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Sample records for peptidyl prolyl cis-trans

  1. Peptidyl prolyl cis-trans-isomerase activity associated with the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Bose, S; Freedman, R B

    1994-01-01

    Peptidyl prolyl cis-trans-isomerase (PPI) activity was detected in microsomal fractions from bovine and rat liver. Extensive washing, proteinase and sonication treatments indicated that although some of this activity was due to adsorbed cytosolic enzymes, there was also an active but latent microsomal PPI activity. Density-gradient subfractionation indicated that activity was associated with vesicles derived from both the rough and the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER), suggesting that the activity was located within the ER lumen. The luminal PPI activity was inhibited by cyclosporin A and was active towards an unfolded protein substrate as well as towards the standard peptide substrate. PMID:8010971

  2. Cellular peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1 facilitates replication of feline coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Amano, Arisa; Morisaki, Masateru; Sato, Yuka; Sasaki, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Although feline coronavirus (FCoV) causes feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), which is a fatal infectious disease, there are no effective therapeutic medicines or vaccines. Previously, in vitro studies have shown that cyclosporin (CsA) and FK506 inhibit virus replication in diverse coronaviruses. CsA and FK506 are targets of clinically relevant immunosuppressive drugs and bind to cellular cyclophilins (Cyps) or FK506 binding proteins (FKBPs), respectively. Both Cyp and FKBP have peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) activity. However, protein interacting with NIMA (Pin1), a member of the parvulin subfamily of PPIases that differs from Cyps and FKBPs, is essential for various signaling pathways. Here we demonstrated that genetic silencing or knockout of Pin1 resulted in decreased FCoV replication in vitro. Dipentamethylene thiuram monosulfide, a specific inhibitor of Pin1, inhibited FCoV replication. These data indicate that Pin1 modulates FCoV propagation. PMID:26675666

  3. Microbial Peptidyl-Prolyl cis/trans Isomerases (PPIases): Virulence Factors and Potential Alternative Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Initially discovered in the context of immunomodulation, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases) were soon identified as enzymes catalyzing the rate-limiting protein folding step at peptidyl bonds preceding proline residues. Intense searches revealed that PPIases are a superfamily of proteins consisting of three structurally distinguishable families with representatives in every described species of prokaryote and eukaryote and, recently, even in some giant viruses. Despite the clear-cut enzymatic activity and ubiquitous distribution of PPIases, reports on solely PPIase-dependent biological roles remain scarce. Nevertheless, they have been found to be involved in a plethora of biological processes, such as gene expression, signal transduction, protein secretion, development, and tissue regeneration, underscoring their general importance. Hence, it is not surprising that PPIases have also been identified as virulence-associated proteins. The extent of contribution to virulence is highly variable and dependent on the pleiotropic roles of a single PPIase in the respective pathogen. The main objective of this review is to discuss this variety in virulence-related bacterial and protozoan PPIases as well as the involvement of host PPIases in infectious processes. Moreover, a special focus is given to Legionella pneumophila macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) and Mip-like PPIases of other pathogens, as the best-characterized virulence-related representatives of this family. Finally, the potential of PPIases as alternative drug targets and first tangible results are highlighted. PMID:25184565

  4. Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase-independent functional NifH mutant of Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Gavini, Nara; Tungtur, Sudheer; Pulakat, Lakshmi

    2006-08-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases) play a pivotal role in catalyzing the correct folding of many prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins that are implicated in a variety of biological functions, ranging from cell cycle regulation to bacterial infection. The nif accessory protein NifM, which is essential for the biogenesis of a functional NifH component of nitrogenase, is a PPIase. To understand the nature of the molecular signature that defines the NifM dependence of NifH, we screened a library of nifH mutants in the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii for mutants that acquired NifM independence. Here, we report that NifH can acquire NifM independence when the conserved Pro258 located in the C-terminal region of NifH, which wraps around the other subunit in the NifH dimer, is replaced by serine. PMID:16885471

  5. Determining the roles of a conserved tyrosine residue in a Mip-like peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase.

    PubMed

    Polley, Soumitra; Chakravarty, Devlina; Chakrabarti, Gopal; Sau, Subrata

    2016-06-01

    The FKBP22 and the related peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases dimerize using their N-terminal domains. Conversely, their C-terminal domains possess both the substrate and inhibitor binding sites. To delineate the roles of a conserved Tyr residue at their N-terminal domains, we have studied a FKBP22 mutant that carries an Ala in place of the conserved Tyr at position 15. We have demonstrated that the Tyr 15 of FKBP22 is indispensable for preserving its dimerization ability, catalytic activity, and structure. The residue, however, little contributed to its inhibitor binding ability and stability. The mode of action of Tyr 15 has been discussed at length. PMID:26944658

  6. Domain structure and denaturation of a dimeric Mip-like peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jana, Biswanath; Bandhu, Amitava; Mondal, Rajkrishna; Biswas, Anindya; Sau, Keya; Sau, Subrata

    2012-02-14

    FKBP22, a protein expressed by Escherichia coli, possesses PPIase (peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase) activity, binds FK506 (an immunosuppressive drug), and shares homology with Legionella Mip (a virulence factor) and its related proteins. To understand the domain structure and the folding-unfolding mechanism of Mip-like proteins, we investigated a recombinant E. coli FKBP22 (His-FKBP22) as a model protein. Limited proteolysis indicated that His-FKBP22 harbors an N-terminal domain (NTD), a C-terminal domain (CTD), and a long flexible region linking the two domains. His-FKBP22, NTD(+) (NTD with the entire flexible region), and CTD(+) (CTD with a truncated flexible region) were unfolded by a two-state mechanism in the presence of urea. Urea induced the swelling of dimeric His-FKBP22 molecules at the pretransition state but dissociated it at the early transition state. In contrast, guanidine hydrochloride (GdnCl)-induced equilibrium unfolding of His-FKBP22 or NTD(+) and CTD(+) seemed to follow three-step and two-step mechanisms, respectively. Interestingly, the intermediate formed during the unfolding of His-FKBP22 with GdnCl was not a molten globule but was thought to be composed of the partially unfolded dimeric as well as various multimeric His-FKBP22 molecules. Dimeric His-FKBP22 did not dissociate gradually with increasing concentrations of GdnCl. Very low GdnCl concentrations also had little effect on the molecular dimensions of His-FKBP22. Unfolding with either denaturant was found to be reversible, as refolding of the unfolded His-FKBP22 completely, or nearly completely, restored the structure and function of the protein. Additionally, denaturation of His-FKBP22 appeared to begin at the CTD(+). PMID:22263615

  7. Cytosolic Aryl sulfotransferase 4A1 interacts with the peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase Pin1.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Deanne J; Minchin, Rodney F

    2009-08-01

    Sulfonation by cytosolic sulfotransferases plays an important role in the metabolism of both endogenous and exogenous compounds. Sulfotransferase 4A1 (SULT4A1) is a novel sulfotransferase found primarily in neurons in the brain. It is highly conserved between species, but no substantial enzyme activity has been identified for the protein. Consequently, little is known about the role of this enzyme in the brain. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human brain library to isolate potential SULT4A1-interacting proteins that might identify the role or regulation of the sulfotransferase in humans. The screen isolated the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase Pin1. Its interaction with SULT4A1 was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation studies in HeLa cells and by in vitro pull-down of expressed proteins. Moreover, Pin1 binding was dependent on phosphorylation of the SULT4A1 protein. Pin1 destabilized SULT4A1, decreasing its half-life from more than 8 h to approximately 4.5 h. This effect was dependent on the isomerase activity of Pin1 and was inhibited by okadaic acid, suggesting a role for the phosphatase PP2A. Pin1-mediated SULT4A1 degradation did not involve the proteosomes or macroautophagy, but it was inhibited by the calpain antagonists N-acetyl-Leu-Leu-Nle-CHO and Z-Val-Phe-CHO. Finally, Pin1 binding was mapped to two threonine-proline motifs (Thr(8) and Thr(11)) that are not present in any of the other human cytosolic sulfotransferases. Our findings suggest that SULT4A1 is subject to post-translational modification that alters its stability in the cell. These modifications may also be important for enzyme activity, which explains why specific substrates for SULT4A1 have not yet been identified. PMID:19439498

  8. Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans-isomerase A1 (Pin1) is a target for modification by lipid electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Aluise, Christopher D; Rose, Kristie; Boiani, Mariana; Reyzer, Michelle L; Manna, Joseph D; Tallman, Keri; Porter, Ned A; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2013-02-18

    Oxidation of membrane phospholipids is associated with inflammation, neurodegenerative disease, and cancer. Oxyradical damage to phospholipids results in the production of reactive aldehydes that adduct proteins and modulate their function. 4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE), a common product of oxidative damage to lipids, adducts proteins at exposed Cys, His, or Lys residues. Here, we demonstrate that peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans-isomerase A1 (Pin1), an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of the peptide bond of pSer/pThr-Pro moieties in signaling proteins from cis to trans, is highly susceptible to HNE modification. Incubation of purified Pin1 with HNE followed by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry resulted in detection of Michael adducts at the active site residues His-157 and Cys-113. Time and concentration dependencies indicate that Cys-113 is the primary site of HNE modification. Pin1 was adducted in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells treated with 8-alkynyl-HNE as judged by click chemistry conjugation with biotin followed by streptavidin-based pulldown and Western blotting with anti-Pin1 antibody. Furthermore, orbitrap MS data support the adduction of Cys-113 in the Pin1 active site upon HNE treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells. siRNA knockdown of Pin1 in MDA-MB-231 cells partially protected the cells from HNE-induced toxicity. Recent studies indicate that Pin1 is an important molecular target for the chemopreventive effects of green tea polyphenols. The present study establishes that it is also a target for electrophilic modification by products of lipid peroxidation. PMID:23231502

  9. Characterization of Peptidyl-Prolyl Cis-Trans Isomerase- and Calmodulin-Binding Activity of a Cytosolic Arabidopsis thaliana Cyclophilin AtCyp19-3

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gundeep; Singh, Supreet; Singh, Harpreet; Chawla, Mrinalini; Dutta, Tanima; Kaur, Harsimran; Bender, Kyle; Snedden, W. A.; Kapoor, Sanjay; Pareek, Ashwani; Singh, Prabhjeet

    2015-01-01

    Cyclophilins, which bind to immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CsA), are ubiquitous proteins and constitute a multigene family in higher organisms. Several members of this family are reported to catalyze cis-trans isomerisation of the peptidyl-prolyl bond, which is a rate limiting step in protein folding. The physiological role of these proteins in plants, with few exceptions, is still a matter of speculation. Although Arabidopsis genome is predicted to contain 35 cyclophilin genes, biochemical characterization, imperative for understanding their cellular function(s), has been carried only for few of the members. The present study reports the biochemical characterization of an Arabidopsis cyclophilin, AtCyp19-3, which demonstrated that this protein is enzymatically active and possesses peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) activity that is specifically inhibited by CsA with an inhibition constant (Ki) of 18.75 nM. The PPIase activity of AtCyp19-3 was also sensitive to Cu2+, which covalently reacts with the sulfhydryl groups, implying redox regulation. Further, using calmodulin (CaM) gel overlay assays it was demonstrated that in vitro interaction of AtCyp19-3 with CaM is Ca2+-dependent, and CaM-binding domain is localized to 35–70 amino acid residues in the N-terminus. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays showed that AtCyp19-3 interacts with CaM in vivo also, thus, validating the in vitro observations. However, the PPIase activity of the Arabidopsis cyclophilin was not affected by CaM. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of Ca2+ signaling and cyclophilin activity in Arabidopsis. PMID:26317213

  10. Rapamycin sensitivity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is mediated by a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase related to human FK506-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Koltin, Y; Faucette, L; Bergsma, D J; Levy, M A; Cafferkey, R; Koser, P L; Johnson, R K; Livi, G P

    1991-01-01

    Rapamycin is a macrolide antifungal agent with structural similarity to FK506. It exhibits potent immunosuppressive properties analogous to those of both FK506 and cyclosporin A (CsA). Unlike FK506 and CsA, however, rapamycin does not inhibit the transcription of early T-cell activation genes, including interleukin-2, but instead appears to block downstream events leading to T-cell activation. FK506 and CsA receptor proteins (FKBP and cyclophilin, respectively) have been identified and shown to be distinct members of a class of enzymes that possess peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) activity. Despite the apparent differences in their mode of action, rapamycin and FK506 act as reciprocal antagonists in vivo and compete for binding to FKBP. As a means of rapidly identifying a target protein for rapamycin in vivo, we selected and genetically characterized rapamycin-resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and isolated a yeast genomic fragment that confers drug sensitivity. We demonstrate that the resonse to rapamycin in yeast cells is mediated by a gene encoding a 114-amino-acid, approximately 13-kDa protein which has a high degree of sequence homology with human FKBP; we designated this gene RBP1 (for rapamycin-binding protein). The RBP1 protein (RBP) was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and shown to catalyze peptidyl-prolyl isomerization of a synthetic peptide substrate. PPIase activity was completely inhibited by rapamycin and FK506 but not by CsA, indicating that both macrolides bind to the recombinant protein. Expression of human FKBP in rapamycin-resistant mutants restored rapamycin sensitivity, indicating a functional equivalence between the yeast and human enzymes. Images PMID:1996117

  11. Isolation and characterization of a 17-kDa FKBP-type peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase from Vibrio anguillarum.

    PubMed

    Jo, Geon-A; Lee, Jong Min; No, Gyuyou; Kang, Dong Seop; Kim, So-Hyun; Ahn, Sun-Hee; Kong, In-Soo

    2015-06-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) catalyzes the isomerization of peptide bonds to achieve conformational changes in native folded proteins. An FKBP-type PPIase with an approximate molecular weight of 17kDa was isolated from Vibrio anguillarum O1 and named VaFKBP17. To investigate its biochemical properties, the ppi gene from V. anguillarum O1 was isolated and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. A protease-coupled assay for isomerization activity, using Succinyl-Ala-Phe-Pro-Phe-p nitroanilide as substrate, indicated that the activity of VaFKBP17 was highest at low temperature (5°C) and alkaline conditions (pH 10). The immunosuppressant FK506 inhibited the isomerization activity of VaFKBP17. The chaperone activity of VaFKBP17 was assessed using a citrate synthase thermal aggregation activity assay. To evaluate its ability to catalyze protein refolding, the effect of VaFKBP17 on inclusion bodies was investigated during a dilution process. In this assay, VaFKBP17 was able to assist protein refolding. These results provide evidence that VaFKBP17 possesses chaperone-like activity. The structural homology of VaFKBP17 relative to other known bacterial FKBPs was also examined. PMID:25747528

  12. Single-Domain Peptidyl-Prolyl cis/trans Isomerase FkpA from Corynebacterium glutamicum Improves the Biomass Yield at Increased Growth Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Bott, Michael; van Ooyen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases) catalyze the rate-limiting protein folding step at peptidyl bonds preceding proline residues and were found to be involved in several biological processes, including gene expression, signal transduction, and protein secretion. Representative enzymes were found in almost all sequenced genomes, including Corynebacterium glutamicum, a facultative anaerobic Gram-positive and industrial workhorse for the production of amino acids. In C. glutamicum, a predicted single-domain FK-506 (tacrolimus) binding protein (FKBP)-type PPIase (FkpA) is encoded directly downstream of gltA, which encodes citrate synthase (CS). This gene cluster is also present in other Actinobacteria. Here we carried out in vitro and in vivo experiments to study the function and influence of predicted FkpA in C. glutamicum. In vitro, FkpA indeed shows typical PPIase activity with artificial substrates and is inhibited by FK-506. Furthermore, FkpA delays the aggregation of CS, which is also inhibited by FK-506. Surprisingly, FkpA has a positive effect on the activity and temperature range of CS in vitro. Deletion of fkpA causes a 50% reduced biomass yield compared to that of the wild type when grown at 37°C, whereas there is only a 10% reduced biomass yield at the optimal growth temperature of 30°C accompanied by accumulation of 7 mM l-glutamate and 22 mM 2-oxoglutarate. Thus, FkpA may be exploited for improved product formation in biotechnical processes. Comparative transcriptome analysis revealed 69 genes which exhibit ≥2-fold mRNA level changes in C. glutamicum ΔfkpA, giving insight into the transcriptional response upon mild heat stress when FkpA is absent. PMID:26341203

  13. Single-Domain Peptidyl-Prolyl cis/trans Isomerase FkpA from Corynebacterium glutamicum Improves the Biomass Yield at Increased Growth Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kallscheuer, Nicolai; Bott, Michael; van Ooyen, Jan; Polen, Tino

    2015-11-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases) catalyze the rate-limiting protein folding step at peptidyl bonds preceding proline residues and were found to be involved in several biological processes, including gene expression, signal transduction, and protein secretion. Representative enzymes were found in almost all sequenced genomes, including Corynebacterium glutamicum, a facultative anaerobic Gram-positive and industrial workhorse for the production of amino acids. In C. glutamicum, a predicted single-domain FK-506 (tacrolimus) binding protein (FKBP)-type PPIase (FkpA) is encoded directly downstream of gltA, which encodes citrate synthase (CS). This gene cluster is also present in other Actinobacteria. Here we carried out in vitro and in vivo experiments to study the function and influence of predicted FkpA in C. glutamicum. In vitro, FkpA indeed shows typical PPIase activity with artificial substrates and is inhibited by FK-506. Furthermore, FkpA delays the aggregation of CS, which is also inhibited by FK-506. Surprisingly, FkpA has a positive effect on the activity and temperature range of CS in vitro. Deletion of fkpA causes a 50% reduced biomass yield compared to that of the wild type when grown at 37°C, whereas there is only a 10% reduced biomass yield at the optimal growth temperature of 30°C accompanied by accumulation of 7 mM l-glutamate and 22 mM 2-oxoglutarate. Thus, FkpA may be exploited for improved product formation in biotechnical processes. Comparative transcriptome analysis revealed 69 genes which exhibit ≥2-fold mRNA level changes in C. glutamicum ΔfkpA, giving insight into the transcriptional response upon mild heat stress when FkpA is absent. PMID:26341203

  14. Identification and Comparative Analysis of the Peptidyl-Prolyl cis/trans Isomerase Repertoires of H. sapiens, D. melanogaster, C. elegans, S. cerevisiae and Sz. pombe

    PubMed Central

    Kay, John E.

    2005-01-01

    The peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) class of proteins comprises three member families that are found throughout nature and are present in all the major compartments of the cell. Their numbers appear to be linked to the number of genes in their respective genomes, although we have found the human repertoire to be smaller than expected due to a reduced cyclophilin repertoire. We show here that whilst the members of the cyclophilin family (which are predominantly found in the nucleus and cytoplasm) and the parvulin family (which are predominantly nuclear) are largely conserved between different repertoires, the FKBPs (which are predominantly found in the cytoplasm and endoplasmic reticulum) are not. It therefore appears that the cyclophilins and parvulins have evolved to perform conserved functions, while the FKBPs have evolved to fill ever-changing niches within the constantly evolving organisms. Many orthologous subgroups within the different PPIase families appear to have evolved from a distinct common ancestor, whereas others, such as the mitochondrial cyclophilins, appear to have evolved independently of one another. We have also identified a novel parvulin within Drosophila melanogaster that is unique to the fruit fly, indicating a recent evolutionary emergence. Interestingly, the fission yeast repertoire, which contains no unique cyclophilins and parvulins, shares no PPIases solely with the budding yeast but it does share a majority with the higher eukaryotes in this study, unlike the budding yeast. It therefore appears that, in comparison with Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a poor representation of the higher eukaryotes for the study of PPIases. PMID:18629211

  15. Folding of barstar C40A/C82A/P27A and catalysis of the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerization by human cytosolic cyclophilin (Cyp18).

    PubMed Central

    Golbik, R.; Fischer, G.; Fersht, A. R.

    1999-01-01

    Refolding of b*C40A/C82A/P27A is comprised of several kinetically detectable folding phases. The slowest phase in refolding originates from trans-->cis isomerization of the Tyr47-Pro48 peptide bond being in cis conformation in the native state. This refolding phase can be accelerated by the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase human cytosolic cyclophilin (Cyp18) with a kcat/K(M) of 254,000 M(-1) s(-1). The fast refolding phase is not influenced by the enzyme. PMID:10422840

  16. Utilizing the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase pin1 as a probe of its phosphorylated target proteins. Examples of binding to nuclear proteins in a human kidney cell line and to tau in Alzheimer's diseased brain.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, J R; Morley, S J; Rulten, S L

    2001-01-01

    The human parvulin Pin1 is a member of the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase group of proteins, which modulate the assembly, folding, activity, and transport of essential cellular proteins. Pin1 is a mitotic regulator interacting with a range of proteins that are phosphorylated before cell division. In addition, an involvement of Pin1 in the tau-related neurodegenerative brain disorders has recently been shown. In this context, Pin1 becomes depleted from the nucleus in Alzheimer's disease (AD) neurons when it is redirected to the large amounts of hyperphosphorylated tau associated with the neurofibrillary tangles. This depletion from the nucleus may ultimately contribute to neuron cell death. Recently we have devised a novel methodology in which exogenous Pin1 is used as a TEM probe for its target proteins. Here we extend this methodology to provide further evidence that Pin1 binds at enhanced levels to mitotic nuclear proteins and to hyperphosphorylated tau in AD brain. We suggest that exogenous Pin1 labeling can be used to elucidate the phosphorylation status of its target proteins in general and could specifically provide important insights into the development of tau-related neurodegenerative brain disorders. PMID:11118482

  17. Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 Is a Cellular Factor Required for Hepatitis C Virus Propagation▿

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yun-Sook; Tran, Huong T. L.; Park, Soo-Je; Yim, Seung-Ae; Hwang, Soon B.

    2011-01-01

    The life cycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly dependent on cellular factors. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA) library screening, we identified peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase NIMA-interacting 1 (Pin1) as a host factor involved in HCV propagation. Here we demonstrated that silencing of Pin1 expression resulted in decreases in HCV replication in both HCV replicon cells and cell culture-grown HCV (HCVcc)-infected cells, whereas overexpression of Pin1 increased HCV replication. Pin1 interacted with both the NS5A and NS5B proteins. However, Pin1 expression was increased only by the NS5B protein. Both the protein binding and isomerase activities of Pin1 were required for HCV replication. Juglone, a natural inhibitor of Pin1, inhibited HCV propagation by inhibiting the interplay between the Pin1 and HCV NS5A/NS5B proteins. These data indicate that Pin1 modulates HCV propagation and may contribute to HCV-induced liver pathogenesis. PMID:21680504

  18. Internal Activation of Peptidyl Prolyl Thioesters in Native Chemical Ligation.

    PubMed

    Gui, Yue; Qiu, Lingqi; Li, Yaohao; Li, Hongxing; Dong, Suwei

    2016-04-13

    Prolyl thioesters have shown significantly lower reactivities in native chemical ligation (NCL) in comparison to that of the alanyl thioester. This report describes a mild and efficient internal activation protocol of peptidyl prolyl thioesters in NCL without using any thiol-based additives, where the introduction of a 4-mercaptan substituent on the C-terminal proline significantly improves the reactivity of prolyl thioesters via the formation of a bicyclic thiolactone intermediate. The kinetic data indicate that the reaction rate is comparable to that of the reported data of alanyl thioesters, and the mechanistic studies suggest that the ligation of two peptide segments proceeds through an NCL-like pathway instead of a direct aminolysis, which ensures the chemoselectivity and compatibility of various amino acid side chains. This 4-mercaptoprolyl thioester-based protocol also allows an efficient one-pot ligation-desulfurization procedure. The utility of this method has been further demonstrated in the synthesis of a proline-rich region of Wilms tumor protein 1. PMID:26982082

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerases Also Exhibit Chaperone like Activity In-Vitro and In-Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Saurabh; Sharma, Ashish; Tripathi, Deeksha; Kumar, Ashutosh; Khubaib, Mohd; Bhuwan, Manish; Chaudhuri, Tapan Kumar; Hasnain, Seyed Ehtesham; Ehtesham, Nasreen Zafar

    2016-01-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases (Ppiases), also known as cyclophilins, are ubiquitously expressed enzymes that assist in protein folding by isomerization of peptide bonds preceding prolyl residues. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) is known to possess two Ppiases, PpiA and PpiB. However, our understanding about the biological significance of mycobacterial Ppiases with respect to their pleiotropic roles in responding to stress conditions inside the macrophages is restricted. This study describes chaperone-like activity of mycobacterial Ppiases. We show that recombinant rPpiA and rPpiB can bind to non-native proteins in vitro and can prevent their aggregation. Purified rPpiA and rPpiB exist in oligomeric form as evident from gel filtration chromatography.E. coli cells overexpressing PpiA and PpiB of M.tb could survive thermal stress as compared to plasmid vector control. HEK293T cells transiently expressing M.tb PpiA and PpiB proteins show increased survival as compared to control cells in response to oxidative stress and hypoxic conditions generated after treatment with H2O2 and CoCl2 thereby pointing to their likely role in adaption under host generated oxidative stress and conditions of hypoxia. The chaperone-like function of these M.tuberculosis cyclophilins may possibly function as a stress responder and consequently contribute to virulence. PMID:26981873

  20. The emerging role of peptidyl-prolyl isomerase chaperones in tau oligomerization, amyloid processing and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Laura J.; Baker, Jeremy D.; Sabbagh, Jonathan J.; Dickey, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases), a unique family of molecular chaperones, regulate protein folding at proline residues. These residues are abundant within intrinsically disordered proteins, like the microtubule-associated protein tau. Tau has been shown to become hyperphosphorylated and accumulate as one of the two main pathological hallmarks in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the other being amyloid beta (Aβ). PPIases, including Pin1, FK506-binding protein (FKBP) 52, FKBP51, and FKBP12, have been shown to interact with and regulate tau biology. This interaction is particularly important given the numerous proline-directed phosphorylation sites found on tau and the role phosphorylation has been found to play in pathogenesis. This regulation then affects downstream aggregation and oligomerization of tau. However, many PPIases have yet to be explored for their effects on tau biology, despite the high likelihood of interaction based on proline content. Moreover, Pin1, FKBP12, FKBP52, cyclophilin (Cyp) A, CypB, and CypD have been shown to also regulate Aβ production or the toxicity associated with Aβ pathology. Therefore, PPIases directly and indirectly regulate pathogenic protein multimerization in AD and represent a family rich in targets for modulating the accumulation and toxicity. PMID:25628064

  1. Regulation of Estrogen Receptor α N-Terminus Conformation and Function by Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerase Pin1

    PubMed Central

    Rajbhandari, Prashant; Finn, Greg; Solodin, Natalia M.; Singarapu, Kiran K.; Sahu, Sarata C.; Markley, John L.; Kadunc, Kelley J.; Ellison-Zelski, Stephanie J.; Kariagina, Anastasia; Haslam, Sandra Z.; Lu, Kun Ping

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), a key driver of growth in the majority of breast cancers, contains an unstructured transactivation domain (AF1) in its N terminus that is a convergence point for growth factor and hormonal activation. This domain is controlled by phosphorylation, but how phosphorylation impacts AF1 structure and function is unclear. We found that serine 118 (S118) phosphorylation of the ERα AF1 region in response to estrogen (agonist), tamoxifen (antagonist), and growth factors results in recruitment of the peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1. Phosphorylation of S118 is critical for Pin1 binding, and mutation of S118 to alanine prevents this association. Importantly, Pin1 isomerizes the serine118-proline119 bond from a cis to trans isomer, with a concomitant increase in AF1 transcriptional activity. Pin1 overexpression promotes ligand-independent and tamoxifen-inducible activity of ERα and growth of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells. Pin1 expression correlates with proliferation in ERα-positive rat mammary tumors. These results establish phosphorylation-coupled proline isomerization as a mechanism modulating AF1 functional activity and provide insight into the role of a conformational switch in the functional regulation of the intrinsically disordered transactivation domain of ERα. PMID:22064478

  2. Cyclophilin J Is a Novel Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerase and Target for Repressing the Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Chen, Shuai; Wang, Jiahui; Zhang, Mingjun; Gong, Zhaohua; Wei, Youheng; Li, Li; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Xuemei; Jiang, Songmin; Yu, Long

    2015-01-01

    Cyclophilin J (CYPJ) is a new member of the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans-isomerase (PPIase) identified with upregulated expression in human glioma. However, the biological function of CYPJ remained unclear. We aimed to study the role of CYPJ in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) carcinogenesis and its therapeutic potential. We determined the expression of CYPJ in HCC/adjacent normal tissues using Western blot, Northern blot and semi-quantitative RT-PCR, analyzed the biochemical characteristics of CYPJ, and resolved the 3D-structure of CYPJ/Cyclosporin A (CsA) complex. We also studied the roles of CYPJ in cell cycle, cyclin D1 regulation, in vitro and in vivo tumor growth. We found that CYPJ expression was upregulated in over 60% HCC tissues. The PPIase activity of CYPJ could be inhibited by the widely used immunosuppressive drug CsA. CYPJ was found expressed in the whole cell of HCC with preferential location at the cell nucleus. CYPJ promoted the transition of cells from G1 phase to S phase in a PPIase-dependent manner by activating cyclin D1 promoter. CYPJ overexpression accelerated liver cell growth in vitro (cell growth assay, colony formation) and in vivo (xenograft tumor formation). Inhibition of CYPJ by its inhibitor CsA or CYPJ-specific RNAi diminished the growth of liver cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, CYPJ could facilitate HCC growth by promoting cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase through the upregulation of cyclin D1. Suppression of CYPJ could repress the growth of HCC, which makes CYPJ a potential target for the development of new strategies to treat this malignancy. PMID:26020957

  3. FK506-Binding Protein 22 from a Psychrophilic Bacterium, a Cold Shock-Inducible Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerase with the Ability to Assist in Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Budiman, Cahyo; Koga, Yuichi; Takano, Kazufumi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2011-01-01

    Adaptation of microorganisms to low temperatures remains to be fully elucidated. It has been previously reported that peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerases (PPIases) are involved in cold adaptation of various microorganisms whether they are hyperthermophiles, mesophiles or phsycrophiles. The rate of cis-trans isomerization at low temperatures is much slower than that at higher temperatures and may cause problems in protein folding. However, the mechanisms by which PPIases are involved in cold adaptation remain unclear. Here we used FK506-binding protein 22, a cold shock protein from the psychrophilic bacterium Shewanella sp. SIB1 (SIB1 FKBP22) as a model protein to decipher the involvement of PPIases in cold adaptation. SIB1 FKBP22 is homodimer that assumes a V-shaped structure based on a tertiary model. Each monomer consists of an N-domain responsible for dimerization and a C-catalytic domain. SIB1 FKBP22 is a typical cold-adapted enzyme as indicated by the increase of catalytic efficiency at low temperatures, the downward shift in optimal temperature of activity and the reduction in the conformational stability. SIB1 FKBP22 is considered as foldase and chaperone based on its ability to catalyze refolding of a cis-proline containing protein and bind to a folding intermediate protein, respectively. The foldase and chaperone activites of SIB1 FKBP22 are thought to be important for cold adaptation of Shewanella sp. SIB1. These activities are also employed by other PPIases for being involved in cold adaptation of various microorganisms. Despite other biological roles of PPIases, we proposed that foldase and chaperone activities of PPIases are the main requirement for overcoming the cold-stress problem in microorganisms due to folding of proteins. PMID:21954357

  4. Enhancement of antibody fragment secretion into the Escherichia coli periplasm by co-expression with the peptidyl prolyl isomerase, FkpA, in the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Levy, Raphael; Ahluwalia, Kiran; Bohmann, David J; Giang, Hoa M; Schwimmer, Lauren J; Issafras, Hassan; Reddy, Nithin B; Chan, Chung; Horwitz, Arnold H; Takeuchi, Toshihiko

    2013-08-30

    Improper protein folding or aggregation can frequently be responsible for low expression and poor functional activity of antibody fragments secreted into the Escherichia coli periplasm. Expression issues also can affect selection of antibody candidates from phage libraries, since antibody fragments displayed on phage also are secreted into the E. coli periplasm. To improve secretion of properly folded antibody fragments into the periplasm, we have developed a novel approach that involves co-expressing the antibody fragments with the peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase, FkpA, lacking its signal sequence (cytFkpA) which consequently is expressed in the E. coli cytosol. Cytoplasmic expression of cytFkpA improved secretion of functional Fab fragments into the periplasm, exceeding even the benefits from co-expressing Fab fragments with native, FkpA localized in the periplasm. In addition, panning and subsequent screening of large Fab and scFv naïve phage libraries in the presence of cytFkpA significantly increased the number of unique clones selected, as well as their functional expression levels and diversity. PMID:23624043

  5. Kinetic isotope effects support the twisted amide mechanism of Pin1 peptidyl-prolyl isomerase.

    PubMed

    Mercedes-Camacho, Ana Y; Mullins, Ashley B; Mason, Matthew D; Xu, Guoyan G; Mahoney, Brendan J; Wang, Xingsheng; Peng, Jeffrey W; Etzkorn, Felicia A

    2013-11-01

    The Pin1 peptidyl-prolyl isomerase catalyzes isomerization of pSer/pThr-Pro motifs in regulating the cell cycle. Peptide substrates, Ac-Phe-Phe-phosphoSer-Pro-Arg-p-nitroaniline, were synthesized in unlabeled form, and with deuterium-labeled Ser-d3 and Pro-d7 amino acids. Kinetic data were collected as a function of Pin1 concentration to measure kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) on catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km). The normal secondary (2°) KIE value measured for the Ser-d3 substrate (kH/kD = 1.6 ± 0.2) indicates that the serine carbonyl does not rehybridize from sp(2) to sp(3) in the rate-determining step, ruling out a nucleophilic addition mechanism. The normal 2° KIE can be explained by hyperconjugation between Ser α-C-H/D and C═O and release of steric strain upon rotation of the amide bond from cis to syn-exo. The inverse 2° KIE value (kH/kD = 0.86 ± 0.08) measured for the Pro-d7 substrate indicates rehybridization of the prolyl nitrogen from sp(2) to sp(3) during the rate-limiting step of isomerization. No solvent kinetic isotope was measured by NMR exchange spectroscopy (kH2O/kD2O = 0.92 ± 0.12), indicating little or no involvement of exchangeable protons in the mechanism. These results support the formation of a simple twisted amide transition state as the mechanism for peptidyl prolyl isomerization catalyzed by Pin1. A model of the reaction mechanism is presented using crystal structures of Pin1 with ground state analogues and an inhibitor that resembles a twisted amide transition state. PMID:24116866

  6. Kinetic Isotope Effects Support the Twisted Amide Mechanism of Pin1 Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Mercedes-Camacho, Ana Y.; Mullins, Ashley B.; Mason, Matthew D.; Xu, Guoyan G.; Mahoney, Brendan J.; Wang, Xingsheng; Peng, Jeffrey W.; Etzkorn, Felicia A.

    2013-01-01

    The Pin1 peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) catalyzes isomerization of pSer/pThr-Pro motifs in regulating the cell cycle. Peptide substrates, Ac–Phe–Phe–phosphoSer–Pro–Arg–p-nitroaniline, were synthesized in unlabeled form, and with deuterium labeled Ser-d3 and Pro-d7 amino acids. Kinetic data was collected as a function of Pin1 concentration to measure kinetic isotope effects (KIE) on catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km). The normal secondary (2°) KIE value measured for the Ser-d3 substrate (kH/kD = 1.6 ± 0.2) indicates that the serine carbonyl does not rehybridize from sp2 to sp3 in the rate-determining step, ruling out a nucleophilic addition mechanism. The normal 2° KIE can be explained by hyperconjugation between Ser α-C–H/D and C=O, and release of steric strain upon rotation of the amide bond from cis to syn-exo. The inverse 2° KIE value (kH/kD = 0.86 ± 0.08) measured for the Pro-d7 substrate indicates rehybridization of the prolyl nitrogen from sp2 to sp3 during the rate-limiting step of isomerization. No solvent kinetic isotope was measured by NMR exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) (kH2O/kD2O = 0.92 ± 0.12), indicating little or no involvement of exchangeable protons in the mechanism. These results support the formation of a simple twisted-amide transition state as the mechanism for peptidyl prolyl isomerization catalyzed by Pin1. A model of the reaction mechanism is presented using crystal structures of Pin1 with ground state analogues and an inhibitor that resembles a twisted amide transition state. PMID:24116866

  7. Nerve Growth Factor Stimulates Interaction of Cayman Ataxia Protein BNIP-H/Caytaxin with Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 in Differentiating Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Buschdorf, Jan Paul; Chew, Li Li; Soh, Unice Jim Kim; Liou, Yih-Cherng; Low, Boon Chuan

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in ATCAY that encodes the brain-specific protein BNIP-H (or Caytaxin) lead to Cayman cerebellar ataxia. BNIP-H binds to glutaminase, a neurotransmitter-producing enzyme, and affects its activity and intracellular localization. Here we describe the identification and characterization of the binding between BNIP-H and Pin1, a peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase. BNIP-H interacted with Pin1 after nerve growth factor-stimulation and they co-localized in the neurites and cytosol of differentiating pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and the embryonic carcinoma P19 cells. Deletional mutagenesis revealed two cryptic binding sites within the C-terminus of BNIP-H such that single point mutants affecting the WW domain of Pin1 completely abolished their binding. Although these two sites do not contain any of the canonical Pin1-binding motifs they showed differential binding profiles to Pin1 WW domain mutants S16E, S16A and W34A, and the catalytically inert C113A of its isomerase domain. Furthermore, their direct interaction would occur only upon disrupting the ability of BNIP-H to form an intramolecular interaction by two similar regions. Furthermore, expression of Pin1 disrupted the BNIP-H/glutaminase complex formation in PC12 cells under nerve growth factor-stimulation. These results indicate that nerve growth factor may stimulate the interaction of BNIP-H with Pin1 by releasing its intramolecular inhibition. Such a mechanism could provide a post-translational regulation on the cellular activity of BNIP-H during neuronal differentiation. (213 words) PMID:18628984

  8. Calcineurin Undergoes a Conformational Switch Evoked via Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerization

    PubMed Central

    Guasch, Alicia; Aranguren-Ibáñez, Álvaro; Pérez-Luque, Rosa; Aparicio, David; Martínez-Høyer, Sergio; Mulero, M. Carmen; Serrano-Candelas, Eva

    2015-01-01

    A limited repertoire of PPP family of serine/threonine phosphatases with a highly conserved catalytic domain acts on thousands of protein targets to orchestrate myriad central biological roles. A major structural reorganization of human calcineurin, a ubiquitous Ser/Thr PPP regulated by calcium and calmodulin and targeted by immunosuppressant drugs cyclosporin A and FK506, is unveiled here. The new conformation involves trans- to cis- isomerization of proline in the SAPNY sequence, highly conserved across PPPs, and remodels the main regulatory site where NFATc transcription factors bind. Transitions between cis- and trans- conformations may involve peptidyl prolyl isomerases such as cyclophilin A and FKBP12, which are known to physically interact with and modulate calcineurin even in the absence of immunosuppressant drugs. Alternative conformations in PPPs provide a new perspective on interactions with substrates and other protein partners and may foster development of more specific inhibitors as drug candidates. PMID:26248042

  9. Peroxide-mediated oxidation and inhibition of the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1.

    PubMed

    Innes, Brendan T; Sowole, Modupeola A; Gyenis, Laszlo; Dubinsky, Michelle; Konermann, Lars; Litchfield, David W; Brandl, Christopher J; Shilton, Brian H

    2015-05-01

    Pin1 is a phosphorylation-dependent peptidyl-prolyl isomerase that plays a critical role in mediating protein conformational changes involved in signaling processes related to cell cycle control. Pin1 has also been implicated as being neuroprotective in aging-related neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease where Pin1 activity is diminished. Notably, recent proteomic analysis of brain samples from patients with mild cognitive impairment revealed that Pin1 is oxidized and also displays reduced activity. Since the Pin1 active site contains a functionally critical cysteine residue (Cys113) with a low predicted pK(a), we hypothesized that Cys113 is sensitive to oxidation. Consistent with this hypothesis, we observed that treatment of Pin1 with hydrogen peroxide results in a 32Da mass increase, likely resulting from the oxidation of Cys113 to sulfinic acid (Cys-SO(2)H). This modification results in loss of peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity. Notably, Pin1 with Cys113 substituted by aspartic acid retains activity and is no longer sensitive to oxidation. Structural studies by X-ray crystallography revealed increased electron density surrounding Cys113 following hydrogen peroxide treatment. At lower concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, oxidative inhibition of Pin1 can be partially reversed by treatment with dithiothreitol, suggesting that oxidation could be a reversible modification with a regulatory role. We conclude that the loss of Pin1 activity upon oxidation results from oxidative modification of the Cys113 sulfhydryl to sulfenic (Cys-SOH) or sulfinic acid (Cys-SO(2)H). Given the involvement of Pin1 in pathological processes related to neurodegenerative diseases and to cancer, these findings could have implications for the prevention or treatment of disease. PMID:25595659

  10. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Human Cyclophilin Family of Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerases

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Tara L.; Walker, John R.; Campagna-Slater, Valérie; Finerty, Jr., Patrick J.; Paramanathan, Ragika; Bernstein, Galina; MacKenzie, Farrell; Tempel, Wolfram; Ouyang, Hui; Lee, Wen Hwa; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2011-12-14

    Peptidyl-prolyl isomerases catalyze the conversion between cis and trans isomers of proline. The cyclophilin family of peptidyl-prolyl isomerases is well known for being the target of the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin, used to combat organ transplant rejection. There is great interest in both the substrate specificity of these enzymes and the design of isoform-selective ligands for them. However, the dearth of available data for individual family members inhibits attempts to design drug specificity; additionally, in order to define physiological functions for the cyclophilins, definitive isoform characterization is required. In the current study, enzymatic activity was assayed for 15 of the 17 human cyclophilin isomerase domains, and binding to the cyclosporin scaffold was tested. In order to rationalize the observed isoform diversity, the high-resolution crystallographic structures of seven cyclophilin domains were determined. These models, combined with seven previously solved cyclophilin isoforms, provide the basis for a family-wide structure:function analysis. Detailed structural analysis of the human cyclophilin isomerase explains why cyclophilin activity against short peptides is correlated with an ability to ligate cyclosporin and why certain isoforms are not competent for either activity. In addition, we find that regions of the isomerase domain outside the proline-binding surface impart isoform specificity for both in vivo substrates and drug design. We hypothesize that there is a well-defined molecular surface corresponding to the substrate-binding S2 position that is a site of diversity in the cyclophilin family. Computational simulations of substrate binding in this region support our observations. Our data indicate that unique isoform determinants exist that may be exploited for development of selective ligands and suggest that the currently available small-molecule and peptide-based ligands for this class of enzyme are insufficient for isoform

  11. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Human Cyclophilin Family of Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerases

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Tara L.; Walker, John R.; Campagna-Slater, Valérie; Finerty, Patrick J.; Paramanathan, Ragika; Bernstein, Galina; MacKenzie, Farrell; Tempel, Wolfram; Ouyang, Hui; Lee, Wen Hwa; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2010-01-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl isomerases catalyze the conversion between cis and trans isomers of proline. The cyclophilin family of peptidyl-prolyl isomerases is well known for being the target of the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin, used to combat organ transplant rejection. There is great interest in both the substrate specificity of these enzymes and the design of isoform-selective ligands for them. However, the dearth of available data for individual family members inhibits attempts to design drug specificity; additionally, in order to define physiological functions for the cyclophilins, definitive isoform characterization is required. In the current study, enzymatic activity was assayed for 15 of the 17 human cyclophilin isomerase domains, and binding to the cyclosporin scaffold was tested. In order to rationalize the observed isoform diversity, the high-resolution crystallographic structures of seven cyclophilin domains were determined. These models, combined with seven previously solved cyclophilin isoforms, provide the basis for a family-wide structure∶function analysis. Detailed structural analysis of the human cyclophilin isomerase explains why cyclophilin activity against short peptides is correlated with an ability to ligate cyclosporin and why certain isoforms are not competent for either activity. In addition, we find that regions of the isomerase domain outside the proline-binding surface impart isoform specificity for both in vivo substrates and drug design. We hypothesize that there is a well-defined molecular surface corresponding to the substrate-binding S2 position that is a site of diversity in the cyclophilin family. Computational simulations of substrate binding in this region support our observations. Our data indicate that unique isoform determinants exist that may be exploited for development of selective ligands and suggest that the currently available small-molecule and peptide-based ligands for this class of enzyme are insufficient for isoform

  12. Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerase PIN1 Directly Binds to and Stabilizes Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyeong-jun; Kwon, Nayoung; Choi, Min-A; Jung, Kyung Oh; Piao, Juan-Yu; Ngo, Hoang Kieu Chi; Kim, Su-Jung; Kim, Do-Hee; Chung, June-Key; Cha, Young-Nam; Youn, Hyewon; Choi, Bu Young; Min, Sang-Hyun; Surh, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PIN1) regulates the functional activity of a subset of phosphoproteins through binding to phosphorylated Ser/Thr-Pro motifs and subsequently isomerization of the phosphorylated bonds. Interestingly, PIN1 is overexpressed in many types of malignancies including breast, prostate, lung and colon cancers. However, its oncogenic functions have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report that PIN1 directly interacts with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in human colon cancer (HCT116) cells. PIN1 binding to HIF-1α occurred in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We also found that PIN1 interacted with HIF-1α at both exogenous and endogenous levels. Notably, PIN1 binding stabilized the HIF-1α protein, given that their levels were significantly increased under hypoxic conditions. The stabilization of HIF-1α resulted in increased transcriptional activity, consequently upregulating expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, a major contributor to angiogenesis. Silencing of PIN1 or pharmacologic inhibition of its activity abrogated the angiogenesis. By utilizing a bioluminescence imaging technique, we were able to demonstrate that PIN1 inhibition dramatically reduced the tumor volume in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model and angiogenesis as well as hypoxia-induced transcriptional activity of HIF-1α. These results suggest that PIN1 interacting with HIF-1α is a potential cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic target. PMID:26784107

  13. Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerase PIN1 Directly Binds to and Stabilizes Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α.

    PubMed

    Han, Hyeong-Jun; Kwon, Nayoung; Choi, Min-A; Jung, Kyung Oh; Piao, Juan-Yu; Ngo, Hoang Kieu Chi; Kim, Su-Jung; Kim, Do-Hee; Chung, June-Key; Cha, Young-Nam; Youn, Hyewon; Choi, Bu Young; Min, Sang-Hyun; Surh, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PIN1) regulates the functional activity of a subset of phosphoproteins through binding to phosphorylated Ser/Thr-Pro motifs and subsequently isomerization of the phosphorylated bonds. Interestingly, PIN1 is overexpressed in many types of malignancies including breast, prostate, lung and colon cancers. However, its oncogenic functions have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report that PIN1 directly interacts with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in human colon cancer (HCT116) cells. PIN1 binding to HIF-1α occurred in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We also found that PIN1 interacted with HIF-1α at both exogenous and endogenous levels. Notably, PIN1 binding stabilized the HIF-1α protein, given that their levels were significantly increased under hypoxic conditions. The stabilization of HIF-1α resulted in increased transcriptional activity, consequently upregulating expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, a major contributor to angiogenesis. Silencing of PIN1 or pharmacologic inhibition of its activity abrogated the angiogenesis. By utilizing a bioluminescence imaging technique, we were able to demonstrate that PIN1 inhibition dramatically reduced the tumor volume in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model and angiogenesis as well as hypoxia-induced transcriptional activity of HIF-1α. These results suggest that PIN1 interacting with HIF-1α is a potential cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic target. PMID:26784107

  14. Inhibition of the FKBP family of peptidyl prolyl isomerases induces abortive translocation and degradation of the cellular prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Stocki, Pawel; Sawicki, Maxime; Mays, Charles E.; Hong, Seo Jung; Chapman, Daniel C.; Westaway, David; Williams, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders for which there is no effective treatment. Because the cellular prion protein (PrPC) is required for propagation of the infectious scrapie form of the protein, one therapeutic strategy is to reduce PrPC expression. Recently FK506, an inhibitor of the FKBP family of peptidyl prolyl isomerases, was shown to increase survival in animal models of prion disease, with proposed mechanisms including calcineurin inhibition, induction of autophagy, and reduced PrPC expression. We show that FK506 treatment results in a profound reduction in PrPC expression due to a defect in the translocation of PrPC into the endoplasmic reticulum with subsequent degradation by the proteasome. These phenotypes could be bypassed by replacing the PrPC signal sequence with that of prolactin or osteopontin. In mouse cells, depletion of ER luminal FKBP10 was almost as potent as FK506 in attenuating expression of PrPC. However, this occurred at a later stage, after translocation of PrPC into the ER. Both FK506 treatment and FKBP10 depletion were effective in reducing PrPSc propagation in cell models. These findings show the involvement of FKBP proteins at different stages of PrPC biogenesis and identify FKBP10 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of prion diseases. PMID:26764098

  15. Inhibition of the FKBP family of peptidyl prolyl isomerases induces abortive translocation and degradation of the cellular prion protein.

    PubMed

    Stocki, Pawel; Sawicki, Maxime; Mays, Charles E; Hong, Seo Jung; Chapman, Daniel C; Westaway, David; Williams, David B

    2016-03-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders for which there is no effective treatment. Because the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is required for propagation of the infectious scrapie form of the protein, one therapeutic strategy is to reduce PrP(C) expression. Recently FK506, an inhibitor of the FKBP family of peptidyl prolyl isomerases, was shown to increase survival in animal models of prion disease, with proposed mechanisms including calcineurin inhibition, induction of autophagy, and reduced PrP(C) expression. We show that FK506 treatment results in a profound reduction in PrP(C) expression due to a defect in the translocation of PrP(C) into the endoplasmic reticulum with subsequent degradation by the proteasome. These phenotypes could be bypassed by replacing the PrP(C) signal sequence with that of prolactin or osteopontin. In mouse cells, depletion of ER luminal FKBP10 was almost as potent as FK506 in attenuating expression of PrP(C). However, this occurred at a later stage, after translocation of PrP(C) into the ER. Both FK506 treatment and FKBP10 depletion were effective in reducing PrP(Sc) propagation in cell models. These findings show the involvement of FKBP proteins at different stages of PrP(C) biogenesis and identify FKBP10 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of prion diseases. PMID:26764098

  16. Chaperone function of FkpA, a heat shock prolyl isomerase, in the periplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Arié, J P; Sassoon, N; Betton, J M

    2001-01-01

    The nature of molecular chaperones in the periplasm of Escherichia coli that assist newly translocated proteins to reach their native state has remained poorly defined. Here, we show that FkpA, a heat shock periplasmic peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase), suppresses the formation of inclusion bodies from a defective-folding variant of the maltose-binding protein, MalE31. This chaperone-like activity of FkpA, which is independent of its PPIase activity, requires a full-length structure of the protein. In vitro, FkpA does not catalyse a slow rate-limiting step in the refolding of MalE31, but prevents its aggregation at stoichiometric amounts and promotes the reactivation of denaturated citrate synthase. We propose that FkpA functions as a chaperone for envelope proteins in the bacterial periplasm. PMID:11123702

  17. Cis-trans photoisomerization of fluorescent-protein chromophores.

    PubMed

    Voliani, Valerio; Bizzarri, Ranieri; Nifosì, Riccardo; Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Grandi, Elena; Viappiani, Cristiano; Beltram, Fabio

    2008-08-28

    Photochromic variants of fluorescent proteins are opening the way to a number of opportunities for high-sensitivity regioselective studies in the cellular environment and may even lead to applications in information and communication technology. Yet, the detailed photophysical processes at the basis of photoswitching have not been fully clarified. In this paper, we used synthetic FP chromophores to clarify the photophysical processes associated with the photochromic behavior. In particular, we investigated the spectral modification of synthetic chromophore analogues of wild-type green fluorescent protein (GFP), Y66F GFP (BFPF), and Y66W GFP (CFP) upon irradiation in solutions of different polarities. We found that the cis-trans photoisomerization mechanism can be induced in all the chromophores. The structural assignments were carried out both by NMR measurements and DFT calculations. Remarkably, we determined for the first time the spectra of neutral trans isomers in different solvents. Finally, we calculated the photoconversion quantum yields by absorption measurements under continuous illumination at different times and by a nanosecond laser-flash photolysis method. Our results indicate that cis-trans photoisomerization is a general mechanism of FP chromophores whose efficiency is modulated by the detailed mutant-specific protein environment. PMID:18671358

  18. Ultrafast cis-trans photoswitching: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Susanne; Stock, Gerhard

    2002-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical model description of a molecular photoswitch is developed. It takes into account (i) the electronic curve crossing arising from the cis-trans twisting of a double bond, resulting in an ultrafast internal-conversion process of the system and (ii) the coupling of the initially excited chromophore (the "system") to the remaining degrees of freedom (the "bath"), affecting a vibrational cooling of the hot photoproducts. The latter mechanism is responsible for the localization of the molecule in the cis and trans configuration, respectively, thus determining the quantum yield of the photoreaction. Following a discussion of the validity and the numerical implementation of the Redfield formulation employed, detailed numerical studies of the time-dependent dissipative photoisomerization dynamics are presented. While the short-time dynamics (≲1 ps) is dominated by the coherent wave-packet motion of the system, the time evolution at larger times mainly reflects the interaction between system and bath. The quantum yield of the cis-trans forward reaction (Yc→t) and the trans-cis backward reaction (Yt→c) is shown to depend on the energy storage of the photoreaction and, in particular, on the form of the system-bath coupling. On the other hand, it is found that Yt→c=1-Yc→t, that is the population probabilities of the cis and trans configuration at long times do not depend on the initial preparation of the system.

  19. Roles of Prolyl Isomerases in RNA-Mediated Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa

    2015-01-01

    The peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases (PPIases) that include immunophilins (cyclophilins and FKBPs) and parvulins (Pin1, Par14, Par17) participate in cell signaling, transcription, pre-mRNA processing and mRNA decay. The human genome encodes 19 cyclophilins, 18 FKBPs and three parvulins. Immunophilins are receptors for the immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporin A, FK506, and rapamycin that are used in organ transplantation. Pin1 has also been targeted in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, asthma, and a number of cancers. While these PPIases are characterized as molecular chaperones, they also act in a nonchaperone manner to promote protein-protein interactions using surfaces outside their active sites. The immunosuppressive drugs act by a gain-of-function mechanism by promoting protein-protein interactions in vivo. Several immunophilins have been identified as components of the spliceosome and are essential for alternative splicing. Pin1 plays roles in transcription and RNA processing by catalyzing conformational changes in the RNA Pol II C-terminal domain. Pin1 also binds several RNA binding proteins such as AUF1, KSRP, HuR, and SLBP that regulate mRNA decay by remodeling mRNP complexes. The functions of ribonucleoprotein associated PPIases are largely unknown. This review highlights PPIases that play roles in RNA-mediated gene expression, providing insight into their structures, functions and mechanisms of action in mRNP remodeling in vivo. PMID:25992900

  20. Wavelength Dependent Cis-Trans Isomerization in Vision†

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Judy E.; Tauber, Michael J.; Mathies, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    The primary event in vision is the light-driven cis-trans isomerization of the 11-cis-retinal chromophore in the G-protein coupled receptor rhodopsin. Early measurements showed that this photoisomerization has a reaction quantum yield Φ of ∼0.67 [Dartnall (1936) Proc. R. Soc. A 156, 158-170; Dartnall (1968) Vision Res. 8, 339-358] and suggested that the quantum yield was wavelength independent [Schneider (1939) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 170, 102-112]. Here we more accurately determine Φ 500) = 0.65 ± 0.01 and reveal that Φ surprisingly depends on the wavelength of the incident light. Although there is no difference in the quantum yield between 450 and 480 nm, the quantum yield falls significantly as the photon energy is reduced below 20 000 cm-1 (500 nm). At the reddest wavelength measured (570 nm), the quantum yield is reduced by 5 ± 1% relative to the 500 nm value. These experiments correct the long-held presumption that the quantum yield in vision is wavelength independent, and support the hypothesis that the 200 fs photoisomerization reaction that initiates vision is dictated by nonstationary excited-state vibrational wave packet dynamics. PMID:11705366

  1. Wavelength dependent cis-trans isomerization in vision.

    PubMed

    Kim, J E; Tauber, M J; Mathies, R A

    2001-11-20

    The primary event in vision is the light-driven cis-trans isomerization of the 11-cis-retinal chromophore in the G-protein coupled receptor rhodopsin. Early measurements showed that this photoisomerization has a reaction quantum yield phi of approximately 0.67 [Dartnall (1936) Proc. R. Soc. A 156, 158-170; Dartnall (1968) Vision Res. 8, 339-358] and suggested that the quantum yield was wavelength independent [Schneider (1939) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 170, 102-112]. Here we more accurately determine phi(500) = 0.65 +/- 0.01 and reveal that phi surprisingly depends on the wavelength of the incident light. Although there is no difference in the quantum yield between 450 and 480 nm, the quantum yield falls significantly as the photon energy is reduced below 20 000 cm(-1) (500 nm). At the reddest wavelength measured (570 nm), the quantum yield is reduced by 5 +/- 1% relative to the 500 nm value. These experiments correct the long-held presumption that the quantum yield in vision is wavelength independent, and support the hypothesis that the 200 fs photoisomerization reaction that initiates vision is dictated by nonstationary excited-state vibrational wave packet dynamics. PMID:11705366

  2. NOT gate in a cis-trans photoisomerization model

    SciTech Connect

    Ndong, M.; Bomble, L.; Justum, Y.; Sugny, D.; Desouter-Lecomte, M.

    2007-10-15

    We numerically study the implementation of a NOT gate by laser pulses in a model molecular system presenting two electronic surfaces coupled by nonadiabatic interactions. The two states of the bit are the fundamental states of the cis-trans isomers of the molecule. The gate is classical in the sense that it involves a one-qubit flip so that the encoding of the outputs is based on population analysis which does not take the phases into account. This gate can also be viewed as a double photoswitch process with the property that the same electric field controls the two isomerizations. As an example, we consider one-dimensional cuts in a model of the retinal in rhodopsin already proposed in the literature. The laser pulses are computed by the multitarget optimal control theory with chirped pulses as trial fields. Very high fidelities are obtained. We also examine the stability of the control when the system is coupled to a bath of oscillators modeled by an ohmic spectral density. The bath correlation time scale being smaller than the pulse duration, the dynamics is carried out in the Markovian approximation.

  3. NOT gate in a cis-trans photoisomerization model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndong, M.; Bomble, L.; Sugny, D.; Justum, Y.; Desouter-Lecomte, M.

    2007-10-01

    We numerically study the implementation of a NOT gate by laser pulses in a model molecular system presenting two electronic surfaces coupled by nonadiabatic interactions. The two states of the bit are the fundamental states of the cis-trans isomers of the molecule. The gate is classical in the sense that it involves a one-qubit flip so that the encoding of the outputs is based on population analysis which does not take the phases into account. This gate can also be viewed as a double photoswitch process with the property that the same electric field controls the two isomerizations. As an example, we consider one-dimensional cuts in a model of the retinal in rhodopsin already proposed in the literature. The laser pulses are computed by the multitarget optimal control theory with chirped pulses as trial fields. Very high fidelities are obtained. We also examine the stability of the control when the system is coupled to a bath of oscillators modeled by an ohmic spectral density. The bath correlation time scale being smaller than the pulse duration, the dynamics is carried out in the Markovian approximation

  4. Quasiperiodic orbit analysis of nonadiabatic cis-trans photoisomerization dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzer, Birgit; Dilthey, Stefan; Hahn, Susanne; Thoss, Michael; Stock, Gerhard

    2003-08-01

    Adopting a multidimensional model of nonadiabatic cis-trans photoisomerization, quantum-mechanical and classical simulations of the ultrafast wave-packet dynamics associated with this photoreaction are presented. The quantum calculations demonstrate that nonadiabatic photoisomerization typically leads to a largely delocalized and diffuse wave function, which hampers an intuitive understanding of the dynamics in terms of specific nuclear motion. To facilitate a classical description, a recently proposed theoretical formulation is employed that affords an exact mapping of discrete electronic states onto continuous degrees of freedom and therefore provides a well-defined classical limit of a nonadiabatically coupled system. It is shown that a simple quasiclassical implementation of the mapping formulation is able to reproduce at least qualitatively the complex quantum dynamics of the system. In addition, the classical description allows us to characterize the nonadiabatic photoisomerization dynamics in terms of a few "quasiperiodic orbits." These orbits are close to a true unstable periodic orbit but are exactly periodic only with respect to the slow reaction coordinate of the system. Various types of quasiperiodic orbits of nonadiabatic photoisomerization are identified and analyzed. It is shown that the diffuse appearance of the quantum-mechanical wave function can be directly connected to irregular classical orbits propagating on vibronically coupled potential-energy surfaces. The chaotic behavior of the system is mainly caused by the relatively high energy corresponding to photoexcitation, the large anharmonicity of the isomerization potentials, and the reflection of the trajectory at surface crossings. The results demonstrate that quasiperiodic orbits represent a concept well suited to analyze the quantum dynamics of complex systems in terms of classical trajectories without the cumbersome search for periodic orbits.

  5. Prolyl isomerase Pin1 and protein kinase HIPK2 cooperate to promote cortical neurogenesis by suppressing Groucho/TLE:Hes1-mediated inhibition of neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ciarapica, R; Methot, L; Tang, Y; Lo, R; Dali, R; Buscarlet, M; Locatelli, F; del Sal, G; Rota, R; Stifani, S

    2014-02-01

    The Groucho/transducin-like Enhancer of split 1 (Gro/TLE1):Hes1 transcriptional repression complex acts in cerebral cortical neural progenitor cells to inhibit neuronal differentiation. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the anti-neurogenic function of the Gro/TLE1:Hes1 complex during cortical neurogenesis remain to be defined. Here we show that prolyl isomerase Pin1 (peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase NIMA-interacting 1) and homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) are expressed in cortical neural progenitor cells and form a complex that interacts with the Gro/TLE1:Hes1 complex. This association depends on the enzymatic activities of both HIPK2 and Pin1, as well as on the association of Gro/TLE1 with Hes1, but is independent of the previously described Hes1-activated phosphorylation of Gro/TLE1. Interaction with the Pin1:HIPK2 complex results in Gro/TLE1 hyperphosphorylation and weakens both the transcriptional repression activity and the anti-neurogenic function of the Gro/TLE1:Hes1 complex. These results provide evidence that HIPK2 and Pin1 work together to promote cortical neurogenesis, at least in part, by suppressing Gro/TLE1:Hes1-mediated inhibition of neuronal differentiation. PMID:24270405

  6. A dual inhibitor against prolyl isomerase Pin1 and cyclophilin discovered by a novel real-time fluorescence detection method

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Tadashi; Hidaka, Masafumi; Lin, Yi-Chin; Yoshizawa, Ibuki; Okabe, Takayoshi; Egashira, Shinichiro; Kojima, Hirotatsu; Nagano, Tetsuo; Koketsu, Mamoru; Takamiya, Mari; Uchida, Takafumi

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} A Pin1 (prolyl isomerase) inhibitor, TME-001, has been discovered by using a new established high-throughput screening method. {yields} The TME-001 showed a cell-active inhibition with lower cytotoxic effect than known Pin1 inhibitors. {yields} Kinetic analyses revealed that the TME-001 is the first compound that exhibits dual inhibition of Pin1 and another type of prolyl isomerase, cyclophilin. {yields} Thus, similarities of structure and reaction mechanism between Pin1 and cyclophilin are proposed. -- Abstract: Pin1, a peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase), is a potential target molecule for cancer, infectious disease, and Alzheimer's disease. We established a high-throughput screening method for Pin1 inhibitors, which employs a real-time fluorescence detector. This screening method identified 66 compounds that inhibit Pin1 out of 9756 compounds from structurally diverse chemical libraries. Further evaluations of surface plasmon resonance methods and a cell proliferation assay were performed. We discovered a cell-active inhibitor, TME-001 (2-(3-chloro-4-fluoro-phenyl)-isothiazol-3-one). Surprisingly, kinetic analyses revealed that TME-001 is the first compound that exhibits dual inhibition of Pin1 (IC{sub 50} = 6.1 {mu}M) and cyclophilin, another type of PPIase, (IC{sub 50} = 13.7 {mu}M). This compound does not inhibit FKBP. This finding suggests the existence of similarities of structure and reaction mechanism between Pin1 and cyclophilin, and may lead to a more complete understanding of the active sites of PPIases.

  7. Nonlinear optical molecular properties associated with cis-trans photochromic transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantsker, David; Speiser, Shammai

    1993-12-01

    In this paper, we examine the nonlinear optical properties of molecular systems undergoing cis-trans photoisomerization process. Such a process gives rise to dynamic photochromism on a picosecond time scale. A kinetic analysis of a general cis-trans nonlinear organic absorber is performed. The analysis is used to derive an expression for the complex nonlinear-molecular index of refraction. The properties of a molecular SLM based on such an absorber are discussed by examining the azo type molecular system. These calculations predict an optimum contrast ratio and fast on-off switching for the SLM performance, achieved at low read-write laser intensities.

  8. IRIS Toxicological Review of cis- & trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene (2010 Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The final Toxicological Review of cis- & trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene provides scientific support and rationale for the hazard and dose-response assessment pertaining to chronic exposure to cis- and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene. 1,2-Dichloroethylene is used as a solvent for wa...

  9. The prolyl isomerase, FKBP25, interacts with RNA-engaged nucleolin and the pre-60S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Gudavicius, Geoff; Dilworth, David; Serpa, Jason J; Sessler, Nicole; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Borchers, Christoph H; Nelson, Christopher J

    2014-07-01

    Peptidyl-proline isomerases of the FK506-binding protein (FKBP) family belong to a class of enzymes that catalyze the cis-trans isomerization of prolyl-peptide bonds in proteins. A handful of FKBPs are found in the nucleus, implying that the isomerization of proline in nuclear proteins is enzymatically controlled. FKBP25 is a nuclear protein that has been shown to associate with chromatin modifiers and transcription factors. In this study, we performed the first proteomic characterization of FKBP25 and found that it interacts with numerous ribosomal proteins, ribosomal processing factors, and a small selection of chromatin modifiers. In agreement with previous reports, we found that nucleolin is a major FKBP25-interacting protein and demonstrated that this interaction is dependent on rRNA. FKBP25 interacts with the immature large ribosomal subunit in nuclear extract but does not associate with mature ribosomes, implicating this FKBP's action in ribosome biogenesis. Despite engaging nascent 60S ribosomes, FKBP25 does not affect steady-state levels of rRNAs or its pre-rRNA intermediates. We conclude that FKBP25 is likely recruited to preribosomes to chaperone one of the protein components of the ribosome large subunit. PMID:24840943

  10. Prolyl isomerase Pin1 negatively regulates the stability of SUV39H1 to promote tumorigenesis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Prem; Kim, Garam; Lim, Sung-Chul; Yun, Hyo-Jeong; Lee, Kwang Youl; Choi, Hoo-Kyun; Choi, Hong Seok

    2013-11-01

    Pin1, a conserved eukaryotic peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase, has profound effects on numerous key-signaling molecules, and its deregulation contributes to disease, particularly cancer. Although Pin1-mediated prolyl isomerization of protein servers as a regulatory switch in signaling pathways, the significance of proline isomerase activity in chromatin modifying complex remains unclear. Here, we identify Pin1 as a key negative regulator for suppressor of variegation 3-9 homologue 1 (SUV39H1) stability, a major methyltransferase responsible for histone H3 trimethylation on Lys9 (H3K9me3). Pin1 interacts with SUV39H1 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner and promotes ubiquitination-mediated degradation of SUV39H1. Consequently, Pin1 reduces SUV39H1 abundance and suppresses SUV39H1 ability to induce H3K9me3. In contrast, depletion of Pin1 in cancer cells leads to elevated SUV39H1 expression, which subsequently increases H3K9me3, inhibiting tumorigenecity of cancer cells. In a xenograft model with 4T1 metastatic mouse breast carcinoma cells, Pin1 overexpression increases tumor growth, whereas SUV39H1 overexpression abrogates it. In human breast cancer patients, immunohistochemical staining shows that Pin1 levels are negatively correlated with SUV39H1 as well as H3K9me3 levels. Thus, Pin1-mediated reduction of SUV39H1 stability contributes to convey oncogenic signals for aggressiveness of human breast cancer, suggesting that Pin1 may be a promising drug target for anticancer therapy. PMID:23934277

  11. Enzyme-like effect of metmyoglobin on the thermal cis-trans isomerization of stilbazolium betaine.

    PubMed

    Pastukhov, A V; Vogel, V R; Kotelnikov, A I

    2000-06-01

    A photochromic compound, stilbazolium betaine M, when associated with metmyoglobin undergoes an accelerated thermal cis-trans isomerization. A study of the pH and ionic strength dependence of the isomerization reaction rate of the photochrome associated with metmyoglobin was performed. A comparative investigation of the reaction carried out in the presence of three proteins, metmyoglobin, apomyoglobin, and human albumin, indicates a specific influence of the heme pocket environment on the reaction. Possible mechanisms of the reaction acceleration are considered. PMID:10907741

  12. Communication: An accurate calculation of the S1 C2H2 cis-trans isomerization barrier height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraban, Joshua H.; Matthews, Devin A.; Stanton, John F.

    2016-03-01

    A high level ab initio calculation of the cis-trans isomerization barrier height in the first excited singlet electronic state of acetylene is found to agree very well with a recent experimental determination.

  13. A high-throughput screen for inhibitors of the prolyl isomerase, Pin1, identifies a seaweed polyphenol that reduces adipose cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tadashi; Hidaka, Masafumi; Ikuji, Hiroko; Yoshizawa, Ibuki; Toyohara, Haruhiko; Okuda, Toru; Uchida, Chiyoko; Asano, Tomoichiro; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Uchida, Takafumi

    2014-01-01

    The peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1 enhances the uptake of triglycerides and the differentiation of fibroblasts into adipose cells in response to insulin stimulation. Pin1 downregulation could be a potential approach to prevent and treat obesity-related disorders. In order to identify an inhibitor of Pin1 that exhibited minimal cytotoxicity, we established a high-throughput screen for Pin1 inhibitors and used this method to identify an inhibitor from 1,056 crude fractions of two natural product libraries. The candidate, a phlorotannin called 974-B, was isolated from the seaweed, Ecklonia kurome. 974-B inhibited the differentiation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts and 3T3-L1 cells into adipose cells without inducing cytotoxicity. We discovered the Pin1 inhibitor, 974-B, from the seaweed, E. kurome, and showed that it blocks the differentiation of fibroblasts into adipose cells, suggesting that 974-B could be a lead drug candidate for obesity-related disorders. PMID:25035986

  14. Discrimination of cis-trans sex pheromone components in two sympatric Lepidopteran species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sufang; Kong, Xiangbo; Ze, Sangzi; Wang, Hongbin; Lin, Aizhu; Liu, Fu; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    Pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs) play an important role in the recognition of pheromones by insects. However, the abilities of these PBPs to discriminate pheromone components and recognize the isomers are unclear. Dendrolimus houi and Dendrolimus kikuchii are two sympatric coniferous pests whose pheromones have cis-trans isomers. We used these insect species to detect the precise recognition abilities of PBPs. The four PBPs examined showed male-biased antenna-intensive expression patterns, whereas PBP1 showed higher expression than PBP2 in the antenna. DhouPBP1 only bound to a minor interspecific pheromone component, whereas DhouPBP2 bound to all three intraspecific components and another minor interspecific component. DkikPBP1 and DkikPBP2 could recognize all three intraspecific components with affinities negatively correlated with their ratios, and they bound to interspecific pheromones with affinity that was positively correlated with the ratios. The four PBPs have different cis-trans isomer discrimination abilities, i.e., DhouPBP1 and DkikPBP1 could not discriminate the two cis-trans isomer pairs of pheromones from the two species, whereas DhouPBP2 could discriminate between both pairs, and DkikPBP2 could only discriminate one pair. Overall, PBPs from D. houi and D. kikuchii use different strategies to help the moths to discriminate the intra- and interspecific pheromone components. Our work will contribute to better understanding of the sex pheromone recognition mechanism in these two sister species of moths and provide insights into more effective management practices of these pest species. PMID:27107681

  15. Energy density analysis (EDA) of cis, trans-enol isomerization in malonaldehyde, tropolone and 9-hydroxyphenalenone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Hiromi; Sodeyama, Keitaro

    2002-10-01

    We have recently proposed an energy density analysis (EDA) that partitions the total energy of a molecular system into atomic energy densities. In this study, the EDA is applied to cis, trans-enol isomerization reactions of malonaldehyde, tropolone and 9-hydroxyphenalenone. Energy density changes in the reactions are shown to be closely related to the formation and breaking of the chemical bonds. By analyzing the energy density changes, we can find the reason why the hydrogen atom moves through the out-of-plane pathway instead of the in-plane pathway.

  16. Ensemble of Transition State Structures for the Cis-Trans Isomerization of N-Methylacetamide

    SciTech Connect

    Mantz, Yves A.; Branduardi, Davide; Bussi, Giovanni; Parrinello, Michele

    2009-09-17

    The cis-trans isomerization of N-methylacetamide (NMA), a model peptidic fragment, is studied theoretically in vacuo and in explicit water solvent at 300 K using the metadynamics technique. The computed cis-trans free energy difference is very similar for NMA(g) and NMA(aq), in agreement with experimental measurements of population ratios and theoretical studies at 0 K. By exploiting the flexibility in the definition of a pair of recently introduced collective variables (Branduardi, D.; Gervasio, F. L.; Parrinello, M. J. Chem. Phys. 2007, 126, 054103), an ensemble of transition state structures is generated at finite temperature for both NMA(g) and NMA(aq), as verified by computing committor distribution functions. Ensemble members of NMA(g) are shown to have correlated values of the backbone dihedral angle and a second dihedral angle involving the amide hydrogen atom. The dynamical character of these structures is preserved in the presence of solvent, whose influence on the committor functions can be modeled using effective friction/noise terms.

  17. AlCl3-Catalyzed Ring-Expansion Cascades of Bicyclic Cyclobutenamides Involving Highly Strained Cis,Trans-Cycloheptadienone Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Na; Krenske, Elizabeth H.; Johnston, Ryne C.; Houk, K. N.; Hsung, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first experimental evidence for the generation of highly strained cis,trans-cycloheptadienones by electrocyclic ring opening of 4,5-fused cyclobutenamides. In the presence of AlCl3, the cyclobutenamides rearrange to [2.2.1]-bicyclic ketones; DFT calculations provide evidence for a mechanism involving torquoselective 4π-electrocyclic ring opening to a cis,trans-cycloheptadienone followed by a Nazarov-like recyclization and a 1,2-alkyl shift. Similarly, 4,6-fused cyclobutenamides undergo AlCl3-catalyzed rearrangements to [3.2.1]-bicyclic ketones through cis,trans-cyclooctadienone intermediates. The products can be further elaborated via facile cascade reactions to give complex tri- and tetracyclic molecules. PMID:25895058

  18. Holographic recording materials development. [development of cis-trans isomerization for holographic memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Developments in the area of organic cis-trans isomerization systems for holographic memory applications are reported. The chemical research effort consisted of photochemical studies leading to the selection of a stilbene derivative and a polymer matrix system which have greatly improved refractive index differences between the cis and trans isomers as well as demonstrated efficiency of the photoisomerization process. In work on lithium niobate effects of sample stoichiometry and of read and write beam polarizations on recording efficiency were investigated. LiNbO3 was used for a study of angular sensitivity and of capability for simultaneous recording of extended objects without interference. The current status of LiNbO3 as a holographic recording material is summarized.

  19. Cis/trans Fluorescent Recognition by Naphthalimide Dyes ⊂ CB [7] Assembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Junyong; Gu, Xiaomin; Yuan, Xiaosheng; Qiu, Qiqi; Sun, Jie; Wang, Haibo

    2016-07-01

    A novel method to recognize cis/trans isomers was studied here. The naphthalimide dye as guest could bind with host cucurbit [7]uril (CB [7]) and 1:1 naphthalimide dye ⊂ CB [7] assembly was formed. Moreover, this assembly was used as a fluorescent probe to recognized Fumaric acid (FA) and maleic acid (MA) via fluorescence titration. Two carboxyls in MA are in the same side, they could form stable interaction with the assembly and the fluorescence intensity decreased obviously when naphthalimide dye ⊂ CB [7] was titrated by MA (nearly quenched in 1.5 equiv). But two carboxyls in FA are in opposite sides, the interaction between FA and the assembly was weak and not stable, and the fluorescence intensity changed inconspicuously when the assembly was titrated by FA. PMID:27130626

  20. Flavylium based dual photochromism: addressing cis-trans isomerization and ring opening-closure by different light inputs.

    PubMed

    Gago, Sandra; Basílio, Nuno; Moro, Artur J; Pina, Fernando

    2015-04-30

    The multistate system of 4',7-dihydroxy-3-methoxyflavylium is constituted by a multiequilibrium involving trans-chalcone, cis-chalcone, hemiketal, flavylium cation and quinoidal base. This system possesses two independently addressable inter-connected photochromic systems based on the cis-trans isomerization and ring opening-closure of the hemiketal. PMID:25820365

  1. Multiple gas-phase conformations of proline-containing peptides: is it always cis/trans isomerization?

    PubMed

    Lietz, Christopher B; Chen, Zhengwei; Yun Son, Chang; Pang, Xueqin; Cui, Qiang; Li, Lingjun

    2016-08-01

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is often employed to look at the secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures of naked peptides and proteins in the gas-phase. Recently, it has offered a unique glimpse into proline-containing peptides and their cis/trans Xxx-Pro isomers. An experimental "signature" has been identified wherein a proline-containing peptide has its Pro residues substituted with another amino acid and the presence or absence of conformations in the IM-MS spectra is observed. Despite the high probability that one could attribute these conformations to cis/trans isomers, it is also possible that cis/trans isomers are not the cause of the additional conformations in proline-containing peptides. However, the experimental evidence of such a system has not been demonstrated or reported. Herein, we present the IM-MS analysis of Neuropeptide Y's wild-type (WT) signal sequence and Leu7Pro (L7P) mutant. Although comparison of arrival times and collision cross-sections of [M + 4H](4+) ions yields the cis/trans "signature", molecular dynamics indicates that a cis-Pro7 is not very stable and that trans-Pro7 conformations of the same cross-section arise with equal frequency. We believe that this work further underscores the importance of theoretical calculations in IM-MS structural assignments. PMID:27434776

  2. Conformational Preferences in Small Peptide Models: The Relevance of cis/trans-Conformations.

    PubMed

    Jangra, Harish; Haindl, Michael H; Achrainer, Florian; Hioe, Johnny; Gschwind, Ruth M; Zipse, Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    The accurate description of cis/trans peptide structures is of fundamental relevance for the field of protein modeling and protein structure determination. A comprehensive conformational analysis of dipeptide model Ace-Gly-NMe (1) has been carried out by using a combination of theoretical calculations and experimental ((1) H and (13) C NMR and NOESY) spectroscopic measurements to assess the relevance of cis-peptide conformers. NMR measurements in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution and calculations employing a continuum solvation model both point to the extended trans,trans conformer C5_tt as the global minimum. The cis-peptide structures C5_ct and C5_tc, with the N- or C-terminal amide group in cis-conformation, are observed separately and located 13.0±2 kJ mol(-1) higher in energy. This is in close agreement with the theoretical prediction of around 12 kJ mol(-1) in DMSO. The ability of common protein force fields to reproduce the energies of the cis-amide conformers C5_ct and C5_tc in 1 is limited, making these methods unsuitable for the description of cis-peptide structures in protein simulations. PMID:27535479

  3. Control of carotenoid biosynthesis through a heme-based cis-trans isomerase.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Jesús; Kloss, Brian; Hosler, Jonathan P; Geng, Jiafeng; Liu, Aimin; Modi, Anuja; Dawson, John H; Sono, Masanori; Shumskaya, Maria; Ampomah-Dwamena, Charles; Love, James D; Wurtzel, Eleanore T

    2015-08-01

    Plants synthesize carotenoids, which are essential for plant development and survival. These metabolites also serve as essential nutrients for human health. The biosynthetic pathway for all plant carotenoids occurs in chloroplasts and other plastids and requires 15-cis-ζ-carotene isomerase (Z-ISO). It was not known whether Z-ISO catalyzes isomerization alone or in combination with other enzymes. Here we show that Z-ISO is a bona fide enzyme and integral membrane protein. Z-ISO independently catalyzes the cis-trans isomerization of the 15-15' carbon-carbon double bond in 9,15,9'-cis-ζ-carotene to produce the substrate required by the subsequent biosynthetic-pathway enzyme. We discovered that isomerization depends upon a ferrous heme b cofactor that undergoes redox-regulated ligand switching between the heme iron and alternate Z-ISO amino acid residues. Heme b-dependent isomerization of a large hydrophobic compound in a membrane was previously undescribed. As an isomerase, Z-ISO represents a new prototype for heme b proteins and potentially uses a new chemical mechanism. PMID:26075523

  4. Structure-Dependent cis/trans Isomerization of Tetraphenylethene Derivatives: Consequences for Aggregation-Induced Emission.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chong-Jing; Feng, Guangxue; Xu, Shidang; Zhu, Zhenshu; Lu, Xianmao; Wu, Jien; Liu, Bin

    2016-05-17

    The isomerization and optical properties of the cis and trans isomers of tetraphenylethene (TPE) derivatives with aggregation-induced emission (AIEgens) have been sparsely explored. We have now observed the tautomerization-induced isomerization of a hydroxy-substituted derivative, TPETH-OH, under acidic but not under basic conditions. Replacing the proton of the hydroxy group in TPETH-OH with an alkyl group leads to the formation of TPETH-MAL, for which the pure cis and trans isomers were obtained and characterized by HPLC analysis and NMR spectroscopy. Importantly, cis-TPETH-MAL emits yellow fluorescence in DMSO at -20 °C whereas trans-TPETH-MAL shows red fluorescence under the same conditions. Moreover, the geometry of cis- and trans-TPETH-MAL remains unchanged when they undergo thiol-ene reactions to form cis- and trans-TPETH-cRGD, respectively. Collectively, our findings improve our fundamental understanding of the cis/trans isomerization and photophysical properties of TPE derivatives, which will guide further AIEgen design for various applications. PMID:27071955

  5. Red- and blue-shifted hydrogen bonds in the cis-trans noncyclic formic acid dimer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pan-Pan; Qiu, Wen-Yuan

    2009-08-01

    The cis-trans noncyclic formic acid dimer was studied by means of MP2 method with 6-31G(d,p), 6-31+G(d,p) and 6-311+G(d,p) basis sets. It exhibits simultaneously red-shifted O-H...O and blue-shifted C-H...O hydrogen bonds. AIM and NBO analyses are performed at the MP2/6-31+G(d,p) level to explore their properties and origins. AIM analysis provides the evidence that the O-H bond becomes weaker and the C-H bond becomes stronger upon the hydrogen bond formations. Intermolecular and intramolecular hyperconjugations have important influence on the electron densities in the X-H (X = O, C) sigma bonding orbital and its sigma* antibonding orbital. The electron densities in the two orbitals are closely connected with the X-H (X = O, C) bond length, and they are used to quantitatively estimate the bond length variation. The larger amount of charge transfer in the red-shifted O-H...O hydrogen bond is due to its favorable H...O electron channel, whereas the H...O electron channel in the blue-shifted C-H...O hydrogen bond is weaker. Structural reorganization effects shorten the C-H bond by approximately 30% when compared to the C-H bond contraction upon the dimerization. Strikingly, it leads to a small elongation and a slight red shift of the O-H bond. Both rehybridization and repolarization result in the X-H (X = O, C) bond contraction, but their effects on the O-H bond do not hold a dominant position. The hydrogen-bonding processes go through the electrostatic attractions, van der Waals interactions, charge-transfer interactions, hydrogen-bonding interactions and electrostatic repulsions. Electrostatic attractions are of great importance on the origin of the red-shifted O-H...O hydrogen bond, especially the strong H(delta+)...O(delta-) attraction. For the blue-shifted C-H...O hydrogen bond, the considerable nucleus-nucleus repulsion between H and O atoms caused by the strong electrostatic attraction between C and O atoms is a possible reason for the C-H bond contraction and

  6. cis-trans photoisomerization of 1,3,5,7-octatetraene in n-hexane at 4.2 K

    PubMed Central

    Granville, Mark F.; Holtom, Gary R.; Kohler, Bryan E.

    1980-01-01

    Photoisomerization of the linear polyene 1,3,5,7-octatetraene has been observed in an n-hexane matrix maintained at the boiling point of helium. To a good approximation, only the trans,trans and cis,trans isomers participate in the photochemistry. These compounds have been unambiguously identified by comparing the observed high-resolution fluorescence spectra to those of chromatographically purified reference compounds. Although the quantum yield of this process is probably low, its microscopic rate seems to compete favorably with vibrational deactivation. PMID:16592751

  7. Solvent-Triggered Cis/Trans Isomerism in Cobalt Dioxolene Chemistry: Distinguishing Effects of Packing on Valence Tautomerism.

    PubMed

    Panja, Anangamohan; Jana, Narayan Ch; Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Mathonière, Corine

    2016-09-01

    In this article, the synthesis and X-ray crystal structures of two cis/trans isomers of valence tautomeric (VT) cobalt dioxolene compounds are reported. The cis isomer (1) was isolated from the polar protic methanol solvent as a kinetic product, whereas the less polar nonprotic solvent acetone yielded the trans isomer (2). It should be noted that, although some coordination polymers involving cobalt bis(dioxolene) with the cis disposition are known for bridging ancillary ligands, such an arrangement is unprecedented for mononuclear compounds. A careful study of intermocular interactions revealed that the methanol solvent does not have much influence on the crystal growth in 1, whereas acetone forms strong halogen-bonding interactions that are crucial in the solid-state architecture of 2. This behavior can likely be used in crystal engineering to design new organic-inorganic hybrid materials. The energy difference between the two isomers was examined using DFT calculations, confirming that the trans form is in the thermodynamic state whereas the cis isomer is a kinetic product that can be converted into the trans isomer with time. Finally, both isomers exhibit solvent loss at elevated temperatures that is accompanied by a change in magnetic properties, associated with an irreversible valence tautomerism. Our results highlight the crucial role of the solvents for the isolation of cis/trans isomers in cobalt dioxolene chemistry, as well as the distinguishing effects of intermolecular forces and the solid-state packing on VT behavior. PMID:27557848

  8. Studies on the s-cis-trans isomerism for some furan derivatives through IR and NMR spectroscopies and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittner, Roberto; Ducati, Lucas C.; Tormena, Cláudio F.; Cormanich, Rodrigo A.; Fiorin, Barbara C.; Braga, Carolyne B.; Abraham, Raymond J.

    2013-02-01

    The s-cis-trans isomerism of two furan derivatives [2-acetyl- (AF) and 2-acetyl-5-methylfuran, (AMF)] was analyzed, using data from the deconvolution of their carbonyl absorption band in two solvents (CH2Cl2 and CH3CN). These infrared data showed that the O,O-trans conformers predominate in the less polar solvent (CH2Cl2), but these equilibria change in a more polar solvent (CH3CN) leading to a slight predominance of the O,O-cis conformers, in agreement with the theoretical calculations. The later results were obtained using B3LYP-IEFPCM/6-31++g(3df,3p) level of theory, which taking into account the solvent effects at IEFPCM (Integral Equation Formalism Polarizable Continuum Model). Low temperature 13C NMR spectra in CD2Cl2 (ca. -75 °C) showed pairs of signals for each carbon, due to the known high energy barrier for the cis-trans interconversion leading to a large predominance of the trans isomers, which decreases in acetone-d6. This was confirmed by their 1H NMR spectra at the same temperatures. Moreover, despite the larger hyperconjugative interactions for the O,O-cis isomers, obtained from NBO data, these isomers are destabilized by the their Lewis energy.

  9. A mechanistic hypothesis for the cytochrome P450-catalyzed cis-trans isomerization of 4-hydroxytamoxifen: an unusual redox reaction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Tu, Yaoquan; Wegman, Pia; Wingren, Sten; Eriksson, Leif A

    2011-09-26

    We provide a detailed description of the cis-trans isomerization of 4-hydroxytamoxifen/endoxifen catalyzed by several isoforms from the cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily, including CYP1B1, CYP2B6, and CYP2C19. We show that the reactions mainly involve redox processes catalyzed by CYP. DFT calculation results strongly suggest that the isomerization occurs via a cationic intermediate. The cationic cis-isomer is more than 3 kcal/mol more stable than the trans form, resulting in an easier conversion from trans-to-cis than cis-to-trans. The cis-trans isomerization is a rarely reported CYP reaction and is ascribed to the lack of a second abstractable proton on the ethenyl group of the triarylvinyl class of substrates. The cationic intermediates thus formed instead of the stable dehydrogenation products allow for isomerization to occur. As a comparison, the reactions for the tamoxifen derivatives are compared to those of other substrates, 4-hydroxyacetanilide and raloxifene, for which the stable dehydrogenation products are formed. PMID:21870861

  10. Peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase activity and molecular evolution of vertebrate Cyclophilin A.

    PubMed

    Liqian, Ren; Wei, Liu; Wenbo, Li; Wenjun, Liu; Lei, Sun

    2016-08-01

    Peptidylprolyl isomerases (PPIase) cyclophilin A (CypA, encoded by PPIA) is a typical member of the Cyclophilin family and is involved in protein folding/translocation, signal transduction, inflammation, immune system regulation, apoptosis and virus replication. In the present study, we investigated the PPIase activity and genetic variation of vertebrate CypA. According to the GenBank reference sequences, vertebrate PPIA genes were cloned, among which the bat (Myotis davidi) and duck (Anas platyrhynchos) PPIA genes were reported for the first time. Then PPIA genes were sub-cloned into the expression vector pGEX-6p-1 and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant CypA proteins were purified by using sepharose 4B affinity chromatography and the GST tag was cleaved, followed by gel filtration. The PPIase activity assay indicated that there was no significant difference in the catalytic activity of prolyl peptide bond isomerization among 12 different vertebrate CypA proteins. In addition, the genetic variation and molecular evolution analysis showed that these vertebrate CypA proteins had the same CsA binding site and the PPIase active sites. Furthermore, the predicted structure and gene localization were remarkable conserved. Our data suggested that the important residues of CypA were highly conserved, which is crucial for its PPIase activity and cellular functions. PMID:27531612

  11. Structural and dynamic implications of an effector-induced backbone amide cis-trans isomerization in cytochrome P450cam

    PubMed Central

    Asciutto, Eliana K.; Madura, Jeffry D.; Pochapsky, Susan Sondej; OuYang, Bo; Pochapsky, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental evidence has been provided for a functionally relevant cis-trans isomerization of the Ile 88-Pro 89 peptide bond in cytochrome P450cam (CYP101). The isomerization is proposed to be a key element of the structural reorganization leading to the catalytically competent form of CYP101 upon binding of the effector protein putidaredoxin (Pdx). A detailed comparison of the results of molecular dynamics simulations on the cis and trans conformations of substrate- and carbonmonoxy-bound ferrous CYP101 with sequence-specific Pdx-induced structural perturbations identified by nuclear magnetic resonance is presented, providing insight into the structural and dynamic consequences of the isomerization. The mechanical coupling between the Pdx binding site on the proximal face of CYP101 and the site of isomerization is described. PMID:19327368

  12. Structural and dynamic implications of an effector-induced backbone amide cis-trans isomerization in cytochrome P450cam.

    PubMed

    Asciutto, Eliana K; Madura, Jeffry D; Pochapsky, Susan Sondej; OuYang, Bo; Pochapsky, Thomas C

    2009-05-15

    Experimental evidence has been provided for a functionally relevant cis-trans isomerization of the Ile88-Pro89 peptide bond in cytochrome P450(cam) (CYP101). The isomerization is proposed to be a key element of the structural reorganization leading to the catalytically competent form of CYP101 upon binding of the effector protein putidaredoxin (Pdx). A detailed comparison of the results of molecular dynamics simulations on the cis and trans conformations of substrate- and carbonmonoxy-bound ferrous CYP101 with sequence-specific Pdx-induced structural perturbations identified by nuclear magnetic resonance is presented, providing insight into the structural and dynamic consequences of the isomerization. The mechanical coupling between the Pdx binding site on the proximal face of CYP101 and the site of isomerization is described. PMID:19327368

  13. Mechanism elucidation of the cis-trans isomerization of an azole ruthenium-nitrosyl complex and its osmium counterpart.

    PubMed

    Gavriluta, Anatolie; Büchel, Gabriel E; Freitag, Leon; Novitchi, Ghenadie; Tommasino, Jean Bernard; Jeanneau, Erwann; Kuhn, Paul-Steffen; González, Leticia; Arion, Vladimir B; Luneau, Dominique

    2013-06-01

    Synthesis and X-ray diffraction structures of cis and trans isomers of ruthenium and osmium metal complexes of general formulas (nBu4N)[cis-MCl4(NO)(Hind)], where M = Ru (1) and Os (3), and (nBu4N)[trans-MCl4(NO)(Hind)], where M = Ru (2) and Os (4) and Hind = 1H-indazole are reported. Interconversion between cis and trans isomers at high temperatures (80-130 °C) has been observed and studied by NMR spectroscopy. Kinetic data indicate that isomerizations correspond to reversible first order reactions. The rates of isomerization reactions even at 110 °C are very low with rate constants of 10(-5) s(-1) and 10(-6) s(-1) for ruthenium and osmium complexes, respectively, and the estimated rate constants of isomerization at room temperature are of ca. 10(-10) s(-1). The activation parameters, which have been obtained from fitting the reaction rates at different temperatures to the Eyring equation for ruthenium [ΔH(cis-trans)‡ = 122.8 ± 1.3; ΔH(trans-cis)‡ = 138.8 ± 1.0 kJ/mol; ΔS(cis-trans)‡ = -18.7 ± 3.6; ΔS(trans-cis)‡ = 31.8 ± 2.7 J/(mol·K)] and osmium [ΔH(cis-trans)‡ = 200.7 ± 0.7; ΔH(trans-cis)‡ = 168.2 ± 0.6 kJ/mol; ΔS(cis-trans)‡ = 142.7 ± 8.9; ΔS(trans-cis)‡ = 85.9 ± 3.9 J/(mol·K)] reflect the inertness of these systems. The entropy of activation for the osmium complexes is highly positive and suggests the dissociative mechanism of isomerization. In the case of ruthenium, the activation entropy for the cis to trans isomerization is negative [-18.6 J/(mol·K)], while being positive [31.0 J/(mol·K)] for the trans to cis conversion. The thermodynamic parameters for cis to trans isomerization of [RuCl4(NO)(Hind)]-, viz. ΔH° = 13.5 ± 1.5 kJ/mol and ΔS° = -5.2 ± 3.4 J/(mol·K) indicate the low difference between the energies of cis and trans isomers. The theoretical calculation has been carried out on isomerization of ruthenium complexes with DFT methods. The dissociative, associative, and intramolecular twist isomerization

  14. 1H-13C HSQC NMR spectroscopy for estimating procyanidin/prodelphinidin and cis/trans flavan-3-ol ratios of condensed tannin samples: correlation with thiolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies with a diverse array of 22 condensed tannin (CT) fractions from 9 plant species demonstrated that procyanidin/prodelphinidin (PC/PD) and cis/trans flavan-3-ol ratios can be appraised by 1H-13C HSQC NMR. The method was developed from fractions containing 44 to ~100% CT, PC/PD ratios ranging f...

  15. Transient-Absorption Spectroscopy of Cis-Trans Isomerization of N,N-dimethyl-4,4'-Azodianiline with 3D-Printed Temperature-Controlled Sample Holder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosenkov, Dmytro; Shaw, James; Zuczek, Jennifer; Kholod, Yana

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory unit demonstrates a project based approach to teaching physical chemistry laboratory where upper-division undergraduates carry out a transient-absorption experiment investigating the kinetics of cis-trans isomerization of N,N-dimethyl-4,4'-azodianiline. Students participate in modification of a standard flash-photolysis spectrometer…

  16. Synthesis, DFT and antimicrobial activity assays in vitro for novel cis/trans-but-2-enedioic acid esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan-Long; Zhou, Ru-Jin; Zeng, Xing-Ye; An, Ya-Xiong; Qiu, Song-Shan; Nie, Li-Jun

    2014-04-01

    Six novel cis/trans-but-2-enedioic acid esters had been synthesized to discover the new bioactive molecules that could kill food-related bacteria and fungi. Their structures were analyzed by melting point, LC-MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR. 4-(Methoxycarbonyl) phenyl ethyl fumarate (6b) was also characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Their antimicrobial activities were evaluated in vitro by measuring the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). Compared with the single monomethyl fumarate and methyl 4-hydroxybenzoate, these compounds had stronger antimicrobial activity against all the eight microorganisms. Among the antibacterial and antifungal compounds, 4-(methoxycarbonyl) phenyl methyl fumarate (6a) showed the best antimicrobial activity. The electronic properties of these compounds were calculated by the density functional theory (DFT) method with 6-31G (d, p) basis set. DFT studies indicated that molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) map, ELUMO, energy gap, electronegativity and electrophilicity index could be helpful to understand the various antimicrobial activities among these compounds. The antimicrobial activity of compound 6a was evaluated in vitro against Salmonellacholeraesuis subsp. choleraesuis, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by time-kill, and it was found that compound 6a exhibited significant microbiocidal activity against the three microorganisms.

  17. Quantum coherence effects in natural light-induced processes: cis-trans photoisomerization of model retinal under incoherent excitation.

    PubMed

    Tscherbul, Timur V; Brumer, Paul

    2015-12-14

    We present a theoretical study of quantum coherence effects in the primary cis-trans photoisomerization of retinal in rhodopsin induced by incoherent solar light. Using the partial secular Bloch-Redfield quantum master equation approach based on a two-state two-mode linear vibronic coupling model of the retinal chromophore [S. Hahn and G. Stock, J. Phys. Chem. B, 2000, 104, 1146-1149], we show that a sudden turn-on of incoherent pumping can generate substantial Fano coherences among the excited states of retinal. These coherences are the most pronounced in the regime where the matrix elements of the transition dipole moment between the ground and excited eigenstates are parallel to one another. We show that even when the transition dipole moments are perpendicular (implying the absence of light-induced Fano coherence) a small amount of excited-state coherence is still generated due to the coupling to intramolecular vibrational modes and the protein environment, causing depopulation of the excited eigenstates. The overall effect of the coherences on the steady-state population and on the photoproduct quantum yield is shown to be small; however we observe a significant transient effect on the formation of the trans photoproduct, enhancing the photoreaction quantum yield by ∼11% at 200 fs. These calculations suggest that coupling to intramolecular vibrational modes and the protein environment play an important role in photoreaction dynamics, suppressing oscillations in the quantum yield associated with Fano interference. PMID:26022517

  18. Thermal cis-trans isomerization of cis,cis-3,7-decadiene - A model for cis-1,4-polybutadiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, M. A.; Lee, W. M.

    1983-01-01

    The thermal cis-trans isomerization of cis,cis-3,7-decadiene (DD), a model compound for cis-PBD, is reported. It is demonstrated that the rather low E for the polyalkenamer isomerizations compared with that for the 2-olefins is not an artifact of the solid polymer structures, but rather is characteristic of both small and large molecules possessing pairs of nonconjugated vinylene double bonds in a suitable arrangement.

  19. Proline cis-trans isomerization and its implications for the dimerization of analogues of cyclopeptide stylostatin 1: a combined computational and experimental study.

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, C; Flores-Morales, P; Cruz, M; González, T; Feliz, M; Diez, A; Campanera, Josep M

    2016-05-14

    Cis and trans proline conformers are often associated with dramatic changes in the biological function of peptides. A slow equilibrium between cis and trans Ile-Pro amide bond conformers occurs in constrained derivatives of the native marine cyclic heptapeptide stylostatin 1 (cyclo-(NSLAIPF)), a potential anticancer agent. In this work, four cyclopeptides, cyclo-(NSTAIPF), cyclo-(KSTAIPF), cyclo-(RSTAIPF) and cyclo-(DSTAIPF), which are structurally related to stylostatin 1, are experimentally and computationally examined in order to assess the effect of residue mutations on the cis-trans conformational ratio and the apparent capacity to form dimeric aggregates. Primarily, cyclo-(KSTAIPF) and cyclo-(RSTAIPF) showed specific trends in circular dichroism, MALDI-TOF and HPLC purification experiments, which suggests the occurrence of peptide dimerization. Meanwhile, the NMR spectrum of cyclo-(KSTAIPF) indicates that this cyclopeptide exists in the two slow-exchange families of conformations mentioned above. Molecular dynamics simulations combined with quantum mechanical calculations have shed light on the factors governing the cis/trans conformational ratio. In particular, we have found that residue mutations affect the internal hydrogen bond pattern which ultimately tunes the cis/trans conformational ratio and that only trans conformers are capable of aggregating due to the shape complementarity of the two subunits. PMID:27097793

  20. Differential Loss of Prolyl Isomerase or Chaperone Activity of Ran-binding Protein 2 (Ranbp2) Unveils Distinct Physiological Roles of Its Cyclophilin Domain in Proteostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung-in; Patil, Hemangi; Senda, Eugene; Wang, Jessica; Yi, Haiqing; Qiu, Sunny; Yoon, Dosuk; Yu, Minzhong; Orry, Andrew; Peachey, Neal S.; Ferreira, Paulo A.

    2014-01-01

    The immunophilins, cyclophilins, catalyze peptidyl cis-trans prolyl-isomerization (PPIase), a rate-limiting step in protein folding and a conformational switch in protein function. Cyclophilins are also chaperones. Noncatalytic mutations affecting the only cyclophilins with known but distinct physiological substrates, the Drosophila NinaA and its mammalian homolog, cyclophilin-B, impair opsin biogenesis and cause osteogenesis imperfecta, respectively. However, the physiological roles and substrates of most cyclophilins remain unknown. It is also unclear if PPIase and chaperone activities reflect distinct cyclophilin properties. To elucidate the physiological idiosyncrasy stemming from potential cyclophilin functions, we generated mice lacking endogenous Ran-binding protein-2 (Ranbp2) and expressing bacterial artificial chromosomes of Ranbp2 with impaired C-terminal chaperone and with (Tg-Ranbp2WT-HA) or without PPIase activities (Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA). The transgenic lines exhibit unique effects in proteostasis. Either line presents selective deficits in M-opsin biogenesis with its accumulation and aggregation in cone photoreceptors but without proteostatic impairment of two novel Ranbp2 cyclophilin partners, the cytokine-responsive effectors, STAT3/STAT5. Stress-induced STAT3 activation is also unaffected in Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA::Ranbp2−/−. Conversely, proteomic analyses found that the multisystem proteinopathy/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis proteins, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2/B1, are down-regulated post-transcriptionally only in Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA::Ranbp2−/−. This is accompanied by the age- and tissue-dependent reductions of diubiquitin and ubiquitylated proteins, increased deubiquitylation activity, and accumulation of the 26 S proteasome subunits S1 and S5b. These manifestations are absent in another line, Tg-Ranbp2CLDm-HA::Ranbp2−/−, harboring SUMO-1 and S1-binding mutations in the Ranbp2 cyclophilin-like domain. These results unveil

  1. Differential effects of collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation on skeletal tissues.

    PubMed

    Homan, Erica P; Lietman, Caressa; Grafe, Ingo; Lennington, Jennifer; Morello, Roy; Napierala, Dobrawa; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Munivez, Elda M; Dawson, Brian; Bertin, Terry K; Chen, Yuqing; Lua, Rhonald; Lichtarge, Olivier; Hicks, John; Weis, Mary Ann; Eyre, David; Lee, Brendan H L

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding cartilage associated protein (CRTAP) and prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1 encoded by LEPRE1) were the first identified causes of recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI). These proteins, together with cyclophilin B (encoded by PPIB), form a complex that 3-hydroxylates a single proline residue on the α1(I) chain (Pro986) and has cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity essential for proper collagen folding. Recent data suggest that prolyl 3-hydroxylation of Pro986 is not required for the structural stability of collagen; however, the absence of this post-translational modification may disrupt protein-protein interactions integral for proper collagen folding and lead to collagen over-modification. P3H1 and CRTAP stabilize each other and absence of one results in degradation of the other. Hence, hypomorphic or loss of function mutations of either gene cause loss of the whole complex and its associated functions. The relative contribution of losing this complex's 3-hydroxylation versus PPIase and collagen chaperone activities to the phenotype of recessive OI is unknown. To distinguish between these functions, we generated knock-in mice carrying a single amino acid substitution in the catalytic site of P3h1 (Lepre1(H662A) ). This substitution abolished P3h1 activity but retained ability to form a complex with Crtap and thus the collagen chaperone function. Knock-in mice showed absence of prolyl 3-hydroxylation at Pro986 of the α1(I) and α1(II) collagen chains but no significant over-modification at other collagen residues. They were normal in appearance, had no growth defects and normal cartilage growth plate histology but showed decreased trabecular bone mass. This new mouse model recapitulates elements of the bone phenotype of OI but not the cartilage and growth phenotypes caused by loss of the prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex. Our observations suggest differential tissue consequences due to selective inactivation of P3H1 hydroxylase activity

  2. Differential Effects of Collagen Prolyl 3-Hydroxylation on Skeletal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Erica P.; Lietman, Caressa; Grafe, Ingo; Lennington, Jennifer; Morello, Roy; Napierala, Dobrawa; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Munivez, Elda M.; Dawson, Brian; Bertin, Terry K.; Chen, Yuqing; Lua, Rhonald; Lichtarge, Olivier; Hicks, John; Weis, Mary Ann; Eyre, David; Lee, Brendan H. L.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding cartilage associated protein (CRTAP) and prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1 encoded by LEPRE1) were the first identified causes of recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI). These proteins, together with cyclophilin B (encoded by PPIB), form a complex that 3-hydroxylates a single proline residue on the α1(I) chain (Pro986) and has cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity essential for proper collagen folding. Recent data suggest that prolyl 3-hydroxylation of Pro986 is not required for the structural stability of collagen; however, the absence of this post-translational modification may disrupt protein-protein interactions integral for proper collagen folding and lead to collagen over-modification. P3H1 and CRTAP stabilize each other and absence of one results in degradation of the other. Hence, hypomorphic or loss of function mutations of either gene cause loss of the whole complex and its associated functions. The relative contribution of losing this complex's 3-hydroxylation versus PPIase and collagen chaperone activities to the phenotype of recessive OI is unknown. To distinguish between these functions, we generated knock-in mice carrying a single amino acid substitution in the catalytic site of P3h1 (Lepre1H662A). This substitution abolished P3h1 activity but retained ability to form a complex with Crtap and thus the collagen chaperone function. Knock-in mice showed absence of prolyl 3-hydroxylation at Pro986 of the α1(I) and α1(II) collagen chains but no significant over-modification at other collagen residues. They were normal in appearance, had no growth defects and normal cartilage growth plate histology but showed decreased trabecular bone mass. This new mouse model recapitulates elements of the bone phenotype of OI but not the cartilage and growth phenotypes caused by loss of the prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex. Our observations suggest differential tissue consequences due to selective inactivation of P3H1 hydroxylase activity

  3. Tuning the DNA Conformational Perturbations Induced by Cytotoxic Platinum-Acridine Bisintercalators: Effect of Metal cis/trans Isomerism and DNA Threading Groups

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Jayati Roy; Guddneppanavar, Rajsekhar; Saluta, Gilda; Kucera, Gregory L.; Bierbach, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Four highly charged, water soluble platinum-acridine bisintercalating agents have been synthesized. Depending on the cis/trans isomerism of the metal and the nature of the acridine side chains, bisintercalation induces/stabilizes the classical Watson-Crick B-form or a non-B-form. Circular dichroism spectra and chemical footprinting experiments suggest that compound 4, the most active derivative in HL-60 cells, produces a structurally severely perturbed DNA with features of a Hoogsteen base-paired biopolymer. PMID:18457380

  4. Ruthenium(II) complexes containing 2-pyridineformamide- and 2-benzoylpyridine-derived thiosemicarbazones and PPh 3: NMR and electrochemical studies of cis- trans-isomerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graminha, Angelica E.; Batista, Alzir A.; Mendes, Isolda C.; Teixeira, Letícia R.; Beraldo, Heloisa

    2008-04-01

    [RuCl(L)(PPh 3) 2] complexes with 2-benzoylpyridine- and 2-pyridineformamide-derived thiosemicarbazones (HL) were obtained and fully characterized. The complexes form cis- trans isomers. The cis isomer is disfavored by the sterical effect of two bulky groups close to each other whereas the trans isomer is disfavored by the electronic effect of competition of two phosphorous for π-bonding d orbitals of the metal. Our results suggest that, although both factors may be operating simultaneously, in CH 2Cl 2 solution the balance of these counterpoising effects favors the formation of the trans isomer.

  5. Secreted Cyclophilin A, a Peptidylprolyl cis-trans Isomerase, Mediates Matrix Assembly of Hensin, a Protein Implicated in Epithelial Differentiation*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hu; Vijayakumar, Soundarapandian; Schiene-Fischer, Cordelia; Li, Hui; Purkerson, Jeffrey M.; Malesevic, Miroslav; Liebscher, Jürgen; Al-Awqati, Qais; Schwartz, George J.

    2009-01-01

    Hensin is a rabbit ortholog of DMBT1, a multifunctional, multidomain protein implicated in the regulation of epithelial differentiation, innate immunity, and tumorigenesis. Hensin in the extracellular matrix (ECM) induced morphological changes characteristic of terminal differentiation in a clonal cell line (clone C) of rabbit kidney intercalated cells. Although hensin is secreted in monomeric and various oligomeric forms, only the polymerized ECM form is able to induce these phenotypic changes. Here we report that hensin secretion and matrix assembly were inhibited by the peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) inhibitors cyclosporin A (CsA) and a derivative of cyclosporin A with modifications in the d-Ser side chain (Cs9) but not by the calcineurin pathway inhibitor FK506. PPIase inhibition led to failure of hensin polymerization in the medium and ECM, plus the loss of apical cytoskeleton, apical microvilli, and the columnar epithelial shape of clone C cells. Cyclophilin A was produced and secreted into the media to a much greater extent than cyclophilins B and C. Our results also identified the direct CsA-sensitive interaction of cyclophilin A with hensin, suggesting that cyclophilin A is the PPIase that mediates the polymerization and matrix assembly of hensin. These results are significant because this is the first time a direct role of peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity has been implicated in the process of epithelial differentiation. PMID:19112104

  6. MNDO barrier heights for catalyzed bicycle-pedal, hula-twist, and ordinary cis-trans isomerizations of protonated retinal Schiff base

    SciTech Connect

    Seltzer, S.

    1987-03-18

    Energy barriers to dark cis-trans isomerization in a protonated retinal Schiff base model in the presence and absence of electrostatic and nucleophilic catalysts have been calculated by the MNDO method. Three general processes - ordinary double bond isomerization, concerted isomerization about two double bonds by bicycle-pedal motion, and one-step double bond and adjacent single bond isomerization by hula-twist motion - are considered. Point negative charges or negatively charged nucleophiles near the protonated nitrogen substantially increase the barrier to cis-trans isomerization over what they would be in the absence of these agents. Negative charge or a nucleophile near C13 lowers the barrier to bicycle-pedal isomerization. Dark isomerization by a hula-twist motion required greater energy and is not substantially aided by the placement of a negative charge or nucleophile near any of the skeletal atoms in the isomerizing system. The importance of this to the mechanism of dark-light adaptation of bacteriorhodopsin is discussed.

  7. Physiological evidence for the presence of a cis-trans isomerase of unsaturated fatty acids in Methylococcus capsulatus Bath to adapt to the presence of toxic organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Claudia; Eberlein, Christian; Mäusezahl, Ines; Kappelmeyer, Uwe; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2010-07-01

    The physiology of the response in the methanotrophic bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus Bath towards thermal and solvent stress was studied. A systematic investigation of the toxic effects of organic compounds (chlorinated phenols and alkanols) on the growth of this bacterium was carried out. The sensitivity to the tested alkanols correlated with their chain length and hydrophobicity; methanol was shown to be an exception to which the cells showed a very high tolerance. This can be explained by the adaptation of these bacteria to growth on C1 compounds. On the other hand, M. capsulatus Bath was very sensitive towards the tested chlorinated phenols. The high toxic effect of phenolic compounds on methanotrophic bacteria might be explained by the occurrence of toxic reactive oxygen species. In addition, a physiological proof of the presence of cis-trans isomerization as a membrane-adaptive response mechanism in M. capsulatus was provided. This is the first report on physiological evidence for the presence of the unique postsynthetic membrane-adaptive response mechanism of the cis-trans isomerization of unsaturated fatty acids in a bacterium that does not belong to the genera Pseudomonas and Vibrio where this mechanism was already reported and described extensively. PMID:20487020

  8. Synthesis and activity of pyrrolidinyl- and thiazolidinyl-dipeptide derivatives as inhibitors of the Tc80 prolyl oligopeptidase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Joyeau, R; Maoulida, C; Guillet, C; Frappier, F; Teixeira, A R; Schrével, J; Santana, J; Grellier, P

    2000-02-01

    Pyrrolidinyl- and thiazolidinyl- dipeptide derivatives, featuring either a vinyl sulfone-, a 2-ketobenzothiazole-, a nitrile-, or a benzimidazole group at the C-terminus, were designed and synthesized as potential inhibitors of the prolyl-specific Tc80 proteinase from Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease. These compounds were evaluated in vitro towards the target enzyme which was classified as a serine protease belonging to the prolyl oligopeptidase family (EC 3.4.21.26). A peptidyl nitrile and two peptidyl alpha-ketobenzothiazoles were shown to be potent reversible and competitive inhibitors of Tc 80 proteinase, with K(i) values in the range 38-219 nM, and compared advantageously with some known mammalian prolyl oligopeptidase inhibitors. PMID:10758287

  9. Prolyl Isomerization as a Molecular Memory in the Allosteric Regulation of the Signal Adapter Protein c-CrkII

    PubMed Central

    Schmidpeter, Philipp A. M.; Schmid, Franz X.

    2015-01-01

    c-CrkII is a central signal adapter protein. A domain opening/closing reaction between its N- and C-terminal Src homology 3 domains (SH3N and SH3C, respectively) controls signal propagation from upstream tyrosine kinases to downstream targets. In chicken but not in human c-CrkII, opening/closing is coupled with cis/trans isomerization at Pro-238 in SH3C. Here, we used advanced double-mixing experiments and kinetic simulations to uncover dynamic domain interactions in c-CrkII and to elucidate how they are linked with cis/trans isomerization and how this regulates substrate binding to SH3N. Pro-238 trans → cis isomerization is not a simple on/off switch but converts chicken c-CrkII from a high affinity to a low affinity form. We present a double-box model that describes c-CrkII as an allosteric system consisting of an open, high affinity R state and a closed, low affinity T state. Coupling of the T-R transition with an intrinsically slow prolyl isomerization provides c-CrkII with a kinetic memory and possibly functions as a molecular attenuator during signal transduction. PMID:25488658

  10. Prolyl isomerization as a molecular memory in the allosteric regulation of the signal adapter protein c-CrkII.

    PubMed

    Schmidpeter, Philipp A M; Schmid, Franz X

    2015-01-30

    c-CrkII is a central signal adapter protein. A domain opening/closing reaction between its N- and C-terminal Src homology 3 domains (SH3N and SH3C, respectively) controls signal propagation from upstream tyrosine kinases to downstream targets. In chicken but not in human c-CrkII, opening/closing is coupled with cis/trans isomerization at Pro-238 in SH3C. Here, we used advanced double-mixing experiments and kinetic simulations to uncover dynamic domain interactions in c-CrkII and to elucidate how they are linked with cis/trans isomerization and how this regulates substrate binding to SH3N. Pro-238 trans → cis isomerization is not a simple on/off switch but converts chicken c-CrkII from a high affinity to a low affinity form. We present a double-box model that describes c-CrkII as an allosteric system consisting of an open, high affinity R state and a closed, low affinity T state. Coupling of the T-R transition with an intrinsically slow prolyl isomerization provides c-CrkII with a kinetic memory and possibly functions as a molecular attenuator during signal transduction. PMID:25488658

  11. Conformations of Prolyl-Peptide Bonds in the Bradykinin 1-5 Fragment in Solution and in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Voronina, Liudmila; Masson, Antoine; Kamrath, Michael; Schubert, Franziska; Clemmer, David; Baldauf, Carsten; Rizzo, Thomas

    2016-07-27

    The dynamic nature of intrinsically disordered peptides makes them a challenge to characterize by solution-phase techniques. In order to gain insight into the relation between the disordered state and the environment, we explore the conformational space of the N-terminal 1-5 fragment of bradykinin (BK[1-5](2+)) in the gas phase by combining drift tube ion mobility, cold-ion spectroscopy, and first-principles simulations. The ion-mobility distribution of BK[1-5](2+) consists of two well-separated peaks. We demonstrate that the conformations within the peak with larger cross-section are kinetically trapped, while the more compact peak contains low-energy structures. This is a result of cis-trans isomerization of the two prolyl-peptide bonds in BK[1-5](2+). Density-functional theory calculations reveal that the compact structures have two very different geometries with cis-trans and trans-cis backbone conformations. Using the experimental CCSs to guide the conformational search, we find that the kinetically trapped species have a trans-trans configuration. This is consistent with NMR measurements performed in a solution, which show that 82% of the molecules adopt a trans-trans configuration and behave as a random coil. PMID:27366919

  12. Different shapes of spherical vaterite by photo-induced cis?trans isomerization of an azobenzene-containing polymer in a mixture of dimethyl sulfoxide and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keum, Dong-Ki; Na, Hai-Sub; Naka, Kensuke; Chujo, Yoshiki

    2004-10-01

    We studied the crystallization of CaCO3 by the photoisomerization of azobenzene groups in poly[1-[4-[3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylazobenzenesulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt] (PAZO) in a mixture of dimethyl sulfoxide and water at 30 °C. The products were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), FT-IR, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. We observed that the different shapes of spherical vaterite particles were produced by the changes of configuration and polarity of the azobenzene groups in the polymer which resulted from photo-induced isomerization. The results indicate that the nucleation of primary particles of CaCO3 was inhibited by in situ photo-induced cis-trans isomerization of PAZO. Therefore, we suggest that the shapes of the spherical vaterite can be effectively modified by photoisomerization of the azobenzene groups in the polymer at the initial stage of CaCO3 crystallization.

  13. Quantum Chemical Benchmark Studies of the Electronic Properties of the Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore: 2. Cis-Trans Isomerization in Water.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Igor; Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Grigorenko, Bella; Krylov, Anna I; Nemukhin, Alexander

    2009-07-14

    We present quantum chemical calculations of the properties of the anionic form of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore that can be directly compared to the results of experimental measurements: the cis-trans isomerization energy profile in water. Calculations of the cis-trans chromophore isomerization pathway in the gas phase and in water reveal a problematic behavior of density functional theory and scaled opposite-spin-MP2 due to the multiconfigurational character of the wave function at twisted geometries. The solvent effects treated with the continuum solvation models, as well as with the water cluster model, are found to be important and can reduce the activation energy by more than 10 kcal/mol. Strong solvent effects are explained by the change in charge localization patterns along the isomerization coordinate. At the equilibrium, the negative charge is almost equally delocalized between the phenyl and imidazolin rings due to the interaction of two resonance structures, whereas at the transition state the charge is localized on the imidazolin moiety. Our best estimate of the barrier obtained in cluster calculations employing the effective fragment potential-based quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method with the complete active space self-consistent field description of the chromophore augmented by perturbation theory correction and the TIP3P water model is 14.8 kcal/mol, which is in excellent agreement with the experimental value of 15.4 kcal/mol. This result helps to resolve previously reported disagreements between experimental measurements and theoretical estimates. PMID:26610015

  14. Regulation of AU-Rich Element RNA Binding Proteins by Phosphorylation and the Prolyl Isomerase Pin1

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhong-Jian; Malter, James S.

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR), AU-rich element (ARE) containing mRNAs, are predominantly controlled at the post-transcriptional level. Regulation appears to rely on a variable and dynamic interaction between mRNA target and ARE-specific binding proteins (AUBPs). The AUBP-ARE mRNA recognition is directed by multiple intracellular signals that are predominantly targeted at the AUBPs. These include (but are unlikely limited to) methylation, acetylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination and isomerization. These regulatory events ultimately affect ARE mRNA location, abundance, translation and stability. In this review, we describe recent advances in our understanding of phosphorylation and its impact on conformation of the AUBPs, interaction with ARE mRNAs and highlight the role of Pin1 mediated prolyl cis-trans isomerization in these biological process. PMID:25874604

  15. Dynamical role of phosphorylation on serine/threonine-proline Pin1 substrates from constant force molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, Hector A.; Hamelberg, Donald

    2015-02-01

    Cis-trans isomerization of peptidyl-prolyl bonds of the protein backbone plays an important role in numerous biological processes. Cis-trans isomerization can be the rate-limiting step due its extremely slow dynamics, compared to the millisecond time scale of many processes, and is catalyzed by a widely studied family of peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase enzymes. Also, mechanical forces along the peptide chain can speed up the rate of isomerization, resulting in "mechanical catalysis," and have been used to study peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerization and other mechanical properties of proteins. Here, we use constant force molecular dynamics simulations to study the dynamical effects of phosphorylation on serine/threonine-proline protein motifs that are involved in the function of many proteins and have been implicated in many aberrant biological processes. We show that the rate of cis-trans isomerization is slowed down by phosphorylation, in excellent agreement with experiments. We use a well-grounded theory to describe the force dependent rate of isomerization. The calculated rates at zero force are also in excellent agreement with experimentally measured rates, providing additional validation of the models and force field parameters. Our results suggest that the slowdown in the rate upon phosphorylation is mainly due to an increase in the friction along the peptidyl-prolyl bond angle during isomerization. Our results provide a microscopic description of the dynamical effects of post-translational phosphorylation on cis-trans isomerization and insights into the properties of proteins under tension.

  16. Effect of processing conditions on the content of cis/trans carotene isomers as provitamin A carotenoids in Korean sweet potato varieties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heon Woong; Kim, Jung Bong; Poovan, Shanmugavelan; Chung, Mi Nam; Cho, Soo Muk; Lee, Young Min; Cho, Young Sook; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Haeng Ran

    2014-11-01

    The present investigation intends to evaluate the changes in the content of cis/trans carotene isomers as provitamin A carotenoids by steaming and roasting processes in the roots of four Korean sweet potato varieties viz. Shinzami, Younwhangmi, Chuwhangmi and Jinhongmi using a liquid chromatography with diode array detection and the negative ion atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometric (LC-DAD-APCI/MS) method and UV spectral pattern library created from several reference data. Except Shinzami, the content of all trans β-carotenes was found to slightly decreased or remained constant when steamed or roasted. The content of cis α-/β-carotenes was potentially increased about 2-fold or greater when raw or steamed and the content was slightly decreased while roasted. In Chuwhangmi, the content of 13-cis α-carotene and all trans α-carotenes were rapidly increased when steamed and slightly decreased when roasted. Chuwhangmi exhibited 27.2 mg/100 g DW content of all trans β-carotenes when roasted and thus, it was considered as a relatively superior cultivar. PMID:24990165

  17. Isolation by high-pressure liquid chromatography of cis-trans isomers of β-apo-12'-carotenal and determination of their configurations by 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ying; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Kurimoto, Yoshitaka; Koyama, Yasushi

    1995-10-01

    High-pressure liquid chromatography of an isomeric mixture of β-apo-12'-carotenal, which was obtained by iodine-sensitized photo-isomerization, resolved eleven peaks of cis-trans isomers. The configurations of eight isomers, i.e., all-trans, 9-, 13-, 15-, 13'-mono-cis, and 9,13-, 9,13'- and 13,13'-di-cis, were determined by 1H NMR spectroscopy. 1H, 1H COSY and long-range 1H, 1H COSY spectra was used for the assignments of all the 1H signals. The isomerization shifts of the olefinic 1H signals and the NOE correlations, which were identified in the 1H, 1H NOESY spectra, were used for the configurational determinations. In relation to the difference in isomeric composition between retinoids and carotenoids, the cis configurations found in the present compound (C 25 aldehyde) are compared with those found in retinal (C 20 aldehyde) and β-apo-8'-carotenal (C 30 aldehyde) having a shorter and a longer conjugated chain, respectively.

  18. Preparative separation and purification of four cis-trans isomers of coumaroylspermidine analogs from safflower by high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Cong; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Lin, Peng-Cheng; Hu, Na; Zhang, Qiu-Long; Suo, You-Rui; Ding, Chen-Xu

    2013-11-01

    High-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) was successfully applied for the first time to isolate and purify four cis-trans isomers of coumaroylspermidine analogs from Safflower. HSCCC separation was achieved with a two-phase solvent system composed of chloroform-methanol-water (1:1:1, v/v/v) with the upper phase as the mobile phase. In a single run, a total of 1.3mg of N(1), N(5), N(10)-(E)-tri-p-coumaroylspermidine (EEE), 4.4mg of N(1)(E)-N(5)-(Z)-N(10)-(E)-tri-p-coumaroylspermidine (EZE), 7.2mg of N(1)(Z)-N(5)-(Z)-N(10)-(E)-tri-p-coumaroylspermidine (ZZE), and 11.5mg of N(1),N(5),N(10)-(Z)-tri-p-coumaroylspermidine (ZZZ) were obtained from 100mg of crude sample. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that the purities of these four components are 95.5%, 98.1%, 97.5% and 96.2%, respectively. The chemical structures were identified by ESI-MS, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR. PMID:24055753

  19. Homodimerization of the G Protein Srbeta in the Nucleotide-Free State Involves Proline cis/trans Isomerication in the Switch II Region

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz,T.; Schmidt, D.; Brohawn, S.; Blobel, G.

    2006-01-01

    Protein translocation across and insertion into membranes is essential to all life forms. Signal peptide-bearing nascent polypeptide chains emerging from the ribosome are first sampled by the signal-recognition particle (SRP), then targeted to the membrane via the SRP receptor (SR), and, finally, transferred to the protein-conducting channel. In eukaryotes, this process is tightly controlled by the concerted action of three G proteins, the 54-kD subunit of SRP and the {alpha}- and {beta}-subunits of SR. We have determined the 2.2-Angstroms crystal structure of the nucleotide-free SR{beta} domain. Unexpectedly, the structure is a homodimer with a highly intertwined interface made up of residues from the switch regions of the G domain. The remodeling of the switch regions does not resemble any of the known G protein switch mechanisms. Biochemical analysis confirms homodimerization in vitro, which is incompatible with SR{alpha} binding. The switch mechanism involves cis/trans isomerization of a strictly conserved proline, potentially implying a new layer of regulation of cotranslational transport.

  20. Fatty acids attached to all-trans-astaxanthin alter its cis-trans equilibrium, and consequently its stability, upon light-accelerated autoxidation.

    PubMed

    de Bruijn, Wouter J C; Weesepoel, Yannick; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Gruppen, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Fatty acid esterification, common in naturally occurring astaxanthin, has been suggested to influence both colour stability and degradation of all-trans-astaxanthin. Therefore, astaxanthin stability was studied as influenced by monoesterification and diesterification with palmitate. Increased esterification decelerated degradation of all-trans-astaxanthin (RP-UHPLC-PDA), whereas, it had no influence on colour loss over time (spectrophotometry). This difference might be explained by the observation that palmitate esterification influenced the cis-trans equilibrium. Free astaxanthin produced larger amounts of 9-cis isomer whereas monopalmitate esterification resulted in increased 13-cis isomerization. The molar ratios of 9-cis:13-cis after 60min were 1:1.7 (free), 1:4.8 (monopalmitate) and 1:2.6 (dipalmitate). The formation of 9-cis astaxanthin, with its higher molar extinction coefficient than that of all-trans-astaxanthin, might compensate for colour loss induced by conjugated double bond cleavage. As such, it was concluded that spectrophotometry is not an accurate measure of the degradation of the all-trans-astaxanthin molecule. PMID:26471660

  1. Chiral Cyclobutane β-Amino Acid-Based Amphiphiles: Influence of Cis/Trans Stereochemistry on Condensed Phase and Monolayer Structure.

    PubMed

    Sorrenti, Alessandro; Illa, Ona; Ortuño, Rosa M; Pons, Ramon

    2016-07-12

    New diastereomeric nonionic amphiphiles, cis- and trans-1, based on an optically pure cyclobutane β-amino ester moiety have been investigated to gain insight into the influence exerted by cis/trans stereochemistry and stereochemical constraints on the physicochemical behavior, molecular organization, and morphology of their Langmuir monolayers and dry solid states. All these features are relevant to the rational design of functional materials. trans-1 showed a higher thermal stability than cis-1. For the latter, a higher fluidity of its monolayers was observed when compared with the films formed by trans-1 whose BAM images revealed the formation of condensed phase domains with a dendritic shape, which are chiral, and all of them feature the same chiral sign. Although the formation of LC phase domains was not observed by BAM for cis-1, compact dendritic crystals floating on a fluid subphase were observed beyond the collapse, which are attributable to multilayered 3D structures. These differences can be explained by the formation of hydrogen bonds between the amide groups of consecutive molecules allowing the formation of extended chains for trans-1 giving ordered arrangements. However, for cis-1, this alignment coexists with another one that allows the simultaneous formation of two hydrogen bonds between the amide and the ester groups of adjacent molecules. In addition, the propensity to form intramolecular hydrogen bonds must be considered to justify the formation of different patterns of hydrogen bonding and, consequently, the formation of less ordered phases. Those characteristics are congruent also with the results obtained from SAXS-WAXS experiments which suggest a more bent configuration for cis-1 than for trans-1. PMID:27327214

  2. NMR analysis of cleaved Escherichia coli thioredoxin (1-73/74-108) and its P76A variant: cis/trans peptide isomerization.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, W. F.; Tung, C. S.; Wang, H.; Tasayco, M. L.

    2000-01-01

    Inspection of high resolution three-dimensional (3D) structures from the protein database reveals an increasing number of cis-Xaa-Pro and cis-Xaa-Yaa peptide bonds. However, we are still far from being able to predict whether these bonds will remain cis upon single-site substitution of Pro or Yaa and/or cleavage of a peptide bond close to it in the sequence. We have chosen oxidized Escherichia coli thioredoxin (Trx), a member of the Trx superfamily with a single alpha/beta domain and cis P76 to determine the effect of single-site substitution and/or cleavage on this isomer. Standard two-dimensional (2D) NMR analysis were performed on cleaved Trx (1-73/74-108) and its P76A variant. Analysis of the NOE connectivities indicates remarkable similarity between the secondary and supersecondary structure of the noncovalent complexes and Trx. Analysis of the 2D version of the HCCH-TOCSY and HMQC-NOESY-HMQC and 13C-filtered HMQC-NOESY spectra of cleaved Trx with uniformly 13C-labeled 175 and P76 shows surprising conservation of both cis P76 and packing of 175 against W31. A similar NMR analysis of its P76A variant provides no evidence for cis A76 and shows only subtle local changes in both the packing of 175 and the interstrand connectivities between its most protected hydrophobic strands (beta2 and beta4). Indeed, a molecular simulation model for the trans P76A variant of Trx shows only subtle local changes around the substitution site. In conclusion, cleavage of R73 is insufficient to provoke cis/trans isomerization of P76, but cleavage and single-site substitution (P76A) favors the trans isomer. PMID:10739243

  3. Investigation of the binding of cis/trans-[MCl4(1H-indazole)(NO)](-) (M = Ru, Os) complexes to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Dömötör, Orsolya; Rathgeb, Anna; Kuhn, Paul-Steffen; Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Bačić, Goran; Enyedy, Eva Anna; Arion, Vladimir B

    2016-06-01

    Overall binding affinity of sodium or indazolium cis/trans-[MCl4(1H-indazole)(NO)] (M = Ru, Os) complexes towards human serum albumin (HSA) and high molecular mass components of the blood serum was monitored by ultrafiltration. HSA was found to be mainly responsible for the binding of the studied ruthenium and osmium complexes. In other words, this protein can provide a depot for the compounds and can affect their biodistribution and transport processes. In order to elucidate the HSA binding sites tryptophan fluorescence quenching studies and displacement reactions with the established site markers warfarin and dansylglycine were performed. Conditional stability constants for the binding to sites I and II on HSA were computed showing that the studied ruthenium and osmium complexes are able to bind into both sites with moderately strong affinity (logK' = 4.4-5.1). Site I is slightly more favored over site II for all complexes. No significant differences in the HSA binding properties were found for these metal complexes demonstrating negligible influence of the type of counterion (sodium vs indazolium), the metal ion center identity (Ru vs. Os) or the position of the nitrosyl group on the binding event. Electron paramagnetic resonance spin labeling of HSA revealed that indazolium trans-[RuCl4(1H-indazole)(NO)] and long-chain fatty acids show competitive binding to HSA. Moreover, this complex has a higher affinity for site I, but when present in excess, it is able to bind to site II as well, and displace fatty acids. PMID:26908285

  4. A Crystallographic Study of Bright Far-Red Fluorescent Protein mKate Reveals pH-induced cis-trans Isomerization of the Chromophore

    SciTech Connect

    Pletnev, Sergei; Shcherbo, Dmitry; Chudakov, Dmitry M.; Pletneva, Nadezhda; Merzlyak, Ekaterina M.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Vladimir

    2008-11-03

    The far-red fluorescent protein mKate {lambda}{sup ex}, 588 nm; {lambda}{sub em}, 635 nm; chromophore-forming triad Met{sup 63}-Tyr{sup 64}-Gly{sup 65}, originating from wild-type red fluorescent progenitor eqFP578 (sea anemone Entacmaea quadricolor), is monomeric and characterized by the pronounced pH dependence of fluorescence, relatively high brightness, and high photostability. The protein has been crystallized at a pH ranging from 2 to 9 in three space groups, and four structures have been determined by x-ray crystallography at the resolution of 1.75--2.6 {angstrom}. The pH-dependent fluorescence of mKate has been shown to be due to reversible cis-trans isomerization of the chromophore phenolic ring. In the non-fluorescent state at pH 2.0, the chromophore of mKate is in the trans-isomeric form. The weakly fluorescent state of the protein at pH 4.2 is characterized by a mixture of trans and cis isomers. The chromophore in a highly fluorescent state at pH 7.0/9.0 adopts the cis form. Three key residues, Ser{sup 143}, Leu{sup 174}, and Arg{sup 197} residing in the vicinity of the chromophore, have been identified as being primarily responsible for the far-red shift in the spectra. A group of residues consisting of Val{sup 93}, Arg{sup 122}, Glu{sup 155}, Arg{sup 157}, Asp{sup 159}, His{sup 169}, Ile{sup 171}, Asn{sup 173}, Val{sup 192}, Tyr{sup 194}, and Val{sup 216}, are most likely responsible for the observed monomeric state of the protein in solution.

  5. Biochemical characterization and selective inhibition of β-carotene cis-trans isomerase D27 and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase CCD8 on the strigolactone biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Peter J; Newgas, Sophie A; Descombes, Flora; Shepherd, Sarah A; Thompson, Andrew J; Bugg, Timothy D H

    2015-10-01

    The first three enzymatic steps of the strigolactone biosynthetic pathway catalysed by β-carotene cis-trans isomerase Dwarf27 (D27) from Oryza sativa and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases CCD7 and CCD8 from Arabidopsis thaliana have been reconstituted in vitro, and kinetic assays have been developed for each enzyme, in order to develop selective enzyme inhibitors. Recombinant OsD27 shows a UV-visible λmax at 422 nm and is inactivated by silver(I) acetate, consistent with the presence of an iron-sulfur cluster that is used in catalysis. OsD27 and AtCCD7 are not inhibited by hydroxamic acids that cause shoot branching in planta, but OsD27 is partially inhibited by terpene-like hydroxamic acids. The reaction catalysed by AtCCD8 is shown to be a two-step kinetic mechanism using pre-steady-state kinetic analysis. Kinetic evidence is presented for acid-base catalysis in the CCD8 catalytic cycle and the existence of an essential cysteine residue in the CCD8 active site. AtCCD8 is inhibited in a time-dependent fashion by hydroxamic acids D2, D4, D5 and D6 (> 95% inhibition at 100 μm) that cause a shoot branching phenotype in A. thaliana, and selective inhibition of CCD8 is observed using hydroxamic acids D13H and D15 (82%, 71% inhibition at 10 μm). The enzyme inhibition data imply that the biochemical basis of the shoot branching phenotype is due to inhibition of CCD8. PMID:26257333

  6. An on-line SPE-HPLC method for effective sample preconcentration and determination of fenoxycarb and cis, trans-permethrin in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Šatínský, Dalibor; Naibrtová, Linda; Fernández-Ramos, Carolina; Solich, Petr

    2015-09-01

    A new on-line SPE-HPLC method using fused-core columns for on-line solid phase extraction and large volume sample injection for increasing the sensitivity of detection was developed for the determination of insecticides fenoxycarb and cis-, trans-permethrin in surface waters. The separation was carried out on fused-core column Phenyl-Hexyl (100×4.6 mm), particle size 2.7 µm with mobile phase acetonitrile:water in gradient mode at flow rate 1.0 mL min(-1), column temperature 45°C. Large volume sample injection (1500 µL) to the extraction dimension using short precolumn Ascentis Express RP C-18 (5×4.6 mm); fused-core particle size 2.7 µm allowed effective sample preconcentration and efficient ballast sample matrix removal. The washing mobile phase consisting of a mixture of acetonitrile:water; 30:70, (v/v) was pumped at flow rate of 0.5 mL min(-1) through the extraction precolumn to the waste. Time of the valve switch for transferring the preconcentrated sample zone from the extraction to the separation column was set at 3rd min. Elution of preconcentrated insecticides from the extraction precolumn and separation on the analytical column was performed in gradient mode. Linear gradient elution started from 40% of acetonitrile at time of valve switch from SPE column (3rd min) to 95% of acetonitrile at 7th min. Synthetic dye sudan I was chosen as an internal standard. UV detection at wavelength 225 nm was used and the method reached the limits of detection (LOD) at ng mL(-1) levels for both insecticides. The method showing on-line sample pretreatment and preconcentration with highly sensitive determination of insecticides was applied for monitoring of fenoxycarb and both permethrin isomers in different surface water samples in Czech Republic. The time of whole analysis including on-line extraction, interferences removal, chromatography separation and system equilibration was less than 8 min. PMID:26003701

  7. The prolyl-isomerase Pin1 activates the mitochondrial death program of p53.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, G; Mioni, M; Giorgi, C; Ruggeri, N; Pinton, P; Moll, U; Mantovani, F; Del Sal, G

    2013-02-01

    In response to intense stress, the tumor protein p53 (p53) tumor suppressor rapidly mounts a direct mitochondrial death program that precedes transcription-mediated apoptosis. By eliminating severely damaged cells, this pathway contributes to tumor suppression as well as to cancer cell killing induced by both genotoxic drugs and non-genotoxic p53-reactivating molecules. Here we have explored the role had in this pathway by the prolyl-isomerase Pin1 (peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase, NIMA-interacting 1), a crucial transducer of p53's phosphorylation into conformational changes unleashing its pro-apoptotic activity. We show that Pin1 promotes stress-induced localization of p53 to mitochondria both in vitro and in vivo. In particular, we demonstrate that upon stress-induced phosphorylation of p53 on Ser46 by homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2, Pin1 stimulates its mitochondrial trafficking signal, that is, monoubiquitination. This pathway is induced also by the p53-activating molecule RITA, and we demonstrate the strong requirement of Pin1 for the induction of mitochondrial apoptosis by this compound. These findings have significant implications for treatment of p53-expressing tumors and for prospective use of p53-activating compounds in clinics. PMID:22935610

  8. The prolyl-isomerase Pin1 activates the mitochondrial death program of p53

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, G; Mioni, M; Giorgi, C; Ruggeri, N; Pinton, P; Moll, U; Mantovani, F; Del Sal, G

    2013-01-01

    In response to intense stress, the tumor protein p53 (p53) tumor suppressor rapidly mounts a direct mitochondrial death program that precedes transcription-mediated apoptosis. By eliminating severely damaged cells, this pathway contributes to tumor suppression as well as to cancer cell killing induced by both genotoxic drugs and non-genotoxic p53-reactivating molecules. Here we have explored the role had in this pathway by the prolyl-isomerase Pin1 (peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase, NIMA-interacting 1), a crucial transducer of p53's phosphorylation into conformational changes unleashing its pro-apoptotic activity. We show that Pin1 promotes stress-induced localization of p53 to mitochondria both in vitro and in vivo. In particular, we demonstrate that upon stress-induced phosphorylation of p53 on Ser46 by homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2, Pin1 stimulates its mitochondrial trafficking signal, that is, monoubiquitination. This pathway is induced also by the p53-activating molecule RITA, and we demonstrate the strong requirement of Pin1 for the induction of mitochondrial apoptosis by this compound. These findings have significant implications for treatment of p53-expressing tumors and for prospective use of p53-activating compounds in clinics. PMID:22935610

  9. Peptidylproline cis-trans-Isomerase Pin1 Interacts with Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Tax and Modulates Its Activation of NF-κB▿

    PubMed Central

    Peloponese, Jean-Marie; Yasunaga, Junichiro; Kinjo, Takao; Watashi, Koichi; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2009-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus etiologically causal of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). The virus encodes a Tax oncoprotein that functions in transcriptional regulation, cell cycle control, and transformation. ATL is a highly virulent cancer that is resistant to chemotherapeutic treatments. To understand this disease better, it is important to comprehend how HTLV-1 promotes cellular growth and survival. Tax activation of NF-κB is important for the proliferation and transformation of virus-infected cells. We show here that prolyl isomerase Pin1 is over expressed in HTLV-1 cell lines; Pin1 binds Tax and regulates Tax-induced NF-κB activation. PMID:19158244

  10. Essential role of Pro 74 in stefin B amyloid-fibril formation: dual action of cyclophilin A on the process.

    PubMed

    Smajlović, Aida; Berbić, Selma; Schiene-Fischer, Cordelia; Tusek-Znidaric, Magda; Taler, Ajda; Jenko-Kokalj, Sasa; Turk, Dusan; Zerovnik, Eva

    2009-04-01

    We report that Pro74 in human stefin B is critical for fibril formation and that proline isomerization plays an important role. The stefin B P74S mutant did not fibrillate over the time of observation at 25 degrees C, and it exhibited a prolonged lag phase at 30 degrees C and 37 degrees C. The peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase cyclophilin A, when added to the wild-type protein, exerted two effects: it prolonged the lag phase and increased the yield and length of the fibrils. Addition of the inactive cyclophilin A R55A variant still resulted in a prolonged lag phase but did not mediate the increase of the final fibril yield. These results demonstrate that peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerism is rate-limiting in stefin B fibril formation. PMID:19265692

  11. An endoplasmic reticulum-specific cyclophilin.

    PubMed Central

    Hasel, K W; Glass, J R; Godbout, M; Sutcliffe, J G

    1991-01-01

    Cyclophilin is a ubiquitously expressed cytosolic peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase that is inhibited by the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A. A degenerate oligonucleotide based on a conserved cyclophilin sequence was used to isolate cDNA clones representing a ubiquitously expressed mRNA from mice and humans. This mRNA encodes a novel 20-kDa protein, CPH2, that shares 64% sequence identity with cyclophilin. Bacterially expressed CPH2 binds cyclosporin A and is a cyclosporin A-inhibitable peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase. Cell fractionation of rat liver followed by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis indicated that CPH2 is not cytosolic but rather is located exclusively in the endoplasmic reticulum. These results suggest that cyclosporin A mediates its effect on cells through more than one cyclophilin and that cyclosporin A-induced misfolding of T-cell membrane proteins normally mediated by CPH2 plays a role in immunosuppression. Images PMID:1710767

  12. Theileria parasites secrete a prolyl isomerase to maintain host leukocyte transformation

    PubMed Central

    Marsolier, J.; Perichon, M.; DeBarry, JD.; Villoutreix, BO.; Chluba, J.; Lopez, T.; Garrido, C.; Zhou, XZ.; Lu, KP.; Fritsch, L.; Ait-Si-Ali, S.; Mhadhbi, M; Medjkane, S.; Weitzman, JB.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious agents develop intricate mechanisms to interact with host cell pathways and hijack the genetic and epigenetic machinery to change phenotypic states. Amongst the Apicomplexa phylum of obligate intracellular parasites which cause veterinary and human diseases, Theileria is the only genus which transforms its mammalian host cells1. Theileria infection of bovine leukocytes induces proliferative and invasive phenotypes associated with activated signalling pathways, notably JNK and AP-12. The transformed phenotypes are reversed by treatment with the theilericidal drug Buparvaquone3. We used comparative genomics to identify a homologue of the Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 (designated TaPin1) in T. annulata which is secreted into the host cell and modulates oncogenic signalling pathways. Here we show that TaPin1 is a bona fide prolyl isomerase and that it interacts with the host ubiquitin ligase FBW7 leading to its degradation and subsequent stabilization of c-Jun which promotes transformation. We performed in vitro analysis and in vivo zebrafish xenograft experiments to demonstrate that TaPin1 is directly inhibited by the anti-parasite drug Buparvaquone (and other known Pin1 inhibitors) and is mutated in a drug-resistant strain. Prolyl isomerisation is thus a conserved mechanism which is important in cancer and is used by Theileria parasites to manipulate host oncogenic signaling. PMID:25624101

  13. Bacillus anthracis Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Modifies Collagen-like Substrates in Asymmetric Patterns.

    PubMed

    Schnicker, Nicholas J; Dey, Mishtu

    2016-06-17

    Proline hydroxylation is the most prevalent post-translational modification in collagen. The resulting product trans-4-hydroxyproline (Hyp) is of critical importance for the stability and thus function of collagen, with defects leading to several diseases. Prolyl 4-hydroxylases (P4Hs) are mononuclear non-heme iron α-ketoglutarate (αKG)-dependent dioxygenases that catalyze Hyp formation. Although animal and plant P4Hs target peptidyl proline, prokaryotes have been known to use free l-proline as a precursor to form Hyp. The P4H from Bacillus anthracis (BaP4H) has been postulated to act on peptidyl proline in collagen peptides, making it unusual within the bacterial clade, but its true physiological substrate remains enigmatic. Here we use mass spectrometry, fluorescence binding, x-ray crystallography, and docking experiments to confirm that BaP4H recognizes and acts on peptidyl substrates but not free l-proline, using elements characteristic of an Fe(II)/αKG-dependent dioxygenases. We further show that BaP4H can hydroxylate unique peptidyl proline sites in collagen-derived peptides with asymmetric hydroxylation patterns. The cofactor-bound crystal structures of BaP4H reveal active site conformational changes that define open and closed forms and mimic "ready" and "product-released" states of the enzyme in the catalytic cycle. These results help to clarify the role of BaP4H as well as provide broader insights into human collagen P4H and proteins with poly-l-proline type II helices. PMID:27129244

  14. Determination of the cis-trans isomerization barriers of L-alanyl-L-proline in aqueous solutions and at water/hydrophobic interfaces by on-line temperature-jump relaxation HPLC and dynamic on-column reaction HPLC.

    PubMed

    Shibukawa, Masami; Miyake, Ayaka; Eda, Sayaka; Saito, Shingo

    2015-09-15

    Proline cis-trans isomerization is known to play a key role in the rate-determining steps of protein folding. It is thus very important to understand the influence of environments, not only bulk solutions but also microenvironments such as interfaces, on the isomerization reaction of proline peptides. Here we present two HPLC methods for measurements of kinetic and equilibrium parameters for the isomerization reactions in bulk solutions and at liquid/solid interfaces. On-line temperature-jump relaxation HPLC (T-jump HPLC) allows the determination of forward and reverse rate constants of the isomerization in a bulk solution by monitoring the whole time course of conversion of pure isomers from both sides of the reaction, in contrast to other HPLC and capillary zone electrophoresis as well as spectrometric and calorimetric methods, which use a mixture of the isomers. We can then determine cis-trans isomerization barriers of the peptide at liquid/solid interfaces from the kinetic data obtained by dynamic on-column reaction HPLC and T-jump HPLC. We observed that the interconversion around the peptide bond for l-alanyl-l-proline (Ala-Pro) in water is accelerated at the surfaces of an alkyl-bonded silica and a poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) copolymer resin, and this is caused by a remarkable decrease in the enthalpy of activation. The molecular structures of the cis and trans forms of Ala-Pro estimated by quantum mechanics calculation reveal that an equilibrium shift toward the cis form as well as the rapid isomerization of Ala-Pro at the water/hydrophobic interfaces can be attributed to the lower polarity of the interfacial water at the surfaces of the hydrophobic materials compared to that of bulk water. PMID:26320351

  15. The yeast Ess1 prolyl isomerase controls Swi6 and Whi5 nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Atencio, David; Barnes, Cassandra; Duncan, Thomas M; Willis, Ian M; Hanes, Steven D

    2014-03-01

    The Ess1 prolyl isomerase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its human ortholog, Pin1, play critical roles in transcription by regulating RNA polymerase II. In human cells, Pin1 also regulates a variety of signaling proteins, and Pin1 misexpression is linked to several human diseases. To gain insight into Ess1/Pin1 function, we carried out a synthetic genetic array screen to identify novel targets of Ess1 in yeast. We identified potential targets of Ess1 in transcription, stress, and cell-cycle pathways. We focused on the cell-cycle regulators Swi6 and Whi5, both of which show highly regulated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling during the cell cycle. Surprisingly, Ess1 did not control their transcription but instead was necessary for their nuclear localization. Ess1 associated with Swi6 and Whi5 in vivo and bound directly to peptides corresponding to their nuclear localization sequences in vitro. Binding by Ess1 was significant only if the Swi6 and Whi5 peptides were phosphorylated at Ser-Pro motifs, the target sites of cyclin-dependent kinases. On the basis of these results, we propose a model in which Ess1 induces a conformational switch (cis-trans isomerization) at phospho-Ser-Pro sites within the nuclear targeting sequences of Swi6 and Whi5. This switch would promote nuclear entry and/or retention during late M and G1 phases and might work by stimulating dephosphorylation at these sites by the Cdc14 phosphatase. This is the first study to identify targets of Ess1 in yeast other than RNA polymerase II. PMID:24470217

  16. Dissociability of free and peptidyl-tRNA bound ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Surguchov, A P; Fominykch, E S; Lyzlova, L V

    1978-06-16

    The influence of peptidyl-tRNA on the dissociation of yeast 80 S ribosomes into subunits was studied. For this purpose temperature-sensitive (ts) suppressor strain of yeast Saccharomyces cervisiae carrying a defect in peptide chain termination was used. It was found that peptidyl-tRNA did not influence the dissociation of ribosomes either at high salt concentration or in the presence of dissociation factor (DF) from yeast. After dissociation of yeast ribosomes in 0.5 M KCl, peptidyl-tRNA remains bound to the 60 S subunit. Some characteristics of the termination process and release of nascent polypeptides from yeast ribosomes are discussed. PMID:355860

  17. Probing cis-trans isomerization in the S{sub 1} state of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} via H-atom action and hot band-pumped IR-UV double resonance spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Changala, P. Bryan; Baraban, Joshua H.; Field, Robert W.; Merer, Anthony J.

    2015-08-28

    We report novel experimental strategies that should prove instrumental in extending the vibrational and rotational assignments of the S{sub 1} state of acetylene, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, in the region of the cis-trans isomerization barrier. At present, the assignments are essentially complete up to ∼500 cm{sup −1} below the barrier. Two difficulties arise when the assignments are continued to higher energies. One is that predissociation into C{sub 2}H + H sets in roughly 1100 cm{sup −1} below the barrier; the resulting quenching of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) reduces its value for recording spectra in this region. The other difficulty is that tunneling through the barrier causes a staggering in the K-rotational structure of isomerizing vibrational levels. The assignment of these levels requires data for K values up to at least 3. Given the rotational selection rule K′ − ℓ{sup ′′} = ± 1, such data must be obtained via excited vibrational levels of the ground state with ℓ{sup ′′} > 0. In this paper, high resolution H-atom resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra are demonstrated to contain predissociated bands which are almost invisible in LIF spectra, while preliminary data using a hyperthermal pulsed nozzle show that ℓ{sup ′′} = 2 states can be selectively populated in a jet, giving access to K′ = 3 states in IR-UV double resonance.

  18. Probing cis-trans isomerization in the S1 state of C2H2 via H-atom action and hot band-pumped IR-UV double resonance spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changala, P. Bryan; Baraban, Joshua H.; Merer, Anthony J.; Field, Robert W.

    2015-08-01

    We report novel experimental strategies that should prove instrumental in extending the vibrational and rotational assignments of the S1 state of acetylene, C2H2, in the region of the cis-trans isomerization barrier. At present, the assignments are essentially complete up to ˜500 cm-1 below the barrier. Two difficulties arise when the assignments are continued to higher energies. One is that predissociation into C2H + H sets in roughly 1100 cm-1 below the barrier; the resulting quenching of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) reduces its value for recording spectra in this region. The other difficulty is that tunneling through the barrier causes a staggering in the K-rotational structure of isomerizing vibrational levels. The assignment of these levels requires data for K values up to at least 3. Given the rotational selection rule K' - ℓ'' = ± 1, such data must be obtained via excited vibrational levels of the ground state with ℓ'' > 0. In this paper, high resolution H-atom resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra are demonstrated to contain predissociated bands which are almost invisible in LIF spectra, while preliminary data using a hyperthermal pulsed nozzle show that ℓ'' = 2 states can be selectively populated in a jet, giving access to K' = 3 states in IR-UV double resonance.

  19. Probing cis-trans isomerization in the S1 state of C2H2 via H-atom action and hot band-pumped IR-UV double resonance spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Changala, P Bryan; Baraban, Joshua H; Merer, Anthony J; Field, Robert W

    2015-08-28

    We report novel experimental strategies that should prove instrumental in extending the vibrational and rotational assignments of the S1 state of acetylene, C2H2, in the region of the cis-trans isomerization barrier. At present, the assignments are essentially complete up to ∼500 cm(-1) below the barrier. Two difficulties arise when the assignments are continued to higher energies. One is that predissociation into C2H + H sets in roughly 1100 cm(-1) below the barrier; the resulting quenching of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) reduces its value for recording spectra in this region. The other difficulty is that tunneling through the barrier causes a staggering in the K-rotational structure of isomerizing vibrational levels. The assignment of these levels requires data for K values up to at least 3. Given the rotational selection rule K' - ℓ('') = ± 1, such data must be obtained via excited vibrational levels of the ground state with ℓ('') > 0. In this paper, high resolution H-atom resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra are demonstrated to contain predissociated bands which are almost invisible in LIF spectra, while preliminary data using a hyperthermal pulsed nozzle show that ℓ('') = 2 states can be selectively populated in a jet, giving access to K' = 3 states in IR-UV double resonance. PMID:26328846

  20. Spontaneous Formation of RNA Strands, Peptidyl RNA, and Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Jauker, Mario; Griesser, Helmut; Richert, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    How the biochemical machinery evolved from simple precursors is an open question. Here we show that ribonucleotides and amino acids condense to peptidyl RNAs in the absence of enzymes under conditions established for genetic copying. Untemplated formation of RNA strands that can encode genetic information, formation of peptidyl chains linked to RNA, and formation of the cofactors NAD+, FAD, and ATP all occur under the same conditions. In the peptidyl RNAs, the peptide chains are phosphoramidate-linked to a ribonucleotide. Peptidyl RNAs with long peptide chains were selected from an initial pool when a lipophilic phase simulating the interior of membranes was offered, and free peptides were released upon acidification. Our results show that key molecules of genetics, catalysis, and metabolism can emerge under the same conditions, without a mineral surface, without an enzyme, and without the need for chemical pre-activation. PMID:26435376

  1. Evidence of Sulfur Mustard Exposure in Human Plasma by LC-ESI-MS-MS Detection of the Albumin-Derived Alkylated HETE-CP Dipeptide and Chromatographic Investigation of Its Cis/Trans Isomerism.

    PubMed

    Gandor, Felix; Gawlik, Michael; Thiermann, Horst; John, Harald

    2015-05-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that causes painful blisters and chemically modifies endogenous biomacromolecules by alkylation to hydroxyethylthioethyl (HETE) adducts representing valuable long-term markers for post-exposure analysis. The albumin adduct formed in human plasma in vitro (HETE bound to the side chain of cysteine 34) was isolated and cleaved by current lots of pronase primarily generating the internal modified dipeptide (HETE-cysteine-proline, HETE-CP) instead of the formerly reported HETE-CPF tripeptide. The analyte was detected by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS-MS). In principle, HETE-CP undergoes a dynamic on-column equilibrium of cis-trans isomerism thus requiring separation at 50°C to obtain one narrow peak. Accordingly, we developed both a novel longer lasting but more sensitive microbore (1 mm i.d., flow 30 µL/min, cycle time 60 min, LOD 50 nM) and a faster, less sensitive narrowbore (2.1 mm i.d., 200 µL/min, cycle time 16 min, LOD 100 nM, both on Atlantis T3 material at 50°C) LC-ESI-MS-MS method suitable for verification analysis. The corresponding tri- and tetrapeptide, Q(HETE)-CPF were monitored simultaneously. HETE-CP peak areas were directly proportional to SM concentrations added to plasma in vitro (0.05-100 µM). Albumin adducts formed by deuterated SM (d8-SM) served as internal standard. PMID:25712440

  2. New Selective Peptidyl Di(chlorophenyl) Phosphonate Esters for Visualizing and Blocking Neutrophil Proteinase 3 in Human Diseases*

    PubMed Central

    Guarino, Carla; Legowska, Monika; Epinette, Christophe; Kellenberger, Christine; Dallet-Choisy, Sandrine; Sieńczyk, Marcin; Gabant, Guillaume; Cadene, Martine; Zoidakis, Jérôme; Vlahou, Antonia; Wysocka, Magdalena; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Jenne, Dieter E.; Lesner, Adam; Gauthier, Francis; Korkmaz, Brice

    2014-01-01

    The function of neutrophil protease 3 (PR3) is poorly understood despite of its role in autoimmune vasculitides and its possible involvement in cell apoptosis. This makes it different from its structural homologue neutrophil elastase (HNE). Endogenous inhibitors of human neutrophil serine proteases preferentially inhibit HNE and to a lesser extent, PR3. We constructed a single-residue mutant PR3 (I217R) to investigate the S4 subsite preferences of PR3 and HNE and used the best peptide substrate sequences to develop selective phosphonate inhibitors with the structure Ac-peptidylP(O-C6H4-4-Cl)2. The combination of a prolyl residue at P4 and an aspartyl residue at P2 was totally selective for PR3. We then synthesized N-terminally biotinylated peptidyl phosphonates to identify the PR3 in complex biological samples. These inhibitors resisted proteolytic degradation and rapidly inactivated PR3 in biological fluids such as inflammatory lung secretions and the urine of patients with bladder cancer. One of these inhibitors revealed intracellular PR3 in permeabilized neutrophils and on the surface of activated cells. They hardly inhibited PR3 bound to the surface of stimulated neutrophils despite their low molecular mass, suggesting that the conformation and reactivity of membrane-bound PR3 is altered. This finding is relevant for autoantibody binding and the subsequent activation of neutrophils in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Wegener disease). These are the first inhibitors that can be used as probes to monitor, detect, and control PR3 activity in a variety of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25288799

  3. Metal Ion Complexes of N,N'-Bis(2-Pyridylmethyl)-trans-1,2-Diaminocyclohexane-N,N'-Diacetic Acid, H2bpcd: Cis/Trans Isomerization Equilibria.

    PubMed

    Florián, Jan; McLauchlan, Craig C; Kissel, Daniel S; Eichman, Chad C; Herlinger, Albert W

    2015-11-01

    The synthesis of N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N'-diacetic acid (H2bpcd) and its complexation of Ga(III) and Co(III) are reported. H2bpcd and the metal-bpcd(2-) complexes, isolated as hexafluorophosphate salts, were characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray crystallography, IR spectroscopy, and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. [Ga(bpcd)]PF6, [Ga(C22H26N4O4)]PF6, crystallized in the orthorhombic space group Ibca, with a = 13.8975(7) Å, b = 15.0872(7) Å, c = 22.2418(10) Å, and Z = 8. Ga is coordinated in a distorted octahedral geometry provided by a N4O2 donor atom set with trans-monodentate acetate groups and cis-2-pyridylmethyl N atoms, i.e., the trans-O,O isomer. The diamagnetic [Co(bpcd)]PF6, [Co(C22H26N4O4)]PF6, also crystallized from solution in the Ibca space group as the trans-O,O isomer. The (1)H and (13)C assignments for H2bpcd and metal-bpcd(2-) complexes were made on the basis of 2D COSY and HSQC experiments, which were used to differentiate among three possible isomers, i.e., one cis (C1 symmetry) and two trans (C2 symmetry). NMR results indicate that the [Ga(bpcd)](+), [Co(bpcd)](+), and cis-O,O, cis-Npy,Npy-[Ga(bppd)](+) cations, where bppd(2-) stands for bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane diacetate, are present in solution as isomers with the same symmetry as observed in the solid state. The crystallographic data and the dramatic shift that occurs in the position of the cis/trans isomerization equilibria for the [Ga(bpad)](+) cations simply by increasing the number of bridging CH2 groups in the ligand's diamine backbone represent a unique opportunity to assess the accuracy of modern computational methods. The performance of several local density functionals using a pseudopotential-based SDD basis set was compared with the more rigorous HF and MP2 ab initio calculations. The SVWN5 and SV5LYP functionals provide significantly better Ga-O and Ga-N distances than the HF method or the nonlocal BLYP functional. However

  4. Phosphate–Induced Renal Fibrosis Requires the Prolyl Isomerase Pin1

    PubMed Central

    Shiizaki, Kazuhiro; Kuro-o, Makoto; Malter, James S.

    2016-01-01

    Tubulo-interstitial fibrosis is a common, destructive endpoint for a variety of kidney diseases. Fibrosis is well correlated with the loss of kidney function in both humans and rodents. The identification of modulators of fibrosis could provide novel therapeutic approaches to reducing disease progression or severity. Here, we show that the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1 is an important molecular contributor that facilitates renal fibrosis in a well-characterized animal model. While wild-type mice fed a high phosphate diet (HPD) for 8–12 weeks developed calcium deposition, macrophage infiltration and extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in the kidney interstitium, Pin1 null mice showed significantly less pathology. The serum Pi in both WT and KO mice were significantly increased by the HPD, but the serum Ca was slightly decreased in KO compared to WT. In addition, both WT and KO HPD mice had less weight gain but exhibited normal organ mass (kidney, lung, spleen, liver and heart). Unexpectedly, renal function was not initially impaired in either genotype irrespective of the HPD. Our results suggest that diet containing high Pi induces rapid renal fibrosis before a significant impact on renal function and that Pin1 plays an important role in the fibrotic process. PMID:26914452

  5. Cyclophilin and Viruses: Cyclophilin as a Cofactor for Viral Infection and Possible Anti-Viral Target

    PubMed Central

    Watashi, Koichi; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    2007-01-01

    Cyclophilin (CyP) is a peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase, catalyzing the cis-trans isomerization of proline residues in proteins. CyP plays key roles in several different aspects of cellular physiology including the immune response, transcription, mitochondrial function, cell death, and chemotaxis. In addition to these cellular events, a number of reports demonstrated that CyP plays a critical role in the life cycle of viruses, especially human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). These two viruses are significant causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, but current therapies are often insufficient. CyP may provide a novel therapeutic target for the management and/or cure of these diseases, in particular HCV. PMID:21901058

  6. Discovery of novel selenium derivatives as Pin1 inhibitors by high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Subedi, Amit; Shimizu, Takeshi; Ryo, Akihide; Sanada, Emiko; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerization by Pin1 regulates various oncogenic signals during cancer progression, and its inhibition through multiple approaches has established Pin1 as a therapeutic target. However, lack of simplified screening systems has limited the discovery of potent Pin1 inhibitors. We utilized phosphorylation-dependent binding of Pin1 to its specific substrate to develop a screening system for Pin1 inhibitors. Using this system, we screened a chemical library, and identified a novel selenium derivative as Pin1 inhibitor. Based on structure-activity guided chemical synthesis, we developed more potent Pin1 inhibitors that inhibited cancer cell proliferation. PMID:27120460

  7. Induced-fit Mechanism for Prolyl Endopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Min; Chen, Changqing; Davies, David R.; Chiu, Thang K.

    2010-11-15

    Prolyl peptidases cleave proteins at proline residues and are of importance for cancer, neurological function, and type II diabetes. Prolyl endopeptidase (PEP) cleaves neuropeptides and is a drug target for neuropsychiatric diseases such as post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and schizophrenia. Previous structural analyses showing little differences between native and substrate-bound structures have suggested a lock-and-key catalytic mechanism. We now directly demonstrate from seven structures of Aeromonus punctata PEP that the mechanism is instead induced fit: the native enzyme exists in a conformationally flexible opened state with a large interdomain opening between the {beta}-propeller and {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase domains; addition of substrate to preformed native crystals induces a large scale conformational change into a closed state with induced-fit adjustments of the active site, and inhibition of this conformational change prevents substrate binding. Absolute sequence conservation among 28 orthologs of residues at the active site and critical residues at the interdomain interface indicates that this mechanism is conserved in all PEPs. This finding has immediate implications for the use of conformationally targeted drug design to improve specificity of inhibition against this family of proline-specific serine proteases.

  8. Oligopeptide cyclophilin inhibitors: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Michael; Jahreis, Günther; Kahlert, Viktoria; Lücke, Christian; Fischer, Gunter

    2011-11-01

    Potent cyclophilin A (CypA) inhibitors such as non-immunosuppressive cyclosporin A (CsA) derivatives have been already used in clinical trials in patients with viral infections. CypA is a peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) that catalyzes slow prolyl bond cis/trans interconversions of the backbone of substrate peptides and proteins. In this study we investigate whether the notoriously low affinity inhibitory interaction of linear proline-containing peptides with the active site of CypA can be increased through a combination of a high cis/trans ratio and a negatively charged C-terminus as has been recently reported for Trp-Gly-Pro. Surprisingly, isothermal titration calorimetry did not reveal formation of an inhibitory CypA/Trp-Gly-Pro complex previously described within a complex stability range similar to CsA, a nanomolar CypA inhibitor. Moreover, despite of cis content of 41% at pH 7.5 Trp-Gly-Pro cannot inhibit CypA-catalyzed standard substrate isomerization up to high micromolar concentrations. However, in the context of the CsA framework a net charge of -7 clustered at the amino acid side chain of position 1 resulted in slightly improved CypA inhibition. PMID:21963115

  9. Uncoating of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 requires prolyl isomerase Pin1.

    PubMed

    Misumi, Shogo; Inoue, Mutsumi; Dochi, Takeo; Kishimoto, Naoki; Hasegawa, Naomi; Takamune, Nobutoki; Shoji, Shozo

    2010-08-13

    The process by which the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) conical core dissociates is called uncoating, but not much is known about this process. Here, we show that the uncoating process requires the interaction of the capsid (CA) protein with the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1 that specifically recognizes the phosphorylated serine/threonine residue followed by proline. We found that the HIV-1 core is composed of some isoforms of the CA protein with different isoelectric points, and one isoform is preferentially phosphorylated in the Ser(16)-Pro(17) motif. The mutant virus S16A/P17A shows a severely attenuated HIV-1 replication and an impaired reverse transcription. The S16A/P17A change increased the amount of particulate CA cores in the cytosol of target cells and correlated with the restriction of HIV-1 infection. Glutathione S-transferase pulldown assays demonstrated a direct interaction between Pin1 and the HIV-1 core via the Ser(16)-Pro(17) motif. Suppression of Pin1 expression by RNA interference in a target cell results in an attenuated HIV-1 replication and increases the amount of particulate CA cores in the cytosol of target cells. Furthermore, heat-inactivated, inhibitor-treated, or W34A/K63A Pin1 causes an attenuated in vitro uncoating of the HIV-1 core. The Pin1-dependent uncoating is inhibited by antisera raised against a CA peptide phosphorylated at Ser(16) or treatment of the HIV-1 core with alkaline phosphatase. These findings provide insights into this obscure uncoating process in the HIV-1 life cycle and a new cellular target for HIV-1 drug development. PMID:20529865

  10. Release kinetics of prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors from collagen barrier membranes.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Omar; Pensch, Manuela; Agis, Hermann

    2015-03-01

    Collagen barrier membranes are used in guided tissue regeneration to support healing. This strategy, however, relies on the healing capacity of the tissue. Pharmacological inhibitors of prolyl hydroxylases can support regeneration by enhancing angiogenesis and are therefore a promising tool for periodontology. Here we evaluate the release kinetics of the prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors dimethyloxalylglycine and L-mimosine from collagen barrier membranes. Dimethyloxalylglycine and L-mimosine were lyophilized onto the collagen barrier membranes. The morphology of the collagen barrier membranes was analysed using scanning electron microscopy. The release of prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors was assessed by colorimetric and spectroscopic methods. Their ability to induce a cellular response was assessed in bioassays with gingival and periodontal ligament fibroblasts based on vascular endothelial growth factor production, proliferation, and metabolic activity of the cells. We found that loading of collagen barrier membranes with prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors did not change the overall membrane morphology. Assessment of the release kinetics by direct measurements and based on vascular endothelial growth factor production showed that supernatants obtained from the collagen barrier membranes in the first 6 hours had a sufficient level of prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors to induce vascular endothelial growth factor production. A similar kinetic was found when cell proliferation was assessed. Changes in metabolic activity did not reach the level of significance in the MTT assay. In conclusion, collagen barrier membranes can release prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors thereby increasing the pro-angiogenic capacity of periodontal cells in vitro. These findings provide the basis for preclinical studies to evaluate the regenerative capacity of prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors in periodontology and oral surgery. PMID:25326176

  11. Sulfated chitooligosaccharides as prolyl endopeptidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Je, Jae-Young; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Ahn, Chang-Bum; Moon, Sang-Ho; Jeon, Byong-Tae; Kim, Bokyung; Park, Tae-Kyu; Park, Pyo-Jam

    2007-12-01

    Prolyl endopeptidase (PEP, EC 3.4.21.26) is a proline-specific endopeptidase with a serine-type mechanism, which digests small peptide-like hormones, neuroactive peptides, and various cellular factors. PEP has been involved in neurodegenerative disorders, therefore, the discovery of PEP inhibitors can revert memory loss caused by amnesic compounds. In this study, we prepared hetero-chitooligosaccharides (COSs) with different molecular sizes using ultrafiltration (UF) membrane reactor system from hetero-chitosan with different degrees of deacetylation (DD; 90%, 75% and 50% deacetylation), and synthesized sulfated COSs (SCOSs). PEP inhibitory activities of SCOSs were evaluated and the results showed that 50% deacetylated SCOSs (50-SCOSs) exhibited higher inhibitory activities than those of 90% and 75% deacetylated SCOSs (90-SCOSs and 75-SCOSs). Among the 50-SCOSs (50-SCOS I, 5000-10,000Da; 50-SCOS II, 1000-5000Da; 50-SCOS III, below 1000Da), 50-SCOS II possessed the highest inhibitory activity and IC(50) value was 0.38mg/ml. Kinetics studies with 50-SCOS II indicated a competitive enzyme inhibition with a K(i) value of 0.78mg/ml. It was concluded that the 50-SCOS II may be useful for PEP inhibitor and for developing a new type PEP inhibitor from carbohydrate based materials. PMID:17714777

  12. Chemical Logic and Enzymatic Machinery for Biological Assembly of Peptidyl Nucleoside Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Christopher T.; Zhang, Wenjun

    2011-01-01

    Peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics are a group of natural products targeting MraY, a bacterial translocase involved in the lipid-linked cycle in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. In this Perspective, we explore how Nature builds complex peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics scaffolds from simple nucleoside and amino acid building blocks. We discuss the current stage of research on biosynthetic pathways for peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics, primarily focusing on chemical logic and enzymatic machinery for uridine transformation and coupling to peptides. We further survey the nonribosomal biosynthetic paradigm for a subgroup of uridyl peptide antibiotics represented by pacidamycins, concluded by diversification opportunities for antibiotic optimization. PMID:21851099

  13. The Dipeptidyl Peptidase Family, Prolyl Oligopeptidase, and Prolyl Carboxypeptidase in the Immune System and Inflammatory Disease, Including Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Waumans, Yannick; Baerts, Lesley; Kehoe, Kaat; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; De Meester, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Research from over the past 20 years has implicated dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV and its family members in many processes and different pathologies of the immune system. Most research has been focused on either DPPIV or just a few of its family members. It is, however, essential to consider the entire DPP family when discussing any one of its members. There is a substantial overlap between family members in their substrate specificity, inhibitors, and functions. In this review, we provide a comprehensive discussion on the role of prolyl-specific peptidases DPPIV, FAP, DPP8, DPP9, dipeptidyl peptidase II, prolyl carboxypeptidase, and prolyl oligopeptidase in the immune system and its diseases. We highlight possible therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, a condition that lies at the frontier between inflammation and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26300881

  14. Recycling of peptidyl-tRNAs by peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase counteracts azithromycin-mediated effects on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gödeke, Julia; Pustelny, Christian; Häussler, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    Acute and chronic infections caused by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa pose a serious threat to human health worldwide, and its increasing resistance to antibiotics requires alternative treatments that are more effective than available strategies. Clinical studies have clearly demonstrated that cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic P. aeruginosa infections benefit from long-term low-dose azithromycin (AZM) treatment. Immunomodulating activity, the impact of AZM on the expression of quorum-sensing-dependent virulence factors, type three secretion, and motility in P. aeruginosa seem to contribute to the therapeutic response. However, to date, the molecular mechanisms underlying these AZM effects have remained elusive. Our data indicate that the AZM-mediated phenotype is caused by a depletion of the intracellular pools of tRNAs available for protein synthesis. Overexpression of the P. aeruginosa peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase, which recycles the tRNA from peptidyl-tRNA drop-off during translation, counteracted the effects of AZM on stationary-phase cell killing, cytotoxicity, and the production of rhamnolipids and partially restored swarming motility. Intriguingly, the exchange of a rare for a frequent codon in rhlR also explicitly diminished the AZM-mediated decreased production of rhamnolipids. These results indicate that depletion of the tRNA pools by AZM seems to affect the translation of genes that use rare aminoacyl-tRNA isoacceptors to a great extent and might explain the selective activity of AZM on the P. aeruginosa proteome and possibly also on the protein expression profiles of other bacterial pathogens. PMID:23318806

  15. Structure and Mechanism of a Viral Collagen Prolyl Hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Fe(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG)-dependent dioxygenases comprise a large and diverse enzyme superfamily the members of which have multiple physiological roles. Despite this diversity, these enzymes share a common chemical mechanism and a core structural fold, a double-stranded β-helix (DSBH), as well as conserved active site residues. The prolyl hydroxylases are members of this large superfamily. Prolyl hydroxylases are involved in collagen biosynthesis and oxygen sensing in mammalian cells. Structural–mechanistic studies with prolyl hydroxylases have broader implications for understanding mechanisms in the Fe(II)- and 2-OG-dependent dioxygenase superfamily. Here, we describe crystal structures of an N-terminally truncated viral collagen prolyl hydroxylase (vCPH). The crystal structure shows that vCPH contains the conserved DSBH motif and iron binding active site residues of 2-OG oxygenases. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to delineate structural changes in vCPH upon binding its substrate. Kinetic investigations are used to report on reaction cycle intermediates and compare them to the closest homologues of vCPH. The study highlights the utility of vCPH as a model enzyme for broader mechanistic analysis of Fe(II)- and 2-OG-dependent dioxygenases, including those of biomedical interest. PMID:26368022

  16. Prolyl-specific peptidases for applications in food protein hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Mika, Nicole; Zorn, Holger; Rühl, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Various food proteins including, e.g. gluten, collagen and casein are rich in L-proline residues. Due to the cyclic structure of proline, these proteins are well protected from enzymatic degradation by typical digestive enzymes. Proline-specific peptidases (PsP) belong to different families of hydrolases acting on peptide bonds (EC 3.4.x.x). They occur in various organisms including bacteria, fungi, plants and insects. Based on their biochemical characteristics, PsP type enzymes are further grouped into different subclasses of which prolyl aminopeptidases (EC 3.4.11.5, PAP), prolyl carboxypeptidases (EC 3.4.17.16, PCP) and prolyl oligopeptidases/prolyl endopeptidases (EC 3.4.21.26, POP/PEP) are of major interest for applications in food biotechnology. This mini review summarises the biochemical assays employed for these subclasses of PsP and their structural properties and the reaction mechanisms. A special focus was set on PsP derived from fungi and insects and important industrial applications in the field of food biotechnology. The degradation of gluten and collagen as well as the hydrolysis of bitter peptides are discussed. PMID:26239067

  17. Uranium-Carbene-Imido Metalla-Allenes: Ancillary-Ligand-Controlled cis-/trans-Isomerisation and Assessment of trans Influence in the R2 C=U(IV) =NR' Unit (R=Ph2 PNSiMe3 ; R'=CPh3 ).

    PubMed

    Lu, Erli; Cooper, Oliver J; Tuna, Floriana; Wooles, Ashley J; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Liddle, Stephen T

    2016-08-01

    Uranium(IV)-carbene-imido complexes [U(BIPM(TMS) )(NCPh3 )(κ(2) -N,N'-BIPY)] (2; BIPM(TMS) =C(PPh2 NSiMe3 )2 ; BIPY=2,2-bipyridine) and [U(BIPM(TMS) )(NCPh3 )(DMAP)2 ] (3; DMAP=4-dimethylamino-pyridine) that contain unprecedented, discrete R2 C=U=NR' units are reported. These complexes complete the family of E=U=E (E=CR2 , NR, O) metalla-allenes with feasible first-row hetero-element combinations. Intriguingly, 2 and 3 contain cis- and trans-C=U=N units, respectively, representing rare examples of controllable cis/trans isomerisation in f-block chemistry. This work reveals a clear-cut example of the trans influence in a mid-valent uranium system, and thus a strong preference for the cis isomer, which is computed in a co-ligand-free truncated model-to isolate the electronic trans influence from steric contributions-to be more stable than the trans isomer by approximately 12 kJ mol(-1) with an isomerisation barrier of approximately 14 kJ mol(-1) . PMID:27405793

  18. The ribosome can discriminate the chirality of amino acids within its peptidyl-transferase center.

    PubMed

    Englander, Michael T; Avins, Joshua L; Fleisher, Rachel C; Liu, Bo; Effraim, Philip R; Wang, Jiangning; Schulten, Klaus; Leyh, Thomas S; Gonzalez, Ruben L; Cornish, Virginia W

    2015-05-12

    The cellular translational machinery (TM) synthesizes proteins using exclusively L- or achiral aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs), despite the presence of D-amino acids in nature and their ability to be aminoacylated onto tRNAs by aa-tRNA synthetases. The ubiquity of L-amino acids in proteins has led to the hypothesis that D-amino acids are not substrates for the TM. Supporting this view, protein engineering efforts to incorporate D-amino acids into proteins using the TM have thus far been unsuccessful. Nonetheless, a mechanistic understanding of why D-aa-tRNAs are poor substrates for the TM is lacking. To address this deficiency, we have systematically tested the translation activity of D-aa-tRNAs using a series of biochemical assays. We find that the TM can effectively, albeit slowly, accept D-aa-tRNAs into the ribosomal aa-tRNA binding (A) site, use the A-site D-aa-tRNA as a peptidyl-transfer acceptor, and translocate the resulting peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA into the ribosomal peptidyl-tRNA binding (P) site. During the next round of continuous translation, however, we find that ribosomes carrying a P-site peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA partition into subpopulations that are either translationally arrested or that can continue translating. Consistent with its ability to arrest translation, chemical protection experiments and molecular dynamics simulations show that P site-bound peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA can trap the ribosomal peptidyl-transferase center in a conformation in which peptidyl transfer is impaired. Our results reveal a novel mechanism through which D-aa-tRNAs interfere with translation, provide insight into how the TM might be engineered to use D-aa-tRNAs, and increase our understanding of the physiological role of a widely distributed enzyme that clears D-aa-tRNAs from cells. PMID:25918365

  19. The ribosome can discriminate the chirality of amino acids within its peptidyl-transferase center

    PubMed Central

    Englander, Michael T.; Avins, Joshua L.; Fleisher, Rachel C.; Liu, Bo; Effraim, Philip R.; Wang, Jiangning; Schulten, Klaus; Leyh, Thomas S.; Gonzalez, Ruben L.; Cornish, Virginia W.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular translational machinery (TM) synthesizes proteins using exclusively L- or achiral aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs), despite the presence of D-amino acids in nature and their ability to be aminoacylated onto tRNAs by aa-tRNA synthetases. The ubiquity of L-amino acids in proteins has led to the hypothesis that D-amino acids are not substrates for the TM. Supporting this view, protein engineering efforts to incorporate D-amino acids into proteins using the TM have thus far been unsuccessful. Nonetheless, a mechanistic understanding of why D-aa-tRNAs are poor substrates for the TM is lacking. To address this deficiency, we have systematically tested the translation activity of D-aa-tRNAs using a series of biochemical assays. We find that the TM can effectively, albeit slowly, accept D-aa-tRNAs into the ribosomal aa-tRNA binding (A) site, use the A-site D-aa-tRNA as a peptidyl-transfer acceptor, and translocate the resulting peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA into the ribosomal peptidyl-tRNA binding (P) site. During the next round of continuous translation, however, we find that ribosomes carrying a P-site peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA partition into subpopulations that are either translationally arrested or that can continue translating. Consistent with its ability to arrest translation, chemical protection experiments and molecular dynamics simulations show that P site-bound peptidyl-D-aa-tRNA can trap the ribosomal peptidyl-transferase center in a conformation in which peptidyl transfer is impaired. Our results reveal a novel mechanism through which D-aa-tRNAs interfere with translation, provide insight into how the TM might be engineered to use D-aa-tRNAs, and increase our understanding of the physiological role of a widely distributed enzyme that clears D-aa-tRNAs from cells. PMID:25918365

  20. NF-κB transcriptional activity is modulated by FK506-binding proteins FKBP51 and FKBP52: a role for peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Erlejman, Alejandra G; De Leo, Sonia A; Mazaira, Gisela I; Molinari, Alejandro M; Camisay, María Fernanda; Fontana, Vanina; Cox, Marc B; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela; Galigniana, Mario D

    2014-09-19

    Hsp90 binding immunophilins FKBP51 and FKBP52 modulate steroid receptor trafficking and hormone-dependent biological responses. With the purpose to expand this model to other nuclear factors that are also subject to nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling, we analyzed whether these immunophilins modulate NF-κB signaling. It is demonstrated that FKBP51 impairs both the nuclear translocation rate of NF-κB and its transcriptional activity. The inhibitory action of FKBP51 requires neither the peptidylprolyl-isomerase activity of the immunophilin nor its association with Hsp90. The TPR domain of FKBP51 is essential. On the other hand, FKBP52 favors the nuclear retention time of RelA, its association to a DNA consensus binding sequence, and NF-κB transcriptional activity, the latter effect being strongly dependent on the peptidylprolyl-isomerase activity and also on the TPR domain of FKBP52, but its interaction with Hsp90 is not required. In unstimulated cells, FKBP51 forms endogenous complexes with cytoplasmic RelA. Upon cell stimulation with phorbol ester, the NF-κB soluble complex exchanges FKBP51 for FKBP52, and the NF-κB biological effect is triggered. Importantly, FKBP52 is functionally recruited to the promoter region of NF-κB target genes, whereas FKBP51 is released. Competition assays demonstrated that both immunophilins antagonize one another, and binding assays with purified proteins suggest that the association of RelA and immunophilins could be direct. These observations suggest that the biological action of NF-κB in different cell types could be positively regulated by a high FKBP52/FKBP51 expression ratio by favoring NF-κB nuclear retention, recruitment to the promoter regions of target genes, and transcriptional activity. PMID:25104352

  1. Peptidyl cyclopropenones: Reversible inhibitors, irreversible inhibitors, or substrates of cysteine proteases?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Meital; Bretler, Uriel; Albeck, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    Peptidyl cyclopropenones were previously introduced as selective cysteine protease reversible inhibitors. In the present study we synthesized one such peptidyl cyclopropenone and investigated its interaction with papain, a prototype cysteine protease. A set of kinetics, biochemical, HPLC, MS, and 13C-NMR experiments revealed that the peptidyl cyclopropenone was an irreversible inhibitor of the enzyme, alkylating the catalytic cysteine. In parallel, this cyclopropenone also behaved as an alternative substrate of the enzyme, providing a product that was tentatively suggested to be either a spiroepoxy cyclopropanone or a gamma-lactone. Thus, a single family of compounds exhibits an unusual variety of activities, being reversible inhibitors, irreversible inhibitors and alternative substrates towards enzymes of the same family. PMID:23553793

  2. Prolyl hydroxylase-2 inhibits liver tumor cell proliferation and cyclin D1 expression in a hydroxylase-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yifeng; Lin, Feng; Li, Ruidong; Shen, Jie; Wang, Zhengxin

    2016-08-01

    Prolyl hydroxylase 2 is a key regulator of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha protein, and has previously been implicated as a tumor suppressor in various cancers. However, the function of prolyl hydroxylase 2 in liver cancer has yet to be elucidated. Characterization of prolyl hydroxylase 2 function and related mechanisms in liver cancer may enable the development of targeted therapy. Here we found that prolyl hydroxylase 2 overexpression in human hepatocellular carcinoma cancer cell lines inhibited cell proliferation, while prolyl hydroxylase 2 knockdown enhanced cell proliferation. Further analyses revealed that the prolyl hydroxylase 2-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation was due to a cell cycle arrest at the G1/S transition. Moreover, the block in cell cycle was facilitated by negative regulation of cyclin D1, a process dependent on the hydroxylase activity of prolyl hydroxylase 2. Using an in vivo xenograft mouse model, we found that the overexpression of prolyl hydroxylase 2 led to a reduction in tumor size. Evaluation of paired human liver cancer patient samples revealed that prolyl hydroxylase 2 protein levels were significantly reduced in 6 of the 10 cancer tissues as compared to their respective normal tissue controls. Furthermore, elevated expression of prolyl hydroxylase 2 was associated with significantly prolonged survival in patients with liver cancer. These results suggest that prolyl hydroxylase 2 plays an important tumor suppressive role in liver cancer and may prove to be of prognostic and therapeutic value. PMID:27307407

  3. Expression, purification, and buffer solubility optimization of the putative human peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase PTRHD1.

    PubMed

    Burks, Geordan L; McFeeters, Hana; McFeeters, Robert L

    2016-10-01

    Performing the essential function of recycling peptidyl-tRNAs, peptidyl-tRNA hydrolases are ubiquitous in all domains of life. The multicomponent eukaryotic Pth system differs greatly from the bacterial system composed predominantly of a single Pth1 enzyme. While bacterial Pth1s are structurally well characterized and promising new targets for antibiotic development, eukaryotic Pths are largely understudied. From amino acid sequence alignment and secondary structure predictions, the human gene product PTRHD1 was classified as a eukaryotic Pth. Herein, we report cloning, recombinant bacterial expression, and weak binding to peptidyl-tRNA for PTRHD1. Additionally, we report binding to tRNA but absence of peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase activity. Thus, PTRHD1 is not a Pth and the functional consequence of nucleotide binding remains undefined. PMID:27235175

  4. EF4 disengages the peptidyl-tRNA CCA end and facilitates back-translocation on the 70S ribosome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dejiu; Yan, Kaige; Liu, Guangqiao; Song, Guangtao; Luo, Jiejian; Shi, Yi; Cheng, Erchao; Wu, Shan; Jiang, Taijiao; Lou, Jizhong; Gao, Ning; Qin, Yan

    2016-02-01

    EF4 catalyzes tRNA back-translocation through an unknown mechanism. We report cryo-EM structures of Escherichia coli EF4 in post- and pretranslocational ribosomes (Post- and Pre-EF4) at 3.7- and 3.2-Å resolution, respectively. In Post-EF4, peptidyl-tRNA occupies the peptidyl (P) site, but the interaction between its CCA end and the P loop is disrupted. In Pre-EF4, the peptidyl-tRNA assumes a unique position near the aminoacyl (A) site, denoted the A site/EF4 bound (A/4) site, with a large displacement at its acceptor arm. Mutagenesis analyses suggest that a specific region in the EF4 C-terminal domain (CTD) interferes with base-pairing between the peptidyl-tRNA 3'-CCA and the P loop, whereas the EF4 CTD enhances peptidyl-tRNA interaction at the A/4 site. Therefore, EF4 induces back-translocation by disengaging the tRNA's CCA end from the peptidyl transferase center of the translating ribosome. PMID:26809121

  5. Spliceosomal Immunophilins

    PubMed Central

    Mesa, Annia; Somarelli, Jason A.; Herrera, Rene J.

    2008-01-01

    The spliceosome is a dynamic, macromolecular complex, which removes non-protein-coding introns from pre-mRNA to form mature mRNA in a process known as splicing. This ribonucleoprotein assembly is comprised of five uridine-rich small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) as well as over 300 proteins. In humans, several of the known splicing factors are members of the immunophilin superfamily. Immunophilins are peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases that catalyze the conversion of proteins from cis to trans at Xaa-Pro bonds. Our review of the data portrays a picture of this protein family as activators of spliceosomal proteins by way of folding and transport. PMID:18544344

  6. Cyclophilins of a novel subfamily interact with SNW/SKIP coregulator in Dictyostelium discoideum and Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Skruzný, M; Ambrozková, M; Fuková, I; Martínková, K; Blahůsková, A; Hamplová, L; Půta, F; Folk, P

    2001-10-31

    We screened the Dictyostelium discoideum two-hybrid cDNA library with the SNW/SKIP transcription coregulator SnwA and identified a novel cyclophilin CypE. Independently, the Schizosaccharomyces pombe cDNA library was screened with the SnwA ortholog Snw1 and the ortholog of CypE (named Cyp2) was found. Both cyclophilins bind the respective SNW protein in their autologous systems. The interaction was localized to the N-terminal part of SnwA as well as of Snw1. CypE was confirmed in vitro to be a cyclosporin A-sensitive peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase. Remarkably, both SNW proteins bind the cyclophilins in a cyclosporin A independent manner, possibly serving as adaptors for these novel isomerases. These results are the first characterization of the members of a novel cyclophilin subfamily, which includes the human CGI-124/PPIL1 protein. PMID:11690648

  7. The cyclophilins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Heitman, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Summary: Cyclophilins (Enzyme Commission (EC) number 5.1.2.8) belong to a group of proteins that have peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity; such proteins are collectively known as immunophilins and also include the FK-506-binding proteins and the parvulins. Cyclophilins are found in all cells of all organisms studied, in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes; humans have a total of 16 cyclophilin proteins, Arabidopsis up to 29 and Saccharomyces 8. The first member of the cyclophilins to be identified in mammals, cyclophilin A, is the major cellular target for, and thus mediates the actions of, the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A. Cyclophilin A forms a ternary complex with cyclosporin A and the calcium-calmodulin-activated serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase calcineurin; formation of this complex prevents calcineurin from regulating cytokine gene transcription. Recent studies have implicated a diverse array of additional cellular functions for cyclophilins, including roles as chaperones and in cell signaling. PMID:15998457

  8. What are the pros and cons of the use of host-targeted agents against hepatitis C?

    PubMed

    Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy is living a revolution. Host-targeted agents (HTAs) block HCV production by interacting with host cell components. Because they target conserved host proteins, not variable viral proteins, HTAs have the potential for pangenotypic antiviral activity and a high barrier to resistance. Only two HTAs have reached clinical development, including specific inhibitors of cyclophilin A peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase activity and antagonists of microRNA-122. Cyclophilin inhibitors have proven to be relatively well tolerated and can be confidently used as backbones of all-oral, interferon-free regimens. In addition, HTAs such as cyclophilin inhibitors offer opportunities for "panviral" approaches when they target mechanisms common to viruses of the same or different families. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "Hepatitis C: next steps toward global eradication." PMID:24583032

  9. ShaPINg Cell Fate Upon DNA Damage: Role of Pin1 Isomerase in DNA Damage-Induced Cell Death and Repair.

    PubMed

    Polonio-Vallon, Tilman; Krüger, Daniel; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2014-01-01

    The peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1 acts as a molecular timer in proline-directed Ser/Thr kinase signaling and shapes cellular responses based on recognition of phosphorylation marks and implementing conformational changes in its substrates. Accordingly, Pin1 has been linked to numerous phosphorylation-controlled signaling pathways and cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, Pin1 plays a pivotal role in DNA damage-triggered cell fate decisions. Whereas moderate DNA damage is balanced by DNA repair, cells confronted with massive genotoxic stress are eliminated by the induction of programed cell death or cellular senescence. In this review, we summarize and discuss the current knowledge on how Pin1 specifies cell fate through regulating key players of the apoptotic and the repair branch of the DNA-damage response. PMID:24982848

  10. Twin-arginine-dependent translocation of SufI in the absence of cytosolic helper proteins.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, Eva; Moser, Michael; Schiltz, Emile; Ueda, Takuya; Betton, Jean-Michel; Müller, Matthias

    2009-06-16

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) machinery present in bacterial and thylakoidal membranes is able to transport fully folded proteins. Folding of some Tat precursor proteins requires dedicated chaperones that also sequester the signal sequence during the maturation process. Whether or not signal sequence-binding chaperones are a general prerequisite for all Tat substrate proteins is not known. Here, we have studied the propensity of Tat signal sequences of Escherichia coli to interact with general chaperones and peptidyl-prolyl-cis,trans-isomerases. Site-specific photocross-linking revealed a clear specificity for FK506-binding proteins. Nevertheless transport of the Tat substrate SufI into inverted inner membrane vesicles of E. coli was found to occur in the bona fide absence of any cytosolic chaperone. Our results suggest that in E. coli, cytosolic chaperones are not essential for the twin-arginine-dependent export of cofactor-less substrates. PMID:19432418

  11. Chemotactic Activity of Cyclophilin A in the Skin Mucus of Yellow Catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) and Its Active Site for Chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Dawar, Farman Ullah; Tu, Jiagang; Xiong, Yang; Lan, Jiangfeng; Dong, Xing Xing; Liu, Xiaoling; Khattak, Muhammad Nasir Khan; Mei, Jie; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Fish skin mucus is a dynamic barrier for invading pathogens with a variety of anti-microbial enzymes, including cyclophilin A (CypA), a multi-functional protein with peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity. Beside various other immunological functions, CypA induces leucocytes migration in vitro in teleost. In the current study, we have discovered several novel immune-relevant proteins in yellow catfish skin mucus by mass spectrometry (MS). The CypA present among them was further detected by Western blot. Moreover, the CypA present in the skin mucus displayed strong chemotactic activity for yellow catfish leucocytes. Interestingly, asparagine (like arginine in mammals) at position 69 was the critical site in yellow catfish CypA involved in leucocyte attraction. These novel efforts do not only highlight the enzymatic texture of skin mucus, but signify CypA to be targeted for anti-inflammatory therapeutics. PMID:27589721

  12. The innate immune roles of host factors TRIM5α and Cyclophilin A on HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Yi-Qun; Liu, Hong-Liang; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2015-10-01

    During the long-term evolutionary history, the interaction between virus and host has driven the first-line barrier, innate immunity, to invading pathogens. Innate immune factor TRIM5α and host peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase Cyclophilin A are two key players in the interaction between HIV-1 and host. Interestingly, Cyclophilin A is retrotransposed into the critical host gene, TRIM5, locus via LINE-1 element in some primate species including New World monkeys and Old World monkeys. This review aims to comprehensively discuss the sensing and immune activation procedures of TRIM5α innate signaling pathway through Cyclophilin A. It will then present the production of TRIMCyp chimeric gene and the different fusion patterns in primates. Finally, it will summarize the distinct restriction activity of TRIMCyp from different primates and explain the current understanding on the innate immune mechanisms involved in the early phase of the viral life cycle during HIV-1 replication. PMID:25894765

  13. Further delineation of FKBP14-related Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: A patient with early vascular complications and non-progressive kyphoscoliosis, and literature review.

    PubMed

    Dordoni, Chiara; Ciaccio, Claudia; Venturini, Marina; Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo; Ritelli, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2016-08-01

    FKBP14-related Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an extremely rare recessive connective tissue disorder described for the first time in 2012 by Baumann and coworkers. The causal gene, FKBP14, encodes a member of the F506-binding family of peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases. The paucity of patients described so far makes this disorder poorly defined at clinical level. Here, we report an additional pediatric patient, who is compound heterozygous for a recurrent and a novel FKBP14 mutation, and compare his phenotype with those available in literature. This evaluation confirms that kyphoscoliosis (either progressive or non-progressive), myopathy, joint hypermobility, and congenital hearing loss (sensorineural, conductive, or mixed) are the typical features of the syndrome. Since the patient showed a severe cardiovascular event in childhood and atlantoaxial instability, this report expands the phenotype of the disorder and the allelic repertoire of FKBP14. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27149304

  14. Bone matrix hypermineralization in prolyl-3 hydroxylase 1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Fratzl-Zelman, Nadja; Bächinger, Hans-Peter; Vranka, Janice A; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Rauch, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Lack of prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1) due to mutations in P3H1 results in severe forms of recessive osteogenesis imperfecta. In the present study, we investigated the bone tissue characteristics of P3H1 null mice. Histomorphometric analyses of cancellous bone in the proximal tibia and lumbar vertebra in 1-month and 3-month old mice demonstrated that P3H1 deficient mice had low trabecular bone volume and low mineral apposition rate, but normal osteoid maturation time and normal osteoblast and osteoclast surfaces. Quantitative backscattered electron imaging revealed that the bone mineralization density distribution was shifted towards higher values, indicating hypermineralization of bone matrix. It thus appears that P3H1 deficiency leads to decreased deposition of extracellular matrix by osteoblasts and increased incorporation of mineral into the matrix. PMID:26808442

  15. Prolyl carboxypeptidase mRNA expression in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Kwon; Diano, Sabrina

    2014-01-13

    Prolyl carboxypeptidase (PRCP), a serine protease, is widely expressed in the body including liver, lung, kidney and brain, with a variety of known substrates such as plasma prekallikrein, bradykinin, angiotensins II and III, and α-MSH, suggesting its role in the processing of tissue-specific substrates. In the brain, PRCP has been shown to inactivate hypothalamic α-MSH, thus modulating melanocortin signaling in the control of energy metabolism. While its expression pattern has been reported in the hypothalamus, little is known on the distribution of PRCP throughout the mouse brain. This study was undertaken to determine PRCP expression in the mouse brain. Radioactive in situ hybridization was performed to determine endogenous PRCP mRNA expression. In addition, using a gene-trap mouse model for PRCP deletion, X-gal staining was performed to further determine PRCP distribution. Results from both approaches showed that PRCP gene is broadly expressed in the brain. PMID:24161824

  16. Structure of the prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic pathogen Giardia lamblia

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Eric T.; Kim, Jessica E.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank H.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2012-09-01

    The structure of Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase cocrystallized with proline and ATP shows evidence for half-of-the-sites activity, leading to a corresponding mixture of reaction substrates and product (prolyl-AMP) in the two active sites of the dimer. The genome of the human intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia contains only a single aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene for each amino acid. The Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase gene product was originally misidentified as a dual-specificity Pro/Cys enzyme, in part owing to its unexpectedly high off-target activation of cysteine, but is now believed to be a normal representative of the class of archaeal/eukaryotic prolyl-tRNA synthetases. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of the G. lamblia enzyme presented here is thus the first structure determination of a prolyl-tRNA synthetase from a eukaryote. The relative occupancies of substrate (proline) and product (prolyl-AMP) in the active site are consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity, as is the observed biphasic thermal denaturation curve for the protein in the presence of proline and MgATP. However, no corresponding induced asymmetry is evident in the structure of the protein. No thermal stabilization is observed in the presence of cysteine and ATP. The implied low affinity for the off-target activation product cysteinyl-AMP suggests that translational fidelity in Giardia is aided by the rapid release of misactivated cysteine.

  17. Mutations in FKBP14 cause a variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with progressive kyphoscoliosis, myopathy, and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Matthias; Giunta, Cecilia; Krabichler, Birgit; Rüschendorf, Franz; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Colombi, Marina; Bittner, Reginald E; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Muntoni, Francesco; Cirak, Sebahattin; Schreiber, Gudrun; Zou, Yaqun; Hu, Ying; Romero, Norma Beatriz; Carlier, Robert Yves; Amberger, Albert; Deutschmann, Andrea; Straub, Volker; Rohrbach, Marianne; Steinmann, Beat; Rostásy, Kevin; Karall, Daniela; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Zschocke, Johannes; Fauth, Christine

    2012-02-10

    We report on an autosomal-recessive variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) characterized by severe muscle hypotonia at birth, progressive scoliosis, joint hypermobility, hyperelastic skin, myopathy, sensorineural hearing impairment, and normal pyridinoline excretion in urine. Clinically, the disorder shares many features with the kyphoscoliotic type of EDS (EDS VIA) and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. Linkage analysis in a large Tyrolean kindred identified a homozygous frameshift mutation in FKBP14 in two affected individuals. Based on the cardinal clinical characteristics of the disorder, four additional individuals originating from different European countries were identified who carried either homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in FKBP14. FKBP14 belongs to the family of FK506-binding peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases (PPIases). ER-resident FKBPs have been suggested to act as folding catalysts by accelerating cis-trans isomerization of peptidyl-prolyl bonds and to act occasionally also as chaperones. We demonstrate that FKBP14 is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and that deficiency of FKBP14 leads to enlarged ER cisterns in dermal fibroblasts in vivo. Furthermore, indirect immunofluorescence of FKBP14-deficient fibroblasts indicated an altered assembly of the extracellular matrix in vitro. These findings suggest that a disturbance of protein folding in the ER affecting one or more components of the extracellular matrix might cause the generalized connective tissue involvement in this disorder. FKBP14 mutation analysis should be considered in all individuals with apparent kyphoscoliotic type of EDS and normal urinary pyridinoline excretion, in particular in conjunction with sensorineural hearing impairment. PMID:22265013

  18. 23S rRNA nucleotides in the peptidyl transferase center are essential for tryptophanase operon induction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Cruz-Vera, Luis R; Yanofsky, Charles

    2009-06-01

    Distinct features of the ribosomal peptide exit tunnel are known to be essential for recognition of specific amino acids of a nascent peptidyl-tRNA. Thus, a tryptophan residue at position 12 of the peptidyl-tRNA TnaC-tRNA(Pro) leads to the creation of a free tryptophan binding site within the ribosome at which bound tryptophan inhibits normal ribosome functions. The ribosomal processes that are inhibited are hydrolysis of TnaC-tRNA(Pro) by release factor 2 and peptidyl transfer of TnaC of TnaC-tRNA(Pro) to puromycin. These events are normally performed in the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center. In the present study, changes of 23S rRNA nucleotides in the 2585 region of the peptidyl transferase center, G2583A and U2584C, were observed to reduce maximum induction of tna operon expression by tryptophan in vivo without affecting the concentration of tryptophan necessary to obtain 50% induction. The growth rate of strains with ribosomes with either of these changes was not altered appreciably. In vitro analyses with mutant ribosomes with these changes showed that tryptophan was not as efficient in protecting TnaC-tRNA(Pro) from puromycin action as wild-type ribosomes. However, added tryptophan did prevent sparsomycin action as it normally does with wild-type ribosomes. These findings suggest that these two mutational changes act by reducing the ability of ribosome-bound tryptophan to inhibit peptidyl transferase activity rather than by reducing the ability of the ribosome to bind tryptophan. Thus, the present study identifies specific nucleotides within the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center that appear to be essential for effective tryptophan induction of tna operon expression. PMID:19329641

  19. Novel post-translational oligomerization of peptidyl dehydrodopa model compound, 1,2-dehydro-N-acetyldopa methyl ester.

    PubMed

    Abebe, Adal; Zheng, Dong; Evans, Jason; Sugumaran, Manickam

    2016-06-01

    Post-translational modification of peptidyl tyrosine to peptidyl dopa is widely observed in different marine organisms. While peptidyl dopas are oxidatively converted to dehydrodopa derivatives, nothing is known about the further fate of dehydrodopyl compounds. To fill this void, we studied the oxidation chemistry of a peptidyl dehydrodopa mimic, 1,2-dehydro-N-acetyldopa methyl ester with mushroom tyrosinase. We employed both routine biochemical studies and reversed phase liquid chromatography mass spectrometry to investigate the course of the reaction. Tyrosinase catalyzed the oxidation of 1,2-dehydro-N-acetyldopa methyl ester readily generating its typical o-quinone as the transient two-electron oxidation product. This quinone was extremely unstable and rapidly reacted with the parent compound forming benzodioxan type oligomeric products. Reaction mixture containing chemically made o-benzoquinone and 1,2-dehydro-N-acetyldopa methyl ester generated a mixed adduct of benzoquinone and 1,2-dehydro-N-acetyldopa methyl ester. Based on this finding, we propose that peptidyl dehydrodopa also exhibits a similar transformation accounting partially for the adhesive and cementing properties of dopyl proteins in nature. PMID:27010908

  20. An efficient solid-phase synthesis of peptidyl-N-acetylguanidines for use in native chemical ligation.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ryo; Isoe, Madoka; Izumi, Masayuki; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2016-05-01

    In the modern protocols of chemical protein syntheses, peptide-α-thioesters have been used as key components for the assembly of full-length polypeptides through chemoselective peptide coupling reactions. A variety of thioester precursors have been developed for the synthesis of the peptide-α-thioesters by Fmoc solid phase peptide synthesis (Fmoc-SPPS). Recently our group found a peptidyl-N-acetylguanidine as a new peptide-α-thioester precursor. This peptide derivative can be converted into a corresponding peptide-α-thioester only by treatment with an excess amount of a thiol in aqueous buffers at around neutral pH. This unique property allowed us to envision the practical use of the peptidyl-N-acetylguanidines for the chemical syntheses of proteins; however, an efficient synthetic method has been lacking. Herein, we report an efficient solid-phase synthesis of peptidyl-N-acetylguanidines. This new synthetic method employing selective activation and cleavage of a peptide bond successfully provided peptidyl-N-acetylguanidines from the on-resin protected peptides prepared by standard Fmoc-SPPS. We also evaluated the reactivity of a peptidyl-N-acetylguanidine in native chemical ligation through the synthesis of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide analogue. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27005965

  1. Activities of the peptidyl transferase center of ribosomes lacking protein L27

    PubMed Central

    Maracci, Cristina; Wohlgemuth, Ingo; Rodnina, Marina V.

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is the molecular machine responsible for protein synthesis in all living organisms. Its catalytic core, the peptidyl transferase center (PTC), is built of rRNA, although several proteins reach close to the inner rRNA shell. In the Escherichia coli ribosome, the flexible N-terminal tail of the ribosomal protein L27 contacts the A- and P-site tRNA. Based on computer simulations of the PTC and on previous biochemical evidence, the N-terminal α-amino group of L27 was suggested to take part in the peptidyl-transfer reaction. However, the contribution of this group to catalysis has not been tested experimentally. Here we investigate the role of L27 in peptide-bond formation using fast kinetics approaches. We show that the rate of peptide-bond formation at physiological pH, both with aminoacyl-tRNA or with the substrate analog puromycin, is independent of the presence of L27; furthermore, translation of natural mRNAs is only marginally affected in the absence of L27. The pH dependence of the puromycin reaction is unaltered in the absence of L27, indicating that the N-terminal α-amine is not the ionizing group taking part in catalysis. Likewise, L27 is not required for the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis during termination. Thus, apart from the known effect on subunit association, which most likely explains the phenotype of the deletion strains, L27 does not appear to be a key player in the core mechanism of peptide-bond formation on the ribosome. PMID:26475831

  2. Developmental Stage-dependent Regulation of Prolyl 3-Hydroxylation in Tendon Type I Collagen.

    PubMed

    Taga, Yuki; Kusubata, Masashi; Ogawa-Goto, Kiyoko; Hattori, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxyproline (3-Hyp), which is unique to collagen, is a fairly rare post-translational modification. Recent studies have suggested a function of prolyl 3-hydroxylation in fibril assembly and its relationships with certain disorders, including recessive osteogenesis imperfecta and high myopia. However, no direct evidence for the physiological and pathological roles of 3-Hyp has been presented. In this study, we first estimated the overall alterations in prolyl hydroxylation in collagens purified from skin, bone, and tail tendon of 0.5-18-month-old rats by LC-MS analysis with stable isotope-labeled collagen, which was recently developed as an internal standard for highly accurate collagen analyses. 3-Hyp was found to significantly increase in tendon collagen until 3 months after birth and then remain constant, whereas increased prolyl 3-hydroxylation was not observed in skin and bone collagen. Site-specific analysis further revealed that 3-Hyp was increased in tendon type I collagen in a specific sequence region, including a previously known modification site at Pro(707) and newly identified sites at Pro(716) and Pro(719), at the early ages. The site-specific alterations in prolyl 3-hydroxylation with aging were also observed in bovine Achilles tendon. We postulate that significant increases in 3-Hyp at the consecutive modification sites are correlated with tissue development in tendon. The present findings suggest that prolyl 3-hydroxylation incrementally regulates collagen fibril diameter in tendon. PMID:26567337

  3. Unveiling Prolyl Oligopeptidase Ligand Migration by Comprehensive Computational Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Kotev, Martin; Lecina, Daniel; Tarragó, Teresa; Giralt, Ernest; Guallar, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a large 80 kDa protease, which cleaves oligopeptides at the C-terminal side of proline residues and constitutes an important pharmaceutical target. Despite the existence of several crystallographic structures, there is an open debate about migration (entrance and exit) pathways for ligands, and their coupling with protein dynamics. Recent studies have shown the capabilities of molecular dynamics and classical force fields in describing spontaneous binding events and nonbiased ligand migration pathways. Due to POP’s size and to the buried nature of its active site, an exhaustive sampling by means of conventional long enough molecular dynamics trajectories is still a nearly impossible task. Such a level of sampling, however, is possible with the breakthrough protein energy landscape exploration technique. Here, we present an exhaustive sampling of POP with a known inhibitor, Z-pro-prolinal. In >3000 trajectories Z-pro-prolinal explores all the accessible surface area, showing multiple entrance events into the large internal cavity through the pore in the β-propeller domain. Moreover, we modeled a natural substrate binding and product release by predicting the entrance of an undecapeptide substrate, followed by manual active site cleavage and nonbiased exit of one of the products (a dipeptide). The product exit shows preference from a flexible 18-amino acid residues loop, pointing to an overall mechanism where entrance and exit occur in different sites. PMID:25564858

  4. Unveiling prolyl oligopeptidase ligand migration by comprehensive computational techniques.

    PubMed

    Kotev, Martin; Lecina, Daniel; Tarragó, Teresa; Giralt, Ernest; Guallar, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a large 80 kDa protease, which cleaves oligopeptides at the C-terminal side of proline residues and constitutes an important pharmaceutical target. Despite the existence of several crystallographic structures, there is an open debate about migration (entrance and exit) pathways for ligands, and their coupling with protein dynamics. Recent studies have shown the capabilities of molecular dynamics and classical force fields in describing spontaneous binding events and nonbiased ligand migration pathways. Due to POP's size and to the buried nature of its active site, an exhaustive sampling by means of conventional long enough molecular dynamics trajectories is still a nearly impossible task. Such a level of sampling, however, is possible with the breakthrough protein energy landscape exploration technique. Here, we present an exhaustive sampling of POP with a known inhibitor, Z-pro-prolinal. In >3000 trajectories Z-pro-prolinal explores all the accessible surface area, showing multiple entrance events into the large internal cavity through the pore in the β-propeller domain. Moreover, we modeled a natural substrate binding and product release by predicting the entrance of an undecapeptide substrate, followed by manual active site cleavage and nonbiased exit of one of the products (a dipeptide). The product exit shows preference from a flexible 18-amino acid residues loop, pointing to an overall mechanism where entrance and exit occur in different sites. PMID:25564858

  5. Selective Inhibition of Collagen Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vasta, James D.; Andersen, Kristen A.; Deck, Kathryn M.; Nizzi, Christopher P.; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. Its overproduction is associated with fibrosis and cancer metastasis. The stability of collagen relies on post-translational modifications, the most prevalent being the hydroxylation of collagen strands by collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylases (CP4Hs). Catalysis by CP4Hs enlists an iron cofactor to convert proline residues to 4 hydroxyproline residues, which are essential for the conformational stability of mature collagen. Ethyl 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (EDHB) is commonly used as a “P4H” inhibitor in cells, but suffers from low potency, poor selectivity, and off-target effects that cause iron deficiency. Dicarboxylates of 2,2′-bipyridine are among the most potent known CP4H inhibitors but suffer from a high affinity for free iron. A screen of biheteroaryl compounds revealed that replacing one pyridyl group with a thiazole moiety retains potency and enhances selectivity. A diester of 2 (5-carboxythiazol-2-yl)pyridine-5-carboxylic acid is bioavailable to human cells and inhibits collagen biosynthesis at concentrations that neither cause general toxicity nor disrupt iron homeostasis. These data anoint a potent and selective probe for CP4H and a potential lead for the development of a new class of antifibrotic and antimetastatic agents. PMID:26535807

  6. Prolyl Hydroxylase PHD3 Activates Oxygen-dependent Protein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Rantanen, Krista; Pursiheimo, Juha; Högel, Heidi; Himanen, Virpi; Metzen, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The HIF prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs/EGLNs) are central regulators of the molecular responses to oxygen availability. One isoform, PHD3, is expressed in response to hypoxia and causes apoptosis in oxygenated conditions in neural cells. Here we show that PHD3 forms subcellular aggregates in an oxygen-dependent manner. The aggregation of PHD3 was seen under normoxia and was strongly reduced under hypoxia or by the inactivation of the PHD3 hydroxylase activity. The PHD3 aggregates were dependent on microtubular integrity and contained components of the 26S proteasome, chaperones, and ubiquitin, thus demonstrating features that are characteristic for aggresome-like structures. Forced expression of the active PHD3 induced the aggregation of proteasomal components and activated apoptosis under normoxia in HeLa cells. The apoptosis was seen in cells prone to PHD3 aggregation and the PHD3 aggregation preceded apoptosis. The data demonstrates the cellular oxygen sensor PHD3 as a regulator of protein aggregation in response to varying oxygen availability. PMID:18337469

  7. Pin1 down-regulates transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signaling by inducing degradation of Smad proteins.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ayako; Koinuma, Daizo; Miyazawa, Keiji; Uchida, Takafumi; Saitoh, Masao; Kawabata, Masahiro; Hanai, Jun-ichi; Akiyama, Hirotada; Abe, Masahiro; Miyazono, Kohei; Matsumoto, Toshio; Imamura, Takeshi

    2009-03-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is crucial in numerous cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis. TGF-beta signaling is transduced by intracellular Smad proteins that are regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Smad ubiquitin regulatory factor 2 (Smurf2) prevents TGF-beta and bone morphogenetic protein signaling by interacting with Smads and inducing their ubiquitin-mediated degradation. Here we identified Pin1, a peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase, as a novel protein binding Smads. Pin1 interacted with Smad2 and Smad3 but not Smad4; this interaction was enhanced by the phosphorylation of (S/T)P motifs in the Smad linker region. (S/T)P motif phosphorylation also enhanced the interaction of Smad2/3 with Smurf2. Pin1 reduced Smad2/3 protein levels in a manner dependent on its peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity. Knockdown of Pin1 increased the protein levels of endogenous Smad2/3. In addition, Pin1 both enhanced the interaction of Smurf2 with Smads and enhanced Smad ubiquitination. Pin1 inhibited TGF-beta-induced transcription and gene expression, suggesting that Pin1 negatively regulates TGF-beta signaling by down-regulating Smad2/3 protein levels via induction of Smurf2-mediated ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation. PMID:19122240

  8. Design of cyclic peptides featuring proline predominantly in the cis conformation under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Malešević, Miroslav; Schumann, Michael; Jahreis, Günther; Fischer, Gunter; Lücke, Christian

    2012-09-24

    Turns are secondary-structure elements that are omnipresent in natively folded polypeptide chains. A large variety of four-residue β-turns exist, which differ mainly in the backbone dihedral angle values of the two central residues i+1 and i+2. The βVI-type turns are of particular biological interest because the i+2 residue is always a proline in the cis conformation and might thus serve as target of peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases). We have designed cyclic hexapeptides containing two proline residues that predominantly adopt the cis conformation in aqueous solution. NMR data and MD calculations indicated that the cyclic peptide sequences c-(-DXaa-Ser-Pro-DXaa-Lys-Pro-) result in highly symmetric backbone structures when both prolines are in the cis conformation and the D-amino acids are either alanine or phenylalanine residues. Replacement of the serine residue either by phosphoserine or by tyrosine compromises this symmetry, but further increases the cis conformation content of both prolines. As a result, we obtained a cyclic hexapeptide that exists almost exclusively as the cis-Pro/cis-Pro conformer but shows no cis/trans interconversion even in the presence of the PPIase Pin1, apparently due to an energetically quite favorable but highly restricted conformational space. PMID:22969011

  9. OsCYP21-4, a novel Golgi-resident cyclophilin, increases oxidative stress tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang S; Park, Hyun J; Jung, Won Y; Lee, Areum; Yoon, Dae H; You, Young N; Kim, Hyun-Soon; Kim, Beom-Gi; Ahn, Jun C; Cho, Hye S

    2015-01-01

    OsCYP21-4 is a rice cyclophilin protein that binds to cyclosporine A, an immunosuppressant drug. CYP21-4s in Arabidopsis and rice were previously shown to function as mitochondrial cyclophilins, as determined by TargetP analysis. In the current study, we found that OsCYP21-4-GFP localized to the Golgi, rather than mitochondria, in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, which was confirmed based on its co-localization with cis Golgi α-ManI-mCherry protein. OsCYP21-4 transcript levels increased in response to treatments with various abiotic stresses and the phytohormone abscisic acid, revealing its stress-responsiveness. CYP21-4 homologs do not possess key peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity/cyclosporine A (CsA) binding residues, and recombinant OsCYP21-4 protein did not convert the synthetic substrate Suc-AAPF-pNA via cis- trans- isomerization in vitro. In addition, transgenic plants overexpressing OsCYP21-4 exhibited increased tolerance to salinity and hydrogen peroxide treatment, along with increased peroxidase activity. These results demonstrate that OsCYP21-4 is a novel Golgi-localized cyclophilin that plays a role in oxidative stress tolerance, possibly by regulating peroxidase activity. PMID:26483814

  10. OsCYP21-4, a novel Golgi-resident cyclophilin, increases oxidative stress tolerance in rice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang S.; Park, Hyun J.; Jung, Won Y.; Lee, Areum; Yoon, Dae H.; You, Young N.; Kim, Hyun-Soon; Kim, Beom-Gi; Ahn, Jun C.; Cho, Hye S.

    2015-01-01

    OsCYP21-4 is a rice cyclophilin protein that binds to cyclosporine A, an immunosuppressant drug. CYP21-4s in Arabidopsis and rice were previously shown to function as mitochondrial cyclophilins, as determined by TargetP analysis. In the current study, we found that OsCYP21-4-GFP localized to the Golgi, rather than mitochondria, in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, which was confirmed based on its co-localization with cis Golgi α-ManI-mCherry protein. OsCYP21-4 transcript levels increased in response to treatments with various abiotic stresses and the phytohormone abscisic acid, revealing its stress-responsiveness. CYP21-4 homologs do not possess key peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity/cyclosporine A (CsA) binding residues, and recombinant OsCYP21-4 protein did not convert the synthetic substrate Suc-AAPF-pNA via cis- trans- isomerization in vitro. In addition, transgenic plants overexpressing OsCYP21-4 exhibited increased tolerance to salinity and hydrogen peroxide treatment, along with increased peroxidase activity. These results demonstrate that OsCYP21-4 is a novel Golgi-localized cyclophilin that plays a role in oxidative stress tolerance, possibly by regulating peroxidase activity. PMID:26483814

  11. Mechanisms of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein Inhibition by Lysyl-Peptidyl-Anthraquinone Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Sosic, Alice; Sinigaglia, Laura; Cappellini, Marta; Carli, Ilaria; Parolin, Cristina; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Rovero, Paolo; Fabris, Dan; Gatto, Barbara

    2016-01-20

    The Nucleocapsid protein NCp7 (NC) is a nucleic acid chaperone responsible for essential steps of the HIV-1 life cycle and an attractive candidate for drug development. NC destabilizes nucleic acid structures and promotes the formation of annealed substrates for HIV-1 reverse transcription elongation. Short helical nucleic acid segments bordered by bulges and loops, such as the Trans-Activation Response element (TAR) of HIV-1 and its complementary sequence (cTAR), are nucleation elements for helix destabilization by NC and also preferred recognition sites for threading intercalators. Inspired by these observations, we have recently demonstrated that 2,6-disubstituted peptidyl-anthraquinone-conjugates inhibit the chaperone activities of recombinant NC in vitro, and that inhibition correlates with the stabilization of TAR and cTAR stem-loop structures. We describe here enhanced NC inhibitory activity by novel conjugates that exhibit longer peptidyl chains ending with a conserved N-terminal lysine. Their efficient inhibition of TAR/cTAR annealing mediated by NC originates from the combination of at least three different mechanisms, namely, their stabilizing effects on nucleic acids dynamics by threading intercalation, their ability to target TAR RNA substrate leading to a direct competition with the protein for the same binding sites on TAR, and, finally, their effective binding to the NC protein. Our results suggest that these molecules may represent the stepping-stone for the future development of NC-inhibitors capable of targeting the protein itself and its recognition site in RNA. PMID:26666402

  12. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase IV by fluoroolefin-containing N-peptidyl-O-hydroxylamine peptidomimetics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jian; Toscano, Paul J.; Welch, John T.

    1998-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (EC 3.4.14.5; DPP IV), also known as the leukocyte differentiation antigen CD26 when found as an extracellular membrane-bound proline specific serine protease, cleaves a dipeptide from the N terminus of a polypeptide chain containing a proline residue in the penultimate position. Here we report that known (Z)-Ala-ψ[CF=C]-Pro dipeptide isosteres 1 and 2, which contain O-acylhydroxylamines, were isolated as diastereomeric pairs u-1, l-1, and l-2. The effect of each diastereomeric pair as an inhibitor of human placental dipeptidyl peptidase DPP IV has been examined. The inhibition of DPP IV by these compounds is rapid and efficient. The diastereomeric pair u-1 exhibits very potent inhibitory activity with a Ki of 188 nM. Fluoroolefin containing N-peptidyl-O-hydroxylamine peptidomimetics, by virtue of their inhibitory potency and stability, are superior to N-peptidyl-O-hydroxylamine inhibitors derived from an Ala-Pro dipeptide. PMID:9826645

  13. Peptidyl α-Ketoamides with Nucleobases, Methylpiperazine, and Dimethylaminoalkyl Substituents as Calpain Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ovat, Asli; Li, Zhao Zhao; Hampton, Christina Y.; Asress, Seneshaw A.; Fernández, Facundo M.; Glass, Jonathan D.; Powers, James C.

    2010-01-01

    A series of peptidyl α-ketoamides with the general structure Cbz-L-Leu-D,L-AA-CONH-R were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors for the cysteine proteases calpain I, calpain II and cathepsin B. Nucleobases, methylpiperazine and dimethylaminoalkyl groups were incorporated into the primed region of the inhibitors to generate compounds that potentially cross the blood-brain barrier. Two of these compounds (Cbz-Leu-D,L-Abu-CONH-(CH2)3-adenin-9-yl and Cbz-Leu-D,L-Abu-CONH-(CH2)3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl) have been shown to have useful concentrations in the brain in animals. The best inhibitor for calpain I was Cbz-Leu-D,L-Abu-CONH-(CH2)3-2-methoxyadenin-9-yl (Ki = 23 nM) and the best inhibitor for calpain II was Cbz-Leu-D,L-Phe-CONH-(CH2)3-adenin-9-yl (Ki = 68 nM). Based on the crystal structure obtained with heterocyclic peptidyl α-ketoamides, we have improved inhibitor potency by introducing a small hydrophobic group on the adenine ring. These inhibitors have good potential to be used in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20690647

  14. Influence of dietary zinc on hepatic collagen and prolyl hydroxylase activity in alcoholic rats.

    PubMed

    Giménez, A; Caballería, J; Parés, A; Alié, S; Deulofeu, R; Andreu, H; Rodés, J

    1992-09-01

    The effects of dietary zinc on hepatic collagen and prolyl hydroxylase activity in normal and alcoholic rats has been investigated in four groups of pair-fed male Wistar rats given either liquid ethanol or a control diet for 12 wk. Each group of pair-fed animals received a diet with a different zinc concentration (standard diet, 7.6 mg/L; low-zinc diet, 3.4 mg/L; zinc-supplemented diet, 76 mg/L; and zinc-extrasupplemented, 300 mg/L. There were no significant differences in hepatic collagen concentration and prolyl hydroxylase activity between alcoholic and normal rats receiving a standard diet (collagen, 77 +/- 5 and 73 +/- 6 micrograms/mg protein; and prolyl hydroxylase; 37 +/- 26 and 36 +/- 22 cpm/mg protein). Alcoholic rats fed a low-zinc diet showed increased prolyl hydroxylase activity (75 +/- 10 cpm/mg protein, p less than 0.05), although no changes in hepatic collagen (77 +/- 10 micrograms/mg protein) were observed in comparison with rats fed a standard alcoholic diet. By contrast, hepatic collagen was significantly lower in alcoholic rats fed a zinc-supplemented diet (66 +/- 4 and 63 +/- 3 micrograms/mg protein, p less than 0.05 and p less than 0.01, respectively), and hepatic prolyl hydroxylase activity was particularly lower in rats receiving zinc 300 mg/L (18 +/- 20 cpm/mg protein). Similar effects were observed in normal rats. We conclude that dietary zinc influences hepatic prolyl hydroxylase activity and collagen deposition in alcoholic rats, and in consequence, the control of dietary zinc is necessary to assess the effects of alcohol on collagen metabolism in rats. PMID:1324218

  15. Human oxygen sensing may have origins in prokaryotic elongation factor Tu prolyl-hydroxylation

    PubMed Central

    Scotti, John S.; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.; Ge, Wei; Bentley, Michael A.; Paps, Jordi; Kramer, Holger B.; Lee, Joongoo; Aik, WeiShen; Choi, Hwanho; Paulsen, Steinar M.; Bowman, Lesley A. H.; Loik, Nikita D.; Horita, Shoichiro; Ho, Chia-hua; Kershaw, Nadia J.; Tang, Christoph M.; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Preston, Gail M.; McDonough, Michael A.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The roles of 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases in eukaryotes include collagen stabilization, hypoxia sensing, and translational regulation. The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) sensing system is conserved in animals, but not in other organisms. However, bioinformatics imply that 2OG-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs) homologous to those acting as sensing components for the HIF system in animals occur in prokaryotes. We report cellular, biochemical, and crystallographic analyses revealing that Pseudomonas prolyl-hydroxylase domain containing protein (PPHD) contain a 2OG oxygenase related in structure and function to the animal PHDs. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa PPHD knockout mutant displays impaired growth in the presence of iron chelators and increased production of the virulence factor pyocyanin. We identify elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) as a PPHD substrate, which undergoes prolyl-4-hydroxylation on its switch I loop. A crystal structure of PPHD reveals striking similarity to human PHD2 and a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii prolyl-4-hydroxylase. A crystal structure of PPHD complexed with intact EF-Tu reveals that major conformational changes occur in both PPHD and EF-Tu, including a >20-Å movement of the EF-Tu switch I loop. Comparison of the PPHD structures with those of HIF and collagen PHDs reveals conservation in substrate recognition despite diverse biological roles and origins. The observed changes will be useful in designing new types of 2OG oxygenase inhibitors based on various conformational states, rather than active site iron chelators, which make up most reported 2OG oxygenase inhibitors. Structurally informed phylogenetic analyses suggest that the role of prolyl-hydroxylation in human hypoxia sensing has ancient origins. PMID:25197067

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Ami; Shimizu, Yoshihiro; Takemoto, Chie; Ueda, Takuya; Uchiumi, Toshio; Ito, Kosuke

    2013-01-01

    Peptidyl-tRNA is produced from the ribosome as a result of aborted translation. Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase cleaves the ester bond between the peptide and the tRNA of peptidyl-tRNA molecules, to recycle tRNA for further rounds of protein synthesis. In this study, peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TthPth) was crystallized using 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol as a precipitant. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.45, b = 53.92, c = 58.67 Å, and diffracted X-rays to atomic resolution (beyond 1.0 Å resolution). The asymmetric unit is expected to contain one TthPth molecule, with a solvent content of 27.13% (V M = 1.69 Å3 Da−1). The structure is being solved by molecular replacement. PMID:23519816

  17. Peptidylation for the determination of low-molecular-weight compounds by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, Feng; Cen, Si-Ying; He, Huan; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-05-23

    Determination of low-molecular-weight compounds by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) has been a great challenge in the analytical research field. Here we developed a universal peptide-based derivatization (peptidylation) strategy for the sensitive analysis of low-molecular-weight compounds by MALDI-TOF-MS. Upon peptidylation, the molecular weights of target analytes increase, thus avoiding serious matrix ion interference in the low-molecular-weight region in MALDI-TOF-MS. Since peptides typically exhibit good signal response during MALDI-TOF-MS analysis, peptidylation endows high detection sensitivities of low-molecular-weight analytes. As a proof-of-concept, we analyzed low-molecular-weight compounds of aldehydes and thiols by the developed peptidylation strategy. Our results showed that aldehydes and thiols can be readily determined upon peptidylation, thus realizing the sensitive and efficient determination of low-molecular-weight compounds by MALDI-TOF-MS. Moreover, target analytes also can be unambiguously detected in biological samples using the peptidylation strategy. The established peptidylation strategy is a universal strategy and can be extended to the sensitive analysis of various low-molecular-weight compounds by MALDI-TOF-MS, which may be potentially used in areas such as metabolomics. PMID:27109889

  18. Peptidyl anthraquinones as potential antineoplastic drugs: synthesis, DNA binding, redox cycling, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Gatto, B; Zagotto, G; Sissi, C; Cera, C; Uriarte, E; Palù, G; Capranico, G; Palumbo, M

    1996-08-01

    A series of new compounds containing a 9,10-anthracenedione moiety and one or two peptide chains at position 1 and/or 4 have been synthesized. The amino acid residues introduced are glycine (Gly), lysine (Lys), and tryptophan (Trp), the latter two in both the L- and D-configurations. The peptidyl anthraquinones maintain the ability of intercalating efficiently into DNA, even though the orientation within the base-pair pocket may change somewhat with reference to the parent drugs mitoxantrone (MX) and ametantrone (AM). The interaction constants of the mono-, di-, and triglycyl derivatives are well comparable to those found for AM but 5-10 times lower than the value reported for MX. On the other hand, the glycyl-lysyl compounds bind DNA to the same extent as (L-isomer) or even better than (D-isomer) MX. As for the parent drugs without peptidyl chains, the new compounds prefer alternating CG binding sites, although to different extents. The bis-Gly-Lys derivatives are the least sensitive to base composition, which may be due to extensive aspecific charged interactions with the polynucleotide backbone. As far as redox properties are concerned, all peptidyl anthraquinones show a reduction potential very close to that of AM and 60-80 mV less negative than that of MX; hence, they can produce free-radical-damaging species to an extent similar to the parent drugs. The biological activity has been tested in human tumor and murine leukemia cell lines. Most of the test anthraquinones exhibit cytotoxic properties close to those of AM and considerably lower than those of MX. Stimulation of topoisomerase-mediated DNA cleavage is moderately present in representatives of the glycylanthraquinone family, whereas inhibition of the background cleavage occurs when Lys is present in the peptide chain. For most of the test anthraquinones, the toxicity data are in line with the DNA affinity scale and the topoisomerase II stimulation activity. However, in the lysyl derivatives, for which

  19. Collagen prolyl3-hydroxylation: a major role for a minor post-translational modification?

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, David M.; Eyre, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Prolyl 3-hydroxylation is a rare but conserved post-translational modification in many collagen types and, when defective, may be linked to a number of human diseases with musculoskeletal and potentially ocular and renal pathologies. Prolyl 3-hydroxylase-1 (P3H1), the enzyme responsible for converting proline to 3-hydroxyproline (3Hyp) in type I collagen, requires the coenzyme CRTAP for activity. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that the Crtap−/− mouse was missing 3-hydroxyproline in type I collagen α-chains. This finding led to the discovery mutations in genes encoding the P3H1 complex as a cause of recessively inherited osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bone disease). Since then, many additional 3Hyp sites have been identified in various collagen types and classified based on observed substrate and tissue specificity. P3H1 is part of a family of gene products that also includes isoenzymes P3H2 and P3H3 as well as CRTAP and Sc65. It is believed these isoenzymes and coenzymes have evolved different collagen substrate site and tissue specificities in their activities. The post-translational fingerprinting of collagens will be essential in understanding the basic role and extent of regulated variations of prolyl 3-hydroxylation in collagen. We believe that prolyl 3-hydroxylation is a functionally significant collagen post-translational modification and can be a cause of disease when absent. PMID:23772978

  20. Modulating the activity of the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Beringer, Malte

    2008-01-01

    The peptidyl transferase (PT) center of the ribosome catalyzes two nucleophilic reactions, peptide bond formation between aminoacylated tRNA substrates and, together with release factor, peptide release. Structure and function of the PT center are modulated by binding of aminoacyl-tRNA or release factor, thus providing the basis for the specificity of catalysis. Another way by which the function of the PT center is controlled is signaling from the peptide exit tunnel. The SecM nascent peptide induces ribosome stalling, presumably by inhibition of peptide bond formation. Similarly, the release factor-induced hydrolytic activity of the PT center can be suppressed by the TnaC nascent peptide contained in the exit tunnel. Thus, local and long-range conformational rearrangements can lead to changes in the reaction specificity and catalytic activity of the PT center. PMID:18369182

  1. Single-Molecule Study of Ribosome Hierarchic Dynamics at the Peptidyl Transferase Center

    PubMed Central

    Altuntop, Mediha Esra; Ly, Cindy Tu; Wang, Yuhong

    2010-01-01

    During protein biosynthesis the ribosome moves along mRNA in steps of precisely three nucleotides. The mechanism for this ribosome motion remains elusive. Using a classification algorithm to sort single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer data into subpopulations, we found that the ribosome dynamics detected at the peptidyl transferase center are highly inhomogeneous. The pretranslocation complex has at least four subpopulations that sample two hybrid states, whereas the posttranslocation complex is mainly static. We observed transitions among the ribosome subpopulations under various conditions, including 1), in the presence of EF-G; 2), spontaneously; 3), in different buffers, and 4), bound to antibiotics. Therefore, these subpopulations represent biologically active ribosomes. One key observation indicates that the Hy2 hybrid state only exists in a fluctuating ribosome subpopulation, which prompts us to propose that ribosome dynamics are hierarchically arranged. This proposal may have important implications for the regulation of cellular translation rates. PMID:21044598

  2. Structural basis for the interaction of antibiotics with peptidyl transferase center in eubacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Schlunzen, Frank; Zarivach, Raz; Harms, Jörg; Bashan, Anat; Tocilj, Ante; Albrecht, Renate; Yonath, Ada; Franceschi, Francois

    2009-10-07

    Ribosomes, the site of protein synthesis, are a major target for natural and synthetic antibiotics. Detailed knowledge of antibiotic binding sites is central to understanding the mechanisms of drug action. Conversely, drugs are excellent tools for studying the ribosome function. To elucidate the structural basis of ribosome-antibiotic interactions, we determined the high-resolution X-ray structures of the 50S ribosomal subunit of the eubacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, complexed with the clinically relevant antibiotics chloramphenicol, clindamycin and the three macrolides erythromycin, clarithromycin and roxithromycin. We found that antibiotic binding sites are composed exclusively of segments of 23S ribosomal RNA at the peptidyl transferase cavity and do not involve any interaction of the drugs with ribosomal proteins. Here we report the details of antibiotic interactions with the components of their binding sites. Our results also show the importance of putative Mg{sup +2} ions for the binding of some drugs. This structural analysis should facilitate rational drug design.

  3. Molecular recognition of proline tRNA by prolyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    PubMed

    Yokozawa, Junji; Okamoto, Koji; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Kuno, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Tsunemi

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the recognition mechanism of tRNA(Pro) by prolyl-tRNA synthetase from hyperthermophilic archaeon, Aeropyrum pernix K1, various tRNA(Pro) transcripts were prepared by in vitro transcription system. These transcripts were aminoacylated with proline by overexpressed A. pernix prolyl-tRNA synthetase. From prolylation experiments, recognition elements of A. pernix tRNA(Pro) were determined to be G35 and G36 of anticodon, discriminator base A73, and G1-C72 base pair at acceptor stem end. PMID:14510473

  4. Small Molecule Binding, Docking, and Characterization of the Interaction between Pth1 and Peptidyl-tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hames, Mary C; McFeeters, Hana; Holloway, W Blake; Stanley, Christopher B; Urban, Volker S; McFeeters, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial Pth1 is essential for viability. Pth1 cleaves the ester bond between the peptide and nucleotide of peptidyl-tRNA generated from aborted translation, expression of mini-genes, and short ORFs. We have determined the shape of the Pth1:peptidyl-tRNA complex using small angle neutron scattering. Binding of piperonylpiperazine, a small molecule constituent of a combinatorial synthetic library common to most compounds with inhibitory activity, was mapped to Pth1 via NMR spectroscopy. We also report computational docking results, modeling piperonylpiperazine binding based on chemical shift perturbation mapping. Overall these studies promote Pth1 as a novel antibiotic target, contributing to understanding how Pth1 interacts with its substrate, advancing the current model for cleavage, and demonstrating feasibility of small molecule inhibition.

  5. Halofuginone and other febrifugine derivatives inhibit prolyl-tRNA synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Tracy L.; Zocco, Davide; Sundrud, Mark S.; Hendrick, Margaret; Edenius, Maja; Yum, Jina; Kim, Yeon-Jin; Lee, Hak-kyo; Cortese, Joseph F.; Wirth, Dyann; Dignam, John David; Rao, Anjana; Yeo, Chang-Yeol; Mazitschek, Ralph; Whitman, Malcolm

    2011-01-01

    Febrifugine, one of the fifty fundamental herbs of traditional Chinese medicine, has been characterized for its therapeutic activity whilst its molecular target has remained unknown. Febrifugine derivatives have been used to treat malaria, cancer, fibrosis, and inflammatory disease. We recently demonstrated that halofuginone (HF), a widely studied derivative of febrifugine, inhibits the development of Th17-driven autoimmunity in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis by activating the amino acid response pathway (AAR). Here we show that HF binds glutamyl-prolyl-tRNA synthetase (EPRS) inhibiting prolyl-tRNA synthetase activity; this inhibition is reversed by the addition of exogenous proline or EPRS. We further show that inhibition of EPRS underlies the broad bioactivities of this family of natural products. This work both explains the molecular mechanism of a promising family of therapeutics, and highlights the AAR pathway as an important drug target for promoting inflammatory resolution. PMID:22327401

  6. Poststatin, a new inhibitor of prolyl endopeptidase. V. Endopeptidase inhibitory activity of poststatin analogues.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, M; Muraoka, Y; Nagai, M; Aoyagi, T; Takeuchi, T

    1996-09-01

    Thirty analogues of poststatin were synthesized, and their inhibitory activities against prolyl endopeptidase, human leukocyte elastase and cathepsin B were measured. The alpha-ketone was essential and the S configuration was preferable to the R configuration in the beta-substituted-beta-amino-alpha-oxopropionic acid moiety of poststatin analogues for endopeptidase inhibitory activity. The analogue in which the D-leucine residue of poststatin was replaced by L-leucine showed strong inhibitory activity to cathepsin B. Introduction of an aromatic group into the P4 position and proline into the P2 position increased inhibitory activity to elastase. Benzyloxycarbonyl-L-homophenylalanyl-(RS)- 3-amino-2-oxovaleryl-D-leucyl-L-valine was about 6 times more active to prolyl endopeptidase than natural poststatin. PMID:8931723

  7. Escherichia coli proline tRNA: structure and recognition sites for prolyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, T; Yokogawa, T

    2000-01-01

    A major proline tRNA was purified from bulk Escherichia coli A19 tRNA by affinity chromatography with a biotinylated DNA probe. Its nucleotide sequence including modified nucleotides was determined by the post-labelling technique. In order to study the recognition sites of this proline tRNA for prolyl-tRNA synthetase, various mutant transcripts were prepared using an in vitro transcription system with T7 RNA polymerase. Based on the results of in vitro kinetic analyses of mutant transcripts, it was concluded that the second and third letters, G35 and G36, of the anticodon, G37 of the anticodon loop, the discriminator base A73, G72 of the acceptor stem, G49 and U17A that existed in the corner of an L-shaped structure are the recognition sites of proline tRNA for prolyl-tRNA synthetase. PMID:12903242

  8. Selective inhibition of the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase PHD3 by Zn(II).

    PubMed

    Na, Yu-Ran; Woo, Dustin J; Choo, Hyunah; Chung, Hak Suk; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2015-07-01

    We report herein that Zn(II) selectively inhibits the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase PHD3 over PHD2, and does not compete with Fe(II). Independent of the oligomer formation induced by Zn(II), inhibition of the activity of PHD3 by Zn(II) involves Cys42 and Cys52 residues distantly located from the active site. PMID:26051901

  9. Preferred interaction of D-peptidyl-anthraquinones with double-stranded B-DNA.

    PubMed

    Gatto, B; Zagotto, G; Sissi, C; Palumbo, M

    1997-12-01

    The quest for more specific drugs in antitumor chemotherapy led us to the design of anthraquinone-peptide conjugates capable of selective recognition of the nucleic acid. We present here the DNA binding characteristics, sequence specificity and geometry of interaction of a pair of enantiomers containing the lysine-glycine dipeptide in the side chains. The D enantiomer binds right handed double stranded DNA more efficiently than the L form under all conditions tested. The source of higher binding affinity is not electrostatic in nature and rests in the more favorable hydrophobic contacts of the D-lysyl side chains in the drug-DNA complex. Both derivatives exhibit preference for alternating GC base sequences and intercalate into DNA in a threading mode as suggested by chiroptical and theoretical studies. The D enantiomer, being a peptidyl derivative that contains a non-natural amino acid, has the considerable advantage of being less susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis and could therefore represent a lead compound for further development. PMID:9493055

  10. Efficient generation of peptide hydrazides via direct hydrazinolysis of Peptidyl-Wang-TentaGel resins.

    PubMed

    Bello, Claudia; Kikul, Frauke; Becker, Christian F W

    2015-03-01

    Peptide hydrazides are valuable building blocks in peptide and protein chemistry, e.g. as precursors of peptide thioesters that allow the preparation of these important intermediates under mild conditions. Additional robust and versatile methods for the generation of peptide hydrazides from standard solid supports are therefore highly desired in order to facilitate access to peptide thioester via Fmoc-based SPPS. Here, the efficient generation of peptide hydrazides from conventional 4-hydroxymethyl phenol Wang-TentalGel peptidyl resins is described. Direct hydrazinolysis of a 19mer mucin1 peptide gives the protected peptide hydrazide in excellent yields. Testing a series of octapeptides carrying the 20 common proteinogenic amino acids at their C-terminus led to preparation of all corresponding peptide hydrazides in very good to excellent yields and purities. The available set of octapeptides allowed analyzing the influence of the nature of the C-terminal amino acid and of the solvent on the hydrazinolysis reaction. Furthermore, the compatibility of the method with posttranslational modifications (here glycosylation) and with potentially sensitive functional groups in amino acid side chains makes this approach a viable alternative for obtaining peptide hydrazides. It combines the advantages of a straightforward synthesis with stereochemical stability and flexibility, as it provides easy access to the peptide acid and the peptide thioester (via the hydrazide) from the same solid support. PMID:25648984

  11. Enzymatic Modification of Soluble Cyanophycin Using the Type II Peptidyl Arginine Deiminase from Oryctolagus cuniculus.

    PubMed

    Wiefel, Lars; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    An increased structural variety expands the number of putative applications for cyanophycin (multi-l-arginyl-poly-[l-aspartic acid], CGP). Therefore, structural modifications of CGP are of major interest; these are commonly obtained by modification and optimization of the bacterial producing strain or by chemical modification. In this study, an enzymatic modification of arginine side chains from lysine-rich CGP is demonstrated using the peptidyl arginine deiminase from Oryctolagus cuniculus, purified from Escherichia coli after heterologous expression. About 10% of the arginine side chains are converted to citrulline which corresponds to 4% of the polymer's total side chains. An inhibition of the reaction in the presence of small amounts of l-citrulline is observed, thereby explaining the low conversion rate. CGP dipeptides can be modified with about 7.5 mol% of the Asp-Arg dipeptides being converted to Asp-Cit. These results show that the enzymatic modification of CGP is feasible, opening up a whole new area of possible CGP modifications for further research. PMID:26953800

  12. Autocitrullination of human peptidyl arginine deiminase type 4 regulates protein citrullination during cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Felipe; Darrah, Erika; Gucek, Marjan; Cole, Robert N.; Rosen, Antony; Zhu, Xiaoming

    2010-01-01

    Objective To address mechanisms that control the activity of human peptidyl arginine deiminase type 4 (PAD-4). Methods PAD-4 autocitrullination was determined by anti–modified citrulline immunoblotting, using purified recombinant and endogenous PAD-4 from activated human primary neutrophils and cell lines expressing PAD-4. The citrullination sites in PAD-4 were determined by mass spectrometry. Mechanisms of autocitrullination-induced inactivation and the functional consequences of autocitrullination in PAD-4 polymorphic variants were addressed using purified components and cell lines expressing PAD-4 wild-type, PAD-4 mutant, and PAD-4 polymorphic variants relevant to rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Results PAD-4 is autocitrullinated in vitro and during activation of primary cells and cell lines expressing PAD-4. Interestingly, this modification inactivated the function of the enzyme. The efficiency of inactivation differed among genetically defined PAD-4 variants relevant to RA. PAD-4 was citrullinated at 10 sites, which are clustered into 3 distinct regions, including a cluster of arginines around the active site cleft where Arg-372 and -374 were identified as the potential autocitrullination targets that inactivate the enzyme. Autocitrullination also modified the structure of PAD-4, abrogating its recognition by multiple rabbit antibodies, but augmenting its recognition by human anti–PAD-4 autoantibodies. Conclusion Our findings suggest that autocitrullination regulates the production of citrullinated proteins during cell activation, and that this is affected by structural polymorphisms in PAD-4. Autocitrullination also influences PAD-4 structure and immune response. PMID:20201080

  13. Structural basis for oxygen degradation domain selectivity of the HIF prolyl hydroxylases

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.; Tian, Ya-Min; Abboud, Martine I.; Ge, Wei; Domene, Carmen; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Landrieu, Isabelle; Hardy, Adam P.; Pugh, Christopher W.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The response to hypoxia in animals involves the expression of multiple genes regulated by the αβ-hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). The hypoxia-sensing mechanism involves oxygen limited hydroxylation of prolyl residues in the N- and C-terminal oxygen-dependent degradation domains (NODD and CODD) of HIFα isoforms, as catalysed by prolyl hydroxylases (PHD 1–3). Prolyl hydroxylation promotes binding of HIFα to the von Hippel–Lindau protein (VHL)–elongin B/C complex, thus signalling for proteosomal degradation of HIFα. We reveal that certain PHD2 variants linked to familial erythrocytosis and cancer are highly selective for CODD or NODD. Crystalline and solution state studies coupled to kinetic and cellular analyses reveal how wild-type and variant PHDs achieve ODD selectivity via different dynamic interactions involving loop and C-terminal regions. The results inform on how HIF target gene selectivity is achieved and will be of use in developing selective PHD inhibitors. PMID:27561929

  14. Structural basis for oxygen degradation domain selectivity of the HIF prolyl hydroxylases.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Leung, Ivanhoe K H; Tian, Ya-Min; Abboud, Martine I; Ge, Wei; Domene, Carmen; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Landrieu, Isabelle; Hardy, Adam P; Pugh, Christopher W; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Claridge, Timothy D W; Schofield, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    The response to hypoxia in animals involves the expression of multiple genes regulated by the αβ-hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). The hypoxia-sensing mechanism involves oxygen limited hydroxylation of prolyl residues in the N- and C-terminal oxygen-dependent degradation domains (NODD and CODD) of HIFα isoforms, as catalysed by prolyl hydroxylases (PHD 1-3). Prolyl hydroxylation promotes binding of HIFα to the von Hippel-Lindau protein (VHL)-elongin B/C complex, thus signalling for proteosomal degradation of HIFα. We reveal that certain PHD2 variants linked to familial erythrocytosis and cancer are highly selective for CODD or NODD. Crystalline and solution state studies coupled to kinetic and cellular analyses reveal how wild-type and variant PHDs achieve ODD selectivity via different dynamic interactions involving loop and C-terminal regions. The results inform on how HIF target gene selectivity is achieved and will be of use in developing selective PHD inhibitors. PMID:27561929

  15. Cellular Oxygen Sensing: Crystal Structure of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl Hydroxylase (PHD2)

    SciTech Connect

    McDonough,M.; Li, V.; Flashman, E.; Chowdhury, R.; Mohr, C.; Lienard, B.; Zondlo, J.; Oldham, N.; Clifton, I.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Cellular and physiological responses to changes in dioxygen levels in metazoans are mediated via the posttranslational oxidation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF). Hydroxylation of conserved prolyl residues in the HIF-{alpha} subunit, catalyzed by HIF prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs), signals for its proteasomal degradation. The requirement of the PHDs for dioxygen links changes in dioxygen levels with the transcriptional regulation of the gene array that enables the cellular response to chronic hypoxia; the PHDs thus act as an oxygen-sensing component of the HIF system, and their inhibition mimics the hypoxic response. We describe crystal structures of the catalytic domain of human PHD2, an important prolyl-4-hydroxylase in the human hypoxic response in normal cells, in complex with Fe(II) and an inhibitor to 1.7 Angstroms resolution. PHD2 crystallizes as a homotrimer and contains a double-stranded {beta}-helix core fold common to the Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependant dioxygenase family, the residues of which are well conserved in the three human PHD enzymes (PHD 1-3). The structure provides insights into the hypoxic response, helps to rationalize a clinically observed mutation leading to familial erythrocytosis, and will aid in the design of PHD selective inhibitors for the treatment of anemia and ischemic disease.

  16. Gallate, the component of HIF-inducing catechins, inhibits HIF prolyl hydroxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukiyama, Fuyo; Nakai, Yumi; Yoshida, Masataka; Tokuhara, Takahiro; Hirota, Kiichi; Sakai, Akiko; Hayashi, Hideyuki . E-mail: hayashi@art.osaka-med.ac.jp; Katsumata, Takahiro

    2006-12-08

    Catechins have recently been reported to increase the cellular content of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1{alpha} within mammalian cells. These catechins have a gallate moiety as a common structure. We now report that n-propyl gallate (nPG) also increases the HIF-1{alpha} protein in the rat heart-derived H9c2 cells. The increase was dose-dependent and reached a maximum at 2-4 h after the addition of nPG to the cells. nPG did not change the HIF-1{alpha} mRNA level, showing that the increase is a posttranscriptional event. Although nPG did not inhibit the HIF prolyl hydroxylase, gallate, the hydrolysis product of nPG, inhibited the enzyme completely at submillimolar concentrations. Model building studies on the human HIF prolyl hydroxylase 2 showed that the two phenolate oxygen atoms of gallate form a chelate with the active site Fe{sup 2+}, while the carboxyl group of gallate forms a strong ionic/hydrogen bonding interaction with Arg383, explaining why nPG, which has an esterified carboxyl group, is unable to inhibit the hydroxylase. Together with the observation that gallate was detected in the H9c2 cells treated with nPG, these results suggest that nPG incorporated into the cells is hydrolyzed and the released gallate inhibits the HIF prolyl hydroxylase, thereby reducing the HIF degradation rate and increasing the HIF-1{alpha} content.

  17. Preischemic targeting of HIF prolyl hydroxylation inhibits fibrosis associated with acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Kapitsinou, Pinelopi P; Jaffe, Jonathan; Michael, Mark; Swan, Christina E; Duffy, Kevin J; Erickson-Miller, Connie L; Haase, Volker H

    2012-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) due to ischemia is an important contributor to the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Key mediators of cellular adaptation to hypoxia are oxygen-sensitive hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF), which are regulated by prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD)-containing dioxygenases. While activation of HIF protects from ischemic cell death, HIF has been shown to promote fibrosis in experimental models of CKD. The impact of HIF activation on AKI-induced fibrosis has not been defined. Here, we investigated the role of pharmacologic HIF activation in AKI-associated fibrosis and inflammation. We found that pharmacologic inhibition of HIF prolyl hydroxylation before AKI ameliorated fibrosis and prevented anemia, while inhibition of HIF prolyl hydroxylation in the early recovery phase of AKI did not affect short- or long-term clinical outcome. Therefore, preischemic targeting of the PHD/HIF pathway represents an effective therapeutic strategy for the prevention of CKD resulting from AKI, and it warrants further investigation in clinical trials. PMID:22262480

  18. C-terminal fragments of oxytocin (prolyl-leucyl-glycinamide and Z-prolyl-D-leucine) attenuate the development of tolerance to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Szabó, G; Kovács, G L; Székeli, S; Baláspiri, L; Telegdy, G

    1987-01-01

    Earlier it was found that oxytocin (OXT) treatment inhibited the development of tolerance to ethanol. In the present study the possibility was investigated whether the effect of OXT on ethanol tolerance was related to peptide fragments derived from the C-terminal part of the molecule. The actions of different doses of the C-terminal tripeptide (prolyl-leucyl-glycinamide, PLG) and of a synthetic dipeptide derivative (Z-prolyl-D-leucine, Z-Pro-D-Leu) on the development of tolerance to the hypothermic effect of ethanol in CFLP mice were therefore investigated. Peptide treatment did not affect body temperature in ethanol-naive animals. The acute effects (hypothermia, sleeping time) of a single ethanol injection were also unaffected by these peptides. In contrast, both PLG and Z-Pro-D-Leu inhibited the development of tolerance to the hypothermic effect of ethanol. Accordingly, it might be speculated that a sequence active in affecting ethanol tolerance is located in the C-terminal part of the OXT molecule. PMID:2884803

  19. Geometry matters: inverse cytotoxic relationship for cis/trans-Ru(ii) polypyridyl complexes from cis/trans-[PtCl2(NH3)2].

    PubMed

    Wachter, Erin; Zamora, Ana; Heidary, David K; Ruiz, José; Glazer, Edith C

    2016-08-01

    Two thermally activated ruthenium(ii) polypyridyl complexes, cis-Ru(bpy)2Cl2 and trans-Ru(qpy)Cl2 were investigated to determine the impact of the geometric arrangement of the exchangable ligands on the potential of the compounds to act as chemotherapeutics. In contrast to the geometry requirements for cisplatin, trans-Ru(qpy)Cl2 was 7.1-9.5× more cytotoxic than cis-Ru(bpy)2Cl2. This discovery could open up a new area of metal-based chemotherapeutic research. PMID:27352966

  20. Phosphorylation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 capsid protein at serine 16, required for peptidyl-prolyl isomerase-dependent uncoating, is mediated by virion-incorporated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Dochi, Takeo; Nakano, Takashi; Inoue, Mutsumi; Takamune, Nobutoki; Shoji, Shozo; Sano, Kouichi; Misumi, Shogo

    2014-05-01

    We reported previously that Pin1 facilitates human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) uncoating by interacting with the capsid core through the phosphorylated Ser(16)-Pro(17) motif. However, the specific kinase responsible for Ser(16) phosphorylation has remained unknown. Here, we showed that virion-associated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) phosphorylates Ser(16). The characterization of immature virions produced by exposing chronically HIV-1LAV-1-infected CEM/LAV-1 cells to 10 µM saquinavir indicated that Ser(16) is phosphorylated after the initiation of Pr55(Gag) processing. Furthermore, a mass spectrometry-based in vitro kinase assay demonstrated that ERK2 specifically phosphorylated the Ser(16) residue in the Ser(16)-Pro(17) motif-containing substrate. The treatment of CEM/LAV-1 cells with the ERK2 inhibitor sc-222229 decreased the Ser(16) phosphorylation level inside virions, and virus partially defective in Ser(16) phosphorylation showed impaired reverse transcription and attenuated replication owing to attenuated Pin1-dependent uncoating. Furthermore, the suppression of ERK2 expression by RNA interference in CEM/LAV-1 cells resulted in suppressed ERK2 packaging inside virions and decreased the Ser(16) phosphorylation level inside virions. Interestingly, the ERK2-packaging-defective virus showed impaired reverse transcription and attenuated HIV-1 replication. Taken together, these findings provide insights into the as-yet-obscure processes in Pin1-dependent HIV-1 uncoating. PMID:24509437

  1. Identification of Novel Peptidyl Serine α-Galactosyltransferase Gene Family in Plants*♦

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Fumie; Suyama, Akiko; Oka, Takuji; Yoko-o, Takehiko; Matsuoka, Ken; Jigami, Yoshifumi; Shimma, Yoh-ichi

    2014-01-01

    In plants, serine residues in extensin, a cell wall protein, are glycosylated with O-linked galactose. However, the enzyme that is involved in the galactosylation of serine had not yet been identified. To identify the peptidyl serine O-α-galactosyltransferase (SGT), we chose Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model. We established an assay system for SGT activity using C. reinhardtii and Arabidopsis thaliana cell extracts. SGT protein was partially purified from cell extracts of C. reinhardtii and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry to determine its amino acid sequence. The sequence matched the open reading frame XP_001696927 in the C. reinhardtii proteome database, and a corresponding DNA fragment encoding 748 amino acids (BAL63043) was cloned from a C. reinhardtii cDNA library. The 748-amino acid protein (CrSGT1) was produced using a yeast expression system, and the SGT activity was examined. Hydroxylation of proline residues adjacent to a serine in acceptor peptides was required for SGT activity. Genes for proteins containing conserved domains were found in various plant genomes, including A. thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. The AtSGT1 and NtSGT1 proteins also showed SGT activity when expressed in yeast. In addition, knock-out lines of AtSGT1 and knockdown lines of NtSGT1 showed no or reduced SGT activity. The SGT1 sequence, which contains a conserved DXD motif and a C-terminal membrane spanning region, is the first example of a glycosyltransferase with type I membrane protein topology, and it showed no homology with known glycosyltransferases, indicating that SGT1 belongs to a novel glycosyltransferase gene family existing only in the plant kingdom. PMID:24914209

  2. Peptidyl - tRNA hydrolase and RNase activities in cell fractions of rat liver used in in vitro reconstitution of rough membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Hochberg, A A; Czosnek, H H; Ziv, E

    1975-01-01

    Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase and RNase activities have been studied in those fractions of rat liver, which are used in in vitro reconstitution of rough membrane, because these enzymes may interfere with the in vitro reconstitution. It was found that smooth membrane has an active peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase, while the other fractions tested, polyribosomes, rough membrane, stripped rough membrane and the post-microsomal supernatant had no, or very low, peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase activity. Polyribosomes, rough and stripped rough membrane have RNase activity; this activity could be completely inhibited by rat liver RNase inhibitor. It is shown that RNase inhibitor is an obligatory component in in vitro experiments, in which rough membrane is reconstituted from stripped rough membrane, ribosomes and mRNA. PMID:1144067

  3. The adaptation of diastereomeric S-prolyl dipeptide derivatives to the quantitative estimation of R- and S-leucine enantiomers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Description of methods developed for the preparation of N-TFA-S(-)prolyl chloride and for synthesizing from it N-TFA-S-prolyl(and S)-leucine methyl ester diastereomers without detectible racemization. These diastereomers prepared by these methods were subjected to GC analyses under conditions permitting baseline separation of two diastereomeric peaks, while peak areas were measured with an electronic digital integrator. Under these conditions, it was found that the known enantiomeric compositions could be duplicated experimentally to an absolute error of only 0.0 to 0.6% over the entire composition range.

  4. Human Collagen Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Is Activated by Ligands for Its Iron Center.

    PubMed

    Vasta, James D; Raines, Ronald T

    2016-06-14

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. The posttranslational hydroxylation of proline residues in collagen contributes greatly to its conformational stability. Deficient hydroxylation is associated with a variety of disease states, including scurvy. The hydroxylation of proline residues in collagen is catalyzed by an Fe(II)- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, collagen prolyl 4-hydroxylase (CP4H). CP4H has long been known to suffer oxidative inactivation during catalysis, and the cofactor ascorbate (vitamin C) is required to reactivate the enzyme by reducing its iron center from Fe(III) to Fe(II). Herein, we report on the discovery of the first synthetic activators of CP4H. Specifically, we find that 2,2'-bipyridine-4-carboxylate and 2,2'-bipyridine-5-carboxylate serve as ligands for the iron center in human CP4H that enhance the rate of ascorbate-dependent reactivation. This new mode of CP4H activation is available to other biheteroaryl compounds but does not necessarily extend to other prolyl 4-hydroxylases. As collagen is weakened in many indications, analogous activators of CP4H could have therapeutic benefits. PMID:27183028

  5. Alkaloids from Peumus boldus and their acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase and prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition activity.

    PubMed

    Hošt'álková, Anna; Opletal, Lubomír; Kuneš, Jiří; Novák, Zdeněk; Hrabinová, Martina; Chlebek, Jakub; Čegan, Lukáš; Cahlíková, Lucie

    2015-04-01

    Eleven isoquinoline alkaloids (1-11) were isolated from dried leaves of Peumus boldus Mol. by standard chromatographic methods. The chemical structures were elucidated by MS, and 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis, and by comparison with literature data. Compounds isolated in sufficient amount were evaluated for their acetylcholinesterase, and butyrylcholinesterase inhibition activity using Ellman's method. In the prolyl oligopeptidase assay, Z-Gly-Pro-p-nitroanilide was used as substrate. Promising butyrylcholinesterase inhibition activities were demonstrated by two benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, reticuline (8) and N-methylcoclaurine (9), with IC50 values of 33.6 ± 3.0 µM and 15.0 ± 1.4 µM, respectively. Important prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition activities were shown by N-methyllaurotetanine (6) and sinoacutine (4) with IC50 values of 135.4 ± 23.2 µM and 143.1 ± 25.4 µM, respectively. Other tested compounds were considered inactive. PMID:25973480

  6. Prolyl isomerase Pin1 regulates axon guidance by stabilizing CRMP2A selectively in distal axons

    PubMed Central

    Balastik, Martin; Zhou, Xiao Zhen; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Weissova, Romana; Žiak, Jakub; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F.; Cosker, Katharina E; Machonova, Olga; Kozmikova, Iryna; Chen, Chun-Hau; Pastorino, Lucia; Asara, John M.; Cole, Adam; Sutherland, Calum; Segal, Rosalind A.; Lu, Kun Ping

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Axon guidance relies on precise translation of the gradients of the extracellular signals into local changes of cytoskeletal dynamics, but the molecular mechanisms regulating dose-dependent responses of growth cones are still poorly understood. Here we show that during embryonic development in growing axons low level of Semaphorin3A stimulation is buffered by the prolyl isomerase Pin1. We demonstrate, that Pin1 stabilizes CDK5-phosphorylated CRMP2A, the major isoform of CRMP2 in distal axons. Consequently, Pin1 knockdown or knockout reduces CRMP2A level specifically in distal axons and inhibits axon growth, which can be fully rescued by Pin1 or CRMP2A expression. Moreover, Pin1 knockdown or knockout increases sensitivity to Sema3A-induced growth cone collapse in vitro and in vivo leading to developmental abnormalities in axon guidance. These results identify an important isoform-specific function and regulation of CRMP2A in controlling axon growth, and uncover Pin1-catalyzed prolyl isomerization as a regulatory mechanism in axon guidance. PMID:26489457

  7. HIF prolyl hydroxylase inhibition increases cell viability and potentiates dopamine release in dopaminergic cells.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Jens Leander; Sager, Thomas Nikolaj; Lotharius, Julie; Witten, Louise; Mørk, Arne; Egebjerg, Jan; Thirstrup, Kenneth

    2010-10-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) controls the expression of genes that adapts the cellular condition to accommodate oxidative stress. The potential beneficial effect of HIF up-regulation in ischemia has recently gained interest substantiated by the known HIF-regulation of erythropoietin and other hypoxia accommodating genes. So far the perspectives for HIF up-regulation has been focused on anemia and ischemia related diseases but little information is available about the relevance of HIF biology for neurodegenerative disease like Parkinson's disease. We therefore sought out to characterize the effect of HIF-up-regulation on survival and dopamine homeostasis in dopaminergic cells. We used a low molecular weight HIF prolyl hydroxylase (HPH) inhibitor and lentiviral based shRNA knockdown of HPH subtypes as molecular tools to increase HIF protein level and downstream HIF-regulated genes. We show that HIF induction results in protection against oxidative stress in cellular models based on PC12 cells and LUHMES cells. In addition, HPH inhibition elevates tyrosine hydroxylase expression and activity, which causes increased dopamine synthesis and release in both PC12 cells and a primary rat ventral mesencephalic cell culture. All together these findings suggest that prolyl hydroxylases may represent novel targets for therapeutic intervention in disorders characterized by dopamine homeostasis dysregulation like Parkinson's disease. PMID:20649842

  8. Peptide Macrocyclization Catalyzed by a Prolyl Oligopeptidase Involved in α-Amanitin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hong; Hong, Sung-Yong; Sgambelluri, R Michael; Angelos, Evan; Li, Xuan; Walton, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Amatoxins are ribosomally-encoded and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) that account for the majority of fatal mushroom poisonings of humans. A representative amatoxin is the bicyclic octapeptide α-amanitin formed via head-to-tail macrocyclization, which is ribosomally biosynthesized as a 35-amino acid propeptide in Amanita bisporigera and in the distantly related mushroom Galerina marginata. Although members of the prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) family of serine proteases were proposed to play a role in α- amanitin post-translational processing the exact mechanistic details are not known. Here, we show that a specific prolyl oligopeptidase (GmPOPB) is required for toxin maturation in G. marginata. Recombinant GmPOPB catalyzed two nonprocessive reactions: hydrolysis at an internal Pro to release the C-terminal 25mer from the 35mer propeptide, and transpeptidation at the second Pro to produce the cyclic octamer. On the other hand, we show that GmPOPA, the putative housekeeping POP of G. marginata, behaves like a conventional POP. PMID:25484237

  9. Antiamnesic effect of acyl-prolyl-containing dipeptide (GVS-111) in compression-induced damage to frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Romanova, G A; Mirzoev, T K; Barskov, I V; Victorov, I V; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaya, R U

    2000-09-01

    Antiamnestic effect of acyl-prolyl-containing dipeptide GVS-111 was demonstrated in rats with bilateral compression-induced damage to the frontal cortex. Both intraperitoneal and oral administration of the dipeptide improved retrieval of passive avoidance responses in rats with compression-induced cerebral ischemia compared to untreated controls. PMID:11177261

  10. Changes produced by bound tryptophan in the ribosome peptidyl transferase center in response to TnaC, a nascent leader peptide.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Vera, Luis Rogelio; Gong, Ming; Yanofsky, Charles

    2006-03-01

    Studies in vitro have established that free tryptophan induces tna operon expression by binding to the ribosome that has just completed synthesis of TnaC-tRNA(Pro), the peptidyl-tRNA precursor of the leader peptide of this operon. Tryptophan acts by inhibiting Release Factor 2-mediated cleavage of this peptidyl-tRNA at the tnaC stop codon. Here we analyze the ribosomal location of free tryptophan, the changes it produces in the ribosome, and the role of the nascent TnaC-tRNA(Pro) peptide in facilitating tryptophan binding and induction. The positional changes of 23S rRNA nucleotides that occur during induction were detected by using methylation protection and binding/competition assays. The ribosome-TnaC-tRNA(Pro) complexes analyzed were formed in vitro; they contained either wild-type TnaC-tRNA(Pro) or its nonfunctional substitute, TnaC(W12R)-tRNA(Pro). Upon comparing these two peptidyl-tRNA-ribosome complexes, free tryptophan was found to block methylation of nucleotide A2572 of wild-type ribosome-TnaC-tRNA(Pro) complexes but not of ribosome-TnaC(W12R)-tRNA(Pro) complexes. Nucleotide A2572 is in the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center. Tryptophanol, a noninducing competitor of tryptophan, was ineffective in blocking A2572 methylation; however, it did reverse the protective effect of tryptophan. Free tryptophan inhibited puromycin cleavage of TnaC-tRNA(Pro); it also inhibited binding of the antibiotic sparsomycin. These effects were not observed with TnaC(W12R)-tRNA(Pro) mutant complexes. These findings establish that Trp-12 of TnaC-tRNA(Pro) is required for introducing specific changes in the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome that activate free tryptophan binding, resulting in peptidyl transferase inhibition. Free tryptophan appears to act at or near the binding sites of several antibiotics in the peptidyl transferase center. PMID:16505360

  11. Molecular mechanism of MLL PHD3 and RNA recognition by the Cyp33 RRM domain

    PubMed Central

    Hom, Robert A.; Chang, Pei-Yun; Roy, Siddhartha; Musselman, Catherine A.; Glass, Karen C.; Selezneva, Anna I.; Gozani, Or; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; Cleary, Michael L.; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The nuclear protein Cyclophilin 33 (Cyp33) is a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase that catalyzes cis-trans isomerization of the peptide bond preceding a proline and promotes folding and conformational changes in folded and unfolded proteins. The N-terminal RRM domain of Cyp33 has been found to associate with the third plant homeodomain (PHD3) finger of the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) proto-oncoprotein and a poly-A RNA sequence. Here, we report a 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of the RRM domain of Cyp33 and describe the molecular mechanism of PHD3 and RNA recognition. The Cyp33 RRM domain folds into a five-stranded antiparallel β-sheet and two α-helices. The RRM domain but not the catalytic module of Cyp33 binds strongly to PHD3, exhibiting a 2 μM affinity as measured by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). NMR chemical shift perturbation (CSP) analysis and dynamics data reveal that the β strands and the β2–β3 loop of the RRM domain are involved in the interaction with PHD3. Mutations in the PHD3-binding site or deletions in the β 2/β 3 loop lead to a significantly reduced affinity or abrogation of the interaction. The RNA-binding pocket of the Cyp33 RRM domain, mapped based on NMR CSP and mutagenesis, partially overlaps with the PHD3-binding site, and RNA association is abolished in the presence of MLL PHD3. Full-length Cyp33 acts as a negative regulator of MLL-induced transcription and reduces the expression levels of MLL target genes MEIS1 and HOXA9. Together, these in vitro and in vivo data provide insight into the multiple functions of Cyp33 RRM and suggest a Cyp33-dependent mechanism for regulating the transcriptional activity of MLL. PMID:20460131

  12. Prolyl isomerase Pin1 regulated signaling pathway revealed by Pin1 +/+ and Pin1 -/- mouse embryonic fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo-Liang; Qiu, Jin-Hua; Li, Bin-Bin; Wu, Jing-Jing; Lu, Yan; Liu, Xing-Yan; He, Zhiwei

    2013-10-01

    Pin1 (peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase, NIMA-interacting 1) plays a key role in a number of diseases including cancer and Alzheimer disease. Previous studies have identified a wide range of phosphoproteins as Pin1 substrates. Related pathways were analyzed separately. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive picture involving Pin1 regulation. A genome-wide mRNA expression microarray was carried out using the RNA isolation from Pin1 (+/+) and Pin1 (-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells. Signaling pathways regulated by Pin1 were analyzed with the utility of KEGG pathway and GO annotation. An expression pattern regulated by Pin1 was revealed. A total of 606 genes, 375 being up-regulated and 231 down-regulated, were differentially expressed when comparing Pin1 +/+ to Pin1 -/- MEF cells. Totally 48 pathways were shown to be regulated by Pin1 expression in KEGG pathway analysis. In the GO annotation system, 19 processes on biological processes, 15 processes on cellular components, and 18 processes on molecular functions were found to be in the regulation of Pin1 expression. Pathways related to immune system and cancer showed most significant association with Pin1 regulation. Pin1 is an important regulator in a wide range of signaling pathways that were related to immune system and cancer. PMID:23563987

  13. Proline cis-trans isomerization in staphylococcal nuclease: multi-substrate free energy perturbation calculations.

    PubMed Central

    Hodel, A.; Rice, L. M.; Simonson, T.; Fox, R. O.; Brünger, A. T.

    1995-01-01

    Staphylococcal nuclease A exists in two folded forms that differ in the isomerization state of the Lys 116-Pro 117 peptide bond. The dominant form (90% occupancy) adopts a cis peptide bond, which is observed in the crystal structure. NMR studies show that the relatively small difference in free energy between the cis and trans forms (delta Gcis-->trans approximately 1.2 kcal/mol) results from large and nearly compensating differences in enthalpy and entropy (delta Hcis-->trans approximately delta TScis-->trans approximately 10 kcal/mol). There is evidence from X-ray crystal structures that the structural differences between the cis and the trans forms of nuclease are confined to the conformation of residues 112-117, a solvated protein loop. Here, we obtain a thermodynamic and structural description of the conformational equilibrium of this protein loop through an exhaustive conformational search that identified several substates followed by free energy simulations between the substrates. By partitioning the search into conformational substates, we overcame the multiple minima problem in this particular case and obtained precise and reproducible free energy values. The protein and water environment was implicitly modeled by appropriately chosen nonbonded terms between the explicitly treated loop and the rest of the protein. These simulations correctly predicted a small free energy difference between the cis and trans forms composed of larger, compensating differences in enthalpy and entropy. The structural predictions of these simulations were qualitatively consistent with known X-ray structures of nuclease variants and yield a model of the unknown minor trans conformation. PMID:7613463

  14. An unexpected promiscuous activity of 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase: the cis-trans isomerisation of nitrostyrene.

    PubMed

    Zandvoort, Ellen; Geertsema, Edzard M; Baas, Bert-Jan; Quax, Wim J; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2012-09-01

    Serendipitous switch: While exploring cis-nitrostyrene as a potential electrophile in Michael-type addition reactions catalysed by the enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), it was unexpectedly found that 4-OT catalyses the isomerisation of cis-nitrostyrene to trans-nitrostyrene (k(cat) /K(m) = 1.9×10(3)  M(-1)  s(-1) ). PMID:22851288

  15. Control of carotenoid biosynthesis through a heme-based cis-trans isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Jesús; Kloss, Brian; Hosler, Jonathan P.; Geng, Jiafeng; Liu, Aimin; Modi, Anuja; Dawson, John H.; Sono, Masanori; Shumskaya, Maria; Ampomah-Dwamena, Charles; Love, James D.; Wurtzel, Eleanore T.

    2015-01-01

    Plants synthesize carotenoids essential for plant development and survival. These metabolites also serve as essential nutrients for human health. The biosynthetic pathway leading to all plant carotenoids occurs in chloroplasts and other plastids and requires 15-cis-ζ-carotene isomerase (Z-ISO). It was not certain whether isomerization was achieved by Z-ISO alone or in combination with other enzymes. Here we show that Z-ISO is a bona fide enzyme and integral membrane protein. Z-ISO independently catalyzes the cis-to-trans isomerization of the 15–15′ C=C bond in 9,15,9′-cis-ζ-carotene to produce the substrate required by the following biosynthetic pathway enzyme. We discovered that isomerization depends upon a ferrous heme b cofactor that undergoes redox-regulated ligand-switching between the heme iron and alternate Z-ISO amino acid residues. Heme b-dependent isomerization of a large, hydrophobic compound in a membrane is unprecedented. As an isomerase, Z-ISO represents a new prototype for heme b proteins and potentially utilizes a novel chemical mechanism. PMID:26075523

  16. IRIS Toxicological Review of cis- & trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On September 24, 2009, the Toxicological Review of cis- and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal ag...

  17. Diffusion ordered spectroscopy for resolution of double bonded cis, trans-isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Sachin Rama; Suryaprakash, N.

    2012-06-01

    NMR spectroscopic separation of double bonded cis- and trans-isomers, that have different molecular shapes but identical mass have been carried out using Diffusion Ordered Spectroscopy (DOSY). The mixtures of fumaric acid and maleic acid, that have similar hydrodynamic radii, have resolved been 'on the basis of their diffusion coefficients arising due to their different tendencies to associate with micelles or reverse micelles. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and Dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium salt (AOT) have been used as the media to mimic the chromatographic conditions, modify the average mobility and to achieve differential diffusion rates. The best separation of the components has been achieved by Dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium salt (AOT) in D2O solution.

  18. Communication: One-photon phase control of cis-trans isomerization in retinal

    SciTech Connect

    Arango, Carlos A.; Brumer, Paul

    2013-02-21

    We computationally demonstrate the one-photon phase control of retinal isomerization under conditions of low laser intensity. The calculations, utilizing the multiconfigurational time dependent Hartree method, include coupling between the two modes that are active in isomerization and the background molecular vibrational environment. Noting previously unsuccessful computations highlights the significance of this result.

  19. Fluorescence of carotenoids. Effect of oxygenation and cis/trans isomerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Kevin; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Skibsted, Leif H.

    1992-03-01

    C 40 carotenoids fall, with respect to fluorescence in homogeneous solution, into two distinct groups depending on the presence of a CO group in the molecule. Excitation spectra agree with absorption spectra for the carbonyl derivatives astaxanthin and canthaxanthin. In contrast, zeaxanthin and isomers of β-carotene have a twentyfold increase in fluorescence quantum yield for excitation around 350 nm compared to excitation near the absorption maximum (at approximatively 430 nm). These differences are interpreted in terms of the role of non-emitting 1(n, π*) states related to the CO group in facilitating non-radiative deactivation of higher 1(π, π*) states.

  20. Hazard identification of cis/trans-zearalenone through the looking-glass.

    PubMed

    Dellafiora, Luca; Galaverna, Gianni; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Cozzini, Pietro

    2015-12-01

    Among the food-related health issues, the presence of contaminants has a prominent role, due to the wide range of exogenous compounds that can occur in food commodities and to their large differences in structure and biological activity. A comprehensive assessment of the related risk is thus actually demanding in terms of time and facilities involved. In this context, the use of computational strategies can be an effective choice for supporting the hazard identification procedure at the early stage. In this work, we focused on the food contaminant zearalenone by comparing the trans and cis isomers, respectively the well-known mycoestrogen and its still largely understudied isomer. We estimated the possible effects exerted by human metabolism on the xenoestrogenicity of cis-ZEN by using a validated in silico strategy based on docking simulations and rescoring procedures. Similarly, the exploitation of the most promising enzymatic detoxifying routes designed for trans-ZEN - which relies on the enzyme lactono hydrolase from Clonostachys rosea - has been assessed for the cis-isomer as well. Our results showed that both isomers can act as functional analogues with respect to xenoestrogenic activity, and several cis-ZEN metabolites with high biological potential have been identified. On the contrary, in spite of the high degree of structural analogy, the cis isomer showed a pattern of interaction with the degrading enzyme in stark contrast with that observed for trans-ZEN. For these reasons, the outcomes presented herein strongly support the inclusion of cis-ZEN in further studies of occurrence, metabolism and bioactivity assessment, and suggest the need for a dedicated handling for the cis isomer in risk assessment studies. PMID:26391124

  1. A theoretical study of the stability of DNA binding with cis/trans platin.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Seema; Khan, Irfan Ali; Srivastava, Shinoo; Gupta, Vishwambhar Dayal

    2004-12-01

    Both cis- and trans-platins are known to form intra- and interstrand cross-linking with DNA. Since the nature and strength of binding is different, it makes their efficacy as anti-tumour drug different. In the present communication, we report theoretical analysis by using an amended Zimm and Bragg theory, to explain the melting behaviour and heat capacity of DNA with and without platin binding. The sharpness of transition has been examined in terms of half width and sensitivity parameter (deltaH/sigma). The experimental measurements of Pilch et al (J Mol Biol 2000, 296, 803) and Ctirad and Brabec (J Biol Chem 2001, 276, 9655) have been used. PMID:22900359

  2. IRIS Toxicological Review of Cis-& Trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of cis- and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene that will appear in the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  3. IRIS Toxicological Review of cis- & trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review of cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene and trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene, that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the Separate cis-trans Pathways Post-transcriptionally Regulate Murine CD154 (CD40 Ligand) Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, B. JoNell; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Collins, Jane; Bloch, Donald; Bergeron, Alan; Henry, Brian; Terry, Benjamin M.; Zan, Moe; Mouland, Andrew J.; Rigby, William F. C.

    2008-01-01

    We report a role for CA repeats in the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) in regulating CD154 expression. Human CD154 is encoded by an unstable mRNA; this instability is conferred in cis by a portion of its 3′-UTR that includes a polypyrimidine-rich region and CA dinucleotide repeat. We demonstrate similar instability activity with the murine CD154 3′-UTR. This instability element mapped solely to a conserved 100-base CU-rich region alone, which we call a CU-rich response element. Surprisingly, the CA dinucleotide-rich region also regulated reporter expression but at the level of translation. This activity was associated with poly(A) tail shortening and regulated by heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L levels. We conclude that the CD154 3′-UTR contains dual cis-acting elements, one of which defines a novel function for exonic CA dinucleotide repeats. These findings suggest a mechanism for the association of 3′-UTR CA-rich response element polymorphisms with CD154 overexpression and the subsequent risk of autoimmune disease. PMID:18640985

  4. Syntheses of 5'-Nucleoside Monophosphate Derivatives with Unique Aminal, Hemiaminal, and Hemithioaminal Functionalities: A New Class of 5'-Peptidyl Nucleotides.

    PubMed

    De, Swarup; Groaz, Elisabetta; Margamuljana, Lia; Herdewijn, Piet

    2016-06-01

    A number of synthetically useful transformations have been developed to generate novel 5'-peptidyl nucleoside monophosphate analogues that incorporate sensitive phosphoaminal, -hemiaminal or -hemithioaminal functionalities. The strategies adopted entailed the coupling between dipeptides, which enclose a reactive Cα-functionalized glycine residue and phosphate or phosphorothioate moieties. These developments led to potentially powerful and general methodologies for the preparation of α-phosphorylated pseudopeptides as well as nucleoside monophosphate mimics. The resulting conjugates are of interest for a variety of important applications, which range from drug development to synthetic biology, as pronucleotides or artificial building blocks for the enzymatic synthesis of xenobiotic information systems. The potential of all dipeptide-TMP conjugates as pyrophosphate mimics in the DNA polymerization reaction was tested, and the influence of the nature of the linker was evaluated by in vitro chain elongation assay in the presence of wild-type microbial DNA polymerases. PMID:27136602

  5. Peptidyl arginine deiminase-4-deficient mice are protected against kidney and liver injury after renal ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Rabadi, May; Kim, Mihwa; D'Agati, Vivette; Lee, H Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that renal peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PAD4) is induced after renal ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury and exacerbates acute kidney injury (AKI) by increasing the renal tubular inflammatory response. Here, we tested whether genetic ablation of PAD4 attenuates renal injury and inflammation after I/R in mice. After renal I/R, PAD4 wild-type mice develop severe AKI with large increases in plasma creatinine, neutrophil infiltration, as well as significant renal tubular necrosis, apoptosis, and proinflammatory cytokine generation. In contrast, PAD4-deficient mice are protected against ischemic AKI with reduced real tubular neutrophil infiltration, renal tubular necrosis, and apoptosis. In addition, hepatic injury and inflammation observed in PAD4 wild-type mice after renal I/R are significantly attenuated in PAD4-deficient mice. We also show that increased renal tubular PAD4 expression after renal I/R is associated with translocation of PAD4 from the nucleus to the cytosol. Consistent with PAD4 cytosolic translocation, we show increased renal tubular cytosolic peptidyl-citrullination after ischemic AKI. Mechanistically, recombinant PAD4 treatment increased nuclear translocation of NF-κB in cultured human as well as murine proximal tubule cells that is inhibited by a PAD4 inhibitor (2-chloroamidine). Taken together, our studies further support the hypothesis that renal tubular PAD4 plays a critical role in renal I/R injury by increasing the renal tubular inflammatory response and neutrophil infiltration after renal I/R perhaps by interacting with the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-κB in the cytosol and promoting its nuclear translocation. PMID:27335376

  6. Pyrithione Zn selectively inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase PHD3.

    PubMed

    Na, Yu-Ran; Woo, Dustin J; Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2016-04-01

    Increasing evidence emphasizes the role of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) isoforms in regulating non-HIF substrates, but isoform selective PHD inhibitors under physiological conditions have not yet been reported. Here we have identified pyrithione Zn (PZ) as a potent, isoform-selective PHD3 inhibitor. The IC50 value of PZ was determined as 0.98 μM for PHD3, while it did not show any inhibitory activity toward full length and truncated PHD2 up to 1 mM. The selective efficacy of PZ was further demonstrated at the cellular level by observing inhibition of the PHD3-dependent DNA damage response pathway without stabilization of HIF-1α. PMID:26940742

  7. Active-Site-Directed Inhibitors of Prolyl Oligopeptidase Abolish Its Conformational Dynamics.

    PubMed

    López, Abraham; Herranz-Trillo, Fátima; Kotev, Martin; Gairí, Margarida; Guallar, Víctor; Bernadó, Pau; Millet, Oscar; Tarragó, Teresa; Giralt, Ernest

    2016-05-17

    Deciphering conformational dynamics is crucial for understanding the biological functions of proteins and for designing compounds targeting them. In particular, providing an accurate description of microsecond-millisecond motions opens the opportunity for regulating protein-protein interactions (PPIs) by modulating the dynamics of one interacting partner. Here we analyzed the conformational dynamics of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) and the effects of active-site-directed inhibitors on the dynamics. We used an integrated structural biology approach based on NMR spectroscopy and SAXS experiments complemented by MD simulations. We found that POP is in a slow equilibrium in solution between open and closed conformations, and that inhibitors effectively abolished this equilibrium by stabilizing the enzyme in the closed conformation. PMID:26918396

  8. Loss of Prolyl Carboxypeptidase in Two-Kidney, One-Clip Goldblatt Hypertensive Mice

    PubMed Central

    Grobe, Nadja; Leiva, Orly; Morris, Mariana; Elased, Khalid M.

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented that angiotensin (Ang) II contributes to kidney disease progression. The protease prolyl carboxypeptidase (PRCP) is highly expressed in the kidney and may be renoprotective by degrading Ang II to Ang-(1-7). The aim of the study was to investigate whether renal PRCP protein expression and activity are altered in two-kidney, one-clip (2K1C) Goldblatt hypertensive mice. Left renal artery was constricted by using 0.12 mm silver clips. Blood pressure was measured using telemetry over the eleven weeks of study period and revealed an immediate increase in 2K1C animals during the first week of clip placement which was followed by a gradual decrease to baseline blood pressure. Similarly, urinary albumin excretion was significantly increased one week after 2K1C and returned to baseline levels during the following weeks. At 2 weeks and at the end of the study, renal pathologies were exacerbated in the 2K1C model as revealed by a significant increase in mesangial expansion and renal fibrosis. Renal PRCP expression and activity were significantly reduced in clipped kidneys. Immunofluorescence revealed the loss of renal tubular PRCP but not glomerular PRCP. In contrast, expression of prolyl endopeptidase, another enzyme capable of converting Ang II into Ang-(1-7), was not affected, while angiotensin converting enzyme was elevated in unclipped kidneys and renin was increased in clipped kidneys. Results suggest that PRCP is suppressed in 2K1C and that this downregulation may attenuate renoprotective effects via impaired Ang II degradation by PRCP. PMID:25706121

  9. Inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase 3 ameliorates cardiac dysfunction in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yanfei; Gong, Luwei; Liu, Hui; Luo, Beibei; Li, Bo; Li, Rui; Li, Beibei; Lv, Mei; Pan, Jinyu; An, Fengshuang

    2015-03-01

    Prolyl hydroxylase 3 (PHD3) is a member of the prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs) family and is induced by hypoxia. It plays a critical role in regulating the abundance of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). Its expression is increased in diabetic rat hearts; however, its role remains unclear. We investigated the potential role and mechanism of action of PHD3 in the setting of diabetes-induced myocardial dysfunction in rats. In vivo, type 2 diabetic rat model was induced via a high-fat diet and intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. PHD3 expression was knocked down using lentivirus-mediated short-hairpin RNA (shRNA). In vitro, primary neonatal cardiomyocytes and H9c2 cardiomyoblasts were cultured in 33.3 mM glucose (high glucose, HG) and 5.5 mM glucose (normal glucose, NG), the latter of which was used as a control. PHD3-siRNA was used to inhibit the expression of PHD3 and to investigate the role of PHD3 in HG-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts. Rats with diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) exhibited severe left ventricular dysfunction as well as myocardial apoptosis and fibrosis. PHD3 expression was increased in the myocardial tissues of diabetic rats, and inhibition of PHD3 ameliorated the disease. Additionally, the inhibition of PHD3 significantly decreased HG-induced apoptosis and MAPK activation in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts. Our results suggest that PHD3 inhibition ameliorates myocardial dysfunction in the setting of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25595486

  10. Neuronal apoptosis by prolyl hydroxylation: implication in nervous system tumours and the Warburg conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Schlisio, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen-sensing mechanisms are often dysfunctional in tumours. Oxygen sensing is mediated partly via prolyl hydroxylation. The EglN prolyl hydroxylases are well characterized in regulating the hypoxia inducible factor α (HIF-α) hypoxic response, but also are implicated in HIF-independent processes. EglN3 executes apoptosis in neural precursors during development and failure of EglN3 developmental apoptosis can lead to certain forms of sympathetic nervous system tumours. Mutations in metabolic/mitochondrial enzymes (SDH, FH, IDH) impair EglN activity and predisposes to certain cancers. This is because the EglNs not only require molecular oxygen to execute hydroxylation, but also equally require the electron donor α-ketoglutarate, a metabolite from the Krebs cycle. Therefore EglN enzymes are considered oxygen, and also, metabolic sensors. α-Ketoglutarate is crucial for EglN hydroxylation activity, whereas the metabolites succinate and fumarate are inhibitors of the EglN enzymes. Since EglN activity is dependent upon metabolites that take part in the Krebs cycle, these enzymes are directly tied into the cellular metabolic network. Cancer cells tend to convert most glucose to lactate regardless of whether oxygen is present (aerobic glycolysis), an observation that was first made by Otto Warburg in 1924. Despite the striking difference in ATP production, cancer cells might favour aerobic glycolysis to escape from EglN hydroxylation, resulting in the accumulation of oncogenic HIFα and/or resistance to EglN3-mediated apoptosis. PMID:19691672

  11. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kanayo; Sakaguchi, Minoru; Tanaka, Satoshi; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Takaoka, Masanori

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

  12. Purification and characterisation of an intracellular X-prolyl-dipeptidyl aminopeptidase from Streptococcus thermophilus ACA-DC 4.

    PubMed

    Tsakalidou, E; Anastasiou, R; Papadimitriou, K; Manolopoulou, E; Kalantzopoulos, G

    1997-01-01

    An intracellular X-prolyl-dipeptidyl aminopeptidase from Streptococcus thermophilus ACA-DC 4, isolated from traditional Greek yoghurt, was purified by anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. A single band of molecular weight of about 80,000 appeared in SDS-PAGE; by gel filtration it was shown that the native enzyme was dimeric. The peptidase showed optimum activity on glycyl-prolyl 4-nitroanilide at pH 7.0 and at 50 degrees C, with K(m) = 3.1 mM and Vmax = 3500 U mg-1; over 50 degrees C the enzyme activity declined rapidly. It was inactivated by PMSF; sulfhydryl group reagents and metal chelators had little effect on enzyme activity. PMID:9519481

  13. Crystal structure of X-prolyl aminopeptidase from Caenorhabditis elegans: A cytosolic enzyme with a di-nuclear active site.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shalini; La-Borde, Penelope J; Payne, Karl A P; Parsons, Mark R; Turner, Anthony J; Isaac, R Elwyn; Acharya, K Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic aminopeptidase P1 (APP1), also known as X-prolyl aminopeptidase (XPNPEP1) in human tissues, is a cytosolic exopeptidase that preferentially removes amino acids from the N-terminus of peptides possessing a penultimate N-terminal proline residue. The enzyme has an important role in the catabolism of proline containing peptides since peptide bonds adjacent to the imino acid proline are resistant to cleavage by most peptidases. We show that recombinant and catalytically active Caenorhabditis elegans APP-1 is a dimer that uses dinuclear zinc at the active site and, for the first time, we provide structural information for a eukaryotic APP-1 in complex with the inhibitor, apstatin. Our analysis reveals that C. elegans APP-1 shares similar mode of substrate binding and a common catalytic mechanism with other known X-prolyl aminopeptidases. PMID:25905034

  14. Crystal structure of X-prolyl aminopeptidase from Caenorhabditis elegans: A cytosolic enzyme with a di-nuclear active site

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Shalini; La-Borde, Penelope J.; Payne, Karl A.P.; Parsons, Mark R.; Turner, Anthony J.; Isaac, R. Elwyn; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic aminopeptidase P1 (APP1), also known as X-prolyl aminopeptidase (XPNPEP1) in human tissues, is a cytosolic exopeptidase that preferentially removes amino acids from the N-terminus of peptides possessing a penultimate N-terminal proline residue. The enzyme has an important role in the catabolism of proline containing peptides since peptide bonds adjacent to the imino acid proline are resistant to cleavage by most peptidases. We show that recombinant and catalytically active Caenorhabditis elegans APP-1 is a dimer that uses dinuclear zinc at the active site and, for the first time, we provide structural information for a eukaryotic APP-1 in complex with the inhibitor, apstatin. Our analysis reveals that C. elegans APP-1 shares similar mode of substrate binding and a common catalytic mechanism with other known X-prolyl aminopeptidases. PMID:25905034

  15. Pyrene Excimer-Based Peptidyl Chemosensors for the Sensitive Detection of Low Levels of Heparin in 100% Aqueous Solutions and Serum Samples.

    PubMed

    Thirupathi, Ponnaboina; Park, Joo-Young; Neupane, Lok Nath; Kishore, Mallela Y L N; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2015-07-01

    Fluorescent chemosensors (1 and 2, Py-(Arg)nGlyGlyGly(Arg)nLys(Py)-NH2, n = 2 and 3) bearing two pyrene (Py) labeled heparin-binding peptides were synthesized for the sensitive ratiometric detection of heparin. The peptidyl chemosensors (1 and 2) sensitively detected nanomolar concentrations of heparin in aqueous solutions and in serum samples via a ratiometric response. In 100% aqueous solutions at pH 7.4, both chemosensors exhibited significant excimer emission at 486 nm as well as weak monomer emission in the absence of heparin. Upon the addition of heparin into the solution, excimer emission increased with a blue shift (10 nm) and monomer emission at 376 nm decreased. The chemosensors showed a similar sensitive ratiometric response to heparin independent of the concentration of the chemosensors. The peptidyl chemosensors were applied to the ratiometric detection of heparin over a wide range of pH (1.5-11.5) using the excimer/momomer emission changes. In the presence of serum, 1 and 2 displayed significant monomer emission at 376 nm with relatively weak excimer emission and the addition of heparin induced a significant increase in excimer emission at 480 nm and a concomitant decrease in monomer emission. The enhanced ratiometric response to heparin in the serum sample was due to the interactions between the peptidyl chemosensors and serum albumin in the serum sample. The detection limits of 2 for heparin were less than 1 nM in 100% aqueous solutions and serum samples. The peptidyl chemosensors bearing two heparin-binding sites are a suitable tool for the sensitive ratiometric detection of nanomolar concentrations of heparin in 100% aqueous solutions and serum samples. PMID:26068096

  16. Post-translationally Abnormal Collagens of Prolyl 3-Hydroxylase-2 Null Mice Offer a Pathobiological Mechanism for the High Myopia Linked to Human LEPREL1 Mutations*

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, David M.; Joeng, Kyu Sang; Werther, Rachel; Rajagopal, Abbhirami; Weis, MaryAnn; Lee, Brendan H.; Eyre, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Myopia, the leading cause of visual impairment worldwide, results from an increase in the axial length of the eyeball. Mutations in LEPREL1, the gene encoding prolyl 3-hydroxylase-2 (P3H2), have recently been identified in individuals with recessively inherited nonsyndromic severe myopia. P3H2 is a member of a family of genes that includes three isoenzymes of prolyl 3-hydroxylase (P3H), P3H1, P3H2, and P3H3. Fundamentally, it is understood that P3H1 is responsible for converting proline to 3-hydroxyproline. This limited additional knowledge also suggests that each isoenzyme has evolved different collagen sequence-preferred substrate specificities. In this study, differences in prolyl 3-hydroxylation were screened in eye tissues from P3h2-null (P3h2n/n) and wild-type mice to seek tissue-specific effects due the lack of P3H2 activity on post-translational collagen chemistry that could explain myopia. The mice were viable and had no gross musculoskeletal phenotypes. Tissues from sclera and cornea (type I collagen) and lens capsule (type IV collagen) were dissected from mouse eyes, and multiple sites of prolyl 3-hydroxylation were identified by mass spectrometry. The level of prolyl 3-hydroxylation at multiple substrate sites from type I collagen chains was high in sclera, similar to tendon. Almost every known site of prolyl 3-hydroxylation in types I and IV collagen from P3h2n/n mouse eye tissues was significantly under-hydroxylated compared with their wild-type littermates. We conclude that altered collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation is caused by loss of P3H2. We hypothesize that this leads to structural abnormalities in multiple eye tissues, but particularly sclera, causing progressive myopia. PMID:25645914

  17. OXYGEN-SENSITIVE RESET OF INDUCIBLE HIF TRANSACTIVATION RESPONSE: PROLYL HYDROXYLASES TUNE THE BIOLOGICAL NORMOXIC SETPOINT

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Savita; Roy, Sashwati; Maurer, Mariah; Ratan, Rajiv R; Sen, Chandan K

    2006-01-01

    Cellular O2 sensing enables physiological adjustments to variations in tissue pO2. Under basal conditions, cells are adjusted to an O2 environment biologically read as normoxia. Any sharp departure from that state of normoxia triggers O2-sensitive biological responses. The stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) signifies a robust biological read-out of hypoxia. In the presence of sufficient O2, HIF is hydroxylated and degraded. HIF prolyl hydroxylation is catalyzed by prolyl hydroxylase isoenzymes PHD1, 2 and 3. Using HT22 neurons stably transfected with a HIF reporter construct, we tested a novel hypothesis postulating that biological cells are capable of resetting their normoxic set-point by O2-sensitive changes in PHD expression. Results of this study show that the pO2 of the mouse brain cortex was 35 mm Hg or 5% O2. Exposure of HT22, adjusted to growing in 20% O2, to 5% O2 resulted in HIF-driven transcription. However, cells adjusted to growing in 5% O2 did not report hypoxia. Cells adjusted to growing in 30% O2 reported hypoxia when acutely exposed to room air culture conditions. When grown under high O2 conditions, cells reset their normoxic set-point upwards by down-regulating the expression of PHD1–3. When grown under low O2 conditions, cells reset their normoxic set-point downwards by inducing the expression of PHD1–3. Exposure of mice in vivo to a hypoxic 10% O2 environment lowered blood as well as brain pO2. Such hypoxic exposure induced PHD1–3. Exposure of mice to a hyperoxic 50% O2 ambience repressed the expression of PHD1–3 indicating that O2-sensitive regulation of PHD expression is effective in the brain in vivo. siRNA dependent knock-down of PHD expression revealed that O2-sensitive regulation of PHD may contribute to tuning the normoxic set-point in biological cells. PMID:16785028

  18. Recombinant production, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic structure determination of peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase from Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Vandavasi, Venugopal; Taylor-Creel, Kasey; McFeeters, Robert L.; Coates, Leighton; McFeeters, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase (Pth; EC 3.1.1.29) from the pathogenic bacterium Salmonella typhimurium has been cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized for X-ray analysis. Crystals were grown using hanging-drop vapor diffusion against a reservoir solution consisting of 0.03 M citric acid, 0.05 M bis-tris propane, 1% glycerol, 3% sucrose, 25% PEG 6000 pH 7.6. Crystals were used to obtain the three-dimensional structure of the native protein at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement of the crystallographic data processed in space group P212121 with unit-cell parameters a = 62.1, b = 64.9, c = 110.5 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The asymmetric unit of the crystallographic lattice was composed of two copies of the enzyme molecule with a 51% solvent fraction, corresponding to a Matthews coefficient of 2.02 Å3 Da−1. The structural coordinates reported serve as a foundation for computational and structure-guided efforts towards novel small-molecule Pth1 inhibitors and potential antibacterial development. PMID:25005080

  19. Recombinant production, crystallization and X-ray crystallographic structure determination of the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Ronny C.; McFeeters, Hana; Coates, Leighton; McFeeters, Robert L.

    2014-10-15

    The peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase enzyme from the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pth; EC 3.1.1.29) has been cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized for X-ray structural analysis. Suitable crystals were grown using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method after one week of incubation against a reservoir solution consisting of 20% polyethylene glycol 4000, 100 mM Tris pH 7.5, 10%(v/v) isopropyl alcohol. The crystals were used to obtain the three-dimensional structure of the native protein at 1.77 Å resolution. The structure was determined by molecular replacement of the crystallographic data processed in space group P6122 with unit-cell parameters a = b = 63.62,c = 155.20 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. The asymmetric unit of the crystallographic lattice was composed of a single copy of the enzyme molecule with a 43% solvent fraction, corresponding to a Matthews coefficient of 2.43 Å3 Da-1. The crystallographic structure reported here will serve as the foundation for future structure-guided efforts towards the development of novel small-molecule inhibitors specific to bacterial Pths.

  1. Heterologous expression of peptidyl-Lys metallopeptidase of Armillaria mellea and mutagenic analysis of the recombinant peptidase.

    PubMed

    Ødum, Anders S R; Østergaard, Søren; Nørby, Inga; Meldal, Morten; Olesen, Kjeld

    2016-04-01

    A method to express, purify and modify the Peptidyl-Lys metallopeptidase (LysN) ofArmillaria melleainPichia pastoriswas developed to enable functional studies of the protease. Based on prior work, we propose a mechanism of action of LysN. Catalytic residues were investigated by site-directed mutagenesis. As anticipated, these mutations resulted in significantly reduced catalytic rates. Additionally, based on molecular modelling eleven mutants were designed to have altered substrate specificity. The S1' binding pocket of LysN is quite narrow and lined with negative charge to specifically accommodate lysine. To allow for arginine specificity in S1', it was proposed to extend the S1' binding pocket by mutagenesis, however the resulting mutant did not show any activity with arginine in P1'. Two mutants, A101D and T105D, showed increased specificity towards arginine in subsites S2'-S4' compared to the wild type protease. We speculate that the increased specificity to result from the additional negative charge which attract and interact with positively charged residues better than the wild type. PMID:26572161

  2. Tuning G-quadruplex vs double-stranded DNA recognition in regioisomeric lysyl-peptidyl-anthraquinone conjugates.

    PubMed

    Zagotto, Giuseppe; Ricci, Antonio; Vasquez, Elena; Sandoli, Andrea; Benedetti, Silvia; Palumbo, Manlio; Sissi, Claudia

    2011-10-19

    Anthraquinone is a versatile scaffold to provide effective DNA binders. This planar system can be easily conjugated to protonable side chains: the nature of the lateral groups and their positions around the tricyclic moiety largely affect the DNA recognition process in terms of binding affinity and mode, as well as sequence and structure of the target nucleic acid. Starting from an anthracenedione system symmetrically functionalized with N-terminal lysyl residues, we incremented the length of side chains by introducing a Gly, Ala, or Phe spacer, characterized by different flexibility, lipophilicity, and bulkiness. Moreover, 2,6, 2,7, 1,8, and 1,5 regioisomers were examined to yield a small bis(lysyl-peptidyl) anthracenedione library. By merging spectroscopic, enzymatic, and cellular results, we showed that the proper combination of a basic aminoacid (Lys) with a more hydrophobic residue (Phe) can provide selective G-quadruplex recognition, in particular when side chains are located at positions 2,6 or 2,7. In fact, while these derivatives effectively bind G-quadruplex structures, they behave at the same time as rather poor double-stranded DNA intercalators. As a result, the Lys-Phe substituted anthraquinones are poorly cytotoxic but still able to promote a senescence mechanism in cancer cells. This combination of chemical and biological properties foresees potentially valuable applications in anticancer medicinal chemistry. PMID:21905741

  3. S-peptide as a potent peptidyl linker for protein cross-linking by microbial transglutaminase from Streptomyces mobaraensis.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Noriho; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Takazawa, Takeshi; Takeda, Shuji; Watanabe, Kimitsuna; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2003-01-01

    We have found that ribonuclease S-peptide can work as a novel peptidyl substrate in protein cross-linking reactions catalyzed by microbial transglutaminase (MTG) from Streptomyces mobaraensis. Enhanced green fluorescent protein tethered to S-peptide at its N-terminus (S-tag-EGFP) appeared to be efficiently cross-linked by MTG. As wild-type EGFP was not susceptible to cross-linking, the S-peptide moiety is likely to be responsible for the cross-linking. A site-directed mutation study assigned Gln15 in the S-peptide sequence as the sole acyl donor. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that two Lys residues (Lys5 and Lys11) in the S-peptide sequence functioned as acyl acceptors. We also succeeded in direct monitoring of the cross-linking process by virtue of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between S-tag-EGFP and its blue fluorescent color variant (S-tag-EBFP). The protein cross-linking was tunable by either engineering S-peptide sequence or capping the S-peptide moiety with S-protein, the partner protein of S-peptide for the formation of ribonuclease A. The latter indicates that S-protein can be used as a specific inhibitor of S-peptide-directed protein cross-linking by MTG. The controllable protein cross-linking of S-peptide as a potent substrate of MTG will shed new light on biomolecule conjugation. PMID:12643745

  4. Downregulation of Peptidylprolyl isomerase A promotes cell death and enhances doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaobing; Luo, Mengchao; Ding, Chaofeng; Peng, Chuanhui; Lv, Zhen; Tong, Rongliang; Xiao, Heng; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Wu, Jian; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-10-10

    Peptidylprolyl isomerase A (PPIA) is a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase that is known to play a critical role in the development of many human cancers. However, the precise biological function of PPIA in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains largely unclear. In this study, lentiviral overexpression vectors and small interfering RNA knockdown methods were employed to investigate the biological effects of PPIA in HCC. PPIA levels in HCC tissues and peritumoral tissues were detected by real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR), Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. Our results indicate that PPIA levels were significantly higher in the HCC tissues compared to the matched peritumoral tissues. Moreover, PPIA expression was significantly associated with tumor size in these tissues. Interestingly, serum PPIA (sPPIA) levels were significantly higher in healthy controls compared to the HCC patients. Knockdown or overexpression of PPIA was shown to downregulate and upregulate cell growth, respectively. Moreover, PPIA siRNA knockdown appears to promote doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in HCC cells, altering the expression of downstream apoptotic factors. In summary, our results indicate that PPIA may play a pivotal role in HCC by regulating cell growth and could serve as a novel marker and therapeutic molecular target for HCC patients. PMID:27397650

  5. C-terminal 13-residue truncation induces compact trigger factor conformation and severely impairs its dimerization ability.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yi; Yu, Ling; Kihara, Hiroshi; Zhou, Jun-Mei

    2014-05-01

    Trigger factor (TF) is the first chaperone to interact with nascent chains and facilitate their folding within bacteria. TF possesses a three-state equilibrium in vivo: monomeric TF bound to ribosome, free monomeric, and dimeric TF in cytoplasm. TF consists of an N-terminal ribosome binding domain, a middle peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) domain and a C-terminal domain involved in substrate binding and dimerization. Investigation of the effect of C-terminal 13 region on TF structure and function will help to further the understanding of its mechanism as a chaperone in vitro and in vivo. Here we present TF419, a TF mutant from which the C-terminal 13 residues were deleted to investigate the role of these residues in the structure stability and function of intact molecules. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), fluorescence measurements and limited proteolysis results suggested that TF transitioned to a compact conformation when the Cterminal 13 residues were truncated. Further biochemical results reveal that TF dimerization was decreased as a result of the truncation. These results suggested that the C-terminal 13 residues play an important role in structural stability and chaperone function of TF. PMID:24555433

  6. Target Cell Cyclophilins Facilitate Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sapp, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Following attachment to primary receptor heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) particles undergo conformational changes affecting the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, respectively. This results in exposure of the L2 N-terminus, transfer to uptake receptors, and infectious internalization. Here, we report that target cell cyclophilins, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases, are required for efficient HPV16 infection. Cell surface cyclophilin B (CyPB) facilitates conformational changes in capsid proteins, resulting in exposure of the L2 N-terminus. Inhibition of CyPB blocked HPV16 infection by inducing noninfectious internalization. Mutation of a putative CyP binding site present in HPV16 L2 yielded exposed L2 N-terminus in the absence of active CyP and bypassed the need for cell surface CyPB. However, this mutant was still sensitive to CyP inhibition and required CyP for completion of infection, probably after internalization. Taken together, these data suggest that CyP is required during two distinct steps of HPV16 infection. Identification of cell surface CyPB will facilitate the study of the complex events preceding internalization and adds a putative drug target for prevention of HPV–induced diseases. PMID:19629175

  7. Proline Isomerization of the Immune Receptor-Interacting Protein RIN4 by a Cyclophilin Inhibits Effector-Triggered Immunity in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Ma, Xiqing; Chiang, Yi-Hsuan; Yadeta, Koste A.; Ding, Pengfei; Dong, Liansai; Zhao, Yan; Li, Xiuming; Yu, Yufei; Zhang, Ling; Shen, Qian-Hua; Xia, Bin; Coaker, Gitta; Liu, Dong; Zhou, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY In the absence of pathogen infection, plant effector-triggered immune (ETI) receptors are maintained in a preactivation state by intermolecular interactions with other host proteins. Pathogen effector-induced alterations activate the receptor. In Arabidopsis, the ETI receptor RPM1 is activated via bacterial effector AvrB-induced phosphorylation of the RPM1-interacting protein RIN4 at Threonine 166. We find that RIN4 also interacts with the prolyl-peptidyl isomerase (PPIase) ROC1, which is reduced upon RIN4 Thr166 phosphorylation. ROC1 suppresses RPM1 immunity in a PPIase-dependent manner. Consistent with this, RIN4 Pro149 undergoes cis/trans isomerization in the presence of ROC1. While the RIN4P149V mutation abolishes RPM1 resistance, the deletion of Pro149 leads to RPM1 activation in the absence of RIN4 phosphorylation. These results support a model in which RPM1 directly senses conformational changes in RIN4 surrounding Pro149 that is controlled by ROC1. RIN4 Thr166 phosphorylation indirectly regulates RPM1 resistance by modulating the ROC1-mediated RIN4 isomerization. PMID:25299333

  8. A proteomic approach towards understanding the cross talk between Bacteroides fragilis and Bifidobacterium longum in coculture.

    PubMed

    Rios-Covián, David; Sánchez, Borja; Martínez, Noelia; Cuesta, Isabel; Hernández-Barranco, Ana M; de Los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2016-07-01

    A better understanding of the interactions among intestinal microbes is needed to decipher the complex cross talk that takes place within the human gut. Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium genera are among the most relevant intestinal bacteria, and it has been previously reported that coculturing of these 2 microorganisms affects their survival. Therefore, coculturing of Bifidobacterium longum NB667 and Bacteroides fragilis DSMZ2151 was performed with the aim of unravelling the mechanisms involved in their interaction. To this end, we applied proteomic (2D-DIGE) analyses, and by chromatographic techniques we quantified the bacterial metabolites produced during coincubation. Coculture stimulated the growth of B. longum, retarding that of B. fragilis, with concomitant changes in the production of some proteins and metabolites of both bacteria. The combined culture promoted upregulation of the bifidobacterial pyruvate kinase and downregulation of the Bacteroides phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase - 2 enzymes involved in the catabolism of carbohydrates. Moreover, B. fragilis FKBP-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase, a protein with chaperone-like activity, was found to be overproduced in coculture, suggesting the induction of a stress response in this microorganism. This study provides mechanistic data to deepen our understanding of the interaction between Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium intestinal populations. PMID:27156738

  9. Mitochondrial Thioredoxin System as a Modulator of Cyclophilin D Redox State.

    PubMed

    Folda, Alessandra; Citta, Anna; Scalcon, Valeria; Calì, Tito; Zonta, Francesco; Scutari, Guido; Bindoli, Alberto; Rigobello, Maria Pia

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial thioredoxin system (NADPH, thioredoxin reductase, thioredoxin) is a major redox regulator. Here we have investigated the redox correlation between this system and the mitochondrial enzyme cyclophilin D. The peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of cyclophilin D was stimulated by the thioredoxin system, while it was decreased by cyclosporin A and the thioredoxin reductase inhibitor auranofin. The redox state of cyclophilin D, thioredoxin 1 and 2 and peroxiredoxin 3 was measured in isolated rat heart mitochondria and in tumor cell lines (CEM-R and HeLa) by redox Western blot analysis upon inhibition of thioredoxin reductase with auranofin, arsenic trioxide, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene or after treatment with hydrogen peroxide. A concomitant oxidation of thioredoxin, peroxiredoxin and cyclophilin D was observed, suggesting a redox communication between the thioredoxin system and cyclophilin. This correlation was further confirmed by i) co-immunoprecipitation assay of cyclophilin D with thioredoxin 2 and peroxiredoxin 3, ii) molecular modeling and iii) depleting thioredoxin reductase by siRNA. We conclude that the mitochondrial thioredoxin system controls the redox state of cyclophilin D which, in turn, may act as a regulator of several processes including ROS production and pro-apoptotic factors release. PMID:26975474

  10. Mitochondrial Thioredoxin System as a Modulator of Cyclophilin D Redox State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folda, Alessandra; Citta, Anna; Scalcon, Valeria; Calì, Tito; Zonta, Francesco; Scutari, Guido; Bindoli, Alberto; Rigobello, Maria Pia

    2016-03-01

    The mitochondrial thioredoxin system (NADPH, thioredoxin reductase, thioredoxin) is a major redox regulator. Here we have investigated the redox correlation between this system and the mitochondrial enzyme cyclophilin D. The peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of cyclophilin D was stimulated by the thioredoxin system, while it was decreased by cyclosporin A and the thioredoxin reductase inhibitor auranofin. The redox state of cyclophilin D, thioredoxin 1 and 2 and peroxiredoxin 3 was measured in isolated rat heart mitochondria and in tumor cell lines (CEM-R and HeLa) by redox Western blot analysis upon inhibition of thioredoxin reductase with auranofin, arsenic trioxide, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene or after treatment with hydrogen peroxide. A concomitant oxidation of thioredoxin, peroxiredoxin and cyclophilin D was observed, suggesting a redox communication between the thioredoxin system and cyclophilin. This correlation was further confirmed by i) co-immunoprecipitation assay of cyclophilin D with thioredoxin 2 and peroxiredoxin 3, ii) molecular modeling and iii) depleting thioredoxin reductase by siRNA. We conclude that the mitochondrial thioredoxin system controls the redox state of cyclophilin D which, in turn, may act as a regulator of several processes including ROS production and pro-apoptotic factors release.

  11. Discovering conformational sub-states relevant to protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Pratul K; Ramanathan, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    Internal motions enable proteins to explore a range of conformations, even in the vicinity of native state. The role of conformational fluctuations in the designated function of a protein is widely debated. Emerging evidence suggests that sub-groups within the range of conformations (or sub-states) contain properties that may be functionally relevant. However, low populations in these sub-states and the transient nature of conformational transitions between these sub-states present significant challenges for their identification and characterization. To overcome these challenges we have developed a new computational technique, quasi-anharmonic analysis (QAA). QAA utilizes higher-order statistics of protein motions to identify sub-states in the conformational landscape. Further, the focus on anharmonicity allows identification of conformational fluctuations that enable transitions between sub-states. QAA applied to equilibrium simulations of human ubiquitin and T4 lysozyme reveals functionally relevant sub-states and protein motions involved in molecular recognition. In combination with a reaction pathway sampling method, QAA characterizes conformational sub-states associated with cis/trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerization catalyzed by the enzyme cyclophilin A. In these three proteins, QAA allows identification of conformational sub-states, with critical structural and dynamical features relevant to protein function. Overall, QAA provides a novel framework to intuitively understand the biophysical basis of conformational diversity and its relevance to protein function.

  12. Involvement of FKBP6 in hepatitis C virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Hirotake; Kawakami, Kunihiro; Yokoe, Hiromasa; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Matsuda, Masanori; Yasumoto, Jun; Maekawa, Shinya; Yamashita, Atsuya; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Ikeda, Masanori; Kato, Nobuyuki; Okamoto, Toru; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Sakamoto, Naoya; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Takeda, Sen; Fujii, Hideki; Tsubuki, Masayoshi; Kusunoki, Masami; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    The chaperone system is known to be exploited by viruses for their replication. In the present study, we identified the cochaperone FKBP6 as a host factor required for hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. FKBP6 is a peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase with three domains of the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR), but lacks FK-506 binding ability. FKBP6 interacted with HCV nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) and also formed a complex with FKBP6 itself or FKBP8, which is known to be critical for HCV replication. The Val121 of NS5A and TPR domains of FKBP6 were responsible for the interaction between NS5A and FKBP6. FKBP6 was colocalized with NS5A, FKBP8, and double-stranded RNA in HCV-infected cells. HCV replication was completely suppressed in FKBP6-knockout hepatoma cell lines, while the expression of FKBP6 restored HCV replication in FKBP6-knockout cells. A treatment with the FKBP8 inhibitor N-(N′, N′-dimethylcarboxamidomethyl)cycloheximide impaired the formation of a homo- or hetero-complex consisting of FKBP6 and/or FKBP8, and suppressed HCV replication. HCV infection promoted the expression of FKBP6, but not that of FKBP8, in cultured cells and human liver tissue. These results indicate that FKBP6 is an HCV-induced host factor that supports viral replication in cooperation with NS5A. PMID:26567527

  13. γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type A (GABAA) Receptor Activation Modulates Tau Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Nykänen, Niko-Petteri; Kysenius, Kai; Sakha, Prasanna; Tammela, Päivi; Huttunen, Henri J.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorylation and aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau are hallmarks of various neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease. Molecular mechanisms that regulate Tau phosphorylation are complex and currently incompletely understood. We have developed a novel live cell reporter system based on protein-fragment complementation assay to study dynamic changes in Tau phosphorylation status. In this assay, fusion proteins of Tau and Pin1 (peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans-isomerase 1) carrying complementary fragments of a luciferase protein serve as a sensor of altered protein-protein interaction between Tau and Pin1, a critical regulator of Tau dephosphorylation at several disease-associated proline-directed phosphorylation sites. Using this system, we identified several structurally distinct GABAA receptor modulators as novel regulators of Tau phosphorylation in a chemical library screen. GABAA receptor activation promoted specific phosphorylation of Tau at the AT8 epitope (Ser-199/Ser-202/Thr-205) in cultures of mature cortical neurons. Increased Tau phosphorylation by GABAA receptor activity was associated with reduced Tau binding to protein phosphatase 2A and was dependent on Cdk5 but not GSK3β kinase activity. PMID:22235112

  14. Overexpression of Fkbp11, a feature of lupus B cells, leads to B cell tolerance breakdown and initiates plasma cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ruer-Laventie, Julie; Simoni, Léa; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Soley, Anne; Duval, Monique; Knapp, Anne-Marie; Marcellin, Luc; Lamon, Delphine; Korganow, Anne-Sophie; Martin, Thierry; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Soulas-Sprauel, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a severe systemic autoimmune disease, characterized by multi-organ damages, triggered by an autoantibody-mediated inflammation, and with a complex genetic influence. It is today accepted that adult SLE arises from the building up of many subtle gene variations, each one adding a new brick on the SLE susceptibility and contributing to a phenotypic trait to the disease. One of the ways to find these gene variations consists in comprehensive analysis of gene expression variation in a precise cell type, which can constitute a good complementary strategy to genome wide association studies. Using this strategy, and considering the central role of B cells in SLE, we analyzed the B cell transcriptome of quiescent SLE patients, and identified an overexpression of FKBP11, coding for a cytoplasmic putative peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase and chaperone enzyme. To understand the consequences of FKBP11 overexpression on B cell function and on autoimmunity's development, we created lentiviral transgenic mice reproducing this gene expression variation. We showed that high expression of Fkbp11 reproduces by itself two phenotypic traits of SLE in mice: breakdown of B cell tolerance against DNA and initiation of plasma cell differentiation by acting upstream of Pax5 master regulator gene. PMID:26417441

  15. Overexpression of Fkbp11, a feature of lupus B cells, leads to B cell tolerance breakdown and initiates plasma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ruer-Laventie, Julie; Simoni, Léa; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Soley, Anne; Duval, Monique; Knapp, Anne-Marie; Marcellin, Luc; Lamon, Delphine; Korganow, Anne-Sophie; Martin, Thierry; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Soulas-Sprauel, Pauline

    2015-09-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a severe systemic autoimmune disease, characterized by multi-organ damages, triggered by an autoantibody-mediated inflammation, and with a complex genetic influence. It is today accepted that adult SLE arises from the building up of many subtle gene variations, each one adding a new brick on the SLE susceptibility and contributing to a phenotypic trait to the disease. One of the ways to find these gene variations consists in comprehensive analysis of gene expression variation in a precise cell type, which can constitute a good complementary strategy to genome wide association studies. Using this strategy, and considering the central role of B cells in SLE, we analyzed the B cell transcriptome of quiescent SLE patients, and identified an overexpression of FKBP11, coding for a cytoplasmic putative peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase and chaperone enzyme. To understand the consequences of FKBP11 overexpression on B cell function and on autoimmunity's development, we created lentiviral transgenic mice reproducing this gene expression variation. We showed that high expression of Fkbp11 reproduces by itself two phenotypic traits of SLE in mice: breakdown of B cell tolerance against DNA and initiation of plasma cell differentiation by acting upstream of Pax5 master regulator gene. PMID:26417441

  16. Low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase: Multifaceted functions of an evolutionarily conserved enzyme.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Anna; Paoli, Paolo; Santi, Alice; Mugnaioni, Camilla; Toti, Alessandra; Camici, Guido; Cirri, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Originally identified as a low molecular weight acid phosphatase, LMW-PTP is actually a protein tyrosine phosphatase that acts on many phosphotyrosine-containing cellular proteins that are primarily involved in signal transduction. Differences in sequence, structure, and substrate recognition as well as in subcellular localization in different organisms enable LMW-PTP to exert many different functions. In fact, during evolution, the LMW-PTP structure adapted to perform different catalytic actions depending on the organism type. In bacteria, this enzyme is involved in the biosynthesis of group 1 and 4 capsules, but it is also a virulence factor in pathogenic strains. In yeast, LMW-PTPs dephosphorylate immunophilin Fpr3, a peptidyl-prolyl-cis-trans isomerase member of the protein chaperone family. In humans, LMW-PTP is encoded by the ACP1 gene, which is composed of three different alleles, each encoding two active enzymes produced by alternative RNA splicing. In animals, LMW-PTP dephosphorylates a number of growth factor receptors and modulates their signalling processes. The involvement of LMW-PTP in cancer progression and in insulin receptor regulation as well as its actions as a virulence factor in a number of pathogenic bacterial strains may promote the search for potent, selective and bioavailable LMW-PTP inhibitors. PMID:27421795

  17. Stability of Pin1 as revealed by thermal and spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing-Zhang; Lin, Tao; Zhu, Guo-Fei; Du, Lin-Fang

    2010-06-01

    Pin1 is a two-domain enzyme which has peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase activity. Pin1 recognizes phospho-Ser/Thr-Pro motifs in cell-signaling proteins, and is both a cancer and an Alzheimer's disease target. The thermal stability of Pin1 was studied intensively by SDS-PAGE, enzymatic activity assay, intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The activity of Pin1 gradually decreased above 40 °C, and the Tm was 57.6 ± 1.0 °C. Fluorescence experiments indicated that heat treatment induced changes in the substructures in Pin1, resulting in that the polarity in the microenvironments of the tryptophan residues increased. It is assumed that the thermal denaturation of Pin1 involved a three-state transition. The intermediate state of Pin1 at about 60 °C was confirmed by fluorescence emission spectra, the synchronous fluorescence spectra and CD measurements. Decreases in α-helix and β-sheet appeared above 40 °C, which was balanced by an enhancement in unordered coil. The Tm values calculated from α-helix transition and β-sheet transition were 54.6 ± 0.6 °C and 70.7 ± 3.3 °C, respectively. Our results illustrated that Pin1 had a relatively high thermal stability and the WW domain had a higher stability than the PPIase domain.

  18. High-resolution insights into binding of unfolded polypeptides by the PPIase chaperone SlpA.

    PubMed

    Quistgaard, Esben M; Nordlund, Pär; Löw, Christian

    2012-10-01

    SlpA is a 2-domain protein consisting of an FK506-binding protein (FKBP) domain that harbors the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans-isomerase (PPIase) active site and a small insert-in-flap (IF) domain that endows the protein with chaperone activity. We have determined the structure of SlpA from Escherichia coli at 1.35-Å resolution. The overall structure is similar to other known structures of the FKBP-IF subfamily. However, by serendipity, the linker region of the purification tag binds in the chaperone binding groove of the IF domain, making this the first structure of an FKBP-IF protein in complex with a mimic of an unfolded chaperone substrate. The linker binds by β-sheet augmentation, thus completing the incomplete β barrel of the IF domain and shielding a considerable hydrophobic surface area from the solvent. Interestingly, a proline residue in trans configuration appears to be specifically recognized in a small pocket within the binding groove. Hence, the IF domain can preselect and prealign substrates with proline residues, which may explain how it enhances the catalytic efficiency and modulates the specificity of the FKBP domain in addition to its chaperone function. Based on pulldown results, we suggest that SlpA is likely to be involved in ribosome assembly. PMID:22735173

  19. Investigating Dynamic Interdomain Allostery in Pin1

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling proteins often sequester complementary functional sites in separate domains. How do the different domains communicate with one another? An attractive system to address this question is the mitotic regulator, human Pin1 (Lu et al. 1996). Pin-1 consists of two tethered domains: a WW domain for substrate binding, and a catalytic domain for peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) activity. Pin1 accelerates the cis-trans isomerization of phospho-Ser/Thr-Pro (pS/T-P) motifs within proteins regulating the cell cycle and neuronal development. The early x-ray (Ranganathan et al. 1997; Verdecia et al. 2000) and solution NMR studies (Bayer et al. 2003; Jacobs et al. 2003) of Pin1 indicated inter- and intradomain motion. We became interested in exploring how such motions might affect interdomain communication, using NMR. Our accumulated results indicate substrate binding to Pin1 WW domain changes the intra/inter domain mobility, thereby altering substrate activity in the distal PPIase domain catalytic site. Thus, Pin1 shows evidence of dynamic allostery, in the sense of Cooper and Dryden (Cooper and Dryden 1984). We highlight our results supporting this conclusion, and summarize them via a simple speculative model of conformational selection. PMID:26495045

  20. Dipentamethylene thiuram monosulfide is a novel inhibitor of Pin1

    SciTech Connect

    Tatara, Yota; Lin, Yi-Chin; Bamba, Yoshimasa; Mori, Tadashi; Uchida, Takafumi

    2009-07-03

    Pin1 is involved in eukaryotic cell proliferation by changing the structure and function of phosphorylated proteins. PiB, the Pin1 specific inhibitor, blocks cancer cell proliferation. However, low solubility of PiB in DMSO has limited studies of its effectiveness. We screened for additional Pin1 inhibitors and identified the DMSO-soluble compound dipentamethylene thiuram monosulfide (DTM) that inhibits Pin1 activity with an EC50 value of 4.1 {mu}M. Molecular modeling and enzyme kinetic analysis indicated that DTM competitively inhibits Pin1 activity, with a K{sub i} value of 0.05 {mu}M. The K{sub D} value of DTM with Pin1 was determined to be 0.06 {mu}M by SPR technology. Moreover, DTM specifically inhibited peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase activity in HeLa cells. FACS analysis showed that DTM induced G0 arrest of the HCT116 cells. Our results suggest that DTM has the potential to guide the development of novel antifungal and/or anticancer drugs.

  1. shutdown is a component of the Drosophila piRNA biogenesis machinery

    PubMed Central

    Preall, Jonathan B.; Czech, Benjamin; Guzzardo, Paloma M.; Muerdter, Felix; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2012-01-01

    In animals, the piRNA pathway preserves the integrity of gametic genomes, guarding them against the activity of mobile genetic elements. This innate immune mechanism relies on distinct genomic loci, termed piRNA clusters, to provide a molecular definition of transposons, enabling their discrimination from genes. piRNA clusters give rise to long, single-stranded precursors, which are processed into primary piRNAs through an unknown mechanism. These can engage in an adaptive amplification loop, the ping-pong cycle, to optimize the content of small RNA populations via the generation of secondary piRNAs. Many proteins have been ascribed functions in either primary biogenesis or the ping-pong cycle, though for the most part the molecular functions of proteins implicated in these pathways remain obscure. Here, we link shutdown (shu), a gene previously shown to be required for fertility in Drosophila, to the piRNA pathway. Analysis of knockdown phenotypes in both the germline and somatic compartments of the ovary demonstrate important roles for shutdown in both primary biogenesis and the ping-pong cycle. shutdown is a member of the FKBP family of immunophilins. Shu contains domains implicated in peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity and in the binding of HSP90-family chaperones, though the relevance of these domains to piRNA biogenesis is unknown. PMID:22753781

  2. Inhibition of Aβ(1-40) fibril formation by cyclophilins.

    PubMed

    Villmow, Marten; Baumann, Monika; Malesevic, Miroslav; Sachs, Rolf; Hause, Gerd; Fändrich, Marcus; Balbach, Jochen; Schiene-Fischer, Cordelia

    2016-05-15

    Cyclophilins interact directly with the Alzheimer's disease peptide Aβ (amyloid β-peptide) and are therefore involved in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ binding to CypD (cyclophilin D) induces dysfunction of human mitochondria. We found that both CypD and CypA suppress in vitro fibril formation of Aβ(1-40) at substoichiometric concentrations when present early in the aggregation process. The prototypic inhibitor CsA (cyclosporin A) of both cyclophilins as well as the new water-soluble MM258 derivative prevented this suppression. A SPOT peptide array approach and NMR titration experiments confirmed binding of Aβ(1-40) to the catalytic site of CypD mainly via residues Lys(16)-Glu(22) The peptide Aβ(16-20) representing this section showed submicromolar IC50 values for the peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of CypD and CypA and low-micromolar KD values in ITC experiments. Chemical cross-linking and NMR-detected hydrogen-deuterium exchange experiments revealed a shift in the populations of small Aβ(1-40) oligomers towards the monomeric species, which we investigated in the present study as being the main process of prevention of Aβ fibril formation by cyclophilins. PMID:26994210

  3. Assisted folding of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by trigger factor.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, G. C.; Li, Z. Y.; Zhou, J. M.; Fischer, G.

    2000-01-01

    The Escherichia coli trigger factor is a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase that catalyzes proline-limited protein folding extremely well. Here, refolding of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in the presence of trigger factor was investigated. The regain of activity of GAPDH was markedly increased by trigger factor after either long- or short-term denaturation, and detectable aggregation of GAPDH intermediates was prevented. In both cases, time courses of refolding of GAPDH were decelerated by trigger factor. The reactivation yield of GAPDH showed a slow down-turn when molar ratios of trigger factor to GAPDH were above 5, due to tight binding between trigger factor and GAPDH intermediates. Such inactive bound GAPDH could be partially rescued from trigger factor by addition of reduced alphaLA as competitor, by further diluting the refolding mixture, or by disrupting hydrophobic interactions in the complexes. A model for trigger factor assisted refolding of GAPDH is proposed. We also suggest that assisted refolding of GAPDH is due mainly to the chaperone function of trigger factor. PMID:10892818

  4. Discovering Conformational Sub-States Relevant to Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Savol, Andrej J.; Langmead, Christopher J.; Agarwal, Pratul K.; Chennubhotla, Chakra S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Internal motions enable proteins to explore a range of conformations, even in the vicinity of native state. The role of conformational fluctuations in the designated function of a protein is widely debated. Emerging evidence suggests that sub-groups within the range of conformations (or sub-states) contain properties that may be functionally relevant. However, low populations in these sub-states and the transient nature of conformational transitions between these sub-states present significant challenges for their identification and characterization. Methods and Findings To overcome these challenges we have developed a new computational technique, quasi-anharmonic analysis (QAA). QAA utilizes higher-order statistics of protein motions to identify sub-states in the conformational landscape. Further, the focus on anharmonicity allows identification of conformational fluctuations that enable transitions between sub-states. QAA applied to equilibrium simulations of human ubiquitin and T4 lysozyme reveals functionally relevant sub-states and protein motions involved in molecular recognition. In combination with a reaction pathway sampling method, QAA characterizes conformational sub-states associated with cis/trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerization catalyzed by the enzyme cyclophilin A. In these three proteins, QAA allows identification of conformational sub-states, with critical structural and dynamical features relevant to protein function. Conclusions Overall, QAA provides a novel framework to intuitively understand the biophysical basis of conformational diversity and its relevance to protein function. PMID:21297978

  5. Acute Heat Stress and Reduced Nutrient Intake Alter Intestinal Proteomic Profile and Gene Expression in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Sarah C.; Lonergan, Steven M.; Huff-Lonergan, Elisabeth; Baumgard, Lance H.; Gabler, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress and reduced feed intake negatively affect intestinal integrity and barrier function. Our objective was to compare ileum protein profiles of pigs subjected to 12 hours of HS, thermal neutral ad libitum feed intake, or pair-fed to heat stress feed intake under thermal neutral conditions (pair-fed thermal neutral). 2D-Differential In Gel Electrophoresis and gene expression were performed. Relative abundance of 281 and 138 spots differed due to heat stress, compared to thermal neutral and pair-fed thermal neutral pigs, respectively. However, only 20 proteins were different due to feed intake (thermal neutral versus pair-fed thermal neutral). Heat stress increased mRNA expression of heat shock proteins and protein abundance of heat shock proteins 27, 70, 90-α and β were also increased. Heat stress reduced ileum abundance of several metabolic enzymes, many of which are involved in the glycolytic or TCA pathways, indicating a change in metabolic priorities. Stress response enzymes peroxiredoxin-1 and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A were decreased in pair-fed thermal neutral and thermal neutral pigs compared to heat stress. Heat stress increased mRNA abundance markers of ileum hypoxia. Altogether, these data show that heat stress directly alters intestinal protein and mRNA profiles largely independent of reduced feed intake. These changes may be related to the reduced intestinal integrity associated with heat stress. PMID:26575181

  6. A novel cyclophilin from parasitic and free-living nematodes with a unique substrate- and drug-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dong; Nelson, Laura S; LeCoz, Krystel; Poole, Catherine; Carlow, Clotilde K S

    2002-04-26

    A highly diversified member of the cyclophilin family of peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases has been isolated from the human parasite Onchocerca volvulus (OvCYP-16). This 25-kDa cyclophilin shares 43-46% similarity to other filarial cyclophilins but does not belong to any of the groups previously defined in invertebrates or vertebrates. A homolog was also isolated from Caenorhabditis elegans (CeCYP-16). Both recombinant O. volvulus and C. elegans cyclophilins were found to possess an enzyme activity with similar substrate preference and insensitivity to cyclosporin A. They represent novel cyclophilins with important differences in the composition of the drug-binding site in particular, namely, a Glu(124) (C. elegans) or Asp(123) (O. volvulus) residue present in a critical position. Site-directed mutagenesis studies and kinetic characterization demonstrated that the single residue dictates the degree of binding to substrate and cyclosporin A. CeCYP-16::GFP-expressing lines were generated with expression in the anterior and posterior distal portions of the intestine, in all larval stages and adults. An exception was found in the dauer stage, where fluorescence was observed in both the cell bodies and processes of the ventral chord motor neurons but was absent from the intestine. These studies highlight the extensive diversification of cyclophilins in an important human parasite and a closely related model organism. PMID:11847225

  7. Single-Domain Parvulins Constitute a Specific Marker for Recently Proposed Deep-Branching Archaeal Subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Lederer, Christoph; Heider, Dominik; van den Boom, Johannes; Hoffmann, Daniel; Mueller, Jonathan W.; Bayer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases) are enzymes assisting protein folding and protein quality control in organisms of all kingdoms of life. In contrast to the other sub-classes of PPIases, the cyclophilins and the FK-506 binding proteins, little was formerly known about the parvulin type of PPIase in Archaea. Recently, the first solution structure of an archaeal parvulin, the PinA protein from Cenarchaeum symbiosum, was reported. Investigation of occurrence and frequency of PPIase sequences in numerous archaeal genomes now revealed a strong tendency for thermophilic microorganisms to reduce the number of PPIases. Single-domain parvulins were mostly found in the genomes of recently proposed deep-branching archaeal subgroups, the Thaumarchaeota and the ARMANs (archaeal Richmond Mine acidophilic nanoorganisms). Hence, we used the parvulin sequence to reclassify available archaeal metagenomic contigs, thereby, adding new members to these subgroups. A combination of genomic background analysis and phylogenetic approaches of parvulin sequences suggested that the assigned sequences belong to at least two distinct groups of Thaumarchaeota. Finally, machine learning approaches were applied to identify amino acid residues that separate archaeal and bacterial parvulin proteins from each other. When mapped onto the recent PinA solution structure, most of these positions form a cluster at one site of the protein possibly indicating a different functionality of the two groups of parvulin proteins. PMID:22065628

  8. Mitochondrial Thioredoxin System as a Modulator of Cyclophilin D Redox State

    PubMed Central

    Folda, Alessandra; Citta, Anna; Scalcon, Valeria; Calì, Tito; Zonta, Francesco; Scutari, Guido; Bindoli, Alberto; Rigobello, Maria Pia

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial thioredoxin system (NADPH, thioredoxin reductase, thioredoxin) is a major redox regulator. Here we have investigated the redox correlation between this system and the mitochondrial enzyme cyclophilin D. The peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of cyclophilin D was stimulated by the thioredoxin system, while it was decreased by cyclosporin A and the thioredoxin reductase inhibitor auranofin. The redox state of cyclophilin D, thioredoxin 1 and 2 and peroxiredoxin 3 was measured in isolated rat heart mitochondria and in tumor cell lines (CEM-R and HeLa) by redox Western blot analysis upon inhibition of thioredoxin reductase with auranofin, arsenic trioxide, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene or after treatment with hydrogen peroxide. A concomitant oxidation of thioredoxin, peroxiredoxin and cyclophilin D was observed, suggesting a redox communication between the thioredoxin system and cyclophilin. This correlation was further confirmed by i) co-immunoprecipitation assay of cyclophilin D with thioredoxin 2 and peroxiredoxin 3, ii) molecular modeling and iii) depleting thioredoxin reductase by siRNA. We conclude that the mitochondrial thioredoxin system controls the redox state of cyclophilin D which, in turn, may act as a regulator of several processes including ROS production and pro-apoptotic factors release. PMID:26975474

  9. Epigallocatechin-gallate Suppresses Tumorigenesis by Directly Targeting Pin1

    SciTech Connect

    Urusova, Darya V.; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Dong Joon; Jung, Sung Keun; Zykova, Tatyana A.; Carper, Andria; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang

    2011-09-01

    The most active anticancer component in green tea is epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). The human peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (Pin1) plays a critical role in oncogenic signaling. Herein, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the Pin1/EGCG complex resolved at 1.9 Å resolution. Notably, the structure revealed the presence of EGCG in both the WW and PPIase domains of Pin1. The direct binding of EGCG with Pin1 was confirmed and the interaction inhibited Pin1 PPIase activity. In addition, proliferation of cells expressing Pin1 was inhibited and tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model was suppressed. The binding of EGCG with Arg17 in the WW domain prevented the binding of c-Jun, a well-known Pin1 substrate. EGCG treatment corresponded with a decreased abundance of cyclin D1 and diminution of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-l3-acetate–induced AP-1 or NF-κB promoter activity in cells expressing Pin1. Overall, these results showed that EGCG directly suppresses the tumor-promoting effect of Pin1.

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Oesophagostomum dentatum (Nematoda) during Larval Transition, and the Effects of Hydrolase Inhibitors on Development

    PubMed Central

    Ondrovics, Martina; Silbermayr, Katja; Mitreva, Makedonka; Young, Neil D.; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Gasser, Robin B.; Joachim, Anja

    2013-01-01

    In this study, in vitro drug testing was combined with proteomic and bioinformatic analyses to identify and characterize proteins involved in larval development of Oesophagostomum dentatum, an economically important parasitic nematode. Four hydrolase inhibitors ο-phenanthroline, sodium fluoride, iodoacetamide and 1,2-epoxy-3-(pnitrophenoxy)-propane (EPNP) significantly inhibited (≥90%) larval development. Comparison of the proteomic profiles of the development-inhibited larvae with those of uninhibited control larvae using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and subsequent MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis identified a down-regulation of 12 proteins inferred to be involved in various larval developmental processes, including post-embryonic development and growth. Furthermore, three proteins (i.e. intermediate filament protein B, tropomyosin and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase) inferred to be involved in the moulting process were down-regulated in moulting- and development-inhibited O. dentatum larvae. This first proteomic map of O. dentatum larvae provides insights in the protein profile of larval development in this parasitic nematode, and significantly improves our understanding of the fundamental biology of its development. The results and the approach used might assist in developing new interventions against parasitic nematodes by blocking or disrupting their key biological pathways. PMID:23717515

  11. Elucidating role of salivary proteins in denture stomatitis using a proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Bencharit, Sompop; Altarawneh, Sandra K; Baxter, Sarah Schwartz; Carlson, Jim; Ross, Gary F; Border, Michael B; Mack, C Russell; Byrd, Warren C; Dibble, Christopher F; Barros, Silvana; Loewy, Zvi; Offenbacher, Steven

    2012-10-30

    Denture stomatitis (DS) is the most common oral pathology among denture wearers, affecting over one-third of this group. DS is usually associated with C. albicans. However, unlike other oral candidiasis, most DS patients have intact host immunity. The presence of a denture alone is usually sufficient for DS. Saliva and its protein contents can theoretically predispose some denture wearers to DS and others resistant toward DS. Here we proposed for the first time to define salivary proteomic profiles of denture wearers with and without DS. SELDI-TOF/MS analysis suggests that there is a proteomic differentiation among control, localized and generalized DS. Based on initial SELDI-TOF/MS profiling, we further used reversed phase liquid chromatography, MALDI-TOF/MS, and LC-MS/MS to characterize the salivary proteins associated with DS. Nineteen proteins based on SELDI-TOF/MS profiling were found including cystatin-SN, statherin, kininogen-1, desmocollin-2, carbonic anhydrase-6, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A like peptides, cystatin C, and several immunoglobulin fragments. The proteomic content gives evidence of the interaction between host tissue, saliva, and candida. Further examination in larger populations of these proteins may help to gain a better understanding of DS pathological processes and improve DS treatments. PMID:23041753

  12. HPV16 E2 enhances the expression of NF-κB and STAT3 target genes and potentiates NF-κB activation by inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Prabhavathy, Devan; Vijayalakshmi, Ramprasath; Kanchana, M Padhmanaban; Karunagaran, Devarajan

    2014-01-01

    HPV-transformed cells exhibit activation of NF-κB and STAT3 (mediators of inflammation), but very little is known about their regulation under inflammatory conditions before HPV integration. This study reports that cervical tissues with stromal inflammation and intact HPV16 E2 gene show increased expression of target genes of NF-κB and/or STAT3 which can regulate cell survival (cyclin D1, c-Myc, survivin and Bcl2) and inflammatory responses (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and CCR2). Increased expression of RelA, p-IκBα, STAT3, p-STAT3 (Ser727), Pin1 (peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase) and MCM2 in the squamous epithelia of cervices with stromal inflammation supports early activation of NF-κB-STAT3. Furthermore, HPV16 E2 potentiated NF-κB activation induced by inflammatory mediators, IL-1β and SDF-1α, in HEK293 cells. These results reveal a novel role for E2 in regulating the activities of NF-κB and STAT3 that may have implications in carcinogenic progression of HPV16-infected cells under conditions of stromal inflammation. PMID:25460081

  13. Skp1-Cullin-F-box (SCF)-type ubiquitin ligase FBXW7 negatively regulates spermatogonial stem cell self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Kanatsu-Shinohara, Mito; Onoyama, Ichiro; Nakayama, Keiichi I.; Shinohara, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) undergo self-renewal divisions to support spermatogenesis throughout life. Although several positive regulators of SSC self-renewal have been discovered, little is known about the negative regulators. Here, we report that F-box and WD-40 domain protein 7 (FBXW7), a component of the Skp1-Cullin-F-box–type ubiquitin ligase, is a negative regulator of SSC self-renewal. FBXW7 is expressed in undifferentiated spermatogonia in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Although peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase NIMA-interacting 1 (PIN1), essential for spermatogenesis, is thought to destroy FBXW7, Pin1 depletion decreased FBXW7 expression. Spermatogonial transplantation showed that Fbxw7 overexpression compromised SSC activity whereas Fbxw7 deficiency enhanced SSC colonization and caused accumulation of undifferentiated spermatogonia, suggesting that the level of FBXW7 is critical for self-renewal and differentiation. Screening of putative FBXW7 targets revealed that Fbxw7 deficiency up-regulated myelocytomatosis oncogene (MYC) and cyclin E1 (CCNE1). Although depletion of Myc/Mycn or Ccne1/Ccne2 compromised SSC activity, overexpression of Myc, but not Ccne1, increased colonization of SSCs. These results suggest that FBXW7 regulates SSC self-renewal in a negative manner by degradation of MYC. PMID:24879440

  14. Cyclophilin B protects SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells against MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity via JNK pathway.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yoojung; Jeong, Kwon; Kim, Kiyoon; Lee, Young-Seok; Jeong, Suyun; Kim, Sung Soo; Yoon, Kyung-Sik; Ha, Joohun; Kang, Insug; Choe, Wonchae

    2016-09-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder of aging. PD involves a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyidine (MPTP) and its toxic metabolite 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+) inhibit the complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, and have been widely used to construct PD models. Cyclophilin B (CypB) is an endoplasmic reticulum protein that binds to cyclosporine A as a cyclophilin family member. CypB has peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) activity. We investigated the protective effects of overexpressed CypB on MPP+-induced neurocytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Overexpressed CypB decreased MPP(+)-induced oxidative stress through the modulation of antioxidant enzymes including manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase, and prevented neurocytotoxicity via mitogen-activated protein kinase, especially the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway. In addition, CypB inhibited the activation of MPP(+)-induced the pro-apoptotic molecules poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, Bax, and Bcl-2, and attenuated MPP(+)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. The data suggest that overexpressed CypB protects neuronal cells from MPP+-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death. PMID:27569281

  15. Pin1 Interacts with the Epstein-Barr Virus DNA Polymerase Catalytic Subunit and Regulates Viral DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Yohei; Ryo, Akihide; Kawashima, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Atsuko; Kanda, Teru; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase NIMA-interacting 1 (Pin1) protein is known as a regulator which recognizes phosphorylated Ser/Thr-Pro motifs and increases the rate of cis and trans amide isomer interconversion, thereby altering the conformation of its substrates. We found that Pin1 knockdown using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) technology resulted in strong suppression of productive Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA replication. We further identified the EBV DNA polymerase catalytic subunit, BALF5, as a Pin1 substrate in glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown and immunoprecipitation assays. Lambda protein phosphatase treatment abolished the binding of BALF5 to Pin1, and mutation analysis of BALF5 revealed that replacement of the Thr178 residue by Ala (BALF5 T178A) disrupted the interaction with Pin1. To further test the effects of Pin1 in the context of virus infection, we constructed a BALF5-deficient recombinant virus. Exogenous supply of wild-type BALF5 in HEK293 cells with knockout recombinant EBV allowed efficient synthesis of viral genome DNA, but BALF5 T178A could not provide support as efficiently as wild-type BALF5. In conclusion, we found that EBV DNA polymerase BALF5 subunit interacts with Pin1 through BALF5 Thr178 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Pin1 might modulate EBV DNA polymerase conformation for efficient, productive viral DNA replication. PMID:23221557

  16. Oxytocin and a C-terminal derivative (Z-prolyl-D-leucine) attenuate tolerance to and dependence on morphine and interact with dopaminergic neurotransmission in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Kovács, G L; Horváth, Z; Sarnyai, Z; Faludi, M; Telegdy, G

    1985-05-01

    The effects of oxytocin (OXT) and of dipeptides derived from the C-terminal portion of oxytocin (Z-prolyl-leucine and Z-prolyl-D-leucine) on the development of acute and chronic tolerance to, and dependence on morphine were tested in the mouse. Oxytocin and the dipeptides attenuated the development of acute and chronic tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of morphine and delayed the onset of the naloxone-precipitated withdrawal syndrome. Both oxytocin and Z-prolyl-D-leucine affected drug-induced behavioural responses related to dopamine (DA) in the brain. Thus, oxytocin potentiated the hypermotility induced by a large dose of apomorphine and decreased the supersensitivity of the DA receptors. Small doses of Z-prolyl-D-leucine inhibited the hypomotility elicited by a small dose of apomorphine and potentiated the hyperactivity induced by amphetamine. The data indicate that both oxytocin and Z-prolyl-D-leucine affect tolerance to and dependence on morphine. While oxytocin interacts mainly with postsynaptic DA-ergic neuronal elements, the dipeptide primarily affects DA-ergic neurotransmission at the presynaptic level. PMID:2991800

  17. Molecular dynamics study of prolyl oligopeptidase with inhibitor in binding cavity.

    PubMed

    Kaszuba, K; Rog, T; St Pierre, J-F; Mannisto, P T; Karttunen, M; Bunker, A

    2009-10-01

    We used the crystal structure of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) with bound Z-pro-prolinal (ZPP) inhibitor (Protein Data Bank (PDB) structure 1QFS) to perform an intensive molecular dynamics study of the POP-ZPP complex. We performed 100 ns of simulation with the hemiacetal bond, through which the ZPP is bound to the POP, removed in order to better investigate the binding cavity environment. From basic analysis, measuring the radius of gyration, root mean square deviation, solvent accessible surface area and definition of the secondary structure of protein, we determined that the protein structure is highly stable and maintains its structure over the entire simulation time. This demonstrates that such long time simulations can be performed without the protein structure losing stability. We found that water bridges and hydrogen bonds play a negligible role in binding the ZPP thus indicating the importance of the hemiacetal bond. The two domains of the protein are bound by a set of approximately 12 hydrogen bonds, specific to the particular POP protein. PMID:20024801

  18. High Myopia Caused by a Mutation in LEPREL1, Encoding Prolyl 3-Hydroxylase 2

    PubMed Central

    Mordechai, Shikma; Gradstein, Libe; Pasanen, Annika; Ofir, Rivka; El Amour, Khalil; Levy, Jaime; Belfair, Nadav; Lifshitz, Tova; Joshua, Sara; Narkis, Ginat; Elbedour, Khalil; Myllyharju, Johanna; Birk, Ohad S.

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive high-grade axial myopia was diagnosed in Bedouin Israeli consanguineous kindred. Some affected individuals also had variable expressivity of early-onset cataracts, peripheral vitreo-retinal degeneration, and secondary sight loss due to severe retinal detachments. Through genome-wide linkage analysis, the disease-associated gene was mapped to ∼1.7 Mb on chromosome 3q28 (the maximum LOD score was 11.5 at θ = 0 for marker D3S1314). Sequencing of the entire coding regions and intron-exon boundaries of the six genes within the defined locus identified a single mutation (c.1523G>T) in exon 10 of LEPREL1, encoding prolyl 3-hydroxylase 2 (P3H2), a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase that hydroxylates collagens. The mutation affects a glycine that is conserved within P3H isozymes. Analysis of wild-type and p.Gly508Val (c.1523G>T) mutant recombinant P3H2 polypeptides expressed in insect cells showed that the mutation led to complete inactivation of P3H2. PMID:21885030

  19. Prolyl Endopeptidase (PREP) is Associated With Male Reproductive Functions and Gamete Physiology in Mice.

    PubMed

    Dotolo, Raffaele; Kim, Jung Dae; Pariante, Paolo; Minucci, Sergio; Diano, Sabrina

    2016-03-01

    Prolyl endopeptidase (PREP) is a serine protease which has been implicated in many biological processes, such as the maturation and degradation of peptide hormones and neuropeptides, learning and memory, cell proliferation and differentiation, and glucose metabolism. A small number of reports have also suggested PREP participation in both male and female reproduction-associated processes. In the present work, we examined PREP distribution in male germ cells and studied the effects of its knockdown (Prep(gt/gt)) on testis and sperm in adult mice. The protein is expressed and localized in elongating spermatids and luminal spermatozoa of wild type (wt) mice, as well as Sertoli, Leydig, and peritubular cells. PREP is also expressed in the head and midpiece of epididymal spermatozoa, whereas the remaining tail region shows a weaker signal. Furthermore, testis weight, histology of seminiferous tubules, and epididymal sperm parameters were assessed in wt and Prep(gt/gt) mice: wild type testes have larger average tubule and lumen diameter; in addition, lumenal composition of seminiferous tubules is dissimilar between wt and Prep(gt/gt), as the percentage of spermiated tubules is much higher in wt. Finally, total sperm count, sperm motility, and normal morphology are also higher in wt than in Prep(gt/gt). These results show for the first time that the expression of PREP could be necessary for a correct reproductive function, and suggest that the enzyme may play a role in mouse spermatogenesis and sperm physiology. PMID:26332268

  20. Identification of selective and potent inhibitors of fibroblast activation protein and prolyl oligopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Poplawski, Sarah E; Lai, Jack H; Li, Youhua; Jin, Zhiping; Liu, Yuxin; Wu, Wengen; Wu, Yong; Zhou, Yuhong; Sudmeier, James L; Sanford, David G; Bachovchin, William W

    2013-05-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a serine protease selectively expressed on reactive stromal fibroblasts of epithelial carcinomas. It is widely believed to play a role in tumor invasion and metastasis and therefore to represent a potential new drug target for cancer. Investigation into its biological function, however, has been hampered by the current unavailability of selective inhibitors. The challenge has been in identifying inhibitors that are selective for FAP over both the dipeptidyl peptidases (DPPs), with which it shares exopeptidase specificity, and prolyl oligopeptidase (PREP), with which it shares endopeptidase specificity. Here, we report the first potent FAP inhibitor with selectivity over both the DPPs and PREP, N-(pyridine-4-carbonyl)-d-Ala-boroPro (ARI-3099, 6). We also report a similarly potent and selective PREP inhibitor, N-(pyridine-3-carbonyl)-Val-boroPro (ARI-3531, 22). Both are boronic acid based inhibitors, demonstrating that high selectivity can be achieved using this electrophile. The inhibitors are stable, easy to synthesize, and should prove to be useful in helping to elucidate the biological functions of these two unique and interesting enzymes, as well as their potential as drug targets. PMID:23594271

  1. Identification of Selective and Potent Inhibitors of Fibroblast Activation Protein and Prolyl Oligopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Poplawski, Sarah E.; Lai, Jack H.; Li, Youhua; Jin, Zhiping; Liu, Yuxin; Wu, Wengen; Wu, Yong; Zhou, Yuhong; Sudmeier, James L.; Sanford, David G.; Bachovchin, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a serine protease selectively expressed on reactive stromal fibroblasts of epithelial carcinomas. It is widely believed to play a role in tumor invasion and metastasis and therefore to represent a potential new drug target for cancer. Investigation into its biological function, however, has been hampered by the current unavailability of selective inhibitors. The challenge has been in identifying inhibitors that are selective for FAP over both the dipeptidyl peptidases (DPPs), with which it shares exopeptidase specificity, and prolyl oligopeptidase (PREP), with which it shares endopeptidase specificity. Here, we report the first potent FAP inhibitor with selectivity over both the DPPs and PREP, N-(pyridine-4-carbonyl)-d-Ala-boroPro (ARI-3099, 6). We also report a similarly potent and selective PREP inhibitor, N-(pyridine-3-carbonyl)-Val-boroPro (ARI-3531, 22). Both are boronic acid based inhibitors, demonstrating that high selectivity can be achieved using this electrophile. The inhibitors are stable, easy to synthesize, and should prove to be useful in helping to elucidate the biological functions of these two unique and interesting enzymes, as well as their potential as drug targets. PMID:23594271

  2. Isolation of prolyl endopeptidase inhibitory peptides from a sodium caseinate hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Cheng-Hong; Wang, Tzu-Yuan; Hung, Chuan-Chuan; Hsieh, You-Liang; Hsu, Kuo-Chiang

    2016-01-01

    Prolyl endopeptidase (PEP) has been associated with neurodegenerative disorders, and the PEP inhibitors can restore the memory loss caused by amnesic compounds. In this study, we investigated the PEP inhibitory activity of the enzymatic hydrolysates from various food protein sources, and isolated and identified the PEP inhibitory peptides. The hydrolysate obtained from sodium caseinate using bromelain (SC/BML) displayed the highest inhibitory activity of 86.8% at 5 mg mL(-1) in the present study, and its IC50 value against PEP was 0.77 mg mL(-1). The F-5 fraction by RP-HPLC (reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography) from SC/BML showed the highest PEP inhibition rate of 88.4%, and 9 peptide sequences were identified. The synthetic peptides (1245.63-1787.94 Da) showed dose-dependent inhibition effects on PEP as competitive inhibitors with IC50 values between 29.8 and 650.5 μM. The results suggest that the peptides derived from sodium caseinate have the potential to be PEP inhibitors. PMID:26574880

  3. Generation of food-grade recombinant Lactobacillus casei delivering Myxococcus xanthus prolyl endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sieiro, Patricia; Martin, Maria Cruz; Redruello, Begoña; Del Rio, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Palanski, Brad A; Khosla, Chaitan; Fernandez, Maria; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2014-08-01

    Prolyl endopeptidases (PEP) (EC 3.4.21.26), a family of serine proteases with the ability to hydrolyze the peptide bond on the carboxyl side of an internal proline residue, are able to degrade immunotoxic peptides responsible for celiac disease (CD), such as a 33-residue gluten peptide (33-mer). Oral administration of PEP has been suggested as a potential therapeutic approach for CD, although delivery of the enzyme to the small intestine requires intrinsic gastric stability or advanced formulation technologies. We have engineered two food-grade Lactobacillus casei strains to deliver PEP in an in vitro model of small intestine environment. One strain secretes PEP into the extracellular medium, whereas the other retains PEP in the intracellular environment. The strain that secretes PEP into the extracellular medium is the most effective to degrade the 33-mer and is resistant to simulated gastrointestinal stress. Our results suggest that in the future, after more studies and clinical trials, an engineered food-grade Lactobacillus strain may be useful as a vector for in situ production of PEP in the upper small intestine of CD patients. PMID:24752841

  4. A prolyl-isomerase mediates dopamine-dependent plasticity and cocaine motor sensitization.

    PubMed

    Park, Joo Min; Hu, Jia-Hua; Milshteyn, Aleksandr; Zhang, Ping-Wu; Moore, Chester G; Park, Sungjin; Datko, Michael C; Domingo, Racquel D; Reyes, Cindy M; Wang, Xiaodong J; Etzkorn, Felicia A; Xiao, Bo; Szumlinski, Karen K; Kern, Dorothee; Linden, David J; Worley, Paul F

    2013-08-01

    Synaptic plasticity induced by cocaine and other drugs underlies addiction. Here we elucidate molecular events at synapses that cause this plasticity and the resulting behavioral response to cocaine in mice. In response to D1-dopamine-receptor signaling that is induced by drug administration, the glutamate-receptor protein metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) is phosphorylated by microtubule-associated protein kinase (MAPK), which we show potentiates Pin1-mediated prolyl-isomerization of mGluR5 in instances where the product of an activity-dependent gene, Homer1a, is present to enable Pin1-mGluR5 interaction. These biochemical events potentiate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated currents that underlie synaptic plasticity and cocaine-evoked motor sensitization as tested in mice with relevant mutations. The findings elucidate how a coincidence of signals from the nucleus and the synapse can render mGluR5 accessible to activation with consequences for drug-induced dopamine responses and point to depotentiation at corticostriatal synapses as a possible therapeutic target for treating addiction. PMID:23911326

  5. Colocalization of amanitin and a candidate toxin-processing prolyl oligopeptidase in Amanita basidiocarps.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Hallen-Adams, Heather E; Scott-Craig, John S; Walton, Jonathan D

    2010-12-01

    Fungi in the basidiomycetous genus Amanita owe their high mammalian toxicity to the bicyclic octapeptide amatoxins such as α-amanitin. Amatoxins and the related phallotoxins (such as the heptapeptide phalloidin) are encoded by members of the "MSDIN" gene family and are synthesized on ribosomes as short (34- to 35-amino-acid) proproteins. Antiamanitin antibodies and confocal microscopy were used to determine the cellular and subcellular localizations of amanitin accumulation in basidiocarps (mushrooms) of the Eastern North American destroying angel (Amanita bisporigera). Consistent with previous studies, amanitin is present throughout the basidiocarp (stipe, pileus, lamellae, trama, and universal veil), but it is present in only a subset of cells within these tissues. Restriction of amanitin to certain cells is especially marked in the hymenium. Several lines of evidence implicate a specific prolyl oligopeptidase, A. bisporigera POPB (AbPOPB), in the initial processing of the amanitin and phallotoxin proproteins. The gene for AbPOPB is restricted taxonomically to the amatoxin-producing species of Amanita and is clustered in the genome with at least one expressed member of the MSDIN gene family. Immunologically, amanitin and AbPOPB show a high degree of colocalization, indicating that toxin biosynthesis and accumulation occur in the same cells and possibly in the same subcellular compartments. PMID:20889720

  6. Loss of prolyl hydroxylase-2 in myeloid cells and T-lymphocytes impairs tumor development.

    PubMed

    Mamlouk, Soulafa; Kalucka, Joanna; Singh, Rashim Pal; Franke, Kristin; Muschter, Antje; Langer, Anika; Jakob, Christiane; Gassmann, Max; Baretton, Gustavo B; Wielockx, Ben

    2014-02-15

    The tumor microenvironment plays a pivotal role during cancer development and progression. The balance between suppressive and cytotoxic responses of the tumor immune microenvironment has been shown to have a direct effect on the final outcome in various human and experimental tumors. Recently, we demonstrated that the oxygen sensor HIF-prolyl hydroxylase-2 (PHD2) plays a detrimental role in tumor cells, stimulating systemic growth and metastasis in mice. In our current study, we show that the conditional ablation of PHD2 in the hematopoietic system also leads to reduced tumor volume, intriguingly generated by an imbalance between enhanced cell death and improved proliferation of tumor cells. This effect seems to rely on the overall downregulation of protumoral as well as antitumoral cytokines. Using different genetic approaches, we were able to confine this complex phenotype to the crosstalk of PHD2-deficient myeloid cells and T-lymphocytes. Taken together, our findings reveal a multifaceted role for PHD2 in several hematopoietic lineages during tumor development and might have important implications for the development of tumor therapies in the future. PMID:23913502

  7. Loss of epithelial hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase 2 accelerates skin wound healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Kalucka, Joanna; Ettinger, Andreas; Franke, Kristin; Mamlouk, Soulafa; Singh, Rashim Pal; Farhat, Katja; Muschter, Antje; Olbrich, Susanne; Breier, Georg; Katschinski, Dörthe M; Huttner, Wieland; Weidemann, Alexander; Wielockx, Ben

    2013-09-01

    Skin wound healing in mammals is a complex, multicellular process that depends on the precise supply of oxygen. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) serves as a crucial oxygen sensor and may therefore play an important role during reepithelialization. Hence, this study was aimed at understanding the role of PHD2 in cutaneous wound healing using different lines of conditionally deficient mice specifically lacking PHD2 in inflammatory, vascular, or epidermal cells. Interestingly, PHD2 deficiency only in keratinocytes and not in myeloid or endothelial cells was found to lead to faster wound closure, which involved enhanced migration of the hyperproliferating epithelium. We demonstrate that this effect relies on the unique expression of β3-integrin in the keratinocytes around the tip of the migrating tongue in an HIF1α-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show enhanced proliferation of these cells in the stratum basale, which is directly related to their attenuated transforming growth factor β signaling. Thus, loss of the central oxygen sensor PHD2 in keratinocytes stimulates wound closure by prompting skin epithelial cells to migrate and proliferate. Inhibition of PHD2 could therefore offer novel therapeutic opportunities for the local treatment of cutaneous wounds. PMID:23798557

  8. Colocalization of Amanitin and a Candidate Toxin-Processing Prolyl Oligopeptidase in Amanita Basidiocarps ▿

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hong; Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.

    2010-01-01

    Fungi in the basidiomycetous genus Amanita owe their high mammalian toxicity to the bicyclic octapeptide amatoxins such as α-amanitin. Amatoxins and the related phallotoxins (such as the heptapeptide phalloidin) are encoded by members of the “MSDIN” gene family and are synthesized on ribosomes as short (34- to 35-amino-acid) proproteins. Antiamanitin antibodies and confocal microscopy were used to determine the cellular and subcellular localizations of amanitin accumulation in basidiocarps (mushrooms) of the Eastern North American destroying angel (Amanita bisporigera). Consistent with previous studies, amanitin is present throughout the basidiocarp (stipe, pileus, lamellae, trama, and universal veil), but it is present in only a subset of cells within these tissues. Restriction of amanitin to certain cells is especially marked in the hymenium. Several lines of evidence implicate a specific prolyl oligopeptidase, A. bisporigera POPB (AbPOPB), in the initial processing of the amanitin and phallotoxin proproteins. The gene for AbPOPB is restricted taxonomically to the amatoxin-producing species of Amanita and is clustered in the genome with at least one expressed member of the MSDIN gene family. Immunologically, amanitin and AbPOPB show a high degree of colocalization, indicating that toxin biosynthesis and accumulation occur in the same cells and possibly in the same subcellular compartments. PMID:20889720

  9. Purification and Characterization of an X-Prolyl-Dipeptidyl Peptidase from Lactobacillus sakei

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Yolanda; Toldrá, Fidel

    2001-01-01

    An X-prolyl-dipeptidyl peptidase has been purified from Lactobacillus sakei by ammonium sulfate fractionation and five chromatographic steps, which included hydrophobic interaction, anion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration chromatography. This procedure resulted in a recovery yield of 7% and an increase in specificity of 737-fold. The enzyme appeared to be a dimer with a subunit molecular mass of approximately 88 kDa. Optimal activity was shown at pH 7.5 and 55°C. The enzyme was inhibited by serine proteinase inhibitors and several divalent cations (Cu2+, Hg2+, and Zn2+). The enzyme almost exclusively hydrolyzed X-Pro from the N terminus of each peptide as well as fluorescent and colorimetric substrates; it also hydrolyzed X-Ala at the N terminus, albeit at lower rates. Km s for Gly-Pro- and Lys-Ala-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin were 29 and 88 μM, respectively; those for Gly-Pro- and Ala-Pro-p-nitroanilide were 192 and 50 μM, respectively. Among peptides, β-casomorphin 1-3 was hydrolyzed at the highest rates, while the relative hydrolysis of the other tested peptides was only 1 to 12%. The potential role of the purified enzyme in the proteolytic pathway by catalyzing the hydrolysis of peptide bonds involving proline is discussed. PMID:11282638

  10. HIF prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors for the treatment of renal anaemia and beyond.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Patrick H; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Small-molecule stabilizers of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) are being developed for the treatment of renal anaemia. These molecules inhibit prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing (PHD) enzymes, resulting in HIF activation and increased production of erythropoietin. Currently, renal anaemia is treated with recombinant human erythropoietin or related analogues, referred to as conventional erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs). Advantages of PHD enzyme inhibitors over conventional ESAs include their oral administration and their simpler - and potentially cheaper - production. Importantly, inhibition of PHD enzymes is likely to have a range of consequences other than increasing levels of erythropoietin, and these effects could be beneficial - for instance by reducing the need for parenteral iron - but might in some instances be harmful. Several companies are currently testing PHD enzyme inhibitors in patients with renal anaemia and have reported clear evidence of efficacy without serious safety concerns. A central question that current studies are beginning to address is whether using PHD enzyme inhibitors will influence hard end points, including mortality and the rate of cardiovascular events. In terms of approaches to therapy, the exquisite specificity of conventional ESAs is a striking contrast to the pleiotropic effects of activating HIF. Excitingly, PHD inhibitors could also be useful for conditions besides renal anaemia, such as protection from ischaemic injury. PMID:26656456

  11. Prolyl 4-hydroxylase activity-responsive transcription factors: From hydroxylation to gene expression and neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Siddiq, Ambreena; Aminova, Leila R; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2008-01-01

    Most homeostatic processes including gene transcription occur as a result of deviations in physiological tone that threatens the survival of the organism. A prototypical homeostatic stress response includes changes in gene expression following alterations in oxygen, iron or 2-oxoglutarate levels. Each of these cofactors plays an important role in cellular metabolism. Accordingly, a family of enzymes known as the Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (PHD) enzymes are a group of dioxygenases that have evolved to sense changes in 2-oxoglutarate, oxygen and iron via changes in enzyme activity. Indeed, PHDs are a part of an established oxygen sensor system that regulates transcriptional regulation of hypoxia/stress-regulated genes and thus are an important component of events leading to cellular rescue from oxygen, iron or 2-oxoglutarate deprivations. The ability of PHD activity to regulate homeostatic responses to oxygen, iron or 2-oxoglutarate metabolism has led to the development of small molecule inhibitors of the PHDs as a strategy for activating or augmenting cellular stress responses. These small molecules are proving effective in preclinical models of stroke and Parkinson's disease. However the precise protective pathways engaged by PHD inhibition are only beginning to be defined. In the current review, we summarize the role of iron, 2-oxoglutarate and oxygen in the PHD catalyzed hydroxylation reaction and provide a brief discussion of some of the transcription factors that play an effective role in neuroprotection against oxidative stress as a result of changes in PHD activity. PMID:17981760

  12. Non-hypoxic activation of the negative regulatory feedback loop of prolyl-hydroxylase oxygen sensors.

    PubMed

    Tug, Suzan; Delos Reyes, Buena; Fandrey, Joachim; Berchner-Pfannschmidt, Utta

    2009-07-10

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF) coordinate cellular responses towards hypoxia. HIFs are mainly regulated by a group of prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs) that in the presence of oxygen, target the HIFalpha subunit for degradation. Herein, we studied the role of nitric oxide (NO) in regulating PHD activities under normoxic conditions. In the present study we show that different NO-donors initially inhibited endogenous PHD2 activity which led to accumulation of HIF-1alpha subsequently to enhance HIF-1 dependent increased PHD2 promoter activity. Consequently PHD2 abundance and activity were strongly induced which caused downregulation of HIF-1alpha. Interestingly, upregulation of endogenous PHD2 activity by NO was not found in cells that lack an intact pVHL dependent degradation pathway. Recovery of PHD activity required intact cells and was not observed in cell extracts or recombinant PHD2. In conclusion induction of endogenous PHD2 activity by NO is dependent on a feedback loop initiated despite normoxic conditions. PMID:19427832

  13. The Ess1 prolyl isomerase is required for growth and morphogenetic switching in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Devasahayam, Gina; Chaturvedi, Vishnu; Hanes, Steven D

    2002-01-01

    Prolyl-isomerases (PPIases) are found in all organisms and are important for the folding and activity of many proteins. Of the 13 PPIases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae only Ess1, a parvulin-class PPIase, is essential for growth. Ess1 is required to complete mitosis, and Ess1 and its mammalian homolog, Pin1, interact directly with RNA polymerase II. Here, we isolate the ESS1 gene from the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans and show that it is functionally homologous to the S. cerevisiae ESS1. We generate conditional-lethal (ts) alleles of C. albicans ESS1 and use these mutations to demonstrate that ESS1 is essential for growth in C. albicans. We also show that reducing the dosage or activity of ESS1 blocks morphogenetic switching from the yeast to the hyphal and pseudohyphal forms under certain conditions. Analysis of double mutants of ESS1 and TUP1 or CPH1, two genes known to be involved in morphogenetic switching, suggests that ESS1 functions in the same pathway as CPH1 and upstream of or in parallel to TUP1. Given that switching is important for virulence of C. albicans, inhibitors of Ess1 might be useful as antifungal agents. PMID:11805043

  14. Attenuation of antagonist-induced impairment of dopamine receptors by L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, M.I.M.

    1988-01-01

    The present study was undertaken in order to determine whether chronic,long-term postnatal challenge of rat pups per se, with specific dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists, would modify the ontogeny of the respective receptor types. Since the neuropeptide L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide (PLG) attenuates the effect of haloperidol on dopamine D2 receptors in adult rats it was of interest to determine whether PLG would modulate antagonists-induced alterations in the ontogeny of striatal dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. Half of the rats were treated daily for 32 days from birth with SCH-23390, a selective dopamine D1 antagonist; or spiroperidol, a selective dopamine D2 antagonists; or both SCH-23390 and spiroperidol; or saline. The other half of the litters were treated with PLG, in combination with the other treatments. Animals were decapitated at 5, 8, and 12 weeks from birth for neurochemical analysis of the striatum. Chronic SCH-23390 treatment produced a 70-80% decrease in the binding of ({sup 3}H) SCH-23390 to striatal homogenates. The alteration at 5 weeks was associated with a 78% decrease in the Bmax for ({sup 3}H) SCH-23390 binding, and no change in the K{sub D}. Similarly, at 5, 8, and 12 weeks, chronic spiroperidol treatment reduced the binding of ({sup 3}H) spiroperidol to striatal homogenates by 70-80%.

  15. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Engagement Mediates Prolyl Endopeptidase Release from Airway Epithelia via Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Szul, Tomasz; Bratcher, Preston E; Fraser, Kyle B; Kong, Michele; Tirouvanziam, Rabindra; Ingersoll, Sarah; Sztul, Elizabeth; Rangarajan, Sunil; Blalock, J Edwin; Xu, Xin; Gaggar, Amit

    2016-03-01

    Proteases are important regulators of pulmonary remodeling and airway inflammation. Recently, we have characterized the enzyme prolyl endopeptidase (PE), a serine peptidase, as a critical protease in the generation of the neutrophil chemoattractant tripeptide Pro-Gly-Pro (PGP) from collagen. However, PE has been characterized as a cytosolic enzyme, and the mechanism mediating PE release extracellularly remains unknown. We examined the role of exosomes derived from airway epithelia as a mechanism for PE release and the potential extracellular signals that regulate the release of these exosomes. We demonstrate a specific regulatory pathway of exosome release from airway epithelia and identify PE as novel exosome cargo. LPS stimulation of airway epithelial cells induces release of PE-containing exosomes, which is significantly attenuated by small interfering RNA depletion of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). These differences were recapitulated upon intratracheal LPS administration in mice competent versus deficient for TLR4 signaling. Finally, sputum samples from subjects with cystic fibrosis colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa demonstrate elevated exosome content and increased PE levels. This TLR4-based mechanism highlights the first report of nonstochastic release of exosomes in the lung and couples TLR4 activation with matrikine generation. The increased quantity of these proteolytic exosomes in the airways of subjects with chronic lung disease highlights a new mechanism of injury and inflammation in the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders. PMID:26222144

  16. Loss of Epithelial Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl Hydroxylase 2 Accelerates Skin Wound Healing in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kalucka, Joanna; Ettinger, Andreas; Franke, Kristin; Mamlouk, Soulafa; Singh, Rashim Pal; Farhat, Katja; Muschter, Antje; Olbrich, Susanne; Breier, Georg; Katschinski, Dörthe M.; Huttner, Wieland; Weidemann, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Skin wound healing in mammals is a complex, multicellular process that depends on the precise supply of oxygen. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) serves as a crucial oxygen sensor and may therefore play an important role during reepithelialization. Hence, this study was aimed at understanding the role of PHD2 in cutaneous wound healing using different lines of conditionally deficient mice specifically lacking PHD2 in inflammatory, vascular, or epidermal cells. Interestingly, PHD2 deficiency only in keratinocytes and not in myeloid or endothelial cells was found to lead to faster wound closure, which involved enhanced migration of the hyperproliferating epithelium. We demonstrate that this effect relies on the unique expression of β3-integrin in the keratinocytes around the tip of the migrating tongue in an HIF1α-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show enhanced proliferation of these cells in the stratum basale, which is directly related to their attenuated transforming growth factor β signaling. Thus, loss of the central oxygen sensor PHD2 in keratinocytes stimulates wound closure by prompting skin epithelial cells to migrate and proliferate. Inhibition of PHD2 could therefore offer novel therapeutic opportunities for the local treatment of cutaneous wounds. PMID:23798557

  17. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition by N-acyl-pro-pyrrolidine-type molecules.

    PubMed

    Kánai, Károly; Arányi, Péter; Böcskei, Zsolt; Ferenczy, György; Harmat, Veronika; Simon, Kálmán; Bátori, Sándor; Náray-Szabo, Gábor; Hermecz, István

    2008-12-11

    Three novel, N-acyl-pro-pyrrolidine-type, inhibitors of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) with nanomolar activities were synthesized and their binding analyzed to the host enzyme in the light of X-ray diffraction and molecular modeling studies. We were interested in the alteration in the binding affinity at the S3 site as a function of the properties of the N-terminal group of the inhibitors. Our studies revealed that, for inhibitors with flat aromatic terminal groups, the optimal length of the linker chain is three C-C bonds, but this increases to four C-C bonds if there is a bulky group in the terminal position. Molecular dynamics calculations indicate that this is due to the better fit into the binding pocket. A 4-fold enhancement of the inhibitor activity upon replacement of the 4-CH2 group of the proline ring by CF2 is a consequence of a weak hydrogen bond formed between the fluorine atom and the hydroxy group of Tyr473 of the host enzyme. There is notably good agreement between the calculated and experimental free energies of binding; the average error in the IC50 values is around 1 order of magnitude. PMID:19006380

  18. Generation of food-grade recombinant Lactobacillus casei delivering Myxococcus xanthus prolyl endopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Sieiro, Patricia; Martin, Maria Cruz; Redruello, Begoña; del Rio, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Palanski, Brad A.; Khosla, Chaitan; Fernandez, Maria; Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Prolyl endopeptidases (PEP), a family of serine proteases with the ability to hydrolyze the peptide bond on the carboxyl side of an internal proline residue, are able to degrade immunotoxic peptides responsible for celiac disease (CD), such as a 33-residue gluten peptide (33-mer). Oral administration of PEP has been suggested as a potential therapeutic approach for CD, although delivery of the enzyme to the small intestine requires intrinsic gastric stability or advanced formulation technologies. We have engineered two food-grade Lactobacillus casei strains to deliver PEP in an in vitro model of small intestine environment. One strain secretes PEP into the extracellular medium, whereas the other retains PEP in the intracellular environment. The strain that secretes PEP into the extracellular medium is the most effective to degrade the 33-mer and is resistant to simulated gastrointestinal stress. Our results suggest that in a future, after more studies and clinical trials, an engineered food-grade Lactobacillus strain may be useful as a vector for in situ production of PEP in the upper small intestine of CD patients. PMID:24752841

  19. Incorporation of a Prolyl Hydroxylase Inhibitor into Scaffolds: A Strategy for Stimulating Vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Sham, Adeline; Martinez, Eliana C.; Beyer, Sebastian; Trau, Dieter W.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical applications of tissue engineering are constrained by the ability of the implanted construct to invoke vascularization in adequate extent and velocity. To overcome the current limitations presented by local delivery of single angiogenic factors, we explored the incorporation of prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors (PHIs) into scaffolds as an alternative vascularization strategy. PHIs are small molecule drugs that can stabilize the alpha subunit of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), a key transcription factor that regulates a variety of angiogenic mechanisms. In this study, we conjugated the PHI pyridine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (PDCA) through amide bonds to a gelatin sponge (Gelfoam®). Fibroblasts cultured on PDCA-Gelfoam were able to infiltrate and proliferate in these scaffolds while secreting significantly more vascular endothelial growth factor than cells grown on Gelfoam without PDCA. Reporter cells expressing green fluorescent protein-tagged HIF-1α exhibited dose-dependent stabilization of this angiogenic transcription factor when growing within PDCA-Gelfoam constructs. Subsequently, we implanted PDCA-Gelfoam scaffolds into the perirenal fat tissue of Sprague Dawley rats for 8 days. Immunostaining of explants revealed that the PDCA-Gelfoam scaffolds were amply infiltrated by cells and promoted vascular ingrowth in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the incorporation of PHIs into scaffolds appears to be a feasible strategy for improving vascularization in regenerative medicine applications. PMID:25370818

  20. Peptidyl-CCA deacylation on the ribosome promoted by induced fit and the O3′-hydroxyl group of A76 of the unacylated A-site tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Simonović, Miljan; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2008-11-24

    The last step in ribosome-catalyzed protein synthesis is the hydrolytic release of the newly formed polypeptide from the P-site bound tRNA. Hydrolysis of the ester link of the peptidyl-tRNA is stimulated normally by the binding of release factors (RFs). However, an unacylated tRNA or just CCA binding to the ribosomal A site can also stimulate deacylation under some nonphysiological conditions. Although the sequence of events is well described by biochemical studies, the structural basis of the mechanism underlying this process is not well understood. Two new structures of the large ribosomal subunit of Haloarcula marismortui complexed with a peptidyl-tRNA analog in the P site and two oligonucleotide mimics of unacylated tRNA, CCA and CA, in the A site show that the binding of either CA or CCA induces a very similar conformational change in the peptidyl-transferase center as induced by aminoacyl-CCA. However, only CCA positions a water molecule appropriately to attack the carbonyl carbon of the peptidyl-tRNA and stabilizes the proper orientation of the ester link for hydrolysis. We, thus, conclude that both the ability of the O3'-hydroxyl group of the A-site A76 to position the water and the A-site CCA induced conformational change of the PTC are critical for the catalysis of the deacylation of the peptidyl-tRNA by CCA, and perhaps, an analogous mechanism is used by RFs.

  1. Peptidyl aldehyde NK-1.8k suppresses enterovirus 71 and enterovirus 68 infection by targeting protease 3C.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaxin; Yang, Ben; Zhai, Yangyang; Yin, Zheng; Sun, Yuna; Rao, Zihe

    2015-05-01

    Enterovirus (EV) is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease in the Pacific-Asia region. In particular, EV71 causes severe central nervous system infections, and the fatality rates from EV71 infection are high. Moreover, an outbreak of respiratory illnesses caused by an emerging EV, EV68, recently occurred among over 1,000 young children in the United States and was also associated with neurological infections. Although enterovirus has emerged as a considerable global public health threat, no antiviral drug for clinical use is available. In the present work, we screened our compound library for agents targeting viral protease and identified a peptidyl aldehyde, NK-1.8k, that inhibits the proliferation of different EV71 strains and one EV68 strain and that had a 50% effective concentration of 90 nM. Low cytotoxicity (50% cytotoxic concentration, >200 μM) indicated a high selective index of over 2,000. We further characterized a single amino acid substitution inside protease 3C (3C(pro)), N69S, which conferred EV71 resistance to NK-1.8k, possibly by increasing the flexibility of the substrate binding pocket of 3C(pro). The combination of NK-1.8k and an EV71 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitor or entry inhibitor exhibited a strong synergistic anti-EV71 effect. Our findings suggest that NK-1.8k could potentially be developed for anti-EV therapy. PMID:25691647

  2. Clindamycin binding to ribosomes revisited: foot printing and computational detection of two binding sites within the peptidyl transferase center.

    PubMed

    Kostopoulou, O N; Papadopoulos, G; Kouvela, E C; Kalpaxis, D L

    2013-07-01

    Clindamycin is a semi-synthetic lincosamide, active against most Gram-positive bacteria and some protozoa. It binds to the 50S ribosomal subunit and inhibits early peptide chain elongation. By kinetic analysis it has been shown that clindamycin (I) competitively interacts with the A-site of translating ribosomes (C) to form the encounter complex CI, which then slowly isomerizes to a tighter complex, termed C*I. As the final complex is capable of synthesizing peptide bonds with decreased velocity, it was assumed that in C*I complex the drug is fixed near the P-site of the ribosome. In the present study, two series of chemical foot printing experiments were carried out. In the first series, clindamycin and ribosomal complex C were incubated for 1 s and then DMS or kethoxal was added (CI probing). In the second series, complex C was preincubated with clindamycin for 1 min before the addition of DMS or kethoxal (C*I probing). It was found that clindamycin in CI complex protects A2451 and A2602 from chemical probing, both located within the A-site of the catalytic center. In contrast, it strongly protects G2505 in C*I complex, which is a discrete foot print of peptidyl-tRNA bound to the P-site. In both CI and C*I complexes, clindamycin also protects nucleotides A2058 and A2059, located next to the entrance of the exit-tunnel where the nascent peptide leaves the ribosome. Polyamines negatively affect the protection of G2505, but favor the protection of A2451 and A2602 nucleotides. Structure modeling confirms the kinetic and chemical foot printing results and suggests that clindamycin mode of action is more complex than a simple competitive inhibition of peptide bond formation. PMID:23923646

  3. The crystal structure of BlmI as a model for nonribosomal peptide synthetase peptidyl carrier proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Jeremy R.; Ma, Ming; Cuff, Marianne E.; Bigelow, Lance; Bearden, Jessica; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Phillips, George N.; Shen, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Carrier proteins (CPs) play a critical role in the biosynthesis of various natural products, especially in nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and polyketide synthase (PKS) enzymology, where the CPs are referred to as peptidyl-carrier proteins (PCPs) or acyl-carrier proteins (ACPs), respectively. CPs can either be a domain in large multifunctional polypeptides or standalone proteins, termed Type I and Type II, respectively. There have been many biochemical studies of the Type I PKS and NRPS CPs, and of Type II ACPs. However, recently a number of Type II PCPs have been found and biochemically characterized. In order to understand the possible interaction surfaces for combinatorial biosynthetic efforts we crystallized the first characterized and representative Type II PCP member, BlmI, from the bleomycin biosynthetic pathway from Streptomyces verticillus ATCC 15003. The structure is similar to CPs in general but most closely resembles PCPs. Comparisons with previously determined PCP structures in complex with catalytic domains reveals a common interaction surface. This surface is highly variable in charge and shape, which likely confers specificity for interactions. Previous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of a prototypical Type I PCP excised from the multimodular context revealed three conformational states. Comparison of the states with the structure of BlmI and other PCPs reveals that only one of the NMR states is found in other studies, suggesting the other two states may not be relevant. The state represented by the BlmI crystal structure can therefore serve as a model for both Type I and Type II PCPs. PMID:25050442

  4. Identification of prolyl carboxypeptidase as an alternative enzyme for processing of renal angiotensin II using mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Grobe, Nadja; Weir, Nathan M.; Leiva, Orly; Ong, Frank S.; Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Schmaier, Alvin H.; Morris, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) catalyzes conversion of ANG II to ANG-(1–7). The present study uses newly established proteomic approaches and genetic mouse models to examine the contribution of alternative renal peptidases to ACE2-independent formation of ANG-(1–7). In situ and in vitro mass spectrometric characterization showed that substrate concentration and pH control renal ANG II processing. At pH ≥6, ANG-(1–7) formation was significantly reduced in ACE2 knockout (KO) mice. However, at pH <6, formation of ANG-(1–7) in ACE2 KO mice was similar to that in wild-type (WT) mice, suggesting alternative peptidases for renal ANG II processing. Furthermore, the dual prolyl carboxypeptidase (PCP)-prolyl endopeptidase (PEP) inhibitor Z-prolyl-prolinal reduced ANG-(1–7) formation in ACE2 KO mice, while the ACE2 inhibitor MLN-4760 had no effect. Unlike the ACE2 KO mice, ANG-(1–7) formation from ANG II in PEP KO mice was not different from that in WT mice at any tested pH. However, at pH 5, this reaction was significantly reduced in kidneys and urine of PCP-depleted mice. In conclusion, results suggest that ACE2 metabolizes ANG II in the kidney at neutral and basic pH, while PCP catalyzes the same reaction at acidic pH. This is the first report demonstrating that renal ANG-(1–7) formation from ANG II is independent of ACE2. Elucidation of ACE2-independent ANG-(1–7) production pathways may have clinically important implications in patients with metabolic and renal disease. PMID:23392115

  5. Thrombin inhibition by the highly selective 'reversible suicide substrate' N-ethoxycarbonyl-D-phenylalanyl-L-prolyl-alpha-azalysine p-nitrophenyl ester.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Gallina, Carlo; Bolognesi, Martino

    2005-07-01

    Thrombin is the last enzyme in the blood coagulation cascade. All pharmacological aspects support the use of thrombin inhibitors as antithrombotic agents. Here, we review the unusual inhibition behavior of the highly selective 'reversible suicide substrate' N-ethoxycarbonyl-D-phenylalanyl-L-prolyl-alpha-azalysine p-nitrophenyl ester (Eoc-D-Phe-Pro-azaLys-ONp) targeted to the active center of human alpha-thrombin. Eoc-D-Phe-Pro-azaLys-ONp is an acylating agent, but its hydrolysis product 1(N-ethoxycarbonyl-D-phenylalanyl-L-prolyl)-2(4-aminobutyl) hydrazine behaves as a highly selective human alpha-thrombin competitive inhibitor. PMID:16029155

  6. Differential Regulation of Cellular Senescence and Differentiation by Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 in Cardiac Progenitor Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Toko, Haruhiro; Hariharan, Nirmala; Konstandin, Mathias H.; Ormachea, Lucia; McGregor, Michael; Gude, Natalie A.; Sundararaman, Balaji; Joyo, Eri; Joyo, Anya Y.; Collins, Brett; Din, Shabana; Mohsin, Sadia; Uchida, Takafumi; Sussman, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Autologous c-kit+ cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) are currently used in the clinic to treat heart disease. CPC-based regeneration may be further augmented by better understanding molecular mechanisms of endogenous cardiac repair and enhancement of pro-survival signaling pathways that antagonize senescence while also increasing differentiation. The prolyl isomerase Pin1 regulates multiple signaling cascades by modulating protein folding and thereby activity and stability of phosphoproteins. In this study, we examine the heretofore unexplored role of Pin1 in CPCs. Pin1 is expressed in CPCs in vitro and in vivo and is associated with increased proliferation. Pin1 is required for cell cycle progression and loss of Pin1 causes cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase in CPCs, concomitantly associated with decreased expression of Cyclins D and B and increased expression of cell cycle inhibitors p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb). Pin1 deletion increases cellular senescence but not differentiation or cell death of CPCs. Pin1 is required for endogenous CPC response as Pin1 knock-out mice have a reduced number of proliferating CPCs after ischemic challenge. Pin1 overexpression also impairs proliferation and causes G2/M phase cell cycle arrest with concurrent down-regulation of Cyclin B, p53, and Rb. Additionally, Pin1 overexpression inhibits replicative senescence, increases differentiation, and inhibits cell death of CPCs, indicating that cell cycle arrest caused by Pin1 overexpression is a consequence of differentiation and not senescence or cell death. In conclusion, Pin1 has pleiotropic roles in CPCs and may be a molecular target to promote survival, enhance repair, improve differentiation, and antagonize senescence. PMID:24375406

  7. A study of prolyl endopeptidase in bovine serum and its relevance to the tissue enzyme.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, D F; O'Connor, B

    1998-01-01

    Prolyl endopeptidase (PE) belongs to a group of enzymes that specifically recognise the imino acid proline. The characterisation of bovine serum PE was undertaken so that its relationship to its tissue counterparts could be considered. Using various chromatographic methods, PE was partially purified from bovine serum. This preparation was deemed to be enzymatically pure, based on its failure to hydrolyse a wide range of fluorimetric substrates. A native molecular mass of 69.7 kDa was estimated for the enzyme. PE was optimally active at pH 8.0-8.5, demonstrated a preference for phosphate buffer and remained stable over a pH range of 5.0-9.0. A narrowly focused optimal assay temperature of 37 degrees C was evident. Functional reagent studies indicated that this enzyme was a serine protease with a cysteine residue located near or at the active site. The enzyme was also sensitive to heavy metal inhibition. Substrate specificity investigations revealed that the bioactive peptides angiotensin II, bradykinin, luliberin and substance P were hydrolysed by the enzyme preparation, but lower specificities were evident towards these peptides in comparison with the enzyme's tissue counterparts. Specific inhibitor studies, using a range of compounds previously untested against a single PE source, indicated that alpha-ketobenzothiazole was the most effective PE inhibitor, with an IC50 value of 41 pM. In conclusion, the results presented in this paper indicate that bovine serum PE shares many of the characteristics associated with its tissue counterparts, with the exception of its specificity towards certain bioactive peptides. PMID:9597757

  8. Minute Time Scale Prolyl Isomerization Governs Antibody Recognition of an Intrinsically Disordered Immunodominant Epitope*

    PubMed Central

    Fassolari, Marisol; Chemes, Lucia B.; Gallo, Mariana; Smal, Clara; Sánchez, Ignacio E.; de Prat-Gay, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Conformational rearrangements in antibody·antigen recognition are essential events where kinetic discrimination of isomers expands the universe of combinations. We investigated the interaction mechanism of a monoclonal antibody, M1, raised against E7 from human papillomavirus, a prototypic viral oncoprotein and a model intrinsically disordered protein. The mapped 12-amino acid immunodominant epitope lies within a “hinge” region between the N-terminal intrinsically disordered and the C-terminal globular domains. Kinetic experiments show that despite being within an intrinsically disordered region, the hinge E7 epitope has at least two populations separated by a high energy barrier. Nuclear magnetic resonance traced the origin of this barrier to a very slow (t½ ∼4 min) trans-cis prolyl isomerization event involving changes in secondary structure. The less populated (10%) cis isomer is the binding-competent species, thus requiring the 90% of molecules in the trans configuration to isomerize before binding. The association rate for the cis isomer approaches 6 × 107 m−1 s−1, a ceiling for antigen-antibody interactions. Mutagenesis experiments showed that Pro-41 in E7Ep was required for both binding and isomerization. After a slow postbinding unimolecular rearrangement, a consolidated complex with KD = 1.2 × 10−7 m is reached. Our results suggest that presentation of this viral epitope by the antigen-presenting cells would have to be “locked” in the cis conformation, in opposition to the most populated trans isomer, in order to select the specific antibody clone that goes through affinity and kinetic maturation. PMID:23504368

  9. Prolyl Oligopeptidase from the Blood Fluke Schistosoma mansoni: From Functional Analysis to Anti-schistosomal Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fajtová, Pavla; Štefanić, Saša; Hradilek, Martin; Dvořák, Jan; Vondrášek, Jiří; Jílková, Adéla; Ulrychová, Lenka; McKerrow, James H.; Caffrey, Conor R.; Mareš, Michael; Horn, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background Blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma cause schistosomiasis, a parasitic disease that infects over 240 million people worldwide, and for which there is a need to identify new targets for chemotherapeutic interventions. Our research is focused on Schistosoma mansoni prolyl oligopeptidase (SmPOP) from the serine peptidase family S9, which has not been investigated in detail in trematodes. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate that SmPOP is expressed in adult worms and schistosomula in an enzymatically active form. By immunofluorescence microscopy, SmPOP is localized in the tegument and parenchyma of both developmental stages. Recombinant SmPOP was produced in Escherichia coli and its active site specificity investigated using synthetic substrate and inhibitor libraries, and by homology modeling. SmPOP is a true oligopeptidase that hydrolyzes peptide (but not protein) substrates with a strict specificity for Pro at P1. The inhibition profile is analogous to those for mammalian POPs. Both the recombinant enzyme and live worms cleave host vasoregulatory, proline-containing hormones such as angiotensin I and bradykinin. Finally, we designed nanomolar inhibitors of SmPOP that induce deleterious phenotypes in cultured schistosomes. Conclusions/Significance We provide the first localization and functional analysis of SmPOP together with chemical tools for measuring its activity. We briefly discuss the notion that SmPOP, operating at the host-parasite interface to cleave host bioactive peptides, may contribute to the survival of the parasite. If substantiated, SmPOP could be a new target for the development of anti-schistosomal drugs. PMID:26039195

  10. Divergent adaptation of tRNA recognition by Methanococcus jannaschii prolyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Burke, B; Lipman, R S; Shiba, K; Musier-Forsyth, K; Hou, Y M

    2001-06-01

    Analysis of prolyl-tRNA synthetase (ProRS) across all three taxonomic domains (Eubacteria, Eucarya, and Archaea) reveals that the sequences are divided into two distinct groups. Recent studies show that Escherichia coli ProRS, a member of the "prokaryotic-like" group, recognizes specific tRNA bases at both the acceptor and anticodon ends, whereas human ProRS, a member of the "eukaryotic-like" group, recognizes nucleotide bases primarily in the anticodon. The archaeal Methanococcus jannaschii ProRS is a member of the eukaryotic-like group, although its tRNA(Pro) possesses prokaryotic features in the acceptor stem. We show here that, in some respects, recognition of tRNA(Pro) by M. jannaschii ProRS parallels that of human, with a strong emphasis on the anticodon and only weak recognition of the acceptor stem. However, our data also indicate differences in the details of the anticodon recognition between these two eukaryotic-like synthetases. Although the human enzyme places a stronger emphasis on G35, the M. jannaschii enzyme places a stronger emphasis on G36, a feature that is shared by E. coli ProRS. These results, interpreted in the context of an extensive sequence alignment, provide evidence of divergent adaptation by M. jannaschii ProRS; recognition of the tRNA acceptor end is eukaryotic-like, whereas the details of the anticodon recognition are prokaryotic-like. This divergence may be a reflection of the unusual dual function of this enzyme, which catalyzes specific aminoacylation with proline as well as with cysteine. PMID:11342535

  11. Effect of X-Prolyl Dipeptidyl Aminopeptidase Deficiency on Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Baltasar; Kok, Jan; Bockelmann, Wilhelm; Haandrikman, Alfred; Leenhouts, Kees J.; Venema, Gerard

    1993-01-01

    The genetic determinant (pepXP) of an X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (PepXP) has recently been cloned and sequenced from both Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris (B. Mayo, J. Kok, K. Venema, W. Bockelmann, M. Teuber, H. Reinke, and G. Venema, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:38-44, 1991) and L. lactis subsp. lactis (M. Nardi, M.-C. Chopin, A. Chopin, M.-M. Cals, and J.-C. Gripon, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57:45-50, 1991). To examine the possible role of the enzyme in the breakdown of caseins required for lactococci to grow in milk, integration vectors have been constructed and used to specifically inactivate the pepXP gene. After inactivation of the gene in L. lactis subsp. lactis MG1363, which is Lac- and Prt-, the Lac+ Prt+ determinants were transferred by conjugation by using L. lactis subsp. lactis 712 as the donor. Since growth of the transconjugants relative to the PepXP+ strains was not retarded in milk, it was concluded that PepXP is not essential for growth in that medium. It was also demonstrated that the open reading frame ORF1, upstream of pepXP, was not required for PepXP activity in L. lactis. A marked difference between metenkephalin degradation patterns was observed after incubation of this pentapeptide with cell extracts obtained from wild-type lactococci and pepXP mutants. Therefore, altered expression of the pepXP-encoded general dipeptidyl aminopeptidase activity may change the peptide composition of fermented milk products. Images PMID:16348982

  12. Inhibition of Human Prolyl Oligopeptidase Activity by the Cyclotide Psysol 2 Isolated from Psychotria solitudinum.

    PubMed

    Hellinger, Roland; Koehbach, Johannes; Puigpinós, Albert; Clark, Richard J; Tarragó, Teresa; Giralt, Ernest; Gruber, Christian W

    2015-05-22

    Cyclotides are head-to-tail cyclized peptides comprising a stabilizing cystine-knot motif. To date, they are well known for their diverse bioactivities such as anti-HIV and immunosuppressive properties. Yet little is known about specific molecular mechanisms, in particular the interaction of cyclotides with cellular protein targets. Native and synthetic cyclotide-like peptides from Momordica plants are potent and selective inhibitors of different serine-type proteinases such as trypsin, chymotrypsin, matriptase, and tryptase-beta. This study describes the bioactivity-guided isolation of a cyclotide from Psychotria solitudinum as an inhibitor of another serine-type protease, namely, the human prolyl oligopeptidase (POP). Analysis of the inhibitory potency of Psychotria extracts and subsequent fractionation by liquid chromatography yielded the isolated peptide psysol 2 (1), which exhibited an IC50 of 25 μM. In addition the prototypical cyclotide kalata B1 inhibited POP activity with an IC50 of 5.6 μM. The inhibitory activity appeared to be selective for POP, since neither psysol 2 nor kalata B1 were able to inhibit the proteolytic activity of trypsin or chymotrypsin. The enzyme POP is well known for its role in memory and learning processes, and it is currently being considered as a promising therapeutic target for the cognitive deficits associated with several psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. In the context of discovery and development of POP inhibitors with beneficial ADME properties, cyclotides may be suitable starting points considering their stability in biological fluids and possible oral bioavailability. PMID:25894999

  13. Structural and mechanistic analysis of two prolyl endopeptidases: role of interdomain dynamics in catalysis and specificity.

    PubMed

    Shan, Lu; Mathews, Irimpan I; Khosla, Chaitan

    2005-03-01

    Prolyl endopeptidases (PEPs) are a unique class of serine proteases with considerable therapeutic potential for the treatment of celiac sprue. The crystal structures of two didomain PEPs have been solved in alternative configurations, thereby providing insights into the mode of action of these enzymes. The structure of the Sphingomonas capsulata PEP, solved and refined to 1.8-A resolution, revealed an open configuration of the active site. In contrast, the inhibitor-bound PEP from Myxococcus xanthus was crystallized (1.5-A resolution) in a closed form. Comparative analysis of the two structures highlights a critical role for the domain interface in regulating interdomain dynamics and substrate specificity. Structure-based mutagenesis of the M. xanthus PEP confirms an important role for several interfacial residues. A salt bridge between Arg-572 and Asp-196/Glu-197 appears to act as a latch for opening or closing the didomain enzyme, and Arg-572 and Ile-575 may also help secure the incoming peptide substrate to the open form of the enzyme. Arg-618 and Asp-145 are responsible for anchoring the invariant proline residue in the active site of this postproline-cleaving enzyme. A model is proposed for the docking of a representative substrate PQPQLPYPQPQLP in the active site, where the N-terminal substrate residues interact extensively with the catalytic domain, and the C-terminal residues stretch into the propeller domain. Given the promise of the M. xanthus PEP as an oral therapeutic enzyme for treating celiac sprue, our results provide a strong foundation for further optimization of the PEP's clinically useful features. PMID:15738423

  14. Inhibition of Human Prolyl Oligopeptidase Activity by the Cyclotide Psysol 2 Isolated from Psychotria solitudinum

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cyclotides are head-to-tail cyclized peptides comprising a stabilizing cystine-knot motif. To date, they are well known for their diverse bioactivities such as anti-HIV and immunosuppressive properties. Yet little is known about specific molecular mechanisms, in particular the interaction of cyclotides with cellular protein targets. Native and synthetic cyclotide-like peptides from Momordica plants are potent and selective inhibitors of different serine-type proteinases such as trypsin, chymotrypsin, matriptase, and tryptase-beta. This study describes the bioactivity-guided isolation of a cyclotide from Psychotria solitudinum as an inhibitor of another serine-type protease, namely, the human prolyl oligopeptidase (POP). Analysis of the inhibitory potency of Psychotria extracts and subsequent fractionation by liquid chromatography yielded the isolated peptide psysol 2 (1), which exhibited an IC50 of 25 μM. In addition the prototypical cyclotide kalata B1 inhibited POP activity with an IC50 of 5.6 μM. The inhibitory activity appeared to be selective for POP, since neither psysol 2 nor kalata B1 were able to inhibit the proteolytic activity of trypsin or chymotrypsin. The enzyme POP is well known for its role in memory and learning processes, and it is currently being considered as a promising therapeutic target for the cognitive deficits associated with several psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, such as schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease. In the context of discovery and development of POP inhibitors with beneficial ADME properties, cyclotides may be suitable starting points considering their stability in biological fluids and possible oral bioavailability. PMID:25894999

  15. HIF prolyl hydroxylase inhibition augments dopamine release in the rat brain in vivo.

    PubMed

    Witten, Louise; Sager, Thomas; Thirstrup, Kenneth; Johansen, Jens Leander; Larsen, Dorrit Bjerg; Montezinho, Liliana P; Mørk, Arne

    2009-05-15

    The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is essential for the activation of several genes that promote the survival of cells exposed to oxidative stress. Expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in the dopamine (DA) synthesis, is one of the genes that are positively regulated by HIF. Accordingly, HIF induction results in elevated DA release in various cell lines in vitro. HIF prolyl hydroxylase (HPH) is critically involved in the negative regulation of HIF levels. We investigated the in vivo effects of the HPH inhibitor FG0041 on brain DA function in rats by microdialysis in freely moving rats, locomotor activity, and Western blot analysis. Administration of FG0041 (10 mg/kg i.p.), as an acute (single injection), or as subchronic (once daily for 6 days) treatment and cobalt chloride (CoCl2) (60 mg/kg s.c.) potentiated potassium (K+) induced increases in extracellular levels of DA levels in the rat striatum. The increase in extracellular DA of freely moving rats was sought in relationship to locomotor activity in rats. A significant increase in locomotor activity was observed in FG0041-treated rats compared with vehicle on a cocaine challenge. In support of these findings, protein levels of TH in the rat brain stem were increased after treatment with FG0041. These data indicate that FG0041 augments DA function in the rat brain. Inhibition of HPH enhances DA function by increasing DA release, which has implications for the use of HIF induction in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19156859

  16. Use of Umbrella Sampling to Calculate the Entrance/Exit Pathway for Z-Pro-Prolinal Inhibitor in Prolyl Oligopeptidase.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Jean-François; Karttunen, Mikko; Mousseau, Normand; Róg, Tomasz; Bunker, Alex

    2011-06-14

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP), a member of the prolyl endopeptidase family, is known to play a role in several neurological disorders. Its primary function is to cleave a wide range of small oligopeptides, including neuroactive peptides. We have used force biased molecular dynamics simulation to study the binding mechanism of POP. We examined three possible binding pathways using Steered Molecular Dynamics (SMD) and Umbrella Sampling (US) on a crystal structure of porcine POP with bound Z-pro-prolinal (ZPP). Using SMD, an exit pathway between the first and seventh blade of the β-propeller domain of POP was found to be a nonviable route. US on binding pathways through the β-propeller tunnel and the TYR190-GLN208 flexible loop at the interface between both POP domains allowed us to isolate the flexible loop pathway as the most probable. Further analysis of that pathway suggests a long-range covariation of the interdomain H-bond network, which indicates the possibility of large-scale domain reorientation observed in bacterial homologues and hypothesized to also occur in human POP. PMID:26596426

  17. Inhibition of IgA1 proteinases from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Hemophilus influenzae by peptide prolyl boronic acids.

    PubMed

    Bachovchin, W W; Plaut, A G; Flentke, G R; Lynch, M; Kettner, C A

    1990-03-01

    The alpha-aminoboronic acid analog of proline has been synthesized and incorporated into a number of peptides as the COOH-terminal residue. These peptide prolyl boronic acids are potent inhibitors of both the type 1 and type 2 IgA proteinases from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Hemophilus influenzae, but not of the functionally similar IgA proteinase from Streptococcus sanguis. The best inhibitors synthesized thus far have Ki values in the nanomolar range (4.0 to 60 nM). These results indicate that the N. gonorrhoeae and the H. influenzae enzymes belong to the serine protease family of proteolytic enzymes while that from S. sanguis does not. As a group, the IgA proteinases have been noted for their remarkable specificity; thus, the peptide prolyl boronic acids reported here are the first small synthetic molecules to exhibit a relatively high affinity for the active site of an IgA proteinase and are therefore the first to yield some insight into the active site structure and specificity requirements of these enzymes. PMID:2105953

  18. Suppression of Tumor Growth in Mice by Rationally Designed Pseudopeptide Inhibitors of Fibroblast Activation Protein and Prolyl Oligopeptidase1

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kenneth W.; Christiansen, Victoria J.; Yadav, Vivek R.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Lupu, Florea; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Zhang, Roy R.; McKee, Patrick A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments (TMEs) are composed of cancer cells, fibroblasts, extracellular matrix, microvessels, and endothelial cells. Two prolyl endopeptidases, fibroblast activation protein (FAP) and prolyl oligopeptidase (POP), are commonly overexpressed by epithelial-derived malignancies, with the specificity of FAP expression by cancer stromal fibroblasts suggesting FAP as a possible therapeutic target. Despite overexpression in most cancers and having a role in angiogenesis, inhibition of POP activity has received little attention as an approach to quench tumor growth. We developed two specific and highly effective pseudopeptide inhibitors, M83, which inhibits FAP and POP proteinase activities, and J94, which inhibits only POP. Both suppressed human colon cancer xenograft growth > 90% in mice. By immunohistochemical stains, M83- and J94-treated tumors had fewer microvessels, and apoptotic areas were apparent in both. In response to M83, but not J94, disordered collagen accumulations were observed. Neither M83- nor J94-treated mice manifested changes in behavior, weight, or gastrointestinal function. Tumor growth suppression was more extensive than noted with recently reported efforts by others to inhibit FAP proteinase function or reduce FAP expression. Diminished angiogenesis and the accompanying profound reduction in tumor growth suggest that inhibition of either FAP or POP may offer new therapeutic approaches that directly target TMEs. PMID:25622898

  19. Physiological and Pathogenic Roles of Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 in Metabolic Regulations via Multiple Signal Transduction Pathway Modulations.

    PubMed

    Nakatsu, Yusuke; Matsunaga, Yasuka; Yamamotoya, Takeshi; Ueda, Koji; Inoue, Yuki; Mori, Keiichi; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Fujishiro, Midori; Ono, Hiraku; Kushiyama, Akifumi; Asano, Tomoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Prolyl isomerases are divided into three groups, the FKBP family, Cyclophilin and the Parvulin family (Pin1 and Par14). Among these isomerases, Pin1 is a unique prolyl isomerase binding to the motif including pSer/pThr-Pro that is phosphorylated by kinases. Once bound, Pin1 modulates the enzymatic activity, protein stability or subcellular localization of target proteins by changing the cis- and trans-formations of proline. Several studies have examined the roles of Pin1 in the pathogenesis of cancers and Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, recent studies have newly demonstrated Pin1 to be involved in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Interestingly, while Pin1 expression is markedly increased by high-fat diet feeding, Pin1 KO mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and diabetic vascular dysfunction. These phenomena result from the binding of Pin1 to several key factors regulating metabolic functions, which include insulin receptor substrate-1, AMPK, Crtc2 and NF-κB p65. In this review, we focus on recent advances in elucidating the physiological roles of Pin1 as well as the pathogenesis of disorders involving this isomerase, from the viewpoint of the relationships between signal transductions and metabolic functions. PMID:27618008

  20. Cellular oxygen sensing: Importins and exportins are mediators of intracellular localisation of prolyl-4-hydroxylases PHD1 and PHD2

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, Amrei; Pientka, Friederike Katharina; Moeckel, Sylvia; Kettelhake, Antje; Hartmann, Enno; Koehler, Matthias; Depping, Reinhard

    2009-10-02

    Hypoxia-inducible factors are crucial in the regulatory process of oxygen homeostasis of vertebrate cells. Inhibition of prolyl hydroxylation of HIF-{alpha} subunits by prolyl-hydroxylases (PHD1, PHD2 and PHD3) leads to transcription of a greater number of hypoxia responsive genes. We have investigated the subcellular distribution and the molecular mechanisms regulating the intracellular allocation of PHD1 and PHD2. As reported earlier we find PHD1 located exclusively in the nucleus. We demonstrate that nuclear import of PHD1 occurs importin {alpha}/{beta} dependently and relies on a nuclear localisation signal (NLS). By contrast PHD2 is cycling between nucleus and cytoplasm, and nuclear import seems to be independent of 'classical' importin {alpha}/{beta} receptors. Furthermore, we reveal that the exit of PHD2 from the nucleus requires CRM1 and the N-terminal 100 amino acids of the protein. Our findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of the regulation of the oxygen sensor cascade of PHDs in different cellular compartments.

  1. miR-190 Enhances HIF-Dependent Responses to Hypoxia in Drosophila by Inhibiting the Prolyl-4-hydroxylase Fatiga

    PubMed Central

    De Lella Ezcurra, Ana Laura; Bertolin, Agustina Paola; Kim, Kevin; Gándara, Lautaro; Luschnig, Stefan; Perrimon, Norbert; Melani, Mariana; Wappner, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Cellular and systemic responses to low oxygen levels are principally mediated by Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs), a family of evolutionary conserved heterodimeric transcription factors, whose alpha- and beta-subunits belong to the bHLH-PAS family. In normoxia, HIFα is hydroxylated by specific prolyl-4-hydroxylases, targeting it for proteasomal degradation, while in hypoxia the activity of these hydroxylases decreases due to low oxygen availability, leading to HIFα accumulation and expression of HIF target genes. To identify microRNAs required for maximal HIF activity, we conducted an overexpression screen in Drosophila melanogaster, evaluating the induction of a HIF transcriptional reporter. miR-190 overexpression enhanced HIF-dependent biological responses, including terminal sprouting of the tracheal system, while in miR-190 loss of function embryos the hypoxic response was impaired. In hypoxic conditions, miR-190 expression was upregulated and required for induction of HIF target genes by directly inhibiting the HIF prolyl-4-hydroxylase Fatiga. Thus, miR-190 is a novel regulator of the hypoxia response that represses the oxygen sensor Fatiga, leading to HIFα stabilization and enhancement of hypoxic responses. PMID:27223464

  2. Cloning and expression of a novel prolyl endopeptidase from Aspergillus oryzae and its application in beer stabilization.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chao; Yu, Xiao-Wei; Xu, Yan

    2015-02-01

    A novel prolyl endopeptidase gene from Aspergillus oryzae was cloned and expressed in Pichia pastoris. Amino acid sequence analysis of the prolyl endopeptidase from Aspergillus oryzae (AO-PEP) showed that this enzyme belongs to a class serine peptide S28 family. Expression, purification and characterization of AO-PEP were analyzed. The optimum pH and temperature were pH 5.0 and 40 °C, respectively. The enzyme was activated and stabilized by metal ion Ca(2+) and inhibited by Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Al(3+), and Cu(2+). The K m and k cat values of the purified enzyme for different substrates were evaluated. The results implied that the recombinant AO-PEP possessed higher affinity for the larger substrate. A fed-batch strategy was developed for the high-cell-density fermentation and the enzyme activity reached 1,130 U/l after cultivation in 7 l fermentor. After addition of AO-PEP during the fermentation phase of beer brewing, demonstrated the potential application of AO-PEP in the non-biological stability of beer, which favor further industrial development of this new enzyme in beer stabilization, due to its reducing operational costs, as well as no beer losses unlike regeneration process and beer lost with regenerated polyvinylpolypyrrolidone system. PMID:25547787

  3. Pharmacological Characterization of ZYAN1, a Novel Prolyl Hydroxylase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Anemia.

    PubMed

    Jain, M R; Joharapurkar, A A; Pandya, V; Patel, V; Joshi, J; Kshirsagar, S; Patel, K; Patel, P R; Desai, R C

    2016-02-01

    Prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) inhibitors stabilize hypoxia inducible factor (HIF), and exert antianemic effect by potentiating erythropoietin (EPO) expression and down-regulation of hepcidin. ZYAN1 is a novel PHD inhibitor under clinical development for the treatment of anemia. The pharmacodynamic effects of acute and chronic dosing of ZYAN1 were assessed in normal and 5/6 nephrectomized Wistar rats. The effect of ZYAN1 was also investigated in cisplatin-induced anemia using C57 mice. Acute treatment with ZYAN1 increased circulating EPO levels (10.3±3.7 and 40.0±8.5 fold rise at 15 and 30 mg/kg, respectively), reticulocyte count (4.2±0.5 and 6.0±0.2 fold rise at 15 and 30 mg/kg, respectively) and stabilized HIF (28% increase at 45 mg/kg) in normal rats. Nephrectomized rats showed similar dose-related pharmacodynamic effects. In a 28-day study in nephrectomized rats, ZYAN1 administered every alternate day, caused increase in hemoglobin (1.9±0.3 and 2.5±0.4 g/dL) and RBC count (10.7±4.0 and 14.0±4.1%) at 15 and 30 mg/kg respectively. In cisplatin-treated mice also an increase in hemoglobin (3.4±0.2 and 5.9±0.2 g/dL) and RBC count (22.5±2.2 and 37.3±1.7%) at 15 and 30 mg/kg respectively was observed. ZYAN1's effects on hemoglobin and RBC count were distinct from darbepoietin. ZYAN1 demonstrated hematinic potential by combined effects on EPO release and efficient iron utilization. The efficacy of ZYAN1 in disease models of different etiologies suggests that it will be useful in treating wide spectrum of anemia patients. PMID:26367279

  4. Human Prolyl-4-hydroxylase α(I) Transcription Is Mediated by Upstream Stimulatory Factors *

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Shen, Ying H.; Wang, Xinwen; Wang, Jing; Gan, Yehua; Chen, Nanyue; Wang, Jian; LeMaire, Scott A.; Coselli, Joseph S.; Wang, Xing Li

    2010-01-01

    Prolyl-4-hydroxylase α(I) (P4Hα(I)) is the rate-limiting subunit forP4Henzyme activity, which is essential for procollagen hydroxylation and secretion. In the current study, we have characterized the human P4Hα(I) promoter for transcription factors and DNA elements regulating P4Hα(I) expression. Using a progressive deletion cloning approach, we have constructed pGL3-P4Hα(I) recombinant plasmids. We have identified a positive regulatory region at the positions of bp −184 to −97 responsible for ~80% of the P4Hα(I) promoter efficiency. Three E-boxes were located within this region, and the E-box at position bp −135 explains most of the regulatory capacity. Upstream stimulatory factors (USF1/USF2) were shown to bind on the E-box using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Suppression of USF1 and/or USF2 using specific short interference RNA resulted in a significant reduction in P4Hα(I) promoter activity, and overexpressed USF1 or USF2 increased P4Hα(I) promoter activity significantly. Although transforming growth factor β1 increased the USF1/USF2-E-box binding and P4Hα(I) promoter activity, this up-regulatory effect can be largely prevented by USF1/USF2-specific short interference RNA. On the other hand, cigarette smoking extracts, which have been shown to suppress P4Hα(I) expression, inhibited the binding between the USF1/USF2 and E-box, resulting in a reduced P4Hα(I) promoter activity. Furthermore, the E-box on the P4Hα(I) promoter appeared to indiscriminately bind with either USF1 or USF2, with a similar outcome on the promoter efficiency. In conclusion, our study shows that USF1/USF2 plays a critical role in basal P4Hα(I) expression, and both positive (transforming growth factor β1) and negative (cigarette smoking extract) regulators appear to influence the USF-E-box interaction and affect P4Hα(I) expression. PMID:16488890

  5. Comparative analysis of the substrate preferences of two post-proline cleaving endopeptidases, prolyl oligopeptidase and fibroblast activation protein α

    PubMed Central

    Jambunathan, Kalyani; Watson, Douglas S.; Endsley, Aaron N.; Kodukula, Krishna; Galande, Amit K.

    2012-01-01

    Post-proline cleaving peptidases are promising therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases, psychiatric conditions, metabolic disorders, and many cancers. Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP; E.C. 3.4.21.26) and fibroblast activation protein α (FAP; E.C. 3.4.24.B28) are two post-proline cleaving endopeptidases with very similar substrate specificities. Both enzymes are implicated in numerous human diseases, but their study is impeded by the lack of specific substrate probes. We interrogated a combinatorial library of proteolytic substrates and identified novel and selective substrates of POP and FAP. These new sequences will be useful as probes for fundamental biochemical study, scaffolds for inhibitor design, and triggers for controlled drug delivery. PMID:22750443

  6. Crystal Structures of Trypanosoma brucei Oligopeptidase B Broaden the Paradigm of Catalytic Regulation in Prolyl Oligopeptidase Family Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Morty, Rory E.; Fülöp, Vilmos

    2013-01-01

    Oligopeptidase B cleaves after basic amino acids in peptides up to 30 residues. As a virulence factor in bacteria and trypanosomatid pathogens that is absent in higher eukaryotes, this is a promising drug target. Here we present ligand-free open state and inhibitor-bound closed state crystal structures of oligopeptidase B from Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. These (and related) structures show the importance of structural dynamics, governed by a fine enthalpic and entropic balance, in substrate size selectivity and catalysis. Peptides over 30 residues cannot fit the enzyme cavity, preventing the complete domain closure required for a key propeller Asp/Glu to fix the catalytic His and Arg in the catalytically competent conformation. This size exclusion mechanism protects larger peptides and proteins from degradation. Similar bacterial prolyl endopeptidase and archael acylaminoacyl peptidase structures demonstrate this mechanism is conserved among oligopeptidase family enzymes across all three domains of life. PMID:24265767

  7. Hypoxia inducible factor prolyl hydroxylases as targets for neuroprotection by “antioxidant” metal chelators: from ferroptosis to stroke

    PubMed Central

    Speer, Rachel E.; Karuppagounder, Saravanan S.; Basso, Manuela; Sleiman, Sama; Kumar, Amit; Brand, David; Smirnova, Natalya; Gazaryan, Irina; Khim, Soah J.; Ratan, Rajiv R.

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic conditions including stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease are leading causes of death and long-term disability in the United States, and efforts to develop novel therapeutics for these conditions have historically had poor success in translating from bench to bedside. Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) mediates a broad, evolutionarily conserved, endogenous adaptive program to hypoxia, and manipulation of components of the HIF pathway are neuroprotective in a number of human neurological diseases and experimental models. In this review, we discuss molecular components of one aspect of hypoxic adpatation in detail, and provide perspective on which targets within this pathway appear to be ripest for preventing and repairing neurodegeneration. Further, we highlight the role of HIF prolyl hydroxylases as emerging targets for the salutary effects of metal chelators on ferroptosis in vitro as well in animal models of neurological diseases. PMID:23376032

  8. Drugs affecting brain dopamine interfere with the effect of Z-prolyl-D-leucine on morphine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Kovács, G L; Telegdy, G; Hódi, K

    1984-09-01

    The dipeptide Z-prolyl-D-leucine (Z-Pro-D-Leu) has been demonstrated to inhibit the development of tolerance to and dependence on morphine in the mouse. Since the dipeptide affects dopamine (DA) utilization in the terminal regions of the mesolimbic and nigrostriatal DA-ergic projections, the question has been studied of whether DA-ergic mechanisms are involved in the action of Z-Pro-D-Leu on morphine withdrawal. Both inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase by alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (alpha-MPT) and inhibition of DA receptors by pimozide interfere with the effect of Z-Pro-D-Leu on naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. Inhibition of serotonin (5-HT) synthesis by DL-p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA), on the other hand, does not modify the effect of the dipeptide. The results argue for a role of DA-ergic mechanisms in the effect of Z-Pro-D-Leu on the development of morphine dependence. PMID:6541792

  9. [Multicomponent antithrombotic effect of the neuroprotective prolyl dipeptide GVS-111 and its major metabolite cyclo-L-prolylglycine].

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaia, R U; Liapina, L A; Pastorova, V E; Mirzoev, T Kh; Gudasheva, T A; Seredenin, S B; Ashmarin, I P

    2002-01-01

    The experiments in vivo showed that the new nootropic prolyl-containing GVS-111 produces an antithrombotic effect, influencing various stages of the blood coagulation process. GVS-111 exhibits anticoagulant and fibrinolytic properties and enhances fibrin destabilization by reducing the XIIIa factor activity. These effects are manifested upon both intraperitoneal (1 mg/kg) and peroral (10 mg/kg) administration of GVS-111 (in both cases, a single daily treatment over a period of 10 days). The same effects (anticoagulant, fibrinolytic, antifibrin-stabilizing) were observed in in vitro experiments with both GVS-111 (10(-3)-10(-6) M) and its main metabolite cyclo-L-prolylglycine (up to 10(-10) M). In addition, the latter metabolite exhibited an antiaggregant effect. The antithrombotic activity of GVS-111, together with previously established neuroprotector properties, low toxicity, and the absence of complications, makes this compound a promising antistroke drug. PMID:12109290

  10. Expression, Purification, Crystallization And Preliminary X-Ray Studies of a Prolyl-4-Hydroxylase Protein From Bacillus Anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.A.; Scott, E.E.; Limburg, J.

    2009-05-26

    Collagen prolyl-4-hydroxylase (C-P4H) catalyzes the hydroxylation of specific proline residues in procollagen, which is an essential step in collagen biosynthesis. A new form of P4H from Bacillus anthracis (anthrax-P4H) that shares many characteristics with the type I C-P4H from human has recently been characterized. The structure of anthrax-P4H could provide important insight into the chemistry of C-P4Hs and into the function of this unique homodimeric P4H. X-ray diffraction data of selenomethionine-labeled anthrax-P4H recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli have been collected to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution.

  11. Four-Week Studies of Oral Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-Prolyl Hydroxylase Inhibitor GSK1278863 for Treatment of Anemia.

    PubMed

    Holdstock, Louis; Meadowcroft, Amy M; Maier, Rayma; Johnson, Brendan M; Jones, Delyth; Rastogi, Anjay; Zeig, Steven; Lepore, John J; Cobitz, Alexander R

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors stabilize levels of hypoxia-inducible factor that upregulate transcription of multiple genes associated with the response to hypoxia, including production of erythropoietin. We conducted two phase 2a studies to explore the relationship between the dose of the hypoxia-inducible factor-prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor GSK1278863 and hemoglobin response in patients with anemia of CKD (baseline hemoglobin 8.5-11.0 g/dl) not undergoing dialysis and not receiving recombinant human erythropoietin (nondialysis study) and in patients with anemia of CKD (baseline hemoglobin 9.5-12.0 g/dl) on hemodialysis and being treated with stable doses of recombinant human erythropoietin (hemodialysis study). Participants were randomized 1:1:1:1 to a once-daily oral dose of GSK1278863 (0.5 mg, 2 mg, or 5 mg) or control (placebo for the nondialysis study; continuing on recombinant human erythropoietin for the hemodialysis study) for 4 weeks, with a 2-week follow-up. In the nondialysis study, GSK1278863 produced dose-dependent effects on hemoglobin, with the highest dose resulting in a mean increase of 1 g/dl at week 4. In the hemodialysis study, treatment with GSK1278863 in the 5-mg arm maintained mean hemoglobin concentrations after the switch from recombinant human erythropoietin, whereas mean hemoglobin decreased in the lower-dose arms. In both studies, the effects on hemoglobin occurred with elevations in endogenous erythropoietin within the range usually observed in the respective populations and markedly lower than those in the recombinant human erythropoietin control arm in the hemodialysis study, and without clinically significant elevations in plasma vascular endothelial growth factor concentrations. GSK1278863 was generally safe and well tolerated at the doses and duration studied. GSK1278863 may prove an effective alternative for managing anemia of CKD. PMID:26494831

  12. TsPAP1 encodes a novel plant prolyl aminopeptidase whose expression is induced in response to suboptimal growth conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Szawlowska, Urszula; Grabowska, Agnieszka; Zdunek-Zastocka, Edyta; Bielawski, Wieslaw

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A cDNA encoding a novel plant prolyl aminopeptidase, TsPAP1, was obtained from triticale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cloned TsPAP1 cDNA is 1387 bp long and encodes a protein of 390 amino acids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The deduced TsPAP1 protein revealed characteristics of the monomeric bacterial PAPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The TsPAP1 mRNA level increased under drought, salinity and in the presence of metal ions. -- Abstract: A triticale cDNA encoding a prolyl aminopeptidase (PAP) was obtained by RT-PCR and has been designated as TsPAP1. The cloned cDNA is 1387 bp long and encodes a protein of 390 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 43.9 kDa. The deduced TsPAP1 protein exhibits a considerable sequence identity with the biochemically characterized bacterial and fungal PAP proteins of small molecular masses ({approx}35 kDa). Moreover, the presence of conserved regions that are characteristic for bacterial monomeric PAP enzymes (the GGSWG motif, the localization of the catalytic triad residues and the segment involved in substrate binding) has also been noted. Primary structure analysis and phylogenetic analysis revealed that TsPAP1 encodes a novel plant PAP protein that is distinct from the multimeric proteins that have thus far been characterized in plants and whose counterparts have been recognized only in bacteria and fungi. A significant increase in the TsPAP1 transcript level in the shoots of triticale plants was observed under drought and saline conditions as well as in the presence of cadmium and aluminium ions in the nutrient medium. This paper is the first report describing changes in the transcript levels of any plant PAP in response to suboptimal growth conditions.

  13. Characterization of peptidyl boronic acid inhibitors of mammalian 20 S and 26 S proteasomes and their inhibition of proteasomes in cultured cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, R C; Assinder, S J; Christie, G; Mason, G G; Markwell, R; Wadsworth, H; McLaughlin, M; King, R; Chabot-Fletcher, M C; Breton, J J; Allsop, D; Rivett, A J

    2000-01-01

    Proteasomes are large multisubunit proteinases which have several distinct catalytic sites. In this study a series of di- and tri-peptidyl boronic acids have been tested on the chymotrypsin-like activity of purified mammalian 20 S and 26 S proteasomes assayed with succinyl-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-amidomethylcoumarin (suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-AMC) as substrate. The inhibition of 20 S proteasomes is competitive but only slowly reversible. The K(i) values for the best inhibitors were in the range 10-100 nM with suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-AMC as substrate, but the compounds tested were much less effective on other proteasome activities measured with other substrates. Free boronic acid inhibitors exhibited equivalent potency to their pinacol esters. Both benzoyl (Bz)-Phe-boroLeu and benzyloxycarbonyl (Cbz)-Leu-Leu-boroLeu pinacol ester inhibited 20 S and 26 S proteasomes with non-ideal behaviour, differences in inhibition of the two forms of proteasomes becoming apparent at high inhibitor concentrations (above 3xK(i)). Both of these compounds were also potent inhibitors of 20 S and 26 S proteasomes in cultured cells. However, gel filtration of cell extracts prepared from cells treated with radiolabelled phenacetyl-Leu-Leu-boroLeu showed that only 20 S proteasomes were strongly labelled, demonstrating differences in the characteristics of inhibition of 20 S and 26 S proteasomes. The usefulness of peptidyl boronic acid inhibitors for investigations of proteasome-mediated protein degradation was confirmed by the observation that Bz-Phe-boroLeu and Cbz-Leu-Leu-boroLeu pinacol ester inhibited NFkappaB activation with IC(50) values comparable to their K(i) values for purified proteasomes. The latter result supports the view that the chymotrypsin-like activity of proteasomes assayed with suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-AMC is a critical one for protein degradation in cells. PMID:10677365

  14. Prolyl hydroxylation by EglN2 destabilizes FOXO3a by blocking its interaction with the USP9x deubiquitinase

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xingnan; Zhai, Bo; Koivunen, Peppi; Shin, Sandra J.; Lu, Gang; Liu, Jiayun; Geisen, Christoph; Chakraborty, Abhishek A.; Moslehi, Javid J.; Smalley, David M.; Wei, Xin; Chen, Xian; Chen, Zhengming; Beres, Justine M.; Tsao, Jen Lan; Brenner, Mitchell C.; Fan, Cheng; DePinho, Ronald A.; Paik, Jihye; Gygi, Steven P.; Kaelin, William G.; Zhang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    The three EglN prolyl hydroxylases (EglN1, EglN2, and EglN3) regulate the stability of the HIF transcription factor. We recently showed that loss of EglN2, however, also leads to down-regulation of Cyclin D1 and decreased cell proliferation in a HIF-independent manner. Here we report that EglN2 can hydroxylate FOXO3a on two specific prolyl residues in vitro and in vivo. Hydroxylation of these sites prevents the binding of USP9x deubiquitinase, thereby promoting the proteasomal degradation of FOXO3a. FOXO transcription factors can repress Cyclin D1 transcription. Failure to hydroxylate FOXO3a promotes its accumulation in cells, which in turn suppresses Cyclin D1 expression. These findings provide new insights into post-transcriptional control of FOXO3a and provide a new avenue for pharmacologically altering Cyclin D1 activity. PMID:24990963

  15. Prolyl hydroxylation by EglN2 destabilizes FOXO3a by blocking its interaction with the USP9x deubiquitinase.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xingnan; Zhai, Bo; Koivunen, Peppi; Shin, Sandra J; Lu, Gang; Liu, Jiayun; Geisen, Christoph; Chakraborty, Abhishek A; Moslehi, Javid J; Smalley, David M; Wei, Xin; Chen, Xian; Chen, Zhengming; Beres, Justine M; Zhang, Jing; Tsao, Jen Lan; Brenner, Mitchell C; Zhang, Yuqing; Fan, Cheng; DePinho, Ronald A; Paik, Jihye; Gygi, Steven P; Kaelin, William G; Zhang, Qing

    2014-07-01

    The three EglN prolyl hydroxylases (EglN1, EglN2, and EglN3) regulate the stability of the HIF transcription factor. We recently showed that loss of EglN2, however, also leads to down-regulation of Cyclin D1 and decreased cell proliferation in a HIF-independent manner. Here we report that EglN2 can hydroxylate FOXO3a on two specific prolyl residues in vitro and in vivo. Hydroxylation of these sites prevents the binding of USP9x deubiquitinase, thereby promoting the proteasomal degradation of FOXO3a. FOXO transcription factors can repress Cyclin D1 transcription. Failure to hydroxylate FOXO3a promotes its accumulation in cells, which in turn suppresses Cyclin D1 expression. These findings provide new insights into post-transcriptional control of FOXO3a and provide a new avenue for pharmacologically altering Cyclin D1 activity. PMID:24990963

  16. Production and characterization of two major Aspergillus oryzae secreted prolyl endopeptidases able to efficiently digest proline-rich peptides of gliadin.

    PubMed

    Eugster, Philippe J; Salamin, Karine; Grouzmann, Eric; Monod, Michel

    2015-12-01

    Prolyl endopeptidases are key enzymes in the digestion of proline-rich proteins. Fungal extracts rich in prolyl endopeptidases produced by a species such as Aspergillus oryzae used in food fermentation would be of particular interest for the development of an oral enzyme therapy product in patients affected by intolerance to gluten. Two major A. oryzae secreted prolyl endopeptidases of the MEROPS S28 peptidase family, AoS28A and AoS28B, were identified when this fungus was grown at acidic pH in a medium containing soy meal protein or wheat gliadin as the sole source of nitrogen. AoS28B was produced by 12 reference A. oryzae strains used in food fermentation. AoS28A was secreted by six of these 12 strains. This protease is the orthologue of the previously characterized Aspergillus fumigatus (AfuS28) and Aspergillus niger (AN-PEP) prolyl endopeptidases which are encoded by genes with a similar intron-exon structure. Large amounts of secreted AoS28A and AoS28B were obtained by gene overexpression in A. oryzae. AoS28A and AoS28B are endoproteases able to cleave N-terminally blocked proline substrates. Both enzymes very efficiently digested the proline-rich 33-mer of gliadin, the most representative immunotoxic peptide deriving from gliadin, with some differences in terms of specificity and optimal pH. Digestion of the gliadin peptide in short peptides with both enzymes was found to occur from its N terminus. PMID:26464108

  17. Photochromism of halorhodopsin. cis/trans isomerization of the retinal around the 13-14 double bond.

    PubMed

    Lanyi, J K

    1986-10-25

    The isomeric composition of retinal in membrane-bound and in purified but detergent-free, dark-adapted halorhodopsin was found to be about 70% 13-cis and 30% all-trans. Any illumination increased the all-trans content relative to the dark-adapted state, but blue illumination shifted the isomeric composition more toward all-trans while red illumination of blue-adapted samples shifted it more toward 13-cis. In the presence of chloride this photoisomerization caused the kind of photochromic behavior reported earlier in Smith, S. O., Marvin, M. J., Bogomolni, R. A., and Mathies, R. A. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 12326-12329, i.e. blue light caused the absorption maximum to move toward longer wavelengths and red light reversed the shift. Only the all-trans chromophore exhibited the complete photocycle described earlier in detergent-solubilized halorhodopsin, and this was the form that could be associated with light-driven chloride transport activity in cell envelope vesicles. In the absence of chloride the spectroscopic changes caused by illumination were much smaller. Reconstitution of bleached preparations with 13-cis- and all-trans-retinal, in the presence and absence of chloride, confirmed that the difference between the absorption maxima of the two isomeric forms of the chromophore is affected by chloride: 13-cis-halorhodopsin absorbs at about 567-568 nm with and without chloride, and the all-trans pigment absorbs near 568 nm in the absence of chloride, but at 578 nm in its presence. The simplest explanation of this finding is that most of the red-shift which accompanies the 13-cis----all-trans transition originates from electrostatic interaction of the retinal with chloride bound in its vicinity. PMID:3771521

  18. "There's no chasing involved": cis/trans relationships, "tranny chasers," and the future of a sex-positive trans politics.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Avery Brooks

    2014-01-01

    This article adds to a small, but growing, body of work on trans sexualities and partnerships, and provides a much-needed inquiry into the complex and contested politics of desire when we take trans identities, bodies, and sexualities into account. Using digital ethnographic data from YouTube videos along with in-person observational data from LGBTQ and trans conferences in the U.S., Tompkins argues that a sex-positive trans politics cannot emerge in trans and trans-allied communities if the rhetoric of the "tranny chaser" continues to inform discourses of desire and attraction to trans people. PMID:24294827

  19. Interplay between metal binding and cis/trans isomerization in legume lectins: structural and thermodynamic study of P. angolensis lectin.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Pino, Abel; Buts, Lieven; Wyns, Lode; Loris, Remy

    2006-08-01

    The interplay between metal binding, carbohydrate binding activity, stability and structure of the lectin from Pterocarpus angolensis was investigated. Removal of the metals leads to a more flexible form of the protein with significantly less conformational stability. Crystal structures of this metal-free form show significant structural rearrangements, although some structural features that allow the binding of sugars are retained. We propose that substitution of an asparagine residue at the start of the C-terminal beta-strand of the legume lectin monomer hinders the trans-isomerization of the cis-peptide bond upon demetallization and constitutes an intramolecular switch governing the isomer state of the non-proline bond and ultimately the lectin phenotype. PMID:16824540

  20. Cis-trans isomerism in a square-planar platinum(II) complex bearing bulky fluorinated phosphane ligands.

    PubMed

    Bernès, Sylvain; Meléndez, Francisco J; Torrens, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    Transition-metal complexes bearing fluorinated phosphane and thiolate ligands has been an area of study in recent years and the chemical context of the current work is related to the metal-assisted functionalization of fluorinated derivatives. The cis and trans isomers of the square-planar complex bis[(pentafluorophenyl)diphenylphosphane-κP]bis(2,3,5,6-tetrafluorobenzenethiolato-κS)platinum(II), [Pt(C6HF4S)2{P(C6H5)2(C6F5)}2], have been crystallized from a single chromatographic fraction and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis. The stabilization of the cis isomer results from weak intramolecular π-stacking interactions and possibly from the formation of a C-F...Pt contact, characterized by an F...Pt separation of 2.957 (6) Å. The natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) for this isomer confirms that the corresponding F → Pt charge transfer accounts for 6.92 kcal mol(-1) in the isomer stabilization. Such interactions are not present in the centrosymmetric trans isomer. PMID:27045175

  1. Molecular cloning of the. alpha. -subunit of human prolyl 4-hydroxylase: The complete cDNA-derived amino acid sequence and evidence for alternative splicing of RNA transcripts

    SciTech Connect

    Helaakoski, T.; Vuori, K.; Myllylae, R.; Kivirikko, K.I.; Pihlajaniemi, T. )

    1989-06-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} tetramer, catalyzes the formation of 4-hydroxyproline in collagens by the hydroxylation of proline residues in peptide linkages. The authors report here on the isolation of cDNA clones encoding the {alpha}-subunit of the enzyme from human tumor HT-1080, placenta, and fibroblast cDNA libraries. Eight overlapping clones covering almost all of the corresponding 3,000-nucleotide mRNA, including all the coding sequences, were characterized. These clones encode a polypeptide of 517 amino acid residues and a signal peptide of 17 amino acids. Previous characterization of cDNA clones for the {beta}-subunit of prolyl 4-hydroxylase has indicated that its C terminus has the amino acid sequence Lys-Asp-Gly-Leu, which, it has been suggested, is necessary for the retention of a polypeptide within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. The {alpha}-subunit does not have this C-terminal sequence, and thus one function of the {beta}-subunit in the prolyl 4-hydroxylase tetramer appears to be to retain the enzyme within this cell organelle. Southern blot analyses of human genomic DNA with a cDNA probe for the {alpha}-subunit suggested the presence of only one gene encoding the two types of mRNA, which appear to result from mutually exclusive alternative splicing of primary transcripts of one gene.

  2. The Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 Promotes the Herpesvirus-Induced Phosphorylation-Dependent Disassembly of the Nuclear Lamina Required for Nucleocytoplasmic Egress.

    PubMed

    Milbradt, Jens; Hutterer, Corina; Bahsi, Hanife; Wagner, Sabrina; Sonntag, Eric; Horn, Anselm H C; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Mori, Yasuko; Sticht, Heinrich; Fossen, Torgils; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear lamina lines the inner nuclear membrane providing a structural framework for the nucleus. Cellular processes, such as nuclear envelope breakdown during mitosis or nuclear export of large ribonucleoprotein complexes, are functionally linked to the disassembly of the nuclear lamina. In general, lamina disassembly is mediated by phosphorylation, but the precise molecular mechanism is still not completely understood. Recently, we suggested a novel mechanism for lamina disassembly during the nuclear egress of herpesviral capsids which involves the cellular isomerase Pin1. In this study, we focused on mechanistic details of herpesviral nuclear replication to demonstrate the general importance of Pin1 for lamina disassembly. In particular, Ser22-specific lamin phosphorylation consistently generates a Pin1-binding motif in cells infected with human and animal alpha-, beta-, and gammaherpesviruses. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we showed that binding of Pin1 to a synthetic lamin peptide induces its cis/trans isomerization in vitro. A detailed bioinformatic evaluation strongly suggests that this structural conversion induces large-scale secondary structural changes in the lamin N-terminus. Thus, we concluded that a Pin1-induced conformational change of lamins may represent the molecular trigger responsible for lamina disassembly. Consistent with this concept, pharmacological inhibition of Pin1 activity blocked lamina disassembly in herpesvirus-infected fibroblasts and consequently impaired virus replication. In addition, a phospho-mimetic Ser22Glu lamin mutant was still able to form a regular lamina structure and overexpression of a Ser22-phosphorylating kinase did not induce lamina disassembly in Pin1 knockout cells. Intriguingly, this was observed in absence of herpesvirus infection proposing a broader importance of Pin1 for lamina constitution. Thus, our results suggest a functional model of similar events leading to disassembly of the nuclear

  3. The Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 Promotes the Herpesvirus-Induced Phosphorylation-Dependent Disassembly of the Nuclear Lamina Required for Nucleocytoplasmic Egress

    PubMed Central

    Milbradt, Jens; Hutterer, Corina; Bahsi, Hanife; Wagner, Sabrina; Sonntag, Eric; Kaufer, Benedikt B.; Mori, Yasuko; Sticht, Heinrich; Fossen, Torgils; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear lamina lines the inner nuclear membrane providing a structural framework for the nucleus. Cellular processes, such as nuclear envelope breakdown during mitosis or nuclear export of large ribonucleoprotein complexes, are functionally linked to the disassembly of the nuclear lamina. In general, lamina disassembly is mediated by phosphorylation, but the precise molecular mechanism is still not completely understood. Recently, we suggested a novel mechanism for lamina disassembly during the nuclear egress of herpesviral capsids which involves the cellular isomerase Pin1. In this study, we focused on mechanistic details of herpesviral nuclear replication to demonstrate the general importance of Pin1 for lamina disassembly. In particular, Ser22-specific lamin phosphorylation consistently generates a Pin1-binding motif in cells infected with human and animal alpha-, beta-, and gammaherpesviruses. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we showed that binding of Pin1 to a synthetic lamin peptide induces its cis/trans isomerization in vitro. A detailed bioinformatic evaluation strongly suggests that this structural conversion induces large-scale secondary structural changes in the lamin N-terminus. Thus, we concluded that a Pin1-induced conformational change of lamins may represent the molecular trigger responsible for lamina disassembly. Consistent with this concept, pharmacological inhibition of Pin1 activity blocked lamina disassembly in herpesvirus-infected fibroblasts and consequently impaired virus replication. In addition, a phospho-mimetic Ser22Glu lamin mutant was still able to form a regular lamina structure and overexpression of a Ser22-phosphorylating kinase did not induce lamina disassembly in Pin1 knockout cells. Intriguingly, this was observed in absence of herpesvirus infection proposing a broader importance of Pin1 for lamina constitution. Thus, our results suggest a functional model of similar events leading to disassembly of the nuclear

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase from Escherichia coli in complex with the acceptor-TΨC domain of tRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kosuke; Qi, Hao; Shimizu, Yoshihiro; Murakami, Ryo; Miura, Kin-ichiro; Ueda, Takuya; Uchiumi, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase (Pth) cleaves the ester bond between the peptide and the tRNA of peptidyl-tRNA molecules, which are the product of aborted translation. In the present work, Pth from Escherichia coli was crystallized with the acceptor-TΨC domain of tRNA using 1,4-butanediol as a precipitant. The crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P61, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 55.1, c = 413.1 Å, and diffracted X-rays beyond 2.4 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit is expected to contain two complexes of Pth and the acceptor-TΨC domain of tRNA (V M = 2.8 Å3 Da−1), with a solvent content of 60.8%. The structure is being solved by molecular replacement. PMID:22139168

  5. Molecular and Biochemical Characterization of the Parvulin-Type PPIases in Lotus japonicus1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kouri, Evangelia D.; Labrou, Nikolaos E.; Garbis, Spiros D.; Kalliampakou, Katerina I.; Stedel, Catalina; Dimou, Maria; Udvardi, Michael K.; Katinakis, Panagiotis; Flemetakis, Emmanouil

    2009-01-01

    The cis/trans isomerization of the peptide bond preceding proline is an intrinsically slow process, although important in many biological processes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In vivo, this isomerization is catalyzed by peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans-isomerases (PPIases). Here, we present the molecular and biochemical characterization of parvulin-type PPIase family members of the model legume Lotus japonicus, annotated as LjPar1, LjPar2, and LjPar3. Although LjPar1 and LjPar2 were found to be homologous to PIN1 (Protein Interacting with NIMA)-type parvulins and hPar14 from human, respectively, LjPar3 represents a novel multidomain parvulin, apparently present only in plants, that contains an active carboxyl-terminal sulfurtransferase domain. All Lotus parvulins were heterologously expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, and purified protein verification measurements used a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based proteomic method. The biochemical characterization of the recombinant Lotus parvulins revealed that they possess PPIase activity toward synthetic tetrapeptides, although they exhibited different substrate specificities depending on the amino acid amino terminal to proline. These differences were also studied in a structural context using molecular modeling of the encoded polypeptides. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the three parvulin genes of Lotus are ubiquitously expressed in all plant organs. LjPar1 was found to be up-regulated during the later stages of nodule development. Subcellular localization of LjPar-enhanced Yellow Fluorescence Protein (eYFP) fusions expressed in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf epidermal cells revealed that LjPar1- and LjPar2-eYFP fusions were localized in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, in contrast to LjPar3-eYFP, which was clearly localized in plastids. Divergent substrate specificities, expression profiles, and subcellular localization indicate that plant

  6. Site-selective chemical modification of chymotrypsin using peptidyl derivatives bearing optically active diphenyl 1-amino-2-phenylethylphosphonate: Stereochemical effect of the diphenyl phosphonate moiety.

    PubMed

    Ono, Shin; Nakai, Takahiko; Kuroda, Hirofumi; Miyatake, Ryuta; Horino, Yoshikazu; Abe, Hitoshi; Umezaki, Masahito; Oyama, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Diphenyl (α-aminoalkyl)phosphonates act as mechanism-based inhibitors against serine proteases by forming a covalent bond with the hydroxy group of the active center Ser residue. Because the covalent bond was found to be broken and replaced by 2-pyridinaldoxime methiodide (2PAM), we employed a peptidyl derivative bearing diphenyl 1-amino-2-phenylethylphosphonate moiety (Phe(p) (OPh)2 ) to target the active site of chymotrypsin and to selectively anchor to Lys175 in the vicinity of the active site. Previously, it was reported that the configuration of the α-carbon of phosphorus in diphenyl (α-aminoalkyl)phosphonates affects the inactivation reaction of serine proteases, i.e., the (R)-enantiomeric diphenyl phosphonate is comparable to l-amino acids and it effectively reacts with serine proteases, whereas the (S)-enantiomeric form does not. In this study, we evaluated the stereochemical effect of the phosphonate moiety on the selective chemical modification. Epimeric dipeptidyl derivatives, Ala-(R or S)-Phe(p) (OPh)2 , were prepared by separation with RP-HPLC. A tripeptidyl (R)-epimer (Ala-Ala-(R)-Phe(p) (OPh)2 ) exhibited a more potent inactivation ability against chymotrypsin than the (S)-epimer. The enzyme inactivated by the (R)-epimer was more effectively reactivated with 2PAM than the enzyme inactivated by the (S)-epimer. Finally, N-succinimidyl (NHS) active ester derivatives, NHS-Suc-Ala-Ala- (R or S)-Phe(p) (OPh)2 , were prepared, and we evaluated their action when modifying Lys175 in chymotrypsin. We demonstrated that the epimeric NHS derivative that possessed the diphenyl phosphonate moiety with the (R)-configuration effectively modified Lys175 in chymotrypsin, whereas that with the (S)-configuration did not. These results demonstrate the utility of peptidyl derivatives that bear an optically active diphenyl phosphonate moiety as affinity labeling probes in protein bioconjugation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 521-530, 2016

  7. Membrane-Active Sequences within gp41 Membrane Proximal External Region (MPER) Modulate MPER-Containing Peptidyl Fusion Inhibitor Activity and the Biosynthesis of HIV-1 Structural Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Si Min; Jejcic, Alenka; Tam, James P.; Vahlne, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The membrane proximal external region (MPER) is a highly conserved membrane-active region located at the juxtamembrane positions within class I viral fusion glycoproteins and essential for membrane fusion events during viral entry. The MPER in the human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) envelope protein (Env) interacts with the lipid bilayers through a cluster of tryptophan (Trp) residues and a C-terminal cholesterol-interacting motif. The inclusion of the MPER N-terminal sequence contributes to the membrane reactivity and anti-viral efficacy of the first two anti-HIV peptidyl fusion inhibitors T20 and T1249. As a type I transmembrane protein, Env also interacts with the cellular membranes during its biosynthesis and trafficking. Here we investigated the roles of MPER membrane-active sequences during both viral entry and assembly, specifically, their roles in the design of peptidyl fusion inhibitors and the biosynthesis of viral structural proteins. We found that elimination of the membrane-active elements in MPER peptides, namely, penta Trp→alanine (Ala) substitutions and the disruption of the C-terminal cholesterol-interacting motif through deletion inhibited the anti-viral effect against the pseudotyped HIV-1. Furthermore, as compared to C-terminal dimerization, N-terminal dimerization of MPER peptides and N-terminal extension with five helix-forming residues enhanced their anti-viral efficacy substantially. The secondary structure study revealed that the penta-Trp→Ala substitutions also increased the helical content in the MPER sequence, which prompted us to study the biological relevance of such mutations in pre-fusion Env. We observed that Ala mutations of Trp664, Trp668 and Trp670 in MPER moderately lowered the intracellular and intraviral contents of Env while significantly elevating the content of another viral structural protein, p55/Gag and its derivative p24/capsid. The data suggest a role of the gp41 MPER in the membrane-reactive events during

  8. Methotrexate and Cyclosporine Treatments Modify the Activities of Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV and Prolyl Oligopeptidase in Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Olivo, R. A.; Nascimento, N. G.; Teixeira, C. F. P.; Silveira, P. F.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the effects of cyclosporine A (25–28 mgkg−1) and/or methotrexate (0.1 mgkg−1) treatments on dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) and prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) activities and on algesic response in two distinct status of murine macrophages (Mφs) was undertaken. In resident Mφs, DPPIV and POP were affected by neither individual nor combined treatments. In thioglycolate-elicited Mφs, methotrexate increased DPPIV (99–110%) and POP (60%), while cyclosporine inhibited POP (21%). Combined treatment with both drugs promoted a rise (51–84%) of both enzyme activities. Only cyclosporine decreased (42%) the tolerance to algesic stimulus. Methotrexate was revealed to exert prevalent action over that of cyclosporine on proinflammatory Mφ POP. The opposite effects of methotrexate and cyclosporine on POP activity might influence the availability of the nociceptive mediators bradykinin and substance P in proinflammatory Mφs. The exacerbated response to thermally induced algesia observed in cyclosporine-treated animals could be related to upregulation of those mediators. PMID:18354729

  9. Increased prolyl 4-hydroxylase expression and differential regulation of hypoxia-inducible factors in the aged rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Ndubuizu, Obinna I.; Chavez, Juan C.; LaManna, Joseph C.

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are heterodimeric transcription factors that mediate the adaptive response of mammalian cells and tissues to changes in tissue oxygenation. In the present study, we show an age-dependent decline in cortical HIF-1α accumulation and activation of HIF target genes in response to hypoxia. This inducible response is significantly attenuated in the cerebral cortex of 18-mo-old Fischer 344 rat yet virtually absent in the cerebral cortex of 24-mo-old Fischer 344 rat. This attenuated HIF-1α response had no effect on mRNA upregulation of HIF-independent genes in the aged cortex. We have provided evidence that this absent HIF-1α response is directly correlated with an increase in the expression of the HIF regulatory enzyme, prolyl 4-hydroxylase (PHD). In addition, our study shows that cortical HIF-2α expression in senescent normoxic controls is also significantly greater than that of younger normoxic controls, despite no difference in HIF-2α mRNA levels. The posttranslational regulation of HIF-2α under normoxic conditions seems to be attenuated in the aged rat brain, which is an in vivo demonstration of differential regulation of HIF-1α and HIF-2α. PMID:19420289

  10. Negative Regulation of the Stability and Tumor Suppressor Function of Fbw7 by the Pin1 Prolyl Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Min, Sang-Hyun; Lau, Alan W.; Lee, Tae Ho; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Wei, Shuo; Huang, Pengyu; Shaik, Shavali; Lee, Daniel Yenhong; Finn, Greg; Balastik, Martin; Chen, Chun-Hau; Luo, Manli; Tron, Adriana E.; DeCaprio, James A.; Zhou, Xiao Zhen; Wei, Wenyi; Lu, Kun Ping

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Fbw7 is the substrate recognition component of the SCF (Skp1-Cullin-F-box)-type E3 ligase complex and a well-characterized tumor suppressor that targets numerous oncoproteins for destruction. Genomic deletion or mutation of FBW7 has been frequently found in various types of human cancers, however, little is known about the upstream signaling pathway(s) governing Fbw7 stability and cellular functions. Here we report that Fbw7 protein destruction and tumor suppressor function are negatively regulated by the prolyl isomerase Pin1. Pin1 interacts with Fbw7 in a phoshorylation-dependent manner and promotes Fbw7 self-ubiquitination and protein degradation by disrupting Fbw7 dimerization. Consequently, over-expressing Pin1 reduces Fbw7 abundance and suppresses Fbw7’s ability to inhibit proliferation and transformation. By contrast, depletion of Pin1 in cancer cells leads to elevated Fbw7 expression, which subsequently reduces Mcl-1 abundance, sensitizing cancer cells to Taxol. Thus, Pin1-mediated inhibition of Fbw7 contributes to oncogenesis and Pin1 may be a promising drug target for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:22608923

  11. Negative regulation of the stability and tumor suppressor function of Fbw7 by the Pin1 prolyl isomerase.

    PubMed

    Min, Sang-Hyun; Lau, Alan W; Lee, Tae Ho; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Wei, Shuo; Huang, Pengyu; Shaik, Shavali; Lee, Daniel Yenhong; Finn, Greg; Balastik, Martin; Chen, Chun-Hau; Luo, Manli; Tron, Adriana E; Decaprio, James A; Zhou, Xiao Zhen; Wei, Wenyi; Lu, Kun Ping

    2012-06-29

    Fbw7 is the substrate recognition component of the Skp1-Cullin-F-box (SCF)-type E3 ligase complex and a well-characterized tumor suppressor that targets numerous oncoproteins for destruction. Genomic deletion or mutation of FBW7 has been frequently found in various types of human cancers; however, little is known about the upstream signaling pathway(s) governing Fbw7 stability and cellular functions. Here we report that Fbw7 protein destruction and tumor suppressor function are negatively regulated by the prolyl isomerase Pin1. Pin1 interacts with Fbw7 in a phoshorylation-dependent manner and promotes Fbw7 self-ubiquitination and protein degradation by disrupting Fbw7 dimerization. Consequently, overexpressing Pin1 reduces Fbw7 abundance and suppresses Fbw7's ability to inhibit proliferation and transformation. By contrast, depletion of Pin1 in cancer cells leads to elevated Fbw7 expression, which subsequently reduces Mcl-1 abundance, sensitizing cancer cells to Taxol. Thus, Pin1-mediated inhibition of Fbw7 contributes to oncogenesis, and Pin1 may be a promising drug target for anticancer therapy. PMID:22608923

  12. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidase gene from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris.

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, B; Kok, J; Venema, K; Bockelmann, W; Teuber, M; Reinke, H; Venema, G

    1991-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris P8-2-47 contains an X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (X-PDAP; EC 3.4.14.5). A mixed-oligonucleotide probe prepared on the basis of the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified protein was made and used to screen a partial chromosomal DNA bank in Escherichia coli. A partial XbaI fragment cloned in pUC18 specified X-PDAP activity in E. coli clones. The fragment was also able to confer X-PDAP activity on Bacillus subtilis. The fact that none of these organisms contain this enzymatic activity indicated that the structural gene for X-PDAP had been cloned. The cloned fragment fully restored X-PDAP activity in X-PDAP-deficient mutants of L. lactis. We have sequenced a 3.8-kb fragment that includes the X-PDAP gene and its expression signals. The X-PDAP gene, designated pepXP, comprises 2,289 nucleotide residues encoding a protein of 763 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 87,787. No homology was detected between pepXP and genes that had been previously sequenced. A second open reading frame, divergently transcribed, was present in the sequenced fragment; the function or relationship to pepXP of this open reading frame is unknown. Images PMID:1674655

  13. Lipophilic modification enhances anti-colitic properties of rosmarinic acid by potentiating its HIF-prolyl hydroxylases inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seongkeun; Park, Huijeong; Hong, Sungchae; Yum, Soohwan; Kim, Wooseong; Jung, Yunjin

    2015-01-15

    Inhibition of hypoxia inducible factor-prolyl hydroxylase-2 (HPH), leading to activation of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1 is a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of colitis. Rosmarinic acid (RA), an ester of caffeic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenyllactic acid is a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound with two catechols, a or inhibition of HPH. To improve accessibility of highly hydrophilic RA to HPH, an intracellular target, RA was chemically modified to decrease hydrophilicity. Of the less-hydrophilic derivatives, rosmarinic acid methyl ester (RAME) most potently inhibited HPH. Accordingly, RAME prevented hydroxylation of HIF-1α and consequently stabilized HIF-1α protein in cells. RAME inhibition of HPH and induction of HIF-1α were diminished by elevated doses of the required factors of HPH, 2-ketoglutarate and ascorbate. RAME induction of HIF-1α led to activation of an ulcer healing pathway, HIF-1-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in human colon carcinoma cells. RAME administered rectally ameliorated TNBS-induced rat colitis and substantially decreased the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators in the inflamed colonic tissue. In parallel with the cellular effects of RAME, RAME up-regulated HIF-1α and VEGF in the inflamed colonic tissue. Thus, lipophilic modification of RA improves its ability to inhibit HPH, leading to activation of the HIF-1-VEGF pathway. RAME, a lipophilic RA derivative, may exert anti-colitic effects via activation of the ulcer healing pathway. PMID:25483211

  14. Collagen-derived dipeptide prolyl-hydroxyproline promotes differentiation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kimira, Yoshifumi; Ogura, Kana; Taniuchi, Yuri; Kataoka, Aya; Inoue, Naoki; Sugihara, Fumihito; Nakatani, Sachie; Shimizu, Jun; Wada, Masahiro; Mano, Hiroshi

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Pro-Hyp did not affect MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation and matrix mineralization. • Pro-Hyp significantly increased alkaline phosphatase activity. • Pro-Hyp significantly upregulated gene expression of Runx2, Osterix, and Col1α1. - Abstract: Prolyl-hydroxyproline (Pro-Hyp) is one of the major constituents of collagen-derived dipeptides. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of Pro-Hyp on the proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells. Addition of Pro-Hyp did not affect MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation and matrix mineralization but alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly increased. Furthermore, cells treated with Pro-Hyp significantly upregulated gene expression of Runx2, Osterix, and Col1α1. These results indicate that Pro-Hyp promotes osteoblast differentiation. This study demonstrates for the first time that Pro-Hyp has a positive effect on osteoblast differentiation with upregulation of Runx2, Osterix, and Collα1 gene expression.

  15. The Zinc Finger of Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain Protein 2 Is Essential for Efficient Hydroxylation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor α.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Patrick R; Song, Daisheng; Chung, Yu Jin; Khurana, Tejvir S; Lee, Frank S

    2016-09-15

    Prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2) (also known as EGLN1) is a key oxygen sensor in mammals that posttranslationally modifies hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIF-α) and targets it for degradation. In addition to its catalytic domain, PHD2 contains an evolutionarily conserved zinc finger domain, which we have previously proposed recruits PHD2 to the HSP90 pathway to promote HIF-α hydroxylation. Here, we provide evidence that this recruitment is critical both in vitro and in vivo We show that in vitro, the zinc finger can function as an autonomous recruitment domain to facilitate interaction with HIF-α. In vivo, ablation of zinc finger function by a C36S/C42S Egln1 knock-in mutation results in upregulation of the erythropoietin gene, erythrocytosis, and augmented hypoxic ventilatory response, all hallmarks of Egln1 loss of function and HIF stabilization. Hence, the zinc finger ordinarily performs a critical positive regulatory function. Intriguingly, the function of this zinc finger is impaired in high-altitude-adapted Tibetans, suggesting that their adaptation to high altitude may, in part, be due to a loss-of-function EGLN1 allele. Thus, these findings have important implications for understanding both the molecular mechanism of the hypoxic response and human adaptation to high altitude. PMID:27325674

  16. Understanding species-specific differences in substrate recognition by Escherichia coli and human prolyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed

    Musier-Forsyth, K; Stehlin, C; Burke, B; Liu, H

    1997-01-01

    Class II human prolyl-tRNA synthetase (ProRS) aminoacylates in vitro transcribed human tRNA(Pro) with kinetic parameters that are similar to those previously determined for aminoacylation of Escherichia coli tRNA(Pro) by its cognate synthetase. As in the bacterial system, large decreases in aminoacylation by human ProRS occur upon mutating anticodon positions G35 and G36 of human tRNA(Pro). The N73 'discriminator' base and the first and third base pairs of the acceptor stem vary between the E.coli and human isoacceptor groups. In contrast to the E. coli synthetase, the human enzyme does not appear to recognize these elements, since mutations at these positions do not significantly affect cognate synthetase charging. E. coli ProRS does not cross-aminoacylate human tRNA(Pro), and the bacterial tRNA(Pro) is a poor substrate for the human enzyme. Mutations in both the tRNAs and the synthetases have been made in an effort to identify elements in each system responsible for blocking cross-species aminoacylation. Alignment of all known ProRS primary sequences from different species reveals particularly low overall sequence homology, as well as two distinct groups of enzymes. The sequence divergence between E. coli and human ProRSs helps to explain the species-specific differences in the RNA code for aminoacylation of tRNA(Pro). PMID:9478190

  17. Essential roles of insulin, AMPK signaling and lysyl and prolyl hydroxylases in the biosynthesis and multimerization of adiponectin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Li, Ming-Ming; Corcoran, Marie; Zhang, Shaoping; Cooper, Garth J S

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of the adiponectin molecule are essential for its full bioactivity, and defects in PTMs leading to its defective production and multimerization have been linked to the mechanisms of insulin resistance, obesity, and type-2 diabetes. Here we observed that, in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, decreased insulin signaling caused by blocking of insulin receptors (InsR) with an anti-InsR blocking antibody, increased rates of adiponectin secretion, whereas concomitant elevations in insulin levels counteracted this effect. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling regulated adiponectin production by modulating the expression of adiponectin receptors, the secretion of adiponectin, and eventually the expression of adiponectin itself. We found that lysyl hydroxylases (LHs) and prolyl hydroxylases (PHs) were expressed in white-adipose tissue of ob/ob mice, wherein LH3 levels were increased compared with controls. In differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, both non-specific inhibition of LHs and PHs by dipyridyl, and specific inhibition of LHs by minoxidil and of P4H with ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate, caused significant suppression of adiponectin production, more particularly of the higher-order isoforms. Transient gene knock-down of LH3 (Plod3) caused a suppressive effect, especially on the high molecular-weight (HMW) isoforms. These data indicate that PHs and LHs are both required for physiological adiponectin production and in particular are essential for the formation/secretion of the HMW isoforms. PMID:25240468

  18. Cyclic dipeptide cyclo(l-leucyl-l-prolyl) from marine Bacillus amyloliquefaciens mitigates biofilm formation and virulence in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Gowrishankar, Shanmugaraj; Sivaranjani, Murugesan; Kamaladevi, Arumugam; Ravi, Arumugam Veera; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy; Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah

    2016-06-01

    This study was intentionally focused on cyclo(l-leucyl-l-prolyl) (CLP), a cyclic dipeptide with myriad pharmaceutical significance, to explore its antivirulence efficacy against the predominant foodborne pathogen,Listeria monocytogenes(LM). Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of CLP against LM ATCC 19111 was found to be 512 μg mL(-1) CLP at sub-MICs (64 128, 256 μg mL(-1)) demonstrated a profound non-bactericidal dose-dependent antibiofilm efficacy (on polystyrene and glass) against LM, which was further confirmed through confocal and scanning electron microscopic analysis (on stainless steel surface).In vitrobioassays divulged the phenomenal inhibitory efficacy of CLP towards various virulence traits of LM, specifically its overwhelming suppression of swimming and swarming motility. Data ofin vivoassay usingCaenorhabditis eleganssignified that the plausible mechanism of CLP could be by impeding the pathogen's initial adhesion and thereby attenuating the biofilm assemblage and its associated virulence. This was further confirmed by significant decrease in extracellular polymeric substance, autoaggregation, hydrophobicity index and extracellular DNA of the CLP-treated LM cells. Collectively, this study unveils the antivirulence efficacy of CLP against the Gram-positive foodborne pathogen and the strainBacillus amyloliquefaciensaugurs well to be a promising probiotic in controlling infections associated with LM. PMID:26945590

  19. The Cytoplasmic Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase of the Malaria Parasite is a Dual-Stage Target for Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Jonathan D.; Pepper, Lauren R.; Cortese, Joseph F.; Estiu, Guillermina; Galinsky, Kevin; Zuzarte-Luis, Vanessa; Derbyshire, Emily R.; Ribacke, Ulf; Lukens, Amanda K.; Santos, Sofia A.; Patel, Vishal; Clish, Clary B.; Sullivan, William J.; Zhou, Huihao; Bopp, Selina E.; Schimmel, Paul; Lindquist, Susan; Clardy, Jon; Mota, Maria M.; Keller, Tracy L.; Whitman, Malcolm; Wiest, Olaf; Wirth, Dyann F.; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance is a major limitation of current antimalarials. The discovery of new druggable targets and pathways including those that are critical for multiple life cycle stages of the malaria parasite is a major goal for the development of the next-generation of antimalarial drugs. Using an integrated chemogenomics approach that combined drug-resistance selection, whole genome sequencing and an orthogonal yeast model, we demonstrate that the cytoplasmic prolyl-tRNA synthetase (PfcPRS) of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is a biochemical and functional target of febrifugine and its synthetic derivatives such as halofuginone. Febrifugine is the active principle of a traditional Chinese herbal remedy for malaria. We show that treatment with febrifugine derivatives activated the amino acid starvation response in both P. falciparum and a transgenic yeast strain expressing PfcPRS. We further demonstrate in the P. berghei mouse model of malaria that halofuginol, a new halofuginone analog that we developed, is highly active against both liver and asexual blood stages of the malaria parasite. Halofuginol, unlike halofuginone and febrifugine, is well tolerated at efficacious doses, and represents a promising lead for the development of dual-stage next generation antimalarials. PMID:25995223

  20. Analyzing slowly exchanging protein conformations by ion mobility mass spectrometry: study of the dynamic equilibrium of prolyl oligopeptidase.

    PubMed

    López, Abraham; Vilaseca, Marta; Madurga, Sergio; Varese, Monica; Tarragó, Teresa; Giralt, Ernest

    2016-07-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IMMS) is a biophysical technique that allows the separation of isobaric species on the basis of their size and shape. The high separation capacity, sensitivity and relatively fast time scale measurements confer IMMS great potential for the study of proteins in slow (µs-ms) conformational equilibrium in solution. However, the use of this technique for examining dynamic proteins is still not generalized. One of the major limitations is the instability of protein ions in the gas phase, which raises the question as to what extent the structures detected reflect those in solution. Here, we addressed this issue by analyzing the conformational landscape of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) - a model of a large dynamic enzyme in the µs-ms range - by native IMMS and compared the results obtained in the gas phase with those obtained in solution. In order to interpret the experimental results, we used theoretical simulations. In addition, the stability of POP gaseous ions was explored by charge reduction and collision-induced unfolding experiments. Our experiments disclosed two species of POP in the gas phase, which correlated well with the open and closed conformations in equilibrium in solution; moreover, a gas-phase collapsed form of POP was also detected. Therefore, our findings not only support the potential of IMMS for the study of multiple co-existing conformations of large proteins in slow dynamic equilibrium in solution but also stress the need for careful data analysis to avoid artifacts. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27434808

  1. Deficiency of prolyl oligopeptidase in mice disturbs synaptic plasticity and reduces anxiety-like behaviour, body weight, and brain volume.

    PubMed

    Höfling, Corinna; Kulesskaya, Natalia; Jaako, Külli; Peltonen, Iida; Männistö, Pekka T; Nurmi, Antti; Vartiainen, Nina; Morawski, Markus; Zharkovsky, Alexander; Võikar, Vootele; Roßner, Steffen; García-Horsman, J Arturo

    2016-06-01

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (PREP) has been implicated in neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation and has been considered a drug target to enhance memory in dementia. However, the true physiological role of PREP is not yet understood. In this paper, we report the phenotyping of a mouse line where the PREP gene has been knocked out. This work indicates that the lack of PREP in mice causes reduced anxiety but also hyperactivity. The cortical volumes of PREP knockout mice were smaller than those of wild type littermates. Additionally, we found increased expression of diazepam binding inhibitor protein in the cortex and of the somatostatin receptor-2 in the hippocampus of PREP knockout mice. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry and tail suspension test revealed lack of response of PREP knockout mice to lipopolysaccharide insult. Further analysis revealed significantly increased levels of polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule in PREP deficient mice. These findings might be explained as possible alteration in brain plasticity caused by PREP deficiency, which in turn affect behaviour and brain development. PMID:26996375

  2. Alteration of prolyl oligopeptidase and activated α-2-macroglobulin in multiple sclerosis subtypes and in the clinically isolated syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tenorio-Laranga, Jofre; Peltonen, Iida; Keskitalo, Salla; Duran-Torres, Gilberto; Natarajan, Renuka; Männistö, Pekka T; Nurmi, Antti; Vartiainen, Nina; Airas, Laura; Elovaara, Irina; García-Horsman, J Arturo

    2013-06-15

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (PREP) has been considered as a drug target for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In plasma, PREP has been found altered in several disorders of the central nervous system including multiple sclerosis (MS). Oxidative stress and the levels of an endogenous plasma PREP inhibitor have been proposed to decrease PREP activity in MS. In this work, we measured the circulating levels of PREP in patients suffering of relapsing remitting (RR), secondary progressive (SP), primary progressive (PP) MS, and in subjects with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS). We found a significantly lower PREP activity in plasma of RRMS as well as in PPMS patients and a trend to reduced activity in subjects diagnosed with CIS, compared to controls. No signs of oxidative inactivation of PREP, and no correlation with the endogenous PREP inhibitor, identified as activated α-2-macroglobulin (α2M*), were observed in any of the patients studied. However, a significant decrease of α2M* was recorded in MS. In cell cultures, we found that PREP specifically stimulates immune active cells possibly by modifying the levels of fibrinogen β, thymosin β4, and collagen. Our results open new lines of research on the role of PREP and α2M* in MS, aiming to relate them to the diagnosis and prognosis of this devastating disease. PMID:23643808

  3. Role of reactive oxygen species in the regulation of HIF-1 by prolyl hydroxylase 2 under mild hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Niecknig, Helene; Tug, Suzan; Reyes, Buena Delos; Kirsch, Michael; Fandrey, Joachim; Berchner-Pfannschmidt, Utta

    2012-06-01

    The function and survival of eukaryotic cells depends on a constant and sufficient oxygen supply. Cells recognize and respond to hypoxia by accumulation of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), composed of an oxygen-sensitive HIF-1α and a constitutive HIF-1β subunit. Besides physiology, HIF-1 induction is involved in major pathological processes such as cardiovascular disease, inflammation and cancer, which are associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS have been reported to affect HIF-1 activity but the role for ROS in regulating HIF-1 has not been definitely settled. In order to shed light on the redox-regulation of HIF-1 by ROS, we studied the impact of exogenous ROS treatment (H(2)O(2)) on HIF-1α and HIF-1 regulatory protein prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) in the human osteosarcoma cell line U2OS. At early reaction periods, H(2)O(2) induced HIF-1α but at prolonged observation phases the opposite occurred. Herein, modulation of PHD activity appeared to be the key element, because knockdown and inhibition of the PHD2 prevented reduction of HIF-1α. However, H(2)O(2) treatment constantly suppressed HIF-1 transactivation at all time-points. Our data indicate a dual redox regulation of HIF-1α protein amount with a constant suppression of HIF-1 target gene expression by ROS. PMID:22360728

  4. Retention of prolyl hydroxylase PHD2 in the cytoplasm prevents PHD2-induced anchorage-independent carcinoma cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Jokilehto, Terhi; Hoegel, Heidi; Heikkinen, Pekka; Rantanen, Krista; Elenius, Klaus; Sundstroem, Jari; Jaakkola, Panu M.

    2010-04-15

    Cellular oxygen tension is sensed by a family of prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1-3) that regulate the degradation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1{alpha} and -2{alpha}). The PHD2 isoform is considered as the main downregulator of HIF in normoxia. Our previous results have shown that nuclear translocation of PHD2 associates with poorly differentiated tumor phenotype implying that nuclear PHD2 expression is advantageous for tumor growth. Here we show that a pool of PHD2 is shuttled between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. In line with this, accumulation of wild type PHD2 in the nucleus was detected in human colon adenocarcinomas and in cultured carcinoma cells. The PHD2 isoforms showing high nuclear expression increased anchorage-independent carcinoma cell growth. However, retention of PHD2 in the cytoplasm inhibited the anchorage-independent cell growth. A region that inhibits the nuclear localization of PHD2 was identified and the deletion of the region promoted anchorage-independent growth of carcinoma cells. Finally, the cytoplasmic PHD2, as compared with the nuclear PHD2, less efficiently downregulated HIF expression. Forced HIF-1{alpha} or -2{alpha} expression decreased and attenuation of HIF expression increased the anchorage-independent cell growth. However, hydroxylase-inactivating mutations in PHD2 had no effect on cell growth. The data imply that nuclear PHD2 localization promotes malignant cancer phenotype.

  5. Inhibition of HIF-prolyl-4-hydroxylases prevents mitochondrial impairment and cell death in a model of neuronal oxytosis.

    PubMed

    Neitemeier, S; Dolga, A M; Honrath, B; Karuppagounder, S S; Alim, I; Ratan, R R; Culmsee, C

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial impairment induced by oxidative stress is a main characteristic of intrinsic cell death pathways in neurons underlying the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, protection of mitochondrial integrity and function is emerging as a promising strategy to prevent neuronal damage. Here, we show that pharmacological inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl-4-hydroxylases (HIF-PHDs) by adaptaquin inhibits lipid peroxidation and fully maintains mitochondrial function as indicated by restored mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production, reduced formation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and preserved mitochondrial respiration, thereby protecting neuronal HT-22 cells in a model of glutamate-induced oxytosis. Selective reduction of PHD1 protein using CRISPR/Cas9 technology also reduced both lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial impairment, and attenuated glutamate toxicity in the HT-22 cells. Regulation of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) expression levels and related target genes may mediate these beneficial effects. Overall, these results expose HIF-PHDs as promising targets to protect mitochondria and, thereby, neurons from oxidative cell death. PMID:27148687

  6. Competitive HIF Prolyl Hydroxylase Inhibitors Show Protection against Oxidative Stress by a Mechanism Partially Dependent on Glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Ann-Louise; Fog, Karina; Sager, Thomas Nikolaj; Bruun, Anne Techau; Thirstrup, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    The hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a central transcription factor involved in the cellular and molecular adaptation to hypoxia and low glucose supply. The level of HIF-1 is to a large degree regulated by the HIF prolyl hydroxylase enzymes (HPHs) belonging to the Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily. In the present study, we compared competitive and noncompetitive HPH-inhibitor compounds in two different cell types (SH-SY5Y and PC12). Although the competitive HPH-inhibitor compounds were found to be pharmacologically more potent than the non-competitive compounds at inhibiting HPH2 and HPH1, this was not translated into the cellular effects of the compounds, where the non-competitive inhibitors were actually more potent than the competitive in stabilizing and translocatingHIF1αto the nucleus (quantified with Cellomics ArrayScan technology). This could be explained by the high cellular concentrations of the cofactor 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) as the competitive inhibitors act by binding to the 2-OG site of the HPH enzymes. Both competitive and non-competitive HPH inhibitors protected the cells against 6-OHDA induced oxidative stress. In addition, the protective effect of a specific HPH inhibitor was partially preserved when the cells were serum starved and exposed to 2-deoxyglucose, an inhibitor of glycolysis, indicating that other processes than restoring energy supply could be important for the HIF-mediated cytoprotection. PMID:25006572

  7. Inhibition of HIF-prolyl-4-hydroxylases prevents mitochondrial impairment and cell death in a model of neuronal oxytosis

    PubMed Central

    Neitemeier, S; Dolga, A M; Honrath, B; Karuppagounder, S S; Alim, I; Ratan, R R; Culmsee, C

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial impairment induced by oxidative stress is a main characteristic of intrinsic cell death pathways in neurons underlying the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, protection of mitochondrial integrity and function is emerging as a promising strategy to prevent neuronal damage. Here, we show that pharmacological inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl-4-hydroxylases (HIF-PHDs) by adaptaquin inhibits lipid peroxidation and fully maintains mitochondrial function as indicated by restored mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production, reduced formation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and preserved mitochondrial respiration, thereby protecting neuronal HT-22 cells in a model of glutamate-induced oxytosis. Selective reduction of PHD1 protein using CRISPR/Cas9 technology also reduced both lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial impairment, and attenuated glutamate toxicity in the HT-22 cells. Regulation of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) expression levels and related target genes may mediate these beneficial effects. Overall, these results expose HIF-PHDs as promising targets to protect mitochondria and, thereby, neurons from oxidative cell death. PMID:27148687

  8. The Endothelial Prolyl-4-Hydroxylase Domain 2/Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2 Axis Regulates Pulmonary Artery Pressure in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kapitsinou, Pinelopi P; Rajendran, Ganeshkumar; Astleford, Lindsay; Michael, Mark; Schonfeld, Michael P; Fields, Timothy; Shay, Sheila; French, Jaketa L; West, James; Haase, Volker H

    2016-05-15

    Hypoxia-inducible factors 1 and 2 (HIF-1 and -2) control oxygen supply to tissues by regulating erythropoiesis, angiogenesis and vascular homeostasis. HIFs are regulated in response to oxygen availability by prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD) proteins, with PHD2 being the main oxygen sensor that controls HIF activity under normoxia. In this study, we used a genetic approach to investigate the endothelial PHD2/HIF axis in the regulation of vascular function. We found that inactivation of Phd2 in endothelial cells specifically resulted in severe pulmonary hypertension (∼118% increase in right ventricular systolic pressure) but not polycythemia and was associated with abnormal muscularization of peripheral pulmonary arteries and right ventricular hypertrophy. Concurrent inactivation of either Hif1a or Hif2a in endothelial cell-specific Phd2 mutants demonstrated that the development of pulmonary hypertension was dependent on HIF-2α but not HIF-1α. Furthermore, endothelial HIF-2α was required for the development of increased pulmonary artery pressures in a model of pulmonary hypertension induced by chronic hypoxia. We propose that these HIF-2-dependent effects are partially due to increased expression of vasoconstrictor molecule endothelin 1 and a concomitant decrease in vasodilatory apelin receptor signaling. Taken together, our data identify endothelial HIF-2 as a key transcription factor in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26976644

  9. Nanovector-based prolyl hydroxylase domain 2 silencing system enhances the efficiency of stem cell transplantation for infarcted myocardium repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kai; Lai, Hao; Guo, Changfa; Li, Jun; Wang, Yulin; Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Chunsheng

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation has attracted much attention in myocardial infarction therapy. One of the limitations is the poor survival of grafted cells in the ischemic microenvironment. Small interfering RNA-mediated prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2) silencing in MSCs holds tremendous potential to enhance their survival and paracrine effect after transplantation. However, an efficient and biocompatible PHD2 silencing system for clinical application is lacking. Herein, we developed a novel PHD2 silencing system based on arginine-terminated generation 4 poly(amidoamine) (Arg-G4) nanoparticles. The system exhibited effective and biocompatible small interfering RNA delivery and PHD2 silencing in MSCs in vitro. After genetically modified MSC transplantation in myocardial infarction models, MSC survival and paracrine function of IGF-1 were enhanced significantly in vivo. As a result, we observed decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis, scar size, and interstitial fibrosis, and increased angiogenesis in the diseased myocardium, which ultimately attenuated ventricular remodeling and improved heart function. This work demonstrated that an Arg-G4 nanovector-based PHD2 silencing system could enhance the efficiency of MSC transplantation for infarcted myocardium repair. PMID:25429216

  10. Origin and Evolution of Glutamyl-prolyl tRNA Synthetase WHEP Domains Reveal Evolutionary Relationships within Holozoa

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partho Sarothi; Fox, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated domains in proteins that have undergone duplication or loss, and sequence divergence, are especially informative about phylogenetic relationships. We have exploited divergent repeats of the highly structured, 50-amino acid WHEP domains that join the catalytic subunits of bifunctional glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase (EPRS) as a sequence-informed repeat (SIR) to trace the origin and evolution of EPRS in holozoa. EPRS is the only fused tRNA synthetase, with two distinct aminoacylation activities, and a non-canonical translation regulatory function mediated by the WHEP domains in the linker. Investigating the duplications, deletions and divergence of WHEP domains, we traced the bifunctional EPRS to choanozoans and identified the fusion event leading to its origin at the divergence of ichthyosporea and emergence of filozoa nearly a billion years ago. Distribution of WHEP domains from a single species in two or more distinct clades suggested common descent, allowing the identification of linking organisms. The discrete assortment of choanoflagellate WHEP domains with choanozoan domains as well as with those in metazoans supported the phylogenetic position of choanoflagellates as the closest sister group to metazoans. Analysis of clustering and assortment of WHEP domains provided unexpected insights into phylogenetic relationships amongst holozoan taxa. Furthermore, observed gaps in the transition between WHEP domain groupings in distant taxa allowed the prediction of undiscovered or extinct evolutionary intermediates. Analysis based on SIR domains can provide a phylogenetic counterpart to palaentological approaches of discovering “missing links” in the tree of life. PMID:24968216

  11. HIF prolyl 4-hydroxylase-2 inhibition improves glucose and lipid metabolism and protects against obesity and metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rahtu-Korpela, Lea; Karsikas, Sara; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Mäkelä, Kari A; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Walkinshaw, Gail; Kivirikko, Kari I; Myllyharju, Johanna; Serpi, Raisa; Koivunen, Peppi

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem, predisposing subjects to metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Specific prolyl 4-hydroxylases (P4Hs) regulate the stability of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), a potent governor of metabolism, with isoenzyme 2 being the main regulator. We investigated whether HIF-P4H-2 inhibition could be used to treat obesity and its consequences. Hif-p4h-2-deficient mice, whether fed normal chow or a high-fat diet, had less adipose tissue, smaller adipocytes, and less adipose tissue inflammation than their littermates. They also had improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of the HIF-1 targets glucose transporters, glycolytic enzymes, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-1 were increased in their tissues, whereas acetyl-CoA concentration was decreased. The hepatic mRNA level of the HIF-2 target insulin receptor substrate-2 was higher, whereas that of two key enzymes of fatty acid synthesis was lower. Serum cholesterol levels and de novo lipid synthesis were decreased, and the mice were protected against hepatic steatosis. Oral administration of an HIF-P4H inhibitor, FG-4497, to wild-type mice with metabolic dysfunction phenocopied these beneficial effects. HIF-P4H-2 inhibition may be a novel therapy that not only protects against the development of obesity and its consequences but also reverses these conditions. PMID:24789921

  12. Abnormal Type I Collagen Post-translational Modification and Crosslinking in a Cyclophilin B KO Mouse Model of Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Wayne A.; Perdivara, Irina; Weis, MaryAnn; Terajima, Masahiko; Blissett, Angela R.; Chang, Weizhong; Perosky, Joseph E.; Makareeva, Elena N.; Mertz, Edward L.; Leikin, Sergey; Tomer, Kenneth B.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Eyre, David R.; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Marini, Joan C.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclophilin B (CyPB), encoded by PPIB, is an ER-resident peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) that functions independently and as a component of the collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex. CyPB is proposed to be the major PPIase catalyzing the rate-limiting step in collagen folding. Mutations in PPIB cause recessively inherited osteogenesis imperfecta type IX, a moderately severe to lethal bone dysplasia. To investigate the role of CyPB in collagen folding and post-translational modifications, we generated Ppib−/− mice that recapitulate the OI phenotype. Knock-out (KO) mice are small, with reduced femoral areal bone mineral density (aBMD), bone volume per total volume (BV/TV) and mechanical properties, as well as increased femoral brittleness. Ppib transcripts are absent in skin, fibroblasts, femora and calvarial osteoblasts, and CyPB is absent from KO osteoblasts and fibroblasts on western blots. Only residual (2–11%) collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation is detectable in KO cells and tissues. Collagen folds more slowly in the absence of CyPB, supporting its rate-limiting role in folding. However, treatment of KO cells with cyclosporine A causes further delay in folding, indicating the potential existence of another collagen PPIase. We confirmed and extended the reported role of CyPB in supporting collagen lysyl hydroxylase (LH1) activity. Ppib−/− fibroblast and osteoblast collagen has normal total lysyl hydroxylation, while increased collagen diglycosylation is observed. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of bone and osteoblast type I collagen revealed site-specific alterations of helical lysine hydroxylation, in particular, significantly reduced hydroxylation of helical crosslinking residue K87. Consequently, underhydroxylated forms of di- and trivalent crosslinks are strikingly increased in KO bone, leading to increased total crosslinks and decreased helical hydroxylysine- to lysine-derived crosslink ratios. The altered

  13. Abrogation of collagen-induced arthritis by a peptidyl arginine deiminase inhibitor is associated with modulation of T cell-mediated immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kawalkowska, Joanna; Quirke, Anne-Marie; Ghari, Fatemeh; Davis, Simon; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Thompson, Paul R; Williams, Richard O; Fischer, Roman; La Thangue, Nicholas B; Venables, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Proteins containing citrulline, a post-translational modification of arginine, are generated by peptidyl arginine deiminases (PAD). Citrullinated proteins have pro-inflammatory effects in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we examine the therapeutic effects in collagen-induced arthritis of the second generation PAD inhibitor, BB-Cl-amidine. Treatment after disease onset resulted in the reversal of clinical and histological changes of arthritis, associated with a marked reduction in citrullinated proteins in lymph nodes. There was little overall change in antibodies to collagen or antibodies to citrullinated peptides, but a shift from pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17-type responses to pro-resolution Th2-type responses was demonstrated by serum cytokines and antibody subtypes. In lymph node cells from the arthritic mice treated with BB-Cl-amidine, there was a decrease in total cell numbers but an increase in the proportion of Th2 cells. BB-Cl-amidine had a pro-apoptotic effect on all Th subsets in vitro with Th17 cells appearing to be the most sensitive. We suggest that these immunoregulatory effects of PAD inhibition in CIA are complex, but primarily mediated by transcriptional regulation. We suggest that targeting PADs is a promising strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:27210478

  14. A SAM-dependent methyltransferase cotranscribed with arsenate reductase alters resistance to peptidyl transferase center-binding antibiotics in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudhir; Singh, Chhaya; Tripathi, Anil Kumar

    2014-05-01

    The genome of Azospirillum brasilense harbors a gene encoding S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferase, which is located downstream of an arsenate reductase gene. Both genes are cotranscribed and translationally coupled. When they were cloned and expressed individually in an arsenate-sensitive strain of Escherichia coli, arsenate reductase conferred tolerance to arsenate; however, methyltransferase failed to do so. Sequence analysis revealed that methyltransferase was more closely related to a PrmB-type N5-glutamine methyltransferase than to the arsenate detoxifying methyltransferase ArsM. Insertional inactivation of prmB gene in A. brasilense resulted in an increased sensitivity to chloramphenicol and resistance to tiamulin and clindamycin, which are known to bind at the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) in the ribosome. These observations suggested that the inability of prmB:km mutant to methylate L3 protein might alter hydrophobicity in the antibiotic-binding pocket of the PTC, which might affect the binding of chloramphenicol, clindamycin, and tiamulin differentially. This is the first report showing the role of PrmB-type N5-glutamine methyltransferases in conferring resistance to tiamulin and clindamycin in any bacterium. PMID:24573606

  15. Complexity Generation in Fungal Peptidyl Alkaloid Biosynthesis: Oxidation of Fumiquinazoline A to the Heptacyclic Hemiaminal Fumiquinazoline C by the Flavoenzyme Af12070 from Aspergillus fumigatus†

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Brian D.; Haynes, Stuart W.; Gao, Xue; Evans, Bradley S; Kelleher, Neil L.; Tang, Yi; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2011-01-01

    The human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus makes a series of fumiquinazoline (FQ) peptidyl alkaloids of increasing scaffold complexity using L-Trp, two equivalents of L-Ala, and the non-proteinogenic amino acid anthranilate as building blocks. The FQ gene cluster encodes two nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) and two flavoproteins. The trimodular NRPS Af12080 assembles FQF (the first level of complexity) while the next two enzymes, Af12060 and Af12050, act in tandem in an oxidative annulation sequence to couple alanine to the indole side chain of FQF to yield the imidazolindolone-containing FQA. In this study we show that the fourth enzyme, the mono-covalent flavoprotein Af12070, introduces a third layer of scaffold complexity by converting FQA to the spirohemiaminal FQC, presumably by catalyzing the formation of a transient imine within the pyrazinone ring (and therefore acting in an unprecedented manner as an FAD-dependent amide oxidase). FQC subsequently converts non-enzymatically to the known cyclic aminal FQD. We also investigated the effect of substrate structure on Af12070 activity and subsequent cyclization with a variety of FQA analogues, including an FQA diastereomer (2′-epi-FQA) which is an intermediate in the fungal biosynthesis of the tremorgenic tryptoquialanine. 2′-epi-FQA is processed by Af12070 to epi-FQD, not epi-FQC, illustrating that the delicate balance in product cyclization regiochemistry can be perturbed by a remote stereochemical center. PMID:21899262

  16. The K+-dependent GTPase Nug1 is implicated in the association of the helicase Dbp10 to the immature peptidyl transferase centre during ribosome maturation

    PubMed Central

    Manikas, Rizos-Georgios; Thomson, Emma; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis employs a number of energy-consuming enzymes in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. One such enzyme is the conserved circularly permuted GTPase Nug1 (nucleostemin in human). Nug1 is essential for 60S subunit assembly and nuclear export, but its role and time of action during maturation remained unclear. Based on in vitro enzymatic assays using the Chaetomium thermophilum (Ct) orthologue, we show that Nug1 exhibits a low intrinsic GTPase activity that is stimulated by potassium ions, rendering Nug1 a cation-dependent GTPase. In vivo we observe 60S biogenesis defects upon depletion of yeast Nug1 or expression of a Nug1 nucleotide-binding mutant. Most prominently, the RNA helicase Dbp10 was lost from early pre-60S particles, which suggested a physical interaction that could be reconstituted in vitro using CtNug1 and CtDbp10. In vivo rRNA–protein crosslinking revealed that Nug1 and Dbp10 bind at proximal and partially overlapping sites on the 60S pre-ribosome, most prominently to H89 that will constitute part of the peptidyl transferase center (PTC). The binding sites of Dbp10 are the same as those identified for the prokaryotic helicase DbpA bound to the 50S subunit. We suggest that Dbp10 and DbpA are performing a conserved role during PTC formation in all organisms. PMID:26823502

  17. The K⁺-dependent GTPase Nug1 is implicated in the association of the helicase Dbp10 to the immature peptidyl transferase centre during ribosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Manikas, Rizos-Georgios; Thomson, Emma; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed

    2016-02-29

    Ribosome synthesis employs a number of energy-consuming enzymes in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. One such enzyme is the conserved circularly permuted GTPase Nug1 (nucleostemin in human). Nug1 is essential for 60S subunit assembly and nuclear export, but its role and time of action during maturation remained unclear. Based on in vitro enzymatic assays using the Chaetomium thermophilum (Ct) orthologue, we show that Nug1 exhibits a low intrinsic GTPase activity that is stimulated by potassium ions, rendering Nug1 a cation-dependent GTPase. In vivo we observe 60S biogenesis defects upon depletion of yeast Nug1 or expression of a Nug1 nucleotide-binding mutant. Most prominently, the RNA helicase Dbp10 was lost from early pre-60S particles, which suggested a physical interaction that could be reconstituted in vitro using CtNug1 and CtDbp10. In vivo rRNA-protein crosslinking revealed that Nug1 and Dbp10 bind at proximal and partially overlapping sites on the 60S pre-ribosome, most prominently to H89 that will constitute part of the peptidyl transferase center (PTC). The binding sites of Dbp10 are the same as those identified for the prokaryotic helicase DbpA bound to the 50S subunit. We suggest that Dbp10 and DbpA are performing a conserved role during PTC formation in all organisms. PMID:26823502

  18. Abrogation of collagen-induced arthritis by a peptidyl arginine deiminase inhibitor is associated with modulation of T cell-mediated immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Kawalkowska, Joanna; Quirke, Anne-Marie; Ghari, Fatemeh; Davis, Simon; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Thompson, Paul R.; Williams, Richard O.; Fischer, Roman; La Thangue, Nicholas B.; Venables, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins containing citrulline, a post-translational modification of arginine, are generated by peptidyl arginine deiminases (PAD). Citrullinated proteins have pro-inflammatory effects in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we examine the therapeutic effects in collagen-induced arthritis of the second generation PAD inhibitor, BB-Cl-amidine. Treatment after disease onset resulted in the reversal of clinical and histological changes of arthritis, associated with a marked reduction in citrullinated proteins in lymph nodes. There was little overall change in antibodies to collagen or antibodies to citrullinated peptides, but a shift from pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17-type responses to pro-resolution Th2-type responses was demonstrated by serum cytokines and antibody subtypes. In lymph node cells from the arthritic mice treated with BB-Cl-amidine, there was a decrease in total cell numbers but an increase in the proportion of Th2 cells. BB-Cl-amidine had a pro-apoptotic effect on all Th subsets in vitro with Th17 cells appearing to be the most sensitive. We suggest that these immunoregulatory effects of PAD inhibition in CIA are complex, but primarily mediated by transcriptional regulation. We suggest that targeting PADs is a promising strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:27210478

  19. Parvulin 17-catalyzed Tubulin Polymerization Is Regulated by Calmodulin in a Calcium-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Burgardt, Noelia Inés; Schmidt, Andreas; Manns, Annika; Schutkowski, Alexandra; Jahreis, Günther; Lin, Yi-Jan; Schulze, Bianca; Masch, Antonia; Lücke, Christian; Weiwad, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Recently we have shown that the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase parvulin 17 (Par17) interacts with tubulin in a GTP-dependent manner, thereby promoting the formation of microtubules. Microtubule assembly is regulated by Ca2+-loaded calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM) both in the intact cell and under in vitro conditions via direct interaction with microtubule-associated proteins. Here we provide the first evidence that Ca2+/CaM interacts also with Par17 in a physiologically relevant way, thus preventing Par17-promoted microtubule assembly. In contrast, parvulin 14 (Par14), which lacks only the first 25 N-terminal residues of the Par17 sequence, does not interact with Ca2+/CaM, indicating that this interaction is exclusive for Par17. Pulldown experiments and chemical shift perturbation analysis with 15N-labeled Par17 furthermore confirmed that calmodulin (CaM) interacts in a Ca2+-dependent manner with the Par17 N terminus. The reverse experiment with 15N-labeled Ca2+/CaM demonstrated that the N-terminal Par17 segment binds to both CaM lobes simultaneously, indicating that Ca2+/CaM undergoes a conformational change to form a binding channel between its two lobes, apparently similar to the structure of the CaM-smMLCK796–815 complex. In vitro tubulin polymerization assays furthermore showed that Ca2+/CaM completely suppresses Par17-promoted microtubule assembly. The results imply that Ca2+/CaM binding to the N-terminal segment of Par17 causes steric hindrance of the Par17 active site, thus interfering with the Par17/tubulin interaction. This Ca2+/CaM-mediated control of Par17-assisted microtubule assembly may provide a mechanism that couples Ca2+ signaling with microtubule function. PMID:25940090

  20. Integrated proteomic platforms for the comparative characterization of medulloblastoma and pilocytic astrocytoma pediatric brain tumors: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Claudia; Iavarone, Federica; D'Angelo, Luca; Arba, Morena; Vincenzoni, Federica; Inserra, Ilaria; Delfino, Daniela; Rossetti, Diana Valeria; Caretto, Marta; Massimi, Luca; Tamburrini, Gianpiero; Di Rocco, Concezio; Caldarelli, Massimo; Messana, Irene; Castagnola, Massimo; Sanna, Maria Teresa; Desiderio, Claudia

    2015-06-01

    A top-down/bottom-up integrated proteomic approach based on LC-MS and 2-DE analysis was applied for comparative characterization of medulloblastoma and pilocytic astrocytoma posterior cranial fossa pediatric brain tumor tissues. Although rare, primary brain tumors are the most frequent solid tumors in the pediatric age. Among them the medulloblastoma is the prevalent malignant tumor in childhood while pilocytic astrocytoma is the most common, rarely showing a malignant progression. Due to the limited availability of this kind of sample, the study was applied to pooled tumor tissues for a preliminary investigation. The results showed different proteomic profiles of the two tumors and evidenced interesting differential expression of several proteins and peptides. Top-down proteomics of acid-soluble fractions of brain tumor homogenates ascribed a potential biomarker role of malignancy to β- and α-thymosins and their truncated proteoforms and to C-terminal truncated (des-GG) ubiquitin, resulting exclusively detected or over-expressed in the highly malignant medulloblastoma. The bottom-up proteomics of the acid-soluble fraction identified several proteins, some of them in common with 2-DE analysis of acid-insoluble pellets. Peroxiredoxin-1, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A, triosephosphate isomerase, pyruvate kinase PKM, tubulin beta and alpha chains, heat shock protein HSP-90-beta and different histones characterized the medulloblastoma while the Ig kappa chain C region, serotransferrin, tubulin beta 2A chain and vimentin the pilocytic astrocytoma. The two proteomic strategies, with their pros and cons, well complemented each other in characterizing the proteome of brain tumor tissues and in disclosing potential disease biomarkers to be validated in a future study on individual samples of both tumor histotypes. PMID:25909245

  1. The Crystal Structure of PPIL1 Bound to Cyclosporine A Suggests a Binding Mode for a Linear Epitope of the SKIP Protein

    PubMed Central

    Stegmann, Christian M.; Lührmann, Reinhard; Wahl, Markus C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The removal of introns from pre-mRNA is carried out by a large macromolecular machine called the spliceosome. The peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase PPIL1 is a component of the human spliceosome and binds to the spliceosomal SKIP protein via a binding site distinct from its active site. Principal Findings Here, we have studied the PPIL1 protein and its interaction with SKIP biochemically and by X-ray crystallography. A minimal linear binding epitope derived from the SKIP protein could be determined using a peptide array. A 36-residue region of SKIP centred on an eight-residue epitope suffices to bind PPIL1 in pull-down experiments. The crystal structure of PPIL1 in complex with the inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) was obtained at a resolution of 1.15 Å and exhibited two bound Cd2+ ions that enabled SAD phasing. PPIL1 residues that have previously been implicated in binding of SKIP are involved in the coordination of Cd2+ ions in the present crystal structure. Employing the present crystal structure, the determined minimal binding epitope and previously published NMR data [1], a molecular docking study was performed. In the docked model of the PPIL1·SKIP interaction, a proline residue of SKIP is buried in a hydrophobic pocket of PPIL1. This hydrophobic contact is encircled by several hydrogen bonds between the SKIP peptide and PPIL1. Conclusion We characterized a short, linear epitope of SKIP that is sufficient to bind the PPIL1 protein. Our data indicate that this SKIP peptide could function in recruiting PPIL1 into the core of the spliceosome. We present a molecular model for the binding mode of SKIP to PPIL1 which emphasizes the versatility of cyclophilin-type PPIases to engage in additional interactions with other proteins apart from active site contacts despite their limited surface area. PMID:20368803

  2. The posttranslocational chaperone lipoprotein PrsA is involved in both glycopeptide and oxacillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Jousselin, Ambre; Renzoni, Adriana; Andrey, Diego O; Monod, Antoinette; Lew, Daniel P; Kelley, William L

    2012-07-01

    Understanding in detail the factors which permit Staphylococcus aureus to counteract cell wall-active antibiotics is a prerequisite to elaborating effective strategies to prolong the usefulness of these drugs and define new targets for pharmacological intervention. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains are major pathogens of hospital-acquired and community-acquired infections and are most often treated with glycopeptides (vancomycin and teicoplanin) because of their resistance to most penicillins and a limited arsenal of clinically proven alternatives. In this study, we examined PrsA, a lipid-anchored protein of the parvulin PPIase family (peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase) found ubiquitously in all Gram-positive species, in which it assists posttranslocational folding at the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. We show by both genetic and biochemical assays that prsA is directly regulated by the VraRS two-component sentinel system of cell wall stress. Disruption of prsA is tolerated by S. aureus, and its loss results in no detectable overt macroscopic changes in cell wall architecture or growth rate under nonstressed growth conditions. Disruption of prsA leads, however, to notable alterations in the sensitivity to glycopeptides and dramatically decreases the resistance of COL (MRSA) to oxacillin. Quantitative transcriptional analysis reveals that prsA and vraR are coordinately upregulated in a panel of stable laboratory and clinical glycopeptide-intermediate S. aureus (GISA) strains compared to their susceptible parents. Collectively, our results point to a role for prsA as a facultative facilitator of protein secretion or extracellular folding and provide a framework for understanding why prsA is a key element of the VraRS-mediated cell wall stress response. PMID:22526301

  3. Classification of rice (oryza sativa l. japonica nipponbare) immunophilins (fkbps, cyps) and expression patterns under water stress

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background FK506 binding proteins (FKBPs) and cyclophilins (CYPs) are abundant and ubiquitous proteins belonging to the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) superfamily, which regulate much of metabolism through a chaperone or an isomerization of proline residues during protein folding. They are collectively referred to as immunophilin (IMM), being present in almost all cellular organs. In particular, a number of IMMs relate to environmental stresses. Results FKBP and CYP proteins in rice (Oryza sativa cv. Japonica) were identified and classified, and given the appropriate name for each IMM, considering the ortholog-relation with Arabidopsis and Chlamydomonas or molecular weight of the proteins. 29 FKBP and 27 CYP genes can putatively be identified in rice; among them, a number of genes can be putatively classified as orthologs of Arabidopsis IMMs. However, some genes were novel, did not match with those of Arabidopsis and Chlamydomonas, and several genes were paralogs by genetic duplication. Among 56 IMMs in rice, a significant number are regulated by salt and/or desiccation stress. In addition, their expression levels responding to the water-stress have been analyzed in different tissues, and some subcellular IMMs located by means of tagging with GFP protein. Conclusion Like other green photosynthetic organisms such as Arabidopsis (23 FKBPs and 29 CYPs) and Chlamydomonas (23 FKBs and 26 CYNs), rice has the highest number of IMM genes among organisms reported so far, suggesting that the numbers relate closely to photosynthesis. Classification of the putative FKBPs and CYPs in rice provides the information about their evolutional/functional significance when comparisons are drawn with the relatively well studied genera, Arabidopsis and Chlamydomonas. In addition, many of the genes upregulated by water stress offer the possibility of manipulating the stress responses in rice. PMID:21087465

  4. RuBisCO depletion improved proteome coverage of cold responsive S-nitrosylated targets in Brassica juncea

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Ankita; Abat, Jasmeet K.; Deswal, Renu

    2013-01-01

    Although in the last few years good number of S-nitrosylated proteins are identified but information on endogenous targets is still limiting. Therefore, an attempt is made to decipher NO signaling in cold treated Brassica juncea seedlings. Treatment of seedlings with substrate, cofactor and inhibitor of Nitric-oxide synthase and nitrate reductase (NR), indicated NR mediated NO biosynthesis in cold. Analysis of the in vivo thiols showed depletion of low molecular weight thiols and enhancement of available protein thiols, suggesting redox changes. To have a detailed view, S-nitrosylation analysis was done using biotin switch technique (BST) and avidin-affinity chromatography. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is S-nitrosylated and therefore, is identified as target repeatedly due to its abundance. It also competes out low abundant proteins which are important NO signaling components. Therefore, RuBisCO was removed (over 80%) using immunoaffinity purification. Purified S-nitrosylated RuBisCO depleted proteins were resolved on 2-D gel as 110 spots, including 13 new, which were absent in the crude S-nitrosoproteome. These were identified by nLC-MS/MS as thioredoxin, fructose biphosphate aldolase class I, myrosinase, salt responsive proteins, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase and malate dehydrogenase. Cold showed differential S-nitrosylation of 15 spots, enhanced superoxide dismutase activity (via S-nitrosylation) and promoted the detoxification of superoxide radicals. Increased S-nitrosylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase sedoheptulose-biphosphatase, and fructose biphosphate aldolase, indicated regulation of Calvin cycle by S-nitrosylation. The results showed that RuBisCO depletion improved proteome coverage and provided clues for NO signaling in cold. PMID:24032038

  5. The cyclophilin CYP20-2 modulates the conformation of BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1, which binds the promoter of FLOWERING LOCUS D to regulate flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Beibei; Xu, Yunyuan; Li, Heng; Li, Shanshan; Zhang, Dajian; Mao, Zhiwei; Guo, Siyi; Yang, Chunhong; Weng, Yuxiang; Chong, Kang

    2013-07-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) regulate many physiological processes during plant development, including flowering. However, little is known about the components of BR signaling that mediate flowering. Here, we report that BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1 (BZR1), the conformation of which is altered by a cyclophilin (CYP20-2), binds cis-elements in the FLOWERING LOCUS D (FLD) promoter to regulate flowering. Both bzr1-1D and fld-4 showed delayed flowering. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that BZR1 bound to a putative BR response cis-element and suppressed the expression of FLD. Overexpression of FLD partially rescued the late flowering of pBZR1:mBZR1(Pro234-Leu)-CFP (mx3). Yeast two-hybrid and pull-down assays demonstrated that BZR1 interacts with CYP20-2. Arabidopsis thaliana CYP20-2 had greater peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity than did wheat (Triticum aestivum) CYP20-2. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed conformation changes in BZR1, dependent on interaction with CYP20-2. Due to differences in activity and substrate preference between CYP20-2 proteins from wheat and Arabidopsis, At-CYP20-2-overexpressing lines showed earlier flowering, whereas Ta CYP20-2 lines flowered later. Immunoblot and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that histone H3 trimethyl Lys4 and H3 acetylation levels were negatively correlated with the transcription of FLD (a putative histone demethylase) in various lines. Therefore, a conformational change of BZR1 mediated by CYP20-2 causes altered flowering through modulation of FLD expression. PMID:23897924

  6. Disentangling mechanisms involved in collagen pyridinoline cross-linking: The immunophilin FKBP65 is critical for dimerization of lysyl hydroxylase 2.

    PubMed

    Gjaltema, Rutger A F; van der Stoel, Miesje M; Boersema, Miriam; Bank, Ruud A

    2016-06-28

    Collagens are subjected to extensive posttranslational modifications, such as lysine hydroxylation. Bruck syndrome (BS) is a connective tissue disorder characterized at the molecular level by a loss of telopeptide lysine hydroxylation, resulting in reduced collagen pyridinoline cross-linking. BS results from mutations in the genes coding for lysyl hydroxylase (LH) 2 or peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) FKBP65. Given that the immunophilin FKBP65 does not exhibit LH activity, it is likely that LH2 activity is somehow dependent on FKPB65. In this report, we provide insights regarding the interplay between LH2 and FKBP65. We found that FKBP65 forms complexes with LH2 splice variants LH2A and LH2B but not with LH1 and LH3. Ablating the catalytic activity of FKBP65 or LH2 did not affect complex formation. Both depletion of FKBP65 and inhibition of FKBP65 PPIase activity reduced the dimeric (active) form of LH2 but did not affect the binding of monomeric (inactive) LH2 to procollagen Iα1. Furthermore, we show that LH2A and LH2B cannot form heterodimers with each other but are able to form heterodimers with LH1 and LH3. Collectively, our results indicate that FKBP65 is linked to pyridinoline cross-linking by specifically mediating the dimerization of LH2. Moreover, FKBP65 does not interact with LH1 and LH3, explaining why in BS triple-helical hydroxylysines are not affected. Our results provide a mechanistic link between FKBP65 and the loss of pyridinolines and may hold the key to future treatments for diseases related to collagen cross-linking anomalies, such as fibrosis and cancer. PMID:27298363

  7. Evaluation of decellularization in umbilical cord artery.

    PubMed

    Mallis, P; Gontika, I; Poulogiannopoulos, T; Zoidakis, J; Vlahou, A; Michalopoulos, E; Chatzistamatiou, T; Papassavas, A; Stavropoulos-Giokas, C

    2014-11-01

    Major achievements in creating decellularized whole tissue scaffolds have drawn considerable attention to decellularization as a promising approach for tissue engineering. Developing a tissue-engineered small-diameter (≤2 mm) vascular graft, using decellularized human umbilical arteries (hUAs), for reconstructive surgery is a challenging task. Polymers used in the past, proved unsuitable due to serious adverse effects and autologous vessels are available only in 40% of patients. In this study, histological and proteomic analysis was performed to evaluate the efficiency of two decellularization protocols. In decellularization protocol A, hUAs were incubated in 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) followed by incubation in alpha minimal essential medium (α-MEM) with foetal bovine serum (FBS) while in decellularization protocol B the hUAs were incubated in Hypotonic Tris and SDS followed by incubation in nuclease solution. Histological analysis of decelullarised hUA with both protocols revealed good preservation of extracellular cell matrix (ECM) proteins and immunofluorescent staining detected collagen I and fibronectin. The DNA content within the hUAs after decellularization with protocol A was 6.2% and with protocol B 17.3%. Proteomic analysis identified cytoplasmic enzymes such as, dehydrogenase X, α-enolase and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A only in native samples, while, cytoskeletal proteins such as a-actin, filamin and ECM proteins like collagens were found both in native and decellularised hUA. In conclusion, both decellularization protocols effectively removed the cellular material while the ECM remained intact. Future studies are warranted to elucidate the specific effects of altered structure-function relationships on the overall fate of decellularized hUAs. PMID:25420867

  8. Surface Lipoprotein PpiA of Streptococcus mutans Suppresses Scavenger Receptor MARCO-Dependent Phagocytosis by Macrophages ▿

    PubMed Central

    Mukouhara, Tadashi; Arimoto, Takafumi; Cho, Kasei; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Igarashi, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is associated with the initiation and progression of human dental caries and is occasionally isolated from the blood of patients with bacteremia and infective endocarditis. For the pathogen to survive in the infected host, surface lipoproteins of S. mutans are likely to play important roles in interactions with the innate immune system. To clarify the role that a putative lipoprotein, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans-isomerase (PpiA), of S. mutans plays in the macrophage response, we investigated the response of THP-1-derived macrophages to S. mutans challenge. The deletion of the gene encoding Lgt eliminated PpiA on the cell surface of S. mutans, which implies that PpiA is a lipoprotein that is lipid anchored in the cell membrane by Lgt. Human and murine peritoneal macrophages both showed higher phagocytic activities for the ppiA and lgt mutants than the wild type, which indicates that the presence of PpiA reduces S. mutans phagocytosis. In addition, infection with S. mutans markedly induced mRNAs of macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) and scavenger receptor A (SR-A) in human macrophages. In particular, transcriptional and translational levels of MARCO in human macrophages infected with the ppiA mutant were higher than those in macrophages infected with the wild type. Phagocytosis of S. mutans by human macrophages markedly decreased after treatment with anti-MARCO IgG. These results demonstrate that the S. mutans lipoprotein PpiA contributes to suppression of MARCO-mediated phagocytosis of this bacterium by macrophages. PMID:21986627

  9. Differential proteome and gene expression for testis of mice exposed to carbon ion radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Hongyan

    Objective To investigate the effect and mechanism of high linear energy transfer (LET) carbon ion irradiation (CIR) on reproduction in the testis of male Swiss Webster mice, and assess the risk associated with space environment. Methods Male mice underwent whole-body irradiation with CIR (0.5, 1 and 4Gy), and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) analysis was used to determine the alteration in protein expression in 2-DE (two-dimensional gel electrophoresis) gels of testes caused by irradiation after 7, 14 days. Results 15 differentially expressed proteins, such as glucose-regulated protein(GRP78), aconitate hydratase-mitochondrial precursor (ACO), pyruvate kinase isozymes M1/M2 (PKM1/M2), glutathione-S-transferaseA3 (GSTA3), glutathione S-transferase Pi 1 (GSTP1), Cu/Zn super-oxide dismutase (SOD1), Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (Pin1) and Heat shock 70 kDa protein 4L (HSPa4L), were identified and these proteins were mainly involved in energy supply, the endoplasmic reticulum, cell proliferation, cell cycle, antioxidant capacity and mitochondrial respiration, which play important roles in the inhibition of testicular function in response to CIR. Furthermore, we confirmed the relationship between transcription of mRNA and the abundance of proteins. Conclusion The findings of the present study demonstrated that these proteins may lead to new insights into the molecular mechanism of CIR toxicity, and suggested that the gene expression response to CIR involves diverse regulatory mechanisms from transcription of mRNA to the formation of functional proteins. These data also may provide a scientific basis for protecting astronauts and space traveler’s health and safety.

  10. Conserved Hydration Sites in Pin1 Reveal a Distinctive Water Recognition Motif in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Barman, Arghya; Smitherman, Crystal; Souffrant, Michael; Gadda, Giovanni; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-01-25

    Structurally conserved water molecules are important for biomolecular stability, flexibility, and function. X-ray crystallographic studies of Pin1 have resolved a number of water molecules around the enzyme, including two highly conserved water molecules within the protein. The functional role of these localized water molecules remains unknown and unexplored. Pin1 catalyzes cis/trans isomerizations of peptidyl prolyl bonds that are preceded by a phosphorylated serine or threonine residue. Pin1 is involved in many subcellular signaling processes and is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of several life threatening diseases. Here, we investigate the significance of these structurally conserved water molecules in the catalytic domain of Pin1 using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, free energy calculations, analysis of X-ray crystal structures, and circular dichroism (CD) experiments. MD simulations and free energy calculations suggest the tighter binding water molecule plays a crucial role in maintaining the integrity and stability of a critical hydrogen-bonding network in the active site. The second water molecule is exchangeable with bulk solvent and is found in a distinctive helix-turn-coil motif. Structural bioinformatics analysis of nonredundant X-ray crystallographic protein structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) suggest this motif is present in several other proteins and can act as a water site, akin to the calcium EF hand. CD experiments suggest the isolated motif is in a distorted PII conformation and requires the protein environment to fully form the α-helix-turn-coil motif. This study provides valuable insights into the role of hydration in the structural integrity of Pin1 that can be exploited in protein engineering and drug design. PMID:26651388

  11. Primary Identification, Biochemical Characterization, and Immunologic Properties of the Allergenic Pollen Cyclophilin Cat r 1*

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Debajyoti; Mueller, Geoffrey A.; Schramm, Gabriele; Edwards, Lori L.; Petersen, Arnd; London, Robert E.; Haas, Helmut; Gupta Bhattacharya, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Cyclophilin (Cyp) allergens are considered pan-allergens due to frequently reported cross-reactivity. In addition to well studied fungal Cyps, a number of plant Cyps were identified as allergens (e.g. Bet v 7 from birch pollen, Cat r 1 from periwinkle pollen). However, there are conflicting data regarding their antigenic/allergenic cross-reactivity, with no plant Cyp allergen structures available for comparison. Because amino acid residues are fairly conserved between plant and fungal Cyps, it is particularly interesting to check whether they can cross-react. Cat r 1 was identified by immunoblotting using allergic patients' sera followed by N-terminal sequencing. Cat r 1 (∼91% sequence identity to Bet v 7) was cloned from a cDNA library and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant Cat r 1 was utilized to confirm peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans-isomerase (PPIase) activity by a PPIase assay and the allergenic property by an IgE-specific immunoblotting and rat basophil leukemia cell (RBL-SX38) mediator release assay. Inhibition-ELISA showed cross-reactive binding of serum IgE from Cat r 1-allergic individuals to fungal allergenic Cyps Asp f 11 and Mala s 6. The molecular structure of Cat r 1 was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The antigenic surface was examined in relation to its plant, animal, and fungal homologues. The structure revealed a typical cyclophilin fold consisting of a compact β-barrel made up of seven anti-parallel β-strands along with two surrounding α-helices. This is the first structure of an allergenic plant Cyp revealing high conservation of the antigenic surface particularly near the PPIase active site, which supports the pronounced cross-reactivity among Cyps from various sources. PMID:24939849

  12. Altered Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variants Induced by Exposure to Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maleki, Anis Rageh; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Tay, Sun Tee; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei primary diagnostic cultures demonstrate colony morphology variation associated with expression of virulence and adaptation proteins. This study aims to examine the ability of B. pseudomallei colony variants (wild type [WT] and small colony variant [SCV]) to survive and replicate intracellularly in A549 cells and to identify the alterations in the protein expression of these variants, post-exposure to the A549 cells. Intracellular survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed followed by proteomics analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. B. pseudomallei SCV survive longer than the WT. During post-exposure, among 259 and 260 protein spots of SCV and WT, respectively, 19 were differentially expressed. Among SCV post-exposure up-regulated proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (CbbA) and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were associated with adhesion and virulence. Among the down-regulated proteins, enolase (Eno) is implicated in adhesion and virulence. Additionally, post-exposure expression profiles of both variants were compared with pre-exposure. In WT pre- vs post-exposure, 36 proteins were differentially expressed. Of the up-regulated proteins, translocator protein, Eno, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk), ferritin Dps-family DNA binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase B were implicated in invasion and virulence. In SCV pre- vs post-exposure, 27 proteins were differentially expressed. Among the up-regulated proteins, flagellin, Eno, CbbA, Ndk and phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase have similarly been implicated in adhesion, invasion. Protein profiles differences post-exposure provide insights into association between morphotypic and phenotypic characteristics of colony variants, strengthening the role of B. pseudomallei morphotypes in pathogenesis of melioidosis. PMID:25996927

  13. Targeting the cyclophilin domain of Ran-binding protein 2 (Ranbp2) with novel small molecules to control the proteostasis of STAT3, hnRNPA2B1 and M-opsin.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyoung-In; Orry, Andrew; Park, Se Eun; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2015-08-19

    Cyclophilins are peptidyl cis-trans prolyl isomerases (PPIases), whose activity is typically inhibited by cyclosporine A (CsA), a potent immunosuppressor. Cyclophilins are also chaperones. Emerging evidence supports that cyclophilins present nonoverlapping PPIase and chaperone activities. The proteostasis of the disease-relevant substrates, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and 5 (STAT3/STAT5), heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2B1 (hnRNPA2B1), and M-opsin, is regulated by nonoverlapping chaperone and PPIase activities of the cyclophilin domain (CY) of Ranbp2, a multifunctional and modular scaffold that controls nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and proteostasis of selective substrates. Although highly homologous, CY and the archetypal cyclophilin A (CyPA) present distinct catalytic and CsA-binding activities owing to unique structural features between these cylophilins. We explored structural idiosyncrasies between CY and CyPA to screen in silico nearly 9 million small molecules (SM) against the CY PPIase pocket and identify SMs with selective bioactivity toward STAT3, hnRNPA2B1, or M-opsin proteostasis. We found three classes of SMs that enhance the cytokine-stimulated transcriptional activity of STAT3 without changing latent and activated STAT3 levels, down-regulate hnRNPA2B1 or M-opsin proteostasis, or a combination of these. Further, a SM that suppresses hnRNPA2B1 proteostasis also inhibits strongly and selectively the PPIase activity of CY. This study unravels chemical probes for multimodal regulation of CY of Ranbp2 and its substrates, and this regulation likely results in the allosterism stemming from the interconversion of conformational substates of cyclophilins. The results also demonstrate the feasibility of CY in drug discovery against disease-relevant substrates controlled by Ranbp2, and they open new opportunities for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26030368

  14. Cyclophilin A is a new M cell marker of bovine intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hondo, Tetsuya; Someya, Shunsuke; Nagasawa, Yuya; Terada, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Chen, Xiangning; Watanabe, Kouichi; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Kitazawa, Haruki; Rose, Michael T; Nochi, Tomonori; Aso, Hisashi

    2016-06-01

    Microfold (M) cells in the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) of Peyer's patches contribute to the mucosal immune response by the transcytosis of microorganisms. The mechanism by which M cells take up microorganisms, and the functional proteins by which they do this, are not clear. In order to explore one such protein, we developed a 2H5-F3 monoclonal antibody (2H5-F3 mAb) through its binding to bovine M cells, and identified the antibody reactive molecule as cyclophilin A (Cyp-A). The localization patterns of Cyp-A were very similar to the localization pattern of cytokeratin (CK) 18-positive M cells. Cyp-A was identified at the luminal surface of CK18-positive M cells in bovine jejunal and ileal FAE. The membranous localization of Cyp-A in the bovine intestinal cell line (BIE cells) increased as cells differentiated toward M cells, as determined by flow cytometry analysis. Additionally, BIE cells released Cyp-A to the extracellular space and the differentiation of BIE cells to M cells increased the secretion of Cyp-A, as determined by western blotting. Accordingly, Cyp-A may be localized in M cells in the small intestinal epithelium of cattle. The rise of the membranous localization and secretion of Cyp-A by differentiation toward M cells indicates that Cyp-A has an important role in the function of M cells. While Cyp-A of the M cell membrane may contribute to the uptake of viruses with peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity, in the extracellular space Cyp-A may work as a chemokine and contribute to the distribution of immuno-competent cells. PMID:26899250

  15. Overexpression of PIN1 Enhances Cancer Growth and Aggressiveness with Cyclin D1 Induction in EBV-Associated Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Meng; Cheung, Chartia Ching-Mei; Chow, Chit; Lun, Samantha Wei-Man; Cheung, Siu-Tim; Lo, Kwok-Wai

    2016-01-01

    Background Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a peculiar Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-associated malignancy that is prevalent in South-East Asia. Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase NIMA-interacting 1 (PIN1) isomerizes specific phosphorylated amino acid residues, which makes it an important regulator in cell survival and apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the contribution made by PIN1 in NPC tumorigenesis and PIN1’s potential role as a therapeutic target. Methods The expression of PIN1 was examined in a panel of NPC cell lines, xenografts and primary tumors. The functional roles of PIN1 in NPC cells were elucidated by the knockdown and overexpression of PIN1 in in vitro and in vivo nude mice models by siRNA and lenti-viral transfection, respectively. The antitumor effects of the PIN1 inhibitor Juglone in NPC cells were also evaluated. Results We revealed the consistent overexpression of PIN1 in almost all EBV-associated NPC cell lines, xenografts and primary tumors. PIN1 suppression was capable of inhibiting cyclin D1 expression and activating caspase-3 in NPC cells. It positively regulated NPC cell proliferation, colony formation and anchorage-independent growth. The inhibition of PIN1 suppressed tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions This study demonstrates the oncogenic role of PIN1 in NPC tumorigenesis, and shows that its overexpression can enhance tumor cell growth via the upregulation of cyclinD1. Our findings inform the development of novel treatments targeting PIN1 for NPC patients. PMID:27258148

  16. Overexpression of OsCYP19-4 increases tolerance to cold stress and enhances grain yield in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Dae Hwa; Lee, Sang Sook; Park, Hyun Ji; Lyu, Jae Il; Chong, Won Seog; Liu, Jang Ryol; Kim, Beom-Gi; Ahn, Jun Cheul; Cho, Hye Sun

    2016-01-01

    AtCYP19-4 (also known as CYP5) was previously identified as interacting in vitro with GNOM, a member of a large family of ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factors that is required for proper polar localization of the auxin efflux carrier PIN1. The present study demonstrated that OsCYP19-4, a gene encoding a putative homologue of AtCYP19-4, was up-regulated by several stresses and showed over 10-fold up-regulation in response to cold. The study further demonstrated that the promoter of OsCYP19-4 was activated in response to cold stress. An OsCYP19-4-GFP fusion protein was targeted to the outside of the plasma membrane via the endoplasmic reticulum as determined using brefeldin A, a vesicle trafficking inhibitor. An in vitro assay with a synthetic substrate oligomer confirmed that OsCYP19-4 had peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity, as was previously reported for AtCYP19-4. Rice plants overexpressing OsCYP19-4 showed cold-resistance phenotypes with significantly increased tiller and spike numbers, and consequently enhanced grain weight, compared with wild-type plants. Based on these results, the authors suggest that OsCYP19-4 is required for developmental acclimation to environmental stresses, especially cold. Furthermore, the results point to the potential of manipulating OsCYP19-4 expression to enhance cold tolerance or to increase biomass. PMID:26453745

  17. Down-regulation of Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 through Inhibiting Erk/Pin 1 Pathway by Sorafenib Facilitates Chemosensitization in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Qingqing; Huo, Longfei; Yang, Jer-Yen; Xia, Weiya; Wei, Yongkun; Liao, Yong; Chang, Chun-Ju; Yang, Yan; Lai, Chien-Chen; Lee, Dung-Fang; Yen, Chia-Jui; Chen, Yun-Ju Rita; Hsu, Jung-Mao; Kuo, Hsu-Ping; Lin, Chun-Yi; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Li, Long-Yuan; Tsai, Chang-Hai; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1), a Bcl-2–like antiapoptotic protein, plays a role in cell immortalization and chemoresistance in a number of human malignancies. A peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase, Pin1 is involved in many cellular events, such as cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, and differentiation through isomerizing prophosphorylated substrates. It has been reported that down-regulation of Pin1 induces apoptosis, and that Erk phosphorylates and up-regulates Mcl-1; however, the underlying mechanisms for the two phenomena are not clear yet. Here, we showed that Pin 1 stabilizes Mcl-1, which is required for Mcl-1 posphorylation by Erk. First, we found expression of Mcl-1 and Pin1 were positively correlated and associated with poor survival in human breast cancer. We then showed that Erk could phosphorylate Mcl-1 at two consensus residues, Thr 92 and 163, which is required for the association of Mcl-1 and Pin1, resulting in stabilization of Mcl-1. Moreover, Pin1 is also required for the up-regulation of Mcl-1 by Erk activation. Based on this newly identified mechanism of Mcl-1 stabilization, two strategies were used to overcome Mcl-1–mediated chemoresistance: inhibiting Erk by Sorafenib, an approved clinical anticancer drug, or knocking down Pin1 by using a SiRNA technique. In conclusion, the current report not only unravels a novel mechanism to link Erk/Pin1 pathway and Mcl-1–mediated chemoresistance but also provides a plausible combination therapy, Taxol (Paclitaxel) plus Sorafenib, which was shown to be effective in killing breast cancer cells. PMID:18676833

  18. Pin1 promotes transforming growth factor-beta-induced migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Isao; Chiang, Keng-Nan; Lai, Chen-Yu; He, Dongming; Wang, Guannan; Ramkumar, Romila; Uchida, Takafumi; Ryo, Akihide; Lu, Kunping; Liu, Fang

    2010-01-15

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) regulates a wide variety of biological activities. It induces potent growth-inhibitory responses in normal cells but promotes migration and invasion of cancer cells. Smads mediate the TGF-beta responses. TGF-beta binding to the cell surface receptors leads to the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 in their C terminus as well as in the proline-rich linker region. The serine/threonine phosphorylation sites in the linker region are followed by the proline residue. Pin1, a peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase, recognizes phosphorylated serine/threonine-proline motifs. Here we show that Smad2/3 interacts with Pin1 in a TGF-beta-dependent manner. We further show that the phosphorylated threonine 179-proline motif in the Smad3 linker region is the major binding site for Pin1. Although epidermal growth factor also induces phosphorylation of threonine 179 and other residues in the Smad3 linker region the same as TGF-beta, Pin1 is unable to bind to the epidermal growth factor-stimulated Smad3. Further analysis suggests that phosphorylation of Smad3 in the C terminus is necessary for the interaction with Pin1. Depletion of Pin1 by small hairpin RNA does not significantly affect TGF-beta-induced growth-inhibitory responses and a number of TGF-beta/Smad target genes analyzed. In contrast, knockdown of Pin1 in human PC3 prostate cancer cells strongly inhibited TGF-beta-mediated migration and invasion. Accordingly, TGF-beta induction of N-cadherin, which plays an important role in migration and invasion, is markedly reduced when Pin1 is depleted in PC3 cells. Because Pin1 is overexpressed in many cancers, our findings highlight the importance of Pin1 in TGF-beta-induced migration and invasion of cancer cells. PMID:19920136

  19. The oncometabolite R-2-hydroxyglutarate activates NF-κB-dependent tumor-promoting stromal niche for acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing-Yi; Lai, You-Syuan; Tsai, Hui-Jen; Kuo, Cheng-Chin; Yen, B. Linju; Yeh, Su-Peng; Sun, H. Sunny; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells produce the oncometabolite R-2-hydroxyglutarate (R-2HG) to induce epigenetic alteration and block hematopoietic differentiation. However, the effect of R-2HG released by IDH-mutated AML cells on the bone marrow microenvironment is unclear. Here, we report that R-2HG induces IκB kinase-independent activation of NF-κB in bone marrow stromal cells. R-2HG acts via a reactive oxygen species/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent pathway to phosphorylate NF-κB on the Thr254 residue. This phosphorylation enhances the interaction of NF-κB and the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase PIN1 and increases the protein stability and transcriptional activity of NF-κB. As a consequence, R-2HG enhances NF-κB-dependent expression of cytokines including IL-6, IL-8 and complement 5a to stimulate proliferation of AML cells. In addition, R-2HG also upregulates vascular endothelial adhesion molecule 1 and CXCR4 in stromal cells to enhance the contact between AML and stromal cells and attenuates chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. More importantly, we validated the R-2HG-activated gene signature in the primary bone marrow stromal cells isolated from IDH-mutated AML patients. Collectively, our results suggest that AML cell-derived R-2HG may be helpful for the establishment of a supportive bone marrow stromal niche to promote AML progression via paracrine stimulation. PMID:27577048

  20. A serine/arginine-rich nuclear matrix cyclophilin interacts with the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Bourquin, J P; Stagljar, I; Meier, P; Moosmann, P; Silke, J; Baechi, T; Georgiev, O; Schaffner, W

    1997-01-01

    The largest subunit of RNA polymerase II shows a striking difference in the degree of phosphorylation, depending on its functional state: initiating and elongating polymerases are unphosphorylated and highly phosphorylated respectively. Phosphorylation mostly occurs at the C-terminal domain (CTD), which consists of a repetitive heptapeptide structure. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we have selected for mammalian proteins that interact with the phosphorylated CTD of mammalian RNA polymerase II. A prominent isolate, designated SRcyp/CASP10, specifically interacts with the CTD not only in vivo but also in vitro . It contains a serine/arginine-rich (SR) domain, similar to that found in the SR protein family of pre-mRNA splicing factors, which is required for interaction with the CTD. Most remarkably, the N-terminal region of SRcyp includes a peptidyl-prolyl cis - trans isomerase domain characteristic of immunophilins/cyclophilins (Cyp), a protein family implicated in protein folding, assembly and transport. SRcyp is a nuclear protein with a characteristic distribution in large irregularly shaped nuclear speckles and co-localizes perfectly with the SR domain-containing splicing factor SC35. Recent independent investigations have provided complementary data, such as an association of the phosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II with the nuclear speckles, impaired splicing in a CTD deletion background and inhibition of in vitro splicing by CTD peptides. Taken together, these data indicate that factors directly or indirectly involved in splicing are associated with the elongating RNA polymerases, from where they might translocate to the nascent transcripts to ensure efficient splicing, concomitant with transcription. PMID:9153302

  1. Psychrophily and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Gerday, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Polar and other low temperature environments are characterized by a low content in energy and this factor has a strong incidence on living organisms which populate these rather common habitats. Indeed, low temperatures have a negative effect on ectothermic populations since they can affect their growth, reaction rates of biochemical reactions, membrane permeability, diffusion rates, action potentials, protein folding, nucleic acids dynamics and other temperature-dependent biochemical processes. Since the discovery that these ecosystems, contrary to what was initially expected, sustain a rather high density and broad diversity of living organisms, increasing efforts have been dedicated to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in their successful adaptation to apparently unfavorable physical conditions. The first question that comes to mind is: How do these organisms compensate for the exponential decrease of reaction rate when temperature is lowered? As most of the chemical reactions that occur in living organisms are catalyzed by enzymes, the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of cold-adapted enzymes have been investigated. Presently, many crystallographic structures of these enzymes have been elucidated and allowed for a rather clear view of their adaptation to cold. They are characterized by a high specific activity at low and moderate temperatures and a rather low thermal stability, which induces a high flexibility that prevents the freezing effect of low temperatures on structure dynamics. These enzymes also display a low activation enthalpy that renders them less dependent on temperature fluctuations. This is accompanied by a larger negative value of the activation entropy, thus giving evidence of a more disordered ground state. Appropriate folding kinetics is apparently secured through a large expression of trigger factors and peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans-isomerases. PMID:24832805

  2. Identification and functional characterization of the putative polysaccharide biosynthesis protein (CapD) of Enterococcus faecium U0317.

    PubMed

    Ali, Liaqat; Spiess, Meike; Wobser, Dominique; Rodriguez, Marta; Blum, Hubert E; Sakιnç, Türkân

    2016-01-01

    Most bacterial species produce capsular polysaccharides that contribute to disease pathogenesis through evasion of the host innate immune system and are also involved in inhibiting leukocyte killing. In the present study, we identified a gene in Enterococcus faecium U0317 with homologies to the polysaccharide biosynthesis protein CapD that is made up of 336 amino acids and putatively catalyzes N-linked glycosylation. A capD deletion mutant was constructed and complemented by homologous recombination that was confirmed by PCR and sequencing. The mutant revealed different growth behavior and morphological changes compared to wild-type by scanning electron microscopy, also the capD mutant showed a strong hydrophobicity and that was reversed in the reconstituted mutant. For further characterization and functional analyses, in-vitro cell culture and in-vivo a mouse infection models were used. Antibodies directed against alpha lipotechoic acid (αLTA) and the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (αPpiC), effectively mediated the opsonophagocytic killing in the capD knock-out mutant, while this activity was not observed in the wild-type and reconstituted mutant. By comparison more than 2-fold decrease was seen in mutant colonization and adherence to both T24 and Caco2 cells. However, a significant higher bacterial colonization was observed in capD mutant during bacteremia in the animal model, while virulence in a mouse UTI (urinary tract infection) model, there were no obvious differences. Further studies are needed to elucidate the function of capsular polysaccharide synthesis gene clusters and its involvement in the disease pathogenesis with the aim to develop targeted therapies to treat multidrug-resistant E. faecium infections. PMID:26611826

  3. Host cell species-specific effect of cyclosporine A on simian immunodeficiency virus replication

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An understanding of host cell factors that affect viral replication contributes to elucidation of the mechanism for determination of viral tropism. Cyclophilin A (CypA), a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase), is a host factor essential for efficient replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in human cells. However, the role of cyclophilins in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication has not been determined. In the present study, we examined the effect of cyclosporine A (CsA), a PPIase inhibitor, on SIV replication. Results SIV replication in human CEM-SS T cells was not inhibited but rather enhanced by treatment with CsA, which inhibited HIV-1 replication. CsA treatment of target human cells enhanced an early step of SIV replication. CypA overexpression enhanced the early phase of HIV-1 but not SIV replication, while CypA knock-down resulted in suppression of HIV-1 but not SIV replication in CEM-SS cells, partially explaining different sensitivities of HIV-1 and SIV replication to CsA treatment. In contrast, CsA treatment inhibited SIV replication in macaque T cells; CsA treatment of either virus producer or target cells resulted in suppression of SIV replication. SIV infection was enhanced by CypA overexpression in macaque target cells. Conclusions CsA treatment enhanced SIV replication in human T cells but abrogated SIV replication in macaque T cells, implying a host cell species-specific effect of CsA on SIV replication. Further analyses indicated a positive effect of CypA on SIV infection into macaque but not into human T cells. These results suggest possible contribution of CypA to the determination of SIV tropism. PMID:22225545

  4. Periplasmic chaperone FkpA is essential for imported colicin M toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Hullmann, Julia; Patzer, Silke I; Römer, Christin; Hantke, Klaus; Braun, Volkmar

    2008-01-01

    Chaperones facilitate correct folding of newly synthesized proteins. We show here that the periplasmic FkpA chaperone is required for killing Escherichia coli by colicin M entering cells from the outside. Highly active colicin M preparations were inactive against fkpA mutant cells; 104-fold dilutions killed fkpA+ cells. Three previously isolated spontaneous mutants tolerant to colicin M carried a stop codon or an IS1 insertion in the peptidyl-prolyl-cis-trans-isomerase (PPIase) domain (C-domain) of FkpA, which resulted in deletion of the domain. A randomly generated mutant carried a G148D mutation in the C-domain. A temperature-sensitive mutant tolerant to colicin M carried a Y25N mutation in the FkpA N-domain. Mutants transformed with wild-type fkpA were colicin M-sensitive. Isolated FkpA-His reduced colicin M-His cleavage by proteinase K and renatured denatured colicin M-His in vitro; renaturation was prevented by the PPIase inhibitor FK506. In both assays, periplasmic SurA-His had no effect. No other tested periplasmic chaperone could activate colicin M. Among the tested colicins, only colicin M required FkpA for activity. Colicin M bound to cells via FhuA was inactivated by trypsin; unbound colicin M retained activity. We propose that colicin M unfolds during import across the outer membrane, FkpA specifically assists in folding colicin M into an active toxin in the periplasm and PPIase is essential for colicin M activity. Colicin M is a suitable tool for the isolation of FkpA mutants used to elucidate the functions of the FkpA N- and C-domains. PMID:18554332

  5. In vitro phosphorylation does not influence the aggregation kinetics of WT α-synuclein in contrast to its phosphorylation mutants.

    PubMed

    Schreurs, Sarah; Gerard, Melanie; Derua, Rita; Waelkens, Etienne; Taymans, Jean-Marc; Baekelandt, Veerle; Engelborghs, Yves

    2014-01-01

    The aggregation of alpha-synuclein (α-SYN) into fibrils is characteristic for several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD). Ninety percent of α-SYN deposited in Lewy Bodies, a pathological hallmark of PD, is phosphorylated on serine129. α-SYN can also be phosphorylated on tyrosine125, which is believed to regulate the membrane binding capacity and thus possibly its normal function. A better understanding of the effect of phosphorylation on the aggregation of α-SYN might shed light on its role in the pathogenesis of PD. In this study we compare the aggregation properties of WT α-SYN with the phospho-dead and phospho-mimic mutants S129A, S129D, Y125F and Y125E and in vitro phosphorylated α-SYN using turbidity, thioflavin T and circular dichroism measurements as well as transmission electron microscopy. We show that the mutants S129A and S129D behave similarly compared to wild type (WT) α-SYN, while the mutants Y125F and Y125E fibrillate significantly slower, although all mutants form fibrillar structures similar to the WT protein. In contrast, in vitro phosphorylation of α-SYN on either S129 or Y125 does not significantly affect the fibrillization kinetics. Moreover, FK506 binding proteins (FKBPs), enzymes with peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity, still accelerate the aggregation of phosphorylated α-SYN in vitro, as was shown previously for WT α-SYN. In conclusion, our results illustrate that phosphorylation mutants can display different aggregation properties compared to the more biologically relevant phosphorylated form of α-SYN. PMID:24434619

  6. Genome Wide Identification of the Immunophilin Gene Family in Leptosphaeria maculans: A Causal Agent of Blackleg Disease in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus)

    PubMed Central

    Zouhar, Miloslav; Mazakova, Jana; Rysanek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Phoma stem canker (blackleg) is a disease of world-wide importance on oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and can cause serious losses for crops globally. The disease is caused by dothideomycetous fungus, Leptosphaeria maculans, which is highly virulent/aggressive. Cyclophilins (CYPs) and FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) are ubiquitous proteins belonging to the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) family. They are collectively referred to as immunophilins (IMMs). In the present study, IMM genes, CYP and FKBP in haploid strain v23.1.3 of L. maculans genome, were identified and classified. Twelve CYPs and five FKBPs were determined in total. Domain architecture analysis revealed the presence of a conserved cyclophilin-like domain (CLD) in the case of CYPs and FKBP_C in the case of FKBPs. Interestingly, IMMs in L. maculans also subgrouped into single domain (SD) and multidomain (MD) proteins. They were primarily found to be localized in cytoplasm, nuclei, and mitochondria. Homologous and orthologous gene pairs were also determined by comparison with the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Remarkably, IMMs of L. maculans contain shorter introns in comparison to exons. Moreover, CYPs, in contrast with FKBPs, contain few exons. However, two CYPs were determined as being intronless. The expression profile of IMMs in both mycelium and infected primary leaves of B. napus demonstrated their potential role during infection. Secondary structure analysis revealed the presence of atypical eight β strands and two α helices fold architecture. Gene ontology analysis of IMMs predicted their significant role in protein folding and PPIase activity. Taken together, our findings for the first time present new prospects of this highly conserved gene family in phytopathogenic fungus. PMID:25259854

  7. SUMO-conjugating enzyme (Sce) and FK506-binding protein (FKBP) encoding rice (Oryza sativa L.) genes: genome-wide analysis, expression studies and evidence for their involvement in abiotic stress response.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Neha; Singh, Amanjot; Sahi, Chandan; Chandramouli, Anupama; Grover, Anil

    2008-04-01

    We report an in-depth characterization of two major stress proteins namely SUMO-conjugating enzyme (Sce) and peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Sce mediates addition of SUMO group to various cell proteins, through process referred to as SUMOylation. Rice nuclear genome has two putative genes encoding the Sce protein (OsSce1 and OsSce2). PCR-amplified full-length OsSce1 cDNA functionally complemented the growth defect in yeast cells lacking the equivalent Ubc9 protein (ScDeltaubc9). RT-PCR analysis showed that transcript levels of OsSce1 and OsSce2 in rice seedlings were regulated by temperature stress. OsSce1 protein was localized to the nucleus in onion epidermal cells as evidenced by the transient GFP expression analysis following micro-projectile gun-based shooting of an OsSce1-GFP fusion construct. PPIase proteins assist molecular chaperones in reactions associated with protein folding and protein transport across membrane. There are 23 putative genes encoding for FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs; specific class of PPIase) in rice genome. OsFKBP20 cDNA was isolated as a stress-inducible EST clone. Largest ORF of 561 bases in OsFKBP20 showed characteristic FK506-binding domain at N-terminus and a coiled-coil motif at C-terminus. RNA expression analysis indicated that OsFKBP20 transcript is heat-inducible. OsFKBP20 over-expression in yeast endowed capacity of high temperature tolerance to yeast cells. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that OsSce1 protein physically interacts with the OsFKBP20 protein. It is thus proposed that OsSce1 and OsFKBP20 proteins in concert mediate the stress response of rice plants. PMID:18219493

  8. Overexpression of OsCYP19-4 increases tolerance to cold stress and enhances grain yield in rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Dae Hwa; Lee, Sang Sook; Park, Hyun Ji; Lyu, Jae Il; Chong, Won Seog; Liu, Jang Ryol; Kim, Beom-Gi; Ahn, Jun Cheul; Cho, Hye Sun

    2016-01-01

    AtCYP19-4 (also known as CYP5) was previously identified as interacting in vitro with GNOM, a member of a large family of ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factors that is required for proper polar localization of the auxin efflux carrier PIN1. The present study demonstrated that OsCYP19-4, a gene encoding a putative homologue of AtCYP19-4, was up-regulated by several stresses and showed over 10-fold up-regulation in response to cold. The study further demonstrated that the promoter of OsCYP19-4 was activated in response to cold stress. An OsCYP19-4-GFP fusion protein was targeted to the outside of the plasma membrane via the endoplasmic reticulum as determined using brefeldin A, a vesicle trafficking inhibitor. An in vitro assay with a synthetic substrate oligomer confirmed that OsCYP19-4 had peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity, as was previously reported for AtCYP19-4. Rice plants overexpressing OsCYP19-4 showed cold-resistance phenotypes with significantly increased tiller and spike numbers, and consequently enhanced grain weight, compared with wild-type plants. Based on these results, the authors suggest that OsCYP19-4 is required for developmental acclimation to environmental stresses, especially cold. Furthermore, the results point to the potential of manipulating OsCYP19-4 expression to enhance cold tolerance or to increase biomass. PMID:26453745

  9. RuBisCO depletion improved proteome coverage of cold responsive S-nitrosylated targets in Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Sehrawat, Ankita; Abat, Jasmeet K; Deswal, Renu

    2013-01-01

    Although in the last few years good number of S-nitrosylated proteins are identified but information on endogenous targets is still limiting. Therefore, an attempt is made to decipher NO signaling in cold treated Brassica juncea seedlings. Treatment of seedlings with substrate, cofactor and inhibitor of Nitric-oxide synthase and nitrate reductase (NR), indicated NR mediated NO biosynthesis in cold. Analysis of the in vivo thiols showed depletion of low molecular weight thiols and enhancement of available protein thiols, suggesting redox changes. To have a detailed view, S-nitrosylation analysis was done using biotin switch technique (BST) and avidin-affinity chromatography. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is S-nitrosylated and therefore, is identified as target repeatedly due to its abundance. It also competes out low abundant proteins which are important NO signaling components. Therefore, RuBisCO was removed (over 80%) using immunoaffinity purification. Purified S-nitrosylated RuBisCO depleted proteins were resolved on 2-D gel as 110 spots, including 13 new, which were absent in the crude S-nitrosoproteome. These were identified by nLC-MS/MS as thioredoxin, fructose biphosphate aldolase class I, myrosinase, salt responsive proteins, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase and malate dehydrogenase. Cold showed differential S-nitrosylation of 15 spots, enhanced superoxide dismutase activity (via S-nitrosylation) and promoted the detoxification of superoxide radicals. Increased S-nitrosylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase sedoheptulose-biphosphatase, and fructose biphosphate aldolase, indicated regulation of Calvin cycle by S-nitrosylation. The results showed that RuBisCO depletion improved proteome coverage and provided clues for NO signaling in cold. PMID:24032038

  10. Identification of Conserved and Species-Specific Functions of the Listeria monocytogenes PrsA2 Secretion Chaperone.

    PubMed

    Cahoon, Laty A; Freitag, Nancy E

    2015-10-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen that relies on the regulated secretion and activity of a variety of proteins that sustain life within diverse environments. PrsA2 has recently been identified as a secreted peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase and chaperone that is dispensable for bacterial growth in broth culture but essential for L. monocytogenes virulence. Following host infection, PrsA2 contributes to the proper folding and activity of secreted proteins that are required for bacterial replication within the host cytosol and for bacterial spread to adjacent cells. PrsA2 is one member of a family of Gram-positive secretion chaperones that appear to play important roles in bacterial physiology; however, it is not known how these proteins recognize their substrate proteins or the degree to which their function is conserved across diverse Gram-positive species. We therefore examined PrsA proteins encoded by a variety of Gram-positive bacteria for functional complementation of L. monocytogenes mutants lacking prsA2. PrsA homologues encoded by Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus aureus, and Lactococcus lactis were examined for functional complementation of a variety of L. monocytogenes PrsA2-associated phenotypes central to L. monocytogenes pathogenesis and bacterial cell physiology. Our results indicate that while selected aspects of PrsA2 function are broadly conserved among diverse Gram-positive bacteria, PrsA2 exhibits unique specificity for L. monocytogenes target proteins required for pathogenesis. The L. monocytogenes PrsA2 chaperone thus appears evolutionarily optimized for virulence factor secretion within the host cell cytosol while still maintaining aspects of activity relevant to more general features of Gram-positive protein translocation. PMID:26216425

  11. Phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of human SULT4A1: role of Erk1 and PP2A.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Deanne J; Butcher, Neville J; Minchin, Rodney F

    2011-01-01

    SULT4A1 is a cytosolic sulfotransferase that shares little homology with other human sulfotransferases but is highly conserved between species. It is found in neurons located in several regions of the brain. Recently, the stability of SULT4A1 was shown to be regulated by Pin1, a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases. Since Pin1 binds preferentially to phosphoproteins, these findings suggested that SULT4A1 is post-translationally modified. In this study, we show that the Thr(11) residue of SULT4A1, which is involved in Pin1 binding is phosphorylated. MEK inhibition was shown to abolish Pin1 mediated degradation of SULT4A1 while in vitro phosphorylation assays using alanine substitution mutants of SULT4A1 demonstrated phosphorylation of Thr(11) by ERK1. We also show that dephosphorylation was catalyzed by the protein phosphatase 2A. The PP2A regulatory subunit, Bβ was identified from a yeast-2-hybrid screen of human brain cDNA as a SULT4A1 interacting protein. This was further confirmed by GST pull-downs and immunoprecipitation. Other members of the B subunit (αδγ) did not interact with SULT4A1. Taken together, these studies indicate that SULT4A1 stability is regulated by post-translational modification that involves the ERK pathway and PP2A. The phosphorylation of SULT4A1 allows interaction with Pin1, which then promotes degradation of the sulfotransferase. PMID:20920535

  12. Novel Cycloheximide Derivatives Targeting the Moonlighting Protein Mip Exhibit Specific Antimicrobial Activity Against Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Rasch, Janine; Theuerkorn, Martin; Ünal, Can; Heinsohn, Natascha; Tran, Stefan; Fischer, Gunter; Weiwad, Matthias; Steinert, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) and Mip-like proteins are virulence factors in a wide range of pathogens including Legionella pneumophila. These proteins belong to the FK506 binding protein (FKBP) family of peptidyl-prolyl-cis/trans-isomerases (PPIases). In L. pneumophila, the PPIase activity of Mip is required for invasion of macrophages, transmigration through an in vitro lung–epithelial barrier, and full virulence in the guinea pig infection model. Additionally, Mip is a moonlighting protein that binds to collagen IV in the extracellular matrix. Here, we describe the development and synthesis of cycloheximide derivatives with adamantyl moieties as novel FKBP ligands, and analyze their effect on the viability of L. pneumophila and other bacteria. All compounds efficiently inhibited PPIase activity of the prototypic human FKBP12 as well as Mip with IC50-values as low as 180 nM and 1.7 μM, respectively. Five of these derivatives inhibited the growth of L. pneumophila at concentrations of 30–40 μM, but exhibited no effect on other tested bacterial species indicating a specific spectrum of antibacterial activity. The derivatives carrying a 3,5-dimethyladamantan-1-[yl]acetamide substitution (MT_30.32), and a 3-ethyladamantan-1-[yl]acetamide substitution (MT_30.51) had the strongest effects in PPIase- and liquid growth assays. MT_30.32 and MT_30.51 were also inhibitory in macrophage infection studies without being cytotoxic. Accordingly, by applying a combinatorial approach, we were able to generate novel, hybrid inhibitors consisting of cycloheximide and adamantane, two known FKBP inhibitors that interact with different parts of the PPIase domain, respectively. Interestingly, despite the proven Mip-inhibitory activity, the viability of a Mip-deficient strain was affected to the same degree as its wild type. Hence, we also propose that cycloheximide derivatives with adamantyl moieties are potent PPIase inhibitors with multiple targets in L

  13. Involvement of polyphosphate kinase in virulence and stress tolerance of uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Jiang, Qiao; Pan, Jia-Yun; Deng, Cong; Yu, Jing-Yi; Wu, Xiao-Man; Huang, Sheng-He; Deng, Xiao-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Proteus mirabilis (P. mirabilis), a gram-negative enteric bacterium, frequently causes urinary tract infections. Many virulence factors of uropathogenic P. mirabilis have been identified, including urease, flagella, hemolysin and fimbriae. However, the functions of polyphosphate kinase (PPK), which are related to the pathogenicity of many bacteria, remain entirely unknown in P. mirabilis. In this study, a ppk gene encoding the PPK insertional mutant in P. mirabilis strain HI4320 was constructed, and its biological functions were examined. The results of survival studies demonstrated that the ppk mutant was deficient in resistance to oxidative, hyperosmotic and heat stress. The swarming and biofilm formation abilities of P. mirabilis were also attenuated after the ppk interruption. In vitro and in vivo experiments suggested that ppk was required for P. mirabilis to invade the bladder. The negative phenotypes of the ppk mutant could be restored by ppk gene complementation. Furthermore, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to analyze the proteomes of the wild-type strain and the ppk mutant. Compared with the wild-type strain, seven proteins including TonB-dependent receptor, universal stress protein G, major mannose-resistant/Proteus-like fimbrial protein (MR/P fimbriae), heat shock protein, flagellar capping protein, putative membrane protein and multidrug efflux protein were down-regulated, and four proteins including exported peptidase, repressor protein for FtsI, FKBP-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase and phosphotransferase were up-regulated in the ppk mutant. As a whole, these results indicate that PPK is an important regulator and plays a crucial role in stress tolerance and virulence in uropathogenic P. mirabilis. PMID:26233310

  14. Staphylococcus aureus Deficient in Lipidation of Prelipoproteins Is Attenuated in Growth and Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Hartmut; Dengjel, Jörn; Nerz, Christiane; Götz, Friedrich

    2005-01-01

    A lipoprotein diacylglyceryl transferase (lgt) deletion mutant of Staphylococcus aureus SA113 was constructed. The lipoprotein and prelipoprotein expression, the growth behavior, and the ability of the mutant to elicit an immune response in various host cells were studied. In the wild type, the majority of [14C]palmitate-labeled lipoproteins were located in the membrane fraction, although some lipoproteins were also present on the cell surface and in the culture supernatant. The lgt mutant completely lacked palmitate-labeled lipoproteins and released high amounts of some unmodified prelipoproteins, e.g., the oligopeptide-binding protein OppA, the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase PrsA, and the staphylococcal iron transporter SitC, into the culture supernatant. The growth of the lgt mutant was hardly affected in rich medium but was retarded under nutrient limitation. The lgt mutant and its crude lysate induced much fewer proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human monocytic (MonoMac6), epithelial (pulmonary A549), and endothelial (human umbilical vein endothelial) cells than the wild type. However, in whole blood samples, the culture supernatant of the lgt mutant was equal or even superior to the wild-type supernatant in tumor necrosis factor alpha induction. Lipoprotein fractionation experiments provided evidence that a small proportion of the mature lipoproteins are released by the S. aureus wild type despite the lipid anchor and are trapped in part by the cell wall, thereby exposing the immune-activating lipid structure on the cell surface. Bacterial lipoproteins appear to be essential for a complete immune stimulation by gram-positive bacteria. PMID:15784587

  15. The cyclophilin A DIAGEOTROPICA gene affects auxin transport in both root and shoot to control lateral root formation.

    PubMed

    Ivanchenko, Maria G; Zhu, Jinsheng; Wang, Bangjun; Medvecká, Eva; Du, Yunlong; Azzarello, Elisa; Mancuso, Stefano; Megraw, Molly; Filichkin, Sergei; Dubrovsky, Joseph G; Friml, Jiří; Geisler, Markus

    2015-02-15

    Cyclophilin A is a conserved peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) best known as the cellular receptor of the immunosuppressant cyclosporine A. Despite significant effort, evidence of developmental functions of cyclophilin A in non-plant systems has remained obscure. Mutations in a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cyclophilin A ortholog, DIAGEOTROPICA (DGT), have been shown to abolish the organogenesis of lateral roots; however, a mechanistic explanation of the phenotype is lacking. Here, we show that the dgt mutant lacks auxin maxima relevant to priming and specification of lateral root founder cells. DGT is expressed in shoot and root, and localizes to both the nucleus and cytoplasm during lateral root organogenesis. Mutation of ENTIRE/IAA9, a member of the auxin-responsive Aux/IAA protein family of transcriptional repressors, partially restores the inability of dgt to initiate lateral root primordia but not the primordia outgrowth. By comparison, grafting of a wild-type scion restores the process of lateral root formation, consistent with participation of a mobile signal. Antibodies do not detect movement of the DGT protein into the dgt rootstock; however, experiments with radiolabeled auxin and an auxin-specific microelectrode demonstrate abnormal auxin fluxes. Functional studies of DGT in heterologous yeast and tobacco-leaf auxin-transport systems demonstrate that DGT negatively regulates PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux transporters by affecting their plasma membrane localization. Studies in tomato support complex effects of the dgt mutation on PIN expression level, expression domain and plasma membrane localization. Our data demonstrate that DGT regulates auxin transport in lateral root formation. PMID:25617431

  16. Coupled Dynamics and Entropic Contribution to the Allosteric Mechanism of Pin1.

    PubMed

    Barman, Arghya; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-08-25

    Allosteric communication in proteins regulates a plethora of downstream processes in subcellular signaling pathways. Describing the effects of cooperative ligand binding on the atomic level is a key to understanding many regulatory processes involving biomolecules. Here, we use microsecond-long molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the allosteric mechanism of Pin1, a potential therapeutic target and a phosphorylated-Ser/Thr dependent peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase that regulates several subcellular processes and has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer and Alzheimer's. Experimental studies suggest that the catalytic domain and the noncatalytic WW domain are allosterically coupled; however, an atomic level description of the dynamics associated with the interdomain communication is lacking. We show that binding of the substrate to the WW domain is directly coupled to the dynamics of the catalytic domain, causing rearrangement of the residue-residue contact dynamics from the WW domain to the catalytic domain. The binding affinity of the substrate in the catalytic domain is also enhanced upon binding of the substrate to the WW domain. Modulation of the dynamics of the catalytic domain upon binding of the substrate to the WW domain leads to prepayment of the entropic cost of binding the substrate to the catalytic domain. This study shows that Ile 28 at the interfacial region between the catalytic and WW domains is certainly one of the residues responsible for bridging the communication between the two domains. The results complement previous experiments and provide valuable atomistic insights into the role of dynamics and possible entropic contribution to the allosteric mechanism of proteins. PMID:27077947

  17. Genome wide identification of the immunophilin gene family in Leptosphaeria maculans: a causal agent of Blackleg disease in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus).

    PubMed

    Singh, Khushwant; Zouhar, Miloslav; Mazakova, Jana; Rysanek, Pavel

    2014-10-01

    Abstract Phoma stem canker (blackleg) is a disease of world-wide importance on oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and can cause serious losses for crops globally. The disease is caused by dothideomycetous fungus, Leptosphaeria maculans, which is highly virulent/aggressive. Cyclophilins (CYPs) and FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) are ubiquitous proteins belonging to the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) family. They are collectively referred to as immunophilins (IMMs). In the present study, IMM genes, CYP and FKBP in haploid strain v23.1.3 of L. maculans genome, were identified and classified. Twelve CYPs and five FKBPs were determined in total. Domain architecture analysis revealed the presence of a conserved cyclophilin-like domain (CLD) in the case of CYPs and FKBP_C in the case of FKBPs. Interestingly, IMMs in L. maculans also subgrouped into single domain (SD) and multidomain (MD) proteins. They were primarily found to be localized in cytoplasm, nuclei, and mitochondria. Homologous and orthologous gene pairs were also determined by comparison with the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Remarkably, IMMs of L. maculans contain shorter introns in comparison to exons. Moreover, CYPs, in contrast with FKBPs, contain few exons. However, two CYPs were determined as being intronless. The expression profile of IMMs in both mycelium and infected primary leaves of B. napus demonstrated their potential role during infection. Secondary structure analysis revealed the presence of atypical eight β strands and two α helices fold architecture. Gene ontology analysis of IMMs predicted their significant role in protein folding and PPIase activity. Taken together, our findings for the first time present new prospects of this highly conserved gene family in phytopathogenic fungus. PMID:25259854

  18. The oncometabolite R-2-hydroxyglutarate activates NF-κB-dependent tumor-promoting stromal niche for acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Yi; Lai, You-Syuan; Tsai, Hui-Jen; Kuo, Cheng-Chin; Yen, B Linju; Yeh, Su-Peng; Sun, H Sunny; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells produce the oncometabolite R-2-hydroxyglutarate (R-2HG) to induce epigenetic alteration and block hematopoietic differentiation. However, the effect of R-2HG released by IDH-mutated AML cells on the bone marrow microenvironment is unclear. Here, we report that R-2HG induces IκB kinase-independent activation of NF-κB in bone marrow stromal cells. R-2HG acts via a reactive oxygen species/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent pathway to phosphorylate NF-κB on the Thr254 residue. This phosphorylation enhances the interaction of NF-κB and the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase PIN1 and increases the protein stability and transcriptional activity of NF-κB. As a consequence, R-2HG enhances NF-κB-dependent expression of cytokines including IL-6, IL-8 and complement 5a to stimulate proliferation of AML cells. In addition, R-2HG also upregulates vascular endothelial adhesion molecule 1 and CXCR4 in stromal cells to enhance the contact between AML and stromal cells and attenuates chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. More importantly, we validated the R-2HG-activated gene signature in the primary bone marrow stromal cells isolated from IDH-mutated AML patients. Collectively, our results suggest that AML cell-derived R-2HG may be helpful for the establishment of a supportive bone marrow stromal niche to promote AML progression via paracrine stimulation. PMID:27577048

  19. Prolyl 4-hydroxylase from Volvox carteri. A low-Mr enzyme antigenically related to the alpha subunit of the vertebrate enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Kaska, D D; Myllylä, R; Günzler, V; Gibor, A; Kivirikko, K I

    1988-01-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase was isolated in a highly purified form from a multi-cellular green alga, Volvox carteri, by a procedure consisting of ion-exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography on poly(L-hydroxyproline) coupled to Sepharose. Two other affinity-column procedures were also developed, one involving 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetate and the other 3,4-dihydroxyphenylpropionate linked to Sepharose. The Km values of the Volvox enzyme for the co-substrates and the peptide substrate, as well as the inhibition constants for selected 2-oxoglutarate analogues, were similar to those of the enzyme from Chlamydomonas reinhardii, except that the Km for 2-oxoglutarate with the Volvox enzyme was 6-fold greater. The temperature optimum of the Volvox enzyme was also 10 degrees C higher. The apparent Mr of the Volvox enzyme by gel filtration was about 40,000, being similar to that reported for the Chlamydomonas enzyme but markedly lower than that of the vertebrate enzymes. A similar apparent Mr of about 40,000 was also found for prolyl 4-hydroxylase from the green alga Enteromorpha intestinalis, whereas the enzyme from various vascular plants gave an apparent Mr greater than 300,000. SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis demonstrated in the highly purified Volvox enzyme the presence of a major protein band doublet with a Mr of about 65,000 and a minor doublet of Mr about 55,000-57,000. A polyclonal antiserum, prepared against the Mr-65,000 doublet, stained in immunoblotting the Mr-65,000 doublet as well as the alpha subunit, but not the beta subunit, of the vertebrate prolyl 4-hydroxylase. An antiserum against the beta subunit of the vertebrate enzyme stained in immunoblotting a Mr-50,000 polypeptide in a partially purified Volvox enzyme preparation, but did not stain either the Mr-65,000 or the Mr-55,000-57,000 doublet of the highly purified enzyme. The data thus suggest that the active Volvox carteri prolyl 4-hydroxylase is an enzyme monomer antigenically related to the

  20. Poststatin, a new inhibitor of prolyl endopeptidase, produced by Streptomyces viridochromogenes MH534-30F3. I. Taxonomy, production, isolation, physico-chemical properties and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, T; Nagai, M; Ogawa, K; Kojima, F; Okada, M; Ikeda, T; Hamada, M; Takeuchi, T

    1991-09-01

    Poststatin, a new inhibitor of prolyl endopeptidase (PEP) was discovered in the fermentation broth of Streptomyces viridochromogenes MH534-30F3. It was purified by Diaion HP-20, Sephadex LH-20 and YMC-gel (ODS-A) column chromatography and then isolated as a colorless powder. Poststatin has the molecular formula C26H47N5O7. The IC50 value of poststatin against the PEP of partially purified porcine kidney was 0.03 microgram/ml. It has low acute toxicity. No deaths occured after iv injection of 250 mg/kg of this agent to mice. PMID:1938617

  1. Strictly Conserved Lysine of Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase Editing Domain Facilitates Binding and Positioning of Misacylated tRNAPro

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To ensure high fidelity in translation, many aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, enzymes responsible for attaching specific amino acids to cognate tRNAs, require proof-reading mechanisms. Most bacterial prolyl-tRNA synthetases (ProRSs) misactivate alanine and employ a post-transfer editing mechanism to hydrolyze Ala-tRNAPro. This reaction occurs in a second catalytic site (INS) that is distinct from the synthetic active site. The 2′-OH of misacylated tRNAPro and several conserved residues in the Escherichia coli ProRS INS domain are directly involved in Ala-tRNAPro deacylation. Although mutation of the strictly conserved lysine 279 (K279) results in nearly complete loss of post-transfer editing activity, this residue does not directly participate in Ala-tRNAPro hydrolysis. We hypothesized that the role of K279 is to bind the phosphate backbone of the acceptor stem of misacylated tRNAPro and position it in the editing active site. To test this hypothesis, we carried out pKa, charge neutralization, and free-energy of binding calculations. Site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic studies were performed to verify the computational results. The calculations revealed a considerably higher pKa of K279 compared to an isolated lysine and showed that the protonated state of K279 is stabilized by the neighboring acidic residue. However, substitution of this acidic residue with a positively charged residue leads to a significant increase in Ala-tRNAPro hydrolysis, suggesting that enhancement in positive charge density in the vicinity of K279 favors tRNA binding. A charge-swapping experiment and free energy of binding calculations support the conclusion that the positive charge at position 279 is absolutely necessary for tRNA binding in the editing active site. PMID:24450765

  2. Cigarette smoke-induced lung emphysema in mice is associated with prolyl endopeptidase, an enzyme involved in collagen breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Koelink, Pim J.; Henricks, Paul A. J.; Jackson, Patricia L.; Nijkamp, Frans P.; Garssen, Johan; Kraneveld, Aletta D.; Blalock, J. Edwin; Folkerts, Gert

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the neutrophil chemoattractant proline-glycine-proline (PGP), derived from the breakdown of the extracellular matrix, plays an important role in neutrophil recruitment to the lung. PGP formation is a multistep process involving neutrophils, metalloproteinases (MMPs), and prolyl endopeptidase (PE). This cascade of events is now investigated in the development of lung emphysema. A/J mice were whole body exposed to cigarette smoke for 20 wk. After 20 wk or 8 wk after smoking cessation, animals were killed, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were collected to analyze the neutrophilic airway inflammation, the MMP-8 and MMP-9 levels, the PE activity, and the PGP levels. Lung tissue degradation was assessed by measuring the mean linear intercept. Additionally, we investigated the effect of the peptide l-arginine-threonine-arginine (RTR), which binds to PGP sequences, on the smoke-induced neutrophil influx in the lung after 5 days of smoke exposure. Neutrophilic airway inflammation was induced by cigarette smoke exposure. MMP-8 and MMP-9 levels, PE activity, and PGP levels were elevated in the lungs of cigarette smoke-exposed mice. PE was highly expressed in epithelial and inflammatory cells (macrophages and neutrophils) in lung tissue of cigarette smoke-exposed mice. After smoking cessation, the neutrophil influx, the MMP-8 and MMP-9 levels, the PE activity, and the PGP levels were decreased or reduced to normal levels. Moreover, RTR inhibited the smoke-induced neutrophil influx in the lung after 5 days' smoke exposure. In the present murine model of cigarette smoke-induced lung emphysema, it is demonstrated for the first time that all relevant components (neutrophils, MMP-8, MMP-9, PE) involved in PGP formation from collagen are upregulated in the airways. Together with MMPs, PE may play an important role in the formation of PGP and thus in the pathophysiology of lung emphysema. PMID:21112944

  3. Ethyl 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (EDHB): a prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor attenuates acute hypobaric hypoxia mediated vascular leakage in brain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deependra Pratap; Nimker, Charu; Paliwal, Piyush; Bansal, Anju

    2016-07-01

    Sudden exposure to altitude hypoxia is responsible for acute mountain sickness (AMS) in un-acclimatized persons. If not treated in time, AMS can worsen and leads to high altitude cerebral edema, which can be fatal. Present study explores the efficacy of ethyl 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (EDHB), a prolyl hydroxylase enzyme inhibitor, in modulating adaptive responses to hypobaric hypoxia (HH) in rat brain. Male Sprague-Dawley rats treated with EDHB (75 mg/kg for 3 days), were subjected to acute HH exposure at 9144 m (30,000 ft) for 5 h. Animals were assessed for transvascular leakage and edema formation in brain and role of key inflammatory markers along with hypoxia responsive genes. HH stress increased transvascular permeability and edema formation in conjunction with upregulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and its regulated proteins. There was surge in pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, interferon-γ, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and decrement in anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10. Further, upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a vascular permeability marker and down-regulation of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory proteins hemoxygenase (HO-1) and metallothionein (MT-1) was also observed under hypoxia. EDHB supplementation effectively scaled down HH induced cerebral edema with concomitant downregulation of brain NF-κB expression. There was significant curtailment of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell adhesion molecules. There was significant downregulation of permeability factor VEGF by EDHB with concomitant increment in hypoxia inducible factor (HIF1α) and anti-inflammatory proteins HO-1 and MT-1 compared to HH control thus accentuating the potential of EDHB as effective hypoxic preconditioning agent in ameliorating HH mediated injury in brain. PMID:26649730

  4. Neuronal deficiency of HIF prolyl 4-hydroxylase 2 in mice improves ischemic stroke recovery in an HIF dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Li, Lexiao; Saliba, Pamela; Reischl, Stefan; Marti, Hugo H; Kunze, Reiner

    2016-07-01

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) mediate the endogenous adaptive responses to hypoxia. HIF prolyl 4-hydroxylase domain proteins (PHD) are important suppressors of the HIF pathway. Recently, we demonstrated that neuron-specific deletion of Phd2 reduces cerebral tissue damage in the very acute phase of ischemic stroke. In the present study, we investigated whether neuronal Phd2 ablation is likewise beneficial for stroke recovery, and aimed to identify underlying cellular mechanisms. Mice underwent permanent occlusion of the distal middle cerebral artery (pdMCAO) for either 7days (sub-acute stage) or 30days (chronic stage). One week after pdMCAO the infarct size of Phd2-deficient mice was significantly reduced as compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Accordingly, Phd2-deficient animals showed less impaired sensorimotor function. Neuronal loss of Phd2 upregulated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and significantly increased microvascular density along the infarct border in the sub-acute stage of stroke. Phd2-deficient mice showed reduced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased numbers of resting microglia/macrophages and reactive astrocytes within peri-infarct regions in comparison to WT littermates. Finally, brain tissue protection and increased angiogenesis upon sub-acute ischemic stroke was completely absent in Phd2 knockout mice that were additionally deficient for both Hif1a and Hif2a. Our findings suggest that lack of PHD2 in neurons improves histological and functional long-term outcome from ischemic stroke at least partly by amplifying endogenous adaptive neovascularization through activation of the HIF-VEGF axis. PMID:27001147

  5. Virus induced gene silencing of three putative prolyl 4-hydroxylases enhances plant growth in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    PubMed

    Fragkostefanakis, Sotirios; Sedeek, Khalid E M; Raad, Maya; Zaki, Marwa Samir; Kalaitzis, Panagiotis

    2014-07-01

    Proline hydroxylation is a major posttranslational modification of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) that is catalyzed by prolyl 4-hydroxylases (P4Hs). HRGPs such as arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) and extensios play significant roles on cell wall structure and function and their implication in cell division and expansion has been reported. We used tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based virus induced gene silencing to investigate the role of three tomato P4Hs, out of ten present in the tomato genome, in growth and development. Eight-days old tomato seedlings were infected with the appropriate TRV vectors and plants were allowed to grow under standard conditions for 6 weeks. Lower P4H mRNA levels were associated with lower hydroxyproline content in root and shoot tissues indicating successful gene silencing. P4H-silenced plants had longer roots and shoots and larger leaves. The increased leaf area can be attributed to increased cell division as indicated by the higher leaf epidermal cell number in SlP4H1- and SlP4H9-silenced plants. In contrast, SlP4H7-silenced plants had larger leaves due to enhanced cell expansion. Western blot analysis revealed that silencing of SlP4H7 and SlP4H9 was associated with reduced levels of JIM8-bound AGP and JIM11-bound extensin epitopes, while silencing of SlP4H1 reduced only the levels of AGP proteins. Collectively these results show that P4Hs have significant and distinct roles in cell division and expansion of tomato leaves. PMID:24803411

  6. Prolyl Hydroxylase 3 Attenuates MCL-1-Mediated ATP Production to Suppress the Metastatic Potential of Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Praveenkumar; Ruh, Nadine; Harnoss, Jonathan M; Kiss, Judit; Mollenhauer, Martin; Scherr, Anna-Lena; Platzer, Lisa K; Schmidt, Thomas; Podar, Klaus; Opferman, Joseph T; Weitz, Juergen; Schulze-Bergkamen, Henning; Koehler, Bruno C; Ulrich, Alexis; Schneider, Martin

    2016-04-15

    Hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors. Prolyl hydroxylase enzymes (PHD1-3) are molecular oxygen sensors that regulate hypoxia-inducible factor activity, but their functions in metastatic disease remain unclear. Here, we assessed the significance of PHD enzymes during the metastatic spread of colorectal cancer. PHD expression analysis in 124 colorectal cancer patients revealed that reduced tumoral expression of PHD3 correlated with increased frequency of distant metastases and poor outcome. Tumorigenicity and metastatic potential of colorectal tumor cells over and underexpressing PHD3 were investigated in orthotopic and heterotopic tumor models. PHD3 overexpression in a syngeneic tumor model resulted in fewer liver metastases, whereas PHD3 knockdown induced tumor spread. The migration of PHD3-overexpressing tumor cells was also attenuated in vitro Conversely, migratory potential and colony formation were enhanced in PHD3-deficient cells, and this phenotype was associated with enhanced mitochondrial ATP production. Furthermore, the effects of PHD3 deficiency were accompanied by increased mitochondrial expression of the BCL-2 family member, member myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (MCL-1), and could be reversed by simultaneous inhibition of MCL-1. MCL-1 protein expression was likewise enhanced in human colorectal tumors expressing low levels of PHD3. Therefore, we demonstrate that downregulation of PHD3 augments metastatic spread in human colorectal cancer and identify MCL-1 as a novel downstream effector of oxygen sensing. Importantly, these findings offer new insight into the possible, context-specific deleterious effects of pharmacologic PHD inhibition. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2219-30. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26921340

  7. Suppression of vascular network formation by chronic hypoxia and prolyl-hydroxylase 2 (phd2) deficiency during vertebrate development.

    PubMed

    Metikala, Sanjeeva; Neuhaus, Herbert; Hollemann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In the adult, new vessels and red blood cells form in response to hypoxia. Here, the oxygen-sensing system (PHD-HIF) has recently been put into focus, since the prolyl-hydroxylase domain proteins (PHD) and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) are considered as potential therapeutic targets to treat ischemia, cancers or age-related macula degeneration. While the oxygen-sensing system (PHD-HIF) has been studied intensively in this respect, only little is known from developing vertebrate embryos since mutations within this pathway led to an early decease of embryos due to placental defects. During vertebrate embryogenesis, a progenitor cell called hemangioblast is assumed to give rise to blood cells and blood vessels in a process called hematopoiesis and vasculogenesis, respectively. Xenopus provides an ideal experimental system to address these processes in vivo, as its development does not depend on a functional placenta and thus allows analyzing the role of oxygen directly. To this end, we adopted a computer-controlled four-channel system, which allowed us to culture Xenopus embryos under defined oxygen concentrations. Our data show that the development of vascular structures and blood cells is strongly impaired under hypoxia, while general development is less compromised. Interestingly, suppression of Phd2 function using specific antisense morpholinos or a chemical inhibitor resulted in mostly overlapping vascular defects; nevertheless, blood cell was formed almost normally. Our results provide the first evidence that oxygen via Phd2 has a decisive influence on the formation of the vascular network during vertebrate embryogenesis. These findings may be considered in certain potential treatment concepts. PMID:26678600

  8. Expression and traffic of cellular prolyl oligopeptidase are regulated during cerebellar granule cell differentiation, maturation, and aging.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Baylach, M J; Felipo, V; Männistö, P T; García-Horsman, J A

    2008-10-15

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is an endopeptidase which cleaves short proline-containing neuropeptides, and it is involved in memory and learning. POP also has an intercellular function mediated through the inositol pathway, and has been involved in cell death. POP has been early considered as a housekeeping enzyme, but the recent research indicates that POP expression is regulated across tissues and intracellularly. In the brain, POP is exclusively expressed in neurons and most abundantly in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex, in the CA1 field neurons of hippocampus and in cerebellar Purkinje's cells. Intracellularly, POP is mainly present in the cytoplasm and some in intracellular membranes, like rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. In this paper, we systematically studied the levels of expression of POP along the life of cerebellar granule cells (CGC) in culture and the distribution of POP within different intracellular compartments. We used the tight-binding inhibitor JTP-4819 covalently coupled with fluorescein (FJTP) as a tool to study the changes on expression and localization of POP protein. Our results indicate that POP activity levels are regulated during the life of the neurons. POP was found mainly in cytoplasm and neuronal projections, but at an early developmental phase significant amounts were found also in nuclei. Along the life of the neurons, POP activity fluctuated in 7-day cycles. In young neurons, the cytosolic POP activity was low but increased by maturation so that the activity peak coincided with full differentiation. Over aging, cytoplasmic POP was concentrated around nucleus, but the activity decreased with time. POP was also present in vesicles across the neuron. No major changes were seen in the nuclear or membrane bound POP over aging until activity disappeared upon neuronal death. This is the first time when POP was found in the nuclei of human neuronal cells. PMID:18718510

  9. Modulation of agonist binding to human dopamine receptor subtypes by L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide and a peptidomimetic analog.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vaneeta; Mann, Amandeep; Costain, Willard; Pontoriero, Giuseppe; Castellano, Jessica M; Skoblenick, Kevin; Gupta, Suresh K; Pristupa, Zdenek; Niznik, Hyman B; Johnson, Rodney L; Nair, Venugopalan D; Mishra, Ram K

    2005-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of the hypothalamic tripeptide L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide (PLG) and its conformationally constrained analog 3(R)-[(2(S)-pyrrolidinylcarbonyl)amino]-2-oxo-1-pyrrolidineacetamide (PAOPA) in modulating agonist binding to human dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes using human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells stably transfected with respective cDNAs. Both PLG and PAOPA enhanced agonist [3H]N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) and [3H]quinpirole binding in a dose-dependent manner to the DA D2L,D2S, and D4 receptors. However, agonist binding to the D1 and D3 receptors and antagonist binding to the D2L receptors by PLG were not significantly affected. Scatchard analysis of [3H]NPA binding to membranes in the presence of PLG revealed a significant increase in affinity of the agonist binding sites for the D2L, D2S, and D4 receptors. Analysis of agonist/antagonist competition curves revealed that PLG and PAOPA increased the population and affinity of the high-affinity form of the D2L receptor and attenuated guanosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imido)-triphosphate-induced inhibition of high-affinity agonist binding sites for the DA D2L receptor. Furthermore, direct NPA binding with D2L cell membranes pretreated with suramin, a compound that can uncouple receptor/G protein complexes, and incubated with and without DA showed that both PLG and PAOPA had only increased agonist binding in membranes pretreated with both suramin and DA, suggesting that PLG requires the D2L receptor/G protein complex to increase agonist binding. These results suggest that PLG possibly modulates DA D2S, D2L, and D4 receptors in an allosteric manner and that the coupling of D2 receptors to the G protein is essential for this modulation to occur. PMID:16126839

  10. Posttranslational Modifications in Type I Collagen from Different Tissues Extracted from Wild Type and Prolyl 3-Hydroxylase 1 Null Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Pokidysheva, Elena; Zientek, Keith D.; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Mizuno, Kazunori; Vranka, Janice A.; Montgomery, Nathan T.; Keene, Douglas R.; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Okuyama, Kenji; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2013-01-01

    Type I collagen extracted from tendon, skin, and bone of wild type and prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1) null mice shows distinct patterns of 3-hydroxylation and glycosylation of hydroxylysine residues. The A1 site (Pro-986) in the α1-chain of type I collagen is almost completely 3-hydroxylated in every tissue of the wild type mice. In contrast, no 3-hydroxylation of this proline residue was found in P3H1 null mice. Partial 3-hydroxylation of the A3 site (Pro-707) was present in tendon and bone, but absent in skin in both α-chains of the wild type animals. Type I collagen extracted from bone of P3H1 null mice shows a large reduction in 3-hydroxylation of the A3 site in both α-chains, whereas type I collagen extracted from tendon of P3H1 null mice shows little difference as compared with wild type. These results demonstrate that the A1 site in type I collagen is exclusively 3-hydroxylated by P3H1, and presumably, this enzyme is required for the 3-hydroxylation of the A3 site of both α-chains in bone but not in tendon. The increase in glycosylation of hydroxylysine in P3H1 null mice in bone was found to be due to an increased occupancy of normally glycosylated sites. Despite the severe disorganization of collagen fibrils in adult tissues, the D-period of the fibrils is unchanged. Tendon fibrils of newborn P3H1 null mice are well organized with only a slight increase in diameter. The absence of 3-hydroxyproline and/or the increased glycosylation of hydroxylysine in type I collagen disturbs the lateral growth of the fibrils. PMID:23861401

  11. Mutations in the highly conserved GGQ motif of class 1 polypeptide release factors abolish ability of human eRF1 to trigger peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Frolova, L Y; Tsivkovskii, R Y; Sivolobova, G F; Oparina, N Y; Serpinsky, O I; Blinov, V M; Tatkov, S I; Kisselev, L L

    1999-01-01

    Although the primary structures of class 1 polypeptide release factors (RF1 and RF2 in prokaryotes, eRF1 in eukaryotes) are known, the molecular basis by which they function in translational termination remains obscure. Because all class 1 RFs promote a stop-codon-dependent and ribosome-dependent hydrolysis of peptidyl-tRNAs, one may anticipate that this common function relies on a common structural motif(s). We have compared amino acid sequences of the available class 1 RFs and found a novel, common, unique, and strictly conserved GGQ motif that should be in a loop (coil) conformation as deduced by programs predicting protein secondary structure. Site-directed mutagenesis of the human eRF1 as a representative of class 1 RFs shows that substitution of both glycyl residues in this motif, G183 and G184, causes complete inactivation of the protein as a release factor toward all three stop codons, whereas two adjacent amino acid residues, G181 and R182, are functionally nonessential. Inactive human eRF1 mutants compete in release assays with wild-type eRF1 and strongly inhibit their release activity. Mutations of the glycyl residues in this motif do not affect another function, the ability of eRF1 together with the ribosome to induce GTPase activity of human eRF3, a class 2 RF. We assume that the novel highly conserved GGQ motif is implicated directly or indirectly in the activity of class 1 RFs in translation termination. PMID:10445876

  12. Ser46 phosphorylation and prolyl-isomerase Pin1-mediated isomerization of p53 are key events in p53-dependent apoptosis induced by mutant huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Grison, Alice; Mantovani, Fiamma; Comel, Anna; Agostoni, Elena; Gustincich, Stefano; Persichetti, Francesca; Del Sal, Giannino

    2011-11-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the gene coding for huntingtin protein. Several mechanisms have been proposed by which mutant huntingtin (mHtt) may trigger striatal neurodegeneration, including mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Furthermore, mHtt induces DNA damage and activates a stress response. In this context, p53 plays a crucial role in mediating mHtt toxic effects. Here we have dissected the pathway of p53 activation by mHtt in human neuronal cells and in HD mice, with the aim of highlighting critical nodes that may be pharmacologically manipulated for therapeutic intervention. We demonstrate that expression of mHtt causes increased phosphorylation of p53 on Ser46, leading to its interaction with phosphorylation-dependent prolyl isomerase Pin1 and consequent dissociation from the apoptosis inhibitor iASPP, thereby inducing the expression of apoptotic target genes. Inhibition of Ser46 phosphorylation by targeting homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2), PKCδ, or ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase, as well as inhibition of the prolyl isomerase Pin1, prevents mHtt-dependent apoptosis of neuronal cells. These results provide a rationale for the use of small-molecule inhibitors of stress-responsive protein kinases and Pin1 as a potential therapeutic strategy for HD treatment. PMID:22011578

  13. HIF prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) is a critical regulator of hematopoietic stem cell maintenance during steady-state and stress.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rashim Pal; Franke, Kristin; Kalucka, Joanna; Mamlouk, Soulafa; Muschter, Antje; Gembarska, Agnieszka; Grinenko, Tatyana; Willam, Carsten; Naumann, Ronald; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Stewart, A Francis; Bornstein, Stefan; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Breier, Georg; Waskow, Claudia; Wielockx, Ben

    2013-06-27

    Hypoxia is a prominent feature in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) quiescence and multipotency. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs) serve as oxygen sensors and may therefore regulate this system. Here, we describe a mouse line with conditional loss of HIF prolyl hydroxylase 2 (PHD2) in very early hematopoietic precursors that results in self-renewal of multipotent progenitors under steady-state conditions in a HIF1α- and SMAD7-dependent manner. Competitive bone marrow (BM) transplantations show decreased peripheral and central chimerism of PHD2-deficient cells but not of the most primitive progenitors. Conversely, in whole BM transfer, PHD2-deficient HSCs replenish the entire hematopoietic system and display an enhanced self-renewal capacity reliant on HIF1α. Taken together, our results demonstrate that loss of PHD2 controls the maintenance of the HSC compartment under physiological conditions and causes the outcompetition of PHD2-deficient hematopoietic cells by their wild-type counterparts during stress while promoting the self-renewal of very early hematopoietic progenitors. PMID:23667053

  14. Prolyl hydroxylation of collagen type I is required for efficient binding to integrin alpha 1 beta 1 and platelet glycoprotein VI but not to alpha 2 beta 1.

    PubMed

    Perret, Stéephanie; Eble, Johannes A; Siljander, Pia R-M; Merle, Christine; Farndale, Richard W; Theisen, Manfred; Ruggiero, Florence

    2003-08-01

    Collagen is a potent adhesive substrate for cells, an event essentially mediated by the integrins alpha 1 beta 1 and alpha 2 beta 1. Collagen fibrils also bind to the integrin alpha 2 beta 1 and the platelet receptor glycoprotein VI to activate and aggregate platelets. The distinct triple helical recognition motifs for these receptors, GXOGER and (GPO)n, respectively, all contain hydroxyproline. Using unhydroxylated collagen I produced in transgenic plants, we investigated the role of hydroxyproline in the receptor-binding properties of collagen. We show that alpha 2 beta 1 but not alpha 1 beta 1 mediates cell adhesion to unhydroxylated collagen. Soluble recombinant alpha 1 beta 1 binding to unhydroxylated collagen is considerably reduced compared with bovine collagens, but binding can be restored by prolyl hydroxylation of recombinant collagen. We also show that platelets use alpha 2 beta 1 to adhere to the unhydroxylated recombinant molecules, but the adhesion is weaker than on fully hydroxylated collagen, and the unhydroxylated collagen fibrils fail to aggregate platelets. Prolyl hydroxylation is thus required for binding of collagen to platelet glycoprotein VI and to cells by alpha 1 beta 1. These observations give new insights into the molecular basis of collagen-receptor interactions and offer new selective applications for the recombinant unhydroxylated collagen I. PMID:12771137

  15. Endothelin-1 Inhibits Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain 2 to Activate Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α in Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Spinella, Francesca; Rosanò, Laura; Del Duca, Martina; Di Castro, Valeriana; Nicotra, Maria Rita; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Bagnato, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Background The endothelin B receptor (ETBR) promotes tumorigenesis and melanoma progression through activation by endothelin (ET)-1, thus representing a promising therapeutic target. The stability of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α is essential for melanomagenesis and progression, and is controlled by site-specific hydroxylation carried out by HIF-prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) and subsequent proteosomal degradation. Principal Findings Here we found that in melanoma cells ET-1, ET-2, and ET-3 through ETBR, enhance the expression and activity of HIF-1α and HIF-2α that in turn regulate the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in response to ETs or hypoxia. Under normoxic conditions, ET-1 controls HIF-α stability by inhibiting its degradation, as determined by impaired degradation of a reporter gene containing the HIF-1α oxygen-dependent degradation domain encompassing the PHD-targeted prolines. In particular, ETs through ETBR markedly decrease PHD2 mRNA and protein levels and promoter activity. In addition, activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent integrin linked kinase (ILK)-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is required for ETBR-mediated PHD2 inhibition, HIF-1α, HIF-2α, and VEGF expression. At functional level, PHD2 knockdown does not further increase ETs-induced in vitro tube formation of endothelial cells and melanoma cell invasiveness, demonstrating that these processes are regulated in a PHD2-dependent manner. In human primary and metastatic melanoma tissues as well as in cell lines, that express high levels of HIF-1α, ETBR expression is associated with low PHD2 levels. In melanoma xenografts, ETBR blockade by ETBR antagonist results in a concomitant reduction of tumor growth, angiogenesis, HIF-1α, and HIF-2α expression, and an increase in PHD2 levels. Conclusions In this study we identified the underlying mechanism by which ET-1, through the regulation of PHD2, controls HIF-1α stability and

  16. Mass spectrometric characterization of a prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor GSK1278863, its bishydroxylated metabolite, and its implementation into routine doping controls.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Milosovich, Susan; Licea-Perez, Hermes; Knecht, Dana; Cavalier, Tom; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2016-08-01

    Drug candidates, which have the potential of enhancing athletic performance represent a risk of being misused in elite sport. Therefore, there is a need for early consideration by anti-doping authorities and implementation into sports drug testing programmes. The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) or prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor (PHI) GSK1278863 represents an advanced candidate of an emerging class of therapeutics that possess substantial potential for abuse in sport due to their capability to stimulate the biogenesis of erythrocytes and, consequently, the individual's oxygen transport capacity. A thorough characterization of such analytes by technologies predominantly used for doping control purposes and the subsequent implementation of the active drug and/or its main urinary metabolite(s) are vital for comprehensive, preventive, and efficient anti-doping work. In the present study, the HIF PHI drug candidate GSK1278863 (comprising a 6-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-dione nucleus) and its bishydroxylated metabolite M2 (GSK2391220A) were studied regarding their mass spectrometric behaviour under electrospray ionization (ESI-MS/MS) conditions. Synthesized reference materials were used to elucidate dissociation pathways by means of quadrupole/time-of-flight high resolution/high accuracy tandem mass spectrometry, and their detection from spiked urine and elimination study urine samples under routine doping control conditions was established using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry with direct injection. Dissociation pathways to diagnostic product ions of GSK1278863 (e.g. m/z 291, 223, and 122) were proposed as substantiated by determined elemental compositions and MS(n) experiments as well as comparison to spectra of the bishydroxylated analogue M2. An analytical assay based on direct urine injection using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of GSK1278863 in

  17. Enzyme-catalyzed formation of beta-peptides: beta-peptidyl aminopeptidases BapA and DmpA acting as beta-peptide-synthesizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Heck, Tobias; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Limbach, Michael; Flögel, Oliver; Seebach, Dieter; Geueke, Birgit

    2007-09-01

    In recent studies, we discovered that the three beta-peptidyl aminopeptidases, BapA from Sphingosinicella xenopeptidilytica 3-2W4, BapA from S. microcystinivorans Y2, and DmpA from Ochrobactrum anthropi LMG7991, possess the unique feature of cleaving N-terminal beta-amino acid residues from beta- and alpha/beta-peptides. Herein, we investigated the use of the same three enzymes for the reverse reaction catalyzing the oligomerization of beta-amino acids and the synthesis of mixed peptides with N-terminal beta-amino acid residues. As substrates, we employed the beta-homoamino acid derivatives H-beta hGly-pNA, H-beta3 hAla-pNA, H-(R)-beta3 hAla-pNA, H-beta3 hPhe-pNA, H-(R)-beta3 hPhe-pNA, and H-beta3 hLeu-pNA. All three enzymes were capable of coupling the six beta-amino acids to oligomers with chain lengths of up to eight amino acid residues. With the enzyme DmpA as the catalyst, we observed very high conversion rates, which correspond to dimer yields of up to 76%. The beta-dipeptide H-beta3 hAla-beta3 hLeu-OH and the beta/alpha-dipeptide H-beta hGly-His-OH (carnosine) were formed with almost 50% conversion, when a five-fold excess of beta3-homoleucine or histidine was incubated with H-beta3 hAla-pNA and H-beta hGly-pNA, respectively, in the presence of the enzyme BapA from S. microcystinivorans Y2. BapA from S. xenopeptidilytica 3-2W4 turned out to be a versatile catalyst capable of coupling various beta-amino acid residues to the free N-termini of beta- and alpha-amino acids and even to an alpha-tripeptide. Thus, these aminopeptidases might be useful to introduce a beta-amino acid residue as an N-terminal protecting group into a 'natural' alpha-peptide, thereby stabilizing the peptide against degradation by other proteolytic enzymes. PMID:17886858

  18. Synthesis and In Vitro Characterization of Novel Dextran-Methylprednisolone Conjugates with Peptide Linkers: Effects of Linker Length on Hydrolytic and Enzymatic Release of Methylprednisolone and its Peptidyl Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Penugonda, Suman; Kumar, Anil; Agarwal, Hitesh K.; Parang, Keykavous; Mehvar, Reza

    2007-01-01

    To control the rate of release of methylprednisolone (MP) in lysosomes, new dextran-MP conjugates with peptide linkers were synthesized and characterized. Methylprednisolone succinate (MPS) was attached to dextran 25 kDa using linkers with 1–5 Gly residues. The release characteristics of the conjugates in pH 4.0 and 7.4 buffers, blood, liver lysosomes, and various lysosomal proteinases were determined using a size-exclusion and/or a newly-developed reversed-phase HPLC method capable of simultaneous quantitation of MP, MPS, and all five possible MPS-peptidyl intermediates. We synthesized conjugates with ≥ 90% purity and 6.9–9.5% (w/w) degree of MP substitution. The conjugates were stable at pH 4.0, but released MP and intact MPS-peptidyl intermediates in the pH 7.4 buffer and rat blood, with faster degradation rates for longer linkers. Rat lysosomal fractions degraded the conjugates to MP and all the possible intermediates also at a rate directly proportional to the length of the peptide. Whereas the degradation of the conjugates by cysteine peptidases (papain or cathepsin B) was relatively substantial, no degradation was observed in the presence of aspartic (cathepsin D) or serine (trypsin) proteinases, which do not cleave peptide bonds with Gly. These newly-developed dextran conjugates of MP show promise for controlled delivery of MP in lysosomes. PMID:17853426

  19. Potent and Selective Triazole-Based Inhibitors of the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl-Hydroxylases with Activity in the Murine Brain

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Mun Chiang; Atasoylu, Onur; Hodson, Emma; Tumber, Anthony; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Gómez-Pérez, Verónica; Demetriades, Marina; Rydzik, Anna M.; Holt-Martyn, James; Tian, Ya-Min; Bishop, Tammie; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Kawamura, Akane; Pugh, Christopher W.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the cellular adaptation to limiting oxygen availability in animals, the expression of a large set of genes is activated by the upregulation of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). Therapeutic activation of the natural human hypoxic response can be achieved by the inhibition of the hypoxia sensors for the HIF system, i.e. the HIF prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs). Here, we report studies on tricyclic triazole-containing compounds as potent and selective PHD inhibitors which compete with the 2-oxoglutarate co-substrate. One compound (IOX4) induces HIFα in cells and in wildtype mice with marked induction in the brain tissue, revealing that it is useful for studies aimed at validating the upregulation of HIF for treatment of cerebral diseases including stroke. PMID:26147748

  20. Isolated erythrocytosis: study of 67 patients and identification of three novel germ-line mutations in the prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2) gene

    PubMed Central

    Albiero, Elena; Ruggeri, Marco; Fortuna, Stefania; Finotto, Silvia; Bernardi, Martina; Madeo, Domenico; Rodeghiero, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The oxygen sensing pathway modulates erythropoietin expression. In normal cells, intracellular oxygen tensions are directly sensed by prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD)-containing proteins. PHD2 isozyme has a key role in tagging hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-α subunits for polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Erythrocytosis-associated PHD2 mutations reduce hydroxylation of HIF-α. The investigation of 67 patients with isolated erythrocytosis, either sporadic or familial, allowed the identification of three novel mutations in the catalytic domain of the PHD2 protein. All new mutations are germ-line, heterozygous and missense, and code for a predicted full length mutant PHD2 protein. Identification of the disease-causing genes will be of critical importance for a better classification of familial and acquired erythrocytosis, offering additional insight into the erythropoietin regulating oxygen sensing pathway. PMID:21828119

  1. The Skp1 Protein from Toxoplasma Is Modified by a Cytoplasmic Prolyl 4-Hydroxylase Associated with Oxygen Sensing in the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuechi; Brown, Kevin M.; Wang, Zhuo A.; van der Wel, Hanke; Teygong, Crystal; Zhang, Dongmei; Blader, Ira J.; West, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    In diverse types of organisms, cellular hypoxic responses are mediated by prolyl 4-hydroxylases that use O2 and α-ketoglutarate as substrates to hydroxylate conserved proline residues in target proteins. Whereas in metazoans these enzymes control the stability of the HIFα family of transcription factor subunits, the Dictyostelium enzyme (DdPhyA) contributes to O2 regulation of development by a divergent mechanism involving hydroxylation and subsequent glycosylation of DdSkp1, an adaptor subunit in E3SCF ubiquitin ligases. Sequences related to DdPhyA, DdSkp1, and the glycosyltransferases that cap Skp1 hydroxyproline occur also in the genomes of Toxoplasma and other protists, suggesting that this O2 sensing mechanism may be widespread. Here we show by disruption of the TgphyA locus that this enzyme is required for Skp1 glycosylation in Toxoplasma and that disrupted parasites grow slowly at physiological O2 levels. Conservation of cellular function was tested by expression of TgPhyA in DdphyA-null cells. Simple gene replacement did not rescue Skp1 glycosylation, whereas overexpression not only corrected Skp1 modification but also restored the O2 requirement to a level comparable to that of overexpressed DdPhyA. Bacterially expressed TgPhyA protein can prolyl hydroxylate both Toxoplasma and Dictyostelium Skp1s. Kinetic analyses showed that TgPhyA has similar properties to DdPhyA, including a superimposable dependence on the concentration of its co-substrate α-ketoglutarate. Remarkably, however, TgPhyA had a significantly higher apparent affinity for O2. The findings suggest that Skp1 hydroxylation by PhyA is a conserved process among protists and that this biochemical pathway may indirectly sense O2 by detecting the levels of O2-regulated metabolites such as α-ketoglutarate. PMID:22648409

  2. Changes in the Chondrocyte and Extracellular Matrix Proteome during Post-natal Mouse Cartilage Development*

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Richard; Norris, Emma L.; Brachvogel, Bent; Angelucci, Constanza; Zivkovic, Snezana; Gordon, Lavinia; Bernardo, Bianca C.; Stermann, Jacek; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Gorman, Jeffrey J.; Bateman, John F.

    2012-01-01

    cartilage development. Although the multifunctional chaperone BiP was not differentially expressed, enzymes and chaperones required specifically for collagen biosynthesis, such as the prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1, cartilage-associated protein, and peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase B complex, were down-regulated during maturation. Conversely, the lumenal proteins calumenin, reticulocalbin-1, and reticulocalbin-2 were significantly increased, signifying a shift toward calcium binding functions. This first proteomic analysis of cartilage development in vivo reveals the breadth of protein expression changes during chondrocyte maturation and ECM remodeling in the mouse femoral head. PMID:21989018

  3. Eukaryotic class 1 translation termination factor eRF1--the NMR structure and dynamics of the middle domain involved in triggering ribosome-dependent peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Elena V; Kolosov, Peter M; Birdsall, Berry; Kelly, Geoff; Pastore, Annalisa; Kisselev, Lev L; Polshakov, Vladimir I

    2007-08-01

    The eukaryotic class 1 polypeptide chain release factor is a three-domain protein involved in the termination of translation, the final stage of polypeptide biosynthesis. In attempts to understand the roles of the middle domain of the eukaryotic class 1 polypeptide chain release factor in the transduction of the termination signal from the small to the large ribosomal subunit and in peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis, its high-resolution NMR structure has been obtained. The overall fold and the structure of the beta-strand core of the protein in solution are similar to those found in the crystal. However, the orientation of the functionally critical GGQ loop and neighboring alpha-helices has genuine and noticeable differences in solution and in the crystal. Backbone amide protons of most of the residues in the GGQ loop undergo fast exchange with water. However, in the AGQ mutant, where functional activity is abolished, a significant reduction in the exchange rate of the amide protons has been observed without a noticeable change in the loop conformation, providing evidence for the GGQ loop interaction with water molecule(s) that may serve as a substrate for the hydrolytic cleavage of the peptidyl-tRNA in the ribosome. The protein backbone dynamics, studied using 15N relaxation experiments, showed that the GGQ loop is the most flexible part of the middle domain. The conformational flexibility of the GGQ and 215-223 loops, which are situated at opposite ends of the longest alpha-helix, could be a determinant of the functional activity of the eukaryotic class 1 polypeptide chain release factor, with that helix acting as the trigger to transmit the signals from one loop to the other. PMID:17651434

  4. Characterization of a multimeric, eukaryotic prolyl aminopeptidase: an inducible and highly specific intracellular peptidase from the non-pathogenic fungus Talaromyces emersonii.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Cathal S; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; Goetz, David H; Murray, Patrick G; Craik, Charles S; Tuohy, Maria G

    2009-11-01

    Fungi are capable of degrading proteins in their environment by secreting peptidases. However, the link between extracellular digestion and intracellular proteolysis has scarcely been investigated. Mycelial lysates of the filamentous fungus Talaromyces emersonii were screened for intracellular peptidase production. Five distinct proteolytic activities with specificity for the p-nitroanilide (pNA) peptides Suc-AAPF-pNA, Suc-AAA-pNA, K-pNA, F-pNA and P-pNA were identified. The native enzyme responsible for the removal of N-terminal proline residues was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by five successive chromatographic steps. The enzyme, termed Talaromyces emersonii prolyl aminopeptidase (TePAP), displayed a 50-fold specificity for cleaving N-terminal Pro-X (k(cat)/K(m)=2.1 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)) compared with Ala-X or Val-X bonds. This intracellular aminopeptidase was optimally active at pH 7.4 and 50 degrees C. Peptide sequencing facilitated the design of degenerate oligonucleotides from homologous sequences encoding putative fungal proline aminopeptidases, enabling subsequent cloning of the gene. TePAP was shown to be relatively uninhibited by classical serine peptidase inhibitors and to be sensitive to selected cysteine- and histidine-modifying reagents, yet gene sequence analysis identified the protein as a serine peptidase with an alpha/beta hydrolase fold. Northern analysis indicated that Tepap mRNA levels were regulated by the composition of the growth medium. Highest Tepap transcript levels were observed when the fungus was grown in medium containing glucose and the protein hydrolysate casitone. Interestingly, both the induction profile and substrate preference of this enzyme suggest potential co-operativity between extracellular and intracellular proteolysis in this organism. Gel filtration chromatography suggested that the enzyme exists as a 270 kDa homo-hexamer, whereas most bacterial prolyl aminopeptidases (PAPs) are

  5. Characterization of a multimeric, eukaryotic prolyl aminopeptidase: an inducible and highly specific intracellular peptidase from the non-pathogenic fungus Talaromyces emersonii

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Cathal S.; O'Donoghue, Anthony J.; Goetz, David H.; Murray, Patrick G.; Craik, Charles S.; Tuohy, Maria G.

    2009-01-01

    Fungi are capable of degrading proteins in their environment by secreting peptidases. However, the link between extracellular digestion and intracellular proteolysis has scarcely been investigated. Mycelial lysates of the filamentous fungus Talaromyces emersonii were screened for intracellular peptidase production. Five distinct proteolytic activities with specificity for the p-nitroanilide (pNA) peptides Suc-AAPF-pNA, Suc-AAA-pNA, K-pNA, F-pNA and P-pNA were identified. The native enzyme responsible for the removal of N-terminal proline residues was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by five successive chromatographic steps. The enzyme, termed Talaromyces emersonii prolyl aminopeptidase (TePAP), displayed a 50-fold specificity for cleaving N-terminal Pro–X (kcat/Km=2.1×106 M−1 s−1) compared with Ala–X or Val–X bonds. This intracellular aminopeptidase was optimally active at pH 7.4 and 50 °C. Peptide sequencing facilitated the design of degenerate oligonucleotides from homologous sequences encoding putative fungal proline aminopeptidases, enabling subsequent cloning of the gene. TePAP was shown to be relatively uninhibited by classical serine peptidase inhibitors and to be sensitive to selected cysteine- and histidine-modifying reagents, yet gene sequence analysis identified the protein as a serine peptidase with an α/β hydrolase fold. Northern analysis indicated that Tepap mRNA levels were regulated by the composition of the growth medium. Highest Tepap transcript levels were observed when the fungus was grown in medium containing glucose and the protein hydrolysate casitone. Interestingly, both the induction profile and substrate preference of this enzyme suggest potential co-operativity between extracellular and intracellular proteolysis in this organism. Gel filtration chromatography suggested that the enzyme exists as a 270 kDa homo-hexamer, whereas most bacterial prolyl aminopeptidases (PAPs) are

  6. Prolyl isomerase Pin1 is highly expressed in Her2-positive breast cancer and regulates erbB2 protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Prudence B; Burga, Laura N; Wu, Bryan P; Hofstatter, Erin W; Lu, Kun Ping; Wulf, Gerburg M

    2008-01-01

    Overexpression of HER-2/Neu occurs in about 25–30% of breast cancer patients and is indicative of poor prognosis. While Her2/Neu overexpression is primarily a result of erbB2 amplification, it has recently been recognized that erbB2 levels are also regulated on the protein level. However, factors that regulate Her2/Neu protein stability are less well understood. The prolyl isomerase Pin1 catalyzes the isomerization of specific pSer/Thr-Pro motifs that have been phosphorylated in response to mitogenic signaling. We have previously reported that Pin1-catalyzed post-phosphorylational modification of signal transduction modulates the oncogenic pathways downstream from c-neu. The goal of this study was to examine the expression of prolyl isomerase Pin1 in human Her2+ breast cancer, and to study if Pin1 affects the expression of Her2/Neu itself. Methods Immunohistochemistry for Her2 and Pin1 were performed on two hundred twenty-three human breast cancers, with 59% of the specimen from primary cancers and 41% from metastatic sites. Pin1 inhibition was achieved using siRNA in Her2+ breast cancer cell lines, and its effects were studied using cell viability assays, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. Results Sixty-four samples (28.7%) stained positive for Her2 (IHC 3+), and 54% (122/223) of all breast cancers stained positive for Pin1. Of the Her2-positive cancers 40 (62.5%) were also Pin1-positive, based on strong nuclear or nuclear and cytoplasmic staining. Inhibition of Pin1 via RNAi resulted in significant suppression of Her2-positive tumor cell growth in BT474, SKBR3 and AU565 cells. Pin1 inhibition greatly increased the sensitivity of Her2-positive breast cancer cells to the mTOR inhibitor Rapamycin, while it did not increase their sensitivity to Trastuzumab, suggesting that Pin1 might act on Her2 signaling. We found that Pin1 interacted with the protein complex that contains ubiquitinated erbB2 and that Pin1 inhibition accelerated erbB2 degradation, which could

  7. Hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase 1 (PHD1) deficiency promotes hepatic steatosis and liver-specific insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Amandine; Belaidi, Elise; Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; van der Zon, Gerard C; Levy, Patrick; Clement, Karine; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Godin-Ribuot, Diane; Guigas, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with local tissue hypoxia and elevated hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) in metabolic tissues. Prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs) play an important role in regulating HIF-α isoform stability. In the present study, we investigated the consequence of whole-body PHD1 gene (Egln2) inactivation on metabolic homeostasis in mice. At baseline, PHD1-/- mice exhibited higher white adipose tissue (WAT) mass, despite lower body weight, and impaired insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance when compared to age-matched wild-type (WT) mice. When fed a synthetic low-fat diet, PHD1-/- mice also exhibit a higher body weight gain and WAT mass along with glucose intolerance and systemic insulin resistance compared to WT mice. PHD1 deficiency led to increase in glycolytic gene expression, lipogenic proteins ACC and FAS, hepatic steatosis and liver-specific insulin resistance. Furthermore, gene markers of inflammation were also increased in the liver, but not in WAT or skeletal muscle, of PHD1-/- mice. As expected, high-fat diet (HFD) promoted obesity, hepatic steatosis, tissue-specific inflammation and systemic insulin resistance in WT mice but these diet-induced metabolic alterations were not exacerbated in PHD1-/- mice. In conclusion, PHD1 deficiency promotes hepatic steatosis and liver-specific insulin resistance but does not worsen the deleterious effects of HFD on metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27094951

  8. von Hippel-Lindau β-domain-luciferase fusion protein as a bioluminescent hydroxyproline sensor for a hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase assay.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sungchae; Yum, Soohwan; Ha, Nam-Chul; Jung, Yunjin

    2010-12-15

    Hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylases (HPHs) are responsible for hydroxylation of proline residues in hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-α), resulting in von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-mediated proteasome degradation of the hydroxylated proteins. Pharmacological inhibition of the enzyme leads to stabilization of HIF-α proteins and consequent activation of HIF, which provides therapeutic benefit for a variety of tissues undergoing ischemic stress. In an effort to develop a new assay for measuring HPH activity, we designed a fusion protein, VHL β-domain-luciferase. Recombinant fusion protein with a glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag was purified from Escherichia coli. GST-VHL β-domain-luciferase with C-terminal deletion (GVbL-CD) was obtained as a major product and found to have luciferase activity. In a GVbL-CD capture assay using HIF peptide-bound beads, at least a 13-fold increase in luciferase activity was elicited for HIF peptide with hydroxyproline compared with unhydroxylated HIF peptide. HPH inhibitory activities of known HPH inhibitors or HIF-1α inducers were assessed using this assay, whose results were in good agreement with those obtained from conventional methods. The competitive effect of 2-ketoglutarate on dimethyloxalylglycine-mediated HPH inhibition was assessed very well in the new assay. Taken together, the VHL β-domain protein with luciferase activity is of use for HPH activity assay. PMID:20705044

  9. Effects of oxytocin and a derivative (Z-prolyl-D-leucine) on morphine tolerance/withdrawal are mediated by the limbic system.

    PubMed

    Kovács, G L; Izbéki, F; Horváth, Z; Telegdy, G

    1984-10-01

    Recent data indicate that the neurohypophyseal hormone oxytocin (OXT) and Z-prolyl-D-leucine (Z-Pro-D-Leu), a synthetic dipeptide derived from the C-terminal part of OXT, attenuate the development of tolerance to and dependence on morphine in the mouse. Biochemical and behavioral data raise the possibility that these effects of the peptides might be associated with their effects on the central nervous system and in particular on limbic brain structures. The present results confirm this hypothesis, since intracerebroventricular (i.c.v., 50 ng) and local (0.5 ng) injections of OXT and Z-Pro-D-Leu into the dorsal hippocampus and the mesolimbic nucleus accumbens attenuate morphine tolerance/dependence, similarly to systemic injections of these peptides in higher amounts (5-50 micrograms). Local injections of these peptides into other brain sites (e.g. the nucleus caudatus, ventral tegmental area and the external cortical surface) are without effect. Lesion of the nucleus accumbens by the catecholaminergic neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) completely prevents the effects of Z-Pro-D-Leu and partially those of OXT on morphine tolerance/dependence. The data point to the role of limbic structures as mediators of the effects of neuropeptides on morphine addiction. PMID:6542796

  10. Feeding, drinking, urine osmolality in DI Brattleboro rats: changes by morphine, naloxone, D-amino acids, prolyl-leucyl-glycinamide (PLG).

    PubMed

    Koyuncuoğlu, H; Berkman, K; Sabuncu, H

    1984-01-01

    Brattleboro rats placed in metabolism cages were injected with morphine (Mor), naloxone (Nal), D- and L-aspartic acid (D- and L-Asp), D-phenylalanine (D-Phe), D-leucine (D-Leu) and prolyl-leucyl-glycinamide (PLG), alone and in suitable combinations. Food and fluid intake, urine outflow, faeces weight, rectal temperature and urinary osmolality were determined at the end of seven hours period of time. Mor, Nal, D-Asp and PLG alone caused a significant decrease in food and fluid intake, urine volume and faeces weight and a significant increase in urinary osmolality being the osmolality of the Mor, D-Asp and PLG injected groups higher than 300 mOsmol/kg. The combination of Nal with Mor, D-Asp and PLG appeared to intensify the changes induced by Mor, D-Asp and PLG whereas L-Asp antagonized the majority of changes caused by Mor or PLG. The results were discussed in the light of the previous experimental findings. PMID:6694997

  11. Enhancement of ACE and prolyl oligopeptidase inhibitory potency of protein hydrolysates from sardine and tuna by-products by simulated gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Alvarez, Oscar; Batista, Irineu; Ramos, Cristina; Montero, Pilar

    2016-04-01

    This work was focused on the study of the bioactive potential of three fish protein hydrolysates, one of them prepared from industrial sardine by-products (head and viscera) and the others from tuna by-products (head, and muscle and viscera). These protein hydrolysates exhibited moderate ability to inhibit Angiotensin Converting Enzyme or ACE (IC50 between 0.24-1.16 mg dry weight per ml) and prolyl oligopeptidase or PO (IC50 between 3.30-9.57 mg ml(-1)), those obtained from tuna by-products being the most effective. Overall, ACE- and PO-inhibiting activities were enhanced by sequential nanofiltration through 3 and 1 kDa MWCO membranes (IC50 between 0.02-0.16 mg ml(-1) (ACE) and 1.10-4.21 mg ml(-1) (PO)). The inhibitory properties of the hydrolysates were greatly improved by in vitro gastric digestion, and were barely affected by further intestinal digestion. The digested tuna hydrolysates, mainly that from heads, proved to be the best source of PO- and ACE- inhibiting molecules (IC50 = 0.16 mg ml(-1) (ACE) and 1.04 mg ml(-1) (PO)) and could be potential new ingredients in food with interest in the prevention or treatment of cardiovascular and neurological diseases. PMID:27045751

  12. Preconditioning of Cardiosphere-Derived Cells With Hypoxia or Prolyl-4-Hydroxylase Inhibitors Increases Stemness and Decreases Reliance on Oxidative Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tan, Suat Cheng; Gomes, Renata S M; Yeoh, Kar Kheng; Perbellini, Filippo; Malandraki-Miller, Sophia; Ambrose, Lucy; Heather, Lisa C; Faggian, Giuseppe; Schofield, Christopher J; Davies, Kay E; Clarke, Kieran; Carr, Carolyn A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs), which can be isolated from heart explants, are a promising candidate cell source for infarcted myocardium regeneration. However, current protocols used to expand CDCs require at least 1 month in vitro to obtain sufficient cells for transplantation. We report that CDC culture can be optimized by preconditioning the cells under hypoxia (2% oxygen), which may reflect the physiological oxygen level of the stem cell niche. Under hypoxia, the CDC proliferation rate increased by 1.4-fold, generating 6 × 10(6) CDCs with higher expression of cardiac stem cell and pluripotency gene markers compared to normoxia. Furthermore, telomerase (TERT), cytokines/ligands involved in stem cell trafficking (SDF/CXCR-4), erythropoiesis (EPO), and angiogenesis (VEGF) were increased under hypoxia. Hypoxic preconditioning was mimicked by treatment with two types of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl-4-hydroxylase inhibitors (PHDIs): dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG) and 2-(1-chloro-4-hydroxyisoquinoline-3-carboxamido) acetic acid (BIC). Despite the difference in specificity, both PHDIs significantly increased c-Kit expression and activated HIF, EPO, and CXCR-4. Furthermore, treatment with PHDIs for 24 h increased cell proliferation. Notably, all hypoxic and PHDI-preconditioned CDCs had decreased oxygen consumption and increased glycolytic metabolism. In conclusion, cells cultured under hypoxia could have potentially enhanced therapeutic potential, which can be mimicked, in part, by PHDIs. PMID:25751158

  13. Antioxidant activity of caffeoyl-prolyl-histidine amide and its effects on PDGF-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Seon-Yeong; Lee, Hyun Jung; Yang, Jin-Kyoung; Lee, Eun Jig; Seo, MiRan; Lee, Yoon-Sik

    2014-12-01

    Caffeic acid (CA) is one of the antioxidants found in plants, which protects vascular cells against vascular injuries from oxidative stress. In our previous study, caffeoyl-prolyl-histidine amide (CA-L-Pro-L-His-NH2; CA-PH; a CA derivative) was synthesized, which exhibited a strong antioxidant activity with sufficient stability. In this study, we investigated the role of CA-PH in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and confirmed the enhanced antioxidant activity of CA-PH compared with that of CA. In in vitro tube assays, CA-PH showed a higher free-radical-scavenging activity and lipid-peroxidation-inhibition activity than those of CA. In VSMCs, CA-PH significantly reduced hydrogen peroxide-induced ROS generation and increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1. Moreover, CA-PH effectively inhibited the platelet-derived growth factor-induced cellular proliferation of VSMCs, which was confirmed by a decrease in the expression of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen and the phosphorylation of Akt. PMID:25218135

  14. Hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase 1 (PHD1) deficiency promotes hepatic steatosis and liver-specific insulin resistance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Amandine; Belaidi, Elise; Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; van der Zon, Gerard C.; Levy, Patrick; Clement, Karine; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Godin-Ribuot, Diane; Guigas, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with local tissue hypoxia and elevated hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) in metabolic tissues. Prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs) play an important role in regulating HIF-α isoform stability. In the present study, we investigated the consequence of whole-body PHD1 gene (Egln2) inactivation on metabolic homeostasis in mice. At baseline, PHD1−/− mice exhibited higher white adipose tissue (WAT) mass, despite lower body weight, and impaired insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance when compared to age-matched wild-type (WT) mice. When fed a synthetic low-fat diet, PHD1−/− mice also exhibit a higher body weight gain and WAT mass along with glucose intolerance and systemic insulin resistance compared to WT mice. PHD1 deficiency led to increase in glycolytic gene expression, lipogenic proteins ACC and FAS, hepatic steatosis and liver-specific insulin resistance. Furthermore, gene markers of inflammation were also increased in the liver, but not in WAT or skeletal muscle, of PHD1−/− mice. As expected, high-fat diet (HFD) promoted obesity, hepatic steatosis, tissue-specific inflammation and systemic insulin resistance in WT mice but these diet-induced metabolic alterations were not exacerbated in PHD1−/− mice. In conclusion, PHD1 deficiency promotes hepatic steatosis and liver-specific insulin resistance but does not worsen the deleterious effects of HFD on metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27094951

  15. Pichia pastoris production of a prolyl 4-hydroxylase derived from Chondrosia reniformis sponge: A new biotechnological tool for the recombinant production of marine collagen.

    PubMed

    Pozzolini, Marina; Scarfì, Sonia; Mussino, Francesca; Salis, Annalisa; Damonte, Gianluca; Benatti, Umberto; Giovine, Marco

    2015-08-20

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H) is a α2β2 tetramer catalyzing the post-translational hydroxylation of prolines in collagen. Its recombinant production is mainly pursued to realize biotechnological tools able to generate animal contaminant-free hydroxylated collagen. One promising candidate for biomedical applications is the collagen extracted from the marine sponge Chondrosia reniformis, because of its biocompatibility and because is devoid of the health risks associated with bovine and porcine collagens. Here we report on the production and selection, by enzymatic and biomolecular analyses, of a triple transformed Pichia pastoris strain expressing a stable P4H tetramer derived from C. reniformis sponge and a hydroxylated non fibrillar procollagen polypeptide from the same animal. The percentage of recombinant procollagen hydroxylated prolines inside the transformed yeast was of 36.3% analyzed by mass spectrometry indicating that the recombinant enzyme is active on its natural substrate inside the yeast cell host. Furthermore, the recombinant sponge P4H has the ability to hydroxylate its natural substrate in both X and Y positions in the Xaa-Yaa-Gly collagenous triplets. In conclusion this Pichia system seems ideal for high-level production of hydroxylated sponge- or marine-derived collagen polypeptides as well as of conotoxins or other marine proteins of high pharmacological interest needing this particular post-translational modification. PMID:26022422

  16. Alternative splicing transcription of Megalobrama amblycephala HIF prolyl hydroxylase PHD3 and up-regulation of PHD3 by HIF-1α.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan; Huang, Cui-Hong; Chen, Bo-Xiang; Liu, Hong; Wang, Wei-Min; Gul, Yasmeen; Wang, Huan-Ling

    2016-01-15

    PHD3 is a hydroxylase that hydroxylates prolyl residues on hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) in mammals. In this study, the full-length cDNA and promoter sequences of Megalobrama amblycephala PHD3 gene were isolated by a modified RACE method. PHD3 cDNA was 1622 bp in length, including an ORF of 717 bp encoding 238 amino acid residues. The semi-quantitative PCR results suggested that PHD3 was highly expressed in liver in the normal condition, while after hypoxia treatment this gene was significantly increased in all analyzed tissues. PHD3 was detected only in the initial stages of M. amblycephala embryo development. In addition, the presence of another alternatively processed PHD3 transcript, designated PHD3Δ1 was observed in the process of analyzing the expression of PHD3. Both PHD3 and PHD3Δ1 were up-regulated under hypoxia, and had five the hypoxia response elements (HREs) by in silico scanning on the promoter. Further luciferase assay indicated that all HREs significantly responded to hypoxia. Taken together, these results suggest that PHD3 plays important roles in hypoxia response and early embryo development of M. amblycephala. PMID:26697748

  17. A simple HPLC method for the comprehensive analysis of cis/trans (Z/E) geometrical isomers of carotenoids for nutritional studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geometrical isomers of carotenoids behave differently in aspects like stability towards oxidants, bioavailability, vitamin A activity and specificity for enzymes. The availability of HPLC methods for their detailed profiling is therefore advisable to expand our knowledge on their metabolism and biol...

  18. Kinetics of Light-Induced cis-trans Isomerization of Four Piperines and their Levels in Ground Black Peppers as Determined by HPLC and LC/MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pungent compound piperine, a secondary metabolite present in black, white, and green pepper fruit, undergoes light-induced isomerizations. To facilitate studies in this area, an HPLC method has been developed for analysis and isolation of the following four possible piperine photo-induced isomer...

  19. Novel cis-trans interactions are involved in post-transcriptional regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A variety of pathways target CDKI p21WAF1/CIP1 expression at transcriptional, post-transcriptional as well as translational levels. We previously found that cell growth suppressing retinoid CD437 enhanced expression of p21WAF1/CIP1 and DNA damage inducible GADD45 proteins in part by elevating their mRNA stability. Results Here, we investigated molecular mechanisms of CD437-dependent post-transcriptional regulation of p21WAF1/CIP1 expression. By utilizing MDA-MB-468 HBC cells expressing chimeric rabbit β-globin-p21WAF1/CIP1 transcripts we mapped multiple CD437-responsive sequences located within positions 1195 to 1795 of the 3'-untranslated region of p21WAF1/CIP1 mRNA. Several cytoplasmic proteins present in MDA-MB-468, MCF-7 HBC as well as HL-60R leukemia cells bound specifically, in vitro, with these CD437-responsive sequences. CD437 treatment of cells resulted in elevated binding of ~85 kD and ~55 kD cytoplasmic proteins with putative CD437-responsive sequences. A 12 nt RNA sequence (5'-UGUGGUGGCACA-3') present within CD437-responsive region of p21WAF1/CIP1 mRNA displayed specific and elevated binding with the above noted proteins. Treatment of cells with ActD or CHX prior to CD437 exposure did not abrogate RNA-protein interactions. However, treatment of cytoplasmic protein extracts with proteinase K or alkaline phosphatase resulted in loss of RNA-protein interactions. Conclusions CD437 regulates cell growth in part by regulating stability of p21WAF1/CIP1 mRNA that involves specific RNA-protein interactions that are phosphorylation-dependent, while not requiring nascent transcription or protein synthesis. PMID:20704727

  20. Study of the time-course of cis/trans (Z/E) isomerization of lycopene, phytoene, and phytofluene from tomato.

    PubMed

    Meléndez-Martínez, Antonio J; Paulino, Margot; Stinco, Carla M; Mapelli-Brahm, Paula; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2014-12-24

    In this study we investigated the formation of isomers of lycopene, phytoene, and phytofluene from tomato and their theoretical energy. The results indicated that certain (Z)-isomers are favored thermodynamically and/or kinetically over their (all-E)-counterparts. The relative percentages of (5Z)-lycopene in either thermodynamic or kinetic equilibria were approximately 33%, and those of (all-E)-lycopene were only approximately 22%. Most strikingly (15Z)-phytoene was the major isomer (>90%) when the thermodynamic or the kinetic equilibria were reached. These observations can explain the high levels of lycopene (Z)-isomers found in humans and their rapid formations upon additions of oil to tomato products. In addition, the results can be useful to predict the isomeric forms of lycopene, phytoene, and phytofluene expected in foods as well as in plasma and tissues upon ingestion. In light of the data in the present study, the use of certain geometrical isomers of phytoene, phytofluene and lycopene on their own or as mixtures is recommended in future studies aimed at assessing their possible bioactivity. PMID:25426993

  1. Effect of gamma-irradiation on the levels of total and cis/trans isomers of beta-carotene in dehydrated parsley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastião, Kátia I.; Almeida-Muradian, Lígia B.; Romanelli, Maria Fernanda; Koseki, Paula Massae; Villavicencio, Anna Lúcia C. H.

    2002-03-01

    Ionizing radiation is a method for preservation of foods that use the high energy of gamma rays or accelerated electrons, thereby ionizing molecules. The most important precursor of vitamin A is β-carotene, a carotenoid with pro-vitamin A activity. The highly unsaturated chain confers the instability of β-carotene, and some reactions, as isomerisation, can reduce the characteristics of pro-vitamin A. The present study investigated whether increasing doses of 0, 10 and 20 kGy lower the total β-carotene level and if an enhancement of cis-isomers occurred on samples of dehydrated parsley. No differences were observed of either fractions analyzed at doses applied in this study, nor did it contribute to the decrease of vitamin A.

  2. A critical evaluation of the s-cis-trans isomerism of 2-acetylpyrrole and its N-methyl derivative through infrared and NMR spectroscopies and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducati, Lucas C.; Braga, Carolyne B.; Rittner, Roberto; Tormena, Cláudio F.

    2013-12-01

    Literature data are controversial regarding the conformational equilibria of 2-acetylpyrrole (AP) and its N-methyl derivative (AMP). Now, a detailed study through infrared spectroscopy and theoretical calculations has shown that previous data were erroneously interpreted, since only a N,O-cis conformer is present in solution and that it is the stable conformer in the isolated state (ΔEtrans-cis = 5.05 kcal mol-1, for AP; ΔEtrans-cis = 7.14 kcal mol-1, for AMP). Carbonyl and Nsbnd H absorption data in different solvents, supported by theoretical results taking into account the solvent effects [at IEFPCM-B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3p) level of theory] clearly demonstrated that only the N,O-cis conformer is present in solution. However, a doublet was observed for AP, in CCl4, which can be attributed to this conformer and the lowest wavenumber component to the cis dimer form, stabilized through intermolecular hydrogen bonds (NH⋯Odbnd C). The overall preference for the N,O-cis conformer, in AP and AMP, as interpreted by the NBO analysis, indicated that the hyperconjugative effect is the main contribution to stabilize this rotamer, overcoming the possible steric repulsion. 13C NMR experiments at low temperature in two different solvents (CS2/CDCl2 and acetone-d6) confirmed the occurrence of a single conformer since no separated signals were observed.

  3. Estimation of procyanidin/prodelphinidin and cis/trans flavanol ratios of condensed tannin fractions by 1H-13C HSQC NMR spectroscopy: Correlation with thiolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integration of cross-peak contours of H/C-2’,6’ signals from prodelphinidin (PD) and of H/C-6’ signals from procyanidin (PC) units in 1H-13C HSQC nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of condensed tannins yielded nuclei-adjusted PC/PD estimates that were highly correlated with PC/PD ratios obtain...

  4. Ruthenium(II) complexes containing N(4)-tolyl-2-acetylpyridine thiosemicarbazones and phosphine ligands: NMR and electrochemical studies of cis- trans isomerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graminha, Angelica E.; Batista, Alzir A.; Ellena, Javier; Castellano, Eduardo E.; Teixeira, Letícia R.; Mendes, Isolda C.; Beraldo, Heloisa

    2008-03-01

    [Ru(HL)(PPh 3) 2Cl]Cl complexes have been obtained in which HL = N(4)- ortho (complex 1), N(4)- meta (complex 2) and N(4)- para-tolyl 2-acetylpyridine thiosemicarbazone (complex 3). NMR and electrochemical studies indicate that both cis and trans isomers exist in solution, and that the cis isomers are converted into the trans isomers with time. Crystal structure determination of ( 1) reveals that the trans isomer is formed in the solid state.

  5. Spectroscopic studies for adducts of 2-aminopyrimidine with tin(IV) halides and tin(II) chloride. Cis- trans isomerism in tetrabromobis(2-aminopyrimidine)tin(IV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovala-Demertzi, D.; Kourkoumelis, N.; Tavridou, P.; Moukarika, A.; Akrivos, P. D.; Russo, U.

    1998-10-01

    The complexes [SnCl 4(Apyrim) 2], 1, [SnBr 4(Apyrim) 2], 2 and [SnCl 2(Apyrim)] 2, 3, have been prepared and structurally characterized in the solid state by means of 119Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy, determination of lattice dynamics by temperature-dependent 119Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy, and by vibrational studies. Conductivity measurements and UV spectra in solution are also reported. A cis octahedral structure ( C2) is proposed for [SnCl 4(Apyrim) 2] while for [SnBr 4(Apyrim) 2] both cis ( C2) and trans ( C2 h) isomers are proposed to be present in the solid state, in an 1:1 molar ratio. An asymmetrically bridged dimer structure is proposed for [SnCl 2(Apyrim)] 2. From the variable-temperature Mössbauer effect, the Debye temperature for 1-3 were determined to be 150, 139 and 117, respectively. A computational study was attempted, utilizing a PM3 Hamiltonian in order to investigate the prevailing isomer of each of the studied species both in the gas phase and in simulated solvent bulk (COSMO model).

  6. 40 CFR 180.545 - Prallethrin (RS)-2-methyl-4-oxo-3-(2-propynyl)cyclopent-2-enyl (1RS)-cis, trans-chrysanthemate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... served. (3) Application shall be limited to space, general surface, and spot and/or crack and crevice.... Spot and/or crack and crevice application may be used while the facility is in operation provided... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES...

  7. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor α and Hif-prolyl Hydroxylase Characterization and Gene Expression in Short-Time Air-Exposed Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Giannetto, Alessia; Maisano, Maria; Cappello, Tiziana; Oliva, Sabrina; Parrino, Vincenzo; Natalotto, Antonino; De Marco, Giuseppe; Barberi, Chiara; Romeo, Orazio; Mauceri, Angela; Fasulo, Salvatore

    2015-12-01

    Aquatic organisms experience environmental hypoxia as a result of eutrophication and naturally occurring tidal cycles. Mytilus galloprovincialis, being an anoxic/hypoxic-tolerant bivalve, provides an excellent model to investigate the molecular mechanisms regulating oxygen sensing. Across the animal kingdom, inadequacy in oxygen supply is signalled predominantly by hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) and Hif-prolyl hydroxylases (PHD). In this study, hif-α 5'-end and partial phd mRNA sequences from M. galloprovincialis were obtained. Phylogenetic and molecular characterization of both HIF-α and PHD putative proteins showed shared key features with the respective orthologues from animals strongly suggesting their crucial involvement in the highly conserved oxygen sensing pathway. Both transcripts displayed a tissue-specific distribution with prominent expression in gills. Quantitative gene expression analysis of hif-α and phd mRNAs from gills of M. galloprovincialis demonstrated that both these key sensors are transcriptionally modulated by oxygen availability during the short-time air exposure and subsequent re-oxygenation treatments proving that they are critical players of oxygen-sensing mechanisms in mussels. Remarkably, hif-α gene expression showed a prompt and transient response suggesting the precocious implication of this transcription factor in the early phase of the adaptive response to hypoxia in Mytilus. HIF-α and PHD proteins were modulated in a time-dependent manner with trends comparable to mRNA expression patterns, thus suggesting a central role of their transcriptional regulation in the hypoxia tolerance strategies in marine bivalves. These results provide molecular information about the effects of oxygen deficiency and identify hypoxia-responsive biomarker genes in mussels applicable in ecotoxicological studies of natural marine areas. PMID:26277612

  8. Conditional Deletion of Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain-Containing Protein 2 (Phd2) Gene Reveals Its Essential Role in Chondrocyte Function and Endochondral Bone Formation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaohong; Xing, Weirong; Pourteymoor, Sheila; Schulte, Jan; Mohan, Subburaman

    2016-01-01

    The hypoxic growth plate cartilage requires hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-mediated pathways to maintain chondrocyte survival and differentiation. HIF proteins are tightly regulated by prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein 2 (Phd2)-mediated proteosomal degradation. We conditionally disrupted the Phd2 gene in chondrocytes by crossing Phd2 floxed mice with type 2 collagen-α1-Cre transgenic mice and found massive increases (>50%) in the trabecular bone mass of long bones and lumbar vertebra of the Phd2 conditional knockout (cKO) mice caused by significant increases in trabecular number and thickness and reductions in trabecular separation. Cortical thickness and tissue mineral density at the femoral middiaphysis of the cKO mice were also significantly increased. Dynamic histomorphometric analyses revealed increased longitudinal length and osteoid surface per bone surface in the primary spongiosa of the cKO mice, suggesting elevated conversion rate from hypertrophic chondrocytes to mineralized bone matrix as well as increased bone formation in the primary spongiosa. In the secondary spongiosa, bone formation measured by mineralizing surface per bone surface and mineral apposition rate were not changed, but resorption was slightly reduced. Increases in the mRNA levels of SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9, osterix (Osx), type 2 collagen, aggrecan, alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, vascular endothelial growth factor, erythropoietin, and glycolytic enzymes in the growth plate of cKO mice were detected by quantitative RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry revealed an increased HIF-1α protein level in the hypertrophic chondrocytes of cKO mice. Infection of chondrocytes isolated from Phd2 floxed mice with adenoviral Cre resulted in similar gene expression patterns as observed in the cKO growth plate chondrocytes. Our findings indicate that Phd2 suppresses endochondral bone formation, in part, via HIF-dependent mechanisms in mice. PMID:26562260

  9. Proline with or without hydroxyproline influences collagen concentration and regulates prolyl 4-hydroxylase α (I) gene expression in juvenile turbo ( Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaikai; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Huihui; Liufu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Yanjiao; Peng, Mo; Ai, Qinghui

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary proline (Pro), and Pro and hydroxyproline (Hyp) in combination on the growth performance, total Hyp and collagen concentrations of tissues, and prolyl 4-hydroxylase α(I) (P4H α(I)) gene expression in juvenile turbot feeding high plant protein diets. A diet containing 50% crude protein and 12% crude lipid was formulated as the basal and control, on which other two protein and lipid contents identical experimental diets were formulated by supplementing the basal with either 0.75% Pro (Pro-0.75) or 0.75% Pro and 0.75% Hyp (Pro+Hyp). Four groups of fish in indoor seawater recirculating systems, 35 individuals each, were fed twice a day to apparent satiation for 10 weeks. The results showed that dietary Pro and Hyp supplementation had no significant effect on growth performance and feed utilization of juvenile turbot (P > 0.05). Total Hyp and collagen concentrations in muscle were significantly increased when dietary Pro and Hyp increased (P <0.05), and fish fed diet Pro+Hyp showed significantly higher free Hyp content in plasma than those fed other diets (P <0.05). The expression of P4H a(I) gene in liver and muscle was significantly up regulated in fish fed diet Pro-0.75 in comparison with control (P <0.05); however the gene was significantly down regulated in fish fed diet Pro+Hyp in muscle in comparison with fish fed diet Pro-0.75 (P <0.05). It can be concluded that supplement of crystal L-Pro and L-Hyp to high plant protein diets did not show positive effects on growth performance of juvenile turbot, but enhanced total collagen concentrations in muscle.

  10. Inhibitors of oxygen sensing prolyl hydroxylases regulate nuclear localization of the transcription factors Smad2 and YAP/TAZ involved in CTGF synthesis.

    PubMed

    Preisser, Felix; Giehl, Klaudia; Rehm, Margot; Goppelt-Struebe, Margarete

    2016-08-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of oxygen sensing prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes (PHDs) has been shown to preserve renal structure and function in various models of kidney disease. Since transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ-1) is one of the major mediators of kidney injury, we investigated if inhibition of PHDs with subsequent stabilization of hypoxia inducible transcription factors (HIF) might interfere with TGFβ-1 signaling with special emphasis on its target gene connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Overnight incubation of human renal tubular cells, primary cells and cell lines, with the PDH inhibitor DMOG increased Smad3 expression, but barely affected Smad2. Both Smads were translocated into the nucleus upon activation of the cells with TGFβ-1. Interestingly, Smad3 nuclear localization was enhanced upon pretreatment of the cells with DMOG for several hours, whereas nuclear Smad2 was reduced. This differential localization was independent of Smad2/3 phosphorylation. Reduced nuclear Smad2 correlated with impaired CTGF secretion in DMOG-treated cells and transient downregulation of Smad2 interfered with TGFβ-1-induced CTGF synthesis. Furthermore, YAP was confirmed as indispensable transcription factor involved in CTGF synthesis. Nuclear localization of YAP and TAZ was reduced in DMOG-treated cells. Our data thus provide evidence for DMOG-mediated reduction of CTGF expression by regulating the nuclear localization of the transcription factors Smad2, YAP and TAZ. Prolonged inhibition of PHDs was necessary to achieve alterations in cellular localization suggesting an indirect HIF-mediated effect. This mechanism might be extended to other transcription factors and target genes, and may thus represent a novel mechanism of negative regulation of gene expression by PHD inhibition. PMID:27155083

  11. Isolation and characterization of cyclo-(tryptophanyl-prolyl) and chloramphenicol from Streptomyces sp. SUK 25 with antimethicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus activity

    PubMed Central

    Alshaibani, Muhanna M; Jalil, Juriyati; Sidik, Nik M; Edrada-Ebel, Ruangelie; Zin, Noraziah M

    2016-01-01

    Background Zingiber spectabile, commonly known as Beehive Ginger, is used as an ethnobotanical plant in many countries as an appetizer or to treat stomachache, toothache, muscle sprain, and as a cure for swelling, sores and cuts. This is the first report of isolation of Streptomyces strain from the root of this plant. Strain Universiti Kebangsaan 25 (SUK 25) has a very high activity to produce secondary metabolites against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates due to acquired multidrug resistance genes and causes medication failure in some clinical cases worldwide. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence exhibited that the most closely related strain was Streptomyces omiyaensis NBRC 13449T (99.0% similarity). Aim This study was conducted to carry out the extraction, identification, and biological evaluation of active metabolites isolated from SUK 25 against three MRSA strains, namely, MRSA ATCC 43300, MRSA ATCC 33591, and MRSA ATCC 49476. Materials and methods The production of secondary metabolites by this strain was optimized through Thronton’s media. Isolation, purification, and identification of the bioactive compounds were carried out using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, high-resolution mass spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared, and one-dimensional and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance. Results During screening procedure, SUK 25 exhibited good antimicrobial potential against several strains of MRSA. The best biological activity was shown from fraction number VII and its subfractions F2 and F3 with minimum inhibitory concentration values at 16 µg/mL and 8 µg/mL, respectively. These two subfractions were identified as diketopiperazine cyclo-(tryptophanyl-prolyl) and chloramphenicol. Conclusion On the basis of obtained results, SUK 25 isolated from Z. spectabile can be regarded as a new valuable source to produce secondary

  12. Increased lung prolyl hydroxylase and decreased glucocorticoid receptor are related to decreased surfactant protein in the growth-restricted sheep fetus.

    PubMed

    Orgeig, Sandra; McGillick, Erin V; Botting, Kimberley J; Zhang, Song; McMillen, I Caroline; Morrison, Janna L

    2015-07-01

    Experimental placental restriction (PR) by carunclectomy in fetal sheep results in intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), chronic hypoxemia, increased plasma cortisol, and decreased lung surfactant protein (SP) expression. The mechanisms responsible for decreased SP expression are unknown but may involve decreased glucocorticoid (GC) action or changes in hypoxia signaling. Endometrial caruncles were removed from nonpregnant ewes to induce PR. Lungs were collected from control and PR fetuses at 130-135 (n = 19) and 139-145 (n = 28) days of gestation. qRT-PCR and Western blotting were used to quantify lung mRNA and protein expression, respectively, of molecular regulators and downstream targets of the GC and hypoxia-signaling pathways. We confirmed a decrease in SP-A, -B, and -C, but not SP-D, mRNA expression in PR fetuses at both ages. There was a net downregulation of GC signaling with a reduction in GC receptor (GR)-α and -β protein expression and a decrease in the cofactor, GATA-6. GC-responsive genes including transforming growth factor-β1, IL-1β, and β2-adrenergic receptor were not stimulated. Prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD)2 mRNA and protein and PHD3 mRNA expression increased with a concomitant increase in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and HIF-1β mRNA expression. There was an increase in mRNA expression of several, but not all, hypoxia-responsive genes. Hence, both GC and hypoxia signaling may contribute to reduced SP expression. Although acute hypoxia normally inactivates PHDs, chronic hypoxemia in the PR fetus increased PHD abundance, which normally prevents HIF signaling. This may represent a mechanism by which chronic hypoxemia contributes to the decrease in SP production in the IUGR fetal lung. PMID:25934670

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Action and Therapeutic Uses of Pharmacological Inhibitors of HIF–Prolyl 4-Hydroxylases for Treatment of Ischemic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraju, Vaithinathan; Parinandi, Narasimham L.; Adluri, Ram Sudheer; Goldman, Joshua W.; Hussain, Naveed; Sanchez, Juan A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: In this review, we have discussed the efficacy and effect of small molecules that act as prolyl hydroxylase domain inhibitors (PHDIs). The use of these compounds causes upregulation of the pro-angiogenic factors and hypoxia inducible factor-1α and -2α (HIF-1α and HIF-2α) to enhance angiogenic, glycolytic, erythropoietic, and anti-apoptotic pathways in the treatment of various ischemic diseases responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in humans. Recent Advances: Sprouting of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and surgical intervention, such as coronary bypass and stent insertion, have been shown to be effective in attenuating ischemia. However, the initial reentry of oxygen leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species that cause oxidative stress and result in ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury. This apparent “oxygen paradox” must be resolved to combat IR injury. During hypoxia, decreased activity of PHDs initiates the accumulation and activation of HIF-1α, wherein the modulation of both PHD and HIF-1α appears as promising therapeutic targets for the pharmacological treatment of ischemic diseases. Critical Issues: Research on PHDs and HIFs has shown that these molecules can serve as therapeutic targets for ischemic diseases by modulating glycolysis, erythropoiesis, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. Efforts are underway to identify and synthesize safer small-molecule inhibitors of PHDs that can be administered in vivo as therapy against ischemic diseases. Future Directions: This review presents a comprehensive and current account of the existing small-molecule PHDIs and their use in the treatment of ischemic diseases with a focus on the molecular mechanisms of therapeutic action in animal models. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2631–2665. PMID:23992027

  14. Identifying a novel role for X-prolyl aminopeptidase (Xpnpep) 2 in CrVI-induced adverse effects on germ cell nest breakdown and follicle development in rats.

    PubMed

    Banu, Sakhila K; Stanley, Jone A; Sivakumar, Kirthiram K; Arosh, Joe A; Barhoumi, Rola; Burghardt, Robert C

    2015-03-01

    Environmental exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is one cause of premature ovarian failure (POF). Hexavalent chromium (CrVI) is a heavy metal EDC widely used in more than 50 industries, including chrome plating, welding, wood processing, and tanneries. Recent data from U.S. Environmental Protection Agency indicate increased levels of Cr in drinking water from several American cities, which potentially predispose residents to various health problems. Recently, we demonstrated that gestational exposure to CrVI caused POF in F1 offspring. The current study was performed to identify the molecular mechanism behind CrVI-induced POF. Pregnant rats were treated with 25 ppm of potassium dichromate from Gestational Day (GD) 9.5 to GD 14.5 through drinking water, and the fetuses were exposed to CrVI through transplacental transfer. Ovaries were removed from the fetuses or pups on Embryonic Day (ED) 15.5, ED 17.5, Postnatal Day (PND) 1, PND 4, or PND 25, and various analyses were performed. Results showed that gestational exposure to CrVI: 1) increased germ cell/oocyte apoptosis and advanced germ cell nest (GCN) breakdown; 2) increased X-prolyl aminopeptidase (Xpnpep) 2, a POF marker in humans, during GCN breakdown; 3) decreased Xpnpep2 during postnatal follicle development; and 4) increased colocalization of Xpnpep2 with Col3 and Col4. We also found that Xpnpep2 inversely regulated the expression of Col1, Col3, and Col4 in all the developmental stages studied. Thus, CrVI advanced GCN breakdown and increased follicle atresia in F1 female progeny by targeting Xpnpep2. PMID:25568306

  15. A computational module assembled from different protease family motifs identifies PI PLC from Bacillus cereus as a putative prolyl peptidase with a serine protease scaffold.

    PubMed

    Rendón-Ramírez, Adela; Shukla, Manish; Oda, Masataka; Chakraborty, Sandeep; Minda, Renu; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Ásgeirsson, Bjarni; Goñi, Félix M; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2013-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes have evolved several mechanisms to cleave peptide bonds. These distinct types have been systematically categorized in the MEROPS database. While a BLAST search on these proteases identifies homologous proteins, sequence alignment methods often fail to identify relationships arising from convergent evolution, exon shuffling, and modular reuse of catalytic units. We have previously established a computational method to detect functions in proteins based on the spatial and electrostatic properties of the catalytic residues (CLASP). CLASP identified a promiscuous serine protease scaffold in alkaline phosphatases (AP) and a scaffold recognizing a β-lactam (imipenem) in a cold-active Vibrio AP. Subsequently, we defined a methodology to quantify promiscuous activities in a wide range of proteins. Here, we assemble a module which encapsulates the multifarious motifs used by protease families listed in the MEROPS database. Since APs and proteases are an integral component of outer membrane vesicles (OMV), we sought to query other OMV proteins, like phospholipase C (PLC), using this search module. Our analysis indicated that phosphoinositide-specific PLC from Bacillus cereus is a serine protease. This was validated by protease assays, mass spectrometry and by inhibition of the native phospholipase activity of PI-PLC by the well-known serine protease inhibitor AEBSF (IC50 = 0.018 mM). Edman degradation analysis linked the specificity of the protease activity to a proline in the amino terminal, suggesting that the PI-PLC is a prolyl peptidase. Thus, we propose a computational method of extending protein families based on the spatial and electrostatic congruence of active site residues. PMID:23940667

  16. Cell-free synthesis and assembly of prolyl 4-hydroxylase: the role of the beta-subunit (PDI) in preventing misfolding and aggregation of the alpha-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    John, D C; Grant, M E; Bulleid, N J

    1993-01-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4-H) catalyses a vital post-translational modification in the biosynthesis of collagen. The enzyme consists of two distinct polypeptides forming an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer (alpha = 64 kDa, beta = 60 kDa), the beta-subunit being identical to the multifunctional enzyme protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). By studying the cell-free synthesis of the rat alpha-subunit of P4-H we have shown that the alpha-subunit can be translocated, glycosylated and the signal peptide cleaved by dog pancreatic microsomal membranes to yield both singly and doubly glycosylated forms. When translations were carried out under conditions which prevent disulfide bond formation, the product synthesized formed aggregates which were associated with the immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP). Translations carried out under conditions that promote disulfide bond formation yielded a product that was not associated with BiP but formed a complex with the endogenous beta-subunit (PDI). Complex formation was detected by co-precipitation of the newly synthesized alpha-subunit with antibodies raised against PDI, by sucrose gradient centrifugation and by chemical cross-linking. When microsomal vesicles were depleted of PDI, BiP and other soluble endoplasmic reticulum proteins, no complex formation was observed and the alpha-subunit aggregated even under conditions that promote disulfide bond formation. We have therefore demonstrated that the enzyme P4-H can be assembled at synthesis in a cell-free system and that the solubility of the alpha-subunit is dependent upon its association with PDI. Images PMID:8385607

  17. Computational Analysis of the Domain Architecture and Substrate-Gating Mechanism of Prolyl Oligopeptidases from Shewanella woodyi and Identification of Probable Lead Molecules.

    PubMed

    Patil, Priya; Skariyachan, Sinosh; Mutt, Eshita; Kaushik, Swati

    2016-09-01

    Prolyl oligopeptidases (POPs) are serine proteases found in prokaryotes and eukaryotes which hydrolyze the peptide bond containing proline. The current study focuses on the analysis of POP sequences, their distribution and domain architecture in Shewanella woodyi, a Gram-negative, luminous bacterium which causes celiac sprue and similar infections in marine organisms. The POP undergoes huge interdomain movement, which allows possible route for the entry of any substrate. Hence, it offers an opportunity to understand the mechanism of substrate gating by studying the domain architecture and possibility to identify a probable drug target. In the present study, the POP sequence was retrieved from GenBank database and the best homologous templates were identified by PSI-BLAST search. The three-dimensional structures of the closed and open forms of POP from S. woodyi, which are not available in native form, were generated by homology modeling. The ideal lead molecules were screened by computer-aided virtual screening, and the binding potential of the best leads toward the target was studied by molecular docking. The domain architecture of the POP revealed that it has a propeller domain consists of [Formula: see text]-sheets, surrounded by [Formula: see text]-helices and [Formula: see text] hydrolase domain with catalytic triad containing Ser-564, Asp-646 and His-681. The hypothetical models of open and closed POP showed backbone RMSD value of 0.56 and 0.65 Å, respectively. Ramachandran plot of the open and closed POP conformations accounts for 99.4 and 98.7 % residues in the favoured region, respectively. Our study revealed that propeller domain comes as an insert between N-terminal and C-terminal [Formula: see text] hydrolase domain. Molecular docking, drug likeness properties and ADME prediction suggested that KUC-103481N and Pramiracetum can be used as probable lead molecules toward the POP from S. woodyi. PMID:26298583

  18. The anti-inflammatory peptide Ac-SDKP is released from thymosin-β4 by renal meprin-α and prolyl oligopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nitin; Nakagawa, Pablo; Janic, Branislava; Romero, Cesar A; Worou, Morel E; Monu, Sumit R; Peterson, Edward L; Shaw, Jiajiu; Valeriote, Frederick; Ongeri, Elimelda M; Niyitegeka, Jean-Marie V; Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine; Carretero, Oscar A

    2016-05-15

    N-acetyl-seryl-aspartyl-lysyl-proline (Ac-SDKP) is a natural tetrapeptide with anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic properties. Previously, we have shown that prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is involved in the Ac-SDKP release from thymosin-β4 (Tβ4). However, POP can only hydrolyze peptides shorter than 30 amino acids, and Tβ4 is 43 amino acids long. This indicates that before POP hydrolysis takes place, Tβ4 is hydrolyzed by another peptidase that releases NH2-terminal intermediate peptide(s) with fewer than 30 amino acids. Our peptidase database search pointed out meprin-α metalloprotease as a potential candidate. Therefore, we hypothesized that, prior to POP hydrolysis, Tβ4 is hydrolyzed by meprin-α. In vitro, we found that the incubation of Tβ4 with both meprin-α and POP released Ac-SDKP, whereas no Ac-SDKP was released when Tβ4 was incubated with either meprin-α or POP alone. Incubation of Tβ4 with rat kidney homogenates significantly released Ac-SDKP, which was blocked by the meprin-α inhibitor actinonin. In addition, kidneys from meprin-α knockout (KO) mice showed significantly lower basal Ac-SDKP amount, compared with wild-type mice. Kidney homogenates from meprin-α KO mice failed to release Ac-SDKP from Tβ4. In vivo, we observed that rats treated with the ACE inhibitor captopril increased plasma concentrations of Ac-SDKP, which was inhibited by the coadministration of actinonin (vehicle, 3.1 ± 0.2 nmol/l; captopril, 15.1 ± 0.7 nmol/l; captopril + actinonin, 6.1 ± 0.3 nmol/l; P < 0.005). Similar results were obtained with urinary Ac-SDKP after actinonin treatment. We conclude that release of Ac-SDKP from Tβ4 is mediated by successive hydrolysis involving meprin-α and POP. PMID:26962108

  19. Selective inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl-hydroxylase 1 mediates neuroprotection against normoxic oxidative death via HIF- and CREB-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Siddiq, Ambreena; Aminova, Leila R; Troy, Carol M; Suh, Kyungsun; Messer, Zachary; Semenza, Gregg L; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2009-07-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to tissue injury in conditions ranging from cardiovascular disease to stroke, spinal cord injury, neurodegeneration, and perhaps even aging. Yet the efficacy of antioxidants in human disease has been mixed at best. We need a better understanding of the mechanisms by which established antioxidants combat oxidative stress. Iron chelators are well established inhibitors of oxidative death in both neural and non-neural tissues, but their precise mechanism of action remains elusive. The prevailing but not completely substantiated view is that iron chelators prevent oxidative injury by suppressing Fenton chemistry and the formation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. Here, we show that iron chelation protects, rather unexpectedly, by inhibiting the hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl 4-hydroxylase isoform 1 (PHD1), an iron and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase. PHD1 and its isoforms 2 and 3 are best known for stabilizing transcriptional regulators involved in hypoxic adaptation, such as HIF-1alpha and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Yet we find that global hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-PHD inhibition protects neurons even when HIF-1alpha and CREB are directly suppressed. Moreover, two global HIF-PHD inhibitors continued to be neuroprotective even in the presence of diminished HIF-2alpha levels, which itself increases neuronal susceptibility to oxidative stress. Finally, RNA interference to PHD1 but not isoforms PHD2 or PHD3 prevents oxidative death, independent of HIF activation. Together, these studies suggest that iron chelators can prevent normoxic oxidative neuronal death through selective inhibition of PHD1 but independent of HIF-1alpha and CREB; and that HIF-2alpha, not HIF-1alpha, regulates susceptibility to normoxic oxidative neuronal death. PMID:19587290

  20. Expression of Prolyl Hydroxylases (PHDs) Is Selectively Controlled by HIF-1 and HIF-2 Proteins in Nucleus Pulposus Cells of the Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Nobuyuki; Markova, Dessislava; Anderson, D. Greg; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Shapiro, Irving M.; Risbud, Makarand V.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive response to hypoxia in nucleus pulposus cells of the intervertebral disc is regulated by the hypoxia-inducible factors, HIF-1α and HIF-2α. Moreover, oxygen-dependent turnover of HIF-1α in these cells is controlled by the prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain (PHD) family of proteins. Whether HIF homologues control expression of PHDs and whether PHDs control hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) turnover and/or activity under hypoxia is not known. Here, we show that in nucleus pulposus cells, hypoxia robustly induces PHD3 expression and, to a lesser extent, of PHD2 and PHD1. Reporter analysis shows that the hypoxic induction of the PHD2 promoter is HIF-1α dependent, whereas PHD3 promoter/enhancer activity is dependent on both HIF-1α and HIF-2α. Lentiviral delivery of HIF-1α, ShHIF-1α, and ShHIF-1β confirmed these observations. Noteworthy, HIF-1α maintains basal expression of PHD1 in hypoxia at the posttranscriptional level. Finally, loss of function studies using lentiviral transduction of ShPHDs clearly shows that even at 1% O2, PHD2 selectively degrades HIF-1α. In contrast, in hypoxia, PHD3 enhances HIF-1α transcriptional activity without affecting protein levels. To correlate these observations with disc disease, a condition characterized by tissue vascularization, we analyzed human tissues. Increased PHD1 mRNA expression but decreased PHD2 and PHD3 expression is observed in degenerate tissues. Interestingly, the hypoxic responsiveness of all the PHDs is maintained in isolated nucleus pulposus cells regardless of the disease state. We propose that PHD2 and PHD3 can be used as a biomarker of tissue oxygenation in the disc and that, as such, it may have important clinical implications. PMID:22451659

  1. Prolyl-4-hydroxylase Domain Protein 2 Controls NF-κB/p65 Transactivation and Enhances the Catabolic Effects of Inflammatory Cytokines on Cells of the Nucleus Pulposus*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Yuan, Wen; Jiang, Shuai; Ye, Wei; Yang, Hao; Shapiro, Irving M.; Risbud, Makarand V.

    2015-01-01

    Prolyl-4-hydroxylase (PHD) proteins are key in sensing tissue hypoxia. In nucleus pulposus (NP) cells, our previous work demonstrated that PHD isoforms have a differential contribution in controlling hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-α degradation and activity. Recently we have shown that a regulatory relationship exists between PHD3 and inflammatory cytokines in NP cells. With respect to PHD2, the most abundant PHD isoform in NP cells, very little is known concerning its function and regulation under inflammatory conditions that characterize intervertebral disc degeneration. Here, we show that PHD2 is a potent regulator of the catabolic activities of TNF-α; silencing of PHD2 significantly decreased TNF-α-induced expression of catabolic markers including SDC4, MMP-3, MMP-13, and ADAMTS5, as well as several inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, while partially restoring aggrecan and collagen II expression. Use of NF-κB reporters with ShPHD2, SiHIF-1α, as well as p65−/−, PHD2−/−, and PHD3−/− cells, shows that PHD2 serves as a co-activator of NF-κB/p65 signaling in HIF-1-independent fashion. Immunoprecipitation of endogenous and exogenously expressed tagged proteins, as well as fluorescence microscopy, indicates that following TNF-α treatment, PHD2 interacts and co-localizes with p65. Conversely, loss of function experiments using lentivirally delivered Sh-p65, Sh-IKKβ, and NF-κB inhibitor confirmed that cytokine-dependent PHD2 expression in NP cells requires NF-κB signaling. These findings clearly demonstrate that PHD2 forms a regulatory circuit with TNF-α via NF-κB and thereby plays an important role in enhancing activity of this cytokine. We propose that during disc degeneration PHD2 may offer a therapeutic target to mitigate the deleterious actions of TNF-α, a key proinflammatory cytokine. PMID:25635047

  2. Translation Regulation of the Glutamyl-prolyl-tRNA Synthetase Gene EPRS through Bypass of Upstream Open Reading Frames with Noncanonical Initiation Codons.

    PubMed

    Young, Sara K; Baird, Thomas D; Wek, Ronald C

    2016-05-13

    In the integrated stress response, phosphorylation of eIF2α (eIF2α-P) reduces protein synthesis while concomitantly promoting preferential translation of specific transcripts associated with stress adaptation. Translation of the glutamyl-prolyl-tRNA synthetase gene EPRS is enhanced in response to eIF2α-P. To identify the underlying mechanism of translation control, we employed biochemical approaches to determine the regulatory features by which upstream ORFs (uORFs) direct downstream translation control and expression of the EPRS coding region. Our findings reveal that translation of two inhibitory uORFs encoded by noncanonical CUG and UUG initiation codons in the EPRS mRNA 5'-leader serve to dampen levels of translation initiation at the EPRS coding region. By a mechanism suggested to involve increased translation initiation stringency during stress-induced eIF2α-P, we observed facilitated ribosome bypass of these uORFs, allowing for increased translation of the EPRS coding region. Importantly, EPRS protein expression is enhanced through this preferential translation mechanism in response to multiple known activators of eIF2α-P and likely serves to facilitate stress adaptation in response to a variety of cellular stresses. The rules presented here for the regulated ribosome bypass of noncanonical initiation codons in the EPRS 5'-leader add complexity into the nature of uORF-mediated translation control mechanisms during eIF2α-P and additionally illustrate the roles that previously unexamined uORFs with noncanonical initiation codons can play in modulating gene expression. PMID:27002157

  3. Solution Structure of Archaeoglobus fulgidis Peptidyl-tRNA Hydrolase(Pth2) Provides Evidence for an Extensive Conserved Family of Pth2 Enzymes in Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryotes.

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Robert; Mirkovic, Nebojsa; Goldsmith-Fischman, Sharon; Acton, Thomas; Chiang, Yiwen; Huang, Yuanpeng; Ma, LiChung; Rajan, Paranji K.; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Liu, Jinfeng; Rost, Burkhard; Honig, Barry; Murray, Diana; Montelione, Gaetano

    2005-11-01

    The solution structure of protein AF2095 from the thermophilic archaea Archaeglobus fulgidis, a 123-residue (13.6 kDa) protein, has been determined by NMR methods. The structure of AF2095 is comprised of four a-helices and a mixed b-sheet consisting of four parallel and anti-parallel b-strands, where the a-helices sandwich the b-sheet. Sequence and structural comparison of AF2095 with proteins from Homo sapiens, Methanocaldococcus jannaschii and Sulfolobus solfataricus, reveals that AF2095 is a peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase (Pth2). This structural comparison also identifies putative catalytic residues and a tRNA interaction region for AF2095. The structure of AF2095 is also similar to the structure of protein TA0108 from archaea Thermoplasma acidophilum, which is deposited in the Protein Database but not functionally annotated. The NMR structure of AF2095 has been further leveraged to obtain good quality structural models for 55 other proteins. Although earlier studies have proposed that the Pth2 protein family is restricted to archeal and eukaryotic organisms, the similarity of the AF2095 structure to human Pth2, the conservation of key active-site residues, and the good quality of the resulting homology models demonstrate a large family of homologous Pth2 proteins that are conserved in eukaryotic, archaeal and bacterial organisms, providing novel insights in the evolution of the Pth and Pth2 enzyme families.

  4. Preparation, characterization and refolding in vitro of a recombinant human cyclophilin A mutant: effect of a single Pro/Ser substitution on cyclophilin A structure and properties.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Ren; Yan, Xiao; Luo, Man; Guan, Yi-Xin; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2008-01-01

    A recombinant cyclophilin A (CypA) mutant, which carries a serine instead of proline at sequence 16, was prepared for structural and functional assessment for human CypA. Soluble expression of the recombinant CypA mutant in E. coli was obtained under 30 degrees C, 180 rpm culture condition after being induced by IPTG. Ion exchange chromatography was used to purify the CypA mutant in a single step, and a high activity recovery of target protein with a high purity was achieved. Peptide fragments produced by trypsin proteolysis were applied to MALDI-TOF-MS, and searching results from the NCBI protein databank confirmed the protein attribution as well as the mutation sequence. Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity was assayed for the CypA mutant using tetrapeptide substrate Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide, and the calculated kcat/Km value was 1.5 x 106 M-1 s-1 at 10 degrees C, which was 10-fold lower than the previously reported constant for wild-type CypA. An Eyring plot was also carried out. Inhibition by cyclosporine A demonstrated that the IC50 value was 26.5 nM. Meanwhile the expected enhancement of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence was quenched by the mutation. The effect of CypA mutant on accelerating protein refolding in vitro was investigated in ribonuclease A refolding process, and it was found that 10% slow phase could be catalyzed by CypA. The protein was subject to urea and GdmCl denaturation, where both activity and fluorescence served as structural probes. Activity recovery indicated this CypA mutant was extremely sensitive to GdmCl and the susceptibility to urea was increased. Low pH could also destabilize CypA. Furthermore the refolding of this CypA mutant itself was studied. Although the activity yield was nearly unchanged, the former proposed folding/assembly pathway might be altered. Fluorescence chart also demonstrated that the folding time was extended, and fast-folding and slow-folding analysis indicated the slow-folding rate constant

  5. PIN1 genetic polymorphisms and the susceptibility of HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma in a Guangxi population.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Mo, Zhuning; Lao, Xianjun; Zhang, Xiaolian; Liu, Yanqiong; Sui, Jingzhe; Qin, Xue; Li, Shan

    2016-05-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase NIMA-interacting 1 (PIN1) plays a critical role in different signaling pathways, cell cycle progression and proliferation, and gene expression, and it has been found to overexpress in many tumor tissues. Recently, researchers have found that PIN1 gene polymorphisms may alter the function of protein and be associated with the risk of cancer. The present study analyzed three common polymorphisms in promoter regions (rs2233678 and rs2233679) and in exon2 (rs2233682) of the PIN1 gene in 254 patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 235 healthy controls in a Guangxi study population to determine whether any relationship exists between the polymorphisms and the risk of HBV-related HCC. The results revealed that the rs2233679 TT genotype was associated with increased risk of HCC with HBV infection [odds ratio (OR) = 2.04, 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) = 1.13-3.69, p = 0.019]. This association was stronger in men than in women (OR = 2.17, 95 % CI = 1.09-4.34, p = 0.028) as well as in men 50 years of age and older (OR = 3.91, 95 % CI = 1.29-11.80, p = 0.016); moreover, for alcohol drinkers, being a carrier of the PIN1 rs2233679 CT genotype had a moderately increased risk of HCC (OR = 3.98, 95 % CI = 1.02-15.57, p = 0.047). In contrast, people carrying the rs2233682 GA genotype and A alleles were 0.23 times more likely to develop HCC (OR = 0.23, 95 % CI = 0.06-0.87, p = 0.031 and OR = 0.23, 95 % CI = 0.06-0.87, p = 0.030). No such associations were found in the PIN1 rs2233678 polymorphisms between the HBV-related HCC cases and the controls. In addition, the haplotype GCA was found to be a high protection factor for HCC with HBV infection (OR = 0.14, 95 % CI = 0.03-0.62, p = 0.003). In conclusion, this study's findings suggest that the PIN1 rs2233679 TT genotype, the rs2233682GA genotype, and A alleles

  6. Dietary Vitamin D Deficiency in Rats from Middle- to Old-age Leads to Elevated Tyrosine Nitration and Proteomics Changes in Levels of Key Proteins in Brain: Implications for Low Vitamin D-dependent Age-Related Cognitive Decline

    PubMed Central

    Keeney, Jeriel T. R.; Förster, Sarah; Sultana, Rukhsana; Brewer, Lawrence D.; Latimer, Caitlin S.; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B.; Porter, Nada M.; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2013-01-01

    In addition to th