2b), were investigated by IR,¹H NMR, CD spectra, and X-ray crystallographic analysis. All peptides 1a,b and 2a,b formed 3₁₀-helical structures in solution. X-ray crystallographic analysis revealed that right-handed (P) 3₁₀-helices were present in 1a and 1b and a mixture of right-handed(P) and left-handed (M) 3₁₀-helices was present in 2b in their crystalline states. PMID:22619002

  5. Vibrational analysis of amino acids and short peptides in hydrated media. II. Role of KLLL repeats to induce helical conformations in minimalist LK-peptides.

    PubMed

    Guiffo-Soh, Guy; Hernandez, Belén; Coïc, Yves-Marie; Boukhalfa-Heniche, Fatima-Zohra; Ghomi, Mahmoud

    2007-11-01

    Aqueous solution secondary structures of minimalist LK-peptides, with the generic sequence defined as KLL(KLLL)nKLLK, have been analyzed by means of circular dichroism (CD) and Raman scattering techniques. Our discussion in the present paper is mainly focused on four synthetic peptides (from 5 to 19 amino acids), KLLLK, KLLKLLLKLLK, KLLKLLLKLLLKLLK, and KLLKLLLKLLLKLLLKLLK, corresponding to the repeat unit, and to the peptide chains with the values of n = 1-3, respectively. CD and Raman spectra were analyzed in order to study both structural features of the peptide chains and their capability to form aggregates. On the basis of the obtained results it was concluded that the conformational flexibility of the shortest peptides (5-mer and 11-mer) is high enough to adopt random, beta-type, and helical chains in aqueous solution. However, the 11-mer shows a clear tendency to form beta-strands in phosphate buffer. The conformational equilibrium can be completely shifted to beta-type structures upon increasing ionic strength, i.e., in PBS and tris buffers. This equilibrium can also be shifted toward helical chains in the presence of methanol. Finally, the longest peptides (15-mer and 19-mer) are shown to form alpha-helical chains with an amphipathic character in aqueous solution. The possibility of bundle formation between helical chains is discussed over the temperature-dependent H-D exchange on labile hydrogens and particularly by considering the particular behavior of an intense Raman mode at 1127 cm-1 originating from the leucine residue side chain. The conformational dependence of this mode observed upon selective deuteration has never been documented up to now. PMID:17918991

  6. Conformational characterization of peptides rich in the cycloaliphatic C alpha,alpha-disubstituted glycine 1-aminocyclononane-1-carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Gatos, M; Formaggio, F; Crisma, M; Valle, G; Toniolo, C; Bonora, G M; Saviano, M; Iacovino, R; Menchise, V; Galdiero, S; Pedone, C; Benedetti, E

    1997-01-01

    A series of N- and C-protected, monodispersed homo-oligopeptides (to the pentamer level) from the cycloaliphatic C alpha,alpha-dialkylated glycine 1-aminocyclononane-1-carboxylic acid (Ac9c) and two Ala/Ac9c tripeptides have been synthesized by solution methods and fully characterized. The conformational preferences of all the model peptides were determined in deuterochloroform solution by FT-IR absorption and 1H-NMR. The molecular structures of the amino acid derivatives mCIAc-Ac9c-OH and Z-Ac9c-OtBu, the dipeptide pBrBz-(Ac9c)2-OtBu, the tetrapeptide Z-(Ac9c)4-OtBu, and the pentapeptide Z-(Ac9c)5-OtBu were determined in the crystal state by X-ray diffraction. Based on this information, the average geometry and the preferred conformation for the cyclononyl moiety of the Ac9c residue have been assessed. The backbone conformational data are strongly in favour of the conclusion that the Ac9c residue is a strong beta-turn and helix former. A comparison with the structural propensity of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid, the prototype of C alpha,alpha-dialkylated glycines, and the other extensively investigated members of the family of 1-aminocycloalkane-1-carboxylic acids (Acnc, with n = 3-8) is made and the implications for the use of the Ac9c residue in conformationally constrained analogues of bioactive peptides are briefly examined. PMID:9391912

  7. Insights into How Cyclic Peptides Switch Conformations.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Sean M; Rogers, Julia R; Yu, Hongtao; Lin, Yu-Shan

    2016-05-10

    Cyclic peptides have recently emerged as promising modulators of protein-protein interactions. However, it is currently highly difficult to predict the structures of cyclic peptides owing to their rugged conformational free energy landscape, which prevents sampling of all thermodynamically relevant conformations. In this article, we first investigate how a relatively flexible cyclic hexapeptide switches conformations. It is found that, although the circular geometry of small cyclic peptides of size 6-8 may require rare, coherent dihedral changes to sample a new conformation, the changes are rather local, involving simultaneous changes of ϕi and ψi or ψi and ϕi+1. The understanding of how these cyclic peptides switch conformations enables the use of metadynamics simulations with reaction coordinates specifically targeting such coupled two-dihedral changes to effectively sample cyclic peptide conformational space. PMID:27031286

  8. Protein biosynthesis with conformationally restricted amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Ellman, J.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1993-05-19

    The incorporation of conformationally constrained amino acids into peptides is a powerful approach for generating structurally defined peptides as conformational probes and bioactive agents. The ability to site-specifically introduce constrained amino acids into large polypeptide chains would provide a similar opportunity to probe the flexibility, conformation, folding and stability of proteins. To this end, we have examined the competence of the Escherichia coli protein biosynthetic machinery to incorporate a number of these unnatural amino acids into the 164 residue protein T4 lysozyme (T4L). Results clearly demonstrate that the protein biosynthetic machinery can accommodate a wide variety of conformationally constrained amino acids. The expansion of structural motifs that can be biosynthetically incorporated into proteins to include a large number of conformationally constrained amino acids significantly increases the power of mutagenesis methods as probes of protein structure and function and provides additional insights into the steric requirements of the translational machinery. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Comparative conformational analysis of peptide T analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akverdieva, Gulnare; Godjayev, Niftali; Akyuz, Sevim

    2009-01-01

    A series of peptide T analogs were investigated within the molecular mechanics framework. In order to determine the role of the aminoacid residues in spatial formation of peptide T the conformational peculiarities of the glycine-substituted analogs were investigated. The conformational profiles of some biologically tested analogs of this peptide were determined independently. The received data permit to assess the active form of this peptide. It is characterized by β-turn at the C-terminal physiologically active pentapeptide fragment of peptide molecule. The received results are important for the investigation of the structure-activity relationship and may be used at design of a rigid-molecule drug against HIV.

  10. Assessing the Impact of Backbone Length and Capping Agent on the Conformational Preferences of a Model Peptide: Conformation Specific IR and UV Spectroscopy of 2-AMINOISOBUTYRIC Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gord, Joseph R.; Hewett, Daniel M.; Kubasik, Matthew A.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2015-06-01

    2-Aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) is an achiral, α-amino acid having two equivalent methyl groups attached to C_α. Extended Aib oligomers are known to have a strong preference for the adoption of a 310-helical structure in the condensed phase. Here, we have taken a simplifying step and focused on the intrinsic folding propensities of Aib by looking at a series of capped Aib oligomers in the gas phase, free from the influence of solvent molecules and cooled in a supersonic expansion. Resonant two-photon ionization and IR-UV holeburning have been used to record single-conformation UV spectra using the Z-cap as the UV chromophore. Resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectroscopy provides single-conformation IR spectra in the OH stretch and NH stretch regions. Data have been collected on a set of Z-(Aib)n-X oligomers with n = 1, 2, 4, 6 and X = -OH and -OMethyl. The impacts of these capping groups and differences in backbone length have been found to dramatically influence the conformational space accessed by the molecules studied here. Oligomers of n=4 have sufficient backbone length for a full turn of the 310-helix to be formed. Early interpretation of the data collected shows clear spectroscopic markers signaling the onset of 310-helix formation as well as evidence of structures incorporating C7 and C14 hydrogen bonded rings. Toniolo, C.; Bonora, G. M.; Barone, V.; Bavoso, A.; Benedetti, E.; Di Blasio, B.; Grimaldi, P.; Lelj, F.; Pavone, V.; Pedone, C., Conformation of Pleionomers of α-Aminoisobutyric Acid. Macromolecules 1985, 18, 895-902.

  11. Effect of peptide conformation on membrane permeability.

    PubMed

    Boguslavsky, V; Hruby, V J; O'Brien, D F; Misicka, A; Lipkowski, A W

    2003-06-01

    The effect of peptide conformational constraint on the peptide permeation across the model membranes was examined by determining the permeability of pairs of cyclic and acyclic peptides related to c[d-Pen2, d-Pen5] enkephalin (DPDPE). The peptides were cyclized by formation of an intramolecular disulfide bridge between the second and fifth residues composed of either d-penicillamine or cysteine. In each case the acyclic peptide was three to seven times more permeable than corresponding cyclic peptide. The possibility that the differences in permeability of cyclic and acyclic peptides is based on the greater conformational freedom of the acyclic peptides in the presence of membrane was examined in more detail by isothermal titration calorimetric studies of Trp6-DPDPE and its acyclic analog. The membrane binding of the acyclic peptide is a more exothermic process than binding of its cyclic Trp6-DPDPE. The transfer of acyclic peptide from water to membrane is an enthalpy driven process, whereas the transfer of the cyclic peptide is driven by entropy. PMID:12753376

  12. Conformational Sampling of Peptides in Cellular Environments☆

    PubMed Central

    Tanizaki, Seiichiro; Clifford, Jacob; Connelly, Brian D.; Feig, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Biological systems provide a complex environment that can be understood in terms of its dielectric properties. High concentrations of macromolecules and cosolvents effectively reduce the dielectric constant of cellular environments, thereby affecting the conformational sampling of biomolecules. To examine this effect in more detail, the conformational preference of alanine dipeptide, poly-alanine, and melittin in different dielectric environments is studied with computer simulations based on recently developed generalized Born methodology. Results from these simulations suggest that extended conformations are favored over α-helical conformations at the dipeptide level at and below dielectric constants of 5–10. Furthermore, lower-dielectric environments begin to significantly stabilize helical structures in poly-alanine at ɛ = 20. In the more complex peptide melittin, different dielectric environments shift the equilibrium between two main conformations: a nearly fully extended helix that is most stable in low dielectrics and a compact, V-shaped conformation consisting of two helices that is preferred in higher dielectric environments. An additional conformation is only found to be significantly populated at intermediate dielectric constants. Good agreement with previous studies of different peptides in specific, less-polar solvent environments, suggest that helix stabilization and shifts in conformational preferences in such environments are primarily due to a reduced dielectric environment rather than specific molecular details. The findings presented here make predictions of how peptide sampling may be altered in dense cellular environments with reduced dielectric response. PMID:17905846

  13. Effect of D-amino acids at Asp{sup 23} and Ser{sup 26} residues on the conformational preference of A{beta}{sub 20-29} peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, Ganesh; Polavarapu, Prasad L. . E-mail: Prasad.L.Polavarapu@Vanderbilt.edu; Hallgas, Balazs; Majer, Zsuzsa

    2005-09-30

    The effects of D-amino acids at Asp{sup 23} and Ser{sup 26} residues on the conformational preference of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) peptide fragment (A{beta}{sub 20-29}) have been studied using different spectroscopic techniques, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), vibrational absorption, and electronic circular dichroism. To study the structure of the A{beta}{sub 20-29}, [D-Asp{sup 23}]A{beta}{sub 20-29}, and [D-Ser{sup 26}]A{beta}{sub 20-29} peptides under different conditions, the spectra were measured in 10 mM acetate buffer (pH 3) and in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE). The spectroscopic results indicated that at pH 3, A{beta}{sub 20-29} peptide takes random coil with {beta}-turn structure, while [D-Ser{sup 26}]A{beta}{sub 20-29} peptide adopts significant amount of polyproline II (PPII) type structure along with {beta}-turn contribution and D-Asp-substituted peptide ([D-Asp{sup 23}]A{beta}{sub 20-29}) adopts predominantly PPII type structure. The increased propensity for PPII conformation upon D-amino acid substitution, in acidic medium, has important biological implications. In TFE, A{beta}{sub 20-29}, [D-Asp{sup 23}]A{beta}{sub 20-29}, and [D-Ser{sup 26}]A{beta}{sub 20-29} peptides adopt 3{sub 10}-helix, {alpha}-helix, and random coil with some {beta}-turn structures, respectively. The VCD data obtained for the A{beta} peptide films suggested that the secondary structures for the peptide films are not the same as those for corresponding solution and are also different among the A{beta} peptides studied here. This observation suggests that dehydration can have a significant influence on the structural preferences of these peptides.

  14. Conformational properties of oxazoline-amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staś, Monika; Broda, Małgorzata A.; Siodłak, Dawid

    2016-04-01

    Oxazoline-amino acids (Xaa-Ozn) occur in natural peptides of potentially important bioactivity. The conformations of the model compounds: Ac-(S)-Ala-Ozn(4R-Me), Ac-(S)-Ala-Ozn(4S-Me), and (gauche+, gauche-, anti) Ac-(S)-Val-Ozn(4R-Me) were studied at meta-hybrid M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) method including solvent effect. Boc-L-Ala-L-Ozn-4-COOMe and Boc-L-Val-L-Ozn-4-COOMe were synthesized and studied by FT-IR and NMR-NOE methods. The conformations in crystal state were gathered from the Cambridge Structural Data Base. The main conformational feature of the oxazoline amino acids is the conformation β2 (ϕ,ψ ∼ -161°, -6°), which predominates in weakly polar environment and still is accessible in polar surrounding. The changes of the conformational preferences towards the conformations αR (ϕ,ψ ∼ -70°, -15°) and then β (ϕ,ψ ∼ -57°, -155°) are observed with increase of the environment polarity.

  15. Picosecond conformational transition and equilibration of a cyclic peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredenbeck, Jens; Helbing, Jan; Sieg, Arne; Schrader, Tobias; Zinth, Wolfgang; Renner, Christian; Behrendt, Raymond; Moroder, Luis; Wachtveitl, Josef; Hamm, Peter

    2003-05-01

    Ultrafast IR spectroscopy is used to monitor the nonequilibrium backbone dynamics of a cyclic peptide in the amide I vibrational range with picosecond time resolution. A conformational change is induced by means of a photoswitch integrated into the peptide backbone. Although the main conformational change of the backbone is completed after only 20 ps, the subsequent equilibration in the new region of conformational space continues for times >16 ns. Relaxation and equilibration processes of the peptide backbone occur on a discrete hierarchy of time scales. Albeit possessing only a few conformational degrees of freedom compared with a protein, the peptide behaves highly nontrivially and provides insights into the complexity of fast protein folding.

  16. pH-directed self-assembling helical peptide conformation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The beta-sheet and alpha-helix peptide conformation are two of the most fundamentally ordered secondary structures found in proteins and peptides. They also give rise to self-assembling motifs that form macromolecular channels and nanostructures. Through design these conformations can yield enhance...

  17. Conformational Variety of Polyanionic Peptides At Low Salt Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Marylène; Brack, André

    1997-12-01

    Cordially dedicated to Dr. Leslie Orgel on the occasion of his 70th birthday. Sequential oligo- and polypeptides based on glutamic acid and leucine residues have been synthesized. In pure water, they exhibit a random coil conformation. Addition of very small amounts of divalent metallic cations induces the formation of ordered structure in the peptides which remain in solution. Higher salt concentrations precipitate the peptides. Polypeptides with alternating glutamic acid and leucine residues undergo a coil to β-sheet transition in the presence of Ca^2+, Ba^2+, Mn^2+, Co^2+, Zn^2+ and Hg^2+. Addition of Cu^2+ or Fe^3+ induces the formation of an α-helix. Solid amorphous CdS generates water soluble β-sheets, as well. Sequential poly(Leu-Glu-Glu-Leu) adopts an α-helix in the presence of divalent cations. The sequence-dependent conformational diversity was extended to poly(Asp-Leu) and poly(Leu-Asp-Asp-Leu).

  18. Dynamics and Conformational Energetics of a Peptide Hormone: Vasopressin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagler, A. T.; Osguthorpe, D. J.; Dauber-Osguthorpe, P.; Hempel, J. C.

    1985-03-01

    A theoretical methodology for use in conjunction with experiment was applied to the neurohypophyseal hormone lysine vasopressin for elucidation of its accessible molecular conformations and associated flexibility, conformational transitions, and dynamics. Molecular dynamics and energy minimization techniques make possible a description of the conformational properties of a peptide in terms of the precise positions of atoms, their fluctuations in time, and the interatomic forces acting on them. Analysis of the dynamic trajectory of lysine vasopressin shows the ability of a flexible peptide hormone to undergo spontaneous conformational transitions. The excursions of an individual phenylalanine residue exemplify the dynamic flexibility and multiple conformational states available to small peptide hormones and their component residues, even within constraints imposed by a cyclic hexapeptide ring.

  19. Salt effects on peptide conformers: a dielectric study of tuftsin.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, L; Valdeavella, C V; Blatt, H D; Pettitt, B M

    1996-01-01

    Four 1-ns molecular dynamics computer simulations of tuftsin, Thr-Lys-Pro-Arg, are analyzed: (1) cis tuftsin in water, (2) trans tuftsin in water, (3) cis tuftsin in 1 M NaCl, and (4) trans tuftsin in 1 M NaCl. Independently of the salt concentration, the trans conformer has a higher dielectric constant than the cis conformer because the former exhibits a more widely distributed charge distribution in space. Independently of the peptide conformation, the presence of salt reduces the dielectric constants of both the peptide and the solvating water molecules because ions, on binding, restrict the motion of other atoms. In contrast to the dielectric constants, neither the peptide conformation nor the salt concentration shows a significant influence on the dielectric relaxation time of water molecules. PMID:8968573

  20. Conformational properties of 1,4- and 1,5-substituted 1,2,3-triazole amino acids – building units for peptidic foldamers† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Tables on the RHF/3-21G conformers, NMR spectra and analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c4ob02359e Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Peptidic foldamers have recently emerged as a novel class of artificial oligomers with properties and structural diversity similar to that of natural peptides, but possessing additional interesting features granting them great potential for applications in fields from nanotechnology to pharmaceuticals. Among these, foldamers containing 1,4- and 1,5-substitued triazole amino acids are easily prepared via the Cu- and Ru-catalyzed click reactions and may offer increased side chain variation, but their structural capabilities have not yet been widely explored. We here describe a systematic analysis of the conformational space of the two most important basic units, the 1,4-substitued (4Tzl) and the 1,5-substitued (5Tzl) 1,2,3-triazole amino acids, using quantum chemical calculations and NMR spectroscopy. Possible conformations of the two triazoles were scanned and their potential minima were located using several theoretical approaches (B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p), ωB97X-D/6-311++G(2d,2p), M06-2X/6-311++G(2d,2p) and MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p)) in different solvents. BOC-protected versions of 4Tzl and 5Tzl were also prepared via one step transformations and analyzed by 2D NOESY NMR. Theoretical results show 9 conformers for 5Tzl derivatives with relative energies lying close to each other, which may lead to a great structural diversity. NMR analysis also indicates that conformers preferring turn, helix and zig-zag secondary structures may coexist in solution. In contrast, 4Tzl has a much lower number of conformers, only 4, and these lack strong intraresidual interactions. This is again supported by NMR suggesting the presence of both extended and bent conformers. The structural information provided on these building units could be employed in future design of triazole foldamers. PMID:25605623

  1. A novel D-leucine-containing Conus peptide: diverse conformational dynamics in the contryphan family.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, R B; Jimenez, E C; De la Cruz, R G; Gray, W R; Cruz, L J; Olivera, B M

    1999-08-01

    A Conus peptide family (the contryphans) is noteworthy because of the presence of a post-translationally modified D-amino acid in all members of the family. A new contryphan peptide, Leu-contryphan-P, was isolated from the venom of Conus purpurascens; the sequence of this peptide is: Gly-Cys-Val-D-Leu-Leu-Pro-Trp-Cys-OH. This is the first known occurrence of D-leucine in a Conus peptide. The discovery of Leu-contryphan-P suggests that there may be branches of the contryphan peptide family that diverge much more in sequence than previously anticipated. Several natural contryphans provide dramatic examples of interconversion between multiple conformational states in small constrained peptides. The contryphans that have 4-trans-hydroxyproline and D-tryptophan in positions 3 and 4, respectively, exhibit two peaks under reverse-phase HPLC conditions, indicating interconversion between two discrete conformations. However, [L-Trp4]contryphan-Sm (with L-Trp substituted for D-Trp) exhibits a single, broad peak that elutes later than the natural peptide, suggesting that D-Trp stabilizes a conformation in which hydrophobic residues are buried. Leucontryphan-P which has valine and D-leucine instead of 4-trans-hydroxyproline and D-tryptophan shows only a single peak that elutes much later than the other contryphans. PMID:10461743

  2. Conformational Restriction of Peptides Using Dithiol Bis-Alkylation.

    PubMed

    Peraro, L; Siegert, T R; Kritzer, J A

    2016-01-01

    Macrocyclic peptides are highly promising as inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. While many bond-forming reactions can be used to make cyclic peptides, most have limitations that make this chemical space challenging to access. Recently, a variety of cysteine alkylation reactions have been used in rational design and library approaches for cyclic peptide discovery and development. We and others have found that this chemistry is versatile and robust enough to produce a large variety of conformationally constrained cyclic peptides. In this chapter, we describe applications, methods, mechanistic insights, and troubleshooting for dithiol bis-alkylation reactions for the production of cyclic peptides. This method for efficient solution-phase macrocyclization is highly useful for the rapid production and screening of loop-based inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. PMID:27586339

  3. Conformational Preferences in Small Peptide Models: The Relevance of cis/trans-Conformations.

    PubMed

    Jangra, Harish; Haindl, Michael H; Achrainer, Florian; Hioe, Johnny; Gschwind, Ruth M; Zipse, Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    The accurate description of cis/trans peptide structures is of fundamental relevance for the field of protein modeling and protein structure determination. A comprehensive conformational analysis of dipeptide model Ace-Gly-NMe (1) has been carried out by using a combination of theoretical calculations and experimental ((1) H and (13) C NMR and NOESY) spectroscopic measurements to assess the relevance of cis-peptide conformers. NMR measurements in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution and calculations employing a continuum solvation model both point to the extended trans,trans conformer C5_tt as the global minimum. The cis-peptide structures C5_ct and C5_tc, with the N- or C-terminal amide group in cis-conformation, are observed separately and located 13.0±2 kJ mol(-1) higher in energy. This is in close agreement with the theoretical prediction of around 12 kJ mol(-1) in DMSO. The ability of common protein force fields to reproduce the energies of the cis-amide conformers C5_ct and C5_tc in 1 is limited, making these methods unsuitable for the description of cis-peptide structures in protein simulations. PMID:27535479

  4. The paradox of conformational constraint in the design of Cbl(TKB)-binding peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Eric A.; Chen, Qianyi; Kizhake, Smitha; Kolar, Carol; Kang, Myungshim; Chang, Chia-en A.; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2013-01-01

    Solving the crystal structure of Cbl(TKB) in complex with a pentapeptide, pYTPEP, revealed that the PEP region adopted a poly-L-proline type II (PPII) helix. An unnatural amino acid termed a proline-templated glutamic acid (ptE) that constrained both the backbone and sidechain to the bound conformation was synthesized and incorporated into the pYTPXP peptide. We estimated imposing structural constraints onto the backbone and sidechain of the peptide and preorganize it to the bound conformation in solution will yield nearly an order of magnitude improvement in activity. NMR studies confirmed that the ptE-containing peptide adopts the PPII conformation, however, competitive binding studies showed an order of magnitude loss of activity. Given the emphasis that is placed on imposing structural constraints, we provide an example to support the contrary. These results point to conformational flexibility at the interface, which have implications in the design of potent Cbl(TKB)-binding peptides. PMID:23572190

  5. The distribution of physical, chemical and conformational properties in signal and nascent peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakaran, M

    1990-01-01

    Signal peptides play a major role in an as-yet-undefined way in the translocation of proteins across membranes. The sequential arrangement of the chemical, physical and conformational properties of the signal and nascent amino acid sequences of the translocated proteins has been compiled and analysed in the present study. The sequence data of 126 signal peptides of length between 18 and 21 residues form the basis of this study. The statistical distribution of the following properties was studied hydrophobicity, Mr, bulkiness, chromatographic index and preference for adopting alpha-helical, beta-sheet and turn structures. The contribution of each property to the sequence arrangement was derived. A hydrophobic core sequence was found in all signal peptides investigated. The structural arrangement of the cleavage site was also clearly revealed by this study. Most of the physical properties of the individual sequences correlated (correlation coefficient approximately 0.4) very well with the average distribution. The preferred occupancy of amino acid residues in the signal and nascent sequences was also calculated and correlated with their property distribution. The periodic behaviour of the signal and nascent chains was revealed by calculating their hydrophobic moments for various repetitive conformations. A graphical analysis of average hydrophobic moments versus average hydrophobicity of peptides revealed the transmembrane characteristics of signal peptides and globular characteristics of the nascent peptides. PMID:2390062

  6. Lattice models of peptide aggregation: evaluation of conformational search algorithms.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Mark T; Garibaldi, Jonathan M; Hirst, Jonathan D

    2005-11-30

    We present a series of conformational search calculations on the aggregation of short peptide fragments that form fibrils similar to those seen in many protein mis-folding diseases. The proteins were represented by a face-centered cubic lattice model with the conformational energies calculated using the Miyazawa-Jernigan potential. The searches were performed using algorithms based on the Metropolis Monte Carlo method, including simulated annealing and replica exchange. We also present the results of searches using the tabu search method, an algorithm that has been used for many optimization problems, but has rarely been used in protein conformational searches. The replica exchange algorithm consistently found more stable structures then the other algorithms, and was particularly effective for the octamers and larger systems. PMID:16170797

  7. Investigation of the conformational flexibility of DGAT1 peptides using tryptophan fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Jose L. S.; Araujo, Ana P. U.; Jameson, David M.

    2015-06-01

    The conformational behavior of synthetic peptides corresponding to the putative binding sites of the diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 enzyme (a polytopic integral membrane protein) was investigated using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. Three small linear peptides with 13, 15 and 22 amino acid residues, containing one, two and three Trp residues, respectively, were studied in aqueous solution, in the absence and presence of model membranes. The high flexibility and unordered conformation of the peptides in solution were confirmed by the low Trp polarization values, the high accessibility to water-soluble quencher, and the fast rotational correlation times of the Trp residues. However, upon binding to the lipid systems, the Trp residues were incorporated within the acyl hydrophobic core and their lifetimes and rotational correlation times increased. Phasor plots were employed to analyze intensity decay of peptide-lipid binding and provided a trajectory, in phasor space, that lies along a line connecting the points of the free and bound peptide. This trajectory was analyzed to determine the association constant of the peptide to the model membrane.

  8. Conformational Flexibility Determines Selectivity and Antibacterial, Antiplasmodial, and Anticancer Potency of Cationic α-Helical Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Vermeer, Louic S.; Lan, Yun; Abbate, Vincenzo; Ruh, Emrah; Bui, Tam T.; Wilkinson, Louise J.; Kanno, Tokuwa; Jumagulova, Elmira; Kozlowska, Justyna; Patel, Jayneil; McIntyre, Caitlin A.; Yam, W. C.; Siu, Gilman; Atkinson, R. Andrew; Lam, Jenny K. W.; Bansal, Sukhvinder S.; Drake, Alex F.; Mitchell, Graham H.; Mason, A. James

    2012-01-01

    We used a combination of fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and NMR spectroscopies in conjunction with size exclusion chromatography to help rationalize the relative antibacterial, antiplasmodial, and cytotoxic activities of a series of proline-free and proline-containing model antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in terms of their structural properties. When compared with proline-free analogs, proline-containing peptides had greater activity against Gram-negative bacteria, two mammalian cancer cell lines, and intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum, which they were capable of killing without causing hemolysis. In contrast, incorporation of proline did not have a consistent effect on peptide activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In membrane-mimicking environments, structures with high α-helix content were adopted by both proline-free and proline-containing peptides. In solution, AMPs generally adopted disordered structures unless their sequences comprised more hydrophobic amino acids or until coordinating phosphate ions were added. Proline-containing peptides resisted ordering induced by either method. The roles of the angle subtended by positively charged amino acids and the positioning of the proline residues were also investigated. Careful positioning of proline residues in AMP sequences is required to enable the peptide to resist ordering and maintain optimal antibacterial activity, whereas varying the angle subtended by positively charged amino acids can attenuate hemolytic potential albeit with a modest reduction in potency. Maintaining conformational flexibility improves AMP potency and selectivity toward bacterial, plasmodial, and cancerous cells while enabling the targeting of intracellular pathogens. PMID:22869378

  9. Structures of two distinct conformations of holo-non-ribosomal peptide synthetases.

    PubMed

    Drake, Eric J; Miller, Bradley R; Shi, Ce; Tarrasch, Jeffrey T; Sundlov, Jesse A; Allen, C Leigh; Skiniotis, Georgios; Aldrich, Courtney C; Gulick, Andrew M

    2016-01-14

    Many important natural products are produced by multidomain non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). During synthesis, intermediates are covalently bound to integrated carrier domains and transported to neighbouring catalytic domains in an assembly line fashion. Understanding the structural basis for catalysis with non-ribosomal peptide synthetases will facilitate bioengineering to create novel products. Here we describe the structures of two different holo-non-ribosomal peptide synthetase modules, each revealing a distinct step in the catalytic cycle. One structure depicts the carrier domain cofactor bound to the peptide bond-forming condensation domain, whereas a second structure captures the installation of the amino acid onto the cofactor within the adenylation domain. These structures demonstrate that a conformational change within the adenylation domain guides transfer of intermediates between domains. Furthermore, one structure shows that the condensation and adenylation domains simultaneously adopt their catalytic conformations, increasing the overall efficiency in a revised structural cycle. These structures and the single-particle electron microscopy analysis demonstrate a highly dynamic domain architecture and provide the foundation for understanding the structural mechanisms that could enable engineering of novel non-ribosomal peptide synthetases. PMID:26762461

  10. Nearest Neighbor Interactions Affect the Conformational Distribution in the Unfolded State of Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toal, Siobhan; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Rybka, Karin; Schwalbe, Hardol

    2013-03-01

    In order to enable structural predictions of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) the intrinsic conformational propensities of amino acids must be complimented by information on nearest-neighbor interactions. To explore the influence of nearest-neighbors on conformational distributions, we preformed a joint vibrational (Infrared, Vibrational Circular Dichroism (VCD), polarized Raman) and 2D-NMR study of selected GxyG host-guest peptides: GDyG, GSyG, GxLG, GxVG, where x/y ={A,K,LV}. D and S (L and V) were chosen at the x (y) position due to their observance to drastically change the distribution of alanine in xAy tripeptide sequences in truncated coil libraries. The conformationally sensitive amide' profiles of the respective spectra were analyzed in terms of a statistical ensemble described as a superposition of 2D-Gaussian functions in Ramachandran space representing sub-ensembles of pPII-, β-strand-, helical-, and turn-like conformations. Our analysis and simulation of the amide I' band profiles exploits excitonic coupling between the local amide I' vibrational modes in the tetra-peptides. The resulting distributions reveal that D and S, which themselves have high propensities for turn-structures, strongly affect the conformational distribution of their downstream neighbor. Taken together, our results indicate that Dx and Sx motifs might act as conformational randomizers in proteins, attenuating intrinsic propensities of neighboring residues. Overall, our results show that nearest neighbor interactions contribute significantly to the Gibbs energy landscape of disordered peptides and proteins.

  11. A Monte Carlo study of peptide insertion into lipid bilayers: equilibrium conformations and insertion mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, Michael W; Longo, Marjorie L

    2002-01-01

    The membrane insertion behavior of two peptides, Magainin2 and M2 delta, was investigated by applying the Monte Carlo simulation technique to a theoretical model. The model included many novel aspects, such as a new semi-empirical lipid bilayer model and a new set of semi-empirical transfer energies, which reproduced the experimental insertion behavior of Magainin2 and M2 delta without parameter fitting. Additionally, we have taken into account diminished internal (intramolecular) hydrogen bonding at the N- and C-termini of helical peptides. All simulations were carried out at 305 K, above the membrane thermal phase transition temperature, and at pH 7.0. The peptide equilibrium conformations are discussed for a range of bilayers with tail polarities varying from octanol-like to alkane-like. Probability distributions of the individual amino-acid-residue positions show the dynamic nature of these equilibrium conformations. Two different insertion mechanisms for M2 delta, and a translocation mechanism for Magainin2, are described. A study of the effect of bilayer thickness on M2 delta insertion suggests a critical thickness above which insertion is unfavorable. Additionally, we did not need to use an orientational potential or array of hard cylinders to persuade M2 delta to insert perpendicular to the membrane surface. Instead, we found that diminished internal hydrogen bonding in the helical conformation anchored the termini in the headgroups and resulted in a nearly perpendicular orientation. PMID:11751313

  12. Conformational Contribution to Thermodynamics of Binding in Protein-Peptide Complexes through Microscopic Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Amit; Chakrabarti, J.; Ghosh, Mahua

    2013-01-01

    We extract the thermodynamics of conformational changes in biomacromolecular complexes from the distributions of the dihedral angles of the macromolecules. These distributions are obtained from the equilibrium configurations generated via all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The conformational thermodynamics data we obtained for calmodulin-peptide complexes using our methodology corroborate well with the experimentally observed conformational and binding entropies. The conformational free-energy changes and their contributions for different peptide-binding regions of calmodulin are evaluated microscopically. PMID:23528087

  13. Design of cyclic peptides featuring proline predominantly in the cis conformation under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Malešević, Miroslav; Schumann, Michael; Jahreis, Günther; Fischer, Gunter; Lücke, Christian

    2012-09-24

    Turns are secondary-structure elements that are omnipresent in natively folded polypeptide chains. A large variety of four-residue β-turns exist, which differ mainly in the backbone dihedral angle values of the two central residues i+1 and i+2. The βVI-type turns are of particular biological interest because the i+2 residue is always a proline in the cis conformation and might thus serve as target of peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases). We have designed cyclic hexapeptides containing two proline residues that predominantly adopt the cis conformation in aqueous solution. NMR data and MD calculations indicated that the cyclic peptide sequences c-(-DXaa-Ser-Pro-DXaa-Lys-Pro-) result in highly symmetric backbone structures when both prolines are in the cis conformation and the D-amino acids are either alanine or phenylalanine residues. Replacement of the serine residue either by phosphoserine or by tyrosine compromises this symmetry, but further increases the cis conformation content of both prolines. As a result, we obtained a cyclic hexapeptide that exists almost exclusively as the cis-Pro/cis-Pro conformer but shows no cis/trans interconversion even in the presence of the PPIase Pin1, apparently due to an energetically quite favorable but highly restricted conformational space. PMID:22969011

  14. Conformational ensembles explored dynamically from disordered peptides targeting chemokine receptor CXCR4.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Marian; Costantini, Susan; Scala, Stefania; Tesauro, Diego; Accardo, Antonella; Leone, Marilisa; Colonna, Giovanni; Guillon, Jean; Portella, Luigi; Trotta, Anna Maria; Ronga, Luisa; Rossi, Filomena

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on the design and the synthesis of two short linear peptides both containing a few amino acids with disorder propensity and an allylic ester group at the C-terminal end. Their structural properties were firstly analyzed by means of experimental techniques in solution such as CD and NMR methods that highlighted peptide flexibility. These results were further confirmed by MD simulations that demonstrated the ability of the peptides to assume conformational ensembles. They revealed a network of transient and dynamic H-bonds and interactions with water molecules. Binding assays with a well-known drug-target, i.e., the CXCR4 receptor, were also carried out in an attempt to verify their biological function and the possibility to use the assays to develop new specific targets for CXCR4. Moreover, our data indicate that these peptides represent useful tools for molecular recognition processes in which a flexible conformation is required in order to obtain an interaction with a specific target. PMID:26030674

  15. Conformational Ensembles Explored Dynamically from Disordered Peptides Targeting Chemokine Receptor CXCR4

    PubMed Central

    Vincenzi, Marian; Costantini, Susan; Scala, Stefania; Tesauro, Diego; Accardo, Antonella; Leone, Marilisa; Colonna, Giovanni; Guillon, Jean; Portella, Luigi; Trotta, Anna Maria; Ronga, Luisa; Rossi, Filomena

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on the design and the synthesis of two short linear peptides both containing a few amino acids with disorder propensity and an allylic ester group at the C-terminal end. Their structural properties were firstly analyzed by means of experimental techniques in solution such as CD and NMR methods that highlighted peptide flexibility. These results were further confirmed by MD simulations that demonstrated the ability of the peptides to assume conformational ensembles. They revealed a network of transient and dynamic H-bonds and interactions with water molecules. Binding assays with a well-known drug-target, i.e., the CXCR4 receptor, were also carried out in an attempt to verify their biological function and the possibility to use the assays to develop new specific targets for CXCR4. Moreover, our data indicate that these peptides represent useful tools for molecular recognition processes in which a flexible conformation is required in order to obtain an interaction with a specific target. PMID:26030674

  16. Cyclic Constraints on Conformational Flexibility in γ-PEPTIDES: Conformation-Specific IR and UV Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Patrick S.; Kusaka, Ryoji; Zwier, Timothy S.; Fisher, Brian F.; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2013-06-01

    Spectroscopic studies of flexible peptides in the gas phase can provide insight to their inherent structural preferences in the absence of solvent. Recently, there has been increased attention paid to synthetic foldamers containing non-natural residues that can be specifically engineered to robustly form particular secondary structures. These engineered peptides have potential in therapeutic drug design because they are resistant to enzymatic degradation. Specifically, the Gellman group has synthesized a γ-peptide with a six membered cyclic constraint in the γ^{4}-γ^{3} position and an ethyl group at the γ^{2} position (γ_{ACHC}). The three stereocenters have a well-defined chirality [S,S,S]. These two features constrain the relative orientation of adjacent amide groups, thereby favoring a particular "pitch" to the turn. Solution phase results indicate that constrained γ-peptides induce the formation of a 14-helix. Ac-γ_{ACHC}-NHBz, its monohydrate and Ac-γ_{ACHC}-γ_{ACHC}-NHBz have been studied using ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) double-resonance methods to obtain conformation-specific spectra under jet-cooled conditions in the gas phase. IR spectra in the hydride stretch (3300-3750 cm^{-1}), amide I/II and OH bend (1400-1800 cm^{-1}) were recorded and compared to predictions using density functional methods (DFT) and harmonic frequency calculations. We will compare the present results on constrained γ-peptides with corresponding results on unconstrained analogs. Data obtained for the monohydrated water cluster of Ac-γ_{ACHC}-NHBz will also be presented, including assignment of the water bend fundamental, which appears in the midst of transitions due to the amide II vibrations. L. Guo, W. Zhang, A. G. Reidenbach, M. W. Giuliano, I. A. Guzei, L. C. Spencer and S. H. Gellman Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2011, 50, 5843-5846

  17. Conformational Interconversions of Amino Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kaminský, Jakub; Jensen, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Exhaustive conformational interconversions including transition structure analyses of N-acetyl-l-glycine-N-methylamide as well as its alanine, serine, and cysteine analogues have been investigated at the MP2/6-31G** level, yielding a total of 142 transition states. Improved estimates of relative energies were obtained by separately extrapolating the Hartree-Fock and MP2 energies to the basis set limit and adding the difference between CCSD(T) and MP2 results with the cc-pVDZ basis set to the extrapolated MP2 results. The performance of eight empirical force fields (AMBER94, AMBER14SB, MM2, MM3, MMFFs, CHARMM22_CMAP, OPLS_2005, and AMOEBAPRO13) in reproducing ab initio energies of transition states was tested. Our results indicate that commonly used class I force fields employing a fixed partial charge model for the electrostatic interaction provide mean errors in the ∼10 kJ/mol range for energies of conformational transition states for amino acid conformers. Modern reparametrized versions, such as CHARMM22_CMAP, and polarizable force fields, such as AMOEBAPRO13, have slightly lower mean errors, but maximal errors are still in the 35 kJ/mol range. There are differences between the force fields in their ability for reproducing conformational transitions classified according to backbone/side-chain or regions in the Ramachandran angles, but the data set is likely too small to draw any general conclusions. Errors in conformational interconversion barriers by ∼10 kJ/mol suggest that the commonly used force field may bias certain types of transitions by several orders of magnitude in rate and thus lead to incorrect dynamics in simulations. It is therefore suggested that information for conformational transition states should be included in parametrizations of new force fields. PMID:26691979

  18. Synthesis of a new β-amino acid with a 3-deoxy-L-ara furnaoside side chain: the influence of the side chain on the conformation of α/β-peptides.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gangavaram V M; Anjaiah, Gonuguntla; Kanakaraju, Marumudi; Sudhakar, Bommeda; Chatterjee, Deepak; Kunwar, Ajit C

    2016-01-14

    The important role of side chains in the stabilization of helical folds in peptidic foldamers containing C-linked carbo-β-amino acids (β-Caa), an interesting class of β-amino acids, with carbohydrate side chains has been extensively elaborated. As a pragmatic approach to alleviate the interference of substituents in the side chains on the folding propensities of the peptides, they are often modified or removed. The present study reports the synthesis of a new β-Caa with a 3-deoxy-L-ara furanoside side chain, [(R)-β-Caa(da)], from D-glucose, and its use in the synthesis of α/β-peptides in 1 : 1 alternation with D-Ala. The synthesis of peptides using (R)-β-Caa(da), was facile unlike those from (R)-β-Caa(a) having the L-ara furanoside side chain. The detailed NMR, molecular dynamics (MD) and CD studies on the new α/β-peptides showed the presence of robust left-handed 11/9-mixed helices. The study demonstrates that the new (R)-β-Caa(da), behaves differently compared to the other two related monomers, (R)-β-Caa(x) with the D-xylo furanoside side chain and (R)-β-Caa(a). PMID:26489370

  19. NMR study of thymulin, a lymphocyte differentiating thymic nonapeptide. Conformational states of free peptide in solution.

    PubMed

    Laussac, J P; Cung, M T; Pasdeloup, M; Haran, R; Marraud, M; Lefrancier, P; Dardenne, M; Bach, J F

    1986-06-15

    The nonapeptide less than Glu-Ala-Lys-Ser-Gln-Gly-Gly-Ser-Asn (formerly called serum thymic factor) is a factor produced by the thymic epithelium, which needs a zinc ion to express its immunoregulatory properties. We report here on 1H and 13C NMR investigation of the conformational properties of the free peptide in aqueous medium and in dimethyl sulfoxide-d6 solution by a combination of homo- and heteronuclear one- and two-dimensional experiments. The various resonances have been assigned in a straightforward manner on the basis of 1H,1H COSY spectroscopy for the recognition of the proton spin systems; two-dimensional NOESY spectra with the correlation peaks across amide bonds and for the amino acid sequence assignment; amide bonds and for the amino acid sequence assignment; 13C,1H COSY experiments using selective polarization transfer from 1H- to 13C-nucleus via the 13C,1H long-range couplings for the attribution of the carboxyl and carbonyl groups; and 13C,1H COSY experiments with selective polarization transfer via the 13C,1H direct couplings for the assignment of all the aliphatic carbons. Other experiments such as pH-dependent chemical shifts, combined use of multiple and selective proton-decoupled 1H and 13C NMR spectra, the temperature and the concentration dependence of the proton shifts of the amide resonances, the solvent dependences of peptide carbonyl carbon resonances, and comparison of the spectra with three different analogues were performed. In aqueous solution, the data are compatible with the assumption of a highly mobile dynamic equilibrium among different conformations, whereas in dimethyl sulfoxide-d6, a more rigid structure is found involving three internal hydrogen bonds. These observations provide an insight into the conformational tendencies of this peptidic hormone in two different media. PMID:3711109

  20. Solvent and conformation dependence of amide I vibrations in peptides and proteins containing proline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Santanu; Lessing, Joshua; Meisl, Georg; Ganim, Ziad; Tokmakoff, Andrei; Knoester, Jasper; Jansen, Thomas L. C.

    2011-12-01

    We present a mixed quantum-classical model for studying the amide I vibrational dynamics (predominantly CO stretching) in peptides and proteins containing proline. There are existing models developed for determining frequencies of and couplings between the secondary amide units. However, these are not applicable to proline because this amino acid has a tertiary amide unit. Therefore, a new parametrization is required for infrared-spectroscopic studies of proteins that contain proline, such as collagen, the most abundant protein in humans and animals. Here, we construct the electrostatic and dihedral maps accounting for solvent and conformation effects on frequency and coupling for the proline unit. We examine the quality and the applicability of these maps by carrying out spectral simulations of a number of peptides with proline in D2O and compare with experimental observations.

  1. Solvent-induced conformational changes in cyclic peptides: a vibrational circular dichroism study.

    PubMed

    Merten, Christian; Li, Fee; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Xu, Yunjie; Sander, Wolfram

    2014-03-28

    The three-dimensional structure of a peptide is strongly influenced by its solvent environment. In the present study, we study three cyclic tetrapeptides which serve as model peptides for β-turns. They are of the general structure cyclo(Boc-Cys-Pro-X-Cys-OMe) with the amino acid X being either glycine (1), or L- or D-leucine (L- or D-2). Using vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy, we confirm previous NMR results which showed that D-2 adopts predominantly a βII turn structure in apolar and polar solvents. Our results for L-2 indicate a preference for a βI structure over βII. With increasing solvent polarity, the preference for 1 is shifted from βII towards βI. This conformational change goes along with the breaking of an intramolecular hydrogen bond which stabilizes the βII conformation. Instead, a hydrogen bond with a solvent molecule can stabilize the βI turn conformation. PMID:24513908

  2. Effect of Inactivating Mutations on Peptide Conformational Ensembles: The Plant Polypeptide Hormone Systemin.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Saikat Dutta; Sarkar, Aditya K; Lahiri, Ansuman

    2016-07-25

    As part of their basal immune mechanism against insect/herbivore attacks, plants have evolved systemic response mechanisms. Such a systemic wound response in tomato was found to involve an 18 amino acid polypeptide called systemin, the first polypeptide hormone to be discovered in plants. Systematic alanine scanning and deletion studies showed differential modulation in its activity, particularly a major loss of function due to alanine substitution at positions 13 and 17 and less extentive loss of function due to substitution at position 12. We have studied the conformational ensembles of wild-type systemin along with its 17 variants by carrying out a total of 5.76 μs of replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulation in an implicit solvent environment. In our simulations, wild-type systemin showed a lack of α-helical and β-sheet structures, in conformity with earlier circular dichroism and NMR data. On the other hand, two regions containing diproline segments showed a tendency to adopt polyproline II structures. Examination of conformational ensembles of the 17 variants revealed a change in the population distributions, suggesting a less flexible structure for alanine substitutions at positions 12 and 13 but not for position 17. Combined with the experimental observations that positions 1-14 of systemin are important for the formation of the peptide-receptor complex, this leads to the hypothesis that loss of conformational flexibility may play a role in the loss of activity of systemin due to the P12A and P13A substitutions, while T17A deactivation probably occurs for a different reason, most likely the loss of the threonine phosphorylation site. We also indicate possible structural reasons why the substitution of the prolines at positions 12 and 13 leads to a loss of conformational freedom in the peptide. PMID:27341535

  3. Determination of statherin N-terminal peptide conformation on hydroxyapatite crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, W.J.; Long, J.R.; Dindot, J.L.; Campbell, A.A.; Stayton, P.S.; Drobny, G.P.

    2000-03-01

    Proteins play an important role in inorganic crystal engineering during the development and growth of hard tissues such as bone and teeth. Although many of these proteins have been studied in the liquid state, there is little direct information describing molecular recognition at the protein-crystal interface. The authors have used {sup 13}C solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques to investigate the conformation of an N-terminal peptide of salivary statherin both free and adsorbed on hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals. The torsion angle {var{underscore}phi} was determined at three positions along the backbone of the phosphorylated N-terminal 15 amino acid peptide fragment (DpSpSEEKFLRRIGRFG) by measuring distances between the backbone carbonyls carbons in the indicated adjacent amino acids using dipolar recoupling with a windowless sequence (DRAWS). Global secondary structure was determined by measuring the dipolar coupling between the {sup 13}C backbone carbonyl and the backbone {sup 15}N in the i {r{underscore}arrow} i + 4 residues (DpSpSEEKFLRRIGRFG) using rotational echo double resonance (REDOR). Peptides singly labeled at amino acids pS{sub 3}, L{sub 8}, and G{sub 12} were used for relaxation and line width measurements. The peptides adsorbed to the HAP surface have an average {var{underscore}phi} of {minus}85{degree} at the N-terminus (pSpS), {minus}60{degree} in the middle (FL) and {minus}73{degree} near the C-terminus (IG). The average {var{underscore}phi} angle measured at the pSpS position and the observed high conformational dispersion suggest a random coil conformation at this position. However, the FL position displays an average {var{underscore}phi} that indicates significant {alpha}-helical content, and the long time points in the DRAWS experiment fit best to a relatively narrow distribution of {var{underscore}phi} that falls within the protein data bank {alpha}-helical conformational space. REDOR measurements confirm the presence of helical content, where the

  4. Multiple gas-phase conformations of proline-containing peptides: is it always cis/trans isomerization?

    PubMed

    Lietz, Christopher B; Chen, Zhengwei; Yun Son, Chang; Pang, Xueqin; Cui, Qiang; Li, Lingjun

    2016-08-01

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is often employed to look at the secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures of naked peptides and proteins in the gas-phase. Recently, it has offered a unique glimpse into proline-containing peptides and their cis/trans Xxx-Pro isomers. An experimental "signature" has been identified wherein a proline-containing peptide has its Pro residues substituted with another amino acid and the presence or absence of conformations in the IM-MS spectra is observed. Despite the high probability that one could attribute these conformations to cis/trans isomers, it is also possible that cis/trans isomers are not the cause of the additional conformations in proline-containing peptides. However, the experimental evidence of such a system has not been demonstrated or reported. Herein, we present the IM-MS analysis of Neuropeptide Y's wild-type (WT) signal sequence and Leu7Pro (L7P) mutant. Although comparison of arrival times and collision cross-sections of [M + 4H](4+) ions yields the cis/trans "signature", molecular dynamics indicates that a cis-Pro7 is not very stable and that trans-Pro7 conformations of the same cross-section arise with equal frequency. We believe that this work further underscores the importance of theoretical calculations in IM-MS structural assignments. PMID:27434776

  5. An Approach to Conformational Analysis of Peptides and Proteins in Solution Based on a Combination of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Conformational Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, W. A.; Némethy, George; Stern, Arnold; Craig, Lyman C.

    1970-01-01

    Simple criteria, based on the combined use of nmr spectral parameters and potential energy maps, are proposed for the conformational analysis of polypeptides and proteins. Experimentally determined coupling constants 3JNC for the N-Cα bond are consistent with the Karplus-Bystrov relationship. It is proposed therefore that 3JNC can be used to distinguish (a) between right-and left-handed α-helices, (b) between α-helical, β-pleated sheet, and randomly coiled forms of peptides. The average 3JNC for the random coil is predicted. The criteria proposed are valid for both L- and D-amino acids. Correlation between the Karplus-Bystrov relationship for 3JNC and the peptide conformational potential energy map limits the possible values of the N-Cα dihedral angle ϕ of each amino acid residue in a polypeptide and protein, and therefore presents a method of conformational analysis in solution superior to the use of either nmr or conformational maps alone. Nmr studies of hydrogen bonding or neighboring-group diamagnetic anisotropy reduce the number of possibilities consistent with the above criteria. A suggestion for evaluating the dihedral angle is presented. These criteria are useful provided the coupling constant is not obscured by line broadening. PMID:5272315

  6. The Inherent Conformational Preferences of Glutamine-Containing Peptides: the Role for Side-Chain Backbone Hydrogen Bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Patrick S.; McBurney, Carl; Gellman, Samuel H.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2015-06-01

    Glutamine is widely known to be found in critical regions of peptides which readily fold into amyloid fibrils, the structures commonly associated with Alzheimer's disease and glutamine repeat diseases such as Huntington's disease. Building on previous single-conformation data on Gln-containing peptides containing an aromatic cap on the N-terminus (Z-Gln-OH and Z-Gln-NHMe), we present here single-conformation UV and IR spectra of Ac-Gln-NHBn and Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn, with its C-terminal benzyl cap. These results point towards side-chain to backbone hydrogen bonds dominating the structures observed in the cold, isolated environment of a molecular beam. We have identified and assigned three main conformers for Ac-Gln-NHBn all involving primary side-chain to backbone interactions. Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn extends the peptide chain by one amino acid, but affords an improvement in the conformational flexibility. Despite this increase in the flexibility, only a single conformation is observed in the gas-phase: a structure which makes use of both side-chain-to-backbone and backbone-to-backbone hydrogen bonds.

  7. Structures of Two Distinct Conformations of holo-Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Eric J.; Miller, Bradley R.; Shi, Ce; Tarrasch, Jeffrey T.; Sundlov, Jesse A.; Allen, C. Leigh; Skiniotis, Georgios; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Gulick, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Many important natural products are produced by multidomain nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs)1–4. During synthesis, intermediates are covalently bound to integrated carrier domains and transported to neighboring catalytic domains in an assembly line fashion5. Understanding the structural basis for catalysis with NRPSs will facilitate bioengineering to create novel products. Here we describe the structures of two different holo-NRPSs modules, each revealing a distinct step in the catalytic cycle. One structure depicts the carrier domain cofactor bound to the peptide bond-forming condensation domain, whereas a second structure captures the installation of the amino acid onto the cofactor within the adenylation domain. These structures demonstrate that a conformational change within the adenylation domain guides transfer of intermediates between domains. Furthermore, one structure shows that the condensation and adenylation domains simultaneously adopt their catalytic conformations, increasing the overall efficiency in a revised structural cycle. These structures and single-particle electron microscopy analysis demonstrate a highly dynamic domain architecture and provide the foundation for understanding the structural mechanisms that could enable engineering novel NRPSs. PMID:26762461

  8. Effect of graphene oxide on the conformational transitions of amyloid beta peptide: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Baweja, Lokesh; Balamurugan, Kanagasabai; Subramanian, Venkatesan; Dhawan, Alok

    2015-09-01

    The interactions between nanomaterials (NMs) and amyloid proteins are central to the nanotechnology-based diagnostics and therapy in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Graphene oxide (GO) and its derivatives have shown to modulate the aggregation pattern of disease causing amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide. However, the mechanism is still not well understood. Using molecular dynamics simulations, the effect of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) having carbon:oxygen ratio of 4:1 and 10:1, respectively, on the conformational transitions (alpha-helix to beta-sheet) and the dynamics of the peptide was investigated. GO and rGO decreased the beta-strand propensity of amino acid residues in Aβ. The peptide displayed different modes of adsorption on GO and rGO. The adsorption on GO was dominated by electrostatic interactions, whereas on rGO, both van der Waals and electrostatic interactions contributed in the adsorption of the peptide. Our study revealed that the slight increase in the hydrophobic patches on rGO made it more effective inhibitor of conformational transitions in the peptide. Alpha helix-beta sheet transition in Aβ peptide could be one of the plausible mechanism by which graphene oxide may inhibit amyloid fibrillation. PMID:26275931

  9. Importance of asparagine on the conformational stability and chemical reactivity of selected anti-inflammatory peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano-Correa, Catalina; Barrientos-Salcedo, Carolina; Campos-Fernández, Linda; Alvarado-Salazar, Andres; Esquivel, Rodolfo O.

    2015-08-01

    Inflammatory response events are initiated by a complex series of molecular reactions that generate chemical intermediaries. The structure and properties of peptides and proteins are determined by the charge distribution of their side chains, which play an essential role in its electronic structure and physicochemical properties, hence on its biological functionality. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of changing one central amino acid, such as substituting asparagine for aspartic acid, from Cys-Asn-Ser in aqueous solution, by assessing the conformational stability, physicochemical properties, chemical reactivity and their relationship with anti-inflammatory activity; employing quantum-chemical descriptors at the M06-2X/6-311+G(d,p) level. Our results suggest that asparagine plays a more critical role than aspartic acid in the structural stability, physicochemical features, and chemical reactivity of these tripeptides. Substituent groups in the side chain cause significant changes on the conformational stability and chemical reactivity, and consequently on their anti-inflammatory activity.

  10. Structurally diverse cyclisation linkers impose different backbone conformations in bicyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiyu; Morales-Sanfrutos, Julia; Angelini, Alessandro; Cutting, Brian; Heinis, Christian

    2012-05-01

    Combinatorial libraries of structurally diverse peptide macrocycles offer a rich source for the development of high-affinity ligands to targets of interest. In this work we have developed linkers for the generation of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides and tested whether the peptides cyclised by them have significant variations in their backbone conformations. Two new cyclisation reagents, each containing three thiol-reactive groups, efficiently and selectively cyclised linear peptides containing three cysteine moieties. When the mesitylene linker of the bicyclic peptide PK15, a potent inhibitor of plasma kallikrein (K(i)=2 nM), was replaced by the new linkers, its inhibitory activity dropped by a factor of more than 1000, suggesting that the linkers impose different conformations on the peptide. Indeed, structural analysis by solution-state NMR revealed different NOE constraints in the three bicyclic peptides, indicating that these relatively small linkers at the centres of bicyclic peptide structures significantly influence the conformations of the peptides. These results demonstrate the prominent structural role of linkers in peptide macrocycles and suggest that application of different cyclisation linkers in a combinatorial fashion could be an attractive means to generate topologically diverse macrocycle libraries. PMID:22492661

  11. Conformation study of HA(306-318) antigenic peptide of the haemagglutinin influenza virus protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, A.; Brito, R. M.; Alix, A. J. P.; Lancelin, J. M.; Carvalho, R. A.; Geraldes, C. F. G. C.; Lakhdar-Ghazal, F.

    2006-11-01

    Several HLA-DR alleles present the immunodominant HA(306-318) peptide of haemagglutinin of the influenza virus to T cells. NMR data of the peptide in various water solutions exclude any α-helix or turn conformations. Circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies indicate an estimated β-extended structure in water of 31% and 28%, respectively, with spectra shape similar to the ones observed for β-sheet containing proteins. The H/D amide exchange suggests a stable length-dependent interchain hydrogen-bonding. The partially β-extended conformation of HA(306-318) in solution might be close to the one found in HA(306-318)-HLA-DR1 complex. These results suggest different interconverting extended conformations of HA(306-318), depending on the microenvironment of the solution medium. This flexibility emphasizes the ability of some peptides to fit more easily the binding site of several HLA-DR molecules. Similar results were obtained on the HIV P25(263-277) peptide which has been previously shown to be a good DR1 binder. From a vibrational point of view, infrared Amide I frequencies of secondary structures in peptides were ascertained. As previously demonstrated for proteins in solution, Fourier transform infrared and circular dichroism spectroscopies appear to be valuable tools for conformational properties of peptides. Their use may contribute to the detection of peptide conformation-binding relationship which has to be further tested by biochemical and biological studies.

  12. Dynamics and Conformational Studies of TOAC Spin Labeled Analogues of Ctx(Ile21)-Ha Peptide from Hypsiboas albopunctatus

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Eduardo F.; Basso, Luis Guilherme M.; Cespedes, Graziely F.; Lorenzón, Esteban N.; Castro, Mariana S.; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José S.; Costa-Filho, Antonio José; Cilli, Eduardo M.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) isolated from several organisms have been receiving much attention due to some specific features that allow them to interact with, bind to, and disrupt cell membranes. The aim of this paper was to study the interactions between a membrane mimetic and the cationic AMP Ctx(Ile21)-Ha as well as analogues containing the paramagnetic amino acid 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl-4-amino-4-carboxylic acid (TOAC) incorporated at residue positions n = 0, 2, and 13. Circular dichroism studies showed that the peptides, except for [TOAC13]Ctx(Ile21)-Ha, are unstructured in aqueous solution but acquire different amounts of α-helical secondary structure in the presence of trifluorethanol and lysophosphocholine micelles. Fluorescence experiments indicated that all peptides were able to interact with LPC micelles. In addition, Ctx(Ile21)-Ha and [TOAC13]Ctx(Ile21)-Ha peptides presented similar water accessibility for the Trp residue located near the N-terminal sequence. Electron spin resonance experiments showed two spectral components for [TOAC0]Ctx(Ile21)-Ha, which are most likely due to two membrane-bound peptide conformations. In contrast, TOAC2 and TOAC13 derivatives presented a single spectral component corresponding to a strong immobilization of the probe. Thus, our findings allowed the description of the peptide topology in the membrane mimetic, where the N-terminal region is in dynamic equilibrium between an ordered, membrane-bound conformation and a disordered, mobile conformation; position 2 is most likely situated in the lipid polar head group region, and residue 13 is fully inserted into the hydrophobic core of the membrane. PMID:23585852

  13. Structure and conformation of peptides at air/aqueous interface and their impact on interfacial water structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra Jena, Kailash; Tomar, Deepak

    Process of protein folding is very essential for the proper functioning of the protein molecules at membrane surface and other organelles. Understanding the process of protein folding at various biological relevant aqueous interfaces are very important to understand various complicated chemical and physical processes relevant to chemistry, physics, and medicine. The building blocks of proteins molecules are amino acids and the chemistry of each amino acid is very different; as a consequence their sequence plays an important role for various conformations upon adsorption for the protein molecules. In the present study, we have investigated the interfacial structure and conformation of two amino acids (L-Proline and L-Tyrosine) and peptide molecules formed from these two amino acids (L-Tyr-Pro). We have used sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy to probe the air/aqueous interface. We have studied the impact of adsorption of the amino acids and the peptide molecules on the interfacial water structure by slowly varying concentration and ionic strength of the solutions. Our preliminary result shows a huge impact of the adsorption process of peptide molecules on the hydrogen bonding environment of interfacial structure of water. Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Nangal Road, Rupnagar, Punjab-140001.

  14. Tetrazole acetic acid: Tautomers, conformers, and isomerization

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo-Andrade, C.; Reva, I. Fausto, R.

    2014-02-14

    Monomers of (tetrazol-5-yl)-acetic acid (TAA) were obtained by sublimation of the crystalline compound and the resulting vapors were isolated in cryogenic nitrogen matrices at 13 K. The conformational and tautomeric composition of TAA in the matrix was characterized by infrared spectroscopy and vibrational calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. TAA may adopt two tautomeric modifications, 1H- and 2H-, depending on the position of the annular hydrogen atom. Two-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) of TAA were theoretically calculated at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level, for each tautomer. Four and six symmetry-unique minima were located on these PESs, for 1H- and 2H-TAA, respectively. The energetics of the detected minima was subsequently refined by calculations at the QCISD level. Two 1H- and three 2H-conformers fall within the 0–8 kJ mol{sup −1} energy range and should be appreciably populated at the sublimation temperature (∼330 K). Observation of only one conformer for each tautomer (1ccc and 2pcc) is explained in terms of calculated barriers to conformational rearrangements. All conformers with the cis O=COH moiety are separated by low barriers (less than 10 kJ mol{sup −1}) and collapse to the most stable 1ccc (1H-) and 2pcc (2H-) forms during deposition of the matrix. On the trans O=COH surfaces, the relative energies are very high (between 12 and 27 kJ mol{sup −1}). The trans forms are not thermally populated at the sublimation conditions and were not detected in matrices. One high-energy form in each tautomer, 1cct (1H-) and 2pct (2H-), was found to differ from the most stable form only by rotation of the OH group and separated from other forms by high barriers. This opened a perspective for their stabilization in a matrix. 1cct and 2pct were generated in the matrices selectively by means of narrow-band near-infrared (NIR) irradiations of the samples at 6920 and 6937 cm{sup −1}, where the first OH stretching overtone

  15. Tetrazole acetic acid: tautomers, conformers, and isomerization.

    PubMed

    Araujo-Andrade, C; Reva, I; Fausto, R

    2014-02-14

    Monomers of (tetrazol-5-yl)-acetic acid (TAA) were obtained by sublimation of the crystalline compound and the resulting vapors were isolated in cryogenic nitrogen matrices at 13 K. The conformational and tautomeric composition of TAA in the matrix was characterized by infrared spectroscopy and vibrational calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. TAA may adopt two tautomeric modifications, 1H- and 2H-, depending on the position of the annular hydrogen atom. Two-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) of TAA were theoretically calculated at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level, for each tautomer. Four and six symmetry-unique minima were located on these PESs, for 1H- and 2H-TAA, respectively. The energetics of the detected minima was subsequently refined by calculations at the QCISD level. Two 1H- and three 2H-conformers fall within the 0-8 kJ mol(-1) energy range and should be appreciably populated at the sublimation temperature (∼330 K). Observation of only one conformer for each tautomer (1ccc and 2pcc) is explained in terms of calculated barriers to conformational rearrangements. All conformers with the cis O=COH moiety are separated by low barriers (less than 10 kJ mol(-1)) and collapse to the most stable 1ccc (1H-) and 2pcc (2H-) forms during deposition of the matrix. On the trans O=COH surfaces, the relative energies are very high (between 12 and 27 kJ mol(-1)). The trans forms are not thermally populated at the sublimation conditions and were not detected in matrices. One high-energy form in each tautomer, 1cct (1H-) and 2pct (2H-), was found to differ from the most stable form only by rotation of the OH group and separated from other forms by high barriers. This opened a perspective for their stabilization in a matrix. 1cct and 2pct were generated in the matrices selectively by means of narrow-band near-infrared (NIR) irradiations of the samples at 6920 and 6937 cm(-1), where the first OH stretching overtone vibrations of 1ccc and 2pcc occur

  16. Tetrazole acetic acid: Tautomers, conformers, and isomerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo-Andrade, C.; Reva, I.; Fausto, R.

    2014-02-01

    Monomers of (tetrazol-5-yl)-acetic acid (TAA) were obtained by sublimation of the crystalline compound and the resulting vapors were isolated in cryogenic nitrogen matrices at 13 K. The conformational and tautomeric composition of TAA in the matrix was characterized by infrared spectroscopy and vibrational calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. TAA may adopt two tautomeric modifications, 1H- and 2H-, depending on the position of the annular hydrogen atom. Two-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) of TAA were theoretically calculated at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level, for each tautomer. Four and six symmetry-unique minima were located on these PESs, for 1H- and 2H-TAA, respectively. The energetics of the detected minima was subsequently refined by calculations at the QCISD level. Two 1H- and three 2H-conformers fall within the 0-8 kJ mol-1 energy range and should be appreciably populated at the sublimation temperature (˜330 K). Observation of only one conformer for each tautomer (1ccc and 2pcc) is explained in terms of calculated barriers to conformational rearrangements. All conformers with the cis O=COH moiety are separated by low barriers (less than 10 kJ mol-1) and collapse to the most stable 1ccc (1H-) and 2pcc (2H-) forms during deposition of the matrix. On the trans O=COH surfaces, the relative energies are very high (between 12 and 27 kJ mol-1). The trans forms are not thermally populated at the sublimation conditions and were not detected in matrices. One high-energy form in each tautomer, 1cct (1H-) and 2pct (2H-), was found to differ from the most stable form only by rotation of the OH group and separated from other forms by high barriers. This opened a perspective for their stabilization in a matrix. 1cct and 2pct were generated in the matrices selectively by means of narrow-band near-infrared (NIR) irradiations of the samples at 6920 and 6937 cm-1, where the first OH stretching overtone vibrations of 1ccc and 2pcc occur. The

  17. 1,2,3-Triazole Bridge as Conformational Constrain in β-Hairpin Peptides: Analysis of Hydrogen-Bonded Positions.

    PubMed

    Celentano, V; Diana, D; Di Salvo, C; De Rosa, L; Romanelli, A; Fattorusso, R; D'Andrea, L D

    2016-04-11

    Conformational constrained β-hairpin peptides are useful tool to modulate protein-protein interactions. A triazole bridge in hydrogen-bonded positions between two antiparallel strands induces a conformational stabilization of the β-hairpin peptide. The entity of the stability of the β-hairpin peptide depends on the length of the bridge. PMID:26938670

  18. Conformational study of two linear hexapeptides by two-dimensional NMR and computer-simulated modeling: implication for peptide cyclization in solution.

    PubMed

    Chiou, A J; Ong, G T; Wang, K T; Chiou, S H; Wu, S H

    1996-02-15

    Two linear peptides, D-leucyl-L-prolyl-L-isoleucyl-L-valyl-L-alanyl-beta-alanine (I) and D-leucyl-L-prolyl-L-isoleucyl-L-valyl-N-methyl-L-alanyl-beta-alanine (II), whose sequences were designed from protodestruxin and desmethyldestruxin B by replacing D-leucic acid with D-leucine, two cyclic hexadepsipeptides with insecticidal and immunodepressant activities, have been found to be cyclized in unusually high yields (>85%). In order to gain insight into the conformation and the relative flexibility of different constituent residues in these linear peptides, we have applied various techniques of 2D-NMR spectroscopy coupled with dynamic simulated annealing by computer modeling to establish the solution conformations of these two linear peptides. Based on the derived structures, it is found that the distances between N- and C-terminal residues of both peptides are short enough to facilitate the cyclization, thus collaborating the observation of favorable cyclization yields for both linear peptides. PMID:8605029

  19. Anthranilic acid-containing cyclic tetrapeptides: at the crossroads of conformational rigidity and synthetic accessibility.

    PubMed

    Xin, Dongyue; Burgess, Kevin

    2016-06-14

    Each amino acid in a peptide contributes three atom units to main-chains, hence natural cyclic peptides can be 9, 12, 15, …. i.e. 3n membered-rings, where n is the number of amino acids. Cyclic peptides that are 9 or 12-membered ring compounds tend to be hard to prepare because of strain, while their one amino acid homologs (15-membered cyclic pentapeptides) are not conformationally homogeneous unless constrained by strategically placed proline or d-amino acid residues. We hypothesized that replacing one genetically encoded amino acid in a cyclic tetrapeptide with a rigid β-amino acid would render peptidomimetic designs that rest at a useful crossroads between synthetic accessibility and conformational rigidity. Thus this research explored non-proline containing 13-membered ring peptides 1 featuring one anthranilic acid (Anth) residue. Twelve cyclic peptides of this type were prepared, and in doing so the viability of both solution- and solid-phase methods was demonstrated. The library produced contained a complete set of four diastereoisomers of the sequence 1aaf (i.e. cyclo-AlaAlaPheAnth). Without exception, these four diastereoisomers each adopted one predominant conformation in solution; basically these conformations feature amide N-H vectors puckering above and below the equatorial plane, and approximately oriented their N-H[combining low line] atoms towards the polar axis. Moreover, the shapes of these conformers varied in a logical and predictable way (NOE, temperature coefficient, D/H exchange, circular dichroism). Comparisons were made of the side-chain orientations presented by compounds 1aaa in solution with ideal secondary structures and protein-protein interaction interfaces. Various 1aaa stereoisomers in solution present side-chains in similar orientations to regular and inverse γ-turns, and to the most common β-turns (types I and II). Consistent with this, compounds 1aaa have a tendency to mimic various turns and bends at protein

  20. Tuning the conformation properties of a peptide by glycosylation and phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, F.-C.; Chen, Rita P.-Y.; Lin, C.-C.; Huang, K.-T.; Chan, S.I. . E-mail: SunneyChan@yahoo.com

    2006-04-07

    We have deployed the {alpha}-helical hairpin peptide ({alpha}-helix/turn/{alpha}-helix) and used it as a model system to explore how glycosylation and phosphorylation might affect the conformational properties of the peptide. The native conformations of the modified peptides in buffer solution have been compared with that of the wild-type peptide by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to probe the effects of an O-linked {beta}-GlcNAc and a phosphate group on the overall folding stability of the peptide. Finally, the rate of fibrillogenesis was used to infer the effects of these chemical modifications on the {alpha}-to-{beta} transition as well as the rate of nucleation of amyloidogenesis.

  1. Multiple Simulated Annealing-Molecular Dynamics (MSA-MD) for Conformational Space Search of Peptide and Miniprotein

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ge-Fei; Xu, Wei-Fang; Yang, Sheng-Gang; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Protein and peptide structure predictions are of paramount importance for understanding their functions, as well as the interactions with other molecules. However, the use of molecular simulation techniques to directly predict the peptide structure from the primary amino acid sequence is always hindered by the rough topology of the conformational space and the limited simulation time scale. We developed here a new strategy, named Multiple Simulated Annealing-Molecular Dynamics (MSA-MD) to identify the native states of a peptide and miniprotein. A cluster of near native structures could be obtained by using the MSA-MD method, which turned out to be significantly more efficient in reaching the native structure compared to continuous MD and conventional SA-MD simulation. PMID:26492886

  2. Theoretical conformational analysis of the bovine adrenal medulla 12 residue peptide molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, N. A.; Tagiyev, Z. H.; Hasanov, E. M.; Akverdieva, G. A.

    2003-02-01

    The spatial structure and conformational properties of the bovine adrenal medulla 12 residue peptide Tyr1-Gly2-Gly3-Phe4-Met5-Arg6-Arg7-Val8-Gly9-Arg10-Pro11-Glu12 (BAM-12P) molecule were studied by theoretical conformational analysis. It is revealed that this molecule can exist in several stable states. The energy and geometrical parameters for the low-energy conformations are obtained. The conformationally rigid and labile segments of this molecule were revealed.

  3. Self-assembly pathway of peptide nanotubes formed by a glutamatic acid-based bolaamphiphile.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Emerson Rodrigo; Alves, Wendel Andrade; Castelletto, Valeria; Reza, Mehedi; Ruokolainen, Janne; Hussain, Rohanah; Hamley, Ian William

    2015-07-25

    The self-assembly of peptide nanotubes formed by an L-glutamic acid-based bolaamphiphile is shown to proceed via a remarkable mechanism where the peptide conformation changes from β-sheet to unordered. The kinetics of this process are elucidated via X-ray scattering and UV circular dichroism methods. The reverse transition from "unordered" to β-sheet structures is triggered by UV radiation. PMID:26094619

  4. Conformational requirement for lysine hydroxylation in collagen. Structural studies on synthetic peptide substrates of lysyl hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Jiang, P; Ananthanarayanan, V S

    1991-12-01

    An attempt has been made to understand the conformational determinants that govern the hydroxylation of selected lysyl residues in the nascent collagen molecule by lysyl hydroxylase (EC 1.14.11.4). A series of peptide substrates of the enzyme, ranging in length from 3 to 12 residues, were synthesized. These included: tert-butyloxylcarbonyl (t-Boc)-Ile-Lys-Gly; Boc-Ala-Lys-Gly; N-acetyl-Ala-Lys-Gly-Ser; Hyp-Gly-Pro-Lys-Gly-Glu; Leu-Hyp-Gly-Ala-Lys-Gly-Glu; Gly-Phe-Hyp-Gly-Leu-Hyp-Gly-Ala-Lys-Gly-Glu; (Hyp-Gly-Pro-Lys-Gly-Glu)2; and Ala-Arg-Gly-Ile-Lys-Gly-Ile-Arg-Gly-Phe-Ser-Gly. The conformational features of these peptides were studied by spectroscopic methods so as to relate this information with the kinetic parameters for the interaction of these peptides with purified lysyl hydroxylase. Spectroscopic data, supported by conformational energy calculations, indicated that the tripeptides t-Boc-Ile-Lys-Gly and t-Boc-Ala-Lys-Gly adopt a gamma-turn structure in water and trifluoroethanol with Lys in the second position of the turn. In the tetra- and larger peptides two structures, the beta-turn and a polyproline-II (PP-II) type extended conformation, were identified. The proportions of these two structures in a given peptide depended on the polarity of the solvent. All of the peptides were hydroxylated by lysyl hydroxylase isolated from chicken embryos. In contrast, a control peptide, t-Boc-Ala-Gly-Lys which adopted a beta-turn with Lys at the end of the turn, was not hydroxylated. Competitive inhibition of the hydroxylation of protocollagen by some of the peptides showed a common binding site for these substrates in the enzyme's active site. Kinetic data on the peptides indicated improved hydroxylation rate (higher Vmax) in peptides having relatively higher beta-turn content and improved binding (lower Km) in peptides with higher content of the PP-II structure. The efficacy of the substrate was also governed by its chain length. These data suggest that the

  5. Peptide Conformations for a Microarray Surface-Tethered Epitope of the Tumor Suppressor p53

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jun; Wong, Ka-Yiu; Lynch, Gillian C.; Gao, Xiaolian; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2007-12-13

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Peptides or proteins near surfaces exhibit different structural properties from those present in a homogeneous solution, and these differences give rise to varied biological activity. Therefore, understanding the detailed molecular structure of these molecules tethered to a surface is important for interpreting the performance of the various microarrays based on the activities of the immobilized peptides or proteins. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of a pentapeptide, RHSVV, an epitope of the tumor suppressor protein p53, tethered via a spacer on a functionalized silica surface and free in solution, to study their structural and conformational differences. These calculations allowed analyses of the peptide-surface interactions, the sequence orientations, and the translational motions of the peptide on the surface to be performed. Conformational similarities are found among dominant structures of the tethered and free peptide. In the peptide microarray simulations, the peptide fluctuates between a parallel and tilted orientation driven in part by the hydrophobic interactions between the nonpolar peptide residues and the methyl-terminated silica surface. The perpendicular movement of the peptide relative to the surface is also restricted due to the hydrophobic nature of the microarray surface. With regard to structures available for recognition and binding, we find that similar conformations to those found in solution are available to the peptide tethered to the surface, but with a shifted equilibrium constant. Comparisons with experimental results show important implications of this for peptide microarray design and assays.

  6. Interaction of linear cationic peptides with phospholipid membranes and polymers of sialic acid.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A S; Dubovskii, P V; Vorontsova, O V; Feofanov, A V; Efremov, R G

    2014-05-01

    Polysialic acid (PSA) is a natural anionic polymer typically occurring on the outer surface of cell membranes. PSA is involved in cell signaling and intermolecular interactions with proteins and peptides. The antimicrobial potential of peptides is usually evaluated in model membranes consisting of lipid bilayers but devoid of either PSA or its analogs. The goal of this work was to investigate the possible effect of PSA on the structure of melittin (Mlt) and latarcins Ltc1K, Ltc2a, and the activity of these peptides with respect to model membranes. These peptides are linear cationic ones derived from the venom of bee (Mlt) and spider (both latarcins). The length of each of the peptides is 26 amino acid residues, and they all have antimicrobial activity. However, they differ with respect to conformational mobility, hydrophobic characteristics, and overall charge. In this work, using circular dichroism spectroscopy, we show that the peptides adopt an α-helical conformation upon interaction with either PSA or phospholipid liposomes formed of either zwitterionic or anionic phospholipids or their mixtures. The extent of helicity depends on the amino acid sequence and properties of the medium. Based on small angle X-ray scattering data and the analysis of the fluorescence spectrum of the Trp residue in Mlt, we conclude that the peptide forms an oligomeric complex consisting of α-helical Mlt and several PSA molecules. Both latarcins, unlike Mlt, the most hydrophobic of the peptides, interact weakly with zwitterionic liposomes. However, they bind anionic liposomes or those composed of anionic/zwitterionic lipid mixtures. Latarcin Ltc1K forms associates on liposomes composed of zwitterionic/anionic lipid mixture. The structure of the peptide associates is either disordered or of β-sheet conformation. In all other cases the studied peptides adopt predominately α-helical conformation. In addition, we demonstrate that PSA inhibits membranolytic activity of Mlt and latarcin

  7. Retention of Conformational Entropy upon Calmodulin Binding to Target Peptides is Driven by Transient Salt Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Straatsma, TP; Squier, Thomas C.

    2012-10-03

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a highly flexible calcium-binding protein that mediates signal transduction through an ability to differentially bind to highly variable binding sequences in target proteins. To identify how binding affects CaM motions, and its relationship to conformational entropy and target peptide sequence, we have employed fully atomistic, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of unbound CaM and CaM bound to five different target peptides. The calculated CaM conformational binding entropies correlate with experimentally derived conformational entropies with a correlation coefficient R2 of 0.95. Selected side-chain interactions with target peptides restrain interhelical loop motions, acting to tune the conformational entropy of the bound complex via widely distributed CaM motions. In the complex with the most conformational entropy retention (CaM in complex with the neuronal nitric oxide synthase binding sequence), Lys-148 at the C-terminus of CaM forms transient salt bridges alternating between Glu side chains in the N-domain, the central linker, and the binding target. Additional analyses of CaM structures, fluctuations, and CaM-target interactions illuminate the interplay between electrostatic, side chain, and backbone properties in the ability of CaM to recognize and discriminate against targets by tuning its conformational entropy, and suggest a need to consider conformational dynamics in optimizing binding affinities.

  8. Accurate Structure Prediction and Conformational Analysis of Cyclic Peptides with Residue-Specific Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hao; Jiang, Fan; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2016-05-19

    Cyclic peptides (CPs) are promising candidates for drugs, chemical biology tools, and self-assembling nanomaterials. However, the development of reliable and accurate computational methods for their structure prediction has been challenging. Here, 20 all-trans CPs of 5-12 residues selected from Cambridge Structure Database have been simulated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics with four different force fields. Our recently developed residue-specific force fields RSFF1 and RSFF2 can correctly identify the crystal-like conformations of more than half CPs as the most populated conformation. The RSFF2 performs the best, which consistently predicts the crystal structures of 17 out of 20 CPs with rmsd < 1.1 Å. We also compared the backbone (ϕ, ψ) sampling of residues in CPs with those in short linear peptides and in globular proteins. In general, unlike linear peptides, CPs have local conformational free energies and entropies quite similar to globular proteins. PMID:27128113

  9. Single-Molecule Protein Folding: A Study of the Surface-Mediated Conformational Dynamics of a Model Amphipathic Peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Joy; English, Douglas

    2004-03-01

    Most surface-active polypeptides, composed of 10-50 amino acids, are devoid of well-defined tertiary structure. The conformation of these proteins is greatly dependent upon their environment and may assume totally different characteristics in an aqueous environment, in a detergent micelle, or in an organic solvent. Most antimicrobial peptides are helix-forming and are activated upon interaction with a membrane-mimicking environment. We are seeking to physically characterize the mechanism of membrane-peptide interaction through studying a simple model peptide, MT-1. MT-1 was designed as a nonhomologous analogue of melittin, the principle component in bee venom. We are using single molecule spectroscopy to examine the induction of secondary structure upon interaction of MT-1 with various membrane-mimicking interfaces. Specifically, we monitor coil-to-helix transition through single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (sm-FRET) to determine conformational distributions of folded and unfolded peptides at an interface. Studies with MT-1 will focus upon the biologically relevant issues of orientation, aggregation, and folding at surfaces using both ensemble and single molecule experiments.

  10. AFM Studies of Conformational Changes in Proteins and Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploscariu, Nicoleta; Sukthankar, Pinakin; Tomich, John; Szoszkiewicz, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Here, we present estimates of molecular stiffness and mechanical energy dissipation factors for some examples of proteins and peptides. The results are obtained from AFM force spectroscopy measurements. To determine molecular stiffness and mechanical energy dissipation factors we developed a model based on measuring several resonance frequencies of an AFM cantilever in contact with either single protein molecule or peptides adsorbed on arbitrary surface. We used compliant AFM cantilevers with a small aspect ratio - a ratio of length to width - in air and in liquid, including biologically relevant phosphate buffered saline medium. Department of Physics.

  11. Conformations of peptide fragments comprising the complete sequence of component III of Chi t I and their relationship to T-cell stimulation.

    PubMed

    Czisch, M; Liebers, V; Bernstein, R; Chen, Z; Baur, X; Holak, T A

    1994-08-16

    Conformational preferences of synthetic peptides that span the complete sequence of Chironomus thummi hemoglobin (Chi t I) component III were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and CD spectroscopies. The peptides, 19-21 amino acids in length, were studied in water, except for the C-terminal peptide, which was investigated in DMSO-d6. NMR showed that all investigated peptides lacked uniquely folded conformations in water at 4 degrees C and pH 3.0 or at 10 degrees C and pD 6.6 in DMSO. However, some preferential helix-like conformations for the peptides corresponding to the helices of the folded protein could be seen in solution. These peptides showed characteristic interactions for conformations in both the beta- and alpha-regions of phi-psi space, based on strong C alpha H(i)-NH(i + 1) interactions, and on NH-NH, C alpha H(i)-NH-(i + 2), C alpha H(i)-NH(i + 3), and C alpha H(i)-C beta H(i + 3) interactions, respectively. Helical motifs seem not to be the most important factors in determining MHC-binding and/or T-cell recognition. However, there is a tendency that more stabilized secondary structures show higher T-cell stimulation. PMID:8068617

  12. Rational Optimization of Conformational Effects Induced By Hydrocarbon Staples in Peptides and their Binding Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lama, Dilraj; Quah, Soo T.; Verma, Chandra S.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Beuerman, Roger W.; Lane, David P.; Brown, Christopher J.

    2013-12-01

    eIF4E is frequently over-expressed in different cancers and causes increased translation of oncogenic proteins via deregulated cap-dependent translation. Inhibitors of the eIF4E:eIF4G interactions represent an approach that would normalize cap-dependent translation. Stapled peptides represent an emerging class of therapeutics that can target protein: protein interactions. We present here molecular dynamics simulations for a set of rationally designed stapled peptides in solution and in complex with eIF4E, supported with biophysical and crystallographic data. Clustering of the simulated structures revealed the favoured conformational states of the stapled peptides in their bound or free forms in solution. Identifying these populations has allowed us to design peptides with improved affinities by introducing mutations into the peptide sequence to alter their conformational distributions. These studies emphasise the effects that engineered mutations have on the conformations of free and bound peptides, and illustrate that both states must be considered in efforts to attain high affinity binding.

  13. Peptides containing β-amino acid patterns: challenges and successes in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Cabrele, Chiara; Martinek, Tamás A; Reiser, Oliver; Berlicki, Łukasz

    2014-12-11

    The construction of bioactive peptides using β-amino acid-containing sequence patterns is a very promising strategy to obtain analogues that exhibit properties of high interest for medicinal chemistry applications. β-Amino acids have been shown to modulate the conformation, dynamics, and proteolytic susceptibility of native peptides. They can be either combined with α-amino acids by following specific patterns, which results in backbone architectures with well-defined orientations of the side chain functional groups, or assembled in de novo-designed bioactive β- or α,β-peptidic sequences. Such peptides display various biological functions, including antimicrobial activity, inhibition of protein-protein interactions, agonism/antagonism of GPCR ligands, and anti-angiogenic activity. PMID:25207470

  14. Structure and dynamics of water in crowded environments slows down peptide conformational changes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Cheng; Prada-Gracia, Diego; Rao, Francesco

    2014-07-28

    The concentration of macromolecules inside the cell is high with respect to conventional in vitro experiments or simulations. In an effort to characterize the effects of crowding on the thermodynamics and kinetics of disordered peptides, molecular dynamics simulations were run at different concentrations by varying the number of identical weakly interacting peptides inside the simulation box. We found that the presence of crowding does not influence very much the overall thermodynamics. On the other hand, peptide conformational dynamics was found to be strongly affected, resulting in a dramatic slowing down at larger concentrations. The observation of long lived water bridges between peptides at higher concentrations points to a nontrivial role of the solvent in the altered peptide kinetics. Our results reinforce the idea for an active role of water in molecular crowding, an effect that is expected to be relevant for problems influenced by large solvent exposure areas like in intrinsically disordered proteins.

  15. NCAD, a database integrating the intrinsic conformational preferences of non-coded amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Revilla-López, Guillem; Torras, Juan; Curcó, David; Casanovas, Jordi; Calaza, M. Isabel; Zanuy, David; Jiménez, Ana I.; Cativiela, Carlos; Nussinov, Ruth; Grodzinski, Piotr; Alemán, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Peptides and proteins find an ever-increasing number of applications in the biomedical and materials engineering fields. The use of non-proteinogenic amino acids endowed with diverse physicochemical and structural features opens the possibility to design proteins and peptides with novel properties and functions. Moreover, non-proteinogenic residues are particularly useful to control the three-dimensional arrangement of peptidic chains, which is a crucial issue for most applications. However, information regarding such amino acids –also called non-coded, non-canonical or non-standard– is usually scattered among publications specialized in quite diverse fields as well as in patents. Making all these data useful to the scientific community requires new tools and a framework for their assembly and coherent organization. We have successfully compiled, organized and built a database (NCAD, Non-Coded Amino acids Database) containing information about the intrinsic conformational preferences of non-proteinogenic residues determined by quantum mechanical calculations, as well as bibliographic information about their synthesis, physical and spectroscopic characterization, conformational propensities established experimentally, and applications. The architecture of the database is presented in this work together with the first family of non-coded residues included, namely, α-tetrasubstituted α-amino acids. Furthermore, the NCAD usefulness is demonstrated through a test-case application example. PMID:20455555

  16. Mixed Cyclic Constraints on Conformational Flexibility in β/γ-PEPTIDES: Conformation Specific IR and UV Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gord, Joseph R.; Walsh, Patrick S.; Zwier, Timothy S.; Fisher, Brian F.; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2013-06-01

    In order to further understand the intramolecular forces governing secondary structure formation in peptides and to provide benchmarks for the computational community, conformation-specific spectroscopy techniques have been applied to several model systems provided by Dr. Sam Gellman's research group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In the present work, two model β/γ-peptides, Ac-β_{ACPC}-γ_{ACHC}-NHBz and Ac-γ_{ACHC}-β_{ACPC}-NHBz have been investigated using single and double resonance ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopy to elucidate their intrinsic folding propensities. The β-peptide is constrained by a five-membered ring spanning the β^{3}-β^{2} positions (β_{ACPC}) and the γ-peptide is constrained by a six-membered ring spanning the γ^{4}-γ^{3} positions with an additional ethyl group at γ^{2} (γ_{ACHC}). Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectra from 37250 to 37750 cm^{-1} were obtained and subsequently interrogated using UV-UV hole-burning to reveal the presence of three conformations for Ac-β_{ACPC}-γ_{ACHC}-NHBz, and a single conformation for Ac-γ_{ACHC}-β_{ACPC}-NHBz. Resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectra were obtained in the NH stretch region from 3300 to 3500 cm^{-1} and in both the amide I and II regions from 1400 to 1800 cm^{-1}. These spectra were compared to computational predictions given by DFT calculations using the M05-2X functional with a 6-31G+(d) basis set revealing two slightly varied iterations of a bifurcated C-8/13 double ring structure for Ac-β_{ACPC}-γ_{ACHC}-NHBz and one bifurcated C-9/13 double ring structure for Ac-γ_{ACHC}-β_{ACPC}-NHBz. The appearance of C-13 rings was also seen in solution phase studies. This work is a complement to studies performed on pure γ-peptides and α/γ-peptides. L. Guo, A. M. Almeida, W. Zhang, A. G. Reidenbach, S. H. Choi, I.. A. Guzei, and S. H. Gellman J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 7868-7869

  17. Nonstatistical UV Fragmentation of Gas-Phase Peptides Reveals Conformers and Their Structural Features.

    PubMed

    Kopysov, Vladimir; Makarov, Alexander; Boyarkin, Oleg V

    2016-03-17

    Solving the 3D structure of a biomolecule requires recognition of its conformers and measurements of their individual structural identities, which can be compared with calculations. We employ the phenomenon of nonstatistical photofragmentation, detected by a combination of UV cold ion spectroscopy and high-resolution mass spectrometry, to identify the main conformers of gas-phase peptides and to recover individual UV absorption and mass spectra of all of these conformers in a single laser scan. We first validate this approach with a benchmark dipeptide, Tyr-Ala, and then apply it to a decapeptide, gramicidin S. The revealed characteristic structural difference between the conformers of the latter identifies some of the previously calculated structures of gramicidin S as the most likely geometries of its remaining unsolved conformer. PMID:26950179

  18. Conformational Free-Energy Landscapes for a Peptide in Saline Environments

    PubMed Central

    Gaborek, Timothy J.; Chipot, Christophe; Madura, Jeffry D.

    2012-01-01

    The conformations that proteins adopt in solution are a function of both their primary structure and surrounding aqueous environment. Recent experimental and computational work on small peptides, e.g., polyK, polyE, and polyR, have highlighted an interesting and unusual behavior in the presence of aqueous ions such as ClO4−, Na+, and K+. Notwithstanding the aforementioned studies, as of this writing, the nature of the driving force induced by the presence of ions and its role on the conformational stability of peptides remains only partially understood. Molecular-dynamics simulations have been performed on the heptapeptide AEAAAEA in NaCl and KCl solutions at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 M. Metadynamics in conjunction with a three-dimensional model reaction coordinate was used to sample the conformational space of the peptide. All simulations were run for 2 μs. Free-energy landscapes were computed over the model reaction coordinate for the peptide in each saline assay as well as in the absence of ions. Circular dichroism spectra were also calculated from each trajectory. In the presence of Na+ and K+ ions, no increase in helicity is observed with respect to the conformation in pure water. PMID:23260053

  19. Conformational Entropy of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins from Amino Acid Triads

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Anupaul; Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-01-01

    This work quantitatively characterizes intrinsic disorder in proteins in terms of sequence composition and backbone conformational entropy. Analysis of the normalized relative composition of the amino acid triads highlights a distinct boundary between globular and disordered proteins. The conformational entropy is calculated from the dihedral angles of the middle amino acid in the amino acid triad for the conformational ensemble of the globular, partially and completely disordered proteins relative to the non-redundant database. Both Monte Carlo (MC) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used to characterize the conformational ensemble of the representative proteins of each group. The results show that the globular proteins span approximately half of the allowed conformational states in the Ramachandran space, while the amino acid triads in disordered proteins sample the entire range of the allowed dihedral angle space following Flory’s isolated-pair hypothesis. Therefore, only the sequence information in terms of the relative amino acid triad composition may be sufficient to predict protein disorder and the backbone conformational entropy, even in the absence of well-defined structure. The predicted entropies are found to agree with those calculated using mutual information expansion and the histogram method. PMID:26138206

  20. Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics Lecture: 2D IR Spectroscopy of Peptide Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2012-02-01

    Descriptions of protein and peptide conformation are colored by the methods we use to study them. Protein x-ray and NMR structures often lead to impressions of rigid or well-defined conformations, even though these are dynamic molecules. The conformational fluctuations and disorder of proteins and peptides is more difficult to quantify. This presentation will describe an approach toward characterizing and quantifying structural heterogeneity and disorder in peptides using 2D IR spectroscopy. Using amide I vibrational spectroscopy, isotope labeling strategies, and computational modeling based on molecular dynamics simulations and Markov state models allows us to characterize distinct peptide conformers and conformational variation. The examples illustrated include the beta-hairpin tripzip2 and elastin-like peptides.

  1. Conformational study of melectin and antapin antimicrobial peptides in model membrane environments.

    PubMed

    Kocourková, Lucie; Novotná, Pavlína; Čujová, Sabína; Čeřovský, Václav; Urbanová, Marie; Setnička, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have long been considered as promising compounds against drug-resistant pathogens. In this work, we studied the secondary structure of antimicrobial peptides melectin and antapin using electronic (ECD) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopies that are sensitive to peptide secondary structures. The results from quantitative ECD spectral evaluation by Dichroweb and CDNN program and from the qualitative evaluation of the VCD spectra were compared. The antimicrobial activity of the selected peptides depends on their ability to adopt an amphipathic α-helical conformation on the surface of the bacterial membrane. Hence, solutions of different zwitterionic and negatively charged liposomes and micelles were used to mimic the eukaryotic and bacterial biological membranes. The results show a significant content of α-helical conformation in the solutions of negatively charged liposomes mimicking the bacterial membrane, thus correlating with the antimicrobial activity of the studied peptides. On the other hand in the solutions of zwitterionic liposomes used as models of the eukaryotic membranes, the fraction of α-helical conformation was lower, which corresponds with their moderate hemolytic activity. PMID:27450123

  2. Characterizing the Conformational Landscape of Flavivirus Fusion Peptides via Simulation and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzinek, Jan K.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Goh, Eunice; Huber, Roland G.; Panzade, Sadhana; Verma, Chandra; Bond, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Conformational changes in the envelope proteins of flaviviruses help to expose the highly conserved fusion peptide (FP), a region which is critical to membrane fusion and host cell infection, and which represents a significant target for antiviral drugs and antibodies. In principle, extended timescale atomic-resolution simulations may be used to characterize the dynamics of such peptides. However, the resultant accuracy is critically dependent upon both the underlying force field and sufficient conformational sampling. In the present study, we report a comprehensive comparison of three simulation methods and four force fields comprising a total of more than 40 μs of sampling. Additionally, we describe the conformational landscape of the FP fold across all flavivirus family members. All investigated methods sampled conformations close to available X-ray structures, but exhibited differently populated ensembles. The best force field / sampling combination was sufficiently accurate to predict that the solvated peptide fold is less ordered than in the crystallographic state, which was subsequently confirmed via circular dichroism and spectrofluorometric measurements. Finally, the conformational landscape of a mutant incapable of membrane fusion was significantly shallower than wild-type variants, suggesting that dynamics should be considered when therapeutically targeting FP epitopes.

  3. Characterizing the Conformational Landscape of Flavivirus Fusion Peptides via Simulation and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Marzinek, Jan K.; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Goh, Eunice; Huber, Roland G.; Panzade, Sadhana; Verma, Chandra; Bond, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Conformational changes in the envelope proteins of flaviviruses help to expose the highly conserved fusion peptide (FP), a region which is critical to membrane fusion and host cell infection, and which represents a significant target for antiviral drugs and antibodies. In principle, extended timescale atomic-resolution simulations may be used to characterize the dynamics of such peptides. However, the resultant accuracy is critically dependent upon both the underlying force field and sufficient conformational sampling. In the present study, we report a comprehensive comparison of three simulation methods and four force fields comprising a total of more than 40 μs of sampling. Additionally, we describe the conformational landscape of the FP fold across all flavivirus family members. All investigated methods sampled conformations close to available X-ray structures, but exhibited differently populated ensembles. The best force field / sampling combination was sufficiently accurate to predict that the solvated peptide fold is less ordered than in the crystallographic state, which was subsequently confirmed via circular dichroism and spectrofluorometric measurements. Finally, the conformational landscape of a mutant incapable of membrane fusion was significantly shallower than wild-type variants, suggesting that dynamics should be considered when therapeutically targeting FP epitopes. PMID:26785994

  4. Incorporation of N-amidino-pyroglutamic acid into peptides using intramolecular cyclization of alpha-guanidinoglutaric acid.

    PubMed

    Burov, Sergey; Moskalenko, Yulia; Dorosh, Marina; Shkarubskaya, Zoya; Panarin, Evgeny

    2009-11-01

    N-terminal modification of peptides by unnatural amino acids significantly affects their enzymatic stability, conformational properties and biological activity. Application of N-amidino-amino acids, positively charged under physiological conditions, can change peptide conformation and its affinity to the corresponding receptor. In this article, we describe synthesis of short peptides, containing a new building block-N-amidino-pyroglutamic acid. Although direct guanidinylation of pyroglutamic acid and oxidation of N-amidino-proline using RuO(4) did not produce positive results, N-amidino-Glp-Phe-OH was synthesized on Wang polymer by cyclization of alpha-guanidinoglutaric acid residue. In the course of synthesis, it was found that literature procedure of selective Boc deprotection using TMSOTf/TEA reagent is accompanied by concomitant side reaction of triethylamine alkylation by polymer linker fragment. It should be mentioned that independently from cyclization time and coupling agent (DIC or HCTU), the lactam formation was incomplete. Separation of the cyclic product from the linear precursor was achieved by HPLC in ammonium formate buffer at pH 6. HPLC analysis showed N-amidino-Glp-Phe-OH stability at acidic and physiological pH and fast ring opening in water solution at pH 9. The suggested method of N-amidino-Glp residue formation can be applied in the case of short peptide chains, whereas synthesis of longer ones will require fragment condensation approach. PMID:19739127

  5. Conformational preferences of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes Jesus, A. J.; Jarmelo, S.; Fausto, R.; Reva, I.

    2015-04-01

    The conformational space of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), an important dopamine metabolite, has been investigated by quantum chemical methods (B3LYP and MP2, with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set) and matrix-isolation infrared spectroscopy. Detailed analysis of the calculated potential energy surfaces of the molecule led to identification of thirteen unique conformers, all of them showing the acetic acid side chain out of the aromatic ring plane by 60-95°. According to the calculated Gibbs energies, the five lowest energy conformers make up 99.7% of the conformational mixture at 298.15 K, exhibiting individual populations falling between 16% and 24%. The main conformational trends of this molecule were interpreted on the grounds of a thorough analysis of the structural parameters and by the application of the Natural Bond Orbital theory. The role of the intramolecular interactions on the relative stability and structure of the conformers was also investigated. The infrared spectrum of DOPAC was registered after isolation of its monomers in argon and xenon matrices. Only one of DOPAC forms populated in the gas phase could be trapped in both matrix gases. This result is in agreement with the predicted low energy barriers for conformational isomerization and is also supported by annealing experiments. The spectra of matrix-isolated model compounds, phenylacetic acid and catechol, were studied under the same experimental conditions. These data were used as references and assisted in the interpretation of the results obtained for DOPAC.

  6. The Periplasmic Bacterial Molecular Chaperone SurA Adapts Its Structure to Bind Peptides in Different Conformations to Assert a Sequence Preference for Aromatic Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.; Wang, S.; Hu, Y.-X.; McKay, D.B.

    2009-06-04

    The periplasmic molecular chaperone protein SurA facilitates correct folding and maturation of outer membrane proteins in Gram-negative bacteria. It preferentially binds peptides that have a high fraction of aromatic amino acids. Phage display selections, isothermal titration calorimetry and crystallographic structure determination have been used to elucidate the basis of the binding specificity. The peptide recognition is imparted by the first peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) domain of SurA. Crystal structures of complexes between peptides of sequence WEYIPNV and NFTLKFWDIFRK with the first PPIase domain of the Escherichia coli SurA protein at 1.3 A resolution, and of a complex between the dodecapeptide and a SurA fragment lacking the second PPIase domain at 3.4 A resolution, have been solved. SurA binds as a monomer to the heptapeptide in an extended conformation. It binds as a dimer to the dodecapeptide in an alpha-helical conformation, predicated on a substantial structural rearrangement of the SurA protein. In both cases, side-chains of aromatic residues of the peptides contribute a large fraction of the binding interactions. SurA therefore asserts a recognition preference for aromatic amino acids in a variety of sequence configurations by adopting alternative tertiary and quaternary structures to bind peptides in different conformations.

  7. IR-induced conformational isomerization of a helical peptide in a cold ion trap.

    PubMed

    Seaiby, Caroline; Zabuga, Aleksandra V; Svendsen, Annette; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we use laser-induced population transfer techniques to study the conformational isomerization of a helical peptide, Ac-Phe-(Ala)5-LysH(+), in a cold ion trap. In one scheme, called IR-UV hole-filling spectroscopy, a single conformation is selectively excited with an IR pump laser via a distinct NH stretch vibration. After giving the vibrationally excited ions sufficient time to isomerize and re-cool in the trap, the new conformational redistribution is detected by UV photofragment spectroscopy. While we clearly observe a redistribution of the conformer populations due to isomerization, only those conformations that initially have population participate in this redistribution-we do not form conformers that were not initially present in the trap. In a second scheme, called IR-induced population transfer spectroscopy, we determine the fractional populations of the four stable conformations of Ac-Phe-(Ala)5-LysH(+) by scanning the IR laser while selectively detecting a specific conformation using UV photofragment spectroscopy. PMID:26747803

  8. Conformation of poly(γ-glutamic acid) in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Muroga, Yoshio; Nakaya, Asami; Inoue, Atsuki; Itoh, Daiki; Abiru, Masaya; Wada, Kaori; Takada, Masako; Ikake, Hiroki; Shimizu, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    Local conformation and overall conformation of poly(γ-DL-glutamic acid) (PγDLGA) and poly(γ-L-glutamic acid) (PγLGA) in aqueous solution was studied as a function of degree of ionization ε by (1) H-NMR, circular dichroism, and potentiometric titration. It was clarified that their local conformation is represented by random coil over an entire ε range and their overall conformation is represented by expanded random-coil in a range of ε > ε(*) , where ε(*) is about 0.3, 0.35, 0.45, and 0.5 for added-salt concentration of 0.02M, 0.05M, 0.1M, and 0.2M, respectively. In a range of ε < ε(*) , however, ε dependence of their overall conformation is significantly differentiated from each other. PγDLGA tends to aggregate intramolecularly and/or intermolecularly with decreasing ε, but PγLGA still behaves as expanded random-coil. It is speculated that spatial arrangement of adjacent carboxyl groups along the backbone chain essentially affects the overall conformation of PγGA in acidic media. PMID:26574908

  9. Predicting most probable conformations of a given peptide sequence in the random coil state.

    PubMed

    Bayrak, Cigdem Sevim; Erman, Burak

    2012-11-01

    In this work, we present a computational scheme for finding high probability conformations of peptides. The scheme calculates the probability of a given conformation of the given peptide sequence using the probability distribution of torsion states. Dependence of the states of a residue on the states of its first neighbors along the chain is considered. Prior probabilities of torsion states are obtained from a coil library. Posterior probabilities are calculated by the matrix multiplication Rotational Isomeric States Model of polymer theory. The conformation of a peptide with highest probability is determined by using a hidden Markov model Viterbi algorithm. First, the probability distribution of the torsion states of the residues is obtained. Using the highest probability torsion state, one can generate, step by step, states with lower probabilities. To validate the method, the highest probability state of residues in a given sequence is calculated and compared with probabilities obtained from the Coil Databank. Predictions based on the method are 32% better than predictions based on the most probable states of residues. The ensemble of "n" high probability conformations of a given protein is also determined using the Viterbi algorithm with multistep backtracking. PMID:22955874

  10. A Conformational Two-State Peptide Model System Containing an Ultrafast but Soft Light Switch

    PubMed Central

    Löweneck, Markus; Milbradt, Alexander G.; Root, Christopher; Satzger, Helmut; Zinth, Wolfgang; Moroder, Luis; Renner, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Combining an azobenzene chromophore with the bis-cysteinyl active-site sequence of the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) we constructed a simple but promising model for allosteric conformational rearrangements. Paralleling cellular signaling events, an external trigger, here absorption of a photon, leads to a structural change in one part of the molecule, namely the azobenzene-based chromophore. The change in geometry translates to the effector site, in our case the peptide sequence, where it modifies covalent and nonbonded interactions and thus leads to a conformational rearrangement. NMR spectroscopy showed that the trans-azo and cis-azo isomer of the cyclic PDI peptide exhibit different, but well-defined structures when the two cystine residues form a disulfide bridge. Without this intramolecular cross-link conformationally more variable structural ensembles are obtained that again differ for the two isomeric states. Ultrafast UV/Vis spectroscopy confirmed that the rapid isomerization of azobenzene is not significantly slowed down when incorporated into the cyclic peptides, although the amplitudes of ballistic and diffusive pathways are changed. The observation that most of the energy of an absorbed photon is dissipated to the solvent in the first few picoseconds when the actual azo-isomerization takes place is important. The conformational rearrangement is weakly driven due to the absence of appreciable excess energy and can be described as biased diffusion similar to natural processes. PMID:16387780

  11. Conformation-specific spectroscopy of capped glutamine-containing peptides: role of a single glutamine residue on peptide backbone preferences.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Patrick S; Dean, Jacob C; McBurney, Carl; Kang, Hyuk; Gellman, Samuel H; Zwier, Timothy S

    2016-04-20

    The conformational preferences of a series of short, aromatic-capped, glutamine-containing peptides have been studied under jet-cooled conditions in the gas phase. This work seeks a bottom-up understanding of the role played by glutamine residues in directing peptide structures that lead to neurodegenerative diseases. Resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectroscopy is used to record single-conformation infrared spectra in the NH stretch, amide I and amide II regions. Comparison of the experimental spectra with the predictions of calculations carried out at the DFT M05-2X/6-31+G(d) level of theory lead to firm assignments for the H-bonding architectures of a total of eight conformers of four molecules, including three in Z-Gln-OH, one in Z-Gln-NHMe, three in Ac-Gln-NHBn, and one in Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn. The Gln side chain engages actively in forming H-bonds with nearest-neighbor amide groups, forming C8 H-bonds to the C-terminal side, C9 H-bonds to the N-terminal side, and an amide-stacked geometry, all with an extended (C5) peptide backbone about the Gln residue. The Gln side chain also stabilizes an inverse γ-turn in the peptide backbone by forming a pair of H-bonds that bridge the γ-turn and stabilize it. Finally, the entire conformer population of Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn is funneled into a single structure that incorporates the peptide backbone in a type I β-turn, stabilized by the Gln side chain forming a C7 H-bond to the central amide group in the β-turn not otherwise involved in a hydrogen bond. This β-turn backbone structure is nearly identical to that observed in a series of X-(AQ)-Y β-turns in the protein data bank, demonstrating that the gas-phase structure is robust to perturbations imposed by the crystalline protein environment. PMID:27054830

  12. Cancer therapeutic approach based on conformational stabilization of mutant p53 protein by small peptides.

    PubMed

    Tal, Perry; Eizenberger, Shay; Cohen, Elad; Goldfinger, Naomi; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Oren, Moshe; Rotter, Varda

    2016-03-15

    The p53 tumor suppressor serves as a major barrier against malignant transformation. Over 50% of tumors inactivate p53 by point mutations in its DNA binding domain. Most mutations destabilize p53 protein folding, causing its partial denaturation at physiological temperature. Thus a high proportion of human tumors overexpress a potential potent tumor suppressor in a non-functional, misfolded form. The equilibrium between the properly folded and misfolded states of p53 may be affected by molecules that interact with p53, stabilizing its native folding and restoring wild type p53 activity to cancer cells. To select for mutant p53 (mutp53) reactivating peptides, we adopted the phage display technology, allowing interactions between mutp53 and random peptide libraries presented on phages and enriching for phage that favor the correctly folded p53 conformation. We obtained a large database of potential reactivating peptides. Lead peptides were synthesized and analyzed for their ability to restore proper p53 folding and activity. Remarkably, many enriched peptides corresponded to known p53-binding proteins, including RAD9. Importantly, lead peptides elicited dramatic regression of aggressive tumors in mouse xenograft models. Such peptides might serve as novel agents for human cancer therapy. PMID:26943582

  13. Cancer therapeutic approach based on conformational stabilization of mutant p53 protein by small peptides

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Perry; Eizenberger, Shay; Cohen, Elad; Goldfinger, Naomi; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Oren, Moshe; Rotter, Varda

    2016-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor serves as a major barrier against malignant transformation. Over 50% of tumors inactivate p53 by point mutations in its DNA binding domain. Most mutations destabilize p53 protein folding, causing its partial denaturation at physiological temperature. Thus a high proportion of human tumors overexpress a potential potent tumor suppressor in a non-functional, misfolded form. The equilibrium between the properly folded and misfolded states of p53 may be affected by molecules that interact with p53, stabilizing its native folding and restoring wild type p53 activity to cancer cells. To select for mutant p53 (mutp53) reactivating peptides, we adopted the phage display technology, allowing interactions between mutp53 and random peptide libraries presented on phages and enriching for phage that favor the correctly folded p53 conformation. We obtained a large database of potential reactivating peptides. Lead peptides were synthesized and analyzed for their ability to restore proper p53 folding and activity. Remarkably, many enriched peptides corresponded to known p53-binding proteins, including RAD9. Importantly, lead peptides elicited dramatic regression of aggressive tumors in mouse xenograft models. Such peptides might serve as novel agents for human cancer therapy. PMID:26943582

  14. Dual, HLA-B27 Subtype-dependent Conformation of a Self-peptide

    PubMed Central

    Hülsmeyer, Martin; Fiorillo, Maria Teresa; Bettosini, Francesca; Sorrentino, Rosa; Saenger, Wolfram; Ziegler, Andreas; Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The products of the human leukocyte antigen subtypes HLA-B*2705 and HLA-B*2709 differ only in residue 116 (Asp vs. His) within the peptide binding groove but are differentially associated with the autoimmune disease ankylosing spondylitis (AS); HLA-B*2705 occurs in AS-patients, whereas HLA-B*2709 does not. The subtypes also generate differential T cell repertoires as exemplified by distinct T cell responses against the self-peptide pVIPR (RRKWRRWHL). The crystal structures described here show that pVIPR binds in an unprecedented dual conformation only to HLA-B*2705 molecules. In one binding mode, peptide pArg5 forms a salt bridge to Asp116, connected with drastically different interactions between peptide and heavy chain, contrasting with the second, conventional conformation, which is exclusively found in the case of B*2709. These subtype-dependent differences in pVIPR binding link the emergence of dissimilar T cell repertoires in individuals with HLA-B*2705 or HLA-B*2709 to the buried Asp116/His116 polymorphism and provide novel insights into peptide presentation by major histocompatibility antigens. PMID:14734527

  15. The interaction with gold suppresses fiber-like conformations of the amyloid β (16-22) peptide.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Luca; Ardèvol, Albert; Parrinello, Michele; Lutz, Helmut; Lu, Hao; Weidner, Tobias; Corni, Stefano

    2016-04-28

    Inorganic surfaces and nanoparticles can accelerate or inhibit the fibrillation process of proteins and peptides, including the biomedically relevant amyloid β peptide. However, the microscopic mechanisms that determine such an effect are still poorly understood. By means of large-scale, state-of-the-art enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations, here we identify an interaction mechanism between the segments 16-22 of the amyloid β peptide, known to be fibrillogenic by itself, and the Au(111) surface in water that leads to the suppression of fiber-like conformations from the peptide conformational ensemble. Moreover, thanks to advanced simulation analysis techniques, we characterize the conformational selection vs. induced fit nature of the gold effect. Our results disclose an inhibition mechanism that is rooted in the details of the microscopic peptide-surface interaction rather than in general phenomena such as peptide sequestration from the solution. PMID:27064268

  16. Conformational dependence of collagenase (matrix metalloproteinase-1) up-regulation by elastin peptides in cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Brassart, B; Fuchs, P; Huet, E; Alix, A J; Wallach, J; Tamburro, A M; Delacoux, F; Haye, B; Emonard, H; Hornebeck, W; Debelle, L

    2001-02-16

    We have established that treatment of cultured human skin fibroblasts with tropoelastin or with heterogenic peptides, obtained after organo-alkaline or leukocyte elastase hydrolysis of insoluble elastin, induces a high expression of pro-collagenase-1 (pro-matrix metalloproteinase-1 (pro-MMP-1)). The identical effect was achieved after stimulation with a VGVAPG synthetic peptide, reflecting the elastin-derived domain known to bind to the 67-kDa elastin-binding protein. This clearly indicated involvement of this receptor in the described phenomenon. This notion was further reinforced by the fact that elastin peptides-dependent MMP-1 up-regulation has not been demonstrated in cultures preincubated with 1 mm lactose, which causes shedding of the elastin-binding protein and with pertussis toxin, which blocks the elastin-binding protein-dependent signaling pathway involving G protein, phospholipase C, and protein kinase C. Moreover, we demonstrated that diverse peptides maintaining GXXPG sequences can also induce similar cellular effects as a "principal" VGVAPG ligand of the elastin receptor. Results of our biophysical studies suggest that this peculiar consensus sequence stabilizes a type VIII beta-turn in several similar, but not identical, peptides that maintain a sufficient conformation to be recognized by the elastin receptor. We have also established that GXXPG elastin-derived peptides, in addition to pro-MMP-1, cause up-regulation of pro-matrix metalloproteinase-3 (pro-stromelysin 1). Furthermore, we found that the presence of plasmin in the culture medium activated these MMP proenzymes, leading to a consequent degradation of collagen substrate. Our results may be, therefore, relevant to pathobiology of inflammation, in which elastin-derived peptides bearing the GXXPG conformation (created after leukocyte-dependent proteolysis) bind to the elastin receptor of local fibroblasts and trigger signals leading to expression and activation of MMP-1 and MMP-3, which in

  17. Conformational dynamics and aggregation behavior of piezoelectric diphenylalanine peptides in an external electric field

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Catherine M.; Northey, Thomas; Ryan, Kate; Brooks, Bernard R.; Kholkin, Andrei; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel

    2014-01-01

    Aromatic peptides such as diphenylalanine (FF) have the characteristic capacity to self-assemble into ordered nanostructures such as peptide nanotubes, which are biocompatible, thermally and chemically stable, and have strong piezoelectric activity and high mechanical strength. The physical properties of FF aggregates open up a variety of potential biomedical applications. Electric fields are commonly applied to align FF nanotubes, yet little is known about the effect of the electric field on the assembly process. Using all-atom molecular dynamics with explicit water molecules, we probe the conformational dynamics of individual, solvated FF molecules with both charged and neutral ends, to account for different possible pH conditions. With charged ends, the FF molecules show more complex dynamics, experiencing three main conformational states (cis, trans and extended). We first examine the structural response of FF monomers to the application of a constant external electric field over a range of intensities. We also probe the aggregation mechanism of FF peptides, both with and without an externally applied electric field, and find that the presence of even relatively weak fields can accelerate the formation of ordered FF aggregates, primarily by facilitating the alignment of individual molecular dipole moments. The correlation between the strength of the external electric field and the local dipolar interactions is modulated both by the conformational response of individual FF peptides (e.g. backbone stretching, hydrogen bonds and relative alignment of aromatic sidechains) and by the response of neighboring FF and water molecules. These field-dependent observations may facilitate future studies on the controlled formation of nano-structured aggregates of piezoelectric peptides and the understanding of their specific electromechanical properties. PMID:25240398

  18. The Presence of Two Cyclase Thioesterases Expands the Conformational Freedom of the Cyclic Peptide Occidiofungin

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Akshaya; Gu, Ganyu; Escano, Jerome; Lu, Shi-En; Smith, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Occidiofungin is a cyclic nonribosomally synthesized antifungal peptide with submicromolar activity produced by Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia contaminans. The biosynthetic gene cluster was confirmed to contain two cyclase thioesterases. NMR analysis revealed that the presence of both thioesterases is used to increase the conformational repertoire of the cyclic peptide. The loss of the OcfN cyclic thioesterase by mutagenesis results in a reduction of conformational variants and an appreciable decrease in bioactivity against Candida species. Presumably, the presence of both asparagine and β-hydroxyasparagine variants coordinate the enzymatic function of both of the cyclase thioesterases. OcfN has presumably evolved to be part of the biosynthetic gene cluster due to its ability to produce structural variants that enhance antifungal activity against some fungi. The enhancement of the antifungal activity from the incorporation of an additional cyclase thioesterase into the biosynthetic gene cluster of occidiofungin supports the need to explore new conformational variants of other therapeutic or potentially therapeutic cyclic peptides. PMID:23394257

  19. Direct Observation of Aggregation-Induced Backbone Conformational Changes in Tau Peptides.

    PubMed

    Jiji, A C; Shine, A; Vijayan, Vinesh

    2016-09-12

    In tau proteins, the hexapeptides in the R2 and R3 repeats are known to initiate tau fibril formation, which causes a class of neurodegenerative diseases called the taupathies. We show that in R3, in addition to the presence of the hexapeptides, the correct turn conformation upstream to it is also essential for producing prion-like fibrils that are capable of propagation. A time-dependent NMR aggregation assay of a slow fibril forming R3-S316P peptide revealed a trans to cis equilibrium shift in the peptide-bond conformation preceding P316 during the growth phase of the aggregation process. S316 was identified as the key residue in the turn that confers templating capacity on R3 fibrils to accelerate the aggregation of the R3-S316P peptide. These results on the specific interactions and conformational changes responsible for tau aggregation could prove useful for developing an efficient therapeutic intervention in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27513615

  20. Conformational analysis of glutamic acid: a density functional approach using implicit continuum solvent model.

    PubMed

    Turan, Başak; Selçuki, Cenk

    2014-09-01

    Amino acids are constituents of proteins and enzymes which take part almost in all metabolic reactions. Glutamic acid, with an ability to form a negatively charged side chain, plays a major role in intra and intermolecular interactions of proteins, peptides, and enzymes. An exhaustive conformational analysis has been performed for all eight possible forms at B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. All possible neutral, zwitterionic, protonated, and deprotonated forms of glutamic acid structures have been investigated in solution by using polarizable continuum model mimicking water as the solvent. Nine families based on the dihedral angles have been classified for eight glutamic acid forms. The electrostatic effects included in the solvent model usually stabilize the charged forms more. However, the stability of the zwitterionic form has been underestimated due to the lack of hydrogen bonding between the solute and solvent; therefore, it is observed that compact neutral glutamic acid structures are more stable in solution than they are in vacuum. Our calculations have shown that among all eight possible forms, some are not stable in solution and are immediately converted to other more stable forms. Comparison of isoelectronic glutamic acid forms indicated that one of the structures among possible zwitterionic and anionic forms may dominate over the other possible forms. Additional investigations using explicit solvent models are necessary to determine the stability of charged forms of glutamic acid in solution as our results clearly indicate that hydrogen bonding and its type have a major role in the structure and energy of conformers. PMID:25135067

  1. Conformational Analysis of Free and Bound Retinoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zheng; Li, Xue; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    The conformational profiles of unbound all-trans and 9-cis retinoic acid (RA) have been determined using classical and quantum mechanical calculations. Sixty-six all-trans-RA (ATRA) and forty-eight 9-cis-RA energy minimum conformers were identified via HF/6-31G* geometry optimizations in vacuo. Their relative conformational energies were estimated utilizing the M06, M06-2x and MP2 methods combined with the 6-311+G(d,p), aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets, as well as complete basis set MP2 extrapolations using the latter two basis sets. Single-point energy calculations performed with the M06-2x density functional were found to yield similar results to MP2/CBS for the low-energy retinoic acid conformations. Not unexpectedly, the conformational propensities of retinoic acid were governed by the orientation and arrangement of the torsion angles associated with the polyene tail. We also used previously reported QM/MM X-ray refinement results on four ATRA-protein crystal structures plus one newly refined 9-cis-RA complex (PDB ID 1XDK) in order to investigate the conformational preferences of bound retinoic acid. In the re-refined RA conformers the conjugated double bonds are nearly coplanar, which is consistent with the global minimum identified by the Omega/QM method rather than the corresponding crystallographically determined conformations given in the PDB. Consequently, a 91.3% average reduction of the local strain energy in the gas phase, as well as 92.1% in PCM solvent, was observed using the QM/MM refined structures versus the PDB deposited RA conformations. These results thus demonstrate that our QM/MM X-ray refinement approach can significantly enhance the quality of X-ray crystal structures refined by conventional refinement protocols, thereby providing reliable drug-target structural information for use in structure-based drug discovery applications. PMID:22844234

  2. Computer determination of peptide conformations in water: different roads to structure.

    PubMed Central

    Simmerling, C L; Elber, R

    1995-01-01

    Fragments of proteins (short peptides) that "fold" suggest a mechanism of how complete conformational search in protein folding is avoided. We used a computational method to determine structures of two foldable peptides in explicit water: RVEW and CSVTC. The optimization starts from random structures and no experimental constraints are used. In agreement with NMR data, the simulations find a hydrophobic pair (Val/Trp) in REVW. The structure of CSVTC is induced by a surface water that bridges two amide hydrogens, a drive to structure hypothesized by Ben-Naim [Ben-Naim, A. (1990) J. Chem. Phys. 93, 8196-8210] that is largely ignored in studies of folding. Tendency to structure in short peptide chains suggests a mechanism for the formation of short-range nucleation sites in protein folding. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7724538

  3. Conformational photoswitching of a synthetic peptide foldamer bound within a phospholipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    De Poli, Matteo; Zawodny, Wojciech; Quinonero, Ophélie; Lorch, Mark; Webb, Simon J; Clayden, Jonathan

    2016-04-29

    The dynamic properties of foldamers, synthetic molecules that mimic folded biomolecules, have mainly been explored in free solution. We report on the design, synthesis, and conformational behavior of photoresponsive foldamers bound in a phospholipid bilayer akin to a biological membrane phase. These molecules contain a chromophore, which can be switched between two configurations by different wavelengths of light, attached to a helical synthetic peptide that both promotes membrane insertion and communicates conformational change along its length. Light-induced structural changes in the chromophore are translated into global conformational changes, which are detected by monitoring the solid-state (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance signals of a remote fluorine-containing residue located 1 to 2 nanometers away. The behavior of the foldamers in the membrane phase is similar to that of analogous compounds in organic solvents. PMID:27033546

  4. Mimicking the membrane-mediated conformation of dynorphin A-(1-13)-peptide: Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance studies in methanolic solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, C.R.D.; Hughes, D.W.; Epand, R.M. ); Mishra, P.K.; Bothner-By, A.A. ); St.Pierre, S.A. )

    1991-05-14

    The structural requirements for the binding of dynorphin to the {kappa}-opioid receptor are of profound clinical interest in the search for a powerful nonaddictive analgesic. These requirements are thought to be met by the membrane-mediated conformation of the opioid peptide dynorphin A-(1-13)-peptide, Tyr{sup 1}-Gly{sup 2}-Gly{sup 3}-Phe{sup 4}-Leu{sup 5}-Arg{sup 6}-Arg{sup 7}-Ile{sup 8}-Arg{sup 9}-Pro{sup 10}-Lys{sup 11}-Leu{sup 12}-Lys{sup 13}. Schwyzer has proposed an essentially {alpha}-helical membrane-mediated conformation of the 13 amino acid peptide. In the present study, circular dichroism (CD) studies on dynorphin A-(1-13)-peptide bound to an anionic phospholipid signified negligible helical content of the peptide. CD studies also demonstrated that the aqueous-membraneous interphase may be mimicked by methanol. The 500- and 620-MHz {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of dynorphin A-(1-13)-peptide in methanolic solution were sequence-specifically assigned with the aid of correlated spectroscopy (COSY), double-quantum filtered phase-sensitive COSY (DQF-COSY), relayed COSY (RELAY), and nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY). 2-D CAMELSPIN/ROESY experiments indicated that at least the part of the molecule from Arg{sup 7} to Arg{sup 9} was in an extended or {beta}-strand conformation, which agreed with deuterium-exchange and temperature-dependence studies of the amide protons and analysis of the vicinal spin-spin coupling constants {sup 3}J{sub HN{alpha}}. The results clearly demonstrated the absence of extensive {alpha}-helix formation. {chi}{sub 1} rotamer analysis of the {sup 3}J{sub {alpha}{beta}} demonstrated no preferred side-chain conformations.

  5. Relationship between conformational dynamics and electron transfer in a desolvated peptide. Part II. Temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Parks, Joel H; Semrouni, David; Clavaguéra, Carine; Ohanessian, Gilles

    2013-02-14

    Recent time-resolved lifetime measurements studied the quenching of the fluorescence emitted by a dye covalently bound to the desolvated peptide Dye-Pro(4)-Arg(+)-Trp. This peptide sequence was chosen for study since intramolecular interactions constrain all large-scale fluctuations except for those of the interacting dye and Trp side chain. It was shown that quenching occurred as a result of interaction between the excited dye and tryptophan side chain. These measurements exhibited a temperature dependence that suggested the quenching mechanism was related to electron transfer. This paper presents a comparison of the experimental quenching rate with the Marcus electron transfer model performed with molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. Taking advantage of the AMOEBA force field that explicitly includes polarizability ensures that the intramolecular electrostatic and polarization interactions in this desolvated peptide ion are treated realistically. MD calculations identify both large-scale fluctuations between conformations as well as small-scale fluctuations within a conformation that are shown to be correlated with torsional dynamics of the Trp side chain. Trajectories of the Dye-Trp distance identify the occurrence of close separations required for efficient electron transfer. The temperature dependence of the quenching rate closely follows the rate predicted by the Marcus electron transfer model within uncertainties resulting from statistical averages. Estimates of the energy parameters characterizing the Marcus model indicate the electronic coupling matrix element and the reaction free energy derived from the fits are consistent with published values for transfer in polyproline bridged peptides. These calculations help to provide a molecular basis for investigating conformational changes in desolvated biomolecular ions by fluorescence quenching measurements. PMID:23297809

  6. Conformational steering in dicarboxy acids: the native structure of succinic acid.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Michaela K; Méndez, Estibaliz; Rajappan Nair, K P; Godfrey, Peter D; McNaughton, Don; Écija, Patricia; Basterretxea, Francisco J; Cocinero, Emilio J; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2015-08-14

    Succinic acid, a dicarboxylic acid molecule, has been investigated spectroscopically with computational support to elucidate the complex aspects of its conformational composition. Due to the torsional freedom of the carbon backbone and hydroxy groups, a large number of potentially plausible conformers can be generated with an indication that the gauche conformer is favored over the trans form. The microwave and millimeter wave spectra have been analyzed and accurate spectroscopic constants have been derived that correlate best with those of the lowest energy gauche conformer. For an unambiguous conformational identification measurements were extended to the monosubstituted isotopologues, precisely determining the structural properties. Besides bond distances and angles, particularly the dihedral angle has been determined to be 67.76(11)°, confirming the anomalous tendency of the methylene units to favor gauche conformers when a short aliphatic segment is placed between two carbonyl groups. PMID:25767836

  7. Site-Specific Characterization of d-Amino Acid Containing Peptide Epimers by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the d-amino acid containing peptide (DAACP) candidate can be discovered by observing the differences of biological activity and chromatographic retention time between the synthetic peptides and naturally occurring peptides. However, it is difficult to determine the exact position of d-amino acid in the DAACP candidates. Herein, we developed a novel site-specific strategy to rapidly and precisely localize d-amino acids in peptides by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) analysis of mass spectrometry (MS)-generated epimeric fragment ions. Briefly, the d/l-peptide epimers were separated by online reversed-phase liquid chromatography and fragmented by collision-induced dissociation (CID), followed by IMS analysis. The epimeric fragment ions resulting from d/l-peptide epimers exhibit conformational differences, thus showing different mobilities in IMS. The arrival time shift between the epimeric fragment ions was used as criteria to localize the d-amino acid substitution. The utility of this strategy was demonstrated by analysis of peptide epimers with different molecular sizes, [d-Trp]-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, [d-Ala]-deltorphin, [d-Phe]-achatin-I, and their counterparts that contain all-l amino acids. Furthermore, the crustacean hyperglycemia hormones (CHHs, 8.5 kDa) were isolated from the American lobster Homarus americanus and identified by integration of MS-based bottom-up and top-down sequencing approaches. The IMS data acquired using our novel site-specific strategy localized the site of isomerization of l- to d-Phe at the third residue of the CHHs from the N-terminus. Collectively, this study demonstrates a new method for discovery of DAACPs using IMS technique with the ability to localize d-amino acid residues. PMID:24328107

  8. Solid Phase Synthesis of C-Terminal Boronic Acid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Behnam, Mira A M; Sundermann, Tom R; Klein, Christian D

    2016-05-01

    Peptides and peptidomimetics with a C-terminal boronic acid group have prolific applications in numerous fields of research, but their synthetic accessibility remains problematic. A convenient, high yield synthesis of peptide-boronic acids on a solid support is described here, using commercially available 1-glycerol polystyrene resin. The method is compatible with Fmoc chemistry and offers a versatile approach to aryl and alkyl aminoboronic acids without additional purification steps. PMID:27104613

  9. Conformational Fine-Tuning of Pore-Forming Peptide Potency and Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Krauson, Aram J; Hall, O Morgan; Fuselier, Taylor; Starr, Charles G; Kauffman, W Berkeley; Wimley, William C

    2015-12-30

    To better understand the sequence-structure-function relationships that control the activity and selectivity of membrane-permeabilizing peptides, we screened a peptide library, based on the archetypal pore-former melittin, for loss-of-function variants. This was accomplished by assaying library members for failure to cause leakage of entrapped contents from synthetic lipid vesicles at a peptide-to-lipid ratio of 1:20, 10-fold higher than the concentration at which melittin efficiently permeabilizes the same vesicles. Surprisingly, about one-third of the library members are inactive under these conditions. In the negative peptides, two changes of hydrophobic residues to glycine were especially abundant. We show that loss-of-function activity can be completely recapitulated by a single-residue change of the leucine at position 16 to glycine. Unlike the potently cytolytic melittin, the loss-of-function peptides, including the single-site variant, are essentially inactive against phosphatidylcholine vesicles and multiple types of eukaryotic cells. Loss of function is shown to result from a shift in the binding-folding equilibrium away from the active, bound, α-helical state toward the inactive, unbound, random-coil state. Accordingly, the addition of anionic lipids to synthetic lipid vesicles restored binding, α-helical secondary structure, and potent activity of the "negative" peptides. While nontoxic to mammalian cells, the single-site variant has potent bactericidal activity, consistent with the anionic nature of bacterial membranes. The results show that conformational fine-tuning of helical pore-forming peptides is a powerful way to modulate their activity and selectivity. PMID:26632653

  10. Conformational Fine-Tuning of Pore-Forming Peptide Potency and Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the sequence–structure–function relationships that control the activity and selectivity of membrane-permeabilizing peptides, we screened a peptide library, based on the archetypal pore-former melittin, for loss-of-function variants. This was accomplished by assaying library members for failure to cause leakage of entrapped contents from synthetic lipid vesicles at a peptide-to-lipid ratio of 1:20, 10-fold higher than the concentration at which melittin efficiently permeabilizes the same vesicles. Surprisingly, about one-third of the library members are inactive under these conditions. In the negative peptides, two changes of hydrophobic residues to glycine were especially abundant. We show that loss-of-function activity can be completely recapitulated by a single-residue change of the leucine at position 16 to glycine. Unlike the potently cytolytic melittin, the loss-of-function peptides, including the single-site variant, are essentially inactive against phosphatidylcholine vesicles and multiple types of eukaryotic cells. Loss of function is shown to result from a shift in the binding–folding equilibrium away from the active, bound, α-helical state toward the inactive, unbound, random-coil state. Accordingly, the addition of anionic lipids to synthetic lipid vesicles restored binding, α-helical secondary structure, and potent activity of the “negative” peptides. While nontoxic to mammalian cells, the single-site variant has potent bactericidal activity, consistent with the anionic nature of bacterial membranes. The results show that conformational fine-tuning of helical pore-forming peptides is a powerful way to modulate their activity and selectivity. PMID:26632653

  11. Conformational states and recognition of amyloidogenic peptides of human insulin-degrading enzyme

    PubMed Central

    McCord, Lauren A.; Liang, Wenguang G.; Dowdell, Evan; Kalas, Vasilios; Hoey, Robert J.; Koide, Akiko; Koide, Shohei; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) selectively degrades the monomer of amyloidogenic peptides and contributes to clearance of amyloid β (Aβ). Thus, IDE retards the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. IDE possesses an enclosed catalytic chamber that engulfs and degrades its peptide substrates; however, the molecular mechanism of IDE function, including substrate access to the chamber and recognition, remains elusive. Here, we captured a unique IDE conformation by using a synthetic antibody fragment as a crystallization chaperone. An unexpected displacement of a door subdomain creates an ∼18-Å opening to the chamber. This swinging-door mechanism permits the entry of short peptides into the catalytic chamber and disrupts the catalytic site within IDE door subdomain. Given the propensity of amyloidogenic peptides to convert into β-strands for their polymerization into amyloid fibrils, they also use such β-strands to stabilize the disrupted catalytic site resided at IDE door subdomain for their degradation by IDE. Thus, action of the swinging door allows IDE to recognize amyloidogenicity by substrate-induced stabilization of the IDE catalytic cleft. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis revealed that IDE exists as a mixture of closed and open states. These open states, which are distinct from the swinging door state, permit entry of larger substrates (e.g., Aβ, insulin) to the chamber and are preferred in solution. Mutational studies confirmed the critical roles of the door subdomain and hinge loop joining the N- and C-terminal halves of IDE for catalysis. Together, our data provide insights into the conformational changes of IDE that govern the selective destruction of amyloidogenic peptides. PMID:23922390

  12. Ribosomal Synthesis of Peptides with Multiple β-Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Tomoshige; Goto, Yuki; Suga, Hiroaki; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2016-02-17

    The compatibility of β-amino acids with ribosomal translation was studied for decades, but it has been still unclear whether the ribosome can accept various β-amino acids, and whether the ribosome can introduce multiple β-amino acids in a peptide. In the present study, by using the Escherichia coli reconstituted cell-free translation system with a reprogramed genetic code, we screened β-amino acids that give high single incorporation efficiency and used them to synthesize peptides containing multiple β-amino acids. The experiments of single β-amino acid incorporation into a peptide revealed that 13 β-amino acids are compatible with ribosomal translation. Six of the tested β-amino acids (βhGly, l-βhAla, l-βhGln, l-βhPhg, l-βhMet, and d-βhPhg) showed high incorporation efficiencies, and seven (l-βhLeu, l-βhIle, l-βhAsn, l-βhPhe, l-βhLys, d-βhAla, and d-βhLeu) showed moderate incorporation efficiencies; whereas no full-length peptide was produced using other β-amino acids (l-βhPro, l-βhTrp, and l-βhGlu). Subsequent double-incorporation experiments using β-amino acids with high single incorporation efficiency revealed that elongation of peptides with successive β-amino acids is prohibited. Efficiency of the double-incorporation of the β-amino acids was restored by the insertion of Tyr or Ile between the two β-amino acids. On the basis of these experiments, we also designed mRNA sequences of peptides, and demonstrated the ribosomal synthesis of peptides containing different types of β-amino acids at multiple positions. PMID:26807980

  13. Effect of osmolytes on the conformation and aggregation of some amyloid peptides: CD spectroscopic data.

    PubMed

    Inayathullah, Mohammed; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2016-06-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation are responsible for a large number of diseases called protein conformational diseases or disorders that include Alzheimer׳s disease, Huntington׳s diseases, Prion related encephalopathies and type-II diabetes (http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/35041139) (Kopito and Ron, 2000) [1]. A variety of studies have shown that some small organic molecules, known as osmolytes have the ability to stabilize native conformation of proteins and prevent misfolding and aggregation (http://www.la-press.com/article.php?article_id=447) (Zhao et al., 2008) [2]. It has been shown that certain short segment or fragment of respective proteins can also form amyloids, and the segments also promote the aggregation in the full-length protein (http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/0929867023369187) (Gazit, 2002) [3]. This article presents circular dichroism spectroscopic data on conformational analysis and effect of osmolytes on Aβ peptide fragments, different lengths of polyglutamine peptide and the amyloidogenic segment of islet amyloid polypeptide. PMID:27222868

  14. Conformational Changes of Calmodulin on Calcium and Peptide Binding Monitored by Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Nirschl, Martin; Ottl, Johannes; Vörös, Janos

    2011-01-01

    Film bulk acoustic resonators (FBAR) are mass sensitive, label-free biosensors that allow monitoring of the interaction between biomolecules. In this paper we use the FBAR to measure the binding of calcium and the CaMKII peptide to calmodulin. Because the mass of the calcium is too small to be detected, the conformational change caused by the binding process is measured by monitoring the resonant frequency and the motional resistance of the FBAR. The resonant frequency is a measure for the amount of mass coupled to the sensor while the motional resistance is influenced by the viscoelastic properties of the adsorbent. The measured frequency shift during the calcium adsorptions was found to be strongly dependent on the surface concentration of the immobilized calmodulin, which indicates that the measured signal is significantly influenced by the amount of water inside the calmodulin layer. By plotting the measured motional resistance against the frequency shift, a mass adsorption can be distinguished from processes involving measurable conformational changes. With this method three serial processes were identified during the peptide binding. The results show that the FBAR is a promising technology for the label-free measurement of conformational changes. PMID:25585566

  15. The effect of protonation site and conformation on surface-induced dissociation in a small, lysine containing peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Kulsum; Blackwood, Jacob; Barnes, George L.

    2015-09-01

    Simulations of surface induced dissociation (SID) of protonated peptides have provided significant insight into the energy transfer and mechanism of SID; however, they have been limited to glycine and alanine containing peptides. The chemical simplicity of these systems forces N-terminus protonation. Here we present results from simulations involving a lysine containing peptide that allowed for multiple protonation sites and conformations. We found that when the excess proton is located on the basic lysine side chain, fragmentation dynamics are typically slower and occur through a 'charge-remote' pathway. Additionally, conformation alone has a significant effect on the observed proton transfer pathways.

  16. The interaction with gold suppresses fiber-like conformations of the amyloid β (16-22) peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, Luca; Ardèvol, Albert; Parrinello, Michele; Lutz, Helmut; Lu, Hao; Weidner, Tobias; Corni, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Inorganic surfaces and nanoparticles can accelerate or inhibit the fibrillation process of proteins and peptides, including the biomedically relevant amyloid β peptide. However, the microscopic mechanisms that determine such an effect are still poorly understood. By means of large-scale, state-of-the-art enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations, here we identify an interaction mechanism between the segments 16-22 of the amyloid β peptide, known to be fibrillogenic by itself, and the Au(111) surface in water that leads to the suppression of fiber-like conformations from the peptide conformational ensemble. Moreover, thanks to advanced simulation analysis techniques, we characterize the conformational selection vs. induced fit nature of the gold effect. Our results disclose an inhibition mechanism that is rooted in the details of the microscopic peptide-surface interaction rather than in general phenomena such as peptide sequestration from the solution.Inorganic surfaces and nanoparticles can accelerate or inhibit the fibrillation process of proteins and peptides, including the biomedically relevant amyloid β peptide. However, the microscopic mechanisms that determine such an effect are still poorly understood. By means of large-scale, state-of-the-art enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations, here we identify an interaction mechanism between the segments 16-22 of the amyloid β peptide, known to be fibrillogenic by itself, and the Au(111) surface in water that leads to the suppression of fiber-like conformations from the peptide conformational ensemble. Moreover, thanks to advanced simulation analysis techniques, we characterize the conformational selection vs. induced fit nature of the gold effect. Our results disclose an inhibition mechanism that is rooted in the details of the microscopic peptide-surface interaction rather than in general phenomena such as peptide sequestration from the solution. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  17. Computing Nonequilibrium Conformational Dynamics of Structured Nucleic Acid Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Sedeh, Reza Sharifi; Pan, Keyao; Adendorff, Matthew Ralph; Hallatschek, Oskar; Bathe, Klaus-Jürgen; Bathe, Mark

    2016-01-12

    Synthetic nucleic acids can be programmed to form precise three-dimensional structures on the nanometer-scale. These thermodynamically stable complexes can serve as structural scaffolds to spatially organize functional molecules including multiple enzymes, chromophores, and force-sensing elements with internal dynamics that include substrate reaction-diffusion, excitonic energy transfer, and force-displacement response that often depend critically on both the local and global conformational dynamics of the nucleic acid assembly. However, high molecular weight assemblies exhibit long time-scale and large length-scale motions that cannot easily be sampled using all-atom computational procedures such as molecular dynamics. As an alternative, here we present a computational framework to compute the overdamped conformational dynamics of structured nucleic acid assemblies and apply it to a DNA-based tweezer, a nine-layer DNA origami ring, and a pointer-shaped DNA origami object, which consist of 204, 3,600, and over 7,000 basepairs, respectively. The framework employs a mechanical finite element model for the DNA nanostructure combined with an implicit solvent model to either simulate the Brownian dynamics of the assembly or alternatively compute its Brownian modes. Computational results are compared with an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of the DNA-based tweezer. Several hundred microseconds of Brownian dynamics are simulated for the nine-layer ring origami object to reveal its long time-scale conformational dynamics, and the first ten Brownian modes of the pointer-shaped structure are predicted. PMID:26636351

  18. Charge, Color, and Conformation: Spectroscopy on Isomer-Selected Peptide Ions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring the chromism induced by intramolecular hydrogen and charge transfers within proteins as well as the isomerization of both protein and cofactor is essential not only to understand photoactive signaling pathways but also to design targeted opto-switchable proteins. We used a dual-ion mobility drift tube coupled to a tunable picosecond laser to explore the optical and structural properties of a peptide chain bound to a chromophore—a prototype system allowing for a proton transfer coupled to conformational change. With the support of molecular dynamics and DFT calculations, we show how proton transfer between the peptide and its cofactor can dramatically modify the optical properties of the system and demonstrate that these changes can be triggered by collisional activation in the gas phase. PMID:26756462

  19. Peptide Conformational Preferences in Osmolyte Solutions: Transfer Free Energies of Decaalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubo, Hironori; Hu, Char Y.; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2011-02-16

    The nature in which the protecting osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and the denaturing osmolyte urea affect protein stability is investigated, simulating a decaalanine peptide model in multiple conformations of the denatured ensemble. Binary solutions of both osmolytes and mixed osmolyte solutions at physiologically relevant concentrations of 2:1 (urea:TMAO) are studied using standard molecular dynamics simulations and solvation free energy calculations. Component analysis reveals the differences in the importance of the van der Waals (vdW) and electrostatic interactions for protecting and denaturing osmolytes. We find that urea denaturation governed by transfer free energy differences is dominated by vdW attractions, whereas TMAO exerts its effect by causing unfavorable electrostatic interactions both in the binary solution and mixed osmolyte solution. Analysis of the results showed no evidence in the ternary solution of disruption of the correlations among the peptide and osmolytes, nor of significant changes in the strength of the water hydrogen bond network.

  20. Conformational dynamics and aggregation behavior of piezoelectric diphenylalanine peptides in an external electric field.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Catherine M; Northey, Thomas; Ryan, Kate; Brooks, Bernard R; Kholkin, Andrei L; Rodriguez, Brian J; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic peptides including diphenylalanine (FF) have the capacity to self-assemble into ordered, biocompatible nanostructures with piezoelectric properties relevant to a variety of biomedical applications. Electric fields are commonly applied to align FF nanotubes, yet little is known about the effect of the electric field on the assembly process. Using all-atom molecular dynamics with explicit water molecules, we examine the response of FF monomers to the application of a constant external electric field over a range of intensities. We probe the aggregation mechanism of FF peptides, and find that the presence of even relatively weak fields can accelerate ordered aggregation, primarily by facilitating the alignment of individual molecular dipole moments. This is modulated by the conformational response of individual FF peptides (e.g., backbone stretching) and by the cooperative alignment of neighboring FF and water molecules. These observations may facilitate future studies on the controlled formation of nanostructured aggregates of piezoelectric peptides and the understanding of their electro-mechanical properties. PMID:25240398

  1. The role of metals in protein conformational disorders - The case of prion protein and Aβ -peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Santis, E.; Minicozzi, V.; Morante, S.; Rossi, G. C.; Stellato, F.

    2016-02-01

    Protein conformational disorders are members of a vast class of pathologies in which endogenous proteins or peptides undergo a misfolding process by switching from the physiological soluble configuration to a pathological fibrillar insoluble state. An important, but not yet fully elucidated, role in the process appears to be played by transition metal ions, mainly copper and zinc. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most suitable techniques for the structural characterization of biological molecules in complex with metal. Owing to its chemical selectivity and sensitivity to the local atomic geometry around the absorber, it can be successfully used to study the environment of metal ions in complex with proteins and peptides in physiological conditions. In this paper we present X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of the metal ions coordination modes in systems where metals are complexed with specific amyloidogenic proteins and peptides. In particular, we show results concerning the Amyloid β peptide, that is involved in Alzheimer's disease, and the Prion protein, that is responsible for the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy. Our findings suggest that the copper and zinc ions may play a crucial role in the aggregation and fibril formation process of these two biomolecules. Elucidating this kind of interaction could be a key preliminary step before any viable therapy can be conceived or designed.

  2. Orientation and helical conformation of a tissue-specific hunter-killer peptide in micelles

    PubMed Central

    Plesniak, Leigh A.; Parducho, Jonathan I.; Ziebart, Angie; Geierstanger, Bernhard H.; Whiles, Jennifer A.; Melacini, Guiseppe; Jennings, Patricia A.

    2004-01-01

    Hunter-killer peptides are chimeric synthetic peptides that selectively target specific cell types for an apoptotic death. These peptides, which are models for potential therapeutics, contain a homing sequence for receptor-mediated interactions and a pro-apoptotic sequence. Homing domains have been designed to target angiogenic tumor cells, prostate cells, arthritic tissue and, most recently, adipose tissue. After a receptor-mediated internalization, the apoptotic sequence, which contains D-enantiomer amino acids, initiates apoptosis through mitochondrial membrane disruption. We have begun structure and functional studies on a peptide (HKP1) that specifically targets angiogenic tumor cells for apoptosis. As a model for mitochondrial membrane disruption, we have examined peptide-induced leakage of a calcein fluorophore from large unilamellar vesicles. These experiments demonstrate more potent leakage activity by HKP1 than the peptide lacking the homing domain. Circular dichroism and 2D homonuclear NMR experiments demonstrate that this tumor-specific HKP adopts a left-handed amphipathic helix in association with dodecylphosphorylcholine micelles in a parallel orientation to the lipid–water interface with the homing domain remaining exposed to solvent. The amphipathic helix of the apoptotic domain orients with nonpolar leucine and alanine residues inserting most deeply into the lipid environment. PMID:15273301

  3. Orientation and helical conformation of a tissue-specific hunter-killer peptide in micelles.

    PubMed

    Plesniak, Leigh A; Parducho, Jonathan I; Ziebart, Angie; Geierstanger, Bernhard H; Whiles, Jennifer A; Melacini, Guiseppe; Jennings, Patricia A

    2004-08-01

    Hunter-killer peptides are chimeric synthetic peptides that selectively target specific cell types for an apoptotic death. These peptides, which are models for potential therapeutics, contain a homing sequence for receptor-mediated interactions and a pro-apoptotic sequence. Homing domains have been designed to target angiogenic tumor cells, prostate cells, arthritic tissue and, most recently, adipose tissue. After a receptor-mediated internalization, the apoptotic sequence, which contains D-enantiomer amino acids, initiates apoptosis through mitochondrial membrane disruption. We have begun structure and functional studies on a peptide (HKP1) that specifically targets angiogenic tumor cells for apoptosis. As a model for mitochondrial membrane disruption, we have examined peptide-induced leakage of a calcein fluorophore from large unilamellar vesicles. These experiments demonstrate more potent leakage activity by HKP1 than the peptide lacking the homing domain. Circular dichroism and 2D homonuclear NMR experiments demonstrate that this tumor-specific HKP adopts a left-handed amphipathic helix in association with dodecylphosphorylcholine micelles in a parallel orientation to the lipid-water interface with the homing domain remaining exposed to solvent. The amphipathic helix of the apoptotic domain orients with nonpolar leucine and alanine residues inserting most deeply into the lipid environment. PMID:15273301

  4. Zeta Inhibitory Peptide Disrupts Electrostatic Interactions That Maintain Atypical Protein Kinase C in Its Active Conformation on the Scaffold p62.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Chun Lisa; Xie, Lei; Dore, Kim; Xie, Li; Del Rio, Jason C; King, Charles C; Martinez-Ariza, Guillermo; Hulme, Christopher; Malinow, Roberto; Bourne, Philip E; Newton, Alexandra C

    2015-09-01

    Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) enzymes signal on protein scaffolds, yet how they are maintained in an active conformation on scaffolds is unclear. A myristoylated peptide based on the autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate fragment of the atypical PKCζ, zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP), has been extensively used to inhibit aPKC activity; however, we have previously shown that ZIP does not inhibit the catalytic activity of aPKC isozymes in cells (Wu-Zhang, A. X., Schramm, C. L., Nabavi, S., Malinow, R., and Newton, A. C. (2012) J. Biol. Chem. 287, 12879-12885). Here we sought to identify a bona fide target of ZIP and, in so doing, unveiled a novel mechanism by which aPKCs are maintained in an active conformation on a protein scaffold. Specifically, we used protein-protein interaction network analysis, structural modeling, and protein-protein docking to predict that ZIP binds an acidic surface on the Phox and Bem1 (PB1) domain of p62, an interaction validated by peptide array analysis. Using a genetically encoded reporter for PKC activity fused to the p62 scaffold, we show that ZIP inhibits the activity of wild-type aPKC, but not a construct lacking the pseudosubstrate. These data support a model in which the pseudosubstrate of aPKCs is tethered to the acidic surface on p62, locking aPKC in an open, signaling-competent conformation. ZIP competes for binding to the acidic surface, resulting in displacement of the pseudosubstrate of aPKC and re-engagement in the substrate-binding cavity. This study not only identifies a cellular target for ZIP, but also unveils a novel mechanism by which scaffolded aPKC is maintained in an active conformation. PMID:26187466

  5. Zeta Inhibitory Peptide Disrupts Electrostatic Interactions That Maintain Atypical Protein Kinase C in Its Active Conformation on the Scaffold p62*

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Li-Chun Lisa; Xie, Lei; Dore, Kim; Xie, Li; Del Rio, Jason C.; King, Charles C.; Martinez-Ariza, Guillermo; Hulme, Christopher; Malinow, Roberto; Bourne, Philip E.; Newton, Alexandra C.

    2015-01-01

    Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) enzymes signal on protein scaffolds, yet how they are maintained in an active conformation on scaffolds is unclear. A myristoylated peptide based on the autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate fragment of the atypical PKCζ, zeta inhibitory peptide (ZIP), has been extensively used to inhibit aPKC activity; however, we have previously shown that ZIP does not inhibit the catalytic activity of aPKC isozymes in cells (Wu-Zhang, A. X., Schramm, C. L., Nabavi, S., Malinow, R., and Newton, A. C. (2012) J. Biol. Chem. 287, 12879–12885). Here we sought to identify a bona fide target of ZIP and, in so doing, unveiled a novel mechanism by which aPKCs are maintained in an active conformation on a protein scaffold. Specifically, we used protein-protein interaction network analysis, structural modeling, and protein-protein docking to predict that ZIP binds an acidic surface on the Phox and Bem1 (PB1) domain of p62, an interaction validated by peptide array analysis. Using a genetically encoded reporter for PKC activity fused to the p62 scaffold, we show that ZIP inhibits the activity of wild-type aPKC, but not a construct lacking the pseudosubstrate. These data support a model in which the pseudosubstrate of aPKCs is tethered to the acidic surface on p62, locking aPKC in an open, signaling-competent conformation. ZIP competes for binding to the acidic surface, resulting in displacement of the pseudosubstrate of aPKC and re-engagement in the substrate-binding cavity. This study not only identifies a cellular target for ZIP, but also unveils a novel mechanism by which scaffolded aPKC is maintained in an active conformation. PMID:26187466

  6. Conformational Flexibility and Peptide Interaction of the Translocation ATPase SecA

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, Jochen; Rapoport, Tom A.; Harvard-Med

    2010-09-21

    The SecA ATPase forms a functional complex with the protein-conducting SecY channel to translocate polypeptides across the bacterial cell membrane. SecA recognizes the translocation substrate and catalyzes its unidirectional movement through the SecY channel. The recent crystal structure of the Thermotoga maritima SecA-SecYEG complex shows the ATPase in a conformation where the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) have closed around a bound ADP-BeFx complex and SecA's polypeptide-binding clamp is shut. Here, we present the crystal structure of T. maritima SecA in isolation, determined in its ADP-bound form at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. SecA alone has a drastically different conformation in which the nucleotide-binding pocket between NBD1 and NBD2 is open and the preprotein cross-linking domain has rotated away from both NBDs, thereby opening the polypeptide-binding clamp. To investigate how this clamp binds polypeptide substrates, we also determined a structure of Bacillus subtilis SecA in complex with a peptide at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution. This structure shows that the peptide augments the highly conserved {beta}-sheet at the back of the clamp. Taken together, these structures suggest a mechanism by which ATP hydrolysis can lead to polypeptide translocation.

  7. Effect of acid predissolution on fibril size and fibril flexibility of synthetic beta-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, C L; Fitzgerald, M C; Murphy, R M

    1994-01-01

    beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) is the major protein component of senile plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits in Alzheimer's patients. Several researchers have demonstrated that A beta is neurotoxic in in vitro and in vivo systems. Peptide aggregation state and/or conformation might play a significant role in determining the toxicity of the peptide. The size and flexibility of fibrils formed from the synthetic peptide beta (1-39), corresponding to the first 39 residues of A beta, were determined. Samples were prepared either directly from lyophilized peptide or diluted from a 10 mg/ml stock solution in 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). All samples had a final peptide concentration of 0.5 mg/ml, a final pH of 7.4, and a final NaCl concentration of 0.14 M. The molecular weight and linear density of the fibrils increased with increasing pre-incubation time in TFA, based on static light scattering measurements. Analysis of the angular dependence of the intensity of scattered light indicated that the fibrils were semi-flexible chains and that the fibril flexibility decreased with increasing pre-incubation time in TFA. There was a concomitant change in phase behavior from precipitation to gelation with the decrease in fibril flexibility. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:7811938

  8. Pulsed hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass spectrometry probes conformational changes in amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Rempel, Don L.; Zhang, Jun; Sharma, Anuj K.; Mirica, Liviu M.; Gross, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Probing the conformational changes of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide aggregation is challenging owing to the vast heterogeneity of the resulting soluble aggregates. To investigate the formation of these aggregates in solution, we designed an MS-based biophysical approach and applied it to the formation of soluble aggregates of the Aβ42 peptide, the proposed causative agent in Alzheimer’s disease. The approach incorporates pulsed hydrogen–deuterium exchange coupled with MS analysis. The combined approach provides evidence for a self-catalyzed aggregation with a lag phase, as observed previously by fluorescence methods. Unlike those approaches, pulsed hydrogen–deuterium exchange does not require modified Aβ42 (e.g., labeling with a fluorophore). Furthermore, the approach reveals that the center region of Aβ42 is first to aggregate, followed by the C and N termini. We also found that the lag phase in the aggregation of soluble species is affected by temperature and Cu2+ ions. This MS approach has sufficient structural resolution to allow interrogation of Aβ aggregation in physiologically relevant environments. This platform should be generally useful for investigating the aggregation of other amyloid-forming proteins and neurotoxic soluble peptide aggregates. PMID:23959898

  9. Proline Editing: A General and Practical Approach to the Synthesis of Functionally and Structurally Diverse Peptides. Analysis of Steric versus Stereoelectronic Effects of 4-Substituted Prolines on Conformation within Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anil K.; Naduthambi, Devan; Thomas, Krista M.; Zondlo, Neal J.

    2013-01-01

    Functionalized proline residues have diverse applications. Herein we describe a practical approach, proline editing, for the synthesis of peptides with stereospecifically modified proline residues. Peptides are synthesized by standard solid-phase-peptide-synthesis to incorporate Fmoc-Hydroxyproline (4R-Hyp). In an automated manner, the Hyp hydroxyl is protected and the remainder of the peptide synthesized. After peptide synthesis, the Hyp protecting group is orthogonally removed and Hyp selectively modified to generate substituted proline amino acids, with the peptide main chain functioning to “protect” the proline amino and carboxyl groups. In a model tetrapeptide (Ac-TYPN-NH2), 4R-Hyp was stereospecifically converted to 122 different 4-substituted prolyl amino acids, with 4R or 4S stereochemistry, via Mitsunobu, oxidation, reduction, acylation, and substitution reactions. 4-Substituted prolines synthesized via proline editing include incorporated structured amino acid mimetics (Cys, Asp/Glu, Phe, Lys, Arg, pSer/pThr), recognition motifs (biotin, RGD), electron-withdrawing groups to induce stereoelectronic effects (fluoro, nitrobenzoate), handles for heteronuclear NMR (19F:fluoro; pentafluorophenyl or perfluoro-tert-butyl ether; 4,4-difluoro; 77SePh) and other spectroscopies (fluorescence, IR: cyanophenyl ether), leaving groups (sulfonate, halide, NHS, bromoacetate), and other reactive handles (amine, thiol, thioester, ketone, hydroxylamine, maleimide, acrylate, azide, alkene, alkyne, aryl halide, tetrazine, 1,2-aminothiol). Proline editing provides access to these proline derivatives with no solution phase synthesis. All peptides were analyzed by NMR to identify stereoelectronic and steric effects on conformation. Proline derivatives were synthesized to permit bioorthogonal conjugation reactions, including azide-alkyne, tetrazinetrans-cyclooctene, oxime, reductive amination, native chemical ligation, Suzuki, Sonogashira, cross-metathesis, and Diels

  10. Occurrence and function of D-amino acid-containing peptides and proteins: antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Mignogna, G; Simmaco, M; Barra, D

    1998-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are widely distributed in living organisms, where they represent a constitutive defence system acting as a first line of response against infections. The number of such peptides discovered has increased rapidly in the last few years, and more than 100 have been described from different sources. So far, antimicrobial peptides containing a D-amino acid have only been found in the skin secretions of frogs belonging to the genus Bombina. In the second position of the sequence of the mature peptides either D-alloisoleucine or D-leucine were detected. The D-amino acids are derived from the corresponding L forms by an as yet unknown posttranslational reaction. PMID:9949866

  11. Osmolyte Induced Changes in Peptide Conformational Ensemble Correlate with Slower Amyloid Aggregation: A Coarse-Grained Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Sukenik, Shahar; Sapir, Liel; Harries, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Stabilizing osmolytes are known to impact the process of amyloid aggregation, often altering aggregation kinetics. Recent evidence further suggests that osmolytes modify the peptide conformational dynamics, as well as change the physical characteristics of assembling amyloid fibrils. To resolve how these variations emerge on the molecular level, we simulated the initial aggregation steps of an amyloid-forming peptide in the presence and absence of the osmolyte sorbitol, a naturally occurring polyol. To this end, a coarse-grained force field was extended and implemented to access larger aggregate sizes and longer time scales. The force field optimization procedure placed emphasis on calibrating the solution thermodynamics of sorbitol, the aggregating peptide in its monomeric form, and the interaction of both of these components with each other and with water. Our simulations show a difference in aggregation kinetics and structural parameters in the presence of sorbitol compared to water, which qualitatively agree well with our experimentally resolved aggregation kinetics of the same peptide. The kinetic changes induced by sorbitol can be traced in our simulations to changes in monomer conformations resulting from osmolyte presence. These translate into changes in peptide conformations within the aggregated clusters and into differences in rates of monomer nucleation and of association to formed fibrils. We find that, compared to pure water as solvent, the presence of sorbitol induces formation of more aggregates each containing fewer peptides, with an increased tendency toward parallel interpeptide contacts. PMID:26587669

  12. Secondary conformation of short lysine- and leucine-rich peptides assessed by optical spectroscopies: effect of chain length, concentration, solvent, and time.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Belén; Boukhalfa-Heniche, F-Z; Seksek, Olivier; Coïc, Yves-Marie; Ghomi, Mahmoud

    2006-01-01

    Solution secondary structures of three synthetic cationic peptides, currently used in antisense oligonucleotide delivery into living cells, have been analyzed by means of circular dichroism (CD) and Raman scattering in different buffers as a function of concentration and time. All three peptides are of minimalist conception, i.e., formed by only two types of amino acids (leucine: L and lysine: K). Two of these peptides contain 15 aminoacids: N(ter)- KLLKLLLKLLLKLLK (L(10)K(5)), N(ter)-KLKLKLKLKLKLKLK (L(7)K(8)), and the third one has only 9 residues: N(ter)-KLKLKLKLK (L(4)K(5)). The conformational behavior of the 15-mers in pure water differs considerably one from another. Although both of them are initially disordered in the 50-350 microM range, L(10)K(5) gradually undergoes a disordered to alpha-helix transition for molecular concentrations above 100 microM. In all other solvents used, L(10)K(5) adopts a stable alpha-helical conformation. In methanol and methanol/Tris mixture, nonnative alpha-helices can be induced in both KL-alternating peptides, i.e., L(7)K(8) and L(4)K(5). However, in major cases and with a time delay depending on peptide concentration, beta-like structures can be gradually formed in both solutions. In PBS and methanol/PBS mixture, the tendency for L(7)K(8) and L(4)K(5) is to form structures belonging to beta-family. A discussion has been undertaken on the effect of counterions as well as their nature in the stabilization of ordered structures in both KL-alternating peptides. PMID:16134172

  13. Disorder and order in unfolded and disordered peptides and proteins: a view derived from tripeptide conformational analysis. II. Tripeptides with short side chains populating asx and β-type like turn conformations.

    PubMed

    Rybka, Karin; Toal, Siobhan E; Verbaro, Daniel J; Mathieu, Daniel; Schwalbe, Harald; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard

    2013-06-01

    In the preceding paper, we found that ensembles of tripeptides with long or bulky chains can include up to 20% of various turns. Here, we determine the structural and thermodynamic characteristics of GxG peptides with short polar and/or ionizable central residues (D, N, C), whose conformational distributions exhibit higher than average percentage (>20%) of turn conformations. To probe the side-chain conformations of these peptides, we determined the (3)J(H(α),H(β)) coupling constants and derived the population of three rotamers with χ1 -angles of -60°, 180° and 60°, which were correlated with residue propensities by DFT-calculations. For protonated GDG, the rotamer distribution provides additional evidence for asx-turns. A comparison of vibrational spectra and NMR coupling constants of protonated GDG, ionized GDG, and the protonated aspartic acid dipeptide revealed that side chain protonation increases the pPII content at the expense of turn populations. The charged terminal groups, however, have negligible influence on the conformational properties of the central residue. Like protonated GDG, cationic GCG samples asx-turns to a significant extent. The temperature dependence of the UVCD spectra and (3)J(H(N)H(α)) constants suggest that the turn populations of GDG and GNG are practically temperature-independent, indicating enthalpic and entropic stabilization. The temperature-independent J-coupling and UVCD spectra of GNG require a three-state model. Our results indicate that short side chains with hydrogen bonding capability in GxG segments of proteins may serve as hinge regions for establishing compact structures of unfolded proteins and peptides. PMID:23229867

  14. Conformational Dynamics of Two Natively Unfolded Fragment Peptides: Comparison of the AMBER and CHARMM Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Shi, Chuanyin; MacKerell, Alexander D; Shen, Jana

    2015-06-25

    Physics-based force fields are the backbone of molecular dynamics simulations. In recent years, significant progress has been made in the assessment and improvement of commonly used force fields for describing conformational dynamics of folded proteins. However, the accuracy for the unfolded states remains unclear. The latter is however important for detailed studies of protein folding pathways, conformational transitions involving unfolded states, and dynamics of intrinsically disordered proteins. In this work, we compare the three commonly used force fields, AMBER ff99SB-ILDN, CHARMM22/CMAP, and CHARMM36, for modeling the natively unfolded fragment peptides, NTL9(1-22) and NTL9(6-17), using explicit-solvent replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations. All three simulations show that NTL9(6-17) is completely unstructured, while NTL9(1-22) transiently samples various β-hairpin states, reminiscent of the first β-hairpin in the structure of the intact NTL9 protein. The radius of gyration of the two peptides is force field independent but likely underestimated due to the current deficiency of additive force fields. Compared to the CHARMM force fields, ff99SB-ILDN gives slightly higher β-sheet propensity and more native-like residual structures for NTL9(1-22), which may be attributed to its known β preference. Surprisingly, only two sequence-local pairs of charged residues make appreciable ionic contacts in the simulations of NTL9(1-22), which are sampled slightly more by the CHARMM force fields. Taken together, these data suggest that the current CHARMM and AMBER force fields are globally in agreement in modeling the unfolded states corresponding to β-sheet in the folded structure, while differing in details such as the native-likeness of the residual structures and interactions. PMID:26020564

  15. Conformational dynamics of two natively unfolded fragment peptides: Comparison of the AMBER and CHARMM force fields

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Shi, Chuanyin; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Shen, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Physics-based force fields are the backbone of molecular dynamics simulations. In recent years, significant progress has been made in the assessment and improvement of commonly-used force fields for describing conformational dynamics of folded proteins. However, the accuracy for the unfolded states remains unclear. The latter is however important for detailed studies of protein folding pathways, conformational transitions involving unfolded states and dynamics of intrinsically disordered proteins. In this work we compare the three commonly-used force fields, AMBER ff99SB-ILDN, CHARMM22/CMAP and CHARMM36, for modeling the natively unfolded fragment peptides, NTL9(1-22) and NTL9(6-17), using explicit-solvent replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations. All three simulations show that NTL9(6-17) is completely unstructured, while NTL9(1-22) transiently samples various β-hairpin states, reminiscent of the first β-hairpin in the structure of the intact NT9 protein. The radius of gyration of the two peptides is force field independent but likely underestimated due to the current deficiency of additive force fields. Compared to the CHARMM force fields, ff99SB-ILDN gives slightly higher β-sheet propensity and more native-like residual structures for NTL9(1-22), which may be attributed to its known β preference. Surprisingly, only two sequence-local pairs of charged residues make appreciable ionic contacts in the simulations of NTL9(1-22), which are sampled slightly more by the CHARMM force fields. Taken together, these data suggest that the current CHARMM and AMBER force fields are globally in agreement in modeling the unfolded states corresponding to β-sheet in the folded structure, while differing in details such as the native-likeness of the residual structures and interactions. PMID:26020564

  16. Helix propensities of conformationally restricted amino acids. Non-natural substitutes for helix breaking proline and helix forming alanine.

    PubMed

    Alías, Miriam; Ayuso-Tejedor, Sara; Fernández-Recio, Juan; Cativiela, Carlos; Sancho, Javier

    2010-02-21

    Alpha helices are useful scaffolds to build biologically active peptides. The intrinsic stability of an alpha-helix is a key feature that can be successfully designed, and it is governed by the constituting amino acid residues. Their individual contributions to helix stability are given, according to Lifson-Roig theory, by their w parameters, which are known for all proteinogenic amino acids, but not for non-natural ones. On the other hand, non-natural, conformationally-restricted amino acids can be used to impart biochemical stability to peptides intended for in vivo administration. Efficient design of peptides based on these amino acids requires the previous determination of their w parameters. We begin here this task by determining the w parameters of two restricted analogs of alanine: (alpha-methyl)alanine and 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid. According to their w values (alpha-methyl)alanine is almost as good a helix forming residue as alanine, while 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid is, similarly to proline, a helix breaker. PMID:20135035

  17. Peptide conformational preferences in osmolyte solutions: Transfer free energies of deca-alanine

    PubMed Central

    Kokubo, Hironori; Hu, Char Y.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2011-01-01

    The nature in which the protecting osmolyte trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and the denaturing osmolyte urea affect protein stability is investigated simulating a deca-alanine peptide model in multiple conformations of the denatured ensemble. Binary solutions of both osmolytes and mixed osmolyte solutions at physiologically-relevant concentrations of 2:1 (urea:TMAO) are studied using standard molecular dynamics simulations and solvation free energy calculations. Component analysis reveals the differences in the importance of the van der Waals (vdW) and electrostatic interactions for protecting and denaturing osmolytes. We find that urea denaturation governed by transfer free energy differences is dominated by vdW attractions, whereas TMAO exerts its effect by causing unfavorable electrostatic interactions both in the binary solution and mixed osmolyte solution. Analysis of the results showed no evidence in the ternary solution of disruption of the correlations among the peptide and osmolytes, nor of significant changes in the strength of the water hydrogen bond network. PMID:21250690

  18. Heteropoly acids triggered self-assembly of cationic peptides into photo- and electro-chromic gels.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingfang; Xu, Jing; Li, Xiaodong; Gao, Wenmei; Wang, Liyan; Wu, Lixin; Lee, Myongsoo; Li, Wen

    2016-07-01

    A series of cationic peptides with alternating lysines and hydrophobic residues were designed and synthesized. These kinds of short peptides with protonated lysines can complex with anionic heteropoly acids (HPAs) to form a stable gel in water/ethanol mixed solution. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the short peptides adopted a mixed conformation (β-sheet and random-coil) within the gel matrix. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the heteropoly acids, acting as nanosized cross-linkers, first initiated the self-assembly of the cationic peptides into spherical nanostructures. Then these nanospheres accumulated with each other through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to form large sheet-like assemblies, which further interconnected with each other forming continuous 3D network structures. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the structural integrity of the HPAs was maintained during the gelation process. The resultant hybrid gels showed reversible photo- and elecrtro-chromic properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the hybrid gels, capable of persistent and reversible changes of their colour, are attributed to the intervalence charge-transfer transition of the HPAs. Reversible information writing and erasing were demonstrated through a repeated photo-lithograph or electric stimuli without significant loss of the gel performance. PMID:27240759

  19. Peptides Composed of Alternating L- and D-Amino Acids Inhibit Amyloidogenesis in Three Distinct Amyloid Systems Independent of Sequence.

    PubMed

    Kellock, Jackson; Hopping, Gene; Caughey, Byron; Daggett, Valerie

    2016-06-01

    There is now substantial evidence that soluble oligomers are primary toxic agents in amyloid diseases. The development of an antibody recognizing the toxic soluble oligomeric forms of different and unrelated amyloid species suggests a common conformational intermediate during amyloidogenesis. We previously observed a common occurrence of a novel secondary structure element, which we call α-sheet, in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of various amyloidogenic proteins, and we hypothesized that the toxic conformer is composed of α-sheet structure. As such, α-sheet may represent a conformational signature of the misfolded intermediates of amyloidogenesis and a potential unique binding target for peptide inhibitors. Recently, we reported the design and characterization of a novel hairpin peptide (α1 or AP90) that adopts stable α-sheet structure and inhibits the aggregation of the β-Amyloid Peptide Aβ42 and transthyretin. AP90 is a 23-residue hairpin peptide featuring alternating D- and L-amino acids with favorable conformational propensities for α-sheet formation, and a designed turn. For this study, we reverse engineered AP90 to identify which of its design features is most responsible for conferring α-sheet stability and inhibitory activity. We present experimental characterization (CD and FTIR) of seven peptides designed to accomplish this. In addition, we measured their ability to inhibit aggregation in three unrelated amyloid species: Aβ42, transthyretin, and human islet amylin polypeptide. We found that a hairpin peptide featuring alternating L- and D-amino acids, independent of sequence, is sufficient for conferring α-sheet structure and inhibition of aggregation. Additionally, we show a correlation between α-sheet structural stability and inhibitory activity. PMID:27012425

  20. IRMPD Spectroscopy: Evidence of Hydrogen Bonding in the Gas Phase Conformations of Lasso Peptides and their Branched-Cyclic Topoisomers.

    PubMed

    Jeanne Dit Fouque, Kevin; Lavanant, Hélène; Zirah, Séverine; Steinmetz, Vincent; Rebuffat, Sylvie; Maître, Philippe; Afonso, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Lasso peptides are natural products characterized by a mechanically interlocked topology. The conformation of lasso peptides has been probed in the gas phase using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) which showed differences in the lasso and their unthreaded branched-cyclic topoisomers depending on the ion charge states. To further characterize the evolution of gas phase conformations as a function of the charge state and to assess associated changes in the hydrogen bond network, infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy was carried out on two representative lasso peptides, microcin J25 (MccJ25) and capistruin, and their branched-cyclic topoisomers. For the branched-cyclic topoisomers, spectroscopic evidence of a disruption of neutral hydrogen bonds were found when comparing the 3+ and 4+ charge states. In contrast, for the lasso peptides, the IRMPD spectra were found to be similar for the two charge states, suggesting very little difference in gas phase conformations upon addition of a proton. The IRMPD data were thus found consistent and complementary to IM-MS, confirming the stable and compact structure of lasso peptides in the gas phase. PMID:27171649

  1. Investigating the microstructure of keratin extracted from wool: Peptide sequence (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and protein conformation (FTIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardamone, Jeanette M.

    2010-04-01

    Investigations of keratins extracted from wool by reduction hydrolysis and by alkaline hydrolysis showed that their chemical compositions and secondary structures were similar to original wool. The keratin isolates were similar in amino acid, Amides I and II, and secondary structure to each other and to original wool. From SDS-PAGE electrophoresis, keratin isolated by reduction contained protein homologs of molecular weight, ˜40-60 kDa and keratin isolate from alkaline hydrolysis contained peptide fragments of ˜6-8 kDa. MALDI-TOF/TOF spectrometry confirmed that the reduction isolate contained Type II microfibrillar component 7C, hair Type II intermediate filament, Type I microfibrillar 48 kDa component 8C-1, and Type I microfibrillar 47.6 kDa protein homologs which contained alanine, glutamine, glutamic acid, leucine, serine, leucine, and cystine with highest amounts glutamic acid and leucine amino acids. FTIR spectroscopy was applied to examine secondary structure to confirm the content of α-helix/β-sheet/disordered regions for original wool (58.2%/37.9%/3.9%); keratin from reduction (36.7%/50.2%/13.1%); and keratin from alkaline hydrolysis (25.7%/51.8%/22.5%). The higher content of β-sheet secondary structure and intact α-helical conformation characterized these isolates as viable starting materials for chemical modification to form novel bio-based materials useful in industrial formulations and compositions. In particular keratin extracted by reduction with the molecular weight of original wool and the probability of useful mechanical properties can be transformed into stand-alone products of various shapes and forms such as porous foams, sponges, mats, and films for bio-based, adaptable structures.

  2. Design and characterization of an acid-activated antimicrobial peptide.

    PubMed

    Li, Lina; He, Jian; Eckert, Randal; Yarbrough, Daniel; Lux, Renate; Anderson, Maxwell; Shi, Wenyuan

    2010-01-01

    Dental caries is a microbial biofilm infection in which the metabolic activities of plaque bacteria result in a dramatic pH decrease and shift the demineralization/remineralization equilibrium on the tooth surface towards demineralization. In addition to causing a net loss in tooth minerals, creation of an acidic environment favors growth of acid-enduring and acid-generating species, which causes further reduction in the plaque pH. In this study, we developed a prototype antimicrobial peptide capable of achieving high activity exclusively at low environmental pH to target bacterial species like Streptococcus mutans that produce acid and thrive under the low pH conditions detrimental for tooth integrity. The features of clavanin A, a naturally occurring peptide rich in histidine and phenylalanine residues with pH-dependent antimicrobial activity, served as a design basis for these prototype 'acid-activated peptides' (AAPs). Employing the major cariogenic species S. mutans as a model system, the two AAPs characterized in this study exhibited a striking pH-dependent antimicrobial activity, which correlated well with the calculated charge distribution. This type of peptide represents a potential new way to combat dental caries. PMID:19878192

  3. A cytoplasmic peptide of the neurotrophin receptor p75NTR: induction of apoptosis and NMR determined helical conformation.

    PubMed

    Hileman, M R; Chapman, B S; Rabizadeh, S; Krishnan, V V; Bredesen, D; Assa-Munt, N; Plesniak, L A

    1997-09-29

    The neurotrophin receptor (NTR) and tumor necrosis factor receptor family of receptors regulate apoptotic cell death during development and in adult tissues [Beutler and van Huffel, Science 264 (1994) 667-668]. We have examined a fragment of p75NTR from the carboxyl terminus of the receptor and a variant form of this peptide via NMR techniques and in vitro assays for apoptotic activity. The wild type peptide induces apoptosis and adopts a helical conformation oriented parallel to the surface of lipid micelles, whereas the variant form adopts a non-helical conformation in the presence of lipid and shows no activity. These experiments suggest a link between structure and function of the two peptides. PMID:9350985

  4. Advances in the Determination of Nucleic Acid Conformational Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Loïc; Yang, Shan; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-04-01

    Conformational changes in nucleic acids play a key role in the way genetic information is stored, transferred, and processed in living cells. Here, we describe new approaches that employ a broad range of experimental data, including NMR-derived chemical shifts and residual dipolar couplings, small-angle X-ray scattering, and computational approaches such as molecular dynamics simulations to determine ensembles of DNA and RNA at atomic resolution. We review the complementary information that can be obtained from diverse sets of data and the various methods that have been developed to combine these data with computational methods to construct ensembles and assess their uncertainty. We conclude by surveying RNA and DNA ensembles determined using these methods, highlighting the unique physical and functional insights obtained so far.

  5. Conformational analysis and vibrational assignments of benzohydroxamic acid and benzohydrazide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A.

    2012-09-01

    The structures of benzohydroxamic acid (BHA) and benzohydrazide (BH) were investigated at the B3LYP, MP2 and MP4(SDQ) levels of theory and compared to the corresponding structures of formyl analogs. All levels of theory predicted the two molecules to exist predominantly in a near-planar structure adopting a cis conformation where the hydroxyl group of the acid and the amino group of the hydrazide eclipse the carbonyl bond. The stability of the near-planar structure is explained on the basis of mutual conjugation between the phenyl and the Nsbnd H moieties with the Cdbnd O group. The intramolecular interaction between the carbonyl group and the hydrogen atom of the hydroxyl group of the acid or the amino group of the hydrazide plays a significant role in stabilizing the near-cis form in both molecules. The degree of the non-planarity was predicted to increase as going from BHA to BH molecules. The computed vibrational frequencies of the near-cis structure were combined with experimental infrared and Raman data to provide reliable vibrational assignments for the two molecules.

  6. Molecular structure and pronounced conformational flexibility of doxorubicin in free and conjugated state within a drug-peptide compound.

    PubMed

    Tsoneva, Yana; Jonker, Hendrik R A; Wagner, Manfred; Tadjer, Alia; Lelle, Marco; Peneva, Kalina; Ivanova, Anela

    2015-02-19

    The search for targeted drug delivery systems requires the design of drug-carrier complexes, which could both reach the malignant cells and preserve the therapeutic substance activity. A promising strategy aimed at enhancing the uptake and reducing the systemic toxicity is to bind covalently the drug to a cell-penetrating peptide. To understand the structure-activity relationship in such preparations, the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin was investigated by unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations, supported by NMR, which yielded its molecular geometry in aqueous environment. Furthermore, the structure and dynamics of a conjugate of the drug with a cell-penetrating peptide was obtained from molecular dynamics simulations in aqueous solution. The geometries of the unbound compounds were characterized at different temperatures, as well as the extent to which they change after covalent binding and whether/how they influence each other in the drug-peptide conjugate. The main structural fragments that affect the conformational ensemble of every molecule were found. The results show that the transitions between different substructures of the three compounds require a modest amount of energy. At increased temperature, either more conformations become populated as a result of the thermal fluctuations or the relative shares of the various conformers equalize at the nanosecond scale. These frequent structural interconversions suggest expressed conformational freedom of the molecules. Conjugation into the drug-peptide compound partially immobilizes the molecules of the parent compounds. Nevertheless, flexibility still exists, as well as an effective intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonding that stabilizes the structures. We observe compact packing of the drug within the peptide that is also based on stacking interactions. All this outlines the drug-peptide conjugate as a prospective building block of a more complex drug-carrier system. PMID:25603129

  7. Heat capacities of amino acids, peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Makhatadze, G I

    1998-04-20

    The heat capacity is one of the fundamental parameters describing thermodynamic properties of a system. It has wide applications in a number of areas such as polymer chemistry, protein folding and DNA stability. To aid the scientific community in the analysis of such data, I have compiled a database on the experimentally measured heat capacities of amino acids, polyamino acids, peptides, and proteins in solid state and in aqueous solutions. PMID:9648205

  8. Differential tapasin dependence of MHC class I molecules correlates with conformational changes upon peptide dissociation: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Sieker, Florian; Straatsma, TP; Springer, Sebastian; Zacharias, Martin W

    2008-08-01

    Efficiency of peptide loading to MHC class I molecules in the endoplasmatic reticulum depends on the class I allele and can involve interaction with tapasin and other proteins of the loading complex. Allele HLA-B*4402 (Asp at position 116) depends on tapasin for efficient peptide loading whereas HLA-B*4405 (identical to B*4402 except for Tyr116) can efficiently load peptides in the absence of tapasin. Both alleles adopt very similar structures in the presence of the same peptide. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on induced peptide termini dissociation from the α1/α2 peptide binding domains have been performed to characterize free energy changes and associated structural changes in the two alleles. A smooth free energy change along the distance dissociation coordinate was obtained for N terminus dissociation. A different shape and magnitude of the calculated free energy change and was obtained for induced peptide C terminus dissociation in case of the tapasin independent allele B*4405 compared to B*4402. Structural changes during C terminus dissociation occurred mainly in the first segment of the α2-1 helix that flanks the peptide C-terminus binding region (F-pocket) and contacts residue 116. This segment is also close to the proposed tapasin contact region. For B*4402, a stable shift towards an altered open F-pocket structure deviating significantly from the bound form was observed. In contrast, B*4405 showed only a transient opening of the F-pocket followed by relaxation towards a structure close to the bound form upon C terminus dissociation. The greater tendency for peptide-receptive conformation in the absence of peptide combined with a more long-range character of the interactions with the peptide C terminus facilitates peptide binding to B*4405 and could be responsible for the tapasin independence of this allele. A possible role of tapasin in case of HLA-B*4402 and other tapasin-dependent alleles could be the stabilization of a peptide receptive class I

  9. Synthesis and structural characterization of monomeric and dimeric peptide nucleic acids prepared by using microwave-promoted multicomponent reactions.

    PubMed

    Ovadia, Reuben; Lebrun, Aurélien; Barvik, Ivan; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Baraguey, Carine; Alvarez, Karine

    2015-12-01

    A solution phase synthesis of peptide nucleic acid monomers and dimers was developed by using microwave-promoted Ugi multicomponent reactions. A mixture of a functionalized amine, a carboxymethyl nucleobase, paraformaldehyde and an isocyanide as building blocks generates PNA monomers which are then partially deprotected and used in a second Ugi 4CC reaction, leading to PNA dimers. Conformational rotamers were identified by using NMR and MD simulations. PMID:26394794

  10. Effects of N-terminus modifications on the conformation and permeation activities of the synthetic peptide L1A.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Luciana Puia Moro; de Araujo, Alexandre Suman; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Casella, Tiago; Nogueira, Mara Correa Lelles; Ruggiero Neto, João

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the effect of the N-terminus modification of the L1A, a synthetic octadecapeptide, on its helical content, affinity and lytic action in model membranes and on its hemolytic and antibacterial activities. L1A and its acetylated analog displayed a selective antibacterial activity to Gram-negative bacteria without being hemolytic. The covalently linked 2-aminobezoic acid to the N-terminus impaired the antibacterial efficacy and increased hemolysis. Despite their lower net charge (+2), N-terminus modifications resulted in enhanced affinity and improved lytic efficiency in anionic vesicles. The analogs also showed higher helical content and consequently higher amphipathicity in these vesicles. The conformational analysis by molecular dynamics simulations in 30 % of TFE/water showed that the hydrophobic faces of the peptides are in close contact with CF3 groups of TFE while the hydrophilic faces with water molecules. Due to the loss of the amino charge, the N-termini of the analogs are buried in TFE molecules. The analysis of the pair distribution functions, obtained for the center of mass of the charged groups, has evidenced that the state of the N-terminus has influenced the possibility of different ion-pairing. The higher complexity of the bacterial cells compared with anionic vesicles hampers to establish correlations structure-function for the analogs. PMID:26920749

  11. Permeabilization and fusion of uncharged lipid vesicles induced by the HIV-1 fusion peptide adopting an extended conformation: dose and sequence effects.

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, F B; Goñi, F M; Muga, A; Nieva, J L

    1997-01-01

    The peptide HIV(arg), corresponding to a sequence of 23 amino acid residues at the N-terminus of HIV-1 gp41 (LAV1a strain), has the capacity to destabilize negatively charged large unilamellar vesicles. As revealed by infrared spectroscopy, the peptide associated with those vesicles showed conformational polymorphism: in the absence of cations the main structure was a pore-forming alpha-helix, whereas in the presence of Ca2+ the conformation switched to a fusogenic, predominantly extended beta-type structure. Here we show that an extended structure can also be involved in electrically neutral vesicle destabilization induced by the HIV-1 fusion peptide when it binds the vesicle from the aqueous phase. In the absence of cations, neutral liposomes composed of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and cholesterol (molar ratio 1:1:1) selected for an extended structure that became fusogenic in a dose-dependent fashion. At subfusogenic doses this structure caused the release of trapped 8-aminonaphtalene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid sodium salt/p-xylenebis(pyridinium)bromide from liposomes, indicating the existence of a peptide-mediated membrane destabilizing process before and independent of the development of fusion. When compared to HIV(arg), the fusion activity of HIV(ala) (bearing the R22 --> A substitution) was reduced by 70%. Fusogenicity was completely abolished when a second substitution (V2 --> E) was included to generate HIV(ala-E2), a sequence representing the N-terminus of an inactive gp41. However, the three sequences associated with vesicles to the same extent, and the three adopted a similar extended structure in the membrane. Whereas 1-(4-trimethylaminophenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene emission anisotropy was unaffected by the three peptides, DPH emission anisotropy in membranes was increased only by the fusogenic sequences. Taken together, our observations strongly argue that it is not an alpha-helical but an extended structure adopted by the HIV-1

  12. Nutritional value of D-amino acids, D-peptides, and amino acid derivatives in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper describes a method for determining the nutritional value of D-amino acids, D-peptides, and amino acid derivatives using a growth assay in mice fed a synthetic all-amino acid diet. A large number of experiments were carried out in which a molar equivalent of the test compound replaced a n...

  13. Conformational assembly and biological properties of collagen mimetic peptides and their thermally responsive polymer conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Ohm Divyam

    2011-12-01

    Collagens are one of the most abundant proteins found in body tissues and organs, endowing structural integrity, mechanical strength, and multiple biological functions. Destabilized collagen inside human body leads to various degenerative diseases (ex. osteoarthritis) and ageing. This has continued to motivate the design of synthetic peptides and bio-synthetic polypeptides to closely mimic the native collagens in terms of triple helix structure and stability, potential for higher order assembly, and biological properties. However, the widespread application of de novo collagens has been limited in part by the need for hydroxylated proline in the formation of stable triple helical structures. To address this continued need, a hydroxyproline-free, thermally stable collagen-mimetic peptide (CLP-Cys) was rationally designed via the incorporation of electrostatically stabilized amino acid triplets. CLP-Cys was synthesized via solid phase peptide synthesis. The formation and stability of the triple helical structure were indicated via circular dichroism (CD) experiments and confirmed via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) results. CLP-Cys also self-assembled into nano-rods and micro-fibrils, as evidenced via a combination of dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Given the high thermal stability and its propensity for higher-order assembly, CLP-Cys was further functionalized at both the ends with a thermally responsive polymer, poly(diethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate), (PDEGMEMA) to synthesize a biohybrid triblock copolymer. The CD results indicated that the triple helical form is retained, the thermal unfolding is sustained and helix to coil transition is reversible in the triblock hybrid context. The LCST of PDEGMEMA homopolymer (26 °C) is increased (to 35 °C) upon conjugation to the hydrophilic collagen peptide domain. Further, a combination of static light scattering, Cryo-SEM, TEM and confocal microscopy elucidated that the

  14. Behavior of amino acids and peptides exposed in Earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, Bernard; Boillot, François; Chabin, Annie; Venet, Michel; Bure, Corinne; Jacquet, Romain; Bertrand-Urbaniak, Marylène; Brack, André

    2001-08-01

    In order to understand the chemical comportment of organic molecules of prebiotic interest when exposed to space conditions, amino acids, derivatives and peptides where exposed in Earth orbit during the CNES "Perseus-Exobiologie" mission. Dry films of samples were exposed free or associated with mineral powders to vacuum and to solar light down to 120 nm during three months outside the MIR station. After the mission, the remaining products were analyzed with respect of chemical degradation, racemization and polymerization. The analyses revealed a higher sensitivity of amino acids comparatively to peptides. The identification of by-products has allowed determining some photolysis pathways where decarboxylation and decarbonylation were found to be the major chemical reactions for amino acids and peptides, respectively. The study of associated minerals have shown that meteoritic powder was the most efficient to protect samples against UV light. The exposure of different peptides associated to meteorite powder of various thickness have allowed to determine that 5μm films were at least necessary to protect associated organics. Implications for the exogenous origin of organics are discussed.

  15. Interaction of collagen-like peptide models of asymmetric acetylcholinesterase with glycosaminoglycans: spectroscopic studies of conformational changes and stability.

    PubMed

    Doss-Pepe, E; Deprez, P; Inestrosa, N C; Brodsky, B

    2000-12-01

    The effect of heparin on the conformation and stability of triple-helical peptide models of the collagen tail of asymmetric acetylcholinesterase expands our understanding of heparin interactions with proteins and presents an opportunity for clarifying the nature of binding of ligands to collagen triple-helix domains. Within the collagen tail of AChE, there are two consensus sequences for heparin binding of the form BBXB, surrounded by additional basic residues. Circular dichroism studies were used to determine the effect of the addition of increasing concentrations of heparin on triple-helical peptide models for the heparin binding domains, including peptides in which the basic residues within and surrounding the consensus sequence were replaced by alanine residues. The addition of heparin caused an increased triple-helix content with saturation properties for the peptide modeling the C-terminal site, while precipitation, with no increased helix content resulted from heparin addition to the peptide modeling the N-terminal site. The results suggest that the two binding sites with a similar triple-helical conformation have distinctive ways of interacting with heparin, which must relate to small differences in the consensus sequence (GRKGR vs GKRGK) and in the surrounding basic residues. Addition of heparin increased the thermal stability of all peptides containing the consensus sequence. Heparan sulfate produced conformational and stabilization effects similar to those of heparin, while chondroitin sulfate led to a cloudy solution, loss of circular dichroism signal, and a smaller increase in thermal stability. Thus, specificity in both the sequence of the triple helix and the type of glycosaminoglycan is required for this interaction. PMID:11101304

  16. How Amino Acids and Peptides Shaped the RNA World

    PubMed Central

    van der Gulik, Peter T.S.; Speijer, Dave

    2015-01-01

    The “RNA world” hypothesis is seen as one of the main contenders for a viable theory on the origin of life. Relatively small RNAs have catalytic power, RNA is everywhere in present-day life, the ribosome is seen as a ribozyme, and rRNA and tRNA are crucial for modern protein synthesis. However, this view is incomplete at best. The modern protein-RNA ribosome most probably is not a distorted form of a “pure RNA ribosome” evolution started out with. Though the oldest center of the ribosome seems “RNA only”, we cannot conclude from this that it ever functioned in an environment without amino acids and/or peptides. Very small RNAs (versatile and stable due to basepairing) and amino acids, as well as dipeptides, coevolved. Remember, it is the amino group of aminoacylated tRNA that attacks peptidyl-tRNA, destroying the bond between peptide and tRNA. This activity of the amino acid part of aminoacyl-tRNA illustrates the centrality of amino acids in life. With the rise of the “RNA world” view of early life, the pendulum seems to have swung too much towards the ribozymatic part of early biochemistry. The necessary presence and activity of amino acids and peptides is in need of highlighting. In this article, we try to bring the role of the peptide component of early life back into focus. We argue that an RNA world completely independent of amino acids never existed. PMID:25607813

  17. Spectroscopic and structural elucidation of amino acid derivatives and small peptides: experimental and theoretical tools.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Tsonko; Spiteller, Michael; Koleva, Bojidarka

    2010-01-01

    This mini review deals with the modern aspects of the spectroscopy and structural elucidation of amino acid derivatives and small biologically active compounds. Free peptide bond rotation in these systems yields various conformers, which possess differing biological activities. Another phenomenon is the intermolecular or intramolecular stacking observed in aromatic small peptides. Specifically, the main aim is to illustrate the successful application of the "complex tool", consisting of a combination of the theoretical approximation methods with experimental linear polarized infrared (IR-LD) and/or Raman spectroscopy of oriented colloid suspensions in a nematic host. The possibilities and limitations of the approach for detailed vibrational assignment and structural elucidation of small peptides are discussed. Having in mind that physical and chemical properties of these systems can be precisely calculated by means of ab initio and DFT methods at Hartee-Fock, MP2 and B3LYP level of theory, varying basis sets, the results obtained allow a precise assignment of many vibrational bands to the corresponding normal modes, electronic structures and conformational state. The validity of the conclusions about the structure or vibrational properties of these systems have been supported, compared and/or additionally proved by the results from independent physical methods. In this respect (1)H and (13)C-NMR, single crystal X-ray diffraction, HPLC tandem mass spectrometry as well as thermal methods are all employed. A well ordered crystal must first be grown in order to determine the molecular structure by the absolute method of single crystal X-ray diffraction. Although the 3D structures of peptides have been determined over the past decades, peptide crystallization is still a major obstacle to X-ray diffraction work, the presence of chiral centre/s makes for this difficulty. For this reason the "complex tool" presented can be regarded as an alternative method for obtaining of

  18. Recent Developments in Peptide-Based Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Veldhoen, Sandra; Laufer, Sandra D.; Restle, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    Despite the fact that non-viral nucleic acid delivery systems are generally considered to be less efficient than viral vectors, they have gained much interest in recent years due to their superior safety profile compared to their viral counterpart. Among these synthetic vectors are cationic polymers, branched dendrimers, cationic liposomes and cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). The latter represent an assortment of fairly unrelated sequences essentially characterised by a high content of basic amino acids and a length of 10–30 residues. CPPs are capable of mediating the cellular uptake of hydrophilic macromolecules like peptides and nucleic acids (e.g. siRNAs, aptamers and antisense-oligonucleotides), which are internalised by cells at a very low rate when applied alone. Up to now, numerous sequences have been reported to show cell-penetrating properties and many of them have been used to successfully transport a variety of different cargos into mammalian cells. In recent years, it has become apparent that endocytosis is a major route of internalisation even though the mechanisms underlying the cellular translocation of CPPs are poorly understood and still subject to controversial discussions. In this review, we will summarise the latest developments in peptide-based cellular delivery of nucleic acid cargos. We will discuss different mechanisms of entry, the intracellular fate of the cargo, correlation studies of uptake versus biological activity of the cargo as well as technical problems and pitfalls. PMID:19325804

  19. Recent developments in peptide-based nucleic acid delivery.

    PubMed

    Veldhoen, Sandra; Laufer, Sandra D; Restle, Tobias

    2008-06-01

    Despite the fact that non-viral nucleic acid delivery systems are generally considered to be less efficient than viral vectors, they have gained much interest in recent years due to their superior safety profile compared to their viral counterpart. Among these synthetic vectors are cationic polymers, branched dendrimers, cationic liposomes and cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). The latter represent an assortment of fairly unrelated sequences essentially characterised by a high content of basic amino acids and a length of 10-30 residues. CPPs are capable of mediating the cellular uptake of hydrophilic macromolecules like peptides and nucleic acids (e.g. siRNAs, aptamers and antisense-oligonucleotides), which are internalised by cells at a very low rate when applied alone. Up to now, numerous sequences have been reported to show cell-penetrating properties and many of them have been used to successfully transport a variety of different cargos into mammalian cells. In recent years, it has become apparent that endocytosis is a major route of internalisation even though the mechanisms underlying the cellular translocation of CPPs are poorly understood and still subject to controversial discussions. In this review, we will summarise the latest developments in peptide-based cellular delivery of nucleic acid cargos. We will discuss different mechanisms of entry, the intracellular fate of the cargo, correlation studies of uptake versus biological activity of the cargo as well as technical problems and pitfalls. PMID:19325804

  20. Structural basis for the varying propensities of different amino acids to adopt the collagen conformation.

    PubMed

    Raman, S Sundar; Gopalakrishnan, R; Wade, R C; Subramanian, V

    2011-03-24

    Although previous experimental studies have shown the positional preference of different amino acids (AAs) to form a stable triple helical collagen motif, the structural basis for the variations in the sequence and the positional propensity has not been systematically investigated. Thus, we have here probed the origin of the structural stability offered by the 20 naturally occurring AAs to collagen by means of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Simulations were carried out on 39 collagen-like peptides employing a host-guest approach. The results show that the propensity of the different AAs to adopt collagen-like conformations depends primarily on their ϕ and ψ angle preferences. Changes in these angles upon substitution of different AAs in the X(AA) and Y(AA) positions in the canonical ((Gly-X(AA)-Y(AA))(7))(3) motif dictate the formation of interchain hydrogen bonds, solvent interactions, and puckering of neighboring imino acids and, thus, the structural stability of the collagen. The role of solvent-mediated hydrogen bonds in the stabilization of collagen has also been elucidated from the MD simulations. In addition to the conventional hydrogen bonds known to be present in collagen, a hitherto unidentified direct interchain hydrogen bond, between the X(AA) N-H group and the Hyp O-H group of the neighboring chain, was observed during the simulations. Its occupancy was ∼36% when Leu was present at the X(AA) position. PMID:21361324

  1. Antimicrobial Peptide Conformation as a Structural Determinant of Omptin Protease Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Brannon, John R.; Thomassin, Jenny-Lee; Gruenheid, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial proteases contribute to virulence by cleaving host or bacterial proteins to promote survival and dissemination. Omptins are a family of proteases embedded in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria that cleave various substrates, including host antimicrobial peptides, with a preference for cleaving at dibasic motifs. OmpT, the enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) omptin, cleaves and inactivates the human cathelicidin LL-37. Similarly, the omptin CroP, found in the murine pathogen Citrobacter rodentium, which is used as a surrogate model to study human-restricted EHEC, cleaves the murine cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP). Here, we compared the abilities of OmpT and CroP to cleave LL-37 and CRAMP. EHEC OmpT degraded LL-37 and CRAMP at similar rates. In contrast, C. rodentium CroP cleaved CRAMP more rapidly than LL-37. The different cleavage rates of LL-37 and CRAMP were independent of the bacterial background and substrate sequence specificity, as OmpT and CroP have the same preference for cleaving at dibasic sites. Importantly, LL-37 was α-helical and CRAMP was unstructured under our experimental conditions. By altering the α-helicity of LL-37 and CRAMP, we found that decreasing LL-37 α-helicity increased its rate of cleavage by CroP. Conversely, increasing CRAMP α-helicity decreased its cleavage rate. This structural basis for CroP substrate specificity highlights differences between the closely related omptins of C. rodentium and E. coli. In agreement with previous studies, this difference in CroP and OmpT substrate specificity suggests that omptins evolved in response to the substrates present in their host microenvironments. IMPORTANCE Omptins are recognized as key virulence factors for various Gram-negative pathogens. Their localization to the outer membrane, their active site facing the extracellular environment, and their unique catalytic mechanism make them attractive targets for novel therapeutic strategies

  2. Conformations of Prolyl-Peptide Bonds in the Bradykinin 1-5 Fragment in Solution and in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Voronina, Liudmila; Masson, Antoine; Kamrath, Michael; Schubert, Franziska; Clemmer, David; Baldauf, Carsten; Rizzo, Thomas

    2016-07-27

    The dynamic nature of intrinsically disordered peptides makes them a challenge to characterize by solution-phase techniques. In order to gain insight into the relation between the disordered state and the environment, we explore the conformational space of the N-terminal 1-5 fragment of bradykinin (BK[1-5](2+)) in the gas phase by combining drift tube ion mobility, cold-ion spectroscopy, and first-principles simulations. The ion-mobility distribution of BK[1-5](2+) consists of two well-separated peaks. We demonstrate that the conformations within the peak with larger cross-section are kinetically trapped, while the more compact peak contains low-energy structures. This is a result of cis-trans isomerization of the two prolyl-peptide bonds in BK[1-5](2+). Density-functional theory calculations reveal that the compact structures have two very different geometries with cis-trans and trans-cis backbone conformations. Using the experimental CCSs to guide the conformational search, we find that the kinetically trapped species have a trans-trans configuration. This is consistent with NMR measurements performed in a solution, which show that 82% of the molecules adopt a trans-trans configuration and behave as a random coil. PMID:27366919

  3. Membrane structure and conformational changes of the antibiotic heterodimeric peptide distinctin by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Resende, Jarbas M.; Moraes, Cléria Mendonça; Munhoz, Victor H. O.; Aisenbrey, Christopher; Verly, Rodrigo M.; Bertani, Philippe; Cesar, Amary; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2009-01-01

    The heterodimeric antimicrobial peptide distinctin is composed of 2 linear peptide chains of 22- and 25-aa residues that are connected by a single intermolecular S-S bond. This heterodimer has been considered to be a unique example of a previously unrecorded class of bioactive peptides. Here the 2 distinctin chains were prepared by chemical peptide synthesis in quantitative amounts and labeled with 15N, as well as 15N and 2H, at selected residues, respectively, and the heterodimer was formed by oxidation. CD spectroscopy indicates a high content of helical secondary structures when associated with POPC/POPG 3:1 vesicles or in membrane-mimetic environments. The propensity for helix formation follows the order heterodimer >chain 2 >chain 1, suggesting that peptide-peptide and peptide-lipid interactions both help in stabilizing this secondary structure. In a subsequent step the peptides were reconstituted into oriented phospholipid bilayers and investigated by 2H and proton-decoupled 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Whereas chain 2 stably inserts into the membrane at orientations close to perfectly parallel to the membrane surface in the presence or absence of chain 1, the latter adopts a more tilted alignment, which further increases in the heterodimer. The data suggest that membrane interactions result in considerable conformational rearrangements of the heterodimer. Therefore, chain 2 stably anchors the heterodimer in the membrane, whereas chain 1 interacts more loosely with the bilayer. These structural observations are consistent with the antimicrobial activities when the individual chains are compared to the dimer. PMID:19805350

  4. Regulation of peptide YY homeostasis by gastric acid and gastrin.

    PubMed

    Gomez, G; Padilla, L; Udupi, V; Tarasova, N; Sundler, F; Townsend, C M; Thompson, J C; Greeley, G H

    1996-04-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) is a gut hormone localized primarily in the distal bowel. Because circulating PYY inhibits gastric acid secretion, we investigated the effects of gastric acid secretion and gastrin on gene expression and secretion of PYY. In conscious dogs, PYY release in response to oral food was inhibited (P < 0.05) by pharmacologic inhibition of gastric acid secretion (omeprazole, famotidine). In rats, omeprazole treatment resulted in a significant elevation in serum gastrin concentrations and a simultaneous decrease in PYY messenger RNA (mRNA) and peptide levels in the colon; administration of a gastrin receptor antagonist (L365, 260) prevented the inhibitory actions of omeprazole on colonic PYY mRNA levels. In athymic-nude mice, implantation of a human gastrinoma resulted in an elevation of serum gastrin concentrations and a concomitant depression of colonic PYY mRNA levels. We conclude that endogenous gastric acid secretion up-regulates PYY release and PYY mRNA expression. Circulating gastrin acts to down-regulate PYY release and PYY mRNA expression. This study provides evidence that foregut functions (i.e., gastric acid secretion and gastrin release) exert control over an antiacid signal (e.g. PYY release) emanating from the hindgut. PMID:8625912

  5. Photosensitizing effect of cations on amino acids and peptides.

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, N P; Khenokh, M A

    1969-01-01

    In connection with a study of the chemical evolution of abiogenically synthesized organic compounds on primitive Earth and the physical conditions of other planets, this paper reports the experimental results obtained by the photolysis of solutions of aliphatic amino acids (glycine, alanine, valine, leucine, n. leucine) and peptides in the atmosphere of the air, N2, Ar and CO2 in the presence of the most simple photocatalyzers-cations of sulphates. The evidence shows that the photochemical conversion of NH2 acids depends on the content of the atmosphere. The decay of NH2-group is most active in air. N2 and Ar exert no significant influence on deamination, whereas in the atmosphere of CO2 the formation of ammonia in valine, for example, was only 29 per cent of its total amount during photolysis in the air. Cu2+ and Fe2+ catalyzed while Al3+ inhibited the ammonia excretion. The formation of acetaldehyde during alanine photolysis was actually independent from the atmosphere of N2 and was inhibited in Ar and CO2. Oxydative processes inducing the formation of glyoxalic acid and formaldehyde were sharply inhibited in Ar, N2 and CO2. Under the influence of ultraviolet light of the decay of NH2-acids is also accompanied by the formation of new NH2-acids. The photosensitizing effect of cations induces a rupture of -CO-NH-bonds in peptides and, provided heavy radiation doses, prevents the formation of new NH2-acids. The longer the dipeptide chain, the more significant the quantum yield of its decomposition. The photolysis of dipeptides, leading to their decay, does not necessarily induce a hydrolytic rupture of -CO-NH-bonds resulting in the formation of three amino acids. The results obtained permit approaching problems concerning the effect of the gas content of the atmosphere and various cations (photocatalyzers) on photolytic conversion of abiogenically synthesized and biogenically significant substances, amino acids for example, at the action of ultraviolet light. PMID

  6. Purification of polyclonal anti-conformational antibodies for use in affinity selection from random peptide phage display libraries: A study using the hydatid vaccine EG95

    PubMed Central

    Read, A.J.; Gauci, C.G.; Lightowlers, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    The use of polyclonal antibodies to screen random peptide phage display libraries often results in the recognition of a large number of peptides that mimic linear epitopes on various proteins. There appears to be a bias in the use of this technology toward the selection of peptides that mimic linear epitopes. In many circumstances the correct folding of a protein immunogen is required for conferring protection. The use of random peptide phage display libraries to identify peptide mimics of conformational epitopes in these cases requires a strategy for overcoming this bias. Conformational epitopes on the hydatid vaccine EG95 have been shown to result in protective immunity in sheep, whereas linear epitopes are not protective. In this paper we describe a strategy that results in the purification of polyclonal antibodies directed against conformational epitopes while eliminating antibodies directed against linear epitopes. These affinity purified antibodies were then used to select a peptide from a random peptide phage display library that has the capacity to mimic conformational epitopes on EG95. This peptide was subsequently used to affinity purify monospecific antibodies against EG95. PMID:19349218

  7. Comprehensive Analysis of Contributions from Protein Conformational Stability and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II-Peptide Binding Affinity to CD4+ Epitope Immunogenicity in HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingfeng; Steede, N. Kalaya; Nguyen, Hong-Nam P.; Freytag, Lucy C.; McLachlan, James B.; Mettu, Ramgopal R.; Robinson, James E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helper T-cell epitope dominance in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 is not adequately explained by peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Antigen processing potentially influences epitope dominance, but few, if any, studies have attempted to reconcile the influences of antigen processing and MHC protein binding for all helper T-cell epitopes of an antigen. Epitopes of gp120 identified in both humans and mice occur on the C-terminal flanks of flexible segments that are likely to be proteolytic cleavage sites. In this study, the influence of gp120 conformation on the dominance pattern in gp120 from HIV strain 89.6 was examined in CBA mice, whose MHC class II protein has one of the most well defined peptide-binding preferences. Only one of six dominant epitopes contained the most conserved element of the I-Ak binding motif, an aspartic acid. Destabilization of the gp120 conformation by deletion of single disulfide bonds preferentially enhanced responses to the cryptic I-Ak motif-containing sequences, as reported by T-cell proliferation or cytokine secretion. Conversely, inclusion of CpG in the adjuvant with gp120 enhanced responses to the dominant CD4+ T-cell epitopes. The gp120 destabilization affected secretion of some cytokines more than others, suggesting that antigen conformation could modulate T-cell functions through mechanisms of antigen processing. IMPORTANCE CD4+ helper T cells play an essential role in protection against HIV and other pathogens. Thus, the sites of helper T-cell recognition, the dominant epitopes, are targets for vaccine design; and the corresponding T cells may provide markers for monitoring infection and immunity. However, T-cell epitopes are difficult to identify and predict. It is also unclear whether CD4+ T cells specific for one epitope are more protective than T cells specific for other epitopes. This work shows that the three-dimensional (3D) structure of an

  8. Conformational Changes and Association of Membrane-Interacting Peptides in Myelin Membrane Models: A Case of the C-Terminal Peptide of Proteolipid Protein and the Antimicrobial Peptide Melittin.

    PubMed

    Appadu, Ashtina; Jelokhani-Niaraki, Masoud; DeBruin, Lillian

    2015-11-25

    Model membranes composed of various lipid mixtures can segregate into liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phases. In this study, lipid vesicles composed of mainly Lo or Ld phases as well as complex lipid systems representing the cytosolic leaflet of the myelin membrane were characterized by fluorescence resonance energy transfer with a donor/acceptor pair that preferentially partitioned into Lo or Ld phases, respectively. The fluidity of the lipid systems containing >30% cholesterol was modulated in the presence of the amphipathic peptide melittin. With all the studied lipid systems, melittin attained an α-helical conformation as determined by CD spectroscopy and attained varying degrees of membrane association and penetration as determined by intrinsic Trp fluorescence. The other protein domain utilized was a putative amphipathic helical peptide derived from the cytosolic C-terminal sequence of proteolipid protein (PLP) which is the most abundant protein in the myelin membrane. The C-terminal PLP peptide transitioned from a random coil to an α-helix in the presence of trifluoroethanol. Upon interacting with each of lipid vesicle system, the PLP peptide also folded into a helix; however, at high concentrations of the peptide with fluid lipid systems, associated helices transmuted into a β-sheet conformer. The membrane-associated aggregation of the cytosolic C-termini could be a mechanism by which the transmembrane PLP multimerizes in the myelin membrane. PMID:26561987

  9. Structure Analysis and Conformational Transitions of the Cell Penetrating Peptide Transportan 10 in the Membrane-Bound State

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, Erik; Verdurmen, Wouter P. R.; Bürck, Jochen; Ehni, Sebastian; Mykhailiuk, Pavel K.; Afonin, Sergii; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Komarov, Igor V.; Brock, Roland; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    Structure analysis of the cell-penetrating peptide transportan 10 (TP10) revealed an exemplary range of different conformations in the membrane-bound state. The bipartite peptide (derived N-terminally from galanin and C-terminally from mastoparan) was found to exhibit prominent characteristics of (i) amphiphilic α-helices, (ii) intrinsically disordered peptides, as well as (iii) β-pleated amyloid fibrils, and these conformational states become interconverted as a function of concentration. We used a complementary approach of solid-state 19F-NMR and circular dichroism in oriented membrane samples to characterize the structural and dynamical behaviour of TP10 in its monomeric and aggregated forms. Nine different positions in the peptide were selectively substituted with either the L- or D-enantiomer of 3-(trifluoromethyl)-bicyclopent-[1.1.1]-1-ylglycine (CF3-Bpg) as a reporter group for 19F-NMR. Using the L-epimeric analogs, a comprehensive three-dimensional structure analysis was carried out in lipid bilayers at low peptide concentration, where TP10 is monomeric. While the N-terminal region is flexible and intrinsically unstructured within the plane of the lipid bilayer, the C-terminal α-helix is embedded in the membrane with an oblique tilt angle of ∼55° and in accordance with its amphiphilic profile. Incorporation of the sterically obstructive D-CF3-Bpg reporter group into the helical region leads to a local unfolding of the membrane-bound peptide. At high concentration, these helix-destabilizing C-terminal substitutions promote aggregation into immobile β-sheets, which resemble amyloid fibrils. On the other hand, the obstructive D-CF3-Bpg substitutions can be accommodated in the flexible N-terminus of TP10 where they do not promote aggregation at high concentration. The cross-talk between the two regions of TP10 thus exerts a delicate balance on its conformational switch, as the presence of the α-helix counteracts the tendency of the unfolded N

  10. Understanding selenocysteine through conformational analysis, proton affinities, acidities and bond dissociation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Damanjit; Sharma, Punita; Bharatam, Prasad V.; Kaur, Mondeep

    Density functional methods have been employed to characterize the gas phase conformations of selenocysteine. The 33 stable conformers of selenocysteine have been located on the potential energy surface using density functional B3LYP/6-31+G* method. The conformers are analyzed in terms of intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions. The proton affinity, gas phase acidities, and bond dissociation energies have also been evaluated for different reactive sites of selenocysteine for the five lowest energy conformers at B3LYP/6-311++G*//B3LYP/6-31+G* level. Evaluation of these intrinsic properties reflects the antioxidant activity of selenium in selenocysteine.0

  11. Conformational stability of alpha-lactalbumin missing a peptide bond between Asp66 and Pro67.

    PubMed

    Hamada, S; Moriyama, Y; Yamaguchi, K; Takeda, K

    1994-05-01

    The peptide bond between Asp66-Pro67 of alpha-lactalbumin was cleaved with formic acid (cleaved alpha-lactalbumin). Secondary structural changes of the cleaved alpha-lactalbumin, in which the two separated polypeptides were joined by disulfide bridges, were examined in solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), urea, and guanidine hydrochloride. The structural changes of the cleaved alpha-lactalbumin were compared with those of the intact protein. The relative proportions of secondary structures were determined by curve fitting of the circular dichroism. The cleaved alpha-lactalbumin contained 29% alpha-helical structure as against 34% for the intact protein. Some helices of the cleaved alpha-lactalbumin which had been disrupted by the cleavage appeared to be reformed upon the addition of SDS of very low concentration (0.5 mM). In the SDS solution, the helicities of both the intact and cleaved proteins increased, attaining 44% at 4 mM SDS. On the other hand, the helical structures of the cleaved alpha-lactalbumin began to be disrupted at low concentrations of guanidine hydrochloride and urea compared with that of the intact protein. However, no difference was observed in the thermal denaturations of the intact and cleaved proteins, except for the difference in the original helicities. The helicities of both proteins decreased with an increase of temperature up to 65 degrees C and recovered upon cooling. PMID:7986345

  12. Determination of conformation and orientation of immobilized peptides and proteins at buried interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lei; Ulrich, Nathan W.; Mello, Charlene M.; Chen, Zhan

    2015-01-01

    Surface immobilized peptides/proteins have important applications such as antimicrobial coating and biosensing. We report a study of such peptides/proteins using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and ATR-FTIR. Immobilization on surfaces via physical adsorption and chemical coupling revealed that structures of chemically immobilized peptides are determined by immobilization sites, chemical environments, and substrate surfaces. In addition, controlling enzyme orientation by engineering the surface immobilization site demonstrated that structures can be well-correlated to measured chemical activity. This research facilitates the development of immobilized peptides/proteins with improved activities by optimizing their surface orientation and structure.

  13. Conformation and Lipid Interaction of the Fusion Peptide of the Paramyxovirus PIV5 in Anionic and Negative-Curvature Membranes from Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Viral fusion proteins catalyze the merger of the virus envelope and the target cell membrane through multiple steps of protein conformational changes. The fusion peptide domain of these proteins is important for membrane fusion, but how it causes membrane curvature and dehydration is still poorly understood. We now use solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate the conformation, topology, and lipid and water interactions of the fusion peptide of the PIV5 virus F protein in three lipid membranes, POPC/POPG, DOPC/DOPG, and DOPE. These membranes allow us to investigate the effects of lipid chain disorder, membrane surface charge, and intrinsic negative curvature on the fusion peptide structure. Chemical shifts and spin diffusion data indicate that the PIV5 fusion peptide is inserted into all three membranes but adopts distinct conformations: it is fully α-helical in the POPC/POPG membrane, adopts a mixed strand/helix conformation in the DOPC/DOPG membrane, and is primarily a β-strand in the DOPE membrane. 31P NMR spectra show that the peptide retains the lamellar structure and hydration of the two anionic membranes. However, it dehydrates the DOPE membrane, destabilizes its inverted hexagonal phase, and creates an isotropic phase that is most likely a cubic phase. The ability of the β-strand conformation of the fusion peptide to generate negative Gaussian curvature and to dehydrate the membrane may be important for the formation of hemifusion intermediates in the membrane fusion pathway. PMID:24428385

  14. Theoretical study of γ-aminobutyric acid conformers: Intramolecular interactions and ionization energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke-Dong; Wang, Mei-Ting; Meng, Ju

    2014-10-01

    Allowing for all combinations of internal single-bond rotamers, 1,296 unique trial structures of γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) are obtained. All of these structures are optimized at the M06-2X level of theory and a total of 68 local minimal conformers are found. The nine low-lying conformers are used for further studies. According to the calculated relative Gibbs free energies at M06-2X level of theory, we find that the dispersion is important for the relative energy of GABA. The intramolecular hydrogen bonds and hyperconjugative interaction and their effects on the conformational stability are studied. The results show that both of them have great influence on the conformers. The vertical ionization energies (VIE) are calculated and match the experimental data well. The results show that the neutral GABA in the gas phase is a multi-conformer system and at least four conformations exist.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of 441 Two-Residue Peptides in Aqueous Solution: Conformational Preferences and Neighboring Residue Effects with the Amber ff99SB-ildn-nmr Force Field

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuxiang; Andrews, Casey T.; Frembgen-Kesner, Tamara; Miller, Mark S.; Siemonsma, Stephen L.; Collingsworth, Timothy D.; Rockafellow, Isaac T.; Ngo, Nguyet Anh; Campbell, Brady A.; Brown, Reid F.; Guo, Chengxuan; Schrodt, Michael; Liu, Yu-Tsan; Elcock, Adrian H.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the intrinsic conformational preferences of amino acids and the extent to which they are modulated by neighboring residues is a key issue for developing predictive models of protein folding and stability. Here we present the results of 441 independent explicit-solvent MD simulations of all possible two-residue peptides that contain the 20 standard amino acids with histidine modeled in both its neutral and protonated states. 3Jhnhα coupling constants and δhα chemical shifts calculated from the MD simulations correlate quite well with recently published experimental measurements for a corresponding set of two-residue peptides. Neighboring residue effects (NREs) on the average 3Jhnhα and δhα values of adjacent residues are also reasonably well reproduced, with the large NREs exerted experimentally by aromatic residues, in particular, being accurately captured. NREs on the secondary structure preferences of adjacent amino acids have been computed and compared with corresponding effects observed in a coil library and the average β-turn preferences of all amino acid types have been determined. Finally, the intrinsic conformational preferences of histidine, and its NREs on the conformational preferences of adjacent residues, are both shown to be strongly affected by the protonation state of the imidazole ring. PMID:26579777

  16. Conformational Analysis of the Host-Defense Peptides Pseudhymenochirin-1Pb and -2Pa and Design of Analogues with Insulin-Releasing Activities and Reduced Toxicities.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Giorgia; Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Srinivasan, Dinesh; Attoub, Samir; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Rinaldi, Andrea C; Casu, Mariano; Flatt, Peter R; Conlon, J Michael

    2015-12-24

    Pseudhymenochirin-1Pb (Ps-1Pb; IKIPSFFRNILKKVGKEAVSLIAGALKQS) and pseudhymenochirin-2Pa (Ps-2Pa; GIFPIFAKLLGKVIKVASSLISKGRTE) are amphibian peptides with broad spectrum antimicrobial activities and cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. In the membrane-mimetic solvent 50% (v/v) trifluoroethanol-H2O, both peptides adopt a well-defined α-helical conformation that extends over almost all the sequence and incorporates a flexible bend. Both peptides significantly (p < 0.05) stimulate the rate of release of insulin from BRIN-BD11 clonal β-cells at concentrations ≥ 0.1 nM but produce loss of integrity of the plasma membrane at concentrations ≥ 1 μM. Increasing cationicity by the substitution Glu(17) → l-Lys in Ps-1Pb and Glu(27) → l-Lys in Ps-2Pa generates analogues with increased cytotoxicity and reduced insulin-releasing potency. In contrast, the analogues [R8r]Ps-1Pb and [K8k,K19k]Ps-2Pa, incorporating d-amino acid residues to destabilize the α-helical domains, retain potent insulin-releasing activity but are nontoxic to BRIN-BD11 cells at concentrations of 3 μM. [R8r]Ps-1Pb produces a significant increase in insulin release rate at 0.3 nM and [K8k,K19k]Ps-2Pa at 0.01 nM. Both analogues show low hemolytic activity (IC50 > 100 μM) but retain broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and remain cytotoxic to a range of human tumor cell lines, albeit with lower potency than the naturally occurring peptides. These analogues show potential for development into agents for type 2 diabetes therapy. PMID:26606380

  17. The nature of peptide interactions with acid end-group PLGAs and facile aqueous-based microencapsulation of therapeutic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sophocleous, Andreas M.; Desai, Kashappa-Goud H.; Mazzara, J. Maxwell; Tong, Ling; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Olsen, Karl F.; Schwendeman, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    An important poorly understood phenomenon in controlled-release depots involves the strong interaction between common cationic peptides and low Mw free acid end-group poly(lactic-co-glycolic acids) (PLGAs) used to achieve continuous peptide release kinetics. The kinetics of peptide sorption to PLGA was examined by incubating peptide solutions of 0.2-4 mM octreotide or leuprolide acetate salts in 0.1 M HEPES buffer, pH 7.4, with polymer particles or films at 4-37 °C for 24 h. The extent of absorption/loading of peptides in PLGA particles/films was assayed by two-phase extraction and amino acid analysis. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and laser scanning confocal imaging techniques were used to examine peptide penetration in the polymer phase. The release of sorbed peptide from leuprolide-PLGA particles was evaluated both in vitro (PBST + 0.02% sodium azide, 37 °C) and in vivo (male Sprague-Dawley rats). We found that when the PLGA-COOH chains are sufficiently mobilized, therapeutic peptides not only bind at the surface, a common belief to date, but can also internalized and distributed throughout the polymer phase at physiological temperature forming a salt with low-molecular weight PLGA-COOH. Importantly, absorption of leuprolide into low MW PLGA-COOH particles yielded ~17 wt% leuprolide loading in the polymer (i.e., ~70% of PLGA-COOH acids occupied), and the absorbed peptide was released from the polymer for > 2 weeks in a controlled fashion in vitro and as indicated by sustained testosterone suppression in male Sprague-Dawley rats. This new approach, which bypasses the traditional encapsulation method and associated production cost, opens up the potential for facile production of low-cost controlled-release injectable depots for leuprolide and related peptides. PMID:24021356

  18. Conformational stability of digestion-resistant peptides of peanut conglutins reveals the molecular basis of their allergenicity

    PubMed Central

    Apostolovic, Danijela; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana; de Jongh, Harmen H. J.; de Jong, Govardus A. H.; Mihailovic, Jelena; Radosavljevic, Jelena; Radibratovic, Milica; Nordlee, Julie A.; Baumert, Joseph L.; Milcic, Milos; Taylor, Steve L.; Garrido Clua, Nuria; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Koppelman, Stef J.

    2016-01-01

    Conglutins represent the major peanut allergens and are renowned for their resistance to gastro-intestinal digestion. Our aim was to characterize the digestion-resistant peptides (DRPs) of conglutins by biochemical and biophysical methods followed by a molecular dynamics simulation in order to better understand the molecular basis of food protein allergenicity. We have mapped proteolysis sites at the N- and C-termini and at a limited internal segment, while other potential proteolysis sites remained unaffected. Molecular dynamics simulation showed that proteolysis only occurred in the vibrant regions of the proteins. DRPs appeared to be conformationally stable as intact conglutins. Also, the overall secondary structure and IgE-binding potency of DRPs was comparable to that of intact conglutins. The stability of conglutins toward gastro-intestinal digestion, combined with the conformational stability of the resulting DRPs provide conditions for optimal exposure to the intestinal immune system, providing an explanation for the extraordinary allergenicity of peanut conglutins. PMID:27377129

  19. Conformational stability of digestion-resistant peptides of peanut conglutins reveals the molecular basis of their allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Apostolovic, Danijela; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana; de Jongh, Harmen H J; de Jong, Govardus A H; Mihailovic, Jelena; Radosavljevic, Jelena; Radibratovic, Milica; Nordlee, Julie A; Baumert, Joseph L; Milcic, Milos; Taylor, Steve L; Garrido Clua, Nuria; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Koppelman, Stef J

    2016-01-01

    Conglutins represent the major peanut allergens and are renowned for their resistance to gastro-intestinal digestion. Our aim was to characterize the digestion-resistant peptides (DRPs) of conglutins by biochemical and biophysical methods followed by a molecular dynamics simulation in order to better understand the molecular basis of food protein allergenicity. We have mapped proteolysis sites at the N- and C-termini and at a limited internal segment, while other potential proteolysis sites remained unaffected. Molecular dynamics simulation showed that proteolysis only occurred in the vibrant regions of the proteins. DRPs appeared to be conformationally stable as intact conglutins. Also, the overall secondary structure and IgE-binding potency of DRPs was comparable to that of intact conglutins. The stability of conglutins toward gastro-intestinal digestion, combined with the conformational stability of the resulting DRPs provide conditions for optimal exposure to the intestinal immune system, providing an explanation for the extraordinary allergenicity of peanut conglutins. PMID:27377129

  20. Improved affinity of engineered streptavidin for the Strep-tag II peptide is due to a fixed open conformation of the lid-like loop at the binding site

    PubMed Central

    Korndörfer, Ingo P.; Skerra, Arne

    2002-01-01

    The Strep-tag II is a nine-amino acid peptide that was developed as an affinity tool for the purification of corresponding fusion proteins on streptavidin columns. The peptide recognizes the same pocket of streptavidin where the natural ligand is normally bound so that biotin or its chemical derivatives can be used for competitive elution. We report here the crystal structures of the streptavidin mutants `1' and `2,' which had been engineered for 10-fold higher affinity towards the Strep-tag II. Both streptavidin mutants carry mutations at positions 44, 45, and 47, that is, in a flexible loop region close to the binding site. The crystal structures of the two apo-proteins and their complexes with the Strep-tag II peptide were refined at resolutions below 2 Å. Both in the presence and absence of the peptide, the lid-like loop next to the ligand pocket—comprising residues 45 through 52—adopts an `open' conformation in all four subunits within the asymmetric unit. The same loop was previously described to be disordered in the wild-type apo-streptavidin and to close over the pocket upon complexation of the natural ligand biotin. Our findings suggest that stabilization of the `open' loop conformation in the absence of a ligand abolishes the need for conformational rearrangement prior to the docking of the voluminous peptide. Because no direct contacts between the flexible part of the loop and the peptide ligand were detected, it seems likely that the higher affinity of the two streptavidin mutants for the Strep-tag II is caused by a predominantly entropic mechanism. PMID:11910031

  1. Cyclolization of D-lysergic acid alkaloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Havemann, Judith; Vogel, Dominik; Loll, Bernhard; Keller, Ullrich

    2014-01-16

    The tripeptide chains of the ergopeptines, a class of pharmacologically important D-lysergic acid alkaloid peptides, are arranged in a unique bicyclic cyclol based on an amino-terminal α-hydroxyamino acid and a terminal orthostructure. D-lysergyl-tripeptides are assembled by the nonribosomal peptide synthetases LPS1 and LPS2 of the ergot fungus Claviceps purpurea and released as N-(D-lysergyl-aminoacyl)-lactams. We show total enzymatic synthesis of ergopeptines catalyzed by a Fe²⁺/2-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase (EasH) in conjunction with LPS1/LPS2. Analysis of the reaction indicated that EasH introduces a hydroxyl group into N-(D-lysergyl-aminoacyl)-lactam at α-C of the aminoacyl residue followed by spontaneous condensation with the terminal lactam carbonyl group. Sequence analysis revealed that EasH belongs to the wide and diverse family of the phytanoyl coenzyme A hydroxylases. We provide a high-resolution crystal structure of EasH that is most similar to that of phytanoyl coenzyme A hydroxylase, PhyH, from human. PMID:24361048

  2. The research on conformal acid etching process of glass ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kepeng; Guo, Peiji

    2014-08-01

    A series of experiments have been done to explore the effect of different conditions on the hydrofluoric acid etching. The hydrofluoric acid was used to etch the glass ceramic called "ZERODUR", which is invented by SCHOTT in Germany. The glass ceramic was processed into cylindrical samples. The hydrofluoric acid etching was done in a plastic beaker. The concentration of hydrofluoric acid and the etching time were changed to measure the changes of geometric tolerance and I observed the surface using a microscope in order to find an appropriate condition of hydrofluoric acid etching.

  3. Conformational flexibility in designing peptides for immunology: the molecular dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Stavrakoudis, Athanassios

    2010-09-01

    Computational modeling techniques and computer simulations have become a routine in biological sciences and have gained great attention from researchers. Molecular dynamics simulation is a valuable tool towards an understanding of the complex structure of biological systems, especially in the study of the flexibility of the biological molecules such as peptides or proteins. Peptides play a very important role in human physiology and control many of the processes involved in the immune system response. Designing new and optimal peptide vaccines is one of the hottest challenges of the 21(st) century science and it brings together researchers from different fields. Molecular dynamics simulations have proven to be a helpful tool assisting laboratory work, saving financial sources and opening possibilities for exploring properties of the molecular systems that are hardly accessible by conventional experimental methods. Present review is dedicated to the recent contributions in applications of molecular dynamics simulations in peptide design for immunological purposes, such as B or T cell epitopes. PMID:20412039

  4. Targeting DNA G-Quadruplex Structures with Peptide Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Panyutin, Igor G.; Onyshchenko, Mykola I.; Englund, Ethan A.; Appella, Daniel H.; Neumann, Ronald D.

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of genetic functions based on targeting DNA or RNA sequences with complementary oligonucleotides is especially attractive in the post-genome era. Oligonucleotides can be rationally designed to bind their targets based on simple nucleic acid base pairing rules. However, the use of natural DNA and RNA oligonucleotides as targeting probes can cause numerous off-target effects. In addition, natural nucleic acids are prone to degradation in vivo by various nucleases. To address these problems, nucleic acid mimics such as peptide nucleic acids (PNA) have been developed. They are more stable, show less off-target effects, and, in general, have better binding affinity to their targets. However, their high affinity to DNA can reduce their sequence-specificity. The formation of alternative DNA secondary structures, such as the G-quadruplex, provides an extra level of specificity as targets for PNA oligomers. PNA probes can target the loops of G-quadruplex, invade the core by forming PNA-DNA guanine-tetrads, or bind to the open bases on the complementary cytosine-rich strand. Not only could the development of such G-quadruplex-specific probes allow regulation of gene expression, but it will also provide a means to clarify the biological roles G-quadruplex structures may possess. PMID:22376112

  5. Helical Conformation of the SEVI Precursor Peptide PAP248-286, a Dramatic Enhancer of HIV Infectivity, Promotes Lipid Aggregation and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Brender, Jeffrey R.; Hartman, Kevin; Gottler, Lindsey M.; Cavitt, Marchello E.; Youngstrom, Daniel W.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2009-01-01

    In previous in vivo studies, amyloid fibers formed from a peptide ubiquitous in human seminal fluid (semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI)) were found to dramatically enhance the infectivity of the HIV virus (3–5 orders of magnitude by some measures). To complement those studies, we performed in vitro assays of PAP248-286, the most active precursor to SEVI, and other polycationic polymers to investigate the physical mechanisms by which the PAP248-286 promotes the interaction with lipid bilayers. At acidic (but not at neutral) pH, freshly dissolved PAP248-286 catalyzes the formation of large lipid flocculates in a variety of membrane compositions, which may be linked to the promotion of convective transport in the vaginal environment rather than transport by a random Brownian motion. Furthermore, PAP248-286 is itself fusiogenic and weakens the integrity of the membrane in such a way that may promote fusion by the HIV gp41 protein. An α-helical conformation of PAP248-286, lying parallel to the membrane surface, is implicated in promoting bridging interactions between membranes by the screening of the electrostatic repulsion that occurs when two membranes are brought into close contact. This suggests that nonspecific binding of monomeric or small oligomeric forms of SEVI in a helical conformation to lipid membranes may be an additional mechanism by which SEVI enhances the infectivity of the HIV virus. PMID:19883590

  6. Synthesis and Kinetic Analysis of Two Conformationally Restricted Peptide Substrates of Escherichia coli Penicillin-Binding Protein 5.

    PubMed

    Nemmara, Venkatesh V; Nicholas, Robert A; Pratt, R F

    2016-07-26

    Escherichia coli PBP5 (penicillin-binding protein 5) is a dd-carboxypeptidase involved in bacterial cell wall maturation. Beyond the C-terminal d-alanyl-d-alanine moiety, PBP5, like the essential high-molecular mass PBPs, has little specificity for other elements of peptidoglycan structure, at least as elicited in vitro by small peptidoglycan fragments. On the basis of the crystal structure of a stem pentapeptide derivative noncovalently bound to E. coli PBP6 (Protein Data Bank entry 3ITB ), closely similar in structure to PBP5, we have modeled a pentapeptide structure at the active site of PBP5. Because the two termini of the pentapeptide are directed into solution in the PBP6 crystal structure, we then modeled a 19-membered cyclic peptide analogue by cross-linking the terminal amines by succinylation. An analogous smaller, 17-membered cyclic peptide, in which the l-lysine of the original was replaced by l-diaminobutyric acid, could also be modeled into the active site. We anticipated that, just as the reactivity of stem peptide fragments of peptidoglycan with PBPs in vivo may be entropically enhanced by immobilization in the polymer, so too would that of our cyclic peptides with respect to their acyclic analogues in vitro. This paper describes the synthesis of the peptides described above that were required to examine this hypothesis and presents an analysis of their structures and reaction kinetics with PBP5. PMID:27420403

  7. Deleting the Redundant TSH Receptor C-Peptide Region Permits Generation of the Conformationally Intact Extracellular Domain by Insect Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Rong; Salazar, Larry M; McLachlan, Sandra M; Rapoport, Basil

    2015-07-01

    The TSH receptor (TSHR) extracellular domain (ECD) comprises a N-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain and an hinge region (HR), the latter contributing to ligand binding and critical for receptor activation. The crystal structure of the leucine-rich repeat domain component has been solved, but previous attempts to generate conformationally intact complete ECD or the isolated HR component for structural analysis have failed. The TSHR HR contains a C-peptide segment that is removed during spontaneous TSHR intramolecular cleavage into disulfide linked A- and B-subunits. We hypothesized that deletion of the redundant C-peptide would overcome the obstacle to generating conformationally intact TSHR ECD protein. Indeed, lacking the C-peptide region, the TSHR ECD (termed ECD-D1) and the isolated HR (termed HR-D1) were secreted into medium of insect cells infected with baculoviruses coding for these modified proteins. The identities of TSHR ECD-D1 and HR-D1 were confirmed by ELISA and immunoblotting using TSHR-specific monoclonal antibodies. The TSHR-ECD-D1 in conditioned medium was folded correctly, as demonstrated by its ability to inhibit radiolabeled TSH binding to the TSH holoreceptor. The TSHR ECD-D1 purification was accomplished in a single step using a TSHR monoclonal antibody affinity column, whereas the HR-D1 required a multistep protocol with a low yield. In conclusion, we report a novel approach to generate the TSHR ECD, as well as the isolated HR in insect cells, the former in sufficient amounts for structural studies. However, such studies will require previous complexing of the ECD with a ligand such as TSH or a thyroid-stimulating antibody. PMID:25860033

  8. Intrinsic Free Energy of the Conformational Transition of the KcsA Signature Peptide from Conducting to Nonconducting State

    PubMed Central

    Khavrutskii, Ilja V.; Fajer, Mikolai; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    We explore a conformational transition of the TATTVGYG signature peptide of the KcsA ion selectivity filter and its GYG to AYA mutant from the conducting α-strand state into the nonconducting pII-like state using a novel technique for multidimensional optimization of transition path ensembles and free energy calculations. We find that the wild type peptide, unlike the mutant, intrinsically favors the conducting state due to G77 backbone propensities and additional hydrophobic interaction between the V76 and Y78 side chains in water. The molecular mechanical free energy profiles in explicit water are in very good agreement with the corresponding adiabatic energies from the Generalized Born Molecular Volume (GBMV) implicit solvent model. However comparisons of the energies to higher level B3LYP/6–31G(d) Density Functional Theory calculations with Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) suggest that the nonconducting state might be more favorable than predicted by molecular mechanics simulations. By extrapolating the single peptide results to the tetrameric channel, we propose a novel hypothesis for the ion selectivity mechanism. PMID:20357907

  9. Conformational change of Sos-derived proline-rich peptide upon binding Grb2 N-terminal SH3 domain probed by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Kenji; Okamura, Hideyasu

    2013-10-01

    Growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) is a small adapter protein composed of a single SH2 domain flanked by two SH3 domains. The N-terminal SH3 (nSH3) domain of Grb2 binds a proline-rich region present in the guanine nucleotide releasing factor, son of sevenless (Sos). Using NMR relaxation dispersion and chemical shift analysis methods, we investigated the conformational change of the Sos-derived proline-rich peptide during the transition between the free and Grb2 nSH3-bound states. The chemical shift analysis revealed that the peptide does not present a fully random conformation but has a relatively rigid structure. The relaxation dispersion analysis detected conformational exchange of several residues of the peptide upon binding to Grb2 nSH3.

  10. Conformational change of Sos-derived proline-rich peptide upon binding Grb2 N-terminal SH3 domain probed by NMR.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Kenji; Okamura, Hideyasu

    2013-01-01

    Growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) is a small adapter protein composed of a single SH2 domain flanked by two SH3 domains. The N-terminal SH3 (nSH3) domain of Grb2 binds a proline-rich region present in the guanine nucleotide releasing factor, son of sevenless (Sos). Using NMR relaxation dispersion and chemical shift analysis methods, we investigated the conformational change of the Sos-derived proline-rich peptide during the transition between the free and Grb2 nSH3-bound states. The chemical shift analysis revealed that the peptide does not present a fully random conformation but has a relatively rigid structure. The relaxation dispersion analysis detected conformational exchange of several residues of the peptide upon binding to Grb2 nSH3. PMID:24105423

  11. Di-heterometalation of thiol-functionalized peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Tanmaya; Patra, Malay; Spiccia, Leone; Gasser, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    As a proof-of-principle, two hetero-bimetallic PNA oligomers containing a ruthenium(II) polypyridyl and a cyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl complex have been prepared by serial combination of solid-phase peptide coupling and in-solution thiol chemistry. Solid-phase N-terminus attachment of Ru(II)-polypyridyl carboxylic acid derivative, C1, onto the thiol-functionalized PNA backbone (H-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) has been performed by standard peptide coupling method. As two parallel approaches, the strong affinity of thiols for maleimide and haloacetyl group has been exploited for subsequent post-SPPS addition of cymantrene-based organometallic cores, C2 and C3. Michael-like addition and thioether ligation of thiol functionalized PNA1 (H-gly-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) and PNA2 (C1-a-a-g-t-c-t-g-c-linker-cys-NH2) to cymantrene maleimide and chloroacetyl derivatives, C2 and C3, respectively, has been performed. The synthesized ruthenium(II)-cymantrenyl PNA oligomers have been characterized by mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and IR spectroscopy. The distinct Mn-CO vibrational IR stretches, between 1,924–2,074 cm−1, have been used as markers to confirm the presence of cymantrenyl units in the PNA sequences and the purity of the HPLC-purified PNA thioethers assessed using LC-MS. PMID:23422249

  12. Conformational preferences of γ-aminobutyric acid in the gas phase and in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Il Keun; Kang, Young Kee

    2012-09-01

    The conformational study of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been carried out at the M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory in the gas phase and the SMD M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory in water. In the gas phase, the folded conformation gG1 with gauche- and gauche+ conformations for the Cβsbnd Cα and Cγsbnd Cβ bonds, respectively, is found to be lowest in energy and enthalpy, which can be ascribed to the favored hyperconjugative n → π* interaction between the lone electron pair of the amine nitrogen atom and the Cdbnd O bond of the carboxylic group and the favored antiparallel dipole-dipole interaction between the Nsbnd H bond and the Cdbnd O bond. In addition, the intramolecular hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic group and the amine Nsbnd H group have contributed to stabilize some low-energy conformers. However, the most preferred conformation is found to be tG1 and more stable by 0.4 kcal/mol in ΔG than the conformer gG1, in which the favored entropic term due to the conformational flexibility and the other favored n → σ*, σ → σ*, and π → σ* interactions seem to play a role. The conformational preferences of the neutral GABA calculated by ΔG's are reasonably consistent with the populations deduced from FT microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets combined with laser ablation. In water, the two folded conformers Gg and gG of the zwitterionic GABA are dominantly populated, each of which has the population of 47%, and the hydrogen bond between the ammonium Nsbnd H group and the lone electron pair of the Csbnd O- group seems to be crucial in stabilizing these conformers. Our calculated result that the folded conformers preferentially exist in water is consistent with the 1H NMR experiments in D2O.

  13. Effects of osmolytes on the helical conformation of model peptide: Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrnejad, Faramarz; Ghahremanpour, Mohammad Mehdi; Khadem-Maaref, Mahmoud; Doustdar, Farahnoosh

    2011-01-01

    Co-solvents such as glycerol and sorbitol are small organic molecules solvated in the cellular solutions that can have profound effects on the protein structures. Here, the molecular dynamics simulations and comparative structural analysis of magainin, as a peptide model, in pure water, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol/water, glycerol/water, and sorbitol/water are reported. Our results show that the peptide NMR structure is largely maintained its native structure in osmolytes-water mixtures. The simulation data indicates that the stabilizing effect of glycerol and sorbitol is induced by preferential accumulation of glycerol and sorbitol molecules around the nonpolar and aromatic residues. Thus, the presence of glycerol and sorbitol molecules decreases the interactions of water molecules with the hydrophobic residues of the peptide, and the alpha helical structure is stabilized.

  14. Structural Dynamic of a Self-Assembling Peptide d-EAK16 Made of Only D-Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhongli; Zhao, Xiaojun; Zhang, Shuguang

    2008-01-01

    We here report systematic study of structural dynamics of a 16-residue self-assembling peptide d-EAK16 made of only D-amino acids. We compare these results with its chiral counterpart L-form, l-EAK16. Circular dichroism was used to follow the structural dynamics under various temperature and pH conditions. At 25°C the d-EAK16 peptide displayed a typical beta-sheet spectrum. Upon increasing the temperature above 70°C, there was a spectrum shift as the 218 nm valley widens toward 210 nm. Above 80°C, the d-EAK16 peptide transformed into a typical alpha-helix CD spectrum without going through a detectable random-coil intermediate. When increasing the temperature from 4°C to 110°C then cooling back from 110°C to 4°C, there was a hysteresis: the secondary structure from beta-sheet to alpha-helix and then from alpha-helix to beta-sheet occurred. d-EAK16 formed an alpha-helical conformation at pH0.76 and pH12 but formed a beta-sheet at neutral pH. The effects of various pH conditions, ionic strength and denaturing agents were also noted. Since D-form peptides are resistant to natural enzyme degradation, such drastic structural changes may be exploited for fabricating molecular sensors to detect minute environmental changes. This provides insight into the behaviors of self-assembling peptides made of D-amino acids and points the way to designing new peptide materials for biomedical engineering and nanobiotechnology. PMID:18509542

  15. Reversible Sheet–Turn Conformational Change of a Cell-Penetrating Peptide in Lipid Bilayers Studied by Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yongchao; Mani, Rajeswari; Doherty, Tim; Waring, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-bound conformation of a cell-penetrating peptide, penetratin, is investigated using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The 13C chemical shifts of 13C, 15N-labeled residues in the peptide indicate a reversible conformational change from β-sheet at low temperature to coil-like at high temperature. This conformational change occurs for all residues examined between positions 3 and 13, at peptide/lipid molar ratios of 1:15 and 1:30, in membranes with 25–50% anionic lipids, and in both saturated DMPC/DMPG (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylchloline/1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylglycerol) membranes and unsaturated POPC/POPG (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylglycerol) membranes. Thus, it is an intrinsic property of penetratin. The coil state of the peptide has C– H order parameters of 0.23–0.52 for Cα and Cβ sites, indicating that the peptide backbone is unstructured. Moreover, chemical shift anisotropy lineshapes are uniaxially averaged, suggesting that the peptide backbone undergoes uniaxial rotation around the bilayer normal. These observations suggest that the dynamic state of penetratin at high temperature is a structured turn instead of an isotropic random coil. The thermodynamic parameters of this sheet–turn transition are extracted and compared to other membrane peptides reported to exhibit conformational changes. We suggest that the function of this turn conformation may be to reduce hydrophobic interactions with the lipid chains and facilitate penetratin translocation across the bilayer without causing permanent membrane damage. PMID:18656895

  16. Conformation specific spectroscopy in the complexity gap: beta-peptides and flexible bichromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baquero, Esteban Edwin

    Flexible biomolecules with many degrees of freedom have the ability to sample a great number of structural minima. The intrinsic structural preferences of these molecules are driven by stabilizations due to intramolecular interactions such as hydrogen bonding and interatomic attractive forces. These interactions become increasingly important as the atoms in the molecule come in close proximity to one another. The present work describes the conformational preferences of several model bio-relevant molecules of different sizes where different kinds of intramolecular interactions can occur. Conformation specific ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopies were utilized to obtain the spectroscopic signatures of different conformations of the jet cooled biomolecules. These experiments allowed for the assignment of conformational families and the development of a general protocol to identify the infrared signatures of amide NH stretches, which were found to vary in frequency due to their immediate chemical and structural environment. Specific examples of systems studied include molecules containing unnatural polypeptide chains and a flexible bichromophore. The unnatural polypetides (Ac-beta3-hPhe-NHMe, Ac-beta 3-hTyr-NHMe Ac-beta3-hPhe-beta3-hAla-NHMe and Ac-beta3-hAla-beta3-hPhe-NHMe) were found to have a rich conformational potential energy landscape that contained many kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded minima. The flexible bichromophore (HNBPA), containing two spectroscopically distinguishable chromophores (Phenol and Phenyl), was found to be an interesting case study for conformational specific electronic energy transfer and testing how well different theoretical methods manage non-covalent interactions, such as those between side-chain atoms and aromatic pi-clouds.

  17. How Cation-Pi Interactions Enhance and Structure the Binding of Metal Ions to Amino Acids and Peptides. Dialanine Probed by Irmpd Spectroscopy as a Prime Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, Robert C.; Steill, Jeffrey; Oomens, Jos

    2010-06-01

    Spectroscopic examination of metalated amino acids and model peptides in the infrared region gives incisive conformational information. The role of cation-pi interactions of the metal ions with aromatic amino acids in structuring the complexes and enforcing particular architectures is being clarified by such experiments using IRMPD action spectroscopy as the experimental probe. The presence of multiple aromatic groups as in dialanine gives particularly stringent conformational stabilization. Comparing spectroscopic peak shifts across a range of alkali and alkaline earth metal ions, ranging from lithium to cesium, and from calcium to barium, allows us to view the systematic relations between normal mode frequencies and ion/peptide interactions. The spectra of the ions were acquired by irradiating the cell of the Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer with infrared light from the FELIX free electron laser at wavelengths in the approximate range 500 to 1900 cm-1.

  18. Proteins, Peptides and Amino Acids: Role in Infant Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Nutten, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are polymers composed of 30 or more amino acids; some of them are essential dietary components, since they are not synthetized by human metabolic processes. They are crucial for healthy growth and development and influence major functions of the body. The infant's first year is a critical time of rapid growth and development, which must be supported by a high rate of protein synthesis. Breast milk, as a single specific food source in the first months of life, is providing the total protein and essential amino acids required. Infant formulas have been designed for infants who cannot be breastfed. They should be similar to breast milk in their composition and their functional outcomes, insuring appropriate growth, optimal development, maturation of the immune system, easy digestion and healthy metabolic programming. By modifying their protein components, specific infant formulas have also been developed for specific needs. For example, partially hydrolyzed (prevention of atopic dermatitis) and extensively hydrolyzed or amino-acid-based infant formulas (reduction in allergy symptoms) have been designed for the management of cow's milk protein allergy. In conclusion, proteins provided via breast milk or infant formula are essential components of the infant's diet; therefore, the specific quality, quantity and conformation of proteins are of utmost importance for healthy growth and development. PMID:27336588

  19. The role of conformational selection in the molecular recognition of the wild type and mutants XPA67-80 peptides by ERCC1.

    PubMed

    Fadda, Elisa

    2015-07-01

    Molecular recognition is a fundamental step in the coordination of biomolecular pathways. Understanding how recognition and binding occur between highly flexible protein domains is a complex task. The conformational selection theory provides an elegant rationalization of the recognition mechanism, especially valid in cases when unstructured protein regions are involved. The recognition of a poorly structured peptide, namely XPA67-80 , by its target receptor ERCC1, falls in this challenging study category. The microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, discussed in this work, show that the conformational propensity of the wild type XPA67-80 peptide in solution supports conformational selection as the key mechanism driving its molecular recognition by ERCC1. Moreover, all the mutations of the XPA67-80 peptide studied here cause a significant increase of its conformational disorder, relative to the wild type. Comparison to experimental data suggests that the loss of the recognized structural motifs at the microscopic time scale can contribute to the critical decrease in binding observed for one of the mutants, further substantiating the key role of conformational selection in recognition. Ultimately, because of the high sequence identity and analogy in binding, it is conceivable that the conclusions of this study on the XPA67-80 peptide also apply to the ERCC1-binding domain of the XPA protein. PMID:25973722

  20. The conformational properties of α,β-dehydroamino acids with a C-terminal ester group.

    PubMed

    Siodłak, Dawid; Grondys, Justyna; Broda, Małgorzata A

    2011-10-01

    α,β-Dehydroamino acid esters occur in nature. To investigate their conformational properties, a systematic theoretical analysis was performed on the model molecules Ac-ΔXaa-OMe [ΔXaa = ΔAla, (E)-ΔAbu, (Z)-ΔAbu, ΔVal] at the B3LYP/6-311+ + G(d,p) level in the gas phase as well as in chloroform and water solutions with the self-consistent reaction field-polarisable continuum model method. The Fourier transform IR spectra in CCl(4) and CHCl(3) have been analysed as well as the analogous solid state conformations drawn from The Cambridge Structural Database. The ΔAla residue has a considerable tendency to adopt planar conformations C5 (ϕ, ψ ≈ - 180°, 180°) and β2 (ϕ, ψ ≈ - 180°, 0°), regardless of the environment. The ΔVal residue prefers the conformation β2 (ϕ, ψ ≈ - 120°, 0°) in a low polar environment, but the conformations α (ϕ, ψ ≈ - 55°, 35°) and β (ϕ, ψ ≈ - 55°, 145°) when the polarity increases. The ΔAbu residues reveal intermediate properties, but their conformational dispositions depend on configuration of the side chain of residue: (E)-ΔAbu is similar to ΔAla, whereas (Z)-ΔAbu to ΔVal. Results indicate that the low-energy conformation β2 is the characteristic feature of dehydroamino acid esters. The studied molecules constitute conformational patterns for dehydroamino acid esters with various side chain substituents in either or both Z and E positions. PMID:21805538

  1. Conformational states of syntaxin-1 govern the necessity of N-peptide binding in exocytosis of PC12 cells and Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Park, Seungmee; Bin, Na-Ryum; Michael Rajah, Maaran; Kim, Byungjin; Chou, Ting-Chieh; Kang, Soo-Young Ann; Sugita, Kyoko; Parsaud, Leon; Smith, Matthew; Monnier, Philippe P; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Zhen, Mei; Sugita, Shuzo

    2016-02-15

    Syntaxin-1 is the central SNARE protein for neuronal exocytosis. It interacts with Munc18-1 through its cytoplasmic domains, including the N-terminal peptide (N-peptide). Here we examine the role of the N-peptide binding in two conformational states ("closed" vs. "open") of syntaxin-1 using PC12 cells and Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that expression of "closed" syntaxin-1A carrying N-terminal single point mutations (D3R, L8A) that perturb interaction with the hydrophobic pocket of Munc18-1 rescues impaired secretion in syntaxin-1-depleted PC12 cells and the lethality and lethargy of unc-64 (C. elegans orthologue of syntaxin-1)-null mutants. Conversely, expression of the "open" syntaxin-1A harboring the same mutations fails to rescue the impairments. Biochemically, the L8A mutation alone slightly weakens the binding between "closed" syntaxin-1A and Munc18-1, whereas the same mutation in the "open" syntaxin-1A disrupts it. Our results reveal a striking interplay between the syntaxin-1 N-peptide and the conformational state of the protein. We propose that the N-peptide plays a critical role in intracellular trafficking of syntaxin-1, which is dependent on the conformational state of this protein. Surprisingly, however, the N-peptide binding mode seems dispensable for SNARE-mediated exocytosis per se, as long as the protein is trafficked to the plasma membrane. PMID:26700321

  2. Conformational preferences of synthetic peptides derived from the immunodominant site of the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium falciparum by sup 1 H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Dyson, H.J.; Satterthwait, A.C.; Lerner, R.A.; Wright, P.E. )

    1990-08-28

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and ultraviolet circular dichroism spectroscopy have been used to probe the conformational ensemble of the tandemly repeated tetrapeptide unit of the circumsporozoite coat protein of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Peptides based on the Asn-Ala-Asn-Pro and Asn-Pro-Asn-Ala cadences and composed of one to three tetrapeptide units were synthesized and examined using one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The chemical shift of the amide protons, the temperature dependence of the amide proton chemical shift, and the patterns of NOE connectivities in the various peptides give evidence for the presence of a substantial population of folded conformers in several of the peptides in water solution at pH 5.0. Correlations between the behavior of the tandemly repeated units in different peptides have been used to infer the structure(s) of the folded conformers. The data are consistent with the presence of turnlike structures stabilized by hydrogen bonding of the backbone amid protons of the alanines and the asparagine residues preceding them. Specific differences in the strengths of NOEs between peptides of different lengths indicate that the folded structure is considerably stabilized by the presence of the asparagine residue following the alanine. Differences between peptides with different cadences of the tandemly repeating unit indicate that a repeating structural motif is formed by the Asn-Pro-Asn-Ala-(Asn) cadence.

  3. Conformational analysis of a nucleoside of 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccur Leal, Kátia; Rudolf Seidl, Peter; Diniz Yoneda, Julliane; Santos, CarlaV. B.; Marques, Isakelly P.; Souza, Maria Cecília B. V.; Francisco Ferreira, Vitor

    2005-06-01

    The synthesis of new ribonucleosides is an essential research area in the investigation of new therapeutically useful agents, particularly those used in the treatment of HIV infection. The conformation of these nucleosides may have direct implications for their ability to bind to receptor targets. We have prepared the 7-methoxy-1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid derivatives and used the ensemble of low-energy minima to develop conformational profiles of quinolonic nucleosides and verify their accuracy in different calculations of structural parameters. Results are compared with experimental data obtained by X-ray and NMR analysis. Finally, we intend to test the applicability of these methods to conformational analysis of other nucleosides and verify if the preferential conformation is the one which gives the best anti-HIV or antiviral activity.

  4. Conformationally restricted C-terminal peptides of substance P. Synthesis, mass spectral analysis and pharmacological properties.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulos, D; Poulos, C; Gatos, D; Cordopatis, P; Escher, E; Mizrahi, J; Regoli, D; Dalietos, D; Furst, A; Lee, T D

    1985-10-01

    Four cyclic analogues of the C-terminal hepta- or hexapeptide of substance P were prepared by the solution method. The cyclizations were obtained by substituting with cysteine the residues normally present in positions 5 or 6 or 11 of substance P and by subsequent disulfide bond formation. The final products were identified by ordinary analytical procedures and advanced mass spectroscopy. The biological activities were determined on three bioassays: the guinea pig ileum, the guinea pig trachea and the rabbit mesenteric vein. Results obtained with these assays indicate that all peptides with a disulfide bridgehead in position 11 are inactive and that a cycle between positions 5 and 6 already strongly reduces the biological activity. The acyclic precursors containing thiol protection groups display weak biological activities. These results further underline the importance of the side chain in position 11 of substance P and suggest that optimal biological activities may require a linear peptide sequence. PMID:2413208

  5. Tri-peptide reference structures for the calculation of relative solvent accessible surface area in protein amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Topham, Christopher M; Smith, Jeremy C

    2015-02-01

    Relative amino acid residue solvent accessibility values allow the quantitative comparison of atomic solvent-accessible surface areas in different residue types and physical environments in proteins and in protein structural alignments. Geometry-optimised tri-peptide structures in extended solvent-exposed reference conformations have been obtained for 43 amino acid residue types at a high level of quantum chemical theory. Significant increases in side-chain solvent accessibility, offset by reductions in main-chain atom solvent exposure, were observed for standard residue types in partially geometry-optimised structures when compared to non-minimised models built from identical sets of proper dihedral angles abstracted from the literature. Optimisation of proper dihedral angles led most notably to marked increases of up to 54% in proline main-chain atom solvent accessibility compared to literature values. Similar effects were observed for fully-optimised tri-peptides in implicit solvent. The relief of internal strain energy was associated with systematic variation in N, C(α) and C(β) atom solvent accessibility across all standard residue types. The results underline the importance of optimisation of 'hard' degrees of freedom (bond lengths and valence bond angles) and improper dihedral angle values from force field or other context-independent reference values, and impact on the use of standardised fixed internal co-ordinate geometry in sampling approaches to the determination of absolute values of protein amino acid residue solvent accessibility. Quantum chemical methods provide a useful and accurate alternative to molecular mechanics methods to perform energy minimisation of peptides containing non-standard (chemically modified) amino acid residues frequently present in experimental protein structure data sets, for which force field parameters may not be available. Reference tri-peptide atomic co-ordinate sets including hydrogen atoms are made freely available

  6. Photoswitchable click amino acids: light control of conformation and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Hoppmann, Christian; Schmieder, Peter; Heinrich, Nadja; Beyermann, Michael

    2011-11-25

    Click the switch: By using a photoswitchable click amino acid (PSCaa) a light-induced intramolecular thiol-ene click reaction with a neighboring cysteine under very mild conditions results in an azobenzene bridge. By expanding the genetic code for PSCaa the specific incorporation of photoswitch units into proteins in living cells can result in an exciting approach for studying light-controllable activity, in vivo. PMID:21998087

  7. Characterization of desmoglein-3 epitope region peptides as synthetic antigens: analysis of their in vitro T cell stimulating efficacy, cytotoxicity, stability, and their conformational features.

    PubMed

    Szabados, Hajnalka; Uray, Katalin; Majer, Zsuzsa; Silló, Pálma; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Hudecz, Ferenc; Bősze, Szilvia

    2015-09-01

    Desmoglein-3 (Dsg3) adhesion protein is the main target of autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells in Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) autoimmune skin disorder. Several mapping studies of Dsg3 T cell epitope regions were performed, and based on those data, we designed and synthesized four peptide series corresponding to Dsg3 T cell epitope regions. Each peptide series consists of a 17mer full-length peptide (Dsg3/189-205, Dsg3/206-222, Dsg3/342-358, and Dsg3/761-777) and its N-terminally truncated derivatives, resulting in 15 peptides altogether. The peptides were prepared on solid phase and were chemically characterized. In order to establish a structure-activity relationship, the solution conformation of the synthetic peptides has been investigated using electronic circular dichroism spectroscopy. The in vitro T cell stimulating efficacy of the peptides has been determined on peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from whole blood of PV patients and also from healthy donors. After 20 h of stimulation, the interferon (IFN)-γ content of the supernatants was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the in vitro conditions, peptides were stable and non-cytotoxic. The in vitro IFN-γ production profile of healthy donors and PV patients, induced by peptides as synthetic antigens, was markedly different. The most unambiguous differences were observed after stimulation with 17mer peptide Dsg3/342-358, and three truncated derivatives from two other peptide series, namely, peptides Dsg3/192-205, Dsg3/763-777, and Dsg3/764-777. Comparative analysis of in vitro activity and the capability of oligopeptides to form ordered or unordered secondary structure showed that peptides bearing high solvent sensibility and backbone flexibility were the most capable to distinguish between healthy and PV donors. PMID:26250896

  8. Effect of specific amino acid substitutions in the putative fusion peptide of structural glycoprotein E2 on Classical Swine Fever Virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández-Sainz, I.J.; Largo, E.; Gladue, D.P.; Fletcher, P.; O’Donnell, V.; Holinka, L.G.; Carey, L.B.; Lu, X.; Nieva, J.L.; Borca, M.V.

    2014-05-15

    E2, along with E{sup rns} and E1, is an envelope glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). E2 is involved in several virus functions: cell attachment, host range susceptibility and virulence in natural hosts. Here we evaluate the role of a specific E2 region, {sup 818}CPIGWTGVIEC{sup 828}, containing a putative fusion peptide (FP) sequence. Reverse genetics utilizing a full-length infectious clone of the highly virulent CSFV strain Brescia (BICv) was used to evaluate how individual amino acid substitutions within this region of E2 may affect replication of BICv. A synthetic peptide representing the complete E2 FP amino acid sequence adopted a β-type extended conformation in membrane mimetics, penetrated into model membranes, and perturbed lipid bilayer integrity in vitro. Similar peptides harboring amino acid substitutions adopted comparable conformations but exhibited different membrane activities. Therefore, a preliminary characterization of the putative FP {sup 818}CPIGWTGVIEC{sup 828} indicates a membrane fusion activity and a critical role in virus replication. - Highlights: • A putative fusion peptide (FP) region in CSFV E2 protein was shown to be critical for virus growth. • Synthetic FPs were shown to efficiently penetrate into lipid membranes using an in vitro model. • Individual residues in the FP affecting virus replication were identified by reverse genetics. • The same FP residues are also responsible for mediating membrane fusion.

  9. Conformations of rat brain hexokinase: studies with monoclonal antibodies and peptide mapping techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.D.; Wilson, J.E.

    1987-05-01

    Brain hexokinase (HK) consists of a single polypeptide chain with M/sub r/ approx. 100,000. Limited proteolysis of native HK with trypsin yields three major fragments, thought to correspond to discrete structural domains, with molecular masses of approximately 10, 50, and 40 kDa, and derived from the N-terminal, central, and C-terminal regions, respectively. Additional tryptic cleavage sites become susceptible in conformations induced by binding of specific ligands. A library of monoclonal antibodies has been developed for use as probes in examining the structure and function of domains present in HK. Epitopes for several of these have been mapped to specific structural regions in HK. Immunoblotting experiments with these antibodies have been useful in defining the location of susceptible proteolytic cleavage sites in various ligand-induced conformations of HK. Effects of ligand binding on epitope recognition have indicated that several of the antibodies interact with epitopes perturbed by ligand-induced conformational changes. Effects of antibody binding on function have also provided a basis for establishing structure-function relationships. For example, several of the monoclonal antibodies inhibit binding of hexokinase to mitochondria and all recognize epitopes located in the 10 kDa N-terminal domain, consistent with other results indicating that this region is critical to the binding function of hexokinase.

  10. Proton and tritium NMR relaxation studies of peptide inhibitor binding to bacterial collagenase: Conformation and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dive, V.; Lai, A.; Valensin, G.; Saba, G.; Yiotakis, A.; Toma, F. )

    1991-02-15

    The interaction of succinyl-Pro-Ala, a competitive inhibitor of Achromobacter iophagus collagenase, with the enzyme was studied by longitudinal proton and tritium relaxation. Specific deuterium and tritium labeling of the succinyl part at vicinal positions allowed the measurement of the cross-relaxation rates of individual proton or tritium spin pairs in the inhibitor-enzyme complex as well as in the free inhibitor. Overall correlation times, internuclear distances, and qualitative information on the internal mobility in Suc1 (as provided by the generalized order parameter S2) could be deduced by the comparison of proton and tritium cross-relaxation of spin pairs at complementary positions in the -CH2- CH2- moiety as analyzed in terms of the model-free approach by Lipari and Szabo. The conformational and motional parameters of the inhibitor in the free and enzyme-bound state were directly compared by this method. The measurement of proton cross-relaxation in the Ala residue provided additional information on the inhibitor binding. The determination of the order parameter in different parts of the inhibitor molecule in the bound state indicates that the succinyl and alanyl residues are primarily involved in the interaction with the enzyme activity site. The succinyl moiety, characterized in solution by the conformational equilibrium among the three staggered rotamers--i.e., trans: 50%; g+: 20%; g-: 30%--adopted in the bound state the unique trans conformation.

  11. Quantum Corrections to the Free Energy Difference between Peptides and Proteins Conformers.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Marco

    2015-09-01

    The calculation of the free energy of conformation is key in understanding the function of biomolecules and has attracted significant interest in recent years. Most current computational approaches evaluate the difference in conformational free energy in the classical limit based on the common "dogma" that only the lowest-frequency modes make a significant contribution to it, i.e. they assume that quantum mechanical corrections are negligible. Here, I show for three biomolecular systems described in the rigid-rotor, harmonic-oscillator approximation that the zero-point energy contribution, although small, is not negligible even at room temperature. I find that a quantum correction arises from the intermediate-frequency vibrational modes and that its magnitude is strongly correlated with the number of atoms in the system. A straightforward, though approximate, way to account for this quantum correction in the calculation of conformational free-energy differences by classical molecular dynamics is presented. The relevance of the quantum correction analyzed in this paper is discussed in the context of conventional force fields for proteins. PMID:26575897

  12. Conformational plasticity of the Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease peptide as indicated by its multiple aggregation pathways.

    PubMed

    Natalello, Antonino; Prokorov, Valery V; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Morbin, Michela; Forloni, Gianluigi; Beeg, Marten; Manzoni, Claudia; Colombo, Laura; Gobbi, Marco; Salmona, Mario; Doglia, Silvia Maria

    2008-09-19

    The existence of several prion strains and their capacity of overcoming species barriers seem to point to a high conformational adaptability of the prion protein. To investigate this structural plasticity, we studied here the aggregation pathways of the human prion peptide PrP82-146, a major component of the Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker amyloid disease. By Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we monitored the time course of PrP82-146 fibril formation. After incubation at 37 degrees C, the unfolded peptide was found to aggregate into oligomers characterized by intermolecular beta-sheet infrared bands. At a critical oligomer concentration, the emergence of a new FT-IR band allowed to detect fibril formation. A different intermolecular beta-sheet interaction of the peptides in oligomers and in fibrils is, therefore, detected by FT-IR spectroscopy, which, in addition, suggests a parallel orientation of the cross beta-sheet structures of PrP82-146 fibrils. By AFM, a wide distribution of PrP82-146 oligomer volumes--the smallest ones containing from 5 to 30 peptides--was observed. Interestingly, the statistical analysis of AFM data enabled us to detect a quantization in the oligomer height values differing by steps of approximately 0.5 nm that could reflect an orientation of oligomer beta-strands parallel with the sample surface. Different morphologies were also detected for fibrils that displayed high heterogeneity in their twisting periodicity and a complex hierarchical assembly. Thermal aggregation of PrP82-146 was also investigated by FT-IR spectroscopy, which indicated for these aggregates an intermolecular beta-sheet interaction different from that observed for oligomers and fibrils. Unexpectedly, random aggregates, induced by solvent evaporation, were found to display a significant alpha-helical structure as well as several beta-sheet components. All these results clearly point to a high

  13. NIR Laser Radiation Induced Conformational Changes and Tunneling Lifetimes of High-Energy Conformers of Amino Acids in Low-Temperature Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazso, Gabor; Najbauer, Eszter E.; Magyarfalvi, Gabor; Tarczay, Gyorgy

    2013-06-01

    We review our recent results on combined matrix isolation FT-IR and NIR laser irradiation studies on glycine alanine, and cysteine. The OH and the NH stretching overtones of the low-energy conformers of these amino acids deposited in Ar, Kr, Xe, and N_{2} matrices were irradiated. At the expense of the irradiated conformer, other conformers were enriched and new, high-energy, formerly unobserved conformers were formed in the matrices. This enabled the separation and unambiguous assignment of the vibrational transitions of the different conformers. The main conversion paths and their efficiencies are described qualitatively showing that there are significant differences in different matrices. It was shown that the high-energy conformer decays in the matrix by H-atom tunneling. The lifetimes of the high-energy conformers in different matrices were measured. Based on our results we conclude that some theoretically predicted low-energy conformers of amino acids are likely even absent in low-energy matrices due to fast H-atom tunneling. G. Bazso, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay J. Mol. Struct. 1025 (Light-Induced Processes in Cryogenic Matrices Special Issue) 33-42 (2012). G. Bazso, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay J. Phys. Chem. A 116 (43) 10539-10547 (2012). G. Bazso, E. E. Najbauer, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay J. Phys. Chem. A in press, DOI: 10.1021/jp400196b. E. E. Najbauer, G. Bazso, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay in preparation.

  14. Effects of vector fusion peptides on the conformation and immune reactivity of epitope-shuffled, recombinant multi-epitope antigens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Lin, Yahui; Cai, Pengfei; Wang, Heng

    2011-01-01

    The use of multi-epitopes has been considered as a promising strategy to overcome the obstacle of antigenic variation in malarial vaccine development. Previously, we constructed a multi-epitope artificial antigen, Malaria Random Constructed Antigen-1(M.RCAg-1), to optimize expression of the antigen, and we subcloned the gene into three prokaryotic expression vectors that contain different fusion tags at the N-terminus. Three recombinant proteins expressed by these vectors, named M.RCAg-1/Exp.V-1, V-2, and V-3, were purified after the cleavage of the fusion tag. All three recombinant proteins were able to induce similar levels of antigenicity in BALB/c murine models. However, the antibody responses against the individual epitope peptides of the recombinant products were dramatically different. Additionally, the different epitopes elicited various CD4(+) T-cell responses, as shown by the resulting lymphocyte proliferation and varied IFN-γ and IL-4 levels determined by EILSPOT; however, each could be distinctly recognized by sera derived from malaria patients. Additionally, the rabbit antibody induced by these proteins showed diverse efficacy in malaria parasite growth inhibition assays in vitro. Furthermore, analysis via circular dichroism spectroscopy confirmed that the secondary structure was different among these recombinant proteins. These results suggest that the expressed multi-epitope artificial antigens originating from the different vector fusion peptides indeed affect the protein folding and, subsequently, the epitope exposure. Thus, these proteins are able to induce both distinct humoral and cellular immune responses in animal models, and they affect the efficacy of immune inhibition against the parasite. This work should lead to a further understanding of the impact of vector fusion peptides on the conformation and immune reactivity of recombinant proteins and could provide a useful reference for the development of artificial multi-epitope vaccines. PMID

  15. Conjugates of amino acids and peptides with 5-o-mycaminosyltylonolide and their interaction with the ribosomal exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, Anna; Makarov, Gennady; Tereshchenkov, Andrey; Korshunova, Galina; Sumbatyan, Nataliya; Golovin, Andrey; Svetlov, Maxim; Bogdanov, Alexey

    2013-11-20

    During protein synthesis the nascent polypeptide chain (NC) extends through the ribosomal exit tunnel (NPET). Also, the large group of macrolide antibiotics binds in the nascent peptide exit tunnel. In some cases interaction of NC with NPET leads to the ribosome stalling, a significant event in regulation of translation. In other cases NC-ribosome interactions lead to pauses in translation that play an important role in cotranslational folding of polypeptides emerging from the ribosome. The precise mechanism of NC recognition in NPET as well as factors that determine NC conformation in the ribosomal tunnel are unknown. A number of derivatives of the macrolide antibiotic 5-O-mycaminosyltylonolide (OMT) containing N-acylated amino acid or peptide residues were synthesized in order to study potential sites of NC-NPET interactions. The target compounds were prepared by conjugation of protected amino acids and peptides with the C23 hydroxyl group of the macrolide. These OMT derivatives showed high although varying abilities to inhibit the firefly luciferase synthesis in vitro. Three glycil-containing derivatives appeared to be strong inhibitors of translation, more potent than parental OMT. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of complexes of tylosin, OMT, and some of OMT derivatives with the large ribosomal subunit of E. coli illuminated a plausible reason for the high inhibitory activity of Boc-Gly-OMT. In addition, the MD study detected a new putative site of interaction of the nascent polypeptide chain with the NPET walls. PMID:24090034

  16. Hydration studies of electrospray ions from amino acids and small peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Chuong (Steve)

    This project was undertaken to gain a better understanding of the hydration behaviors of gas phase ions from solutions containing amino acids and peptides. In order to characterize their hydration behavior, the molecules of interest in solutions were first converted into gas phase ions by electrospray ionization (ESI). The completely desolvated ions were then deliberately dispersed into an inert bath gas, usually nitrogen, containing accurately known concentrations of solvent vapor. The resulting mixtures of ions and bath gas were subsequently passed into a vacuum chamber by way of an adiabatic supersonic free jet expansion. The cooling during that expansion caused solvation of the ions, the extent of which was determined by a quadrupole mass analyzer. Mass analysis of the solute ions in the absence of vapor showed peaks with the mass to charge ratios corresponding to the desolvated ions. On the other hand, mass spectrometric analyses of ions in the presence of solvent vapor showed sequences of peaks corresponding to the solvated ions with varying numbers of water molecules. The extent of the ion solvation was controlled by varying the concentration of solvent vapor in the bath gas. Two different scales were proposed for the evaluation of the relative affinities of amino acids for water molecules. One was based primarily on the assumption that the affinities of amino acids for water molecules are directly proportional to their gas phase solvation rate constants ( k). An alternative approach produced an affinity scale based on the extent of ion hydration occurred during the free jet expansion. It was found that the addition of a polar solvent vapor to the bath gas at low concentrations substantially enhanced the production of the bare solute ions from the evaporating charged droplets. This remarkable result not only provided a means to increase the ion production and thus detection sensitivity of mass spectrometric analyses, but also yielded important information

  17. Magic Angle Spinning NMR Reveals Sequence-Dependent Structural Plasticity, Dynamics, and the Spacer Peptide 1 Conformation in HIV-1 Capsid Protein Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yun; Hou, Guangjin; Suiter, Christopher L.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Burton, Sarah D.; Hung, Ivan; Gorkov, Peter L.; Gan, Zhehong; Brey, William W.; Rice, David M.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2013-11-27

    Maturation of HIV-1 virus into an infectious virion requires cleavage of the Gag polyprotein into its constituent domains and formation of a conical capsid core that encloses viral RNA and a small complement of proteins for replication. The final step of this process is the cleavage of the SP1 peptide from the CA-SP1 maturation intermediate, which triggers the condensation of the CA protein into a conical capsid. The mechanism of this step, including the conformation of the SP1 peptide in CA-SP1, is under intense debate. In this report, we examine the tubular assemblies of CA and the CA-SP1 maturation intermediate using Magic Angle Spinning NMR spectroscopy. At the magnetic fields of 19.9 T and above, tubular CA and CA-SP1 assemblies yield outstanding-quality 2D and 3D MAS NMR spectra, which are amenable to resonance assignments and detailed structural characterization. Dipolar- and scalar-based correlation experiments unequivocally indicate that SP1 peptide is in a random coil conformation and mobile in the assembled CA-SP1. Analysis of two sequence variants reveals that remarkably, the conformation of SP1 tail, of the functionally important CypA loop, and of the loop preceding helix 8 are sequence dependent and modulated by the residue variations at distal sites. These findings challenge the role of SP1 as a conformational switch in the maturation process and establish sequence-dependent conformational plasticity in CA.

  18. Pegylation of Antimicrobial Peptides Maintains the Active Peptide Conformation, Model Membrane Interactions, and Antimicrobial Activity while Improving Lung Tissue Biocompatibility following Airway Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Christopher J.; Beck, Konrad; Fox, Marc A.; Ulaeto, David; Clark, Graeme C.

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have therapeutic potential, particularly for localized infections such as those of the lung. Here we show that airway administration of a pegylated AMP minimizes lung tissue toxicity while nevertheless maintaining antimicrobial activity. CaLL, a potent synthetic AMP (KWKLFKKIFKRIVQRIKDFLR) comprising fragments of LL-37 and cecropin A peptides, was N-terminally pegylated (PEG-CaLL). PEG-CaLL derivatives retained significant antimicrobial activity (50% inhibitory concentrations [IC50s] 2- to 3-fold higher than those of CaLL) against bacterial lung pathogens even in the presence of lung lining fluid. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that conformational changes associated with the binding of CaLL to model microbial membranes were not disrupted by pegylation. Pegylation of CaLL reduced AMP-elicited cell toxicity as measured using in vitro lung epithelial primary cell cultures. Further, in a fully intact ex vivo isolated perfused rat lung (IPRL) model, airway-administered PEG-CaLL did not result in disruption of the pulmonary epithelial barrier, whereas CaLL caused an immediate loss of membrane integrity leading to pulmonary edema. All AMPs (CaLL, PEG-CaLL, LL-37, cecropin A) delivered to the lung by airway administration showed limited (<3%) pulmonary absorption in the IPRL with extensive AMP accumulation in lung tissue itself, a characteristic anticipated to be beneficial for the treatment of pulmonary infections. We conclude that pegylation may present a means of improving the lung biocompatibility of AMPs designed for the treatment of pulmonary infections. PMID:22430978

  19. Prolonged signaling at the parathyroid hormone receptor by peptide ligands targeted to a specific receptor conformation

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Makoto; Ferrandon, Sebastien; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Potts, John T.; Gardella, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    The parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) is a class B G protein-coupled receptor that plays critical roles in bone and mineral ion metabolism. Ligand binding to the PTHR involves interactions to both the amino-terminal extracellular (N) domain, and transmembrane/extracellular loop, or juxtamembrane (J) regions of the receptor. Recently, we found that PTH(1–34), but not PTH-related protein, PTHrP(1–36), or M-PTH(1–14) (M = Ala/Aib1,Aib3,Gln10,Har11,Ala12,Trp14,Arg19), binds to the PTHR in a largely GTPγS-resistant fashion, suggesting selective binding to a novel, high-affinity conformation (R0), distinct from the GTPγS-sensitive conformation (RG). We examined the effects in vitro and in vivo of introducing the M substitutions, which enhance interaction to the J domain, into PTH analogs extended C-terminally to incorporate residues involved in the N domain interaction. As compared with PTH(1–34), M-PTH(1–28) and M-PTH(1–34) bound to R0 with higher affinity, produced more sustained cAMP responses in cells, formed more stable complexes with the PTHR in FRET and subcellular localization assays, and induced more prolonged calcemic and phosphate responses in mice. Moreover, after 2 weeks of daily injection in mice, M-PTH(1–34) induced larger increases in trabecular bone volume and greater increases in cortical bone turnover, than did PTH(1–34). Thus, the putative R0 PTHR conformation can form highly stable complexes with certain PTH ligand analogs and thereby mediate surprisingly prolonged signaling responses in bone and/or kidney PTH target cells. Controlling, via ligand analog design, the selectivity with which a PTH ligand binds to R0, versus RG, may be a strategy for optimizing signaling duration time, and hence therapeutic efficacy, of PTHR agonist ligands. PMID:18946036

  20. Amino acid sequence of a vitamin K-dependent Ca2+-binding peptide from bovine prothrombin.

    PubMed

    Howard, J B; Fausch, M D

    1975-08-10

    The amino acid sequence of a 31-residue peptide from bovine prothrombin has been determined. This peptide has been shown to contain the vitamin K-dependent modification required for Ca2+ binding (Nelsestuen, G. L., and Suttie, J. W. (1973) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 70, 3366-3370) and the modified amino acid, gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Nelsestuen, G. L., Zytkovicz, T., and Howard, J. B. (1974) J. Biol. Chem. 249, 6347-6350). The peptide was shown to correspond to residues 12 to 42 of prothrombin. PMID:807581

  1. Conformation of succinic acid: its pH dependence by Licry-NMR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidichimo, G.; Formoso, P.; Golemme, A.; Imbardelli, D.

    The conformations of fully protonated (H2SA), fully deprotonated (SA=) and monoprotonated (HSA-) succinic acid have been investigated by means of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in liquid crystal mesophases (Licry-NMR). H-H and 13C-H direct dipolar couplings have been determined by measuring 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR spectra from quaternary nematic-lyotropic solutions of myristyltrimethylammonium bromide (MTAB), decanol, deuterated water and succinic acid (in each of its three different protonated forms). Direct dipolar couplings have been used to investigate the conformational equilibrium of the molecule in its three different protonation forms. Data could be interpreted in terms of a single conformation for each of the investigated forms. The dihedral angle between the H3-C5'-C5 and the C5'-C5-H1 planes gradually increases when going from the fully protonated H2SA species to the SA= ions. Our findings are different from those obtained by other authors by analysis of Jij couplings. In that case an equilibrium conformation between the gauche and trans conformers had been obtained.

  2. The first experimental observation of the higher-energy trans conformer of trifluoroacetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apóstolo, R. F. G.; Bazsó, Gábor; Bento, R. R. F.; Tarczay, G.; Fausto, R.

    2016-12-01

    We report here the first experimental observation of the higher-energy conformer of trifluoroacetic acid (trans-TFA). The new conformer was generated by selective narrowband near-infrared vibrational excitation of the lower-energy cis-TFA conformer isolated in cryogenic matrices (Ar, Kr, N2) and shown to spontaneously decay to this latter form in the various matrix media, by tunneling. The decay rates in the different matrices were measured and compared with those of the trans conformers of other carboxylic acids in similar experimental conditions. The experimental studies received support from quantum chemistry calculations undertaken at various levels of approximation, which allowed a detailed characterization of the relevant regions of the potential energy surface of the molecule and the detailed assignment of the infrared spectra of the two conformers in the various matrices. Noteworthly, in contrast to cis-TFA that has its trifluoromethyl group eclipsed with the Cdbnd O bond of the carboxylic moiety, trans-TFA has the trifluoromethyl group eclipsed with the Csbnd O bond. This unusual structure of trans-TFA results from the fact that the relative orientation of the CF3 and COOH groups in this geometry facilitates the establishment of an intramolecular hydrogen-bond-like interaction between the OH group and the closely located in-plane fluorine atom of the CF3 moiety.

  3. Uncovering the Relationship between Sulphation Patterns and Conformation of Iduronic Acid in Heparan Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Po-Hung; Thieker, David F.; Guerrini, Marco; Woods, Robert J.; Liu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The L-iduronic acid (IdoA) residue is a critically important structural component in heparan sulphate polysaccharide for the biological functions. The pyranose ring of IdoA is present in 1C4-chair, 2SO-skew boat, and less frequently, in 4C1-chair conformations. Here, we analyzed the conformation of IdoA residue in eight hexasaccharides by NMR. The data demonstrate a correlation between the conformation of IdoA and sulphations in the surrounding saccharide residues. For the 2-O-sulpho IdoA residue, a high degree of sulphation on neighboring residues drives ring dynamics towards the 2SO-skew boat conformer. In contrast, the nonsulphated IdoA residue is pushed towards the 1C4-chair conformer when the neighboring residues are highly sulphated. Our data suggest that the conformation of IdoA is regulated by the sulphation pattern of nearby saccharides that is genetically controlled by the heparan sulphate biosynthetic pathway. PMID:27412370

  4. Uncovering the Relationship between Sulphation Patterns and Conformation of Iduronic Acid in Heparan Sulphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Po-Hung; Thieker, David F.; Guerrini, Marco; Woods, Robert J.; Liu, Jian

    2016-07-01

    The L-iduronic acid (IdoA) residue is a critically important structural component in heparan sulphate polysaccharide for the biological functions. The pyranose ring of IdoA is present in 1C4-chair, 2SO-skew boat, and less frequently, in 4C1-chair conformations. Here, we analyzed the conformation of IdoA residue in eight hexasaccharides by NMR. The data demonstrate a correlation between the conformation of IdoA and sulphations in the surrounding saccharide residues. For the 2-O-sulpho IdoA residue, a high degree of sulphation on neighboring residues drives ring dynamics towards the 2SO-skew boat conformer. In contrast, the nonsulphated IdoA residue is pushed towards the 1C4-chair conformer when the neighboring residues are highly sulphated. Our data suggest that the conformation of IdoA is regulated by the sulphation pattern of nearby saccharides that is genetically controlled by the heparan sulphate biosynthetic pathway.

  5. Calculation of free-energy differences by confinement simulations. Application to peptide conformers.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, M; Krivov, S V; Spichty, M; Karplus, M

    2009-07-23

    Conformational free-energy differences are key quantities for understanding important phenomena in molecular biology that involve large structural changes of macromolecules. In this paper, an improved version of the confinement approach, which is based on earlier developments, is used to determine the free energy of individual molecular states by progressively restraining the corresponding molecular structures to pure harmonic basins, whose absolute free energy can be computed by normal-mode analysis. The method is used to calculate the free-energy difference between two conformational states of the alanine dipeptide in vacuo, and of the beta-hairpin from protein G with an implicit solvation model. In all cases, the confinement results are in excellent agreement with the ones obtained from converged equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, which have a much larger computational cost. The systematic and statistical errors of the results are evaluated and the origin of the errors is identified. The sensitivity of the calculated free-energy differences to structure-based definitions of the molecular states is discussed. A variant of the method, which closes the thermodynamic cycle by a quasi-harmonic rather than harmonic analysis, is introduced. The latter is proposed for possible use with explicit solvent simulations. PMID:19552392

  6. Supramolecular control of self-assembling terthiophene-peptide conjugates through the amino acid side chain

    SciTech Connect

    Lehrman, Jessica A.; Cui, Honggang; Tsai, Wei-Wen; Moyer, Tyson J.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2013-07-30

    The self-assembly of oligothiophene–peptide conjugates can be directed through the systematic variation of the peptide sequence into different nanostructures, including flat spicules, nanotubes, spiral sheets, and giant, flat sheets. Furthermore, the assembly of these molecules is not controlled by steric interactions between the amino acid side chains.

  7. Predicting the conformations of peptides and proteins in early evolution. A review article submitted to Biology Direct

    PubMed Central

    Milner-White, E James; Russell, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Considering that short, mainly heterochiral, polypeptides with a high glycine content are expected to have played a prominent role in evolution at the earliest stage of life before nucleic acids were available, we review recent knowledge about polypeptide three-dimensional structure to predict the types of conformations they would have adopted. The possible existence of such structures at this time leads to a consideration of their functional significance, and the consequences for the course of evolution. This article was reviewed by Bill Martin, Eugene Koonin and Nick Grishin. PMID:18226248

  8. A peptide & peptide nucleic acid synthesis technology for transporter molecules and theranostics--the SPPS.

    PubMed

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  9. A Peptide & Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthesis Technology for Transporter Molecules and Theranostics - The SPPS

    PubMed Central

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  10. Peptides inhibitors of acid-sensing ion channels.

    PubMed

    Diochot, S; Salinas, M; Baron, A; Escoubas, P; Lazdunski, M

    2007-02-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) channels are proton-gated cationic channels mainly expressed in central and peripheric nervous system and related to the epithelial amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channels and to the degenerin family of ion channels. ASICs comprise four proteins forming functional channel subunits (ASIC1a, ASIC1b, ASIC2a, and ASIC3) and two proteins (ASIC2b and ASIC4) without yet known activators. Functional channels are activated by external pH variations ranging from pH(0.5) 6.8 to 4.0 and currents are characterized by either rapid kinetics of inactivation (ASIC1a, ASIC1b, ASIC3) or slow kinetics of inactivation (ASIC2a) and sometimes the presence of a plateau phase (ASIC3). ASIC1a and ASIC3, which are expressed in nociceptive neurons, have been implicated in inflammation and knockout mice studies support the role of ASIC3 in various pain processes. ASIC1a seems more related to synaptic plasticity, memory, learning and fear conditioning in the CNS. ASIC2a contributes to hearing in the cochlea, sour taste sensation, and visual transduction in the retina. The pharmacology of ASICs is limited to rather nonselective drugs such as amiloride, nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs, and neuropeptides. Recently, two peptides, PcTx1 and APETx2, isolated from a spider and a sea anemone, have been characterized as selective and high-affinity inhibitors for ASIC1a and ASIC3 channels, respectively. PcTx1 inhibits ASIC1a homomers with an affinity of 0.7 nM (IC(50)) without any effect on ASIC1a containing heteromers and thus helped to characterize ASIC1a homomeric channels in peripheric and central neurons. PcTx1 acts as a gating modifier since it shifts the channel from the resting to an inactivated state by increasing its affinity for H(+). APETx2 is less selective since it inhibits several ASIC3-containing channels (IC(50) from 63 nM to 2 microM) and to date its mode of action is unknown. Nevertheless, APETx2 structure is related to other sea anemone peptides, which

  11. Amino acid and peptide absorption from partial digests of proteins in isolated rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, M L

    1978-01-01

    1. Absorption of each of sixteen amino acids, free and peptide-bound, has been measured in isolated rat small intestine perfused with five partial digests of proteins. 2. At low concentrations net absorption of each amino acid was proportional to its luminal concentration and independent of the nature of the amino acid. 3. A series of first-order multiple regressions was found to describe well the characteristics of absorption. 4. Rate constants for disappearance of free and peptide-bound amino acids from the lumen were closely similar. However, substantial back-flux occurred of amino acids derived from peptide hydrolysis. Hence 60-70% of the amino-N entering the serosal tissue fluid probably had left the lumen as free amino acids. 5. Intact peptides crossed the mucosa during absorption from a soy bean hydrolysate and in substantial quantities during absorption from one casein digest but not from another. With other hydrolysates there was no evidence for passage of peptides to the serosa. 6. In several cases there was a serious discrepancy between the amount of amino-N absorbed from the lumen and the amount accounted for as peptide or free amino acid in the serosal secretion. 7. The characteristics of absorption were similar (apart from the exceptions in 5 above) for all the digests studied except for soy bean hydrolysate. PMID:731590

  12. Aqueous Synthesis of Peptide Thioesters from Amino Acids and a Thiol Using 1,1‧-Carbonyldiimidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2005-10-01

    A new method was developed for the synthesis of peptide thioesters from free amino acids and thiols in water. This one-pot simple method involves two steps: (1) activation in water of an amino acid presumably as its N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) using 1,1‧-carbonyldiimidazole (CDI), and (2) subsequent condensation of the activated amino acid-NCA in the presence of a thiol. With this method citrulline peptide thioesters containing up to 10 amino acid residues were prepared in a single reaction. This aqueous synthetic method provides a simple way to prepare peptide thioesters for studies of peptide replication involving ligation of peptide thioesters on peptide templates. The relevance of peptide replication to the origin-of-life process is supported by previous studies showing that amino acid thioesters (peptide thioester precursors) can be synthesized under prebiotic conditions by reaction of small sugars with ammonia and a thiol.

  13. Cyclic Sulfamidate Enabled Syntheses of Amino Acids, Peptides, Carbohydrates, and Natural Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article reviews the emergence of cyclic sulfamidates as versatile intermediatesfor the synthesis of unnatural amino acids, chalcogen peptides, modified sugars, drugs and drug candidates, and important natural products.

  14. Tetrazine-Containing Amino Acid for Peptide Modification and Live Cell Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Zhongqiu; Zhou, Lanxia; Li, Xu; Zhang, Jing; Dong, Shouliang

    2015-01-01

    A novel amino acid derivative 3-(4-(1, 2, 4, 5-tetrazine-3-yl) phenyl)-2-aminopropanoic acid was synthesized in this study. The compound possessed better water-solubility and was synthesized more easily compared with the well-known and commercially available 3-(p-benzylamino)-1, 2, 4, 5-tetrazine. Tetrazine-containing amino acid showed excellent stability in biological media and might be used for cancer cell labeling. Moreover, the compound remained relatively stable in 50% TFA/DCM with little decomposition after prolonged exposure at room temperature. The compound could be utilized as phenylalanine or tyrosine analogue in peptide modification, and the tetrazine-containing peptide demonstrated more significant biological activity than that of the parent peptide. The combination of tetrazine group and amino acid offered broad development prospects of the bioorthogonal labeling and peptide synthesis. PMID:26536589

  15. Stimulation of Lysine Decarboxylase Production in Escherichia coli by Amino Acids and Peptides1

    PubMed Central

    Cascieri, T.; Mallette, M. F.

    1973-01-01

    A commercial hydrolysate of casein stimulated production of lysine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.18) by Escherichia coli B. Cellulose and gel chromatography of this hydrolysate yielded peptides which were variably effective in this stimulation. Replacement of individual, stimulatory peptides by equivalent amino acids duplicated the enzyme levels attained with those peptides. There was no indication of specific stimulation by any peptide. The peptides were probably taken up by the oligopeptide transport system of E. coli and hydrolyzed intracellularly by peptidases to their constituent amino acids for use in enzyme synthesis. Single omission of amino acids from mixtures was used to screen them for their relative lysine decarboxylase stimulating abilities. Over 100 different mixtures were evaluated in establishing the total amino acid requirements for maximal synthesis of lysine decarboxylase by E. coli B. A mixture containing all of the common amino acids except glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and alanine increased lysine decarboxylase threefold over an equivalent weight of casein hydrolysate. The nine most stimulatory amino acids were methionine, arginine, cystine, leucine, isoleucine, glutamine, threonine, tyrosine, and asparagine. Methionine and arginine quantitatively were the most important. A mixture of these nine was 87% as effective as the complete mixture. Several amino acids were inhibitory at moderate concentrations, and alanine (2.53 mM) was the most effective. Added pyridoxine increased lysine decarboxylase activity 30%, whereas other B vitamins and cyclic adenosine 5′-monophosphate had no effect. PMID:4588201

  16. Efficacy of peptide nucleic acid and selected conjugates against specific cellular pathologies of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Browne, Elisse C; Parakh, Sonam; Duncan, Luke F; Langford, Steven J; Atkin, Julie D; Abbott, Belinda M

    2016-04-01

    Cellular studies have been undertaken on a nonamer peptide nucleic acid (PNA) sequence, which binds to mRNA encoding superoxide dismutase 1, and a series of peptide nucleic acids conjugated to synthetic lipophilic vitamin analogs including a recently prepared menadione (vitamin K) analog. Reduction of both mutant superoxide dismutase 1 inclusion formation and endoplasmic reticulum stress, two of the key cellular pathological hallmarks in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, by two of the prepared PNA oligomers is reported for the first time. PMID:26935939

  17. Isodesmic reaction for accurate theoretical pKa calculations of amino acids and peptides.

    PubMed

    Sastre, S; Casasnovas, R; Muñoz, F; Frau, J

    2016-04-20

    Theoretical and quantitative prediction of pKa values at low computational cost is a current challenge in computational chemistry. We report that the isodesmic reaction scheme provides semi-quantitative predictions (i.e. mean absolute errors of 0.5-1.0 pKa unit) for the pKa1 (α-carboxyl), pKa2 (α-amino) and pKa3 (sidechain groups) of a broad set of amino acids and peptides. This method fills the gaps of thermodynamic cycles for the computational pKa calculation of molecules that are unstable in the gas phase or undergo proton transfer reactions or large conformational changes from solution to the gas phase. We also report the key criteria to choose a reference species to make accurate predictions. This method is computationally inexpensive and makes use of standard density functional theory (DFT) and continuum solvent models. It is also conceptually simple and easy to use for researchers not specialized in theoretical chemistry methods. PMID:27052591

  18. Rational Evolution of Antimicrobial Peptides Containing Unnatural Amino Acids to Combat Burn Wound Infections.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Meng; Chen, Ming; Zhang, Jue

    2016-09-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have long been raised as a promising strategy to combat bacterial infection in burn wounds. Here, we attempted to rationally design small antimicrobial peptides containing unnatural amino acids by integrating in silico analysis and in vitro assay. Predictive quantitative sequence-activity models were established and validated rigorously based on a large panel of nonamer antimicrobial peptides with known antibacterial activity. The best quantitative sequence-activity model predictor was employed to guide genetic evolution of a peptide population. In the evolution procedure, a number of unnatural amino acids with desired physicochemical properties were introduced, resulting in a genetic evolution-improved population, from which seven peptide candidates with top scores, containing 1-3 unnatural amino acids, and having diverse structures were successfully identified, and their antibacterial potencies against two antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains isolated from infected burn wounds were measured using in vitro susceptibility test. Consequently, four (WL-Orn-LARKIV-NH2 , ARKRWF-Dab-FL-NH2 , KFI-Hag-IWR-Orn-R-NH2 and YW-Hag-R-Cit-RF-Orn-N-NH2 ) of the seven tested peptides were found to be more potent than reference Bac2A, the smallest naturally occurring broad spectrum antimicrobial peptide. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the designed peptides can fold into amphipathic helical structure that allows them to interact directly with microbial membranes. PMID:27062533

  19. Conformational analysis of a 20-membered cyclic peptide disulfide from Conus virgo with a WPW segment: evidence for an aromatic-proline sandwich.

    PubMed

    Sonti, Rajesh; Rao, K N Shashanka; Chidanand, Sudarshan; Gowd, Konkallu Hanumae; Raghothama, Srinivasarao; Balaram, Padmanabhan

    2014-04-22

    A novel peptide containing a single disulfide bond, CIWPWC (Vi804), has been isolated and characterised from the venom of the marine cone snail, Conus virgo. A precursor polypeptide sequence derived from complementary DNA, corresponding to the M-superfamily conotoxins, has been identified. The identity of the synthetic and natural peptide sequence has been established. A detailed analysis of the conformation in solution is reported for Vi804 and a synthetic analogue, CI(D) WPWC ((D) W3-Vi804), in order to establish the structure of the novel WPW motif, which occurs in the context of a 20-membered macrocyclic disulfide. Vi804 exists exclusively in the cis W3P4 conformer in water and methanol, whereas (D) W3-Vi804 occurs exclusively as the trans conformer. NMR spectra revealed a W3P4 type VI β turn in Vi804 and a type II' β turn in the analogue peptide, (D) W3-Vi804. The extremely high-field chemical shifts of the proline ring protons, together with specific nuclear Overhauser effects, are used to establish a conformation in which the proline ring is sandwiched between the flanking Trp residues, which emphasises a stabilising role for the aromatic-proline interactions, mediated predominantly by dispersion forces. PMID:24644085

  20. Installing amino acids and peptides on N-heterocycles under visible-light assistance

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yunhe; Jiang, Min; Wang, Hui; Fu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Readily available natural α-amino acids are one of nature’s most attractive and versatile building blocks in synthesis of natural products and biomolecules. Peptides and N-heterocycles exhibit various biological and pharmaceutical functions. Conjugation of amino acids or peptides with N-heterocycles provides boundless potentiality for screening and discovery of diverse biologically active molecules. However, it is a great challenge to install amino acids or peptides on N-heterocycles through formation of carbon-carbon bonds under mild conditions. In this article, eighteen N-protected α-amino acids and three peptides were well assembled on phenanthridine derivatives via couplings of N-protected α-amino acid and peptide active esters with substituted 2-isocyanobiphenyls at room temperature under visible-light assistance. Furthermore, N-Boc-proline residue was successfully conjugated with oxindole derivatives using similar procedures. The simple protocol, mild reaction conditions, fast reaction, and high efficiency of this method make it an important strategy for synthesis of diverse molecules containing amino acid and peptide fragments. PMID:26830014

  1. Installing amino acids and peptides on N-heterocycles under visible-light assistance.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yunhe; Jiang, Min; Wang, Hui; Fu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Readily available natural α-amino acids are one of nature's most attractive and versatile building blocks in synthesis of natural products and biomolecules. Peptides and N-heterocycles exhibit various biological and pharmaceutical functions. Conjugation of amino acids or peptides with N-heterocycles provides boundless potentiality for screening and discovery of diverse biologically active molecules. However, it is a great challenge to install amino acids or peptides on N-heterocycles through formation of carbon-carbon bonds under mild conditions. In this article, eighteen N-protected α-amino acids and three peptides were well assembled on phenanthridine derivatives via couplings of N-protected α-amino acid and peptide active esters with substituted 2-isocyanobiphenyls at room temperature under visible-light assistance. Furthermore, N-Boc-proline residue was successfully conjugated with oxindole derivatives using similar procedures. The simple protocol, mild reaction conditions, fast reaction, and high efficiency of this method make it an important strategy for synthesis of diverse molecules containing amino acid and peptide fragments. PMID:26830014

  2. Rapid complexing of oxoacylglycerols with amino acids, peptides and aminophospholipids.

    PubMed

    Kurvinen, J P; Kuksis, A; Ravandi, A; Sjövall, O; Kallio, H

    1999-03-01

    We prepared model Schiff bases from 2-[9-oxo]nonanoyl glycerol (2-MAG-ALD) and various amino compounds. 2-MAG-ALD was obtained by pancreatic lipase hydrolysis of trioleoyl glycerol and reductive ozonolysis of the resulting 2-monooleoyl glycerol. The reaction products were purified by thin-layer chromatography. Schiff bases were synthesized in greater than 50% yield by reacting 2-MAG-ALD with twofold molar excess of valine, Nalpha-acetyl-L-lysine methyl ester and the tripeptides glycyl-glycyl-glycine, glycyl-glycyl-histidine, and glycyl-histidyl-lysine in aqueous methanol and with 1-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl glycerophosphoethanolamine (PE) in chloroform/methanol for 16 h at room temperature. Prior to analysis the bases were reduced with sodium cyanoborohydride in methanol for 30 min at 4 degrees C. Reaction products were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI/MS). Reduced Schiff bases of 2-MAG-ALD with PE and amino acids were analyzed by normal-phase HPLC/ESI/MS and those with peptides by reversed-phase HPLC/ESI/MS. Single adducts were obtained in all cases and both the alpha-amino group of valine and the epsilon-amino group of Nalpha-acetyl-L-lysine methyl ester were reactive. Molecular ions of reaction products were the only detected ions in the negative ionization mode, whereas in the positive ion mode sodiated molecular ions were also detected. The present study suggests that 2-MAG-ALD may form Schiff base adducts with amino compounds in other aqueous media, such as the intestinal lumen and in the hydrophobic environment of cell membranes. PMID:10230725

  3. Vibrational analysis of amino acids and short peptides in aqueous media. V. The effect of the disulfide bridge on the structural features of the peptide hormone somatostatin-14.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Belén; Carelli, Claude; Coïc, Yves-Marie; De Coninck, Joël; Ghomi, Mahmoud

    2009-09-24

    To emphasize the role played by the S-S bridge in the structural features of somatostatin-14 (SST-14), newly recorded CD and Raman spectra of this cyclic peptide and its open analogue obtained by Cys-->Ser substitution are presented. CD spectra of both peptides recorded in aqueous solutions in the 100-500 microM concentration range are strikingly similar. They reveal principally that random conformers constitute the major population in both peptides. Consequently, the S-S bridge has no structuring effect at submillimolar concentrations. In methanol, the CD spectrum of somatostatin-14 keeps globally the same spectral shape as that observed in water, whereas its open analogue presents a major population of helical conformers. Raman spectra recorded as a function of peptide concentration (5-20 mM) and also in the presence of 150 mM NaCl provide valuable conformational information. All Raman spectra present a mixture of random and beta-hairpin structures for both cyclic and open peptides. More importantly, the presence or the absence of the disulfide bridge does not seem to influence considerably different populations of secondary structures within this range of concentrations. CD and Raman data obtained in the submillimolar and millimolar ranges of concentrations, respectively, lead us to accept the idea that SST-14 monomers aggregate upon increasing concentration, thus stabilizing beta-hairpin conformations in solution. However, even at high concentrations, random conformers do not disappear. Raman spectra of SST-14 also reveal a concentration effect on the flexibility of the S-S linkage and consequently on that of its cyclic part. In conclusion, although the disulfide linkage does not seem to markedly influence the SST-14 conformational features in aqueous solutions, its presence seems to be necessary to ensure the flexibility of the cyclic part of this peptide and to maintain its closed structure in lower dielectric constant environments. PMID:19708669

  4. The impact of α-hydrazino acids embedded in short fluorescent peptides on peptide interactions with DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Suć, Josipa; Tumir, Lidija-Marija; Glavaš-Obrovac, Ljubica; Jukić, Marijana; Piantanida, Ivo; Jerić, Ivanka

    2016-06-01

    A series of novel hydrazino-based peptidomimetics and analogues comprising N-terminal lysine and C-terminal phenanthridinyl-l-alanine were prepared. The presented results demonstrate the up to now unknown possibility to finely modulate peptide interactions with DNA/RNA by α-hydrazino group insertion and how the different positioning of two α-hydrazino groups in peptides controls binding to various double stranded and single stranded DNA and RNA. All peptidomimetics bind with 1-10 micromolar affinity to ds-DNA/RNA, whereby the binding mode is a combination of electrostatic interactions and hydrophobic interactions within DNA/RNA grooves. Insertion of the α-hydrazino group into the peptide systematically decreased its fluorimetric response to DNA/RNA binding in the order: mono-hydrazino < alternating-hydrazino < sequential-hydrazino group. Binding studies of ss-polynucleotides suggest intercalation of phenanthridine between polynucleotide bases, whereby affinity and fluorimetric response decrease with the number of α-hydrazino groups in the peptide sequence. Particularly interesting was the interaction of two sequential α-hydrazino acids-peptidomimetic with poly rG, characterised by a specific strong increase of CD bands, while all other peptide/ssRNA combinations gave only a CD-band decrease. All mentioned interactions could also be reversibly controlled by adjusting the pH, due to the protonation of the fluorophore. PMID:27161341

  5. Conformational states of syntaxin-1 govern the necessity of N-peptide binding in exocytosis of PC12 cells and Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seungmee; Bin, Na-Ryum; Michael Rajah, Maaran; Kim, Byungjin; Chou, Ting-Chieh; Kang, Soo-young Ann; Sugita, Kyoko; Parsaud, Leon; Smith, Matthew; Monnier, Philippe P.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Zhen, Mei; Sugita, Shuzo

    2016-01-01

    Syntaxin-1 is the central SNARE protein for neuronal exocytosis. It interacts with Munc18-1 through its cytoplasmic domains, including the N-terminal peptide (N-peptide). Here we examine the role of the N-peptide binding in two conformational states (“closed” vs. “open”) of syntaxin-1 using PC12 cells and Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that expression of “closed” syntaxin-1A carrying N-terminal single point mutations (D3R, L8A) that perturb interaction with the hydrophobic pocket of Munc18-1 rescues impaired secretion in syntaxin-1–depleted PC12 cells and the lethality and lethargy of unc-64 (C. elegans orthologue of syntaxin-1)-null mutants. Conversely, expression of the “open” syntaxin-1A harboring the same mutations fails to rescue the impairments. Biochemically, the L8A mutation alone slightly weakens the binding between “closed” syntaxin-1A and Munc18-1, whereas the same mutation in the “open” syntaxin-1A disrupts it. Our results reveal a striking interplay between the syntaxin-1 N-peptide and the conformational state of the protein. We propose that the N-peptide plays a critical role in intracellular trafficking of syntaxin-1, which is dependent on the conformational state of this protein. Surprisingly, however, the N-peptide binding mode seems dispensable for SNARE-mediated exocytosis per se, as long as the protein is trafficked to the plasma membrane. PMID:26700321

  6. Studying the Conformation of a Silaffin-Derived Pentalysine Peptide Embedded in Bioinspired Silica using Solution and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Magic-Angle Spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Yasmin; Gottlieb, Hugo E; Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Goobes, Gil

    2016-05-01

    Smart materials are created in nature at interfaces between biomolecules and solid materials. The ability to probe the structure of functional peptides that engineer biogenic materials at this heterogeneous setting can be facilitated tremendously by use of DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy. This sensitive NMR technique allows simple and quick measurements, often without the need for isotope enrichment. Here, it is used to characterize a pentalysine peptide, derived from a diatom's silaffin protein. The peptide accelerates the formation of bioinspired silica and gets embedded inside the material as it is formed. Two-dimensional DNP MAS NMR of the silica-bound peptide and solution NMR of the free peptide are used to derive its secondary structure in the two states and to pinpoint some subtle conformational changes that the peptide undergoes in order to adapt to the silica environment. In addition, interactions between abundant lysine residues and silica surface are identified, and proximity of other side chains to silica and to neighboring peptide molecules is discussed. PMID:26451953

  7. Formation of Amino Acid Thioesters for Prebiotic Peptide Synthesis: Catalysis By Amino Acid Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The origin of life can be described as a series of events in which a prebiotic chemical process came increasingly under the control of its catalytic products. In our search for this prebiotic process that yielded catalytic takeover products (such as polypeptides), we have been investigating a reaction system that generates peptide-forming amino acid thioesters from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia in the presence of thiols. As shown below, this model process begins by aldol condensation of formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde to give trioses and releases. These sugars then undergo beta-dehydration yielding their respective alpha-ketoaldehydes. Addition of ammonia to the alpha-ketoaldehydes yields imines which can either: (a) rearrange in the presence of thesis to give amino acid thioesters or (be react with another molecule of aldehyde to give imidazoles. This 'one-pot' reaction system operates under mild aqueous conditions, and like modem amino acid biosynthesis, uses sugar intermediates which are converted to products by energy-yielding redox reactions. Recently, we discovered that amino acids, such as the alanine reaction product, catalyze the first and second steps of the process. In the presence of ammonia the process also generates other synthetically useful products, like the important biochemical -- pyruvic acid.

  8. Plasma amino acid coatings for a conformal growth of titania nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kyle D; Marczewski, Kamil; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Slocik, Joseph M; Jakubiak, Rachel; Naik, Rajesh R; Bunning, Timothy J; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2010-08-01

    We report on the conformal synthesis of ultrathin films from the amino acid histidine on flat silicon substrates and 3D periodic polymer structures via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. We demonstrate the efficient utilization of this functional amino acid nanocoating for the formation of individual titania nanoparticles with dimensions from 2 to 15 nm depending upon reduction conditions. The titania nanoparticles were grown directly on histidine-functionalized planar and 3D polymer substrates by a wet-chemistry method that showed uniform surface coverage that reached approximately 75%. This approach demonstrates the potential for modifying the optical properties of periodic porous polymeric structures via direct conformal growth of titania nanoparticles. PMID:20735097

  9. Molecular mechanics and dynamics studies on the interaction of gallic acid with collagen-like peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhan, B.; Thanikaivelan, P.; Subramanian, V.; Raghava Rao, J.; Unni Nair, Balachandran; Ramasami, T.

    2001-10-01

    Molecular modelling approaches have been used to understand the interaction of collagen-like peptides with gallic acid, which mimic vegetable tanning processes involved in protein stabilization. Several interaction sites have been identified and the binding energies of the complexes have been calculated. The calculated binding energies for various geometries are in the range 6-13 kcal/mol. It is found that some complexes exhibit hydrogen bonding, and electrostatic interaction plays a dominant role in the stabilization of the peptide by gallic acid. The π-OH type of interaction is also observed in the peptide stabilization. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for 600 ps revealed the possibility of hydrogen bonding between the collagen-like peptide and gallic acid.

  10. Conformation of the umifenovir cation in the molecular and crystal structures of four carboxylic acid salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orola, Liana; Sarcevica, Inese; Kons, Artis; Actins, Andris; Veidis, Mikelis V.

    2014-01-01

    The umifenovir salts of maleic, salicylic, glutaric, and gentisic acid as well as the chloroform solvate of the salicylate were prepared. Single crystals of the five compounds were obtained and their molecular and crystal structures determined by X-ray diffraction. In each structure the conformation of phenyl ring with respect to the indole group of the umifenovir moiety is different. The water solubility and melting points of the studied umifenovir salts have been determined.