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Sample records for peptide mapping analysis

  1. High throughput peptide mapping method for analysis of site specific monoclonal antibody oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojuan; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Jia; Liu, Yan-Hui; Richardson, Daisy; Li, Huijuan; Shameem, Mohammed; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2016-08-19

    Oxidation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) often occurs on surface exposed methionine and tryptophan residues during their production in cell culture, purification, and storage, and can potentially impact the binding to their targets. Characterization of site specific oxidation is critical for antibody quality control. Antibody oxidation is commonly determined by peptide mapping/LC-MS methods, which normally require a long (up to 24h) digestion step. The prolonged sample preparation procedure could result in oxidation artifacts of susceptible methionine and tryptophan residues. In this paper, we developed a rapid and simple UV based peptide mapping method that incorporates an 8-min trypsin in-solution digestion protocol for analysis of oxidation. This method is able to determine oxidation levels at specific residues of a mAb based on the peptide UV traces within <1h, from either TBHP treated or UV light stressed samples. This is the simplest and fastest method reported thus far for site specific oxidation analysis, and can be applied for routine or high throughput analysis of mAb oxidation during various stability and degradation studies. By using the UV trace, the method allows more accurate measurement than mass spectrometry and can be potentially implemented as a release assay. It has been successfully used to monitor antibody oxidation in real time stability studies. PMID:27432793

  2. CLPM: A Cross-Linked Peptide Mapping Algorithm for Mass Spectrometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yong; Chen, Yingfeng; Lichti, Cheryl F; Hall, Roger A; Raney, Kevin D; Jennings, Steven F

    2005-01-01

    Background Protein-protein, protein-DNA and protein-RNA interactions are of central importance in biological systems. Quadrapole Time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometry is a sensitive, promising tool for studying these interactions. Combining this technique with chemical crosslinking, it is possible to identify the sites of interactions within these complexes. Due to the complexities of the mass spectrometric data of crosslinked proteins, new software is required to analyze the resulting products of these studies. Result We designed a Cross-Linked Peptide Mapping (CLPM) algorithm which takes advantage of all of the information available in the experiment including the amino acid sequence from each protein, the identity of the crosslinker, the identity of the digesting enzyme, the level of missed cleavage, and possible chemical modifications. The algorithm does in silico digestion and crosslinking, calculates all possible mass values and matches the theoretical data to the actual experimental data provided by the mass spectrometry analysis to identify the crosslinked peptides. Conclusion Identifying peptides by their masses can be an efficient starting point for direct sequence confirmation. The CLPM algorithm provides a powerful tool in identifying these potential interaction sites in combination with chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry. Through this cost-effective approach, subsequent efforts can quickly focus attention on investigating these specific interaction sites. PMID:16026606

  3. Antibodies that neutralize human beta interferon biologic activity recognize a linear epitope: analysis by synthetic peptide mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Redlich, P N; Hoeprich, P D; Colby, C B; Grossberg, S E

    1991-01-01

    The location of biologically relevant epitopes on recombinant human beta interferon in which Ser-17 replaces Cys-17 (rh[Ser17]IFN-beta) was evaluated by testing the immunoreactivity of antibodies against 159 sequential, overlapping octamer peptides. Three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralize rh[Ser17]IFN-beta biologic activity, designated A1, A5, and A7, bound to peptides spanning only residues 39-48, whereas nonneutralizing mAb bound less specifically at multiple sites near the amino terminus. The immunoreactivity of peptides spanning residues 40-47 that contained a series of single amino acid substitutions suggested that residues 41-43 (Pro-Glu-Glu) and 46 (Gln) are important for the binding of neutralizing mAbs. The reactivity of mAbs to larger synthetic peptides containing rh[Ser17]IFN-beta sequences from residue 32 through residue 56 was evaluated. All mAbs except A7 reacted with synthetic peptides representing rh[Ser17]IFN-beta residues 32-47, 40-56, and 32-56, but only mAbs A1 and A5 bound to the core peptide composed of residues 40-47. Peptide 32-56 effectively blocked the binding of mAbs A1 and A5 to rh[Ser17]IFN-beta and markedly inhibited their neutralizing activity. Biologic activity of the peptides was undetectable. Rabbit antisera raised against peptides 32-47 and 40-56 recognized rh[Ser17]IFN-beta but did not neutralize its antiviral activity. Thus, structure-function analysis by peptide mapping has permitted the identification of a linear epitope recognized by neutralizing antibody on a biologically active cytokine. We conclude that the region spanning residues 32-56 is of major importance in the expression of the biologic activity of human IFN-beta. Images PMID:1708891

  4. Investigation of purification process stresses on erythropoietin peptide mapping profile

    PubMed Central

    Sepahi, Mina; Kaghazian, Hooman; Hadadian, Shahin; Norouzian, Dariush

    2015-01-01

    Background: Full compliance of recombinant protein peptide mapping chromatogram with the standard reference material, is one of the most basic quality control tests of biopharmaceuticals. Changing a single amino acid substitution or side chain diversity for a given peptide changes protein hydrophobicity and causes peak shape or retention time alteration in a peptide mapping assay. In this work, the effect of different stresses during the recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) purification process, including pH 4, pH 5, and room temperature were checked on product peptide mapping results. Materials and Methods: Cell culture harvest was purified under stress by different chromatographic techniques consisting of gel filtration, anionic ion exchange, concentration by ultrafiltration, and high resolution size exclusion chromatography. To induce more pH stresses, the purified EPO was exposed to pH stress 4 and 5 by exchanging buffer by a 10 KDa dialysis sac overnight. The effects of temperature and partial deglycosylation (acid hydrolysis) on purified EPO were also studied by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and peptide mapping analysis. Removal of sialic acid by mild hydrolysis was performed by exposure to two molar acetic acid at 80°C for 3 h. Results: No significant effect was observed between intact and stressed erythropoietin peptide mapping profiles and SDS-PAGE results. To validate the sensibility of the technique, erythropoietin was partially acid hydrolyzed and significant changes in the chromatographic peptide map of the intact form and a reduction on its molecular weight were detected, which indicates some partial deglycosylation. Conclusions: Purification process does not alter the peptide mapping profile and purification process stresses are not the cause of peptide mapping noncompliance. PMID:26261816

  5. Epitope mapping by epitope excision, hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and peptide-panning techniques combined with in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Nicola; Mancini, Nicasio; Criscuolo, Elena; Cappelletti, Francesca; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The fine characterization of protective B cell epitopes plays a pivotal role in the development of novel vaccines. The development of epitope-based vaccines, in fact, cannot be possible without a clear definition of the antigenic regions involved in the binding between the protective antibody (Ab) and its molecular target. To achieve this result, different epitope-mapping approaches have been widely described (Clementi et al. Drug Discov Today 18(9-10):464-471, 2013). Nowadays, the best way to characterize an Ab bound region is still the resolution of Ab-antigen (Ag) co-crystal structure. Unfortunately, the crystallization approaches are not always feasible. However, different experimental strategies aimed to predict Ab-Ag interaction and followed by in silico analysis of the results may be good surrogate approaches to achieve this result. Here, we review few experimental techniques followed by the use of "basic" informatics tools for the analysis of the results. PMID:24515481

  6. Combinatorial peptide ligand libraries for the analysis of low-expression proteins: Validation for normal urine and definition of a first protein MAP.

    PubMed

    Santucci, Laura; Candiano, Giovanni; Bruschi, Maurizio; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Petretto, Andrea; Scaloni, Andrea; Urbani, Andrea; Righetti, Pier G; Ghiggeri, Gian M

    2012-02-01

    In this review, we report the evolution on experimental conditions for the analysis of normal urine based on combinatorial peptide ligand library (CPLL) treatment and successive 2-DE and 2-DE/MS analysis. The main topics are (i) definition of the urine sample requirements, (ii) optimization of the urine/ligand ratio, (iii) essay conditions, (iv) en bloc elution. Overall, normal urine protein composition as studied by 2-DE includes over 2600 spots. Relevant data on inter and intraessay reproducibility obtained by the analysis of different normal urines repeated several times are also here presented. We found a 73% reproducibility upon analysis of the same sample and 68% correspondence of protein composition among different normal urine samples. Based on the above results, we are completing the characterization with LC-MS of 249 spots. The composition of normal urine proteins after CPLLs is finally shown with the indication of those spots which are currently under identification. This map will be completed in a near future; in the meantime this would represent the basic reference sample for newly developed studies on human diseases. PMID:22246922

  7. A simple contact mapping algorithm for identifying potential peptide mimetics in protein–protein interaction partners

    PubMed Central

    Krall, Alex; Brunn, Jonathan; Kankanala, Spandana; Peters, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    A simple, static contact mapping algorithm has been developed as a first step at identifying potential peptide biomimetics from protein interaction partner structure files. This rapid and simple mapping algorithm, “OpenContact” provides screened or parsed protein interaction files based on specified criteria for interatomic separation distances and interatomic potential interactions. The algorithm, which uses all-atom Amber03 force field models, was blindly tested on several unrelated cases from the literature where potential peptide mimetics have been experimentally developed to varying degrees of success. In all cases, the screening algorithm efficiently predicted proposed or potential peptide biomimetics, or close variations thereof, and provided complete atom-atom interaction data necessary for further detailed analysis and drug development. In addition, we used the static parsing/mapping method to develop a peptide mimetic to the cancer protein target, epidermal growth factor receptor. In this case, secondary, loop structure for the peptide was indicated from the intra-protein mapping, and the peptide was subsequently synthesized and shown to exhibit successful binding to the target protein. The case studies, which all involved experimental peptide drug advancement, illustrate many of the challenges associated with the development of peptide biomimetics, in general. Proteins 2014; 82:2253–2262. © 2014 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24756879

  8. Rat hepatic (Na/sup +/, K/sup +/)-ATPase:. cap alpha. =subunit isolation by immunoaffinity chromatography and structural analysis by peptide mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, J.J.; Schenk, D.B.; Skelly, H.; Leffert, H.L.

    1986-07-01

    The catalytic ..cap alpha..-subunit of rat hepatic (Na/sup +/, K/sup +/)-ATPase (EC 3.6.1.3) has been isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography from microsomes solubilized in n-dodecyl octaethylene glycol monoether. The procedure employs an anticatalytic mouse monoclonal antibody (9-A5) covalently linked to Sepharose 4B that specifically block phosphorylation of the sodium pump's ..cap alpha..-subunit from (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP. The hepatic subunit is virtually identical with purified rat, dog, and human renal ..cap alpha..-subunits as judged by its apparent molecular weight after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate (M/sub r/ 92K) and its two-dimensional tryptic and chymotryptic peptide maps on cellulose-coated thin-layer plates. In contrast, the structures of authentic renal ..beta..-subunits from the three species differ significantly from each other as judged by their peptide maps; no detectable homologies are seen between their chymotryptic maps and those of putative hepatic ..beta..-subunits (M/sub r/ 50K and 55K) eluted from 9-A5-Spharose. Additional studies of ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes reveal inhibition curves with single inflection points in the absence or presence of pump-stimulating peptides like insulin, glucagon, and epidermal growth factor. These findings indicate that rat hepatocytes express only one of two know structurally conserved forms of catalytic subunit (the renallike ..cap alpha.. form) and, if at all, structurally divergent forms of the sodium pump's ..beta..-subunit.

  9. Low-Cost Peptide Microarrays for Mapping Continuous Antibody Epitopes.

    PubMed

    McBride, Ryan; Head, Steven R; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Law, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing need for understanding antibody specificity in antibody and vaccine research, pepscan assays provide a rapid method for mapping and profiling antibody responses to continuous epitopes. We have developed a relatively low-cost method to generate peptide microarray slides for studying antibody binding. Using a setup of an IntavisAG MultiPep RS peptide synthesizer, a Digilab MicroGrid II 600 microarray printer robot, and an InnoScan 1100 AL scanner, the method allows the interrogation of up to 1536 overlapping, alanine-scanning, and mutant peptides derived from the target antigens. Each peptide is tagged with a polyethylene glycol aminooxy terminus to improve peptide solubility, orientation, and conjugation efficiency to the slide surface. PMID:26490468

  10. Data on the peptide mapping and MS identification for phosphorylated peptide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Tu, Zong-Cai; Liu, Guang-Xian; Zhang, Lu; Chen, Yuan

    2016-09-01

    This article contains peptides mapping, mass spectrometry and processed data related to the research "Identification and quantification of the phosphorylated ovalbumin by high resolution mass spectrometry under dry-heating treatment" [1]. Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) was used to investigate the specific phosphorylation sites and the degree of phosphorylation (DSP) at each site. Specifically, phosphorylated peptides were monitored through mass shift on the FTICR MS spectrum. DSP was evaluated through the relative abundance levels of the FTICR MS spectrometry. From these data, the calculation method of DSP was exemplified. PMID:27274527

  11. Quantitative Evaluation of Peptide-Material Interactions by a Force Mapping Method: Guidelines for Surface Modification.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Oguchi, Masahiro; Kim, Seong-Oh; Jackman, Joshua A; Ogawa, Tetsu; Lkhamsuren, Ganchimeg; Cho, Nam-Joon; Hayashi, Tomohiro

    2015-07-28

    Peptide coatings on material surfaces have demonstrated wide application across materials science and biotechnology, facilitating the development of nanobio interfaces through surface modification. A guiding motivation in the field is to engineer peptides with a high and selective binding affinity to target materials. Herein, we introduce a quantitative force mapping method in order to evaluate the binding affinity of peptides to various hydrophilic oxide materials by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Statistical analysis of adhesion forces and probabilities obtained on substrates with a materials contrast enabled us to simultaneously compare the peptide binding affinity to different materials. On the basis of the experimental results and corresponding theoretical analysis, we discuss the role of various interfacial forces in modulating the strength of peptide attachment to hydrophilic oxide solid supports as well as to gold. The results emphasize the precision and robustness of our approach to evaluating the adhesion strength of peptides to solid supports, thereby offering guidelines to improve the design and fabrication of peptide-coated materials. PMID:26125092

  12. Distinction between mouse DNA polymerases alpha and beta by tryptic peptide mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Planck, S R; Tanabe, K; Wilson, S H

    1980-01-01

    Results presented here and in a previous paper (Tanabe et al. (1979) Biochemistry 18, 3401--3406) indicate that mouse beta-polymerase is a single polypeptide with an apparent molecular weight of 40,000. This polypeptide has now been analyzed by tryptic peptide mapping. Comparison of the results with identical analysis of mouse alpha-polymerase reveals that the tryptic peptides derived from the two enzymes are different. These results indicate that beta-polymerase is neither a subunit of alpha-polymerase nor a proteolytic degradation product of alpha-polymerase. Images PMID:7433094

  13. [Peptide mapping of the major proteins in 2 strains of influenza virus].

    PubMed

    Savich, I M; Gerasimova, L M; Mertvetsov, N P

    1985-01-01

    The protein composition of two influenza A virus strains from different serological groups was studied. For preliminary separation of envelope and core proteins the virus was treated with nonionic detergent Triton X-100 solution followed by chromatography in ultragel AcA 34. After their separation by disk electrophoresis and treatment with trypsin they were labeled with tritium and peptide analysis was carried out. Differences in peptide maps between the appropriate light and heavy chains of hemagglutinins of the strains under study were demonstrated. Differences in the composition of nucleoprotein and matrix protein were insignificant. PMID:3922120

  14. Studies on the autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor from human placenta. Analysis of the sites phosphorylated by two-dimensional peptide mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Tavaré, J M; Denton, R M

    1988-01-01

    1. A partially purified preparation of human placental insulin receptors was incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP in the presence or absence of insulin. The 32P-labelled insulin-receptor beta-subunits were then isolated, cleaved with trypsin followed by protease V8 and the [32P]phosphopeptides generated were analysed by thin layer electrophoresis and chromatography. This approach revealed that insulin stimulates autophosphorylation of the insulin-receptor beta-subunit in vitro on at least seven tyrosine residues distributed among three distinct domains. 2. One domain (domain 2), containing tyrosine residues 1146, 1150 and 1151 was the most rapidly phosphorylated and could be recovered as mono-, di- and triphosphorylated peptides cleaved by trypsin at Arg-1143 and either Lys-1153 or Lys-1156. Multiple phosphorylation of this domain appears to partially inhibit the cleavage at Lys-1153 by trypsin. 3. In a second domain (domain 3) containing two phosphorylated tyrosine residues at positions 1316 and 1322 the tyrosines were phosphorylated more slowly than those in domain 2. This domain is close to the C-terminus of the beta-subunit polypeptide chain. 4. At least two further tyrosine residues appeared to be phosphorylated after those in domains 2 and 3. These residues probably residue within a domain lying in close proximity to the inner face of the plasma membrane containing tyrosines 953, 960 and 972, but conclusive evidence is still required. 5. The two-dimensional thin-layer analysis employed in this study to investigate insulin-receptor phosphorylation has several advantages over previous methods based on reverse-phase chromatography. It allows greater resolution of 32P-labelled tryptic peptides and, when coupled to radioautography, is considerably more sensitive. The approach can be readily adapted to study phosphorylation of the insulin receptor within intact cells. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3166375

  15. Mapping peptide thiol accessibility in membranes using a quaternary ammonium isotope-coded mass tag (ICMT)

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chiao-Yung; London, Erwin; Sampson, Nicole S.

    2013-01-01

    The plasma membrane contains a diverse array of proteins, including receptors, channels, and signaling complexes, that serve as decision-making centers. Investigation of membrane protein topology is important for understanding the function of these types of protein. Here, we report a method to determine protein topology in the membrane that utilizes labeling of cysteine with isotope-coded mass tags. The mass tags contain a thiol reactive moiety, linker, and a quaternary ammonium group to aid ionization in the mass spectrometer and were synthesizes as both light and heavy (deuterated) forms. The probes were found to be membrane impermeable when applied to lipid vesicles. To assess the utility of the probes for mapping peptide thiol topology, we employed a two-step labeling procedure. Vesicles containing α-helical transmembrane peptides were labeled with heavy (or light) probe, solubilized by detergent, and then labeled by an excess of the complementary probe. Peptide for which the cysteine was oriented in the center of the lipid bilayer was not labeled until the lipid vesicles were lysed with detergent, consistent with the membrane impermeability of the probes and reduced ionization of the thiol in the hydrophobic membrane. Peptide for which the cysteine was positioned in the head group zone of the lipid bilayer was labeled rapidly. Peptide for which the cysteine was positioned below the head group abutting the hydrocarbon region was labeled at a reduced rate compared to the fully accessible cysteine. Moreover, the effect of lipid bilayer structure on the kinetics of peptide and lipid flipping in the bilayer was readily measured with our two-step labeling method. The small sample size required, the ease and rapidity of sample preparation, and the amenability of MALDI-TOF mass spectral to analysis in the presence of lipids will enable future facile investigation of membrane proteins in a cellular context. PMID:23725486

  16. LC-MS/MS Peptide Mapping with Automated Data Processing for Routine Profiling of N-Glycans in Immunoglobulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Bhavana; Jiang, Xinzhao Grace; Chen, Louise; Zhang, Zhongqi

    2014-06-01

    Protein N-Glycan analysis is traditionally performed by high pH anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC), reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), or hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) on fluorescence-labeled glycans enzymatically released from the glycoprotein. These methods require time-consuming sample preparations and do not provide site-specific glycosylation information. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) peptide mapping is frequently used for protein structural characterization and, as a bonus, can potentially provide glycan profile on each individual glycosylation site. In this work, a recently developed glycopeptide fragmentation model was used for automated identification, based on their MS/MS, of N-glycopeptides from proteolytic digestion of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Experimental conditions were optimized to achieve accurate profiling of glycoforms. Glycan profiles obtained from LC-MS/MS peptide mapping were compared with those obtained from HPAEC, RPLC, and HILIC analyses of released glycans for several mAb molecules. Accuracy, reproducibility, and linearity of the LC-MS/MS peptide mapping method for glycan profiling were evaluated. The LC-MS/MS peptide mapping method with fully automated data analysis requires less sample preparation, provides site-specific information, and may serve as an alternative method for routine profiling of N-glycans on immunoglobulins as well as other glycoproteins with simple N-glycans.

  17. Temporal mapping and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Hara, Charles G. (Inventor); Shrestha, Bijay (Inventor); Vijayaraj, Veeraraghavan (Inventor); Mali, Preeti (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A compositing process for selecting spatial data collected over a period of time, creating temporal data cubes from the spatial data, and processing and/or analyzing the data using temporal mapping algebra functions. In some embodiments, the temporal data cube is creating a masked cube using the data cubes, and computing a composite from the masked cube by using temporal mapping algebra.

  18. Mapping the human proteome for non-redundant peptide islands.

    PubMed

    Capone, G; De Marinis, A; Simone, S; Kusalik, A; Kanduc, D

    2008-06-01

    We describe immune-proteome structures using libraries of protein fragments that define a structural immunological alphabet. We propose and validate such an alphabet as i) composed of letters of five consecutive amino acids, pentapeptide units being sufficient minimal antigenic determinants in a protein, and ii) characterized by low-similarity to human proteins, so representing structures unknown to the host and potentially able to evoke an immune response. In this context, we have thoroughly sifted through the entire human proteome searching for non-redundant protein motifs. Here, for the first time, a complete sequence redundancy dissection of the human proteome has been conducted. The non-redundant peptide islands in the human proteome have been quantified and catalogued according to the amino acid length. The library of uniquely occurring n-peptide sequences that was obtained is characterized by a logarithmic decrease of the number of non-redundant peptides as a function of the peptide length. This library represents a highly specific catalogue of molecular protein signatures, the possible use of which in cancer/autoimmunity research is discussed, with a major focus on non-redundant dodecamer sequences. PMID:17701099

  19. Mapping the Vif-A3G interaction using peptide arrays: a basis for anti-HIV lead peptides.

    PubMed

    Reingewertz, Tali H; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Rotem-Bamberger, Shahar; Viard, Mathias; Jacobs, Amy; Miller, Abigail; Lee, Ji Youn; Hwang, Jeeseong; Blumenthal, Robert; Kotler, Moshe; Friedler, Assaf

    2013-06-15

    Human apolipoprotein-B mRNA-editing catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (A3G) is a cytidine deaminase that restricts retroviruses, endogenous retro-elements and DNA viruses. A3G plays a key role in the anti-HIV-1 innate cellular immunity. The HIV-1 Vif protein counteracts A3G mainly by leading A3G towards the proteosomal machinery and by direct inhibition of its enzymatic activity. Both activities involve direct interaction between Vif and A3G. Disrupting the interaction between A3G and Vif may rescue A3G antiviral activity and inhibit HIV-1 propagation. Here, mapping the interaction sites between A3G and Vif by peptide array screening revealed distinct regions in Vif important for A3G binding, including the N-terminal domain (NTD), C-terminal domain (CTD) and residues 83-99. The Vif-binding sites in A3G included 12 different peptides that showed strong binding to either full-length Vif, Vif CTD or both. Sequence similarity was found between Vif-binding peptides from the A3G CTD and NTD. A3G peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to counteract Vif action. A3G 211-225 inhibited HIV-1 replication in cell culture and impaired Vif dependent A3G degradation. In vivo co-localization of full-length Vif with A3G 211-225 was demonstrated by use of FRET. This peptide has the potential to serve as an anti-HIV-1 lead compound. Our results suggest a complex interaction between Vif and A3G that is mediated by discontinuous binding regions with different affinities. PMID:23545135

  20. Comparative conformational analysis of peptide T analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akverdieva, Gulnare; Godjayev, Niftali; Akyuz, Sevim

    2009-01-01

    A series of peptide T analogs were investigated within the molecular mechanics framework. In order to determine the role of the aminoacid residues in spatial formation of peptide T the conformational peculiarities of the glycine-substituted analogs were investigated. The conformational profiles of some biologically tested analogs of this peptide were determined independently. The received data permit to assess the active form of this peptide. It is characterized by β-turn at the C-terminal physiologically active pentapeptide fragment of peptide molecule. The received results are important for the investigation of the structure-activity relationship and may be used at design of a rigid-molecule drug against HIV.

  1. Bioinformatic analysis of peptide precursor proteins.

    PubMed

    Baggerman, G; Liu, F; Wets, G; Schoofs, L

    2005-04-01

    Neuropeptides are among the most important signal molecules in animals. Traditional identification of peptide hormones through peptide purification is a tedious and time-consuming process. With the advent of the genome sequencing projects, putative peptide precursor can be mined from the genome. However, because bioactive peptides are usually quite short in length and because the active core of a peptide is often limited to only a few amino acids, using the BLAST search engine to identify neuropeptide precursors in the genome is difficult and sometimes impossible. To overcome these shortcomings, we subject the entire set of all known Drosophila melanogaster peptide precursor sequences to motif-finding algorithms in search of a motif that is common for all prepropeptides and that could be used in the search for new peptide precursors. PMID:15891006

  2. HPLC analysis and purification of peptides.

    PubMed

    Mant, Colin T; Chen, Yuxin; Yan, Zhe; Popa, Traian V; Kovacs, James M; Mills, Janine B; Tripet, Brian P; Hodges, Robert S

    2007-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has proved extremely versatile over the past 25 yr for the isolation and purification of peptides varying widely in their sources, quantity and complexity. This article covers the major modes of HPLC utilized for peptides (size-exclusion, ion-exchange, and reversed-phase), as well as demonstrating the potential of a novel mixed-mode hydrophilic interaction/cation-exchange approach developed in this laboratory. In addition to the value of these HPLC modes for peptide separations, the value of various HPLC techniques for structural characterization of peptides and proteins will be addressed, e.g., assessment of oligomerization state of peptides/proteins by size-exclusion chromatography and monitoring the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of amphipathic alpha-helical peptides, a vital precursor for the development of novel antimicrobial peptides. The value of capillary electrophoresis for peptide separations is also demonstrated. Preparative reversed-phase chromatography purification protocols for sample loads of up to 200 mg on analytical columns and instrumentation are introduced for both peptides and recombinant proteins. PMID:18604941

  3. Mapping the HLA ligandome landscape of acute myeloid leukemia: a targeted approach toward peptide-based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Berlin, C; Kowalewski, D J; Schuster, H; Mirza, N; Walz, S; Handel, M; Schmid-Horch, B; Salih, H R; Kanz, L; Rammensee, H-G; Stevanović, S; Stickel, J S

    2015-03-01

    Identification of physiologically relevant peptide vaccine targets calls for the direct analysis of the entirety of naturally presented human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ligands, termed the HLA ligandome. In this study, we implemented this direct approach using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to define acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-associated peptide vaccine targets. Mapping the HLA class I ligandomes of 15 AML patients and 35 healthy controls, more than 25 000 different naturally presented HLA ligands were identified. Target prioritization based on AML exclusivity and high presentation frequency in the AML cohort identified a panel of 132 LiTAAs (ligandome-derived tumor-associated antigens), and 341 corresponding HLA ligands (LiTAPs (ligandome-derived tumor-associated peptides)) represented subset independently in >20% of AML patients. Functional characterization of LiTAPs by interferon-γ ELISPOT (Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot) and intracellular cytokine staining confirmed AML-specific CD8(+) T-cell recognition. Of note, our platform identified HLA ligands representing several established AML-associated antigens (e.g. NPM1, MAGED1, PRTN3, MPO, WT1), but found 80% of them to be also represented in healthy control samples. Mapping of HLA class II ligandomes provided additional CD4(+) T-cell epitopes and potentially synergistic embedded HLA ligands, allowing for complementation of a multipeptide vaccine for the immunotherapy of AML. PMID:25092142

  4. MAP stability, design, and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson-Jackson, A. J.; Andrews, S. F.; O'Donnell, J. R., Jr.; Markley, F. L.

    1998-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) is a follow-on to the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. The design and analysis of the MAP attitude control system (ACS) have been refined since work previously reported. The full spacecraft and instrument flexible model was developed in NASTRAN, and the resulting flexible modes were plotted and reduced with the Modal Significance Analysis Package (MSAP). The reduced-order model was used to perform the linear stability analysis for each control mode, the results of which are presented in this paper. Although MAP is going to a relatively disturbance-free Lissajous orbit around the Earth-Sun L(2) Lagrange point, a detailed disturbance-torque analysis is required because there are only a small number of opportunities for momentum unloading each year. Environmental torques, including solar pressure at L(2), aerodynamic and gravity gradient during phasing-loop orbits, were calculated and simulated. Thruster plume impingement torques that could affect the performance of the thruster modes were estimated and simulated, and a simple model of fuel slosh was derived to model its effect on the motion of the spacecraft. In addition, a thruster mode linear impulse controller was developed to meet the accuracy requirements of the phasing loop burns. A dynamic attitude error limiter was added to improve the performance of the ACS during large attitude slews. The result of this analysis is a stable ACS subsystem that meets all of the mission's requirements.

  5. Structural and functional evaluation of the palindromic alanine-rich antimicrobial peptide Pa-MAP2.

    PubMed

    Migliolo, Ludovico; Felício, Mário R; Cardoso, Marlon H; Silva, Osmar N; Xavier, Mary-Ann E; Nolasco, Diego O; de Oliveira, Adeliana Silva; Roca-Subira, Ignasi; Vila Estape, Jordi; Teixeira, Leandro D; Freitas, Sonia M; Otero-Gonzalez, Anselmo J; Gonçalves, Sónia; Santos, Nuno C; Franco, Octavio L

    2016-07-01

    Recently, several peptides have been studied regarding the defence process against pathogenic microorganisms, which are able to act against different targets, with the purpose of developing novel bioactive compounds. The present work focuses on the structural and functional evaluation of the palindromic antimicrobial peptide Pa-MAP2, designed based on the peptide Pa-MAP from Pleuronectes americanus. For a better structural understanding, molecular modelling analyses were carried out, together with molecular dynamics and circular dichroism, in different media. Antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and positive bacteria was evaluated, as well as cytotoxicity against human erythrocytes, RAW 264.7, Vero and L6 cells. In silico docking experiments, lipid vesicle studies, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging were carried out to explore the activity of the peptide. In vivo studies on infected mice were also done. The palindromic primary sequence favoured an α-helix structure that was pH dependent, only present on alkaline environment, with dynamic N- and C-terminals that are stabilized in anionic media. Pa-MAP2 only showed activity against Gram-negative bacteria, with a MIC of 3.2 μM, and without any cytotoxic effect. In silico, lipid vesicles and AFM studies confirm the preference for anionic lipids (POPG, POPS, DPPE, DPPG and LPS), with the positively charged lysine residues being essential for the initial electrostatic interaction. In vivo studies showed that Pa-MAP2 increases to 100% the survival rate of mice infected with Escherichia coli. Data here reported indicated that palindromic Pa-MAP2 could be an alternative candidate for use in therapeutics against Gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:27063608

  6. Time-Frequency Analysis of Peptide Microarray Data: Application to Brain Cancer Immunosignatures.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Brian; Maurer, Alexander; Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia; Stafford, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    One of the gravest dangers facing cancer patients is an extended symptom-free lull between tumor initiation and the first diagnosis. Detection of tumors is critical for effective intervention. Using the body's immune system to detect and amplify tumor-specific signals may enable detection of cancer using an inexpensive immunoassay. Immunosignatures are one such assay: they provide a map of antibody interactions with random-sequence peptides. They enable detection of disease-specific patterns using classic train/test methods. However, to date, very little effort has gone into extracting information from the sequence of peptides that interact with disease-specific antibodies. Because it is difficult to represent all possible antigen peptides in a microarray format, we chose to synthesize only 330,000 peptides on a single immunosignature microarray. The 330,000 random-sequence peptides on the microarray represent 83% of all tetramers and 27% of all pentamers, creating an unbiased but substantial gap in the coverage of total sequence space. We therefore chose to examine many relatively short motifs from these random-sequence peptides. Time-variant analysis of recurrent subsequences provided a means to dissect amino acid sequences from the peptides while simultaneously retaining the antibody-peptide binding intensities. We first used a simple experiment in which monoclonal antibodies with known linear epitopes were exposed to these random-sequence peptides, and their binding intensities were used to create our algorithm. We then demonstrated the performance of the proposed algorithm by examining immunosignatures from patients with Glioblastoma multiformae (GBM), an aggressive form of brain cancer. Eight different frameshift targets were identified from the random-sequence peptides using this technique. If immune-reactive antigens can be identified using a relatively simple immune assay, it might enable a diagnostic test with sufficient sensitivity to detect tumors in a

  7. Towards High-throughput Immunomics for Infectious Diseases: Use of Next-generation Peptide Microarrays for Rapid Discovery and Mapping of Antigenic Determinants*

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Santiago J.; Nielsen, Morten; Schafer-Nielsen, Claus; Mucci, Juan; Altcheh, Jaime; Balouz, Virginia; Tekiel, Valeria; Frasch, Alberto C.; Campetella, Oscar; Buscaglia, Carlos A.; Agüero, Fernán

    2015-01-01

    Complete characterization of antibody specificities associated to natural infections is expected to provide a rich source of serologic biomarkers with potential applications in molecular diagnosis, follow-up of chemotherapeutic treatments, and prioritization of targets for vaccine development. Here, we developed a highly-multiplexed platform based on next-generation high-density peptide microarrays to map these specificities in Chagas Disease, an exemplar of a human infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. We designed a high-density peptide microarray containing more than 175,000 overlapping 15mer peptides derived from T. cruzi proteins. Peptides were synthesized in situ on microarray slides, spanning the complete length of 457 parasite proteins with fully overlapped 15mers (1 residue shift). Screening of these slides with antibodies purified from infected patients and healthy donors demonstrated both a high technical reproducibility as well as epitope mapping consistency when compared with earlier low-throughput technologies. Using a conservative signal threshold to classify positive (reactive) peptides we identified 2,031 disease-specific peptides and 97 novel parasite antigens, effectively doubling the number of known antigens and providing a 10-fold increase in the number of fine mapped antigenic determinants for this disease. Finally, further analysis of the chip data showed that optimizing the amount of sequence overlap of displayed peptides can increase the protein space covered in a single chip by at least ∼threefold without sacrificing sensitivity. In conclusion, we show the power of high-density peptide chips for the discovery of pathogen-specific linear B-cell epitopes from clinical samples, thus setting the stage for high-throughput biomarker discovery screenings and proteome-wide studies of immune responses against pathogens. PMID:25922409

  8. Matched Peptides: Tuning Matched Molecular Pair Analysis for Biopharmaceutical Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals hold great promise for the future of drug discovery. Nevertheless, rational drug design strategies are mainly focused on the discovery of small synthetic molecules. Herein we present matched peptides, an innovative analysis technique for biological data related to peptide and protein sequences. It represents an extension of matched molecular pair analysis toward macromolecular sequence data and allows quantitative predictions of the effect of single amino acid substitutions on the basis of statistical data on known transformations. We demonstrate the application of matched peptides to a data set of major histocompatibility complex class II peptide ligands and discuss the trends captured with respect to classical quantitative structure–activity relationship approaches as well as structural aspects of the investigated protein–peptide interface. We expect our novel readily interpretable tool at the interface of cheminformatics and bioinformatics to support the rational design of biopharmaceuticals and give directions for further development of the presented methodology. PMID:26501781

  9. Improved Methods for the Enrichment and Analysis of Glycated Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Schepmoes, Athena A; Brock, Jonathan W; Wu, Si; Moore, Ronald J; Purvine, Samuel O; Baynes, John; Smith, Richard D; Metz, Thomas O

    2008-12-15

    Non-enzymatic glycation of tissue proteins has important implications in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus. Herein we report improved methods for the enrichment and analysis of glycated peptides using boronate affinity chromatography and electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry, respectively. The enrichment of glycated peptides was improved by replacing an off-line desalting step with an on-line wash of column-bound glycated peptides using 50 mM ammonium acetate. The analysis of glycated peptides by MS/MS was improved by considering only higher charged (≥3) precursor-ions during data-dependent acquisition, which increased the number of glycated peptide identifications. Similarly, the use of supplemental collisional activation after electron transfer (ETcaD) resulted in more glycated peptide identifications when the MS survey scan was acquired with enhanced resolution. In general, acquiring ETD-MS/MS data at a normal MS survey scan rate, in conjunction with the rejection of both 1+ and 2+ precursor-ions, increased the number of identified glycated peptides relative to ETcaD or the enhanced MS survey scan rate. Finally, an evaluation of trypsin, Arg-C, and Lys-C showed that tryptic digestion of glycated proteins was comparable to digestion with Lys-C and that both were better than Arg-C in terms of the number glycated peptides identified by LC-MS/MS.

  10. Limited proteolysis and peptide mapping for comparability of biopharmaceuticals: An evaluation of repeatability, intra-assay precision and capability to detect structural change.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Camille; Burkitt, Will; Perraud, Xavier; O'Hara, John; Jone, Carl

    2016-05-10

    The use of limited proteolysis followed by peptide mapping for the comparability of the higher-order structure of biopharmaceuticals was investigated. In this approach the proteolysis is performed under non-reducing and non-denaturing conditions, and the resulting peptide map is determined by the samples primary and higher order structures. This allows comparability of biopharmaceuticals to be made in terms of their higher order structure, using a method that is relatively simple to implement. The digestion of a monoclonal antibody under non-denaturing conditions was analyzed using peptide mapping, circular dichroism (CD) and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). This allowed an optimal digestion time to be chosen. This method was then assessed for its ability to detect structural change using a monoclonal antibody, which had been subjected to a range of stresses; deglycosylation, mild denaturation and a batch that had failed specifications due to in-process reduction. The repeatability and inter-assay precision were assessed. It was demonstrated that the limited proteolysis peptide maps of the three stressed samples were significantly different to control samples and that the differences observed were consistent between the occasions when the assays were run. A combination of limited proteolysis and CD or SDS-PAGE analysis was shown to enhance the capacity of these techniques to detect structural change, which otherwise would not have been observed. PMID:26918895

  11. Protein surface topology-probing by selective chemical modification and mass spectrometric peptide mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Suckau, D; Mak, M; Przybylski, M

    1992-01-01

    Aminoacetylation of lysine residues and the modification of arginine by 1,2-cyclohexanedione to N7,N8-(dihydroxy-1,2-cyclohexylidene)arginine were used for probing the surface topology of hen-eggwhite lysozyme as a model protein. The molecular identification of lysine and arginine modification sites was provided by molecular weight determinations of modified and unmodified tryptic peptide mixtures (peptide mapping) using 252Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry. At conditions of limited chemical modification, mass-spectrometric peptide-mapping analyses of lysozyme derivatives enabled the direct assignment of relative reactivities of lysine and arginine residues at different reaction times and reagent concentrations. The relative reactivities of lysine residues showed a direct correlation with their surface accessibilities from x-ray structure data. For the reaction with 1,2-cyclohexanedione, a selective modification at Arg-5, -125, -112, and -73 was identified, and an inverse correlation of relative reactivities with the surface accessibility ratios of the N7- and the N8-guanidino functions was obtained. By examination of the x-ray structural data of lysozyme, this selective modification was attributed to intramolecular catalysis because of the presence of neighboring proton acceptor groups, such as the Asp-119 carboxylate group for Arg-125 and the Trp-123 and Arg-125 carbonyl groups for Arg-5. PMID:1608973

  12. Comparison of peptide mass mapping and electron capture dissociation as assays for histone posttranslational modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liwen; Freitas, Michael A.

    2004-05-01

    Posttranslational modifications of core histones play a critical role in the structure of chromatin and the regulation of gene activities. Improved techniques for determining these modification sites may lead to a better understanding of histone regulation at the molecular level. LC-MS peptide mass mapping was performed on pepsin, trypsin and Glu-C digests of bovine thymus H4 using a QqTOF instrument. The well established modification sites of H4 (acetylation of K8, 12, 16 and methylation of K20) were observed in addition to several recently discovered modifications including: methylation of K31, 44, 59 and acetylation of K20, 77, 79. For comparison, electron capture dissociation (ECD) was performed on intact H4 along with several peptides from enzymatic digestion. The results from the ECD experiments of histone H4 indicated the acetylation of K5, 12, 16, 31, 91 and the methylation of K20 and 59 in good agreement with the result from peptide mapping. The work is dedicated to Alan G. Marshall on his 60th birthday. His endeavors in the advancement of FT-ICR facilitated experiments reported herein.

  13. Global Analysis of Human Nonreceptor Tyrosine Kinase Specificity Using High-Density Peptide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases phosphorylate substrates in the context of specific phosphorylation site sequence motifs. The knowledge of the specific sequences that are recognized by kinases is useful for mapping sites of phosphorylation in protein substrates and facilitates the generation of model substrates to monitor kinase activity. Here, we have adapted a positional scanning peptide library method to a microarray format that is suitable for the rapid determination of phosphorylation site motifs for tyrosine kinases. Peptide mixtures were immobilized on glass slides through a layer of a tyrosine-free Y33F mutant avidin to facilitate the analysis of phosphorylation by radiolabel assay. A microarray analysis provided qualitatively similar results in comparison with the solution phase peptide library “macroarray” method. However, much smaller quantities of kinases were required to phosphorylate peptides on the microarrays, which thus enabled a proteome scale analysis of kinase specificity. We illustrated this capability by microarray profiling more than 80% of the human nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs). Microarray results were used to generate a universal NRTK substrate set of 11 consensus peptides for in vitro kinase assays. Several substrates were highly specific for their cognate kinases, which should facilitate their incorporation into kinase-selective biosensors. PMID:25164267

  14. Immobilized Pepsin Microreactor for Rapid Peptide Mapping with Nanoelectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Ying; Wood, Troy D.

    2015-01-01

    Most enzymatic microreactors for protein digestion are based on trypsin, but proteins with hydrophobic segments may be difficult to digest because of the paucity of Arg and Lys residues. Microreactors based on pepsin, which is less specific than trypsin, can overcome this challenge. Here, an integrated immobilized pepsin microreactor (IPMR)/nanoelectrospray emitter is examined for its potential for peptide mapping. For myoglobin, equivalent sequence coverage is obtained in a thousandth the time of solution digestion with better sequence coverage. While sequence coverage of cytochrome c is lesser than solution in this short duration, more highly-charged peptic peptides are produced and a number of peaks are unidentified at low-resolution, suggesting that high-resolution mass spectrometry is needed to take full advantage of integrated IPMR/nanoelectrospray devices.

  15. Mapping protein-protein interactions with phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries.

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, B. K.; Castagnoli, L.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Rome

    2003-01-01

    This unit describes the process and analysis of affinity selecting bacteriophage M13 from libraries displaying combinatorial peptides fused to either a minor or major capsid protein. Direct affinity selection uses target protein bound to a microtiter plate followed by purification of selected phage by ELISA. Alternatively, there is a bead-based affinity selection method. These methods allow one to readily isolate peptide ligands that bind to a protein target of interest and use the consensus sequence to search proteomic databases for putative interacting proteins.

  16. Screening Method for the Discovery of Potential Bioactive Cysteine-Containing Peptides Using 3D Mass Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oosten, Luuk N.; Pieterse, Mervin; Pinkse, Martijn W. H.; Verhaert, Peter D. E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Animal venoms and toxins are a valuable source of bioactive peptides with pharmacologic relevance as potential drug leads. A large subset of biologically active peptides discovered up till now contain disulfide bridges that enhance stability and activity. To discover new members of this class of peptides, we developed a workflow screening specifically for those peptides that contain inter- and intra-molecular disulfide bonds by means of three-dimensional (3D) mass mapping. Two intrinsic properties of the sulfur atom, (1) its relatively large negative mass defect, and (2) its isotopic composition, allow for differentiation between cysteine-containing peptides and peptides lacking sulfur. High sulfur content in a peptide decreases the normalized nominal mass defect (NMD) and increases the normalized isotopic shift (NIS). Hence in a 3D plot of mass, NIS, and NMD, peptides with sulfur appear in this plot with a distinct spatial localization compared with peptides that lack sulfur. In this study we investigated the skin secretion of two frog species; Odorrana schmackeri and Bombina variegata. Peptides from the crude skin secretions were separated by nanoflow LC, and of all eluting peptides high resolution zoom scans were acquired in order to accurately determine both monoisotopic mass and average mass. Both the NMD and the NIS were calculated from the experimental data using an in-house developed MATLAB script. Candidate peptides exhibiting a low NMD and high NIS values were selected for targeted de novo sequencing, and this resulted in the identification of several novel inter- and intra-molecular disulfide bond containing peptides.

  17. Structural and Functional Analysis of Horse Cathelicidin Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Skerlavaj, Barbara; Scocchi, Marco; Gennaro, Renato; Risso, Angela; Zanetti, Margherita

    2001-01-01

    Cathelicidin-derived antimicrobial peptides are a component of the peptide-based host defense of neutrophils and epithelia, with a widespread distribution in mammals. We recently reported the cDNA sequences of three putative horse myeloid cathelicidins, named eCATH-1, -2, and -3. A Western analysis was performed to investigate their presence in neutrophils and processing to mature peptides. eCATH-2 and eCATH-3, but not eCATH-1, were found to be present in uncleaved forms in horse neutrophils. The corresponding mature peptides were detected in inflammatory sites, suggesting that processing of the propeptides takes place upon neutrophil activation. A functional characterization was then performed with synthetic eCATH peptides. Circular dichroism measurements indicated an amphipathic α-helical conformation of these peptides in an anisotropic environment, and in vitro assays revealed a potent activity and a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity for eCATH-1 and a somewhat more restricted spectrum of activity for eCATH-2. Conversely, a strong dependence on salt concentration was observed when the activity of eCATH-3 was tested. This peptide efficiently killed bacteria and some fungal species, i.e., Cryptococcus neoformans and Rhodotorula rubra, in low-ionic-strength media, but the activity was inhibited in the presence of physiological salt medium. This behavior could be modified by modulating the amphipathicity of the molecule. In fact, the synthetic analogue LLK-eCATH-3, with a slightly modified sequence that increases the hydrophobic moment of the peptide, displayed a potent activity in physiological salt medium against the strains resistant to eCATH-3 under these conditions. PMID:11181349

  18. A conventional procedure to reduce Asn deamidation artifacts during trypsin peptide mapping.

    PubMed

    Kori, Yekaterina; Patel, Rekha; Neill, Alyssa; Liu, Hongcheng

    2016-01-15

    Asn deamidation is a common post-translational modification of proteins with significant biological consequences. Asn deamidation can cause changes in structure, stability and function of proteins. LC-MS peptide mapping is the most widely used method to detect and quantify Asn deamidation. However, a significant amount of deamidation can occur during sample preparation for peptide mapping, making it challenging to accurately determine the original level of deamidation. Although several protocols to reduce procedure-induced deamidation have been reported, they either require special procedural steps or are not optimal for maintaining trypsin activity. In the current study, several commonly used buffers that are optimal for trypsin activity were evaluated. The results demonstrated that much lower levels of Asn deamidation artifacts were observed when Tris buffer was used, especially at lower concentrations. The addition of 10% acetonitrile further reduced the levels of Asn deamidation artifacts. The utility of the optimized procedure was demonstrated by the digestion of a recombinant monoclonal antibody. The proposed procedure can be readily applied to any laboratory settings as it does not require any special reagents or procedures. PMID:26720699

  19. Fine-Mapping of Immunodominant Linear B-Cell Epitopes of the Staphylococcus Aureus SEB Antigen Using Short Overlapping Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhuo; Li, Bin; Sun, He-Qiang; Zhang, Jin-Yong; Wang, Yi-Lin; Chen, Li; Hu, Jian; He, Ya-Fei; Zeng, Hao; Zou, Quan-Ming; Wu, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is one of the most potent Staphylococcus aureus exotoxins (SEs). Due to its conserved sequence and stable structure, SEB might be a good candidate antigen for MRSA vaccines. Although cellular immune responses to SEB are well-characterized, much less is known regarding SEB-specific humoral immune responses, particularly regarding detailed epitope mapping. In this study, we utilized a recombinant nontoxic mutant of SEB (rSEB) and an AlPO4 adjuvant to immunize BALB/c mice and confirmed that rSEB can induce a high antibody level and effective immune protection against MRSA infection. Next, the antisera of immunized mice were collected, and linear B cell epitopes within SEB were finely mapped using a series of overlapping synthetic peptides. Three immunodominant B cell epitopes of SEB were screened by ELISA, including a novel epitope, SEB205-222, and two known epitopes, SEB97–114 and SEB247-261. Using truncated peptides, an ELISA was performed with peptide-KLH antisera, and the core sequence of the three immunodominant B cell epitopes were verified as SEB97-112, SEB207-222, and SEB247-257. In vitro, all of the immunodominant epitope-specific antisera (anti-SEB97-112, anti-SEB207-222 and anti-SEB247-257) were observed to inhibit SEB-induced T cell mitogenesis and cytokine production from splenic lymphocytes of BALB/c mice. The homology analysis indicated that SEB97–112 and SEB207-222 were well-conserved among different Staphylococcus aureus strains. The 3D crystal structure of SEB indicated that SEB97–112 was in the loop region inside SEB, whereas SEB207-222 and SEB247-257 were in the β-slice region outside SEB. In summary, the fine-mapping of linear B-cell epitopes of the SEB antigen in this study will be useful to understand anti-SEB immunity against MRSA infection further and will be helpful to optimize MRSA vaccine designs that are based on the SEB antigen. PMID:24599257

  20. UNIT 11.10 N-Terminal Sequence Analysis of Proteins and Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Speicher, Kaye D.; Gorman, Nicole; Speicher, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Automated N-terminal sequence analysis involves a series of chemical reactions that derivatize and remove one amino acid at a time from the N-terminal of purified peptides or intact proteins. At least several pmoles of a purified protein or 10 to 20 pmoles of a purified peptide with an unmodified N-terminal is required in order to obtain useful sequence information. In recent years the demand for N-terminal sequencing has decreased substantially as some applications for protein identification and characterization can now be more effectively performed using mass spectrometry. However, N-terminal sequencing remains the method of choice for verifying the N-terminal boundary of recombinant proteins, determining the N-terminal of protease-resistant domains, identifying proteins isolated from species where most of the genome has not yet been sequenced, and mapping modified or crosslinked sites in proteins that prove to be refractory to analysis by mass spectrometry. PMID:18429102

  1. Micropreparative separation, fractionation, and peptide mapping of beta-lactoglobulin A and B variants by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Olguin-Arredondo, Hector Armando; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda; González-Córdova, Aarón Fernando

    2005-01-01

    The methodological aspects for the separation, fractionation, and peptide mapping by free zone capillary electrophoresis (CZE) of beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) variants A and B were established. First, beta-Lg variants A or B were separated and fractionated by CZE. Then, the collected protein fraction was subjected to off-line tryptic digestion. Second, peptide mapping of the tryptic hydrolysates and peptide fraction collection were carried out by CZE. beta-Lg variants were separated and collected using an uncoated capillary (72 cm x 75 microm i.d.) in 0.05 M borate buffer containing 0.1% Tween 20 at pH 8.0 by applying 20 kV. By subjecting the capillary under pressure after a delay time of 15%, the protein was collected in a microvial containing digestion buffer. The most suitable conditions for the tryptic digestion of beta-Lg were established by monitoring the reaction products with CZE. A tryptic hydrolysis with an enzyme-to-substrate ratio (E/S) of 1/20 and incubation for 20 hr at 37 degrees C was found to result in the most suitable conditions. Peptides were separated and collected using an uncoated capillary (120 cm x 75 microm i.d.) in 0.15 M formic acid at pH 2.3 by applying 28 kV. Peptide maps were highly reproducible as shown by coefficients of variation of less than 0.89 and 5.42% for migration times and peak areas, respectively. Moreover, very good resolution of the peptide maps revealed the region in which the aberrant peptides of the beta-Lg variants may be located. PMID:16042127

  2. Monomeric Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 Peptides in Solution Adopt Very Similar Ramachandran Map Distributions That Closely Resemble Random Coil

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the aggregation and fibrillation of amyloid peptides Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 into amyloid plaques. Despite strong potential therapeutic interest, the structural pathways associated with the conversion of monomeric Aβ peptides into oligomeric species remain largely unknown. In particular, the higher aggregation propensity and associated toxicity of Aβ1–42 compared to that of Aβ1–40 are poorly understood. To explore in detail the structural propensity of the monomeric Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 peptides in solution, we recorded a large set of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters, including chemical shifts, nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs), and J couplings. Systematic comparisons show that at neutral pH the Aβ1–40 and Aβ1–42 peptides populate almost indistinguishable coil-like conformations. Nuclear Overhauser effect spectra collected at very high resolution remove assignment ambiguities and show no long-range NOE contacts. Six sets of backbone J couplings (3JHNHα, 3JC′C′, 3JC′Hα, 1JHαCα, 2JNCα, and 1JNCα) recorded for Aβ1–40 were used as input for the recently developed MERA Ramachandran map analysis, yielding residue-specific backbone ϕ/ψ torsion angle distributions that closely resemble random coil distributions, the absence of a significantly elevated propensity for β-conformations in the C-terminal region of the peptide, and a small but distinct propensity for αL at K28. Our results suggest that the self-association of Aβ peptides into toxic oligomers is not driven by elevated propensities of the monomeric species to adopt β-strand-like conformations. Instead, the accelerated disappearance of Aβ NMR signals in D2O over H2O, particularly pronounced for Aβ1–42, suggests that intermolecular interactions between the hydrophobic regions of the peptide dominate the aggregation process. PMID:26780756

  3. How to unveil self-quenched fluorophores and subsequently map the subcellular distribution of exogenous peptides

    PubMed Central

    Swiecicki, Jean-Marie; Thiebaut, Frédéric; Di Pisa, Margherita; Gourdin -Bertin, Simon; Tailhades, Julien; Mansuy, Christelle; Burlina, Fabienne; Chwetzoff, Serge; Trugnan, Germain; Chassaing, Gérard; Lavielle, Solange

    2016-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is the most popular technique for mapping the subcellular distribution of a fluorescent molecule and is widely used to investigate the penetration properties of exogenous macromolecules, such as cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), within cells. Despite the membrane-association propensity of all these CPPs, the signal of the fluorescently labeled CPPs did not colocalize with the plasma membrane. We studied the origin of this fluorescence extinction and the overall consequence on the interpretation of intracellular localizations from CLSM pictures. We demonstrated that this discrepancy originated from fluorescence self-quenching. The fluorescence was unveiled by a “dilution” protocol, i.e. by varying the ratio fluorescent/non-fluorescent CPP. This strategy allowed us to rank with confidence the subcellular distribution of several CPPs, contributing to the elucidation of the penetration mechanism. More generally, this study proposes a broadly applicable and reliable method to study the subcellular distribution of any fluorescently labeled molecules. PMID:26839211

  4. Automated carboxy-terminal sequence analysis of peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, J. M.; Shenoy, N. R.; Ronk, M.; Shively, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    current limitations, the methodology should be a valuable new tool for the C-terminal sequence analysis of peptides. PMID:1304884

  5. Peptide-Centric Proteome Analysis: An Alternative Strategy for the Analysis of Tandem Mass Spectrometry Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, Ying S.; Egertson, Jarrett D.; Payne, Samuel H.; Kim, Sangtae; MacLean, Brendan; Kall, Lukas; Aebersold, Ruedi; Smith, Richard D.; Noble, William; MacCoss, Michael

    2015-09-01

    In mass spectrometry-based bottom-up proteomics, data-independent acquisition (DIA) is an emerging technique due to its comprehensive and unbiased sampling of precursor ions. However, current DIA methods use wide precursor isolation windows, resulting in co- fragmentation and complex mixture spectra. Thus, conventional database searching tools that identify peptides by interpreting individual MS/MS spectra are inherently limited in analyzing DIA data. Here we discuss an alternative approach, peptide-centric analysis, which tests directly for the presence and absence of query peptides. We discuss how peptide-centric analysis resolves some limitations of traditional spectrum-centric analysis, and we outline the benefits of peptide-centric analysis in general.

  6. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry and analysis of endogenous peptides.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Bijon; Pich, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) has developed as a promising tool to investigate the spatial distribution of biomolecules in intact tissue specimens. Ion densities of various molecules can be displayed as heat maps while preserving anatomical structures. In this short review, an overview of different biomolecules that can be analyzed by MALDI-IMS is given. Many reviews have covered imaging of lipids, small metabolites, whole proteins and enzymatically digested proteins in the past. However, little is known about imaging of endogenous peptides, for example, in the rat brain, and this will therefore be highlighted in this review. Furthermore, sample preparation of frozen or formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is crucial for imaging experiments. Therefore, some aspects of sample preparation will be addressed, including washing and desalting, the choice of MALDI matrix and its deposition. Apart from mapping endogenous peptides, their reliable identification in situ still remains challenging and will be discussed as well. PMID:23992420

  7. Genetic and biochemical analysis of peptide transport in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    E. coli peptide transport mutants have been isolated based on their resistance to toxic tripeptides. These genetic defects were found to map in two distinct chromosomal locations. The transport systems which require expression of the trp-linked opp genes and the oppE gene(s) for activity were shown to have different substrate preferences. Growth of E. coli in medium containing leucine results in increased entry of exogenously supplied tripeptides into the bacterial cell. This leucine-mediated elevation of peptide transport required expression of the trp-linked opp operon and was accompanied by increased sensitivity to toxic tripeptides, by an enhanced capacity to utilize nutritional peptides, and by an increase in both the velocity and apparent steady-state level of L-(U-/sup 14/C)alanyl-L-alanyl-L-alanine accumulation for E. coli grown in leucine-containing medium relative to these parameters of peptide transport measured with bacteria grown in media lacking leucine. Direct measurement of opp operon expression by pulse-labeling experiments demonstrated that growth of E. coli in the presence of leucine resulted in increased synthesis of the oppA-encoded periplasmic binding protein. The transcriptional regulation of the trp-linked opp operon of E. coli was investigated using lambda placMu51-generated lac operon fusions. Synthesis of ..beta..-galactosidase by strains harboring oppA-lac, oppB-lac, and oppD-lac fusions occurred at a basal level when the fusion-containing strains were grown in minimal medium.

  8. Serial concept maps: tools for concept analysis.

    PubMed

    All, Anita C; Huycke, LaRae I

    2007-05-01

    Nursing theory challenges students to think abstractly and is often a difficult introduction to graduate study. Traditionally, concept analysis is useful in facilitating this abstract thinking. Concept maps are a way to visualize an individual's knowledge about a specific topic. Serial concept maps express the sequential evolution of a student's perceptions of a selected concept. Maps reveal individual differences in learning and perceptions, as well as progress in understanding the concept. Relationships are assessed and suggestions are made during serial mapping, which actively engages the students and faculty in dialogue that leads to increased understanding of the link between nursing theory and practice. Serial concept mapping lends itself well to both online and traditional classroom environments. PMID:17547345

  9. Recombinant expression and purification of a MAP30-cell penetrating peptide fusion protein with higher anti-tumor bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qiang; Yang, Xu-Zhong; Fu, Long-Yun; Lu, Yv-Ting; Lu, Yan-Hua; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Fu-Jun

    2015-07-01

    MAP30 (Momordica Antiviral Protein 30 Kd), a single-stranded type-I ribosome inactivating protein, possesses versatile biological activities including anti-tumor abilities. However, the low efficiency penetrating into tumor cells hampers the tumoricidal effect of MAP30. This paper describes MAP30 fused with a human-derived cell penetrating peptide HBD which overcome the low uptake efficiency by tumor cells and exhibits higher anti-tumor bioactivity. MAP30 gene was cloned from the genomic DNA of Momordica charantia and the recombinant plasmid pET28b-MAP30-HBD was established and transferred into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant MAP30-HBD protein (rMAP30-HBD) was expressed in a soluble form after being induced by 0.5mM IPTG for 14h at 15°C. The recombinant protein was purified to greater than 95% purity with Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The rMAP30-HBD protein not only has topological inactivation and protein translation inhibition activity but also showed significant improvements in cytotoxic activity compared to that of the rMAP30 protein without HBD in the tested tumor cell lines, and induced higher apoptosis rates in HeLa cells analyzed by Annexin V-FITC with FACS. This paper demonstrated a new method for improving MAP30 protein anti-tumor activity and might have potential applications in cancer therapy area. PMID:25797209

  10. Structure of the gene for porcine peptide antibiotic PR-39, a cathelin gene family member: comparative mapping of the locus for the human peptide antibiotic FALL-39.

    PubMed Central

    Gudmundsson, G H; Magnusson, K P; Chowdhary, B P; Johansson, M; Andersson, L; Boman, H G

    1995-01-01

    PR-39 is a porcine 39-aa peptide antibiotic composed of 49% proline and 24% arginine, with an activity against Gram-negative bacteria comparable to that of tetracycline. In Escherichia coli, it inhibits DNA and protein synthesis. PR-39 was originally isolated from pig small intestine, but subsequent cDNA cloning showed that the gene is expressed in the bone marrow. The open reading frame of the clone showed that PR-39 is made as 173-aa precursor whose proregion belongs to the cathelin family. The PR39 gene, which is rather compact and spans only 1784 bp has now been sequenced. The coding information is split into four exons. The first exon contains the signal sequence of 29 residues and the first 37 residues of the cathelin propart. Exons 2 and 3 contain only cathelin information, while exon 4 codes for the four C-terminal cathelin residues and the mature PR-39 peptide extended by three residues. The sequenced upstream region (1183 bp) contains four potential recognition sites for NF-IL6 and three for APRF, transcription factors known to regulate genes for both cytokines and acute phase response factors. Genomic hybridizations revealed a fairly high level of restriction fragment length polymorphism and indicated that there are at least two copies of the PR39 gene in the pig genome. PR39 was mapped to pig chromosome 13 by linkage and in situ hybridization mapping. The gene for the human peptide antibiotic FALL-39 (also a member of the cathelin family) was mapped to human chromosome 3, which is homologous to pig chromosome 13. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7624374

  11. Mask Analysis Program (MAP) reference manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    A document intended to serve as a User's Manual and a Programmer's Manual for the Mask Analysis Program is presented. The first portion of the document is devoted to the user. It contains all of the information required to execute MAP. The remainder of the document describes the details of MAP software logic. Although the information in this portion is not required to run the program, it is recommended that every user review it to gain an appreciation for the program functions.

  12. Rapid sequencing and disulfide mapping of peptides containing disulfide bonds by using 1,5-diaminonaphthalene as a reductive matrix.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Yuko; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Tanaka, Koichi

    2006-02-01

    MS/MS is indispensable for the amino acid sequencing of peptides. However, its use is limited for peptides containing disulfide bonds. We have applied the reducing properties of 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (1,5-DAN) as a MALDI matrix to amino acid sequencing and disulfide bond mapping of human urotensin II possessing one disulfide bond, and human guanylin possessing two disulfide bonds. 1,5-DAN was used in the same manner as the usual MALDI matrices without any pre-treatment of the peptide, and MS/MS was performed using a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MALDI QIT TOFMS). The results demonstrated that MS/MS of the molecular ions reduced by 1,5-DAN provided a series of significant b-/y-product ions. All 11 amino acid residues of urotensin II were identified using 1,5-DAN, while only 5 out of 11 residues were identified using 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB); similarly 11 out of 15 amino acid residues of guanylin were identified using 1,5-DAN, while only three were identified using DHB. In addition, comparison of the theoretical and measured values of the mass differences between corresponding MS/MS product ions using 1,5-DAN and DHB narrowed down the possible disulfide bond arrangement candidates. Consequently, 1,5-DAN as a reductive matrix facilitates rapid amino acid sequencing and disulfide mapping for peptides containing disulfide bonds. PMID:16382486

  13. MapReduce Implementation of a Hybrid Spectral Library-Database Search Method for Large-Scale Peptide Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyanaraman, Anantharaman; Cannon, William R.; Latt, Benjamin K.; Baxter, Douglas J.

    2011-11-01

    A MapReduce-based implementation called MR- MSPolygraph for parallelizing peptide identification from mass spectrometry data is presented. The underlying serial method, MSPolygraph, uses a novel hybrid approach to match an experimental spectrum against a combination of a protein sequence database and a spectral library. Our MapReduce implementation can run on any Hadoop cluster environment. Experimental results demonstrate that, relative to the serial version, MR-MSPolygraph reduces the time to solution from weeks to hours, for processing tens of thousands of experimental spectra. Speedup and other related performance studies are also reported on a 400-core Hadoop cluster using spectral datasets from environmental microbial communities as inputs.

  14. Characterization of desmoglein-3 epitope region peptides as synthetic antigens: analysis of their in vitro T cell stimulating efficacy, cytotoxicity, stability, and their conformational features.

    PubMed

    Szabados, Hajnalka; Uray, Katalin; Majer, Zsuzsa; Silló, Pálma; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Hudecz, Ferenc; Bősze, Szilvia

    2015-09-01

    Desmoglein-3 (Dsg3) adhesion protein is the main target of autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells in Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) autoimmune skin disorder. Several mapping studies of Dsg3 T cell epitope regions were performed, and based on those data, we designed and synthesized four peptide series corresponding to Dsg3 T cell epitope regions. Each peptide series consists of a 17mer full-length peptide (Dsg3/189-205, Dsg3/206-222, Dsg3/342-358, and Dsg3/761-777) and its N-terminally truncated derivatives, resulting in 15 peptides altogether. The peptides were prepared on solid phase and were chemically characterized. In order to establish a structure-activity relationship, the solution conformation of the synthetic peptides has been investigated using electronic circular dichroism spectroscopy. The in vitro T cell stimulating efficacy of the peptides has been determined on peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from whole blood of PV patients and also from healthy donors. After 20 h of stimulation, the interferon (IFN)-γ content of the supernatants was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the in vitro conditions, peptides were stable and non-cytotoxic. The in vitro IFN-γ production profile of healthy donors and PV patients, induced by peptides as synthetic antigens, was markedly different. The most unambiguous differences were observed after stimulation with 17mer peptide Dsg3/342-358, and three truncated derivatives from two other peptide series, namely, peptides Dsg3/192-205, Dsg3/763-777, and Dsg3/764-777. Comparative analysis of in vitro activity and the capability of oligopeptides to form ordered or unordered secondary structure showed that peptides bearing high solvent sensibility and backbone flexibility were the most capable to distinguish between healthy and PV donors. PMID:26250896

  15. Liquid MALDI MS Analysis of Complex Peptide and Proteome Samples.

    PubMed

    Wiangnon, Kanjana; Cramer, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) is well-known to be a powerful technique for the analysis of biological samples. By using glycerol-based liquid support matrices (LSMs) instead of conventional MALDI matrices the power of this technique can be extended further. In this study, we exploited LSMs for the identification of complex samples, that is, the Lactobacillus proteome and a bovine serum albumin (BSA) digest. Liquid and solid MALDI samples were manually and robotically prepared by coupling a nanoflow high-performance liquid chromatography (nanoHPLC) system to an automated MALDI sample spotting device. MS and MS/MS data were successfully acquired at the femtomole level using TOF/TOF as well as Q-TOF instrumentation and used for protein identification searching sequence databases. For the BSA digest analysis, liquid MALDI samples resulted in peptide mass fingerprints, which led to a higher confidence in protein identification compared with solid (crystalline) MALDI samples; however, postsource decay (PSD) MS/MS analysis of both the proteome of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 cells and BSA digest showed that further optimization of the formation and detection of peptide fragment ions is still needed for liquid MALDI samples, as the MS/MS ion search score was lower than that for the solid MALDI samples, reflecting the poorer quality of the liquid MALDI-PSD spectra, which can be attributed to the differences in PSD parameters and their optimization that is currently achievable. PMID:27418427

  16. Identification and mapping of linear antibody epitopes in human serum albumin using high-density Peptide arrays.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lajla Bruntse; Buus, Soren; Schafer-Nielsen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    We have recently developed a high-density photolithographic, peptide array technology with a theoretical upper limit of 2 million different peptides per array of 2 cm(2). Here, we have used this to perform complete and exhaustive analyses of linear B cell epitopes of a medium sized protein target using human serum albumin (HSA) as an example. All possible overlapping 15-mers from HSA were synthesized and probed with a commercially available polyclonal rabbit anti-HSA antibody preparation. To allow for identification of even the weakest epitopes and at the same time perform a detailed characterization of key residues involved in antibody binding, the array also included complete single substitution scans (i.e. including each of the 20 common amino acids) at each position of each 15-mer peptide. As specificity controls, all possible 15-mer peptides from bovine serum albumin (BSA) and from rabbit serum albumin (RSA) were included as well. The resulting layout contained more than 200.000 peptide fields and could be synthesized in a single array on a microscope slide. More than 20 linear epitope candidates were identified and characterized at high resolution i.e. identifying which amino acids in which positions were needed, or not needed, for antibody interaction. As expected, moderate cross-reaction with some peptides in BSA was identified whereas no cross-reaction was observed with peptides from RSA. We conclude that high-density peptide microarrays are a very powerful methodology to identify and characterize linear antibody epitopes, and should advance detailed description of individual specificities at the single antibody level as well as serologic analysis at the proteome-wide level. PMID:23894373

  17. Mapping protein-protein interactions with phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries and alanine scanning.

    PubMed

    Kokoszka, Malgorzata E; Kay, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    One avenue for inferring the function of a protein is to learn what proteins it may bind to in the cell. Among the various methodologies, one way for doing so is to affinity select peptide ligands from a phage-displayed combinatorial peptide library and then to examine if the proteins that carry such peptide sequences interact with the target protein in the cell. With the protocols described in this chapter, a laboratory with skills in microbiology, molecular biology, and protein biochemistry can readily identify peptides in the library that bind selectively, and with micromolar affinity, to a given target protein on the time scale of 2 months. To illustrate this approach, we use a library of bacteriophage M13 particles, which display 12-mer combinatorial peptides, to affinity select different peptide ligands for two different targets, the SH3 domain of the human Lyn protein tyrosine kinase and a segment of the yeast serine/threonine protein kinase Cbk1. The binding properties of the selected peptide ligands are then dissected by sequence alignment, Kunkel mutagenesis, and alanine scanning. Finally, the peptide ligands can be used to predict cellular interacting proteins and serve as the starting point for drug discovery. PMID:25616333

  18. Specific degradation of the mucus adhesion-promoting protein (MapA) of Lactobacillus reuteri to an antimicrobial peptide.

    PubMed

    Bøhle, Liv Anette; Brede, Dag Anders; Diep, Dzung B; Holo, Helge; Nes, Ingolf F

    2010-11-01

    The intestinal flora of mammals contains lactic acid bacteria (LAB) that may provide positive health effects for the host. Such bacteria are referred to as probiotic bacteria. From a pig, we have isolated a Lactobacillus reuteri strain that produces an antimicrobial peptide (AMP). The peptide was purified and characterized, and it was unequivocally shown that the AMP was a well-defined degradation product obtained from the mucus adhesion-promoting protein (MapA); it was therefore termed AP48-MapA. This finding demonstrates how large proteins might inherit unexpected pleiotropic functions by conferring antimicrobial capacities on the producer. The MapA/AP48-MapA system is the first example where a large protein of an intestinal LAB is shown to give rise to such an AMP. It is also of particular interest that the protein that provides this AMP is associated with the binding of the bacterium producing it to the surface/lining of the gut. This finding gives us new perspective on how some probiotic bacteria may successfully compete in this environment and thereby contribute to a healthy microbiota. PMID:20833791

  19. Diffusion maps, clustering and fuzzy Markov modeling in peptide folding transitions.

    PubMed

    Nedialkova, Lilia V; Amat, Miguel A; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G; Hummer, Gerhard

    2014-09-21

    Using the helix-coil transitions of alanine pentapeptide as an illustrative example, we demonstrate the use of diffusion maps in the analysis of molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Diffusion maps and other nonlinear data-mining techniques provide powerful tools to visualize the distribution of structures in conformation space. The resulting low-dimensional representations help in partitioning conformation space, and in constructing Markov state models that capture the conformational dynamics. In an initial step, we use diffusion maps to reduce the dimensionality of the conformational dynamics of Ala5. The resulting pretreated data are then used in a clustering step. The identified clusters show excellent overlap with clusters obtained previously by using the backbone dihedral angles as input, with small--but nontrivial--differences reflecting torsional degrees of freedom ignored in the earlier approach. We then construct a Markov state model describing the conformational dynamics in terms of a discrete-time random walk between the clusters. We show that by combining fuzzy C-means clustering with a transition-based assignment of states, we can construct robust Markov state models. This state-assignment procedure suppresses short-time memory effects that result from the non-Markovianity of the dynamics projected onto the space of clusters. In a comparison with previous work, we demonstrate how manifold learning techniques may complement and enhance informed intuition commonly used to construct reduced descriptions of the dynamics in molecular conformation space. PMID:25240340

  20. Diffusion maps, clustering and fuzzy Markov modeling in peptide folding transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedialkova, Lilia V.; Amat, Miguel A.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Hummer, Gerhard

    2014-09-01

    Using the helix-coil transitions of alanine pentapeptide as an illustrative example, we demonstrate the use of diffusion maps in the analysis of molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Diffusion maps and other nonlinear data-mining techniques provide powerful tools to visualize the distribution of structures in conformation space. The resulting low-dimensional representations help in partitioning conformation space, and in constructing Markov state models that capture the conformational dynamics. In an initial step, we use diffusion maps to reduce the dimensionality of the conformational dynamics of Ala5. The resulting pretreated data are then used in a clustering step. The identified clusters show excellent overlap with clusters obtained previously by using the backbone dihedral angles as input, with small—but nontrivial—differences reflecting torsional degrees of freedom ignored in the earlier approach. We then construct a Markov state model describing the conformational dynamics in terms of a discrete-time random walk between the clusters. We show that by combining fuzzy C-means clustering with a transition-based assignment of states, we can construct robust Markov state models. This state-assignment procedure suppresses short-time memory effects that result from the non-Markovianity of the dynamics projected onto the space of clusters. In a comparison with previous work, we demonstrate how manifold learning techniques may complement and enhance informed intuition commonly used to construct reduced descriptions of the dynamics in molecular conformation space.

  1. Diffusion maps, clustering and fuzzy Markov modeling in peptide folding transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Nedialkova, Lilia V.; Amat, Miguel A.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G. E-mail: gerhard.hummer@biophys.mpg.de; Hummer, Gerhard E-mail: gerhard.hummer@biophys.mpg.de

    2014-09-21

    Using the helix-coil transitions of alanine pentapeptide as an illustrative example, we demonstrate the use of diffusion maps in the analysis of molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Diffusion maps and other nonlinear data-mining techniques provide powerful tools to visualize the distribution of structures in conformation space. The resulting low-dimensional representations help in partitioning conformation space, and in constructing Markov state models that capture the conformational dynamics. In an initial step, we use diffusion maps to reduce the dimensionality of the conformational dynamics of Ala5. The resulting pretreated data are then used in a clustering step. The identified clusters show excellent overlap with clusters obtained previously by using the backbone dihedral angles as input, with small—but nontrivial—differences reflecting torsional degrees of freedom ignored in the earlier approach. We then construct a Markov state model describing the conformational dynamics in terms of a discrete-time random walk between the clusters. We show that by combining fuzzy C-means clustering with a transition-based assignment of states, we can construct robust Markov state models. This state-assignment procedure suppresses short-time memory effects that result from the non-Markovianity of the dynamics projected onto the space of clusters. In a comparison with previous work, we demonstrate how manifold learning techniques may complement and enhance informed intuition commonly used to construct reduced descriptions of the dynamics in molecular conformation space.

  2. Proteomic analysis of peptides tagged with dimedone and related probes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Acedo, Pablo; Gupta, Vinayak; Carroll, Kate S

    2014-04-01

    Owing to its labile nature, a new role for cysteine sulfenic acid (-SOH) modification has emerged. This oxidative modification modulates protein function by acting as a redox switch during cellular signaling. The identification of proteins that undergo this modification represents a methodological challenge, and its resolution remains a matter of current interest. The development of strategies to chemically modify cysteinyl-containing peptides for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis has increased significantly within the past decade. The method of choice to selectively label sulfenic acid is based on the use of dimedone or its derivatives. For these chemical probes to be effective on a proteome-wide level, their reactivity toward -SOH must be high to ensure reaction completion. In addition, the presence of an adduct should not interfere with electrospray ionization, the efficiency of induced dissociation in MS/MS experiments or with the identification of Cys-modified peptides by automated database searching algorithms. Herein, we employ a targeted proteomics approach to study the electrospray ionization and fragmentation effects of different -SOH specific probes and compared them to commonly used alkylating agents. We then extend our study to a whole proteome extract using shotgun proteomic approaches. These experiments enable us to demonstrate that dimedone adducts do not interfere with electrospray by suppressing the ionization nor impede product ion assignment by automated search engines, which detect a + 138 Da increase from unmodified peptides. Collectively, these results suggest that dimedone can be a powerful tool to identify sulfenic acid modifications by high-throughput shotgun proteomics of a whole proteome. PMID:24719340

  3. Identification of peptide-specific TCR genes by in vitro peptide stimulation and CDR3 length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hongwei; Lin, Yanmei; Wang, Teng; Ou, Yusheng; Shen, Han; Tao, Changli; Wu, Fenglin; Zhang, Wenfeng; Bo, Huaben; Wang, Hui; Huang, Shulin

    2015-07-10

    Identification of TCR genes specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) is necessary for TCR gene modification of T cells, which is applied in anti-tumor adoptive T cell therapy (ACT). The usual identification methods are based on isolating single peptide-responding T cells and cloning the TCR gene by in vitro expansion or by single-cell RT-PCR. However, the long and exacting in vitro culture period and demanding operational requirements restrict the application of these methods. Immunoscope is an effective tool that profiles a repertoire of TCRs and identifies significantly expanded clones through CDR3 length analysis. In this study, a survivin-derived mutant peptide optimized for HLA-A2 binding was selected to load DCs and activate T cells. The monoclonal expansion of TCRA and TCRB genes was separately identified by Immunoscope analysis and following sequence identification, the properly paired TCR genes were transferred into T cells. Peptide recognition and cytotoxicity assays indicated that TCR-modified PBMCs could respond to both the mutant and wild type peptides and lyse target cells. These results show that combining Immunoscope with in vitro peptide stimulation provides an alternative and superior method for identifying specific TCR genes, which represents a significant advance for the application of TCR gene-modified T cells. PMID:25890221

  4. Parallel map analysis on 2-D grids

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, M.; Comiskey, J.; Minser, K.

    1993-12-31

    In landscape ecology, computer modeling is used to assess habitat fragmentation and its ecological iMPLications. Specifically, maps (2-D grids) of habitat clusters must be analyzed to determine number, sizes and geometry of clusters. Models prior to this study relied upon sequential Fortran-77 programs which limited the sizes of maps and densities of clusters which could be analyzed. In this paper, we present more efficient computer models which can exploit recursion or parallelism. Significant improvements over the original Fortran-77 programs have been achieved using both recursive and nonrecursive C implementations on a variety of workstations such as the Sun Sparc 2, IBM RS/6000-350, and HP 9000-750. Parallel implementations on a 4096-processor MasPar MP-1 and a 32-processor CM-5 are also studied. Preliminary experiments suggest that speed improvements for the parallel model on the MasPar MP-1 (written in MPL) and on the CM-5 (written in C using CMMD) can be as much as 39 and 34 times faster, respectively, than the most efficient sequential C program on a Sun Sparc 2 for a 512 map. An important goal in this research effort is to produce a scalable map analysis algorithm for the identification and characterization of clusters for relatively large maps on massively-parallel computers.

  5. Inhibition of inflammation by a p38 MAP kinase targeted cell permeable peptide.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing; Meng, Xianmei; He, Junyun; Gu, Jun

    2008-11-01

    p38 MAPK has been the key therapeutic target for multiple inflammation diseases. However, the clinical applications of p38 inhibitors, most of which target on the ATP binding groove in the kinase, have been held back, largely because of their limited specificity and severe side-effects. An alternative strategy to generate highly selective p38 inhibitor is to block the specific interaction in the p38 signal pathway. Based on the hypothesis that specific binding peptides targeting on the docking groove would interfere the intrinsic interaction between p38 and its partners, we have designed a fusion peptide containing 12aa p38 docking sequence derived from MKK3b and 11aa HIV-TAT transmembrane sequence to form a cell permeable peptide. The peptide specifically binds to p38, and aborts its interaction with upstream kinase as well as downstream substrates, and thus to inhibit p38 phosphorylation and its signaling. Furthermore, the induction and secretion of TNFalpha and other inflammatory factors by LPS are blocked in peptide treated cells and mice. Finally the peptide has been shown to significantly inhibit ear oedema in mice. Therefore, the peptide holds great potential as an anti-inflammation agent for the treatment of inflammation and its related diseases. PMID:18991745

  6. Wavelet analysis of electron-density maps.

    PubMed

    Main, P; Wilson, J

    2000-05-01

    The wavelet transform is a powerful technique in signal processing and image analysis and it is shown here that wavelet analysis of low-resolution electron-density maps has the potential to increase their resolution. Like Fourier analysis, wavelet analysis expresses the image (electron density) in terms of a set of orthogonal functions. In the case of the Fourier transform, these functions are sines and cosines and each one contributes to the whole of the image. In contrast, the wavelet functions (simply called wavelets) can be quite localized and may only contribute to a small part of the image. This gives control over the amount of detail added to the map as the resolution increases. The mathematical details are outlined and an algorithm which achieves a resolution increase from 10 to 7 A using a knowledge of the wavelet-coefficient histograms, electron-density histogram and the observed structure amplitudes is described. These histograms are calculated from the electron density of known structures, but it seems likely that the histograms can be predicted, just as electron-density histograms are at high resolution. The results show that the wavelet coefficients contain the information necessary to increase the resolution of electron-density maps. PMID:10771431

  7. Meteorological analysis of MAPS first shuttle flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, M.; Newell, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The data from the MAPS radiometer launched on board the first shuttle flight was analyzed. The meteorological data relevant to the MAPS measurements was also analyzed so that the in situ calibration measurements and any anomalous features within the data set can be evaluated in the context of the atmospheric circulation during the period of observation. The three dimensioned isentropic analysis scheme was used as the main analytical tool. A graphical output of the N and delta channel signals, black body reference temperatures, reduced CO concentrations and ground tracks for orbits 15 and 16 were provided. The insentropic trajectory methods was emphasized because it is a basic requirement that the analysis be extended to incorporate daily data within the tropics.

  8. MAP Attitude Control System Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, S. F.; Campbell, C. E.; Ericsson-Jackson, A. J.; Markley, F. L.; ODonnell, J. R., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) is a follow-on to the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. The MAP spacecraft will perform its mission in a Lissajous orbit around the Earth-Sun L(sub 2) Lagrange point to suppress potential instrument disturbances. To make a full-sky map of cosmic microwave background fluctuations, a combination fast spin and slow precession motion will be used. MAP requires a propulsion system to reach L(sub 2), to unload system momentum, and to perform stationkeeping maneuvers once at L(sub 2). A minimum hardware, power and thermal safe control mode must also be provided. Sufficient attitude knowledge must be provided to yield instrument pointing to a standard deviation of 1.8 arc-minutes. The short development time and tight budgets require a new way of designing, simulating, and analyzing the Attitude Control System (ACS). This paper presents the design and analysis of the control system to meet these requirements.

  9. Quality Analysis of Open Street Map Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Li, Q.; Hu, Q.; Zhou, M.

    2013-05-01

    Crowd sourcing geographic data is an opensource geographic data which is contributed by lots of non-professionals and provided to the public. The typical crowd sourcing geographic data contains GPS track data like OpenStreetMap, collaborative map data like Wikimapia, social websites like Twitter and Facebook, POI signed by Jiepang user and so on. These data will provide canonical geographic information for pubic after treatment. As compared with conventional geographic data collection and update method, the crowd sourcing geographic data from the non-professional has characteristics or advantages of large data volume, high currency, abundance information and low cost and becomes a research hotspot of international geographic information science in the recent years. Large volume crowd sourcing geographic data with high currency provides a new solution for geospatial database updating while it need to solve the quality problem of crowd sourcing geographic data obtained from the non-professionals. In this paper, a quality analysis model for OpenStreetMap crowd sourcing geographic data is proposed. Firstly, a quality analysis framework is designed based on data characteristic analysis of OSM data. Secondly, a quality assessment model for OSM data by three different quality elements: completeness, thematic accuracy and positional accuracy is presented. Finally, take the OSM data of Wuhan for instance, the paper analyses and assesses the quality of OSM data with 2011 version of navigation map for reference. The result shows that the high-level roads and urban traffic network of OSM data has a high positional accuracy and completeness so that these OSM data can be used for updating of urban road network database.

  10. Analysis of illegal peptide biopharmaceuticals frequently encountered by controlling agencies.

    PubMed

    Vanhee, Celine; Janvier, Steven; Desmedt, Bart; Moens, Goedele; Deconinck, Eric; De Beer, Jacques O; Courselle, Patricia

    2015-09-01

    Recent advances in genomics, recombinant expression technologies and peptide synthesis have led to an increased development of protein and peptide therapeutics. Unfortunately this goes hand in hand with a growing market of counterfeit and illegal biopharmaceuticals, including substances that are still under pre-clinical and clinical development. These counterfeit and illegal protein and peptide substances could imply severe health threats as has been demonstrated by numerous case reports. The Belgian Federal Agency for Medicines and Health Products (FAMHP) and customs are striving, together with their global counterparts, to curtail the trafficking and distributions of these substances. At their request, suspected protein and peptide preparations are analysed in our Official Medicines Control Laboratory (OMCL). It stands to reason that a general screening method would be beneficiary in the battle against counterfeit and illegal peptide drugs. In this paper we present such general screening method employing liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the identification of counterfeit and illegal injectable peptide preparations, extended with a subsequent quantification method using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (UHPLC-DAD). The screening method, taking only 30 min, is able to selectively detect 25 different peptides and incorporates the proposed minimum of five identification points (IP) as has been recommended for sports drug testing applications. The group of peptides represent substances which have already been detected in illegal and counterfeit products seized by different European countries as well as some biopharmaceutical peptides which have not been confiscated yet by the controlling agencies, but are already being used according to the many internet users forums. Additionally, we also show that when applying the same LC gradient, it is also possible to quantify these peptides without the need for

  11. Likelihood Analysis for Mega Pixel Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, Alan J.

    1999-01-01

    The derivation of cosmological parameters from astrophysical data sets routinely involves operations counts which scale as O(N(exp 3) where N is the number of data points. Currently planned missions, including MAP and Planck, will generate sky maps with N(sub d) = 10(exp 6) or more pixels. Simple "brute force" analysis, applied to such mega-pixel data, would require years of computing even on the fastest computers. We describe an algorithm which allows estimation of the likelihood function in the direct pixel basis. The algorithm uses a conjugate gradient approach to evaluate X2 and a geometric approximation to evaluate the determinant. Monte Carlo simulations provide a correction to the determinant, yielding an unbiased estimate of the likelihood surface in an arbitrary region surrounding the likelihood peak. The algorithm requires O(N(sub d)(exp 3/2) operations and O(Nd) storage for each likelihood evaluation, and allows for significant parallel computation.

  12. Chaotic map clustering algorithm for EEG analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, R.; De Carlo, F.; Stramaglia, S.

    2004-03-01

    The non-parametric chaotic map clustering algorithm has been applied to the analysis of electroencephalographic signals, in order to recognize the Huntington's disease, one of the most dangerous pathologies of the central nervous system. The performance of the method has been compared with those obtained through parametric algorithms, as K-means and deterministic annealing, and supervised multi-layer perceptron. While supervised neural networks need a training phase, performed by means of data tagged by the genetic test, and the parametric methods require a prior choice of the number of classes to find, the chaotic map clustering gives a natural evidence of the pathological class, without any training or supervision, thus providing a new efficient methodology for the recognition of patterns affected by the Huntington's disease.

  13. Combining Ultracentrifugation and Peptide Termini Group-specific Immunoprecipitation for Multiplex Plasma Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Sonja; Schreiber, Thomas D.; Eisen, David; Wiese, Calvin; Planatscher, Hannes; Pynn, Christopher J.; Stoll, Dieter; Templin, Markus F.; Joos, Thomas O.; Pötz, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Blood plasma is a valuable source of potential biomarkers. However, its complexity and the huge dynamic concentration range of its constituents complicate its analysis. To tackle this problem, an immunoprecipitation strategy was employed using antibodies directed against short terminal epitope tags (triple X proteomics antibodies), which allow the enrichment of groups of signature peptides derived from trypsin-digested plasma. Isolated signature peptides are subsequently detected using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Sensitivity of the immunoaffinity approach was, however, compromised by the presence of contaminant peaks derived from the peptides of nontargeted high abundant proteins. A closer analysis of the enrichment strategy revealed nonspecific peptide binding to the solid phase affinity matrix as the major source of the contaminating peptides. We therefore implemented a sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation separation step into the procedure. This yielded a 99% depletion of contaminating peptides from a sucrose fraction containing 70% of the peptide-antibody complexes and enabled the detection of the previously undetected low abundance protein filamin-A. Assessment of this novel approach using 15 different triple X proteomics antibodies demonstrated a more consistent detection of a greater number of targeted peptides and a significant reduction in the intensity of nonspecific peptides. Ultracentrifugation coupled with immunoaffinity MS approaches presents a powerful tool for multiplexed plasma protein analysis without the requirement for demanding liquid chromatography separation techniques. PMID:22527512

  14. Sequence analysis by iterated maps, a review.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Jonas S

    2014-05-01

    Among alignment-free methods, Iterated Maps (IMs) are on a particular extreme: they are also scale free (order free). The use of IMs for sequence analysis is also distinct from other alignment-free methodologies in being rooted in statistical mechanics instead of computational linguistics. Both of these roots go back over two decades to the use of fractal geometry in the characterization of phase-space representations. The time series analysis origin of the field is betrayed by the title of the manuscript that started this alignment-free subdomain in 1990, 'Chaos Game Representation'. The clash between the analysis of sequences as continuous series and the better established use of Markovian approaches to discrete series was almost immediate, with a defining critique published in same journal 2 years later. The rest of that decade would go by before the scale-free nature of the IM space was uncovered. The ensuing decade saw this scalability generalized for non-genomic alphabets as well as an interest in its use for graphic representation of biological sequences. Finally, in the past couple of years, in step with the emergence of BigData and MapReduce as a new computational paradigm, there is a surprising third act in the IM story. Multiple reports have described gains in computational efficiency of multiple orders of magnitude over more conventional sequence analysis methodologies. The stage appears to be now set for a recasting of IMs with a central role in processing nextgen sequencing results. PMID:24162172

  15. Antisera preparation and epitope mapping of a recombinant protein comprising three peptide fragments of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Tang, Haiping; Xu, Wanxiang; Chen, Aijun; Shi, Qixian; Sun, Zhida; Wang, Liyan; Ni, Ya

    2015-10-01

    Antibodies targeting a single epitope of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) have been reported to influence the validity of immunological analyses; however, autoimmune mechanisms associated with CFTR epitopes are not well understood. In this study, antiserum raised against a multi-epitope recombinant protein composed of three peptide fragments of CFTR (r-CFTR-3P) was prepared and B cell epitope mapping of the protein was carried out using biosynthetic peptides. The r-CFTR-3P gene was cloned into the pSY621 expression plasmid and the protein was expressed in the BL21 strain of Escherichia coli. The rabbit r-CFTR-3P antiserum recognized the native CFTR antigen extracted from human sperm and the GST188 fusion peptides CFTR(25-36), CFTR(103-117), and CFTR(1387-1480) spanning different regions of CFTR. Four novel r-CFTR-3P B cell epitopes were identified: (29)RQRLEL(34), (104)RIIASY(109), (111)PDN(113), and (1447)VKLF(1450) of CFTR. Other proteins from various species shared sequence homology with the identified epitopes based on NCBI BLAST alignment. This study provides new tools for detecting CFTR protein and insight into the characteristics of minimal B cell epitopes of CFTR and associated immunological mechanisms. PMID:26087025

  16. Molecular Evolutionary Analysis of β-Defensin Peptides in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Jianbo; Li, Diyan; Li, Qingqing; Zhang, Long; Zhu, Qing; Gaur, Uma; Fan, Xiaolan; Xu, Huailiang; Yao, Yongfang; Zhao, Xiaoling; Yang, Mingyao

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate β-defensins comprise an important family of antimicrobial peptides that protect organisms from a diverse spectrum of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoan parasites. Previous studies have shown a marked variation in the number of β-defensins among species, but the underlying reason is unclear. To address this question, we performed comprehensive computational searches to study the intact β-defensin genes from 29 vertebrates. Phylogenetic analysis of the β-defensin genes in vertebrates identified frequent changes in the number of β-defensin genes and multiple species-specific gene gains and losses that have been occurring throughout the evolution of vertebrates. The number of intact β-defensin genes varied from 1 in the western clawed frog to 20 in cattle, with numerous expansions and contractions of the gene family throughout vertebrates, especially among tetrapods. The β-defensin gene number in a species is relevant to the ever-changing microbial challenges from the environment that they inhabit. Selection pressure analysis shows there exist three amino acid sites under significant positive selection. Protein structural characteristics analysis suggests that structural diversity determines the diverse functions of β-defensins. Our study provides a new perspective on the relationships among vertebrate β-defensin gene repertoires and different survival circumstances, which helps explain how β-defensins have evolved. PMID:26056425

  17. Molecular Evolutionary Analysis of β-Defensin Peptides in Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jianbo; Li, Diyan; Li, Qingqing; Zhang, Long; Zhu, Qing; Gaur, Uma; Fan, Xiaolan; Xu, Huailiang; Yao, Yongfang; Zhao, Xiaoling; Yang, Mingyao

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate β-defensins comprise an important family of antimicrobial peptides that protect organisms from a diverse spectrum of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protozoan parasites. Previous studies have shown a marked variation in the number of β-defensins among species, but the underlying reason is unclear. To address this question, we performed comprehensive computational searches to study the intact β-defensin genes from 29 vertebrates. Phylogenetic analysis of the β-defensin genes in vertebrates identified frequent changes in the number of β-defensin genes and multiple species-specific gene gains and losses that have been occurring throughout the evolution of vertebrates. The number of intact β-defensin genes varied from 1 in the western clawed frog to 20 in cattle, with numerous expansions and contractions of the gene family throughout vertebrates, especially among tetrapods. The β-defensin gene number in a species is relevant to the ever-changing microbial challenges from the environment that they inhabit. Selection pressure analysis shows there exist three amino acid sites under significant positive selection. Protein structural characteristics analysis suggests that structural diversity determines the diverse functions of β-defensins. Our study provides a new perspective on the relationships among vertebrate β-defensin gene repertoires and different survival circumstances, which helps explain how β-defensins have evolved. PMID:26056425

  18. [Amino acid composition and peptide maps of udder and serum albumins in lactating and nonlactating cows].

    PubMed

    Lagodiuk, P Z; Klos, Iu S; Charkin, V A; Kisil', I O

    1983-01-01

    Amino acids and peptides of albumin hydrolyzates from the mammary gland and blood serum were studied for lactating and nonlactating (dry, pregnant 1-4.5 and 4.5-9 months) black-and-white cows. Most pronounced difference between the content of certain amino acids of the mammary gland and blood serum albumins are established for lactating cows and least pronounced for nonlactating dry cows. Dactylography detected 55-57 fragments of products resulted from trypsin hydrolysis of the mammary gland and blood serum albumins of the animals under study. Differences are found in the content and mobility of certain peptides. PMID:6829076

  19. Identification of 2D-gel proteins : a comparison of MALDI/TOF peptide mass mapping to {mu} LC-ESI tandem mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, H.; Hays, L. G.; Eng, J.; Tollaksen, S. L.; Giometti, C. S.; Holden, J. F.; Adams, M. W. W.; Reich, C. I.; Olsen, G. J.; Yates, J. R.; Biosciences Division; The Scripps Research Inst.; Univ. of Georgia; Univ. of Illinois

    2003-09-01

    A comparative analysis of protein identification for a total of 162 protein spots separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis from two fully sequenced archaea, Methanococcus jannaschii and Pyrococcus furiosus, using MALDI-TOF peptide mass mapping (PMM) and mu LC-MS/MS is presented. 100% of the gel spots analyzed were successfully matched to the predicted proteins in the two corresponding open reading frame databases by mu LC-MS/MS while 97% of them were identified by MALDI-TOF PMM. The high success rate from the PMM resulted from sample desalting/concentrating with ZipTip(C18) and optimization of several PMM search parameters including a 25 ppm average mass tolerance and the application of two different protein molecular weight search windows. By using this strategy, low-molecular weight (<23 kDa) proteins could be identified unambiguously with less than 5 peptide matches. Nine percent of spots were identified as containing multiple proteins. By using mu LC-MS/MS, 50% of the spots analyzed were identified as containing multiple proteins. mu LC-MS/MS demonstrated better protein sequence coverage than MALDI-TOF PMM over the entire mass range of proteins identified. MALDI-TOF and PMM produced unique peptide molecular weight matches that were not identified by mu LC-MS/MS. By incorporating amino acid sequence modifications into database searches, combined sequence coverage obtained from these two complimentary ionization methods exceeded 50% for approximately 70% of the 162 spots analyzed. This improved sequence coverage in combination with enzymatic digestions of different specificity is proposed as a method for analysis of post-translational modification from 2D-gel separated proteins.

  20. Two dimensional mass mapping as a general method of data representation in comprehensive analysis of complex molecular mixtures.

    PubMed

    Artemenko, Konstantin A; Zubarev, Alexander R; Samgina, Tatiana Yu; Lebedev, Albert T; Savitski, Mikhail M; Zubarev, Roman A

    2009-05-15

    A recent proteomics-grade (95%+ sequence reliability) high-throughput de novo sequencing method utilizes the benefits of high resolution, high mass accuracy, and the use of two complementary fragmentation techniques collision-activated dissociation (CAD) and electron capture dissociation (ECD). With this high-fidelity sequencing approach, hundreds of peptides can be sequenced de novo in a single LC-MS/MS experiment. The high productivity of the new analysis technique has revealed a new bottleneck which occurs in data representation. Here we suggest a new method of data analysis and visualization that presents a comprehensive picture of the peptide content including relative abundances and grouping into families. The 2D mass mapping consists of putting the molecular masses onto a two-dimensional bubble plot, with the relative monoisotopic mass defect and isotopic shift being the axes and with the bubble area proportional to the peptide abundance. Peptides belonging to the same family form a compact group on such a plot, so that the family identity can in many cases be determined from the molecular mass alone. The performance of the method is demonstrated on the high-throughput analysis of skin secretion from three frogs, Rana ridibunda, Rana arvalis, and Rana temporaria. Two dimensional mass maps simplify the task of global comparison between the species and make obvious the similarities and differences in the peptide contents that are obscure in traditional data presentation methods. Even biological activity of the peptide can sometimes be inferred from its position on the plot. Two dimensional mass mapping is a general method applicable to any complex mixture, peptide and nonpeptide alike. PMID:19382811

  1. Magnetic properties and energy-mapping analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Hongjun; Lee, Changhoon; Koo, Hyun-Joo; Gong, Xingao; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2013-01-28

    The magnetic energy levels of a given magnetic solid are closely packed in energy because the interactions between magnetic ions are weak. Thus, in describing its magnetic properties, one needs to generate its magnetic energy spectrum by employing an appropriate spin Hamiltonian. In this review article we discuss how to determine and specify a necessary spin Hamiltonian in terms of first principles electronic structure calculations on the basis of energy-mapping analysis and briefly survey important concepts and phenomena that one encounters in reading the current literature on magnetic solids. Our discussion is given on a qualitative level from the perspective of magnetic energy levels and electronic structures. The spin Hamiltonian appropriate for a magnetic system should be based on its spin lattice, i.e., the repeat pattern of its strong magnetic bonds (strong spin exchange paths), which requires one to evaluate its Heisenberg spin exchanges on the basis of energy-mapping analysis. Other weaker energy terms such as Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) spin exchange and magnetocrystalline anisotropy energies, which a spin Hamiltonian must include in certain cases, can also be evaluated by performing energy-mapping analysis. We show that the spin orientation of a transition-metal magnetic ion can be easily explained by considering its split d-block levels as unperturbed states with the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) as perturbation, that the DM exchange between adjacent spin sites can become comparable in strength to the Heisenberg spin exchange when the two spin sites are not chemically equivalent, and that the DM interaction between rare-earth and transition-metal cations is governed largely by the magnetic orbitals of the rare-earth cation. PMID:23128376

  2. Peptide Arrays for Kinome Analysis of Livestock Species

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Joanna; Van Wyk, Brenden; Trost, Brett; Scruten, Erin; Arsenault, Ryan; Kusalik, Anthony; Griebel, Philip John; Napper, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a central mechanism for both the transfer of intracellular information and the initiation of cellular responses. Within human medicine, considerable emphasis is placed on understanding and controlling the enzymes (kinases) that are responsible for catalyzing these modifications. This is evident in the prominent use of kinase inhibitors as drugs as well as the trend to understand complex biology and identify biomarkers via characterizations of global kinase (kinome) activity. Despite the demonstrated value of focusing on kinome activity, the application of this perspective to livestock has been restricted by the absence of appropriate research tools. In this review, we discuss the development of software platforms that facilitate the development and application of species-specific peptide arrays for kinome analysis of livestock. Examples of the application of kinomic approaches to a number of priority species (cattle, pigs, and chickens) in a number of biological contexts (infections, biomarker discovery, and food quality) are presented as are emerging trends for kinome analysis of livestock. PMID:26664912

  3. Peptide Arrays for Kinome Analysis of Livestock Species.

    PubMed

    Daigle, Joanna; Van Wyk, Brenden; Trost, Brett; Scruten, Erin; Arsenault, Ryan; Kusalik, Anthony; Griebel, Philip John; Napper, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a central mechanism for both the transfer of intracellular information and the initiation of cellular responses. Within human medicine, considerable emphasis is placed on understanding and controlling the enzymes (kinases) that are responsible for catalyzing these modifications. This is evident in the prominent use of kinase inhibitors as drugs as well as the trend to understand complex biology and identify biomarkers via characterizations of global kinase (kinome) activity. Despite the demonstrated value of focusing on kinome activity, the application of this perspective to livestock has been restricted by the absence of appropriate research tools. In this review, we discuss the development of software platforms that facilitate the development and application of species-specific peptide arrays for kinome analysis of livestock. Examples of the application of kinomic approaches to a number of priority species (cattle, pigs, and chickens) in a number of biological contexts (infections, biomarker discovery, and food quality) are presented as are emerging trends for kinome analysis of livestock. PMID:26664912

  4. Parametric Response Mapping of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) as an Imaging Biomarker to Distinguish Pseudoprogression from True Tumor Progression In Peptide-Based Vaccine Therapy for Pediatric Diffuse Instrinsic Pontine Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ceschin, Rafael; Kurland, Brenda F.; Abberbock, Shira R.; Ellingson, Benjamin M.; Okada, Hideho; Jakacki, Regina I.; Pollack, Ian F.; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Immune response to cancer therapy may result in pseudoprogression, which can only be identified retrospectively and which may disrupt an effective therapy. This study assesses whether serial parametric response mapping (PRM, a voxel-by-voxel method of image analysis also known as functional diffusion mapping) analysis of ADC measurements following peptide-based vaccination may help prospectively distinguish progression from pseudoprogression in pediatric patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas. Materials and Methods From 2009–2012, 21 children age 4–18 with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas were enrolled in a serial peptide-based vaccination protocol following radiotherapy. DWI was acquired before immunotherapy and at six week intervals during vaccine treatment. Pseudoprogression was identified retrospectively based on clinical and radiographic findings, excluding DWI. Parametric response mapping was used to analyze 96 scans, comparing ADC measures at multiple time points (from first vaccine to up to 12 weeks after the vaccine was halted) to pre-vaccine baseline values. Log-transformed fractional increased ADC (fiADC), fractional decreased ADC (fdADC), and parametric response mapping ratio (fiADC/fdADC) were compared between patients with and without pseudoprogression, using generalized estimating equations with inverse weighting by cluster size. Results Median survival was 13.1 months from diagnosis (range 6.4–24.9 months). Four of 21 children (19%) were assessed as experiencing pseudoprogression. Patients with pseudoprogression had higher fitted average log-transformed parametric response mapping ratios (p=0.01) and fiADCs (p=0.0004), compared to patients without pseudoprogression. Conclusion Serial parametric response mapping of ADC, performed at multiple time points of therapy, may distinguish pseudoprogression from true progression in patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas treated with peptide-based vaccination

  5. A complete mass spectrometric map for the analysis of the yeast proteome and its application to quantitative trait analysis

    PubMed Central

    Picotti, Paola; Clement-Ziza, Mathieu; Lam, Henry; Campbell, David S.; Schmidt, Alexander; Deutsch, Eric W.; Röst, Hannes; Sun, Zhi; Rinner, Oliver; Reiter, Lukas; Shen, Qin; Michaelson, Jacob J.; Frei, Andreas; Alberti, Simon; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Wollscheid, Bernd; Moritz, Robert; Beyer, Andreas; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2013-01-01

    Complete reference maps or datasets, like the genomic map of an organism, are highly beneficial tools for biological and biomedical research. Attempts to generate such reference datasets for a proteome so far failed to reach complete proteome coverage, with saturation apparent at approximately two thirds of the proteomes tested, even for the most thoroughly characterized proteomes. Here, we used a strategy based on high-throughput peptide synthesis and mass spectrometry to generate a close to complete reference map (97% of the genome-predicted proteins) of the S. cerevisiae proteome. We generated two versions of this mass spectrometric map one supporting discovery- (shotgun) and the other hypothesis-driven (targeted) proteomic measurements. The two versions of the map, therefore, constitute a complete set of proteomic assays to support most studies performed with contemporary proteomic technologies. The reference libraries can be browsed via a web-based repository and associated navigation tools. To demonstrate the utility of the reference libraries we applied them to a protein quantitative trait locus (pQTL) analysis, which requires measurement of the same peptides over a large number of samples with high precision. Protein measurements over a set of 78 S. cerevisiae strains revealed a complex relationship between independent genetic loci, impacting on the levels of related proteins. Our results suggest that selective pressure favors the acquisition of sets of polymorphisms that maintain the stoichiometry of protein complexes and pathways. PMID:23334424

  6. Mapping and analysis of Martian landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Giovanni B.; Frattini, Paolo; Valbuzzi, Elena; Russo, Valeria

    2013-04-01

    This work is part of a larger effort aimed to a more quantitative description of landslide phenomena on Mars and the understanding of rock mass properties and landslide mobility with respect to their Earth equivalents. Recently, large satellite imagery datasets have become available and they have been mosaicked in different suitable tools making mapping an easier job than before. Furthermore, the availability of other georeferenced database makes possible and easily feasible some spatially distributed analyses. We prepared a new landslide inventory to acquire information about: landslide size distribution and areal density, controls of geometrical condition along Martian slopes, landslide typology and mechanism, relationship with impact craters distribution, runout, volume estimates, characteristic features. We adopted Google Earth, Google, Inc. as a mapping tool using both visible and CTX images. Landslides have been mapped according to standard geomorphological criteria, by two landslide experts delineating both the landslide scar and accumulation limits, associating each scarp to a deposit. Multiple accumulations have been differentiated where possible to obtain a more sound dataset. We prevalently mapped landslides located along the Martian valleys and Chasma flanks with only minor attention to classical block and slump instabilities typical of crater rim failures. This because we were mainly interested in long runout landslides or complex failures which could allow to define some rock mass characteristics along these slopes, and to study landslide mobility with respect to Earth equivalent phenomena. So long runout landslides have been mapped also when recognized within crater rims. Topographic characteristics have been extracted by means of the available MOLA dataset. The inventory presently consists of 1232 landslides covering a total area of about 180,000 km2. Landslide size ranges from 0.15 km2 to a maximum of 12,000 km2. We examined area

  7. Monolithic capillary columns based on pentaerythritol tetraacrylate for peptide analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherenko, E. V.; Melnik, D. M.; Korolev, A. A.; Kanateva, A. Yu.; Pirogov, A. V.; Kurganov, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    Monolythic medium-polar capillary columns based on pentaerythritol tetraacrylate were optimized for separation of peptides. The synthesis temperature and time, the fraction of monomer in the initial polymerization mixture, and the nature of alcohol contained in the complex porogen were chosen as optimization parameters. The highest efficiency was attained for columns obtained with 33 and 34% monomer at a polymerization time of 75 min and a temperature of 75°C. The columns with the optimum structure were effective in separation of a model mixture of five peptides. The sensitivity of the method was 200 ng of peptide per column.

  8. Sequence analysis by iterated maps, a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Among alignment-free methods, Iterated Maps (IMs) are on a particular extreme: they are also scale free (order free). The use of IMs for sequence analysis is also distinct from other alignment-free methodologies in being rooted in statistical mechanics instead of computational linguistics. Both of these roots go back over two decades to the use of fractal geometry in the characterization of phase-space representations. The time series analysis origin of the field is betrayed by the title of the manuscript that started this alignment-free subdomain in 1990, ‘Chaos Game Representation’. The clash between the analysis of sequences as continuous series and the better established use of Markovian approaches to discrete series was almost immediate, with a defining critique published in same journal 2 years later. The rest of that decade would go by before the scale-free nature of the IM space was uncovered. The ensuing decade saw this scalability generalized for non-genomic alphabets as well as an interest in its use for graphic representation of biological sequences. Finally, in the past couple of years, in step with the emergence of BigData and MapReduce as a new computational paradigm, there is a surprising third act in the IM story. Multiple reports have described gains in computational efficiency of multiple orders of magnitude over more conventional sequence analysis methodologies. The stage appears to be now set for a recasting of IMs with a central role in processing nextgen sequencing results. PMID:24162172

  9. Low-Energy Collision-Induced Dissociation Fragmentation Analysis of Cysteinyl-Modified Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, Oleg V.; Goshe, Michael B. ); Conrads, Thomas P. ); Rakov, Vsevolod S. ); Veenstra, Timothy D. ); Smith, Richard D. )

    2002-05-15

    The development of methods to chemically modify and isolate cysteinyl-residue containing peptides (Cys-peptides) for LC-MS/MS analysis has generated considerable interest in the field of proteomics. Methods using isotope-coded affinity tags (ICAT) and (+)-biotinyl-iodoacetamidyl-3,6-dioxaoctanediamine (iodoacetyl-PEO-biotin) employ similar Cys-modifying reagents that contain a thiolate-specific biotin group to modify and isolate Cys-containing peptides in conjunction with immobilized avidin. For these strategies to be effective on a proteome-wide level, the presence of the ICAT or acetyl-PEO-biotin tag should not interfere with the efficiency of induced dissociation in MS/MS experiments or with the identification of the modified Cys-peptides by automated database searching algorithms. We have compared the collision-induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation patterns of peptides labeled with iodoacetyl-PEO-biotin and the ICAT reagent to those of the unmodified peptides. CID of Cys-peptides modified with either reagent resulted in the formation of ions attributed to the modified Cys-peptides as well as those unique to the labeling reagent. As demonstrated by analyzing acetyl-PEO-biotin labeled peptides from ribonuclease A and the ICAT-labeled proteome of D. radiodurans, the presence of these labeled-specific product ions provides a useful identifier to discern whether a peptide has been modified with the Cys-specific reagent, especially when a number of peptides analyzed using these methods do not contain a modified Cys-residue, and to differentiate identical Cys-peptides labeled with either ICAT-D0 or ICAT-D8.

  10. Development of the affinity materials for phosphorylated proteins/peptides enrichment in phosphoproteomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Lv, Nan; Bi, Wen-Zhi; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Ni, Jia-Zuan

    2015-04-29

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a key event in numerous biological processes. Mass spectrometry (MS) is the most powerful analysis tool in modern phosphoproteomics. However, the direct MS analysis of phosphorylated proteins/peptides is still a big challenge because of the low abundance and insufficient ionization of phosphorylated proteins/peptides as well as the suppression effects of nontargets. Enrichment of phosphorylated proteins/peptides by affinity materials from complex biosamples is the most widely used strategy to enhance the MS detection. The demand of efficiently enriching phosphorylated proteins/peptides has spawned diverse affinity materials based on different enrichment principles (e.g., electronic attraction, chelating). In this review, we summarize the recent development of various affinity materials for phosphorylated proteins/peptides enrichment. We will highlight the design and fabrication of these affinity materials, discuss the enrichment mechanisms involved in different affinity materials, and suggest the future challenges and research directions in this field. PMID:25845677

  11. Preparation of a verifiable peptide-protein immunogen: direction-controlled conjugation of a synthetic fragment of the monitor peptide with myoglobin and application for sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Iwai, K; Fukuoka, S; Fushiki, T; Kido, K; Sengoku, Y; Semba, T

    1988-06-01

    A useful method for preparing a synthetic peptide-carrying protein for specific antibody production was established. The monitor peptide is a trypsin-sensitive cholecystokinin-releasing peptide purified from rat pancreatic juice on the basis of its stimulatory activity toward pancreatic enzyme secretion. The NH2-terminus fragment of the monitor peptide (residues 1-14) was synthesized by a solid phase method. Cysteine at the COOH terminus of the fragment was conjugated with amino groups of myoglobin using a hetero-bifunctional reagent. Sequence analysis of the fragment-myoglobin conjugate indicated that the peptide/myoglobin conjugation ratio was about 1/1 (mol/mol). Antiserum against the conjugate from a rabbit effectively abolished the stimulatory activity of the monitor peptide in the rat small intestine. PMID:3407924

  12. Coupling protein complex analysis to peptide based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiang; Madian, Ashraf G; Liu, Xiuping; Adamec, Jiri; Regnier, Fred E

    2010-12-01

    Proteolysis is a central component of most proteomics methods. Unfortunately much of the information relating to the structural diversity of proteins is lost during digestion. This paper describes a method in which the native proteome of yeast was subjected to preliminary fractionation by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) prior to trypsin digestion of SEC fractions and reversed phase chromatography-mass spectral analysis to identify tryptic peptides thus generated. Through this approach proteins associated with other proteins in high molecular mass complexes were recognized and identified. A focus of this work was on the identification of Hub proteins that associate with multiple interaction partners. A critical component of this strategy is to choose methods and conditions that maximize retention of native structure during the various stages of analysis prior to proteolysis, especially during cell lysis. Maximum survival of protein complexes during lysis was obtained with the French press and bead-beater methods of cell disruption at approximately pH 8 with 200 mM NaCl in the lysis buffer. Structure retention was favored by higher ionic strength, suggesting that hydrophobic effects are important in maintaining the structure of protein complexes. Recovery of protein complexes declined substantially with storage at any temperature, but storage at -20°C was best when low temperature storage was necessary. Slightly lower recovery was obtained with storage at -80°C while lowest recovery was achieved at 4°C. It was concluded that initial fractionation of native proteins in cell lysates by SEC prior to RPC-MS/MS of tryptic digests can be used to recognize and identify proteins in complexes along with their interaction partners in known protein complexes. PMID:21036361

  13. UAV for landslide mapping and deformation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Beiqi; Liu, Chun

    2015-12-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) can be a flexible, cost-effective, and accurate method to monitor landslides with high resolution aerial images. Images acquired on 05 May 2013 and 13 December 2014 of the Xishan landslide, China, have been used to produce a high-resolution ortho-mosaic of the entire landslide and digital elevation model (DEM). The UAV capability for imaging detection and displacements on the landslide surface has been evaluated, and the subsequent image processing approaches for suitably georectifying the data have been assessed. Objects derived from the segmentation of a multispectral image were used as classifying units for landslide object-oriented analysis. Spectral information together with various morphometric characteristics was applied for recognizing landslides from false positives. Digital image correlation technique was evaluated to quantify and map terrain displacements. The magnitude and direction of the displacement vectors derived from correlating two temporal UAV images corresponded to a visual interpretation of landslide change. Therefore, the UAV can demonstrate its capability for producing valuable landslide mapping data and deformation information.

  14. Mapping protein-RNA interactions by RCAP, RNA-cross-linking and peptide fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Robert C; Kao, C Cheng

    2015-01-01

    RNA nanotechnology often feature protein RNA complexes. The interaction between proteins and large RNAs are difficult to study using traditional structure-based methods like NMR or X-ray crystallography. RCAP, an approach that uses reversible-cross-linking affinity purification method coupled with mass spectrometry, has been developed to map regions within proteins that contact RNA. This chapter details how RCAP is applied to map protein-RNA contacts within virions. PMID:25896007

  15. Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    McMahon, Ben [LANL

    2013-01-25

    Ben McMahon of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) presents "Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  16. Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Ben

    2012-06-01

    Ben McMahon of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) presents "Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  17. Interrelationships of the subgenera of Coryphaenoides (Teleostei: Gadiformes: Macrouridae): synthesis of allozyme, peptide mapping, and DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Raymond R; Attia, Phoebe

    2003-05-01

    DNA sequences of the 12s rRNA mitochondrial gene from 12 species key to the question of the monophyly of the deep-sea fish genus Coryphaenoides (Macrouridae) were analyzed phylogenetically using maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood. The results were compared with those of three previous studies in which allozyme, peptide mapping, and DNA sequence data were similarly analyzed. The allozyme and DNA sequence data suggested that the largest subgenus (Coryphaenoides), which contained most of the species inhabiting continental slopes between approximately 600 and 2000m depth, is monophyletic. Two of the three subgenera containing the species inhabiting abyssal ocean basins below approximately 2000m together formed a sister group to subgenus Coryphaenoides. The macrourids of the abyssal basins and those of the continental slopes thus appear to have experienced separate radiations from a common ancestor. PMID:12695096

  18. Analysis of protective antigen peptide binding motifs using bacterial display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Dorsey, Brandi L.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2015-05-01

    In today's fast-paced world, a new biological threat could emerge at any time, necessitating a prompt, reliable, inexpensive detection reagent in each case. Combined with magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), bacterial display technology makes it possible to isolate selective, high affinity peptide reagents in days to weeks. Utilizing the eCPX display scaffold is also a rapid way to screen potential peptide reagents. Peptide affinity reagents for protective antigen (PA) of the biothreat Bacillus anthracis were previously discovered using bacterial display. Bioinformatics analysis resulted in the consensus sequence WXCFTC. Additionally, we have discovered PA binding peptides with a WW motif, one of which, YGLHPWWKNAPIGQR, can pull down PA from 1% human serum. The strength of these two motifs combined, to obtain a WWCFTC consensus, is assessed here using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). While monitoring binding to PA, overall expression of the display scaffold was assessed using the YPet Mona expression control tag (YPet), and specificity was assessed by binding to Streptavidin R-Phycoerythrin (SAPE). The importance of high YPet binding is highlighted as many of the peptides in one of the three replicate experiments fell below our 80% binding threshold. We demonstrate that it is preferable to discard this experiment, due to questionable expression of the peptide itself, than to try to normalize for relative expression. The peptides containing the WWCFTC consensus were of higher affinity and greater specificity than the peptides containing the WW consensus alone, validating further investigation to optimize known PA binders.

  19. Coupling in silico and in vitro analysis of peptide-MHC binding: a bioinformatic approach enabling prediction of superbinding peptides and anchorless epitopes.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Walshe, Valerie A; Jones, Nicola A; Gloster, Simone E; Borrow, Persephone; Flower, Darren R

    2004-06-15

    The ability to define and manipulate the interaction of peptides with MHC molecules has immense immunological utility, with applications in epitope identification, vaccine design, and immunomodulation. However, the methods currently available for prediction of peptide-MHC binding are far from ideal. We recently described the application of a bioinformatic prediction method based on quantitative structure-affinity relationship methods to peptide-MHC binding. In this study we demonstrate the predictivity and utility of this approach. We determined the binding affinities of a set of 90 nonamer peptides for the MHC class I allele HLA-A*0201 using an in-house, FACS-based, MHC stabilization assay, and from these data we derived an additive quantitative structure-affinity relationship model for peptide interaction with the HLA-A*0201 molecule. Using this model we then designed a series of high affinity HLA-A2-binding peptides. Experimental analysis revealed that all these peptides showed high binding affinities to the HLA-A*0201 molecule, significantly higher than the highest previously recorded. In addition, by the use of systematic substitution at principal anchor positions 2 and 9, we showed that high binding peptides are tolerant to a wide range of nonpreferred amino acids. Our results support a model in which the affinity of peptide binding to MHC is determined by the interactions of amino acids at multiple positions with the MHC molecule and may be enhanced by enthalpic cooperativity between these component interactions. PMID:15187128

  20. High throughput comparative proteome analysis using a quantitative cysteinyl-peptide enrichment technology

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Camp, David G.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Thrall, Brian D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2004-09-15

    A new quantitative cysteinyl-peptide enrichment technology (QCET) was developed to achieve higher efficiency, greater dynamic range, and higher throughput in quantitative proteomics that use stable-isotope labeling techniques combined with high resolution liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry (MS). This approach involves {sup 18}O labeling of tryptic peptides, high efficiency enrichment of cysteine-containing peptides, and confident protein identification and quantification using the accurate mass and time tag strategy. Proteome profiling of naive and in vitro-differentiated human mammary epithelial cells using QCET resulted in the identification and quantification of 603 proteins in a single LC-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance MS analysis. Advantages of this technology include: (1) a simple, highly efficient method for enriching cysteinyl-peptides; (2) a high throughput strategy suitable for extensive proteome analysis; and (3) improved labeling efficiency for better quantitative measurements. This technology enhances both the functional analysis of biological systems and the detection of potential clinical biomarkers.

  1. Chemical cross-linking with thiol-cleavable reagents combined with differential mass spectrometric peptide mapping--a novel approach to assess intermolecular protein contacts.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, K. L.; Kussmann, M.; Björk, P.; Godzwon, M.; Mikkelsen, M.; Sørensen, P.; Roepstorff, P.

    2000-01-01

    The intermolecular contact regions between monomers of the homodimeric DNA binding protein ParR and the interaction between the glycoproteins CD28 and CD80 were investigated using a strategy that combined chemical cross-linking with differential MALDI-MS analyses. ParR dimers were modified in vitro with the thiol-cleavable cross-linker 3,3'-dithio-bis(succinimidylproprionate) (DTSSP), proteolytically digested with trypsin and analyzed by MALDI-MS peptide mapping. Comparison of the peptide maps obtained from digested cross-linked ParR dimers in the presence and absence of a thiol reagent strongly supported a "head-to-tail" arrangement of the monomers in the dimeric complex. Glycoprotein fusion constructs CD28-IgG and CD80-Fab were cross-linked in vitro by DTSSP, characterized by nonreducing SDS-PAGE, digested in situ with trypsin and analyzed by MALDI-MS peptide mapping (+/- thiol reagent). The data revealed the presence of an intermolecular cross-link between the receptor regions of the glycoprotein constructs, as well as a number of unexpected but nonetheless specific interactions between the fusion domains of CD28-IgG and the receptor domain of CD80-Fab. The strategy of chemical cross-linking combined with differential MALDI-MS peptide mapping (+ thiol reagent) enabled localization of the interface region(s) of the complexes studied and clearly demonstrates the utility of such an approach to obtain structural information on interacting noncovalent complexes. PMID:10975572

  2. Analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome with PeptideAtlas

    PubMed Central

    King, Nichole L; Deutsch, Eric W; Ranish, Jeffrey A; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Eddes, James S; Mallick, Parag; Eng, Jimmy; Desiere, Frank; Flory, Mark; Martin, Daniel B; Kim, Bong; Lee, Hookeun; Raught, Brian; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2006-01-01

    We present the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PeptideAtlas composed from 47 diverse experiments and 4.9 million tandem mass spectra. The observed peptides align to 61% of Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) open reading frames (ORFs), 49% of the uncharacterized SGD ORFs, 54% of S. cerevisiae ORFs with a Gene Ontology annotation of 'molecular function unknown', and 76% of ORFs with Gene names. We highlight the use of this resource for data mining, construction of high quality lists for targeted proteomics, validation of proteins, and software development. PMID:17101051

  3. A peptide N-terminal protection strategy for comprehensive glycoproteome analysis using hydrazide chemistry based method

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Junfeng; Qin, Hongqiang; Sun, Zhen; Huang, Guang; Mao, Jiawei; Cheng, Kai; Zhang, Zhang; Wan, Hao; Yao, Yating; Dong, Jing; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Fangjun; Ye, Mingliang; Zou, Hanfa

    2015-01-01

    Enrichment of glycopeptides by hydrazide chemistry (HC) is a popular method for glycoproteomics analysis. However, possible side reactions of peptide backbones during the glycan oxidation in this method have not been comprehensively studied. Here, we developed a proteomics approach to locate such side reactions and found several types of the side reactions that could seriously compromise the performance of glycoproteomics analysis. Particularly, the HC method failed to identify N-terminal Ser/Thr glycopeptides because the oxidation of vicinal amino alcohol on these peptides generates aldehyde groups and after they are covalently coupled to HC beads, these peptides cannot be released by PNGase F for identification. To overcome this drawback, we apply a peptide N-terminal protection strategy in which primary amine groups on peptides are chemically blocked via dimethyl labeling, thus the vicinal amino alcohols on peptide N-termini are eliminated. Our results showed that this strategy successfully prevented the oxidation of peptide N-termini and significantly improved the coverage of glycoproteome. PMID:25959593

  4. AMYLOID-β PEPTIDE BINDS TO MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 1B (MAP1B)

    PubMed Central

    Gevorkian, Goar; Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso; Acero, Gonzalo; Ordoñez, Jorge; Michalak, Colette; Munguia, Maria Elena; Govezensky, Tzipe; Cribbs, David H.; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal formation of amyloid-beta aggregates have been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of targets have deleterious effects on cellular functions. In the present study we have shown for the first time that amyloid-beta 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the microtubule binding domain of the heavy chain of microtubule-associated protein 1B by the screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage. This interaction may explain, in part, the loss of neuronal cytoskeletal integrity, impairment of microtubule-dependent transport and synaptic dysfunction observed previously in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:18079022

  5. Amyloid-beta peptide binds to microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B).

    PubMed

    Gevorkian, Goar; Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso; Acero, Gonzalo; Ordoñez, Jorge; Michalak, Colette; Munguia, Maria Elena; Govezensky, Tzipe; Cribbs, David H; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2008-05-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal formation of amyloid-beta aggregates have been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of targets have deleterious effects on cellular functions. In the present study we have shown for the first time that amyloid-beta 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the microtubule binding domain of the heavy chain of microtubule-associated protein 1B by the screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage. This interaction may explain, in part, the loss of neuronal cytoskeletal integrity, impairment of microtubule-dependent transport and synaptic dysfunction observed previously in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:18079022

  6. Peptide motif analysis predicts alphaviruses as triggers for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hogeboom, Charissa

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) develops in response to both genetic and environmental factors. The strongest genetic determinant is HLA-DR, where polymorphisms within the P4 and P6 binding pockets confer elevated risk. However, low disease concordance across monozygotic twin pairs underscores the importance of an environmental factor, probably infectious. The goal of this investigation was to predict the microorganism most likely to interact with HLA-DR to trigger RA under the molecular mimicry hypothesis. A set of 185 structural proteins from viruses or intracellular bacteria was scanned for regions of sequence homology with a collagen peptide that binds preferentially to DR4; candidates were then evaluated against a motif required for T cell cross-reactivity. The plausibility of the predicted agent was evaluated by comparison of microbial prevalence patterns to epidemiological characteristics of RA. Peptides from alphavirus capsid proteins provided the closest fit. Variations in the P6 position suggest that the HLA binding preference may vary by species, with Ross River virus, Chikungunya virus, and Mayaro virus peptides binding preferentially to DR4, and peptides from Sindbis/Ockelbo virus showing stronger affinity to DR1. The predicted HLA preference is supported by epidemiological studies of post-infection chronic arthralgia. Parallels between the cytokine profiles of RA and chronic alphavirus infection are discussed. PMID:26476978

  7. Gardony Map Drawing Analyzer: Software for quantitative analysis of sketch maps.

    PubMed

    Gardony, Aaron L; Taylor, Holly A; Brunyé, Tad T

    2016-03-01

    Sketch maps are effective tools for assessing spatial memory. However, despite their widespread use in cognitive science research, sketch map analysis techniques remain unstandardized and carry limitations. In the present article, we present the Gardony Map Drawing Analyzer (GMDA), an open-source software package for sketch map analysis. GMDA combines novel and established analysis techniques into a graphical user interface that permits rapid computational sketch map analysis. GMDA calculates GMDA-unique measures based on pairwise comparisons between landmarks, as well as bidimensional regression parameters (Friedman & Kohler, 2003), which together reflect sketch map quality at two levels: configural and individual landmark. The configural measures assess the overall landmark configuration and provide a whole-map analysis. Individual landmark measures, introduced in GMDA, assess individual landmark placement and indicate how individual landmarks contribute to the configural scores. Together, these measures provide a more complete psychometric picture of sketch map analysis, allowing for comparisons between sketch maps and between landmarks. The calculated measures reflect specific and cognitively relevant aspects of interlandmark spatial relationships, including distance and angular representation. GMDA supports complex environments (up to 48 landmarks) and two software modes that capture aspects of maps not addressed by existing techniques, such as landmark size and shape variation and interlandmark containment relationships. We describe the software and its operation and present a formal specification of calculation procedures for its unique measures. We then validate the software by demonstrating the capabilities and reliability of its measures using simulation and experimental data. The most recent version of GMDA is available at www.aarongardony.com/tools/map-drawing-analyzer. PMID:25673320

  8. Global Proteomics and Pathway Analysis of Pressure-overload Induced Heart Failure and Its Attenuation by Mitochondrial Targeted Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Dao-Fu; Hsieh, Edward J.; Chen, Tony; Menendez, Lorena G.; Basisty, Nathan B.; Tsai, Lauren; Beyer, Richard P.; Crispin, David A.; Shulman, Nicholas J.; Szeto, Hazel H.; Tian, Rong; MacCoss, Michael J.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated the protective effects of mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant and protective peptides, SS31 and SS20, on cardiac function, proteomic remodeling and signaling pathways. Methods and Results We applied an improved label-free shotgun proteomics approach to evaluate the global proteomics changes in transverse aortic constriction (TAC) induced heart failure, and the associated signaling pathway changes using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). We found 538 proteins significantly changed after TAC, which mapped to 53 pathways. The top pathways were in the categories of actin cytoskeleton, mitochondrial function, intermediate metabolism, glycolysis / gluconeogenesis and citrate cycle. Concomitant treatment with SS31 ameliorated the congestive heart failure phenotypes and mitochondrial damage induced by TAC, in parallel with global attenuation of mitochondrial proteome changes, with an average of 84% protection of mitochondrial and 69% of non-mitochondrial protein changes. This included significant amelioration of All the IPA pathways noted above. SS20 had only modest effects on heart failure and this tracked with only partial attenuation of global proteomics changes; furthermore, while actin cytoskeleton pathways were significantly protected in SS20, mitochondrial and metabolic pathways essentially were not. Conclusions This study elucidates the signaling pathways significantly changed in pressure-overload induced heart failure. The global attenuation of TAC-induced proteomic alterations by the mitochondrial targeted peptide SS-31 suggests that perturbed mitochondrial function may be an upstream signal to many of pathway alterations in TAC and supports the potential clinical application of mitochondrial-targeted peptide drugs for the treatment heart failure. PMID:23935006

  9. Cloning, characterization, and embryonic expression analysis of the Drosophila melanogaster gene encoding insulin/relaxin-like peptide.

    PubMed

    Nasonkin, Igor O; Alikasifoglu, Ayfer; Barrette, Terry; Cheng, Michael M; Thomas, Pamela M; Nikitin, Alexey G

    2002-07-12

    Insulin is one of the key peptide hormones that regulates growth and metabolism in vertebrates. Evolutionary conservation of many elements of the insulin/IGF signaling network makes it possible to study the basic genetic function of this pathway in lower metazoan models such as Drosophila. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the gene for Drosophila insulin/relaxin-like peptide (DIRLP). The predicted protein structure of DIRLP greatly resembles typical insulin structure and contains features that differentiate it from the Drosophila juvenile hormone, another member of the insulin family. The Dirlp gene is represented as a single copy in the Drosophila melanogaster genome (compared to multiple copies for Drosophila juvenile hormone) and shows evolutionary conservation of genetic structure. The gene was mapped to the Drosophila chromosome 3, region 67D2. In situ hybridization of whole-mount Drosophila embryos with Dirlp antisense RNA probe reveals early embryonic mesodermal/ventral furrow expression pattern, consistent with earlier observation of the insulin protein immunoreactivity in Drosophila embryos. The in situ hybridization pattern was found to be identical to that obtained during immunohistochemistry analysis of the Drosophila embryos using various insulin monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies that do not recognize Drosophila juvenile hormone, supporting the idea that Dirlp is a possible Drosophila insulin ortholog. Identification of the gene for DIRLP provides a new approach for study of the regulatory pathway of the insulin family of peptides. PMID:12150949

  10. Assessment of amide I spectroscopic maps for a gas-phase peptide using IR-UV double-resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, J. K.; Zabuga, A. V.; Roy, S.; Rizzo, T. R.; Skinner, J. L.

    2014-06-01

    The spectroscopy of amide I vibrations has become a powerful tool for exploring protein structure and dynamics. To help with spectral interpretation, it is often useful to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To connect spectroscopic experiments to simulations in an efficient manner, several researchers have proposed "maps," which relate observables in classical MD simulations to quantum spectroscopic variables. It can be difficult to discern whether errors in the theoretical results (compared to experiment) arise from inaccuracies in the MD trajectories or in the maps themselves. In this work, we evaluate spectroscopic maps independently from MD simulations by comparing experimental and theoretical spectra for a single conformation of the α-helical model peptide Ac-Phe-(Ala)5-Lys-H+ in the gas phase. Conformation-specific experimental spectra are obtained for the unlabeled peptide and for several singly and doubly 13C-labeled variants using infrared-ultraviolet double-resonance spectroscopy, and these spectra are found to be well-modeled by density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. We then compare DFT results for the deuterated and 13C18O-labeled peptide with those from spectroscopic maps developed and used previously by the Skinner group. We find that the maps are typically accurate to within a few cm-1 for both frequencies and couplings, having larger errors only for the frequencies of terminal amides.

  11. Assessment of amide I spectroscopic maps for a gas-phase peptide using IR-UV double-resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    PubMed Central

    Carr, J. K.; Zabuga, A. V.; Roy, S.; Rizzo, T. R.; Skinner, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopy of amide I vibrations has become a powerful tool for exploring protein structure and dynamics. To help with spectral interpretation, it is often useful to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To connect spectroscopic experiments to simulations in an efficient manner, several researchers have proposed “maps,” which relate observables in classical MD simulations to quantum spectroscopic variables. It can be difficult to discern whether errors in the theoretical results (compared to experiment) arise from inaccuracies in the MD trajectories or in the maps themselves. In this work, we evaluate spectroscopic maps independently from MD simulations by comparing experimental and theoretical spectra for a single conformation of the α-helical model peptide Ac-Phe-(Ala)5-Lys-H+ in the gas phase. Conformation-specific experimental spectra are obtained for the unlabeled peptide and for several singly and doubly 13C-labeled variants using infrared-ultraviolet double-resonance spectroscopy, and these spectra are found to be well-modeled by density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. We then compare DFT results for the deuterated and 13C18O-labeled peptide with those from spectroscopic maps developed and used previously by the Skinner group. We find that the maps are typically accurate to within a few cm−1 for both frequencies and couplings, having larger errors only for the frequencies of terminal amides. PMID:24929378

  12. Assessment of amide I spectroscopic maps for a gas-phase peptide using IR-UV double-resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, J. K.; Roy, S.; Skinner, J. L.; Zabuga, A. V.; Rizzo, T. R.

    2014-06-14

    The spectroscopy of amide I vibrations has become a powerful tool for exploring protein structure and dynamics. To help with spectral interpretation, it is often useful to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To connect spectroscopic experiments to simulations in an efficient manner, several researchers have proposed “maps,” which relate observables in classical MD simulations to quantum spectroscopic variables. It can be difficult to discern whether errors in the theoretical results (compared to experiment) arise from inaccuracies in the MD trajectories or in the maps themselves. In this work, we evaluate spectroscopic maps independently from MD simulations by comparing experimental and theoretical spectra for a single conformation of the α-helical model peptide Ac-Phe-(Ala){sub 5}-Lys-H{sup +} in the gas phase. Conformation-specific experimental spectra are obtained for the unlabeled peptide and for several singly and doubly {sup 13}C-labeled variants using infrared-ultraviolet double-resonance spectroscopy, and these spectra are found to be well-modeled by density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G** level. We then compare DFT results for the deuterated and {sup 13}C{sup 18}O-labeled peptide with those from spectroscopic maps developed and used previously by the Skinner group. We find that the maps are typically accurate to within a few cm{sup −1} for both frequencies and couplings, having larger errors only for the frequencies of terminal amides.

  13. Disulfide structures of highly bridged peptides: a new strategy for analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    A new approach is described for analyzing disulfide linkage patterns in peptides containing tightly clustered cystines. Such peptides are very difficult to analyze with traditional strategies, which require that the peptide chain be split between close or adjacent Cys residues. The water-soluble tris-(2-carboxyethyl)-phosphine (TCEP) reduced disulfides at pH 3, and partially reduced peptides were purified by high performance liquid chromatography with minimal thiol-disulfide exchange. Alkylation of free thiols, followed by sequencer analysis, provided explicit assignment of disulfides that had been reduced. Thiol-disulfide exchange occurred during alkylation of some peptides, but correct deductions were still possible. Alkylation competed best with exchange when peptide solution was added with rapid mixing to 2.2 M iodoacetamide. Variants were developed in which up to three alkylating agents were used to label different pairs of thiols, allowing a full assignment in one sequencer analysis. Model peptides used included insulin (three bridges, intra- and interchain disulfides; -Cys.Cys- pair), endothelin and apamin (two disulfides; -Cys.x.Cys- pair), conotoxin GI and isomers (two disulfides; -Cys.Cys- pair), and bacterial enterotoxin (three bridges within 13 residues; two -Cys.Cys- pairs). With insulin, all intermediates in the reduction pathway were identified; with conotoxin GI, analysis was carried out successfully for all three disulfide isomers. In addition to these known structures, the method has been applied successfully to the analysis of several previously unsolved structures of similar complexity. Rates of reduction of disulfide bonds varied widely, but most peptides did not show a strongly preferred route for reduction. PMID:8251945

  14. Mapping of the Signal Peptide-Binding Domain of Escherichia coli SecA Using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer†

    PubMed Central

    Auclair, Sarah M.; Moses, Julia P.; Musial-Siwek, Monika; Kendall, Debra A.; Oliver, Donald B.; Mukerji, Ishita

    2010-01-01

    Identification of the signal peptide-binding domain within SecA ATPase is an important goal for understanding the molecular basis of SecA preprotein recognition as well as elucidating the chemo-mechanical cycle of this nanomotor during protein translocation. In this study, Förster resonance energy transfer methodology was employed to map the location of the SecA signal peptide-binding domain using a collection of functional monocysteine SecA mutants and alkaline phosphatase signal peptides labeled with appropriate donor–acceptor fluorophores. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements yielded an equilibrium binding constant of 1.4 or 10.7 μM for the alkaline phosphatase signal peptide labeled at residue 22 or 2, respectively, with SecA, and a binding stoichiometry of one signal peptide bound per SecA monomer. Binding affinity measurements performed with a monomer-biased mutant indicate that the signal peptide binds equally well to SecA monomer or dimer. Distance measurements determined for 13 SecA mutants show that the SecA signal peptide-binding domain encompasses a portion of the preprotein cross-linking domain but also includes regions of nucleotide-binding domain 1 and particularly the helical scaffold domain. The identified region lies at a multidomain interface within the heart of SecA, surrounded by and potentially responsive to domains important for binding nucleotide, mature portions of the preprotein, and the SecYEG channel. Our FRET-mapped binding domain, in contrast to the domain identified by NMR spectroscopy, includes the two-helix finger that has been shown to interact with the preprotein during translocation and lies at the entrance to the protein-conducting channel in the recently determined SecA–SecYEG structure. PMID:20025247

  15. C-peptide as a Therapy for Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, James A.; Shetty, Partha; Burns, Kevin D.; Fergusson, Dean; Knoll, Greg A.

    2015-01-01

    C-peptide has intrinsic biological activity and may be renoprotective. We conducted a systematic review to determine whether C-peptide had a beneficial effect on renal outcomes. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Databases were searched for human and animal studies in which C-peptide was administered and renal endpoints were subsequently measured. We identified 4 human trials involving 74 patients as well as 18 animal studies involving 35 separate experiments with a total of 641 animals. In humans, the renal effects of exogenously delivered C-peptide were only studied in type 1 diabetics with either normal renal function or incipient nephropathy. Pooled analysis showed no difference in GFR (mean difference, -1.36 mL/min/1.73 m2, p = 0.72) in patients receiving C-peptide compared to a control group, but two studies reported a reduction in glomerular hyperfiltration (p<0.05). Reduction in albuminuria was also reported in the C-peptide group (p<0.05). In diabetic rodent models, C-peptide led to a reduction in GFR (mean difference, -0.62 mL/min, p<0.00001) reflecting a partial reduction in glomerular hyperfiltration. C-peptide also reduced proteinuria (mean difference, -186.25 mg/day, p = 0.05), glomerular volume (p<0.00001), and mesangial matrix area (p<0.00001) in diabetic animals without affecting blood pressure or plasma glucose. Most studies were relatively short-term in duration, ranging from 1 hour to 3 months. Human studies of sufficient sample size and duration are needed to determine if the beneficial effects of C-peptide seen in animal models translate into improved long-term clinical outcomes for patients with chronic kidney disease. (PROSPERO CRD42014007472) PMID:25993479

  16. C-peptide as a Therapy for Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shaw, James A; Shetty, Partha; Burns, Kevin D; Fergusson, Dean; Knoll, Greg A

    2015-01-01

    C-peptide has intrinsic biological activity and may be renoprotective. We conducted a systematic review to determine whether C-peptide had a beneficial effect on renal outcomes. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Databases were searched for human and animal studies in which C-peptide was administered and renal endpoints were subsequently measured. We identified 4 human trials involving 74 patients as well as 18 animal studies involving 35 separate experiments with a total of 641 animals. In humans, the renal effects of exogenously delivered C-peptide were only studied in type 1 diabetics with either normal renal function or incipient nephropathy. Pooled analysis showed no difference in GFR (mean difference, -1.36 mL/min/1.73 m2, p = 0.72) in patients receiving C-peptide compared to a control group, but two studies reported a reduction in glomerular hyperfiltration (p<0.05). Reduction in albuminuria was also reported in the C-peptide group (p<0.05). In diabetic rodent models, C-peptide led to a reduction in GFR (mean difference, -0.62 mL/min, p<0.00001) reflecting a partial reduction in glomerular hyperfiltration. C-peptide also reduced proteinuria (mean difference, -186.25 mg/day, p = 0.05), glomerular volume (p<0.00001), and mesangial matrix area (p<0.00001) in diabetic animals without affecting blood pressure or plasma glucose. Most studies were relatively short-term in duration, ranging from 1 hour to 3 months. Human studies of sufficient sample size and duration are needed to determine if the beneficial effects of C-peptide seen in animal models translate into improved long-term clinical outcomes for patients with chronic kidney disease. (PROSPERO CRD42014007472). PMID:25993479

  17. Landform Mapping Using Multiscale Topographic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliss, N. B.

    2008-12-01

    Many ecological and agricultural processes depend on topographic relationships. Topography strongly influences microclimate, the types and productivity of plants, biomass, evapotranspiration rates, carbon storage rates, and fire fuel accumulation. These factors in turn influence the water cycle, stream flow, water quality, and soil formation. Most previous topographic analysis methods have focused on the elevation of a given grid cell (pixel) and very localized measures of slope and aspect (e.g., computed from elevation in a 3x3 window). Some measures have moved beyond a strictly local relationship, such as the compound topographic index, which can be used as a soil wetness index. I introduce a new method of multiscale topographic analysis which can be applied to digital elevation model (DEM) data of any resolution. The method calculates slope and curvature (change of slope) of the land not only in relation to adjacent grid cells but also for much larger distances downstream. The algorithm uses a flow direction grid to create a synthetic stream network as a set of connected line segments (a vector dataset). The multiscale measures are stored on a node attribute table, where the nodes are the endpoints of line segments connecting the original DEM grid cells. A pointer is computed for directly accessing data for nodes at selected distances down the stream network. Baseline distances are selected by counting cells down the flow path by each power of two (1, 2, 4, 8, ... cells downstream). Slope and curvature measures are defined for each of these baselines and are queried to distinguish multiscale topographic characteristics. Several applications of these methods have been tested. A floodplain measure identifies areas that are relatively low on the landscape, even as elevation changes while moving from plains into hills or mountains (study area: South Dakota). The landscape may be partitioned to provide zones for ecological analysis, including selection of field

  18. Analysis of thematic map classification error matrices.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenfield, G.H.

    1986-01-01

    The classification error matrix expresses the counts of agreement and disagreement between the classified categories and their verification. Thematic mapping experiments compare variables such as multiple photointerpretation or scales of mapping, and produce one or more classification error matrices. This paper presents a tutorial to implement a typical problem of a remotely sensed data experiment for solution by the linear model method.-from Author

  19. Characterization of the Mouse Brain Proteome Using Global Proteomic Analysis Complemented with Cysteinyl-Peptide Enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haixing H.; Qian, Weijun; Chin, Mark H.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Barry, Richard C.; Liu, Tao; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Khan, Arshad H.; Smith, Desmond; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-02-01

    Given the growing interest in applying genomic and proteomic approaches for studying the mammalian brain using mouse models, we hereby present for the first time a comprehensive characterization of the mouse brain proteome. Preparation of the whole brain sample incorporated a highly efficient cysteinyl-peptide enrichment (CPE) technique to complement a global enzymatic digestion method. Both the global and the cysteinyl-enriched peptide samples were analyzed by SCX fractionation coupled with reversed phase LC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 48,328 different peptides were confidently identified (>98% confidence level), covering 7792 non-redundant proteins (~34% of the predicted mouse proteome). 1564 and 1859 proteins were identified exclusively from the cysteinyl-peptide and the global peptide samples, respectively, corresponding to 25% and 31% improvements in proteome coverage compared to analysis of only the global peptide or cysteinyl-peptide samples. The identified proteins provide a broad representation of the mouse proteome with little bias evident due to protein pI, molecular weight, and/or cellular localization. Approximately 26% of the identified proteins with gene ontology (GO) annotations were membrane proteins, with 1447 proteins predicted to have transmembrane domains, and many of the membrane proteins were found to be involved in transport and cell signaling. The MS/MS spectrum count information for the identified proteins was used to provide a measure of relative protein abundances. The mouse brain peptide/protein database generated from this study represents the most comprehensive proteome coverage for the mammalian brain to date, and the basis for future quantitative brain proteomic studies using mouse models.

  20. A Method for Selective Enrichment and Analysis of Nitrotyrosine-Containing Peptides in Complex Proteome Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Qian, Weijun; Knyushko, Tanya V.; Clauss, Therese RW; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Sacksteder, Colette A.; Chin, Mark H.; Smith, Desmond J.; Camp, David G.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-06-01

    Elevated levels of protein tyrosine nitration have been found in various neurodegenerative diseases and aging related pathologies; however, the lack of an efficient enrichment method has prevented the analysis of this important low level protein modification. We have developed an efficient method for specific enrichment of nitrotyrosine containing peptides that permits nitrotyrosine peptides and specific nitration sites to be unambiguously identified with LC-MS/MS. The method is based on the derivatization of nitrotyrosine into free sulfhydryl groups followed by high efficiency enrichment of sulfhydryl-containing peptides with thiopropyl sepharose beads. The derivatization process starts with acetylation with acetic anhydride to block all primary amines, followed by reduction of nitrotyrosine to aminotyrosine, then derivatization of aminotyrosine with N-Succinimidyl S-Acetylthioacetate (SATA), and finally deprotecting of S-acetyl on SATA to form free sulfhydryl groups. This method was evaluated using nitrotyrosine containing peptides, in-vitro nitrated human histone 1.2, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). 91% and 62% of the identified peptides from enriched histone and BSA samples were nitrotyrosine derivatized peptides, respectively, suggesting relative high specificity of the enrichment method. The application of this method to in-vitro nitrated mouse brain homogenate resulted in 35% of identified peptides containing nitrotyrosine (compared to only 5.9% observed from the global analysis of unenriched sample), and a total of 150 unique nitrated peptides covering 102 proteins were identified with a false discovery rate estimated at 3.3% from duplicate LC-MS/MS analyses of a single enriched sample.

  1. Gas-phase Ion Isomer Analysis Reveals the Mechanism of Peptide Sequence Scrambling

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Chenxi; Wu, Zhe; Lietz, Christopher B.; Liang, Zhidan; Cui, Qiang; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Peptide sequence scrambling during mass spectrometry-based gas-phase fragmentation analysis causes misidentification of peptides and proteins. Thus, there is a need to develop an efficient approach to probing the gas-phase fragment ion isomers related to sequence scrambling and the underlying fragmentation mechanism, which will facilitate the development of bioinformatics algorithm for proteomics research. Herein, we report on the first use of electron transfer dissociation (ETD)-produced diagnostic fragment ions to probe the components of gas-phase peptide fragment ion isomers. In combination with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and formaldehyde labeling, this novel strategy enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of b-type fragment ion isomers. ETD fragmentation produced diagnostic fragment ions indicative of the precursor ion isomer components, and subsequent IMS analysis of b ion isomers provided their quantitative and structural information. The isomer components of three representative b ions (b9, b10, and b33 from three different peptides) were accurately profiled by this method. IMS analysis of the b9 ion isomers exhibited dynamic conversion among these structures. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation predicted theoretical drift time values which were in good agreement with experimentally measured values. Our results strongly support the mechanism of peptide sequence scrambling via b ion cyclization, and provide the first experimental evidence to support that the conversion from molecular precursor ion to cyclic b ion (M→cb) pathway is less energetically (or kinetically) favored. PMID:24313304

  2. Mapping of neutralizing epitopes on Renibacterium salmoninarum p57 by use of transposon mutagenesis and synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Gregory D; Owen, Jennifer

    2005-06-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a gram-positive bacterium that causes bacterial kidney disease in salmonid fish. The virulence mechanisms of R. salmoninarum are not well understood. Production of a 57-kDa protein (p57) has been associated with isolate virulence and is a diagnostic marker for R. salmoninarum infection. Biological activities of p57 include binding to eukaryotic cells and immunosuppression. We previously isolated three monoclonal antibodies (4D3, 4C11, and 4H8) that neutralize p57 activity. These monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) bind to the amino-terminal region of p57 between amino acids 32 though 243; however, the precise locations of the neutralizing epitopes were not determined. Here, we use transposon mutagenesis to map the 4D3, 4C11, and 4H8 epitopes. Forty-five transposon mutants were generated and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The ability of MAbs 4D3, 4H8, and 4C11 to bind each mutant protein was assessed by immunoblotting. Transposons inserting between amino acids 51 and 112 disrupted the 4H8 epitope. Insertions between residues 78 and 210 disrupted the 4C11 epitope, while insertions between amino acids 158 and 234 disrupted the 4D3 epitope. The three MAbs failed to bind overlapping, 15-mer peptides spanning these regions, suggesting that the epitopes are discontinuous in conformation. We conclude that recognition of secondary structure on the amino terminus of p57 is important for neutralization. The epitope mapping studies suggest directions for improvement of MAb-based immunoassays for detection of R. salmoninarum-infected fish. PMID:15932983

  3. Mapping of Neutralizing Epitopes on Renibacterium salmoninarum p57 by Use of Transposon Mutagenesis and Synthetic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Gregory D.; Owen, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is a gram-positive bacterium that causes bacterial kidney disease in salmonid fish. The virulence mechanisms of R. salmoninarum are not well understood. Production of a 57-kDa protein (p57) has been associated with isolate virulence and is a diagnostic marker for R. salmoninarum infection. Biological activities of p57 include binding to eukaryotic cells and immunosuppression. We previously isolated three monoclonal antibodies (4D3, 4C11, and 4H8) that neutralize p57 activity. These monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) bind to the amino-terminal region of p57 between amino acids 32 though 243; however, the precise locations of the neutralizing epitopes were not determined. Here, we use transposon mutagenesis to map the 4D3, 4C11, and 4H8 epitopes. Forty-five transposon mutants were generated and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The ability of MAbs 4D3, 4H8, and 4C11 to bind each mutant protein was assessed by immunoblotting. Transposons inserting between amino acids 51 and 112 disrupted the 4H8 epitope. Insertions between residues 78 and 210 disrupted the 4C11 epitope, while insertions between amino acids 158 and 234 disrupted the 4D3 epitope. The three MAbs failed to bind overlapping, 15-mer peptides spanning these regions, suggesting that the epitopes are discontinuous in conformation. We conclude that recognition of secondary structure on the amino terminus of p57 is important for neutralization. The epitope mapping studies suggest directions for improvement of MAb-based immunoassays for detection of R. salmoninarum-infected fish. PMID:15932983

  4. High-sensitivity HLA class I peptidome analysis enables a precise definition of peptide motifs and the identification of peptides from cell lines and patients' sera.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Danilo; Gloger, Andreas; Weide, Benjamin; Garbe, Claus; Neri, Dario; Fugmann, Tim

    2016-05-01

    The characterization of peptides bound to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I is of fundamental importance for understanding CD8+ T cell-driven immunological processes and for the development of immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies. However, until now, the mass spectrometric analysis of HLA-bound peptides has typically required billions of cells, still resulting in relatively few high-confidence peptide identifications. Capitalizing on the recent developments in mass spectrometry and bioinformatics, we have implemented a methodology for the efficient recovery of acid-eluted HLA peptides after purification with the pan-reactive antibody W6/32 and have identified a total of 27 862 unique peptides with high confidence (1% false discovery rate) from five human cancer cell lines. More than 93% of the identified peptides were eight to 11 amino acids in length and contained signatures that were in excellent agreement with published HLA binding motifs. Furthermore, by purifying soluble HLA class I complexes (sHLA) from sera of melanoma patients, up to 972 high-confidence peptides could be identified, including melanoma-associated antigens already described in the literature. Knowledge of the HLA class I peptidome should facilitate multiplex tetramer technology-based characterization of T cells, and allow the development of patient selection, stratification and immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies. PMID:26992070

  5. Mapping the Interactions between the Alzheimer’s Aβ-Peptide and Human Serum Albumin beyond Domain Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Algamal, Moustafa; Milojevic, Julijana; Jafari, Naeimeh; Zhang, William; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is a potent inhibitor of Aβ self-association and this novel, to our knowledge, function of HSA is of potential therapeutic interest for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. It is known that HSA interacts with Aβ oligomers through binding sites evenly partitioned across the three albumin domains and with comparable affinities. However, as of this writing, no information is available on the HSA-Aβ interactions beyond domain resolution. Here, we map the HSA-Aβ interactions at subdomain and peptide resolution. We show that each separate subdomain of HSA domain 3 inhibits Aβ self-association. We also show that fatty acids (FAs) compete with Aβ oligomers for binding to domain 3, but the determinant of the HSA/Aβ oligomer interactions are markedly distinct from those of FAs. Although salt bridges with the FA carboxylate determine the FA binding affinities, hydrophobic contacts are pivotal for Aβ oligomer recognition. Specifically, we identified a site of Aβ oligomer recognition that spans the HSA (494–515) region and aligns with the central hydrophobic core of Aβ. The HSA (495–515) segment includes residues affected by FA binding and this segment is prone to self-associate into β-amyloids, suggesting that sites involved in fibrilization may provide a lead to develop inhibitors of Aβ self-association. PMID:24094411

  6. StructMap: Elastic Distance Analysis of Electron Microscopy Maps for Studying Conformational Changes.

    PubMed

    Sanchez Sorzano, Carlos Oscar; Alvarez-Cabrera, Ana Lucia; Kazemi, Mohsen; Carazo, Jose María; Jonić, Slavica

    2016-04-26

    Single-particle electron microscopy (EM) has been shown to be very powerful for studying structures and associated conformational changes of macromolecular complexes. In the context of analyzing conformational changes of complexes, distinct EM density maps obtained by image analysis and three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction are usually analyzed in 3D for interpretation of structural differences. However, graphic visualization of these differences based on a quantitative analysis of elastic transformations (deformations) among density maps has not been done yet due to a lack of appropriate methods. Here, we present an approach that allows such visualization. This approach is based on statistical analysis of distances among elastically aligned pairs of EM maps (one map is deformed to fit the other map), and results in visualizing EM maps as points in a lower-dimensional distance space. The distances among points in the new space can be analyzed in terms of clusters or trajectories of points related to potential conformational changes. The results of the method are shown with synthetic and experimental EM maps at different resolutions. PMID:27119636

  7. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis and Detection of Antimicrobial Peptides of the American Cockroach Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus).

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Woo; Lee, Joon Ha; Subramaniyam, Sathiyamoorthy; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, Iksoo; Park, Junhyung; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2016-01-01

    Cockroaches are surrogate hosts for microbes that cause many human diseases. In spite of their generally destructive nature, cockroaches have recently been found to harbor potentially beneficial and medically useful substances such as drugs and allergens. However, genomic information for the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) is currently unavailable; therefore, transcriptome and gene expression profiling is needed as an important resource to better understand the fundamental biological mechanisms of this species, which would be particularly useful for the selection of novel antimicrobial peptides. Thus, we performed de novo transcriptome analysis of P. americana that were or were not immunized with Escherichia coli. Using an Illumina HiSeq sequencer, we generated a total of 9.5 Gb of sequences, which were assembled into 85,984 contigs and functionally annotated using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), Gene Ontology (GO), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database terms. Finally, using an in silico antimicrobial peptide prediction method, 86 antimicrobial peptide candidates were predicted from the transcriptome, and 21 of these peptides were experimentally validated for their antimicrobial activity against yeast and gram positive and -negative bacteria by a radial diffusion assay. Notably, 11 peptides showed strong antimicrobial activities against these organisms and displayed little or no cytotoxic effects in the hemolysis and cell viability assay. This work provides prerequisite baseline data for the identification and development of novel antimicrobial peptides, which is expected to provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of innate immunity in similar species. PMID:27167617

  8. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis and Detection of Antimicrobial Peptides of the American Cockroach Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus)

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniyam, Sathiyamoorthy; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, Iksoo; Park, Junhyung; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2016-01-01

    Cockroaches are surrogate hosts for microbes that cause many human diseases. In spite of their generally destructive nature, cockroaches have recently been found to harbor potentially beneficial and medically useful substances such as drugs and allergens. However, genomic information for the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) is currently unavailable; therefore, transcriptome and gene expression profiling is needed as an important resource to better understand the fundamental biological mechanisms of this species, which would be particularly useful for the selection of novel antimicrobial peptides. Thus, we performed de novo transcriptome analysis of P. americana that were or were not immunized with Escherichia coli. Using an Illumina HiSeq sequencer, we generated a total of 9.5 Gb of sequences, which were assembled into 85,984 contigs and functionally annotated using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), Gene Ontology (GO), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database terms. Finally, using an in silico antimicrobial peptide prediction method, 86 antimicrobial peptide candidates were predicted from the transcriptome, and 21 of these peptides were experimentally validated for their antimicrobial activity against yeast and gram positive and -negative bacteria by a radial diffusion assay. Notably, 11 peptides showed strong antimicrobial activities against these organisms and displayed little or no cytotoxic effects in the hemolysis and cell viability assay. This work provides prerequisite baseline data for the identification and development of novel antimicrobial peptides, which is expected to provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of innate immunity in similar species. PMID:27167617

  9. A Peptide-Based Method for 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis in Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Amit; Nilmeier, Jerome; Weaver, Daniel; Adams, Paul D.; Keasling, Jay D.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Petzold, Christopher J.; Martín, Héctor García

    2014-01-01

    The study of intracellular metabolic fluxes and inter-species metabolite exchange for microbial communities is of crucial importance to understand and predict their behaviour. The most authoritative method of measuring intracellular fluxes, 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis (13C MFA), uses the labeling pattern obtained from metabolites (typically amino acids) during 13C labeling experiments to derive intracellular fluxes. However, these metabolite labeling patterns cannot easily be obtained for each of the members of the community. Here we propose a new type of 13C MFA that infers fluxes based on peptide labeling, instead of amino acid labeling. The advantage of this method resides in the fact that the peptide sequence can be used to identify the microbial species it originates from and, simultaneously, the peptide labeling can be used to infer intracellular metabolic fluxes. Peptide identity and labeling patterns can be obtained in a high-throughput manner from modern proteomics techniques. We show that, using this method, it is theoretically possible to recover intracellular metabolic fluxes in the same way as through the standard amino acid based 13C MFA, and quantify the amount of information lost as a consequence of using peptides instead of amino acids. We show that by using a relatively small number of peptides we can counter this information loss. We computationally tested this method with a well-characterized simple microbial community consisting of two species. PMID:25188426

  10. Expression analysis and identification of antimicrobial peptide transcripts from six North American frog species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Laura S.; Fellers, Gary M.; Marranca, Jamie Marie; Kleeman, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Frogs secrete antimicrobial peptides onto their skin. We describe an assay to preserve and analyze antimicrobial peptide transcripts from field-collected skin secretions that will complement existing methods for peptide analysis. We collected skin secretions from 4 North American species in the field in California and 2 species in the laboratory. Most frogs appeared healthy after release; however, Rana boylii in the Sierra Nevada foothills, but not the Coast Range, showed signs of morbidity and 2 died after handling. The amount of total RNA extracted from skin secretions was higher in R. boylii and R. sierrae compared to R. draytonii, and much higher compared to Pseudacris regilla. Interspecies variation in amount of RNA extracted was not explained by size, but for P. regilla it depended upon collection site and date. RNA extracted from skin secretions from frogs handled with bare hands had poor quality compared to frogs handled with gloves or plastic bags. Thirty-four putative antimicrobial peptide precursor transcripts were identified. This study demonstrates that RNA extracted from skin secretions collected in the field is of high quality suitable for use in sequencing or quantitative PCR (qPCR). However, some species do not secrete profusely, resulting in very little extracted RNA. The ability to measure transcript abundance of antimicrobial peptides in field-collected skin secretions complements proteomic analyses and may provide insight into transcriptional mechanisms that could affect peptide abundance.

  11. Structural Mass Spectrometry: Rapid Methods for Separation and Analysis of Peptide Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Cody R.; Fenn, Larissa S.; Derewacz, Dagmara K.; Bachmann, Brian O.; McLean, John A.

    2012-01-01

    A significant challenge in natural product discovery is the initial discrimination of discrete secondary metabolites alongside functionally similar primary metabolic cellular components within complex biological samples. A property that has yet to be fully exploited for natural product identification and characterization is the gas phase collision cross section, or, more generally, the mobility-mass correlation. Peptide natural products possess many of the properties that distinguish natural products as they are frequently characterized by a high degree of intramolecular bonding, and possess extended and compact conformations among other structural modifications. This report describes a rapid structural mass spectrometry technique based on ion mobility-mass spectrometry for the comparison of peptide natural products to their primary metabolic congeners using mobility-mass correlation. This property is empirically determined using ion mobility-mass spectrometry, applied to the analysis of linear versus modified peptides, and used to discriminate peptide natural products in a crude microbial extract. Complementary computational approaches are utilized to understand the structural basis for the separation of primary metabolism derived linear peptides from secondary metabolite cyclic and modified cyclic species. These findings provide a platform for enhancing the identification of secondary metabolic peptides with distinct mobility-mass ratios within complex biological samples. PMID:22216918

  12. Short communication: peptide profiling in cheeses packed using different technologies.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rivera, Laura; Recio, Isidra; Ramos, Mercedes; Gómez-Ruiz, José Ángel

    2013-06-01

    Peptides released during the shelf life of cheeses packaged using 2 different technologies, vacuum packaging (VP) and modified-atmosphere packaging (MAP), were identified by on-line reverse phase-HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 22 peptides from the N-terminal domain of αS1-casein (CN) and 26 from β-CN were identified, the latter more evenly distributed over the whole sequence. Peptides were monitored during the shelf life of these cheeses when stored at 4°C, revealing that the peptide profile changed significantly with the storage time. Qualitative differences between VP and MAP cheeses were only found for 3 αS1-CN peptides, which were absent in MAP cheeses. Semiquantitative analysis of peptides revealed some differences between cheeses packaged using different technologies. However, evolution of peptides during storage followed a common trend in both types of cheeses. In addition, the presence of certain peptides, which had been previously described because of their potential bioactivity, is illustrated. For instance, some of the identified peptides had been previously reported as antihypertensive peptides, such as peptide αS1-CN (1-9) or β-CN f(201-209). PMID:23548291

  13. Linkage Analysis and QTL Mapping Using SNP Dosage Data in a Tetraploid Potato Mapping Population

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Christine A.; McLean, Karen; Bryan, Glenn J.

    2013-01-01

    New sequencing and genotyping technologies have enabled researchers to generate high density SNP genotype data for mapping populations. In polyploid species, SNP data usually contain a new type of information, the allele dosage, which is not used by current methodologies for linkage analysis and QTL mapping. Here we extend existing methodology to use dosage data on SNPs in an autotetraploid mapping population. The SNP dosages are inferred from allele intensity ratios using normal mixture models. The steps of the linkage analysis (testing for distorted segregation, clustering SNPs, calculation of recombination fractions and LOD scores, ordering of SNPs and inference of parental phase) are extended to use the dosage information. For QTL analysis, the probability of each possible offspring genotype is inferred at a grid of locations along the chromosome from the ordered parental genotypes and phases and the offspring dosages. A normal mixture model is then used to relate trait values to the offspring genotypes and to identify the most likely locations for QTLs. These methods are applied to analyse a tetraploid potato mapping population of parents and 190 offspring, genotyped using an Infinium 8300 Potato SNP Array. Linkage maps for each of the 12 chromosomes are constructed. The allele intensity ratios are mapped as quantitative traits to check that their position and phase agrees with that of the corresponding SNP. This analysis confirms most SNP positions, and eliminates some problem SNPs to give high-density maps for each chromosome, with between 74 and 152 SNPs mapped and between 100 and 300 further SNPs allocated to approximate bins. Low numbers of double reduction products were detected. Overall 3839 of the 5378 polymorphic SNPs can be assigned putative genetic locations. This methodology can be applied to construct high-density linkage maps in any autotetraploid species, and could also be extended to higher autopolyploids. PMID:23704960

  14. UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS OF RUNOFF ESTIMATES FROM A RUNOFF CONTOUR MAP

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA in cooperation with the USGS conducted an analysis to quantify the uncertainty associated with interpolatinq runoff to specific sites using a runoff contour map. e interpolated runoff to 93 gaged watersheds from a runoff contour map using 1) hand interpolation to the w...

  15. A Graphics System for Pole-Zero Map Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, William Fred, III

    Computer scientists have developed an interactive, graphical display system for pole-zero map analysis. They designed it for use as an educational tool in teaching introductory courses in automatic control systems. The facilities allow the user to specify a control system and an input function in the form of a pole-zero map and then examine the…

  16. Recursive Frame Analysis: A Practitioner's Tool for Mapping Therapeutic Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeney, Hillary; Keeney, Bradford; Chenail, Ronald J.

    2012-01-01

    Recursive frame analysis (RFA), both a practical therapeutic tool and an advanced qualitative research method that maps the structure of therapeutic conversation, is introduced with a clinical case vignette. We present and illustrate a means of mapping metaphorical themes that contextualize the performance taking place in the room, recursively…

  17. Using Mind Maps To Teach Social Problems Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Anne R.; Snyder, Paula J.

    This paper identifies five difficulties in teaching the analysis of social problems, and proffers "mind maps," a concept that refers to the ways in which students create a visual representation of their thinking patterns, as a possible solution. In constructing mind maps, especially for a Social Problems course, the following four steps are…

  18. Conformations of rat brain hexokinase: studies with monoclonal antibodies and peptide mapping techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.D.; Wilson, J.E.

    1987-05-01

    Brain hexokinase (HK) consists of a single polypeptide chain with M/sub r/ approx. 100,000. Limited proteolysis of native HK with trypsin yields three major fragments, thought to correspond to discrete structural domains, with molecular masses of approximately 10, 50, and 40 kDa, and derived from the N-terminal, central, and C-terminal regions, respectively. Additional tryptic cleavage sites become susceptible in conformations induced by binding of specific ligands. A library of monoclonal antibodies has been developed for use as probes in examining the structure and function of domains present in HK. Epitopes for several of these have been mapped to specific structural regions in HK. Immunoblotting experiments with these antibodies have been useful in defining the location of susceptible proteolytic cleavage sites in various ligand-induced conformations of HK. Effects of ligand binding on epitope recognition have indicated that several of the antibodies interact with epitopes perturbed by ligand-induced conformational changes. Effects of antibody binding on function have also provided a basis for establishing structure-function relationships. For example, several of the monoclonal antibodies inhibit binding of hexokinase to mitochondria and all recognize epitopes located in the 10 kDa N-terminal domain, consistent with other results indicating that this region is critical to the binding function of hexokinase.

  19. Modeling and Analysis of Information Product Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heien, Christopher Harris

    2012-01-01

    Information Product Maps are visual diagrams used to represent the inputs, processing, and outputs of data within an Information Manufacturing System. A data unit, drawn as an edge, symbolizes a grouping of raw data as it travels through this system. Processes, drawn as vertices, transform each data unit input into various forms prior to delivery…

  20. Mapping Peptide Hormone–Receptor Interactions Using a Disulfide-Trapping Approach†

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Paul; Thomas, Beena E.; Woznica, Iwona; Wittelsberger, Angela; Mierke, Dale F.; Rosenblatt, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Efforts to elucidate the nature of the bimolecular interaction of parathyroid hormone (PTH) with its cognate receptor, the PTH receptor type 1 (PTHR1), have relied heavily on benzoylphenylalanine- (Bpa-) based photoaffinity cross-linking. However, given the flexibility, size, and shape of Bpa, the resolution at the PTH–PTHR1 interface appears to be reaching the limit of this technique. Here we employ a disulfide-trapping approach developed by others primarily for use in screening compound libraries to identify novel ligands. In this method, cysteine substitutions are introduced into a specific site within the ligand and a region in the receptor predicted to interact with each other. Upon ligand binding, if these cysteines are in close proximity, they form a disulfide bond. Since the geometry governing disulfide bond formation is more constrained than Bpa cross-linking, this novel approach can be employed to generate a more refined molecular model of the PTH–PTHR1 complex. Using a PTH analogue containing a cysteine at position 1, we probed 24 sites and identified 4 in PTHR1 to which cross-linking occurred. Importantly, previous photoaffinity cross-linking studies using a PTH analogue with Bpa at position 1 only identified a single interaction site. The new sites identified by the disulfide-trapping procedure were used as constraints in molecular dynamics simulations to generate an updated model of the PTH–PTHR1 complex. Mapping by disulfide trapping extends and complements photoaffinity cross-linking. It is applicable to other peptide–receptor interfaces and should yield insights about yet unknown sites of ligand–receptor interactions, allowing for generation of more refined models. PMID:18459800

  1. Influence of analysis methods on interpretation of hazard maps.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Kirsten A; Peters, Thomas M

    2013-06-01

    Exposure or hazard mapping is becoming increasingly popular among industrial hygienists. Direct-reading instruments used for hazard mapping of data collection are steadily increasing in reliability and portability while decreasing in cost. Exposure measurements made with these instruments generally require no laboratory analysis although hazard mapping can be a time-consuming process. To inform decision making by industrial hygienists and management, it is crucial that the maps generated from mapping data are as accurate and representative as possible. Currently, it is unclear how many sampling locations are necessary to produce a representative hazard map. As such, researchers typically collect as many points as can be sampled in several hours and interpolation methods are used to produce higher resolution maps. We have reanalyzed hazard-mapping data sets from three industrial settings to determine which interpolation methods yield the most accurate results. The goal is to provide practicing industrial hygienists with some practical guidelines to generate accurate hazard maps with 'off-the-shelf' mapping software. Visually verifying the fit of the variogram model is crucial for accurate interpolation. Exponential and spherical variogram models performed better than Gaussian models. It was also necessary to diverge from some of the default interpolation parameters such as the number of bins used for the experimental variogram and whether or not to allow for a nugget effect to achieve reasonable accuracy of the interpolation for some data sets. PMID:23258453

  2. Use of a porous silicon-gold plasmonic nanostructure to enhance serum peptide signals in MALDI-TOF analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Tan, Jie; Yu, Jiekai; Feng, Jiandong; Pan, Aiwu; Zheng, Shu; Wu, Jianmin

    2014-11-01

    Small peptides in serum are potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of cancer and other diseases. The identification of peptide biomarkers in human plasma/serum has become an area of high interest in medical research. However, the direct analysis of peptides in serum samples using mass spectrometry is challenging due to the low concentration of peptides and the high abundance of high-molecular-weight proteins in serum, the latter of which causes severe signal suppression. Herein, we reported that porous semiconductor-noble metal hybrid nanostructures can both eliminate the interference from large proteins in serum samples and significantly enhance the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) yields of peptides captured on the nanostructure. Serum peptide fingerprints with high fidelity can be acquired rapidly, and successful discrimination of colorectal cancer patients based on peptide fingerprints is demonstrated. PMID:25300214

  3. Automated reduction and interpretation of multidimensional mass spectra for analysis of complex peptide mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambin, Anna; Dutkowski, Janusz; Karczmarski, Jakub; Kluge, Boguslaw; Kowalczyk, Krzysztof; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Poznanski, Jaroslaw; Tiuryn, Jerzy; Bakun, Magda; Dadlez, Michal

    2007-01-01

    Here we develop a fully automated procedure for the analysis of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) datasets collected during the analysis of complex peptide mixtures. We present the underlying algorithm and outcomes of several experiments justifying its applicability. The novelty of our approach is to exploit the multidimensional character of the datasets. It is common knowledge that highly complex peptide mixtures can be analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, but we are not aware of any existing automated MS spectra interpretation procedure designed to take into account the multidimensional character of the data. Our work fills this gap by providing an effective algorithm for this task, allowing for automated conversion of raw data to the list of masses of peptides.

  4. Nanopore analysis of the effect of metal ions on the folding of peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeremy S

    2014-03-01

    In this minireview, the nanopore analysis of peptides and proteins in the presence of divalent metal ions will be surveyed. In all cases the binding of the metal ions causes the peptide or protein to adopt a more compact conformation which can no longer enter the α-hemolysin pore. In the absence of Zn(II) the 30-amino acid Zn-finger peptide can readily translocate the pore; but upon addition of Zn(II) the peptide folds and only bumping events are observed. Similarly, the octapeptide repeat from the N-terminus of the prion protein binds Cu(II), which prevents it from translocating. The full-length prion protein also undergoes conformational changes upon binding Cu(II), which results in an increase in the proportion of bumping events. Myelin basic protein of 170 residues is intrinsically disordered and, perhaps surprisingly, for a basic protein of this size, can translocate against the electric field based on the observation that the event time increases with increasing voltage. It, too, folds into a more compact conformation upon binding Cu(II) and Zn(II), which prevents translocation. Finally even proteins such as maltose binding protein which does not contain a formal binding site for metal ions undergoes conformational changes in the presence of the metal chelator, EDTA. Thus, contamination of proteins with trace metal ions should be considered when studying proteins and peptides by nanopore analysis. PMID:24370255

  5. Recognition of ZnT8, Proinsulin, and Homologous MAP Peptides in Sardinian Children at Risk of T1D Precedes Detection of Classical Islet Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Niegowska, Magdalena; Paccagnini, Daniela; Mannu, Carla; Targhetta, Clara; Songini, Marco; Sechi, Leonardo A.

    2016-01-01

    As numerous studies put in evidence the increasing incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in children, an early diagnosis is of great importance to define correct treatment and diet. Currently, the identification of classical islet autoantibodies is the primary biomarker for diagnosis in subjects at risk, especially in pediatric patients. Recent studies suggest that detection of antibodies against ZnT8 protein in preclinical phase can predict the development of T1D. We previously demonstrated a significant association of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) with T1D in adult Sardinian patients. To enforce this finding, we investigated the presence of antibodies against ZnT8 and proinsulin (PI) with respective homologous epitopes: MAP3865c133–141/ZnT8186–194, MAP3865c125–133/ZnT8178–186, MAP2404c70–85/PI46–61, and MAP1,4αgbp157–173/PI64–80, in 23 children at risk for T1D, formerly involved in the TRIGR study, and 22 healthy controls (HCs). Positivity to anti-MAP and homologous human peptides was detected in 48% of at-risk subjects compared to 5,85% HCs, preceding appearance of islet autoantibodies. Being MAP easily transmitted to humans with infected cow's milk and detected in retail infant formulas, MAP epitopes could be present in extensively hydrolyzed formula and act as antigens stimulating β-cell autoimmunity. PMID:26824044

  6. Mapping Rise Time Information with Down-Shift Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnell, T. W., Machorro, E. A., Diaz, A. B.

    2011-11-01

    These viewgraphs summarize the application of recent developments in digital down-shift (DDS) analysis of up converted PDV data to map out how well the PDV diagnostic would capture rise time information (mid point and rise time) in short rise time (<1 ns) shock events. The mapping supports a PDV vs VISAR challenge. The analysis concepts are new (~September FY 2011), simple, and run quickly, which makes them good tools to map out (with ~1 million Monte Carlo simulations) how well PDV captures rise time information as function of baseline velocity, rise time, velocity jump, and signal-to-noise ratios.

  7. Microfluidic enzymatic-reactors for peptide mapping: strategy, characterization, and performance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huiling; Zhai, Jianjun; Tian, Yuping; Lu, Haojie; Wang, Xiaoyan; Jia, Weitao; Liu, Baohong; Yang, Pengyuang; Xu, Yunmin; Wang, Honghai

    2004-12-01

    The design and characterization of two kinds of poly(dimethylsiloxane)(PDMS) microfluidic enzymatic-reactors along with their analytical utility coupled to MALDI TOF and ESI MS were reported. Microfluidic devices integrated with microchannel and stainless steel tubing (SST) was fabricated using a PDMS casting technique, and was used for the preparation of the enzymatic-reactor. The chemical modification was performed by introducing carboxyl groups to PDMS surface based on ultraviolet graft polymerization of acrylic acid. The covalent and physical immobilization of trypsin was carried out with the use of the activation reagents 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl)carbodiimide(EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) and a coupling reagent poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)(PDDA), respectively. The properties and success of processes of trypsin immobilization were investigated by measuring contact angle, infrared absorption by attenuated total reflection spectra, AFM imaging and electropherograms. An innovative feature of the microfluidic enzymatic-reactors is the feasibility of performing on-line protein analysis by embedded SST electrode and replaceable tip. The lab-made devices provide an excellent extent of digestion of several model proteins even at the fast flow rate of 3.5 microL min(-1) for the EDC/NHS-made device and 0.8 microL min(-1) for the PDDA-made device, which afford very short residence times of 5 s and 20 s, respectively. In addition, the lab-made devices are less susceptive to memory effect and can be used for at least 50 runs in one week without noticeable loss of activity. Moreover, the degraded PDDA-made device can be regenerated by simple treatment of a HCl solution. These features are the most required for microfluidic devices used for protein analysis. PMID:15570370

  8. Unique diversity of the venom peptides from the scorpion Androctonus bicolor revealed by transcriptomic and proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Shi, Wanxia; Zeng, Xian-Chun; Ge, Feng; Yang, Mingkun; Nie, Yao; Bao, Aorigele; Wu, Shifen; E, Guoji

    2015-10-14

    Androctonus bicolor is one of the most poisonous scorpion species in the world. However, little has been known about the venom composition of the scorpion. To better understand the molecular diversity and medical significance of the venom from the scorpion, we systematically analyzed the venom components by combining transcriptomic and proteomic surveys. Random sequencing of 1000 clones from a cDNA library prepared from the venom glands of the scorpion revealed that 70% of the total transcripts code for venom peptide precursors. Our efforts led to a discovery of 103 novel putative venom peptides. These peptides include NaTx-like, KTx-like and CaTx-like peptides, putative antimicrobial peptides, defensin-like peptides, BPP-like peptides, BmKa2-like peptides, Kunitz-type toxins and some new-type venom peptides without disulfide bridges, as well as many new-type venom peptides that are cross-linked with one, two, three, five or six disulfide bridges, respectively. We also identified three peptides that are identical to known toxins from scorpions. The venom was also analyzed using a proteomic technique. The presence of a total of 16 different venom peptides was confirmed by LC-MS/MS analysis. The discovery of a wide range of new and new-type venom peptides highlights the unique diversity of the venom peptides from A. bicolor. These data also provide a series of novel templates for the development of therapeutic drugs for treating ion channel-associated diseases and infections caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens, and offer molecular probes for the exploration of structures and functions of various ion channels. PMID:26254009

  9. Meteorological Data Analysis Using MapReduce

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Wei; Sheng, V. S.; Wen, XueZhi; Pan, Wubin

    2014-01-01

    In the atmospheric science, the scale of meteorological data is massive and growing rapidly. K-means is a fast and available cluster algorithm which has been used in many fields. However, for the large-scale meteorological data, the traditional K-means algorithm is not capable enough to satisfy the actual application needs efficiently. This paper proposes an improved MK-means algorithm (MK-means) based on MapReduce according to characteristics of large meteorological datasets. The experimental results show that MK-means has more computing ability and scalability. PMID:24790576

  10. Superposition of an AC field improves the discrimination between peptides in nanopore analysis.

    PubMed

    Jakova, Elisabet; Lee, Jeremy S

    2015-07-21

    In standard nanopore analysis a constant DC voltage is used to electrophoretically drive small molecules and peptides towards a pore. Superposition of an AC voltage at particular frequencies causes molecules to oscillate as they approach the pore which can alter the event parameters, the blockade current (I) and blockade time (T). Four peptides with similar structures were studied. Alpha-helical peptides A10 (FmocDDA10KK), A14, A18 and retro-inverso A10. It was shown that the ratio of translocations to bumping events could be manipulated by a combination of AC voltages and frequencies. In particular, A10 could be studied without interference from retro-inverso A10. Similarly, a large, intrinsically disordered protein of 140 amino acids, α-synuclein, which translocates the pore readily in a DC field could be prevented from doing so by application of an AC field of 200 mV at 100 MHz. PMID:25699656

  11. Using Infrared Spectroscopy of Cyanylated Cysteine to Map Membrane Binding Structure and Orientation of the Hybrid Antimicrobial Peptide CM15

    PubMed Central

    Alfieri, Katherine N.; Vienneau, Alice R.; Londergan, Casey H.

    2011-01-01

    The synthetic antimicrobial peptide CM15, a hybrid of N-terminal sequences from cecropin and melittin peptides, has been shown to be extremely potent. Its mechanism of action has been speculated to involve pore formation based on prior site-directed spin labeling studies. This study examines four single-site β-thiocyanatoalanine variants of CM15 in which the artificial amino acid side chain acts as a vibrational reporter of its local environment through the frequency and lineshape of the unique CN stretching band in the infrared spectrum. Circular dichroism experiments indicate that the placements of the artificial side chain have only small perturbative effects on the membrane-bound secondary structure of the CM15 peptide. All variant peptides were placed in buffer solution, in contact with dodecylphosphatidylcholine micelles, and in contact with vesicles formed from E. coli polar lipid extract. At each site, the CN stretching band reports a different behavior. Time-dependent attenuated total reflectance infrared spectra were also collected for each variant as it was allowed to remodel the E. coli lipid vesicles. These experiments agree with the previously proposed formation of toroidal pores, in which each peptide finds itself in an increasingly homogeneous and curved local environment without apparent peptide-peptide interactions. This work also demonstrates the excellent sensitivity of the SCN stretching vibration to small changes in peptide-lipid interfacial structure. PMID:22103476

  12. Chemoselective synthesis and analysis of naturally occurring phosphorylated cysteine peptides.

    PubMed

    Bertran-Vicente, Jordi; Penkert, Martin; Nieto-Garcia, Olaia; Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Schmieder, Peter; Krause, Eberhard; Hackenberger, Christian P R

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to protein O-phosphorylation, studying the function of the less frequent N- and S-phosphorylation events have lagged behind because they have chemical features that prevent their manipulation through standard synthetic and analytical methods. Here we report on the development of a chemoselective synthetic method to phosphorylate Cys side-chains in unprotected peptides. This approach makes use of a reaction between nucleophilic phosphites and electrophilic disulfides accessible by standard methods. We achieve the stereochemically defined phosphorylation of a Cys residue and verify the modification using electron-transfer higher-energy dissociation (EThcD) mass spectrometry. To demonstrate the use of the approach in resolving biological questions, we identify an endogenous Cys phosphorylation site in IICB(Glc), which is known to be involved in the carbohydrate uptake from the bacterial phosphotransferase system (PTS). This new chemical and analytical approach finally allows further investigating the functions and significance of Cys phosphorylation in a wide range of crucial cellular processes. PMID:27586301

  13. Peptide Fragmentation and Surface Structural Analysis by Means of ToF-SIMS Using Large Cluster Ion Sources.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yuta; Aoyagi, Satoka; Fujii, Makiko; Matsuo, Jiro; Fletcher, John S; Lockyer, Nicholas P; Vickerman, John C; Passarelli, Melissa K; Havelund, Rasmus; Seah, Martin P

    2016-04-01

    Peptide or protein structural analysis is crucial for the evaluation of biochips and biodevices, therefore an analytical technique with the ability to detect and identify protein and peptide species directly from surfaces with high lateral resolution is required. In this report, the efficacy of ToF-SIMS to analyze and identify proteins directly from surfaces is evaluated. Although the physics governing the SIMS bombardment process precludes the ability for researchers to detect intact protein or larger peptides of greater than a few thousand mass unit directly, it is possible to obtain information on the partial structures of peptides or proteins using low energy per atom argon cluster ion beams. Large cluster ion beams, such as Ar clusters and C60 ion beams, produce spectra similar to those generated by tandem MS. The SIMS bombardment process also produces peptide fragment ions not detected by conventional MS/MS techniques. In order to clarify appropriate measurement conditions for peptide structural analysis, peptide fragmentation dependency on the energy of a primary ion beam and ToF-SIMS specific fragment ions are evaluated. It was found that the energy range approximately 6 ≤ E/n ≤ 10 eV/atom is most effective for peptide analysis based on peptide fragments and [M + H] ions. We also observed the cleaving of side chain moieties at extremely low-energy E/n ≤ 4 eV/atom. PMID:26916620

  14. A quantitative analysis of IRAS maps of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer J.; Adams, Fred C.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of IRAS maps of five molecular clouds: Orion, Ophiuchus, Perseus, Taurus, and Lupus. For the classification and description of these astrophysical maps, we use a newly developed technique which considers all maps of a given type to be elements of a pseudometric space. For each physical characteristic of interest, this formal system assigns a distance function (a pseudometric) to the space of all maps: this procedure allows us to measure quantitatively the difference between any two maps and to order the space of all maps. We thus obtain a quantitative classification scheme for molecular clouds. In this present study we use the IRAS continuum maps at 100 and 60 micrometer(s) to produce column density (or optical depth) maps for the five molecular cloud regions given above. For this sample of clouds, we compute the 'output' functions which measure the distribution of density, the distribution of topological components, the self-gravity, and the filamentary nature of the clouds. The results of this work provide a quantitative description of the structure in these molecular cloud regions. We then order the clouds according to the overall environmental 'complexity' of these star-forming regions. Finally, we compare our results with the observed populations of young stellar objects in these clouds and discuss the possible environmental effects on the star-formation process. Our results are consistent with the recently stated conjecture that more massive stars tend to form in more 'complex' environments.

  15. A quantitative analysis of IRAS maps of molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer J.; Adams, Fred C.

    1994-11-01

    We present an analysis of IRAS maps of five molecular clouds: Orion, Ophiuchus, Perseus, Taurus, and Lupus. For the classification and description of these astrophysical maps, we use a newly developed technique which considers all maps of a given type to be elements of a pseudometric space. For each physical characteristic of interest, this formal system assigns a distance function (a pseudometric) to the space of all maps: this procedure allows us to measure quantitatively the difference between any two maps and to order the space of all maps. We thus obtain a quantitative classification scheme for molecular clouds. In this present study we use the IRAS continuum maps at 100 and 60 micrometer(s) to produce column density (or optical depth) maps for the five molecular cloud regions given above. For this sample of clouds, we compute the 'output' functions which measure the distribution of density, the distribution of topological components, the self-gravity, and the filamentary nature of the clouds. The results of this work provide a quantitative description of the structure in these molecular cloud regions. We then order the clouds according to the overall environmental 'complexity' of these star-forming regions. Finally, we compare our results with the observed populations of young stellar objects in these clouds and discuss the possible environmental effects on the star-formation process. Our results are consistent with the recently stated conjecture that more massive stars tend to form in more 'complex' environments.

  16. On-Plate Desalting and SALDI-MS Analysis of Peptides with Hydrophobic Silicate Nanofilms on a Gold Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jicheng; Wang, Hui; Cheng, Quan

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of silicate nanofilms for on-plate desalting and subsequently direct laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometric (LDI-MS) analysis of peptides. A hydrophobic octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) monolayer is formed on a calcinated nanofilm on a gold substrate to facilitate sample deposition and interaction with the surface that allows effective removal of MS-incompatible contaminants such as salts and surfactants by simple on-plate washing while the peptides are retained on the spot. By eliminating interferences from matrix-related ions and contaminants, sensitivity of MS analysis has been enhanced over ca. 20 times, leading to improved detection of peptides at the low-fmol level. A high recovery rate of the peptides is obtained by using relatively rough nanofilms, which are prepared through a modified layer-by-layer (LbL)-deposition/calcination process. The performance of the films has been investigated with peptide samples in the presence of high salts (NaCl and sodium acetate) and urea. Compared to MALDI analysis with CHCA-matrix, LDI with on-plate desalting offers marked improvement for analysis of peptides due to low background ions and reduction of sample complexity. Additionally, selective capture of the hydrophobic components of a protein can be achieved, providing a highly useful strategy for specific peptide enrichment. LDI with on-plate desalting approach has also been successfully applied to peptide analysis from protein digests. PMID:20964322

  17. Diffusion maps and radar data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Y. S.; Arnold, Gregory

    2007-04-01

    Understanding and organizing data, in particular understanding the key modes of variation in the data, is a first step toward exploiting and evaluating sensor phenomenology. Spectral theory and manifold learning methods have been recently shown to offer sever powerful tools for many parts of the exploitation problem. We will describe the method of diffusion maps and give some examples with radar (backhoe data dome) data. The so-called diffusion coordinates are kernel based dimensionality reduction techniques that can, for example, organize random data and yield explicit insight into the type and relative importance of the data variation. We will provide sufficient background for others to adopt these tools and apply them to other aspects of exploitation and evaluation.

  18. Linear Algebraic Method for Non-Linear Map Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,L.; Nash, B.

    2009-05-04

    We present a newly developed method to analyze some non-linear dynamics problems such as the Henon map using a matrix analysis method from linear algebra. Choosing the Henon map as an example, we analyze the spectral structure, the tune-amplitude dependence, the variation of tune and amplitude during the particle motion, etc., using the method of Jordan decomposition which is widely used in conventional linear algebra.

  19. Molecular Design, Structural Analysis and Antifungal Activity of Derivatives of Peptide CGA-N46.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui-Fang; Lu, Zhi-Fang; Sun, Ya-Nan; Chen, Shi-Hua; Yi, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Hui-Ru; Yang, Shuo-Ye; Yu, Guang-Hai; Huang, Liang; Li, Chao-Nan

    2016-09-01

    Chromogranin A (CGA)-N46, a derived peptide of human chromogranin A, has antifungal activity. To further research the active domain of CGA-N46, a series of derivatives were designed by successively deleting amino acid from both terminus of CGA-N46, and the amino acid sequence of each derivative was analyzed by bioinformatic software. Based on the predicted physicochemical properties of the peptides, including half-life time in mammalian reticulocytes (in vitro), yeast (in vivo) and E. coli (in vivo), instability index, aliphatic index and grand average of hydropathicity (GRAVY), the secondary structure, net charge, the distribution of hydrophobic residues and hydrophilic residues, the final derivatives CGA-N15, CGA-N16, CGA-N12 and CGA-N8 were synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis. The results of bioinformatic analysis showed that CGA-N46 and its derivatives were α-helix, neutral or weak positive charge, hydrophilic, and CGA-N12 and CGA-N8 were more stable than the other derivatives. The results of circular dichroism confirmed that CGA-N46 and its derived peptides displayed α-helical structure in an aqueous solution and 30 mM sodium dodecylsulfate, but α-helical contents decreased in hydrophobic lipid vesicles. CGA-N15, CGA-N16, CGA-N12 and CGA-N8 had higher antifungal activities than their mother peptide CGA-N46. Among of the derived peptides, CGA-N12 showed the least hemolytic activity. In conclusion, we have successfully identified the active domain of CGA-N46 with strong antifungal activity and weak hemolytic activity, which provides the possibility to develop a new class of antibiotics. PMID:27165480

  20. Electron capture dissociation mass spectrometric analysis of lysine-phosphorylated peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kowalewska, Karolina; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Ruman, Tomasz; Frączyk, Tomasz; Rode, Wojciech; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins is an essential signalling mechanism in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Although N-phosphorylation of basic amino acid is known for its importance in biological systems, it is still poorly explored in terms of products and mechanisms. In the present study, two MS fragmentation methods, ECD (electron-capture dissociation) and CID (collision-induced dissociation), were tested as tools for analysis of N-phosphorylation of three model peptides, RKRSRAE, RKRARKE and PLSRTLSVAAKK. The peptides were phosphorylated by reaction with monopotassium phosphoramidate. The results were confirmed by 1H NMR and 31P NMR studies. The ECD method was found useful for the localization of phosphorylation sites in unstable lysine-phosphorylated peptides. Its main advantage is a significant reduction of the neutral losses related to the phosphoramidate moiety. Moreover, the results indicate that the ECD–MS may be useful for analysis of regioselectivity of the N-phosphorylation reaction. Stabilities of the obtained lysine-phosphorylated peptides under various conditions were also tested. PMID:20144148

  1. Large Improvements in MS/MS Based Peptide Identification Rates using a Hybrid Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, William R.; Rawlins, Mitchell M.; Baxter, Douglas J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Lipton, Mary S.; Bryant, Donald A.

    2011-05-06

    We have developed a hybrid method for identifying peptides from global proteomics studies that significantly increases sensitivity and specificity in matching peptides to tandem mass spectra using database searches. The method increased the number of spectra that can be assigned to a peptide in a global proteomics study by 57-147% at an estimated false discovery rate of 5%, with clear room for even greater improvements. The approach combines the general utility of using consensus model spectra typical of database search methods1-3 with the accuracy of the intensity information contained in spectral libraries4-6. This hybrid approach is made possible by recent developments that elucidated the statistical framework common to both data analysis and statistical thermodynamics, resulting in a chemically inspired approach to incorporating fragment intensity information into both database searches and spectral library searches. We applied this approach to proteomics analysis of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, a cyanobacterium that is a model organism for studies of photosynthetic carbon fixation and biofuels development. The increased specificity and sensitivity of this approach allowed us to identify many more peptides involved in the processes important for photoautotrophic growth.

  2. Mapping the Future, Mapping Education: An Analysis of the 2011 State of the Union Address

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collin, Ross

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a discourse analysis of President Barack Obama's 2011 State of the Union Address. Fredric Jameson's concepts of cognitive mapping, cultural revolution, and the unconscious are employed to examine the president's vision of educational and economic transformation. Ultimately, it is argued this vision evokes a world in which…

  3. Data for comparative proteomics analysis of the antitumor effect of CIGB-552 peptide in HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Núñez de Villavicencio-Díaz, Teresa; Ramos Gómez, Yassel; Oliva Argüelles, Brizaida; Fernández Masso, Julio R; Rodríguez-Ulloa, Arielis; Cruz García, Yiliam; Guirola-Cruz, Osmany; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Javier González, Luis; Tiscornia, Inés; Victoria, Sabina; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Besada Pérez, Vladimir; Guerra Vallespi, Maribel

    2015-09-01

    CIGB-552 is a second generation antitumor peptide that displays potent cytotoxicity in lung and colon cancer cells. The nuclear subproteome of HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells treated with CIGB-552 peptide was identified and analyzed [1]. This data article provides supporting evidence for the above analysis. PMID:26306321

  4. Analysis of cardiac fibrillation using phase mapping.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Richard H; Nash, Martyn P

    2015-03-01

    The sequence of myocardial electrical activation during fibrillation is complex and changes with each cycle. Phase analysis represents the electrical activation-recovery process as an angle. Lines of equal phase converge at a phase singularity at the center of rotation of a reentrant wave, and the identification of reentry and tracking of reentrant wavefronts can be automated. We examine the basic ideas behind phase analysis. With the exciting prospect of using phase analysis of atrial electrograms to guide ablation in the human heart, we highlight several recent developments in preprocessing electrograms so that phase can be estimated reliably. PMID:25784022

  5. An Approach to Conformational Analysis of Peptides and Proteins in Solution Based on a Combination of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Conformational Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, W. A.; Némethy, George; Stern, Arnold; Craig, Lyman C.

    1970-01-01

    Simple criteria, based on the combined use of nmr spectral parameters and potential energy maps, are proposed for the conformational analysis of polypeptides and proteins. Experimentally determined coupling constants 3JNC for the N-Cα bond are consistent with the Karplus-Bystrov relationship. It is proposed therefore that 3JNC can be used to distinguish (a) between right-and left-handed α-helices, (b) between α-helical, β-pleated sheet, and randomly coiled forms of peptides. The average 3JNC for the random coil is predicted. The criteria proposed are valid for both L- and D-amino acids. Correlation between the Karplus-Bystrov relationship for 3JNC and the peptide conformational potential energy map limits the possible values of the N-Cα dihedral angle ϕ of each amino acid residue in a polypeptide and protein, and therefore presents a method of conformational analysis in solution superior to the use of either nmr or conformational maps alone. Nmr studies of hydrogen bonding or neighboring-group diamagnetic anisotropy reduce the number of possibilities consistent with the above criteria. A suggestion for evaluating the dihedral angle is presented. These criteria are useful provided the coupling constant is not obscured by line broadening. PMID:5272315

  6. All-atom molecular dynamics analysis of multi-peptide systems reproduces peptide solubility in line with experimental observations

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yutaka; Suenaga, Atsushi; Sato, Yuji; Kosuda, Satoshi; Taiji, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the contribution of individual amino acids to protein and peptide solubility, we carried out 100 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 106 Å3 cubic boxes containing ~3 × 104 water molecules and 27 tetra-peptides regularly positioned at 23 Å from each other and composed of a single amino acid type for all natural amino acids but cysteine and glycine. The calculations were performed using Amber with a standard force field on a special purpose MDGRAPE-3 computer, without introducing any “artificial” hydrophobic interactions. Tetra-peptides composed of I, V, L, M, N, Q, F, W, Y, and H formed large amorphous clusters, and those containing A, P, S, and T formed smaller ones. Tetra-peptides made of D, E, K, and R did not cluster at all. These observations correlated well with experimental solubility tendencies as well as hydrophobicity scales with correlation coefficients of 0.5 to > 0.9. Repulsive Coulomb interactions were dominant in ensuring high solubility, whereas both Coulomb and van der Waals (vdW) energies contributed to the aggregations of low solubility amino acids. Overall, this very first all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of a multi-peptide system appears to reproduce the basic properties of peptide solubility, essentially in line with experimental observations. PMID:26817663

  7. Computational analysis of LDDMM for brain mapping

    PubMed Central

    Ceritoglu, Can; Tang, Xiaoying; Chow, Margaret; Hadjiabadi, Darian; Shah, Damish; Brown, Timothy; Burhanullah, Muhammad H.; Trinh, Huong; Hsu, John T.; Ament, Katarina A.; Crocetti, Deana; Mori, Susumu; Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Yantis, Steven; Miller, Michael I.; Ratnanather, J. Tilak

    2013-01-01

    One goal of computational anatomy (CA) is to develop tools to accurately segment brain structures in healthy and diseased subjects. In this paper, we examine the performance and complexity of such segmentation in the framework of the large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM) registration method with reference to atlases and parameters. First we report the application of a multi-atlas segmentation approach to define basal ganglia structures in healthy and diseased kids' brains. The segmentation accuracy of the multi-atlas approach is compared with the single atlas LDDMM implementation and two state-of-the-art segmentation algorithms—Freesurfer and FSL—by computing the overlap errors between automatic and manual segmentations of the six basal ganglia nuclei in healthy subjects as well as subjects with diseases including ADHD and Autism. The high accuracy of multi-atlas segmentation is obtained at the cost of increasing the computational complexity because of the calculations necessary between the atlases and a subject. Second, we examine the effect of parameters on total LDDMM computation time and segmentation accuracy for basal ganglia structures. Single atlas LDDMM method is used to automatically segment the structures in a population of 16 subjects using different sets of parameters. The results show that a cascade approach and using fewer time steps can reduce computational complexity as much as five times while maintaining reliable segmentations. PMID:23986653

  8. On-column digestion of protein for peptide mapping by capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced native fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, H.T.; Yeung, E.S. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA )

    1993-10-15

    We have developed a novel technique to separate and detect peptide fragments which are digested on the same column. In this procedure, pepsin is used to digest low femtomole amounts of [beta]-lactoglobulin on the column. Then, CZE and LINF are applied to separate and detect the peptide fragments. The advantages of this method are its simplicity, high sensitivity, high selectivity, efficient operation, and high speed. 38 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. NMR-Based Mapping of Disulfide Bridges in Cysteine-Rich Peptides: Application to the μ-Conotoxin SxIIIA*

    PubMed Central

    Walewska, Aleksandra; Skalicky, Jack J.; Davis, Darrell R.; Zhang, Min-Min; Lopez-Vera, Estuardo; Watkins, Maren; Han, Tiffany S.; Yoshikami, Doju; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2009-01-01

    Disulfide-rich peptides represent a megadiverse group of natural products with very promising therapeutic potential. To accelerate their functional characterization, high-throughput chemical synthesis and folding methods are required, including efficient mapping of multiple disulfide bridges. Here, we describe a novel approach for such mapping and apply it to a three-disulfide bridged conotoxin, μ-SxIIIA (from the venom of Conus striolatus) whose discovery is also reported here for the first time. μ-SxIIIA was chemically synthesized with three cysteine residues labeled 100% with 15N/13C, while the remaining three cysteine residues were incorporated using a mixture of 70%:30% unlabeled:labeled Fmoc-protected residues. After oxidative folding, the major product was analyzed by NMR spectroscopy. Sequence-specific resonance assignments for the isotope-enriched Cys residues were determined with 2D versions of standard triple resonance (1H,13C,15N) NMR experiments and 2D [13C,1H] HSQC. Disulfide patterns were directly determined with cross-disulfide NOEs confirming that the oxidation product had the disulfide connectivities characteristic of μ-conotoxins. μ-SxIIIA was found to be a potent blocker of the sodium channel subtype NaV1.4 (IC50 = 7 nM). These results suggest that differential incorporation of isotope-labeled cysteine residues is an efficient strategy to map disulfides and should facilitate the discovery and structure-function studies of many bioactive peptides. PMID:18831583

  10. Epitope mapping of anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibodies in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis: microwave-assisted synthesis of the peptide antigens and ELISA screening.

    PubMed

    Pacini, Giulia; Ieronymaki, Matthaia; Nuti, Francesca; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Larregola, Maud; Aharoni, Rina; Papini, Anna Maria; Rovero, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The role of pathologic auto-antibodies against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) in multiple sclerosis is a highly controversial matter. As the use of animal models may enable to unravel the molecular mechanisms of the human disorder, numerous studies on multiple sclerosis are carried out using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In particular, the most extensively used EAE model is obtained by immunizing C57BL/6 mice with the immunodominant peptide MOG(35-55). In this scenario, we analyzed the anti-MOG antibody response in this model using the recombinant refolded extracellular domain of the protein, MOG(1-117). To assess the presence of a B-cell intramolecular epitope spreading mechanism, we tested also five synthetic peptides mapping the 1-117 sequence of MOG, including MOG(35-55). For this purpose, we cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and on-column refolded MOG(1-117), and we applied an optimized microwave-assisted solid-phase synthetic strategy to obtain the designed peptide sequences. Subsequently, we set up a solid-phase immunoenzymatic assay testing both naïve and EAE mice sera and using MOG protein and peptides as antigenic probes. The results obtained disclose an intense IgG antibody response against both the recombinant protein and the immunizing peptide, while no response was observed against the other synthetic fragments, thus excluding the presence of an intramolecular epitope spreading mechanism. Furthermore, as the properly refolded recombinant probe is able to bind antibodies with greater efficiency compared with MOG(35-55), we hypothesize the presence of both linear and conformational epitopes on MOG(35-55) sequence. PMID:26663200

  11. Quantitative analysis of single amino acid variant peptides associated with pancreatic cancer in serum by an isobaric labeling quantitative method.

    PubMed

    Nie, Song; Yin, Haidi; Tan, Zhijing; Anderson, Michelle A; Ruffin, Mack T; Simeone, Diane M; Lubman, David M

    2014-12-01

    Single amino acid variations are highly associated with many human diseases. The direct detection of peptides containing single amino acid variants (SAAVs) derived from nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in serum can provide unique opportunities for SAAV associated biomarker discovery. In the present study, an isobaric labeling quantitative strategy was applied to identify and quantify variant peptides in serum samples of pancreatic cancer patients and other benign controls. The largest number of SAAV peptides to date in serum including 96 unique variant peptides were quantified in this quantitative analysis, of which five variant peptides showed a statistically significant difference between pancreatic cancer and other controls (p-value < 0.05). Significant differences in the variant peptide SDNCEDTPEAGYFAVAVVK from serotransferrin were detected between pancreatic cancer and controls, which was further validated by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) analysis. The novel biomarker panel obtained by combining α-1-antichymotrypsin (AACT), Thrombospondin-1 (THBS1) and this variant peptide showed an excellent diagnostic performance in discriminating pancreatic cancer from healthy controls (AUC = 0.98) and chronic pancreatitis (AUC = 0.90). These results suggest that large-scale analysis of SAAV peptides in serum may provide a new direction for biomarker discovery research. PMID:25393578

  12. Analysis of novel angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides from protease-hydrolyzed marine shrimp Acetes chinensis.

    PubMed

    Hai-Lun, He; Xiu-Lan, Chen; Cai-Yun, Sun; Yu-Zhong, Zhang; Bai-Cheng, Zhou

    2006-11-01

    Acetes chinensis is an underutilized shrimp species thriving in the Bo Hai Gulf of China. In a previous study, we had used the protease from Bacillus sp. SM98011 to digest this kind of shrimp and found that the oligopeptide-enriched hydrolysate possessed antioxidant activity and high angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.97 mg/ml. In this paper, by ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), five peptides with high ACE inhibitory activity were purified from the shrimp hydrolysates and their sequences were identified by amino acid composition analysis and molecular weight (MW) analysis. Three of them, FCVLRP (a), IFVPAF (f) and KPPETV (j), were novel ACE inhibitory peptides. Their IC50 values were 12.3 microM, 3.4 microM and 24.1 microM, respectively, and their recoveries were 30 mg/100 g (solid basis of shrimp), 19 mg/100 g and 33 mg/100 g, respectively. Lineweaver-Burk plots for the three novel peptides showed that they are all competitive inhibitors. To test the ACE inhibitory activity of peptide a, f, j after they were digested by digestive enzymes in vivo, 12 derived peptides from FCVLRP and IFVPAF were synthesized based on their amino acid sequences and the cleavage sites of digestive enzymes. No digestive enzyme cleavage site was found in KPPETV. The IC50 values of the derived peptides were determined and the result showed that except for VPAF, FC and FCVL, the ACE inhibitory activity of the other nine derived peptides did not significantly change when compared with their original peptides. Surprisingly, five peptides had lower IC50 values than their original peptides, particularly for RP (IC50 value = 0.39 microM), which is about 30 times lower than its original peptide and almost the lowest IC50 value for ACE inhibitory peptides reported. Therefore, the novel peptides identified from A. chinensis hydrolysates probably still maintain a high ACE

  13. Mapping Creativity: Creativity Measurements Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinheiro, Igor Reszka; Cruz, Roberto Moraes

    2014-01-01

    This article borrowed network analysis tools to discover how the construct formed by the set of all measures of creativity configures itself. To this end, using a variant of the meta-analytical method, a database was compiled simulating 42,381 responses to 974 variables centered on 64 creativity measures. Results, although preliminary, indicate…

  14. Automated thermal mapping techniques using chromatic image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal imaging techniques are introduced using a chromatic image analysis system and temperature sensitive coatings. These techniques are used for thermal mapping and surface heat transfer measurements on aerothermodynamic test models in hypersonic wind tunnels. Measurements are made on complex vehicle configurations in a timely manner and at minimal expense. The image analysis system uses separate wavelength filtered images to analyze surface spectral intensity data. The system was initially developed for quantitative surface temperature mapping using two-color thermographic phosphors but was found useful in interpreting phase change paint and liquid crystal data as well.

  15. Modular Automated Processing System (MAPS) for analysis of biological samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, Geun-Cheol; Chirica, Gabriela S.; Fruetel, Julia A.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Branda, Steven S.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Brennan, James S.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2010-10-01

    We have developed a novel modular automated processing system (MAPS) that enables reliable, high-throughput analysis as well as sample-customized processing. This system is comprised of a set of independent modules that carry out individual sample processing functions: cell lysis, protein concentration (based on hydrophobic, ion-exchange and affinity interactions), interferent depletion, buffer exchange, and enzymatic digestion of proteins of interest. Taking advantage of its unique capacity for enclosed processing of intact bioparticulates (viruses, spores) and complex serum samples, we have used MAPS for analysis of BSL1 and BSL2 samples to identify specific protein markers through integration with the portable microChemLab{trademark} and MALDI.

  16. Molecular genetic analysis of a locus required for resistance to antimicrobial peptides in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Parra-Lopez, C; Baer, M T; Groisman, E A

    1993-01-01

    The innate immunity of vertebrates and invertebrates to microbial infection is mediated in part by small cationic peptides with antimicrobial activity. Successful pathogens have evolved mechanisms to withstand the antibiotic activity of these molecules. We have isolated a set of genes from Salmonella typhimurium which are required for virulence and resistance to the antimicrobial peptides melittin and protamine. Sequence analysis of a 5.7 kb segment from the wild-type plasmid conferring resistance to protamine contained five open reading frames: sapA, sapB, sapC, sapD and sapF, organized in an operon structure and transcribed as a 5.3 kb mRNA. SapD and SapF exhibited similarity with the 'ATP binding cassette' family of transporters including the bacterial Opp and SpoOK, involved in the uptake of oligopeptides; the yeast STE6, necessary for the export of a peptide pheromone; and the mammalian mdr, which mediates resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in cancer cells. SapA showed identity with other periplasmic solute binding proteins involved in peptide transport. The SapABCDF system constitutes a novel transporter for enteric bacteria and the first one harboring a periplasmic component with a role in virulence. Images PMID:8223423

  17. Strain mapping analysis of textile composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Dmitry; Ivanov, Sergey; Lomov, Stepan; Verpoest, Ignaas

    2009-03-01

    The focus of the work is meso-scale analysis (scale level of the fabric unit cell) of textile composite deformation and failure. The surface strain measurement is used for: (1) experimental investigation, which includes study of strain distribution at various stages of deformation, plasticity detection, damage initiation; (2) numerical validation of the correspondent finite element (FE) models. Two examples are considered: carbon-epoxy triaxial-braided and glass polypropylene-woven composite. The surface strain measurement (by digital image correlation technique) accompanies the tensile tests, aiming at: (1) elastic anisotropic constants characterisation, (2) study of non-linear material behaviour (for the thermoplastic composite), (3) control of homogeneity of the macro-strain distribution, and (4) analysis of damage initiation in brittle composites. Validation of meso-FE models by strain measurements encounters difficulties arising from (1) resolution of the strain measurements, (2) irregularities of the initial structure such as random layer nesting, ply interaction, and deviation of yarns from their theoretical position, which affects the measured strain fields. The paper discusses these difficulties and demonstrates a qualitative agreement with the FE analysis of idealised composite configurations.

  18. Pooled-Peptide Epitope Mapping Strategies Are Efficient and Highly Sensitive: An Evaluation of Methods for Identifying Human T Cell Epitope Specificities in Large-Scale HIV Vaccine Efficacy Trials.

    PubMed

    Fiore-Gartland, Andrew; Manso, Bryce A; Friedrich, David P; Gabriel, Erin E; Finak, Greg; Moodie, Zoe; Hertz, Tomer; De Rosa, Stephen C; Frahm, Nicole; Gilbert, Peter B; McElrath, M Juliana

    2016-01-01

    The interferon gamma, enzyme-linked immunospot (IFN-γ ELISpot) assay is widely used to identify viral antigen-specific T cells is frequently employed to quantify T cell responses in HIV vaccine studies. It can be used to define T cell epitope specificities using panels of peptide antigens, but with sample and cost constraints there is a critical need to improve the efficiency of epitope mapping for large and variable pathogens. We evaluated two epitope mapping strategies, based on group testing, for their ability to identify vaccine-induced T-cells from participants in the Step HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial, and compared the findings to an approach of assaying each peptide individually. The group testing strategies reduced the number of assays required by >7-fold without significantly altering the accuracy of T-cell breadth estimates. Assays of small pools containing 7-30 peptides were highly sensitive and effective at detecting single positive peptides as well as summating responses to multiple peptides. Also, assays with a single 15-mer peptide, containing an identified epitope, did not always elicit a response providing validation that 15-mer peptides are not optimal antigens for detecting CD8+ T cells. Our findings further validate pooling-based epitope mapping strategies, which are critical for characterizing vaccine-induced T-cell responses and more broadly for informing iterative vaccine design. We also show ways to improve their application with computational peptide:MHC binding predictors that can accurately identify the optimal epitope within a 15-mer peptide and within a pool of 15-mer peptides. PMID:26863315

  19. Pooled-Peptide Epitope Mapping Strategies Are Efficient and Highly Sensitive: An Evaluation of Methods for Identifying Human T Cell Epitope Specificities in Large-Scale HIV Vaccine Efficacy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fiore-Gartland, Andrew; Manso, Bryce A.; Friedrich, David P.; Gabriel, Erin E.; Finak, Greg; Moodie, Zoe; Hertz, Tomer; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Frahm, Nicole; Gilbert, Peter B.; McElrath, M. Juliana

    2016-01-01

    The interferon gamma, enzyme-linked immunospot (IFN-γ ELISpot) assay is widely used to identify viral antigen-specific T cells is frequently employed to quantify T cell responses in HIV vaccine studies. It can be used to define T cell epitope specificities using panels of peptide antigens, but with sample and cost constraints there is a critical need to improve the efficiency of epitope mapping for large and variable pathogens. We evaluated two epitope mapping strategies, based on group testing, for their ability to identify vaccine-induced T-cells from participants in the Step HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial, and compared the findings to an approach of assaying each peptide individually. The group testing strategies reduced the number of assays required by >7-fold without significantly altering the accuracy of T-cell breadth estimates. Assays of small pools containing 7–30 peptides were highly sensitive and effective at detecting single positive peptides as well as summating responses to multiple peptides. Also, assays with a single 15-mer peptide, containing an identified epitope, did not always elicit a response providing validation that 15-mer peptides are not optimal antigens for detecting CD8+ T cells. Our findings further validate pooling-based epitope mapping strategies, which are critical for characterizing vaccine-induced T-cell responses and more broadly for informing iterative vaccine design. We also show ways to improve their application with computational peptide:MHC binding predictors that can accurately identify the optimal epitope within a 15-mer peptide and within a pool of 15-mer peptides. PMID:26863315

  20. Modified capillary electrophoresis system for peptide, protein and double-stranded DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Belenkii, B G; Kassalainen, G E; Nasledov, D G

    2000-05-26

    The results of high-performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE) studies of peptide, protein and double-stranded DNA separations on a laboratory-made HPCE system are presented. Parameters of the HPCE system are given. The new method of capillary surface modification by grafting poly(glycidyl methacrylate) is described. The problems of HPCE biopolymer analysis connected with the sample-wall interactions are discussed. PMID:10893035

  1. Interrogating the repertoire: broadening the scope of peptide-MHC multimer analysis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mark M; Altman, John D; Newell, Evan W

    2011-08-01

    Labelling antigen-specific T cells with peptide-MHC multimers has provided an invaluable way to monitor T cell-mediated immune responses. A number of recent developments in this technology have made these multimers much easier to make and use in large numbers. Furthermore, enrichment techniques have provided a greatly increased sensitivity that allows the analysis of the naive T cell repertoire directly. Thus, we can expect a flood of new information to emerge in the coming years. PMID:21760610

  2. Negative electron-transfer dissociation nLC-MS/MS facilitates the analysis of thousands of acidic peptides

    PubMed Central

    McAlister, Graeme C.; Russell, Jason D.; Rumachik, Neil G.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Syka, John E. P.; Geer, Lewis Y.; Westphall, Michael S.; Pagliarini, David J.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the first implementation of negative electron-transfer dissociation (NETD) on a hybrid ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometer and its application to high-throughput sequencing of peptide anions. NETD – coupled with high pH separations, negative electrospray ionization (ESI), and an NETD compatible version of OMSSA – is part of a complete workflow that includes the formation, interrogation and sequencing of peptide anions. Together these interlocking pieces facilitated the identification of more than 2,000 unique peptides from Saccharomyces cerevisiae representing the most comprehensive analysis of peptide anions by tandem mass spectrometry to date. The same S. cerevisiae samples were interrogated using traditional, positive modes of peptide LC-MS/MS analysis (e.g., acidic LC separations, positive ESI, and collision activated dissociation), and the resulting peptide identifications of the different workflows were compared. Due to a decreased flux of peptide anions, and a tendency to produced lowly charged precursors, the NETD-based LC-MS/MS workflow was not as sensitive as the positive mode methods. However, the use of NETD readily permits access to underrepresented acidic portions of the proteome by identifying peptides that tended to have lower pI values. As such NETD improves sequence coverage, filling out the acidic portions of proteins that are often overlooked by the other methods. PMID:22335612

  3. Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1979-01-01

    The area of geological mapping in the United States in 1978 increased greatly over that reported in 1977; state geological maps were added for California, Idaho, Nevada, and Alaska last year. (Author/BB)

  4. Dissociation Behavior of a TEMPO-Active Ester Cross-Linker for Peptide Structure Analysis by Free Radical Initiated Peptide Sequencing (FRIPS) in Negative ESI-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hage, Christoph; Ihling, Christian H.; Götze, Michael; Schäfer, Mathias; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    We have synthesized a homobifunctional amine-reactive cross-linking reagent, containing a TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxy) and a benzyl group (Bz), termed TEMPO-Bz-linker, to derive three-dimensional structural information of proteins. The aim for designing this novel cross-linker was to facilitate the mass spectrometric analysis of cross-linked products by free radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS). In an initial study, we had investigated the fragmentation behavior of TEMPO-Bz-derivatized peptides upon collision activation in (+)-electrospray ionization collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-CID-MS/MS) experiments. In addition to the homolytic NO-C bond cleavage FRIPS pathway delivering the desired odd-electron product ions, an alternative heterolytic NO-C bond cleavage, resulting in even-electron product ions mechanism was found to be relevant. The latter fragmentation route clearly depends on the protonation of the TEMPO-Bz-moiety itself, which motivated us to conduct (-)-ESI-MS, CID-MS/MS, and MS3 experiments of TEMPO-Bz-cross-linked peptides to further clarify the fragmentation behavior of TEMPO-Bz-peptide molecular ions. We show that the TEMPO-Bz-linker is highly beneficial for conducting FRIPS in negative ionization mode as the desired homolytic cleavage of the NO-C bond is the major fragmentation pathway. Based on characteristic fragments, the isomeric amino acids leucine and isoleucine could be discriminated. Interestingly, we observed pronounced amino acid side chain losses in cross-linked peptides if the cross-linked peptides contain a high number of acidic amino acids.

  5. Small interacting peptides. Part II: Interaction of cyclohexapeptides with immobilised model peptides. Comparison of infrared investigations, principal components analysis and force field calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Frauke; Stingel, Christiane; Tünnemann, Rolf; Mack, Hans-Georg; Jung, Günther; Hoffmann, Volker

    2004-07-01

    The interaction of cyclic peptides with surface-bound model peptides was investigated by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, principal components analysis and force field calculations. Information about the interacting functional COOH, COO -, and NH 3+ groups and the peptide backbone was gained through a set of cyclohexapeptides (seven of the type c(X 1KX 2KX 3K) (K = L-lysine) and one of the type c(X 1KX 2KX 3k) (k = D-lysine), which are interacting with L-arginine- or tripeptide-coated Si-ATR crystals. All measurements were performed in aqueous solutions. Spectra evaluation in the range 1800-1500 cm -1 was done by band and principal components analysis (PCA). Only adsorbed molecules were present in these spectra. The coatings were investigated by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy too in order to characterise their functional groups. Based on this knowledge, the spectra of the interacting partners could be evaluated in relation to cyclohexapeptides and coatings. As a result, it was possible to identify the distinct differences in the bonding behaviour of the various peptides.

  6. Global land cover mapping: a review and uncertainty analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Congalton, Russell G.; Gu, Jianyu; Yadav, Kamini; Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Ozdogan, Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    Given the advances in remotely sensed imagery and associated technologies, several global land cover maps have been produced in recent times including IGBP DISCover, UMD Land Cover, Global Land Cover 2000 and GlobCover 2009. However, the utility of these maps for specific applications has often been hampered due to considerable amounts of uncertainties and inconsistencies. A thorough review of these global land cover projects including evaluating the sources of error and uncertainty is prudent and enlightening. Therefore, this paper describes our work in which we compared, summarized and conducted an uncertainty analysis of the four global land cover mapping projects using an error budget approach. The results showed that the classification scheme and the validation methodology had the highest error contribution and implementation priority. A comparison of the classification schemes showed that there are many inconsistencies between the definitions of the map classes. This is especially true for the mixed type classes for which thresholds vary for the attributes/discriminators used in the classification process. Examination of these four global mapping projects provided quite a few important lessons for the future global mapping projects including the need for clear and uniform definitions of the classification scheme and an efficient, practical, and valid design of the accuracy assessment.

  7. Identification and expression analysis of the zebrafish orthologues of the mammalian MAP1LC3 gene family.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Swamynathan; Moussavi Nik, Seyyed Hani; Newman, Morgan; Lardelli, Michael

    2014-10-15

    Autophagy is the principle pathway within cells involved in clearing damaged proteins and organelles. Therefore autophagy is necessary to maintain the turnover balance of peptides and homoeostasis. Autophagy occurs at basal levels under normal conditions but can be upregulated by chemical inducers or stress conditions. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) serves as a versatile tool to understand the functions of genes implicated in autophagy. We report the identification of the zebrafish orthologues of mammalian genes MAP1LC3A (map1lc3a) and MAP1LC3B (map1lc3b) by phylogenetic and conserved synteny analysis and we examine their expression during embryonic development. The zebrafish map1lc3a and map1lc3b genes both show maternally contributed transcripts in early embryogenesis. However, levels of map1lc3a transcript steadily increase until at least 120h post-fertilisation while the levels of map1lc3b show a more variable pattern across developmental time. We have also validated the LC3I ratio/LC3I immunoblot autophagy assay in the presence of chloroquine (a lysosomal proteolysis inhibitor). We found that the LC3II/LC3I ratio is significantly increased in the presence of sodium azide with chloroquine supporting that hypoxia induces autophagy in zebrafish. This was supported by our qPCR assay that showed increased map1lc3a transcript levels in the presence of sodium azide. In contrast, levels of map1lc3b transcripts were reduced in the presence of rapamycin but the decrease in the presence of sodium azide did not reach statistical significance. Our study supports the use of zebrafish for analysing the interplay between hypoxia, development and autophagy. PMID:25051050

  8. PHASTpep: Analysis Software for Discovery of Cell-Selective Peptides via Phage Display and Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dasa, Siva Sai Krishna; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has enhanced the phage display process, allowing for the quantification of millions of sequences resulting from the biopanning process. In response, many valuable analysis programs focused on specificity and finding targeted motifs or consensus sequences were developed. For targeted drug delivery and molecular imaging, it is also necessary to find peptides that are selective—targeting only the cell type or tissue of interest. We present a new analysis strategy and accompanying software, PHage Analysis for Selective Targeted PEPtides (PHASTpep), which identifies highly specific and selective peptides. Using this process, we discovered and validated, both in vitro and in vivo in mice, two sequences (HTTIPKV and APPIMSV) targeted to pancreatic cancer-associated fibroblasts that escaped identification using previously existing software. Our selectivity analysis makes it possible to discover peptides that target a specific cell type and avoid other cell types, enhancing clinical translatability by circumventing complications with systemic use. PMID:27186887

  9. Computational Analysis and Mapping of ijCSCL Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonchamp, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this empirical study is to analyze and map the content of the "International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning" since its inception in 2006. Co-word analysis is the general approach that is used. In this approach, patterns of co-occurrence of pairs of items (words or phrases) identify relationships among ideas.…

  10. WAMI: a web server for the analysis of minisatellite maps

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Minisatellites are genomic loci composed of tandem arrays of short repetitive DNA segments. A minisatellite map is a sequence of symbols that represents the tandem repeat array such that the set of symbols is in one-to-one correspondence with the set of distinct repeats. Due to variations in repeat type and organization as well as copy number, the minisatellite maps have been widely used in forensic and population studies. In either domain, researchers need to compare the set of maps to each other, to build phylogenetic trees, to spot structural variations, and to study duplication dynamics. Efficient algorithms for these tasks are required to carry them out reliably and in reasonable time. Results In this paper we present WAMI, a web-server for the analysis of minisatellite maps. It performs the above mentioned computational tasks using efficient algorithms that take the model of map evolution into account. The WAMI interface is easy to use and the results of each analysis task are visualized. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, WAMI is the first server providing all these computational facilities to the minisatellite community. The WAMI web-interface and the source code of the underlying programs are available at http://www.nubios.nileu.edu.eg/tools/wami. PMID:20525398

  11. Epitope Mapping of Antigenic MUC1 Peptides to Breast Cancer Antibody Fragment B27.29: A Heteronuclear NMR Study

    SciTech Connect

    Grinstead, Jeffrey S.; Schuman, Jason T.; Campbell, Ann P.

    2003-11-13

    MUC1 mucin is a breast cancer-associated transmembrane glycoprotein, of which the extracellular domain is formed by the repeating 20-amino acid sequence GVTSAPDTRPAPGSTAPPAH. In neoplastic breast tissue, the highly immunogenic sequence PDTRPAP (in bold above) is exposed. Antibodies raised directly against MUC1-expressing tumors offer unique access to this neoplastic state, as they represent immunologically relevant ''reverse templates'' of the tumor-associated mucin. In a previous study [Grinstead, J. S., et al. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 9946-9961], 1H NMR methods were used to correlate the effects of cryptic glycosylation outside of the PDTRPAP core epitope sequence on the recognition and binding of Mab B27.29, a monoclonal antibody raised against breast tumor cells. In the study presented here, isotope-edited NMR methods, including 15N and 13C relaxation measurements, were used to probe the recognition and binding of the PDTRPAP epitope sequence to Fab B27.29. Two peptides were studied: a one-repeat MUC1 16mer peptide of the sequence GVTSAPDTRPAPGSTA and a two-repeat MUC1 40mer peptide of the sequence (VTSAPDTRPAPGSTAPPAHG)2. 15N and 13C NMR relaxation parameters were measured for both peptides free in solution and bound to Fab B27.29. The 13CR T1 values best represent changes in the local correlation time of the peptide epitope upon binding antibody, and demonstrate that the PDTRPAP sequence is immobilized in the antibody-combining site. This result is also reflected in the appearance of the 15N- and 13C-edited HSQC spectra, where line broadening of the same peptide epitope resonances is observed. The PDTRPAP peptide epitope expands upon the peptide epitope identified previously in our group as PDTRP by homonuclear NMR experiments [Grinstead, J. S., et al. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 9946-9961], and illustrates the usefulness of the heteronuclear NMR experiments. The implications of these results are discussed within the context of MUC1 breast cancer vaccine design.

  12. Sequence analysis and mapping of a novel human mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit 9 cDNA (ATP5G3)

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, W.L.; Gusella, J.F. |; Haines, J.L. |

    1994-11-15

    The authors describe the cloning, sequence analysis, and chromosomal mapping of a novel mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit 9 cDNA, P3. Subunit 9 transports protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane to the F{sub 1}-ATPase protruding on the matrix side, resulting in the generation of ATP. Sequence analysis of the P3 cDNA reveals only 80% identity with the human subunit 9 genes P1 and P2 in the DNA sequence encoding the mature protein identical to P1 and P2. The predicted sequence of the P3 leader peptide differs from the P1 and P2 leaders, but retains the {open_quotes}RFS{close_quotes} motif critical for mitochondrial import and maturation. The P3 gene (ATP5G3) maps to chromosome 2. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. In silico prediction of peptide binding affinity to class I mouse major histocompatibility complexes: a comparative molecular similarity index analysis (CoMSIA) study.

    PubMed

    Hattotuwagama, Channa K; Doytchinova, Irini A; Flower, Darren R

    2005-01-01

    Current methods for the in silico identification of T cell epitopes (which form the basis of many vaccines, diagnostics, and reagents) rely on the accurate prediction of peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) affinity. A three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) for the prediction of peptide binding to class I MHC molecules was established using the comparative molecular similarity index analysis (CoMSIA) method. Three MHC alleles were studied: H2-D(b), H2-K(b), and H2-K(k). Models were produced for each allele. Each model consisted of five physicochemical descriptors-steric bulk, electrostatic potentials, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen-bond donor and hydrogen-bond acceptor abilities. The models have an acceptable level of predictivity: cross-validation leave-one-out statistical terms q2 and SEP (standard error of prediction) ranged between 0.490 and 0.679 and between 0.525 and 0.889, respectively. The non-cross-validated statistical terms r2 and SEE (standard error of estimate) ranged between 0.913 and 0.979 and between 0.167 and 0.248, respectively. The use of coefficient contour maps, which indicate favored and disfavored areas for each position of the MHC-bound peptides, allowed the binding specificity of each allele to be identified, visualized, and understood. The present study demonstrates the effectiveness of CoMSIA as a method for studying peptide-MHC interactions. The peptides used in this study are available on the Internet (http://www.jenner.ac.uk/AntiJen). The partial least-squares method is available commercially in the SYBYL molecular modeling software package. PMID:16180918

  14. 3D Regression Heat Map Analysis of Population Study Data.

    PubMed

    Klemm, Paul; Lawonn, Kai; Glaßer, Sylvia; Niemann, Uli; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Völzke, Henry; Preim, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies comprise heterogeneous data about a subject group to define disease-specific risk factors. These data contain information (features) about a subject's lifestyle, medical status as well as medical image data. Statistical regression analysis is used to evaluate these features and to identify feature combinations indicating a disease (the target feature). We propose an analysis approach of epidemiological data sets by incorporating all features in an exhaustive regression-based analysis. This approach combines all independent features w.r.t. a target feature. It provides a visualization that reveals insights into the data by highlighting relationships. The 3D Regression Heat Map, a novel 3D visual encoding, acts as an overview of the whole data set. It shows all combinations of two to three independent features with a specific target disease. Slicing through the 3D Regression Heat Map allows for the detailed analysis of the underlying relationships. Expert knowledge about disease-specific hypotheses can be included into the analysis by adjusting the regression model formulas. Furthermore, the influences of features can be assessed using a difference view comparing different calculation results. We applied our 3D Regression Heat Map method to a hepatic steatosis data set to reproduce results from a data mining-driven analysis. A qualitative analysis was conducted on a breast density data set. We were able to derive new hypotheses about relations between breast density and breast lesions with breast cancer. With the 3D Regression Heat Map, we present a visual overview of epidemiological data that allows for the first time an interactive regression-based analysis of large feature sets with respect to a disease. PMID:26529689

  15. Analysis of variance of thematic mapping experiment data.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenfield, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    As an example of the methodology, data from an experiment using three scales of land-use and land-cover mapping have been analyzed. The binomial proportions of correct interpretations have been analyzed untransformed and transformed by both the arcsine and the logit transformations. A weighted analysis of variance adjustment has been used. There is evidence of a significant difference among the three scales of mapping (1:24 000, 1:100 000 and 1:250 000) using the transformed data. Multiple range tests showed that all three scales are different for the arcsine transformed data. - from Author

  16. “On silico” peptide microarrays for high-resolution mapping of antibody epitopes and diverse protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Price, Jordan V; Tangsombatvisit, Stephanie; Xu, Guangyu; Levy, Dan; Baechler, Emily C.; Gozani, Or; Varma, Madoo; Liu, Chih Long

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel, silicon-based peptide array for broad biological applications, including potential for development as a real-time point-of-care platform. We employed photolithography on silicon wafers to synthesize microarrays (Intel arrays), containing every possible overlapping peptide within a linear protein sequence covering the N-terminal tail of human histone H2B. Arrays also included peptides with acetylated and methylated lysine residues reflecting post-translational modifications of H2B. We defined minimum binding epitopes for commercial antibodies recognizing modified and unmodified H2B peptides. We further demonstrated that this platform is suitable for highly sensitive methyltransferase and kinase substrate characterization. Intel arrays also revealed specific H2B epitopes recognized by autoantibodies in individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that have increased disease severity. By combining emerging nonfluorescence-based detection methods with an underlying integrated circuit, we are now poised to create a truly transformative proteomics platform with applications in bioscience, drug development, and clinical diagnostics. PMID:22902875

  17. A cost-benefit analysis of The National Map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halsing, David L.; Theissen, Kevin; Bernknopf, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The Geography Discipline of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has conducted this cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of The National Map. This analysis is an evaluation of the proposed Geography Discipline initiative to provide the Nation with a mechanism to access current and consistent digital geospatial data. This CBA is a supporting document to accompany the Exhibit 300 Capital Asset Plan and Business Case of The National Map Reengineering Program. The framework for estimating the benefits is based on expected improvements in processing information to perform any of the possible applications of spatial data. This analysis does not attempt to determine the benefits and costs of performing geospatial-data applications. Rather, it estimates the change in the differences between those benefits and costs with The National Map and the current situation without it. The estimates of total costs and benefits of The National Map were based on the projected implementation time, development and maintenance costs, rates of data inclusion and integration, expected usage levels over time, and a benefits estimation model. The National Map provides data that are current, integrated, consistent, complete, and more accessible in order to decrease the cost of implementing spatial-data applications and (or) improve the outcome of those applications. The efficiency gains in per-application improvements are greater than the cost to develop and maintain The National Map, meaning that the program would bring a positive net benefit to the Nation. The average improvement in the net benefit of performing a spatial data application was multiplied by a simulated number of application implementations across the country. The numbers of users, existing applications, and rates of application implementation increase over time as The National Map is developed and accessed by spatial data users around the country. Results from the 'most likely' estimates of model parameters and data inputs indicate that

  18. Mapping of the SecA signal peptide binding site and dimeric interface by using the substituted cysteine accessibility method.

    PubMed

    Bhanu, Meera K; Zhao, Ping; Kendall, Debra A

    2013-10-01

    SecA is an ATPase nanomotor critical for bacterial secretory protein translocation. Secretory proteins carry an amino-terminal signal peptide that is recognized and bound by SecA followed by its transfer across the SecYEG translocon. While this process is crucial for the onset of translocation, exactly where the signal peptide interacts with SecA is unclear. SecA protomers also interact among themselves to form dimers in solution, yet the oligomeric interface and the residues involved in dimerization are unknown. To address these issues, we utilized the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM); we generated a library of 23 monocysteine SecA mutants and probed for the accessibility of each mutant cysteine to maleimide-(polyethylene glycol)2-biotin (MPB), a sulfhydryl-labeling reagent, both in the presence and absence of a signal peptide. Dramatic differences in MPB labeling were observed, with a select few mutants located at the preprotein cross-linking domain (PPXD), the helical wing domain (HWD), and the helical scaffold domain (HSD), indicating that the signal peptide binds at the groove formed between these three domains. The exposure of this binding site is varied under different conditions and could therefore provide an ideal mechanism for preprotein transfer into the translocon. We also identified residues G793, A795, K797, and D798 located at the two-helix finger of the HSD to be involved in dimerization. Adenosine-5'-(γ-thio)-triphosphate (ATPγS) alone and, more extensively, in conjunction with lipids and signal peptides strongly favored dimer dissociation, while ADP supports dimerization. This study provides key insight into the structure-function relationships of SecA preprotein binding and dimer dissociation. PMID:23935053

  19. SIM-XL: A powerful and user-friendly tool for peptide cross-linking analysis.

    PubMed

    Lima, Diogo B; de Lima, Tatiani B; Balbuena, Tiago S; Neves-Ferreira, Ana Gisele C; Barbosa, Valmir C; Gozzo, Fábio C; Carvalho, Paulo C

    2015-11-01

    Chemical cross-linking has emerged as a powerful approach for the structural characterization of proteins and protein complexes. However, the correct identification of covalently linked (cross-linked or XL) peptides analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry is still an open challenge. Here we present SIM-XL, a software tool that can analyze data generated through commonly used cross-linkers (e.g., BS3/DSS). Our software introduces a new paradigm for search-space reduction, which ultimately accounts for its increase in speed and sensitivity. Moreover, our search engine is the first to capitalize on reporter ions for selecting tandem mass spectra derived from cross-linked peptides. It also makes available a 2D interaction map and a spectrum-annotation tool unmatched by any of its kind. We show SIM-XL to be more sensitive and faster than a competing tool when analyzing a data set obtained from the human HSP90. The software is freely available for academic use at http://patternlabforproteomics.org/sim-xl. A video demonstrating the tool is available at http://patternlabforproteomics.org/sim-xl/video. SIM-XL is the first tool to support XL data in the mzIdentML format; all data are thus available from the ProteomeXchange consortium (identifier PXD001677). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics. PMID:25638023

  20. Global proteogenomic analysis of human MHC class I-associated peptides derived from non-canonical reading frames.

    PubMed

    Laumont, Céline M; Daouda, Tariq; Laverdure, Jean-Philippe; Bonneil, Éric; Caron-Lizotte, Olivier; Hardy, Marie-Pierre; Granados, Diana P; Durette, Chantal; Lemieux, Sébastien; Thibault, Pierre; Perreault, Claude

    2016-01-01

    In view of recent reports documenting pervasive translation outside of canonical protein-coding sequences, we wished to determine the proportion of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-associated peptides (MAPs) derived from non-canonical reading frames. Here we perform proteogenomic analyses of MAPs eluted from human B cells using high-throughput mass spectrometry to probe the six-frame translation of the B-cell transcriptome. We report that ∼ 10% of MAPs originate from allegedly noncoding genomic sequences or exonic out-of-frame translation. The biogenesis and properties of these 'cryptic MAPs' differ from those of conventional MAPs. Cryptic MAPs come from very short proteins with atypical C termini, and are coded by transcripts bearing long 3'UTRs enriched in destabilizing elements. Relative to conventional MAPs, cryptic MAPs display different MHC class I-binding preferences and harbour more genomic polymorphisms, some of which are immunogenic. Cryptic MAPs increase the complexity of the MAP repertoire and enhance the scope of CD8 T-cell immunosurveillance. PMID:26728094

  1. Comprehensive Analysis of the Naturally Processed Peptide Repertoire: Differences between HLA-A and B in the Immunopeptidome

    PubMed Central

    Spijkers, Sanne N. M.; Poelen, Martien C. M.; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A. M.; van der Poel, Kees; Costa, Ana I.; van Els, Cecile A. C. M.; van Baarle, Debbie; Kesmir, Can

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic T cell (CTL) response is determined by the peptide repertoire presented by the HLA class I molecules of an individual. We performed an in-depth analysis of the peptide repertoire presented by a broad panel of common HLA class I molecules on four B lymphoblastoid cell-lines (BLCL). Peptide elution and mass spectrometry analysis were utilised to investigate the number and abundance of self-peptides. Altogether, 7897 unique self-peptides, derived of 4344 proteins, were eluted. After viral infection, the number of unique self-peptides eluted significantly decreased compared to uninfected cells, paralleled by a decrease in the number of source proteins. In the overall dataset, the total number of unique self-peptides eluted from HLA-B molecules was larger than from HLA-A molecules, and they were derived from a larger number of source proteins. These results in B cells suggest that HLA-B molecules possibly present a more diverse repertoire compared to their HLA-A counterparts, which may contribute to their immunodominance. This study provides a unique data set giving new insights into the complex system of antigen presentation for a broad panel of HLA molecules, many of which were never studied this extensively before. PMID:26375851

  2. A novel node-structural map for angiogenesis analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yizhi; Zhao, Tong; Talavera, Dodanim; Honigmann, Rocio S.; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2005-04-01

    We introduce a novel node-structural map method for digital image-based analysis of angiogenesis, and apply it to quantitate the effect of pro-angiogenic (e.g. VEGF) and anti-angiogenic (e.g. anti-VEGF) treatments on blood vessel patterns in the quail chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) in vivo model. After vessel segmentation and skeletonization, a node-structural map is derived to represent the structural property of each pixel in the skeletonized image, such as end nodes (root and leaf), branch and furcation/junction nodes. By combining the node-structural map with vascular thickness map, our proposed method provides more detailed morphometric and structural measurement of vascular angiogenesis, such as average diameter, average branch length, branch thickness distribution, density of branch and furcation nodes, etc. Furthermore, the concept of vascular generations will be proposed. Accordingly, more detailed measurements related to the generations of the vascular tree can be easily evaluated. From the quantitative analysis results, it correctly shows the fact that VEGF/anti-VEGF can modify the blood vessel pattern and increase/decrease the vessel density in CAM significantly, compared to the phosphate-buffered saline treated controls.

  3. Processing of chromatographic data for chemometric analysis of peptide profiles from cheese extracts: a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Piraino, Paolo; Parente, Eugenio; McSweeney, Paul L H

    2004-11-17

    Chemometric analysis of chromatograms plays a fundamental role in characterization of foods or in detection of adulteration. Data for multivariate analysis of chromatographic profiles are usually obtained by visual matching (VM) of peaks, the identities of which, as for peptide profiles from cheese extracts, are often unknown. To avoid the main disadvantages of VM, which is subjective and time-consuming, a novel approach was developed. Fuzzy logic was employed to handle in a systematic way uncertainty in the position of peptide peaks, and chromatograms were processed by a rule-based membership function. Processed data consisted of classes of retention time wherein peak heights were accumulated by using the distance from the center of the class as a weight. The novel approach (fuzzy approach, FA) was compared with VM by using a real data set and by performing multivariate descriptive statistical techniques (principal component analysis, multidimensional scaling, and nonhierarchical cluster analysis). FA provided a fast, reliable, and objective alternative to VM and could be successfully applied for chemometric analysis of chromatographic profiles whenever knowledge of the identity of peaks is lacking or unnecessary. PMID:15537294

  4. Sequences encoding identical peptides for the analysis and manipulation of coding DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    The use of sequences encoding identical peptides (SEIP) for the in silico analysis of coding DNA from different species has not been reported; the study of such sequences could directly reveal properties of coding DNA that are independent of peptide sequences. For practical purposes SEIP might also be manipulated for e.g. heterologous protein expression. We extracted 1,551 SEIP from human and E. coli and 2,631 SEIP from human and D. melanogaster. We then analyzed codon usage and intercodon dinucleotide tendencies and found differences in both, with more conspicuous disparities between human and E. coli than between human and D. melanogaster. We also briefly manipulated SEIP to find out if they could be used to create new coding sequences. We hence attempted replacement of human by E. coli codons via dicodon exchange but found that full replacement was not possible, this indicated robust species-specific dicodon tendencies. To test another form of codon replacement we isolated SEIP from human and the jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) and we then re-constructed the GFP coding DNA with human tetra-peptide-coding sequences. Results provide proof-of-principle that SEIP may be used to reveal differences in the properties of coding DNA and to reconstruct in pieces a protein coding DNA with sequences from a different organism, the latter might be exploited in heterologous protein expression. PMID:23861567

  5. Sequences encoding identical peptides for the analysis and manipulation of coding DNA.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    The use of sequences encoding identical peptides (SEIP) for the in silico analysis of coding DNA from different species has not been reported; the study of such sequences could directly reveal properties of coding DNA that are independent of peptide sequences. For practical purposes SEIP might also be manipulated for e.g. heterologous protein expression. We extracted 1,551 SEIP from human and E. coli and 2,631 SEIP from human and D. melanogaster. We then analyzed codon usage and intercodon dinucleotide tendencies and found differences in both, with more conspicuous disparities between human and E. coli than between human and D. melanogaster. We also briefly manipulated SEIP to find out if they could be used to create new coding sequences. We hence attempted replacement of human by E. coli codons via dicodon exchange but found that full replacement was not possible, this indicated robust species-specific dicodon tendencies. To test another form of codon replacement we isolated SEIP from human and the jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) and we then re-constructed the GFP coding DNA with human tetra-peptide-coding sequences. Results provide proof-of-principle that SEIP may be used to reveal differences in the properties of coding DNA and to reconstruct in pieces a protein coding DNA with sequences from a different organism, the latter might be exploited in heterologous protein expression. PMID:23861567

  6. Analysis and prediction of affinity of TAP binding peptides using cascade SVM.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, Manoj; Raghava, G P S

    2004-03-01

    The generation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes from an antigenic sequence involves number of intracellular processes, including production of peptide fragments by proteasome and transport of peptides to endoplasmic reticulum through transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). In this study, 409 peptides that bind to human TAP transporter with varying affinity were analyzed to explore the selectivity and specificity of TAP transporter. The abundance of each amino acid from P1 to P9 positions in high-, intermediate-, and low-affinity TAP binders were examined. The rules for predicting TAP binding regions in an antigenic sequence were derived from the above analysis. The quantitative matrix was generated on the basis of contribution of each position and residue in binding affinity. The correlation of r = 0.65 was obtained between experimentally determined and predicted binding affinity by using a quantitative matrix. Further a support vector machine (SVM)-based method has been developed to model the TAP binding affinity of peptides. The correlation (r = 0.80) was obtained between the predicted and experimental measured values by using sequence-based SVM. The reliability of prediction was further improved by cascade SVM that uses features of amino acids along with sequence. An extremely good correlation (r = 0.88) was obtained between measured and predicted values, when the cascade SVM-based method was evaluated through jackknife testing. A Web service, TAPPred (http://www.imtech.res.in/raghava/tappred/ or http://bioinformatics.uams.edu/mirror/tappred/), has been developed based on this approach. PMID:14978300

  7. Structural analysis of peptide fragments following the hydrolysis of bovine serum albumin by trypsin and chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Özyiğit, İbrahim Ethem; Akten, E Demet; Pekcan, Önder

    2016-05-01

    Peptide bond hydrolysis of bovine serum albumin (BSA) by chymotrypsin and trypsin was investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. As a fluorescent cross-linking reagent, N-(1-pyrenyl) maleimide (PM) was attached to BSA, through all free amine groups of arginine, lysine, and/or single free thiol (Cys34). Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used to monitor fluorescence decays analyzed by exponential series method to obtain the changes in lifetime distributions. After the exposure of synthesized protein substrate PM-BSA to chymotrypsin and trypsin, it is observed that each protease produced a distinct change in the lifetime distribution profile, which was attributed to distinct chemical environments created by short peptide fragments in each hydrolysate. The persistence of excimer emission at longer lifetime regions for chymotrypsin, as opposed to trypsin, suggested the presence of small-scale hydrophobic clusters that might prevent some excimers from being completely quenched. It is most likely that the formation of these clusters is due to hydrophobic end groups of peptide fragments in chymotrypsin hydrolysate. A similar hydrophobic shield was not suggested for trypsin hydrolysis, as the end groups of peptide fragments would be either arginine or lysine. Overall, in case the target protein's 3D structure is known, the structural analysis of possible excimer formation presented here can be used as a tool to explain the differences in activity between two proteases, i.e. the peak's intensity and location in the profile. Furthermore, this structural evaluation might be helpful in obtaining the optimum experimental conditions in order to generate the highest amount of PM-BSA complexes. PMID:26169062

  8. Analysis of Peptides and Proteins in Their Binding to GroEL

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yali; Zheng, Zhida; Ramsey, Andrew; Chen, Lingling

    2010-01-01

    The GroEL-GroES is an essential molecular chaperon system that assists protein folding in cell. Binding of various substrate proteins to GroEL is one of the key aspects in GroEL-assisted protein folding. Small peptides may mimic segments of the substrate proteins in contact with GroEL, and allow detailed structural analysis of the interactions. A model peptide SBP has been shown to bind to a region in GroEL that is important for binding of substrate proteins. Here, we investigated whether the observed GroEL-SBP interaction represented those of GroEL-substrate proteins, and whether SBP was able to mimic various aspects of substrate proteins in GroE-assisted protein folding cycle. We found that SBP competed with substrate proteins, including α-lactalbumin, rhodanese, and malate dehydrogenase, in binding to GroEL. SBP stimulated GroEL ATP hydrolysis rate in a manner similar to that of α-lactalbumin. SBP did not prevent GroES from binding to GroEL, and GroES association reduced the ATPase rates of GroEL/SBP and GroEL/α-lactalbumin to a comparable extent. Binding of both SBP and α-lactalbumin to apo GroEL was dominated by hydrophobic interaction. Interestingly, association of α-lactalbumin to GroEL/GroES was thermodynamically distinct from that to GroEL with reduced affinity and decreased contribution from hydrophobic interaction. However, SBP did not display such differential binding behaviors to apo GroEL and GroEL/GroES, likely due to the lack of a contiguous polypeptide chain that links all of the bound peptide fragments. Nevertheless, studies using peptides provide valuable information on the nature of GroEL-substrate protein interaction, which is central to understand the mechanism of GroEL-assisted protein folding. PMID:20814869

  9. Porcine MAP3K5 analysis: molecular cloning, characterization, tissue expression pattern, and copy number variations associated with residual feed intake.

    PubMed

    Pu, L; Zhang, L C; Zhang, J S; Song, X; Wang, L G; Liang, J; Zhang, Y B; Liu, X; Yan, H; Zhang, T; Yue, J W; Li, N; Wu, Q Q; Wang, L X

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 5 (MAP3K5) is essential for apoptosis, proliferation, differentiation, and immune responses, and is a candidate marker for residual feed intake (RFI) in pig. We cloned the full-length cDNA sequence of porcine MAP3K5 by rapid-amplification of cDNA ends. The 5451-bp gene contains a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) (718 bp), a coding region (3738 bp), and a 3'-UTR (995 bp), and encodes a peptide of 1245 amino acids, which shares 97, 99, 97, 93, 91, and 84% sequence identity with cattle, sheep, human, mouse, chicken, and zebrafish MAP3K5, respectively. The deduced MAP3K5 protein sequence contains two conserved domains: a DUF4071 domain and a protein kinase domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that porcine MAP3K5 forms a separate branch to vicugna and camel MAP3K5. Tissue expression analysis using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed that MAP3K5 was expressed in the heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, muscle, fat, pancrea, ileum, and stomach tissues. Copy number variation was detected for porcine MAP3K5 and validated by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, a significant increase in average copy number was detected in the low RFI group when compared to the high RFI group in a Duroc pig population. These results provide useful information regarding the influence of MAP3K5 on RFI in pigs. PMID:27525933

  10. Homogenization of soil properties map by Principal Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde Arias, Omar; Garrido, Alberto; Villeta, Maria; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    It is widely known that extreme climatic phenomena occur with more intensity and frequency. This fact has put more pressure over farming, becoming very important to implement agriculture risk management policies by governments and institutions. One of the main strategies is transfer risk by agriculture insurance. Agriculture insurance based in indexes has gained importance in the last decade. And consist in a comparison between measured index values with a defined threshold that triggers damage losses. However, based index insurance could not be based on an isolated measurement. It is necessary to be integrated in a complete monitoring system that uses many sources of information and tools. For example, index influence areas, crop production risk maps, crop yields, claim statistics, and so on. To establish index influence area is necessary to have a secondary information that show us homogeneous climatic and soil areas, which inside of each homogeneous classes, index measurements on crops of interest are going to be similar, and in this way reduce basis risk. But it is necessary an efficient method to accomplish this aim, to get homogeneous areas that not depends on only in expert criteria and that could be widely used, for this reason this study asses two conventional agricultural and geographic methods (control and climatic maps) based in expert criteria, and one classical statistical method of multi-factorial analysis (factorial map), all of them to homogenize soil and climatic characteristics. Resulting maps were validated by agricultural and spatial analysis, obtaining very good results in statistical method (Factorial map) that proves to be an efficient and accuracy method that could be used for similar porpoises.

  11. Expanding the repertoire of secretory peptides controlling root development with comparative genome analysis and functional assays

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Sarieh; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Parizot, Boris; Fernandez, Ana; Njo, Maria Fransiska; Van de Peer, Yves; Beeckman, Tom; Hilson, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Plant genomes encode numerous small secretory peptides (SSPs) whose functions have yet to be explored. Based on structural features that characterize SSP families known to take part in postembryonic development, this comparative genome analysis resulted in the identification of genes coding for oligopeptides potentially involved in cell-to-cell communication. Because genome annotation based on short sequence homology is difficult, the criteria for the de novo identification and aggregation of conserved SSP sequences were first benchmarked across five reference plant species. The resulting gene families were then extended to 32 genome sequences, including major crops. The global phylogenetic pattern common to the functionally characterized SSP families suggests that their apparition and expansion coincide with that of the land plants. The SSP families can be searched online for members, sequences and consensus (http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/webtools/PlantSSP/). Looking for putative regulators of root development, Arabidopsis thaliana SSP genes were further selected through transcriptome meta-analysis based on their expression at specific stages and in specific cell types in the course of the lateral root formation. As an additional indication that formerly uncharacterized SSPs may control development, this study showed that root growth and branching were altered by the application of synthetic peptides matching conserved SSP motifs, sometimes in very specific ways. The strategy used in the study, combining comparative genomics, transcriptome meta-analysis and peptide functional assays in planta, pinpoints factors potentially involved in non-cell-autonomous regulatory mechanisms. A similar approach can be implemented in different species for the study of a wide range of developmental programmes. PMID:26195730

  12. Isolation and sequence analysis of peptides from the skin secretion of the Middle East tree frog Hyla savignyi.

    PubMed

    Langsdorf, Markus; Ghassempour, Alireza; Römpp, Andreas; Spengler, Bernhard

    2010-12-01

    Novel peptides were identified in the skin secretion of the tree frog Hyla savignyi. Skin secretions were collected by mild electrical stimulation. Peptides were separated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Mass spectra were acquired by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS), and fragment ion spectra were obtained after collision-induced dissociation and electron capture dissociation. Peptides were analyzed by manual de novo sequencing and composition-based sequencing (CBS). Sequence analyses of three so far undescribed, structurally unrelated peptides are presented in this paper, having the sequences DDSEEEEVE-OH, P*EEVEEERJK-OH, and GJJDPJTGJVGGJJ-NH(2). The glutamate-rich sequences are assumed to be acidic spacer peptides of the prepropeptide. One of these peptides contains the modified amino acid hydroxyproline, as identified and localized by high-accuracy FTICR-MS. Combination of CBS and of experience-based manual sequence analysis as complementary and database-independent sequencing strategies resulted in peptide identification with high reliability. PMID:20835817

  13. Design and analysis of structure-activity relationship of novel antimicrobial peptides derived from the conserved sequence of cecropin.

    PubMed

    Hao, Gang; Shi, Yong-Hui; Han, Jing-Hui; Li, Qi-Hui; Tang, Ya-Li; Le, Guo-Wei

    2008-03-01

    We have de novo designed four antimicrobial peptides AMP-A/B/C/D, the 51-residues peptides, which are based on the conserved sequence of cecropin. In the present study, the four peptides were chemically synthesized and their activities assayed. Their secondary structure, amphipathic property, electric field distribution and transmembrane domain were subsequently predicted by bioinformatics tools. Finally, the structure-activity relationship was analyzed from the results of activity experiments and prediction. The results of activity experiments indicated that AMP-B/C/D clearly possessed excellent broad-spectrum activity against bacteria, whereas AMP-A was almost inactive against most of the bacterial strains tested. AMP-B/C/D showed more potent activity against Gram-positive bacteria than against Gram-negative bacteria. By utilizing bioinformatics analysis tools, we found that the secondary structure of the four cation peptides was mainly alpha-helix, and the result of CD spectrum also displayed that all the peptides had considerable alpha-helix in the presence of either 50% TFE or SDS micelles. AMP-C showed much better activity than other peptides against most of the bacteria tested, owing to its remarkable cation property and the amphipathic character of its N-terminal. The study of structure-activity relationship of the designed peptides confirmed that amphipathic structure and high net positive charge were prerequisites for maintaining their activities. PMID:17929330

  14. A frequency domain analysis of spatial organization of epicardial maps.

    PubMed

    Sih, H J; Sahakian, A V; Arentzen, C E; Swiryn, S

    1995-07-01

    Mapping of organized rhythms like sinus rhythm uses activation times from individual electrograms, and often assumes that the map for a single activation is similar to maps for subsequent activations. However, during fibrillation, activation times and electrograms are not easy to define, and maps change from activation to activation. Volume and complexity of data make analysis of more than a few seconds of fibrillation difficult. Magnitude Squared Coherence (MSC), a frequency domain measure of the phase consistency between two signals, can be used to help interpret longer data segments without defining activation times or electrograms. Sinus rhythm, flutter, and fibrillation in humans and swine were mapped with an array of unipolar electrodes (2.5 mm apart) at 240 sites on the atrial or ventricular epicardium. Four-second data segments were analyzed. One site near the center of the array was chosen ad hoc as a reference. MSC maps were made by measuring mean MSC from 0-50 Hz between every point in the array relative to the reference. Isocoherence contours were drawn. The effects of bias in the coherence estimate due to misalignment were investigated. Average MSC versus distance from the reference was measured for all rhythms. Results indicate that in a 4-s segment of fibrillation, there can exist some phase consistency between one site and the reference and little or none between a second site and the reference even when both sites are equidistant from the reference. In fibrillation, isocoherence contours are elongated and irregularly shaped, reflecting long-term, but nonuniform, spatial organization. That is, activation during fibrillation cannot be considered as random over a 4-s interval. Bias in the coherence estimate due to misalignment is significant for sinus rhythm and flutter, but can be corrected by manual realignment. Average MSC drops with distance for all rhythms, being most pronounced for fibrillation, MSC maps may provide insights into long

  15. Analysis of peptides synthesized in the presence of SAz-1 montmorillonite and Cu(2+) exchanged hectorite.

    PubMed

    Porter, T L; Eastman, M P; Bain, E; Begay, S

    2001-07-01

    We have investigated the synthesis of oligopeptides containing glycine and tyrosine in the presence of the clay minerals montmorillonite (non-exchanged, SAz-1) and Cu(2+) exchanged hectorite. In both cases, homopolymers of the two amino acids are formed, as are mixed peptides. In the case of Cu(2+) hectorite, mixed oligopeptides up to trimers are detected in small amounts. For montmorillonite, heterogeneous oligopeptides up to hexamers are detected. Our experiments indicate montmorillonite is more effective in promoting oligopeptide formation than Cu(2+) hectorite. Analysis of the oligopeptide sequences formed on the montmorillonite surfaces indicates preferential synthesis of certain Gly-Tyr sequences over others. PMID:11429201

  16. Theoretical conformational analysis of the bovine adrenal medulla 12 residue peptide molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, N. A.; Tagiyev, Z. H.; Hasanov, E. M.; Akverdieva, G. A.

    2003-02-01

    The spatial structure and conformational properties of the bovine adrenal medulla 12 residue peptide Tyr1-Gly2-Gly3-Phe4-Met5-Arg6-Arg7-Val8-Gly9-Arg10-Pro11-Glu12 (BAM-12P) molecule were studied by theoretical conformational analysis. It is revealed that this molecule can exist in several stable states. The energy and geometrical parameters for the low-energy conformations are obtained. The conformationally rigid and labile segments of this molecule were revealed.

  17. Protein separation and characterization by np-RP-HPLC followed by intact MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and peptide mass mapping analyses

    PubMed Central

    Dauly, Claire; Perlman, David H.; Costello, Catherine E.; McComb, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    Due to their complexity, the separation of intact proteins from complex mixtures is an important step to comparative proteomics and the identification and characterization of the proteins by mass spectrometry (MS). In the study reported, we evaluated the use of non-porous-reversed-phase (np-RP) HPLC for intact protein separation prior to MS analyses. The separation system was characterized and compared to 1D-SDS-PAGE electrophoresis in terms of resolution and sensitivity. We demonstrate that np-RP HPLC protein separation is highly reproducible and provides intact protein fractions which can be directly analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS for intact molecular weight determination. An in-well digestion protocol was developed, allowing for rapid protein identification by peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) and resulted in comparable or improved peptide recovery compared with in-gel digestion. The np-RP sensitivity of detection by UV absorbance at 214 nm for intact proteins was at the low ng level and the sensitivity of peptide analysis by MALDI-TOF MS was in the 10–50 pg level. A membrane protein fraction was characterized to demonstrate application of this methodology. Among the identified proteins, multiple forms of vimentin were observed. Overall we demonstrate that np-RP HPLC followed by MALDI-TOF MS allows for rapid, sensitive and reproducible protein fractionation and very specific protein characterization by integration of PMF analysis with MS intact molecular weight information. PMID:16823977

  18. Exploratory data analysis using set operations and ordinal mapping.

    PubMed

    Churches, Tim

    2003-05-01

    Exploratory data analysis requires the ability to issue ad hoc queries to filter and summarise data sets. As the sizes of health data sets grow, traditional methods of processing data have difficulty in providing acceptable response times for such queries. An alternative method is described which combines complete vertical partitioning of data with set operations on ordinal mappings (SOOM). An initial implementation of the technique provides significantly better performance than a conventional SQL database on typical exploratory data analysis queries. The use of parallel, distributed computation to further increase the performance of the technique appears to be feasible. PMID:12725961

  19. Analysis of gene expression data using self-organizing maps.

    PubMed

    Törönen, P; Kolehmainen, M; Wong, G; Castrén, E

    1999-05-21

    DNA microarray technologies together with rapidly increasing genomic sequence information is leading to an explosion in available gene expression data. Currently there is a great need for efficient methods to analyze and visualize these massive data sets. A self-organizing map (SOM) is an unsupervised neural network learning algorithm which has been successfully used for the analysis and organization of large data files. We have here applied the SOM algorithm to analyze published data of yeast gene expression and show that SOM is an excellent tool for the analysis and visualization of gene expression profiles. PMID:10371154

  20. Lassa fever virus peptides predicted by computational analysis induce epitope-specific cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte responses in HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Boesen, Agnieszka; Sundar, Krishnan; Coico, Richard

    2005-10-01

    Lassa fever is a hemorrhagic disease caused by Lassa fever virus (LV). Although the precise host defense mechanism(s) that affords protection against LV is not completely understood, cellular immunity mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) plays a pivotal role in controlling viral replication and LV infection. To date, there have been no reports mapping major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-binding CTL epitopes for LV. Using computer-assisted algorithms, we identified five HLA-A2.1-binding peptides of LV glycoprotein (GP) and two peptides from LV nucleoprotein (NP). Synthesized peptides were examined for their ability to bind to MHC class I molecules using a flow cytometric assay that measures peptide stabilization of class I. Three of the LV-GP peptides tested (LLGTFTWTL, SLYKGVYEL, and YLISIFLHL) stabilized HLA-A2. The LV-NP peptides tested failed to stabilize this HLA-A2. We then investigated the ability of the HLA-A2-binding LV-GP peptides to generate peptide-specific CTLs in HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice. Functional assays used to confirm CTL activation included gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays and intracellular cytokine staining of CD8+ T cells from peptide-primed mice. CTL assays were also performed to verify the cytolytic activity of peptide-pulsed target cells. Each of the LV-GP peptides induced CTL responses in HLA-A2-transgenic mice. MHC class I tetramers prepared using one LV-GP peptide that showed the highest cytolytic index (LLGTFTWTL) confirmed that peptide-binding CD8+ T cells were present in pooled lymphocytes harvested from peptide-primed mice. These findings provide direct evidence for the existence of LV-derived GP epitopes that may be useful in the development of protective immunogens for this hemorrhagic virus. PMID:16210487

  1. Lassa Fever Virus Peptides Predicted by Computational Analysis Induce Epitope-Specific Cytotoxic-T-Lymphocyte Responses in HLA-A2.1 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boesen, Agnieszka; Sundar, Krishnan; Coico, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Lassa fever is a hemorrhagic disease caused by Lassa fever virus (LV). Although the precise host defense mechanism(s) that affords protection against LV is not completely understood, cellular immunity mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) plays a pivotal role in controlling viral replication and LV infection. To date, there have been no reports mapping major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-binding CTL epitopes for LV. Using computer-assisted algorithms, we identified five HLA-A2.1-binding peptides of LV glycoprotein (GP) and two peptides from LV nucleoprotein (NP). Synthesized peptides were examined for their ability to bind to MHC class I molecules using a flow cytometric assay that measures peptide stabilization of class I. Three of the LV-GP peptides tested (LLGTFTWTL, SLYKGVYEL, and YLISIFLHL) stabilized HLA-A2. The LV-NP peptides tested failed to stabilize this HLA-A2. We then investigated the ability of the HLA-A2-binding LV-GP peptides to generate peptide-specific CTLs in HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice. Functional assays used to confirm CTL activation included gamma interferon enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays and intracellular cytokine staining of CD8+ T cells from peptide-primed mice. CTL assays were also performed to verify the cytolytic activity of peptide-pulsed target cells. Each of the LV-GP peptides induced CTL responses in HLA-A2-transgenic mice. MHC class I tetramers prepared using one LV-GP peptide that showed the highest cytolytic index (LLGTFTWTL) confirmed that peptide-binding CD8+ T cells were present in pooled lymphocytes harvested from peptide-primed mice. These findings provide direct evidence for the existence of LV-derived GP epitopes that may be useful in the development of protective immunogens for this hemorrhagic virus. PMID:16210487

  2. Adapting and testing a portable Raman spectrometer for SERS analysis of amino acids and small peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, A.; Philippidis, A.; Nevin, A.; Comelli, D.; Valentini, G.; Anglos, D.

    2013-07-01

    Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS), a powerful spectrochemical technique enabling highly sensitive analysis of organic and biological materials, is investigated for applications in the analysis of archaeological materials including in situ screening. In this work, a compact mobile Raman spectrometer is employed for acquiring Surface-Enhanced Raman spectra from natural amino acids (L-Arg, L-Phe, L-Met) and a tripeptide (Glutathione), adsorbed on silver colloids. The detection limits of the portable Raman spectrometer, together with an optimization of sample preparation and experimental parameters, are reported. The collection and interpretation of SER spectra of amino acids and peptides is a starting point for the optimization of the instrumentation and its application in the study of more complex biological molecules in the context of detection and analysis of archaeological materials and residues.

  3. Mapping photoautotrophic metabolism with isotopically nonstationary (13)C flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Young, Jamey D; Shastri, Avantika A; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Morgan, John A

    2011-11-01

    Understanding in vivo regulation of photoautotrophic metabolism is important for identifying strategies to improve photosynthetic efficiency or re-route carbon fluxes to desirable end products. We have developed an approach to reconstruct comprehensive flux maps of photoautotrophic metabolism by computational analysis of dynamic isotope labeling measurements and have applied it to determine metabolic pathway fluxes in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. Comparison to a theoretically predicted flux map revealed inefficiencies in photosynthesis due to oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and malic enzyme activity, despite negligible photorespiration. This approach has potential to fill important gaps in our understanding of how carbon and energy flows are systemically regulated in cyanobacteria, plants, and algae. PMID:21907300

  4. Why Map Issues? On Controversy Analysis as a Digital Method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article takes stock of recent efforts to implement controversy analysis as a digital method in the study of science, technology, and society (STS) and beyond and outlines a distinctive approach to address the problem of digital bias. Digital media technologies exert significant influence on the enactment of controversy in online settings, and this risks undermining the substantive focus of controversy analysis conducted by digital means. To address this problem, I propose a shift in thematic focus from controversy analysis to issue mapping. The article begins by distinguishing between three broad frameworks that currently guide the development of controversy analysis as a digital method, namely, demarcationist, discursive, and empiricist. Each has been adopted in STS, but only the last one offers a digital “move beyond impartiality.” I demonstrate this approach by analyzing issues of Internet governance with the aid of the social media platform Twitter. PMID:26336325

  5. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of a labeled peptide bound to a class II major histocompatibility complex molecule.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, P C; Altman, J D; Boniface, J J; Sakaguchi, K; Reay, P A; Omichinski, J G; Appella, E; Davis, M M

    1993-07-20

    The formation of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complexes and their subsequent recognition by T cells is a pivotal event in the initiation of an immune response. While X-ray crystal structures are now available for class I MHC/peptide complexes, little detailed structural information is known about the class II MHC equivalent, and there are no solution structure data for either. A 16 amino acid residue moth cytochrome c peptide (residues 88 to 103) was 13C-labeled for two-dimensional isotope-edited NMR analysis. The peptide was labeled either selectively in the methyl groups of alanine residues or uniformly at every carbon position, and bound to unlabeled soluble mouse I-Ek class II MHC molecules. Although alpha-helical in the native cytochrome c protein and with no uniform structure in solution, the peptide is bound to the I-Ek molecule with the alpha-carbon atoms of the 11 C-terminal residues held in the binding groove. This indicates that the class II MHC peptide binding site is somewhat larger than that of class I MHC molecules (> or = 11 amino acid residues versus 8 to 10 amino acid residues), consistent with recent data on eluted peptides. Despite the large size of the complex (approximately 70 kDa), nuclear Overhauser effects are clearly detectable between peptide side-chains and the MHC molecule. Indications of the buried or exposed nature of particular side-chains within the bound peptide are derived from the NMR data and these are used together with information from previous biological studies to propose a crude model of the interaction of the peptide with the groove of the MHC molecule. We find no evidence for a conformational change in the peptide/MHC complex in the spectra at pH 5.0 versus pH 7.0, despite a 40-fold faster on-rate for the peptide at the lower pH value. PMID:8393933

  6. A LiDAR based analysis of hydraulic hazard mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazorzi, F.; De Luca, A.; Checchinato, A.; Segna, F.; Dalla Fontana, G.

    2012-04-01

    Mapping hydraulic hazard is a ticklish procedure as it involves technical and socio-economic aspects. On the one hand no dangerous areas should be excluded, on the other hand it is important not to exceed, beyond the necessary, with the surface assigned to some use limitations. The availability of a high resolution topographic survey allows nowadays to face this task with innovative procedures, both in the planning (mapping) and in the map validation phases. The latter is the object of the present work. It should be stressed that the described procedure is proposed purely as a preliminary analysis based on topography only, and therefore does not intend in any way to replace more sophisticated analysis methods requiring based on hydraulic modelling. The reference elevation model is a combination of the digital terrain model and the digital building model (DTM+DBM). The option of using the standard surface model (DSM) is not viable, as the DSM represents the vegetation canopy as a solid volume. This has the consequence of unrealistically considering the vegetation as a geometric obstacle to water flow. In some cases the topographic model construction requires the identification and digitization of the principal breaklines, such as river banks, ditches and similar natural or artificial structures. The geometrical and topological procedure for the validation of the hydraulic hazard maps is made of two steps. In the first step the whole area is subdivided into fluvial segments, with length chosen as a reasonable trade-off between the need to keep the hydrographical unit as complete as possible, and the need to separate sections of the river bed with significantly different morphology. Each of these segments is made of a single elongated polygon, whose shape can be quite complex, especially for meandering river sections, where the flow direction (i.e. the potential energy gradient associated to the talweg) is often inverted. In the second step the segments are analysed

  7. Children's Understanding of Large-Scale Mapping Tasks: An Analysis of Talk, Drawings, and Gesture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotsopoulos, Donna; Cordy, Michelle; Langemeyer, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    This research examined how children represent motion in large-scale mapping tasks that we referred to as "motion maps". The underlying mathematical content was transformational geometry. In total, 19 children, 8- to 10-year-old, created motion maps and captured their motion maps with accompanying verbal description digitally. Analysis of…

  8. Saturation of an Intra-Gene Pool Linkage Map: Towards a Unified Consensus Linkage Map for Fine Mapping and Synteny Analysis in Common Bean

    PubMed Central

    Galeano, Carlos H.; Fernandez, Andrea C.; Franco-Herrera, Natalia; Cichy, Karen A.; McClean, Phillip E.; Vanderleyden, Jos; Blair, Matthew W.

    2011-01-01

    Map-based cloning and fine mapping to find genes of interest and marker assisted selection (MAS) requires good genetic maps with reproducible markers. In this study, we saturated the linkage map of the intra-gene pool population of common bean DOR364×BAT477 (DB) by evaluating 2,706 molecular markers including SSR, SNP, and gene-based markers. On average the polymorphism rate was 7.7% due to the narrow genetic base between the parents. The DB linkage map consisted of 291 markers with a total map length of 1,788 cM. A consensus map was built using the core mapping populations derived from inter-gene pool crosses: DOR364×G19833 (DG) and BAT93×JALO EEP558 (BJ). The consensus map consisted of a total of 1,010 markers mapped, with a total map length of 2,041 cM across 11 linkage groups. On average, each linkage group on the consensus map contained 91 markers of which 83% were single copy markers. Finally, a synteny analysis was carried out using our highly saturated consensus maps compared with the soybean pseudo-chromosome assembly. A total of 772 marker sequences were compared with the soybean genome. A total of 44 syntenic blocks were identified. The linkage group Pv6 presented the most diverse pattern of synteny with seven syntenic blocks, and Pv9 showed the most consistent relations with soybean with just two syntenic blocks. Additionally, a co-linear analysis using common bean transcript map information against soybean coding sequences (CDS) revealed the relationship with 787 soybean genes. The common bean consensus map has allowed us to map a larger number of markers, to obtain a more complete coverage of the common bean genome. Our results, combined with synteny relationships provide tools to increase marker density in selected genomic regions to identify closely linked polymorphic markers for indirect selection, fine mapping or for positional cloning. PMID:22174773

  9. C6 Peptide-Based Multiplex Phosphorescence Analysis (PHOSPHAN) for Serologic Confirmation of Lyme Borreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Pomelova, Vera G.; Korenberg, Edward I.

    2015-01-01

    Background A single-tier immunoassay using the C6 peptide of VlsE (C6) from Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (Bb) has been proposed as a potential alternative to conventional two-tier testing for the serologic diagnosis of Lyme disease in the United States and Europe. Objective To evaluate the performance of C6 peptide based multiplex Phosphorescence Analysis (PHOSPHAN) for the serologic confirmation of Lyme borreliosis (LB) in Russian patients. Methods Serum samples (n = 351) were collected from 146 patients with erythema migrans (EM); samples from 131 of these patients were taken several times prior to treatment and at different stages of recovery. The control group consisted of 197 healthy blood donors and 31 patients with other diseases, all from the same highly endemic region of Russia. All samples were analyzed by PHOSPHAN for IgM and IgG to Bb C6, recombinant OspC and VlsE proteins, and C6 peptides from B. garinii and B. afzelii. Results IgM and IgG to Bb C6 were identified in 43 and 95 out of 131 patients (32.8 and 72.5%, respectively); seroconversion of IgM antibodies was observed in about half of the patients (51.2%), and of IgG antibodies, in almost all of them (88.4%). Additional detection of OspC-IgM and VlsE-IgM or IgG to C6 from B. garinii or B. afzelii did not contribute significantly to the overall sensitivity of the multiplex immunoassay. Conclusions The multiplex phosphorescence immunoassay is a promising method for simultaneously revealing the spectrum of antibodies to several Borrelia antigens. Detection of IgM and IgG to Bb C6 in the sera of EM patients provides effective serologic confirmation of LB and, with high probability, indicates an active infection process. PMID:26147441

  10. “Proteomic analysis of peptides tagged with dimedone and related probes”

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Acedo, Pablo; Gupta, Vinayak; Carroll, Kate S.

    2014-01-01

    Owing to its labile nature, a new role for cysteine sulfenic acid (-SOH) modification has emerged. This oxidative modification modulates protein function by acting as a redox switch during cellular signaling. The identification of proteins that undergo this modification represents a methodological challenge, and its resolution remains a matter of current interest. The development of strategies to chemically modify cysteinyl-containing peptides for LC-MS/MS analysis has increased significantly within the past decade. The method of choice to selectively label sulfenic acid is based on the use of dimedone or its derivatives. For these chemical probes to be effective on a proteome-wide level, their reactivity toward -SOH must be high to ensure reaction completion. In addition, the presence of an adduct should not interfere with electrospray ionization, the efficiency of induced dissociation in MS/MS experiments, or with identification of Cys-modified peptides by automated database searching algorithms. Herein, we employ a targeted proteomics approach to study the electrospray ionization and fragmentation effects of different –SOH specific probes, and compared them to commonly used alkylating agents. We then extend our study to a whole proteome extract using shotgun proteomic approaches. These experiments enable us to demonstrate that dimedone adducts do not interfere with electrospray by suppressing the ionization nor impedes product ion assignment by automated search engines, which detect a + 138 Da increase from unmodified peptides. Collectively, these results suggest dimedone can be a powerful tool to identify sulfenic acid modifications by high-throughput shotgun proteomics of a whole proteome. PMID:24719340

  11. Peptidomic analysis of the extensive array of host-defense peptides in skin secretions of the dodecaploid frog Xenopus ruwenzoriensis (Pipidae).

    PubMed

    Coquet, Laurent; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Jouenne, Thierry; Nowotny, Norbert; King, Jay D; Conlon, J Michael

    2016-09-01

    The Uganda clawed frog Xenopus ruwenzoriensis with a karyotype of 2n=108 is one of the very few vertebrates with dodecaploid status. Peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from this species led to the isolation and structural characterization of 23 host-defense peptides belonging to the following families: magainin (3 peptides), peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa; 6 peptides), xenopsin precursor fragment (XPF; 3 peptides), caerulein precursor fragment (CPF; 8 peptides), and caerulein precursor fragment-related peptide (CPF-RP; 3 peptides). In addition, the secretions contained caerulein, identical to the peptide from Xenopus laevis, and two peptides that were identified as members of the trefoil factor family (TFF). The data indicate that silencing of the host-defense peptide genes following polyploidization has been appreciable and non-uniform. Consistent with data derived from comparison of nucleotide sequences of mitochrondrial and nuclear genes, cladistic analyses based upon the primary structures of the host-defense peptides provide support for an evolutionary scenario in which X. ruwenzoriensis arose from an allopolyploidization event involving an octoploid ancestor of the present-day frogs belonging to the Xenopus amieti species group and a tetraploid ancestor of Xenopus pygmaeus. PMID:27290612

  12. AHTPDB: a comprehensive platform for analysis and presentation of antihypertensive peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravi; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Sharma, Minakshi; Nagpal, Gandharva; Chauhan, Jagat Singh; Singh, Sandeep; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P.S.

    2015-01-01

    AHTPDB (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/ahtpdb/) is a manually curated database of experimentally validated antihypertensive peptides. Information pertaining to peptides with antihypertensive activity was collected from research articles and from various peptide repositories. These peptides were derived from 35 major sources that include milk, egg, fish, pork, chicken, soybean, etc. In AHTPDB, most of the peptides belong to a family of angiotensin-I converting enzyme inhibiting peptides. The current release of AHTPDB contains 5978 peptide entries among which 1694 are unique peptides. Each entry provides detailed information about a peptide like sequence, inhibitory concentration (IC50), toxicity/bitterness value, source, length, molecular mass and information related to purification of peptides. In addition, the database provides structural information of these peptides that includes predicted tertiary and secondary structures. A user-friendly web interface with various tools has been developed to retrieve and analyse the data. It is anticipated that AHTPDB will be a useful and unique resource for the researchers working in the field of antihypertensive peptides. PMID:25392419

  13. Application of automated multispectral analysis to Delaware's coastal vegetation mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator); Daiber, D.; Bartlett, D. S.; Crichton, O. W.; Fornes, A. O.

    1973-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Overlay maps of Delaware's wetlands have been prepared, showing the dominant species or group of species of vegetation present. Five such categories of vegetation were used indicating marshes dominated by: (1) salt marsh cord grass; (2) salt marsh hay and spike grass; (3) reed grass; (4) high tide bush and sea myrtle; and (5) a group of fresh water species found in impounded areas built to attract water fowl. Fifteen such maps cover Delaware's wetlands from the Pennsylvania to the Maryland borders. The mapping technique employed utilizes the General Electric multispectral data processing system. This system is a hybrid analog-digital system designed as an analysis tool to be used by an operator whose own judgment and knowledge of ground truth can be incorporated at any time into the analyzing process. The result is a high speed, cost effective method for producing enhanced photomaps showing a number of spectral classes, each enhanced spectral class being representative of a vegetative species or group of species.

  14. CAD system for automatic analysis of CT perfusion maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachaj, T.; Ogiela, M. R.

    2011-03-01

    In this article, authors present novel algorithms developed for the computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) system for analysis of dynamic brain perfusion, computer tomography (CT) maps, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and cerebral blood volume (CBV). Those methods perform both quantitative analysis [detection and measurement and description with brain anatomy atlas (AA) of potential asymmetries/lesions] and qualitative analysis (semantic interpretation of visualized symptoms). The semantic interpretation (decision about type of lesion: ischemic/hemorrhagic, is the brain tissue at risk of infraction or not) of visualized symptoms is done by, so-called, cognitive inference processes allowing for reasoning on character of pathological regions based on specialist image knowledge. The whole system is implemented in.NET platform (C# programming language) and can be used on any standard PC computer with.NET framework installed.

  15. A new strategy for site-specific protein modification: analysis of a Tat peptide-TAR RNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Tamilarasu, N; Zhang, J; Hwang, S; Rana, T M

    2001-01-01

    Site-specific modification of proteins and peptides with reporter molecules provides a powerful research tool in chemistry and biology. We report the synthesis and application of a tyrosine analogue, N-alpha-Fmoc-3-acetyl-L-tyrosine, for selective modification of proteins. As a model system, we synthesized the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat peptide (amino acids 47-56) containing the arginine rich RNA-binding region and replaced the Tyr-47 with 3-acetyl-tyrosine. The acetyl-Tyr-Tat peptide was subsequently labeled with a fluorescein derivative to study RNA-protein interactions by fluorescence energy transfer experiments. Our results showed that the Tat peptide binds to the rhodamine labeled TAR RNA with a dissociation constant (KD) of 1.0 +/- 0.5 nM. This strategy of selective protein modification offers a versatile new procedure for labeling peptides of biological interest at a desired site when several nucleophilic side chains of lysine and cysteine are present. These methods would provide tools for postsynthetic peptide modification and introducing biophysical probes for structural and functional analysis of proteins. PMID:11312672

  16. The good, the bad, the ugly: validating the mass spectrometric analysis of modified peptides.

    PubMed

    Beck, Florian; Lewandrowski, Urs; Wiltfang, Matthias; Feldmann, Ingo; Geiger, Jörg; Sickmann, Albert; Zahedi, René Peiman

    2011-03-01

    Mass spectrometric characterization of protein modifications is usually based on single peptides. With the advent of large-scale PTM-focussed MS studies, vast amounts of data are generated continuously, providing biologists extremely valuable and virtually never-ending sources for targeted functional research. However, even more than for proteomics in general, appropriate strategies for quality control of the different steps of the analytical strategy are imperative to prevent functional researchers from doing Sisyphos work on false-positive and unconfident PTM assignments. Here, we describe strategies to address the important issue of quality control for PTM analysis on various levels of the analytical pipeline: sample preparation/processing, analysis/identification and finally data interpretation, for qualitative as well as quantitative studies. PMID:21298789

  17. Membrane-targeting peptides for nanoparticle-facilitated cellular imaging and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breger, Joyce; Delehanty, James B.; Boeneman Gemmill, Kelly; Field, Lauren D.; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B.; Dawson, Philip E.; Huston, Alan L.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2015-03-01

    The controlled delivery of nanomaterials to the plasma membrane is critical for the development of nanoscale probes that can eventually enable cellular imaging and analysis of membrane processes. Chief among the requisite criteria are delivery/targeting modalities that result in the long-term residence (e.g., days) of the nanoparticles on the plasma membrane while simultaneously not interfering with regular cellular physiology and homeostasis. Our laboratory has developed a suite of peptidyl motifs that target semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots (QDs) to the plasma membrane where they remain resident for up to three days. Notably, only small a percentage of the QDs are endocytosed over this time course and cellular viability is maintained. This talk will highlight the utility of these peptide-QD constructs for cellular imaging and analysis.

  18. Stakeholder analysis and mapping as targeted communication strategy.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2012-09-01

    This department highlights change management strategies that may be successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change initiatives. With the goal of presenting practical approaches helpful to nurse leaders advancing organizational change, content includes evidence-based projects, tools, and resources that mobilize and sustain organizational change initiatives. In this article, the author highlights the importance of stakeholder theory and discusses how to apply the theory to conduct a stakeholder analysis. This article also provides an explanation of how to use related stakeholder mapping techniques with targeted communication strategies. PMID:22922747

  19. Transcriptomic Analysis of Neuropeptides and Peptide Hormones in the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite: Evidence of Roles in Larval Settlement

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xing-Cheng; Chen, Zhang-Fan; Sun, Jin; Matsumura, Kiyotaka; Wu, Rudolf S. S.; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed marine crustacean and has been used as a model species for intertidal ecology and biofouling studies. Its life cycle consists of seven planktonic larval stages followed by a sessile juvenile/adult stage. The transitional processes between larval stages and juveniles are crucial for barnacle development and recruitment. Although some studies have been conducted on the neuroanatomy and neuroactive substances of the barnacle, a comprehensive understanding of neuropeptides and peptide hormones remains lacking. To better characterize barnacle neuropeptidome and its potential roles in larval settlement, an in silico identification of putative transcripts encoding neuropeptides/peptide hormones was performed, based on transcriptome of the barnacle B. amphitrite that has been recently sequenced. Potential cleavage sites andstructure of mature peptides were predicted through homology search of known arthropod peptides. In total, 16 neuropeptide families/subfamilies were predicted from the barnacle transcriptome, and 14 of them were confirmed as genuine neuropeptides by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends. Analysis of peptide precursor structures and mature sequences showed that some neuropeptides of B. amphitrite are novel isoforms and shared similar characteristics with their homologs from insects. The expression profiling of predicted neuropeptide genes revealed that pigment dispersing hormone, SIFamide, calcitonin, and B-type allatostatin had the highest expression level in cypris stage, while tachykinin-related peptide was down regulated in both cyprids and juveniles. Furthermore, an inhibitor of proprotein convertase related to peptide maturation effectively delayed larval metamorphosis. Combination of real-time PCR results and bioassay indicated that certain neuropeptides may play an important role in cypris settlement. Overall, new insight into neuropeptides/peptide hormones characterized in this study shall

  20. Mechanism of interaction of optimized Limulus-derived cyclic peptides with endotoxins: thermodynamic, biophysical and microbiological analysis

    PubMed Central

    Andrä, Jörg; Howe, Jörg; Garidel, Patrick; Rössle, Manfred; Richter, Walter; Leiva-León, José; Moriyon, Ignacio; Bartels, Rainer; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of formerly investigated peptides corresponding to the endotoxin-binding domain from LALF [Limulus anti-LPS (lipopolysaccharide) factor], a protein from Limulus polyphemus, we have designed and synthesized peptides of different lengths with the aim of obtaining potential therapeutic agents against septic shock syndrome. For an understanding of the mechanisms of action, we performed a detailed physicochemical and biophysical analysis of the interaction of rough mutant LPS with these peptides by applying FTIR (Fourier-transform infrared) spectroscopy, SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering), calorimetric techniques [DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) and ITC (isothermal titration calorimetry)] and FFTEM (freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy). Also, the action of the peptides on bacteria of different origin in microbial assays was investigated. Using FTIR and DSC, our results indicated a strong fluidization of the lipid A acyl chains due to peptide binding, with a decrease in the endothermic melting enthalpy change of the acyl chains down to a complete disappearance in the 1:0.5 to 1:2 [LPS]:[peptide] molar ratio range. Via ITC, it was deduced that the binding is a clearly exothermic process which becomes saturated at a 1:0.5 to 1:2 [LPS]:[peptide] molar ratio range. The results obtained with SAXS indicated a drastic change of the aggregate structures of LPS into a multilamellar stack, which was visualized in electron micrographs as hundreds of lamellar layers. This can be directly correlated with the inhibition of the LPS-induced production of tumour necrosis factor α in human mononuclear cells, but not with the action of the peptides on bacteria. PMID:17501719

  1. Automated carboxy-terminal sequence analysis of peptides and proteins using diphenyl phosphoroisothiocyanatidate.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, J. M.; Nikfarjam, F.; Shenoy, N. R.; Shively, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    peptides covalently attached to carboxylic acid-modified polyethylene and proteins (200 pmol to 5 nmol) noncovalently applied to Zitex (porous Teflon). The generality of our automated C-terminal sequencing methodology was examined by sequencing model peptides containing all 20 of the common amino acids. All of the amino acids tested were found to sequence in good yield except for proline, which was found not to be capable of derivatization. In spite of this limitation, the methodology should be a valuable tool for the C-terminal sequence analysis of peptides and proteins.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1304893

  2. Mitochondrial DAMPs from femoral reamings activate neutrophils via formyl peptide receptors and P44/42 MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Carl J.; Sursal, Tolga; Rodriguez, Edward K.; Appleton, Paul T.; Zhang, Qin; Itagaki, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Hypothesis Fractures and femoral reaming are associated with lung injury. The mechanisms linking fractures and inflammation are unclear; but tissue disruption might release mitochondria. Mitochondria are evolutionarily derived from bacteria and contain “Damage Associated Molecular Patterns” (DAMPs) like formylated peptides that can activate immunocytes. We therefore studied whether fracture reaming releases mitochondrial DAMPs (MTD) and how MTD act on immune cells. Methods Femur fracture reamings (FFx) from 10 patients were spun to remove bone particulates. Supernatants were assayed for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Mitochondria were isolated from the residual reaming slurry, sonicated and spun at 12,000g. The resultant MTD were assayed for their ability to cause neutrophil (PMN) Ca2+ transient production, p44/42 MAPK phosphorylation, IL-8 release and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) release with and without formyl peptide receptor-1 (FPR1) blockade. Rats were injected with MTD and whole lung assayed for p44/42 activation. Results mtDNA appears at many thousand fold normal plasma levels in FFx and at intermediate levels in patients’ plasma, suggesting release from fracture to plasma. FFx MTD caused brisk PMN Ca2+ flux, activated PMN p44/42 MAPK and caused PMN release of IL-8 and MMP9. Responses to MTD were inhibited by FPR1 blockade using Cyclosporin H and anti-FPR1. MTD injection caused P44/42 phosphorylation in rat lung. Conclusions FFx reaming releases mitochondria into the wound and circulation. MTD then activates PMN. Release of damage signals like MTD from FFx may underlie activation of the cytokine cascades known to be associated with facture fixation and lung injury. PMID:20736789

  3. Chemical genetic analysis reveals the effects of NMU2R on the expression of peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Fang, Liyan; Zhang, Mancang; Li, Chunxia; Dong, Suzhen; Hu, Yinghe

    2006-08-14

    Neuromedin U 2 receptor (NMU2R) plays important roles for the regulation of food intake and body weight. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the action of NMU2R has not been clearly defined. We have taken chemical genetic approach to examine the involvement of peptides in the regulation of NMU2R effects. A cell-based reporter gene assay has been developed and used for the screening of human NMU2R agonist. Three natural product compounds, EUK2010, EUK2011 and EUK2012, were identified that could activate the reporter gene expression in the cell-based functional assay. Although these compounds showed high EC50 at hundreds micro-molar range, in vitro pharmacological analysis suggested that they were specific agonists for the human NMU2R. The natural compounds could decrease food intake and lead to the reduction of body weight in different animal models. To understand the molecular basis of the NMU2R regulation of food intake and body weight, we examined the expression of a number of key genes in hypothalamus and adipose tissues after oral administration of EUK2010 in mice. Our results demonstrated that the expression levels of a number of neuropeptide genes were altered after the treatment of EUK2010. Interestingly, EUK2010 increased the expression of Leptin in white fat. These results suggested that these peptides may participate in the regulation of NMU2R effects in mice. PMID:16781063

  4. Combined autoradiographic-immunocytochemical analysis of opioid receptors and opioid peptide neuronal systems in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.E.; Khachaturian, H.; Watson, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    Using adjacent section autoradiography-immunocytochemistry, the distribution of (TH)naloxone binding sites was studied in relation to neuronal systems containing (Leu)enkephalin, dynorphin A, or beta-endorphin immunoreactivity in rat brain. Brain sections from formaldehyde-perfused rats show robust specific binding of (TH)naloxone, the pharmacological (mu-like) properties of which appear unaltered. In contrast, specific binding of the delta ligand (TH)D-Ala2,D-Leu5-enkephalin was virtually totally eliminated as a result of formaldehyde perfusion. Using adjacent section analysis, the authors have noted associations between (TH)naloxone binding sites and one, two, or all three opioid systems in different brain regions; however, in some areas, no apparent relationship could be observed. Within regions, the relationship was complex. The complexity of the association between (TH)naloxone binding sites and the multiple opioid systems, and previous reports of co-localization of mu and kappa receptors in rat brain, are inconsistent with a simple-one-to-one relationship between a given opioid precursor and opioid receptor subtype. Instead, since differential processing of the three precursors gives rise to peptides of varying receptor subtype potencies and selectivities, the multiple peptide-receptor relationships may point to a key role of post-translational processing in determining the physiological consequences of opioid neurotransmission.

  5. Frames of reference for helicopter electronic maps - The relevance of spatial cognition and componential analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwood, Kelly; Wickens, Christopher D.

    1991-01-01

    Computer-generated map displays for NOE and low-level helicopter flight were formed according to prior research on maps, navigational problem solving, and spatial cognition in large-scale environments. The north-up map emphasized consistency of object location, wheareas, the track-up map emphasized map-terrain congruency. A component analysis indicates that different cognitive components, e.g., orienting and absolute object location, are supported to varying degrees by properties of different frames of reference.

  6. Large areas elemental mapping by ion beam analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, T. F.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Curado, J. F.; Allegro, P.; Moro, M. V.; Campos, P. H. O. V.; Santos, S. B.; Kajiya, E. A. M.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.

    2015-07-01

    The external beam line of the Laboratory for Material Analysis with Ion Beams (LAMFI) is a versatile setup for multi-technique analysis. X-ray detectors for Particle Induced X-rays Emission (PIXE) measurements, a Gamma-ray detector for Particle Induced Gamma- ray Emission (PIGE), and a particle detector for scattering analysis, such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), were already installed. In this work, we present some results, using a large (60-cm range) XYZ computer controlled sample positioning system, completely developed and build in our laboratory. The XYZ stage was installed at the external beam line and its high spacial resolution (better than 5 μm over the full range) enables positioning the sample with high accuracy and high reproducibility. The combination of a sub-millimeter beam with the large range XYZ robotic stage is being used to produce elemental maps of large areas in samples like paintings, ceramics, stones, fossils, and all sort of samples. Due to its particular characteristics, this is a unique device in the sense of multi-technique analysis of large areas. With the continuous development of the external beam line at LAMFI, coupled to the robotic XYZ stage, it is becoming a robust and reliable option for regular analysis of trace elements (Z > 5) competing with the traditional in-vacuum ion-beam-analysis with the advantage of automatic rastering.

  7. Halvade: scalable sequence analysis with MapReduce

    PubMed Central

    Decap, Dries; Reumers, Joke; Herzeel, Charlotte; Costanza, Pascal; Fostier, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Post-sequencing DNA analysis typically consists of read mapping followed by variant calling. Especially for whole genome sequencing, this computational step is very time-consuming, even when using multithreading on a multi-core machine. Results: We present Halvade, a framework that enables sequencing pipelines to be executed in parallel on a multi-node and/or multi-core compute infrastructure in a highly efficient manner. As an example, a DNA sequencing analysis pipeline for variant calling has been implemented according to the GATK Best Practices recommendations, supporting both whole genome and whole exome sequencing. Using a 15-node computer cluster with 360 CPU cores in total, Halvade processes the NA12878 dataset (human, 100 bp paired-end reads, 50× coverage) in <3 h with very high parallel efficiency. Even on a single, multi-core machine, Halvade attains a significant speedup compared with running the individual tools with multithreading. Availability and implementation: Halvade is written in Java and uses the Hadoop MapReduce 2.0 API. It supports a wide range of distributions of Hadoop, including Cloudera and Amazon EMR. Its source is available at http://bioinformatics.intec.ugent.be/halvade under GPL license. Contact: jan.fostier@intec.ugent.be Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25819078

  8. Amplitude-Phase Analysis of Cosmic Microwave Background Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, D.; Naselsky, P.; Silk, J.

    We suggest the amplitude-phase analysis (APA) as a new method for the CMB image reconstruction. This method has been adopted for any kind of possible noise in the CMB observational data ( like point sources, dust emission, pixel and radiometer noise and so on). The important advantage of our scheme is that unlike other methods the phase analysis doesn't require any information about the expected CMB power spectra to subtract the noise. The only assumption we made is that the initial cosmological signal has a Gaussian nature. This method is very efficient computationally because it requires only O(Nln (N)) operations, where N is the number of pixels. Therefore, the full advantage of our scheme can be reached on very large data sets. Its efficiency has been successfully tested on simulated signals corresponding to MAP, PLANCK and RATAN-600 angular resolutions. P. Naselsky (TAC, Denmark), I. Novikov (TAC, Denmark)

  9. Analysis of radiotracking data using digitized habitat maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilmer, D.S.; Miller, S.E.; Cowardin, L.M.

    1973-01-01

    A method is described that provides a rapid and accurate analysis of habitat used by radio-equipped animals. The digitizer (basically an X-Y plotter in reverse) converts maps into digital form by describing each habitat unit as a polygon that closely approximates the actual shape of the unit. The coordinates of each polygon are then stored on magnetic tape. Habitat classification data and other information are coded and combined with the proper polygon coordinates. This results in one file containing all habitat data. A computer program with inputs of tracking data and habitat data provides a listing of the habitat used by the animals studied. Analysis of habitat used by radio-equipped ducks is demonstrated using this method.

  10. New Mexico Play Fairway Analysis: Particle Tracking ArcGIS Map Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Pepin

    2015-11-15

    These are map packages used to visualize geochemical particle-tracking analysis results in ArcGIS. It includes individual map packages for several regions of New Mexico including: Acoma, Rincon, Gila, Las Cruces, Socorro and Truth or Consequences.