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Sample records for percent hafnium tubing

  1. Effect of nitrogen on tensile properties and structures of T-111 (tantalum, 8 percent tungsten, 2 percent hafnium) tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzard, R. J.; Metroka, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of controlled nitrogen additions was evaluated on the mechanical properties of T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) fuel pin cladding material proposed for use in a lithium-cooled nuclear reactor concept. Additions of 80 to 1125 ppm nitrogen resulted in increased strengthening of T-111 tubular section test specimens at temperatures of 25 to 1200 C. Homogeneous distributions of up to 500 ppm nitrogen did not seriously decrease tensile ductility. Both single and two-phase microstructures, with hafnium nitride as the second phase, were evaluated in this study.

  2. Thermomechanical and Thermochemical Behavior of a Hafnium-20 Percent Tantalum Alloy. Ph.D. Thesis - North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the thermomechanical and thermochemical behavior of a high temperature, oxidation resistant, hafnium-20 percent tantalum alloy. The elastic and shear moduli of this alloy were determined in air up to 1000 C and in vacuum up to 2000 C using a mechanical resonance technique. The internal friction of the alloy was measured up to temperatures greater than 1400 C. Room temperature stress-strain behavior of the oxidized and unoxidized alloy was established. The effect of annealing on the elastic and shear moduli of the extruded rod material was investigated. The martensitic-type phase transformation occurring in the alloy was studied using hot stage metallography and electron microscopy. Static oxidation tests were conducted on the alloy at temperatures from 1000 C to 1700 C with weight gain measurements made as a function of time and temperatures. Surface morphology studies were conducted on the oxide coatings formed at the different temperatures using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques.

  3. Thermal expansion method for lining tantalum alloy tubing with tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, G. K.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Mattson, W. F.

    1973-01-01

    A differential-thermal expansion method was developed to line T-111 (tantalum - 8 percent tungsten - 2 percent hafnium) tubing with a tungsten diffusion barrier as part of a fuel element fabrication study for a space power nuclear reactor concept. This method uses a steel mandrel, which has a larger thermal expansion than T-111, to force the tungsten against the inside of the T-111 tube. Variables investigated include lining temperature, initial assembly gas size, and tube length. Linear integrity increased with increasing lining temperature and decreasing gap size. The method should have more general applicability where cylinders must be lined with a thin layer of a second material.

  4. SEPARATING HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Lister, B.A.J.; Duncan, J.F.

    1956-08-21

    A dilute aqueous solution of zirconyl chloride which is 1N to 2N in HCl is passed through a column of a cation exchange resin in acid form thereby absorbing both zirconium and associated hafnium impurity in the mesin. The cation exchange material with the absorbate is then eluted with aqueous sulfuric acid of a O.8N to 1.2N strength. The first portion of the eluate contains the zirconium substantially free of hafnium.

  5. Article having an improved platinum-aluminum-hafnium protective coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagaraj, Bangalore Aswatha (Inventor); Williams, Jeffrey Lawrence (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An article protected by a protective coating has a substrate and a protective coating having an outer layer deposited upon the substrate surface and a diffusion zone formed by interdiffusion of the outer layer and the substrate. The protective coating includes platinum, aluminum, no more than about 2 weight percent hafnium, and substantially no silicon. The outer layer is substantially a single phase.

  6. Amphoteric Aqueous Hafnium Cluster Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Goberna-Ferrón, Sara; Park, Deok-Hie; Amador, Jenn M; Keszler, Douglas A; Nyman, May

    2016-05-17

    Selective dissolution of hafnium-peroxo-sulfate films in aqueous tetramethylammonium hydroxide enables extreme UV lithographic patterning of sub-10 nm HfO2 structures. Hafnium speciation under these basic conditions (pH>10), however, is unknown, as studies of hafnium aqueous chemistry have been limited to acid. Here, we report synthesis, crystal growth, and structural characterization of the first polynuclear hydroxo hafnium cluster isolated from base, [TMA]6 [Hf6 (μ-O2 )6 (μ-OH)6 (OH)12 ]⋅38 H2 O. The solution behavior of the cluster, including supramolecular assembly via hydrogen bonding is detailed via small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The study opens a new chapter in the aqueous chemistry of hafnium, exemplifying the concept of amphoteric clusters and informing a critical process in single-digit-nm lithography. PMID:27094575

  7. A simple spectrophotometric method for determination of zirconium or hafnium in selected molybdenum-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupraw, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    A simple analytical procedure is described for accurately and precisely determining the zirconium or hafnium content of molybdenum-base alloys. The procedure is based on the reaction of the reagent Arsenazo III with zirconium or hafnium in strong hydrochloric acid solution. The colored complexes of zirconium or hafnium are formed in the presence of molybdenum. Titanium or rhenium in the alloy have no adverse effect on the zirconium or hafnium complex at the following levels in the selected aliquot: Mo, 10 mg; Re, 10 mg; Ti, 1 mg. The spectrophotometric measurement of the zirconium or hafnium complex is accomplished without prior separation with a relative standard deviation of 1.3 to 2.7 percent.

  8. Multistage depressed collector with efficiency of 90 to 94 percent for operation of a dual-mode traveling wave tube in the linear region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramins, P.; Fox, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    An axisymmetric, multistage, depressed collector of fixed geometric design was evaluated in conjunction with an octave bandwidth, dual mode traveling wave tube (TWT). The TWT was operated over a wide range of conditions to simulate different applications. The collector performance was optimized (within the constraint of fixed geometric design) over the range of TWT operating conditions covered. For operation of the TWT in the linear, low distortion range, 90 percent and greater collector efficiencies were obtained leading to TWT overall efficiencies of 20 to 35 percent, as compared with 2 to 5 percent with an undepressed collector. With collectors of this efficiency and minimized beam interception losses, it becomes practical to design dual mode TWT's such that the low mode can represent operation well below saturation. Consequently, the required pulse up in beam current can be reduced or eliminated, and this mitigates beam control and dual mode TWT circuit design problems. For operation of the dual mode TWT at saturation, average collector efficiencies in excess of 85 percent were obtained for both the low and high modes across an octave bandwidth, leading to a three to fourfold increase in the TWT overall efficiency.

  9. SEPARATING HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Lister, B.A.J.; Duncan, J.F.; Hutcheon, J.M.

    1956-08-21

    Substantially complete separation of zirconium from hafnium may be obtained by elution of ion exchange material, on which compounds of the elements are adsorbed, with an approximately normal solution of sulfuric acid. Preferably the acid concentration is between 0.8 N amd 1.2 N, amd should not exceed 1.5 N;. Increasing the concentration of sulfate ion in the eluting solution by addition of a soluble sulfate, such as sodium sulfate, has been found to be advantageous. The preferred ion exchange materials are sulfonated polystyrene resins such as Dowex 50,'' and are preferably arranged in a column through which the solutions are passed.

  10. SEPARATION OF HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Overholser, L.B.; Barton, C.J. Sr.; Ramsey, J.W.

    1960-05-31

    The separation of hafnium impurities from zirconium can be accomplished by means of organic solvent extraction. The hafnium-containing zirconium feed material is dissolved in an aqueous chloride solution and the resulting solution is contacted with an organic hexone phase, with at least one of the phases containing thiocyanate. The hafnium is extracted into the organic phase while zirconium remains in the aqueous phase. Further recovery of zirconium is effected by stripping the onganic phase with a hydrochloric acid solution and commingling the resulting strip solution with the aqueous feed solution. Hexone is recovered and recycled by means of scrubbing the onganic phase with a sulfuric acid solution to remove the hafnium, and thiocyanate is recovered and recycled by means of neutralizing the effluent streams to obtain ammonium thiocyanate.

  11. Hafnium germanium telluride

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Gyung-Joo; Yun, Hoseop

    2008-01-01

    The title hafnium germanium telluride, HfGeTe4, has been synthesized by the use of a halide flux and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. HfGeTe4 is isostructural with stoichiometric ZrGeTe4 and the Hf site in this compound is also fully occupied. The crystal structure of HfGeTe4 adopts a two-dimensional layered structure, each layer being composed of two unique one-dimensional chains of face-sharing Hf-centered bicapped trigonal prisms and corner-sharing Ge-centered tetra­hedra. These layers stack on top of each other to complete the three-dimensional structure with undulating van der Waals gaps. PMID:21202163

  12. Ablation Resistant Zirconium and Hafnium Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Jeffrey (Inventor); White, Michael J. (Inventor); Kaufman, Larry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    High temperature ablation resistant ceramic composites have been made. These ceramics are composites of zirconium diboride and zirconium carbide with silicon carbide, hafnium diboride and hafnium carbide with silicon carbide and ceramic composites which contain mixed diborides and/or carbides of zirconium and hafnium. along with silicon carbide.

  13. Zirconium and hafnium in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehmann, W. D.; Chyi, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    The abundances of zirconium and hafnium have been determined in nine stony meteorites by a new, precise neutron-activation technique. The Zr/Hf abundance ratios for the chondrites vary in a rather narrow range, consistent with previously published observations from our group. Replicate analyses of new, carefully selected clean interior samples of the Cl chondrite Orgueil yield mean zirconium and hafnium abundances of 5.2 and 0.10 ppm, respectively. These abundances are lower than we reported earlier for two Cl chondrite samples which we now suspect may have suffered contamination. The new Cl zirconium and hafnium abundances are in closer agreement with predictions based on theories of nucleosynthesis than the earlier data.

  14. Hafnium radioisotope recovery from irradiated tantalum

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Wayne A.; Jamriska, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Hafnium is recovered from irradiated tantalum by: (a) contacting the irradiated tantalum with at least one acid to obtain a solution of dissolved tantalum; (b) combining an aqueous solution of a calcium compound with the solution of dissolved tantalum to obtain a third combined solution; (c) precipitating hafnium, lanthanide, and insoluble calcium complexes from the third combined solution to obtain a first precipitate; (d) contacting the first precipitate of hafnium, lanthanide and calcium complexes with at least one fluoride ion complexing agent to form a fourth solution; (e) selectively adsorbing lanthanides and calcium from the fourth solution by cationic exchange; (f) separating fluoride ion complexing agent product from hafnium in the fourth solution by adding an aqueous solution of ferric chloride to obtain a second precipitate containing the hafnium and iron; (g) dissolving the second precipitate containing the hafnium and iron in acid to obtain an acid solution of hafnium and iron; (h) selectively adsorbing the iron from the acid solution of hafnium and iron by anionic exchange; (i) drying the ion exchanged hafnium solution to obtain hafnium isotopes. Additionally, if needed to remove residue remaining after the product is dried, dissolution in acid followed by cation exchange, then anion exchange, is performed.

  15. Hafnium carbide formation in oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenbücher, C.; Hildebrandt, E.; Szot, K.; Sharath, S. U.; Kurian, J.; Komissinskiy, P.; Breuer, U.; Waser, R.; Alff, L.

    2016-06-01

    On highly oxygen deficient thin films of hafnium oxide (hafnia, HfO2-x) contaminated with adsorbates of carbon oxides, the formation of hafnium carbide (HfCx) at the surface during vacuum annealing at temperatures as low as 600 °C is reported. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy the evolution of the HfCx surface layer related to a transformation from insulating into metallic state is monitored in situ. In contrast, for fully stoichiometric HfO2 thin films prepared and measured under identical conditions, the formation of HfCx was not detectable suggesting that the enhanced adsorption of carbon oxides on oxygen deficient films provides a carbon source for the carbide formation. This shows that a high concentration of oxygen vacancies in carbon contaminated hafnia lowers considerably the formation energy of hafnium carbide. Thus, the presence of a sufficient amount of residual carbon in resistive random access memory devices might lead to a similar carbide formation within the conducting filaments due to Joule heating.

  16. Determination of Ideal Broth Formulations Needed to Prepare Hydrous Hafnium Oxide Microspheres via the Internal Gelation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Jack Lee; Hunt, Rodney Dale; Simmerman, S. G.

    2009-02-01

    A simple test-tube methodology was used to determine optimum process parameters for preparing hydrous hafnium oxide microspheres by the internal gelation process. Broth formulations of hafnyl chloride [HfOCl{sub 2}], hexamethylenetetramine, and urea were found that can be used to prepare hydrous hafnium oxide gel spheres in the temperature range of 70-90 C. A few gel-forming runs were made in which microspheres were prepared with some of these formulations in order to equate the test-tube gelation times with actual gelation times. These preparations confirmed that the test-tube methodology is reliable for determining the ideal broths.

  17. Silver-hafnium braze alloy

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, Jr., John J.; Hosking, F. Michael; Yost, Frederick G.

    2003-12-16

    A binary allow braze composition has been prepared and used in a bonded article of ceramic-ceramic and ceramic-metal materials. The braze composition comprises greater than approximately 95 wt % silver, greater than approximately 2 wt % hafnium and less than approximately 4.1 wt % hafnium, and less than approximately 0.2 wt % trace elements. The binary braze alloy is used to join a ceramic material to another ceramic material or a ceramic material, such as alumina, quartz, aluminum nitride, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, and mullite, to a metal material, such as iron-based metals, cobalt-based metals, nickel-based metals, molybdenum-based metals, tungsten-based metals, niobium-based metals, and tantalum-based metals. A hermetic bonded article is obtained with a strength greater than 10,000 psi.

  18. Ferroelectricity in undoped hafnium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polakowski, Patrick; Müller, Johannes

    2015-06-01

    We report the observation of ferroelectric characteristics in undoped hafnium oxide thin films in a thickness range of 4-20 nm. The undoped films were fabricated using atomic layer deposition (ALD) and embedded into titanium nitride based metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitors for electrical evaluation. Structural as well as electrical evidence for the appearance of a ferroelectric phase in pure hafnium oxide was collected with respect to film thickness and thermal budget applied during titanium nitride electrode formation. Using grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction (GIXRD) analysis, we observed an enhanced suppression of the monoclinic phase fraction in favor of an orthorhombic, potentially, ferroelectric phase with decreasing thickness/grain size and for a titanium nitride electrode formation below crystallization temperature. The electrical presence of ferroelectricity was confirmed using polarization measurements. A remanent polarization Pr of up to 10 μC cm-2 as well as a read/write endurance of 1.6 × 105 cycles was measured for the pure oxide. The experimental results reported here strongly support the intrinsic nature of the ferroelectric phase in hafnium oxide and expand its applicability beyond the doped systems.

  19. Ferroelectricity in undoped hafnium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Polakowski, Patrick; Müller, Johannes

    2015-06-08

    We report the observation of ferroelectric characteristics in undoped hafnium oxide thin films in a thickness range of 4–20 nm. The undoped films were fabricated using atomic layer deposition (ALD) and embedded into titanium nitride based metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitors for electrical evaluation. Structural as well as electrical evidence for the appearance of a ferroelectric phase in pure hafnium oxide was collected with respect to film thickness and thermal budget applied during titanium nitride electrode formation. Using grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction (GIXRD) analysis, we observed an enhanced suppression of the monoclinic phase fraction in favor of an orthorhombic, potentially, ferroelectric phase with decreasing thickness/grain size and for a titanium nitride electrode formation below crystallization temperature. The electrical presence of ferroelectricity was confirmed using polarization measurements. A remanent polarization P{sub r} of up to 10 μC cm{sup −2} as well as a read/write endurance of 1.6 × 10{sup 5} cycles was measured for the pure oxide. The experimental results reported here strongly support the intrinsic nature of the ferroelectric phase in hafnium oxide and expand its applicability beyond the doped systems.

  20. Formulation and method for preparing gels comprising hydrous hafnium oxide

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Jack L; Hunt, Rodney D; Montgomery, Frederick C

    2013-08-06

    Formulations useful for preparing hydrous hafnium oxide gels contain a metal salt including hafnium, an acid, an organic base, and a complexing agent. Methods for preparing gels containing hydrous hafnium oxide include heating a formulation to a temperature sufficient to induce gel formation, where the formulation contains a metal salt including hafnium, an acid, an organic base, and a complexing agent.

  1. The Hot-Pressing of Hafnium Carbide (Melting Point, 7030 F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, William A.; Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the effects of the hot-pressing variables (temperature, pressure, and time) on the density and grain size of hafnium carbide disks. The purpose was to provide information necessary for the production of high-density test shapes for the determination of physical and mechanical properties. Hot-pressing of -325 mesh hafnium carbide powder was accomplished with a hydraulic press and an inductively heated graphite die assembly. The ranges investigated for each variable were as follows: temperature, 3500 to 4870 F; pressure, 1000 to 6030 pounds per square inch; and time, 5 to 60 minutes. Hafnium carbide bodies of approximately 98 percent theoretical density can be produced under the following minimal conditions: 4230 F, 3500 pounds per square inch, and 15 minutes. Further increases in temperature and time resulted only in greater grain size.

  2. Oxidation of Hafnium and Diffusion of Hafnium Atoms in Hexagonal Close-Packed Hafnium; Microscopic Investigations by Perturbed Angular Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Chandi C.

    2012-11-01

    Time-differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) studies in hafnium metal (~5%Zr) have been carried out at different temperatures. It is found that hafnium metal on heating at 873 K continuously for two days in air, transforms partially and abruptly to HfO2 while no component of oxide has been observed for heating up to 773 K and during initial heating at 873 K for 1 day. This result is strikingly different to that expected from the Arrhenius theory. Also, a strong nuclear relaxation effect has been observed at 873 K due to rapid fluctuation of hafnium atoms in hexagonal closepacked (hcp) hafnium. At this temperature, ~ 5% probe nuclei experience static perturbation due to monoclinic HfO2, ~ 50% experience fluctuating interaction, and ~ 5% produce static defect configuration of hcp hafnium. With lowering of temperature, defect configurations of hafnium increase at the cost of fluctuating interaction. An almost total fluctuating interaction observed in hcp hafnium at a temperature much lower than its melting point is another interesting phenomenon.

  3. Inhibition of urediniospore germination Puccinia hemerocallidis by Bacto Agar and changes in percent germination and germ-tube elongation on agarose over time.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of some gelling agents and pH on urediniospore germination and germ tube elongation of Puccinia hemerocallidis were investigated in vitro. Gelling agents significantly affected urediniospore germination. Very few urediniospores germinated on the substrates containing more than 0.5% Bacto...

  4. Thermal Expansion of Hafnium Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1960-01-01

    Since hafnium carbide (HfC) has a melting point of 7029 deg. F, it may have many high-temperature applications. A literature search uncovered very little information about the properties of HfC, and so a program was initiated at the Lewis Research Center to determine some of the physical properties of this material. This note presents the results of the thermal expansion investigation. The thermal-expansion measurements were made with a Gaertner dilatation interferometer calibrated to an accuracy of +/- 1 deg. F. This device indicates expansion by the movement of fringes produced by the cancellation and reinforcement of fixed wave-length light rays which are reflected from the surfaces of two parallel quartz glass disks. The test specimens which separate these disks are three small cones, each approximately 0.20 in. high.

  5. Zirconium and hafnium tetrachloride separation by extractive distillation with molten zinc chloride lead chloride solvent

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Stoltz, R.A.

    1988-04-12

    In an extractive distillation method for separating hafniuim tetrachloride from zirconium tetrachloride of the type wherein a mixture of zirconium and hafnium tetrachlorides is introduced into an extractive distillation column, which extractive distillation column has a reboiler connected at the bottom and a reflux condenser connected at the top and wherein a molten salt solvent is circulated into the reflux condenser and through the column to provide a liquid phase, and wherein molten salt solvent containing zirconium tetrachloride is taken from the reboiler and run through a stripper to remove zirconium tetrachloride product from the molten salt solvent and the stripped molten salt solvent is returned to the reflux condenser and hafnium tetrachloride enriched vapor is taken as product from the reflux condenser, the improvement is described comprising: the molten salt having a composition of at least 30 mole percent zinc chloride and at least 10 mole percent of lead chloride.

  6. Recovery of hafnium values from loaded extraction solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Abodishish, H.A.

    1989-10-10

    This patent describes an improvement in a process for recovering high purity hafnium hydroxide from a methyl isobutyl ketone organic solvent that is substantially free of sulfate ions and contains hafnium thiocyanate and thiocyanic acid. The improvement comprising reacting the organic solvent with ammonia to produce a reaction product in the form of a methyl isobutyl ketone organic solvent that is substantially free of sulfate ions and contains ammonium thiocyanite solution and hafnium hydroxide; separating the constituents of the reaction product in accordance with their respective specific gravities to produce a hafnium hydroxide sludge as one of the separation products; and removing the liquid component of the sludge to yield a high purity hafnium hydroxide ready for calcination to hafnium oxide.

  7. Percolation conductivity in hafnium sub-oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Islamov, D. R. Gritsenko, V. A.; Cheng, C. H.; Chin, A.

    2014-12-29

    In this study, we demonstrated experimentally that formation of chains and islands of oxygen vacancies in hafnium sub-oxides (HfO{sub x}, x < 2) leads to percolation charge transport in such dielectrics. Basing on the model of Éfros-Shklovskii percolation theory, good quantitative agreement between the experimental and theoretical data of current-voltage characteristics was achieved. Based on the percolation theory suggested model shows that hafnium sub-oxides consist of mixtures of metallic Hf nanoscale clusters of 1–2 nm distributed onto non-stoichiometric HfO{sub x}. It was shown that reported approach might describe low resistance state current-voltage characteristics of resistive memory elements based on HfO{sub x}.

  8. Percolation conductivity in hafnium sub-oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islamov, D. R.; Gritsenko, V. A.; Cheng, C. H.; Chin, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we demonstrated experimentally that formation of chains and islands of oxygen vacancies in hafnium sub-oxides (HfOx, x < 2) leads to percolation charge transport in such dielectrics. Basing on the model of Éfros-Shklovskii percolation theory, good quantitative agreement between the experimental and theoretical data of current-voltage characteristics was achieved. Based on the percolation theory suggested model shows that hafnium sub-oxides consist of mixtures of metallic Hf nanoscale clusters of 1-2 nm distributed onto non-stoichiometric HfOx. It was shown that reported approach might describe low resistance state current-voltage characteristics of resistive memory elements based on HfOx.

  9. Process of precipitating zirconium or hafnium from spent pickling solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, C.L.; Walker, R.G.

    1991-12-31

    This patent describes a process for regenerating a spent, fluoride-containing pickle solution used in the pickling of zirconium or hafnium metal or their alloys. It comprises adding to the spent pickle solution a sufficient amount of sodium sulfate to precipitate sodium zirconium or hafnium fluoride.

  10. Assessing hafnium on hafnia as an oxygen getter

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, Andrew; Demkov, Alexander A.; Bersuker, Gennadi

    2014-05-14

    Hafnium dioxide or hafnia is a wide band gap dielectric used in a range of electronic applications from field effect transistors to resistive memory. In many of these applications, it is important to maintain control over oxygen stoichiometry, which can be realized in practice by using a metal layer, specifically hafnium, to getter oxygen from the adjacent dielectric. In this paper, we employ density functional theory to study the thermodynamic stability of an interface between (100)-oriented monoclinic hafnia and hafnium metal. The nudged elastic band method is used to calculate the energy barrier for migration of oxygen from the oxide to the metal. Our investigation shows that the presence of hafnium lowers the formation energy of oxygen vacancies in hafnia, but more importantly the oxidation of hafnium through the migration of oxygen from hafnia is favored energetically.

  11. The Teaching of Percent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, T.

    1998-01-01

    Proposes looking at the percent symbol (%) as an operator, which means to divide any number in front of it by 100. Stresses the importance of using correct words to describe the numbers generated in percent calculations. Explains how to (1) calculate percent using equivalent fractions; (2) divide fraction numerators by denominators, retaining the…

  12. Percent solids measurement using Coriolis technology

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.; Schietinger, M.

    1995-12-31

    In many industrial processes, measurement of percent solids is vital to product quality. Percent solids values are most often derived form measurement of density, specific gravity and refractive index. In the lab and in the process, measurement methods range from nuclear and refractometer to vibrating tube. For on-line measurement, Coriolis technology, a vibrating tube approach, is playing a more significant role. Coriolis technology is best known for the performance and benefits it provides for direct mass flow measurement. This discussion focuses on Coriolis technology as an option for percent solids measurement and its ability to provide real-time data for controlling the process, maintaining consistency, improving quality, and controlling costs. The combined abilities of a Coriolis mass flowmeter to provide direct mass flow and percent solids information simultaneously provides real-time control that is unattainable with any other single technology.

  13. Meaning of percent sunshine

    SciTech Connect

    Sands, J.

    1983-05-01

    The meaning of the term percent of possible sunshine is discussed. The Percent of Possible Sunshine (POPS) is published monthly with annual summaries by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) for 168 locations, and is a measure of how long the sun shines, not how much sunshine there is. The weakness of the POPS as a serious indicator of solar performance is pointed out.

  14. Uranium-preextraction in zirconium/hafnium separations processs

    SciTech Connect

    Feuling, R.J.

    1990-04-03

    This patent describes an improvement in a process for recovering zirconium values from uranium containing zircon ore. The process comprising a fluidized bed carbochlorination of the zircon ore at 800{degrees}--1250{degrees} C., producing a relatively impure, hafnium-containing zirconium tetrachloride stream and by-product silicon tetrachloride, which silicon tetrachloride by-product is separated by differential condensation, and wherein uranium chloride is volatilized at the ore chlorinator temperature and follows as an impurity in the zirconium-hafnium tetrachloride stream, mixing the zirconium-hafnium tetrachloride with water to produce a zirconium-hafnium oxychloride solution, and removing iron impurities by liquid--liquid iron extraction with a methyl isobutyl ketone extractant.

  15. Hafnium stainless steel absorber rod for control rod

    SciTech Connect

    Charnley, J.E.; Cearley, J.E.; Dixon, R.C.; Izzo, K.R.; Aiello, L.L.

    1989-08-01

    This patent describes an improvement in a control rod having a stainless steel body for enclosing a neutron absorbing poison, the control rod having movement along an axial direction for insertion into and out of a nuclear reactor for controlling a nuclear reaction. The improvement comprising: a piece of hafnium; a piece of stainless steel joined to the hafnium by a thin diffusion interface created by friction welding. The hafnium and the stainless steel oriented serially in the axial direction with the thin diffusion interface disposed normal to the axial direction of the control rod movement; means for confining the hafnium to movement along the axial direction with the control rod; and means for attaching the piece of stainless steel to the remaining portion of the control rod to load the weld therebetween under compression or tension during the control rod movement. Whereby the thin diffusion interface is loaded in tension or compression only upon dynamic movement of the control rod.

  16. Percents Can Make Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zambo, Ron

    2008-01-01

    This article describes instructional activities designed to help students develop an understanding of the multiple relationships between fractions and percents and unit price as they develop their mental-math abilities. (Contains 4 figures.)

  17. Structure of copper-hafnium multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, B.M.; Stec, J.P.; Heald, S.M.; Tranquada, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The structure of copper-hafnium multilayers has been studied as a function of composition modulation wavelength by x-ray diffraction and EXAFS. Sputter deposited samples were produced with composition modulation wavelengths of 1/2, 5, 7, 10, 14, and 20 close packed planes of each constituent per layer. The structure evolved anisotropically from amorphous to crystalline with increasing composition modulation wavelength, with crystalline order first appearing in the growth direction in the 7 monolayer sample. Structural coherence in the growth direction was not observed to extend beyond one elemental layer in any sample, and evidence for a disordered interfacial layer was observed by EXAFS for all samples. Small angle x-ray diffraction showed strong composition modulation for all but the 1/2 monolayer sample. The amorphous interface is the result of reaction during deposition similar to the solid state reaction observed in other systems such as nickel-zirconium.

  18. 40 CFR 421.330 - Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. 421.330 Section 421.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Zirconium and Hafnium Subcategory § 421.330 Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  19. 40 CFR 471.90 - Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. 471.90 Section 471.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.90 Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants...

  20. 40 CFR 471.90 - Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. 471.90 Section 471.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.90 Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of...

  1. 40 CFR 471.90 - Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. 471.90 Section 471.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.90 Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants...

  2. 40 CFR 421.330 - Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. 421.330 Section 421.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Zirconium and Hafnium Subcategory § 421.330 Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  3. 40 CFR 471.90 - Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. 471.90 Section 471.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... METAL POWDERS POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.90 Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants...

  4. 40 CFR 471.90 - Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. 471.90 Section 471.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Zirconium-Hafnium Forming Subcategory § 471.90 Applicability; description of the zirconium-hafnium forming subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants to waters of...

  5. 40 CFR 421.330 - Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. 421.330 Section 421.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Zirconium and Hafnium Subcategory § 421.330 Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  6. Hafnium isotope variations in oceanic basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patchett, P. J.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1980-01-01

    Hafnium isotope ratios generated by the beta(-) decay of Lu-176 are investigated in volcanic rocks derived from the suboceanic mantle. Hf-176/Hf-177 and Lu/Hf ratios were determined to precisions of 0.01-0.04% and 0.5%, respectively, by routine, low-blank chemistry. The Hf-176/Hf-177 ratio is found to be positively correlated with the Nd-143/Nd-144 ratio and negatively correlated with the Sr-87/Sr-86 and Pb-206/Pb-204 ratios, and to increase southwards along the Iceland-Reykjanes ridge traverse. An approximate bulk earth Hf-176/Hf-177 ratio of 0.28295 is inferred from the bulk earth Nd-143/Nd-144 ratio, which requires a bulk earth Lu/Hf ratio of 0.25, similar to the Juvinas eucrite. Midocean ridge basalts are shown to account for 60% of the range of Hf isotope ratios, and it is suggested that Lu-Hf fractionation is decoupled from Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr fractionation in very trace-element-depleted source regions as a result of partial melting.

  7. Ground-state structures of Hafnium clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Wei Chun; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    Hafnium (Hf) is a very large tetra-valence d-block element which is able to form relatively long covalent bond. Researchers are interested to search for substitution to silicon in the semi-conductor industry. We attempt to obtain the ground-state structures of small Hf clusters at both empirical and density-functional theory (DFT) levels. For calculations at the empirical level, charge-optimized many-body functional potential (COMB) is used. The lowest-energy structures are obtained via a novel global-minimum search algorithm known as parallel tempering Monte-Carlo Basin-Hopping and Genetic Algorithm (PTMBHGA). The virtue of using COMB potential for Hf cluster calculation lies in the fact that by including the charge optimization at the valence shells, we can encourage the formation of proper bond hybridization, and thus getting the correct bond order. The obtained structures are further optimized using DFT to ensure a close proximity to the ground-state.

  8. Some properties of RF sputtered hafnium nitride coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aron, P. R.; Grill, A.

    1982-01-01

    Hafnium nitride coatings were deposited by reactive RF sputtering from a hafnium target in nitrogen and argon gas mixtures. The rate of deposition, composition, electrical resistivity and complex index of refraction were investigated as a function of target substrate distance and the fraction nitrogen, (fN2) in the sputtering atmosphere. The relative composition of the coatings is independent on fN2 for values above 0.1. The electric resistivity of the hafnium nitride films changes over 8 orders of magnitude when fN2 changes from 0.10 to 0.85. The index of refraction is almost constant at 2.8(1-0.3i) up to fN2 = 0.40 then decreases to 2.1(1 - 0.01i) for higher values of fN2.

  9. Composition effects on mechanical properties of tungsten-rhenium-hafnium-carbon alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzke, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanical properties of rod and sheet fabricated from arc melted W-4Re-Hf-C alloys containing up to about 0.8 mol percent hafnium carbide (HfC) were evaluated in the as-worked condition. The DBTT's of electropolished bend and tensile specimens were independent of HfC content in this range but dependent on excess Hf or C above that required for stoichiometric HfC. Low temperature ductility was a maximum at Hf contents slightly in excess of stoichiometric. Variations in high temperature strength were also dependent on excess Hf and C. Maximum creep strengthening also occurred at Hf contents in excess of stoichiometric. Analysis of extracted second phase particles indicated that creep strength was reduced by increasing WC content in the HfC particles.

  10. Discovery of gallium, germanium, lutetium, and hafnium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, J.L.; Thoennessen, M.

    2012-09-15

    Currently, twenty-eight gallium, thirty-one germanium, thirty-five lutetium, and thirty-six hafnium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  11. Mineral resource of the month: zirconium and hafnium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Zirconium and hafnium are corrosion-resistant metals that are grouped in the same family as titanium on the periodic table. The two elements commonly occur in oxide and silicate minerals and have significant economic importance in everything from ink, ceramics and golf shoes to nuclear fuel rods.

  12. Corrosion and tribocorrosion of hafnium in simulated body fluids.

    PubMed

    Rituerto Sin, J; Neville, A; Emami, N

    2014-08-01

    Hafnium is a passive metal with good biocompatibility and osteogenesis, however, little is known about its resistance to wear and corrosion in biological environments. The corrosion and tribocorrosion behavior of hafnium and commercially pure (CP) titanium in simulated body fluids were investigated using electrochemical techniques. Cyclic polarization scans and open circuit potential measurements were performed in 0.9% NaCl solution and 25% bovine calf serum solution to assess the effect of organic species on the corrosion behavior of the metal. A pin-on-plate configuration tribometer and a three electrode electrochemical cell were integrated to investigate the tribocorrosion performance of the studied materials. The results showed that hafnium has good corrosion resistance. The corrosion density currents measured in its passive state were lower than those measured in the case of CP titanium; however, it showed a higher tendency to suffer from localized corrosion, which was more acute when imperfections were present on the surface. The electrochemical breakdown of the oxide layer was retarded in the presence of proteins. Tribocorrosion tests showed that hafnium has the ability to quickly repassivate after the oxide layer was damaged; however, it showed higher volumetric loss than CP titanium in equivalent wear-corrosion conditions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 102B: 1157-1164, 2014. PMID:24376175

  13. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    MJ Trbovich; DP Barry; RE Slovacck; Y Danon; RC Block; JA Burke; NJ Drindak; G Leinweber; RV Ballad

    2004-10-13

    The focus of this work is to determine resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005-200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. The large neutron cross section of hafnium, combined with its corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties, make it a useful material for controlling nuclear reactions. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission were performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) using the time of flight method. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m. Capture experiments were done using a sixteen section NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized various thicknesses of metallic and isotopically-enriched liquid samples. The liquid samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analysis was done using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M6 beta. SAMMY is able to account for experimental resolution effects for each of the experimental setups at the RPI LINAC, and also can correct for multiple scattering effects in neutron capture yield data. The combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005-200 eV. Resonance integrals were calculated along with errors for each hafnium isotope using the NJOY [1] and INTER [2] codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previously published values; however the calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral changed very little.

  14. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trbovich, Michael J.; Barry, Devin P.; Burke, John A.; Drindak, Noel J.; Leinweber, Greg; Ballad, Robert V.; Slovacek, Rudy E.; Danon, Yaron; Block, Robert C.

    2005-05-24

    The focus of this work is to determine resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005-200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping 176Hf and 178Hf resonances near 8 eV. The large neutron cross section of hafnium, combined with its corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties, make it a useful material for controlling nuclear reactions.Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission were performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) using the time of flight method. 6Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m. Capture experiments were done using a sixteen-section NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized various thicknesses of metallic and isotopically enriched liquid samples. The liquid samples were designed to provide information on the 176Hf and 178Hf contributions to the 8-eV doublet without saturation.Data analysis was done using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M6 beta. SAMMY is able to account for experimental resolution effects for each of the experimental setups at the RPI LINAC, and also can correct for multiple scattering effects in neutron capture yield data. The combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005-200 eV. Resonance integrals were calculated along with errors for each hafnium isotope using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previously published values; however the calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral changed very little.

  15. Development and control of the process for the manufacture of zircaloy-4 tubing for LWBR fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The technical requirements for the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) fuel elements (fuel rods) imposed certain unique requirements for the low hafnium Zircaloy-4 tubing used as fuel rod cladding. This report describes, in detail, the tube manufacturing process, the product and process controls used, the inspections and tests performed, and the efforts involved in refining a commercial tube reducing process to produce tubes that would satisfy the requirements for LWBR fuel rod cladding.

  16. Method of purifying zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride in a vapor stream

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, T.S.; Stolz, R.A.

    1992-04-07

    This patent describes a method of purifying zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride in a vapor stream from a sand chlorinator in which the silicon and metals present in sand fed to the chlorinator are converted to chlorides at temperatures over about 800{degrees} C. It comprises cooling a vapor stream from a sand chlorinator, the vapor stream containing principally silicon tetrachloride, zirconium tetrachloride, and hafnium tetrachloride contaminated with ferric chloride, to a temperature of from about 335{degrees} C to about 600{degrees} C; flowing the vapor stream through a gaseous diffusion separative barrier to produce a silicon tetrachloride-containing vapor stream concentrated in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride and a silicon tetrachloride-containing vapor stream depleted in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride; adsorbing the ferric chloride in the separative barrier; and recovering the silicon tetrachloride stream concentrated in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride separately from the silicon tetrachloride stream depleted in zirconium tetrachloride and hafnium tetrachloride.

  17. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trbovich, M J; Barry, D P; Slovacek, R E; Danon, Y; Block, R C; Francis, N C; Lubert, M; Burke, J A; Drindak, N J; Lienweber, G; Ballad, R

    2007-02-06

    The focus of this work is to determine the resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005 - 200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. Accurate hafnium cross sections and resonance parameters are needed in order to quantify the effects of hafnium found in zirconium, a metal commonly used in reactors. The accuracy of the cross sections and the corresponding resonance parameters used in current nuclear analysis tools are rapidly becoming the limiting factor in reducing the overall uncertainty on reactor physics calculations. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission are routinely performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) LINAC using the time-of flight technique. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m, respectively. Capture experiments were performed using a sixteen section NaI multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized several thicknesses of metallic and isotope-enriched liquid Hf samples. The liquid Hf samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analyses were performed using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. A combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005 - 200 eV. Additionally, resonance integrals were calculated, along with errors for each hafnium isotope, using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previous values. The {sup 176}Hf resonance integral, based on this work, is approximately 73% higher than the ENDF/B-VI value. This is due primarily to the changes to resonance parameters in the 8 eV resonance, the neutron width presented in this work is more than twice that of the previous value. The calculated elemental

  18. Synthesis of Hafnium-Based Ceramic Materials for Ultra-High Temperature Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Feldman, Jay

    2004-01-01

    This project involved the synthesis of hafnium (Hf)-based ceramic powders and Hf-based precursor solutions that were suitable for preparation of Hf-based ceramics. The Hf-based ceramic materials of interest in this project were hafnium carbide (with nominal composition HE) and hafnium dioxide (HfO2). The materials were prepared at Georgia Institute of Technology and then supplied to research collaborators Dr. Sylvia Johnson and Dr. Jay Feldman) at NASA Ames Research Center.

  19. Electrochemical Synthesis of Niobium-Hafnium Coatings in Molten Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Sergey A.; Kuznetsova, Svetlana V.

    2007-08-01

    Graphite is widely used in technology because of its unique properties. A drawback of graphite is its low heat resistance in oxidizing atmospheres. To increase its heat resistance, Nb-Hf protective coatings were synthesized. Electrodeposition of niobium coatings on graphite with subsequent precise surface alloying of niobium with hafnium was studied. Electrochemical synthesis of Nb-Hf coatings from molten salt systems containing compounds of niobium and hafnium was used too. It was shown that Nb-Hf coatings with a planar growing front can be obtained if the concentration and therefore the limiting current density of the more electropositive component Nb is kept low. Nb-Hf coatings with a thickness of 20 - 30 μm have been obtained in this way from an NaCl-KCl-K2NbF7 (1 wt%)-K2HfF6 (10 wt%)-NaF (5 wt%) melt, above the limiting current density of niobium deposition.

  20. Process for producing high purity zirconium and hafnium

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Y.J.

    1987-05-26

    An improved process is described for producing zirconium or hafnium. The process is of the type wherein a tetrachloride of zirconium or hafnium is reduced by magnesium and the resulting metal is subjected to a distillation treatment. The improvement comprises: introducing magnesium chloride into a combination reduction-distillation vessel. An inner liner with at least one bottom drain opening with the drain opening providing fluid communication between the vessel and the liner. The magnesium chloride is added in a quantity to fill the vessel and the inner liner to a level above the liner bottom drain opening, whereby the magnesium chloride provides a seal which prevents magnesium in the inner liner from flowing out of the inner liner.

  1. Alternative Processing of High Temperature Hafnium and Zirconium Based Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew; Gusman, Michael; Ellerby, Don; Irby, Edward; Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of refractory hafnium and zirconium based materials are being investigated at NASA Ames as part of ongoing research aimed at developing superior heat resistant materials for aerospace applications. Hafnium and zirconium diboride based materials have shown high temperature capabilities in simulated reentry environments indicating that these materials may successfully operate as reusable oxidation resistant components for leading edge applications. Due to the refractory nature of these materials, processing of fine-grained uniform microstructures poses a number of challenges. To better understand the process-property-microstructure relationship, processing of these materials has been carried out with conventional hot pressing in addition to the novel approach of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). The two processing methods are compared and contrasted in an evaluation of the sintering behavior of high temperature diboride based materials and preliminary physical and mechanical properties are presented.

  2. Phase transformations in some hafnium-tantalum-titanium-zirconium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.; Kapoor, D.

    1997-11-01

    Phase transformations in hafnium alloys are of interest as a means of achieving a material which exhibits flow softening and high localized strains during deformation at high strain rates. Hafnium transforms from a body-centered-cubic beta phase to a hexagonal alpha phase upon cooling below 1749{degrees}C. Hafnium-based alloys containing up to 17.5% Ti, up to 17.5% Ta, and up to 7.3% Zr by weight were button-arc melted and, in some cases, hot extruded to obtain a refined grain size. A number of alloys were shown to have beta solvus temperatures in the range of 1100 to 1300{degrees}C and showed evidence of a shear transformation upon water quenching. The Vickers microhardness of the quenched materials are typically above 350 HV as compared to 300 HV or less for materials with an alpha plus beta structure. Quenching dilatometry indicates a martensite start temperature of about 750{degrees}C for the Hf-7.5 Ta-10 Ti-1 Zr alloy and 800{degrees}C or more for the Hf-7.5 Ta-7.5 Ti-1 Zr alloy. Tensile tests at 1 s{sup {minus}1} strain rate show a constant ultimate tensile strength for temperatures up to 600{degrees}C for the above two alloys and a rapid decrease in strength with a further increase in temperature.

  3. Continuous ion exchange separation of zirconium and hafnium

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Sisson, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    A pressurized continuous annular chromatograph (CAC) has been developed for truly continuous ion exchange preparative separations. This device utilizes a slowly rotating annular bed of sorbent material, fixed multiple feed points, and fixed withdrawal locations. Most of our investigations have been performed with a 28-cm-diam by 60-cm-long CAC, but a larger model has recently been designed and constructed. A detailed study has been made of the separation of copper, nickel, and cobalt components from a simulated carbonate leach liquor of the Caron process for recovering nickel and cobalt from laterite ores. Recent studies have investigated the ion exchange separation of zirconium and hafnium from a sulfate feed solution. Nuclear reactor-grade zirconium, containing < 0.01 wt % hafnium, and hafnium, containing < 1% zirconium, have been continuously prepared using cation exchange resin in the pressurized CAC. This device, because of its continuous feed and product withdrawal, its adaptability to largescale operations, and its ability to separate many components, is expected to make chromatography a more competitive process in the industrial sector.

  4. Development on thin wall tubes of dispersion type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shien; Wang, Xiyou; Li, Jianshan; Zhang, Rongsheng; Xue, Zhenshu

    A method using powder metallurgy and metallic extrusion to manufacture three kinds of magnesium based thin wall tubes of dispersion type is presented. In each case, the composition of dispersed gold, boron and hafnium in magnesium matrix is 0.5 wt%, 1 wt%, 2 wt%, 4 wt% and 8 wt%, respectively. The diameter of the tubes are 20 mm with wall thickness of 1 mm. The process of mixing, compacting, lubricating, heat-extrusion, checking and die designing are described in detail. Measures for controlling tube tolerance and even distribution of dispersion phase, and improving the surface quality are suggested.

  5. Percents Are Not Natural Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Adults are prone to treating percents, one representational format of rational numbers, as novel cases of natural number. This suggests that percent values are not differentiated from natural numbers; a conceptual shift from the natural numbers to the rational numbers has not yet occurred. This is most surprising, considering people are inundated…

  6. Inspiration: One Percent and Rising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R.

    2009-01-01

    Inventor Thomas Edison once famously declared, "Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration." If that's the case, then the students the author witnessed at the International Student Media Festival (ISMF) last November in Orlando, Florida, are geniuses and more. The students in the ISMF pre-conference workshop had much to…

  7. 40 CFR 421.330 - Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. 421.330 Section 421.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Zirconium and Hafnium Subcategory § 421.330 Applicability: Description of the...

  8. 40 CFR 421.330 - Applicability: Description of the primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary zirconium and hafnium subcategory. 421.330 Section 421.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Zirconium and Hafnium Subcategory § 421.330 Applicability: Description of the...

  9. Tube support

    DOEpatents

    Mullinax, Jerry L.

    1988-01-01

    A tube support for supporting horizontal tubes from an inclined vertical support tube passing between the horizontal tubes. A support button is welded to the vertical support tube. Two clamping bars or plates, the lower edges of one bearing on the support button, are removably bolted to the inclined vertical tube. The clamping bars provide upper and lower surface support for the horizontal tubes.

  10. Radiochemical separation of zirconium and hafnium from other radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Hahn, R B

    1972-11-01

    Radiozirconium and radiohafnium may be separated from all other radionuclides except scandium and protactinium by precipitation with mandelic acid from 5-10 M hydrochloric acid, using commercial zirconyl chloride as carrier. Scandium and protactinium are removed by dissolving the precipitate in sodium carbonate, then adding barium nitrate to precipitate barium carbonate which acts as a scavenger. Zirconium mandelate is finally reprecipitated and the sample weighed and counted in this form. The method was checked by analysing commercial zirconyl chloride and standard rock samples for zirconium and hafnium by neutron-activation analysis. PMID:18961201

  11. Slow DNA Transport through Nanopores in Hafnium Oxide Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David C.; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Wanunu, Meni

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of double- and single-stranded DNA transport through nanopores fabricated in ultrathin (2–7 nm thick) free-standing hafnium oxide (HfO2) membranes. The high chemical stability of ultrathin HfO2 enables long-lived experiments with <2 nm diameter pores that last several hours, in which we observe >50 000 DNA translocations with no detectable pore expansion. Mean DNA velocities are slower than velocities through comparable silicon nitride pores, providing evidence that HfO2 nanopores have favorable physicochemical interactions with nucleic acids that can be leveraged to slow down DNA in a nanopore. PMID:24083444

  12. The abundances of zirconium and hafnium in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapathy, R.; Papia, G. M.; Grossman, L.

    1976-01-01

    The concentrations of zirconium and hafnium have been determined in the Orgueil, Murchison, Allende, Bruderheim, and Alais meteorites by radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The mean Zr/Hf weight ratio in the first four of these meteorites is 31.3 (plus or minus 2.2), indicating no major fractionation of Zr from Hf. Alais contains anomalously high amounts of many refractory lithophile elements, including Zr and Hf. Orgueil contains 3.1 ppm Zr and 0.11 ppm Hf, corresponding to 9.0 and 0.16 atoms, respectively, relative to 1 million Si atoms.

  13. Recoil Induced Room Temperature Stable Frenkel Pairs in a-Hafnium Upon Thermal Neutron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butz, Tilman; Das, Satyendra K.; Dey, Chandi C.; Ghoshal, Shamik

    2013-11-01

    Ultrapure hafnium metal (110 ppm zirconium) was neutron activated with a thermal neutron flux of 6:6 · 1012 cm-2s-1 in order to obtain 181Hf for subsequent time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) experiments using the nuclear probe 181Hf(β-) 181Ta. Apart from the expected nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) signal for a hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metal, three further discrete NQIs were observed with a few percent fraction each. The TDPAC spectra were recorded for up to 11 half lives with extreme statistical accuracy. The fitted parameters vary slightly within the temperature range between 248 K and 373 K. The signals corresponding to the three additional sites completely disappear after `annealing' at 453 K for one minute. Based on the symmetry of the additional NQIs and their temperature dependencies, they are tentatively attributed to Frenkel pairs produced by recoil due to the emission of a prompt 5:694 MeV -ray following thermal neutron capture and reported by the nuclear probe in three different positions. These Frenkel pairs are stable up to at least 373 K.

  14. Feeding Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... administer the TPN. Tubes Used for Enteral Feeds NG (Nasogastric Tube) A flexible tube is placed via ... down through the esophagus into the stomach. The NG tube can be used to empty the stomach ...

  15. Ear Tubes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Tubes Ear Tubes Patient Health Information News media ... and throat specialist) may be considered. What are ear tubes? Ear tubes are tiny cylinders placed through ...

  16. Formation of hybrid hafnium oxide by applying sacrifacial silicon film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chiung-Wei; Zheng, Bo-Shen; Huang, Jing-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In the fabrication of hafnium oxide (HfO2)-based metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) devices, a sacrificial amorphous silicon (a-Si) film was used as silicon source for facilitating the formation of hafnium silicate (Hf-silicate; HfSiO) between HfO2 and crystallized Si (c-Si). HfSiO can assist in changing the phase of the HfO2 film into the tetragonal phase and achieve high dielectric constant. The combination of HfSiO and HfO2 was named as “Hybrid HfO2”. When this Hybrid HfO2 insulator was applied to MIS devices, it can form a good insulator/semiconductor interface with c-Si. Hybrid HfO2 cannot only suppress the leakage current but also show high dielectric strength. The Hybrid HfO2 film in this work exhibited a high dielectric constant of 25.5 and a high dielectric strength of 17.9 MV/cm.

  17. Changes in the Young Modulus of hafnium oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, André Luís Marin; de Araújo Ribeiro, Fabiana; Hübler, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Hafnium-oxide (HfO2)-based materials have been extensively researched due to their excellent optical and electrical properties. However, the literature data on the mechanical properties of these materials and its preparation for heavy machinery application is very limited. The aim of this work is to deposit hafnium oxide thin films by DC reactive magnetron sputtering with different Young's Modulus from the Ar/O2 concentration variation in the deposition chamber. The thin films were deposited by DC reactive magnetron sputtering with different Ar/O2 gas concentrations in plasma. After deposition, HfOx thin films were characterized through XRD, AFM, RBS and XRF. In this regard, it was observed that the as-deposited HfO2 films were mostly amorphous in the lower Ar/O2 gas ratio and transformed to polycrystalline with monoclinic structure as the Ar/O2 gas ratios grows. RBS technique shows good compromise between the experimental data and the simulated ones. It was possible to tailored the Young Modulus of the films by alter the Ar/O2 content on the deposition chamber without thermal treatment.

  18. Simultaneous determination of tantalum and hafnium in silicates by neutron activation analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.

    1968-01-01

    A neutron activation procedure suitable for the routine determination of tantalum and hafnium in silicates is described. The irradiated sample is fused with sodium peroxide and leached, and the insoluble hydroxides are dissolved in dilute hydrofluoric acid-hydrochloric acid. After LaF3 and AgCl scavenges, tantalum and hafnium are separated by anion exchange. Tantalum is obtained radiochemically pure; 233Pa and 95Zr contaminants in the hafnium fraction are resolved by ??-ray spectrometry. The chemical yield of the procedure is detemined after counting by re-irradiation. Values for the 8 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks are reported. ?? 1968.

  19. PROCESS OF RECOVERING ZIRCONIUM VALUES FROM HAFNIUM VALUES BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION WITH AN ALKYL PHOSPHATE

    DOEpatents

    Peppard, D.F.

    1960-02-01

    A process of separating hafnium nitrate from zirconium nitrate contained in a nitric acid solution by selectively. extracting the zirconium nitrate with a water-immiscible alkyl phosphate is reported.

  20. Hafnium and Neodymium Isotopes in Atlantic Ocean Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickli, J.; Frank, M.; Halliday, A.

    2007-12-01

    Neodymium isotopic compositions (ICs) have been established as a tracer of water masses in the present and past oceans since the late 1970s. Hafnium isotopes share the capability of tracing water masses and in combination with Nd isotopes provide information on continental weathering regimes. Whereas Nd released during weathering reflects the bulk Nd IC of the weathered lithology, the released Hf is more radiogenic than the weathered lithology. This effect is due to highly variable Lu/Hf--ratios in rock--forming minerals ("zircon effect") and as a consequence physical weathering apparently leads to more congruent weathering of Hf than chemical weathering does. Our understanding of the Hf IC of seawater to date has been derived (with the exception of some as yet unpublished data from the Arctic and Pacific oceans (Zimmermann et al., in prep.)) from ferromanganese crusts and nodules, since Hf concentrations in seawater are low and have until recently hampered direct measurements of Hf IC of seawater. We present IC for the dissolved Hf and Nd in Atlantic seawater. Samples were taken mainly on a transect from the Bay of Biscay to Cape Town (RV Polarstern cruise ANT XXIII/1 in 2005). A few additional samples are from the Labrador Sea and the Drake Passage. Hafnium and Nd were pre--concentrated by iron co--precipitation from 60 to 140 liters of filtered (0.45 μm) seawater. Separation of Hf and Nd followed previously established ion chromatographic procedures. Hafnium and Nd ICs were measured by MC--ICPMS (Nu Plasma) with a 2σ external reproducibility of 0.65 and 0.3 ǎrepsilon--units, respectively. Sample sizes varied but were in most cases larger than 3ng of Hf. Surface seawater as well as deep water samples extending to ~5,000 m, plot on the "seawater array" defined previously from measurements of ferromanganese crusts and nodules. Surface seawater ICs are quite uniform for Hf ranging from ǎrepsilonHf = 0 to +2 at most sampling sites on the Atlantic transect. In the

  1. Growth mode evolution of hafnium oxide by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Xianglong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Dayan; Xu, Kewei

    2014-01-15

    HfO{sub 2} thin films were deposited using tetrakis-ethylmethylamido hafnium and H{sub 2}O as precursors on silicon by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The morphology and microstructures at different ALD cycles were characterized by atomic force microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Based on the height–height correlation function and power spectral density function, quantitative analysis of surface morphologies was performed. Three characteristic dimensions (ξ{sub 1}, ξ{sub 2}, and ξ{sub 3}) corresponding to three surface structures, islands, local and global fluctuations, were identified. The evolution of ALD growth mode at range of the three critical scales was investigated, respectively. It suggests the transformation of growth mode from quasi two-dimensional layer-by-layer to three-dimensional island for global fluctuations.

  2. On hafnium chelation by EDTA and DTPA for TDPAC experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chain, Cecilia Y.; Pasquevich, A. F.

    2010-04-01

    Polyaminocarboxilate chelating agents, like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), form stable complexes with many heavy metals ions and are of spread use in the industrial and biomedical field. In this paper, Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlations (TDPAC) spectroscopy has been used to investigate the formation of Hf-complexes prepared from 181Hf-HfF4 and polyaminocarboxylic acids, by taking into account the possible formation of inorganic compounds. The obtained wet precipitates were measured at room temperature. Different behaviors were observed depending on the ratio fluorine/sodium atoms present in the sample. The obtaining of sodium heptafluorohafnate Na3HfF7 was verified when the ratio F/Na was approximately 1.5 and tridecafluorodihafnate Na5Hf2F13 appeared for relations between 3 and 4. No evidence of hafnium complexation by the polyaminocarboxilic acids was observed.

  3. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and characterization of high-permittivity hafnium and zirconium silicate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hiromitsu; Nango, Tomohiro; Miyagawa, Takeshi; Katagiri, Takahiro; Seol, Kwang Soo; Ohki, Yoshimichi

    2002-07-01

    Deposition of hafnium silicate films with various hafnium contents was tried by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using tetraethoxysilane and a hafnium alkoxide. From x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the deposited films are confirmed to be silicate with Hf-O-Si bonds but without any Hf-Si bonds. The permittivity calculated from the capacitance of the accumulation layer increases monotonically with an increase in the hafnium content, whereas the optical band gap energy estimated from vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectra decreases. Similar results were obtained from zirconium silicate films deposited using tetraethoxysilane and a zirconium alkoxide. If we compare the films with the same hafnium or zirconium content, the hafnium silicate exhibits a higher permittivity and a larger band gap energy than the zirconium silicate.

  4. TUBE TESTER

    DOEpatents

    Gittings, H.T. Jr.; Kalbach, J.F.

    1958-01-14

    This patent relates to tube testing, and in particular describes a tube tester for automatic testing of a number of vacuum tubes while in service and as frequently as may be desired. In it broadest aspects the tube tester compares a particular tube with a standard tube tarough a difference amplifier. An unbalanced condition in the circuit of the latter produced by excessive deviation of the tube in its characteristics from standard actuates a switch mechanism stopping the testing cycle and indicating the defective tube.

  5. RF-sputtered silicon and hafnium nitrides - Properties and adhesion to 440C stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon nitride and hafnium nitride coatings were deposited by reactive RF sputtering on oxidized and unoxidized 440C stainless steel substrates. Sputtering was done in mixtures of argon and nitrogen gases from pressed powder silicon nitride and from hafnium metal targets. Depositions were at two background pressures, 8 and 20 mtorr, and at two different fractions (f) of nitrogen in argon, 0.25 and 0.60, for hafnium nitride and at f = 0.25 for silicon nitride. The coatings and the interface between the coating and substrates were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy. A Knoop microhardness of 1650 + or 100 kg/sq mm was measured for hafnium nitride and 3900 + or 500 kg/sq mm for silicon nitride. The friction coefficients between a 440C rider and the coatings were measured under lubricated conditions. Scratch test results demonstrate that the adhesion of hafnium nitride to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C is superior to that of silicon nitride. Oxidized 440C is found to have increased adhesion, to both nitrides, over that of unoxidized 440C.

  6. RF sputtered silicon and hafnium nitrides: Properties and adhesion to 440C stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1982-01-01

    Silicon nitride and hafnium nitride coatings were deposited by reactive RF sputtering on oxidized and unoxidized 440C stainless steel substrates. Sputtering was done in mixtures of argon and nitrogen gases from pressed powder silicon nitride and from hafnium metal targets. Depositions were at two background pressures, 8 and 20 mtorr, and at two different fractions (f) of nitrogen in argon, 0.25 and 0.60, for hafnium nitride and at f = 0.25 for silicon nitride. The coatings and the interface between the coating and substrates were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy. A Knoop microhardness of 1650 + or - 100 kg/sq mm was measured for hafnium nitride and 3900 + or - 500 kg/sq mm for silicon nitride. The friction coefficients between a 440C rider and the coatings were measured under lubricated conditions. Scratch test results demonstrate that the adhesion of hafnium nitride to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C is superior to that of silicon nitride. Oxidized 440C is found to have increased adhesion, to both nitrides, over that of unoxidized 440C.

  7. Hafnium oxide nanoparticles: toward an in vitro predictive biological effect?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hafnium oxide, NBTXR3 nanoparticles were designed for high dose energy deposition within cancer cells when exposed to ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of predicting in vitro the biological effect of NBTXR3 nanoparticles when exposed to ionizing radiation. Methods Cellular uptake of NBTXR3 nanoparticles was assessed in a panel of human cancer cell lines (radioresistant and radiosensitive) by transmission electron microscopy. The radioenhancement of NBTXR3 nanoparticles was measured by the clonogenic survival assay. Results NBTXR3 nanoparticles were taken up by cells in a concentration dependent manner, forming clusters in the cytoplasm. Differential nanoparticle uptake was observed between epithelial and mesenchymal or glioblastoma cell lines. The dose enhancement factor increased with increase NBTXR3 nanoparticle concentration and radiation dose. Beyond a minimum number of clusters per cell, the radioenhancement of NBTXR3 nanoparticles could be estimated from the radiation dose delivered and the radiosensitivity of the cancer cell lines. Conclusions Our preliminary results suggest a predictable in vitro biological effect of NBTXR3 nanoparticles exposed to ionizing radiation. PMID:24981953

  8. Oxidation Effect in Octahedral Hafnium Disulfide Thin Film.

    PubMed

    Chae, Sang Hoon; Jin, Youngjo; Kim, Tae Soo; Chung, Dong Seob; Na, Hyunyeong; Nam, Honggi; Kim, Hyun; Perello, David J; Jeong, Hye Yun; Ly, Thuc Hue; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-26

    Atomically smooth van der Waals materials are structurally stable in a monolayer and a few layers but are susceptible to oxygen-rich environments. In particular, recently emerging materials such as black phosphorus and perovskite have revealed stronger environmental sensitivity than other two-dimensional layered materials, often obscuring the interesting intrinsic electronic and optical properties. Unleashing the true potential of these materials requires oxidation-free sample preparation that protects thin flakes from air exposure. Here, we fabricated few-layer hafnium disulfide (HfS2) field effect transistors (FETs) using an integrated vacuum cluster system and study their electronic properties and stability under ambient conditions. By performing all the device fabrication and characterization procedure under an oxygen- and moisture-free environment, we found that few-layer AA-stacking HfS2-FETs display excellent field effect responses (Ion/Ioff ≈ 10(7)) with reduced hysteresis compared to the FETs prepared under ambient conditions. Oxidation of HfS2 occurs uniformly over the entire area, increasing the film thickness by 250% at a prolonged oxidation time of >120 h, while defects on the surface are the preferential initial oxidation sites. We further demonstrated that the stability of the device in air is significantly improved by passivating FETs with BN in a vacuum cluster. PMID:26735305

  9. Cathodo- and photoluminescence increase in amorphous hafnium oxide under annealing in oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, E. V. Zamoryanskaya, M. V.; Pustovarov, V. A.; Aliev, V. Sh.; Gritsenko, V. A.; Yelisseyev, A. P.

    2015-04-15

    Cathodo- and photoluminescence of amorphous nonstoichiometric films of hafnium oxide are studied with the aim to verify the hypothesis that oxygen vacancies are responsible for the luminescence. To produce oxygen vacancies, hafnium oxide was enriched in surplus metal during synthesis. To reduce the oxygen concentration, the film was annealed in oxygen. A qualitative control of the oxygen concentration was carried out by the refractive index. In the initial, almost stoichiometric films we observed a 2.7-eV band in cathodoluminescence. Annealing in oxygen results in a considerable increase in its intensity, as well as in the appearance of new bands at 1.87, 2.14, 3.40, and 3.6 eV. The observed emission bands are supposed to be due to single oxygen vacancies and polyvacancies in hafnium oxide. The luminescence increase under annealing in an oxygen atmosphere may be a result of the emission quenching effect.

  10. Electric quadrupole interaction of 100Rh in antimony, hafnium and rhenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, W. J.; Abiona, A. A.; Kessler, P.; Timmers, H.

    2013-05-01

    Time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) spectroscopy in beryllium, zinc, rhodium, antimony, hafnium and rhenium was performed with the 100Pd/100Rh probe using four-detector arrays with relative detector orientations of 90° and 180°. The probe was synthesized using the 92Zr(12C,4n)100Pd fusion evaporation reaction, with evaporation residues recoiling into specimens of the metals. The quadrupole coupling constant for 100Rh has been determined for the first time for antimony, hafnium and rhenium, while results for the other elements agree with known values. The coupling constants for the measured hexagonal lattices of the period VI transition metals, hafnium and rhenium, show the same trend with increasing atomic number as those of period V.

  11. Cathodo- and photoluminescence increase in amorphous hafnium oxide under annealing in oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, E. V.; Zamoryanskaya, M. V.; Pustovarov, V. A.; Aliev, V. Sh.; Gritsenko, V. A.; Yelisseyev, A. P.

    2015-04-01

    Cathodo- and photoluminescence of amorphous nonstoichiometric films of hafnium oxide are studied with the aim to verify the hypothesis that oxygen vacancies are responsible for the luminescence. To produce oxygen vacancies, hafnium oxide was enriched in surplus metal during synthesis. To reduce the oxygen concentration, the film was annealed in oxygen. A qualitative control of the oxygen concentration was carried out by the refractive index. In the initial, almost stoichiometric films we observed a 2.7-eV band in cathodoluminescence. Annealing in oxygen results in a considerable increase in its intensity, as well as in the appearance of new bands at 1.87, 2.14, 3.40, and 3.6 eV. The observed emission bands are supposed to be due to single oxygen vacancies and polyvacancies in hafnium oxide. The luminescence increase under annealing in an oxygen atmosphere may be a result of the emission quenching effect.

  12. Mechanical Effects of Hafnium and Boron Addition to Aluminum Alloy Films for Submicrometer LSI Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoda, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Eishi; Kawai, Yasuaki; Madokoro, Shoji; Fukuyo, Hideaki; Sawada, Susumu

    1993-11-01

    This is the first report on the mechanical properties of hafnium- and boron-added Al-Si-Cu alloy film for LSI interconnects. Two to three hundred ppm of hafnium and boron addition into Al-Si-Cu alloy film does not influence the Al alloy properties for metal lines as LSI interconnects, such as its low resistivity, low ohmic contact resistance with Si, and fine-line patterning feasibility. The mechanical properties of the Al alloy film, however, change greatly. Vertical hillock and lateral hillock formation is considerably suppressed during heat treatments used in LSI fabrication processes. Stress-induced void formation is also reduced during aging test at 125°C. These effects due to hafnium and boron addition are considered to be an impurity precipitation effect ihat was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis and electron probe microanalysis.

  13. Composition and microstructure of zirconium and hafnium germanates obtained by different chemical routes

    SciTech Connect

    Utkin, A.V. Prokip, V.E.; Baklanova, N.I.

    2014-01-15

    The phase composition and morphology of zirconium and hafnium germanates synthesized by ceramic and co-precipitation routes were studied. The products were characterized using high-temperature X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal (TG/DTA) analysis. To investigate the phase composition and stoichiometry of compounds the unit cell parameters were refined by full-profile Rietveld XRD analysis. The morphology of products and its evolution during high-temperature treatment was examined by SEM analysis. It was stated that there is the strong dependence of the phase composition and morphology of products on the preparation route. The ceramic route requires a multi-stage high-temperature treatment to obtain zirconium and hafnium germanates of 95% purity or more. Also, there are strong diffusion limitations to obtain hafnium germanate Hf{sub 3}GeO{sub 8} by ceramic route. On the contrary, the co-precipitation route leads to the formation of nanocrystalline single phase germanates of stoichiometric composition at a relatively low temperatures (less than 1000 °C). The results of quantitative XRD analysis showed the hafnium germanates are stoichiometric compounds in contrast to zirconium germanates that form a set of solid solutions. This distinction may be related to the difference in the ion radii of Zr and Hf. - Graphical abstract: The phase composition and morphology of zirconium and hafnium germanates synthesized by ceramic and co-precipitation routes were studied. It was stated that there is the strong dependence of the phase composition and morphology of products on the preparation route. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Zr and Hf germanates were synthesized by ceramic and co-precipitation routes. • The morphology of products depends on the synthesis parameters. • Zirconium germanates forms a set of solid solutions. • Hafnium germanates are stoichiometric compounds.

  14. Effect of substrate temperature on structural and electrical properties of RF sputtered hafnium oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Das, K. C.; Ghosh, S. P.; Tripathy, N.; Kar, J. P.; Bose, G.; Lee, T.; Myoung, J. M.

    2015-06-24

    In this work hafnium oxide thin films were deposited on p-type silicon substrate by Radio frequency magnetron sputtering at different substrate temperature ranging from room temperature to 300 °C. The structural and electrical properties of the sputtered films were investigated by x-ray diffraction, capacitance-voltage and current-voltage measurements. The XRD results show the formation monoclinic structure of the hafnium oxide thin films. The shifting of C-V curves towards negative voltage side depicts the increase in positive oxide charges with the rise of substrate temperature. Leakage current was found increased, when temperature enhanced from room temperature to 300 °C.

  15. Image tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Csorba, I.P.

    1985-01-01

    This text provides a wealth of valuable, hard-to-find data on electron optics, imaging, and image intensification systems. The author explains details of image tube theory, design, construction, and components. He includes material on the design and operation of camera tubes, power components, and secondary electron emitters, as well as data on photomultiplier tubes and electron guns.

  16. A reconnaissance ion-probe of hafnium isotopes in zircons

    SciTech Connect

    Kinny, P.D.; Compston, W.; Williams, I.S. )

    1991-03-01

    A SIMS technique for the isotopic analysis of hafnium in zircons using the SHRIMP ion microprobe has been developed, and a precision of typically 0.5{per thousand} (2{sigma}) achieved in the mean reduced {sup 176}Hf/{sup 177}Hf ratio measured at several spots on a single grain. Unfractionated (chondritic) initial Hf isotopic compositions have been measured on a number of Archaean zircon populations. These include the oldest-known terrestrial minerals, the 4.2 Ga-old Mount Narryer detrital zircons, thereby confirming their antiquity. In contrast, positive initial {epsilon}{sub Hf} (relative to the chondritic model composition) has been found in several post-Archaean zircon populations, reflecting the increasing involvement of isotopically evolved depleted mantle sources in the formation of younger crust. The 570 Ma-old Sri Lankan zircon standard SL7 yielded an exceptionally low initial {epsilon}{sub Hf} of {minus}23, implying a metamorphic origin as a reworked product of ancient crust. SHRIMP U-Pb analyses of zircons from Archaean tonalitic gneiss at Watersmeet, Michigan, yield a precise crystallization age of 3636 {plus minus}6 Ma (2{sigma}), and show that a previously reported correlation between {sup 176}Hf/{sup 177}Hf and U-Pb isotopic discordance in bulk zircon samples (Patchett, 1983) was caused by the addition of radiogenic Hf in discrete overgrowths of new zircon ca. 2.7 Ga ago. The original 3.64 Ga grains show no evidence of distrubance to their original (chondritic) Hf isotopic composition. There is presently no evidence for significant isotopic exchange of Hf between zircon and other minerals in crustal rocks.

  17. Beyond Marbles: Percent Change and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Flannery

    2013-01-01

    In the author's eighth year of teaching, she hit a wall teaching percent change. Percent change is one of the few calculations taught in math classes that shows up regularly in the media, and one that she often does in her head to make sense of the world around her. Despite this, she had been teaching percent change using textbook problems about…

  18. Theoretical Investigation of the Hafnia-Hafnium Interface in RRAM Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, Andrew; Bersuker, Gennadi; Demkov, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Oxide based resistive-switching memory devices (RRAM) utilizing hafnia (HfO2) as the dielectric serve as an attractive option for embedded non-volatile memory systems. Successful operation requires a degree of oxygen deficiency caused by application of a forming voltage. A recent approach to help facilitate this has been the use of an oxygen gettering layer overlaying hafnia. Using density functional theory (DFT) in the local density approximation (LDA), we construct and study a hafnia-hafnium interface to understand the reducing and gettering properties. With this interface, we compare two routes to the creation of substoichiometric hafnia: formation of oxygen vacancies that leave hafnium unoxidized and migration of oxygen to hafnium to form an extended Frenkel pair (FP). Our work shows that the presence of the interface lowers the vacancy formation energy by 1.1 eV from the bulk value of 7.5 eV. Using the nudged-elastic band method, we show that not only is the formation energy lower for an extended FP, but that the barrier to formation of the shortest such FP is only 1.3 eV implying the favorability of such defects. Finally, we study the diffusion of oxygen in bulk hafnium to learn how the defect would behave after disassociation of the FP.

  19. Synthesis, properties, and structure of potassium titanyl phosphate single crystals doped with hafnium

    SciTech Connect

    Orlova, E. I.; Kharitonova, E. P.; Novikova, N. E. Verin, I. A.; Alekseeva, O. A.; Sorokina, N. I.; Voronkova, V. I.

    2010-05-15

    Single crystals of potassium titanyl phosphate doped with hafnium are grown by spontaneous flux crystallization. Their physical properties are studied, and the structure of three KTi{sub 1-x}Hf{sub x}OPO{sub 4} crystals (x = 0.01, 0.03, and 0.12) is determined. In the crystals studied, hafnium mostly occupies the second titanium position. The doping of KTP crystals with hafnium results in an elongation of K-O bonds in the potassium polyhedra and, as a consequence, in a considerable (by approximately 180 deg. C) decrease in the temperature of ferroelectric phase transition. The magnitude of anomalous permittivity substantially decreases. The electrical conduction in the specimens studied decreases by approximately half an order of magnitude in the low-temperature region but remains almost unchanged in the high-temperature region. Even at minor concentrations, the presence of a hafnium additive in the specimens considerably (by 35%) enhances the intensity of the second harmonic generation of laser radiation.

  20. "Decarbonization" of an imino N-heterocyclic carbene via triple benzyl migration from hafnium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An imino N-heterocyclic carbene underwent three sequential benzyl migrations upon reaction with tetrabenzylhafnium, resulting in complete removal of the carbene carbon from the ligand. The resulting eneamido-amidinato hafnium complex showed alkene polymerization activity comparable to that of a prec...

  1. The corrosion behavior of hafnium in high-temperature-water environments

    SciTech Connect

    Rishel, D.M.; Smee, J.D.; Kammenzind, B.F.

    1999-10-01

    The high-temperature-water corrosion performance of hafnium is evaluated. Corrosion kinetic data are used to develop correlations that are a function of time and temperature. The evaluation is based on corrosion tests conducted in out-of-pile autoclaves and in out-of-flux locations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at temperatures ranging from 288 to 360 C. Similar to the corrosion behavior of unalloyed zirconium, the high-temperature-water corrosion response of hafnium exhibits three corrosion regimes: pretransition, posttransition, and spalling. In the pretransition regime, cubic corrosion kinetics are exhibited, whereas in the posttransition regime, linear corrosion kinetics are exhibited. Because of the scatter in the spalling regime data, it is not reasonable to use a best fit of the data to describe spalling regime corrosion. Data also show that neutron irradiation does not alter the corrosion performance of hafnium. Finally, the data illustrate that the corrosion rate of hafnium is significantly less than that of Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4.

  2. Tensile and stress-rupture behavior of hafnium carbide dispersed molybdenum and tungsten base alloy wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Hee Mann; Titran, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    The tensile strain rate sensitivity and the stress-rupture strength of Mo-base and W-base alloy wires, 380 microns in diameter, were determined over the temperature range from 1200 K to 1600 K. Three molybdenum alloy wires; Mo + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC), Mo + 25w/o W + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC+25W) and Mo + 45w/o W + 1.1w/o hafnium carbide (MoHfC+45W), and a W + 0.4w/o hafnium carbide (WHfC) tungsten alloy wire were evaluated. The tensile strength of all wires studied was found to have a positive strain rate sensitivity. The strain rate dependency increased with increasing temperature and is associated with grain broadening of the initial fibrous structures. The hafnium carbide dispersed W-base and Mo-base alloys have superior tensile and stress-rupture properties than those without HfC. On a density compensated basis the MoHfC wires exhibit superior tensile and stress-rupture strengths to the WHfC wires up to approximately 1400 K. Addition of tungsten in the Mo-alloy wires was found to increase the long-term stress rupture strength at temperatures above 1400 K. Theoretical calculations indicate that the strength and ductility advantage of the HfC dispersed alloy wires is due to the resistance to recrystallization imparted by the dispersoid.

  3. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube insertion; G-tube insertion; PEG tube insertion; Stomach tube insertion; Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion ... and down the esophagus, which leads to the stomach. After the endoscopy tube is inserted, the skin ...

  4. Nasogastric feeding tube

    MedlinePlus

    Feeding - nasogastric tube; NG tube; Bolus feeding; Continuous pump feeding; Gavage tube ... A nasogastric tube (NG tube) is a special tube that carries food and medicine to the stomach through the nose. It can be ...

  5. Torsional Stability of Aluminum Alloy Seamless Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R L; Paul, D A

    1939-01-01

    Torsion tests were made on 51ST aluminum-alloy seamless tubes having diameter-to-thickness ratios of from 77 to 139 and length-to-diameter ratios of from 1 to 60. The torsional strengths developed in the tubes which failed elastically (all tubes having lengths greater than 2 to 6 times the diameter) were in most cases within 10 percent of the value indicated by the theories of Donnel, Timoshenko, and Sturm, assuming a condition of simply supported ends.

  6. Breathing 100 percent oxygen compared with 50 percent oxygen:50 percent nitrogen reduces altitude-induced venous gas emboli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, James T.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1993-01-01

    The study investigates effects of 40 zero-prebreathe decompressions of male subjects to 8.3-6.8 psia for 6 h while they were breathing 100 percent oxygen and performing moderate exercise. No decompression sickness (DCS) symptoms were observed. Severe venous gas emboli (VGE) were not detected at 8.3 psia, but were present during 10, 20, and 40 percent of the exposures at 7.8, 7.3, and 6.8 psia, respectively. Zero-prebreathe decompression while breathing 100 percent oxygen results in significantly lower VGE and DCS risk levels than while breathing a 50:50 mix. It is shown that 7.3 psia EVA pressure suits with 100 percent oxygen should be safer than 8.3 psia suits with a 50:50 mix.

  7. Electrodeposition of hafnium coatings from molten CsCl-HfCl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, S.A.; Glagolevskaya, A.L.; Kuznetsova, S.V.

    1992-04-20

    The electrode processes in the CsCl-HfCl{sub 4} melt were examined by potentiodynamic and potentiostatic methods with the use of P-5827 and PI-50.1.1 potentiostats. The potential sweep rates were varied form 0.005 to 1.0 V/sec. The recorders were KSP-4 and LKD-4-003 potentiometers and a PO-5122 oscillographic polarograph. The electrochemical cell was the traditional one for electrochemical studies. The reference electrode was Ag/NaCl-KCl-AgCl (2 mass %). The mass loss in the hafnium anode was used to determine the anode current yield and the mean degree of oxidation for the hafnium ion entering the melt. The anode products were identified by X-ray methods with a DRON-2 diffractometer and also by thermographic and chemical analysis. 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Chemical solution deposition of ferroelectric yttrium-doped hafnium oxide films on platinum electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Starschich, S.; Griesche, D.; Schneller, T.; Böttger, U.; Waser, R.

    2014-05-19

    Ferroelectric hafnium oxide films were fabricated by chemical solution deposition with a remnant polarization of >13 μC/cm{sup 2}. The samples were prepared with 5.2 mol. % yttrium-doping and the thickness varied from 18 nm to 70 nm. The hafnium oxide layer was integrated into a metal-insulator-metal capacitor using platinum electrodes. Due to the processing procedure, no thickness dependence of the ferroelectric properties was observed. To confirm the ferroelectric nature of the deposited samples, polarization, capacitance, and piezoelectric displacement measurements were performed. However, no evidence of the orthorhombic phase was found which has been proposed to be the non-centrosymmetric, ferroelectric phase in HfO{sub 2}.

  9. Properties of tungsten-rhenium and tungsten-rhenium with hafnium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Todd

    2009-07-01

    Historically, tungsten-25wt.% rhenium alloy has been manufactured into wire for the thermocouple market, but recent demands for high-temperature structural components have forced the development of novel processing techniques for tungsten-rhenium and tungsten-rhenium with hafnium carbide. With a melting temperature of 3,050°C, and a recrystallization temperature near 1,900°C, tungsten-rhenium alloys are being used in aerospace, temperature measuring, and friction stir welding applications. The mechanical properties and microstructures of tungsten-25wt.% rhenium and tungsten-25wt.% rhenium with hafnium carbide are reported at ambient temperature, 1,371°C, and 1,926°C, after processing by three methods: hot isostatic pressing, swaging, and extrusion.

  10. An evaluation of 10 percent and 20 percent benzocaine gels in patients with acute toothaches

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, Elliot V.; Ciancio, Sebastian G.; Kuperstein, Arthur S.; Stoopler, Eric T.; Moore, Paul A.; Boynes, Sean G.; Levine, Steven C.; Casamassimo, Paul; Leyva, Rina; Mathew, Tanya; Shibly, Othman; Creighton, Paul; Jeffers, Gary E.; Corby, Patricia M.A.; Turetzky, Stanley N.; Papas, Athena; Wallen, Jillian; Idzik-Starr, Cynthia; Gordon, Sharon M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The authors evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of 10 percent and 20 percent benzocaine gels compared with those of a vehicle (placebo) gel for the temporary relief of toothache pain. They also assessed the compliance with the label dose administration directions on the part of participants with toothache pain. Methods Under double-masked conditions, 576 participants self-applied study gel to an open tooth cavity and surrounding oral tissues. Participants evaluated their pain intensity and pain relief for 120 minutes. The authors determined the amount of gel the participants applied. Results The responders’ rates (the primary efficacy parameter), defined as the percentage of participants who had an improvement in pain intensity as exhibited by a pain score reduction of at least one unit on the dental pain scale from baseline for two consecutive assessments any time between the five- and 20-minute points, were 87.3 percent, 80.7 percent and 70.4 percent, respectively, for 20 percent benzocaine gel, 10 percent benzocaine gel and vehicle gel. Both benzocaine gels were significantly (P ≤ .05) better than vehicle gel; the 20 percent benzocaine gel also was significantly (P ≤ .05) better than the 10 percent benzocaine gel. The mean amount of gel applied was 235.6 milligrams, with 88.2 percent of participants applying 400 mg or less. Conclusions Both 10 percent and 20 percent benzocaine gels were more efficacious than the vehicle gel, and the 20 percent benzocaine gel was more efficacious than the 10 percent benzocaine gel. All treatments were well tolerated by participants. Practical Implications Patients can use 10 percent and 20 percent benzocaine gels to temporarily treat toothache pain safely. PMID:23633700

  11. Oxidation Characterization of Hafnium-Based Ceramics Fabricated by Hot Pressing and Electric Field-Assisted Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matt; Johnson, Sylvia; Marschall, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    Ceramic borides, such as hafnium diboride (HfB2) and zirconium diboride (ZrB2), are members of a family of materials with extremely high melting temperatures referred to as Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs). UHTCs constitute a class of promising materials for use in high temperature applications, such as sharp leading edges on future-generation hypersonic flight vehicles, because of their high melting points. The controlled development of microstructure has become important to the processing of UHTCs, with the prospect of improving their mechanical and thermal properties. The improved oxidation resistance of HfB2 has also become important if this material is to be successfully used at temperatures above 2000 C. Furthermore, the use of UHTCs on the leading edges of vehicles traveling at hypersonic speeds will mean exposure to a mixed oxidation environment comprised of both molecular and atomic oxygen. The current study has investigated the high-temperature oxidation behavior of HfB2-based materials in a pure O2 environment, as well as in environments containing different levels of dissociated oxygen (O/O2). Materials were processed by two techniques: conventional hot pressing (HP) and electric field-assisted sintering (FAS). Their oxidation behavior was evaluated in both a tube furnace at 1250 C for 3 hours and in a simulated re-entry environment in the Advanced Heating Facility (AHF) arcjet at NASA Ames Research Center, during a 10-minute exposure to a cold wall heat flux of 250W/sq cm and stagnation pressure of 0.1-0.2 atm. The microstructure of the different materials was characterized before and after oxidation using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  12. Hafnium nitride buffer layers for growth of GaN on silicon

    DOEpatents

    Armitage, Robert D.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2005-08-16

    Gallium nitride is grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy on (111) and (001) silicon substrates using hafnium nitride buffer layers. Wurtzite GaN epitaxial layers are obtained on both the (111) and (001) HfN/Si surfaces, with crack-free thickness up to 1.2 {character pullout}m. However, growth on the (001) surface results in nearly stress-free films, suggesting that much thicker crack-free layers could be obtained.

  13. Hafnium- and titanium-coated tungsten powders for kinetic energy penetrators, Phase I, SBIR. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, B.E.; Stiglich, J.J.

    1992-05-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is the state-of-the-art material for kinetic energy penetrators used to defeat steel and composite armors. DU alloys, however, are costly to fabricate, handle, and store because of their extremely complex metallurgy and the obvious health considerations associated with the use of uranium. Tungsten composite materials are also used in kinetic energy penetrators, offering easier and safer fabrication, handling, and storage but to date lacking the performance of DU. The mechanisms by which a penetrator defeats an armor are difficult to determine, either experimentally or from first principles. Recent experiments have identified the presence of an adiabatic shear mechanism that appears to be important in the penetration of rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) by DU penetrators. In this program, Ultramet proposed to apply hafnium and titanium coatings to tungsten powder (Wp) particles by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using an established fluidized-bed powder coating technique. Both hafnium and titanium are known to exhibit the adiabatic shear phenomenon. High strain rate experiments (approx.10 to the 4th power/sec) were performed on Ti(6A1-4V) and hafnium materials in order to establish the presence or absence of this mode of deformation in small cylindrical specimens. In addition, specimens of 2 wt% CVD Hf/Wp and 2 wt% CVD Hf + 8 wt% powder-mixed Hf/Wp were tested at high strain rate conditions (approx. 10 to the 4th power/sec). Tungsten powders, Composites, Chemical Vapor Deposition(CVD), Microstructure, Hafnium, Titanium, Dynamic tests, Strain rate testing, Powder metallurgy.

  14. Protective tubes for sodium heated water tubes

    DOEpatents

    Essebaggers, Jan

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which water tubes are heated by liquid sodium which minimizes the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes. A cylindrical protective tube envelopes each water tube and the sodium flows axially in the annular spaces between the protective tubes and the water tubes.

  15. Oxygen and nitrogen diffusion in α-hafnium from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, Andrew; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2014-05-26

    We use a combination of density functional theory and multistate diffusion formalism to analyze the diffusion of oxygen and nitrogen in technologically important hafnium metal. Comparing the local density approximation and the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof version of the generalized gradient approximation, we find that a better description of the hafnium lattice in the latter results in the correct sequence of stable and transition states for oxygen interstitials leading to essentially quantitative agreement with experiment. For oxygen diffusion, we find an isotropic temperature-dependent diffusion coefficient of D=0.082e{sup −2.04/k{sub B}T}cm{sup 2}s{sup −1} utilizing interstitial sites with hexahedral and octahedral coordination. For the diffusivity of nitrogen, we find that an additional stable interstitial site, the crowdion site, exists and that the diffusion coefficient is D=0.15e{sup −2.68/k{sub B}T}cm{sup 2}s{sup −1}. Our results also reproduce the experimental observation that nitrogen diffusivity is lower than that of oxygen in hafnium.

  16. On the phase formation of sputtered hafnium oxide and oxynitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Sarakinos, K.; Music, D.; Mraz, S.; Baben, M. to; Jiang, K.; Nahif, F.; Braun, A.; Zilkens, C.; Schneider, J. M.; Konstantinidis, S.; Renaux, F.; Cossement, D.; Munnik, F.

    2010-07-15

    Hafnium oxynitride films are deposited from a Hf target employing direct current magnetron sputtering in an Ar-O{sub 2}-N{sub 2} atmosphere. It is shown that the presence of N{sub 2} allows for the stabilization of the transition zone between the metallic and the compound sputtering mode enabling deposition of films at well defined conditions of target coverage by varying the O{sub 2} partial pressure. Plasma analysis reveals that this experimental strategy facilitates control over the flux of the O{sup -} ions which are generated on the oxidized target surface and accelerated by the negative target potential toward the growing film. An arrangement that enables film growth without O{sup -} ion bombardment is also implemented. Moreover, stabilization of the transition sputtering zone and control of the O{sup -} ion flux without N{sub 2} addition is achieved employing high power pulsed magnetron sputtering. Structural characterization of the deposited films unambiguously proves that the phase formation of hafnium oxide and hafnium oxynitride films with the crystal structure of HfO{sub 2} is independent from the O{sup -} bombardment conditions. Experimental and theoretical data indicate that the presence of vacancies and/or the substitution of O by N atoms in the nonmetal sublattice favor the formation of the cubic and/or the tetragonal HfO{sub 2} crystal structure at the expense of the monoclinic HfO{sub 2} one.

  17. Radiation effects on the electrical properties of hafnium oxide based MOS capacitors.

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosky, J. C.; McClory, J. W.; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Foster, J. C.

    2010-10-01

    Hafnium oxide-based MOS capacitors were investigated to determine electrical property response to radiation environments. In situ capacitance versus voltage measurements were analyzed to identify voltage shifting as a result of changes to trapped charge with increasing dose of gamma, neutron, and ion radiation. In situ measurements required investigation and optimization of capacitor fabrication to include dicing, cleaning, metalization, packaging, and wire bonding. A top metal contact of 200 angstroms of titanium followed by 2800 angstroms of gold allowed for repeatable wire bonding and proper electrical response. Gamma and ion irradiations of atomic layer deposited hafnium oxide on silicon devices both resulted in a midgap voltage shift of no more than 0.2 V toward less positive voltages. This shift indicates recombination of radiation induced positive charge with negative trapped charge in the bulk oxide. Silicon ion irradiation caused interface effects in addition to oxide trap effects that resulted in a flatband voltage shift of approximately 0.6 V also toward less positive voltages. Additionally, no bias dependent voltage shifts with gamma irradiation and strong oxide capacitance room temperature annealing after ion irradiation was observed. These characteristics, in addition to the small voltage shifts observed, demonstrate the radiation hardness of hafnium oxide and its applicability for use in space systems.

  18. In vivo and in vitro studies of hafnium-binding to rat serum transferrin.

    PubMed

    Then, G M; Appel, H; Duffield, J; Taylor, D M; Thies, W G

    1986-08-01

    The binding of hafnium to rat serum transferrin was studied using the time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique. Hafnium is interesting as a toxic metal binding to transferrin because it behaves metabolically similarly to plutonium. The isotope 181Hf offers favorable access to the TDPAC-method. Samples were prepared in vivo by intravenous injection of Hf-NTA, Hf-citrate, and Hf-oxalate solutions, respectively, into Sprague-Dawley rats and in vitro by adding Hf-NTA solution to fresh rat serum. In both cases two specific electric quadrupole interactions were observed, which correspond to two well-defined binding configurations. They may be attributed to the N-terminal and the C-terminal binding site in the transferrin molecule. The 181Hf-distribution between these two binding states depends on pH, salt and hafnium concentrations, temperature, and incubation time. With a fast TDPAC-setup of four BaF2-detectors a time resolution of about 600 ps could be achieved. The specific binding configurations of 181Hf and the comparatively slow relaxation times lead to spectra of considerable accuracy. PMID:3746294

  19. In vivo and in vitro studies of hafnium-binding to rat serum transferrin

    SciTech Connect

    Then, G.M.; Appel, H.; Duffield, J.; Taylor, D.M.; Thies, W.G.

    1986-08-01

    The binding of hafnium to rat serum transferrin was studied using the time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique. Hafnium is interesting as a toxic metal binding to transferrin because it behaves metabolically similarly to plutonium. The isotope 181Hf offers favorable access to the TDPAC-method. Samples were prepared in vivo by intravenous injection of Hf-NTA, Hf-citrate, and Hf-oxalate solutions, respectively, into Sprague-Dawley rats and in vitro by adding Hf-NTA solution to fresh rat serum. In both cases two specific electric quadrupole interactions were observed, which correspond to two well-defined binding configurations. They may be attributed to the N-terminal and the C-terminal binding site in the transferrin molecule. The 181Hf-distribution between these two binding states depends on pH, salt and hafnium concentrations, temperature, and incubation time. With a fast TDPAC-setup of four BaF2-detectors a time resolution of about 600 ps could be achieved. The specific binding configurations of 181Hf and the comparatively slow relaxation times lead to spectra of considerable accuracy.

  20. On the phase formation of sputtered hafnium oxide and oxynitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarakinos, K.; Music, D.; Mráz, S.; to Baben, M.; Jiang, K.; Nahif, F.; Braun, A.; Zilkens, C.; Konstantinidis, S.; Renaux, F.; Cossement, D.; Munnik, F.; Schneider, J. M.

    2010-07-01

    Hafnium oxynitride films are deposited from a Hf target employing direct current magnetron sputtering in an Ar-O2-N2 atmosphere. It is shown that the presence of N2 allows for the stabilization of the transition zone between the metallic and the compound sputtering mode enabling deposition of films at well defined conditions of target coverage by varying the O2 partial pressure. Plasma analysis reveals that this experimental strategy facilitates control over the flux of the O- ions which are generated on the oxidized target surface and accelerated by the negative target potential toward the growing film. An arrangement that enables film growth without O- ion bombardment is also implemented. Moreover, stabilization of the transition sputtering zone and control of the O- ion flux without N2 addition is achieved employing high power pulsed magnetron sputtering. Structural characterization of the deposited films unambiguously proves that the phase formation of hafnium oxide and hafnium oxynitride films with the crystal structure of HfO2 is independent from the O- bombardment conditions. Experimental and theoretical data indicate that the presence of vacancies and/or the substitution of O by N atoms in the nonmetal sublattice favor the formation of the cubic and/or the tetragonal HfO2 crystal structure at the expense of the monoclinic HfO2 one.

  1. RF sputtered silicon and hafnium nitrides as applied to 440C steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon nitride and hafnium nitride coatings were deposited on oxidized and unoxidized 440C stainless steel substrates. Sputtering was done in mixtures of argon and nitrogen gases from pressed powder silicon nitride and from hafnium metal targets. The coatings and the interface between the coating and substrate were investigated by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger electron spectroscopy. Oxide was found at all interfaces with an interface width of at least 600 A for the oxidized substrates and at least 300 A for the unoxidized substrates. Scratch test results demonstrate that the adhesion of hafnium nitride to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C is superior to that of silicon nitride. Oxidized 440C is found to have increased adhesion, to both nitrides, over that of unoxidized 440C. Coatings of both nitrides deposited at 8 mtorr were found to have increased adhesion to both oxidized and unoxidized 440C over those deposited at 20 mtorr.

  2. Ear tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Myringotomy; Tympanostomy; Ear tube surgery; Pressure equalization tubes; Ventilating tubes; Ear infection - tubes; Otitis - tubes ... trapped fluid can flow out of the middle ear. This prevents hearing loss and reduces the risk ...

  3. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Naidu, Balachandar; Ziminksy, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2013-08-13

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  4. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2012-12-11

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  5. Tube Feedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy

    This module on tube feedings is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who work in long-term care. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then provided. A brief discussion follows…

  6. Angular glass tubing drawn from round tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Round glass tubing softened in a furnace is drawn over a shaped plug or mandel to form shapes with other than a circular cross section. Irregularly shaped tubing is formed without limitations on tube length or wall thickness.

  7. Electron tube

    DOEpatents

    Suyama, Motohiro; Fukasawa, Atsuhito; Arisaka, Katsushi; Wang, Hanguo

    2011-12-20

    An electron tube of the present invention includes: a vacuum vessel including a face plate portion made of synthetic silica and having a surface on which a photoelectric surface is provided, a stem portion arranged facing the photoelectric surface and made of synthetic silica, and a side tube portion having one end connected to the face plate portion and the other end connected to the stem portion and made of synthetic silica; a projection portion arranged in the vacuum vessel, extending from the stem portion toward the photoelectric surface, and made of synthetic silica; and an electron detector arranged on the projection portion, for detecting electrons from the photoelectric surface, and made of silicon.

  8. Neutron tubes

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  9. QUANTIZING TUBE

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, A.S.; Gray, G.W.

    1958-07-01

    Beam deflection tubes are described for use in switching or pulse amplitude analysis. The salient features of the invention reside in the target arrangement whereby outputs are obtained from a plurality of collector electrodes each correspondlng with a non-overlapping range of amplitudes of the input sigmal. The tube is provded with mcans for deflecting the electron beam a1ong a line in accordance with the amplitude of an input signal. The target structure consists of a first dymode positioned in the path of the beam wlth slots spaced a1ong thc deflection line, and a second dymode posltioned behind the first dainode. When the beam strikes the solid portions along the length of the first dymode the excited electrons are multiplied and collected in separate collector electrodes spaced along the beam line. Similarly, the electrons excited when the beam strikes the second dynode are multiplied and collected in separate electrodes spaced along the length of the second dyode.

  10. Long period gratings coated with hafnium oxide by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition for refractive index measurements.

    PubMed

    Melo, Luis; Burton, Geoff; Kubik, Philip; Wild, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Long period gratings (LPGs) are coated with hafnium oxide using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) to increase the sensitivity of these devices to the refractive index of the surrounding medium. PEALD allows deposition at low temperatures which reduces thermal degradation of UV-written LPGs. Depositions targeting three different coating thicknesses are investigated: 30 nm, 50 nm and 70 nm. Coating thickness measurements taken by scanning electron microscopy of the optical fibers confirm deposition of uniform coatings. The performance of the coated LPGs shows that deposition of hafnium oxide on LPGs induces two-step transition behavior of the cladding modes. PMID:27137052

  11. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your ...

  12. Tube Feeding Troubleshooting Guide

    MedlinePlus

    ... profile tube also has a stem length). Note: NG and NJ tubes (that go through a person’s ... Immediate Action: • Discontinue feeding. • If you have an NG or NJ tube, and the tube is curled ...

  13. Estimating a percent reduction in load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millard, Steven P.

    This article extends the work of Cohn et al. [1989] on estimating constituent loads to the problem of estimating a percent reduction in load. Three estimators are considered: the maximum likelihood (MLE), a ``bias-corrected'' maximum likelihood (BCMLE), and the minimum variance unbiased (MVUE). In terms of root-mean-square error, both the MVUE and BCMLE are superior to the MLE, and for the cases considered here there is no appreciable difference between the MVUE and the BCMLE. The BCMLE is constructed from quantities computed by most regression packages and is therefore simpler to compute than the MVUE (which involves approximating an infinite series). All three estimators are applied to a case study in which an agricultural tax in the Everglades agricultural area is tied to an observed percent reduction in phosphorus load. For typical hydrological data, very large sample sizes (of the order of 100 observations each in the baseline period and after) are required to estimate a percent reduction in load with reasonable precision.

  14. Aluminum depletion in komatiites and garnet fractionation in the early Archean mantle: Hafnium isotopic constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Gruau, G. Universite de Rennes ); Chauvel, C.; Arndt, N.T. ); Cornichet, J. )

    1990-11-01

    Hafnium isotopic compositions were measured in Al-depleted and Al-enriched komatiites from the 3,450 Ma old Barberton greenstone belt, southern Africa. All samples have initial {var epsilon}{sub Hf} values close to zero. Such values are at variance with the strongly negative or positive values that should be observed if these rocks came from old garnet-depleted or garnet-enriched layers, such as may have formed during the solidification of an ancient terrestrial magma ocean. The garnet fractionation observed in komatiites probably took place during the melting event.

  15. Periodic alignment of Si quantum dots on hafnium oxide coated single wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmedo, Mario; Martinez-Morales, Alfredo A.; Liu, Gang; Yengel, Emre; Ozkan, Cengiz S.; Lau, Chun Ning; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Liu, Jianlin

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate a bottom up approach for the aligned epitaxial growth of Si quantum dots (QDs) on one-dimensional (1D) hafnium oxide (HfO2) ridges created by the growth of HfO2 thin film on single wall carbon nanotubes. This growth process creates a high strain 1D ridge on the HfO2 film, which favors the formation of Si seeds over the surrounding flat HfO2 area. Periodic alignment of Si QDs on the 1D HfO2 ridge was observed, which can be controlled by varying different growth conditions, such as growth temperature, growth time, and disilane flow rate.

  16. Multimode resistive switching in nanoscale hafnium oxide stack as studied by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y.; Celano, U.; Goux, L.; Liu, L.; Degraeve, R.; Cheng, Y.; Kang, J.; Jurczak, M.; Vandervorst, W.

    2016-07-01

    The nanoscale resistive switching in hafnium oxide stack is investigated by the conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). The initial oxide stack is insulating and electrical stress from the C-AFM tip induces nanometric conductive filaments. Multimode resistive switching can be observed in consecutive operation cycles at one spot. The different modes are interpreted in the framework of a low defect quantum point contact theory. The model implies that the optimization of the conductive filament active region is crucial for the future application of nanoscale resistive switching devices.

  17. Casting Stainless-Steel Models Around Pressure Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter; Micol, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Survivability of thin-wall stainless-steel tubing increased to nearly 100 percent. Improves state of art in pressure-model castings and reduces cost associated with machining complete model from stainless-steel blank.

  18. Tube furnace

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Kenneth G.; Frohwein, Eugene J.; Taylor, Robert W.; Bowen, David W.

    1991-01-01

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  19. Tube furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.G.; Frohwein, E.J.; Taylor, R.W.; Bowen, D.W.

    1990-12-31

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  20. Tube furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.G.; Frohwein, E.J.; Taylor, R.W.; Bowen, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  1. Microstructure and optical properties of Pr3+-doped hafnium silicate films

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we report on the evolution of the microstructure and photoluminescence properties of Pr3+-doped hafnium silicate thin films as a function of annealing temperature (TA). The composition and microstructure of the films were characterized by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Fourier transform infrared absorption, and X-ray diffraction, while the emission properties have been studied by means of photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation (PLE) spectroscopies. It was observed that a post-annealing treatment favors the phase separation in hafnium silicate matrix being more evident at 950°C. The HfO2 phase demonstrates a pronounced crystallization in tetragonal phase upon 950°C annealing. Pr3+ emission appeared at TA = 950°C, and the highest efficiency of Pr3+ ion emission was detected upon a thermal treatment at 1,000°C. Analysis of the PLE spectra reveals an efficient energy transfer from matrix defects towards Pr3+ ions. It is considered that oxygen vacancies act as effective Pr3+ sensitizer. Finally, a PL study of undoped HfO2 and HfSiOx matrices is performed to evidence the energy transfer. PMID:23336520

  2. Processing and properties of extruded tungsten-hafnium and tungsten-steel composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.; Sikka, V.K.; Kapoor, D.

    1995-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the processing behavior and properties of tungsten-hafnium (W-Hf) and W-steel composites produced by hot extrusion of canned powders. The W-Hf composite was consolidated by extrusion of blended powders with preheat temperatures over the temperature range of 1100 to 1400{degrees}C. All extrusions produced fully dense material which exhibits elongation of the tungsten phase within the hafnium matrix. The flow stress, as characterized by the extrusion constant, decreases with increasing temperature up to 1300{degrees}C and increases substantially at 1400{degrees}C as significant quantities of intermetallic phase are formed during preheating. The room-temperature (RT) hardness and compressive yield stress increase modestly with increased extrusion ratio and are not affected by extrusion temperature in the range 1100 to 1300{degrees}C. The microstructures are essentially fully recrystallized at the 1300{degrees}C preheat temperature and partially recrystallized at lower temperatures. Additionally, a mixture of tungsten and steel powder was consolidated to full density by hot extrusion at a 1000{degrees}C preheat temperature and a reduction ratio of 4.2. Increased reduction of the W-steel composite results in increased RT hardness.

  3. Effect of reactive magnetron sputtering parameters on structural and electrical properties of hafnium oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymańska, Magdalena; Gierałtowska, Sylwia; Wachnicki, Łukasz; Grobelny, Marcin; Makowska, Katarzyna; Mroczyński, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the structural and electrical properties of magnetron sputtered hafnium oxide (HfOx) and hafnium oxynitride (HfOxNy) thin films. A careful analysis of the influence of deposition process parameters, among them: pressure in the reactor chamber, Ar and O2 flow rate, power applied to the reactor chamber and deposition time, on electro-physical properties of HfOx and HfOxNy layers has been performed. In the course of this work we performed number of experiments by means of Taguchi's orthogonal arrays approach. Such a method allowed for the determination of dielectric layers properties depending on process parameters with relatively low amount of experiments. Moreover, the effects of post-deposition annealing on electrical characteristics of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures with HfOx or HfOxNy gate dielectric and its structural properties have also been reported. Investigated hafnia thin films were characterized by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), electrical characteristics measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS).

  4. Collapse Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02154 Collapse Tubes

    The discontinuous channels in this image are collapsed lava tubes.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -19.7N, Longitude 317.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. Tapered pulse tube for pulse tube refrigerators

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Olson, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal insulation of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube refrigerator is maintained by optimally varying the radius of the pulse tube to suppress convective heat loss from mass flux streaming in the pulse tube. A simple cone with an optimum taper angle will often provide sufficient improvement. Alternatively, the pulse tube radius r as a function of axial position x can be shaped with r(x) such that streaming is optimally suppressed at each x.

  6. Hafnium hydroxide complexation and solubility: The impact of hydrolysis reactions on the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Cerefice, G.; Draye, M.; Noyes, K.; Czerwinski, K.

    1999-07-01

    The stability constants for the complexation of hafnium by hydroxide ions is investigated by potentiometric titration over a range of ionic strengths (I{sub m} = 0.1 to 6.6 molal). The stability constants are determined from the titration data using the HYPERQUAD suite of programs. The stability constants at infinite dilution are determined using the Specific Ion Interaction Theory from the stability constants determined by titration. The solubility product of Hf(OH){sub 4} (s) is determined in 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} by measuring the total hafnium in solution that is in equilibrium with an excess of hafnium hydroxide solid under an argon atmosphere. The total Hf concentration is determined by ICP-AES. The solubility product is determined using the stability constants measured for the Hf hydrolysis products in 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4}. The precipitate examined is confirmed to be a hydroxide by IR spectroscopy. For Hf(OH){sub 4} (s) in 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4}, the solubility product is log K{sub sp} (Hf(OH){sub 4} (s)) = {minus}51.8 {+-} 0.5. The solubility and stability constants determined are used, along with literature values for plutonium solubility and complexation constants, to examine the behavior of hafnium and plutonium under the conditions expected at Yucca Mountain.

  7. Preparation and properties of electrically conducting ceramics based on indium oxide-rare earth oxides-hafnium oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Marchant, D.D.; Bates, J.L.

    1983-09-01

    Electrically conducting refractory oxides based on adding indium oxide to rare earth-stabilized hafnium oxide are being studied for use in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generators, fuel cells, and thermoelectric generators. The use of indium oxide generally increases the electrical conductivity. The results of measurements of the electrical conductivity and data on corrosion resistance in molten salts are presented.

  8. A 20 GHz, 70 watt, 48 percent efficient space communications TWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, M. A.; Tamashiro, R. N.

    A space qualifiable helix traveling wave tube capable of producing saturated output power levels above 70 watts at 48 percent total efficiency has been developed for 20 GHz satellite communications systems. The design approach stresses high reliability consistent with high power and efficiency. Advanced construction features incorporated into the design are a five stage collector, an M-type dispenser cathode, and a dynamic velocity tapered (DVT) helix.

  9. A tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator

    SciTech Connect

    Ashcroft, J.; Campbell, B.; Depoy, D.

    1996-12-31

    A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell.

  10. Tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator

    SciTech Connect

    Ashcroft, John; Campbell, Brian; DePoy, David

    1998-01-01

    A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell.

  11. Tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator

    DOEpatents

    Ashcroft, J.; Campbell, B.; DePoy, D.

    1998-06-30

    A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell. 8 figs.

  12. How I Love My 80 Percenters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maturo, Anthony J.

    2002-01-01

    Don't ever take your support staff for granted. By support staff, I mean the people in personnel, logistics, and finance; the ones who can make things happen with a phone call or a signature, or by the same token frustrate you to no end by their inaction; these are people you must depend on. I've spent a lot of time thinking about how to cultivate relationships with my support staff that work to the advantage of both of us. The most important thing that have learned working with people, any people--and I will tell you how I learned this in a minute--is there are some folks you just can't motivate, so forget it, don't try; others you certainly can with a little psychology and some effort; and the best of the bunch, what I call the 80 percenters, you don't need to motivate because they're already on the team and performing beautifully. The ones you can't change are rocks. Face up to it, and just kick them out of your way. I have a reputation with the people who don't want to perform or be part of the team. They don't come near me. If someone's a rock, I pick up on it right away, and I will walk around him or her to find someone better. The ones who can be motivated I take time to nurture. I consider them my projects. A lot of times these wannabes are people who want to help but don't know how. Listen, you can work with them. Lots of people in organizations have the mindset that all that matters are the regulations. God forbid if you ever work outside those regulations. They've got one foot on that regulation and they're holding it tight like a baby holds a blanket. What you're looking for is that first sign that their minds are opening. Usually you hear it in their vocabulary. What used to sound like "We can't do that ... the regulations won't allow it ... we have never done this before," well, suddenly that changes to "We have options ... let's take a look at the options ... let me research this and get back to you." The 80 percenters you want to nurture too, but

  13. Effect of hafnium doping on density of states in dual-target magnetron co-sputtering HfZnSnO thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chuan-Xin; Li, Jun Fu, Yi-Zhou; Jiang, Xue-Yin; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Lin

    2015-11-23

    This study investigates the effect of hafnium doping on the density of states (DOSs) in HfZnSnO thin film transistors fabricated by dual-target magnetron co-sputtering system. The DOSs is extracted by temperature-dependent field-effect measurements, and they decrease from 1.1 × 10{sup 17} to 4.6 × 10{sup 16 }eV/cm{sup 3} with increasing the hafnium concentrations. The behavior of DOSs for the increasing hafnium concentration HfZnSnO thin film transistors can be confirmed by both the reduction of ΔV{sub T} under bias stress and the trapping charges calculated by capacitance voltage measurements. It suggests that the reduction in DOSs due to the hafnium doping is closely related with the bias stability and thermal stability.

  14. Tracheostomy tube - eating

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000464.htm Tracheostomy tube - eating To use the sharing features on ... when you swallow foods or liquids. Eating and Tracheostomy Tubes When you get your tracheostomy tube, or ...

  15. Heat exchanger tube mounts

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.; Dawson, B.E.

    1974-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which tubes are secured to a tube sheet by internal bore welding is described. The tubes may be moved into place in preparation for welding with comparatively little trouble. A number of segmented tube support plates are provided which allow a considerable portion of each of the tubes to be moved laterally after the end thereof has been positioned in preparation for internal bore welding to the tube sheet. (auth)

  16. Tube-shape verifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. N.; Christ, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Inexpensive apparatus checks accuracy of bent tubes. Assortment of slotted angles and clamps is bolted down to flat aluminum plate outlining shape of standard tube bent to desired configuration. Newly bent tubes are then checked against this outline. Because parts are bolted down, tubes can be checked very rapidly without disturbing outline. One verifier per tube-bending machine can really speed up production in tube-bending shop.

  17. Ionization tube simmer current circuit

    DOEpatents

    Steinkraus, Jr., Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current.

  18. Ionization tube simmer current circuit

    DOEpatents

    Steinkraus, R.F. Jr.

    1994-12-13

    A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current. 6 figures.

  19. Periodic alignment of Si quantum dots on hafnium oxide coated single wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Olmedo, Mario; Martinez-Morales, Alfredo A.; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Liu Jianlin; Liu Gang; Lau, C.N.; Yengel, Emre; Ozkan, Cengiz S.

    2009-03-23

    We demonstrate a bottom up approach for the aligned epitaxial growth of Si quantum dots (QDs) on one-dimensional (1D) hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) ridges created by the growth of HfO{sub 2} thin film on single wall carbon nanotubes. This growth process creates a high strain 1D ridge on the HfO{sub 2} film, which favors the formation of Si seeds over the surrounding flat HfO{sub 2} area. Periodic alignment of Si QDs on the 1D HfO{sub 2} ridge was observed, which can be controlled by varying different growth conditions, such as growth temperature, growth time, and disilane flow rate.

  20. Hafnium dioxide as a dielectric for highly-sensitive waveguide-coupled surface plasmon resonance sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Kunal; Sharma, Suresh C.; Hozhabri, Nader

    2016-04-01

    Hafnium dioxide has been recognized as an excellent dielectric for microelectronics. However, its usefulness for the surface plasmon based sensors has not yet been tested. Here we investigate its usefulness for waveguide-coupled bi-metallic surface plasmon resonance sensors. Several Ag/HfO2/Au multilayer structure sensors were fabricated and evaluated by optical measurements and computer simulations. The resulting data establish correlations between the growth parameters and sensor performance. The sensor sensitivity to refractive index of analytes is determined to be S n = /∂ θ SPR ∂ n ≥ 4 7 0 . The sensitivity data are supported by simulations, which also predict 314 nm for the evanescent field decay length in air.

  1. Sub-10 nm low current resistive switching behavior in hafnium oxide stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y.; Celano, U.; Goux, L.; Liu, L.; Fantini, A.; Degraeve, R.; Youssef, A.; Xu, Z.; Cheng, Y.; Kang, J.; Jurczak, M.; Vandervorst, W.

    2016-03-01

    In this letter, a tip-induced cell relying on the conductive atomic force microscope is proposed. It is verified as a referable replica of an integrated resistive random access memory (RRAM) device. On the basis of this cell, the functionality of sub-10 nm resistive switching is confirmed in hafnium oxide stack. Moreover, the low current switching behavior in the sub-10 nm dimension is found to be more pronounced than that of a 50 × 50 nm2 device. It shows better ON/OFF ratio and low leakage current. The enhanced memory performance is ascribed to a change in the shape of the conductive filament as the device dimensions are reduced to sub-10 nm. Therefore, device downscaling provides a promising approach for the resistance optimization that benefits the RRAM array design.

  2. The effect of twinning on the work hardening behavior in Hafnium

    SciTech Connect

    Cerreta, E. K.; Gray, G. T. , III; Yablinsky, C.

    2004-01-01

    In many HCP metals, both twinning and slip are known to be important modes of deformation. However, the interaction of the two mechanisms and their effect on work hardening is not well understood. In hafnium, twinning and work hardening rates increase with increasing strain, increasing strain rate, and decreasing temperature. At low strains and strain rates and at higher temperatures, slip dominates deformation and rates of work hardening are relatively lower. To characterize the interaction of slip and twinning, Hf specimens were prestrained quasi-statically in compression at 77K, creating specimens that were heavily twinned. These specimens were subsequently reloaded at room temperature. Twinning within the microstructures was characterized optically and using transmission electron microscopy. The interaction of slip with the twins was investigated as a function of prestrain and correlated with the observed rates of work hardening.

  3. Cesium hafnium chloride: A high light yield, non-hygroscopic cubic crystal scintillator for gamma spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, Arnold; Rowe, Emmanuel; Groza, Michael; Morales Figueroa, Kristle; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Beck, Patrick R.; Hunter, Steven; Payne, Stephen A.

    2015-10-05

    We report on the scintillation properties of Cs{sub 2}HfCl{sub 6} (cesium hafnium chloride or CHC) as an example of a little-known class of non-hygroscopic compounds having the generic cubic crystal structure of K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}. The crystals are easily growable from the melt using the Bridgman method with minimal precursor treatments or purification. CHC scintillation is centered at 400 nm, with a principal decay time of 4.37 μs and a light yield of up to 54 000 photons/MeV when measured using a silicon CCD photodetector. The light yield is the highest ever reported for an undoped crystal, and CHC also exhibits excellent light yield nonproportionality. These desirable properties allowed us to build and test CHC gamma-ray spectrometers providing energy resolution of 3.3% at 662 keV.

  4. Stress-rupture strength and microstructural stability of tungsten-hafnium-carbon-wire reinforced superalloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, D. W.; Signorelli, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    Tungsten-hafnium-carbon - superalloy composites were found to be potentially useful for turbine blade applications on the basis of stress-rupture strength. The 100- and 1000-hr rupture strengths calculated for 70 vol. % fiber composites based on test data at 1090C (2000F) were 420 and 280 MN/m2 (61,000 and 41,000 psi, respectively). The investigation indicated that, with better quality fibers, composites having 100- and 1000-hr rupture strengths of 570 and 370 MN/m2 (82,000 and 54,000 psi, respectively), may be obtained. Metallographic studies indicated sufficient fiber-matrix compatibility for 1000 hr or more at 1090C (2000F).

  5. Density and surface tension of melts of zirconium and hafnium fluorides with lithium fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Katyshev, S.F.; Artemov, V.V.; Desyatnik, V.N.

    1988-06-01

    A study was conducted to determine the temperature dependence of the density and surface tension of melts of LiF-ZrF/sub 4/ and LiF-HfF/sub 4/. Density and surface tension were determined by the method of maximum pressure in an argon bubble. On the basis of experimental data over the entire concentration range the molar volumes and their relative deviations from the additive molar volumes were calculated for 1100/sup 0/K. The positive deviations of the molar volumes from additivity in the LiF-HfF/sub 4/ system (22.45%) were greater than in the LiF-ZrF/sub 4/ system (15.75%). This indicated that the reaction with lithium fluoride is intensified with the switch to the hafnium fluoride. Results also demonstrated that the fluorides are surface-active components in the molten mixtures.

  6. High-k (k=30) amorphous hafnium oxide films from high rate room temperature deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Flora M.; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Hofmann, Stephan; Milne, William I.; Flewitt, Andrew J.; Dutson, James D.; Wakeham, Steve J.; Thwaites, Mike J.

    2011-06-20

    Amorphous hafnium oxide (HfO{sub x}) is deposited by sputtering while achieving a very high k{approx}30. Structural characterization suggests that the high k is a consequence of a previously unreported cubiclike short range order in the amorphous HfO{sub x} (cubic k{approx}30). The films also possess a high electrical resistivity of 10{sup 14} {Omega} cm, a breakdown strength of 3 MV cm{sup -1}, and an optical gap of 6.0 eV. Deposition at room temperature and a high deposition rate ({approx}25 nm min{sup -1}) makes these high-k amorphous HfO{sub x} films highly advantageous for plastic electronics and high throughput manufacturing.

  7. Episodic growth of the Gondwana supercontinent from hafnium and oxygen isotopes in zircon.

    PubMed

    Kemp, A I S; Hawkesworth, C J; Paterson, B A; Kinny, P D

    2006-02-01

    It is thought that continental crust existed as early as 150 million years after planetary accretion, but assessing the rates and processes of subsequent crustal growth requires linking the apparently contradictory information from the igneous and sedimentary rock records. For example, the striking global peaks in juvenile igneous activity 2.7, 1.9 and 1.2 Gyr ago imply rapid crustal generation in response to the emplacement of mantle 'super-plumes', rather than by the continuous process of subduction. Yet uncertainties persist over whether these age peaks are artefacts of selective preservation, and over how to reconcile episodic crust formation with the smooth crustal evolution curves inferred from neodymium isotope variations of sedimentary rocks. Detrital zircons encapsulate a more representative record of igneous events than the exposed geology and their hafnium isotope ratios reflect the time since the source of the parental magmas separated from the mantle. These 'model' ages are only meaningful if the host magma lacked a mixed or sedimentary source component, but the latter can be diagnosed by oxygen isotopes, which are strongly fractionated by rock-hydrosphere interactions. Here we report the first study that integrates hafnium and oxygen isotopes, all measured in situ on the same, precisely dated detrital zircon grains. The data reveal that crust generation in part of Gondwana was limited to major pulses at 1.9 and 3.3 Gyr ago, and that the zircons crystallized during repeated reworking of crust formed at these times. The implication is that the mechanisms of crust formation differed from those of crustal differentiation in ancient orogenic belts. PMID:16452978

  8. Improved Traveling-Wave Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseau, Art; Tammaru, Ivo; Vaszari, John

    1988-01-01

    New space traveling-wave tube (TWT) provides coherent source of 75 watts of continuous-wave power output over bandwidth of 5 GHz at frequency of 65 GHz. Coupled-cavity TWT provides 50 dB of saturated gain. Includes thermionic emitter, M-type dispenser cathode providing high-power electron beam. Beam focused by permanent magnets through center of radio-frequency cavity structure. Designed for reliable operation for 10 years, and overall efficiency of 35 percent minimizes prime power input and dissipation of heat.

  9. EC Tube Fits

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, C.H.; /Fermilab

    1987-03-03

    In the design of the EC, the beam tube, through which the beam line travels, can be found in the IH tube which is centrally located in the IH module. However, also between the beam tube and the IH tube lie both the vacuum and inner tubes of the vacuum and inner vessels. It is the vacuum between these vessels which provides insulation between the ambient beam tube and liquid argon in the cryostat. while the vacuum tube is supported along its length with the inner tube as best as possible, the inner tube will only be supported at the ends. The beam tube will also be end-supported, but it will be allowed to rest directly on the inner surface of the vacuum tube. It is required that the beam tube be able to slide in and out of the vacuum tube with relative ease in order that the EC's can be moved away from the CC when necessary (repair work, etc.). Although the frequency of such a move is not known, it is hoped to be low, and it would therefore be desirable, for cost reasons, to be able to use stock tubing for the vacuum and beam tubes instead of using specially machined tubing.

  10. Bender/Coiler for Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Easy-to-use tool makes coils of tubing. Tubing to be bend clamped with stop post. Die positioned snugly against tubing. Operator turns handle to slide die along tubing, pushing tubing into spiral groove on mandrel.

  11. Ion-bombardment-induced reduction in vacancies and its enhanced effect on conductivity and reflectivity in hafnium nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhiqing; Wang, Jiafu; Hu, Chaoquan; Zhang, Xiaobo; Dang, Jianchen; Zhang, Sam; Gao, Jing; Wang, Xiaoyi; Chen, Hong; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-08-01

    Although the role of ion bombardment on electrical conductivity and optical reflectivity of transition metal nitrides films was reported previously, the results were controversial and the mechanism was not yet well explored. Here, we show that proper ion bombardment, induced by applying the negative bias voltage ( V b), significantly improves the electrical conductivity and optical reflectivity in rocksalt hafnium nitride films regardless of level of stoichiometry (i.e., in both near-stoichiometric HfN1.04 and over-stoichiometric HfN1.17 films). The observed improvement arises from the increase in the concentration of free electrons and the relaxation time as a result of reduction in nitrogen and hafnium vacancies in the films. Furthermore, HfN1.17 films have always much lower electrical conductivity and infrared reflectance than HfN1.04 films for a given V b, owing to more hafnium vacancies because of larger composition deviation from HfN exact stoichiometry (N:Hf = 1:1). These new insights are supported by good agreement between experimental results and theoretical calculations.

  12. High-efficiency, 200 watt, 12-gigahertz traveling wave tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G.; Mcnary, B. D.; Sauseng, O.

    1974-01-01

    Design and performance of a highly efficient experimental 200-watt traveling wave tube for space communications are described. The tube uses a coupled cavity slow wave structure with periodic permanent magnet focusing. A two-step velocity taper is incorporated in the slow wave structure for velocity resynchronization with the modulated beam. The spent beam is reconditioned in a refocusing section before it is collected in a novel multistage depressed collector. The collector is radiation cooled and heat insulated from the tube body. At saturation the tube provides peak output power of 240 watts with a 35-db gain and an overall maximum efficiency of 56 percent.

  13. Space-Qualified Traveling-Wave Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Krawczyk, Richard; Simons, Rainee N.; Williams, Wallace D.; Robbins, Neal R.; Dibb, Daniel R.; Menninger, William L.; Zhai, Xiaoling; Benton, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    The L-3 Communications Electron Technologies, Inc. Model 999HA traveling-wave tube (TWT), was developed for use as a high-power microwave amplifier for high-rate transmission of data and video signals from deep space to Earth (see figure). The 999HA is a successor to the 999H a non-space qualified TWT described in High-Power, High-Efficiency Ka-Band Traveling-Wave Tube (LEW-17900-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 2 (February 2007), page 32. Operating in the 31.8-to-32.3 GHz frequency band, the 999HA has been shown to generate 252 W of continuous- wave output power at 62 percent overall power efficiency a 75-percent increase in output power over the 999H. The mass of the 999HA is 35 percent less than that of the 999H. Moreover, taking account of the elimination of a Faraday cage that is necessary for operation of the 999H but is obviated by a redesign of high-voltage feed-throughs for the 999HA, the overall reduction in mass becomes 57 percent with an 82 percent reduction in volume. Through a series of rigorous tests, the 999HA has been qualified for operation aboard spacecraft with a lifetime exceeding seven years. Offspring of the 999HA will fly on the Kepler and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter missions.

  14. Torsion Tests of Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stang, Ambrose H; Ramberg, Walter; Back, Goldie

    1937-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests of 63 chromium-molybdenum steel tubes and 102 17st aluminum-alloy tubes of various sizes and lengths made to study the dependence of the torsional strength on both the dimensions of the tube and the physical properties of the tube material. Three types of failure are found to be important for sizes of tubes frequently used in aircraft construction: (1) failure by plastic shear, in which the tube material reached its yield strength before the critical torque was reached; (2) failure by elastic two-lobe buckling, which depended only on the elastic properties of the tube material and the dimensions of the tube; and (3) failure by a combination of (1) and (2) that is, by buckling taking place after some yielding of the tube material.

  15. 1999 tubing guide

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    Petroleum Engineer International`s 1999 Tubing Guide contains performance and metallurgical data, as well as connection dimensions, on tubing from several companies. Parameters listed in each section were selected with the input of buyers and manufacturers of connections and tubing. Connections listings include: nominal tube OD, weight, tensile efficiency, sealing system, standard connection OD, special clearance OD, minimum ID and make-up loss. The grades section lists the tubing OD range, yield strength, tensile strength, hardness and whether the tubing is seamless or welded. An applications index specifies the downhole environments each grade can survive.

  16. Coaxial tube array space transmission line characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Switzer, Colleen A.; Bents, David J.

    1987-01-01

    The coaxial tube array tether/transmission line used to connect an SP-100 nuclear power system to the space station was characterized over the range of reactor-to-platform separation distances of 1 to 10 km. Characterization was done with respect to array performance, physical dimensions and masses. Using a fixed design procedure, a family of designs was generated for the same power level (300 kWe), power loss (1.5 percent), and meteoroid survival probability (99.5 percent over 10 yr). To differentiate between vacuum insulated and gas insulated lines, two different maximum values of the E field were considered: 20 kV/cm (appropriate to vacuum insulation) and 50 kV/cm (compressed SF6). Core conductor, tube, bumper, standoff, spacer and bumper support dimensions, and masses were also calculated. The results of the characterization show mainly how transmission line size and mass scale with reactor-to-platform separation distance.

  17. Coaxial tube array space transmission line characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzer, Colleen A.; Bents, David J.

    The coaxial tube array tether/transmission line used to connect an SP-100 nuclear power system to the space station was characterized over the range of reactor-to-platform separation distances of 1 to 10 km. Characterization was done with respect to array performance, physical dimensions and masses. Using a fixed design procedure, a family of designs was generated for the same power level (300 kWe), power loss (1.5 percent), and meteoroid survival probability (99.5 percent over 10 yr). To differentiate between vacuum insulated and gas insulated lines, two different maximum values of the E field were considered: 20 kV/cm (appropriate to vacuum insulation) and 50 kV/cm (compressed SF6). Core conductor, tube, bumper, standoff, spacer and bumper support dimensions, and masses were also calculated. The results of the characterization show mainly how transmission line size and mass scale with reactor-to-platform separation distance.

  18. Facing-target mid-frequency magnetron reactive sputtered hafnium oxide film: Morphology and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Xu, Jun; Wang, You-Nian; Choi, Chi Kyu; Zhou, Da-Yu

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous hafnium dioxide (HfO2) film was prepared on Si (100) by facing-target mid-frequency reactive magnetron sputtering under different oxygen/argon gas ratio at room temperature with high purity Hf target. 3D surface profiler results showed that the deposition rates of HfO2 thin film under different O2/Ar gas ratio remain unchanged, indicating that the facing target midfrequency magnetron sputtering system provides effective approach to eliminate target poisoning phenomenon which is generally occurred in reactive sputtering procedure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) demonstrated that the gradual reduction of oxygen vacancy concentration and the densification of deposited film structure with the increase of oxygen/argon (O2/Ar) gas flow ratio. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis suggested that the surface of the as-deposited HfO2 thin film tends to be smoother, the root-meansquare roughness (RMS) reduced from 0.876 nm to 0.333 nm while O2/Ar gas flow ratio increased from 1/4 to 1/1. Current-Voltage measurements of MOS capacitor based on Au/HfO2/Si structure indicated that the leakage current density of HfO2 thin films decreased by increasing of oxygen partial pressure, which resulted in the variations of pore size and oxygen vacancy concentration in deposited thin films. Based on the above characterization results the leakage current mechanism for all samples was discussed systematically.

  19. Tailoring the index of refraction of nanocrystalline hafnium oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Mirella; Murphy, N. R.; Ramana, C. V.

    2014-03-10

    Hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) films were grown by sputter-deposition by varying the growth temperature (T{sub s} = 25–700 °C). HfO{sub 2} films grown at T{sub s} < 200 °C were amorphous, while those grown at T{sub s} ≥ 200 °C were monoclinic, nanocrystalline with (1{sup ¯}11) texturing. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) analyses indicate that the film-density (ρ) increases with increasing T{sub s}. The index of refraction (n) profiles derived from spectroscopic ellipsometry analyses follow the Cauchy dispersion relation. Lorentz-Lorenz analysis (n{sub (λ)} = 550 nm) and optical-model adopted agree well with the XRR data/analyses. A direct T{sub s}-ρ-n relationship suggests that tailoring the optical quality is possible by tuning T{sub s} and the microstructure of HfO{sub 2} films.

  20. Effect of nitrogen containing plasmas on interface stability of hafnium oxide ultrathin films on Si (100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Bhandari, H. B.; Klein, T. M.

    2004-08-01

    Hafnium oxide dielectric thin films were deposited by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition with Hf (IV) t-butoxide and either an O2, N2, or N2O plasma in a 1:1 ratio with helium. Films approximately 5nm thick were analyzed using angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and variable angle ellipsometry before and after heat treatment in an ultrahigh vacuum up to 470°C. Interdiffusion and/or reaction of the film with the silicon substrate, as measured by an increase in thickness and an increase in Si-O type bonding at the interface was most apparent with O2 plasma deposited films and least observed with N2 plasma deposited films. Also, the Hf (4f) XPS peak shifts toward higher binding energy after anneals for the N2 and N2O plasma deposited films indicates further oxidation of the film. In contrast, oxygen plasma deposited films do not exhibit a Hf (4f) peak shift. These results provide evidence that high-κ film/substrate stability may be controlled by applying appropriate plasma chemistry.

  1. Coordination compounds of hafnium(IV) with some N-substituted derivatives of unsaturated hydroxamic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Stratulat, A.A.; Batyr, D.G.

    1987-05-01

    Coordination compounds of hafnium(IV) with N-o(or m)-X-phenylacryl- and methacrylhydroxamic acids with the general formula (Hf/XC/sub 6/H/sub 4/-N(O)-C(O)-R//sub 4/), where X = 4-CH/sub 3/, H, 4-Cl, 4-Br, 4-CH/sub 3/C(O), 4-CH=CH/sub 2/, 4-CH/sub 3/OC(O), 3-CH/sub 3/, 3-Cl, and 3-Br, and R = CH=CH/sub 2/ and C(CH/sub 3/)=CH/sub 2/, have been synthesized and characterized. The type of coordination of the organic ligands and the structure of the complexes have been established on the basis of the data from IR, electronic, and PMR spectra. It has been shown that the complexation process involves the replacement of the proton of the hydroxyl group of the hydroxamic grouping by a metal ion and the coordination of the oxygen atom of the carbonyl group. The coordination compounds obtained have been assigned a square-antiprismatic structure. The introduction of a methyl radical into the vinyl grouping R results in a significant increase in the strength of the complex.

  2. Compounds between the dioxides of hafnium and zirconium and the oxides of strontium and barium

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimyuk, G.I.; Lopato, L.M.; Shevchenko, A.V.; Zaitseva, Z.A.

    1985-12-01

    The goal of the paper is the synthesis and study of the properties of compounds in the system HfO/sub 2/ (ZrO2)-SrO(BaO). These compounds form in the region of high alkaline-earth content. The phase composition of the samples was studied by x-ray and petrographic analyses on a DRON-1.5 unit at room temperature. It was established from the studies that, independent of the means of sample preparation, there form on interaction of the dioxides of hafnium and zirconium with the oxides of strontium in the region of high SrO content the compounds Sr/sub 4/HF/sub 3/O/sub 10/, Sr/sub 4/Zr/sub 3/O/sub 10/, Sr/sub 3/Hf/sub 2/O/sub 7/, Sr/sub 3/Zr/sub 2/O/sub 7/, Sr/sub 2/HfO/sub 4/, and Sr/sub 2/ZrO/sub 4/. The unit-cell parameters and crystal-optical characteristics of the compounds synthesized were determined.

  3. Investigation of crystallization processes from hafnium silicate powders prepared from an oxychloride sol-gel

    SciTech Connect

    McGilvery, Catriona M.; De Gendt, S; Payzant, E Andrew; Craven, A J; MacKenzie, M; McComb, D W

    2012-01-01

    Hafnium oxide and silicate materials are now incorporated into working CMOS devices, however the crystallisation mechanism is still poorly understood. In particular, addition of SiO2 to HfO2 has been shown to increase the crystallisation temperature of HfO2 hence allowing it to remain amorphous under current processing conditions. Building on earlier work we here investigate bulk HfxSi1-xO2 samples to determine the effect of SiO2 on the crystallisation pathway. Techniques such as XRD, HTXRD, thermal analysis techniques and TEM are used. It is found that the addition of SiO2 has very little affect on the crystallisation path at temperatures below 900 C but at higher temperatures a second t-HfO2 phase nucleates and is stabilised due to the strain of the surrounding amorphous SiO2 material. With an increase in SiO2 content the temperature at which this nucleation and stabilisation occurs is increased. The effect of strain has implications for inhibiting the crystallisation of the high-k layer, reduction of grain boundaries and hence diffusion, reduction of formation of interface layers and the possibility of stabilising t-HfO2 rather than m-HfO2 hence increasing the dielectric of the layer.

  4. Temperature effect on electrospinning of nanobelts: the case of hafnium oxide.

    PubMed

    Su, Yurong; Lu, Bingan; Xie, Yizhu; Ma, Ziwei; Liu, Lixin; Zhao, Haiting; Zhang, Jia; Duan, Huigao; Zhang, Hongliang; Li, Jian; Xiong, Yuqing; Xie, Erqing

    2011-07-15

    Electrospinning is a convenient and versatile method for fabricating different kinds of one-dimensional nanostructures such as nanofibres, nanotubes and nanobelts. Environmental parameters have a great influence on the electrospinning nanostructure. Here we report a new method to fabricate hafnium oxide (HfO(2)) nanobelts. HfO(2) nanobelts were prepared by electrospinning a sol-gel solution with the implementation of heating and subsequent calcination treatment. We investigate the temperature dependence of the products by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The heating temperature of spinning ambient is found to be crucial to the formation of HfO(2) nanobelts. By tuning the temperature, the morphological transformation of HfO(2) from nanowires to nanobelts was achieved. It was found that the rapid evaporation of solvent played an important role in the formation process of HfO(2) nanobelts. It is shown that nanobelts can only be obtained with the temperature higher than 50 °C and they are in the high quality monoclinic phase. A possible growth mechanism of the nanobelts based on phase separation is proposed. The enhanced photoluminescence (PL) of HfO(2):Eu(3+) nanobelts is also illustrated. PMID:21659687

  5. Low temperature structural phase transition in hafnium and zirconium tetrafluoride trihydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, S. K.; Dey, C. C.; Saha, S.

    2016-04-01

    From time-differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) measurements, the monoclinic and triclinic crystal structures in hafnium and zirconium tetrafluoride trihydrates are found to be present simultaneously in both the compounds. From previous TDPAC and XRD investigations, a monoclinic crystal structure for HfF4·3H2O but, for its analogues zirconium compound, a triclinic structure was reported. Contrary to earlier reports, the triclinic fraction in HfF4·3H2O is found to be maximum (80%) at room temperature. In fact, the triclinic crystal structure of HfF4·3H2O is reported here which was not known prior to this report. In ZrF4·3H2O, a strong signal (80-90%) for the triclinic structure is found at room temperature while the monoclinic fraction appears as a weak signal (10-15%). Structural phase transitions in these trihydrate compounds have been observed in the temperature range 298-333 K.

  6. Carrier Transport at Metal/Amorphous Hafnium-Indium-Zinc Oxide Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seoungjun; Gil, Youngun; Choi, Youngran; Kim, Kyoung-Kook; Yun, Hyung Joong; Son, Byoungchul; Choi, Chel-Jong; Kim, Hyunsoo

    2015-10-14

    In this paper, the carrier transport mechanism at the metal/amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc oxide (a-HIZO) interface was investigated. The contact properties were found to be predominantly affected by the degree of interfacial reaction between the metals and a-HIZO; that is, a higher tendency to form metal oxide phases leads to excellent Ohmic contact via tunneling, which is associated with the generated donor-like oxygen vacancies. In this case, the Schottky-Mott theory is not applicable. Meanwhile, metals that do not form interfacial metal oxide, such as Pd, follow the Schottky-Mott theory, which results in rectifying Schottky behavior. The Schottky characteristics of the Pd contact to a-HIZO can be explained in terms of the barrier inhomogeneity model, which yields a mean barrier height of 1.40 eV and a standard deviation of 0.14 eV. The work function of a-HIZO could therefore be estimated as 3.7 eV, which is in good agreement with the ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (3.68 eV). Our findings will be useful for establishing a strategy to form Ohmic or Schottky contacts to a-HIZO films, which will be essential for fabricating reliable high-performance electronic devices. PMID:26411354

  7. Measurement and Simulation of Thermal Conductivity of Hafnium-Aluminum Thermal Neutron Absorber Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillen, Donna Post; Harris, William H.

    2016-05-01

    A metal matrix composite (MMC) material composed of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) intermetallic particles in an aluminum matrix has been identified as a promising material for fast flux irradiation testing applications. This material can filter thermal neutrons while simultaneously providing high rates of conductive cooling for experiment capsules. The purpose of this work is to investigate effects of Hf-Al material composition and neutron irradiation on thermophysical properties, which were measured before and after irradiation. When performing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) on the irradiated specimens, a large exotherm corresponding to material annealment was observed. Therefore, a test procedure was developed to perform DSC and laser flash analysis (LFA) to obtain the specific heat and thermal diffusivity of pre- and post-annealment specimens. This paper presents the thermal properties for three states of the MMC material: (1) unirradiated, (2) as-irradiated, and (3) irradiated and annealed. Microstructure-property relationships were obtained for the thermal conductivity. These relationships are useful for designing components from this material to operate in irradiation environments. The ability of this material to effectively conduct heat as a function of temperature, volume fraction Al3Hf, radiation damage, and annealing is assessed using the MOOSE suite of computational tools.

  8. Unique erosion features of hafnium cathode in atmospheric pressure arcs of air, nitrogen and oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorui, S.; Meher, K. C.; Kar, R.; Tiwari, N.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    Experimental investigation of cathode erosion in atmospheric pressure hafnium-electrode plasma torches is reported under different plasma environments along with the results of numerical simulation. Air, nitrogen and oxygen are the plasma gases considered. Distinct differences in the erosion features in different plasmas are brought out. Cathode images exhibiting a degree of erosion and measured erosion rates are presented in detail as a function of time of arc operation and arc current. Physical erosion rates are determined using high precision balance. The changes in the surface microstructures are investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Evolution of cathode chemistry is determined using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Numerical simulation with proper consideration of the plasma effects is performed for all the plasma gases. The important role of electromagnetic body forces in shaping the flow field and the distribution of pressure in the region is explored. It is shown that the mutual interaction between fluid dynamic and electromagnetic body forces may self-consistently evolve a situation of an extremely low cathode erosion rate.

  9. Ion-assisted deposition of moisture-stable hafnium oxide films for ultraviolet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Traci R.; Warren, John; Johnson,, Robert L., Jr.

    2002-06-01

    A design-of-experiments statistical approach was taken to determine the optimum ion gun operating parameters for the deposition of moisture-stable, low-absorbing hafnium oxide films by ion-assisted electron-beam evaporation. Factors identified as affecting the quality of hafnia films were chamber pressure, deposition rate, ion gun source gas composition, and ion gun current. Both oxygen and argon were used as source gases. High and low levels of the factors were chosen on the basis of our experience with the operating range of the system, and we made a series of 24 runs with all possible combinations of these factors. From a statistical analysis of the data, we find that the best films are obtained with a 1:1 mixture of argon and oxygen, 3-3.5 x 10-4 Torr chamber pressure, 0.3-nm/s deposition rate, and 0.5-A ion gun current. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the ion-assisted films exhibit a partial monoclinic crystalline structure, whereas the unassisted films are amorphous.

  10. Electron-beam-evaporated thin films of hafnium dioxide for fabricating electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Zhigang; Kisslinger, Kim

    2015-06-17

    Thin films of hafnium dioxide (HfO2) are widely used as the gate oxide in fabricating integrated circuits because of their high dielectric constants. In this paper, the authors report the growth of thin films of HfO2 using e-beam evaporation, and the fabrication of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits using this HfO2 thin film as the gate oxide. The authors analyzed the thin films using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction, thereby demonstrating that the e-beam-evaporation-grown HfO2 film has a polycrystalline structure and forms an excellent interface with silicon. Accordingly, we fabricated 31-stage CMOS ring oscillator to test the quality of the HfO2 thin film as the gate oxide, and obtained excellent rail-to-rail oscillation waveforms from it, denoting that the HfO2 thin film functioned very well as the gate oxide.

  11. Electron-beam-evaporated thin films of hafnium dioxide for fabricating electronic devices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiao, Zhigang; Kisslinger, Kim

    2015-06-17

    Thin films of hafnium dioxide (HfO2) are widely used as the gate oxide in fabricating integrated circuits because of their high dielectric constants. In this paper, the authors report the growth of thin films of HfO2 using e-beam evaporation, and the fabrication of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits using this HfO2 thin film as the gate oxide. The authors analyzed the thin films using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction, thereby demonstrating that the e-beam-evaporation-grown HfO2 film has a polycrystalline structure and forms an excellent interface with silicon. Accordingly, we fabricated 31-stage CMOS ring oscillator to test themore » quality of the HfO2 thin film as the gate oxide, and obtained excellent rail-to-rail oscillation waveforms from it, denoting that the HfO2 thin film functioned very well as the gate oxide.« less

  12. Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of Hafnium-Based Bulk Metallic Glass at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshri, Anup Kumar; Behl, Lovish; Lahiri, Debrupa; Dulikravich, George S.; Agarwal, Arvind

    2016-07-01

    Dry sliding wear behavior of hafnium-based bulk metallic glass was studied at two loads (5 and 15 N) and two temperatures (298 and 673 K) using aluminum oxide (Al2O3) ball as a wear counterpart. At 5 N load, wear reduced by ~71% on increasing the temperature from 298 to 673 K. At a higher load of 15 N, the weight loss reduction was much lower (45%) on increasing the temperature from 298 to 673 K. Decreased wear weight loss on increasing the temperature was attributed to the increased hardness of the Hf-based metallic glass at high temperatures. Micro-hardness of the alloy at 293 K was found to be 636 Hv, which gradually increased to 655 Hv on annealing at 673 K. Improvement in the hardness at elevated temperature is attributed to: (1) free volume annihilation, (2) surface oxide formation and (3) nano-crystallites precipitation. Reduced wear at elevated temperature resulted in smaller volume of debris generation that restricted three-body wear to obtain lower coefficient of friction (COF) (0.25-0.35) compared to COF (0.65-0.75) at room temperature.

  13. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the first month ... that she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In spina bifida, ...

  14. Tracheostomy tube - speaking

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000465.htm Tracheostomy tube - speaking To use the sharing features on ... are even speaking devices that can help you. Tracheostomy Tubes and Speaking Air passing through vocal cords ( ...

  15. Tracheostomy tube - speaking

    MedlinePlus

    ... key part of communicating with people. Having a tracheostomy tube can change your ability to talk and ... you can learn how to speak with a tracheostomy tube. It just takes practice. There are even ...

  16. A Comparison of the Haider Tube-Guard® Endotracheal Tube Holder Versus Adhesive Tape to Determine if This Novel Device Can Reduce Endotracheal Tube Movement and Prevent Unplanned Extubation

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Jack C.; Brown, Adam P.; Shin, John S.; Rogers, Kirsten M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endotracheal tube security is a critical safety issue. We compared the mobility of an in situ endotracheal tube secured with adhesive tape to the one secured with a new commercially available purpose-designed endotracheal tube-holder device (Haider Tube-Guard®). We also observed for the incidence of oropharyngeal or facial trauma associated with the 2 tube fixation methods. METHODS: Thirty adult patients undergoing general anesthesia with neuromuscular blockade were prospectively enrolled. Immediately after intubation, a single study author positioned the endotracheal tube tip in the distal trachea using a bronchoscope. Anesthesiologists caring for patients secured the tube in their normal fashion (always with adhesive tape). A force transducer was used to apply linear force, increasing to 15 N or until the principal investigator deemed that the force be aborted for safety reasons. The displacement of the endotracheal tube was measured with the bronchoscope. Any tape was then removed and the endotracheal tube secured with the Haider Tube-Guard device. The linear force was reapplied and the displacement of the endotracheal tube measured. The Haider Tube-Guard device was left in place for the duration of the case. The patient’s face and oropharynx were examined for any evidence of trauma during surgery and in the recovery room. On discharge from the postanesthesia care unit, the patient answered a brief survey assessing for any subjective evidence of minor facial or oropharyngeal trauma. RESULTS: Under standardized tension, the endotracheal tube withdrew a mean distance of 3.4 cm when secured with adhesive tape versus 0.3 cm when secured with the Haider Tube-Guard (P <0.001). Ninety-seven percent of patients (29/30) experienced clinically significant endotracheal tube movement (>1 cm) when adhesive tape was used to secure the tube versus 3% (1/30) when the Haider Tube-Guard was used (P <0.001). Thirty percent of patients (9/30) were potentially deemed

  17. Microhole Tubing Bending Report

    DOE Data Explorer

    Oglesby, Ken

    2012-01-01

    A downhole tubing bending study was made and is reported herein. IT contains a report and 2 excel spreadsheets to calculate tubing bending and to estimate contact points of the tubing to the drilled hole wall (creating a new support point).

  18. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  19. REACTOR COOLANT TUBE SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Morris, W.J.

    1958-12-01

    A plle-flattenlng control element and a fluid seal therefore to permit movement of the element into a liquld contnining region of a neutronlc reactor are described. The device consists of flattened, thin-walled aluminum tubing contalnlng a uniform mixture of thermal neutron absorbing material, and a number of soft rubber closures for the process tubes, having silts capable of passing the flattened elements therethrough, but effectively sealing the process tubes against fluld leaknge by compression of the rubber. The flattened tubing is sufficiently flexible to enable it to conform to the configuratlon of the annular spacing surrounding the fuel elements ln the process tubes.

  20. Telescoping tube assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturm, Albert J. (Inventor); Marrinan, Thomas E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An extensible and retractable telescoping tube positions test devices that inspect large stationary objects. The tube has three dimensional adjustment capabilities and is vertically suspended from a frame. The tube sections are independently supported with each section comprising U-shaped housing secured to a thicker support plate. Guide mechanisms preferably mounted only to the thicker plates guide each tube section parallel to a reference axis with improved accuracy so that the position of the remote end of the telescoping tube is precisely known.

  1. Creep-rupture tests of internally pressurized Rene 41 tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumto, K. H.; Weiss, B.

    1972-01-01

    Weld-drawn tubes of Rene 41 with 0.935 centimeter outside diameter and 0.064 centimeter wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1117 to 1233 K and internal helium pressures from 5.5 to 12.4 meganewtons per square meter. Lifetimes ranged from 5 to 2065 hours. The creep-rupture strength of the tubes was 50 percent lower than that of unwelded, thick sheet specimens, and 20 percent lower than that of unwelded, thin sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.

  2. Creep-rupture tests of internally pressurized Inconel 702 tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumto, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Seamless Inconel 702 tubes with 0.375-in. outside diameter and 0.025-in. wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1390 to 1575 F and internal helium pressures from 700 to 1800 psi. Lifetimes ranged from 29 to 1561 hr. The creep-rupture strength of the tubes was about 70 percent lower than that of sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.

  3. Heat tube device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattar, Mukesh K. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention discloses a heat tube device through which a working fluid can be circulated to transfer heat to air in a conventional air conditioning system. The heat tube device is disposable about a conventional cooling coil of the air conditioning system and includes a plurality of substantially U-shaped tubes connected to a support structure. The support structure includes members for allowing the heat tube device to be readily positioned about the cooling coil. An actuatable adjustment device is connected to the U-shaped tubes for allowing, upon actuation thereof, for the heat tubes to be simultaneously rotated relative to the cooling coil for allowing the heat transfer from the heat tube device to air in the air conditioning system to be selectively varied.

  4. Corrosion guard tubing nipple

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, W.E.

    1988-09-27

    This patent describes the process of placing a string of tubing in an oil field well; a. the string of tubing when placed extending from the surface of the earth to an oil bearing formation far below the surface, b. the string made from i. a plurality of tubing sections, ii. each section having external threads on each end, and iii. cuffs with internal threads coupling the tubing sections together, c. each of the tubing sections having i. an axis, ii. a wall thickness, and iii. a corrosion resistant coating on its inside bore; wherein the improved method comprises: d. placing a section of tubing into the well with a cuff attached to the upper end at the surface of the earth, e. dropping a corrosion resistant nipple into the cuff, f. the nipple being loose in the cuff, g. attaching an additional section of tubing onto the cuff, and h. screwing the additional section tightly to the cuff.

  5. In-Pile Experiment of a New Hafnium Aluminide Composite Material to Enable Fast Neutron Testing in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Douglas L. Porter; James R. Parry; Heng Ban

    2010-06-01

    A new hafnium aluminide composite material is being developed as a key component in a Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) system designed to provide fast neutron flux test capability in the Advanced Test Reactor. An absorber block comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) particles (~23% by volume) dispersed in an aluminum matrix can absorb thermal neutrons and transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels. However, the thermophysical properties, such as thermal conductivity, of this material and the effect of irradiation are not known. This paper describes the design of an in-pile experiment to obtain such data to enable design and optimization of the BFFL neutron filter.

  6. Emission stability enhancement of a tip-type carbon-nanotube-based field emitter via hafnium interlayer deposition and thermal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Pil; Chang, Han-Beet; Kim, Bu-Jong; Park, Jin-Seok

    2012-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were deposited on a tip-type tungsten substrate via electrophoretic deposition, in which a hafnium thin film was used as an interlayer. The long-term (up to 24 h) emission stability of the CNT-based field emitter was remarkably enhanced when the hafnium interlayer was coated and thermally treated. This is attributed to the enhanced adhesion between the substrate and the CNTs. An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study and nano-scratch measurement provided a convincing evidence of the increase in the adhesive force.

  7. The equilibrium structure of thin magnetic flux tubes. II. [in sun and late stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, W.; Rosner, R.; Ferrari, A.; Massaglia, S.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal structure of the medium inside thin, vertical magnetic flux tubes embedded in a given external atmosphere is investigated, assuming cylindrical symmetry and a depth-independent plasma beta. The variation with tube radius of the temperature on the tube axis is computed and the temperature on the tube wall is estimated. The temperature variation across the flux tube is found to be due to the depth variation of the intensity and to the density stratification of the atmosphere. Since the temperature difference between the axis and the wall is small in thin flux tubes (of the order of 10 percent), the horizontal temperature gradient may often be neglected and the temperature in a tube of given radius may be described by a single function of depth. Thus, a more detailed numerical treatment of the radiative transfer within thin flux tubes can be substantially simplified by neglecting horizontal temperature differences within the flux tube proper.

  8. Intercostal drainage tube or intracardiac drainage tube?

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, N.; Kamath, S. Ganesh; Khymdeit, Edison; Prabhu, Manjunath

    2016-01-01

    Although insertion of chest drain tubes is a common medical practice, there are risks associated with this procedure, especially when inexperienced physicians perform it. Wrong insertion of the tube has been known to cause morbidity and occasional mortality. We report a case where the left ventricle was accidentally punctured leading to near-exsanguination. This report is to highlight the need for experienced physicians to supervise the procedure and train the younger physician in the safe performance of the procedure. PMID:27397467

  9. Hafnium isotope evidence for a transition in the dynamics of continental growth 3.2 Gyr ago.

    PubMed

    Næraa, T; Scherstén, A; Rosing, M T; Kemp, A I S; Hoffmann, J E; Kokfelt, T F; Whitehouse, M J

    2012-05-31

    Earth's lithosphere probably experienced an evolution towards the modern plate tectonic regime, owing to secular changes in mantle temperature. Radiogenic isotope variations are interpreted as evidence for the declining rates of continental crustal growth over time, with some estimates suggesting that over 70% of the present continental crustal reservoir was extracted by the end of the Archaean eon. Patterns of crustal growth and reworking in rocks younger than three billion years (Gyr) are thought to reflect the assembly and break-up of supercontinents by Wilson cycle processes and mark an important change in lithosphere dynamics. In southern West Greenland numerous studies have, however, argued for subduction settings and crust growth by arc accretion back to 3.8 Gyr ago, suggesting that modern-day tectonic regimes operated during the formation of the earliest crustal rock record. Here we report in situ uranium-lead, hafnium and oxygen isotope data from zircons of basement rocks in southern West Greenland across the critical time period during which modern-like tectonic regimes could have initiated. Our data show pronounced differences in the hafnium isotope-time patterns across this interval, requiring changes in the characteristics of the magmatic protolith. The observations suggest that 3.9-3.5-Gyr-old rocks differentiated from a >3.9-Gyr-old source reservoir with a chondritic to slightly depleted hafnium isotope composition. In contrast, rocks formed after 3.2 Gyr ago register the first additions of juvenile depleted material (that is, new mantle-derived crust) since 3.9 Gyr ago, and are characterized by striking shifts in hafnium isotope ratios similar to those shown by Phanerozoic subduction-related orogens. These data suggest a transitional period 3.5-3.2 Gyr ago from an ancient (3.9-3.5 Gyr old) crustal evolutionary regime unlike that of modern plate tectonics to a geodynamic setting after 3.2 Gyr ago that involved juvenile crust generation by plate

  10. Electronic States of Hafnium and Vanadium oxide in Silicon Gate Stack Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chiyu; Tang, Fu; Liu, Xin; Yang, Jialing; Nemanich, Robert

    2010-03-01

    Vanadium oxide (VO2) is a narrow band gap material with a metal-insulator transition (MIT) at less than 100C. Hafnium oxide (HfO2) is currently the preferred high-k material for gate dielectrics. To utilize VO2 in a charge storage device, it is necessary to understand the band relationships between VO2, HfO2, and Si substrate. In this study, a 2nm thick VO2 layer is embedded in a dielectric stack structure between an oxidized n-type Si(100) surface and a 2nm HfO2 layer. The in situ experiments are carried out in an UHV multi-chamber system. After each growth step, the surface is characterized using XPS and UPS. After the initial plasma cleaning and oxidation treatment the Si substrate displayed essentially flat bands at the surface. After deposition of the VO2 layer, the Si 2p peak shifted to lower binding energy, and the Si 2p associated with the SiO2 layer also was shifted, indicating an internal field in the SiO2. The VO2 valence band maximum (VBM) was identified at 0.6 eV below the Fermi level (EF). This ultra thin VO2 exhibits the metal-insulator transition at a temperature higher than thicker films. As a comparison, a 100nm thick film of VO2 on Si showed a MIT at 60C. After the HfO2 deposition, the Si 2p substrate feature returned to the initial value indicating a return to flat band conditions. The UPS indicated the VBM of HfO2 at 4.0 eV below EF. This work is supported by the NSF (DMR-0805353).

  11. Pulse Tube Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Yoichi

    The pulse tube refrigerator is one of the regenerative cycle refrigerators such as Stirling cycle or Gifford-McMahon cycle which gives the cooling temperature below 150 K down to liquid helium temperature. In 1963, W. E. Gifford invented a simple refrigeration cycle which is composed of compressor, regenerator and simple tube named as pulse tube which gives a similar function of the expander in Stirling or Gifford-McMahon cycle. The thermodynamically performance of this pulse tube refrigerator is inferior to that of other regenerative cycles. In 1984, however, Mikulin and coworkers made a significant advance in pulse tube configuration called as orifice pulse tube. After this, several modifications of the pulse tube hot end configuration have been developed. With those modifications, the thermodynamic performance of the pulse tube refrigerator became the same order to that of Stirling and Gifford-McMahon refrigerator. This article reviews the brief history of the pulse tube refrigerator development in the view point of its thermodynamically efficiency. Simplified theories of the energy flow in the pulse tube have also been described.

  12. Selected fretting-wear-resistant coatings for titanium - 6-percent-aluminum - 4-percent-vanadium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    A titanium - 6-percent-aluminum - 4-percent-vanadium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) was subjected to fretting-wear exposures against uncoated Ti-6Al-4V as a baseline and against various coatings and surface treatments applied to Ti-6Al-4V. The coatings evaluated included plasma-sprayed tungsten carbide with 12 percent cobalt, aluminum oxide with 13 percent titanium oxide, chromium oxide, and aluminum bronze with 10 percent aromatic polyester; polymer-bonded polyimide, polyimide with graphite fluoride, polyimide with molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), and methyl phenyl silicone bonded MoS2, preoxidation surface treatment, a nitride surface treatment, and a sputtered MoS2 coating. Results of wear measurements on both the coated and uncoated surfaces after 300,000 fretting cycles indicated that the polyimide coating was the most wear resistant and caused the least wear to the uncoated mating surface.

  13. Lunar Lava Tube Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Cheryl Lynn; Walden, Bryce; Billings, Thomas L.; Reeder, P. Douglas

    1992-01-01

    Large (greater than 300 m diameter) lava tube caverns appear to exist on the Moon and could provide substantial safety and cost benefits for lunar bases. Over 40 m of basalt and regolith constitute the lava tube roof and would protect both construction and operations. Constant temperatures of -20 C reduce thermal stress on structures and machines. Base designs need not incorporate heavy shielding, so lightweight materials can be used and construction can be expedited. Identification and characterization of lava tube caverns can be incorporated into current precursor lunar mission plans. Some searches can even be done from Earth. Specific recommendations for lunar lava tube search and exploration are (1) an Earth-based radar interferometer, (2) an Earth-penetrating radar (EPR) orbiter, (3) kinetic penetrators for lunar lava tube confirmation, (4) a 'Moon Bat' hovering rocket vehicle, and (5) the use of other proposed landers and orbiters to help find lunar lava tubes.

  14. Collapse of flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilets, L.; Puff, R. D.

    1995-01-01

    The dynamics of an idealized, infinite, MIT-type flux tube is followed in time as the interior evolves from a pure gluon field to a q¯q plasma. We work in color U(1). q¯q pair formation is evaluated according to the Schwinger mechanism using the results of Brink and Pavel. The motion of the quarks toward the tube end caps is calculated by a Boltzmann equation including collisions. The tube undergoes damped radial oscillations until the electric field settles down to zero. The electric field stabilizes the tube against pinch instabilities; when the field vanishes, the tube disintegrates into mesons. There is only one free parameter in the problem, namely the initial flux tube radius, to which the results are very sensitive. Among various quantities calculated is the mean energy of the emitted pions.

  15. Ruggedized electronographic tube development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevin, S.

    1981-01-01

    Because of their glass components and lack of far ultraviolet sensitivity, currently available Spectracons are not suited for rocket launch. Technology developed for second generation image tubes and for magnetically focused image tubes can be applied to improve the optical and mechanical properties of these magnetically focused electronographic tubes whose 40 kilovolt signal electrons exit a 4-micrometer thick mica window and penetrate a photographic recording emulsion.

  16. TUBE SPLITTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Frantz, C.E.; Cawley, W.E.

    1961-05-01

    A tool is described for cutting a coolant tube adapted to contain fuel elements to enable the tube to be removed from a graphite moderator mass. The tool splits the tube longitudinally into halves and curls the longitudinal edges of the halves inwardly so that they occupy less space and can be moved radially inwardly away from the walls of the hole in the graphite for easy removal from the graphite.

  17. Tube-welder aids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Simple tools assist in setting up and welding tubes. Welder aids can be easily made to fit given tube diameter. Finished set can be used repeatedly to fix electrode-to-weld gap and mark sleeve and joint positions. Tools are readily made in tube-manufacturing plants and pay for themselves in short time in reduced labor costs and quality control: Conventional measurements are too slow for mass production and are prone to errors.

  18. Conduction cooled tube supports

    DOEpatents

    Worley, Arthur C.; Becht, IV, Charles

    1984-01-01

    In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

  19. Composite Pulse Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jerry L.; Cloyd, Jason H.

    2007-01-01

    A modification of the design of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube cryocooler reduces axial thermal conductance while preserving radial thermal conductance. It is desirable to minimize axial thermal conductance in the pulse-tube wall to minimize leakage of heat between the warm and cold ends of the pulse tube. At the same time, it is desirable to maximize radial thermal conductance at the cold end of the pulse tube to ensure adequate thermal contact between (1) a heat exchanger in the form of a stack of copper screens inside the pulse tube at the cold end and (2) the remainder of the cold tip, which is the object to which the heat load is applied and from which heat must be removed. The modified design yields a low-heat-leak pulse tube that can be easily integrated with a cold tip. A typical pulse tube of prior design is either a thin-walled metal tube or a metal tube with a nonmetallic lining. It is desirable that the outer surface of a pulse tube be cylindrical (in contradistinction to tapered) to simplify the design of a regenerator that is also part of the cryocooler. Under some conditions, it is desirable to taper the inner surface of the pulse tube to reduce acoustic streaming. The combination of a cylindrical outer surface and a tapered inner surface can lead to unacceptably large axial conduction if the pulse tube is made entirely of metal. Making the pulse-tube wall of a nonmetallic, lowthermal- conductivity material would not solve the problem because the wall would not afford the needed thermal contact for the stack of screens in the cold end. The modified design calls for fabricating the pulse tube in two parts: a longer, nonmetallic part that is tapered on the inside and cylindrical on the outside and a shorter, metallic part that is cylindrical on both the inside and the outside. The nonmetallic part can be made from G-10 fiberglass-reinforced epoxy or other low-thermal-conductivity, cryogenically compatible material. The metallic part must have high

  20. Flared tube attachment fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkire, I. D.; King, J. P., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Tubes can be flared first, then attached to valves and other flow line components, with new fitting that can be disassembled and reused. Installed fitting can be disassembled so parts can be inspected. It can be salvaged and reused without damaging flared tube; tube can be coated, tempered, or otherwise treated after it has been flared, rather than before, as was previously required. Fitting consists of threaded male portion with conical seating surface, hexagonal nut with hole larger than other diameter of flared end of tube, and split ferrule.

  1. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  2. Sapphire tube pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Outwater, J.O.

    2000-05-23

    A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

  3. Sapphire tube pressure vessel

    DOEpatents

    Outwater, John O.

    2000-01-01

    A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

  4. Manpower Considers CETA 5 Percent Set-Aside

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Joan Wills, from the National Governor's Association (NGA), explains NGA's recommendation to eliminate CETA's five percent set-aside for vocational education. (This article summarizes her presentation at the annual vocational convention.) (Editor)

  5. Gondwanan basement terranes of the Variscan-Appalachian orogen: Baltican, Saharan and West African hafnium isotopic fingerprints in Avalonia, Iberia and the Armorican Terranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Bonnie J.; Collins, William Joseph; Murphy, James Brendan; Gutierrez-Alonso, Gabriel; Hand, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Iberia, Avalonia and the "Armorican" terranes form key constituents of the Variscan-Appalachian orogen, but their Neoproterozoic origins along the northern Gondwanan margin continue to be strongly debated. Here, we present a new detrital zircon U-Pb-Hf dataset from Neoproterozoic-Silurian sedimentary sequences in NW Iberia and Avalonia, in conjunction with the comprehensive existing datasets from potential source cratons, to demonstrate that the provenance of each terrane is relatively simple and can be traced back to three major cratons. The enigmatic Tonian-Stenian detrital zircons in autochthonous Iberian rocks were derived from the Saharan metacraton in the latest Neoproterozoic-early Cambrian. Avalonia is commonly considered to have been derived from the Amazonian margin of Gondwana, but the hafnium isotopic characteristics of the detrital zircon grains in early Neoproterozoic rocks bear much stronger similarities to Baltica. The hafnium isotopic array also suggests the early Avalonian oceanic arc was built on a sliver of "Grenvillian-type crust" (~ 2.0-1.0 Ga) possibly of Baltican affinity at ~ 800 Ma, prior to accretion with a continental margin at ~ 640 Ma. The Upper Allochthon of Iberia is frequently linked to the West African Craton in the late Neoproterozoic-early Cambrian, however the hafnium isotopic array presented here does not support this connection; rather it is more similar to the hafnium array from Avalonia. The Armorican terranes have strong detrital zircon isotopic links to the West African Craton during the late Neoproterozoic-Cambrian.

  6. 26 CFR 301.6226(b)-1 - 5-percent group.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... beginning prior to October 4, 2001, see § 301.6226(b)-1T contained in 26 CFR part 1, revised April 1, 2001. ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false 5-percent group. 301.6226(b)-1 Section 301.6226... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Assessment In General § 301.6226(b)-1 5-percent group. (a) In...

  7. 26 CFR 301.6226(b)-1 - 5-percent group.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... beginning prior to October 4, 2001, see § 301.6226(b)-1T contained in 26 CFR part 1, revised April 1, 2001. ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false 5-percent group. 301.6226(b)-1 Section 301.6226... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Assessment In General § 301.6226(b)-1 5-percent group. (a) In...

  8. Steam generator tube failures

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

  9. The energy landscape of glassy dynamics on the amorphous hafnium diboride surface

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Duc; Girolami, Gregory S.; Mallek, Justin; Cloud, Andrew N.; Abelson, John R.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-11-28

    Direct visualization of the dynamics of structural glasses and amorphous solids on the sub-nanometer scale provides rich information unavailable from bulk or conventional single molecule techniques. We study the surface of hafnium diboride, a conductive ultrahigh temperature ceramic material that can be grown in amorphous films. Our scanning tunneling movies have a second-to-hour dynamic range and single-point current measurements extend that to the millisecond-to-minute time scale. On the a-HfB{sub 2} glass surface, two-state hopping of 1–2 nm diameter cooperatively rearranging regions or “clusters” occurs from sub-milliseconds to hours. We characterize individual clusters in detail through high-resolution (<0.5 nm) imaging, scanning tunneling spectroscopy and voltage modulation, ruling out individual atoms, diffusing adsorbates, or pinned charges as the origin of the observed two-state hopping. Smaller clusters are more likely to hop, larger ones are more likely to be immobile. HfB{sub 2} has a very high bulk glass transition temperature T{sub g}, and we observe no three-state hopping or sequential two-state hopping previously seen on lower T{sub g} glass surfaces. The electronic density of states of clusters does not change when they hop up or down, allowing us to calibrate an accurate relative z-axis scale. By directly measuring and histogramming single cluster vertical displacements, we can reconstruct the local free energy landscape of individual clusters, complete with activation barrier height, a reaction coordinate in nanometers, and the shape of the free energy landscape basins between which hopping occurs. The experimental images are consistent with the compact shape of α-relaxors predicted by random first order transition theory, whereas the rapid hopping rate, even taking less confined motion at the surface into account, is consistent with β-relaxations. We make a proposal of how “mixed” features can show up in surface dynamics of glasses.

  10. The Molecular Frame Electric Dipole Moment and Hyperfine Interactions in Hafnium Fluoride, HfF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Anh; Steimle, Timothy C.; Skripnikov, Leonid; Titov, Anatoly V.

    2013-06-01

    The identification of HfF^{+} as a possible candidate for a d_{e}} measurement has stimulated new interest in the spectroscopy of both HfF^{+} and neutral HfF. Studies of the neutral are relevant because photoionization schemes can be used to produce the cations. More importantly, computational methodologies used to predict the electronic wavefunction of HfF^{+} can be effectively assessed by making a comparison of predicted and experimental properties of the neutral, which are more readily determinable. The (1,0)[17.9]2.5 -X^{2}Δ_{3/2} band of hafnium monofluoride (HfF) has been recorded using high-resolution laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy both field-free and in the presence of a static electric field. The field-free spectra of ^{177}HfF, ^{179}HfF, and ^{180}HfF were model to generate a set of fine and hyperfine parameters for the X^{2}Δ_{3/2} (v=0) and [17.9]2.5 (v=1) states. The observed optical Stark shifts for the ^{180}HfF isotopologue were analyzed to produce the molecular frame electric dipole moments of 1.66(1)D and 0.419(7)D for the X^{2}Δ_{3/2} and [17.9]2.5 states, respectively. A two-step ab initio calculation consisting of a two-component generalized relativistic effective core potential calculation (GRECP) followed by a restoration of the proper four-component wavefunction was performed to predict the properties of ground state HfF. B. J. Barker, I. O. Antonov, V. E. Bondybey, and M. C. Heaven, J. Chem. Phys., 134, 201102 (2011). K. C. Cossel, D. N. Gresh, L. C. Sinclair, T. Coffey, L. V. Skripnikov, A. N. Petrov, N. S. Mosyagin, A. V. Titov, R. W. Field, E. R. Meyer, E. A. Cornell and J. Ye, Chem. Phys. Lett., 546, 1 (2012). M. Grau, A. E. Leanhardt, H. Loh, L. C. Sinclair, R. P. Stutz, T. S. Yahn, and E. A. Cornell, J. Mol. Spectroc., 272, 32 (2012). H. Loh, R. P. Stutz, T. S. Yahn, H. Looser, R. W. Field, and E. A. Cornell, J. Mol. Spectroc.,276-277, 49 (2012).

  11. Hafnium dioxide gate dielectrics, metal gate electrodes, and phenomena occurring at their interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, James Kenyon, III

    As metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) gate lengths scale down below 45 nm, the gate oxide thickness approaches 1 nm equivalent oxide thickness. At this thickness, conventional silicon dioxide (SiO 2) gate dielectrics suffer from excessive gate leakage. Higher permittivity dielectrics are required to counter the increase in gate leakage. Hafnium dioxide (HfO2) has emerged as a promising dielectric candidate. HfO2 films deposited using metal organic chemical vapor deposition are being studied to determine the impact of process and annealing conditions on the physical and electrical properties of the gate dielectric. This study indicates that deposition and annealing temperatures influence the microstructure, density, impurity concentration, chemical environment of the impurities, and band-gap of the HfO2 dielectric. Correlations of the electrical and physical properties of the films indicate that impurities in the form of segregated carbon clusters, and low HfO2 density are detrimental to the leakage properties of the gate dielectric. Additionally, as the HfO2 thickness scales, the additional series capacitance due to poly-silicon depletion plays a larger roll in reducing the total gate capacitance. To solve this problem, high performance bulk MOSFETs will require dual metal gate electrodes possessing work functions near the silicon band edges for optimized drive current. This investigation evaluates TiN, Ta-Si-N, Ti-Al-N, WN, TaN, TaSi, Ir and IrO2 electrodes as candidate electrodes on HfO2 dielectrics. The metal-dielectric compatibility was studied by annealing the gate stacks at different temperatures. The physical stability and effective work functions of metal electrodes on HfO2 are discussed. Finally, Fermi level pinning of the metal is a barrier to identifying materials with appropriate threshold voltages. The contributions to the Fermi level pinning of platinum electrodes on HfO2 gate dielectrics are investigated by examining the

  12. Deposition and characterization of titanium dioxide and hafnium dioxide thin films for high dielectric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Meeyoung

    The industry's demand for higher integrated circuit density and performance has forced the gate dielectric layer thickness to decrease rapidly. The use of conventional SiO2 films as gate oxide is reaching its limit due to the rapid increase in tunneling current. Therefore, a need for a high dielectric material to produce large oxide capacitance and low leakage current has emerged. Metal-oxides such as titanium dioxide (TiO2) and hafnium dioxide (HfO2) are attractive candidates for gate dielectrics due to their electrical and physical properties suitable for high dielectric applications. MOCVD of TiO2 using titanium isopropoxide (TTIP) precursor on p-type Si(100) has been studied. Insertion of a TiO x buffer layer, formed by depositing metallic Ti followed by oxidation, at the TiO2/Si interface has reduced the carbon contamination in the TiO2 film. Elemental Ti films, analyzed by in-situ AES, were found to grow according to Stranski-Krastanov mode on Si(100). Carbon-free, stoichiometric TiO2 films were successfully produced on Si(100) without any parasitic SiO2 layers at the TiO 2/Si interface. Electron-beam deposition of HfO2 films on Si(100) has also been investigated in this work. HfO2 films are formed by depositing elemental Hf on Si(100) and then oxidizing it either in O2 or O 3. XPS results reveal that with oxidation Hf(4f) peak shifts +3.45eV with 02 and +3.65eV with O3 oxidation. LEED and AFM studies show that the initially ordered crystalline Hf becomes disordered after oxidation. The thermodynamic stability of HfO2 films on Si has been studied using a unique test-bed structure of Hf/O3/Si. Post-Oxidation of Layer Deposition (POLD) has been employed to produce HfO2 films with a desired thickness. XPS results indicate that stoichiometric HfO 2 films were successfully produced using the POLD process. The investigation of the growth and thin film properties of TiO 2 and HfO2 using oxygen and ozone has laid a foundation for the application of these metal

  13. Charge trapping characterization methodology for the evaluation of hafnium-based gate dielectric film systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Chadwin Delin

    Scaling of advanced CMOS device dimensions, as set forth for future technology nodes by the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), will require reduction of the equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) of gate dielectrics below a point that can be physically realized using silicon dioxide. In order to continue EOT scaling below ˜1.5nm and reduce gate leakage current, higher dielectric constant materials will be needed to replace SiO2. Hafnium-based dielectrics are being widely investigated as potential candidates for the gate dielectric application. Their charge trapping characteristics were identified as a primary issue preventing the introduction of Hf-based materials into CMOS technology, potentially causing threshold voltage instability and mobility degradation. Several measurement techniques can be used to study and quantify charge trapping: Capacitance-Voltage (C-V) hysteresis, alternating stress and sense Vfb/Vt instability, charge pumping (CP), and fast transient Id-Vg (FT) measurement. The two most promising techniques are CP and FT measurements. Fixed-amplitude (FA) CP can measure interface state densities, while variable-amplitude (VA) CP can measure trap densities in the high-kappa bulk. In the FT measurement, the shift of the Id -Vg curves generated by the up and down swing of a trapezoidal pulse (i.e., DeltaVt) corresponds to the amount of the trapped charge. By using these two measurement approaches on varying physical thicknesses of Hf-based gate dielectric stacks, the impact of interfacial and bulk high-kappa charge-trapping properties on device performance (i.e., mobility) was investigated. Fixed-amplitude CP gives low interface state densities for all depositions indicating good interface passivation, whereas VA CP and FT shows large trap densities in the bulk of the high-kappa layer. Results demonstrate that the bulk trapping in the high-kappa film contributes to the degradation of device performance. Using fast transient

  14. Hafnium and neodymium isotope composition of seawater and filtered particles from the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stichel, T.; Frank, M.; Haley, B. A.; Rickli, J.; Venchiarutti, C.

    2009-12-01

    Radiogenic hafnium (Hf) and neodymium (Nd) isotopes have been used as tracers for past continental weathering regimes and ocean circulation. To date, however, there are only very few data available on dissolved Hf isotope compositions in present-day seawater and there is a complete lack of particulate data. During expedition ANTXXIV/3 (February to April 2008) we collected particulate samples (> 0.8 µm), which were obtained by filtrations of 270-700 liters of water. The samples were separated from the filters, completely dissolved, and purified for Nd and Hf isotope determination by TIMS and MC-ICPMS, respectively. In addition, we collected filtered (0.45 µm) seawater samples (20-120 liters) to determine the dissolved isotopic composition of Hf and Nd. The Hf isotope composition of the particulate fraction in the Drake Passage ranged from 0 to -28 ɛHf and is thus similar to that observed in core top sediments from the entire Southern Ocean in a previous study. The most unradiogenic and isotopically homogenous Hf isotope compositions in our study were found near the Antarctic Peninsula. Most of the stations north of the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Front (SACC) show a large variation in ɛHf between 0 and -23 within the water column of one station and between the stations. The locations at which these Hf isotope compositions were measured are mostly far away from the potential source areas. Nd, in contrast, was nearly absent throughout the entire sample set and the only measurable ɛNd data ranged from 0 to -7, which is in good agreement with the sediment data in that area. The dissolved seawater isotopic compositions of both Hf and Nd show only minor variance (ɛHf = 4.2 to 4.7 and ɛNd = -8.8 to -7.6, respectively). These patterns in Hf isotopes and the nearly complete absence of Nd indicates that the particulate fraction does not contain a lot of terrigeneous material but is almost entirely dominated by biogenic opal. The homogenous and relatively radiogenic

  15. Welding Tubes In Place

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, R.

    1984-01-01

    Special welding equipment joins metal tubes that carry pressurized cyrogenic fluids. Equipment small enough to be used in confined spaces in which such tubes often mounted. Welded joints lighter in weight and more leak-proof than joints made with mechanical fittings.

  16. Pyrotechnic Tubing Connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Thomas J.; Yang, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Tool forms mechanical seal at joint without levers or hydraulic apparatus. Proposed tool intended for use in outer space used on Earth by heavily garbed workers to join tubing in difficult environments. Called Pyrotool, used with Lokring (or equivalent) fittings. Piston slides in cylinder when pushed by gas from detonating pyrotechnic charge. Impulse of piston compresses fittings, sealing around butting ends of tubes.

  17. Method for shaping polyethylene tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Method forms polyethylene plastic tubing into configurations previously only possible with metal tubing. By using polyethylene in place of copper or stain less steel tubing inlow pressure systems, fabrication costs are significantly reduced. Polyethylene tubing can be used whenever low pressure tubing is needed in oil operations, aircraft and space applications, powerplants, and testing laboratories.

  18. Evaluation of Length-of-Stain Gas Indicator Tubes for Measuring Carbon Monoxide in Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaubert, Earl C.; And Others

    Techniques for detection and measurement of carbon monoxide (CO) in air are of interest and utility in many aspects of automotive safety. CO concentrations may range from less than 100 parts per million (ppm), or 0.01 percent, to about 10 percent by volume. Gas indicator tubes have been used for many years primarily as detectors of hazardous gases…

  19. Fallopian Tube Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Thurmond, Amy Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Fallopian tube catheterization is used for treatment of infertility caused by proximal tubal occlusion, and has replaced surgical treatment for this condition. More recently, fallopian tube catheterization has been used for tubal sterilization. Interventional radiologists tested numerous methods for tubal occlusion using the rabbit as an animal model. As a result, a tubal device has recently been Food and Drug Administration approved for permanent sterilization using hysteroscopic guidance; it can also be placed fluoroscopically by fallopian tube catheterization as an “off-label” procedure. This is a 5-year continuation and update on a procedure that has been done by interventional radiologists for 25 years; history of the development of fallopian tube catheterization in women has been published in detail in this journal. Highlighted in this article will be description of the basic components needed for fallopian tube catheterization. PMID:24436565

  20. Robotic Tube-Gap Inspector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Gutow, David A.; Maslakowski, John E.

    1993-01-01

    Robotic vision system measures small gaps between nearly parallel tubes. Robot-held video camera examines closely spaced tubes while computer determines gaps between tubes. Video monitor simultaneously displays data on gaps.

  1. What Are Neural Tube Defects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Neural Tube Defects (NTDs): Condition Information Skip sharing on ... media links Share this: Page Content What are neural tube defects? Neural (pronounced NOOR-uhl ) tube defects ...

  2. Holder for Straightening Bent Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, A. R.; Polzien, E. D.

    1985-01-01

    One-piece holder restrains bent metal tube against further bending during straightening operation. Holder consists of handle 16 in. (41 cm) long welded to short, strong tube that fits around tube to be straightened.

  3. A 200 watt traveling wave-tube for the communications technology satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    The results of the design, development, and test of experimental and production units of PPM focused traveling wave tube that produces 225 watts of CW RF power over 85 MHz centered at 12.080 GHz are presented. The tube uses a coupled cavity RF circuit with a velocity taper for greater than 26 percent basic efficiency. Overall efficiency of 50 percent is achieved by the incorporation of a multistage depressed collector designed at NASA Lewis Research Center. The collector is cooled by direct radiation to deep space. The tube was designed to be used for broadcasting power transmission from a satellite.

  4. Comparing proton conductivity of polymer electrolytes by percent conducting volume

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yu Seung; Pivovar, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    Proton conductivity of sulfonated polymers plays a key role in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Mass based water uptake and ion exchange capacity of sulfonated polymers have been failed to correlating their proton conductivity. In this paper, we report a length scale parameter, percent conductivity volume, which is rather simply obtained from the chemical structure of polymer to compare proton conductivity of wholly aromatic sulfonated polymer perflurosulfonic acid. Morphology effect on proton conductivity at lower RH conditions is discussed using the percent conductivity volume parameter.

  5. Development of high efficiency (14 percent) solar cell array module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iles, P. A.; Khemthong, S.; Olah, S.; Sampson, W. J.; Ling, K. S.

    1980-01-01

    Most effort was concentrated on development of procedures to provide large area (3 in. diameter) high efficiency (16.5 percent AM1, 28 C) P+NN+ solar cells. Intensive tests with 3 in. slices gave consistently lower efficiency (13.5 percent). The problems were identified as incomplete formation of and optimum back surface field (BSF), and interaction of the BSF process and the shallow P+ junction. The problem was shown not to be caused by reduced quality of silicon near the edges of the larger slices.

  6. YouTube, dentistry, and dental education.

    PubMed

    Knösel, Michael; Jung, Klaus; Bleckmann, Annalen

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to systematically assess the informational value, intention, source, and bias of videos related to dentistry available on the video-sharing Internet platform YouTube. YouTube (www.youtube.com) was searched for videos related to dentistry, using the system-generated sorts "by relevance" and "most viewed" and two categories (All and Education). Each of the first thirty results was rated by two assessors filling out a questionnaire for each (total: 120). The data were subjected to statistical analysis using Cohen's kappa, Pearson's correlation coefficient tau, Mann-Whitney U-tests, and a nonparametric three-way ANOVA, including an analysis of the interaction between the sorting and category effect, with an α-level of 5 percent. The scan produced 279,000 results in the category All and 5,050 in the category Education. The analysis revealed a wide variety of information about dentistry available on YouTube. The purpose of these videos includes entertainment, advertising, and education. The videos classified under Education have a higher degree of usefulness and informational value for laypersons, dental students, and dental professionals than those found in a broader search category. YouTube and similar social media websites offer new educational possibilities that are currently both underdeveloped and underestimated in terms of their potential value. Dentists and dental educators should also recognize the importance of these websites in shaping public opinion about their profession. PMID:22184594

  7. Eustachian Tube Function.

    PubMed

    Ars, Bernard; Dirckx, Joris

    2016-10-01

    The fibrocartilaginous eustachian tube is part of a system of contiguous organs including the nose, palate, rhinopharynx, and middle ear cleft. The middle ear cleft consists of the tympanic cavity, which includes the bony eustachian tube (protympanum) and the mastoid gas cells system. The tympanic cavity and mastoid gas cells are interconnected and allow gaseous exchange and pressure regulation. The fibrocartilaginous eustachian tube is a complex organ consisting of a dynamic conduit with its mucosa, cartilage, surrounding soft tissue, peritubal muscles (ie, tensor and levator veli palatine, salpingopharyngeus and tensor tympani), and superior bony support (the sphenoid sulcus). PMID:27468632

  8. In situ infrared spectroscopy of hafnium oxide growth on hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.-T.; Wang, Y.; Brewer, R.T.; Wielunski, L.S.; Chabal, Y.J.; Moumen, N.; Boleslawski, M.

    2005-09-26

    The interface formation between HfO{sub 2} and H-terminated Si(111) and Si(100) is studied by in situ infrared absorption spectroscopy during atomic layer deposition using alternating tetrakis-ethylmethylamino hafnium (TEMAH) and deuterium oxide (D{sub 2}O) pulses. The HfO{sub 2} growth is initiated by the reaction of TEMAH with Si-H rather than D{sub 2}O, and there is no evidence for SiO{sub 2} formation at moderate growth temperatures ({approx}100 deg. C). Although Rutherford backscattering shows a linear increase of Hf coverage, direct observations of Si-H, Si-O-Hf, and HfO{sub 2} phonons indicate that five cycles are needed to reach the steady state interface composition of {approx}50% reacted sites. The formation of interfacial SiO{sub 2} ({approx}0.7 nm) is observed after postdeposition annealing at 700 deg. C in ultrapure nitrogen.

  9. Tribo-electrochemical characterization of hafnium multilayer systems deposited on nitride/vanadium nitride AISI 4140 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, M.; Vera, E.; Aperador, W.

    2016-02-01

    In this work is presented the synergistic behaviour among corrosion/wear (tribocorrosion) of the multilayer coatings hafnium nitride/vanadium nitride [HfN/VN]n. The multilayers were deposited on AISI 4140 steel using the technique of physical vapor deposition PVD magnetron sputtering, the tests were performed using a pin-on-disk tribometer, which has an adapted potentiostat galvanostat with three-electrode electrochemical cell. Tribocorrosive parameters such as: Friction coefficient between the coating and the counter body (100 Cr6 steel ball); Polarization resistance by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique and corrosion rate by polarization curves were determined. It was observed an increase in the polarization resistance, a decrease in the corrosion rate and a low coefficient of friction in comparison with the substrate, due to an increase on the number of bilayers.

  10. Nuclear quadrupole interaction at 181Ta in hafnium dioxide fiber: Time differential perturbed angular correlation measurements and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, D.; Das, P.; Guin, R.; Das, S. K.

    2012-09-01

    The thermal behavior of hafnium dioxide fiber has been investigated with the aid of time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique along with XRD and SEM measurements. This study has proved a good thermal stability of the fibrous material up to 1173 K and the fiber loses its crystallinity to a meager extent at 1673 K. No phase transition has been observed up to 1673 K in this fiber. TDPAC parameters for the HfO2 fiber annealed at 1173 K are ωQ=124.6 (3) Mrad/s and η=0.36 (1). These values remain unaltered for the HfO2 fiber annealed even at 1673 K. Electronic structure calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) for HfO2 doped with tantalum impurity have been performed and the calculated EFG parameters are in reasonable agreement with the experimental values.