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Sample records for percent ni austenitic

  1. Effect of Temperature on the Deformation Behavior of B2 Austenite in a Polycrystalline Ni49.9Ti50.1 (at.Percent) Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, A.; Benafan, O.; Noebe, R. D.; Padula, S. A., II; Clausen, B.; Vogel, S.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2013-01-01

    Superelasticity in austenitic B2-NiTi is of great technical interest and has been studied in the past by several researchers [1]. However, investigation of temperature dependent deformation in B2-NiTi is equally important since competing mechanisms of stress-induced martensite (SIM), retained martensite, plastic and deformation twinning can lead to unusual mechanical behaviors. Identification of the role of various mechanisms contributing to the overall deformation response of B2-NiTi is imperative to understanding and maturing SMA-enabled technologies. Thus, the objective of this work was to study the deformation of polycrystalline Ni49.9Ti50.1 (at. %) above A(sub f) (105 C) in the B2 state at temperatures between 165-440 C, and generate a B2 deformation map showing active deformation mechanisms in different temperature-stress regimes.

  2. The chemical composition of precipitated austenite in 9Ni steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fultz, B.; Kim, J. I.; Kim, Y. H.; Morris, J. W.

    1986-06-01

    Analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy and a novel Mössbauer spectrometry technique were used to measure the chemical composition of austenite particles which precipitate during intercritical tempering of 9Ni steel. Both techniques showed an enrichment of Ni, Mn, Cr, and Si in the austenite. A straightforward analysis involving data on both austenite composition and austenite formation kinetics suggests that the growth of austenite particles is controlled by a 3-dimensional diffusion process. The segregation of solutes to the austenite accounts for much of its stability against the martensitic transformation at low temperatures. Composition inhomogeneities develop in austenite particles after long temperings; the central regions of the particles are lean in solutes and are first to undergo the martensitic transformation. However, changes in solute concentrations of the austenite during long temperings seem too small to account for the large changes in austenite stability. It appears that some of the stability of precipitated austenite must be microstructural in origin.

  3. Evaporative segregation in 80 percent Ni-20 percent Cr and 60 percent Fe-40 percent Ni alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, J. L.; Gupta, K. P.; Li, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    The phenomenon of evaporative segregation in binary alloys has been investigated through a study of some experimental evaporation data relating to the Ni-Cr and Ni-Fr systems. In normal evaporation it is assumed that (1) the evaporating alloy is always homogeneous, (2) the vapor is instantly removed, and (3) the alloy follows Raoult's law. The solutions of the evaporation equations for the two most important cases are presented and experimental data are analyzed with these equations. The difference between observed and calculated values of evaporation constants lies within one order of magnitude. This is surprising because of the major assumptions stated above. Experimental results have shown that the evaporation time and final solute concentration are logarithmically related, further supporting our evaporation equations. It is further shown that neglecting the nonlogarithmic term in these evaporation equations may introduce considerable errors in the analysis.

  4. Precipitation and stability of reversed austenite in 9Ni steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue-Hui; Cai, Qing-Wu; Tang, Di; Wu, Hui-Bin

    2010-10-01

    A new method was used to analyze the factors affecting the precipitation of reversed austenite during tempering. The samples were kept at various tempering temperatures for 10 min and their length changes were recorded. Then, the precipitation of reversed austenite which led to the length reduction was shown by thermal expansion curves. The results show that the effects of process parameters on the precipitation of reversed austenite can be determined more accurately by this method than by X-ray diffraction. When the quenching and tempering process is adopted, both the lower quenching temperature and higher tempering temperature can promote the precipitation of reversed austenite during tempering; and when the quenching, lamellarizing, and tempering process is used, intercritical quenching is considered beneficial to the precipitation of reversed austenite in the subsequent tempering because of Ni segregation during holding at the intercritical temperature.

  5. The mechanical stability of precipitated austenite in 9Ni steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fultz, B.; Morris, J. W.

    1985-12-01

    The strains inherent to the martensitic transformation of austenite particles in 9Ni steel create dislocation structures in the tempered martensite. These dislocation structures were studied by the complementary techniques of X-ray line profile analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The energy required to form these dislocation structures affects the thermodynamics of the transformation. We propose that changes in these dislocation structures reduce the “mechanical stability” of the austenite particles as they grow larger during isothermal tempering.

  6. Stable atomic structure of NiTi austenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-08-01

    Nitinol (NiTi), the most widely used shape-memory alloy, exhibits an austenite phase that has yet to be identified. The usually assumed austenitic structure is cubic B2, which has imaginary phonon modes, hence it is unstable. We suggest a stable austenitic structure that "on average" has B2 symmetry (observed by x-ray and neutron diffraction), but it exhibits finite atomic displacements from the ideal B2 sites. The proposed structure has a phonon spectrum that agrees with that from neutron scattering, has diffraction spectra in agreement with x-ray diffraction, and has an energy relative to the ground state that agrees with calorimetry data.

  7. Stable atomic structure of NiTi austenite

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A; Johnson, Duane D

    2014-08-01

    Nitinol (NiTi), the most widely used shape-memory alloy, exhibits an austenite phase that has yet to be identified. The usually assumed austenitic structure is cubic B2, which has imaginary phonon modes, hence it is unstable. We suggest a stable austenitic structure that “on average” has B2 symmetry (observed by x-ray and neutron diffraction), but it exhibits finite atomic displacements from the ideal B2 sites. The proposed structure has a phonon spectrum that agrees with that from neutron scattering, has diffraction spectra in agreement with x-ray diffraction, and has an energy relative to the ground state that agrees with calorimetry data.

  8. Austenite Formation from Martensite in a 13Cr6Ni2Mo Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojack, A.; Zhao, L.; Morris, P. F.; Sietsma, J.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of austenitization treatment of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel (X2CrNiMoV13-5-2) on austenite formation during reheating and on the fraction of austenite retained after tempering treatment is measured and analyzed. The results show the formation of austenite in two stages. This is probably due to inhomogeneous distribution of the austenite-stabilizing elements Ni and Mn, resulting from their slow diffusion from martensite into austenite and carbide and nitride dissolution during the second, higher temperature, stage. A better homogenization of the material causes an increase in the transformation temperatures for the martensite-to-austenite transformation and a lower retained austenite fraction with less variability after tempering. Furthermore, the martensite-to-austenite transformation was found to be incomplete at the target temperature of 1223 K (950 °C), which is influenced by the previous austenitization treatment and the heating rate. The activation energy for martensite-to-austenite transformation was determined by a modified Kissinger equation to be approximately 400 and 500 kJ/mol for the first and the second stages of transformation, respectively. Both values are much higher than the activation energy found during isothermal treatment in a previous study and are believed to be effective activation energies comprising the activation energies of both mechanisms involved, i.e., nucleation and growth.

  9. The stability of precipitated austenite and the toughness of 9Ni steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fultz, B.; Kim, J. I.; Kim, Y. H.; Kim, H. J.; Fior, G. O.; Morris, J. W.

    1985-12-01

    A correlation was confirmed between the good low temperature Charpy toughness of 9Ni steel and the stability of its precipitated austenite against the martensitic transformation. Changes in the microstructure during isothermal tempering were studied in detail. The austenite/martensite interface is originally quite coherent over ˜100 A distances. With further tempering, however, the dislocation structure at the austenite/martensite interface changes, and this change may be related to the increased instability of the austenite particles. The reduction in austenite carbon concentration does not seem large enough to account for the large reduction in austenite stability with tempering time. The strains inherent to the transformation of austenite particles create dislocation structures in the tempered martensite. The large deterioration of the Charpy toughness of overtempered material is attributed, in part, to these dislocation structures.

  10. The formation of twinned austenite in Fe-10Cr-10Ni-2W maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Suk, J.I.; Hong, S.H.; Nam, S.W. )

    1991-12-01

    The precipitation hardening mechanisms in high strength maraging steels have been studied in detail by many investigators, but limited information is available on the formation of austenite during aging. Some investigations have been concerned with the understanding of the effect of reverted austenite formed during aging on the mechanical properties. However, only a few investigations have been reported on the morphology and crystallographic feature of austenite. Shiang and Wayman first reported the twin-related and coupled morphology of Widmanstatten austenite plates which were frequently observed in maraging steel. In addition, Ameyama et al. reported the morphology and crystallographic features of austenite formed in ferrite grain during aging in a two-phase stainless steel, and found that each side of the austenite pair of twins satisfies the Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S) orientation relationship with the parent phase. The morphology and crystallographic features of the reverted austenite formed during aging of Fe-10Cr-10Ni-2W stainless maraging steel have been investigated in this paper. The major strengthening precipitate in Fe-10Cr-10Ni-2W maraging steels has been identified as the rod-shaped {eta}-Ni{sub 3}Ti phase in our previous study. The peculiar morphology of the austenite, i.e., twinned austenite, also has been found in our studies of maraging steel in the Fe-10Cr-10Ni-2W lath martensite. In addition, computer simulation of the diffraction pattern is used to confirm the orientation relationships, such as the Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S) relationship, the Nishiyama-Wasserman (N-W) relationship and the twin relationship by comparisons with the experimentaly observed results.

  11. Austenite precipitation during tempering in 16Cr-2Ni martensitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Balan, K.P.; Reddy, A.V.; Sarma, D.S.

    1998-09-04

    The 16Cr-2Ni steel when quenched from austenitizing temperature of 1,323K results in the formation of a complex microstructure consisting of the inherited {delta}-ferrite, martensite and retained austenite with a few undissolved M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides. There do not appear to be many reports on tempering behavior of 16Cr-2Ni steel through microstructural characterization using transmission electron microscopy. A comprehensive study is under progress to examine the structure-fracture-property relationship on 16Cr-2Ni steel and the microstructural changes that occur on tempering the steel are dealt with in this paper.

  12. Microstructure inhomogeneity of Fe-31%Ni alloy and stabilization of austenite.

    PubMed

    Dzevin, Ievgenij M

    2015-01-01

    Сrystal structure and mechanism of crystallization of Fe-Ni alloys were studied by methods of X-ray diffraction and metallography. It has been found that macro- and microstructure of austenitic alloy was essentially heterogeneous at the contact and free surfaces and in the volume of a ribbon. The indentified peculiarities of the austenitic phase in different areas of the ribbon are attributed to different cooling rates and the melt crystallization conditions. PMID:25852411

  13. Austenite layer and precipitation in high Co-Ni maraging steel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenchong; Zhang, Chi; Yang, Zhigang

    2014-12-01

    In high Co-Ni maraging steel, austenite has a great effect on the fracture toughness of the steel and the precipitated carbides are the main strengthening phase. In this study, both austenite layers and precipitation were observed and their formation theory was analyzed by Thermo-Calc simulation and several reported results. TEM and HRTEM observation results showed that the thickness of the austenite layers was about 5-10 nm and the length of the needle-like precipitated carbides was less than 10nm. The carbides maintained coherent or semi-coherent relation with the matrix. PMID:25129424

  14. The composition of precipitated austenite in 5.5ni steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. I.; Morris, J. W.

    1981-11-01

    Both scanning transmission electron microscopic (STEM) and chemical extraction techniques were used to analyze the chemical content of precipitated austenite in 5.5Ni steel as a function of heat treatment. Austenite was introduced into the steel by tempering at 600 °C for 2 h (QT2) or 100 h (QT100), by tempering for 1 h at 670 °C (QL), or by double tempering 1 h at 670 °C + 1 h at 600 °C (QLT). The two methods of chemical analysis employed for the analysis of this austenite differ quantitatively in the measured austenite composition but are in qualitative agreement; they show an austenite enrichment in Ni, Cr, Mn, and Mo which is most pronounced (and nearly equivalent) for the QT100 and QLT treatments. The similar enrichment of the QT100 and QLT material is interpreted in light of the sequence of reactions leading to the QLT structure. A good correlation is found between the apparent solute enrichment of the precipitated austenite and its thermal stability on cooling to 77 K.

  15. Ultrafine-Grained Structure of Fe-Ni-C Austenitic Alloy Formed by Phase Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilchenko, Vitalij

    2016-02-01

    The X-ray and magnetometry methods were used to study α-γ transformation mechanisms on heating quenched Fe-22.7 wt.% Ni-0.58 wt.% C alloy. Variation of heating rate within 0.03-80 K/min allowed one to switch from diffusive to non-diffusive mechanism of the α-γ transformation. Heating up primary austenitic single crystal specimen at a rate of less than 1.0-0.5 K/min has led to formation of aggregate of grains with different orientation and chemical composition in the reverted austenite. Significant fraction of these grains was determined to have sizes within nanoscale range.

  16. In-situ determination of austenite and martensite formation in 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bojack, A.; Zhao, L.; Morris, P.F.; Sietsma, J.

    2012-09-15

    In-situ analysis of the phase transformations in a 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel (X2CrNiMoV13-5-2) was carried out using a thermo-magnetic technique, dilatometry and high temperature X-ray diffractometry (HT-XRD). A combination of the results obtained by the three applied techniques gives a valuable insight in the phase transformations during the austenitization treatment, including subsequent cooling, of the 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel, where the magnetic technique offers a high accuracy in monitoring the austenite fraction. It was found by dilatometry that the austenite formation during heating takes place in two stages, most likely caused by partitioning of Ni into austenite. The in-situ evolution of the austenite fraction is monitored by high-temperature XRD and dilatometry. The progress of martensite formation during cooling was described with a Koistinen-Marburger relation for the results obtained from the magnetic and dilatometer experiments. Enhanced martensite formation at the sample surface was detected by X-ray diffraction, which is assumed to be due to relaxation of transformation stresses at the sample surface. Due to the high alloy content and high thermodynamic stability of austenite at room temperature, 4 vol.% of austenite was found to be stable at room temperature after the austenitization treatment. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We in-situ analyzed phase transformations and fractions of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo SMSS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher accuracy of the austenite fraction was obtained from magnetic technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Austenite formation during heating takes place in two stages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced martensite formation at the sample surface detected by X-ray diffraction.

  17. In Situ Thermo-magnetic Investigation of the Austenitic Phase During Tempering of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojack, A.; Zhao, L.; Morris, P. F.; Sietsma, J.

    2014-09-01

    The formation of austenite during tempering of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel (X2CrNiMoV13-5-2) was investigated using an in situ thermo-magnetic technique to establish the kinetics of the martensite to austenite transformation and the stability of austenite. The austenite fraction was obtained from in situ magnetization measurements. It was found that during heating to the tempering temperature 1 to 2 vol pct of austenite, retained during quenching after the austenitization treatment, decomposed between 623 K and 753 K (350 °C and 480 °C). The activation energy for martensite to austenite transformation was found by JMAK-fitting to be 233 kJ/mol. This value is similar to the activation energy for Ni and Mn diffusion in iron and supports the assumption that partitioning of Ni and Mn to austenite are mainly rate determining for the austenite formation during tempering. This also indicates that the stability of austenite during cooling after tempering depends on these elements. With increasing tempering temperature the thermal stability of austenite is decreasing due to the lower concentrations of austenite-stabilizing elements in the increased fraction of austenite. After cooling from the tempering temperature the retained austenite was further partially decomposed during holding at room temperature. This appears to be related to previous martensite formation during cooling.

  18. In Situ Thermo-magnetic Investigation of the Austenitic Phase During Tempering of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojack, A.; Zhao, L.; Morris, P. F.; Sietsma, J.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of austenite during tempering of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel (X2CrNiMoV13-5-2) was investigated using an in situ thermo-magnetic technique to establish the kinetics of the martensite to austenite transformation and the stability of austenite. The austenite fraction was obtained from in situ magnetization measurements. It was found that during heating to the tempering temperature 1 to 2 vol pct of austenite, retained during quenching after the austenitization treatment, decomposed between 623 K and 753 K (350 °C and 480 °C). The activation energy for martensite to austenite transformation was found by JMAK-fitting to be 233 kJ/mol. This value is similar to the activation energy for Ni and Mn diffusion in iron and supports the assumption that partitioning of Ni and Mn to austenite are mainly rate determining for the austenite formation during tempering. This also indicates that the stability of austenite during cooling after tempering depends on these elements. With increasing tempering temperature the thermal stability of austenite is decreasing due to the lower concentrations of austenite-stabilizing elements in the increased fraction of austenite. After cooling from the tempering temperature the retained austenite was further partially decomposed during holding at room temperature. This appears to be related to previous martensite formation during cooling.

  19. Machining and Phase Transformation Response of Room-Temperature Austenitic NiTi Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaynak, Yusuf

    2014-09-01

    This experimental work reports the results of a study addressing tool wear, surface topography, and x-ray diffraction analysis for the finish cutting process of room-temperature austenitic NiTi alloy. Turning operation of NiTi alloy was conducted under dry, minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) and cryogenic cooling conditions at various cutting speeds. Findings revealed that cryogenic machining substantially reduced tool wear and improved surface topography and quality of the finished parts in comparison with the other two approaches. Phase transformation on the surface of work material was not observed after dry and MQL machining, but B19' martensite phase was found on the surface of cryogenically machined samples.

  20. Defect and solute properties in dilute Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloys from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaver, T. P. C.; Hepburn, D. J.; Ackland, G. J.

    2012-05-01

    We present results of an extensive set of first-principles density functional theory calculations of point defect formation, binding, and clustering energies in austenitic Fe with dilute concentrations of Cr and Ni solutes. A large number of possible collinear magnetic structures were investigated as appropriate reference states for austenite. We found that the antiferromagnetic single- and double-layer structures with tetragonal relaxation of the unit cell were the most suitable reference states and highlighted the inherent instabilities in the ferromagnetic states. Test calculations for the presence and influence of noncollinear magnetism were performed but proved mostly negative. We calculate the vacancy formation energy to be between 1.8 and 1.95 eV. Vacancy cluster binding was initially weak at 0.1 eV for divacancies but rapidly increased with additional vacancies. Clusters of up to six vacancies were studied and a highly stable octahedral cluster and stacking fault tetrahedron were found with total binding energies of 2.5 and 2.3 eV, respectively. The <100> dumbbell was found to be the most stable self-interstitial with a formation energy of between 3.2 and 3.6 eV and was found to form strongly bound clusters, consistent with other fcc metals. Pair interaction models were found to be capable of capturing the trends in the defect cluster binding energy data. Solute-solute interactions were found to be weak in general, with a maximal positive binding of 0.1 eV found for Ni-Ni pairs and maximum repulsion found for Cr-Cr pairs of -0.1 eV. Solute cluster binding was found to be consistent with a pair interaction model, with Ni-rich clusters being the most stable. Solute-defect interactions were consistent with Ni and Cr being modestly oversized and undersized solutes, respectively, which is exactly opposite to the experimentally derived size factors for Ni and Cr solutes in type 316 stainless steel and in the pure materials. Ni was found to bind to the vacancy and

  1. Deformation-induced dissolution of the intermetallics Ni3Ti and Ni3Al in austenitic steels at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagaradze, V. V.; Shabashov, V. A.; Kataeva, N. V.; Zavalishin, V. A.; Kozlov, K. A.; Kuznetsov, A. R.; Litvinov, A. V.; Pilyugin, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    An anomalous deformation-induced dissolution of the intermetallics Ni3Al and Ni3Ti in the matrix of austenitic Fe-Ni-Al(Ti) alloys has been revealed in experiment at cryogenic temperatures (down to 77 K) under rolling and high pressure torsion. The observed phenomenon is explained as the result of migration of deformation-stipulated interstitial atoms from a particle into the matrix in the stress field of moving dislocations. With increasing the temperature of deformation, the dissolution is replaced by the deformation-induced precipitation of the intermetallics, which is accelerated due to a sufficient amount of point defects in the matrix, gained as well in the course of deformation at lower temperatures.

  2. Ultrafine-Grained Structure of Fe-Ni-C Austenitic Alloy Formed by Phase Hardening.

    PubMed

    Danilchenko, Vitalij

    2016-12-01

    The X-ray and magnetometry methods were used to study α-γ transformation mechanisms on heating quenched Fe-22.7 wt.% Ni-0.58 wt.% С alloy. Variation of heating rate within 0.03-80 K/min allowed one to switch from diffusive to non-diffusive mechanism of the α-γ transformation. Heating up primary austenitic single crystal specimen at a rate of less than 1.0-0.5 K/min has led to formation of aggregate of grains with different orientation and chemical composition in the reverted austenite. Significant fraction of these grains was determined to have sizes within nanoscale range. PMID:26860715

  3. On the Mechanisms for Martensite Formation in YAG Laser Welded Austenitic NiTi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. P.; Braz Fernandes, F. M.; Miranda, R. M.; Schell, N.

    2016-03-01

    Extensive work has been reported on the microstructure of laser-welded NiTi alloys either superelastic or with shape memory effect, motivated by the fact that the microstructure affects the functional properties. However, some effects of laser beam/material interaction with these alloys have not yet been discussed. This paper aims to discuss the mechanisms for the occurrence of martensite in the heat-affected zone and in the fusion zone at room temperature, while the base material is fully austenitic. For this purpose, synchrotron radiation was used together with a simple thermal analytic mathematical model. Two distinct mechanisms are proposed for the presence of martensite in different zones of a weld, which affects the mechanical and functional behavior of a welded component.

  4. Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkevich, N. A.; Johnson, D. D.

    2014-12-24

    NiTi is the most used shape-memory alloy, nonetheless, a lack of understanding remains regarding the associated structures and transitions, including their barriers. Using a generalized solid-state nudge elastic band (GSSNEB) method implemented via density-functional theory, we detail the structural transformations in NiTi relevant to shape memory: those between body-centered orthorhombic (BCO) groundstate and a newly identified stable austenite (“glassy” B2-like) structure, including energy barriers (hysteresis) and intermediate structures (observed as a kinetically limited R-phase), and between martensite variants (BCO orientations). All results are in good agreement with available experiment. We contrast the austenite results to those from the often-assumed, but unstable B2. Furthermore, these high- and low-temperature structures and structural transformations provide much needed atomic-scale detail for transitions responsible for NiTi shape-memory effects.

  5. Shape-memory transformations of NiTi: Minimum-energy pathways between austenite, martensites, and kinetically limited intermediate states

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zarkevich, N. A.; Johnson, D. D.

    2014-12-24

    NiTi is the most used shape-memory alloy, nonetheless, a lack of understanding remains regarding the associated structures and transitions, including their barriers. Using a generalized solid-state nudge elastic band (GSSNEB) method implemented via density-functional theory, we detail the structural transformations in NiTi relevant to shape memory: those between body-centered orthorhombic (BCO) groundstate and a newly identified stable austenite (“glassy” B2-like) structure, including energy barriers (hysteresis) and intermediate structures (observed as a kinetically limited R-phase), and between martensite variants (BCO orientations). All results are in good agreement with available experiment. We contrast the austenite results to those from the often-assumed, butmore » unstable B2. Furthermore, these high- and low-temperature structures and structural transformations provide much needed atomic-scale detail for transitions responsible for NiTi shape-memory effects.« less

  6. Strengthening of σ phase in a Fe20Cr9Ni cast austenite stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.Q.; Han, J.; Yang, B.; Wang, X.T.

    2013-10-15

    The strengthening mechanism of σ phase in a Fe20Cr9Ni cast austenite stainless steel used for primary coolant pipes of nuclear power plants has been investigated. The yield and ultimate tensile strengths of aged specimens increased comparing with those of the unaged ones. It was found that the increase of strengths is due to the hard and brittle (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure which decomposed from α phase in the steel. Fracture surfaces of specimens after in situ tensile test showed that the inhibition of (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure on the dislocation movements was more significant than ferrite although cracks started predominately at σ/γ{sub 2} interfaces. The (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure behaves like a fiber reinforced composite material. - Highlights: • The strengthening mechanism of σ phase in a Fe20Cr9Ni CASS is investigated. • The yield and ultimate tensile strengths increase with increasing of σ phase. • The increase of strengths is due to hard and brittle (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure. • The (σ + γ{sub 2}) structure in CASS behaves like a fibre reinforced composite material. • The σ/γ{sub 2} and α/σ/γ{sub 2} boundaries hinder the movement of dislocation.

  7. Influence of the PM-Processing Route and Nitrogen Content on the Properties of Ni-Free Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefor, Kathrin; Walter, M.; Weddeling, A.; Hryha, E.; Huth, S.; Weber, S.; Nyborg, L.; Theisen, W.

    2015-03-01

    Ni-free austenitic steels alloyed with Cr and Mn are an alternative to conventional Ni-containing steels. Nitrogen alloying of these steel grades is beneficial for several reasons such as increased strength and corrosion resistance. Low solubility in liquid and δ-ferrite restricts the maximal N-content that can be achieved via conventional metallurgy. Higher contents can be alloyed by powder-metallurgical (PM) production via gas-solid interaction. The performance of sintered parts is determined by appropriate sintering parameters. Three major PM-processing routes, hot isostatic pressing, supersolidus liquid phase sintering (SLPS), and solid-state sintering, were performed to study the influence of PM-processing route and N-content on densification, fracture, and mechanical properties. Sintering routes are designed with the assistance of thermodynamic calculations, differential thermal analysis, and residual gas analysis. Fracture surfaces were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Tensile tests and X-ray diffraction were performed to study mechanical properties and austenite stability. This study demonstrates that SLPS process reaches high densification of the high-Mn-containing powder material while the desired N-contents were successfully alloyed via gas-solid interaction. Produced specimens show tensile strengths >1000 MPa combined with strain to fracture of 60 pct and thus overcome the other tested production routes as well as conventional stainless austenitic or martensitic grades.

  8. Microstructure evolution in proton-irradiated austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys under LWR core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Jian

    1999-11-01

    Irradiation-induced microstructure of austenitic stainless steel was investigated using proton irradiation. High-purity alloys of Fe-20Cr-9Ni (UHP 304 SS), Fe-20Cr-24Ni and Ni-18Cr-9Fe were irradiated using 3.2 MeV protons at a dose rate of 7 × 10-6 dpa/s between 300°C and 600°C. The irradiation produced a microstructure consisting of dislocation loops and voids. The dose and temperature dependence of the number density and size of dislocation loops and voids were investigated. The changes in yield strength due to irradiation were estimated from Vickers hardness measurements and compared to calculations using a dispersed-barrier hardening model. The dose and temperature dependence of microstructure and hardness change for proton irradiation follows the same trend as that for neutron irradiation at comparable irradiation conditions. Commercial purity alloys of CP 304 SS and CP 316 SS were irradiated at 360°C to doses between 0.3 and 3.0 dpa. The irradiated microstructure consists of dislocation loops. No voids were detected at doses up to 3.0 dpa. Loop size distributions are in close agreement with that in the same alloys neutron-irradiated in a LWR core. The loop density also agrees with neutron irradiation data. The yield strength as a function of dose in proton irradiated commercial purity alloys is consistent with the neutron- data trend. A fast-reactor microstructure model was adapted for light water reactor (LWR) irradiation conditions (275°C, 7 × 10 -8 dpa/s) and then applied to proton irradiation under conditions (360°C, 7 × 10-6 dpa/s) relevant to LWRs. The original model was modified by including in-cascade interstitial clustering and the loss of interstitial clusters to sinks by cluster diffusion. It was demonstrated that loop nucleation for both LWR irradiation condition and proton irradiation are driven by in-cascade interstitial clustering. One important result from this modeling work is that the difference in displacement cascade between

  9. Performance of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Steels, Fe-base and Ni-base alloys exposed to metal dusting environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vande Put Ep Rouaix, Aurelie; Unocic, Kinga A; Pint, Bruce A; Brady, Michael P

    2011-01-01

    A series of conventional Fe- and Ni- base, chromia- and alumina- forming alloys, and a newly developed creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic steel were developed and its performance relative to conventional Fe- and Ni-based chromia-forming alloys was evaluated in metal dusting environments with a range of water vapor contents. Five 500h experiments have been performed at 650 C with different water vapor contents and total pressures. Without water vapor, the Ni-base alloys showed greater resistance to metal dusting than the Fe-base alloys, including AFA. However, with 10-28% water vapor, more protective behavior was observed with the higher-alloyed materials and only small mass changes were observed. Longer exposure times are in progress to further differentiate performance.

  10. Microstructure evolution in austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys irradiated with rotons: comparison with neutron-irradiated microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, J.; Was, G. S.

    2001-08-01

    Irradiation-induced microstructures of high purity and commercial purity austenitic stainless steels were investigated using proton-irradiation. For high purity alloys, Fe-20Cr-9Ni (HP 304 SS), Fe-20Cr-24Ni and Ni-18Cr-9Fe were irradiated using 3.2 MeV protons between 300°C and 600°C at a dose rate of 7×10 -6 dpa/ s to doses up to 3.0 dpa. The commercial purity alloys, CP 304 SS and CP 316 SS were irradiated at 360°C to doses between 0.3 and 5.0 dpa. The dose, temperature and composition dependence of the number density and size of dislocation loops and voids were characterized. The changes in yield strength due to irradiation were estimated from Vickers hardness measurements and compared to calculations using a dispersed-barrier-hardening (DBH) model. The dose and temperature dependence of proton-irradiated microstructure (loops, voids) and the irradiation hardening are consistent with the neutron-data trend. Results indicate that proton-irradiation can accurately reproduce the microstructure of austenitic alloys irradiated in LWR cores.

  11. Effect of Vanadium Nitride Precipitation on Martensitic Transformation and Mechanical Properties of CrMnNi Cast Austenitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendler, Marco; Reichel, Benedikt; Eckner, Ralf; Fabrichnaya, Olga; Krüger, Lutz; Weiß, Andreas; Mola, Javad

    2016-01-01

    The microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of two cast Fe-15Cr-6Mn-3Ni-0.5Si-0.2N-0.1C (concentrations in wt pct) steels containing no vanadium and 0.65 wt pct vanadium were investigated under uniaxial tensile loading for room temperature (RT) and 373 K (100 °C). The alloy development was focused on the formation of nanosized vanadium nitride precipitates in the austenite to serve as obstacles to dislocation motion. The austenitic steels exhibited transformation- and twinning-induced plasticity (TRIP/TWIP) effects and the planar glide of dislocations in the austenite. The triggering stress for the RT strain-induced σ γ→ α' formation increased by 190 MPa, and the transformation occurred at higher strain levels due to the presence of VN precipitates. The occurrence of the TWIP effect during tensile testing at 373 K (100 °C) of both steels resulted in engineering strains above 50 pct. The yield strength (YS) of the VN-containing steel was 420 MPa at RT, 52 MPa higher than the vanadium-free alloy. The difference increased to 59 MPa at 373 K (100 °C) with the VN-containing alloy exhibiting a YS of 311 MPa.

  12. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; <0.3Ti+V; <0.03N; and, balance Fe, where the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure, the austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite free and essentially BCC-phase-free. A method of making austenitic stainless steel alloys is also disclosed.

  13. Lattice dynamics in austenitic stainless steels Fe 18Cr 12Ni 2Mo and Fe 18Cr 16Ni 10Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajevac, V.; Hoelzel, M.; Danilkin, S. A.; Hoser, A.; Fuess, H.

    2004-04-01

    Phonon dispersion curves of austenitic stainless steels Fe-18Cr-16Ni-10Mn and Fe-18Cr-12Ni-2Mo have been measured by triple-axis neutron spectroscopy. The data were analysed using Born-von Karman interactions as well as calculations including the contribution of conduction electrons on the lattice dynamics. An appropriate description of the experimental data was obtained by taking into account two-neighbour shells plus the contribution of the electron gas. The elastic constants and moduli obtained are close to reported results by ultrasonic studies on polycrystalline samples. The phonon densities of states in both systems calculated from the dispersion curves agree well with results obtained by time-of-flight neutron spectroscopy on polycrystalline samples. The Debye temperature THgr(T) shows a minimum around 40 K, similar to copper and nickel.

  14. The Effect of Aging Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 10Cr20Ni25Mo1.5NbN Austenitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhiyuan; Sha, Wanhua; Zhao, Qinxin; Wang, Chongbin; Wang, Jianyong; Jiang, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of aging heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 10Cr20Ni25Mo1.5NbN austenitic steel was investigated in this article. The microstructure was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. Results show that the microstructure of 10Cr20Ni25Mo1.5NbN austenitic is composed of austenite. This steel was strengthened by precipitates of secondary phases that were mainly M23C6 carbides and NbCrN nitrides. As aging treatment time increased, the tensile strength first rose (0-3,000 h) and then fell (3,000-5,000 h) due to the decrease of high density of dislocations. The impact absorbed energy decreased sharply, causing the sulfides to precipitate at the grain boundary. Therefore, the content of sulfur should be strictly controlled in the steelmaking process.

  15. A conjoint XRD-ND analysis of the crystal structures of austenitic and martensitic Ti 0.64Zr 0.36Ni hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuevas, F.; Latroche, M.; Bourée-Vigneron, F.; Percheron-Guégan, A.

    2006-11-01

    The crystal structures of the hydrides of austenitic and martensitic Ti 0.64Zr 0.36Ni alloy have been investigated by conjoint X-ray diffraction (XRD)-neutron diffraction (ND) analysis. Austenitic Ti 0.64Zr 0.36Ni alloy with cubic CsCl-type structure preserves its metal sublattice structure after deuteration. It forms a Ti 0.64Zr 0.36NiD 1.5 deuteride with D-atoms occupying half of the octahedrally coordinated 3 d sites. On the contrary, the monoclinic TiNi-type structure of martensitic Ti 0.64Zr 0.36Ni alloy is modified after deuterium absorption. At P=103 Pa and T=298 K, two deuterides coexist with orthorhombic CrB-type structure for the metal sublattice and compositions Ti 0.64Zr 0.36NiD ( β-deuteride) and Ti 0.64Zr 0.36NiD 2.6 ( γ-deuteride). For the β-monodeuteride, deuterium atoms are tetrahedrally coordinated by (Ti,Zr) atoms. For the γ-deuteride, D-atoms fully occupy tetrahedrally coordinated (Ti,Zr) 3Ni 8 f sites and partially occupy pyramidal (Ti,Zr) 3Ni 2 4 c sites. At higher pressures, deuterium solution occurs in the γ-phase with a partial occupancy of octahedrally coordinated (Ti,Zr) 2Ni 4 4 a sites.

  16. Electron irradiation-induced defects in Mo-diluted FeCrNi austenitic alloy during void swelling incubation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B. Y.; Lu, E. Y.; Zhang, C. X.; Xu, Q.; Jin, S. X.; Zhang, P.; Cao, X. Z.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructural features and the effect of Mo addition in FeCrNi austenitic alloy during incubation period were investigated using positron annihilation technique and micro- Vickers Hardness. The electron irradiation, which could induce vacancy defects in material, was performed at room temperature up to the dose of 1.7×10-4 and 5×10-4 dpa, respectively. The defect concentration was estimated about 10-4-10-7 though the standard trapping model. The added Mo atoms could trap vacancies to form Mo-vacancy complexes, which may restrain the migration and growth of vacancy defects during electron irradiation. In addition, the microstructural evolution during electron radiation resulted in hardening, while the added Mo might improve the hardening property of the alloy.

  17. High Mn austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy includes, in weight percent: >4 to 15 Mn; 8 to 15 Ni; 14 to 16 Cr; 2.4 to 3 Al; 0.4 to 1 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; 0.05 to 0.2 C; 0.01 to 0.02 B; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1W; up to 3 Cu; up to 1 Si; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, the particles including at least one of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure that is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  18. Kinetic arrest of the first order austenite to martensite phase transition in Ni50Mn34In16 : dc magnetization studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, V. K.; Chattopadhyay, M. K.; Roy, S. B.

    2007-10-01

    We report results of dc magnetization studies focusing particularly on the austenite-martensite phase transition in Ni50Mn34In16 . We show that the nature of this phase transition depends significantly on the temperature (T) and magnetic field (H) history of the sample. In the presence of high magnetic field, this austenite to martensite first order phase transition is kinetically arrested. The low-temperature and high-field magnetic state shows a typical nonergodic glasslike dynamical response. Comparisons are made with similar phenomena observed recently in various classes of magnetic materials including CMR manganites.

  19. The Nature and Origin of "Double Expanded Austenite" in Ni-Based Ni-Ti Alloys Developing Upon Low Temperature Gaseous Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonović, Matej; Leineweber, Andreas; Robach, Odile; Jägle, Eric A.; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    2015-09-01

    Gaseous nitriding of Ni-4 wt pct Ti alloy plates led to the development of double expanded austenite ( γ N1 and γ N2) at the surface of the nitride plates. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated that the component γ N1 is located close to the surface and the component γ N2 is located at a certain depth below the specimen surface, in correspondence with a layered character of the nitrided zone beneath the surface as revealed by optical microscopy. Electron probe microanalysis, atom probe tomography, and Laue microdiffraction analysis did not reveal a significant difference in nitrogen content of the γ N1 and γ N2 sublayers. By X-ray diffraction stress analysis it was shown that the only significant differences of the two expanded austenite layers is a pronounced difference in compressive stress parallel to the surface: the γ N1 layer is subjected to a huge compressive stress, as large as a few GPa, whereas a relatively modest stress prevails in the γ N2 layer.

  20. Dependence of the nitriding rate of ferritic and austenitic substrates on the crystallographic orientation of surface grains; gaseous nitriding of Fe-Cr and Ni-Ti alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, M.; Jung, M.; Meka, S. R.; Fonović, M.; Leineweber, A.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Gaseous nitriding of ferritic Fe-Cr and austenitic Ni-Ti solid solutions reveals that the extent of the uptake of dissolved nitrogen depends on the crystallographic orientation of the surface grains of the substrate. In both ferritic and austenitic substrates, the surface nitrogen concentration and the nitriding depth decrease upon increasing the smallest angle between the surface normal and the normal of a {1 0 0} plane of the surface grain considered. This phenomenon could be ascribed to the residual compressive macrostress developed during nitriding which varies as a function of crystallographic orientation of the (surface) grains due to the elastically anisotropic nature of ferrite and austenite solid solutions investigated in this study.

  1. A conjoint XRD-ND analysis of the crystal structures of austenitic and martensitic Ti{sub 0.64}Zr{sub 0.36}Ni hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Cuevas, F. . E-mail: fermin.cuevas@glvt-cnrs.fr; Latroche, M.; Bouree-Vigneron, F.; Percheron-Guegan, A.

    2006-11-15

    The crystal structures of the hydrides of austenitic and martensitic Ti{sub 0.64}Zr{sub 0.36}Ni alloy have been investigated by conjoint X-ray diffraction (XRD)-neutron diffraction (ND) analysis. Austenitic Ti{sub 0.64}Zr{sub 0.36}Ni alloy with cubic CsCl-type structure preserves its metal sublattice structure after deuteration. It forms a Ti{sub 0.64}Zr{sub 0.36}NiD{sub 1.5} deuteride with D-atoms occupying half of the octahedrally coordinated 3d sites. On the contrary, the monoclinic TiNi-type structure of martensitic Ti{sub 0.64}Zr{sub 0.36}Ni alloy is modified after deuterium absorption. At P{sub D2}=10{sup 3}Pa and T=298K, two deuterides coexist with orthorhombic CrB-type structure for the metal sublattice and compositions Ti{sub 0.64}Zr{sub 0.36}NiD ({beta}-deuteride) and Ti{sub 0.64}Zr{sub 0.36}NiD{sub 2.6} ({gamma}-deuteride). For the {beta}-monodeuteride, deuterium atoms are tetrahedrally coordinated by (Ti,Zr) atoms. For the {gamma}-deuteride, D-atoms fully occupy tetrahedrally coordinated (Ti,Zr){sub 3}Ni 8f sites and partially occupy pyramidal (Ti,Zr){sub 3}Ni{sub 2} 4c sites. At higher pressures, deuterium solution occurs in the {gamma}-phase with a partial occupancy of octahedrally coordinated (Ti,Zr){sub 2}Ni{sub 4} 4a sites.

  2. Dissolution and oxidation behaviour of various austenitic steels and Ni rich alloys in lead-bismuth eutectic at 520 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Marion; Martinelli, Laure; Ginestar, Kevin; Favergeon, Jérôme; Moulin, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Ten austenitic steels and Ni rich alloys were tested in static lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 520 °C in order to obtain a selection of austenitic steels having promising corrosion behaviour in LBE. A test of 1850 h was carried out with a dissolved oxygen concentration between 10-9 and 5 10-4 g kg-1. The combination of thermodynamic of the studied system and literature results leads to the determination of an expression of the dissolved oxygen content in LBE as a function of temperature: RT(K)ln[O](wt%) = -57584/T(K) -55.876T(K) + 254546 (R is the gas constant in J mol-1 K-1). This relation can be considered as a threshold of oxygen content above which only oxidation is observed on the AISI 316L and AISI 304L austenitic alloys in static LBE between 400 °C and 600 °C. The oxygen content during the test leads to both dissolution and oxidation of the samples during the first 190 h and leads to pure oxidation for the rest of the test. Results of mixed oxidation and dissolution test showed that only four types of corrosion behaviour were observed: usual austenitic steels and Ni rich alloys behaviour including the reference alloy 17Cr-12Ni-2.5Mo (AISI 316LN), the 20Cr-31Ni alloy one, the Si containing alloy one and the Al containing alloy one. According to the proposed criteria of oxidation and dissolution kinetics, silicon rich alloys and aluminum rich alloy presented a promising corrosion behaviour.

  3. The effect of 0.1 atomic percent zirconium on the cyclic oxidation behavior of beta-NiAl for 300 hours at 1200 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    The long time effect of 0.1 at percent Zr (0.2 wt percent Zr) on the cyclic oxidation behavior of hipped beta-NiAl was studied. Oxidation testing was performed in static air at 1200 C for up to 3000 one-hour exposure cycles. Specific weight change versus time data was modeled with the COSP computer program to analyze cyclic oxidation behavior. The Zr-free stoichiometric alloy oxidized and spalled randomly to bare metal between cycles at a rate high enough to deplete Al to a low enough level that oxidation breakaway took place as nonprotective NiO replaced the alpha-Al2O3/NiAl2O4 scale as the controlling oxide. The Zr minimized this severe type of spalling maintaining the protective alpha-Al2O3 scale even out to 3000 hours for the stoichiometric alloy with no significant Al depletion. A third beta-NiAl alloy containing 0.1 at percent Zr but with 10 percent less Al than the stoichiometric alloy was also tested and showed some depletion of Al, but the protective Al2O3/NiAl2O4 was still maintained to close to 2700 hours.

  4. The effect of 0.1 atomic percent zirconium on the cyclic oxidation behavior of beta-NiAl for 3000 hours at 1200 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    The long time effect of 0.1 at percent Zr (0.2 wt percent Zr) on the cyclic oxidation behavior of hipped beta-NiAl was studied. Oxidation testing was performed in static air at 1200 C for up to 3000 one-hour exposure cycles. Specific weight change versus time data was modeled with the COSP computer program to analyze cyclic oxidation behavior. The Zr-free stoichiometric alloy oxidized and spalled randomly to bare metal between cycles at a rate high enough to deplete Al to a low enough level that oxidation breakaway took place as nonprotective NiO replaced the alpha-Al203/NiAl204 scale as the controlling oxide. The Zr minimized this severe type of spalling maintaining the protective alpha-Al203 scale even out to 3000 hours for the stoichiometric alloy with no significant Al depletion. A third beta-NiAl alloy containing 0.1 at percent Zr but with 10 percent less Al than the stoichiometric alloy was also tested and showed some depletion of Al, but the protective Al203/NiAl204 was still maintained to close to 2700 hours.

  5. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  6. Hot and cold rolling of high nitrogen Cr-Ni and Cr-Mn austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Iiola, R.; Hanninen, H.; Kauppi, T.

    1998-10-01

    Behavior of austenitic Cr-Ni-(0.14--0.50)N and Cr-Mn-(0.78--1.00)N steels in hot and cold rolling was investigated by rolling experiments and mechanical testing. Structure of the steels in the as-cast condition and fracture surfaces after the rolling experiments were investigated using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Resistance to deformation was calculated using rolling forces in hot rolling. Increase in strength in the rolling experiments was related to the nitrogen content of the steels. Resistance to deformation during hot rolling increased with decreasing rolling temperature and with increasing nitrogen content. In some steels, hot rolling led to edge cracking, which was more a function of impurity than nitrogen content. Microscopy revealed that the edge cracking occurred along grain boundaries and second phase particles. For the cold-rolled steels, the highest achievable reductions were limited due to a crocodiling phenomenon, that is, opening of the strip end. Fracture type at the opened strip end was a brittle-like fracture.

  7. Development of 18Cr-9Ni-W-Nb-V-N Austenitic Stainless Steel Tube for Thermal Power Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitsuka, Tetsuo; Mimura, Hiroyuki

    An 18Cr-9Ni-W-Nb-V-N austenitic stainless steel tube for thermal power boilers has been newly developed. The high temperature mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the steel were investigated. The creep rupture strength of the developed steel is about 1.5 times as high as that of SUS347HTB, and is almost the same as that of Ka-SUS310J2TB at 650°C. This excellent creep strength of the steel is mainly due to solid solution strengthening by tungsten and nitrogen, and precipitation strengthening by nitrides of niobium and vanadium. The carbon content of the steel is reduced to 0.03% to improve intergranular corrosion resistance. The steam oxidation resistance and the high temperature corrosion resistance of the tube are almost the same as those of SUS347HTB. Weldability of the developed steel is superior to that of SUS304HTB and SUS310TB. Thus the developed steel is suitable for use as a material for superheater and reheater tubes of thermal power boilers.

  8. Effect of cold working on biocompatibility of Ni-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels using Dalton's Lymphoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Talha, Mohd; Kumar, Sanjay; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2014-02-01

    The aims of the present work are to explore the effect of cold working on in-vitro biocompatibility of indigenized low cost Ni-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels (HNSs) and to compare it with conventionally used biomedical grade, i.e. AISI 316L and 316LVM, using Dalton's Lymphoma (DL) cell line. The MTT assay [3-(4,5-dimethythiazol 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] was performed on DL cell line for cytotoxicity evaluation and cell adhesion test. As a result, it was observed that the HNS had higher cell proliferation and cell growth and it increases by increasing nitrogen content and degree of cold working. The surface wettability of the alloys was also investigated by water contact angle measurements. The value of contact angles was found to decrease with increase in nitrogen content and degree of cold working. This indicates that the hydrophilic character increases with increasing nitrogen content and degree of cold working which further attributed to enhance the surface free energy (SFE) which would be conducive to cell adhesion which in turn increases the cell proliferation. PMID:24411354

  9. The effect of antiphase boundaries on the elastic properties of Ni-Mn-Ga austenite and premartensite.

    PubMed

    Seiner, Hanuš; Sedlák, Petr; Bodnárová, Lucie; Drahokoupil, Jan; Kopecký, Vít; Kopeček, Jaromír; Landa, Michal; Heczko, Oleg

    2013-10-23

    The evolution of elastic properties with temperature and magnetic field was studied in two differently heat-treated single crystals of the Ni-Mn-Ga magnetic shape memory alloy using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy. Quenching and slow furnace cooling were used to obtain different densities of antiphase boundaries. We found that the crystals exhibited pronounced differences in the c' elastic coefficient and related shear damping in high-temperature ferromagnetic phases (austenite and premartensite). The difference can be ascribed to the formation of fine magnetic domain patterns and pinning of the magnetic domain walls on antiphase boundaries in the material with a high density of antiphase boundaries due to quenching. The fine domain pattern arising from mutual interactions between antiphase boundaries and ferromagnetic domain walls effectively reduces the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and amplifies the contribution of magnetostriction to the elastic response of the material. As a result, the anomalous elastic softening prior to martensite transformation is significantly enhanced in the quenched sample. Thus, for any comparison of experimental data and theoretical calculations the microstructural changes induced by specific heat treatment must be taken into account. PMID:24067443

  10. Contributions of ɛ and α' TRIP Effects to the Strength and Ductility of AISI 304 (X5CrNi18-10) Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, Andreas; Gutte, Heiner; Mola, Javad

    2016-01-01

    The deformation-induced processes by tensile loading of X5CrNi18-10 austenitic stainless steel in the temperature range of 77 K to 413 K (-196 °C to 140 °C) were investigated. The results were presented in the form of stress-temperature-transformation (STT) and strain-temperature-transformation (DTT) diagrams. The thermodynamic stability of the austenite with respect to the ɛ- and α'-martensite transformations was reflected in the STT and DTT diagrams. Furthermore, conclusions could be drawn from the transformation diagrams about the kinetics of stress- and strain-induced martensitic transformations. The diagrams laid foundations for the development of a new method of quantitative determination of strength and elongation contributions by means of induced and often overlapping deformation processes in the austenite. In this context, the plastic strains contributed by the glide and shearing of austenite were quantified and presented in connection with the ɛ and α' TRansformation-Induced Plasticity effects. Each deformation process was shown to have made a contribution to the strength and ductility, with a magnitude proportional to its dominance. The summation of such contributions provided the tensile strength and the uniform elongation of the steel. In other words, tensile strength and uniform elongation could be derived from a rule of mixtures. The newly proposed method was capable of explaining the anomalous temperature dependence of uniform elongation in the alloy investigated.

  11. Effect of prior oxidation on the creep behavior of NiAl-hardened austenitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayana, D. V. V.; Malakondaiah, G.; Sarma, D. S.

    2003-11-01

    The effect of prior oxidation at 1473 K on the creep behavior of an Fe-Ni-Cr-Al alloy, hardened by ordered NiAl precipitates, has been investigated at 873 K over a stress range of 275 to 450 MPa. The alloy in the as-electroslag remelted (ESR) as well as the ESR-plus-hot-worked conditions was considered. Prior oxidation causes creep strengthening in the Fe-Ni-Cr-Al alloy, resulting in a decrease in minimum creep rate and increase in time to rupture, in contrast to the observations reported on nickel-based superalloys. Creep strengthening is, however, accompanied by a significant reduction in creep ductility. Oxidation-induced creep strengthening in the current alloy can be attributed to the improved adherence of surface oxide caused by the presence of yttrium. An effective stress that incorporates the contributions of load transfer as well as substructural strengthening is used to account for the observed oxidation-induced creep strengthening. While creep strengthening is more pronounced in the ESR cast alloy, the loss in creep ductility is more intense in the ESR wrought alloy. Increasing the oxidation time beyond 1 hour has a minimal effect on creep strengthening of both the alloys, though it lowers significantly the creep ductility of the wrought alloy. The observed differences in creep behavior of the alloy in the two different conditions could be attributed to the differences in grain size as well as morphology and related oxidation-induced damage.

  12. Factors which control the swelling of FeCrNi ternary austenitic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, F. A.; Black, C. A.; Edwards, D. J.

    1997-06-01

    In agreement with limited earlier studies, a comprehensive irradiation experiment conducted in both EBR-II and FFTF demonstrates that while cold-working usually decreases void swelling of ternary FeCrNi alloys at relatively low irradiation temperatures, it in general increases swelling at higher irradiation temperatures. Aging of cold-worked specimens to produce cellular dislocation networks tends to further increase swelling, especially at higher nickel levels. The swelling of ternary alloy at lower nickel levels also appears to be sensitive to details of the preirradiation annealing treatment. The differences in the details of reactor operating conditions also exert an influence on void nucleation and thereby on the duration of the transient regime of swelling. In the current irradiation series this leads to the swelling developed in EBR-II at ˜ 30 dpa being consistently larger than that in FFTF. All of these results confirm an earlier conclusion that the primary variability of void swelling of FeCrNi alloys lies in the incubation and transient regimes, rather than in the steady-state swelling rate regime. Under certain conditions, the transient regime can be made to approach 0 dpa.

  13. Annealing effect on the magnetic induced austenite transformation in polycrystalline freestanding Ni-Co-Mn-In films produced by co-sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Crouïgneau, G.; Porcar, L.; Pairis, S.; Mossang, E.; Eyraud, E.; Bourgault, D.; Courtois, P.

    2015-01-21

    Ni-Co-Mn-In freestanding films, with a magneto-structural transformation at room temperature were successfully produced by co-sputtering and post-annealing methods leading to film composition mastering. For a post-annealing temperature of 700 °C, the phase transformation occurs slightly above room temperature, with a twisted martensitic microstructure phase observed at 300 K by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy. Magnetization measurements on a polycrystalline film showed a phase transformation from a weakly magnetic martensite to a magnetic austenite phase. Moreover, an inverse magnetocaloric effect with an entropy variation of 4 J/kg K under 5 T was also measured. A simple magneto-actuation experiment based on the magnetic induced austenite transformation was also successfully completed. The possibility to insert such films in microsystems is clearly demonstrated in this work.

  14. Annealing effect on the magnetic induced austenite transformation in polycrystalline freestanding Ni-Co-Mn-In films produced by co-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouïgneau, G.; Porcar, L.; Courtois, P.; Pairis, S.; Mossang, E.; Eyraud, E.; Bourgault, D.

    2015-01-01

    Ni-Co-Mn-In freestanding films, with a magneto-structural transformation at room temperature were successfully produced by co-sputtering and post-annealing methods leading to film composition mastering. For a post-annealing temperature of 700 °C, the phase transformation occurs slightly above room temperature, with a twisted martensitic microstructure phase observed at 300 K by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy. Magnetization measurements on a polycrystalline film showed a phase transformation from a weakly magnetic martensite to a magnetic austenite phase. Moreover, an inverse magnetocaloric effect with an entropy variation of 4 J/kg K under 5 T was also measured. A simple magneto-actuation experiment based on the magnetic induced austenite transformation was also successfully completed. The possibility to insert such films in microsystems is clearly demonstrated in this work.

  15. Improved Creep Behavior of a High Nitrogen Nb-Stabilized 15Cr-15Ni Austenitic Stainless Steel Strengthened by Multiple Nanoprecipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Vu The; Jung, Woo Sang; Suh, Jin Yoo

    2011-11-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are expected to be a major material for boiler tubes and steam turbines in future ultra-supercritical (USC) fossil power plants. It is of great interest to maximize the creep strength of the materials without increasing the cost. Precipitation strengthening was found to be the best and cheapest way for increasing the creep strength of such steels. This study is concerned with improving creep properties of a high nitrogen Nb-stabilized 15Cr-15Ni austenitic alloy through introducing a high number of nanosized particles into the austenitic matrix. The addition of around 4 wt pct Mn and 0.236 wt pct N into the 15Cr-15Ni-0.46Si-0.7Nb-1.25Mo-3Cu-Al-B-C matrix in combination with a special multicycled aging-quenching heat treatment resulted in the fine dispersion of abundant quantities of thermally stable (Nb,Cr,Fe)(C,N) precipitates with sizes of 10 to 20 nm. Apart from the carbonitrides, it was found that a high number of coherent copper precipitates with size 40 to 60 nm exist in the microstructure. Results of creep tests at 973 K and 1023 K (700 °C and 750 °C) showed that the creep properties of the investigated steel are superior compared to that of the commercial NF709 alloy. The improved creep properties are attributed to the improved morphology and thermal stability of the carbonitrides as well as to the presence of the coherent copper precipitates inside the austenitic matrix.

  16. Flow stress and microstructural evolution during hot working of alloy 22Cr-13Ni-5Mn-0.3N austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Mataya, M.C.; Perkins, C.A.; Thompson, S.W.; Matlock, D.K.

    1996-05-01

    The stress-strain behavior and the development of microstructure between 850 C and 1,150 C in an austenitic stainless steel, 22Cr-13Ni-5Mn-0.3N, were investigated by uniaxial compression of cylindrical specimens at strain rates between 0.01 and 1 s{sup {minus}1} up to a strain of one. The measured (anisothermal) and corrected (isothermal) flow curves were distinctly different. The flow stress at moderate hot working temperatures, compared to a number of other austenitic alloys, was second only to that of alloy 718. Both static and dynamic recrystallization were observed. Recrystallization was sluggish in comparison to alloy 304L, apparently due to the presence of a fine Cr- and Nb-rich second-phase dispersion, identified as Z phase, which tended to pin the high-angle grain boundaries even at a high temperature of 1,113 C. Recrystallization may also be retarded by preferential restoration through the competitive process of recovery, which is consistent with the relatively high stacking-fault energy for this alloy. It is concluded that this alloy must be hot worked at temperatures higher than usual for austenitic stainless steels in order to minimize flow stress and refine grain size.

  17. Effect of single and double austenitization treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 16Cr-2Ni steel

    SciTech Connect

    Balan, K.P.; Venugopal Reddy, A.; Sarma, D.S.

    1999-06-01

    Double austenitization (DA) treatment is found to yield the best combination of strength and toughness in both low-temperature as well as high-temperature tempered conditions as compared to single austenitization (SA) treatments. Obtaining the advantages of double austenitization (DA) to permit dissolution of alloy carbides without significant grain coarsening was attempted in AISI 431 type martensitic stainless steel. Structure-property correlation after low-temperature tempering (200 C) as well as high-temperature double tempering (650 + 600 C) was carried out for three austenitization treatments through SA at 1000 C, SA at 1070 C, and DA at 1070 + 1000 C. While the increase in strength after DA treatment and low-temperature tempering at 200 C is due to the increased amount of carbon in solution as a result of dissolution of alloy carbides during first austenitization, the increased toughness is attributable to the increased quantity of retained austenite. After double tempering (650 + 600 C), strength and toughness are mainly found to depend on the precipitation and distribution of carbides in the microstructure and the grain size effect.

  18. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Nano/Ultrafine-Grained N-Bearing, Low-Ni Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeedipour, S.; Kermanpur, A.; Najafizadeh, A.; Abbasi, M.

    2015-02-01

    The nitrogen (N)-bearing austenitic stainless steels are new materials with interesting mechanical properties such as high strength and ductility, desirable toughness and work hardening, and good corrosion resistance. This work attempted to investigate the effect of N addition from 0.08 to 0.35 wt.% on grain refinement of the 201L austenitic stainless steel using the martensite thermomechanical process. This process was composed of cold rolling up to the thickness reduction of 90 % followed by reversion annealing at 800 °C for 60 and 1800 s. It was found that increasing N content resulted in an increase in the austenite grain size for short annealing duration (e.g. 60 s), but caused a decrease in the austenite grain size for long annealing duration (e.g. 1800 s). The smallest austenite grain size of about 150 nm was achieved for the 201L steel containing 0.08 wt.% N after reversion annealing at 800 °C for 60 s. The mechanical properties of the reversion-annealed N-bearing steels were enhanced due to both N alloying and grain refinement.

  19. Precipitation hardening austenitic superalloys

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1985-01-01

    Precipitation hardening, austenitic type superalloys are described. These alloys contain 0.5 to 1.5 weight percent silicon in combination with about 0.05 to 0.5 weight percent of a post irradiation ductility enhancing agent selected from the group of hafnium, yttrium, lanthanum and scandium, alone or in combination with each other. In addition, when hafnium or yttrium are selected, reductions in irradiation induced swelling have been noted.

  20. Shear punch testing of 59Ni isotopically-doped model austenitic alloys after irradiation in FFTF at different He/dpa ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, G. L.; Toloczko, M. B.; Hamilton, M. L.; Garner, F. A.; Faulkner, R. G.

    1998-10-01

    In this last of a series of papers describing the evolution of microstructure, void swelling and mechanical properties of model austenitic alloys in response to differences in helium/dpa rates, shear punch testing is used to assess the relative effect of helium generation ratios and various important material and environmental variables. Shear punch data confirm the general trends observed in earlier tensile data derived from the 59Ni isotopic doping experiment. There is a convergence to a common saturation level of yield strength that depends on alloy composition, temperature and displacement rate, but not on starting condition. The approach to saturation can be sensitive to helium/dpa ratio, however, and may depend on the starting state. For reasons not yet known, shear punch tests appear to be more sensitive to such transient differences than are tensile tests.

  1. Investigation of high temperature annealing effectiveness for recovery of radiation-induced structural changes and properties of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B. A.; Kuleshova, E. A.; Frolov, A. S.; Maltsev, D. A.; Prikhodko, K. E.; Fedotova, S. V.; Margolin, B. Z.; Sorokin, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    A complex study of structural state and properties of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti austenitic stainless steel after irradiation in BOR-60 fast research reactor (in the temperature range 330-400 °C up to damaging doses of 145 dpa) and in VVER-1000 light water reactor (at temperature ∼320 °C and damaging doses ∼12-14 dpa) was performed. The possibility of recovery of structural-phase state and mechanical properties to the level almost corresponding to the initial state by the recovery annealing was studied. The principal possibility of the recovery annealing of pressurized water reactor internals that ensures almost complete recovery of its mechanical properties and microstructure was shown. The optimal mode of recovery annealing was established: 1000 °C during 120 h.

  2. Corrosion behaviour and biocompatibility of a novel Ni-free intermetallic coating growth on austenitic steel by hot dipping in an Al-12.6%Si alloy.

    PubMed

    Arenas, M A; Frutos, E; Saldaña, L; Conde, A; Labajos-Broncano, L; González-Martín, M L; González-Carrasco, J L; Vilaboa, N

    2011-04-01

    Commercial 316 LVM austenitic stainless steel samples have been coated by immersion in a bath of molten Al-12.6%Si alloy for 120 s. The coating consists of the Al(12)(Fe,Cr)(3)Si(2) intermetallic. In vitro corrosion behaviour has been evaluated in the Ringer's solution by means of potentiodynamic curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results reveal that the coated specimens exhibit lower susceptibility to localised corrosion with respect to the substrate. XPS analysis suggests that the ennoblement of the pitting potential is due to the formation of a chromium oxyhydroxide containing passive layer. The intermetallic coating shows a good biocompatibility, as demonstrated by culturing human mesenchymal stem cells isolated from bone marrow which attached, grew and differentiated to the osteoblastic lineage to a similar extent on coated and bare steels. In summary, this study proposes a method that generates Ni-free coatings of the stainless steel with useful properties for biomedical applications. PMID:21437641

  3. Microstructure and creep characteristics of dissimilar T91/TP316H martensitic/austenitic welded joint with Ni-based weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Falat, Ladislav; Svoboda, Milan; Vyrostkova, Anna; Petryshynets, Ivan; Sopko, Martin

    2012-10-15

    This paper deals with characterization of microstructure and creep behavior of dissimilar weldment between the tempered martensitic steel T91 and the non-stabilized austenitic steel TP316H with Ni-based weld metal (Ni WM). Microstructure analyses were performed using light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The martensitic part of the welded joint exhibited a wide heat-affected zone (HAZ) with typical microstructural gradient from its coarse-grained to the fine-grained/intercritical region. In contrast, the HAZ of austenitic steel was limited to only a narrow region with coarsened polygonal grains. The microstructure of Ni WM was found to be very heterogeneous with respect to the size, morphology and distribution of grain boundaries and MC-type precipitates as a result of strong weld metal dilution effects and fast non-equilibrium solidification. Cross-weld creep tests were carried out in a temperature range from 600 to 650 Degree-Sign C at applied stresses from 60 to 140 MPa. The obtained values of apparent stress exponents and creep activation energies indicate thermally activated dislocation glide to be the governing creep deformation mechanism within the range of used testing conditions. The creep samples ruptured in the T91 intercritical HAZ region by the 'type IV cracking' failure mode and the creep fracture mechanism was identified to be the intergranular dimple tearing by microvoid coalescence at grain boundaries. The TEM observations revealed pronounced microstructural differences between the critical HAZ region and the T91 base material before as well as after the creep exposure. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase transformations affect the microstructures of T91 and TP316H HAZ regions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High weld metal dilution results in heterogeneous microstructure with MC carbides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Creep behavior of the studied weldment is controlled

  4. Phase relations in the Fe-Ni-Cr-S system and the sulfidation of an austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, K. T.; Rao, D. B.; Nelson, H. G.

    1977-01-01

    The stability fields of various sulfide phases that form on Fe-Cr, Fe-Ni, Ni-Cr and Fe-Cr-Ni alloys were developed as a function of temperature and the partial pressure of sulfur. The calculated stability fields in the ternary system were displayed on plots of log P sub S sub 2 versus the conjugate extensive variable which provides a better framework for following the sulfidation of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys at high temperatures. Experimental and estimated thermodynamic data were used in developing the sulfur potential diagrams. Current models and correlations were employed to estimate the unknown thermodynamic behavior of solid solutions of sulfides and to supplement the incomplete phase diagram data of geophysical literature. These constructed stability field diagrams were in excellent agreement with the sulfide phases and compositions determined during a sulfidation experiment.

  5. Mn-Fe base and Mn-Cr-Fe base austenitic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brager, Howard R.; Garner, Francis A.

    1987-09-01

    Manganese-iron base and manganese-chromium-iron base austenitic alloys designed to have resistance to neutron irradiation induced swelling and low activation have the following compositions (in weight percent): 20 to 40 Mn; up to about 15 Cr; about 0.4 to about 3.0 Si; an austenite stabilizing element selected from C and N, alone or in combination with each other, and in an amount effective to substantially stabilize the austenite phase, but less than about 0.7 C, and less than about 0.3 N; up to about 2.5 V; up to about 0.1 P; up to about 0.01 B; up to about 3.0 Al; up to about 0.5 Ni; up to about 2.0 W; up to about 1.0 Ti; up to about 1.0 Ta; and with the remainder of the alloy being essentially iron.

  6. Mn-Fe base and Mn-Cr-Fe base austenitic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brager, Howard R.; Garner, Francis A.

    1987-01-01

    Manganese-iron base and manganese-chromium-iron base austenitic alloys designed to have resistance to neutron irradiation induced swelling and low activation have the following compositions (in weight percent): 20 to 40 Mn; up to about 15 Cr; about 0.4 to about 3.0 Si; an austenite stabilizing element selected from C and N, alone or in combination with each other, and in an amount effective to substantially stabilize the austenite phase, but less than about 0.7 C, and less than about 0.3 N; up to about 2.5 V; up to about 0.1 P; up to about 0.01 B; up to about 3.0 Al; up to about 0.5 Ni; up to about 2.0 W; up to about 1.0 Ti; up to about 1.0 Ta; and with the remainder of the alloy being essentially iron.

  7. Effect of nitrogen and cold working on structural and mechanical behavior of Ni-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Talha, Mohd; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2015-02-01

    This investigation deals with the evaluation of structural and mechanical behavior of deformed (10% and 20% cold work) and annealed (at 1050°C for 15 min followed by water quenching) Ni-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels (HNSs). The microstructure was observed by optical micrograph and the mechanical properties were determined by macrohardness and tensile tests. Both stress strain behavior and work hardening behavior were evaluated. HNSs have smaller grain size as compared to low nitrogen steels and no formation of martensite was observed after 20% cold working. Further, it was found that hardness; yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the steels linearly increases and elongation decreased with nitrogen content and degree of cold working. The strength coefficient was observed to be higher for the high nitrogen steels; it decreased to some extent with degree of cold working. The work hardening exponent was also observed to decrease with degree of cold working. Influence of nitrogen on mechanical properties was mainly related to its effect on solid solution strengthening. X-ray diffraction analysis of annealed as well as deformed alloys further confirmed no evidence for formation of martensite or any other secondary phases. SEM fractography of the annealed and deformed samples after tensile tests indicates predominantly ductile fracture in all specimens. PMID:25492189

  8. Temperature-dependent quantitative 3{omega} scanning thermal microscopy: Local thermal conductivity changes in NiTi microstructures induced by martensite-austenite phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Chirtoc, M.; Gibkes, J.; Wernhardt, R.; Pelzl, J.; Wieck, A.

    2008-09-15

    We develop the theoretical description of 3{omega} signals from the resistive Wollaston thermal probe (ThP) of a scanning thermal microscope (SThM) in terms of an equivalent low-pass filter. The normalized amplitude and phase frequency spectra are completely characterized by a single parameter, the crossover frequency f{sub c}(k) depending on the sample thermal conductivity k. The application concerns polycrystalline NiTi shape memory alloy microstructured by focused Ga ion beam milling and implantation. The calibration of the ThP combined with a novel two-step normalization procedure allowed quantitative exploitation of 3{omega} signal variations as small as -1.75% in amplitude and 0.60 deg. in phase upon heating the sample from room temperature to 100 deg. C. This corresponds to k increase of 23.9% that is consistent with the expected thermal conductivity variation due to martensite-austenite structural phase transition. To our knowledge this is for the first time that SThM 3{omega} phase information is used quantitatively as well. The static, calibrated 3{omega} measurements are complementary to 3{omega} SThM images of the patterned sample surface. The local SThM measurement of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity opens the possibility to imaging structural phase transitions at submicron scale.

  9. Modeling and simulation of austenite grain evolution for heavy forging steel 30Cr2Ni4MoV undergoing hot deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhenshan; Li, Cuidong; Chen, Fei; Sui, Dashan

    2013-05-01

    30Cr2Ni4MoV is widely used as heavy forging materials for low pressure rotors which equips the ultra-supercritical power generations. The final properties of the heavy forging products relies apparently on the grain size of the material, so that the grain should be refined and homogenized during forming process through controlling the working parameters during forming process. For this purpose, the research on the modeling and simulation of austenite grain evolution is conducted for different forming stages: the grain growth during heating, dynamic recrystallization (DRX) during hitting, and meta-dynamic (MDRX) and static recrystallization (SRX) during hitting intervals. Experiment-based phenomenological models, as easy ways to characterize the grain evolution, are established for the process of heating and single-hit, while the Cellular Automaton simulations are applied for tracing more complex recrystallization process during multi-hit deformations. The research shows that, for heavy forgings, the long-time heating process can cause very coarse grains which are harmful to the final properties. Therefore, in order to refine and homogenize the grain size for the heavy forgings, the working parameters for forging should be determined to ensure the recrystallization can be completed and the deformation can be uniformly distributed. Some applications of the models and simulation method in multi-hit process are also demonstrated.

  10. Solidification Behavior and Weldability of Dissimilar Welds Between a Cr-Free, Ni-Cu Welding Consumable and Type 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowards, Jeffrey W.; Liang, Dong; Alexandrov, Boian T.; Frankel, Gerald S.; Lippold, John C.

    2012-04-01

    The solidification behavior of a Cr-free welding consumable based on the Ni-Cu system was evaluated in conjunction with Type 304L stainless steel. The weld metal microstructure evolution was evaluated with optical and secondary electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, button melting, and thermodynamic (CALPHAD-based) modeling. Solidification partitioning patterns showed that higher dilutions of the filler metal by Type 304L increased segregation of Ti, Cu, and Si to interdendritic regions. Button melting experiments showed a widening of the solidification temperature range with increasing dilution because of the expansion of the austenite solidification range and formation of Ti(C,N) via a eutectic reaction. The model predictions showed good correlation with button melting experiments and were used to evaluate the nature of the Ti(C,N) precipitation reaction. Solidification cracking susceptibility of the weld metal was shown to increase with dilution of 304L stainless steel based on testing conducted with the cast pin tear test. The increase in cracking susceptibility is associated with expansion of the solidification temperature range and the presence of eutectic liquid at the end of solidification that wets solidification grain boundaries.

  11. Correlation Between Experimental and Calculated Phase Fractions in Aged 20Cr32Ni1Nb Austenitic Stainless Steels Containing Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewar, Matthew P.; Gerlich, Adrian P.

    2013-02-01

    A centrifugally cast 20Cr32Ni1Nb stainless steel manifold in service for 16 years at temperatures ranging from 1073 K to 1123 K (800 °C to 850 °C) has been characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA), auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Nb(C,N), M23C6, and the silicide G-phases (Ni16Nb6Si7) were all identified in a conventional SEM, while the nitride Z-phase (CrNbN) was observed only in AES. M23C6, Z-phase and G-phase were characterized in XRD. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations using ThermoCalc Version S, with the TCS Steel and Fe-alloys Database (TCFE6), and Thermotech Ni-based Superalloys Database (TTNI8) were validated by comparing experimental phase fraction results obtained from both EPMA and AES. A computational study looking at variations in the chemical composition of the alloy, and how they affect phase equilibria, was investigated. Increasing the nitrogen concentration is shown to decrease G-phase formation, where it is replaced by other intermetallic phases such as Z-phase and π-phase that do not experience liquation during pre-weld annealing treatments. Suppressing G-phase formation was ultimately determined to be a function of minimizing silicon content, and understabilizing the Nb/(C + 6/7N) ratio.

  12. High Nb, Ta, and Al creep- and oxidation-resistant austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel HTUPS alloy includes, in weight percent: 15 to 30 Ni; 10 to 15 Cr; 2 to 5 Al; 0.6 to 5 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1 W; up to 0.5 Cu; up to 4 Mn; up to 1 Si; 0.05 to 0.15 C; up to 0.15 B; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni wherein said alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, said particles comprising at least one composition selected from the group consisting of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure, said austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  13. The Effect of Nb and Ti on Structure and Mechanical Properties of 12Ni-25Cr-0.4C Austenitic Heat-Resistant Steel after Aging at 900 °C for 1000 h

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaheri, Vahid; Shahri, Farzad; Mohammadnezhad, Mahyar; Tamizifar, Morteza; Naseri, Masaab

    2014-10-01

    Austenitic heat-resistant steels are particularly suitable for applications where service conditions comprise high temperature. The demand for better performance has motivated developments in these steels. In this work, Ti and Nb were added to austenitic heat-resistant steels, Fe-12Ni-25Cr-0.4C, wt.% simultaneously. Microstructural changes were studied via scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), optical microscopy, and x-ray diffraction (XRD) in as-cast condition and after aging in 900 °C for 1000 h. Mechanical properties were measured using tensile tests, impact energy, and Vickers hardness. It was observed that by formation of NbC and TiC, the level of fragmentation of the chromium carbides increased, as a positive aspect for mechanical properties. XRD and EDS results show increasing the amount of Ti can inhibit G-phase transformation.

  14. Austenitic structure formation in an Fe-32% Ni alloy during slow heating in the critical temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemtsova, N. D.

    2014-08-01

    Electron diffraction is used to show (for the first time) that the reverse α → γ transformation in an Fe-32% Ni during slow heating develops via the formation of an intermediate paramagnetic 9 R phase. Coarse extended lamellae form according to a shear mechanism in the central part of the temperature range of the reverse transformation, which is called the critical range (here, the physical properties of the alloy change anomalously). The extended lamellae consist of 9 R-phase lamellae with γ-phase interlayers. A high density of periodic stacking faults in the structure of the 9 R phase and a high density of chaotic stacking faults in the complex 9 R + γ phase determine the nature of phase transformation-induced hardening.

  15. Development of a high strength, hydrogen-resistant austenitic alloy. [Fe-36 Ni-3 Ti-3 Ta-1. 3 Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, K.M.; Klahn, D.H.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    Research toward high-strength, high toughness nonmagnetic steels for use in the retaining rings of large electrical generators led to the development of a Ta-modified iron-based superalloy (Fe-36 Ni-3 Ti-3 Ta-0.5 Al-1.3 Mo-0.3 V-0.01 B) which combines high strength with good toughness after suitable aging. The alloy did, however, show some degradation in fatigue resistance in gaseous hydrogen. This sensitivity was associated with a deformation-induced martensitic transformation near the fracture surface. The addition of a small amount of chromium to the alloy suppressed the martensite transformation and led to a marked improvement in hydrogen resistance.

  16. Development of Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Fe-Cr-Ni Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloy with Improved High-Temperature Strength and Creep-Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.

    2001-06-15

    In February of 1999, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Special Metals Corporation - Huntington Alloys (formerly INCO Alloys International, Inc.) to develop a modified wrought austenitic stainless alloy with considerably more strength and corrosion resistance than alloy 800H or 800HT, but with otherwise similar engineering and application characteristics. Alloy 800H and related alloys have extensive use in coal flue gas environments, as well as for tubing or structural components in chemical and petrochemical applications. The main concept of the project was make small, deliberate elemental microalloying additions to this Fe-based alloy to produce, with proper processing, fine stable carbide dispersions for enhanced high temperature creep-strength and rupture resistance, with similar or better oxidation/corrosion resistance. The project began with alloy 803, a Fe-25Cr-35NiTi,Nb alloy recently developed by INCO, as the base alloy for modification. Smaller commercial developmental alloy heats were produced by Special Metal. At the end of the project, three rounds of alloy development had produced a modified 803 alloy with significantly better creep resistance above 815 C (1500 C) than standard alloy 803 in the solution-annealed (SA) condition. The new upgraded 803 alloy also had the potential for a processing boost in that creep resistance for certain kinds of manufactured components that was not found in the standard alloy. The upgraded 803 alloy showed similar or slightly better oxidation and corrosion resistance relative to standard 803. Creep strength and oxidation/corrosion resistance of the upgraded 803 alloy were significantly better than found in alloy 800 H, as originally intended. The CRADA was terminated in February 2003. A contributing factor was Special Metals Corporation being in Chapter 11 Bankruptcy. Additional testing, further commercial scale-up, and any potential

  17. Analysis and Characterization of the Role of Ni Interlayer in the Friction Welding of Titanium and 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralimohan, C. H.; Ashfaq, M.; Ashiri, Rouholah; Muthupandi, V.; Sivaprasad, K.

    2016-01-01

    Joining of commercially pure Ti to 304 stainless steel by fusion welding processes possesses problems due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds in the weld metal, which degrade the mechanical properties of the joints. Solid-state welding processes are contemplated to overcome these problems. However, intermetallic compounds are likely to form even in Ti-SS joints produced with solid-state welding processes such as friction welding process. Therefore, interlayers are employed to prevent the direct contact between two base metals and thereby mainly to suppress the formation of brittle Ti-Fe intermetallic compounds. In the present study, friction-welded joints between commercially pure titanium and 304 stainless steel were obtained using a thin nickel interlayer. Then, the joints were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, and X-ray diffractometry. The mechanical properties of the joints were evaluated by microhardness survey and tensile tests. Although the results showed that the tensile strength of the joints is even lower than titanium base metal, it is higher than that of the joints which were produced without nickel interlayer. The highest hardness value was observed at the interface between titanium and nickel interlayers indicating the formation of Ni-Ti intermetallic compounds. Formation these compounds was validated by XRD patterns. Moreover, in tensile tests, fracture of the joints occurred along this interface which is related to its brittle nature.

  18. Effect of titanium doping on accumulation and annealing of radiation defects in austenitic steel 16Cr15Ni3Mo(0-1)Ti at low temperature (80 K) electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, V. L.; Danilov, S. E.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of titanium doping on accumulation and annealing of radiation defects was investigated in austenitic stainless steel 16Cr15Ni3Mo under low temperature (80 K) electron irradiation. Steel has been taken in the quenched, aged and separation of solid solution states. The data obtained on the accumulation of radiation defects and their evolution during isochronous annealing. The types of defects and its complexes and the activation energy of the processes taking place with their participation is identified. The mechanisms of radiation- induced processes and the effect of titan doping is discussed.

  19. Dependence of steady-state radiation swelling rate of l 0.1C-16Cr-15Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Ti-Si austenitic steel on dpa rate and irradiation temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, А. V.; Portnykh, I. А.

    2009-04-01

    A large number of swelling measurement data on the 0.1C-16Cr-15Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Ti-Si austenitic steel used as a fuel cladding at temperatures 640-870 К in the BN-600 fast reactor were analyzed. It was found that within irradiation temperatures 690-830 К a steady-state swelling dose rate was from 0.45%/dpa to 1.1%/dpa. By the statistical model of point defect migration for the 0.1C-16Cr-15Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Ti-S steel the dependence of the steady-state swelling rate on the irradiation temperature and displacement rate was calculated. The calculation data were consistent with the experimental data.

  20. Development of Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Fe-Cr-Ni Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloy with Improved High Temperature Strenth and Creep-Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, PJ

    2004-09-30

    In February of 1999, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Special Metals Corporation-Huntington Alloys (formerly INCO Alloys International, Inc.) to develop a modified wrought austenitic stainless alloy with considerably more strength and corrosion resistance than alloy 800H or 800HT, but with otherwise similar engineering and application characteristics. Alloy 800H and related alloys have extensive use in coal flue gas environments, as well as for tubing or structural components in chemical and petrochemical applications. The main concept of the project was make small, deliberate elemental microalloying additions to this Fe-based alloy to produce, with proper processing, fine stable carbide dispersions for enhanced high temperature creep-strength and rupture resistance, with similar or better oxidation/corrosion resistance. The project began with alloy 803, a Fe-25Cr-35NiTi,Nb alloy recently developed by INCO, as the base alloy for modification. Smaller commercial developmental alloy heats were produced by Special Metals. At the end of the project, three rounds of alloy development had produced a modified 803 alloy with significantly better creep resistance above 815EC (1500EC) than standard alloy 803 in the solution-annealed (SA) condition. The new upgraded 803 alloy also had the potential for a processing boost in that creep resistance for certain kinds of manufactured components that was not found in the standard alloy. The upgraded 803 alloy showed similar or slightly better oxidation and corrosion resistance relative to standard 803. Creep strength and oxidation/corrosion resistance of the upgraded 803 alloy were significantly better than found in alloy 800H, as originally intended. The CRADA was terminated in February 2003. A contributing factor was Special Metals Corporation being in Chapter 11 Bankruptcy. Additional testing, further commercial scale-up, and any potential

  1. Contribution a l'etude du comportement en fatigue des aciers inoxydables 13%Cr-4%Ni: Contraintes residuelles de soudage et transformation sous contrainte de l'austenite de reversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Denis

    The objectives of the present study are to characterize some of the main parameters affecting fatigue behaviour of 13%Cr-4%Ni martensitic stainless steels used for hydraulic turbines manufacturing. Two aspects are studied: the residual stresses left after autogenous welding of these steels and the stress-assisted transformation of the reformed austenite contained in this alloy. The residual stresses induced by welding were characterized by four different methods: the hole-drilling method, X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and the contour method. The state of stress was characterized in two different joints geometries, both using 41ONiMo weld filler metal. The characterization was made before and after post-weld heat treatment. A stress distribution completely different of the stress distribution commonly found in structural steels was measured. Triaxial compression was found in the last bead with a maximum value of approximately 400 MPa. Tensile stress was measured around the heat-affected zone and just below the last weld layer. The low temperature martensitic transformation occuring during weld cooling (˜300°C) explains this unusual stress distribution. The results also showed that the post-weld heat treatment commonly used in the industry is efficient in lowering residual stresses. A maximum stress of about 150 MPa was found after heat treament. The austenite formed during this post-weld heat treatment is mechanically unstable. The results presented in this thesis show that after fatigue crack propagation testing, all the reformed austenite found near the fracture surface has transformed to martensite under cyclic stress loading. These measurements made by X-ray diffraction are confirmed by low-cycle fatigue tests showing that the reformed austenite found in this alloy transforms gradually to martensite during strain cycling. The transformation is completed after 100 cycles. The fatigue crack growth behaviour of the tested alloys does not seem to be

  2. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-09-19

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K.

  3. Corrosion behavior in high heat input welded heat-affected zone of Ni-free high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Joonoh Ha, Heon-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2013-08-15

    The pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion behaviors in high heat input welded heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a metastable high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel were explored through electrochemical tests. The HAZs were simulated using Gleeble simulator with high heat input welding condition of 300 kJ/cm and the peak temperature of the HAZs was changed from 1200 °C to 1350 °C, aiming to examine the effect of δ-ferrite formation on corrosion behavior. The electrochemical test results show that both pitting corrosion resistance and interphase corrosion resistance were seriously deteriorated by δ-ferrite formation in the HAZ and their aspects were different with increasing δ-ferrite fraction. The pitting corrosion resistance was decreased by the formation of Cr-depleted zone along δ-ferrite/austenite (γ) interphase resulting from δ-ferrite formation; however it didn't depend on δ-ferrite fraction. The interphase corrosion resistance depends on the total amount of Cr-depleted zone as well as ferrite area and thus continuously decreased with increasing δ-ferrite fraction. The different effects of δ-ferrite fraction on pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion were carefully discussed in terms of alloying elements partitioning in the HAZ based on thermodynamic consideration. - Highlights: • Corrosion behavior in the weld HAZ of high-nitrogen austenitic alloy was studied. • Cr{sub 2}N particle was not precipitated in high heat input welded HAZ of tested alloy. • Pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion show a different behavior. • Pitting corrosion resistance was affected by whether or not δ-ferrite forms. • Interphase corrosion resistance was affected by the total amount of δ-ferrite.

  4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis of oxidized Fe-16Cr-16Ni-2Mn-1Mo-2Si austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, J.A., Jr.; Siriwardane, R.V.; Dunning, J.S.; Alman, D.E.; Rawers, J.C.

    2007-03-30

    Depth profile analysis (argon ion etching/X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) was conducted on a series of Fe–16Cr–16Ni–2Mn–1Mo–2Si austenitic stainless steel samples oxidized at 973 and 1073 K with exposure times of 25, 100, 193, 436 and 700 h. Surface and near surface rearrangement following oxidation resulted in a region of high Cr concentration on all oxidized samples. Temperature and time dependence to O2 penetration depth was observed. In general, O2 penetration depth was found to increase with increasing exposure up to 436 h. No increase in depth was observed between 436 and 700 h exposure time.

  5. Irradiation creep of 11Cr-0.5Mo-2W,V,Nb ferritic-martensitic, modified 316, and 15Cr-20Ni austenitic S.S. irradiated in FFTF to 103-206 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehira, A.; Mizuta, S.; Ukai, S.; Puigh, R. J.

    2000-12-01

    The irradiation creep of 11Cr-0.5Mo-2W-0.2V-0.05Nb ferritic-martensitic (PNC-FMS), modified 316 (PNC316) and 15Cr-20Ni base austenitic S.S. were determined by the gas pressurized capsule irradiation test using MOTA in FFTF. The pressurized capsules and open tubes were irradiated at 678-943 K to a peak dose of 206 dpa. The irradiation creep coefficients were derived from the diametral change differences between the capsules and open tubes, accounting for the stress-induced swelling. The creep compliance B0 and creep-swelling coupling coefficient D for PNC-FMS were found to be 0.43-0.76×10-6 MPa-1 dpa-1 and 0.85-2.5×10-2 MPa-1 for volumetric swelling, respectively. For both PNC316 and 15Cr-20Ni base S.S. the irradiation creep properties were very similar. B0 and D range from 0.55 to -1.5×10-6 MPa-1 dpa-1 and from 1.2 to -2.8×10-3 MPa-1, respectively.

  6. Irradiation creep and stress-enhanced swelling of Fe-16Cr-15Ni-Nb austenitic stainless steel in BN-350

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobjev, A.N.; Porollo, S.I.; Konobeev, Yu.V.

    1997-04-01

    Irradiation creep and void swelling will be important damage processes for stainless steels when subjected to fusion neutron irradiation at elevated temperatures. The absence of an irradiation device with fusion-relevant neutron spectra requires that data on these processes be collected in surrogate devices such as fast reactors. This paper presents the response of an annealed austenitic steel when exposed to 60 dpa at 480{degrees}C and to 20 dpa at 520{degrees}C. This material was irradiated as thin-walled argon-pressurized tubes in the BN-350 reactor located in Kazakhstan. These tubes were irradiated at hoop stresses ranging from 0 to 200 MPa. After irradiation both destructive and non-destructive examination was conducted.

  7. Effect of Nitrogen Content on Grain Refinement and Mechanical Properties of a Reversion-Treated Ni-Free 18Cr-12Mn Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behjati, P.; Kermanpur, A.; Najafizadeh, A.; Samaei Baghbadorani, H.; Karjalainen, L. P.; Jung, J.-G.; Lee, Y.-K.

    2014-12-01

    Martensite reversion treatment was utilized to obtain ultrafine grain size in Fe-18Cr-12Mn-N stainless steels containing 0 to 0.44 wt pct N. This was achieved by cold rolling to 80 pct reduction followed by reversion annealing at temperatures between 973 K and 1173 K (700 °C and 900 °C) for 1 to 104 seconds. The microstructural evolution was characterized using both transmission and scanning electron microscopes, and mechanical properties were evaluated using hardness and tensile tests. The steel without nitrogen had a duplex ferritic-austenitic structure and the grain size refinement remained inefficient. The finest austenitic microstructure was achieved in the steels with 0.25 and 0.36 wt pct N following annealing at 1173 K (900 °C) for 100 seconds, resulting in average grain sizes of about 0.240 ± 0.117 and 0.217 ± 0.73 µm, respectively. Nano-size Cr2N precipitates observed in the microstructure were responsible for retarding the grain growth. The reversion mechanism was found to be diffusion controlled in the N-free steel and shear controlled in the N-containing steels. Due to a low fraction of strain-induced martensite in cold rolled condition, the 0.44 wt pct N steel displayed relatively non-uniform, micron-scale grain structure after the same reversion treatment, but it still exhibited superior mechanical properties with a yield strength of 1324 MPa, tensile strength of 1467 MPa, and total elongation of 17 pct. While the high yield strength can be attributed to strengthening by nitrogen alloying, dislocation hardening, and slight grain refinement, the moderate strain-induced martensitic transformation taking place during tensile straining was responsible for enhancement in tensile strength and elongation.

  8. Shear punch testing of {sup 59}Ni isotopically-doped model austenitic alloys after irradiation in FFTF at different He/dpa ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Hankin, G.L.; Faulkner, R.G.; Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A.

    1998-03-01

    A series of three model alloys, Fe-15Cr-25Ni, Fe-15Cr-25Ni-0.04P and Fe-15Cr45Ni were irradiated side-by-side in FFTF-MOTA in both the annealed and the cold worked condition in each of two variants, one using naturally occurring isotopic mixtures, and another doped with {sup 59}Ni to generate relatively high helium-to-dpa ratios. Previous papers in this series have addressed the influence of helium on radiation-induced evolution of microstructure, dimensional stability and mechanical properties, the latter using miniature-tensile specimens. In the final paper of this experimental series, three sets of irradiations conducted at different temperatures and displacement rates were examined by shear punch testing of standard microscopy disks. The results were used to determine the influence of helium generation rate, alloy starting condition, irradiation temperature and total neutron exposure. The results were also compared with the miniature tensile data obtained earlier. In general, all alloys approached saturation levels of strength and ductility that were relatively independent of He/dpa ratio and starting condition, but were sensitive to the irradiation temperature and total exposure. Some small influence of helium/dpa ratio on the shear strength is visible in the two series that ran at {approximately}490 C, but is not evident at 365 C.

  9. The Teaching of Percent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, T.

    1998-01-01

    Proposes looking at the percent symbol (%) as an operator, which means to divide any number in front of it by 100. Stresses the importance of using correct words to describe the numbers generated in percent calculations. Explains how to (1) calculate percent using equivalent fractions; (2) divide fraction numerators by denominators, retaining the…

  10. Creep-rupture performance of 0.07C-23Cr-45Ni-6W-Ti,Nb austenitic alloy (HR6W) tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Neal D; Shingledecker, John P

    2010-01-01

    A series of base metal and cross-weld creep-rupture tests were conducted on the advanced austenitic alloy, HR6W, to evaluate the material for use at advanced ultrasupercritical (A-USC) steam conditions. Creep deformation and rupture were evaluated by traditional methods and data were compared with other studies to evaluate the creep response of the material. Optical and scanning electron microscopy revealed changes in failure mode and precipitation behavior. Thermodynamic predictions of phase stability were conducted and the results were compared with the experimental data. This research confirmed the important role of W and the precipitation of laves phase in the alloy system, but a direct relationship between laves phase content and creep strength was not observed. Furthermore, Cr content was investigated as an additional factor which may be important in the microstructural stability of the alloy which had not been previously considered. Finally, when compared to commercially available stainless steels, this heat of HR6W showed no creep strength advantage for A-USC application.

  11. Accumulation and annealing of radiation defects and the hydrogen effect thereon in an austenitic steel 16Cr15Ni3Mo1Ti upon low-temperature neutron and electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, V. L.; Gothchitskii, B. N.; Danilov, S. E.; Zaluzhnyi, A. G.; Zuev, Yu. N.; Kar'kin, A. E.; Parkhomenko, V. D.; Sagaradze, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen, accumulation and annealing of radiation defects on the physicomechanical properties of an austenitic Kh16N15M3T1 steel (16Cr15Ni3Mo1Ti) has been investigated upon low-temperature (77 K) neutron and electron irradiations. It has been shown that, when its concentration is about 300 at ppm, hydrogen reduces plasticity by 25%. The presence of helium (2.0-2.5 at ppm) introduced by the tritium-trick method exerts an effect on the yield strength and hardly affects embrittlement. Upon both electron and neutron irradiation, there is a linear relation between the increment of the yield strength and the square root of the increment of the residual electrical resistivity (the concentration of radiation defects). The annealing of vacancies occurs in the neighborhood of 300 K (energy for vacancy migration is 1.0-1.0 eV). Vacancy clusters dissociate near 480 K (energy for dissociation is 1.4-1.5 eV).

  12. Empirical Study of the Multiaxial, Thermomechanical Behavior of NiTiHf Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, Dhwanil; Noebe, Ronald D.; Stebner Aaron P.

    2013-01-01

    An empirical study was conducted to characterize the multiaxial, thermomechanical responses of new high temperature NiTiHf alloys. The experimentation included loading thin walled tube Ni(sub 50.3)Ti(sub 29.7)Hf(sub 20) alloy samples along both proportional and nonproportional axial-torsion paths at different temperatures while measuring surface strains using stereo digital image correlation. A Ni(sub 50.3)Ti(sub 33.7)Hf(sub 16) alloy was also studied in tension and compression to document the effect of slightly depleting the Hf content on the constitutive responses of NiTiHf alloys. Samples of both alloys were made from nearly texture free polycrystalline material processed by hot extrusion. Analysis of the data shows that very small changes in composition significantly alter NiTiHf alloy properties, as the austenite finish (Af) temperature of the 16-at Hf alloy was found to be approximately 60 C less than the 20-at Hf alloy (approximately 120 C vs. 180 C). In addition, the 16-at Hf alloy exhibited smaller compressive transformation strains (2 vs. 2.5 percent). Multi-axial characterization of the 20-at % Hf alloy showed that while the random polycrystal transformation strains in tension (4 percent) and compression (2.5 percent) are modest in comparison with binary NiTi (6 percent, 4 percent), the torsion performance is superior (7 vs. 4 shear strain width to the pseudoelastic plateau).

  13. Meaning of percent sunshine

    SciTech Connect

    Sands, J.

    1983-05-01

    The meaning of the term percent of possible sunshine is discussed. The Percent of Possible Sunshine (POPS) is published monthly with annual summaries by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) for 168 locations, and is a measure of how long the sun shines, not how much sunshine there is. The weakness of the POPS as a serious indicator of solar performance is pointed out.

  14. Magnetic nature of the austenite-martensite phase transition and spin glass behaviour in nanostructured Mn2Ni1.6Sn0.4 melt-spun ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nidhi; Borgohain, Barsha; Srivastava, A. K.; Dhar, Ajay; Singh, H. K.

    2016-03-01

    Nanocrystalline ribbons of inverse Heusler alloy Mn2Ni1.6Sn0.4 have been synthesised by melt spinning of the arc-melted bulk precursor. The single-phase ribbons crystallize into a cubic structure and exhibit very fine crystallite size of <2 nm. Temperature-dependent magnetization ( M- T) measurements reveal ferromagnetic-austenite (FM-A)-antiferromagnetic-martensite (AFM-M) phase transition that begins at M S ≈ 249 K and finishes at M f ≈ 224 K. During warming, the reverse AFM-M to FM-A transitions begins at A s ≈ 240 K and finishes at A f ≈ 261 K. A re-entrant FM transition is observed in the M-phase at T_{{CM}} ≈ 145 K. These transitions are also confirmed by temperature-dependent resistivity ( ρ- T) measurements. The hysteretic behaviour of M- T and ρ- T in the temperature regime spanned by the A-M transition is a manifestation of the first-order phase transition. M- T and ρ- T data also provide unambiguous evidence in favour of spin glass at T < T_{{CM}}. The scaling of the glass freezing temperature ( T f) with frequency, extracted from the frequency-dependent AC susceptibility measurements, confirms the existence of canonical spin glass at T < T_{{CM}} ≈ 145 K. The occurrence of canonical spin glass has been explained in terms of the nanostructuring modified interactions between the coexisting FM and AFM correlations in the martensitic phase.

  15. Percents Can Make Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zambo, Ron

    2008-01-01

    This article describes instructional activities designed to help students develop an understanding of the multiple relationships between fractions and percents and unit price as they develop their mental-math abilities. (Contains 4 figures.)

  16. Effet d'un enrichissement en nickel sur la stabilite mecanique de l'austenite de reversion lorsque soumise a de la fatigue oligocyclique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Stephane

    The effect of nickel enrichment on the mechanical stability of the reversed austenite contained in martensitic stainless steels 13%Cr-4%Ni and 13%Cr-6%Ni was investigated. The main objective of the study was to observe their microstructure and to compare the dynamic behaviour of the reversed austenite. Tempers made at different temperatures showed that the 6% Ni alloy began to form more austenite and at a lower temperature. SEM and TEM analysis were used to see the austenite and measure its chemical composition. It has been observed that it was richer in Ni than the surrounding martensite. This enrichment increased with tempering temperature and caused an impoverishment of the surrounding martensite. The study also showed that the chemical composition of the austenite formed at the peak (maximum) of both alloys was similar. For a same tempering, this suggests Ni can help to form more austenite but this austenite is not necessarily richer in Ni. The analysis also showed that the austenite was predominantly lamellar and located at the interface and/or inside the martensite laths. Low cycle fatigue tests have shown that the austenite of the 6% Ni alloy was the most mechanically stable even if its Ni content was lower than the 4% Ni alloy austenite. This behaviour was explained by a thinner and narrower morphology of this phase. For a different content of Ni and different quantity of austenite, the most mechanically stable one was in the 4% Ni alloy. It turned out that its reversed austenite was thinner and its surrounding martensite was a bit harder than the 6% Ni alloy austenite. The effect of Ni enrichment of an alloy would be beneficial regarding the mechanical stability if a suitable tempering is made. This tempering must form a thin lamellar austenite in a sufficiently hard martensite. More Ni in the austenite would not necessarily raise the mechanical stability. It could contribute but it seems that it is not be the main factor governing the mechanical stability

  17. Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I [Greensburg, PA

    2011-08-23

    A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

  18. Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I [Greensburg, PA

    2010-07-06

    A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

  19. Calorimetric Investigation of Thermal Stability of 304H Cu (Fe-17.7Cr-9.3Ni-2.95Cu-0.91Mn-0.58Nb-0.24Si-0.1C-0.12N-Wt Pct) Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Haraprasanna; Subramanian, Raju; Hajra, Raj Narayan; Rai, Arun Kumar; Rengachari, Mythili; Saibaba, Saroja; Jayakumar, Tammana

    2016-05-01

    The sequence of phase instabilities that take place in a Fe-17.7Cr-9.3Ni-0.58Nb-2.95Cu-0.12N (wt pct) austenitic stainless steel (304H Cu grade) as a function of temperature has been investigated using dynamic calorimetry. The results obtained from this investigation are supplemented by Thermocalc-based equilibrium and Scheil-Gulliver nonequilibrium solidification simulation. The following phase transformation sequence is found upon slow cooling from liquid: L → L + γ → L + γ + MX → γ + MX + δ → γ +MX + M23C6 → γ + MX + M23C6 + Cu. Under slow cooling, the solidification follows austenite + ferrite (AF) mode, which is in accordance with Thermocalc prediction and Scheil-Gulliver simulation. However, higher cooling rates result in skeletal δ-ferrite formation, due to increased segregation tendency of Nb and Cr to segregate to interdendritic liquid. The solidification mode is found to depend on combined Nb + Cu content. Experimental estimates of enthalpy change associated with melting and secondary phase precipitation are also obtained. In addition a semi-quantitative study on the dissolution kinetics of M23C6 type carbides has also been investigated. The standard solution treatment at 1413 K (1140 °C) is found to be adequate to dissolve both Cu and M23C6 into γ-austenite; but the complete dissolution of MX type carbonitrides occurs near the melting region.

  20. Magnetic properties of single crystalline expanded austenite obtained by plasma nitriding of austenitic stainless steel single crystals.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Enric; Templier, Claude; Garcia-Ramirez, Pablo; Santiso, José; Vantomme, André; Temst, Kristiaan; Nogués, Josep

    2013-10-23

    Ferromagnetic single crystalline [100], [110], and [111]-oriented expanded austenite is obtained by plasma nitriding of paramagnetic 316L austenitic stainless steel single crystals at either 300 or 400 °C. After nitriding at 400 °C, the [100] direction appears to constitute the magnetic easy axis due to the interplay between a large lattice expansion and the expected decomposition of the expanded austenite, which results in Fe- and Ni-enriched areas. However, a complex combination of uniaxial (i.e., twofold) and biaxial (i.e., fourfold) in-plane magnetic anisotropies is encountered. It is suggested that the former is related to residual stress-induced effects while the latter is associated to the in-plane projections of the cubic lattice symmetry. Increasing the processing temperature strengthens the biaxial in-plane anisotropy in detriment of the uniaxial contribution, in agreement with a more homogeneous structure of expanded austenite with lower residual stresses. In contrast to polycrystalline expanded austenite, single crystalline expanded austenite exhibits its magnetic easy axes along basic directions. PMID:24028676

  1. Embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    The microstructure of type-308 austenitic stainless steel weld metal containing {gamma} and {delta} and ferrite is shown. Typical composition of the weld metal is Cr-20.2, Ni-9.4, Mn-1.7, Si-0.5, C-0.05, N-0.06 and balance Fe (in wt %). Exposure of austenitic stainless steel welds to elevated temperatures can lead to extensive changes in the microstructural features of the weld metal. On exposure to elevated temperatures over a long period of time, a continuous network of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide forms at the austenite/ferrite interface. Upon aging at temperatures between 550--850 C, ferrite in the weld has been found to be unstable and transforms to sigma phase. These changes have been found to influence mechanical behavior of the weld metal, in particular the creep-rupture properties. For aging temperatures below 550 C the ferrite decomposes spinodally into {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} phases. In addition, precipitation of G-phase occurs within the decomposed ferrite. These transformations at temperatures below 550 C lead to embrittlement of the weld metal as revealed by the Charpy impact properties.

  2. Embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-06-01

    To prevent hot-cracking, austenitic stainless steel welds generally contain a small percent of delta ferrite. Although ferrite has been found to effectively prevent hot-cracking, it can lead to embrittlement of welds when exposed to elevated temperatures. The aging behavior of type-308 stainless steel weld has been examined over a range of temperatures 475--850 C for times up to 10,000 hrs. Upon aging, and depending on the temperature range, the unstable ferrite may undergo a variety of solid state transformations. These phase changes creep-rupture and Charpy impact properties.

  3. Pinning of Austenite Grain Boundaries by

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğan, Ömer N.; Michal, G. M.; Kwon, H.-W.

    1992-08-01

    The growth behavior of austenite grains in the presence of A1N precipitates varies with the temperature and time of anneal. To study this behavior, two iron alloys, (in weight percent) a 0.1 carbon base chemistry with 0.03A1/0.01N and 0.09A1/0.04N, respectively, were annealed between 1000 °C and 1200 °C for times of up to 180 minutes. Using optical microscopy, as many as 1000 austenite grains per heat-treatment condition were measured. Conditions of sup- pressed, abnormal, and uniform grain growth were observed. Using an extraction replica tech- nique, the size, shape, and distribution of the A1N particles were determined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The largest grain boundary curvatures calculated, using the Hellman- Hillert pinning model, were in close agreement with independent calculations of curvatures using the grain size data. The largest grains in the lognormal size distribution of austenite grains were found to be the ones with the potential to grow to abnormally large sizes.

  4. Corrosion of austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys in supercritical water and novel control methods

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Allen, Todd R.; Yang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    This chapter contains sections titled: (1) Introduction; (2) Thermodynamics of Alloy Oxidation; (3) Corrosion of Austenitic Stainless Steels and Ni-Base Alloys in SCW; (4) Novel Corrosion Control Methods; (5) Factors Influencing Corrosion; (6) Summary; and (7) References.

  5. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    SciTech Connect

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1981-05-05

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the mo content.

  6. Direct decomposition of austenite in two Fe-V-C alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishima, Y.; Horn, R. M.; Zackay, V. F.; Parker, E. R.

    1980-03-01

    Investigations of austenite decomposition have been undertaken in (1) Fe-0.5Mn-1V-0.2C and (2) Fe-0.5Mn-3Ni-1V-0.2C alloys. Isothermal transformation characteristics were determined using dilatometric and thermo-electric potential techniques. Also, micro-structural features were observed using optical and transmission electron microscopy for treatments of interest following isothermal austenite decomposition in the 550 to 750° C range. Associated mechanical properties were measured with emphasis being placed on Charpy impact behavior. Both alloys exhibited two temperature regions in which “C-curve” austenite decomposition occurred. In the upper region a combination of fibrous and fine particle VC precipitation was observed in both alloys. In the lower transformation region, bainitic microstructures resulted from the isothermal treatments. Additionally, the alloy containing 3 pct Ni exhibited VC precipitation in the austenite prior to ferrite formation. In both alloys, complete isothermal transformation produced microstructures with poor impact properties. However, a good combination of strength and toughness was produced in the 3 pct Ni alloy using the heat treatment that promoted VC precipitation in austenite but avoided total isothermal austenite decomposition.

  7. Manganese-stabilized austenitic stainless steels for fusion applications

    DOEpatents

    Klueh, Ronald L.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    1990-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel that is comprised of Fe, Cr, Mn, C but no Ni or Nb and minimum N. To enhance strength and fabricability minor alloying additions of Ti, W, V, B and P are made. The resulting alloy is one that can be used in fusion reactor environments because the half-lives of the elements are sufficiently short to allow for handling and disposal.

  8. Manganese-stabilized austenitic stainless steels for fusion applications

    DOEpatents

    Klueh, Ronald L.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    1990-08-07

    An austenitic stainless steel that is comprised of Fe, Cr, Mn, C but no Ni or Nb and minimum N. To enhance strength and fabricability minor alloying additions of Ti, W, V, B and P are made. The resulting alloy is one that can be used in fusion reactor environments because the half-lives of the elements are sufficiently short to allow for handling and disposal.

  9. Hyperfine fields in Fe-Ni-X alloys and their application to a study of tempering of 9Ni steel

    SciTech Connect

    Fultz, B.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1984-12-01

    Hyperfine interactions due to solutes in Fe-Ni-X alloys were systematized, and interpreted with a model of linear response of hyperfine magnetic fields to magnetic moments. The effects of solutes on the /sup 57/Fe hmf were used for chemical analysis of the austenite formed in 9Ni steel during tempering. Diffusion kinetics of the Ni and X solutes were found to play an important role in the formation of the austenite particles.

  10. Long term corrosion resistance of alumina forming austenitic stainless steels in liquid lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejenstam, Jesper; Szakálos, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Alumina forming austenitic steels (AFA) and commercial stainless steels have been exposed in liquid lead with 10-7 wt.% oxygen at 550 °C for up to one year. It is known that chromia forming austenitic stainless steels, such as 316L and 15-15 Ti, have difficulties forming protective oxides in liquid lead at temperatures above 500 °C, which is confirmed in this study. By adding Al to austenitic steels, it is in general terms possible to increase the corrosion resistance. However this study shows that the high Ni containing AFA alloys are attacked by the liquid lead, i.e. dissolution attack occurs. By lowering the Ni content in AFA alloys, it is possible to achieve excellent oxidation properties in liquid lead. Following further optimization of the microstructural properties, low Ni AFA alloys may represent a promising future structural steel for lead cooled reactors.

  11. First-principles study of helium, carbon, and nitrogen in austenite, dilute austenitic iron alloys, and nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepburn, D. J.; Ferguson, D.; Gardner, S.; Ackland, G. J.

    2013-07-01

    An extensive set of first-principles density functional theory calculations have been performed to study the behavior of He, C, and N solutes in austenite, dilute Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloys, and Ni in order to investigate their influence on the microstructural evolution of austenitic steel alloys under irradiation. The results show that austenite behaves much like other face-centered cubic metals and like Ni in particular. Strong similarities were also observed between austenite and ferrite. We find that interstitial He is most stable in the tetrahedral site and migrates with a low barrier energy of between 0.1 and 0.2 eV. It binds strongly into clusters as well as overcoordinated lattice defects and forms highly stable He-vacancy (VmHen) clusters. Interstitial He clusters of sufficient size were shown to be unstable to self-interstitial emission and VHen cluster formation. The binding of additional He and V to existing VmHen clusters increases with cluster size, leading to unbounded growth and He bubble formation. Clusters with n/m around 1.3 were found to be most stable with a dissociation energy of 2.8 eV for He and V release. Substitutional He migrates via the dissociative mechanism in a thermal vacancy population but can migrate via the vacancy mechanism in irradiated environments as a stable V2He complex. Both C and N are most stable octahedrally and exhibit migration energies in the range from 1.3 to 1.6 eV. Interactions between pairs of these solutes are either repulsive or negligible. A vacancy can stably bind up to two C or N atoms with binding energies per solute atom up to 0.4 eV for C and up to 0.6 eV for N. Calculations in Ni, however, show that this may not result in vacancy trapping as VC and VN complexes can migrate cooperatively with barrier energies comparable to the isolated vacancy. This should also lead to enhanced C and N mobility in irradiated materials and may result in solute segregation to defect sinks. Binding to larger vacancy clusters

  12. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure and cryogenic fracture properties in 5Ni and 9Ni steel

    SciTech Connect

    Strife, J.R.; Passoja, D.E.

    1980-08-01

    Heat treatments were utilized in 5Ni and 9Ni steel which resulted in the development of tempered microstructures which contained either no measurable retained austenite (<0.5 pct) or approximately 4 to 5 pct retained austenite as determined by X-ray diffraction. Microstructural observations coupled with the results of tensile testing indicated that the formation of retained austenite correlated with a decrease in carbon content of the matrix. Relative values of K/sub IC/ at 77 K were estimated from slow bend precracked Charpy data using both the COD and equivalent energy measurements. In addition, Charpy impact properties at 77/sup 0/K were determined. In the 9Ni alloy, optimum fracture toughness was achieved in specimens which contained retained austenite. This was attributed to changes in yield and work hardening behavior which accompanied the microstructural changes. In the 5Ni alloy, fracture toughness equivalent to that observed in the 9Ni alloy was developed in grain refined and tempered microstructures containing <0.5 pct retained austenite. A decrease in fracture toughness was observed in grain refined 5Ni specimens containing 3.8 pct retained austenite due to the premature onset of unstable cracking. This was attributed to the transformation of retained austenite to brittle martensite during deformation. It was concluded that the formation of thermally stable retained austenite is beneficial to the fracture toughness of Ni steels at 77/sup 0/K as a result of austenite gettering carbon from the matrix during tempering. However, it was also concluded that the mechanical stability of the retained austenite is critical in achieving a favorable enhancement of cryogenic fracture toughnes properties.

  13. The effect of heat treatment on microstructure and cryogenic fracture properties in 5Ni and 9Ni steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strife, J. R.; Passoja, D. E.

    1980-08-01

    Heat treatments were utilized in 5Ni and 9Ni steel which resulted in the development of tempered microstructures which contained either no measurable retained austenite (<0.5 pct) or approximately 4 to 5 pct retained austenite as determined by X-ray diffraction. Microstructural observations coupled with the results of tensile testing indicated that the formation of retained austenite correlated with a decrease in carbon content of the matrix. Relative values of K IC at 77 K were estimated from slow bend precracked Charpy data using both the COD and equivalent energy measurements. In addition, Charpy impact properties at 77 K were determined. In the 9Ni alloy, optimum fracture toughness was achieved in specimens which contained retained austenite. This was attributed to changes in yield and work hardening behavior which accompanied the microstructural changes. In the 5Ni alloy, fracture toughness equivalent to that observed in the 9Ni alloy was developed in grain refined and tempered microstructures containing <0.5 pct retained austenite. A decrease in fracture toughness was observed in grain refined 5Ni specimens containing 3.8 pct retained austenite due to the premature onset of unstable cracking. This was attributed to the transformation of retained austenite to brittle martensite during deformation. It was concluded that the formation of thermally stable retained austenite is beneficial to the fracture toughness of Ni steels at 77 K as a result of austenite gettering carbon from the matrix during tempering. However, it was also concluded that the mechanical stability of the retained austenite is critical in achieving a favorable enhancement of cryogenic fracture toughness properties.

  14. Improved high temperature creep resistant austenitic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1988-05-13

    An improved austenitic alloy having in wt% 19-21 Cr, 30-35 Ni, 1.5-2.5 Mn, 2-3 Mo, 0.1-0.4 Si, 0.3-0.5 Ti, 0.1-0.3 Nb, 0.1-0.5 V, 0.001-0.005 P, 0.08-0.12 C, 0.01-0.03 N, 0.005-0.01 B and the balance iron that is further improved by annealing for up to 1 hour at 1150-1200/degree/C and then cold deforming 5-15%. The alloy exhibits dramatically improved creep rupture resistance and ductility at 700/degree/C. 2 figs.

  15. High temperature creep resistant austenitic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Swindeman, Robert W.; Goodwin, Gene M.

    1989-01-01

    An improved austenitic alloy having in wt % 19-21 Cr, 30-35 Ni, 1.5-2.5 Mn, 2-3 Mo, 0.1-0.4 Si, 0.3-0.5 Ti, 0.1-0.3 Nb, 0.1-0.5 V, 0.001-0.005 P, 0.08-0.12 C, 0.01-0.03 N, 0.005-0.01 B and the balance iron that is further improved by annealing for up to 1 hour at 1150.degree.-1200.degree. C. and then cold deforming 5-15 %. The alloy exhibits dramatically improved creep rupture resistance and ductility at 700.degree. C.

  16. Inspiration: One Percent and Rising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R.

    2009-01-01

    Inventor Thomas Edison once famously declared, "Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration." If that's the case, then the students the author witnessed at the International Student Media Festival (ISMF) last November in Orlando, Florida, are geniuses and more. The students in the ISMF pre-conference workshop had much to…

  17. Percents Are Not Natural Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Adults are prone to treating percents, one representational format of rational numbers, as novel cases of natural number. This suggests that percent values are not differentiated from natural numbers; a conceptual shift from the natural numbers to the rational numbers has not yet occurred. This is most surprising, considering people are inundated…

  18. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Braski, David N.; Rowcliffe, Arthur F.

    1989-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01% to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties.

  19. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1987-02-11

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01 to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties. 4 figs.

  20. Development of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Bei, Hongbin; Santella, Michael L; Maziasz, Philip J

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the continued development of creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys, which exhibit a unique combination of excellent oxidation resistance via protective alumina (Al2O3) scale formation and high-temperature creep strength through the formation of stable nano-scale MC carbides and intermetallic precipitates. Efforts in fiscal year 2009 focused on the characterization and understanding of long-term oxidation resistance and tensile properties as a function of alloy composition and microstructure. Computational thermodynamic calculations of the austenitic matrix phase composition and the volume fraction of MC, B2-NiAl, and Fe2(Mo,Nb) base Laves phase precipitates were used to interpret oxidation behavior. Of particular interest was the enrichment of Cr in the austenitic matrix phase by additions of Nb, which aided the establishment and maintenance of alumina. Higher levels of Nb additions also increased the volume fraction of B2-NiAl precipitates, which served as an Al reservoir during long-term oxidation. Ageing studies of AFA alloys were conducted at 750 C for times up to 2000 h. Ageing resulted in near doubling of yield strength at room temperature after only 50 h at 750 C, with little further increase in yield strength out to 2000 h of ageing. Elongation was reduced on ageing; however, levels of 15-25% were retained at room temperature after 2000 h of total ageing.

  1. Intermetallic strengthened alumina-forming austenitic steels for energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bin

    In order to achieve energy conversion efficiencies of >50 % for steam turbines/boilers in power generation systems, materials required are strong, corrosion-resistant at high temperatures (>700°C), and economically viable. Austenitic steels strengthened with Laves phase and Ni3Al precipitates, and alloyed with aluminum to improve oxidation resistance, are potential candidate materials for these applications. The creep resistance of these alloys is significantly improved through intermetallic strengthening (Laves-Fe 2Nb + L12-Ni3Al precipitates) without harmful effects on oxidation resistance. This research starts with microstructural and microchemical analyses of these intermetallic strengthened alumina-forming austenitic steels in a scanning electron microscope. The microchemistry of precipitates, as determined by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscope, is also studied. Different thermo-mechanical treatments were carried out to these stainless steels in an attempt to further improve their mechanical properties. The microstructural and microchemical analyses were again performed after the thermo-mechanical processing. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to measure the lattice parameters of these steels after different thermo-mechanical treatments. Tensile tests at both room and elevated temperatures were performed to study mechanical behaviors of this novel alloy system; the deformation mechanisms were studied by strain rate jump tests at elevated temperatures. Failure analysis and post-mortem TEM analysis were performed to study the creep failure mechanisms of these alumina-forming austenitic steels after creep tests. Experiments were carried out to study the effects of boron and carbon additions in the aged alumina-forming austenitic steels.

  2. Copper modified austenitic stainless steel alloys with improved high temperature creep resistance

    DOEpatents

    Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1987-04-28

    An improved austenitic stainless steel that incorporates copper into a base Fe-Ni-Cr alloy having minor alloying substituents of Mo, Mn, Si, T, Nb, V, C, N, P, B which exhibits significant improvement in high temperature creep resistance over previous steels. 3 figs.

  3. Moessbauer study of microstructural and chemical changes in Fe-9Ni steel during two-phase tempering

    SciTech Connect

    Fultz, B.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1980-11-01

    Two-phase tempering of martensitic Fe-9Ni steel serves to enhance the low temperature toughness and forms austenite precipitates in this material. Hyperfine field effects in Fe-Ni alloys were systematized so that tempering induced chemical composition changes in the martensite could be quantified by Moessbauer spectrometry. The kinetics of segregation of alloy elements from the martensite into the fresh austenite can be determined simultaneously with the amount of austenite which was formed.

  4. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015 to 0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  5. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  6. Microstructure and crack resistance of low carbon Cr-Ni and Cr-Ni-W steel after austempering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdjieva, Tatyana B.; Tsutsumanova, Gichka G.; Russev, Stoyan N.; Staevski, Konstantin G.

    2013-09-01

    The microstructure of the low carbon Cr-Ni steel after slow cooling from austenization temperature represents a mix of granulated bainite with islands from carbon-rich martensite and carbon-poor austenite. After quick cooling throwing in salt bath from austenization temperature the microstructure is lath bainite. However, in the same treatment conditions, the microstructure of the low carbon Cr-Ni-W steel is different — clusters consist from lath ferrite and retained austenite, disposed in the frame of parent's austenite grains. The cooling velocity has no effect upon the structure making. The impact toughness of the steel with tungsten content is bigger than the steel without tungsten.

  7. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi[sub 5-x]Al[sub x] (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  8. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi{sub 5-x}Al{sub x} (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  9. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, E. A.

    1992-09-01

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi(5-x)Al(x) (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  10. Influence of damage rate on physical and mechanical properties and swelling of 18Cr-9Ni austenitic steel in the range of 3 × 10 -9 to 4 × 10 -8 dpa/s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, E. N.; Kozlov, A. V.; Yagovitin, P. I.; Evseev, M. V.; Kinev, E. A.; Panchenko, V. L.; Isobe, I.; Sagisaka, M.; Okita, T.; Sekimura, N.; Garner, F. A.

    2009-04-01

    The results of the examination of the specimens constructed from the Fe-18Cr-9Ni steel thick-wall pipe irradiated at temperatures 370-375 °С to damage rates from 1.5 to 21 dpa at displacement rates from 3 × 10 -9 to 4 × 10 -8 dpa/s are presented. Electrical resistance, elasticity characteristics and radiation swelling of this material under different irradiation conditions were measured. Changes in the microstructure of the steel, in particular, the porosity characteristics dependent on a damage rate are shown.

  11. An approach to prior austenite reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, Majid; Nelson, Tracy W.; Sorensen, Carl D.; Wei Lingyun

    2012-04-15

    One area of interest in Friction Stir Welding (FSW) of steels is to understand microstructural evolution during the process. Most of the deformation occurs in the austenite temperature range. Quantitative microstructural measurements of prior austenite microstructure are needed in order to understand evolution of the microstructure. Considering the fact that room temperature microstructure in ferritic steels contains very little to no retained austenite, prior austenite microstructure needs to be recovered from the room temperature ferrite. In this paper, an approach based on Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) is introduced to detect Bain zones. Bain zone detection is used to reconstruct prior austenite grain structure. Additionally, a separate approach based on phase transformation orientation relationships is introduced in order to recover prior austenite orientation. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This approach provides a tool to reconstruct large-scale austenite microstructures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It recovers prior austenite orientation without relying on retained austenite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It utilizes EBSD data from the room temperature microstructure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher number of active variants leads to more accurate reconstructions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At least two variants are needed in order to recover prior austenite orientation.

  12. Grain refinement of a nickel and manganese free austenitic stainless steel produced by pressurized solution nitriding

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh Akbari, Alireza

    2014-07-01

    Prolonged exposure at high temperatures during solution nitriding induces grain coarsening which deteriorates the mechanical properties of high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels. In this study, grain refinement of nickel and manganese free Fe–22.75Cr–2.42Mo–1.17N high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel plates was investigated via a two-stage heat treatment procedure. Initially, the coarse-grained austenitic stainless steel samples were subjected to an isothermal heating at 700 °C to be decomposed into the ferrite + Cr{sub 2}N eutectoid structure and then re-austenitized at 1200 °C followed by water quenching. Microstructure and hardness of samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, optical and scanning electron microscopy, and micro-hardness testing. The results showed that the as-solution-nitrided steel decomposes non-uniformly to the colonies of ferrite and Cr{sub 2}N nitrides with strip like morphology after isothermal heat treatment at 700 °C. Additionally, the complete dissolution of the Cr{sub 2}N precipitates located in the sample edges during re-austenitizing requires longer times than 1 h. In order to avoid this problem an intermediate nitrogen homogenizing heat treatment cycle at 1200 °C for 10 h was applied before grain refinement process. As a result, the initial austenite was uniformly decomposed during the first stage, and a fine grained austenitic structure with average grain size of about 20 μm was successfully obtained by re-austenitizing for 10 min. - Highlights: • Successful grain refinement of Fe–22.75Cr–2.42Mo–1.17N steel by heat treatment • Using the γ → α + Cr{sub 2}N reaction for grain refinement of a Ni and Mn free HNASS • Obtaining a single phase austenitic structure with average grain size of ∼ 20 μm • Incomplete dissolution of Cr{sub 2}N during re-austenitizing at 1200 °C for long times • Reducing re-austenitizing time by homogenizing treatment before grain refinement.

  13. Retained Austenite in SAE 52100 Steel Post Magnetic Processing and Heat Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, Nathaniel R; Watkins, Thomas R; Cavin, Odis Burl; Jaramillo, Roger A; Ludtka, Gerard Michael

    2007-01-01

    Steel is an iron-carbon alloy that contains up to 2% carbon by weight. Understanding which phases of iron and carbon form as a function of temperature and percent carbon is important in order to process/manufacture steel with desired properties. Austenite is the face center cubic (fcc) phase of iron that exists between 912 and 1394 C. When hot steel is rapidly quenched in a medium (typically oil or water), austenite transforms into martensite. The goal of the study is to determine the effect of applying a magnetic field on the amount of retained austenite present at room temperature after quenching. Samples of SAE 52100 steel were heat treated then subjected to a magnetic field of varying strength and time, while samples of SAE 1045 steel were heat treated then subjected to a magnetic field of varying strength for a fixed time while being tempered. X-ray diffraction was used to collect quantitative data corresponding to the amount of each phase present post processing. The percentage of retained austenite was then calculated using the American Society of Testing and Materials standard for determining the amount of retained austenite for randomly oriented samples and was plotted as a function of magnetic field intensity, magnetic field apply time, and magnetic field wait time after quenching to determine what relationships exist with the amount of retained austenite present. In the SAE 52100 steel samples, stronger field strengths resulted in lower percentages of retained austenite for fixed apply times. The results were inconclusive when applying a fixed magnetic field strength for varying amounts of time. When applying a magnetic field after waiting a specific amount of time after quenching, the analyses indicate that shorter wait times result in less retained austenite. The SAE 1045 results were inconclusive. The samples showed no retained austenite regardless of magnetic field strength, indicating that tempering removed the retained austenite. It is apparent

  14. Experimental investigation of stress effect on swelling and microstructure of Fe-16Cr-15Ni-3Mo-Nb austenitic stainless steel under low-temperature irradiation up to high damage dose in the BOR-60 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neustroev, V. S.; Ostrovsky, Z. E.; Shamardin, V. K.

    2004-08-01

    The present paper was devoted to investigation of the stress effect on swelling and microstructure evolution of the Fe-15.8Cr-15.3Ni-2.8Mo-0.6Nb steel irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor at temperatures from 395 to 410 °C and damage doses from 79 to 98 dpa. Was found out that the stress increase leads to an increase of swelling, that can be associated with a decrease in incubation period with a practically constant swelling rate. Voids concentration increases at the first stage of irradiation when the void sizes are practically constant, and then the concentration reaches some saturation and swelling increase is caused by void growth.

  15. Effect of austenitizing conditions on the impact properties of an alloyed austempered ductile iron of initially ferritic matrix structure

    SciTech Connect

    Delia, M.; Alaalam, M.; Grech, M.

    1998-04-01

    The effect of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure and impact properties of an austempered ductile iron (ADI) containing 1.6% Cu and 1.6% Ni as the main alloying elements was investigated. Impact tests were carried out on samples of initially ferritic matrix structure and which had been first austenitized at 850, 900, 950, and 1,000 C for 15 to 360 min and austempered at 360 C for 180 min. Results showed that the austenitizing temperature, T{sub {gamma}}, and time, t{sub {gamma}} have a significant effect on the impact properties of the alloy. This has been attributed to the influence of these variables on the carbon kinetics. Microstructures of samples austenitized at 950 and 1,000 C contain no pro-eutectoid ferrite. The impact properties of the former structures are independent of t{sub {gamma}}, while those solution treated at 1,000 C are generally low and show wide variation over the range of soaking time investigated. For fully ausferritic structures, impact properties fall with an increase in T{sub {gamma}}. This is particularly evident at 1,000 C. As the T{sub {gamma}} increases, the amount of carbon dissolved in the original austenite increases. This slows down the rate of austenite transformation and results in coarser structures with lower mechanical properties. Optimum impact properties are obtained following austenitizing between 900 and 950 C for 120 to 180 min.

  16. Austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gerald D.; Powell, Roger W.

    1985-01-01

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.08 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; 0.01-0.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; 0.03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, O; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P+wt. % B+wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding.

  17. Microstructural studies of advanced austenitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, J. A.; Ren, Jyh-Ching

    1989-11-15

    This report presents the first complete microstructural and analytical electron microscopy study of Alloy AX5, one of a series of advanced austenitic steels developed by Maziasz and co-workers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for their potential application as reheater and superheater materials in power plants that will reach the end of their design lives in the 1990's. The advanced steels are modified with carbide forming elements such as titanium, niobium and vanadium. When combined with optimized thermo-mechanical treatments, the advanced steels exhibit significantly improved creep rupture properties compared to commercially available 316 stainless steels, 17--14 Cu--Mo and 800 H steels. The importance of microstructure in controlling these improvements has been demonstrated for selected alloys, using stress relaxation testing as an accelerated test method. The microstructural features responsible for the improved creep strengths have been identified by studying the thermal aging kinetics of one of the 16Ni--14Cr advanced steels, Alloy AX5, in both the solution annealed and the solution annealed plus cold worked conditions. Time-temperature-precipitation diagrams have been developed for the temperature range 600 C to 900 C and for times from 1 h to 3000 h. 226 refs., 88 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. Texture development in dual-phase cold-rolled 18 pct Ni maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Z.; Farooque, M.; Ul Haq, A.; Khan, A.Q.

    1997-12-01

    Austenite and martensite textures were studied in 18 pct Ni 350-maraging steel as a function of various degrees of cold rolling. The austenite phase in the samples was produced by repeated thermal cycling between ambient and 800 C. The austenite phase thus formed was mechanically unstable and transformed to the martensite phase after 30 pct cold rolling. The texture developed as a result of cold rolling, and its effect upon microstructure and hardness has been studied.

  19. Unraveling the Effect of Thermomechanical Treatment on the Dissolution of Delta Ferrite in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezayat, Mohammad; Mirzadeh, Hamed; Namdar, Masih; Parsa, Mohammad Habibi

    2016-02-01

    Considering the detrimental effects of delta ferrite stringers in austenitic stainless steels and the industrial considerations regarding energy consumption, investigating, and optimizing the kinetics of delta ferrite removal is of vital importance. In the current study, a model alloy prone to the formation of austenite/delta ferrite dual phase microstructure was subjected to thermomechanical treatment using the wedge rolling test aiming to dissolve delta ferrite. The effect of introducing lattice defects and occurrence of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) were investigated. It was revealed that pipe diffusion is responsible for delta ferrite removal during thermomechanical process, whereas when the DRX is dominant, the kinetics of delta ferrite dissolution tends toward that of the static homogenization treatment for delta ferrite removal that is based on the lattice diffusion of Cr and Ni in austenite. It was concluded that the optimum condition for dissolution of delta ferrite can be defined by the highest rolling temperature and strain in which DRX is not pronounced.

  20. Magneto-mechanical effects in two steels with metastable austenite

    SciTech Connect

    Fultz, B.; Fior, G.O.; Chang, G.M.; Kopa, R.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-03-01

    Magneto-mechanical effects, or effects of magnetic fields on mechanical propeties of materials, are reported for two steels containing austenite that undergoes an fcc..-->..bcc martensitic transformation during plastic deformation. Stress-strain curves from tensile tests of AISI 304 stainless steels and 9Ni steels were measured in magnetic fields as large as 18 T at temperatures of 4/sup 0/K, 77/sup 0/K and room temperature. Even in 18 T magnetic fields at cryogenic temperatures the magneto-mechanical effects were small, but they were reproducible and scaled with the strength of the magnetic field and the amount of transformation. Magneto-mechanical effects in steels with metastable austenite provide a unique means of determining how martensitic transformations affect mechanical behavior. The fcc..-->..bcc transformation makes an important contribution to the work hardening of both AISI 304 and 9Ni steel, so the more rapid transformation during magnetic exposure results in a higher strength and a reduced elongation of tensile specimens. In AISI 304 stainless steel a reduced flow stress in the magnetic field was found at small plastic strains.

  1. Weldable, age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Brooks, J.A.; Krenzer, R.W.

    1975-07-22

    An age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel having superior weldability properties as well as resistance to degradation of properties in a hydrogen atmosphere is described. It has a composition of from about 24.0 to about 34.0 weight percent (w/o) nickel, from about 13.5 to about 16.0 w/o chromium, from about 1.9 to about 2.3 w/o titanium, from about 1.0 to about 1.5 w/ o molybdenum, from about 0.01 to about 0.05 w/o carbon, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o manganese, from about 0 to about 0.01 w/o phosphorous and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.010 w/o sulfur and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o silicon, from about 0.1 to about 0.35 w/o aluminum, from about 0.10 to about 0.50 w/o vanadium, from about 0 to about 0.0015 w/o boron, and the balance essentially iron. (auth)

  2. Austenite decomposition during continuous cooling of an HSLA-80 plate steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. W.; Colvin, D. J.; Krauss, G.

    1996-06-01

    Decomposition of fine-grained austenite (10-µm grain size) during continuous cooling of an HSLA-80 plate steel (containing 0.05C, 0.50Mn, 1.12Cu, 0.88Ni, 0.71Cr, and 0.20Mo) was evaluated by dilatometric measurements, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and microhardness testing. Between 750 °C and 600 °C, austenite transforms primarily to polygonal ferrite over a wide range of cooling rates, and Widmanstätten ferrite sideplates frequently evolve from these crystals. Carbon-enriched islands of austenite transform to a complex mixture of granular ferrite, acicular ferrite, and martensite (all with some degree of retained austenite) at cooling rates greater than approximately 5 °C/s. Granular and acicular ferrite form at temperatures slightly below those at which polygonal and Widmanstätten ferrite form. At cooling rates less than approximately 5 °C/s, regions of carbon-enriched austenite transform to a complex mixture of upper bainite, lower bainite, and martensite (plus retained austenite) at temperatures which are over 100 °C lower than those at which polygonal and Widmanstätten ferrite form. Interphase precipitates of copper form only in association with polygonal and Widmanstätten ferrite. Kinetic and microstruc-tural differences between Widmanstätten ferrite, acicular ferrite, and bainite (both upper and lower) suggest different origins and/or mechanisms of formation for these morphologically similar austenite transformation products.

  3. The influence of silicon and aluminum on austenite deformation behavior during fatigue and tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnhoff, Gregory R.

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) for automobile light-weighting utilize Si and Al alloying to retain austenite in the microstructure during thermal partitioning treatments. This research project utilized fully austenitic steels with varied Si and Al compositions to understand the effect of these elements on austenite deformation response, including deformation induced martensite formation and deformation twinning. Specific focus was directed at understanding austenite deformation response during fatigue loading. Independent alloying additions of 2.5 wt pct Si and Al were made to a base steel composition of 15 Ni - 11 Cr - 1 Mn - 0.03 C (wt pct). Weak beam dark field transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging of dissociated dislocations was implemented to experimentally determine the influences of Si and Al on austenite stacking fault energy (SFE). The 2.5 wt pct Si alloying addition decreased the SFE by 6.4 mJ/m2, while the 2.5 wt pct Al alloying increased the SFE by 12 mJ/m2. Fully reversed, total strain controlled, low cycle fatigue (LCF) tests indicated that all four alloys underwent primary cyclic hardening and stabilization. Secondary cyclic strain hardening was correlated to BCC martensite formation using Feritscope magnetic fraction measurements of LCF specimens; the formation of 1 pct martensite led to 7 MPa of secondary hardening. TEM showed that martensite predominantly formed as parallel, irregular bands through strain induced nucleation on austenite shear bands. The austenite shear bands consisted of austenite {111} planes with concentrated dislocations, stacking faults, and/or HCP epsilon-martensite. Aluminum alloying promoted martensite formation during LCF, while Si suppressed martensite. Therefore, the strain induced nucleation process was not suppressed by the increased SFE associated with Al alloying. Tensile testing indicated that Si alloying promoted deformation twinning by lowering the SFE. Similarly to LCF loading, Al promoted

  4. Deformation Mechanisms in Austenitic TRIP/TWIP Steel as a Function of Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Stefan; Wolf, Steffen; Martin, Ulrich; Krüger, Lutz; Rafaja, David

    2016-01-01

    A high-alloy austenitic CrMnNi steel was deformed at temperatures between 213 K and 473 K (-60 °C and 200 °C) and the resulting microstructures were investigated. At low temperatures, the deformation was mainly accompanied by the direct martensitic transformation of γ-austenite to α'-martensite (fcc → bcc), whereas at ambient temperatures, the transformation via ɛ-martensite (fcc → hcp → bcc) was observed in deformation bands. Deformation twinning of the austenite became the dominant deformation mechanism at 373 K (100 °C), whereas the conventional dislocation glide represented the prevailing deformation mode at 473 K (200 °C). The change of the deformation mechanisms was attributed to the temperature dependence of both the driving force of the martensitic γ → α' transformation and the stacking fault energy of the austenite. The continuous transition between the ɛ-martensite formation and the twinning could be explained by different stacking fault arrangements on every second and on each successive {111} austenite lattice plane, respectively, when the stacking fault energy increased. A continuous transition between the transformation-induced plasticity effect and the twinning-induced plasticity effect was observed with increasing deformation temperature. Whereas the formation of α'-martensite was mainly responsible for increased work hardening, the stacking fault configurations forming ɛ-martensite and twins induced additional elongation during tensile testing.

  5. Manufacture of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys by Conventional Casting and Hot-Working Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.P.; Yamamoto, Y.; Magee, J.H.

    2009-03-23

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Carpenter Technology Corporation (CarTech) participated in an in-kind cost share cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) effort under the auspices of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technology Maturation program to explore the feasibility for scale up of developmental ORNL alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels by conventional casting and rolling techniques. CarTech successfully vacuum melted 30lb heats of four AFA alloy compositions in the range of Fe-(20-25)Ni-(12-14)Cr-(3-4)Al-(1-2.5)Nb wt.% base. Conventional hot/cold rolling was used to produce 0.5-inch thick plate and 0.1-inch thick sheet product. ORNL subsequently successfully rolled the 0.1-inch sheet to 4 mil thick foil. Long-term oxidation studies of the plate form material were initiated at 650, 700, and 800 C in air with 10 volume percent water vapor. Preliminary results indicated that the alloys exhibit comparable (good) oxidation resistance to ORNL laboratory scale AFA alloy arc casting previously evaluated. The sheet and foil material will be used in ongoing evaluation efforts for oxidation and creep resistance under related CRADAs with two gas turbine engine manufacturers. This work will be directed to evaluation of AFA alloys for use in gas turbine recuperators to permit higher-temperature operating conditions for improved efficiencies and reduced environmental emissions.

  6. Manufacture of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Steel Alloys by Conventional Casting and Hot-Working Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.P.; Yamamoto, Y.; Magee, J.H.

    2009-03-10

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Carpenter Technology Corporation (CarTech) participated in an in-kind cost share cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) effort under the auspices of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technology Maturation Program to explore the feasibility for scale up of developmental ORNL alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels by conventional casting and rolling techniques. CarTech successfully vacuum melted 301b heats of four AFA alloy compositions in the range of Fe-(20-25)Ni-(12-14)Cr-(3-4)Al-(l-2.5)Nb wt.% base. Conventional hot/cold rolling was used to produce 0.5-inch thick plate and 0.1-inch thick sheet product. ORNL subsequently successfully rolled the 0.1-inch sheet to 4 mil thick foil. Long-term oxidation studies of the plate form material were initiated at 650, 700, and 800 C in air with 10 volume percent water vapor. Preliminary results indicated that the alloys exhibit comparable (good) oxidation resistance to ORNL laboratory scale AFA alloy arc casting previously evaluated. The sheet and foil material will be used in ongoing evaluation efforts for oxidation and creep resistance under related CRADAs with two gas turbine engine manufacturers. This work will be directed to evaluation of AFA alloys for use in gas turbine recuperators to permit higher-temperature operating conditions for improved efficiencies and reduced environmental emissions. AFA alloy properties to date have been obtained from small laboratory scale arc-castings made at ORNL. The goal of the ORNL-CarTech CRADA was to establish the viability for producing plate, sheet and foil of the AFA alloys by conventional casting and hot working approaches as a first step towards scale up and commercialization of the AFA alloys. The AFA alloy produced under this effort will then be evaluated in related CRADAs with two gas turbine engine manufacturers for gas turbine recuperator applications.

  7. Beyond Marbles: Percent Change and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Flannery

    2013-01-01

    In the author's eighth year of teaching, she hit a wall teaching percent change. Percent change is one of the few calculations taught in math classes that shows up regularly in the media, and one that she often does in her head to make sense of the world around her. Despite this, she had been teaching percent change using textbook problems about…

  8. The calculation of T{sub {delta}} and V{sub {delta}} in austenitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Qixun; Yang Ruzeng

    1997-03-01

    The relation between the {gamma}/{gamma} + {delta} boundary temperature, T{sub {delta}}, of austenitic steels and the equivalent weights, [Cr] and [Ni], has been studied, as has the law of variation of the {delta} phase volume, V{sub {delta}}, with temperature. With the aid of a computer, the following regression expressions have been derived from the experimental results: T{sub {delta}} ({degree}C) =- T{sub 4} {minus} 21.2[Cr] + 15.8[Ni] {minus} 223; V{sub {delta}} (%) = 0.715 exp [0.015(T {minus} T{sub {delta}})]. Satisfactory results have been obtained by using these regression expressions.

  9. Stress response of Barkhausen noise and coercive force in 9Ni steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautioaho, R.; Karjalainen, P.; Moilanen, M.

    1987-09-01

    The stress response curves of barkhausen noise, coercive force and lattice parameter of ratained austenite are measured for 9Ni steel in as-received condition (quenched and tempered plate), in tempered states following annealing for 1 to 243 h at 590°C, and in a coarse-grained state after annealing at 1200°C. The stress response is strong in all cases, but depends on the content of retained austenite, exhibiting the strongest response at 3 to 5 vol% austenite. The total range of retained austenite content was from 1.5 to 11.1%. The coercive force rises from about 500 to 850 A/m at temperings from 1 to 243 h, and contains a major contribution from dislocation of the fresh martensite formed furing cooling. The figures for austenite content and the lattice parameter measurements reveal that the austenite begins to lose stability after a few of tempering.

  10. High temperature properties of an austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, I.; Kaibyshev, R.; Skorobogatykh, V.

    2010-07-01

    Tensile properties of the 18Cr-9Ni-W-Nb-V-N austenitic stainless steel were studied at strain rates ranging from 6.7×10-6 to 1.3×10-2 s-1 in the temperature interval 20-740°C. It was found that this steel exhibits jerky flow at temperatures ranging from 530 to 680°C and an initial strain rate of 1.3×10-3 s-1. This phenomenon was interpreted in terms of Portevin-Le Chatelier (PLC) effect occurring due to dynamic strain aging (DSA). PLC yields significant increase in high temperature strength of this steel due to extending of plateau on temperature dependence of yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) to higher temperatures. As a result, YS and UTS remain virtually unchanged with increasing temperature from 350 to 740°C. Role of additives of tungsten and vanadium in DSA and high temperatures strength of the austenitic stainless steel is discussed.

  11. Nanostructured nickel-free austenitic stainless steel/hydroxyapatite composites.

    PubMed

    Tulinski, Maciej; Jurczyk, Mieczyslaw

    2012-11-01

    In this work Ni-free austenitic stainless steels with nanostructure and their nanocomposites with hydroxyapatite are presented and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction and optical profiling. The samples were synthesized by mechanical alloying, heat treatment and nitriding of elemental microcrystalline powders with addition of hydroxyapatite (HA). In our work we wanted to introduce into stainless steel hydroxyapatite ceramics that have been intensively studied for bone repair and replacement applications. Such applications were chosen because of their high biocompatibility and ability to bond to bone. Since nickel-free austenitic stainless steels seem to have better mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility compared to 316L stainless steels, it is possible that composite made of this steel and HA could improve properties, as well. Mechanical alloying and nitriding are very effective technologies to improve the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. Similar process in case of nanocomposites of stainless steel with hydroxyapatite helps achieve even better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Hence nanocrystalline nickel-free stainless steels and nickel-free stainless steel/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites could be promising bionanomaterials for use as a hard tissue replacement implants, e.g., orthopedic implants. In such application, the surface roughness and more specifically the surface topography influences the proliferation of cells (e.g., osteoblasts). PMID:23421285

  12. Heavy hydrogen isotopes penetration through austenitic and martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinski, Yu.; Lyasota, I.; Shestakov, A.; Repritsev, Yu.; Zouev, Yu.

    2000-12-01

    Experimental results are presented of deuterium and tritium permeability through samples of nickel, austenitic steel (16Cr-15Ni-3Mo-Ti), and martensitic steel DIN 1.4914 (MANET) exposed to a gaseous phase. Experiments were carried out at the RFNC-VNHTF installation, which has the capability of measuring the permeability of hydrogen isotopes by mass spectrometry over a temperature range of 293-1000 K, hydrogen isotope pressure ranges of 50-1000 Pa. Sample disks (30 and 40 mm diam.) can be assembled in the test chamber by electron-beam welding or mounted (30-mm diam. disks) on gaskets. Diffusion and permeability dependencies on temperature and pressure are determined and corresponding activation energies are presented.

  13. Alumina-forming Austenitic Alloys for Advanced Recuperators

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Shingledecker, John P; Brady, Michael P; Maziasz, Philip J

    2007-01-01

    Materials selection for thin-walled recuperators has been extensively investigated over the past decade. In the latest generation of recuperated turbine engines, type 347 stainless steel has been replaced by higher alloyed steels and Ni-base chromia-forming alloys. However, high (linear) rates of chromia evaporation in exhaust gas fundamentally limits the oxidation lifetime of these chromia-forming alloys. One solution is to use alumina-forming alloys that are more resistant to this environment. The lower scale growth kinetics and resistance to evaporation in the presence of water vapor suggests an order of magnitude increase in lifetime for alumina-forming alloys. A significant problem with this strategy was the large drop in creep strength with the addition of sufficient Al to form an external alumina scale. However, new Fe-base austenitic compositions have been developed with sufficient strength for this application above 700 C.

  14. Improvement in the Corrosion Resistance of Austenitic Stainless Steel 316L by Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xun; Feng, Kai

    In the present work, austenitic stainless steel 316L (SS316L) samples were implanted with Ni and Ni-Cr. A nickel-rich layer about 100 nm in thickness and a Ni-Cr enriched layer about 60 nm thick are formed on the surface of SS316L. The effects of ion implantation on the corrosion performance of SS316L are investigated in a 0.5 M H2SO4 with 2 ppm HF solution at 80°C by open circuit potential (OCP), potentiodynamic and potentiostatic tests. The samples after the potentiostatic test are analyzed by XPS. The results indicate that the composition of the passive film change from a mixture of Fe oxides and Cr oxide to a Cr oxide dominated passive film after the potentiostatic test. The solutions after the potentiostatic test are analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results reveal that Fe is selectively dissolved in all cases and a proper Ni and Ni-Cr implant fluence can greatly improve the corrosion resistance of SS316L in the simulated polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCS) environment. They are in agreement with the electrochemical test results that the bare SS316L has the highest dissolution rate in both cathode and anode environments and the Ni and Ni-Cr implantation reduce markedly the dissolution rate. After the potentiostatic test the interfacial contact resistance (ICR) values are also measured. Ni and Ni-Cr are enriched in the passive film formed in the simulated PEMFC cathode environment after ion implantation thereby providing better conductivity than that formed in the anode one. A significant improvement of ICR is achieved for the SS316L implanted with Ni and Ni-Cr as compared to the bare SS316L, which is attributed to the reduction in passive layer thickness caused by Ni and Ni-Cr implantation. The ICR values for implanted specimens increase with increasing dose.

  15. A simplified leak-before-break evaluation procedure for austenitic and ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, R.M.; Zahoor, A.; Ghassemi, B.

    1994-10-01

    A simplified procedure has been defined for computing the allowable circumferential throughwall crack length as a function of applied loads in piping. This procedure has been defined to enable leak-before-break (LBB) evaluations to be performed without complex and time consuming analyses. The development of the LBB evaluation procedure is similar to that now used in Section 11 of the ASME Code for evaluation of part-throughwall flaws found in piping. The LBB evaluation procedure was bench marked using experimental data obtained from pipes having circumferential throughwall flaws. Comparisons of the experimental and predicted load carrying capacities indicate that the method has a conservative bias, such that for at least 97% of the experiments the experimental load is equal to or greater than 90% of the predicted load. The procedures described in this report are applicable to pipe and pipe fittings with: (1) wrought austenitic steel (Ni-Cr-Fe alloy) having a specified minimum yield strength less than 45 ksi, and gas metal-arc, submerged arc and shielded metal-arc austenitic welds, and (2) seamless or welded wrought carbon steel having a minimum yield strength not greater than 40 ksi, and associated weld materials. The procedures can be used for cast austenitic steel when adequate information is available to place the cast material toughness into one of the categories identified later in this report for austenitic wrought and weld materials.

  16. Phase Transformations of an Fe-0.85 C-17.9 Mn-7.1 Al Austenitic Steel After Quenching and Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei-Chun

    2014-09-01

    Low-density Mn-Al steels could potentially be substitutes for commercial Ni-Cr stainless steels. However, the development of the Mn-Al stainless steels requires knowledge of the phase transformations that occur during the steel making processes. Phase transformations of an Fe-0.85 C-17.9 Mn-7.1 Al (wt.%) austenitic steel, which include spinodal decomposition, precipitation transformations, and cellular transformations, have been studied after quenching and annealing. The results show that spinodal decomposition occurs prior to the precipitation transformation in the steel after quenching and annealing at temperatures below 1023 K and that coherent fine particles of L12-type carbide precipitate homogeneously in the austenite. The cellular transformation occurs during the transformation of high-temperature austenite into lamellae of austenite, ferrite, and kappa carbide at temperatures below 1048 K. During annealing at temperatures below 923 K, the austenite decomposes into lamellar austenite, ferrite, κ-carbide, and M23C6 carbide grains for another cellular transformation. Last, when annealing at temperatures below 873 K, lamellae of ferrite and κ-carbide appear in the austenite.

  17. SCC of austenitic stainless steel, Ni-21Cr-13.5Mo alloy, and 0.3Mo-0.8Ni-Ti in 350 C synthetic, NO{sub 2}2-NO{sub 3}-OH tank waste

    SciTech Connect

    Pednekar, S.P.

    1998-12-31

    A necessary step in preparation of high-level radioactive tank waste for sate disposal is removal of non radioactive organic and inorganic components from washed waste. The oxidizing and alkaline nature of most wastes allows the removal of the organic components as water vapor, carbon dioxide, and ammonia gas merely by heating the wastes to no more than 350 C. Type 3 16L stainless steel (UNS S3 1603) a 21Cr-13.5Mo-Ni alloy (UNS N06022), and 0.8Ni-0.3Mo-Ti alloy (UNS R53400) were candidate materials for reactors in which the oxidation could be performed. Slow-strain-rate tests were performed on these three materials at a strain rate of 10{sup {minus}6}sec{sup {minus}1} in a diluted waste type solution containing 4.1% NO{sub 2}, 3.7% NO{sub 3}, 1% OH, and 0.22% TIC. All three materials showed intergranular stress corrosion cracking with substantial losses in ductility and strength.

  18. Reactive Ni/Ti nanolaminates

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D. P.; Bai, M. M.; Rodriguez, M. A.; McDonald, J. P.; Jones, E. Jr.; Brewer, L.; Moore, J. J.

    2009-11-01

    Nickel/titanium nanolaminates fabricated by sputter deposition exhibited rapid, high-temperature synthesis. When heated locally, self-sustained reactions were produced in freestanding Ni/Ti multilayer foils characterized by average propagation speeds between approx0.1 and 1.4 m/s. The speed of a propagating reaction front was affected by total foil thickness and bilayer thickness (layer periodicity). In contrast to previous work with compacted Ni-Ti powders, no preheating of Ni/Ti foils was required to maintain self-propagating reactions. High-temperature synthesis was also stimulated by rapid global heating demonstrating low ignition temperatures (T{sub ig})approx300-400 deg. C for nanolaminates. Ignition temperature was influenced by bilayer thickness with more coarse laminate designs exhibiting increased T{sub ig}. Foils reacted in a vacuum apparatus developed either as single-phase B2 cubic NiTi (austenite) or as a mixed-phase structure that was composed of monoclinic B19{sup '} NiTi (martensite), hexagonal NiTi{sub 2}, and B2 NiTi. Single-phase, cubic B2 NiTi generally formed when the initial bilayer thickness was made small.

  19. Development and Exploratory Scale-Up of Alumina-Forming Austenitic (AFA) Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Magee, John H; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Maziasz, Philip J; Santella, Michael L; Pint, Bruce A; Bei, Hongbin

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the continued development of creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys, which exhibit a unique combination of excellent oxidation resistance via protective alumina (Al2O3) scale formation and high-temperature creep strength through the formation of stable nano-scale MC carbides and intermetallic precipitates. Efforts in fiscal year 2009 focused on the characterization and understanding of long-term oxidation resistance and tensile properties as a function of alloy composition and microstructure. Computational thermodynamic calculations of the austenitic matrix phase composition and the volume fraction of MC, B2-NiAl, and Fe2(Mo,Nb) base Laves phase precipitates were used to interpret oxidation behavior. Of particular interest was the enrichment of Cr in the austenitic matrix phase by additions of Nb, which aided the establishment and maintenance of alumina. Higher levels of Nb additions also increased the volume fraction of B2-NiAl precipitates, which served as an Al reservoir during long-term oxidation. Ageing studies of AFA alloys were conducted at 750C for times up to 2000 h. Ageing resulted in near doubling of yield strength at room temperature after only 50 h at 750C, with little further increase in yield strength out to 2000 h of ageing. Elongation was reduced on ageing; however, levels of 15-25% were retained at room temperature after 2000 h of total ageing.

  20. Evolution of secondary phases in austenitic stainless steels during long-term exposures at 600, 650 and 800 deg. C

    SciTech Connect

    Vach, Marian Kunikova, Terezia; Domankova, Maria; Sevc, Peter; Caplovic, Lubomir; Gogola, Peter; Janovec, Jozef

    2008-12-15

    Three austenitic steels (18Cr-8Ni, 18Cr-10Ni, 21Cr-30Ni), used for long-term applications at temperatures between 600 and 800 deg. C were investigated. In the investigation, metallography, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were used. In additional to the experimental measurements, thermodynamic predictions were done using the ThermoCalc software and the non-commercial database STEEL16F. Various combinations of M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, sigma, and MC phases were identified in the austenite matrix of these steels. It was confirmed experimentally that extra large particles (up to 10 {mu}m) observed in the 21Cr-30Ni steel are M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, even though this carbide was not predicted as the equilibrium carbide at service temperature (800 deg. C). The analytical-experimental approach, combining thermodynamic predictions and experimental measurements, was found to be reliable for the characterization of austenitic steels.

  1. Breathing 100 percent oxygen compared with 50 percent oxygen:50 percent nitrogen reduces altitude-induced venous gas emboli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, James T.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1993-01-01

    The study investigates effects of 40 zero-prebreathe decompressions of male subjects to 8.3-6.8 psia for 6 h while they were breathing 100 percent oxygen and performing moderate exercise. No decompression sickness (DCS) symptoms were observed. Severe venous gas emboli (VGE) were not detected at 8.3 psia, but were present during 10, 20, and 40 percent of the exposures at 7.8, 7.3, and 6.8 psia, respectively. Zero-prebreathe decompression while breathing 100 percent oxygen results in significantly lower VGE and DCS risk levels than while breathing a 50:50 mix. It is shown that 7.3 psia EVA pressure suits with 100 percent oxygen should be safer than 8.3 psia suits with a 50:50 mix.

  2. CrN precipitation and elemental segregation during the decay of expanded austenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manova, D.; Lotnyk, A.; Mändl, S.; Neumann, H.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen insertion into austenitic stainless steel at elevated temperatures leads to anomalous fast nitrogen diffusion and the formation of an expanded fcc phase which is known as expanded austenite. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements during low energy nitrogen ion implantation into steel AISI 304 at 475 °C and short annealing at 575 °C were performed in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy investigations. They show the time dependent decay of this expanded phase with coalescing and growing CrN precipitates. There is elemental segregation associated with this decay where Fe is absent very early from the Cr–N containing precipitates. Ni is segregating towards the Fe-rich matrix more slowly. At the same time, the microstructure—decayed phase vs expanded austenite—is visible in SIMS cluster analysis.

  3. Low Temperature Creep of Hot-Extruded Near-Stoichiometric NiTi Shape Memory Alloy. Part 2; Effect of Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Noebe, R. D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is the first report on the effect prior low temperature creep on the thermal cycling behavior of NiTi. The isothermal low temperature creep behavior of near-stoichiometric NiTi between 300 and 473 K was discussed in Part I. The effect of temperature cycling on its creep behavior is reported in the present paper (Part II). Temperature cycling tests were conducted between either 300 or 373 K and 473 K under a constant applied stress of either 250 or 350 MPa with hold times lasting at each temperature varying between 300 and 700 h. Each specimen was pre-crept either at 300 or at 473 K for several months under an identical applied stress as that used in the subsequent thermal cycling tests. Irrespective of the initial pre-crept microstructures, the specimens exhibited a considerable increase in strain with each thermal cycle so that the total strain continued to build-up to 15 to 20 percent after only 5 cycles. Creep strains were immeasurably small during the hold periods. It is demonstrated that the strains in the austenite and martensite are linearly correlated. Interestingly, the differential irrecoverable strain, in the material measured in either phase decreases with increasing number of cycles, similar to the well-known Manson-Coffin relation in low cycle fatigue. Both phases are shown to undergo strain hardening due to the development of residual stresses. Plots of true creep rate against absolute temperature showed distinct peaks and valleys during the cool-down and heat-up portions of the thermal cycles, respectively. Transformation temperatures determined from the creep data revealed that the austenitic start and finish temperatures were more sensitive to the pre-crept martensitic phase than to the pre-crept austenitic phase. The results are discussed in terms of a phenomenological model, where it is suggested that thermal cycling between the austenitic and martensitic phase temperatures or vice versa results in the deformation of the austenite and

  4. Influence of Martensite Fraction on the Stabilization of Austenite in Austenitic-Martensitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiuliang; De Cooman, Bruno C.; Biermann, Horst; Mola, Javad

    2016-05-01

    The influence of martensite fraction ( f α') on the stabilization of austenite was studied by quench interruption below M s temperature of an Fe-13Cr-0.31C (mass pct) stainless steel. The interval between the quench interruption temperature and the secondary martensite start temperature, denoted as θ, was used to quantify the extent of austenite stabilization. In experiments with and without a reheating step subsequent to quench interruption, the variation of θ with f α' showed a transition after transformation of almost half of the austenite. This trend was observed regardless of the solution annealing temperature which influenced the martensite start temperature. The transition in θ was ascribed to a change in the type of martensite nucleation sites from austenite grain and twin boundaries at low f α' to the faults near austenite-martensite (A-M) boundaries at high f α'. At low temperatures, the local carbon enrichment of such boundaries was responsible for the enhanced stabilization at high f α'. At high temperatures, relevant to the quenching and partitioning processing, on the other hand, the pronounced stabilization at high f α' was attributed to the uniform partitioning of the carbon stored at A-M boundaries into the austenite. Reduction in the fault density of austenite served as an auxiliary stabilization mechanism at high temperatures.

  5. Explosive Surface Hardening of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs-Coskun, T.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the effects of explosion hardening on the microstructure and the hardness of austenitic stainless steel have been studied. The optimum explosion hardening technology of austenitic stainless steel was researched. In case of the explosive hardening used new idea mean indirect hardening setup. Austenitic stainless steels have high plasticity and can be easily cold formed. However, during cold processing the hardening phenomena always occurs. Upon the explosion impact, the deformation mechanism indicates a plastic deformation and this deformation induces a phase transformation (martensite). The explosion hardening enhances the mechanical properties of the material, includes the wear resistance and hardness. In case of indirect hardening as function of the setup parameters specifically the flayer plate position the hardening increased differently. It was find a relationship between the explosion hardening setup and the hardening level.

  6. Percent solids measurement using Coriolis technology

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.; Schietinger, M.

    1995-12-31

    In many industrial processes, measurement of percent solids is vital to product quality. Percent solids values are most often derived form measurement of density, specific gravity and refractive index. In the lab and in the process, measurement methods range from nuclear and refractometer to vibrating tube. For on-line measurement, Coriolis technology, a vibrating tube approach, is playing a more significant role. Coriolis technology is best known for the performance and benefits it provides for direct mass flow measurement. This discussion focuses on Coriolis technology as an option for percent solids measurement and its ability to provide real-time data for controlling the process, maintaining consistency, improving quality, and controlling costs. The combined abilities of a Coriolis mass flowmeter to provide direct mass flow and percent solids information simultaneously provides real-time control that is unattainable with any other single technology.

  7. An evaluation of 10 percent and 20 percent benzocaine gels in patients with acute toothaches

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, Elliot V.; Ciancio, Sebastian G.; Kuperstein, Arthur S.; Stoopler, Eric T.; Moore, Paul A.; Boynes, Sean G.; Levine, Steven C.; Casamassimo, Paul; Leyva, Rina; Mathew, Tanya; Shibly, Othman; Creighton, Paul; Jeffers, Gary E.; Corby, Patricia M.A.; Turetzky, Stanley N.; Papas, Athena; Wallen, Jillian; Idzik-Starr, Cynthia; Gordon, Sharon M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The authors evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of 10 percent and 20 percent benzocaine gels compared with those of a vehicle (placebo) gel for the temporary relief of toothache pain. They also assessed the compliance with the label dose administration directions on the part of participants with toothache pain. Methods Under double-masked conditions, 576 participants self-applied study gel to an open tooth cavity and surrounding oral tissues. Participants evaluated their pain intensity and pain relief for 120 minutes. The authors determined the amount of gel the participants applied. Results The responders’ rates (the primary efficacy parameter), defined as the percentage of participants who had an improvement in pain intensity as exhibited by a pain score reduction of at least one unit on the dental pain scale from baseline for two consecutive assessments any time between the five- and 20-minute points, were 87.3 percent, 80.7 percent and 70.4 percent, respectively, for 20 percent benzocaine gel, 10 percent benzocaine gel and vehicle gel. Both benzocaine gels were significantly (P ≤ .05) better than vehicle gel; the 20 percent benzocaine gel also was significantly (P ≤ .05) better than the 10 percent benzocaine gel. The mean amount of gel applied was 235.6 milligrams, with 88.2 percent of participants applying 400 mg or less. Conclusions Both 10 percent and 20 percent benzocaine gels were more efficacious than the vehicle gel, and the 20 percent benzocaine gel was more efficacious than the 10 percent benzocaine gel. All treatments were well tolerated by participants. Practical Implications Patients can use 10 percent and 20 percent benzocaine gels to temporarily treat toothache pain safely. PMID:23633700

  8. The Effects of Cold Work on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Intermetallic Strengthened Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, B.; Trotter, G.; Baker, Ian; Miller, M. K.; Yao, L.; Chen, S.; Cai, Z.

    2015-08-01

    In order to achieve energy conversion efficiencies of >50 pct for steam turbines/boilers in power generation systems, materials are required that are both strong and corrosion-resistant at >973 K (700 °C), and economically viable. Austenitic steels strengthened with Laves phase, NiAl and Ni3Al precipitates, and alloyed with aluminum to improve oxidation resistance, are potential candidate materials for these applications. The microstructure and microchemistry of recently developed alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Different thermo-mechanical treatments were performed on these steels to improve their mechanical performance. These reduced the grain size significantly to the nanoscale (~100 nm) and the room temperature yield strength to above 1000 MPa. A solutionizing anneal at 1473 K (1200 °C) was found to be effective for uniformly redistributing the Laves phase precipitates that form upon casting.

  9. Possible martensitic transformation and ferrimagnetic properties in Heusler alloy Mn2NiSn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Ying-Ni; Fan, Xiao-Xi; Kutluk, Abdugheni; Du, Xiu-Juan; Zhang, Zheng-Wei; Song, Yu-Ling

    2015-07-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of Hg2CuTi-type Mn2NiSn have been studied by performing the first-principle calculations. It is found that the phase transformation from the cubic to the tetragonal structure reduces the total energy, indicating that the martensitic phase is more stable and the phase transition from austenite to martensite may happen at low temperature for Hg2CuTi-type Mn2NiSn. Concerning the magnetism of Hg2CuTi-type Mn2NiSn, both austenitic and martensitic phases are suggested to be ferrimagnets. Furthermore, martensitic transformation decreases the magnetic moment per formula unit compared with austenitic phase. The results are helpful to accelerate the use of Mn2NiSn alloys in the series for magnetic shape memory applications.

  10. Corrosion resistance tests on NiTi shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Rondelli, G

    1996-10-01

    The corrosion performances of NiTi shape memory alloys (SMA) in human body simulating fluids were evaluated in comparison with other implant materials. As for the passivity current in potentiostatic conditions, taken as an index of ion release, the values are about three times higher for NiTi than for Ti6Al4V and austenitic stainless steels. Regarding the localized corrosion, while plain potentiodynamic scans indicated for NiTi alloy good resistance to pitting attack similar to Ti6Al4V, tests in which the passive film is abruptly damaged (i.e. potentiostatic scratch test and modified ASTM F746) pointed out that the characteristics of the passive film formed on NiTi alloy (whose strength can be related to the alloy's biocompatibility) are not as good as those on Ti6Al4V but are comparable or inferior to those on austenitic stainless steels. PMID:8894095

  11. Site occupancy trend of Co in Ni2MnIn: Ab initio approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Soumyadipta; Mahadevan, Priya; Biswas, C.

    2015-06-01

    The trend of site occupation of Co at Ni sites of Ni2MnIn system is studied in austenitic phase having L21 structure by ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculation. The Co atoms prefer to be at Ni sites rather than Mn site and are ferromagetically coupled with Ni and Mn. The ground state has tetragonal structure for Ni1.5Co0.5MnIn and Ni1.25Co0.75MnIn. The Co tends to form cluster.

  12. Delocalization and hybridization enhance the magnetocaloric effect in Ni2Mn0.75Cu0.25Ga

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sujoy; Blackburn, E.; Valvidares, S. M.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Vogel, Sven C.; Khan, M.; Dubenko, I.; Stadler, S.; Ali, N.; Sinha, S. K.; Kortright, J. B.

    2008-11-26

    In view of the looming energy crisis facing our planet, attention increasingly focuses on materials potentially useful as a basis for energy saving technologies. The discovery of giant magnetocaloric (GMC) compounds - materials that exhibit especially large changes in temperature as the externally applied magnetic field is varied - is one such compound 1. These materials have potential for use in solid state cooling technology as a viable alternative to existing gas based refrigeration technologies that use choro-fluoro - and hydro-fluoro-carbon chemicals known to have a severe detrimental effect on human health and environment 2,3. Examples of GMC compounds include Gd5(SiGe)4 4, MnFeP1-xAsx 5 and Ni-Mn-Ga shape memory alloy based compounds 6-8. Here we explain how the properties of one of these compounds (Ni2MnGa) can be tuned as a function of temperature by adding dopants. By altering the free energy such that the structural and magnetic transitions coincide, a GMC compound that operates at just the right temperature for human requirements can be obtained 9. We show how Cu, substituted for Mn, pulls the magnetic transition downwards in temperature and also, counterintuitively, increases the delocalization of the Mn magnetism. At the same time, this reinforces the Ni-Ga chemical bond, raising the temperature of the martensite-austenite transition. At 25percent doping, the two transitions coincide at 317 K.

  13. Effects of phosphorus, silicon and sulphur on microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steels during electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuya, K.; Nakahigashi, S.; Ozaki, S.; Shima, S.

    1991-03-01

    Fe-18Cr-9Ni-1.5Mn austenitic alloys containing phosphorus, silicon and sulphur were irradiated by 1 MeV electrons at 573-773 K. Phosphorus increased the intersitial loop nucleation and decreased the void swelling by increasing void number density and suppressing void growth. Silicon had a similar effect to phosphorus but its effect was weaker than phosphorus. Sulphur enhanced void swelling through increasing the void density. Nickel enrichment at grain boundaries was suppressed only in the alloy containing phosphorus. These phosphorus effects may be explained by a strong interaction with interstitials resulting in a high density of sinks for point defects.

  14. Migration and accumulation at dislocations of transmutation helium in austenitic steels upon neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. V.; Portnykh, I. A.

    2016-04-01

    The model of the migration and accumulation at dislocations of transmutation helium and the formation of helium-vacancy pore nuclei in austenitic steels upon neutron irradiation has been proposed. As illustrations of its application, the dependences of the characteristics of pore nuclei on the temperature of neutron irradiation have been calculated. The results of the calculations have been compared with the experimental data in the literature on measuring the characteristics of radiation-induced porosity that arises upon the irradiation of shells of fuel elements of a 16Cr-19Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Si-Ti-Nb-V-B steel in a fast BN600 neutron reactor at different temperatures.

  15. Characterization of high performance austenitic and ODS alloys for SCWR conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Penttila, S.; Toivonen, A.; Auerkari, P.; Novotny, R.

    2012-07-01

    High temperature oxidation resistance is of critical importance for the in-reactor components of the European supercritical water reactor (SCWR) concept. To consider candidate materials for this purpose, selected austenitic steels, iron based ODS (Oxide Dispersion Strengthened) alloys and one Ni alloy have been tested by exposure to supercritical water at 650 deg. C/25 MPa up to 2000 h. Results of observed mass change, oxide thickness and composition after exposure are shown and discussed regarding implications for long term oxidation performance. (authors)

  16. On the Cutting Performance of Coated HSS Taps When Machining of Austenitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliwkova, Petra; Piska, Miroslav

    2014-12-01

    The paper deals with a quality of the PVD coated HSS taps when cutting the stainless austenitic chromiumnickel non-stabilized steel DIN 1.4301 (X5CrNi 18-10). The main attention is focused on the analysis of loading (cutting moment, specific energy) of the HSS taps by means of pieso-electrical dynamometer Kistler 9272 and the relation between the quality of duplex and triplex PVD coatings and their effects on the quality of machined thread surfaces and tool life of the taps. The results showed a safe and stabilized cutting with acceptable quality of threads for HSSE with the TiN+TiCN+DLC coating.

  17. An Investigation of the Massive Transformation from Ferrite to Austenite in Laser-Welded Mo-Bearing Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perricone, M. J.; Dupont, J. N.; Anderson, T. D.; Robino, C. V.; Michael, J. R.

    2011-03-01

    A series of 31 Mo-bearing stainless steel compositions with Mo contents ranging from 0 to 10 wt pct and exhibiting primary δ-ferrite solidification were analyzed over a range of laser welding conditions to evaluate the effect of composition and cooling rate on the solid-state transformation to γ-austenite. Alloys exhibiting this microstructural development sequence are of particular interest to the welding community because of their reduced susceptibility to solidification cracking and the potential reduction of microsegregation (which can affect corrosion resistance), all while harnessing the high toughness of γ-austenite. Alloys were created using the arc button melting process, and laser welds were prepared on each alloy at constant power and travel speeds ranging from 4.2 to 42 mm/s. The cooling rates of these processes were estimated to range from 10 K (°C)/s for arc buttons to 105 K (°C)/s for the fastest laser welds. No shift in solidification mode from primary δ-ferrite to primary γ-austenite was observed in the range of compositions or welding conditions studied. Metastable microstructural features were observed in many laser weld fusion zones, as well as a massive transformation from δ-ferrite to γ-austenite. Evidence of epitaxial massive growth without nucleation was also found when intercellular γ-austenite was already present from a solidification reaction. The resulting single-phase γ-austenite in both cases exhibited a homogenous distribution of Mo, Cr, Ni, and Fe at nominal levels.

  18. A simplified LBB evaluation procedure for austenitic and ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, R.M.; Wichman, K.R.

    1997-04-01

    The NRC previously has approved application of LBB analysis as a means to demonstrate that the probability of pipe rupture was extremely low so that dynamic loads associated with postulated pipe break could be excluded from the design basis (1). The purpose of this work was to: (1) define simplified procedures that can be used by the NRC to compute allowable lengths for circumferential throughwall cracks and assess margin against pipe fracture, and (2) verify the accuracy of the simplified procedures by comparison with available experimental data for piping having circumferential throughwall flaws. The development of the procedures was performed using techniques similar to those employed to develop ASME Code flaw evaluation procedures. The procedures described in this report are applicable to pipe and pipe fittings with: (1) wrought austenitic steel (Ni-Cr-Fe alloy) having a specified minimum yield strength less than 45 ksi, and gas metal-arc, submerged arc and shielded metal-arc austentic welds, and (2) seamless or welded wrought carbon steel having a minimum yield strength not greater than 40 ksi, and associated weld materials. The procedures can be used for cast austenitic steel when adequate information is available to place the cast material toughness into one of the categories identified later in this report for austenitic wrought and weld materials.

  19. High-Temperature Performance of Cast CF8C-Plus Austenitic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, Philip J; Pint, Bruce A

    2011-01-01

    Covers and casings of small to medium size gas turbines can be made from cast austenitic stainless steels, including grades such as CF8C, CF3M, or CF10M. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Caterpillar have developed a new cast austenitic stainless steel, CF8C-Plus, which is a fully austenitic stainless steel, based on additions of Mn and N to the standard Nb-stabilized CF8C steel grade. The Mn addition improves castability, as well as increases the alloy solubility for N, and both Mn and N synergistically act to boost mechanical properties. CF8C-Plus steel has outstanding creep-resistance at 600-900 C, which compares well with Ni-based superalloys such as alloys X, 625, 617, and 230. CF8C-Plus also has very good fatigue and thermal fatigue resistance. It is used in the as-cast condition, with no additional heat-treatments. While commercial success for CF8C-Plus has been mainly for diesel exhaust components, this steel can also be considered for gas turbine and microturbine casings. The purposes of this paper are to demonstrate some of the mechanical properties, to update the long-term creep-rupture data, and to present new data on the high-temperature oxidation behavior of these materials, particularly in the presence of water vapor.

  20. Modeling the Ferrite-Austenite Transformation in the Heat-Affected Zone of Stainless Steel Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; David, S.A.

    1997-12-01

    The diffusion-controlled ferrite-austenite transformation in stainless steel welds was modeled. An implicit finite-difference analysis that considers multi-component diffusion was used. The model was applied to the Fe-Cr-Ni system to investigate the ferrite- austenite transformation in the heat-affected zone of stainless steel weld metal. The transformation was followed as a function of time as the heat-affected zone was subjected to thermal cycles comparable to those experienced during gas-tungsten arc welding. The results showed that the transformation behavior and the final microstructural state are very sensitive to the maximum temperature that is experienced by the heat-affected zone. For high maximum exposure temperatures ({approximately} 1300{degree} C), the ferrite formation that occurs at the highest temperatures is not completely offset by the reverse ferrite dissolution at lower temperatures. As a result, for high temperature exposures there is a net increase in the amount of ferrite in the microstructure. It was also found that if compositional gradients are present in the initial ferrite and austenite phases, the extent of the transformation is impacted.

  1. Development of a robust modeling tool for radiation-induced segregation in austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ying; Field, Kevin G; Allen, Todd R.; Busby, Jeremy T

    2015-09-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components has been linked to changes in grain boundary composition due to irradiation induced segregation (RIS). This work developed a robust RIS modeling tool to account for thermodynamics and kinetics of the atom and defect transportation under combined thermal and radiation conditions. The diffusion flux equations were based on the Perks model formulated through the linear theory of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Both cross and non-cross phenomenological diffusion coefficients in the flux equations were considered and correlated to tracer diffusion coefficients through Manning’s relation. The preferential atomvacancy coupling was described by the mobility model, whereas the preferential atom-interstitial coupling was described by the interstitial binding model. The composition dependence of the thermodynamic factor was modeled using the CALPHAD approach. Detailed analysis on the diffusion fluxes near and at grain boundaries of irradiated austenitic stainless steels suggested the dominant diffusion mechanism for chromium and iron is via vacancy, while that for nickel can swing from the vacancy to the interstitial dominant mechanism. The diffusion flux in the vicinity of a grain boundary was found to be greatly influenced by the composition gradient formed from the transient state, leading to the oscillatory behavior of alloy compositions in this region. This work confirms that both vacancy and interstitial diffusion, and segregation itself, have important roles in determining the microchemistry of Fe, Cr, and Ni at irradiated grain boundaries in austenitic stainless steels.

  2. Control of cryogenic intergranular fracture in high-manganese austenitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Strum, M.J.

    1986-12-01

    The sources of cryogenic intergranular embrittlement in high-Mn austenitic steels and the conditions necessary for its control are examined. It is shown that the high-Mn alloys are inherently susceptible to intergranular embrittlement due to both their low grain boundary cohesion and heterogeneous deformation characteristics. Extrinsic sources of embrittlement which could account for the transition behavior are not observed. An Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) study shows no indication of impurity-segregation-induced embrittlement. No grain boundary precipitation is observed, and austenite stabilization does not ensure ductile fracture. The influence of chemistry modifications on the ductile-to-brittle transition behavior were also examined through additions of N, Cr, and C to binary Fe-31 Mn. Nitrogen additions increase the 77K yield strength at a rate of 2200 MPa per weight percent N, and increase the austenite stability, but also increase the susceptibility of ternary alloys to intergranular fracture. Quaternary Cr additions are effective in increasing the N solubility, and lower the transition temperature. Carbon additions result in complete suppression of intergranular fracture at 77K. Qualitatively significant changes in the deformation heterogeneity with chemistry modifications are not observed. The temper-toughening of Fe-Mn-Cr-N alloys is associated with the grain boundary segregation of boron and the redistribution of N. Both boron and carbon are expected to inhibit intergranular fracture through increases in grain boundary cohesion.

  3. Estimating a percent reduction in load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millard, Steven P.

    This article extends the work of Cohn et al. [1989] on estimating constituent loads to the problem of estimating a percent reduction in load. Three estimators are considered: the maximum likelihood (MLE), a ``bias-corrected'' maximum likelihood (BCMLE), and the minimum variance unbiased (MVUE). In terms of root-mean-square error, both the MVUE and BCMLE are superior to the MLE, and for the cases considered here there is no appreciable difference between the MVUE and the BCMLE. The BCMLE is constructed from quantities computed by most regression packages and is therefore simpler to compute than the MVUE (which involves approximating an infinite series). All three estimators are applied to a case study in which an agricultural tax in the Everglades agricultural area is tied to an observed percent reduction in phosphorus load. For typical hydrological data, very large sample sizes (of the order of 100 observations each in the baseline period and after) are required to estimate a percent reduction in load with reasonable precision.

  4. The nucleation of austenite in ferritic ductile cast iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.M.; Hon, M.H. ); Lee, J.L. )

    1992-07-01

    Austempered ductile cast iron has recently been receiving increasing attention because of its excellent combination of strength and ductility. Since the austenitization process has a significant influence on the mechanical properties of austempered ductile cast iron, several investigations on the nucleation sites of austenite and diffusion paths of carbon from spheroidal graphite have been reported in ferritic ductile cast iron. However, agreement on this subject has not ben reached. The purpose of this paper is to study the preferential nucleation sites of austenite during austenitization at two austenitizing temperatures in ferritic ductile cast iron. An attempt was made to understand the reasons which give rise to preferential austenite nucleation sites. The carbon diffusion paths from spheroidal graphite were also investigated.

  5. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  6. Influence of boron on void swelling in model austenitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, T.; Wolfer, W. G.; Garner, F. A.; Sekimura, N.

    2004-08-01

    Model austenitic steels based on Fe-15Cr-16Ni with additions of 0.25Ti, 500 appm B, or 0.25Ti-500 appm B were irradiated in FFTF/MOTA over a wide range of dose rates at ˜400 °C. In addition to the effect of dose rate on swelling, it was desired to study the effect of boron addition to produce variations in He/dpa ratio. A strong effect of dose rate was observed, so strong that the relatively small distances separating the boron-free and doped alloys introduced a complication into the experiment. For specimens irradiated within the core, boron addition had no significant effect. For irradiations conducted near or outside the core edge, swelling appeared to be either enhanced or decreased by boron. The variability was a consequence of a strong dose rate effect overwhelming the influence of boron and helium. It is shown that helium exerted little influence relative to other important factors in these alloys.

  7. Hot compression deformation behavior of AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haj, Mehdi; Mansouri, Hojjatollah; Vafaei, Reza; Ebrahimi, Golam Reza; Kanani, Ali

    2013-06-01

    The hot compression behavior of AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel was studied at the temperatures of 950-1100°C and the strain rates of 0.01-1 s-1 using a Baehr DIL-805 deformation dilatometer. The hot deformation equations and the relationship between hot deformation parameters were obtained. It is found that strain rate and deformation temperature significantly influence the flow stress behavior of the steel. The work hardening rate and the peak value of flow stress increase with the decrease of deformation temperature and the increase of strain rate. In addition, the activation energy of deformation ( Q) is calculated as 433.343 kJ/mol. The microstructural evolution during deformation indicates that, at the temperature of 950°C and the strain rate of 0.01 s-1, small circle-like precipitates form along grain boundaries; but at the temperatures above 950°C, the dissolution of such precipitates occurs. Energy-dispersive X-ray analyses indicate that the precipitates are complex carbides of Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Ti.

  8. Structure and composition of phases occurring in austenitic stainless steels in thermal and irradiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.H.; Maziasz, P.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Transmission electron diffraction techniques coupled with quantitative x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy have been used to characterize the phases which develop in austenitic stainless steels during exposure to thermal and to irradiation environments. In AISI 316 and Ti-modified stainless steels some thirteen phases have been identified and characterized in terms of their crystal structure and chemical composition. Irradiation does not produce any completely new phases. However, as a result of radiation-induced segregation principally of Ni and Si, and of enhanced diffusion rates, several major changes in phase relationships occur during irradiation. Firstly, phases characteristic of remote regions of the phase diagram appear unexpectedly and dissolve during postirradiation annealing (radiation-induced phases). Secondly, some phases develop with their compositions significantly altered by the incorporation of Ni or Si (radiation-modified phases).

  9. Microstructural changes within similar coronary stents produced from two different austenitic steels.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Sabine; Meissner, Andreas; Fischer, Alfons

    2009-04-01

    Coronary heart disease has become the most common source for death in western industrial countries. Since 1986, a metal vessel scaffold (stent) is inserted to prevent the vessel wall from collapsing [Puel, J., Joffre, F., Rousseau, H., Guermonprez, B., Lancelin, B., Valeix, B., Imbert, G., Bounhoure, J.P, 1987. Endo-prothéses coronariennes autoexpansives dans la Préevention des resténoses apés angioplastie transluminale. Archives des Maladies du Coeur et des Vaisseaux, 1311--1312]. Most of these coronary stents are made from CrNiMo-steel (AISI 316L). Due to its austenitic structure, the material shows strength and ductility combined with corrosion resistance and a satisfactory biocompatibility. However, recent studies indicate that Nickel is under discussion as to its allergenic potential. Other typically used materials like Co-Base L605 or Tantalum alloys are relatively expensive and are not used so often. Newly developed austenitic high-nitrogen CrMnMoN-steels (AHNS) may offer an alternative. Traditional material tests revealed that strength and ductility, as well as corrosion resistance and biocompatibility, are as good as or even better than those of 316L [Vogt, J.B., Degallaix, S., Foct J., 1984. Low cycle fatigue life enhancement of 316L stainless steel by nitrogen alloying. International Journal of Fatigue 6 (4), 211-215, Menzel, J., Stein, G., 1996. High nitrogen containing Ni-free austenitic steels for medical applications. ISIJ Intern 36 (7), 893-900, Gavriljuk, V.G., Berns, H., 1999. High nitrogen steels, Springer Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg]. However, because of a strut diameter of about 100 microm, the cross section consists of about five to ten crystal grains (oligo-crystalline). Thus very few, or even just one, grain can be responsible for the success or failure of the whole stent. During implantation, the structure of coronary artery stents is subjected to distinct inhomogeneous plastic deformation due to crimping and dilation. PMID:19627825

  10. Hydrogen-induced defects in austenite and ferrite of a duplex steel.

    PubMed

    Głowacka, A; Swiatnicki, W A; Jezierska, E

    2006-09-01

    The influence of hydrogen on the microstructure of two types of austeno-ferritic duplex stainless steel (Cr26-Ni6 model steel and Cr22-Ni5-Mo3 commercial steel), each of them after two thermo-mechanical treatments, was investigated. The aim of this study was to reveal microstructural changes appearing during the hydrogen charging and particularly to clarify the occurrence of phase transformations induced by hydrogen. The specific microstructural changes in the ferrite (alpha) and austenite (gamma) of both types of steel were observed. A strong increase of dislocation density was noticed in the alpha phase. In the case of model steel, longer hydrogen charging times led to significant ferrite grain refinement. In the commercial steel, the strips and twin plates appeared in the ferrite after hydrogenation. The appearance of stacking faults was revealed in the gamma phase. The martensite laths appeared in austenite after longer hydrogenation times. It seems that the microstructural changes gave rise to the formation of microcracks in the alpha and gamma phases as well as on the alpha/gamma interphase boundaries. PMID:17059551

  11. Effect of prior cold work on creep properties of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayanand, V. D.; Parameswaran, P.; Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Laha, K.; Mathew, M. D.

    2013-07-01

    Prior cold worked (PCW) titanium-modified 14Cr-15Ni austenitic stainless steel (SS) is used as a core-structural material in fast breeder reactor because of its superior creep strength and resistance to void swelling. In this study, the influence of PCW in the range of 16-24% on creep properties of IFAC-1 SS, a titanium modified 14Cr-15Ni austenitic SS, at 923 K and 973 K has been investigated. It was found that PCW has no appreciable effect on the creep deformation rate of the steel at both the test temperatures; creep rupture life increased with PCW at 923 K and remained rather unaffected at 973 K. The dislocation structure along with precipitation in the PCW steel was found to change appreciably depending on creep testing conditions. A well-defined dislocation substructure was observed on creep testing at 923 K; a well-annealed microstructure with evidences of recrystallization was observed on creep testing at 973 K. Creep rupture life of the steel increased with the increase in PCW at 923 K. This has been attributed to the partial retention of prior cold work induced dislocations which facilitated the extensive precipitation of secondary Ti(C,N) particles on the stable dislocation substructure. Creep rupture life of the steel did not vary with PCW at 973 K due to softening by recrystallization and absence of secondary Ti(C,N).

  12. Defect structures before steady-state void growth in austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiie, T.; Sato, K.; Cao, X.; Xu, Q.; Horiki, M.; Troev, T. D.

    2012-10-01

    In the radiation damage process of austenitic stainless steels, there exists an incubation period before steady-state void growth, and the defect formation behaviors during that period strongly depend on alloy composition. Using the technique of positron annihilation lifetime measurement, the evolution of defect clusters during the incubation period in neutron, electron, and H-ion irradiations was studied for a variety of austenitic stainless steels including commercial and model alloys. The lifetime measurements indicated that in fission neutron irradiation to 0.2 dpa at 363 K, single vacancies were predominantly formed in the commercial alloys, SUS316L and Ti added, modified SUS316, while large voids were formed in Ni and Fe-Cr-Ni. After neutron irradiation at 573 K, stacking fault tetrahedra and/or precipitates were detected in the commercial alloys, while large voids were detected in the model alloys. In the 30 MeV electron irradiation to a dose of 0.012 dpa, the effect of alloying elements on lifetime data was less significant at 353 K, but a significant difference was found between model alloys and commercial alloys at 573 K. The H-ion irradiation at 2 MeV was also performed at room temperature. Defect evolution during the incubation period is discussed on the basis of the neutron, electron and H-ion irradiation results.

  13. Atomistic simulation of martensite-austenite phase transition in nanoscale nickel-titanium crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kexel, Christian; Schramm, Stefan; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2015-09-01

    Shape-memory (SM) alloys can, after initial inelastic deformation, reconstruct their pristine lattice structure upon heating. The underlying phenomenon is the structural solid-solid phase transition from low-temperature lower-symmetry martensite to the high-temperature higher-symmetry austenite. Conventional nickel-titanium (NiTi) with near-equiatomic concentration already possesses an eminent importance for many applications, whereas the nanostructured equivalent can exhibit yet enhanced thermomechanical properties. However, no plausible microscopic theory of the SM effect in NiTi exists, especially for nanoscale systems. We investigate the thermally induced martensite-austenite phase transition in free equiatomic nanocrystals, comprising up to approximately 40 000 atoms, by means of molecular-dynamics simulations (MD) using a classical Gupta-type many-body scheme. Thereby we complement and extend a previously published study [D. Mutter, P. Nielaba, Eur. Phys. J. B 84, 109 (2011)]. The structural transition, revealing features of a first-order phase transition, is demonstrated. It is contrasted with the melting phase transition, a quantum solid model and bulk experimental findings. Moreover, a nucleation-growth process is observed as well as the irreversibility of the transition upon cooling.

  14. Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels Strengthened by Laves Phase and MC Carbide Precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Brady, M. P.; Lu, Z. P.; Liu, C. T.; Takeyama, M.; Maziasz, P. J.; Pint, B. A.

    2007-11-01

    Creep strengthening of Al-modified austenitic stainless steels by MC carbides or Fe2Nb Laves phase was explored. Fe-20Cr-15Ni-(0-8)Al and Fe-15Cr-20Ni-5Al base alloys (at. pct) with small additions of Nb, Mo, W, Ti, V, C, and B were cast, thermally-processed, and aged. On exposure from 650 °C to 800 °C in air and in air with 10 pct water vapor, the alloys exhibited continuous protective Al2O3 scale formation at an Al level of only 5 at. pct (2.4 wt pct). Matrices of the Fe-20Cr-15Ni-5Al base alloys consisted of γ (fcc) + α (bcc) dual phase due to the strong α-Fe stabilizing effect of the Al addition and exhibited poor creep resistance. However, adjustment of composition to the Fe-15Cr-20Ni-5Al base resulted in alloys that were single-phase γ-Fe and still capable of alumina scale formation. Alloys that relied solely on Fe2Nb Laves phase precipitates for strengthening exhibited relatively low creep resistance, while alloys that also contained MC carbide precipitates exhibited creep resistance comparable to that of commercially available heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels. Phase equilibria studies indicated that NbC precipitates in combination with Fe2Nb were of limited benefit to creep resistance due to the solution limit of NbC within the γ-Fe matrix of the alloys studied. However, when combined with other MC-type strengtheners, such as V4C3 or TiC, higher levels of creep resistance were obtained.

  15. Effect of Alloying Element Partition in Pearlite on the Growth of Austenite in High-Carbon Low Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z. N.; Xia, Y.; Enomoto, M.; Zhang, C.; Yang, Z. G.

    2016-03-01

    The growth of austenite from pearlite in high-carbon low alloy steel occurs with and without alloy element redistribution depending on the amount of superheating above the eutectoid temperature. The transition temperature of austenite growth (denoted PNTT) is calculated as a function of pearlite transformation temperature and subsequent holding time, which affect the degree of partitioning in pearlite, using experimental partition coefficients k θ/ α of Mn, Cr, Co, Si, and Ni reported in the literature. PNTT is the highest in Cr-containing alloys which have the largest k θ/ α in pearlite. Post-transformation aging, usually accompanied by cementite spheroidization, leads to a marked increase of PNTT in Mn and Cr alloys. PNTT of Ni alloy does not depend on pearlite transformation temperature because practically the formation of partitioned pearlite is severely limited in this alloy for kinetic reasons. Above PNTT, austenite growth occurs fast initially, but slows down in the order of ten seconds when the ferrite disappears, and the remaining small carbide particles dissolve very slowly under the control of alloy element diffusion.

  16. Overview of strategies for high-temperature creep and oxidation resistance of alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P; Santella, Michael L; Bei, Hongbin; Maziasz, Philip J; Pint, Bruce A

    2011-01-01

    A family of creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys is under development for structural use in fossil energy conversion and combustion system applications. The AFA alloys developed to date exhibit comparable creep-rupture lives to state-of-the-art advanced austenitic alloys, and superior oxidation resistance in the {approx}923 K to 1173 K (650 C to 900 C) temperature range due to the formation of a protective Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale rather than the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales that form on conventional stainless steel alloys. This article overviews the alloy design approaches used to obtain high-temperature creep strength in AFA alloys via considerations of phase equilibrium from thermodynamic calculations as well as microstructure characterization. Strengthening precipitates under evaluation include MC-type carbides or intermetallic phases such as NiAl-B2, Fe{sub 2}(Mo,Nb)-Laves, Ni{sub 3}Al-L1{sub 2}, etc. in the austenitic single-phase matrix. Creep, tensile, and oxidation properties of the AFA alloys are discussed relative to compositional and microstructural factors.

  17. Procurement and screening test data for advanced austenitic alloys for 650/degree/C steam service: Part 2, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Goodwin, G.M.; Maziasz, P.J.; Bolling, E.

    1988-08-01

    The results of screening tests on alloys from three compositional groups are summarized and compared to the alloy design and performance criteria identified as needed for austenitic alloys suitable as superheater/reheater tubing in advanced heat recovery systems. The three alloy groups included lean (nominally 14% Cr and 16% Ni) austenitic stainless steels that were modifications of type 316 stainless steel, 20Cr-30Ni-Fe alloys that were modifications of alloy 800H, and Ni-Cr aluminides, (Ni,Cr)/sub 3/Al. The screening tests covered fabricability, mechanical properties, weldability, and oxidation behavior. The lean stainless steels were found to possess excellent strength and ductility if cold-worked to an equivalent strain in the range 5 to 10% prior to testing. However, they possessed marginal weldability, poor oxidation resistance, and sensitivity to aging. The modified alloy 800H alloys also exhibited good strength and ductility in the cold-worked condition. The weldability was marginal, while the oxidation resistance was good. The aluminides were difficult to fabricate by methods typically used to produce superheater tubing alloys. The alloys that could be worked had marginal strength and ductility. An aluminide cast alloy, however, was found to be very strong and ductile. 23 refs., 19 figs., 13 tabs.

  18. Influence of nitrogen on the sensitization, corrosion, mechanical, and microstructural properties of austenitic stainless steels. First annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.A.T.; Macdonald, D.D.

    1982-04-01

    During this first year of the project, the research effort has concentrated on the electrochemical aspects of the effect of nitrogen on austenitic steels. The status of all the individual project tasks are outlined briefly, and then more detailed results of the electrochemical studies conducted so far are reported. Highlights of this quarter are: (1) nitrogen additions of up to 0.16 wt % retard sensitization of 18Cr-8Ni austenitic stainless steels. However, nitrogen additions to levels above approx. 0.25 wt % promote sensitization; (2) the retardation of sensitization by nitrogen can possibly be explained as being due to retardation of the nucleation or rate of growth of chromium carbides; and (3) polarization studies in high temperature 0.01 M Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions at 250/sup 0/C demonstrate that the sensitized alloys are electrochemically more active than the solution annealed materials thereby indicating that they are susceptible to intergranular attack.

  19. Suppression of the ferromagnetic order in the Heusler alloy Ni50Mn35In15 by hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar Mejía, C.; Mydeen, K.; Naumov, P.; Medvedev, S. A.; Wang, C.; Hanfland, M.; Nayak, A. K.; Schwarz, U.; Felser, C.; Nicklas, M.

    2016-06-01

    We report on the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the magnetic and structural properties of the shape-memory Heusler alloy Ni50Mn35In15. Magnetization and x-ray diffraction experiments were performed at hydrostatic pressures up to 5 GPa using diamond anvil cells. Pressure stabilizes the martensitic phase, shifting the martensitic transition to higher temperatures, and suppresses the ferromagnetic austenitic phase. Above 3 GPa, where the martensitic-transition temperature approaches the Curie temperature in the austenite, the magnetization shows no longer indications of ferromagnetic ordering. We further find an extended temperature region with a mixture of martensite and austenite phases, which directly relates to the magnetic properties.

  20. How I Love My 80 Percenters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maturo, Anthony J.

    2002-01-01

    Don't ever take your support staff for granted. By support staff, I mean the people in personnel, logistics, and finance; the ones who can make things happen with a phone call or a signature, or by the same token frustrate you to no end by their inaction; these are people you must depend on. I've spent a lot of time thinking about how to cultivate relationships with my support staff that work to the advantage of both of us. The most important thing that have learned working with people, any people--and I will tell you how I learned this in a minute--is there are some folks you just can't motivate, so forget it, don't try; others you certainly can with a little psychology and some effort; and the best of the bunch, what I call the 80 percenters, you don't need to motivate because they're already on the team and performing beautifully. The ones you can't change are rocks. Face up to it, and just kick them out of your way. I have a reputation with the people who don't want to perform or be part of the team. They don't come near me. If someone's a rock, I pick up on it right away, and I will walk around him or her to find someone better. The ones who can be motivated I take time to nurture. I consider them my projects. A lot of times these wannabes are people who want to help but don't know how. Listen, you can work with them. Lots of people in organizations have the mindset that all that matters are the regulations. God forbid if you ever work outside those regulations. They've got one foot on that regulation and they're holding it tight like a baby holds a blanket. What you're looking for is that first sign that their minds are opening. Usually you hear it in their vocabulary. What used to sound like "We can't do that ... the regulations won't allow it ... we have never done this before," well, suddenly that changes to "We have options ... let's take a look at the options ... let me research this and get back to you." The 80 percenters you want to nurture too, but

  1. Investigation of joining techniques for advanced austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, C.D.; Qiao, C.Y.P.; Kikuchi, Y.; Shi, C.; Gill, T.P.S.

    1991-05-01

    Modified Alloys 316 and 800H, designed for high temperature service, have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Assessment of the weldability of the advanced austenitic alloys has been conducted at the University of Tennessee. Four aspects of weldability of the advanced austenitic alloys were included in the investigation.

  2. The effect of multiple martensitic transformations on diffusion of Fe and Ni atoms in Fe-31.7%Ni-0.06%C alloy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion characteristics of iron and nickel atoms were investigated using radioactive isotopes method in phase-hardened metastable iron-nickel Fe-31.7%Ni-0.06%C alloy with nanofragmented structure. It has been found that diffusion mobility of nickel and iron atoms in reverted austenite of Fe-31.7%Ni-0.06%C alloy significantly increases as the result of multiple γ-α-γ martensitic transformations. The diffusion coefficients of nickel and iron in the austenite at 400°C corresponded to the stationary diffusion coefficients at the temperatures above 900°C. The revealed diffusion acceleration at low temperatures is caused by high-density dislocations and additional low-angle subboundaries of disoriented nanofragments of reverted austenite and deformation twin subboundaries formed during multiple γ-α-γ cycles. PMID:25024684

  3. Wear behavior of austenite containing plate steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Christina E.

    As a follow up to Wolfram's Master of Science thesis, samples from the prior work were further investigated. Samples from four steel alloys were selected for investigation, namely AR400F, 9260, Hadfield, and 301 Stainless steels. AR400F is martensitic while the Hadfield and 301 stainless steels are austenitic. The 9260 exhibited a variety of hardness levels and retained austenite contents, achieved by heat treatments, including quench and tempering (Q&T) and quench and partitioning (Q&P). Samples worn by three wear tests, namely Dry Sand/Rubber Wheel (DSRW), impeller tumbler impact abrasion, and Bond abrasion, were examined by optical profilometry. The wear behaviors observed in topography maps were compared to the same in scanning electron microscopy micrographs and both were used to characterize the wear surfaces. Optical profilometry showed that the scratching abrasion present on the wear surface transitioned to gouging abrasion as impact conditions increased (i.e. from DSRW to impeller to Bond abrasion). Optical profilometry roughness measurements were also compared to sample hardness as well as normalized volume loss (NVL) results for each of the three wear tests. The steels displayed a relationship between roughness measurements and observed wear rates for all three categories of wear testing. Nanoindentation was used to investigate local hardness changes adjacent to the wear surface. DSRW samples generally did not exhibit significant work hardening. The austenitic materials exhibited significant hardening under the high impact conditions of the Bond abrasion wear test. Hardening in the Q&P materials was less pronounced. The Q&T microstructures also demonstrated some hardening. Scratch testing was performed on samples at three different loads, as a more systematic approach to determining the scratching abrasion behavior. Wear rates and scratch hardness were calculated from scratch testing results. Certain similarities between wear behavior in scratch testing

  4. Corrosion of austenitic alloys in aerated brines

    SciTech Connect

    Heidersbach, R.; Shi, A.; Sharp, S.

    1999-11-01

    This report discusses the results of corrosion exposures of three austenitic alloys--3l6L stainless steel, UNS N10276, and UNS N08367. Coupons of these alloys were suspended in a series of brines used for processing in the pharmaceutical industry. The effects of surface finish and welding processes on the corrosion behavior of these alloys were determined. The 316L coupons experienced corrosion in several environments, but the other alloys were unaffected during the one-month exposures of this investigation. Electropolishing the surfaces improved corrosion resistance.

  5. Magneto-optical spectroscopy of ferromagnetic shape-memory Ni-Mn-Ga alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Veis, M. Beran, L.; Zahradnik, M.; Antos, R.; Straka, L.; Kopecek, J.; Fekete, L.; Heczko, O.

    2014-05-07

    Magneto-optical properties of single crystal of Ni{sub 50.1}Mn{sub 28.4}Ga{sub 21.5} magnetic shape memory alloy in martensite and austenite phase were systematically studied. Crystal orientation was approximately along (100) planes of parent cubic austenite. At room temperature, the sample was in modulated 10M martensite phase and transformed to cubic austenite at 323 K. Spectral dependence of polar magneto-optical Kerr effect was obtained by generalized magneto-optical ellipsometry with rotating analyzer in the photon energy range from 1.2 to 4 eV, and from room temperature to temperature above the Curie point. The Kerr rotation spectra exhibit prominent features typical for complexes containing Mn atoms. Significant spectral changes during transformation to austenite can be explained by different optical properties caused by changes in density of states near the Fermi energy.

  6. Nickel-hydrogen LEO cycling at 20-50 percent DOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowery, John E.; Mai, Jenny

    Two NiH2 two-cell packs made up of engineering cells built according to the Hubble Space Telescope design (EPI RNH 90-3) are currently being low-earth-orbit (LEO) cycled at 20-50 percent depth of discharge (DOD). The cells were manufactured by Eagle-Picher Industries, Inc., and activated with electrolyte (KOH) concentrations of 26 percent (pack No.1) and 31 percent (pack No.2), for use during evaluation of the HST cell design. The cells have been grouped according to electrolyte concentration but follow the same test schedule for comparison. This test was set up to study the behavior of NiH2 cells having differing electrolyte concentrations, when operated at relatively high DOD (20-50 percent) in a LEO cycling program. The test was designed specifically to allow the cells to pick their own recharge ratio for varying DOD and varying EOC (end of charge) voltages. The cells are being cycled in a simulated 96-min orbit with 60-min charge and 36-min discharge where an EOC cutoff voltage controls high-rate charging. EOC cutoff voltages vary between 1.48 V and 1.56 V.

  7. Nickel-hydrogen LEO cycling at 20-50 percent DOD. [depth of discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, John E.; Mai, Jenny

    1991-01-01

    Two NiH2 two-cell packs made up of engineering cells built according to the Hubble Space Telescope design (EPI RNH 90-3) are currently being low-earth-orbit (LEO) cycled at 20-50 percent depth of discharge (DOD). The cells were manufactured by Eagle-Picher Industries, Inc., and activated with electrolyte (KOH) concentrations of 26 percent (pack No.1) and 31 percent (pack No.2), for use during evaluation of the HST cell design. The cells have been grouped according to electrolyte concentration but follow the same test schedule for comparison. This test was set up to study the behavior of NiH2 cells having differing electrolyte concentrations, when operated at relatively high DOD (20-50 percent) in a LEO cycling program. The test was designed specifically to allow the cells to pick their own recharge ratio for varying DOD and varying EOC (end of charge) voltages. The cells are being cycled in a simulated 96-min orbit with 60-min charge and 36-min discharge where an EOC cutoff voltage controls high-rate charging. EOC cutoff voltages vary between 1.48 V and 1.56 V.

  8. Weldment for austenitic stainless steel and method

    DOEpatents

    Bagnall, Christopher; McBride, Marvin A.

    1985-01-01

    For making defect-free welds for joining two austenitic stainless steel mers, using gas tungsten-arc welding, a thin foil-like iron member is placed between the two steel members to be joined, prior to making the weld, with the foil-like iron member having a higher melting point than the stainless steel members. When the weld is formed, there results a weld nugget comprising melted and then solidified portions of the joined members with small portions of the foil-like iron member projecting into the solidified weld nugget. The portions of the weld nugget proximate the small portions of the foil-like iron member which project into the weld nugget are relatively rich in iron. This causes these iron-rich nugget portions to display substantial delta ferrite during solidification of the weld nugget which eliminates weld defects which could otherwise occur. This is especially useful for joining austenitic steel members which, when just below the solidus temperature, include at most only a very minor proportion of delta ferrite.

  9. HREM study on the ledge structures, transient lattices and dislocation structures at the austenite-martensite and austenite-bainite interfaces in Fe-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiwara, S.

    2003-10-01

    High-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) has been performed to know the atomic arrangement of the austenite-martensite interface and the austenite-bainite interface in Fe-based alloys. The alloys studied are Fe-23.0Ni-3.8Mn, Fe-8.8Cr-l.lC, Fe-30.5Ni-lOCo-3Ti (mass %) for martensitic transformation and Fe-2Si-1.4C (mass %) for bainitic transformation. These alloys have various transformation characteristics depending on the alloy; for martensitic transformation, athermal and isothermal kinetics, the Kurdjumow-Sachs (K-S) and Nishiyama (N) orientation relationships, reversible and irreversible movement of the interface, and for bainitic transformation, upper bainite and lower bainite. All the interfaces observed had to be limited to 112 (macroscopically 225) or very close to 112 because of the geometrical condition that the atom rows of <110>f, b and <100>b must be observed parallel to the interface, i.e., the edge-on orientation. The austenite-martensite interface is (121)f with the K-S orientation relationship of (lll)f//(011)b and [ bar{1}01] f//[ bar{1}bar{1}1] b, and the interface is basically composed of the terrace of (lll)f and the ledge of (010)f, which have the average ratio of 2:1 for the number of atom rows of [ bar{1}01] //[ bar{1}bar{1}1] b on these planes. This interface always accompanies the transient lattice region with the thickness of 0.4-1.0 nm, where the lattice changes continuously from fcc to bcc (or bct). No extra-half plane is observed at the (121)f interface over a large distance of 100-200 lattice planes. The interface for both the upper and lower bainites is close to (112)f with the N orientation relationship of (lll)f/(011)b and [ bar{1}bar{1}0] f//[ bar{1}00] b'. Contrary to the interface for martensite, this interface for bainite has many extra-half planes except when the interface is close to (112)f. The interface is basically made up of the terrace of (lll)f/(011)b and the ledge of (0bar{1}l)b'//(bar{1}bar{1}2)f, and the

  10. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-08-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld metal.

  11. Phase diffusionless γ↔α transformations and their effect on physical, mechanical and corrosion properties of austenitic stainless steels irradiated with neutrons and charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimkin, O. P.

    2016-04-01

    The work presents relationships of γ→α' and α'→γ-transformations in reactor 12Cr18Ni10Ti and 08Cr16Ni11Mo3 austenitic stainless steels induced by cold work, irradiation and/or temperature. Energy and mechanical parameters of nucleation and development of deformation-induced martensitic α'-phase in the non-irradiated and irradiated steels are given. The mechanisms of localized static deformation were investigated and its effect on martensitic γ→α' transformation is determined. It has been shown that irradiation of 12Cr18Ni10Ti steel with heavy Kr ions (1.56MeV/nucleon, fluence of 1·1015 cm-2) results in formation of α'-martensite in near-surface layer of the sample. Results of systematic research on reversed α'→γ-transformation in austenitic metastable stainless steels irradiated with slow (VVR-K) and fast (BN-350) neutrons are presented. The effect of annealing on strength and magnetic characteristics was determined. It was found that at the temperature of 400 °C in the irradiated with neutrons samples (59 dpa) an increase of ferromagnetic α'-phase and microhardness was observed. The obtained results could be used during assessment of operational characteristics of highly irradiated austenitic steels during transportation and storage of Fuel Assemblies for fast nuclear reactors.

  12. Long-Term Oxidation of Candidate Cast Iron and Advanced Austenitic Stainless Steel Exhaust System Alloys from 650-800 C in Air with Water Vapor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brady, Michael P; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Leonard, Donovan N; Haynes, James A

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of SiMo cast iron, Ni-resist D5S cast iron, cast chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels of varying Cr/Ni content based on CF8C plus, HK, and HP, and a developmental cast alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel of interest for diesel exhaust system components were studied for up to 5000 h at 650-800 C in air with 10% H2O. At 650 C, the Ni-resist D5S exhibited moderately better oxidation resistance than did the SiMo cast iron. However, the D5S suffered from oxide scale spallation issues at 700 C and higher, whereas the oxide scales formed on SiMo cast iron remained adherentmore » from 700-800 C despite oxide scales hundreds of microns thick. The oxidation of the SiMo cast iron exhibited unusual temperature dependence, with periods of slower oxidation kinetics at 750-800 C compared to 650-700 C due to continuous silica-rich scale formation at the higher temperatures. The oxidation of the cast chromia-forming austenitics trended with the level of Cr and Ni additions, with small mass losses consistent with Cr oxy-hydroxide volatilization processes for the higher 25Cr/25-35Ni HK and HP type alloys, and transition to rapid Fe-base oxide formation and scale spallation in the lower 19Cr/12Ni CF8C plus type alloy. In contrast, small positive mass changes consistent with protective alumina scale formation were observed for the cast AFA alloy under all conditions studied. Implications of these findings for diesel exhaust system components are discussed.« less

  13. Metallographic etching and microstructure characterization of NiCrMoV rotor steels for nuclear power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Lu, Feng-gui; Liu, Xia; Gao, Yu-lai

    2013-12-01

    The grain size of prior austenite has a distinct influence on the microstructure and final mechanical properties of steels. Thus, it is significant to clearly reveal the grain boundaries and therefore to precisely characterize the grain size of prior austenite. For NiCrMoV rotor steels quenched and tempered at high temperature, it is really difficult to display the grain boundaries of prior austenite clearly, which limits a further study on the correlation between the properties and the corresponding microstructure. In this paper, an effective etchant was put forward and further optimized. Experimental results indicated that this agent was effective to show the details of grain boundaries, which help analyze fatigue crack details along the propagation path. The optimized corrosion agent is successful to observe the microstructure characteristics and expected to help analyze the effect of microstructure for a further study on the mechanical properties of NiCrMoV rotor steels used in the field of nuclear power.

  14. Modeling of Austenite Grain Growth During Austenitization in a Low Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Dingqian; Chen, Fei; Cui, Zhenshan

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to develop a pragmatic model to predict austenite grain growth in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel. Austenite grain growth kinetics has been investigated under different heating conditions, involving heating temperature, holding time, as well as heating rate. Based on the experimental results, the mathematical model was established by regression analysis. The model predictions present a good agreement with the experimental data. Meanwhile, grain boundary precipitates and pinning effects on grain growth were studied by transmission electron microscopy. It is found that with the increasing of the temperature, the second-phase particles tend to be dissolved and the pinning effects become smaller, which results in a rapid growth of certain large grains with favorable orientation. The results from this study provide the basis for the establishment of large-sized ingot heating specification for SA508-III steel.

  15. Growth of nanotubular oxide layer on Ti-Ni alloys with different Ni contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Su; Tsuchiya, Hiroaki; Fujimoto, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    Anodization of near-equiatomic Ti-Ni alloys was performed in an ethylene glycol based electrolyte under various conditions in order to investigate the effects of crystal structure and chemical composition of the Ti-Ni alloy on the morphology of the resulting oxide layers. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that Ti-Ni substrates with Ni content lower than 50.0 at.% were in the martensitic phase, while substrates with Ni content higher than 50.0 at.% were in the austenitic phase. Oxide layers formed at 20 or 35 V for 5 min exhibited no distinct nanotubular structures; however, at 50 V, nanotubular oxide layers were formed. After anodization at 50 V for 20 min, the growth of an irregular-shaped porous layer underneath the nanotubular oxide layer was observed for Ti-Ni alloys with Ni content lower than 52.2 at.%, whereas the oxide layer consisted of only irregular-shaped porous structures for the Ti-52.5 at.% Ni alloy. Further anodization resulted in the formation of irregular-shaped porous oxide layers on all Ti-Ni alloys examined. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis indicated that this morphological transition is related to Ni accumulation in the vicinity of the interface between the bottoms of the oxide layers and the surfaces of the substrate alloys. Therefore, nanotubular oxide layers cannot be grown, and instead irregular-shaped porous oxide layers are formed underneath the nanotubular layers. These results indicate that the morphology of anodic oxide layers formed on the near-equiatomic Ti-Ni alloys is not affected by their crystal structure, but by Ni content and anodization time.

  16. Bainitic stabilization of austenite in low alloy sheet steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Mitchell L.

    The stabilization of retained austenite in 'triple phase' ferrite/bainite/austenite sheet steels by isothermal bainite transformation after intercritical annealing has been studied in 0.27C-1.5Si steels with 0.8 to 2.4Mn. Dilatometric studies show that cooling rates comparable to CAPL processing result in approximately 30% conversion of austenite to epitaxial ferrite, but the reaction can be suppressed by the faster cooling rate of salt bath quenching. Measured isothermal transformation kinetics at 350 to 450sp°C shows a maximum overall rate near 400sp°C. X-ray diffraction shows that the amount of austenite retained from 400sp°C treatment peaks at 3 minutes but the carbon content increases monotonically to a saturation level. The stability of austenite in this type of steel has been quantified for the first time by direct measurement of the characteristic Msbsps{sigma} temperature. With variations in processing conditions and test temperatures, the tensile uniform ductility has been correlated with the amount and stability of retained austenite, while maintaining a constant 3% flow of 83 ksi. Consistent with previous transformations plasticity studies an optimal austenite stability is found at approximately 10 K above the Msbsps{sigma} temperature, demonstrating a maximum uniform ductility of 44% for an austenite content of 16%. Correlations indicate that desired uniform ductility levels of 20 to 25% could be achieved with only approximately 5% austenite if stability is optimized by placing Msbsps{sigma} 10 K below ambient temperature. Measured uniform ductility in plane strain tension shows similar trends with processing conditions, but models predict that stress state effects will shift the Msbsps{sigma} temperature approximately 5 K higher than that for uniaxial tension. The measured dependence of Msbsps{sigma} on austenite composition and particle size has been modeled via heterogeneous nucleation theory. The composition dependence is consistent with

  17. Carbon content of austenite in austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.

    1998-06-05

    The development of austempered ductile iron (ADI) is a major achievement in cast iron technology. The austempering heat treatment enables the ductile cast iron containing mainly strong bainitic ferrite and ductile carbon-enriched austenite, with some martensite transforms from austenite during cooling down to room temperature. A key factor controlling the stability of the retained austenite can be evaluated soundly using the thermodynamics principles. It is the purpose here to demonstrate that the data of ADI from numerous sources have a similar trend.

  18. Physical and welding metallurgy of Gd-enriched austenitic alloys for spent nuclear fuel applications. Part II, nickel base alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Michael, Joseph Richard; Williams, David Brian; Dupont, John Neuman; Robino, Charles Victor

    2004-06-01

    The physical and welding a metallurgy of gadolinium- (Gd-) enriched Ni-based alloys has been examined using a combination of differential thermal analysis, hot ductility testing. Varestraint testing, and various microstructural characterization techniques. Three different matrix compositions were chosen that were similar to commercial Ni-Cr-Mo base alloys (UNS N06455, N06022, and N06059). A ternary Ni-Cr-Gd alloy was also examined. The Gd level of each alloy was {approx}2 wt-%. All the alloys initiated solidification by formation of primary austenite and terminated solidification by a Liquid {gamma} + Ni{sub 5}Gd eutectic-type reaction at {approx}1270 C. The solidification temperature ranges of the alloys varied from {approx}100 to 130 C (depending on alloy composition). This is a substantial reduction compared to the solidification temperature range to Gd-enriched stainless steels (360 to 400 C) that terminate solidification by a peritectic reaction at {approx}1060 C. The higher-temperature eutectic reaction that occurs in the Ni-based alloys is accompanied by significant improvements in hot ductility and solidification cracking resistance. The results of this research demonstrate that Gd-enriched Ni-based alloys are excellent candidate materials for nuclear criticality control in spent nuclear fuel storage applications that require production and fabrication of large amounts of material through conventional ingot metallurgy and fusion welding techniques.

  19. Prediction of Indentation Behavior of Superelastic TiNi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, Rabin; Farhat, Zoheir

    2014-09-01

    Superelastic TiNi shape memory alloys have been extensively used in various applications. The great interest in TiNi alloys is due to its unique shape memory and superelastic effects, along with its superior wear and dent resistance. Assessment of mechanical properties and dent resistance of superelastic TiNi is commonly performed using indentation techniques. However, the coupling of deformation and reversible martensitic transformation of TiNi under indentation conditions makes the interpretation of results challenging. An attempt is made to enhance current interpretation of indentation data. A load-depth curve is predicted that takes into consideration the reversible martensitic transformation. The predicted curve is in good agreement with experimental results. It is found in this study that the elastic modulus is a function of indentation depth. At shallow depths, the elastic modulus is high due to austenite dominance, while at high depths, the elastic modulus drops as the depth increases due to austenite to martensite transition, i.e., martensite dominance. It is also found that TiNi exhibits superior dent resistance compared to AISI 304 steel. There is two orders of magnitude improvement in dent resistance of TiNi in comparison to AISI 304 steel.

  20. Ferromagnetic and spin wave resonances in thin layer of expanded austenite phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Typek, J.; Guskos, N.; Zolnierkiewicz, G.; Berczynski, P.; Guskos, A.; Baranowska, J.; Fryska, S.

    2014-06-01

    Four samples of austenite coatings deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering on silicon substrate at four different temperatures and pressures were investigated by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) method at room temperature. The expanded austenite phase S ( γ N ) layers with thickness in the 160-273 nm range and concentration of magnetic atoms: 72 % Fe, 18 % Cr and 10 % Ni, were obtained. The coatings with nanometric size grains were strongly textured and grown mostly in [100] direction, perpendicular to the sample surface. Intense FMR spectra were recorded at various angles between the static magnetic field direction and the sample surface. A strong magnetic anisotropy of the main uniform FMR mode was observed and the effective magnetization 4 πM eff determined. Spin wave resonance (SWR) modes were observed in all investigated samples in out-of-plane geometry of the magnetic field. The resonance fields of SWR modes in our samples varied linearly with the spin wave mode number. The value of the effective magnon stiffness constant was determined assuming a parabolic shape of the magnetization variation across the sample thickness.

  1. Flexural Strength and Toughness of Austenitic Stainless Steel Reinforced High-Cr White Cast Iron Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallam, H. E. M.; Abd El-Aziz, Kh.; Abd El-Raouf, H.; Elbanna, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Flexural behavior of high-Cr white cast iron (WCI) reinforced with different shapes, i.e., I- and T-sections, and volume fractions of austenitic stainless steel (310 SS) were examined under three-point bending test. The dimensions of casted beams used for bending test were (50 × 100 × 500 mm3). Carbon and alloying elements diffusion enhanced the metallurgical bond across the interface of casted beams. Carbon diffusion from high-Cr WCI into 310 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-carbides in 310 SS near the interface and Ni diffusion from 310 SS into high-Cr WCI led to the formation of austenite within a network of M7C3 eutectic carbides in high-Cr WCI near the interface. Inserting 310 SS plates into high-Cr WCI beams resulted in a significant improvement in their toughness. All specimens of this metal matrix composite failed in a ductile mode with higher plastic deformation prior to failure. The high-Cr WCI specimen reinforced with I-section of 310 SS revealed higher toughness compared to that with T-section at the same volume fraction. The presence of the upper flange increased the reinforcement efficiency for delaying the crack growth.

  2. Hydrogen-Assisted Crack Propagation in Austenitic Stainless Steel Fusion Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerday, B. P.; Dadfarnia, M.; Balch, D. K.; Nibur, K. A.; Cadden, C. H.; Sofronis, P.

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize hydrogen-assisted crack propagation in gas-tungsten arc (GTA) welds of the nitrogen-strengthened, austenitic stainless steel 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn (21-6-9), using fracture mechanics methods. The fracture initiation toughness and crack growth resistance curves were measured using fracture mechanics specimens that were thermally precharged with 230 wppm (1.3 at. pct) hydrogen. The fracture initiation toughness and slope of the crack growth resistance curve for the hydrogen-precharged weld were reduced by as much as 60 and 90 pct, respectively, relative to the noncharged weld. A physical model for hydrogen-assisted crack propagation in the welds was formulated from microscopy evidence and finite-element modeling. Hydrogen-assisted crack propagation proceeded by a sequence of microcrack formation at the weld ferrite, intense shear deformation in the ligaments separating microcracks, and then fracture of the ligaments. One salient role of hydrogen in the crack propagation process was promoting microcrack formation at austenite/ferrite interfaces and within the ferrite. In addition, hydrogen may have facilitated intense shear deformation in the ligaments separating microcracks. The intense shear deformation could be related to the development of a nonuniform distribution of hydrogen trapped at dislocations between microcracks, which in turn created a gradient in the local flow stress.

  3. Austenitic alloy and reactor components made thereof

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John F.; Brager, Howard R.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1986-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy is disclosed, having excellent fast neutron irradiation swelling resistance and good post irradiation ductility, making it especially useful for liquid metal fast breeder reactor applications. The alloy contains: about 0.04 to 0.09 wt. % carbon; about 1.5 to 2.5 wt. % manganese; about 0.5 to 1.6 wt. % silicon; about 0.030 to 0.08 wt. % phosphorus; about 13.3 to 16.5 wt. % chromium; about 13.7 to 16.0 wt. % nickel; about 1.0 to 3.0 wt. % molybdenum; and about 0.10 to 0.35 wt. % titanium.

  4. Microstructural Variations Across a Dissimilar 316L Austenitic: 9Cr Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel Weld Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Karthikeyan, T.; Dasgupta, Arup; Sudha, C.; Hajra, R. N.; Albert, S. K.; Saroja, S.; Jayakumar, T.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discuss the microstructural variations across a dissimilar weld joint between SS316 and 9Cr-RAFM steel and its modifications on post weld heat treatments (PWHT). Detailed characterization showed a mixed microstructure of austenite and martensite in the weld which is in agreement with the phases predicted using Schaeffler diagram based on composition measurements. The presence of very low volume fraction of δ-ferrite in SS316L has been identified employing state of the art electron back-scattered diffraction technique. PWHT of the ferritic steel did not reduce the hardness in the weld metal. Thermal exposure at 973 K (700 °C) showed a progressive reduction in hardness of weld joint with duration of treatment except in austenitic base metal. However, diffusion annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) for 100 hours resulted in an unexpected increase in hardness of weld metal, which is a manifestation of the dilution effects and enrichment of Ni on the transformation characteristics of the weld zone. Migration of carbon from ferritic steel aided the precipitation of fine carbides in the austenitic base metal on annealing at 973 K (700 °C); but enhanced diffusion at 1073 K (880 °C) resulted in coarsening of carbides and thereby reduction of hardness.

  5. Thermomagnetic history dependence of magnetocaloric effect in Ni50Mn34In16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, M. K.; Sharma, V. K.; Roy, S. B.

    2008-01-01

    A large inverse magnetocaloric effect has been reported to be associated with the austenite to martensite phase transition in Ni50Mn34In16. It is shown here that the magnitude of the observed magnetocaloric effect as well as effective refrigerant capacity depend significantly on the thermo-magnetic history of the sample.

  6. Alumina-Forming Austenitics: A New Approach to Thermal and Degradation Resistant Stainless Steels for Industrial Use

    SciTech Connect

    David A Helmick; John H Magee; Michael P Brady

    2012-05-31

    A series of developmental AFA alloys was selected for study based on: 25 Ni wt.% (alloys A-F), 20 wt% Ni (alloys G-H), and 12 Ni wt.% (alloys I-L). An emphasis in this work was placed on the lower alloy content direction for AFA alloys to reduce alloy raw material cost, rather than more highly alloyed and costly AFA alloys for higher temperature performance. Alloys A-D explored the effects of Al (3-4 wt.%) and C (0.05-0.2 wt.%) in the Fe-25Ni-14Cr-2Mn-2Mo-1W-1Nb wt.% base range; alloys E and F explored the effects of removing costly Mo and W additions in a Fe-25Ni-14Cr-4Al-2.5Nb-2Mn-0.2C base, alloys G and H examined Nb (1-2.5wt.%) and removal of Mo, W in a Fe-20Ni-14Cr-3Al-2Mn-0.2 C wt.% base; and alloys I-L examined effects of C (0.1-0.2 wt.%) and Mn (5-10 wt.%) on a low cost Fe-14Cr-12Ni-3Cu-2.5Al wt.% base (no Mo, W additions). Creep testing resulted in elemental trends that included the beneficial effect of higher carbon and lower niobium in 20-25%Ni AFA alloys and, the beneficial of lower Mn in 12%Ni AFA alloys. Corrosion tests in steam and sulfidation-oxidation environments showed, in general, these alloys were capable of a ten-fold improvement in performance when compared to conventional austenitic stainless steels. Also, corrosion test results in metal-dusting environments were promising and, warrant further investigation.

  7. Precipitation kinetics during aging of an alumina-forming austenitic stainless steel

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Trotter, Geneva; Hu, Bin; Sun, Annie Y.; Harder, Reed; Miller, Michael K.; Baker, Ian; Yao, Lan

    2016-04-28

    The microstructural evolution of DAFA26, an alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel, was investigated during aging. The effect of aging at 750 °C and 800 °C on the growth of spherical γ’-Ni3(Al, Ti) particles present in the as-processed state was studied extensively using X-ray diffraction, microhardness testing, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography. The γ’ particles had a cube-on-cube orientation relationship with the matrix (i.e. ((010)(010)m//(010)(010)p, [100][100]m//[100][100]p)). The coarsening kinetics of γ’-Ni3Al particles were in agreement with the Lifshitz, Slyozof-Wagner theory. Coarse Laves phase particles were also present in the as-processed state, and during the aging processmore » both smaller Laves phase precipitates and B2-NiAl precipitates formed on both the grain boundaries and in the matrix. As a result, the γ’ precipitates were determined to have the most impact on the room temperature hardness.« less

  8. Effects of dose rate on microsturctural evolution and swelling in austenitic steels under irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, T.; Kamada, T.; Sekimura, N.

    2000-12-01

    Effects of dose rate on microstructural evolution in a simple model austenitic ternary alloy are examined. Annealed specimens are irradiated with fast neutrons at several positions in the core and above core in FFTF/MOTA between 390°C and 435°C in a wide range of doses and dose rates. In Fe-15Cr-16Ni, swelling seems to increase linearly with dose without incubation dose. Cavities are observed even in the specimens irradiated to 0.07 dpa at 1.9×10-9 dpa/s. Both cavity nucleation and growth are enhanced by low dose rates. These are mainly caused by accelerated formation of dislocation loops at lower dose rates. Low dose rates enhance swelling by shortening incubation dose for the onset of steady-state swelling. In the specimens irradiated at higher dose rates to higher doses, high density of dislocation increases average cavity diameter, however decreases cavity density.

  9. Development of corrosion-resistant improved Al-doped austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Keietsu; Miwa, Yukio; Okubo, Nariaki; Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Tsukada, Takashi

    2011-10-01

    Aluminum-doped type 316L SS (316L/Al) has been developed for the purpose of suppressing the degradation of corrosion resistance induced by irradiation in austenitic stainless steels (SSs). The electrochemical corrosion properties of this material were estimated after Ni-ion irradiation at a temperature range from 330 °C to 550 °C. When irradiated at 550 °C up to 12 dpa, 316L/Al showed high corrosion resistance in the vicinity of grain boundaries (GBs) and in grains, while severe GB etching and local corrosion in grains were observed in irradiated 316L and 316 SS. It is supposed that aluminum enrichment was enhanced by high-temperature irradiation at GBs and in grains, to compensate for lost corrosion resistance induced by chromium depletion.

  10. Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbins, James; Heuser, Brent; Robertson, Ian; Sehitoglu, Huseyin; Sofronis, Petros; Gewirth, Andrew

    2015-04-22

    This “Blue Sky” project was directed at exploring the opportunities that would be gained by developing Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys based on the Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloy system. A great deal of research effort has been directed toward ferritic and ferritic/martensitic ODS alloys which has resulted in reasonable advances in alloy properties. Similar gains should be possible with austenitic alloy which would also take advantage of other superior properties of that alloy system. The research effort was aimed at the developing an in-depth understanding of the microstructural-level strengthening effects of ODS particles in austentic alloys. This was accomplished on a variety of alloy compositions with the main focus on 304SS and 316SS compositions. A further goal was to develop an understanding other the role of ODS particles on crack propagation and creep performance. Since these later two properties require bulk alloy material which was not available, this work was carried out on promising austentic alloy systems which could later be enhanced with ODS strengthening. The research relied on a large variety of micro-analytical techniques, many of which were available through various scientific user facilities. Access to these facilities throughout the course of this work was instrumental in gathering complimentary data from various analysis techniques to form a well-rounded picture of the processes which control austenitic ODS alloy performance. Micromechanical testing of the austenitic ODS alloys confirmed their highly superior mechanical properties at elevated temperature from the enhanced strengthening effects. The study analyzed the microstructural mechanisms that provide this enhanced high temperature performance. The findings confirm that the smallest size ODS particles provide the most potent strengthening component. Larger particles and other thermally- driven precipitate structures were less effective contributors and, in some cases, limited

  11. Strain mediated coupling in magnetron sputtered multiferroic PZT/Ni-Mn-In/Si thin film heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Kirandeep; Kaur, Davinder; Singh, Sushil Kumar

    2014-09-21

    The strain mediated electrical and magnetic properties were investigated in PZT/Ni-Mn-In heterostructure deposited on Si (100) by dc/rf magnetron sputtering. X-ray diffraction pattern revealed that (220) orientation of Ni-Mn-In facilitate the (110) oriented tertragonal phase growth of PZT layer in PZT/Ni-Mn-In heterostructure. A distinctive peak in dielectric constant versus temperature plots around martensitic phase transformation temperature of Ni-Mn-In showed a strain mediated coupling between Ni-Mn-In and PZT layers. The ferroelectric measurement taken at different temperatures exhibits a well saturated and temperature dependent P-E loops with a highest value of P{sub sat}~55 μC/cm² obtained during martensite-austenite transition temperature region of Ni-Mn-In. The stress induced by Ni-Mn-In layer on upper PZT film due to structural transformation from martensite to austenite resulted in temperature modulated Tunability of PZT/Ni-Mn-In heterostructure. A tunability of 42% was achieved at 290 K (structural transition region of Ni-Mn-In) in these heterostructures. I-V measurements taken at different temperatures indicated that ohmic conduction was the main conduction mechanism over a large electric field range in these heterostructures. Magnetic measurement revealed that heterostructure was ferromagnetic at room temperature with a saturation magnetization of ~123 emu/cm³. Such multiferroic heterostructures exhibits promising applications in various microelectromechanical systems.

  12. Microstructural Features Affecting Tempering Behavior of 16Cr-5Ni Supermartensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sanctis, Massimo; Lovicu, Gianfranco; Valentini, Renzo; Dimatteo, Antonella; Ishak, Randa; Migliaccio, Umberto; Montanari, Roberto; Pietrangeli, Emanuele

    2015-05-01

    In industrial production processes, the respect of hardness and UTS maximum values of 16Cr5Ni steel is of utmost importance and a careful control of chemical composition and thermo-mechanical treatments is a common practice. Nevertheless, some scatter of properties is often observed with consequent rejection of final components. To better understand the role played by different factors, two heats of 16Cr-5Ni supermartensitic stainless steels with very close chemical compositions but different thermal behavior during tempering have been studied by means of TEM observations, X-ray diffraction measurements, dilatometry, and thermo-mechanical simulations. It has been found that Ms-Mf temperature range can extend below the room temperature and the relative amount of retained austenite in as-quenched conditions plays a significant role in determining the thermal behavior. When present, the γ-phase increases the amount of reversed austenite formed during tempering and accelerates the process kinetics of martensite recovery. Moreover, increasing amounts of retained austenite after quenching lower the critical temperature for austenite destabilization and influence the optimum temperature-time combination to be adopted for controlling final mechanical properties. In the studied cases, the very close chemical composition of the heats was not a sufficient condition to guarantee the same as-quenched structure in terms of retained austenite amount. This was proven to be related to solute segregation effects during solidification of original heats.

  13. Stress-induced martensitic transformations in NiTi and NiTi-TiC composites investigated by neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidyanathan, R.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Dunand, D.C.

    1998-12-31

    Superelastic NiTi (51.0 at% Ni) with 0, 10 and 20 vol% TiC particles were deformed under uniaxial compression as neutron diffraction spectra were simultaneously obtained. The experiments yielded in-situ measurements of the thermoelastic stress-induced transformation. A detailed Rietveld determination is made of the phase fractions and the evolving strains in the reinforcing TiC particles and the austenite as it transforms to martensite on loading (and its subsequent back transformation on unloading). These strains are used to shed light on the phenomenon of load transfer in composites where the matrix undergoes a stress-induced phase transformation.

  14. Surface relief of TiNiCu thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiulan; Xu, Dong; Cai, Bingchu; Wang, Li; Chen, Jian; Li, Gang; Xu, Shi

    2001-10-01

    TiNiCu thin film shape memory alloys are potential materials for microactuator. In our previous research, the various natural surface relief of crystallized TiNiCu thin film was observed, and it was related with compositions and the sputtering deposition conditions. In order to understand the origin and nature of the surface relief, the temperature-resistance measurement, X-ray diffraction and atomic fore microscopic study were performed. For Ti48.4Ni46.3Cu5.3 thin films, the transformation temperatures are below 0 degree(s)C, and the natural surface is smooth at 12 degree(s)C since the microstructure is austenite. For Ti51Ni44Cu5 thin films, two typical kinds of surface relief, e.g., chrysanthemum and rock candy, were observed at 12 degree(s)C. The chrysanthemum on the martensitic block relief is Ti-rich G.P. zone and will not disappear in thermal cycles later. It is also found that the Ti-rich G.P. zone is related with the thin films formed under lower sputtering Ar pressure. The rock candy relief is a typical martensite surface relief and will disappear when heating to the austenite phase. During crystallization process, the inherent compressive stress introduced under the condition of higher sputtering pressure is helpful to the transition from G.P. zones to Ti2(NiCu) precipitates and the increase of the transformation temperatures.

  15. Precipitation sensitivity to alloy composition in Fe-Cr-Mn austenitic steels developed for reduced activation for fusion application

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Klueh, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Special austenitic steels are being designed in which alloying elements like Mo, Nb, and Ni are replaced with Mn, W, V, Ti, and/or Ta to reduce the long-term radioactivity induced by fusion reactor irradiation. However, the new steels still need to have properties otherwise similar to commercial steels like type 316. Precipitation strongly affects strength and radiation-resistance in austenitic steels during irradiation at 400--600/degree/C, and precipitation is also usually quite sensitive to alloy composition. The initial stage of development was to define a base Fe-Cr-Mn-C composition that formed stable austenite after annealing and cold-working, and resisted recovery or excessive formation of coarse carbide and intermetallic phases during elevated temperature annealing. These studies produced a Fe-12Cr-20Mn-0.25C base alloy. The next stage was to add the minor alloying elements W, Ti, V, P, and B for more strength and radiation-resistance. One of the goals was to produce fine MC precipitation behavior similar to the Ti-modified Fe-Cr-Ni prime candidate alloy (PCA). Additions of Ti+V+P+B produced fine MC precipitation along network dislocations and recovery/recrystallization resistance in 20% cold worked material aged at 800/degree/C for 166h, whereas W, Ti, W+Ti, or Ti+P+B additions did not. Addition of W+Ti+V+P+B also produced fine MC, but caused some sigma phase formation and more recrystallization as well. 29 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

  16. The effects of cold work on the microstructure and mechanical properties of intermetallic strengthened alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, Bin; Baker, Ian; Miller, Michael K.; Yao, Lan; Chen, Si; Cai, Z.; Trotter, G.

    2015-06-12

    In order to achieve energy conversion efficiencies of >50 pct for steam turbines/boilers in power generation systems, materials are required that are both strong and corrosion-resistant at >973 K (700 °C), and economically viable. Austenitic steels strengthened with Laves phase, NiAl and Ni3Al precipitates, and alloyed with aluminum to improve oxidation resistance, are potential candidate materials for these applications. The microstructure and microchemistry of recently developed alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Different thermo-mechanical treatments were performed on these steels to improve their mechanical performance. These reduced themore » grain size significantly to the nanoscale (~100 nm) and the room temperature yield strength to above 1000 MPa. Lastly, a solutionizing anneal at 1473 K (1200 °C) was found to be effective for uniformly redistributing the Laves phase precipitates that form upon casting.« less

  17. The effects of cold work on the microstructure and mechanical properties of intermetallic strengthened alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Bin; Baker, Ian; Miller, Michael K.; Yao, Lan; Chen, Si; Cai, Z.; Trotter, G.

    2015-06-12

    In order to achieve energy conversion efficiencies of >50 pct for steam turbines/boilers in power generation systems, materials are required that are both strong and corrosion-resistant at >973 K (700 °C), and economically viable. Austenitic steels strengthened with Laves phase, NiAl and Ni3Al precipitates, and alloyed with aluminum to improve oxidation resistance, are potential candidate materials for these applications. The microstructure and microchemistry of recently developed alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Different thermo-mechanical treatments were performed on these steels to improve their mechanical performance. These reduced the grain size significantly to the nanoscale (~100 nm) and the room temperature yield strength to above 1000 MPa. Lastly, a solutionizing anneal at 1473 K (1200 °C) was found to be effective for uniformly redistributing the Laves phase precipitates that form upon casting.

  18. The Effects of Cold Work on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Intermetallic Strengthened Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, B.; Trotter, G.; Baker, Ian; Miller, M. K.; Yao, L.; Chen, S.; Cai, Z.

    2015-08-01

    In order to achieve energy conversion efficiencies of > 50 pct for steam turbines/boilers in power generation systems, materials are required that are both strong and corrosion-resistant at > 973 K (700 A degrees C), and economically viable. Austenitic steels strengthened with Laves phase, NiAl and Ni3Al precipitates, and alloyed with aluminum to improve oxidation resistance, are potential candidate materials for these applications. The microstructure and microchemistry of recently developed alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Different thermo-mechanical treatments were performed on these steels to improve their mechanical performance. These reduced the grain size significantly to the nanoscale (similar to 100 nm) and the room temperature yield strength to above 1000 MPa. A solutionizing anneal at 1473 K (1200 A degrees C) was found to be effective for uniformly redistributing the Laves phase precipitates that form upon casting. (C) The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society and ASM International 2015

  19. Discontinuous coarsening behavior of Ni(2)MnAl intermetallic compound during isothermal aging treatment of Fe-Mn-Ni-Al alloys.

    PubMed

    Heo, Yoon-Uk; Takeguchi, Masaki; Furuya, Kazuo; Lee, Hu-Chul

    2010-08-01

    The discontinuous reaction of the Ni(2)MnAl intermetallic phase was investigated during the aging of a solution-treated Fe-8.3Mn-8.2Ni-4.2Al alloy. During aging, Ni(2)MnAl lamellae formed at the prior austenite grain boundaries and twin boundaries and grew into the neighboring grains. The presence of continuously precipitated fine Ni(2)MnAl particles before the growth of the discontinuously precipitated lamellae was confirmed by dark-field transmission electron microscopy, and it was concluded that the present reaction is a type of discontinuous coarsening process, alpha' + Ni(2)MnAl (continuous precipitation) --> alpha + Ni(2)MnAl (discontinuous coarsening). The chemical driving force and the reduction of the total coherent strain energy were suggested to be the driving force for the discontinuous coarsening reaction. PMID:20551447

  20. The wetting characteristics and surface tension of some Ni-based alloys on yttria, hafnia, alumina, and zirconia substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanetkar, C. S.; Kacar, A. S.; Stefanescu, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    The surface tension and wetting characteristics of four commercial Ni-based alloys (UD718, Waspaloy, UD720, and UD520), pure Ni, and three special alloys (Ni-20 percent Cr, Ni-20 percent Cr-1 percent Al, and Ni-20 percent Cr-4 percent Al) on various ceramic substrates (including alumina, zirconia, hafnia, and yttria) were investigated using sessile drop experiments. Most of the systems studied exhibited a nonwetting behavior. Wetting improved with holding time at a given temperature to the point that some systems, such as Ni-20Cr on alumina, Ni-20Cr-4Al on alumina and on yttria, became marginally wetting. Wetting characteristics were apparently related to constitutional undercooling, which in turn could be affected by the metal dissolving some of the substrate during measurements.

  1. Instabilities in stabilized austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayer, Raghavan; Klein, C. F.; Marzinsky, C. N.

    1992-09-01

    The effect of aging on the precipitation of grain boundary phases in three austenitic stainless steels (AISI 347, 347AP, and an experimental steel stabilized with hafnium) was investigated. Aging was performed both on bulk steels as well as on samples which were subjected to a thermal treatment to simulate the coarse grain region of the heat affected zone (HAZ) during welding. Aging of the bulk steels at 866 K for 8000 hours resulted in the precipitation of Cr23C6 carbides, σ, and Fe2Nb phases; the propensity for precipitation was least for the hafnium-stabilized steel. Weld simulation of the HAZ resulted in dissolution of the phases present in the as-received 347 and 347AP steels, leading to grain coarsening. Subsequent aging caused extensive grain boundary Cr23C6 carbides and inhomogeneous matrix precipitation. In addition, steel 347AP formed a precipitate free zone (PFZ) along the grain boundaries. The steel containing hafnium showed the best microstructural stability to aging and welding.

  2. Weldability of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Kyoichi; Nishimura, Seiji; Saito, Yoshiaki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yuji; Kato, Takahiko; Hashimoto, Tsuneyuki

    1999-01-01

    Degradation of weldability in neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steel is an important issue to be addressed in the planning of proactive maintenance of light water reactor core internals. In this work, samples selected from reactor internal components which had been irradiated to fluence from 8.5 × 10 22 to 1.4 × 10 26 n/m 2 ( E > 1 MeV) corresponding to helium content from 0.11 to 103 appm, respectively, were subjected to tungsten inert gas arc (TIG) welding with heat input ranged 0.6-16 kJ/cm. The weld defects were characterized by penetrant test and cross-sectional metallography. The integrity of the weld was better when there were less helium and at lower heat input. Tensile properties of weld joint containing 0.6 appm of helium fulfilled the requirement for unirradiated base metal. Repeated thermal cycles were found to be very hazardous. The results showed the combination of material helium content and weld heat input where materials can be welded with little concern to invite cracking. Also, the importance of using properly selected welding procedures to minimize thermal cycling was recognized.

  3. Effect of double vacuum melting and retained austenite on rolling-element fatigue life of AMS 5749 bearing steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Hodder, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    AMS 5749 steel combines the tempering, hot hardness, and hardness retention characteristics of AISI M-50 steel with the corrosion and oxidation resistance of AISI 440C stainless steel. The five-ball fatigue tester was used to evaluate the rolling-element fatigue life of AMS 5749. Double vacuum melting (vacuum induction melting plus vacuum arc remelting, VIM-VAR) produced AMS 5749 material with a rolling-element fatigue life at least 14 times that of vacuum induction melting alone. The VIM-VAR AMS 5749 steel balls gave lives from 6 to 12 times greater than VIM-VAR AISI M-50 steel balls. The highest level of retained austenite, 14.6 percent, was significantly detrimental to rolling-element fatigue life relative to the intermediate level of 11.1 percent.

  4. Corrosion behavior of Ni and Ni-based alloys in concentrated NaOH solutions at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, M.; Fukumoto, K.; Ogata, Y.; Hine, F.

    1988-12-01

    Corrosion behavior of SUS 310S austenitic stainless steel, Alloy 600, Monel 400, and Ni 200 and NaOH solutions in the concentration range 30-60% at high temperatures up to 166/sup 0/C was studied. In solutions containing dissolved oxygen or under oxidizing conditions, all the specimens examined were corroded seriously due to oxygen diffusion through the porous oxide layer consisting of ..beta..-Ni(OH)/sub 2/. In hydrogen-saturated solutions, on the other hand, these Ni alloys were corrosion resistant because nickel in the alloys was active to oxidation of hydrogen. The specimens were corroded by deaerated solution at high temperatures in which hydrogen evolution took place as the counterreaction. The corrosion rate controlled by the hydrogen formation reaction increased exponentially with the decrease of the Ni content in the alloy.

  5. Austenite Formation in a Cold-Rolled Semi-austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celada Casero, Carola; San Martín, David

    2014-04-01

    The progress of the martensite ( α') to austenite ( γ) phase transformation has been thoroughly investigated at different temperatures during the continuous heating of a cold-rolled precipitation hardening metastable stainless steel at a heating rate of 0.1 K/s. Heat-treated samples have been characterized using different experimental complementary techniques: high-resolution dilatometry, magnetization, and thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements, micro-hardness-Vickers testing, optical/scanning electron microscopy, and tensile testing. The two-step transformation behavior observed is thought to be related to the presence of a pronounced chemical banding in the initial microstructure. This banding has been characterized using electron probe microanalysis. Unexpectedly, dilatometry measurements seem unable to locate the end of the transformation accurately, as this technique does not detect the second step of this transformation (last 20 pct of it). It is shown that once the starting ( A S) and finishing ( A F) transformation temperatures have been estimated by magnetization measurements, the evolution of the volume fractions of austenite and martensite can be evaluated by TEP or micro-hardness measurement quite reliably as compared to magnetization measurements. The mechanical response of the material after being heated to temperatures close to A S, A F, and ( A F - A S)/2 is also discussed.

  6. Deformation of a super-elastic NiTiNb alloy with controllable stress hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, S.; Schaffer, J. E.; Ren, Y.; Wang, L.

    2016-06-01

    Room temperature deformation of a Ni46.7Ti42.8Nb10.5 alloy was studied by in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Compared to binary NiTi alloy, the Nb dissolved in the matrix significantly increased the onset stress for Stress-Induced Martensite Transformation (SIMT). The secondary phase, effectively a Nb-nanowire dispersion in a NiTi-Nb matrix, increased the elastic stiffness of the bulk material, reduced the strain anisotropy in austenite families by load sharing during SIMT, and increased the stress hysteresis by resisting reverse phase transformation during unloading. The stress hysteresis can be controlled over a wide range by heat treatment through its influences on the residual stress of the Nb-nanowire dispersion and the stability of the austenite.

  7. Precipitates and Grain Boundary Strength of an Fe-Mn-Ni Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Yoon-Uk; Jang, Jae Hoon; Lee, Hu-Chul

    2012-11-01

    The effect of grain boundary (GB) precipitates on the GB strength of an age-hardened Fe-7.8Mn-8.2Ni alloy was investigated. Premature intergranular fracture was observed after age hardening due to the precipitation of θ-MnNi precipitates at prior austenite grain boundaries. However, the conversion of GB θ precipitates to austenite by a short second aging at 793 K (520 °C) after peak aging at 713 K (440 °C) resulted in a remarkable improvement of GB strength. The result strongly supports the proposition that the weak bonding of GB θ precipitates to the matrix is the main reason for GB embrittlement in age-hardened Fe-Mn-Ni alloys.

  8. Austenite to ferrite transformation kinetics during continuous cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Militzer, M.; Pandi, R.; Hawbolt, E.B.

    1994-12-31

    The austenite decomposition has been investigated in a hypo-eutectoid plain carbon steel under continuous cooling conditions using a dilatometer and a Gleeble 1500 thermomechanical simulator. The experimental results were used to verify model calculations based on a fundamental approach for the dilute ternary systems Fe-C-Mn. The austenite to ferrite transformation start temperature can be predicted from a nucleation model for slow cooling rates. The formation of ferrite nuclei takes place with equilibrium composition on austenite grain boundaries. The nuclei are assumed to have a pill box shape in accordance with minimal interfacial energy. For higher cooling rates, early growth has to be taken into account to describe the transformation start. In contrast to nucleation, growth of the ferrite is characterized by paraequilibrium; i.e. only carbon can redistribute, whereas the diffusion of Mn is too slow to allow full equilibrium in the ternary system. However, Mn segregation to the moving ferrite-austenite interface has to be considered. The latter, in turn, exerts a solute drag effect on the boundary movement. Thus, growth kinetics is controlled by carbon diffusion in austenite modified by interfacial segregation of Mn. Employing a phenomenological segregation model, good agreement has been achieved with the measurements.

  9. Solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel filler metals

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Braski, D.N.

    1980-02-01

    Thermal analysis and interrupted solidification experiments on selected austenitic stainless steel filler metals provided an understanding of the solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel welds. The sequences of phase separations found were for type 308 stainless steel filler metal, L + L + delta + L + delta + ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. + delta, and for type 310 stainless steel filler metal, L ..-->.. L + ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..gamma... In type 308 stainless steel filler metal, ferrite at room temperature was identified as either the untransformed primary delta-ferrite formed during the initial stages of solidification or the residual ferrite after Widmanstaetten austenite precipitation. Microprobe and scanning transmission electron microscope microanalyses revealed that solute extensively redistributes during the transformation of primary delta-ferrite to austenite, leading to enrichment and stabilization of ferrite by chromium. The type 310 stainless steel filler metal investigated solidifies by the primary crystallization of austenite, with the transformation going to completion at the solidus temperature. In our samples residual ferrite resulting from solute segregation was absent at the intercellular or interdendritic regions.

  10. Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties in Dissimilar Austenitic/Super Duplex Stainless Steel Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Mehdi; Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza

    2014-10-01

    To study the effect of chemical composition on microstructural features and mechanical properties of dissimilar joints between super duplex and austenitic stainless steels, welding was attempted by gas tungsten arc welding process with a super duplex (ER2594) and an austenitic (ER309LMo) stainless steel filler metal. While the austenitic weld metal had vermicular delta ferrite within austenitic matrix, super duplex stainless steel was mainly comprised of allotriomorphic grain boundary and Widmanstätten side plate austenite morphologies in the ferrite matrix. Also the heat-affected zone of austenitic base metal comprised of large austenite grains with little amounts of ferrite, whereas a coarse-grained ferritic region was observed in the heat-affected zone of super duplex base metal. Although both welded joints showed acceptable mechanical properties, the hardness and impact strength of the weld metal produced using super duplex filler metal were found to be better than that obtained by austenitic filler metal.

  11. Physical and mechanical modelling of neutron irradiation effect on ductile fracture. Part 1. Prediction of fracture strain and fracture toughness of austenitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolin, Boris; Sorokin, Alexander; Smirnov, Valeriy; Potapova, Vera

    2014-09-01

    A physical-and-mechanical model of ductile fracture has been developed to predict fracture toughness and fracture strain of irradiated austenitic steels taking into account stress-state triaxiality and radiation swelling. The model is based on criterion of plastic collapse of a material unit cell controlled by strain hardening of a material and criterion of voids coalescence due to channel shearing of voids. The model takes into account deformation voids nucleation and growth of deformation and vacancy voids. For justification of the model experimental data on fracture strain and fracture toughness of austenitic steel 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade irradiated up to maximal dose 150 dpa with various swelling were used. Experimental data on fracture strain and fracture toughness were compared with the results predicted by the model. It has been shown that for prediction of the swelling effect on fracture toughness the dependence of process zone size on swelling should be taken into account.

  12. Characteristics of radiation porosity and structural phase state of reactor austenitic 07C-16Cr-19Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Ti-Si-V-P-B Steel after neutron irradiation at a temperature of 440-600°C to damaging doses of 36-94 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnykh, I. A.; Panchenko, V. L.

    2016-06-01

    The phase composition and the characteristics of vacancy voids in cold-worked steel 07C-16Cr-19Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Ti-Si-V-P-B (CW EK164-ID) after neutron irradiation at damaging doses of 36-94 dpa and temperatures of 440-600°C are investigated. In the entire range of damaging doses and temperatures, voids with different sizes are observed in the material. The maximum void size increases with irradiation temperature up to ~550°C, whereas their concentration decreases. At higher irradiation temperatures, almost no coarse voids are observed. The concentration of fine voids (to 10 nm in size) sharply increases with temperature from 440 to 480°C. Further increases in the temperature do not result in the noticeable concentration growth. In the irradiation temperature range of 440-515°C, second phases precipitate ( G phase, γ' phase, and complex fcc carbides). At higher irradiation temperatures, there are Laves-phase particles, fine second carbides of the MC type, and needle shape precipitates identified as phosphides in the material.

  13. Crystalline structure and magnetic behavior of the Ni41Mn39In12Co8 alloy demonstrating giant magnetocaloric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madiligama, A. S. B.; Ari-Gur, P.; Shavrov, V. G.; Koledov, V. V.; Calder, S.; Mashirov, A. V.; Kamantsev, A. P.; Dilmieva, E. T.; Gonzalez-Legarreta, L.; Grande, B. H.; Vega, V. V.; Kayani, A.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic cooling is a green cooling technology, which is more energy efficient than existing fluid-compression cooling machines. Ni41Mn39In12Co8 alloy, which demonstrates promising magnetocaloric performances, was investigated using neutron diffraction and thermomagnetic measurements. The austenite structure is cubic L21 (Fm\\bar{3}m), while that of the martensite is a mix of 8 and 6 M modulated monoclinic structures (P\\quad 1\\quad 2/m\\quad 1). The austenitic site occupancy refinements reveal that all substituting Co atoms occupy Ni-sites. Most Mn atoms (65%) are in the Mn-sites and the rest go to In-sites (about 35%) and Ni-sites (less than 5%). This disorder of the magnetic atoms (Mn, Ni and Co) in the austenitic phase remains unchanged during the martensitic transition. The distortions of the interatomic distances due to the modulation of the martensitic structures further enhance the disorder in the magnetic interactions. Thermomagnetic measurements indicate that the austenitic phase is ferromagnetic. Cooling to below 250 K, where the alloy loses its ferromagnetic nature, and down to 50 K, the lack of any antiferromagnetic Bragg peaks suggests no antiferromagnetic ordering in the martensitic phase. At very low temperatures in the martensitic phase, spin glass magnetic nature is identified by magnetic measurements, and the spin-glass transition temperature is ∼19 K.

  14. Effects of Co and Al Contents on Cryogenic Mechanical Properties and Hydrogen Embrittlement for Austenitic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Ma, L.M.; Li, Y.Y.

    2004-06-28

    The effects of Co and Al content on ambient and cryogenic mechanical properties, microstructure and hydrogen embrittlement of a high strength precipitate-strengthened austenitic alloy (Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo system) had been investigated with temperature range from 293K to 77 K. Hydrogen embrittlement tests were conducted using the method of high pressure thermal hydrogen charging. It was found that increasing Co content can cause increasing in ambient and cryogenic ductility, but has less effect on ultimate tensile strength. When Co content is 9.8%, obvious decrease was found in cryogenic yield strength. Increasing Al content can result in decreasing ambient and cryogenic ductility and severe hydrogen embrittlement, but slight increase in cryogenic yield strength. Increasing Co content, reducing Al content, and decreasing test temperature tend to decrease the hydrogen embrittlement tendency for the alloys. This work showed that the alloy with composition of Fe-31%Ni-15%Cr-5%Co-4.5%Mo-2.4%Ti-0.3%Al-0.3%Nb-0.2%V has the superior cryogenic mechanical properties and lower hydrogen embrittlement tendency, is a good high strength cryogenic hydrogen-resistant material.

  15. Simulation of an Austenite-Twinned-Martensite Interface

    PubMed Central

    Kearsley, A.J.; Melara, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    Developing numerical methods for predicting microstructure in materials is a large and important research area. Two examples of material microstructures are Austenite and Martensite. Austenite is a microscopic phase with simple crystallographic structure while Martensite is one with a more complex structure. One important task in materials science is the development of numerical procedures which accurately predict microstructures in Martensite. In this paper we present a method for simulating material microstructure close to an Austenite-Martensite interface. The method combines a quasi-Newton optimization algorithm and a nonconforming finite element scheme that successfully minimizes an approximation to the total stored energy near the interface of interest. Preliminary results suggest that the minimizers of this energy functional located by the developed numerical algorithm appear to display the desired characteristics.

  16. Precipitation and fracture behaviour of Fe-Mn-Ni-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Yoon-Uk; Lee, Hu-Chul

    2013-12-01

    The effects of Al addition on the precipitation and fracture behaviour of Fe-Mn-Ni alloys were investigated. With the increasing of Al concentration, the matrix and grain boundary precipitates changed from L10 θ-MnNi to B2 Ni2MnAl phase, which is coherent and in cube-to-cube orientation relationship with the α‧-matrix. Due to the suppression of the θ-MnNi precipitates at prior austenite grain boundaries (PAGBs), the fracture mode changed from intergranular to transgranular cleavage fracture. Further addition of Al resulted in the discontinuous growth of Ni2MnAl precipitates in the alloy containing 4.2 wt.% Al and fracture occurred by void growth and coalescence, i.e. by ductile dimple rupture. The transition of the fracture behaviour of the Fe-Mn-Ni-Al alloys is discussed in relation to the conversion of the precipitates and their discontinuous precipitation behaviour at PAGBs.

  17. Properties of Ni/Nb magnetic/superconducting multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Mattson, J.E.; Osgood III, R.M.; Potter, C.D.; Sowers, C.H.; Bader, S.D.

    1997-05-01

    We examine structural, magnetic, and superconducting properties of magnetic/superconducting Ni/Nb multilayers. The Ni(Nb) films are textured {l_brace}111{r_brace}({l_brace}110{r_brace}) and have smooth interfaces. The average moment of the Ni atoms in the structure drops by 80{percent} from that of bulk Ni for 19 {Angstrom} thick Ni layers in proximity to 140 {Angstrom} thick Nb layers, and goes to zero for smaller Ni thicknesses. The Nb layer is not superconducting for thicknesses {lt}100 {Angstrom} in the presence of a 19 {Angstrom} thick ferromagnetic Ni layer. The behavior of the superconducting critical temperature as a function of the superconducting layer thickness was fitted and an interfacial scattering parameter and scattering time for the paramagnetic Ni regime determined.

  18. Processing, physical metallurgy and creep of NiAl + Ta and NiAl + Nb alloys. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Contractor Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pathare, Viren M.

    1988-01-01

    Powder processed NiAl + Ta alloys containing 1, 2, and 4.5 at percent tantalum and NiAl + Nb alloys containing 1 and 2 at percent niobium were developed for improved creep properties. In addition, a cast alloy with 5 at percent tantalum was also studied. Hot extrusion parameters for processing alloys with 1 and 2 at percent of tantalum or niobium were designed. The NiAl + 4.5 at percent Ta alloy could be vacuum hot pressed successfully, even though it could not be extruded. All the phases in the multiphase alloys were identified and the phase transformations studied. The Ni2AlTa in NiAl + 4.5 at percent Ta alloy transforms into a liquid phase above 1700 K. Solutionizing and annealing below this temperature gives rise to a uniform distribution of fine second phase precipitates. Compressive creep properties were evaluated at 1300 K using constant load and constant velocity tests. In the higher strain rate region single phase NiAl + 1 at percent Ta and NiAl + 1 at percent Nb alloys exhibit a stress exponent of 5 characteristic of climb controlled dislocation creep. In slower strain rate regime diffusional creep becomes important. The two phase alloys containing 2 to 5 at percent Ta and 2 at percent Nb show considerable improvement over binary NiAl and single phase alloys. Loose dislocation networks and tangles stabilized by the precipitates were found in the as crept microstructure. The cast alloy which has larger grains and a distribution of fine precipitates shows the maximum improvement over binary NiAl.

  19. Hardenability of austenite in a dual-phase steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sarwar, M.; Priestner, R.

    1999-06-01

    A low-carbon, low-alloy steel was intercritically heat treated and thermomechanically processed to study the martensitic hardenability of austenite present. Rolling of the two-phase ({alpha} + {gamma}) microstructure elongated austenite particles and reduced their martensitic hardenability because the {alpha}/{gamma} interface where new ferrite forms during cooling was increased by the particle elongation. The martensite particles obtained in rolled material were also elongated or fibered in the rolling direction. Therefore, the thermomechanical processing of a two-phase ({alpha} + {gamma}) mixture has the detrimental effect of increasing the quenching power needed to yield a specific amount of martensite.

  20. Phase control of austenitic chrome-nickel steel

    SciTech Connect

    Korkh, M. K. Davidov, D. I. Korkh, J. V. Rigmant, M. B. Nichipuruk, A. P. Kazantseva, N. V.

    2015-10-27

    The paper presents the results of the comparative study of the possibilities of different structural and magnetic methods for detection and visualization of the strain-induced martensitic phase in low carbon austenitic chromium-nickel steel. Results of TEM, SEM, optical microscopy, atomic and magnetic force microscopy, and magnetic measurements are presented. Amount of the magnetic strain-induced martensite was estimated. We pioneered magnetic force microscopic images of the single domain cluster distribution of the strain-induced martensite in austenite-ferrite materials.

  1. Examination of carbon partitioning into austenite during tempering of bainite

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J; Caballero, Francisca G; Miller, Michael K; Garcia - Mateo, C

    2010-01-01

    The redistribution of carbon after tempering of a novel nanocrystalline bainitic steel consisting of a mixture of supersaturated ferrite and retained austenite, has been analyzed by atom probe tomography. Direct supporting evidence of additional austenite carbon enrichment beyond that initially achieved during the bainite heat treatment was not obtained during subsequent tempering of this high carbon, high silicon steel. Evidence of competing reactions during tempering, such as the formation of carbon clusters in bainitic ferrite that signify the onset of the transitional carbides precipitation, was observed.

  2. Corrosion performance of laser-welded austenitic-ferritic connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigl, M.; Schmidt, M.

    2013-02-01

    In order to reduce the material costs of white-goods made of stainless steels, tailored constructions with unequally alloyed stainless steels shall be used. For that purpose nickel-alloyed austenitic stainless steels are supposed to be limited to zones with demanding needs for corrosions resistance, whereas nickel-free ferritic stainless steels provide an attractive cost-performance ratio for the remaining components of a system. Particularly the present article discusses the corrosion performance of austenitic-ferritic connections, welded with high-power disc lasers at accelerated feed rates, as a function of the shielding gas composition and the surface condition.

  3. Selected fretting-wear-resistant coatings for titanium - 6-percent-aluminum - 4-percent-vanadium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    A titanium - 6-percent-aluminum - 4-percent-vanadium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) was subjected to fretting-wear exposures against uncoated Ti-6Al-4V as a baseline and against various coatings and surface treatments applied to Ti-6Al-4V. The coatings evaluated included plasma-sprayed tungsten carbide with 12 percent cobalt, aluminum oxide with 13 percent titanium oxide, chromium oxide, and aluminum bronze with 10 percent aromatic polyester; polymer-bonded polyimide, polyimide with graphite fluoride, polyimide with molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), and methyl phenyl silicone bonded MoS2, preoxidation surface treatment, a nitride surface treatment, and a sputtered MoS2 coating. Results of wear measurements on both the coated and uncoated surfaces after 300,000 fretting cycles indicated that the polyimide coating was the most wear resistant and caused the least wear to the uncoated mating surface.

  4. The effect of alloy composition on radiation-induced segregation in FeCrNi alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, T. R.; Was, G. S.; Kenik, E. A.

    1997-04-01

    The effect of alloy composition on radiation-induced segregation (RIS) was investigated in austenitic iron-base and nickel-base alloys using proton irradiation. Specifically, RIS was studied by irradiation of Ni18Cr, Ni18Cr9Fe, and Fe20Cr9Ni over a dose range of 0 to 1.0 dpa and a temperature range of 200 to 500°C. Grain boundary composition was measured using Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Measurements from this study along with measurements from Fe16Cr24Ni, Fe20Cr24Ni, Fe24Cr24Ni, and Fe24Cr19Ni alloys irradiated with protons confirm that RIS is strongly dependent on the alloy composition. Trends in segregation behavior in Fe-base alloys are consistent with high temperature diffusion measurements, indicating that a vacancy mechanism is the most likely primary driving force for RIS in austenitic steels. The migration energy for Cr is shown to be larger than the migration energy of Fe. Segregation measurements in Ni-base alloys are not consistent with high temperature diffusion measurements, indicating that ordering forces may be significant in the segregation process. Comparison of model calculations to measured RIS data indicate that Fe, Cr, and Ni diffusivities are composition dependent. This dependence on alloy composition limits the predictive ability of simple models because of the need for separate diffusion parameters for every alloy composition.

  5. Effect of minor reactive metal additions on fracture toughness of iron: 12-percent nickel alloy at-196 deg and 25 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzke, W. R.; Stephens, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The slow bend precracked Charpy fracture toughness and tensile behavior of arc-melted and hot-rolled Fe-12Ni alloys containing up to 4 atomic percent reactive metal additions were determined at -196 C and 25 C after water quenching from three annealing temperatures. The fracture toughness of Fe-12Ni at -196 C was improved by small amounts of Al, Ce, Hf, La, Nb, Ta, Ti, V, Y, and Zr, but not by Si. Cryogenic toughness was improved up to 7.5 times that of binary Fe-12Ni and varied with the reactive metal, its concentration, and the annealing temperature.

  6. Corrosion behavior of cold-worked austenitic stainless steels in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, Yuji

    2014-05-01

    The effect of cold working on the corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) was studied to develop accelerator-driven systems for the transmutation of long-lived radioactive wastes and lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors. Corrosion tests on solution-treated, 20% cold-worked and 50% cold-worked 316SS and JPCA (15Cr-15Ni-Ti) were conducted in oxygen-controlled LBE. Slight ferritization caused by Ni dissolution and Pb-Bi penetration were observed for all specimens in the corrosion test conducted at 500 °C for 1000 h in liquid LBE with an intermediate oxygen concentration (1.4 × 10-7 wt.%). In the corrosion test performed at 550 °C for 1000 h in liquid LBE with a low oxygen concentration (4.2 × 10-9 wt.%), the depth of the ferritization of 316SS and JPCA increased with the extent of cold working. Only oxidation was observed in the corrosion test that was performed at 550 °C for 1000 h in liquid LBE with a high oxygen concentration (approximately 10-5 wt.%). Cold working accelerated the formation of the double layer oxide and increased the thickness of the oxide layer slightly. In contrast, the ferritization accompanied by Pb-Bi penetration was widely observed with oxidation for all specimens corrosion tested at 550 °C for 3000 h under the high-oxygen condition. Cold working increased the depth of the ferritization of 316SS and JPCA. It is considered that cold working accelerated the ferritization and Pb-Bi penetration through the enhanced dissolution of Ni into LBE due to an increase in the dislocation density under conditions in which the protective oxide layer was not formed in liquid LBE.

  7. Effect of initial microstructure on austenite formation kinetics in high-strength experimental microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Martínez, Edgar; Vázquez-Gómez, Octavio; Vergara-Hernández, Héctor Javier; Campillo, Bernardo

    2015-12-01

    Austenite formation kinetics in two high-strength experimental microalloyed steels with different initial microstructures comprising bainite-martensite and ferrite-martensite/austenite microconstituents was studied during continuous heating by dilatometric analysis. Austenite formation occurred in two steps: (1) carbide dissolution and precipitation and (2) transformation of residual ferrite to austenite. Dilatometric analysis was used to determine the critical temperatures of austenite formation and continuous heating transformation diagrams for heating rates ranging from 0.03°C•s-1 to 0.67°C•s-1. The austenite volume fraction was fitted using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov equation to determine the kinetic parameters k and n as functions of the heating rate. Both n and k parameters increased with increasing heating rate, which suggests an increase in the nucleation and growth rates of austenite. The activation energy of austenite formation was determined by the Kissinger method. Two activation energies were associated with each of the two austenite formation steps. In the first step, the austenite growth rate was controlled by carbon diffusion from carbide dissolution and precipitation; in the second step, it was controlled by the dissolution of residual ferrite to austenite.

  8. Accurate modelling of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Nowers, O. D.; Duxbury, D. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2014-02-18

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic steel welds is challenging due to the formation of highly anisotropic and heterogeneous structures post-welding. This is due to the intrinsic crystallographic structure of austenitic steel, driving the formation of dendritic grain structures on cooling. The anisotropy is manifested as both a ‘steering’ of the ultrasonic beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the quantitative effects and relative impacts of these phenomena are not well-understood. A semi-analytical simulation framework has been developed to allow the study of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds. Frequency-dependent scatterers are allocated to a weld-region to approximate the coarse grain-structures observed within austenitic welds and imaged using a simulated array. The simulated A-scans are compared against an equivalent experimental setup demonstrating excellent agreement of the Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. Comparison of images of the simulated and experimental data generated using the Total Focusing Method (TFM) indicate a prominent layered effect in the simulated data. A superior grain allocation routine is required to improve upon this.

  9. Effect of re-austenitization on the transformation texture inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaijalainen, A.; Suikkanen, P.; Porter, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Bainitic-martensitic microstructures produced by direct quenching austenite subjected to different degrees of pancaking have been re-austenitized and quenched to fully martensitic structures in order to investigate the effect of prior texture on the final martensite texture. Three different prior austenite pancaking states varying from convex-like to highly pancaked were investigated using an ultrahigh-strength strip steel hot rolled with various finish rolling temperatures followed by direct quenching. Microstructures were characterized using FESEM and transformation texture analysed using FESEM-EBSD at the strip surface, quarter- thickness and mid-thickness positions. The results show that an increase in rolling reduction below the non-recrystallization temperature increases the intensities of ∼{554}<225>α and ∼{112}<110>α texture components in the ferrite along the strip mid-thickness and of the ∼{112}<111>α component at the surface. The re-austenitization of the materials at 910°C for 30 min led to an inheritance of the same components from the parent specimens, but also increased the intensity of {001}<110>α, {110}<110>α and {011}<100>α components.

  10. Accurate modelling of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowers, O. D.; Duxbury, D. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2014-02-01

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic steel welds is challenging due to the formation of highly anisotropic and heterogeneous structures post-welding. This is due to the intrinsic crystallographic structure of austenitic steel, driving the formation of dendritic grain structures on cooling. The anisotropy is manifested as both a `steering' of the ultrasonic beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the quantitative effects and relative impacts of these phenomena are not well-understood. A semi-analytical simulation framework has been developed to allow the study of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds. Frequency-dependent scatterers are allocated to a weld-region to approximate the coarse grain-structures observed within austenitic welds and imaged using a simulated array. The simulated A-scans are compared against an equivalent experimental setup demonstrating excellent agreement of the Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. Comparison of images of the simulated and experimental data generated using the Total Focusing Method (TFM) indicate a prominent layered effect in the simulated data. A superior grain allocation routine is required to improve upon this.

  11. Solidification and solid state transformations of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J A; Williams, J C; Thompson, A W

    1982-05-01

    The microstructure of austenitic stainless steel welds can contain a large variety of ferrite morphologies. It was originally thought that many of these morphologies were direct products of solidification. Subsequently, detailed work on castings suggested the structures can solidify either as ferrite or austenite. However, when solidification occurs by ferrite, a large fraction of the ferrite transforms to austenite during cooling via a diffusion controlled transformation. It was also shown by Arata et al that welds in a 304L alloy solidified 70-80% as primary ferrite, a large fraction of which also transformed to austenite upon cooling. More recently it was suggested that the cooling rates in welds were sufficiently high that diffusionless transformations were responsible for several commonly observed ferrite morphologies. However, other workers have suggested that even in welds, delta ..-->.. ..gamma.. transformations are diffusion controlled. A variety of ferrite morphologies have more recently been characterized by Moisio and coworkers and by David. The purpose of this paper is to provide further understanding of the evaluation of the various weld microstructures which are related to both the solidification behavior and the subsequent solid state transformations. To accomplish this, both TEM and STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy) techniques were employed.

  12. Advanced austenitic alloys for fossil power systems. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.; Cole, N.C.; Canonico, D.A.; Henry, J.F.

    1998-08-01

    In 1993, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ABB Combustion Engineering t examine advanced alloys for fossil power systems. Specifically, the use of advanced austenitic stainless steels for superheater/reheater construction in supercritical boilers was examined. The strength of cold-worked austenitic stainless steels was reviewed and compared to the strength and ductility of advanced austenitic stainless steels. The advanced stainless steels were found to retain their strength to very long times at temperatures where cold-worked standard grades of austenitic stainless steels became weak. Further, the steels exhibited better long-time stability than the stabilized 300 series stainless steels in either the annealed or cold worked conditions. Type 304H mill-annealed tubing was provided to ORNL for testing of base metal and butt welds. The tubing was found to fall within range of expected strength for 304H stainless steel. The composite 304/308 stainless steel was found to be stronger than typical for the weldment. Boiler tubing was removed from a commercial boiler for replacement by newer steels, but restraints imposed by the boiler owners did not permit the installation of the advanced steels, so a standard 32 stainless steel was used as a replacement. The T91 removed from the boiler was characterized.

  13. Deformation and thermal fatigue in high temperature austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, P.D.; Yost, B.; Swindeman, R.W.; Li, Che-Yu . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1991-03-01

    The flow properties of modified austenitic alloys are reviewed. The important strengthening mechanisms discussed include precipitation hardening produced by a combination of cold work and aging and by creep aging. Grain boundary sliding enhanced by reduced grain size is shown to reduce the flow strength of these alloys. 5 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Austenite recrystallization and carbonitride precipitation in niobium microalloyed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, J.G.; Hansen, S.S. )

    1989-01-01

    The response of austenite to thermomechanical treatment is investigated in two series of niobium microalloyed steels. Optical and electron metallographic techniques were used to follow the austenite recystallizaiton and carbonitride precipitation reactions in these steels. The first series of steels contained a constant level of 0.05Nb, with carbon levels varying from 0.008 to 0.25 pct. It was found that a lower carbon concentration results in faster austenite recrystallization due to a smaller carbonitride supersaturation which leads to a reduced precipitate nucleation rate. The second series of steels was designed with a constant carbonitride supersaturation by simultaneously varying the Nb and C concentrations while maintaining a constant solubility product. In these steels, the recrystallization kinetics increase as the volume fraction of Nb(C,N) is reduced and/or as the precipitate coarsening rate is increased. The volume fraction of carbonitrides increases as the Nb:(C + 12/14 N) ratio approaches the stoichiometric ratio of approximately 8:1. An experiment to determine whether Nb atoms dissolved in the austenite could exert a significant solute-drag effect on the recrystallization reaction indicated that 0.20Nb in solution could reduce the rate of recrystallization compared to a Nb-free C-Mn steel.

  15. Manpower Considers CETA 5 Percent Set-Aside

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Joan Wills, from the National Governor's Association (NGA), explains NGA's recommendation to eliminate CETA's five percent set-aside for vocational education. (This article summarizes her presentation at the annual vocational convention.) (Editor)

  16. 26 CFR 301.6226(b)-1 - 5-percent group.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... beginning prior to October 4, 2001, see § 301.6226(b)-1T contained in 26 CFR part 1, revised April 1, 2001. ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false 5-percent group. 301.6226(b)-1 Section 301.6226... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Assessment In General § 301.6226(b)-1 5-percent group. (a) In...

  17. 26 CFR 301.6226(b)-1 - 5-percent group.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... beginning prior to October 4, 2001, see § 301.6226(b)-1T contained in 26 CFR part 1, revised April 1, 2001. ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false 5-percent group. 301.6226(b)-1 Section 301.6226... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Assessment In General § 301.6226(b)-1 5-percent group. (a) In...

  18. Nature and evolution of the fusion boundary in ferritic-austenitic dissimilar weld metals. Part 1 -- Nucleation and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, T.W.; Lippold, J.C.; Mills, M.J.

    1999-10-01

    A fundamental investigation of fusion boundary microstructure evolution in dissimilar-metal welds (DMWs) between ferritic base metals and a face-centered-cubic (FCC) filler metal was conducted. The objective of the work presented here was to characterize the nature and character of the elevated-temperature fusion boundary to determine the nucleation and growth characteristics of DMWs. Type 409 ferritic stainless steel and 1080 pearlitic steel were utilized as base metal substrates, and Monel (70Ni-30Cu) was used as the filler metal. The Type 409 base metal provided a fully ferritic or body-centered-cubic (BCC) substrate at elevated temperatures and exhibited no on-cooling phase transformations to mask or disguise the original character of the fusion boundary. The 1080 pearlitic steel was selected because it is austenitic at the solidus temperature, providing an austenite substrate at the fusion boundary. The weld microstructure generated with each of the base metals in combination with Monel was fully austenitic. In the Type 409/Monel system, there was no evidence of epitaxial nucleation and growth as normally observed in homogeneous weld metal combinations. The fusion boundary in this system exhibited random grain boundary misorientations between the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal grains. In the 1080/Monel system, evidence of normal epitaxial growth was observed at the fusion boundary, where solidification and HAZ grain boundaries converged. The fusion boundary morphologies are a result of the crystal structure present along the fusion boundary during the initial stages of solidification. Based on the results of this investigation, a model for heterogeneous nucleation along the fusion boundary is proposed when the base and weld metals exhibit ferritic (BCC) and FCC crystal structures, respectively.

  19. Austenite Grain Growth and the Surface Quality of Continuously Cast Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dippenaar, Rian; Bernhard, Christian; Schider, Siegfried; Wieser, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    Austenite grain growth does not only play an important role in determining the mechanical properties of steel, but certain surface defects encountered in the continuous casting industry have also been attributed to the formation of large austenite grains. Earlier research has seen innovative experimentation, the development of metallographic techniques to determine austenite grain size and the building of mathematical models to simulate the conditions pertaining to austenite grain growth during the continuous casting of steel. Oscillation marks and depressions in the meniscus region of the continuously casting mold lead to retarded cooling of the strand surface, which in turn results in the formation of coarse austenite grains, but little is known about the mechanism and rate of formation of these large austenite grains. Relevant earlier research will be briefly reviewed to put into context our recent in situ observations of the delta-ferrite to austenite phase transition. We have confirmed earlier evidence that very large delta-ferrite grains are formed very quickly in the single-phase region and that these large delta-ferrite grains are transformed to large austenite grains at low cooling rates. At the higher cooling rates relevant to the early stages of the solidification of steel in a continuously cast mold, delta-ferrite transforms to austenite by an apparently massive type of transformation mechanism. Large austenite grains then form very quickly from this massive type of microstructure and on further cooling, austenite transforms to thin ferrite allotriomorphs on austenite grain boundaries, followed by Widmanstätten plate growth, with almost no regard to the cooling rate. This observation is important because it is now well established that the presence of a thin ferrite film on austenite grain boundaries is the main cause of reduction in hot ductility. Moreover, this reduction in ductility is exacerbated by the presence of large austenite grains.

  20. Hydrogen vibrations in austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilkin, S. A.; Delafosse, D.; Fuess, H.; Gavriljuk, V. G.; Ivanov, A.; Magnin, T.; Wipf, H.

    The vibrational modes of hydrogen in fcc Fe-25Cr-20Ni stainless steel with a hydrogen content of 0.33at.% were studied by neutron spectroscopy. Hydrogen doping was performed at 810K in a hydrogen-gas atmosphere of 190bar. Neutron spectra were taken at 2K and 77K with the spectrometer IN1-BeF (ILL, Grenoble). The spectra show the fundamental hydrogen vibration at 130 meV and the second harmonics at 260 meV. The frequencies are higher than in other fcc hydrides. In spite of the cubic symmetry of the octahedral hydrogen positions and the low hydrogen content, the inelastic hydrogen peak has a relatively large width and an asymmetric shape.

  1. Development of Low-Cost Austenitic Stainless Gas-Turbine and Diesel Engine Components with Enhanced High-Temperature Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.; Browning, P.F.; Frary, M.E.; Pollard, M.J.; Siebenaler, C.W.; McGreevy, T.E.

    2004-06-01

    In July of 1999, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Solar Turbines, Inc. and Caterpillar, Inc. (Caterpillar Technical Center) to evaluate commercial cast stainless steels for gas turbine engine and diesel engine exhaust component applications relative to the materials currently being used. If appropriate, the goal was to develop cast stainless steels with improved performance and reliability rather than switch to more costly cast Ni-based superalloys for upgraded performance. The gas-turbine components considered for the Mercury-50 engine were the combustor housing and end-cover, and the center-frame hot-plate, both made from commercial CF8C cast austenitic stainless steel (Fe-l9Cr-12Ni-Nb,C), which is generally limited to use at below 650 C. The advanced diesel engine components considered for truck applications (C10, C12, 3300 and 3400) were the exhaust manifold and turbocharger housing made from commercial high SiMo ductile cast iron with uses limited to 700-750 C or below. Shortly after the start of the CRADA, the turbine materials emphasis changed to wrought 347H stainless steel (hot-plate) and after some initial baseline tensile and creep testing, it was confirmed that this material was typical of those comprising the abundant database; and by 2000, the emphasis of the CRADA was primarily on diesel engine materials. For the diesel applications, commercial SiMo cast iron and standard cast CN12 austenitic stainless steel (Fe-25Cr-13Ni-Nb,C,N,S) baseline materials were obtained commercially. Tensile and creep testing from room temperature to 900 C showed the CN12 austenitic stainless steel to have far superior strength compared to SiMo cast iron above 550 C, together with outstanding oxidation resistance. However, aging at 850 C reduced room-temperature ductility of the standard CN12, and creep-rupture resistance at 850 C was less than expected, which triggered a focused

  2. Application of advanced austenitic alloys to fossil power system components

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    Most power and recovery boilers operating in the US produce steam at temperatures below 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) and pressures below 24 MPa (3500 psi). For these operating conditions, carbon steels and low alloy steels may be used for the construction of most of the boiler components. Austenitic stainless steels often are used for superheater/reheater tubing when these components are expected to experience temperatures above 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) or when the environment is too corrosive for low alloys steels. The austenitic stainless steels typically used are the 304H, 321H, and 347H grades. New ferritic steels such as T91 and T92 are now being introduced to replace austenitic: stainless steels in aging fossil power plants. Generally, these high-strength ferritic steels are more expensive to fabricate than austenitic stainless steels because the ferritic steels have more stringent heat treating requirements. Now, annealing requirements are being considered for the stabilized grades of austenitic stainless steels when they receive more than 5% cold work, and these requirements would increase significantly the cost of fabrication of boiler components where bending strains often exceed 15%. It has been shown, however, that advanced stainless steels developed at ORNL greatly benefit from cold work, and these steels could provide an alternative to either conventional stainless steels or high-strength ferritic steels. The purpose of the activities reported here is to examine the potential of advanced stainless steels for construction of tubular components in power boilers. The work is being carried out with collaboration of a commercial boiler manufacturer.

  3. Influence of displacement damage on deuterium and helium retention in austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloys considered for ADS service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyevodin, V. N.; Karpov, S. A.; Kopanets, I. E.; Ruzhytskyi, V. V.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of ion-implanted hydrogen (deuterium) and helium in austenitic 18Cr10NiTi stainless steel, EI-852 ferritic steel and ferritic/martensitic steel EP-450 and their interaction with displacement damage were investigated. Energetic argon irradiation was used to produce displacement damage and bubble formation to simulate nuclear power environments. The influence of damage morphology and the features of radiation-induced defects on deuterium and helium trapping in structural alloys was studied using ion implantation, the nuclear reaction D(3He,p)4He, thermal desorption spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. It was found in the case of helium irradiation that various kinds of helium-radiation defect complexes are formed in the implanted layer that lead to a more complicated spectra of thermal desorption. Additional small changes in the helium spectra after irradiation with argon ions to a dose of ≤25 dpa show that the binding energy of helium with these traps is weakly dependent on the displacement damage. It was established that retention of deuterium in ferritic and ferritic-martensitic alloys is three times less than in austenitic steel at damage of ˜1 dpa. The retention of deuterium in steels is strongly enhanced by presence of radiation damages created by argon ion irradiation, with a shift in the hydrogen release temperature interval of 200 K to higher temperature. At elevated temperatures of irradiation the efficiency of deuterium trapping is reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  4. The temperature dependent role of phosphorus and titanium in microstructural evolution of FeCrNi alloys irradiated in FFTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, H.; Muroga, T.; Yoshida, N.

    1996-04-01

    The influence of combined addition of phosphorus and titanium on the microstructure of model FeCrNi austenitic alloys irradiated at 700-873 K to 60 dpa has been investigated in comparison with that of a complex austenitic alloy (JPCA-2). At all temperatures, void swelling of the model alloys was suppressed with increasing phosphorus content or co-addition of phosphorus and titanium. The microstructures observed and calculation of defect processes showed that the suppressed void swelling was due to an interaction of phosphorus in solution with defects at lower temperature and needle-like phosphide acting as defect sinks at higher temperature.

  5. Analysis of the microstructure of Cr-Ni surface layers deposited on Fe{sub 3}Al by TIG

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Haijun . E-mail: hjma123@mail.sdu.edu.cn; Li Yajiang; Wang Juan

    2006-12-15

    A series of Cr-Ni alloys were overlaid on a Fe{sub 3}Al surface by tungsten inert gas arc welding (TIG) technology. The microstructure of the Cr-Ni surface layers were analysed by means of optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results indicated that when the appropriate TIG parameters were used and Cr25-Ni13 and Cr25-Ni20 alloys were used for the overlaid materials, the Cr-Ni surface layers were crack-free. The matrix of the surface layer was austenite (A), pro-eutectoid ferrite (PF), acicular ferrite (AF), carbide-free bainite (CFB) and lath martensite (LM), distributed on the austenitic grain boundaries as well as inside the grains. The phase constituents of the Cr25-Ni13 surface layer were {gamma}-Fe, Fe{sub 3}Al, FeAl, NiAl, an Fe-C compound and an Fe-C-Cr compound. The microhardness of the fusion zone was lower than that of the Fe{sub 3}Al base metal and Cr25-Ni13 surface layer.

  6. Microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of an Fe-18Ni-16Cr-4Al base alloy during aging at 950°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Man; Sun, Yong-duo; Feng, Jing-kai; Zhang, Rui-qian; Tang, Rui; Zhou, Zhang-jian

    2016-03-01

    The development of Gen-IV nuclear systems and ultra-supercritical power plants proposes greater demands on structural materials used for key components. An Fe-18Ni-16Cr-4Al (316-base) alumina-forming austenitic steel was developed in our laboratory. Its microstructural evolution and mechanical properties during aging at 950°C were investigated subsequently. Micro-structural changes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Needle-shaped NiAl particles begin to precipitate in austenite after ageing for 10 h, whereas round NiAl particles in ferrite are coarsened during aging. Precipitates of NiAl with different shapes in different matrices result from differences in lattice misfits. The tensile plasticity increases by 32.4% after aging because of the improvement in the percentage of coincidence site lattice grain boundaries, whereas the tensile strength remains relatively high at approximately 790 MPa.

  7. The 1200 C cyclic oxidation behavior of two nickel-aluminum alloys (Ni3AL and NiAl) with additions of chromium, silicon, and titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Santoro, G. J.

    1972-01-01

    The alloys Ni3Al and NiAl with and without 1 and 3 atomic percent chromium, silicon, and titanium replacing the aluminum were cyclically oxidized at 1200 C for times to 200 hours, and the results were compared with those obtained with the alloy B-1900 subjected to the same oxidation process. The evaluation was based on metal recession, specific weight change, metallography, electron microprobe analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The oxidation resistance of Ni3Al was improved by Si, unaffected by Ti, and degraded by Cr. The oxidation resistance of NiAl was slightly improved by Ti, unaffected by Si, and degraded by Cr. The oxidation resistance of Ni3Al with 1 atomic percent Si was nearly equal to that of NiAl. Alloy B-1900 exhibited oxidation resistance comparable to that of Ni3Al + Cr compositions.

  8. Temperature effect on characteristics of void population formed in the austenitic steel under neutron irradiation up to high damage dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. V.; Portnykh, I. A.; Skryabin, L. A.; Kinev, E. A.

    2002-12-01

    Radiation-induced porosity in fuel pin cladding of the BN-600 reactor fabricated of cold-worked austenitic steel 16Cr-15Ni-2Mo-2Mn irradiated to different damage dose 20-90 dpa at 410-600 °C has been examined by transmission electron microscopy. Formation and growth of various types of voids were shown to occur according to their both duration and mechanism of nucleation. Dependencies of average diameters and concentration of all void types on neutron irradiation damage dose were plotted for various temperature ranges. The change of void population with increasing dose at various temperature ranges was analyzed based on point defect kinetic. The contribution of different types of voids to swelling was examined.

  9. Microstructural development due to long-term aging and ion irradiation behavior in weld metals of austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, K.; Ikeda, S.; Hamada, S.; Hishinuma, A.

    1996-10-01

    In a candidate austenitic stainless steel (316F) for fusion reactor structural materials, irradiation behavior of the weld metal produced by electron-beam welding (containing 7.9 vol% δ-ferrite) was investigated in terms of microstructural development. The densities of interstitial clusters in the γ-phase of the weld metal irradiated with He-ions at 673 and 773 K were about four times larger than those in 316F. Voids were formed in the δ-ferrite of the weld irradiated at 773 K. The number of clusters decreased in the weld metal (γ-phase) aged at 773 to 973 K, compared with that in the as-welded metal. The change in cluster density could be attributed to a Ni concentration increase in the γ-phase of the weld metal during aging.

  10. INFLUENCE OF CARBON AND DPA RATE ON NEUTRON-INDUCED SWELLING OF Fe-15Cr-16Ni-0.25Ti IN FFTF AT ~400 DEGREES C

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, Taira; Sekimura, Naoto; Garner, Francis A.; Wolfer, W. G.

    2002-12-31

    The purpose of this effort is to determine the influence of dpa rate and composition on the void swelling of simple austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. Contrary to the swelling behavior of fcc Fe-15Cr-16Ni and Fe-15Cr-16Ni-0.25Ti alloys irradiated in the same FFTF-MOTA experiment, Fe-15Cr-16Ni-0.25Ti-0.04C does not exhibit a dependence of swelling on dpa rate at approximately 400 degrees C. The transient regime of swelling is prolonged by carbon addition, however.

  11. Premartensite transition in Ni{sub 2}FeGa Heusler alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, Hrusikesh; Phanikumar, G.

    2015-04-15

    Martensitic phase transformation of Ni{sub 2}FeGa Heusler alloy was studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Atomic ordering induced in the austenite structure by quenching from high temperature plays a significant role on martensitic phase transformation. Higher magnetization and larger magneto-crystalline anisotropy of martensite phase than that of austenite phase are noticed. Tweed contrast regions observed in the transmission electron microscopy were correlated to premartensite phenomena. A shift in premartensitic transition temperature prior to martensitic transformation as measured by differential scanning calorimetry is being reported for the first time in this system. - Highlights: • Atomic ordering influences martensitic transformation in Ni{sub 2}FeGa Heusler alloy. • Observation of tweed contrast in TEM was correlated to premartensite phenomena. • For the first time the shift in premartensite peak was observed in DSC.

  12. Comparing proton conductivity of polymer electrolytes by percent conducting volume

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yu Seung; Pivovar, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    Proton conductivity of sulfonated polymers plays a key role in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Mass based water uptake and ion exchange capacity of sulfonated polymers have been failed to correlating their proton conductivity. In this paper, we report a length scale parameter, percent conductivity volume, which is rather simply obtained from the chemical structure of polymer to compare proton conductivity of wholly aromatic sulfonated polymer perflurosulfonic acid. Morphology effect on proton conductivity at lower RH conditions is discussed using the percent conductivity volume parameter.

  13. Development of high efficiency (14 percent) solar cell array module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iles, P. A.; Khemthong, S.; Olah, S.; Sampson, W. J.; Ling, K. S.

    1980-01-01

    Most effort was concentrated on development of procedures to provide large area (3 in. diameter) high efficiency (16.5 percent AM1, 28 C) P+NN+ solar cells. Intensive tests with 3 in. slices gave consistently lower efficiency (13.5 percent). The problems were identified as incomplete formation of and optimum back surface field (BSF), and interaction of the BSF process and the shallow P+ junction. The problem was shown not to be caused by reduced quality of silicon near the edges of the larger slices.

  14. X-ray diffraction study of the phase transformations in NiTi shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Uchil, J.; Fernandes, F.M. Braz . E-mail: kkmahesh@rediffmail.com

    2007-03-15

    The phase transformations occurring in heat-treated NiTi shape memory alloys have been studied through the analysis of variation in integrated peak area (integrated intensity) with temperature, under the XRD peak profiles in the transformation temperature range. For this purpose, integrated peak area under the prominent peak corresponding to (110) plane of the austenitic phase has been chosen. The results so obtained are compared with those got from the DSC method. The XRD method is found to be more sensitive.

  15. Autofocus imaging: Experimental results in an anisotropic austenitic weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.; Hunter, A.

    2012-05-01

    The quality of an ultrasonic array image, especially for anisotropic material, depends on accurate information about acoustic properties. Inaccuracy of acoustic properties causes image degradation, e.g., blurring, errors in locating of reflectors and introduction of artifacts. In this paper, for an anisotropic austenitic steel weld, an autofocus imaging technique is presented. The array data from a series of beacons is captured and then used to statistically extract anisotropic weld properties by using a Monte-Carlo inversion approach. The beacon and imaging systems are realized using two separated arrays; one acts as a series of beacons and the other images these beacons. Key to the Monte-Carlo inversion scheme is a fast forward model of wave propagation in the anisotropic weld and this is based on the Dijkstra algorithm. Using this autofocus approach a measured weld map was extracted from an austenitic weld and used to reduce location errors, initially greater than 6mm, to less than 1mm.

  16. An alternative to the crystallographic reconstruction of austenite in steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bernier, Nicolas; Bracke, Lieven; Malet, Loïc; Godet, Stéphane

    2014-03-01

    An alternative crystallographic austenite reconstruction programme written in Matlab is developed by combining the best features of the existing models: the orientation relationship refinement, the local pixel-by-pixel analysis and the nuclei identification and spreading strategy. This programme can be directly applied to experimental electron backscatter diffraction mappings. Its applicability is demonstrated on both quenching and partitioning and as-quenched lath-martensite steels. - Highlights: • An alternative crystallographic austenite reconstruction program is developed. • The method combines a local analysis and a nuclei identification/spreading strategy. • The validity of the calculated orientation relationship is verified on a Q and P steel. • The accuracy of the reconstructed microtexture is investigated on a martensite steel.

  17. On the Mechanical Stability of Austenite Matrix After Martensite Formation in a Medium Mn Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, B. B.; Huang, M. X.

    2016-07-01

    The present work employs the nanoindentation technique to investigate the effect of prior martensite formation on the mechanical stability of a retained austenite matrix. It is found that the small austenite grains that were surrounded by martensite laths have higher mechanical stability than the large austenite grains that were free of martensite laths. The higher mechanical stability of small austenite grains is due to its higher amount of defects resulting from the prior martensite formation. These defects act as barriers for the later martensite formation and therefore contribute to the higher mechanical stability of small austenite grains. As a result, the present work suggests that the formation of martensite tends to stabilize the surrounding austenite matrix. Therefore, it may explain the lower transformed amount of martensite after quenching as compared to the theoretical calculation using the Koistinen and Marburger (K-M) equation.

  18. Effect of Intercritical Annealing Temperature on Martensite and Bainite Start Temperatures After Partial Austenitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erişir, Ersoy; Bilir, Oğuz Gürkan

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure evolution of dual-phase steel during partial austenitization was investigated for different intercritical annealing temperatures between Ac1 and Ac3 temperatures. Partial austenitization may result in different austenite volume fraction, chemical composition, and grain size of austenite depending on the intercritical annealing temperature. This study examines the effect of intercritical annealing temperature on M s and B s temperatures for dual-phase steels. M s and B s were measured experimentally for different intercritical annealing temperatures by using dilatometry and were compared with calculated values from empirical formulas. The grain sizes of the final microstructures were also quantitatively analyzed. It was shown that M s depends on the intercritical annealing temperature and austenite grain size. It was concluded that this double effect is attributed to the intercritical annealing temperature, which is responsible for both austenite chemical composition and grain size.

  19. On the Mechanical Stability of Austenite Matrix After Martensite Formation in a Medium Mn Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, B. B.; Huang, M. X.

    2016-04-01

    The present work employs the nanoindentation technique to investigate the effect of prior martensite formation on the mechanical stability of a retained austenite matrix. It is found that the small austenite grains that were surrounded by martensite laths have higher mechanical stability than the large austenite grains that were free of martensite laths. The higher mechanical stability of small austenite grains is due to its higher amount of defects resulting from the prior martensite formation. These defects act as barriers for the later martensite formation and therefore contribute to the higher mechanical stability of small austenite grains. As a result, the present work suggests that the formation of martensite tends to stabilize the surrounding austenite matrix. Therefore, it may explain the lower transformed amount of martensite after quenching as compared to the theoretical calculation using the Koistinen and Marburger (K-M) equation.

  20. Grain Boundary Strengthening in High Mn Austenitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jee-Hyun; Duan, Shanghong; Kim, Sung-Joon; Bleck, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    The Hall-Petch relationship is investigated to find the yield strengths of two high Mn austenitic steels. The Hall-Petch coefficient is found to depend on the overall C concentration and cooling rate, which suggests that the C concentration at the grain boundaries is an important factor. The pile-up model suggests that C raises the stress for the dislocation emission, while the ledge model predicts that C increases the density of ledges which act as dislocation sources.

  1. A discrete dislocation transformation model for austenitic single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, J.; Turteltaub, S.; Van der Giessen, E.; Remmers, J. J. C.

    2008-07-01

    A discrete model for analyzing the interaction between plastic flow and martensitic phase transformations is developed. The model is intended for simulating the microstructure evolution in a single crystal of austenite that transforms non-homogeneously into martensite. The plastic flow in the untransformed austenite is simulated using a plane-strain discrete dislocation model. The phase transformation is modeled via the nucleation and growth of discrete martensitic regions embedded in the austenitic single crystal. At each instant during loading, the coupled elasto-plasto-transformation problem is solved using the superposition of analytical solutions for the discrete dislocations and discrete transformation regions embedded in an infinite homogeneous medium and the numerical solution of a complementary problem used to enforce the actual boundary conditions and the heterogeneities in the medium. In order to describe the nucleation and growth of martensitic regions, a nucleation criterion and a kinetic law suitable for discrete regions are specified. The constitutive rules used in discrete dislocation simulations are supplemented with additional evolution rules to account for the phase transformation. To illustrate the basic features of the model, simulations of specimens under plane-strain uniaxial extension and contraction are analyzed. The simulations indicate that plastic flow reduces the average stress at which transformation begins, but it also reduces the transformation rate when compared with benchmark simulations without plasticity. Furthermore, due to local stress fluctuations caused by dislocations, martensitic systems can be activated even though transformation would not appear to be favorable based on the average stress. Conversely, the simulations indicate that the plastic hardening behavior is influenced by the reduction in the effective austenitic grain size due to the evolution of transformation. During cyclic simulations, the coupled plasticity

  2. Method for residual stress relief and retained austenite destabilization

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2004-08-10

    A method using of a magnetic field to affect residual stress relief or phase transformations in a metallic material is disclosed. In a first aspect of the method, residual stress relief of a material is achieved at ambient temperatures by placing the material in a magnetic field. In a second aspect of the method, retained austenite stabilization is reversed in a ferrous alloy by applying a magnetic field to the alloy at ambient temperatures.

  3. 48 CFR 1852.219-76 - NASA 8 percent goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... means an institution determined by the Secretary of Education to meet the requirements of 34 CFR Section... requirements of 13 CFR 124. Women-owned small business concern, as used in this clause, means a small business... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true NASA 8 percent goal....

  4. 48 CFR 1852.219-76 - NASA 8 percent goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... means an institution determined by the Secretary of Education to meet the requirements of 34 CFR Section... requirements of 13 CFR 124. Women-owned small business concern, as used in this clause, means a small business... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false NASA 8 percent goal....

  5. 48 CFR 1852.219-76 - NASA 8 percent goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... means an institution determined by the Secretary of Education to meet the requirements of 34 CFR Section... requirements of 13 CFR 124. Women-owned small business concern, as used in this clause, means a small business... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false NASA 8 percent goal....

  6. 48 CFR 1852.219-76 - NASA 8 percent goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... means an institution determined by the Secretary of Education to meet the requirements of 34 CFR Section... requirements of 13 CFR 124. Women-owned small business concern, as used in this clause, means a small business... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false NASA 8 percent goal....

  7. 48 CFR 1852.219-76 - NASA 8 percent goal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... means an institution determined by the Secretary of Education to meet the requirements of 34 CFR Section... requirements of 13 CFR 124. Women-owned small business concern, as used in this clause, means a small business... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false NASA 8 percent goal....

  8. 35 GHz integrated circuit rectifying antenna with 33 percent efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, T.-W.; Chang, K.

    1991-11-01

    A 35 GHz integrated circuit rectifying antenna (rectenna) has been developed using a microstrip dipole antenna and beam-lead mixer diode. Greater than 33 percent conversion efficiency has been achieved. The circuit should have applications in microwave/millimeter-wave power transmission and detection.

  9. Tricky Times for the Top 10 Percent Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Both supporters and critics of Texas' Top 10 Percent law have been surprised at its popularity, but some UT officials and legislators would like to see the program scaled back. As a Texas state legislator, Jim McReynolds, D-Lufkin, knows a thing or two about influencing the voting positions of his colleagues. This past spring, when Texas House…

  10. School Designed To Use 80 Percent Less Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1975

    1975-01-01

    The new Terraset Elementary School in Reston, Virginia, uses earth as a cover for the roof area and for about 80 percent of the wall area. A heat recovery system will be used with solar collectors playing a primary role in heating and cooling. (Author/MLF)

  11. 35 GHz integrated circuit rectifying antenna with 33 percent efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoo, T.-W.; Chang, K.

    1991-01-01

    A 35 GHz integrated circuit rectifying antenna (rectenna) has been developed using a microstrip dipole antenna and beam-lead mixer diode. Greater than 33 percent conversion efficiency has been achieved. The circuit should have applications in microwave/millimeter-wave power transmission and detection.

  12. 24 CFR 100.305 - 80 percent occupancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false 80 percent occupancy. 100.305 Section 100.305 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT...

  13. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Certain 100 percent disability retirement. 48... disability retirement. An election filed on or after August 13, 1968 is not effective if the member dies within 30 days following retirement from a disability of 100 per centum (under the standard schedule...

  14. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Certain 100 percent disability retirement. 48... disability retirement. An election filed on or after August 13, 1968 is not effective if the member dies within 30 days following retirement from a disability of 100 per centum (under the standard schedule...

  15. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Certain 100 percent disability retirement. 48... disability retirement. An election filed on or after August 13, 1968 is not effective if the member dies within 30 days following retirement from a disability of 100 per centum (under the standard schedule...

  16. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Certain 100 percent disability retirement. 48... disability retirement. An election filed on or after August 13, 1968 is not effective if the member dies within 30 days following retirement from a disability of 100 per centum (under the standard schedule...

  17. 32 CFR 48.508 - Certain 100 percent disability retirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certain 100 percent disability retirement. 48... disability retirement. An election filed on or after August 13, 1968 is not effective if the member dies within 30 days following retirement from a disability of 100 per centum (under the standard schedule...

  18. Tensile flow and work-hardening behavior of a Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaprasad, P.V.; Venugopal, S.; Venkadesan, S.

    1997-01-01

    The flow-stress data of a 15Cr-15Ni-2.2Mo-Ti modified austenitic stainless steel in the temperature range 300 to 1,023 K was analyzed in terms of Ludwigson and Voce equations. The parameters of these equations were critically examined with respect to the effect of Ti/C ratio and test temperature. It was found that the Ludwigson equation described the flow behavior adequately up to the test temperature of 923 K, whereas the Voce equation could be employed in the full temperature range. The peaks/plateaus observed in the variation of these parameters as a function of temperature in the intermediate temperature range have been identified as one of the manifestations of dynamic strain aging (DSA). Also, the variation of these parameters with temperature clearly could bring out the different domains of DSA observed in this alloy. The work-hardening analysis of the flow-stress data revealed that in the DSA regime, the onset of stage III hardening is athermal.

  19. In vitro corrosion resistance of plasma source ion nitrided austenitic stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Le, M K; Zhu, X M

    2001-04-01

    Plasma source ion nitriding has emerged as a low-temperature, low-pressure nitriding approach for low-energy implanting nitrogen ions and then diffusing them into steel and alloy. In this work, a single high nitrogen face-centered-cubic (f.c.c.) phase (gammaN) formed on the 1Cr18Ni9Ti and AISI 316L austenitic stainless steels with a high nitrogen concentration of about 32 at % was characterized using Auger electron spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, glancing angle X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance of the gammaN-phase layer was studied by the electrochemical cyclic polarization measurement in Ringer's solutions buffered to pH from 3.5 to 7.2 at a temperature of 37 degrees C. No pitting corrosion in the Ringer's solutions with pH = 7.2 and 5.5 was detected for the gammaN-phase layers on the two stainless steels. The high pitting potential for the gammaN-phase layers is higher, about 500 and 600 mV, above that of the two original stainless steels, respectively, in the Ringer's solution with pH = 3.5. The corroded surface morphologies of the gammaN-phase layers observed by scanning electron microscopy are consistent with the results of the electrochemical polarization measurement. PMID:11246957

  20. Partial transient liquid phase diffusion bonding of Zircaloy-4 to stabilized austenitic stainless steel 321

    SciTech Connect

    Atabaki, M. Mazar; Hanzaei, A. Talebi

    2010-10-15

    An innovative method was applied for bonding Zircaloy-4 to stabilized austenitic stainless steel 321 using an active titanium interlayer. Specimens were joined by a partial transient liquid phase diffusion bonding method in a vacuum furnace at different temperatures under 1 MPa dynamic pressure of contact. The influence of different bonding temperatures on the microstructure, microindentation hardness, joint strength and interlayer thickness has been studied. The diffusion of Fe, Cr, Ni and Zr has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy elemental analyses. Results showed that control of the heating and cooling rate and 20 min soaking at 1223 K produces a perfect joint. However, solid-state diffusion of the melting point depressant elements into the joint metal causes the solid/liquid interface to advance until the joint is solidified. The tensile strength of all the bonded specimens was found around 480-670 MPa. Energy dispersive spectroscopy studies indicated that the melting occurred along the interface of the bonded specimens as a result of the transfer of atoms between the interlayer and the matrix during bonding. This technique provides a reliable method of bonding zirconium alloy to stainless steel.

  1. Improved austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications. [Improved stress-rupture properties

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.08 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; .01-.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; .03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, 0; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P + wt. % B + wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding.

  2. Mechanisms of hydrogen-assisted fracture in austenitic stainless steel welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Balch, Dorian K.; Sofronis, Petros; Somerday, Brian P.; Novak, Paul

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the hydrogen-assisted fracture susceptibility of gas-tungsten arc (GTA) welds in the nitrogen-strengthened, austenitic stainless steels 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn (21-6-9) and 22Cr-13Ni-5Mn (22-13-5). In addition, mechanisms of hydrogen-assisted fracture in the welds were identified using electron microscopy and finite-element modeling. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics experiments were conducted on hydrogen-charged GTA welds at 25 C. Results showed that hydrogen dramatically lowered the fracture toughness from 412 kJ/m{sup 2} to 57 kJ/m{sup 2} in 21-6-9 welds and from 91 kJ/m{sup 2} to 26 kJ/m{sup 2} in 22-13-5 welds. Microscopy results suggested that hydrogen served two roles in the fracture of welds: it promoted the nucleation of microcracks along the dendritic structure and accelerated the link-up of microcracks by facilitating localized deformation. A continuum finite-element model was formulated to test the notion that hydrogen could facilitate localized deformation in the ligament between microcracks. On the assumption that hydrogen decreased local flow stress in accordance with the hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility argument, the finite-element results showed that deformation was localized in a narrow band between two parallel, overlapping microcracks. In contrast, in the absence of hydrogen, the finite-element results showed that deformation between microcracks was more uniformly distributed.

  3. Corrosion resistance of kolsterised austenitic 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudaia, F. B.; Khalil, E. O.; Esehiri, A. F.; Daw, K. E.

    2015-03-01

    Austenitic stainless suffers from low wear resistance in applications where rubbing against other surfaces is encountered. This drawback can be overcome by surface treatment such as coating by hard materials. Other treatments such as carburization at relatively low temperature become applicable recently to improve hardness and wear resistance. Carburization heat treatment would only be justified if the corrosion resistance is unaffected. In this work samples of 304 stainless steels treated by colossal supersaturation case carburizing (known as Kolsterising) carried out by Bodycote Company was examined for pitting corrosion resistance at room temperature and at 50 °C. Comparison with results obtained for untreated samples in similar testing conditions show that there is no deterioration in the pitting resistance due to the Kolsterising heat treatment. X ray diffraction patterns obtained for Kolsterising sample showed that peaks correspond to the austenite phase has shifted to lower 2θ values compared with those of the untreated sample. The shift is an indication for expansion of austenite unit cells caused by saturation with diffusing carbon atoms. The XRD of Kolsterising samples also revealed additional peaks appeared in the patterns due to formation of carbides in the kolsterised layer. Examination of these additional peaks showed that these peaks are attributed to a type of carbide known as Hagg carbide Fe2C5. The absence of carbides that contain chromium means that no Cr depletion occurred in the layer and the corrosion properties are maintained. Surface hardness measurements showed large increase after Kolsterising heat treatment.

  4. Researches upon the cavitation erosion behaviour of austenite steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeasu, I.; Popoviciu, M. O.; Mitelea, I.; Salcianu, L. C.; Bordeasu, D.; Duma, S. T.; Iosif, A.

    2016-02-01

    Paper analyzes the cavitation erosion behavior of two stainless steels with 100% austenitic structure but differing by the chemical composition and the values of mechanical properties. The research is based on the MDE(t) and MDER(t) characteristic curves. We studied supplementary the aspect of the eroded areas by other to different means: observations with performing optical microscopes and roughness measurements. The tests were done in the T2 vibratory facility in the Cavitation Laboratory of the Timisoara Polytechnic University. The principal purpose of the study is the identification of the elements influencing significantly the cavitation erosion resistance. It was established the effect of the principal chemical components (determining the proportion of the structural components in conformity the Schaffler diagram) upon the cavitation erosion resistance. The results of the researches present the influence of the proportion of unstable austenite upon cavitation erosion resistance. The stainless steel with the great proportion of unstable austenite has the best behavior. The obtained conclusion are important for the metallurgists which realizes the stainless steels used for manufacturing the runners of hydraulic machineries (turbines and pumps) with increased resistance to cavitation attack.

  5. Retained austenite thermal stability in a nanostructured bainitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Avishan, Behzad; Garcia-Mateo, Carlos; Yazdani, Sasan; Caballero, Francisca G.

    2013-07-15

    The unique microstructure of nanostructured bainite consists of very slender bainitic ferrite plates and high carbon retained austenite films. As a consequence, the reported properties are opening a wide range of different commercial uses. However, bainitic transformation follows the T{sub 0} criteria, i.e. the incomplete reaction phenomena, which means that the microstructure is not thermodynamically stable because the bainitic transformation stops well before austenite reaches an equilibrium carbon level. This article aims to study the different microstructural changes taking place when nanostructured bainite is destabilized by austempering for times well in excess of that strictly necessary to end the transformation. Results indicate that while bainitic ferrite seems unaware of the extended heat treatment, retained austenite exhibits a more receptive behavior to it. - Highlights: • Nanostructured bainitic steel is not thermodynamically stable. • Extensive austempering in these microstructures has not been reported before. • Precipitation of cementite particles is unavoidable at longer austempering times. • TEM, FEG-SEM and XRD analysis were used for microstructural characterization.

  6. Corrosion resistance of kolsterised austenitic 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Abudaia, F. B. Khalil, E. O. Esehiri, A. F. Daw, K. E.

    2015-03-30

    Austenitic stainless suffers from low wear resistance in applications where rubbing against other surfaces is encountered. This drawback can be overcome by surface treatment such as coating by hard materials. Other treatments such as carburization at relatively low temperature become applicable recently to improve hardness and wear resistance. Carburization heat treatment would only be justified if the corrosion resistance is unaffected. In this work samples of 304 stainless steels treated by colossal supersaturation case carburizing (known as Kolsterising) carried out by Bodycote Company was examined for pitting corrosion resistance at room temperature and at 50 °C. Comparison with results obtained for untreated samples in similar testing conditions show that there is no deterioration in the pitting resistance due to the Kolsterising heat treatment. X ray diffraction patterns obtained for Kolsterising sample showed that peaks correspond to the austenite phase has shifted to lower 2θ values compared with those of the untreated sample. The shift is an indication for expansion of austenite unit cells caused by saturation with diffusing carbon atoms. The XRD of Kolsterising samples also revealed additional peaks appeared in the patterns due to formation of carbides in the kolsterised layer. Examination of these additional peaks showed that these peaks are attributed to a type of carbide known as Hagg carbide Fe{sub 2}C{sub 5}. The absence of carbides that contain chromium means that no Cr depletion occurred in the layer and the corrosion properties are maintained. Surface hardness measurements showed large increase after Kolsterising heat treatment.

  7. A Study of the Properties of a Room Temperature Martensitic Binary Nitinol Alloy Above and Below its Martensite to Austenite Transformation Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwich, Dennis W.

    2011-07-01

    Room temperature martensitic Nitinol alloys provide a challenge to end users of the material because they are martensitic and soft at room temperature. These are commonly referred to as Shape Memory alloys as they revert to their superelastic (pseudoelastic) form and austenitic structure at a temperature above ambient. For this study, a NiTi wire, Ti-55.3 wt.%Ni in composition (Alloy-B) and heat-treated to an Af ≈ 60 °C was used. Tensile testing was performed to fully characterize the performance of the material at a series of temperatures above and below its transformation temperature. This article will summarize the properties of the material along with the effects of multiple strains on key material performance characteristics.

  8. Elevated temperature dry sliding wear behavior of nickel-based composite coating on austenitic stainless steel deposited by a novel central hollow laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiang-Ming; Liu, Xiu-Bo; Wang, Ming-Di; Yang, Mao-Sheng; Shi, Shi-Hong; Fu, Ge-Yan; Chen, Shu-Fa

    2011-10-01

    In order to improve the high-temperature wear resistance of austenitic stainless steel, a wear resistant composite coating reinforced with hard (Cr,Fe) 7C 3 carbide and toughened by ductile γ-(Ni,Fe)/(Cr,Fe) 7C 3 eutectic matrix was fabricated by a novel central hollow laser cladding technique. The constituent phases and microstructure as well as high-temperature tribological behaviors of the Ni-based coating were investigated, respectively, and the corresponding wear mechanisms were discussed. It has been found that the composite coating exhibits superior wear resistance than substrate either at ambient or high temperatures. The coating shows better sliding wear resistance at 600 °C than 300 °C owing to high-temperature stability of the reinforced carbide and polishing effect as well as formation of continuous lubricious films, which implied it has large potential industrial applications at relatively higher temperatures.

  9. Strain behavior and lattice dynamics in Ni50Mn35In15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar Mejía, C.; Nayak, A. K.; Schiemer, J. A.; Felser, C.; Nicklas, M.; Carpenter, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    The lattice dynamics in the polycrystalline shape-memory Heusler alloy Ni50Mn35In15 have been studied by means of resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS). RUS spectra were collected in a frequency range 100-1200 kHz between 10 and 350 K. Ni50Mn35In15 exhibits a ferromagnetic transition at 313 K in the austenite phase and a martensitic transition at 248 K accompanied by a change of the magnetic state. Furthermore it displays a paramagnetic to ferrimagnetic transition within the martensitic phase. We determined the temperature dependence of the shear modulus and the acoustic attenuation of Ni50Mn35In15 and compared it with magnetization data. Following the structural softening, which accompanies the martensitic transition as a pretransitional phenomenon, a strong stiffening of the lattice is observed at the martensitic magneto-structural transition. Only a weak magnetoelastic coupling is evidenced at the Curie temperatures both in austenite and martensite phases. The large acoustic damping in the martensitic phase compared with the austenitic phase reflects the motion of the twin walls, which freezes out in the low temperature region.

  10. Strain behavior and lattice dynamics in Ni50Mn35In15.

    PubMed

    Salazar Mejía, C; Nayak, A K; Schiemer, J A; Felser, C; Nicklas, M; Carpenter, M A

    2015-10-21

    The lattice dynamics in the polycrystalline shape-memory Heusler alloy Ni50Mn35In15 have been studied by means of resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS). RUS spectra were collected in a frequency range 100-1200 kHz between 10 and 350 K. Ni50Mn35In15 exhibits a ferromagnetic transition at 313 K in the austenite phase and a martensitic transition at 248 K accompanied by a change of the magnetic state. Furthermore it displays a paramagnetic to ferrimagnetic transition within the martensitic phase. We determined the temperature dependence of the shear modulus and the acoustic attenuation of Ni50Mn35In15 and compared it with magnetization data. Following the structural softening, which accompanies the martensitic transition as a pretransitional phenomenon, a strong stiffening of the lattice is observed at the martensitic magneto-structural transition. Only a weak magnetoelastic coupling is evidenced at the Curie temperatures both in austenite and martensite phases. The large acoustic damping in the martensitic phase compared with the austenitic phase reflects the motion of the twin walls, which freezes out in the low temperature region. PMID:26418569

  11. Serum Predictors of Percent Lean Mass in Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Lustgarten, Michael S; Price, Lori L; Phillips, Edward M; Kirn, Dylan R; Mills, John; Fielding, Roger A

    2016-08-01

    Lustgarten, MS, Price, LL, Phillips, EM, Kirn, DR, Mills, J, and Fielding, RA. Serum predictors of percent lean mass in young adults. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2194-2201, 2016-Elevated lean (skeletal muscle) mass is associated with increased muscle strength and anaerobic exercise performance, whereas low levels of lean mass are associated with insulin resistance and sarcopenia. Therefore, studies aimed at obtaining an improved understanding of mechanisms related to the quantity of lean mass are of interest. Percent lean mass (total lean mass/body weight × 100) in 77 young subjects (18-35 years) was measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Twenty analytes and 296 metabolites were evaluated with the use of the standard chemistry screen and mass spectrometry-based metabolomic profiling, respectively. Sex-adjusted multivariable linear regression was used to determine serum analytes and metabolites significantly (p ≤ 0.05 and q ≤ 0.30) associated with the percent lean mass. Two enzymes (alkaline phosphatase and serum glutamate oxaloacetate aminotransferase) and 29 metabolites were found to be significantly associated with the percent lean mass, including metabolites related to microbial metabolism, uremia, inflammation, oxidative stress, branched-chain amino acid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, glycerolipid metabolism, and xenobiotics. Use of sex-adjusted stepwise regression to obtain a final covariate predictor model identified the combination of 5 analytes and metabolites as overall predictors of the percent lean mass (model R = 82.5%). Collectively, these data suggest that a complex interplay of various metabolic processes underlies the maintenance of lean mass in young healthy adults. PMID:23774283

  12. Matter power spectrum and the challenge of percent accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Aurel; Teyssier, Romain; Potter, Doug; Stadel, Joachim; Onions, Julian; Reed, Darren S.; Smith, Robert E.; Springel, Volker; Pearce, Frazer R.; Scoccimarro, Roman

    2016-04-01

    Future galaxy surveys require one percent precision in the theoretical knowledge of the power spectrum over a large range including very nonlinear scales. While this level of accuracy is easily obtained in the linear regime with perturbation theory, it represents a serious challenge for small scales where numerical simulations are required. In this paper we quantify the precision of present-day N-body methods, identifying main potential error sources from the set-up of initial conditions to the measurement of the final power spectrum. We directly compare three widely used N-body codes, Ramses, Pkdgrav3, and Gadget3 which represent three main discretisation techniques: the particle-mesh method, the tree method, and a hybrid combination of the two. For standard run parameters, the codes agree to within one percent at k<=1 h Mpc‑1 and to within three percent at k<=10 h Mpc‑1. We also consider the bispectrum and show that the reduced bispectra agree at the sub-percent level for k<= 2 h Mpc‑1. In a second step, we quantify potential errors due to initial conditions, box size, and resolution using an extended suite of simulations performed with our fastest code Pkdgrav3. We demonstrate that the simulation box size should not be smaller than L=0.5 h‑1Gpc to avoid systematic finite-volume effects (while much larger boxes are required to beat down the statistical sample variance). Furthermore, a maximum particle mass of Mp=109 h‑1Msolar is required to conservatively obtain one percent precision of the matter power spectrum. As a consequence, numerical simulations covering large survey volumes of upcoming missions such as DES, LSST, and Euclid will need more than a trillion particles to reproduce clustering properties at the targeted accuracy.

  13. Enhancing Hydrogen Embrittlement Resistance of Lath Martensite by Introducing Nano-Films of Interlath Austenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meimei; Tasan, C. Cem; Koyama, Motomichi; Ponge, Dirk; Raabe, Dierk

    2015-09-01

    Partial reversion of interlath austenite nano-films is investigated as a potential remedy for hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of martensitic steels. We conducted uniaxial tensile tests on hydrogen-free and pre-charged medium-Mn transformation-induced plasticity-maraging steels with different austenite film thicknesses. Mechanisms of crack propagation and microstructure interaction are quantitatively analyzed using electron channelling contrast imaging and electron backscatter diffraction, revealing a promising strategy to utilize austenite reversion for hydrogen-resistant martensitic steel design.

  14. Retained austenite characteristics in thermomechanically processed Si-Mn transformation-induced plasticity steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hanzaki, A.Z.; Hodgson, P.D.; Yue, S.

    1997-11-01

    It is well known that a significant amount of retained austenite can be obtained in steels containing high additions (>1 pct) of Si, where bainite is the predominant microconstituent. Furthermore, retained austenite with optimum characteristics (volume fraction, composition, morphology, size, and distribution), when present in ferrite plus bainite microstructures, can potentially increase strength and ductility, such that formability and final properties are greatly improved. These beneficial properties can be obtained largely by transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP). In this work, the effect of a microalloy addition (0.035 pct Nb) in a 0.22 pct C-1.55 pct Si-1.55 pct Mn TRIP steel was investigated. Niobium was added to enable the steel to be processed by a variety of thermomechanical processing (TMP) routes, thus allowing the effects of prior austenite grain size, austenite recrystallization temperature, Nb in austenite solid solution, and Nb as a precipitate to be studied. The results, which were compared with those of the same steel without Nb, indicate that the retained austenite volume fraction is strongly influenced by both prior austenite grain size and the state of Nb in austenite. Promoting Nb(CN) precipitation by the change in TMP conditions resulted in a decrease in the V{sub RA}. These findings are rationalized by considering the effects of changes in the TMP conditions on the subsequent transformation characteristics of the parent austenite.

  15. Effects of focused ion beam milling on austenite stability in ferrous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Knipling, K.E.; Rowenhorst, D.J.; Fonda, R.W.; Spanos, G.

    2010-01-15

    The susceptibility of fcc austenite to transform to bcc during focused ion beam milling was studied in three commercial stainless steels. The alloys investigated, in order of increasing austenite stability, were: (i) a model maraging steel, Sandvik 1RK91; (ii) an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel; and (iii) AL-6XN, a super-austenitic stainless steel. Small trenches were milled across multiple austenite grains in each alloy using a 30 kV Ga{sup +} ion beam at normal incidence to the specimen surface. The ion beam dose was controlled by varying the trench depth and the beam current. The factors influencing the transformation of fcc austenite to bcc (listed in order of decreasing influence) were found to be: (i) alloy composition (i.e., austenite stability), (ii) ion beam dose (or trench depth), and (iii) crystallographic orientation of the austenite grains. The ion beam current had a negligible influence on the FIB-induced transformation of austenite in these alloys.

  16. Unoccupied electronic structure of Ni2MnGa ferromagnetic shape memory alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maniraj, M.; D׳Souza, S. W.; Rai, Abhishek; Schlagel, D. L.; Lograsso, T. A.; Chakrabarti, Aparna; Barman, S. R.

    2015-08-20

    Momentum resolved inverse photoemission spectroscopy measurements show that the dispersion of the unoccupied bands of Ni2MnGa is significant in the austenite phase. Furthermore, in the martensite phase, it is markedly reduced, which is possibly related to the structural transition to an incommensurate modulated state in the martensite phase. Finally, based on the first principle calculations of the electronic structure of Ni–Mn–Ga, we show that the modification of the spectral shape with surface composition is related to change in the hybridization between the Mn 3d and Ni 3d-like states that dominate the unoccupied conduction band.

  17. Unoccupied electronic structure of Ni2MnGa ferromagnetic shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Maniraj, M.; D׳Souza, S. W.; Rai, Abhishek; Schlagel, D. L.; Lograsso, T. A.; Chakrabarti, Aparna; Barman, S. R.

    2015-08-20

    Momentum resolved inverse photoemission spectroscopy measurements show that the dispersion of the unoccupied bands of Ni2MnGa is significant in the austenite phase. Furthermore, in the martensite phase, it is markedly reduced, which is possibly related to the structural transition to an incommensurate modulated state in the martensite phase. Finally, based on the first principle calculations of the electronic structure of Ni–Mn–Ga, we show that the modification of the spectral shape with surface composition is related to change in the hybridization between the Mn 3d and Ni 3d-like states that dominate the unoccupied conduction band.

  18. AQUEOUS AMMONIA EQUILIBRIUM - TABULATION OF PERCENT UN-IONIZED AMMONIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The percent of un-ionized ammonia as a function of pH and temperature in aqueous ammonia solutions of zero salinity is presented in tabular form over the following ranges: temperature 0.0 to 40.0 C in increments of 0.2 degree, and pH 5.00 to 12.00 in increments of 0.01 pH unit.

  19. 28 percent efficient GaAs concentrator solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmillan, H. F.; Hamaker, H. C.; Kaminar, N. R.; Kuryla, M. S.; Ladle Ristow, M.

    1988-01-01

    AlGaAs/GaAs heteroface solar concentrator cells which exhibit efficiencies in excess of 27 percent at high solar concentrations (over 400 suns, AM1.5D, 100 mW/sq cm) have been fabricated with both n/p and p/n configurations. The best n/p cell achieved an efficiency of 28.1 percent around 400 suns, and the best p/n cell achieved an efficiency of 27.5 percent around 1000 suns. The high performance of these GaAs concentrator cells compared to earlier high-efficiency cells was due to improved control of the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition growth conditions and improved cell fabrication procedures (gridline definition and edge passivation). The design parameters of the solar cell structures and optimized grid pattern were determined with a realistic computer modeling program. An evaluation of the device characteristics and a discussion of future GaAs concentrator cell development are presented.

  20. Relationship between breast sound speed and mammographic percent density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sak, Mark; Duric, Nebojsa; Boyd, Norman; Littrup, Peter; Myc, Lukasz; Faiz, Muhammad; Li, Cuiping; Bey-Knight, Lisa

    2011-03-01

    Despite some shortcomings, mammography is currently the standard of care for breast cancer screening and diagnosis. However, breast ultrasound tomography is a rapidly developing imaging modality that has the potential to overcome the drawbacks of mammography. It is known that women with high breast densities have a greater risk of developing breast cancer. Measuring breast density is accomplished through the use of mammographic percent density, defined as the ratio of fibroglandular to total breast area. Using an ultrasound tomography (UST) prototype, we created sound speed images of the patient's breast, motivated by the fact that sound speed in a tissue is proportional to the density of the tissue. The purpose of this work is to compare the acoustic performance of the UST system with the measurement of mammographic percent density. A cohort of 251 patients was studied using both imaging modalities and the results suggest that the volume averaged breast sound speed is significantly related to mammographic percent density. The Spearman correlation coefficient was found to be 0.73 for the 175 film mammograms and 0.69 for the 76 digital mammograms obtained. Since sound speed measurements do not require ionizing radiation or physical compression, they have the potential to form the basis of a safe, more accurate surrogate marker of breast density.

  1. Processing and Mechanical Properties of NiAl-Based In-Situ Composites. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, David Ray

    1994-01-01

    In-situ composites based on the NiAl-Cr eutectic system were successfully produced by containerless processing and evaluated. The NiAl-Cr alloys had a fibrous microstructure while the NiAl-(Cr,Mo) alloys containing 1 at. percent or more molybdenum exhibited a lamellar structure. The NiAl-28Cr-6Mo eutectic displays promising high temperature strength while still maintaining a reasonable room temperature fracture toughness when compared to other NiAl-based materials. The Laves phase NiAlTa was used to strengthen NiAl and very promising creep strengths were found for the directionally solidified NiAl-NiAlTa eutectic. The eutectic composition was found to be near NiAl-15.5Ta (at. percent) and well aligned microstructures were produced at this composition. An off-eutectic composition of NiAl-14.5Ta was also processed, consisting of NiAl dendrites surrounded by aligned eutectic regions. The room temperature toughness of these two phase alloys was similar to that of polycrystalline NiAl even with the presence of the brittle Laves phase NiAlTa. Polyphase in-situ composites were generated by directional solidification of ternary eutectics. The systems investigated were the Ni-Al-Ta-X (X=Cr, Mo, or V) alloys. Ternary eutectics were found in each of these systems and both the eutectic composition and temperature were determined. Of these ternary eutectics, the one in the NiAl-Ta-Cr system was found to be the most promising. The fracture toughness of the NiAl-(Cr,Al)NiTa-Cr eutectic was intermediate between those of the NiAl-NiAlTa eutectic and the NiAl-Cr eutectic. The creep strength of this ternary eutectic was similar to or greater than that of the NiAl-Cr eutectic.

  2. Computational design and analysis of high strength austenitic TRIP steels for blast protection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, Padmanava

    Recent assessment of material property requirements for blast resistant applications, especially for the naval ship hulls, has defined the need to design steels with high stretch ductility and fragment penetration resistance, along with high strength and adequate toughness. Using a system based computational materials design approach, two series of austenitic (gamma) steels have been designed -- BA120 to exhibit high uniform ductility in tension (>20%) and SA120 to exhibit high tensile (>20%) and shear strains (>50%), with both alloys maintaining high levels of yield strength (120 ksi/827 MPa) at room temperature under Tensile and Shear stress states. BA120 is low chromium (4 wt %) high nickel (23.5 wt %) alloy while the SA120 is a high chromium design (10 wt %), both designed for non-magnetic behavior. The Thermo-Calc computational thermodynamics software in conjunction with a Ni-DATA 7 thermodynamic database has been used to model precipitation strengthening of the alloy, by quantifying the dependence of yield stress of austenitic steels on the mole fraction of the precipitated gamma' (Gamma Prime) Ni3(Ti, Al) phase. The required high strength has been achieved by the precipitation of spheroidal intermetallic gamma' -- phase of optimum diameter (15 nm) in equilibrium with the matrix at the standard aging temperature. Adequate Al and Ti with respect 5 to the Ni in the matrix ensure enough gamma' phase fraction and number density of precipitates to provide the necessary strength. The predicted gamma' precipitation strengthening to 120-130 ksi for both BA120 and SA120 has been validated through both microhardness as well as static and dynamic tensile and shear tests conducted at room temperature. 3-D LEAP analysis of the aged specimens has shown the expected size and distribution of gamma' -- precipitates with good compositional accuracy of predicted values from the thermodynamic models, for both matrix austenite and gamma'. Metastable austenitic steels have been

  3. Influence of Addition of Nb on Phase Transformation, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Equiatomic NiTi SMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shuyong; Liang, Yulong; Zhang, Yanqiu; Zhao, Yanan; Zhao, Chengzhi

    2016-08-01

    Three novel NiTiNb shape memory alloys, which possess a nominal chemical composition of Ni50-x/2-Ti50-x/2-Nb x (at.%) where x stands for 2, 4 and 6, respectively, were designed in order to investigate the influence of the addition of Nb on phase transformation, microstructure and mechanical properties of equiatomic NiTi shape memory alloy. All the three NiTiNb shape memory alloys contain B2 austenite phase, B19' martensite phase and β-Nb precipitate phase. Martensite type II twin can be observed in the case of Ni49Ti49Nb2 alloy. In the case of Ni48Ti48Nb4 alloy, there exists a boundary between Ti2Ni precipitate phase and β-Nb precipitate phase. As for Ni47Ti47Nb6 alloy, it can be observed that there exists an orientation relationship of [01bar{1}]_{{β{{ - Nb}}}} //[01bar{1}]_{{B2}} between β-Nb precipitate phase and B2 austenite matrix. The increase in Nb content contributes to enhancing the yield stress of NiTiNb shape memory alloy, but it leads to the decrease in compression fracture stress. The addition of Nb to equiatomic NiTi shape memory alloy does not have a significant influence on the transformation hysteresis of the alloy, which is attributed to the fact that NiTiNb shape memory alloy is not subjected to plastic deformation and hence β-Nb precipitate phase is unable to relax the elastic strain in the martensite interface.

  4. Mechanism of Austenite Formation from Spheroidized Microstructure in an Intermediate Fe-0.1C-3.5Mn Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Qingquan; Gouné, Mohamed; Perlade, Astrid; Pardoen, Thomas; Jacques, Pascal; Bouaziz, Olivier; Bréchet, Yves

    2016-05-01

    The austenitization from a spheroidized microstructure during intercritical annealing was studied in a Fe-0.1C-3.5Mn alloy. The austenite grains preferentially nucleate and grow from intergranular cementite. The nucleation at intragranular cementite is significantly retarded or even suppressed. The DICTRA software, assuming local equilibrium conditions, was used to simulate the austenite growth kinetics at various temperatures and for analyzing the austenite growth mechanism. The results indicate that both the mode and the kinetics of austenite growth strongly depend on cementite composition. With sufficiently high cementite Mn content, the austenite growth is essentially composed of two stages, involving the partitioning growth controlled by Mn diffusion inside ferrite, followed by a stage controlled by Mn diffusion within austenite for final equilibration. The partitioning growth results in a homogeneous distribution of carbon within austenite, which is supported by NanoSIMS carbon mapping.

  5. Mechanism of Austenite Formation from Spheroidized Microstructure in an Intermediate Fe-0.1C-3.5Mn Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Qingquan; Gouné, Mohamed; Perlade, Astrid; Pardoen, Thomas; Jacques, Pascal; Bouaziz, Olivier; Bréchet, Yves

    2016-07-01

    The austenitization from a spheroidized microstructure during intercritical annealing was studied in a Fe-0.1C-3.5Mn alloy. The austenite grains preferentially nucleate and grow from intergranular cementite. The nucleation at intragranular cementite is significantly retarded or even suppressed. The DICTRA software, assuming local equilibrium conditions, was used to simulate the austenite growth kinetics at various temperatures and for analyzing the austenite growth mechanism. The results indicate that both the mode and the kinetics of austenite growth strongly depend on cementite composition. With sufficiently high cementite Mn content, the austenite growth is essentially composed of two stages, involving the partitioning growth controlled by Mn diffusion inside ferrite, followed by a stage controlled by Mn diffusion within austenite for final equilibration. The partitioning growth results in a homogeneous distribution of carbon within austenite, which is supported by NanoSIMS carbon mapping.

  6. Influence of the microstructure on electrochemical corrosion and nickel release in NiTi orthodontic archwires.

    PubMed

    Briceño, J; Romeu, A; Espinar, E; Llamas, J M; Gil, F J

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the influence of the present phases and the chemical composition on the corrosion behavior and the nickel ion release of the NiTi orthodontic archwires. Eight Ni-Ti archwires from six commercial brands, in the as-received condition, were studied. The chemical composition, roughness, microstructure and the proportion of the phases as well as the corrosion behavior were analyzed for each archwire. The nickel ion release was characterized in artificial saliva immersion settings ranging up to 4 weeks. The results show that the presence of the martensitic phase improves corrosion resistance and significantly decreases Ni release into exterior medium in comparison with the austenitic specimens. In spite of the partial loss of superelasticity produced in the martensitic phase, it could be of great interest for biomedical applications, as it could minimize sensitization and allergies and improve biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of NiTi shape memory alloys. PMID:24094215

  7. Long-term behaviour of solid oxide fuel cell interconnect materials in contact with Ni-mesh during exposure in simulated anode gas at 700 and 800 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Fresnillo, L.; Shemet, V.; Chyrkin, A.; de Haart, L. G. J.; Quadakkers, W. J.

    2014-12-01

    In the present study the long-term behaviour of two ferritic steels, Crofer 22 APU and Crofer 22H, in contact with a Ni-mesh during exposure in simulated anode gas, Ar-4%H2-2%H2O, at 700 and 800 °C for exposure times up to 3000 h was investigated. Ni diffusion from the Ni-mesh into the steel resulted in the formation of an austenitic zone whereas diffusion of iron and chromium from the steel into the Ni-mesh resulted in the formation of chromia base oxides in the Ni-mesh. Depending on the chemical composition of the steel, the temperature and the exposure time, interdiffusion processes between ferritic steel and Ni-mesh also resulted in σ-phase formation at the austenite-ferrite interface and in Laves-phase dissolution in the austenitic zone. The extent and morphology of the σ-phase formation are discussed on the basis of thermodynamic considerations, including reaction paths in the ternary alloy system Fe-Ni-Cr.

  8. Characterization of the effect of cryogenic treatment on the tempering behavior of a secondary hardening high Co-Ni steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, M.; Ressel, G.; Ploberger, S.; Marsoner, S.; Ebner, R.

    2016-03-01

    For high Co-Ni steels sub-zero treatments are conducted to reduce the retained austenite phase fraction for obtaining excellent fracture toughness properties, but in general, cryogenic treatment has a great impact on the microstructural evolution of steels during tempering. Hence, the aim of this work was to analyze the influence of cryogenic treatments on the microstructural evolution of high Co-Ni steels, including carbide precipitation kinetics and austenite phase fraction evolution, during heating to elevated temperatures. In order to study the formation properties of carbides, the heating processes of cryogenically and non- cryogenically treated specimens were analyzed by dilatometer measurements. Furthermore, for determining the evolution of austenite phase fraction and hardness due to tempering, dilatometer investigations were combined with X-ray diffraction analyses and hardness measurements. It is revealed that sub-zero treated samples exhibit much stronger carbide precipitation signals. This was ascribed to the lower phase fraction of retained austenite, as more carbon is available for carbide precipitation.

  9. 75 FR 70908 - Circular Welded Austenitic Stainless Pressure Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Extension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ... for Revocation in Part, 75 FR 22107 (April 27, 2010). The period of review (``POR'') is September 5... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Austenitic Stainless Pressure Pipe From the People's Republic... of the antidumping duty order on circular welded austenitic stainless pressure pipe from the...

  10. Austenite Static Recrystallization Kinetics in Microalloyed B Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrañaga-Otegui, Ane; Pereda, Beatriz; Jorge-Badiola, Denis; Gutiérrez, Isabel

    2016-04-01

    Boron is added to steels to increase hardenability, substituting of more expensive elements. Moreover, B acts as a recrystallization delaying element when it is in solid solution. However, B can interact with N and/or C to form nitrides and carbides at high temperatures, limiting its effect on both phase transformation and recrystallization. On the other hand, other elements like Nb and Ti are added due to the retarding effect that they exert on the austenite softening processes, which results in pancaked austenite grains and refined room microstructures. In B steels, Nb and Ti are also used to prevent B precipitation. However, the complex interaction between these elements and its effect on the austenite microstructure evolution during hot working has not been investigated in detail. The present work is focused on the effect the B exerts on recrystallization when added to microalloyed steels. Although B on its own leads to retarded static recrystallization kinetics, when Nb is added a large delay in the static recrystallization times is observed in the 1273 K to 1373 K (1000 °C to 1100 °C) temperature range. The effect is larger than that predicted by a model developed for Nb-microalloyed steels, which is attributed to a synergistic effect of both elements. However, this effect is not so prominent for Nb-Ti-B steels. The complex effect of the composition on recrystallization kinetics is explained as a competition between the solute drag and precipitation pinning phenomena. The effect of the microalloying elements is quantified, and a new model for the predictions of recrystallization kinetics that accounts for the B and Nb+B synergetic effects is proposed.

  11. Market Opportunities for Austenitic Stainless Steels in SO2 Scrubbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Harold T.

    1980-10-01

    Recent U.S. federal legislation has created new opportunities for SO2 scrubbers because all coals, even low-sulfur western coals, will probably require scrubbing to remove SO2 from gaseous combustion products. Scrubbing, the chemical absorption of SO2 by vigorous contact with a slurry—usually lime or limestone—creates an aggressive acid-chloride solution. This presents a promising market for pitting-resistant austenitic stainless steels, but there is active competition from rubber and fiberglass-lined carbon steel. Since the latter are favored on a first-cost basis, stainless steels must be justified on a cost/performance or life-cost basis. Nickel-containing austenitic alloys are favored because of superior field fabricability. Ferritic stainless steels have little utility in this application because of limitations in weldability and resulting poor corrosion resistance. Inco corrosion test spools indicate that molybdenum-containing austenitic alloys are needed. The leanest alloys for this application are 316L and 317L. Low-carbon grades of stainless steel are specified to minimize corrosion in the vicinity of welds. More highly alloyed materials may be required in critical areas. At present, 16,000 MW of scrubber capacity is operational and 17,000 MW is under construction. Another 29,000 MW is planned, bringing the total to 62,000 MW. Some 160,000 MW of scrubber capacity is expected to be placed in service over the next 10 years. This could translate into a total potential market of 80,000 tons of alloy plate for new power industry construction in the next decade. Retrofitting of existing power plants plus scrubbers for other applications such as inert gas generators for oil tankers, smelters, municipal incinerators, coke ovens, the pulp and paper industry, sulfuric acid plants, and fluoride control in phosphoric acid plants will add to this large market.

  12. Austenite Static Recrystallization Kinetics in Microalloyed B Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrañaga-Otegui, Ane; Pereda, Beatriz; Jorge-Badiola, Denis; Gutiérrez, Isabel

    2016-06-01

    Boron is added to steels to increase hardenability, substituting of more expensive elements. Moreover, B acts as a recrystallization delaying element when it is in solid solution. However, B can interact with N and/or C to form nitrides and carbides at high temperatures, limiting its effect on both phase transformation and recrystallization. On the other hand, other elements like Nb and Ti are added due to the retarding effect that they exert on the austenite softening processes, which results in pancaked austenite grains and refined room microstructures. In B steels, Nb and Ti are also used to prevent B precipitation. However, the complex interaction between these elements and its effect on the austenite microstructure evolution during hot working has not been investigated in detail. The present work is focused on the effect the B exerts on recrystallization when added to microalloyed steels. Although B on its own leads to retarded static recrystallization kinetics, when Nb is added a large delay in the static recrystallization times is observed in the 1273 K to 1373 K (1000 °C to 1100 °C) temperature range. The effect is larger than that predicted by a model developed for Nb-microalloyed steels, which is attributed to a synergistic effect of both elements. However, this effect is not so prominent for Nb-Ti-B steels. The complex effect of the composition on recrystallization kinetics is explained as a competition between the solute drag and precipitation pinning phenomena. The effect of the microalloying elements is quantified, and a new model for the predictions of recrystallization kinetics that accounts for the B and Nb+B synergetic effects is proposed.

  13. Microstructural evolution of austenitic stainless steels irradiated in spectrally tailored experiment in ORR at 400°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, T.; Maziasz, P. J.; Kanazawa, H.; Hishinuma, A.

    1992-09-01

    Several different heats of austenitic stainless steel, including Japanese-PCA(JPCA), were irradiated in the spectrally tailored ORR experiment at 400°C to 7.4 dpa. The levels of helium generated were 155 appm for JPCA (16Ni, 30 wppm B) and 102 appm for standard type 316 steel (13Ni). The mean He: dpa ratio throughout the irradiation falls between 15 and 20 appm He/dpa, which is close to the He/dpa values expected for fusion. Swelling was measured by transmission electron microscopy and by precision immersion densitometry. All the CW alloys showed swelling that was at or below the detection limit of the densitometer (0.1%). No measurable swelling was detected in the SA JPCA alloy, while the highest value of 0.8% was observed in the SA high-purity alloy. One Ti-modified steel with low C also showed a relatively high swelling value of 0.5%, while standard type 316 steel showed only 0.15% swelling. TEM observation gave consistent but slightly larger values of swelling.

  14. Modeling the austenite decomposition into ferrite and bainite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazeli, Fateh

    2005-12-01

    Novel advanced high-strength steels such as dual-phase (DP) and transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels, are considered as promising materials for new generation of lightweight vehicles. The superior mechanical properties of these steels, compared to classical high strength steels, are associated with their complex microstructures. The desired phase configuration and morphology can only be achieved through well-controlled processing paths with rather tight processing windows. To implement such challenging processing stages into the current industrial facilities a significant amount of development efforts, in terms of mill trials, have to be performed. Alternatively, process models as predictive tools can be employed to aid the process development' and also to design new steel grades. Knowledge-based process models are developed by virtue of the underlying physical phenomena occurring during the industrial processing and are validated with experimental data. The goal of the present work is to develop an integrated microstructure model to adequately describe the kinetics of austenite decomposition into polygonal ferrite and bainite, such that for complex thermal paths simulating those of industrial practice, the final microstructure in advanced high strength steels can reasonably be predicted. This is in particular relevant to hot-rolled DP and TRIP steels, where the intercritical ferrite evolution due to its crucial influence on the onset and kinetics of the subsequent bainite formation, has to be quantified precisely. The calculated fraction, size and spatial carbon distribution of the intercritical austenite are employed as input to characterize adequately the kinetic of the bainite reaction. Pertinent to ferrite formation, a phenomenological, physically-based model was developed on the ground of the mixed-mode approach. The model deals with the growth stage since nucleation site saturation at prior austenite grain boundaries is likely to be attained

  15. Microstructures of laser deposited 304L austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKS,JOHN A.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.

    2000-05-22

    Laser deposits fabricated from two different compositions of 304L stainless steel powder were characterized to determine the nature of the solidification and solid state transformations. One of the goals of this work was to determine to what extent novel microstructure consisting of single-phase austenite could be achieved with the thermal conditions of the LENS [Laser Engineered Net Shape] process. Although ferrite-free deposits were not obtained, structures with very low ferrite content were achieved. It appeared that, with slight changes in alloy composition, this goal could be met via two different solidification and transformation mechanisms.

  16. The Influence of the R-Phase on the Superelastic Behavior of NiTi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerig, T. W.; Bhattacharya, K.

    2015-06-01

    Approximately equiatomic Ni-Ti alloys, or Nitinol, can transform upon cooling or when stressed from a parent ordered cubic (B2) Austenite phase into two martensitic structures: a monoclinic structure commonly referred to as simply martensite and a rhombohedrally distorted martensite referred to as the R-phase. While the former is often more stable, the R-phase presents a substantially lower barrier to formation, creating an interesting competition for the succession of Austenite. This competition has markedly different outcomes depending upon whether Austenite instability is caused by cooling or by the application of stress. While medical applications are generally used isothermally, most characterization is done using thermal scans such as differential scanning calorimetry. This leads to frequent and significant misunderstandings regarding plateau stresses in particular. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the competition between these two martensites as the parent Austenite phase loses stability, and to clarify how tests can be properly conducted and interpreted to avoid confusion. To that end, the examples shown are not selected to be ideal or theoretical, but rather to illustrate complexities typical of those found in medical devices, such as cold worked conditions that make peaks difficult to interpret and "plateaus" ill-defined. Finally, a stress-induced M ⇒ R ⇒ M sequence will be discussed.

  17. Creep behaviour of Cu-30 percent Zn at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.

    1991-01-01

    The present, intermediate-temperature (573-823 K) range investigation of creep properties for single-phase Cu-30 percent Zn alpha-brass observed inverse, linear, and sigmoidal primary-creep transients above 573 K under stresses that yield minimum creep rates in the 10 to the -7th to 2 x 10 to the -4th range; normal primary creep occurred in all other conditions. In conjunction with a review of the pertinent literature, a detailed analysis of these data suggests that no clearly defined, classes M-to-A-to-M transition exists in this alloy notwithstanding the presence of both classes' characteristics under nominally similar stresses and temperatures.

  18. IET. Aerial view of project, 95 percent complete. Camera facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET. Aerial view of project, 95 percent complete. Camera facing east. Left to right: stack, duct, mobile test cell building (TAN-624), four-rail track, dolly. Retaining wall between mobile test building and shielded control building (TAN-620) just beyond. North of control building are tank building (TAN-627) and fuel-transfer pump building (TAN-625). Guard house at upper right along exclusion fence. Construction vehicles and temporary warehouse in view near guard house. Date: June 6, 1955. INEEL negative no. 55-1462 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. On the formation of stacking fault tetrahedra in irradiated austenitic stainless steels - A literature review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schibli, Raluca; Schäublin, Robin

    2013-11-01

    . According to this mechanism, an SFT can form directly from the collapse of a void [29]. Several other MD studies had revealed earlier that SFTs, though truncated, are formed directly within the volume of the displacement cascade, for few tens of keV pka's in Cu [30-32] and in Ni [33]. They may derive from any of the abovementioned mechanisms. Ref. [26] is the only one suggesting that the observed SFT features observed at the end of the simulated cascade in Cu arise from Silcox and Hirsch mechanism.Zinkle et al. [34] focused on vacancy cluster type defects and calculated their relative stability in a number of metals taking into account the SFE, the shear modulus, the Poisson's ratio and the magnitude of the Burgers vector, as a function of cluster size. They predicted that the SFT is the most stable vacancy-cluster morphology in austenitic stainless steels up to a size of about 4000 vacancies, or a Frank loop size of about 17.0 nm. They also report from their literature review that the presence of small levels of impurities such as oxygen can promote these vacancy-clusters formation and nucleation. In a more recent paper [35], it is suggested from experimental results in Cu, Au, Ni and Pd that the reduced SFE should be smaller than 1/50 to promote SFT formation. Taking for austenitic steels an average value of 40 mJ m2, 76 GPa and 2.5 Å, for respectively, the SFE, the shear modulus and the Burgers vector, one gets a reduced SFE of 1/475. This confirms that SFTs should be largely promoted in austenitic steels.The formation of SFTs following irradiation is an issue for nuclear materials because the interactions between mobile dislocations and SFTs cause changes in the mechanical properties, such as strengthening, hardening and plastic instability during deformation [36-38]. In this context, the formation of SFTs in austenitic stainless steels following irradiation has been widely studied, but it still remains highly controversial. The existing literature on irradiated

  20. Quantitative analysis of microstructure deformation in creep fenomena of ferritic SA-213 T22 and austenitic SA-213 TP304H material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyana, Cukup; Taufik, Ahmad; Gunawan, Agus Yodi; Siregar, Rustam Efendi

    2013-09-01

    The failure of critical component of fossil fired power plant that operated in creep range (high stress, high temperature and in the long term) depends on its microstructure characteristics. Ferritic low carbon steel (2.25Cr-1Mo) and Austenitic stainless alloy (18Cr-8Ni) are used as a boiler tube in the secondary superheater outlet header to deliver steam before entering the turbin. The tube failure is occurred in a form of rupture, resulting trip that disrupts the continuity of the electrical generation. The research in quantification of the microstructure deformation has been done in predicting the remaining life of the tube through interrupted accelerated creep test. For Austenitic Stainless Alloy (18Cr-8Ni), creep test was done in 550°C with the stress 424.5 MPa and for Ferritic Low Carbon Steel (2.25Cr-1Mo) in 570°C with the stress 189 MPa. The interrupted accelerated creep test was done by stopping the observation in condition 60%, 70%, 80% and 90% of remaining life, the creep test fracture was done before. Then the micro hardness test, photo micro, SEM and EDS were obtained from those samples. Refer to ASTM E122, microstructure parameters were calculated. The results indicated that there are a consistency of decreasing their grain diameters, increasing their grain size numbers, micro hardness, and the length of crack or void number per unit area with the decreasing of remaining life. While morphology of grain (stated in parameter α=LV/LH) relatively constant for austenitic. However, for ferritic the change of morphology revealed significantly. Fracture mode propagation of ferritic material is growth with voids transgranular and intergranular crack, and for austenitic material the fracture growth with intergranular creep fracture void and wedge crack. In this research, it was proposed a formulation of mathematical model for creep behavior corresponding their curve fitting resulted for the primary, secondary and tertiary in accelerated creep test. In

  1. Effects of Retained Austenite Stability and Volume Fraction on Deformation Behaviors of TRIP Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Soulami, Ayoub; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-10-02

    In this paper, the separate effects of austenite stability and its volume fraction on the deformation behaviors of transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels are investigated based on the microstructure-based finite element modeling method. The effects of austenite stability on the strength, ductility and formability of TRIP steels are first examined based on the microstructure of a commercial TRIP 800 steel. Then, the separate effects of the austenite volume fraction on the overall deformation behaviors of TRIP steels are examined based on the various representative volume elements (RVEs). The computational results suggest that the higher austenite stability is helpful to increase the ductility and formability, but not the UTS. However, the increase of austenite volume fraction alone is not helpful in improving the performance of TRIP steels. This may indicate that various other material factors should also be concurrently adjusted during thermo-mechanical manufacturing process in a way to increase the performance of TRIP steels, which needs further investigation.

  2. Influence of interface mobility on the evolution of Austenite-Martensite grain assemblies during annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J; Santofimia, Maria J; Speer, John G; Zhao, L; Sietsma, Jilt

    2009-01-01

    The quenching and partitioning (Q&P) process is a new heat treatment for the creation of advanced high-strength steels. This treatment consists of an initial partial or full austenitization, followed by a quench to form a controlled amount of martensite and an annealing step to partition carbon atoms from the martensite to the austenite. In this work, the microstructural evolution during annealing of martensite-austenite grain assemblies has been analyzed by means of a modeling approach that considers the influence of martensite-austenite interface migration on the kinetics of carbon partitioning. Carbide precipitation is precluded in the model, and three different assumptions about interface mobility are considered, ranging from a completely immobile interface to the relatively high mobility of an incoherent ferrite-austenite interface. Simulations indicate that different interface mobilities lead to profound differences in the evolution of microstructure that is predicted during annealing.

  3. Effect of nitrogen and vanadium on austenite grain growth kinetics of a low alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Stasko, Renata . E-mail: rstasko@ap.Cracow.pl; Adrian, Henryk . E-mail: adrian@uci.agh.edu.pl; Adrian, Anna . E-mail: adrian@metal.agh.edu.pl

    2006-06-15

    Austenite grain growth kinetics in a steel containing 0.4% C, 1.8% Cr with different nitrogen contents (in the range 0.0038-0.0412%) and a micralloying addition of 0.078% V were investigated. The investigations were carried out in an austenitising temperature range of 840-1200 deg. C for 30 min. The results of investigations showed that N promotes the grain growth of austenite. The microalloying addition of vanadium protects the austenite grain growth because of carbonitride V(C,N) precipitation and the grain boundary pinning effect of undissolved particles of V(C,N). Using a thermodynamic model, the carbonitride V(C,N) content, undissolved at the austenitising temperature was calculated. At temperatures when a coarsening and dissolution of carbonitride occurs, the austenite grains start to growth. The effect of nitrogen on the type of chord length distribution of austenite grains was analysed.

  4. Hysteresis and magnetocaloric effect at the magnetostructural phase transition of Ni-Mn-Ga and Ni-Mn-Co-Sn Heusler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Vittorio; Sasso, Carlo P.; Skokov, Konstantin P.; Gutfleisch, Oliver; Khovaylo, Vladimir V.

    2012-01-01

    Hysteresis features of the direct and inverse magnetocaloric effect associated with first-order magnetostructural phase transitions in Ni-Mn-X (X = Ga, Sn) Heusler alloys have been disclosed by differential calorimetry measurements performed either under a constant magnetic field, H, or by varying H in isothermal conditions. We have shown that the magnetocaloric effect in these alloys crucially depends on the employed measuring protocol. Experimentally observed peculiarities of the magnetocaloric effect have been explained in the framework of a model that accounts for different contributions to the Gibbs energy of austenitic gA and martensitic gM phases. Obtained experimental results have been summarized by plotting a phase fraction of the austenite xA versus the driving force gM-gA. The developed approach allows one to predict reversible and irreversible features of the direct as well as inverse magnetocaloric effect in a variety of materials with first-order magnetic phase transitions.

  5. Deformation and Phase Transformation Processes in Polycrystalline NiTi and NiTiHf High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benafan, Othmane

    2012-01-01

    The deformation and transformation mechanisms of polycrystalline Ni49.9Ti50.1 and Ni50.3Ti29.7Hf20 (in at.%) shape memory alloys were investigated by combined experimental and modeling efforts aided by an in situ neutron diffraction technique at stress and temperature. The thermomechanical response of the low temperature martensite, the high temperature austenite phases, and changes between these two states during thermomechanical cycling were probed and reported. In the cubic austenite phase, stress-induced martensite, deformation twinning and slip processes were observed which helped in constructing a deformation map that contained the limits over which each of the identified mechanisms was dominant. Deformation of the monoclinic martensitic phase was also investigated where the microstructural changes (texture, lattice strains, and phase fractions) during room-temperature deformation and subsequent thermal cycling were compared to the bulk macroscopic response. When cycling between these two phases, the evolution of inelastic strains, along with the shape setting procedures were examined and used for the optimization of the transformation properties as a function of deformation levels and temperatures. Finally, this work was extended to the development of multiaxial capabilities at elevated temperatures for the in situ neutron diffraction measurements of shape memory alloys on the VULCAN Diffractometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  6. Corrosion aspects of Ni-Cr-Fe based and Ni-Cu based steam generator tube materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, R. S.

    2009-09-01

    This paper reviews corrosion related issues of Ni-Cr-Fe based (in a general sense) and Ni-Cu based steam generator tube materials for nuclear power plants those have been dealt with for last more than four decades along with some updated information on corrosion research. The materials include austenitic stainless steels (SSs), Alloy 600, Monel 400, Alloy 800 and Alloy 690. Compatibility related issues of these alloys are briefly discussed along with the alloy chemistry and microstructure. For austenitic SSs, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour in high temperature aqueous environments is discussed. For Alloy 600, intergranular cracking in high temperature water including hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking is highlighted along with the interactions of material in various environments. In case of Monel 400, intergranular corrosion and pitting corrosion at ambient temperature and SCC behaviour at elevated temperature are briefly described. For Alloy 800, the discussion covers SCC behaviour, surface characterization and microstructural aspects of pitting, whereas hydrogen-related issues are also highlighted for Alloy 690.

  7. Effect of Manganese on Microstructures and Solidification Modes of Cast Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Huabei; Wen, Yuhua; Du, Yangyang; Yu, Qinxu; Yang, Qin

    2013-10-01

    We investigated microstructures and solidification modes of cast Fe-(13-27)Mn-5.5Si-8.5Cr-5Ni shape memory alloys to clarify whether Mn was an austenite former during solidification. Furthermore, we examined whether the Creq/Nieq equations (Delong, Hull, Hammer and WRC-1992 equations) and Thermo-Calc software® together with database TCFE6 were valid to predict the solidification modes of cast Fe-(13-27)Mn-5.5Si-8.5Cr-5Ni shape memory alloys. The results have shown that the solidification modes of Fe-(13-27)Mn-5.5Si-8.5Cr-5Ni alloys changed from the F mode to the FA mode with increasing the Mn concentration. Mn is an austenite former during the solidification for the cast Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni shape memory alloys. The Delong, Hull, Hammer, and WRC-1992 equations as well as Thermo-Calc software® together with database TCFE6 are invalid to predict the solidification modes of cast Fe-(13-27)Mn-5.5Si-8.5Cr-5Ni SMAs. To predict the solidification modes of cast Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni alloys, a new Creq/Nieq equation should be developed or the thermodynamic database of Thermo-Calc software® should be corrected.

  8. Phase Transformation Behavior of Porous TiNi Alloys Produced by Powder Metallurgy Using Magnesium as a Space Holder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydoğmuş, Tarik; Bor, Elif Tarhan; Bor, Şakir

    2011-09-01

    Porous TiNi alloys with porosities in the range of 51 to 73 pct were prepared successfully applying a new powder metallurgy fabrication route in which magnesium was used as a space holder, resulting in either single austenite phase or a mixture of austenite and martensite phases dictated by the composition of the starting powders, but entirely free from secondary brittle intermetallics, oxides, nitrides, and carbonitrides. Since transformation temperatures are very sensitive to composition, deformation, and oxidation, for the first time, transformation temperatures of porous TiNi alloys were investigated using chemically homogeneous specimens in as-sintered and aged conditions eliminating secondary phase, contamination, and deformation effects. It was found that the porosity content of the foams has no influence on the phase transformation temperatures both in as-sintered and aged conditions, while deformation, oxidation, and aging treatment are severely influential.

  9. Microstructure and shape recovery characteristics in a TIG-welded Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Zhixia; Li, Lianjin; Wang, Dongai; Li, Zongmin

    2007-07-01

    Microstructure of an Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni shape memory alloy (SMA) after being TIG (tungsten-insert gas welding) welded was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffractometer. The results show that dendrite crystals composed of cellular sub-structures form in the weld zone due to remelting. There is no obvious change in microstructure of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) except for some degree of growth of austenite grains. Since both the weld zone and HAZ consist of single phase of austenite (γ), pre-strain can still induce the γ-->ɛ martensite transformation in welding joints of the alloy. Effect of TIG welding on shape recovery characteristics of the alloy was examined by bending tests and it was found that the TIG-welded Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni alloy exhibits almost the same excellent SME as the base material.

  10. A 99 percent purity molecular sieve oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    Molecular sieve oxygen generating systems (MSOGS) have become the accepted method for the production of breathable oxygen on military aircraft. These systems separate oxygen for aircraft engine bleed air by application of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) technology. Oxygen is concentrated by preferential adsorption in nitrogen in a zeolite molecular sieve. However, the inability of current zeolite molecular sieves to discriminate between oxygen and argon results in an oxygen purity limitations of 93-95 percent (both oxygen and argon concentrate). The goal was to develop a new PSA process capable of exceeding the present oxygen purity limitations. A novel molecular sieve oxygen concentrator was developed which is capable of generating oxygen concentrations of up to 99.7 percent directly from air. The process is comprised of four absorbent beds, two containing a zeolite molecular sieve and two containing a carbon molecular sieve. This new process may find use in aircraft and medical breathing systems, and industrial air separation systems. The commercial potential of the process is currently being evaluated.

  11. Comparison of the microstructure, deformation and crack initiation behavior of austenitic stainless steel irradiated in-reactor or with protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Kale J.; Was, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the microstructures, microchemistry, hardening, susceptibility to IASCC initiation, and deformation behavior resulting from proton or reactor irradiation. Two commercial purity and six high purity austenitic stainless steels with various solute element additions were compared. Samples of each alloy were irradiated in the BOR-60 fast reactor at 320 °C to doses between approximately 4 and 12 dpa or by a 3.2 MeV proton beam at 360 °C to a dose of 5.5 dpa. Irradiated microstructures consisted mainly of dislocation loops, which were similar in size but lower in density after proton irradiation. Both irradiation types resulted in the formation of Ni-Si rich precipitates in a high purity alloy with added Si, but several other high purity neutron irradiated alloys showed precipitation that was not observed after proton irradiation, likely due to their higher irradiation dose. Low densities of small voids were observed in several high purity proton irradiated alloys, and even lower densities in neutron irradiated alloys, implying void nucleation was in process. Elemental segregation at grain boundaries was very similar after each irradiation type. Constant extension rate tensile experiments on the alloys in simulated light water reactor environments showed excellent agreement in terms of the relative amounts of intergranular cracking, and an analysis of localized deformation after straining showed a similar response of cracking to surface step height after both irradiation types. Overall, excellent agreement was observed after proton and reactor irradiation, providing additional evidence that proton irradiation is a useful tool for accelerated testing of irradiation effects in austenitic stainless steel.

  12. Reducing tool wear when machining austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, J.H.; Kosa, T.

    1998-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are considered more difficult to machine than carbon steels due to their high work hardening rate, large spread between yield and ultimate tensile strength, high toughness and ductility, and low thermal conductivity. These characteristics can result in a built-up edge or excessive tool wear during machining, especially when the cutting speed is too high. The practical solution is to lower the cutting speed until tool life reaches an acceptable level. However, lower machining speed negatively impacts productivity. Thus, in order to overcome tool wear at relatively high machining speeds for these alloys, on-going research is being performed to improve cutting fluids, develop more wear-resistant tools, and to modify stainless steels to make them less likely to cause tool wear. This paper discusses compositional modifications to the two most commonly machined austenitic stainless steels (Type 303 and 304) which reduced their susceptibility to tool wear, and allowed these grades to be machined at higher cutting speeds.

  13. Evaluation of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Foil for Advanced Recuperators

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Brady, Michael P; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Santella, Michael L; Maziasz, Philip J; Matthews, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    A corrosion- and creep-resistant austenitic stainless steel has been developed for advanced recuperator applications. By optimizing the Al and Cr contents, the alloy is fully austenitic for creep strength while allowing the formation of a chemically stable external alumina scale at temperatures up to 900 C. An alumina scale eliminates long-term problems with the formation of volatile Cr oxy-hydroxides in the presence of water vapor in exhaust gas. As a first step in producing foil for primary surface recuperators, three commercially cast heats have been rolled to 100 m thick foil in the laboratory to evaluate performance in creep and oxidation testing. Results from initial creep testing are presented at 675 C and 750 C, showing excellent creep strength compared with other candidate foil materials. Laboratory exposures in humid air at 650 800 C have shown acceptable oxidation resistance. A similar oxidation behavior was observed for sheet specimens of these alloys exposed in a modified 65 kW microturbine for 2871 h. One composition that showed superior creep and oxidation resistance has been selected for the preparation of a commercial batch of foil. DOI: 10.1115/1.4002827

  14. Texture and Strain Measurements from Bending of NiTi Shape Memory Alloy Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carl, Matthew; Zhang, Baozhuo; Young, Marcus L.

    2016-07-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are a new generation of materials that exhibit unique nonlinear deformations due to a phase transformation which allows the material to return to its original shape after removal of stress or a change in temperature. These unique properties are the result of a martensitic/austenitic phase transformation through the application of temperature changes or applied stress. Many technological applications of austenitic SMAs involve cyclical mechanical loading and unloading in order to take advantage of pseudoelasticity, but are limited due to poor fatigue life. In this paper, commercial pseudoelastic NiTi SMA wires (50.7 at.% Ni) were placed under different bending strains and examined using scanning electron microscopy and high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD). By observing the microstructure, phase transformation temperatures, surface texture and diffraction patterns along the wire, it is shown that the wire exhibits a strong anisotropic behavior whether on the tensile or compressive side of the bending axis and that the initiation of micro-cracks in the wires is localized on the compression side, but that crack propagation will still happen if the wire is reloaded in the opposite direction. In addition, lattice strains are examined for both the austenite and martensite phases.

  15. Behavior of a Ni-Ti shape memory alloy under cyclic proportional and nonproportional loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Tzishing Jesse

    Ni-Ti shape memory alloy behaves pseudoelastically above the austenite finish temperature, Af, due to stress-induced austenite-martensite phase transformation. In this work, novel multiaxial proportional and nonproportional loading experiments were conducted on a Ni-Ti shape memory alloy above the Af temperature. Several features of pseudoelasticity were highlighted, namely, the tension-compression asymmetry, near symmetry in both senses of shear, apparent strain rate dependence and relaxation (thermo-mechanical effects) and nonconformity to J2--J3 theory of phase transformation under nonproportional loading. Both a simplified representative volume element (RVE) numerical scheme and finite element (FE) modeling based on a micromechanical constitutive model were conducted in order to study the mechanics of phase transformation, interaction between different martensite variants, and intergranular interactions in a polycrystalline structure. In simulations, the austenite to martensite phase transformation can be quite accurately predicted for different modes of loading. Strain rate effects can also be quite accurately modeled; specimen heating/cooling due to latent heat generation/absorption during phase transformation is the primary cause of strain rate dependence.

  16. Magnetic properties of martensite in metamagnetic Ni-Co-Mn-Ga alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguí, C.; Cesari, E.; Lázpita, P.

    2016-04-01

    Ni50-x Co x Mn30Ga20 (x  =  6-9) alloys show metamagnetic behaviour, undergoing martensitic transformation (MT) between ferromagnetic austenite and weak magnetic martensite. The temperatures of the structural and magnetic transitions depend on composition and L21 order degree, in such a way that combined composition and thermal treatment allows for MT between any magnetic state of austenite and martensite. For these alloys, mutual influence between atomic and magnetic order has been widely studied. However, the type of magnetism of martensite remains unclear. In this work, the magnetic state of martensite in a Ni43Co7Mn30Ga20 alloy has been studied in detail. Its evolution as a function of post-quench ageing time indicates that improved atomic order enhances the ferromagnetic character of the weakly magnetic martensite. The most important changes occur when austenite switches from paramagnetic to ferromagnetic. The magnetic behavior of martensite is consistent with the presence of ferromagnetic clusters inside a paramagnetic matrix.

  17. Effect of Deformation Mode on the Wear Behavior of NiTi Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lina; Liu, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Owing to good biocompatibility, good fatigue resistance, and excellent superelasticity, various types of bio-medical devices based on NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) have been developed. Due to the complexity in deformation mode in service, for example NiTi implants, accurate assessment/prediction of the surface wear process is difficult. This study aims at providing a further insight into the effect of deformation mode on the wear behavior of NiTi SMA. In the present study, two types of wear testing modes were used, namely sliding wear mode and reciprocating wear mode, to investigate the effect of deformation mode on the wear behavior of NiTi SMA in both martensitic and austenitic states. It was found that, when in martensitic state and under high applied loads, sliding wear mode resulted in more surface damage as compared to that under reciprocating wear mode. When in austenitic state, although similar trends in the coefficient of friction were observed, the coefficient of friction and surface damage in general is less under reciprocating mode than under sliding mode. These observations were further discussed in terms of different deformation mechanisms involved in the wear tests, in particular, the reversibility of martensite variant reorientation and stress-induced phase transformation, respectively.

  18. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of laser processed NiTi alloy.

    PubMed

    Marattukalam, Jithin J; Singh, Amit Kumar; Datta, Susmit; Das, Mitun; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bontha, Srikanth; Kalpathy, Sreeram K

    2015-12-01

    Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™), a commercially available additive manufacturing technology, has been used to fabricate dense equiatomic NiTi alloy components. The primary aim of this work is to study the effect of laser power and scan speed on microstructure, phase constituents, hardness and corrosion behavior of laser processed NiTi alloy. The results showed retention of large amount of high-temperature austenite phase at room temperature due to high cooling rates associated with laser processing. The high amount of austenite in these samples increased the hardness. The grain size and corrosion resistance were found to increase with laser power. The surface energy of NiTi alloy, calculated using contact angles, decreased from 61 mN/m to 56 mN/m with increase in laser energy density from 20 J/mm(2) to 80 J/mm(2). The decrease in surface energy shifted the corrosion potentials to nobler direction and decreased the corrosion current. Under present experimental conditions the laser power found to have strong influence on microstructure, phase constituents and corrosion resistance of NiTi alloy. PMID:26354269

  19. Effect of Deformation Mode on the Wear Behavior of NiTi Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lina; Liu, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Owing to good biocompatibility, good fatigue resistance, and excellent superelasticity, various types of bio-medical devices based on NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) have been developed. Due to the complexity in deformation mode in service, for example NiTi implants, accurate assessment/prediction of the surface wear process is difficult. This study aims at providing a further insight into the effect of deformation mode on the wear behavior of NiTi SMA. In the present study, two types of wear testing modes were used, namely sliding wear mode and reciprocating wear mode, to investigate the effect of deformation mode on the wear behavior of NiTi SMA in both martensitic and austenitic states. It was found that, when in martensitic state and under high applied loads, sliding wear mode resulted in more surface damage as compared to that under reciprocating wear mode. When in austenitic state, although similar trends in the coefficient of friction were observed, the coefficient of friction and surface damage in general is less under reciprocating mode than under sliding mode. These observations were further discussed in terms of different deformation mechanisms involved in the wear tests, in particular, the reversibility of martensite variant reorientation and stress-induced phase transformation, respectively.

  20. Microstructural Development and Ternary Interdiffusion in Ni-Mn-Ga Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Le; Kammerer, Catherine; Giri, Anit; Cho, Kyu; Sohn, Yongho

    2015-12-01

    NiMnGa alloys functioning as either ferromagnetic shape memory alloys or magnetocaloric materials have both practical applications and fundamental research value. In this study, solid-to-solid diffusion couple experiments were carried out to investigate the phase equilibria, microstructural development, and interdiffusion behavior in Ni-Mn-Ga ternary alloys. Selected diffusion couples between pure Ni, Ni25Mn75 and four ternary off-stoichiometric NiMnGa alloys ( i.e., Ni52Mn18Ga30, Ni46Mn30Ga24, Ni52Mn30Ga18, Ni58Mn18Ga24) were assembled and annealed at 1073 K, 1123 K, and 1173 K (800 °C, 850 °C, and 900 °C) for 480, 240, and 120 hours, respectively. At these high temperatures, the β NiMnGa phase has a B2 crystal structure. The microstructure of the interdiffusion zone was examined by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Concentration profiles across the interdiffusion zone were determined by electron probe micro analysis. Solubility values obtained for various phases were mostly consistent with the existing isothermal phase diagrams, but the phase boundary of the γ(Mn) + β two-phase region was slightly modified. In addition, equilibrium compositions for the γ(Ni) and α' phases at 1173 K (900 °C) were also determined for the respective two-phase region. Both austenitic and martensitic phases were found at room temperature in each diffusion couple with a clear boundary. The compositions at the interfaces corresponded close to valence electron concentration (e/a) of 7.6, but trended to lower values when Mn increased to more than 35 at. pct. Average effective interdiffusion coefficients for the β phase over different compositional ranges were determined and reported in the light of temperature-dependence. Ternary interdiffusion coefficients were also determined and examined to assess the ternary diffusional interactions among Ni, Mn, and Ga. Ni was observed to interdiffuse the fastest, followed by Mn then Ga. Interdiffusion flux

  1. One Percent Strömvil Photometry in M 67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, A. G. D.; Boyle, R. P.; Janusz, R.

    2005-05-01

    The Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope on Mt. Graham is being used in a program of CCD photometry of open and globular clusters. We are using the Ströomvil System (Straižys et al. 1996), a combination of the Strömgren and Vilnius Systems. This system allows stars to be classified as to temperature, surface gravity, metallicity and reddening from the photometric measures alone. However, to make accurate estimates of the stellar parameters the photometry should be accurate to 1 or 1.5 percent. In our initial runs on the VATT we did not achieve this accuracy. The problem turned out to be scattered light in the telescope and this has now been reduced so we can do accurate photometry. Boyle has written a routine in IRAF which allows us to correct the flats for any differences. We take rotated frames and also frames which are offset in position by one third of a frame, east-west and north-south. Measures of the offset stars give us the corrections that need to be made to the flat. Robert Janusz has written a program, the CommandLog, which allows us to paste IRAF commands in the correct order to reduce measures made on a given observing run. There is an automatic version where one can test various parameters and get a set of solutions. Now we have a set of Strömvil frames in the open cluster, M 67 and we compare our color-magnitude diagram with those of BATC (Fan et al. 1996) and Vilnius (Boyle et al. 1998). A preliminary report of the M 67 photometry will be found in Laugalys et al. (2004). Here we report on a selected set of stars in the M 67 frames, those with errors 1 percent or less.

  2. Effect of nano-hydroxyapatite reinforcement in mechanically alloyed NiTi composites for biomedical implant.

    PubMed

    Akmal, Muhammad; Raza, Ahmad; Khan, Muhammad Mudasser; Khan, M Imran; Hussain, Muhammad Asif

    2016-11-01

    Equi-atomic NiTi alloy composites reinforced with 0, 2, 4 and 6vol.% nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) were successfully synthesized using pressureless sintering. Pure Ni and Ti elements were ball milled for 10h in order to produce a mechanically alloyed equi-atomic NiTi alloy (MA-NiTi). Mechanically alloyed NiTi and HA powders were blended, compacted and then sintered for 3h at 1325K. The sintered density varied inversely with volume percent of HA reinforcement. The X-Ray diffraction spectra and SEM images showed the formation of multiple phases like NiTi, NiTi2, Ni3Ti, and Ni4Ti3. The back scattered-SEM image analysis confirmed the presence of Ni-rich and Ti-rich phases with increasing HA content. The 6vol.% HA reinforced composite showed Ni3Ti as the major phase having the highest hardness value which can be attributed to the presence of relatively harder phases along with higher HA content as a reinforcement. The composite of MA-NiTi with 2vol.% HA manifested the most desirable results in the form of better sintering density mainly due to the minute decomposition of NiTi into other phases. Therefore, the 2vol.% reinforced MA-NiTi composite can be exploited as a novel material for manufacturing biomedical implants. PMID:27523992

  3. Copper, Boron, and Cerium Additions in Type 347 Austenitic Steel to Improve Creep Rupture Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Kinkar; Kyono, J.; Shinya, Norio

    2012-04-01

    Type 347 austenitic stainless steel (18Cr-12Ni-Nb) was alloyed with copper (3 wt pct), boron (0.01 to 0.06 wt pct), and cerium (0.01 wt pct) with an aim to increase the creep rupture strength of the steel through the improved deformation and cavitation resistance. Short-term creep rupture strength was found to increase with the addition of copper in the 347 steel, but the long-term strength was inferior. Extensive creep cavitation deprived the steel of the beneficial effect of creep deformation resistance induced by nano-size copper particles. Boron and cerium additions in the copper-containing steel increased its creep rupture strength and ductility, which were more for higher boron content. Creep deformation, grain boundary sliding, and creep cavity nucleation and growth in the steel were found to be suppressed by microalloying the copper-containing steel with boron and cerium, and the suppression was more for higher boron content. An auger electron spectroscopic study revealed the segregation of boron instead of sulfur on the cavity surface of the boron- and cerium-microalloyed steel. Cerium acted as a scavenger for soluble sulfur in the steels through the precipitation of cerium sulfide (CeS). This inhibited the segregation of sulfur and facilitated the segregation of boron on cavity surface. Boron segregation on the nucleated cavity surface reduced its growth rate. Microalloying the copper-containing 347 steel with boron and cerium thus enabled to use the full extent of creep deformation resistance rendered by copper nano-size particle by increase in creep rupture strength and ductility.

  4. Recrystallization Behavior of a Heavily Deformed Austenitic Stainless Steel During Iterative Type Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi Kumar, B.; Sharma, Sailaja

    2014-09-01

    The study describes evolution of the recrystallization microstructure in an austenitic stainless steel during iterative or repetitive type annealing process. The starting heavily cold deformed microstructure consisted of a dual phase structure i.e., strain-induced martensite (SIM) (43 pct in volume) and heavily deformed large grained retained austenite. Recrystallization behavior was compared with Johnson Mehl Avrami and Kolmogorov model. Early annealing iterations led to reversion of SIM to reversed austenite. The microstructure changes observed in the retained austenite and in the reverted austenite were mapped by electron backscatter diffraction technique and transmission electron microscope. The reversed austenite was characterized by a fine polygonal substructure consisting of low-angle grain boundaries. With an increasing number of annealing repetitions, these boundaries were gradually replaced by high-angle grain boundaries and recrystallized into ultrafine-grained microstructure. On the other hand, recrystallization of retained austenite grains was sluggish in nature. Progress of recrystallization in these grains was found to take place by a gradual evolution of subgrains and their subsequent transformation into fine grains. The observed recrystallization characteristics suggest continuous recrystallization type process. The analysis provided basic insight into the recrystallization mechanisms that enable the processing of ultrafine-grained fcc steels by iterative type annealing. Tensile properties of the processed material showed a good combination of strength and ductility.

  5. Recrystallization Behavior of a Heavily Deformed Austenitic Stainless Steel During Iterative Type Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi Kumar, B.; Sharma, Sailaja

    2014-12-01

    The study describes evolution of the recrystallization microstructure in an austenitic stainless steel during iterative or repetitive type annealing process. The starting heavily cold deformed microstructure consisted of a dual phase structure i.e., strain-induced martensite (SIM) (43 pct in volume) and heavily deformed large grained retained austenite. Recrystallization behavior was compared with Johnson Mehl Avrami and Kolmogorov model. Early annealing iterations led to reversion of SIM to reversed austenite. The microstructure changes observed in the retained austenite and in the reverted austenite were mapped by electron backscatter diffraction technique and transmission electron microscope. The reversed austenite was characterized by a fine polygonal substructure consisting of low-angle grain boundaries. With an increasing number of annealing repetitions, these boundaries were gradually replaced by high-angle grain boundaries and recrystallized into ultrafine-grained microstructure. On the other hand, recrystallization of retained austenite grains was sluggish in nature. Progress of recrystallization in these grains was found to take place by a gradual evolution of subgrains and their subsequent transformation into fine grains. The observed recrystallization characteristics suggest continuous recrystallization type process. The analysis provided basic insight into the recrystallization mechanisms that enable the processing of ultrafine-grained fcc steels by iterative type annealing. Tensile properties of the processed material showed a good combination of strength and ductility.

  6. Influence of reverted austenite on the texture and magnetic properties of 350 maraging steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Hamilton F. G.; Silva, Jean J.; Silva, Manoel R.; Gomes da Silva, Marcelo J.

    2015-11-01

    The aging temperature to improve magnetic properties in Maraging-350 steel (Mar-350) is limited by the onset of austenite reversion. The traditional process of cooling after aging is to remove the piece from the oven and then to air cool it. The purpose of this research was to characterize the reverted austenite and to investigate the effect of cooling below the martensite start temperature (Ms) on the magnetic properties. The Mar350 samples aged at temperatures above 550 °C, and subsequently cooled in liquid nitrogen presented less austenite than samples cooled in air, resulting in higher magnetization saturation and a lower coercive force. A combination of optical microscopy (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques were used to characterize the presence of reverted austenite. The crystallographic texture of both martensite and reverted austenite were analyzed. The texture of the reverted austenite coincides with the texture of the parent austenite indicating that a phenomenon of texture memory is present.

  7. Crystallographic, magnetic, and electronic structures of ferromagnetic shape memory alloys Ni2XGa (X=Mn,Fe,Co) from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, J.; Raulot, J. M.; Zhang, Y. D.; Esling, C.; Zhao, X.; Zuo, L.

    2011-01-01

    The crystallographic, magnetic and electronic structures of the ferromagnetic shape memory alloys Ni2XGa (X=Mn, Fe, and Co), are systematically investigated by means of the first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory using the VIENNA AB INITIO SOFTWARE PACKAGE. The lattice parameters of both austenitic and martensitic phases in Ni2MnGa have been calculated. The formation energies of the cubic phase of Ni2XGa are estimated, and show a destabilization tendency if Mn atom is substituted by Fe or Co. From Ni2MnGa to Ni2CoGa, the down spin total density of states (DOS) at Fermi level is gradually increasing, whereas that of the up spin part remains almost unchanged. This is the main origin of the difference of the magnetic moment in these alloys. The partial DOS is dominated by the Ni and Mn 3d states in the bonding region below EF. There are two bond types existing in Ni2XGa: one is between neighboring Ni atoms in Ni2MnGa; the other is between Ni and X atoms in Ni2FeGa and Ni2CoGa alloys.

  8. Fractographic analysis of gaseous hydrogen induced cracking in 18Ni maraging steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Wei, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    Electron microscope fractographic analysis supplemented an extensive study of the kinetics of gaseous hydrogen assisted cracking in 18Ni maraging steel. Temperature determined the crack path morphology in each steel which, in turn, was directly related to the temperature dependence of the crack growth rate. Crack growth in the low temperature regime proceeded along prior austenite grain boundaries. Increasing the temperature above a critical value produced a continuously increasing proportion of transgranular quasi-cleavage associated with lath martensite boundaries. The amount of transgranular cracking was qualitatively correlated with the degree of temperature-induced deviation from Arrhenius behavior. Fractographic observations are interpreted in terms of hypothesized mechanisms for gaseous hydrogen embrittlement. It is concluded that hydrogen segregation to prior austenite and lath martensite boundaries must be considered as a significant factor in developing mechanisms for gaseous embrittlement of high strength steels.

  9. Observation on Formation of Fresh Martensite from the Reversed Austenite During Water-Quenching Process in Fe-0.2C-5Mn Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chuan; Zhang, Chi; Cao, Wen-Quan; Yang, Zhi-Gang; Weng, Yu-Qing

    2015-09-01

    Phase transformation behavior during intercritical annealing in Fe-0.2C-5Mn was studied. Austenite lath formed and transformed at martensite lath during annealing. XRD revealed that retained austenite amount did not always increase with time. TEM result may firstly demonstrate that reversed austenite partly changed into fresh martensite during quenching while the remained part was retained as retained austenite. The final structure consisted of ferrite, retained austenite and fresh martensite. Simulation was done by DICTRA to support TEM result.

  10. Structure and Mechanical Properties of Nitrogen Austenitic Steel after Ultrasonic Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narkevich, N. A.; Tolmachev, A. I.; Vlasov, I. V.; Surikova, N. S.

    2016-03-01

    Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction have been used to investigate a nitrogen 07Kh17AG18 steel with an austenitic structure after the surface deformation treatment—ultrasonic forging. During ultrasonic forging, an austenitic structure transforms into a new structure with an elevated concentration of deformation-induced stacking faults, a lot of deformation microtwins, ɛ-martensite crystals. The austenite lattice parameter is found to be decreased in the surface layer. After ultrasonic forging, nitrided steel exhibits enhanced strength properties with retained high plasticity.

  11. A methodology suitable for TEM local measurements of carbon concentration in retained austenite

    SciTech Connect

    Kammouni, A.; Saikaly, W. Dumont, M.; Marteau, C.; Bano, X.; Charai, A.

    2008-09-15

    Carbon concentration in retained austenite grains is of great importance determining the mechanical properties of hot-rolled TRansformation Induced Plasticity steels. Among the different techniques available to measure such concentrations, Kikuchi lines obtained in Transmission Electron Microscopy provide a relatively easy and accurate method. The major problem however is to be able to locate an austenitic grain in the observed Transmission Electron Microscopy thin foil. Focused Ion Beam in combination with Scanning Electron Microscopy was used to successfully prepare a thin foil for Transmission Electron Microscopy and carbon concentration measurements from a 700 nm retained austenite grain.

  12. Influence of carbon partitioning kinetics on final Austenite fraction during quenching and partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J; Speer, John G; Matlock, David K; Rizzo, F C; Edmonds, David V; Santofimia, Maria J

    2009-01-01

    The quenching and partitioning (Q&P) process is a two-stage heat-treatment procedure proposed for producing steel microstructures that contain carbon-enriched retained austenite. In Q&P processing, austenite stabilization is accomplished by carbon partitioning from supersaturated martensite. A quench temperature selection methodology was developed to predict an optimum process quench temperature; extension of this methodology to include carbon partitioning kinetics is developed here. Final austenite fraction is less sensitive to quench temperature than previously predicted, in agreement with experimental results.

  13. Martensitic transformation and phase stability of In-doped Ni-Mn-Sn shape memory alloys from first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, H. B.; Yang, C. P. Wang, R. L.; Luo, X.; Marchenkov, V. V.

    2014-05-28

    The effect of the alloying element Indium (In) on the martensitic transition, magnetic properties, and phase stabilities of Ni{sub 8}Mn{sub 6}Sn{sub 2−x}In{sub x} shape memory alloys has been investigated using the first-principles pseudopotential plane-wave method based on density functional theory. The energy difference between the austenitic and martensitic phases was found to increase with increasing In content, which implies an enhancement of the martensitic phase transition temperature (T{sub M}). Moreover, the formation energy results indicate that In-doping increases the relative stability of Ni{sub 8}Mn{sub 6}Sn{sub 2−x}In{sub x} both in austenite and martensite. This results from a reduction in density of states near the Fermi level regions caused by Ni-3d–In-5p hybridization when Sn is replaced by In. The equilibrium equation of state results show that the alloys Ni{sub 8}Mn{sub 6}Sn{sub 2−x}In{sub x} exhibit an energetically degenerated effect for an In content of x = ∼1.5. This implies the coexistence of antiparallel and parallel configurations in the austenite.

  14. Characterization of the sodium corrosion behavior of commercial austenitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Shiels, S.A.; Bagnall, C.; Keeton, A.R.; Witkowski, R.E.; Anantatmula, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    During the course of an on-going evaluation of austenitic alloys for potential liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) fuel pin cladding application, a series of commercial alloys was selected for study. The data obtained led to the recognition of an underlying pattern of behavior and enabled the prediction of surface chemistry changes. The changes in surface topographical development from alloy to alloy are shown and the important role played by the element molybdenum in this development is indicated. The presentation also illustrates how a total damage equation was evolved to encompass all aspects of weight loss and metal/sodium interactions: wall thinning ferrite layer formation and intergranular attack. The total damage equation represents a significant departure from the classical description of sodium corrosion in which weight loss is simply translated into wall thinning.

  15. Strain oxidation cracking of austenitic stainless steels at 610 C

    SciTech Connect

    Calvar, M. Le; Scott, P.M.; Magnin, T.; Rieux, P.

    1998-02-01

    Strain oxidation cracking of both forged and welded austenitic stainless steels (SS) was studied. Creep and slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were performed in vacuum, air, and a gas furnace environment (air + carbon dioxide [CO{sub 2}] + water [H{sub 2}O]). Results showed cracking was environmentally dependent. Almost no cracking was observed in vacuum, whereas intergranular cracking was observed with increasing severity in passing from an air to a gas furnace environment. The most severe cracking was associated with formation of a less protective film formed in the gas furnace environment (air: haematite-like M{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide; gas furnace environment: spinel M{sub 3}O{sub 4} oxide). Cracking depended strongly on the carbon content and the sensitization susceptibility of the material: the higher the carbon content, the more susceptible the alloy. This cracking was believed to be similar to other oxidation-induced cracking phenomena.

  16. Formability analysis of austenitic stainless steel-304 under warm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lade, Jayahari; Singh, Swadesh Kumar; Banoth, Balu Naik; Gupta, Amit Kumar

    2013-12-01

    A warm deep drawing process of austenitic stainless steel-304 (ASS-304) of circular blanks with coupled ther mal analysis is studied in this article. 65 mm blanks were deep drawn at different temperatures and thickness distribution is experimentally measured after cutting the drawn component into two halves. The process is simulated using explicit fin ite element code LS-DYNA. A Barlat 3 parameter model is used in the simulation, as the material is anisotropic up to 30 0°C. Material properties for the simulation are determined at different temperatures using a 5 T UTM coupled with a furn ace. In this analysis constant punch speed and variable blank holder force (BHF) is applied to draw cups without wrinkle.

  17. Austenite Formation Kinetics During Rapid Heating in a Microalloyed Steel

    SciTech Connect

    BURNETT,M.E.; DYKHUIZEN,RONALD C.; KELLEY,J. BRUCE; PUSKAR,JOSEPH D.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.

    1999-09-07

    The model parameters for the normalized 1054V1 material were compared to parameters previously generated for 1026 steel, and the transformation behavior was relatively consistent. Validation of the model predictions by heating into the austenite plus undissolved ferrite phase field and rapidly quenching resulted in reasonable predictions when compared to the measured volume fractions from optical metallography. The hot rolled 1054V1 material, which had a much coarser grain size and a non-equilibrium volume fraction of pearlite, had significantly different model parameters and the on heating transformation behavior of this material was less predictable with the established model. The differences in behavior is consistent with conventional wisdom that normalized micro-structure produce a more consistent response to processing, and it reinforces the need for additional work in this area.

  18. Fatigue crack growth in metastable austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Z.; Chang, G.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The research reported here is an investigation of the influence of the mechanically induced martensitic transformation on the fatigue crack growth rate in 304-type steels. The alloys 304L and 304LN were used to test the influence of composition, the testing temperatures 298 K and 77 K were used to study the influence of test temperature, and various load ratios (R) were used to determine the influence of the load ratio. It was found that decreasing the mechanical stability of the austenite by changing composition or lowering temperature decreases the fatigue crack growth rate. The R-ratio effect is more subtle. The fatigue crack growth rate increases with increasing R-ratio, even though this change increases the martensite transformation. Transformation-induced crack closure can explain the results in the threshold regime, but cannot explain the R-ratio effect at higher cyclic stress intensities. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Strength of nanostructured austenitic steel 316LN at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarkowski, P.; Krawczynska, A. T.; Brynk, T.; Nowacki, M.; Lewandowska, M.; Kurzydłowski, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of nano-refinement on the properties of austenitic steel. The material with the initial grain size of 40-50pm was subjected to hydrostatic extrusion at a room temperature to the total accumulated strain exceeding 1. The microstructure developed was investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Focus Ion Beam (FIB). The strength of the extruded samples was tested at 293K, 77K and 4.2K by means of cryostat for static tensile tests. The results show that the hydrostatically extruded steel 316LN has excellent strength in cryogenic conditions, which make this material interesting for applications in cryogenic devices.

  20. First-principles computation of structural, elastic and magnetic properties of Ni2FeGa across the martensitic transformation.

    PubMed

    Sahariah, Munima B; Ghosh, Subhradip; Singh, Chabungbam S; Gowtham, S; Pandey, Ravindra

    2013-01-16

    The structural stabilities, elastic, electronic and magnetic properties of the Heusler-type shape memory alloy Ni(2)FeGa are calculated using density functional theory. The volume conserving tetragonal distortion of the austenite Ni(2)FeGa find an energy minimum at c/a = 1.33. Metastable behaviour of the high temperature cubic austenite phase is predicted due to elastic softening in the [110] direction. Calculations of the total and partial magnetic moments show a dominant contribution from Fe atoms of the alloy. The calculated density of states shows a depression in the minority spin channel of the cubic Ni(2)FeGa just above the Fermi level which gets partially filled up in the tetragonal phase. In contrast to Ni(2)MnGa, the transition metal spin-down states show partial hybridization in Ni(2)FeGa and there is a relatively high electron density of states near the Fermi level in both phases. PMID:23186622

  1. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis of deformation behaviour in Ti-Ni-based thin films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Sun, Guangai; Wang, Xiaolin; Chen, Bo; Zu, Xiaotao; Liu, Yanping; Li, Liangbin; Pan, Guoqiang; Sheng, Liusi; Liu, Yaoguang; Fu, Yong Qing

    2015-01-01

    Deformation mechanisms of as-deposited and post-annealed Ti50.2Ni49.6, Ti50.3Ni46.2Cu3.5 and Ti48.5Ni40.8Cu7.5 thin films were investigated using the in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction technique. Results showed that initial crystalline phases determined the deformation mechanisms of all the films during tensile loading. For the films dominated by monoclinic martensites (B19'), tensile stress induced the detwinning of 〈011〉 type-II twins and resulted in the preferred orientations of (002)B19' parallel to the loading direction (∥ LD) and (020)B19' perpendicular to the LD (⊥ LD). For the films dominated by austenite (B2), the austenite directly transformed into martensitic variants (B19') with preferred orientations of (002)B19' ∥ LD and (020)B19' ⊥ LD. For the Ti50.3Ni46.2Cu3.5 and Ti48.1Ni40.8Cu7.5 films, martensitic transformation temperatures decreased apparently after post-annealing because of the large thermal stress generated in the films due to the large differences in thermal expansion coefficients between the film and substrate. PMID:25537586

  2. Ion beam nitriding of single and polycrystalline austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Abrasonis, G.; Riviere, J.P.; Templier, C.; Declemy, A.; Pranevicius, L.; Milhet, X.

    2005-04-15

    Polycrystalline and single crystalline [orientations (001) and (011)] AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel was implanted at 400 deg. C with 1.2 keV nitrogen ions using a high current density of 0.5 mA cm{sup -2}. The nitrogen distribution profiles were determined using nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). The structure of nitrided polycrystalline stainless steel samples was analyzed using glancing incidence and symmetric x-ray diffraction (XRD) while the structure of the nitrided single crystalline stainless steel samples was analyzed using x-ray diffraction mapping of the reciprocal space. For identical treatment conditions, it is observed that the nitrogen penetration depth is larger for the polycrystalline samples than for the single crystalline ones. The nitrogen penetration depth depends on the orientation, the <001> being more preferential for nitrogen diffusion than <011>. In both type of samples, XRD analysis shows the presence of the phase usually called 'expanded' austenite or {gamma}{sub N} phase. The lattice expansion depends on the crystallographic plane family, the (001) planes showing an anomalously large expansion. The reciprocal lattice maps of the nitrided single crystalline stainless steel demonstrate that during nitriding lattice rotation takes place simultaneously with lattice expansion. The analysis of the results based on the presence of stacking faults, residual compressive stress induced by the lattice expansion, and nitrogen concentration gradient indicates that the average lattice parameter increases with the nitrided layer depth. A possible explanation of the anomalous expansion of the (001) planes is presented, which is based on the combination of faster nitriding rate in the (001) oriented grains and the role of stacking faults and compressive stress.

  3. Microstructural evolution in fast-neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    The present work has focused on the specific problem of fast-neutron-induced radiation damage to austenitic stainless steels. These steels are used as structural materials in current fast fission reactors and are proposed for use in future fusion reactors. Two primary components of the radiation damage are atomic displacements (in units of displacements per atom, or dpa) and the generation of helium by nuclear transmutation reactions. The radiation environment can be characterized by the ratio of helium to displacement production, the so-called He/dpa ratio. Radiation damage is evidenced microscopically by a complex microstructural evolution and macroscopically by density changes and altered mechanical properties. The purpose of this work was to provide additional understanding about mechanisms that determine microstructural evolution in current fast reactor environments and to identify the sensitivity of this evolution to changes in the He/dpa ratio. This latter sensitivity is of interest because the He/dpa ratio in a fusion reactor first wall will be about 30 times that in fast reactor fuel cladding. The approach followed in the present work was to use a combination of theoretical and experimental analysis. The experimental component of the work primarily involved the examination by transmission electron microscopy of specimens of a model austenitic alloy that had been irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. A major aspect of the theoretical work was the development of a comprehensive model of microstructural evolution. This included explicit models for the evolution of the major extended defects observed in neutron irradiated steels: cavities, Frank faulted loops and the dislocation network. 340 refs., 95 figs., 18 tabs.

  4. Microstructural Study Of Fusion Welds in 304L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn Stainless Steels (U)

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL, TOSTEN

    2005-03-01

    Light-optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been employed to characterize the microstructures of a series of fusion welds made on 304L and 21-6-9 stainless steels. The materials investigated in this study included high-energy-rate-forged 304L, conventionally forged 21-6-9, and 304L weld critical plate (higher ferrite potential). The weld critical plate contained an electron beam weld (no filler wire) while other specimens were welded with various combinations of 308L, 309L modified (MOD) and 312 MOD stainless steel filler wires to produce samples with a range of delta ferrite contents (4 to 33 percent) in the resulting welds. TEM specimens were prepared from broken arc-shaped, mechanical property test specimens that had been used to measure fracture toughness of the fusion welds. Specimens were prepared from regions of the weld heat-affected zones as well as from areas within the weld metal, including areas close to the fracture surface (plastically deformed regions). The observed microstructures varied according to the amount of ferrite in each weld. At the lowest ferrite levels the microstructure consisted of austenite and skeletal ferrite with austenite being the majority (matrix) phase. At intermediate levels of ferrite, lathy austenite/ferrite was observed and the ferrite became continuous throughout the specimens examined. In the weld with the most ferrite, many austenite morphologies were observed and ferrite was the matrix phase. Closest to the fracture surface an increase in dislocation density in both the ferrite and austenite were observed in all welds. Deformation twinning was also observed in the austenite. Many of the welds contained a large number of non-metallic inclusions (oxide particles) which most likely originated from impurities in the weld wires.

  5. Magnetocaloric properties of as-quenched Ni50.4Mn34.9In14.7 ferromagnetic shape memory alloy ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Llamazares, J. L.; García, C.; Hernando, B.; Prida, V. M.; Baldomir, D.; Serantes, D.; González, J.

    2011-06-01

    The temperature dependences of magnetic entropy change and refrigerant capacity have been calculated for a maximum field change of Δ H=30 kOe in as-quenched ribbons of the ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni50.4Mn34.9In14.7 around the structural reverse martensitic transformation and magnetic transition of austenite. The ribbons crystallize into a single-phase austenite with the L21-type crystal structure and Curie point of 284 K. At 262 K austenite starts its transformation into a 10-layered structurally modulated monoclinic martensite. The first- and second-order character of the structural and magnetic transitions was confirmed by the Arrott plot method. Despite the superior absolute value of the maximum magnetic entropy change obtained in the temperature interval where the reverse martensitic transformation occurs (|\\varDelta SM^{max}|=7.2 J kg^{-1} K^{-1}) with respect to that obtained around the ferromagnetic transition of austenite (|\\varDelta SM^{max}|=2.6 J kg^{-1} K^{-1}), the large average hysteretic losses due to the effect of the magnetic field on the phase transformation as well as the narrow thermal dependence of the magnetic entropy change make the temperature interval around the ferromagnetic transition of austenite of a higher effective refrigerant capacity (RC^{magn}_{eff}=95J kg^{-1} versus RC^{struct}_{eff}=60J kg^{-1}).

  6. Inverse magnetocaloric effect in Mn{sub 2}NiGa and Mn{sub 1.75}Ni{sub 1.25}Ga magnetic shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sanjay Barman, S. R.; Esakki Muthu, S.; Arumugam, S.; Senyshyn, A.; Rajput, P.; Suard, E.

    2014-02-03

    Inverse magnetocaloric effect is demonstrated in Mn{sub 2}NiGa and Mn{sub 1.75}Ni{sub 1.25}Ga magnetic shape memory alloys. The entropy change at the martensite transition is larger in Mn{sub 1.75}Ni{sub 1.25}Ga, and it increases linearly with magnetic field in both the specimens. Existence of inverse magnetocaloric effect is consistent with the observation that magnetization in the martensite phase is smaller than the austenite phase. Although the Mn content is smaller in Mn{sub 1.75}Ni{sub 1.25}Ga, from neutron diffraction, we show that the origin of inverse magnetocaloric effect is the antiferromagnetic interaction between the Mn atoms occupying inequivalent sites.

  7. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels and high Ni-Cr alloys to acid fluoride wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.; Mackey, D.B.; Pool, K.H. ); Schwenk, E.B. )

    1992-04-01

    TRUEX processing of Hanford Site waste will utilize potentially corrosive acid fluoride processing solutions. Appropriate construction materials for such a processing facility need to be identified. Toward this objective, candidate stainless steels and high Ni-Cr alloys have been corrosion tested in simulated acid fluoride process solutions at 333K. The high Ni-Cr alloys exhibited corrosion rates as low as 0.14 mm/y in a solution with an HF activity of about 1.2 M, much lower than the 19 to 94 mm/y observed for austenitic stainless steels. At a lower HF activity (about 0.008 M), stainless steels display delayed passivation while high Ni-Cr alloys display essentially no reaction.

  8. Improvement of mechanical and biological properties of TiNi alloys by addition of Cu and Co to orthodontic archwires.

    PubMed

    Phukaoluan, Aphinan; Khantachawana, Anak; Kaewtatip, Pongpan; Dechkunakorn, Surachai; Kajornchaiyakul, Julathep

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate improved performances of TiNi in order to promote tooth movement. Special attention was paid to the effect on the clinical properties of TiNi of adding Cu and Co to this alloy. Ti49.4Ni50.6, Ti49Ni46Cu5 and Ti50Ni47Co3 (at %) alloys were prepared. Specimens were cold-rolled at 30% reduction and heat-treated at 400°C for 60min. Then, the test results were compared with two types of commercial archwires. The findings showed that superelasticity properties were confirmed in the manufactured commercial alloys at mouth temperature. The difference of stress plateau in TiNi, TiNiCo and commercial wires B at 25°C changed significantly at various testing temperatures due to the combination of martensite and austenite phases. At certain temperatures the alloys exhibited zero recovery stress at 2% strain and consequently produced zero activation force for moving teeth. The corrosion test showed that the addition of Cu and Co to TiNi alloys generates an increase in corrosion potential (Ecorr) and corrosion current densities (Icorr). Finally, we observed that addition of Cu and Co improved cell viability. We conclude that addition of an appropriate amount of a third alloying element can help enhance the performances of TiNi orthodontic archwires. PMID:27520713

  9. The Effect of Active Phase of the Work Material on Machining Performance of a NiTi Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaynak, Yusuf; Karaca, Haluk E.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Jawahir, I. S.

    2015-06-01

    Poor machinability with conventional machining processes is a major shortcoming that limits the manufacture of NiTi components. To better understand the effects of phase state on the machining performance of NiTi alloys, cutting temperature, tool-wear behavior, cutting force components, tool-chip contact length, chip thickness, and machined surface quality data were generated from a NiTi alloy using precooled cryogenic, dry, minimum quantity lubrication (MQL), and preheated machining conditions. Findings reveal that machining NiTi in the martensite phase, which was achieved through precooled cryogenic machining, profoundly improved the machining performance by reducing cutting force components, notch wear, and surface roughness. Machining in the austenite state, achieved through preheating, did not provide any benefit over dry and MQL machining, and these processes were, in general, inferior to cryogenic machining in terms of machining performance, particularly at higher cutting speeds.

  10. Microstructural Characterization and Mechanical Properties Analysis of Weld Metals with Two Ni Contents During Post-Weld Heat Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Da-yong; Han, Xiu-lin; Tian, Hong-tao; Liao, Bo; Xiao, Fu-ren

    2015-05-01

    This study designed post-weld heat treatments, including reheating and tempering, associated with hot bending to investigate the microstructures, toughness, and hardness of two weld metals with different Ni contents (<1 wt pct level). The results indicated that a high Ni content decreased the ferrite transformation temperature and increased the proportion of acicular ferrite (AF). Furthermore, a high Ni content promoted the martensite/austenite (M/A) constituent formation after reheating. The promotion of the M/A formation increased the number of cementite particles, and accelerated cementite coarsening during tempering. The large-angle grain boundary density from the AF improved the toughness despite the negative effect of cementite. The strengthening contributions were calculated, and the grain refinement was the greatest. The high Ni content decreased the effective grain size with a 2 deg tolerance angle, thus enhancing the grain refinement contribution.

  11. HYDROGEN-ASSISTED FRACTURE IN FORGED TYPE 304L AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, Nathan; Neidt, Ted; Hollenbeck, John; Knutson, J.; Everhart, Wes; Hanlin, R.; Bergen, R.; Balch, D. K.

    2012-09-06

    Austenitic stainless steels generally have good resistance to hydrogen-assisted fracture; however, structural designs for high-pressure gaseous hydrogen are constrained by the low strength of this class of material. Forging is used to increase the low strength of austenitic stainless steels, thus improving the efficiency of structural designs. Hydrogen-assisted racture, however, depends on microstructural details associated with manufacturing. In this study, hydrogen-assisted fracture of forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is investigated. Microstructural variation in multi-step forged 304L was achieved by forging at different rates and temperatures, and by process annealing. High internal hydrogen content in forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is achieved by thermal precharging in gaseous hydrogen and results in as much as 50% reduction of tensile ductility.

  12. A Feasibility Study on Low Temperature Thermochemical Treatments of Austenitic Stainless Steel in Fluidized Bed Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruman, Esa; Sun, Yong; Triwiyanto, Askar; Manurung, Yupiter H. P.; Adesta, Erry Y.

    2011-04-01

    In this work, the feasibility of using an industrial fluidized bed furnace to perform low temperature thermochemical treatments of austenitic stainless steels has been studied, with the aim to produce expanded austenite layers with combined wear and corrosion resistance, similar to those achievable by plasma and gaseous processes. Several low temperature thermochemical treatments were studied, including nitriding, carburizing, combined nitridingcarburizing (hybrid treatment), and sequential carburizing and nitriding. The results demonstrate that it is feasible to produce expanded austenite layers on the investigated austenitic stainless steel by the fluidized bed heat treatment technique, thus widening the application window for the novel low temperature processes. The results also demonstrate that the fluidized bed furnace is the most effective for performing the hybrid treatment, which involves the simultaneous incorporation of nitrogen and carbon together into the surface region of the component in nitrogen and carbon containing atmospheres. Such hybrid treatment produces a thicker and harder layer than the other three processes investigated.

  13. Heat treatment giving a stable high temperature micro-structure in cast austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Anton, Donald L.; Lemkey, Franklin D.

    1988-01-01

    A novel micro-structure developed in a cast austenitic stainless steel alloy and a heat treatment thereof are disclosed. The alloy is based on a multicomponent Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo-Si-Nb-C system consisting of an austenitic iron solid solution (.gamma.) matrix reinforced by finely dispersed carbide phases and a heat treatment to produce the micro-structure. The heat treatment includes a prebraze heat treatment followed by a three stage braze cycle heat treatment.

  14. Fundamental study of the austenite formation and decomposition in low-silicon, aluminum added TRIP steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose Enrique

    2005-11-01

    TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steels are under development for automotive applications that require high strength and excellent formability. Conventional TRIP steels consist of a multiphase microstructure comprised of a ferrite matrix with a dispersion of bainite and metastable retained austenite. The high ductility exhibited by these steels results from the transformation of the metastable retained austenite to martensite during straining. In conventional TRIP steel processing, the multiphase microstructure is obtained by controlled cooling from the alpha + gamma region to an isothermal holding temperature. During this holding, bainite forms and carbon is rejected out into the austenite, which lowers the Ms temperature and stabilizes the austenite to room temperature. In this research project, a fundamental study of a low-Si, Mo-Nb added cold rolled TRIP steel with and without Al additions was conducted. In this study, the recrystallization of cold-rolled ferrite, the formation of austenite during intercritical annealing and the characteristics of the decomposition of the intercritically annealed austenite by controlled cooling rates were systematically assessed. Of special interest were: (i) the effect of the initial hot band microstructure, (ii) the formation of epitaxial ferrite during cooling from the intercritical annealing temperature to the isothermal holding temperature, (iii) the influence of the intercritically annealed austenite on the formation of bainite during the isothermal holding temperature, and (iv) the influence of the processing variables on the type, amount, composition and stability of the retained austenite. During this research study, techniques such as OM, SEM, EBSD, TEM, XRD and Magnetometry were used to fully characterize the microstructures. Furthermore, a Gleeble 3500 unit at US Steel Laboratories was used for dilatometry studies and to simulate different CGL processing routes, from which specimens were obtained to evaluate

  15. Austenite Grain Growth and Precipitate Evolution in a Carburizing Steel with Combined Niobium and Molybdenum Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enloe, Charles M.; Findley, Kip O.; Speer, John G.

    2015-11-01

    Austenite grain growth and microalloy precipitate size and composition evolution during thermal processing were investigated in a carburizing steel containing various additions of niobium and molybdenum. Molybdenum delayed the onset of abnormal austenite grain growth and reduced the coarsening of niobium-rich precipitates during isothermal soaking at 1323 K, 1373 K, and 1423 K (1050 °C, 1100 °C, and 1150 °C). Possible mechanisms for the retardation of niobium-rich precipitate coarsening in austenite due to molybdenum are considered. The amount of Nb in solution and in precipitates at 1373 K (1100 °C) did not vary over the holding times evaluated. In contrast, the amount of molybdenum in (Nb,Mo)C precipitates decreased with time, due to rejection of Mo into austenite and/or dissolution of fine Mo-rich precipitates. In hot-rolled alloys, soaking in the austenite regime resulted in coarsening of the niobium-rich precipitates at a rate that exceeded that predicted by the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner relation for volume-diffusion-controlled coarsening. This behavior is attributed to an initial bimodal precipitate size distribution in hot-rolled alloys that results in accelerated coarsening rates during soaking. Modification of the initial precipitate size distribution by thermal processing significantly lowered precipitate coarsening rates during soaking and delayed the associated onset of abnormal austenite grain growth.

  16. Structure and properties of high-temperature austenitic steels for superheater tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, V. M.

    2009-12-01

    The structure and properties of high-temperature austenitic steels intended for superheater tubes are analyzed. Widely used Kh18N10T (AISI 304) and Kh16N13M3 (AISI 316) steels are found not to ensure a stable austenitic structure and stable properties during long-term thermal holding under stresses. The hardening of austenitic steels by fine particles of vanadium and niobium carbides and nitrides and γ'-phase and Fe2W and Fe2Mo Laves phase intermetallics is considered. The role of Cr23C6 chromium carbides, the σ phase, and coarse precipitates of an M 3B2 phase and a boron-containing eutectic in decreasing the time to failure and the stress-rupture strength of austenitic steels is established. The mechanism of increasing the stress-rupture strength of steels by boron additions is described. The chemical compositions, mechanical properties, stress-rupture strength, and creep characteristics of Russian and foreign austenitic steels used or designed for superheater tubes intended for operation under stress conditions at temperatures above 600°C are presented. The conditions are found for increasing the strength, plasticity, and thermodeformation stability of austenite in steels intended for superheater tubes operating at 700°C under high stresses for a long time.

  17. Morphology and crystallographic orientation relationship in isothermally transformed Fe–N austenite

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Dongling; Luo, Chengping; Liu, Jiangwen; Zhang, Guoqing

    2014-02-15

    The 225 °C isothermal transformation of a high-nitrogen austenite with Fe–2.71 wt.% N was investigated by means of electron microscopy. It was found that the transformation products were composed of ultrafine α-Fe and γ′-Fe{sub 4}N plus retained austenite γ, which were in two types of morphologies, namely, (i) with the retained austenite patches dispersed among the (α-Fe + γ′-Fe{sub 4}N) packets and (ii) with the ultrafine α-Fe and γ/γ′-Fe{sub 4}N laths interwoven with each other within a single bainitic packet. A cube–cube orientation relationship between the γ (austenite) and γ′-Fe{sub 4}N, and a near Greninger–Troiano (G–T) one between the γ (austenite) and the bainitic α-ferrite were detected. The morphology, orientation relationship and high hardness (> 1000 HV) of the transformation products indicated that the isothermal transformation of the high nitrogen austenite was analogous to a bainitic one. - Highlights: • Isothermal transformation products consisted of nano-sized α-Fe + γ′ + γ (retained). • The hardness of transformation product exceeded 1000 HV. • The α-Fe and γ/γ′-Fe{sub 4}N kept a near G-T OR in the grain interior.

  18. On the measurement of austenite in supermartensitic stainless steel by X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Tolchard, Julian Richard; Sømme, Astri; Solberg, Jan Ketil; Solheim, Karl Gunnar

    2015-01-15

    Sections of a 13Cr supermartensitic stainless steel were investigated to determine the optimum sample preparation for measurement of the austenite content by X-ray diffraction. The surface of several samples was mechanically ground or polished using media of grit sizes in the range 1–120 μm. The strained surface layer was afterwards removed stepwise by electropolishing, and the austenite content measured at each step. It was found that any level of mechanical grinding or polishing results in a reduction of the measured austenite fraction relative to the true bulk value, and that coarser grinding media impart greater damage and greater reduction in the measured austenite content. The results thus highlight the importance of the electropolishing step in preparation of such samples, but suggest that the American Society for Testing and Materials standard E975-03 substantially overestimates the amount of material which needs to be removed to recover the true “bulk” content. - Highlights: • Quantitative Rietveld analysis of austenite/martensite ratio in supermartensitic stainless steels • Critical evaluation of sample preparation for residual austenite measurements by X-ray diffraction • Highlighting of the importance of electropolishing as a final preparation step.

  19. Tailoring plasticity of austenitic stainless steels for nuclear applications: Review of mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels below 400 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meric de Bellefon, G.; van Duysen, J. C.

    2016-07-01

    AISI 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels were invented in the early 1900s and are still trusted by materials and mechanical engineers in numerous sectors because of their good combination of strength, ductility, and corrosion resistance, and thanks to decades of experience and data. This article is part of an effort focusing on tailoring the plasticity of both types of steels to nuclear applications. It provides a synthetic and comprehensive review of the plasticity mechanisms in austenitic steels during tensile tests below 400 °C. In particular, formation of twins, extended stacking faults, and martensite, as well as irradiation effects and grain rotation are discussed in details.

  20. Effect of Austenitizing Temperature on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Semi-High-Speed Steel Cold-Forged Rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiong; Sun, Da-Le; Liu, Chang-Sheng

    2009-10-01

    The effect of austenitizing temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of semi-high-speed steel (S-HSS) cold-forged rolls was investigated. Low-temperature austenitizing below 1313 K induced carbide coarsening during subsequent tempering at 973 K due to the nucleation effect of undissolved M7C3. On the other hand, the heavy dissolution of M7C3 above 1353 K caused the fine carbide formation on lath and plate boundaries, which retarded the subgrain growth during tempering. The increase in strength with increasing austenitizing temperature was attributed to the fine carbide distribution and the high dislocation density. Furthermore, as the austenitizing temperature increased, the impact energy markedly reduced, due to the large prior austenite grain size and the high strength. Finally, based on the microstructure and mechanical properties, an optimal austenitizing temperature range between 1313 and 1333 K was determined.

  1. A Study of Thermo-mechanically Processed High Stiffness NiTiCo Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjeri, R. M.; Norwich, D.; Sczerzenie, F.; Huang, X.; Long, M.; Ehrlinspiel, M.

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates a vacuum induction melted-vacuum arc re-melted (VIM-VAR) and thermo-mechanically processed ternary NiTiCo shape memory alloy. The NiTiCo ingot was hot processed to 6.35-mm-diameter coiled wire. The coiled wire was subsequently cold drawn to a final wire diameter of 0.53 mm, with interpass anneals. The wires were shape set at 450 °C for 3.5 min. After electropolishing, the wires were subjected to microstructural, thermal, and mechanical characterization studies. Microstructural analysis was performed by transmission electron microscope (TEM), thermal analyses by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), and bend-free recovery and mechanical testing by uniaxial tensile testing. TEM did not reveal Ni-rich precipitates—either at the grain boundary or in the grain interior. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy showed a uniform distribution of Ni, Ti, and Co in the sample. The DSC results on the shape set wire showed a single-step transformation between the austenite and the R-phase, in the forward and reverse directions. Cyclic tensile tests of the shape set wire, processed under optimum conditions, showed minimum residual strain and a stable upper plateau stress. Further, the fatigue behavior of NiTi and NiTiCo alloys was studied by rotating beam testing. The results showed that the fatigue properties of NiTiCo, under zero mean strain, are equivalent to that of binary NiTi in the high-cycle and medium-cycle regimes, taking into account the higher stiffness of NiTiCo. The above analyses helped in establishing the processing-structure-property correlation in a VIM-VAR-melted NiTiCo shape memory alloy.

  2. Transformation and Precipitation Kinetics in 30Cr10Ni Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazarinc, Matevz; Terčelj, Milan; Bombač, David; Kugler, Goran

    2010-09-01

    To improve the microstructure during casting, hot forming, and heat treatment of 30Cr10Ni duplex stainless steel, accurate data on the precipitation and transformation processes at high temperatures are needed. In this article, the precipitation and transformation processes at various aging times in the temperature range 873 K to 1573 K (600 °C to 1300 °C) were studied. The 30Cr10Ni ferrous alloy contains a relatively large amount of Cr, Ni, and C, which results in a complex microstructure. In addition to the ferrite, austenite, and sigma phase, the M23C6 and MC carbides were also observed in the microstructure. The precipitation of the sigma phase was observed after just 3 minutes of aging, and after 30 minutes of aging at approximately 1053 K (780 °C), its fraction exceeded 40 pct. An intensive austenite-to-ferrite transformation was observed above 1423 K (1150 °C). Optical microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), as well as micro-indentation hardness, hardness, impact toughness, and tensile tests, were carried out to evaluate the obtained microstructures of aged samples.

  3. Internal Crack Propagation in a Continuously Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Analyzed by Actual Residual Stress Tensor Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Youichi; Tanaka, Shun-Ichiro

    2016-04-01

    Initiation, propagation, and termination of internal cracks in a continuously cast austenitic stainless steel has been investigated with emphasis on stress loading of the solidified shell during casting. Cracks were formed at the center of the slab, parallel to the width of the cast, and were observed near the narrow faces. Optimized two-dimensional X-ray diffraction method was employed to measure residual stress tensor distributions around the cracks in the as-cast slab with coarse and strongly preferentially oriented grains. The tensor distributions had a sharp peak, as high as 430 MPa, at the crack end neighboring the columnar grains. On the other hand, lower values were measured at the crack end neighboring the equiaxed grains, where the local temperatures were higher during solidification. The true residual stress distributions were determined by evaluating the longitudinal elastic constant for each measured position, resulting in more accurate stress values than before. Electron probe micro-analysis at the terminal crack position showed that Ni, Ti, and Si were concentrated at the boundaries of the equiaxed grains, where the tensile strength was estimated to be lower than at the primary grains. A model of the crack formation and engineering recommendations to reduce crack formation are proposed.

  4. Strengthening of a thin austenitic stainless steel coil by cold wavy rolling with no magnetic and dimensional changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, K. Chandra; Kashyap, B. P.; Sangal, S.; Misra, R. D. K.

    2015-10-01

    A comparison of the effects of wavy rolling and cold rolling on microstructure variation, phase evolution, tensile and magnetic properties of a thin coil of Fe-18.47Cr-8.10Ni-0.94Mn austenitic stainless steel was made at room temperature. Wavy rolling led to strengthening with no change in magnetic property and thickness, unlike the conventional cold rolling that changed all these properties by deformation induced martensitic transformation, in addition to substructure evolution. The yield strength of 413 MPa and magnetic saturation 3.7 emu/g under mill-annealed condition increased, respectively, to 1208 MPa and 11.8 emu/g, upon four cycles of wavy rolling. While the maximum yield strength of 1790 MPa could be achieved by combining this stage of four cycles of wavy rolling with subsequent 50% conventional cold rolling, the magnetic saturation increased to 73.3 emu/g by deformation induced martensitic transformation caused by the latter.

  5. Development of radiation damage during in-situ Kr++ irradiation of Fesbnd Nisbnd Cr model austenitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desormeaux, M.; Rouxel, B.; Motta, A. T.; Kirk, M.; Bisor, C.; de Carlan, Y.; Legris, A.

    2016-07-01

    In situ irradiations of 15Cr/15Nisbnd Ti and 15Cr/25Nisbnd Ti model austenitic steels were performed at the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM)-Tandem user Facility (Argonne National Laboratory) at 600 °C using 1 MeV Kr++. The experiment was designed in the framework of cladding development for the GEN IV Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR). It is an extension of previous high dose irradiations on those model alloys at JANNuS-Saclay facility in France, aimed at investigating swelling mechanisms and microstructure evolution of these alloys under irradiation [1]. These studies showed a strong influence of Ni in decreasing swelling. In situ irradiations were used to continuously follow the microstructure evolution during irradiation using both diffraction contrast imaging and recording of diffraction patterns. Defect analysis, including defect size, density and nature, was performed to characterize the evolving microstructure and the swelling. Comparison of 15Cr/15Nisbnd Ti and 15Cr/25Nisbnd Ti irradiated microstructure has lent insight into the effect of nickel content in the development of radiation damage caused by heavy ion irradiation. The results are quantified and discussed in this paper.

  6. Comparative analysis of corrosion cracking of austenitic steels with different contents of nitrogen in chloride- and hydrogen-containing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushnikova, S. Yu.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Filippov, Yu. I.; Kataeva, N. V.; Zavalishin, V. A.; Malyshevskii, V. A.; Kalinin, G. Yu.; Kostin, S. K.

    2015-06-01

    The structural state and the resistance to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) at constant loads have been studied using samples with a grown crack by the method of the cantilever bending on quenched austenitic stainless steels of the 20Cr-6Ni-11Mn-2Mo-N-V-Nb (Kh20N6G11M2AFB) type, with different contents of nitrogen (0.17, 0.34, 0.43, and 0.50 wt % N). The tests were conducted in a 3.5% aqueous solution of NaCl (without providing polarization) and in a similar solution under cathodic polarization, which causes the formation of hydrogen. It has been shown that, in a chloride solution without polarization, the steels do not undergo SCC for 2000 h. In the case of significant cathodic polarization via employment of a magnesium protector, there was revealed a brittle character of fracture upon SCC in all steels. It has been shown that steel with a nitrogen content of 0.43 wt % possesses the maximum absolute values of rupture stresses under the conditions of cathodic polarization.

  7. Suppression of Twinning and Phase Transformation in an Ultrafine Grained 2 GPa Strong Metastable Austenitic Steel: Experiment and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Jia, Nan; Wang, Y. D.; Sun, Xin; Zuo, Liang; Raabe, Dierk

    2015-07-17

    An ultrafine-grained 304 austenitic 18 wt.%Cr-8 wt.%Ni stainless steel with a grain size of ~270 nm was synthesized by accumulative rolling (67 % total reduction) and annealing (550 °C, 150s). Uniaxial tensile testing at room temperature reveals an extremely high yield strength of 1890 ± 50MPa and a tensile strength of 2050 ± 30MPa, while the elongation reaches 6 ± 1%. Experimental characterization on samples with different grain sizes between 270 nm and 35 μm indicates that both, deformation twinning and martensitic phase transformation are significantly retarded with increasing grain refinement. A crystal plasticity finite element model incorporating a constitutive law reflecting the grain size-controlled dislocation slip and deformation twinning captures the micromechanical behavior of the steels with different grain sizes. Comparison of simulation and experiment shows that the deformation of ultrafine-grained 304 steels is dominated by the slip of partial dislocations, whereas for coarse-grained steels dislocation slip, twinning and martensite formation jointly contribute to the shape change.

  8. Effect of impurities and grain boundaries on the kinetic characteristics of the radiation damage of iron and austenitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, D.; Smirnov, E.; Tsepelev, A.

    2016-04-01

    Austenitic stainless steel AISI 304, 316 and similar in composition, are used to create many elements of the reactor core, such as fuel cladding of fast-neutron reactor. It is known that during the operation, they became subject to such type of radiation damage, as the vacancy swelling and radiation creep. In this paper, was analyzed the effect of alloying elements, impurities and their complexes with radiation defects (RD) on the characteristics of RD and radiation-enhanced diffusion (RED) Parameters of vacancy voids nucleation and growth processes were also studied on the example of Cr18Ni10T steel. Evaluation of the temperature dependence of steady-state concentration of RD for materials with different binding energy complexes "defect - impurity", the effective values of mutual recombination rate RD for materials complexes, influence the formation of impurity complexes and volume density of grain boundaries on the rate of growth of vacancy voids and radiation creep was conducted. The possibility of varying the characteristics of the complex defect - impurity and grain boundary size for the suppression of radiation creep and vacancy swelling was studied

  9. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steels applicable to LWR core internals.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    This report summarizes work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels that were irradiated in the Halden reactor in simulation of irradiation-induced degradation of boiling water reactor (BWR) core internal components. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests in BWR-like oxidizing water were conducted on 27 austenitic stainless steel alloys that were irradiated at 288 C in helium to 0.4, 1.3, and 3.0 dpa. Fractographic analysis was conducted to determine the fracture surface morphology. Microchemical analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy was performed on BWR neutron absorber tubes to characterize grain-boundary segregation of important elements under BWR conditions. At 0.4 and 1.4 dpa, transgranular fracture was mixed with intergranular fracture. At 3 dpa, transgranular cracking was negligible, and fracture surface was either dominantly intergranular, as in field-cracked core internals, or dominantly ductile or mixed. This behavior indicates that percent intergranular stress corrosion cracking determined at {approx}3 dpa is a good measure of IASCC susceptibility. At {approx}1.4 dpa, a beneficial effect of a high concentration of Si (0.8-1.5 wt.%) was observed. At {approx}3 dpa, however, such effect was obscured by a deleterious effect of S. Excellent resistance to IASCC was observed up to {approx}3 dpa for eight heats of Types 304, 316, and 348 steel that contain very low concentrations of S. Susceptibility of Types 304 and 316 steels that contain >0.003 wt.% S increased drastically. This indicates that a sulfur related critical phenomenon plays an important role in IASCC. A sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% is the primary material factor necessary to ensure good resistance to IASCC. However, for Types 304L and 316L steel and their high-purity counterparts, a sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% alone is not a sufficient condition to ensure good resistance to IASCC. This is in distinct contrast to

  10. Microstructural effects on the stability of retained austenite in Transformation Induced Plasticity steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, Alison Fiona Lockie

    Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels have both high strength and high ductility. Retained austenite in the microstructure, upon straining, transforms to martensite and this absorbs energy and improves the work hardening of the steel, giving improved elongation. The transformation can be either stress-assisted or strain-induced and the initiation and the mechanism depend on the composition of, the size and shape of, and the phases surrounding, the austenite grains. It is important to understand the relationship between these variables and the properties of the TRIP steel. The aim of this work was to determine how the microstructure of the TRIP steel affects the transformation. Four experimental microstructures were developed, containing austenite grains with different sizes, shapes, and surrounding phases. The Fine microstructure had thin elongated austenite laths between fine bainitic ferrite laths, the Coarse microstructure had elongated austenite grains between coarser bainitic ferrite laths, the Equiaxed microstructure had equiaxed austenite grains in a matrix of equiaxed ferrite and the Acicular microstructure had elongated austenite grains surrounded by recovered ferrite laths. Tensile tests were performed and detailed characterization, using neutron diffraction, was done of samples with the four microstructures. The variation in the amount of austenite during deformation was measured. The tensile tests revealed that the microstructures had different mechanical properties and different transformation behaviours. Fine had the lowest elongation and the highest strength. Acicular and Equiaxed had good elongation but lower strength. Coarse had intermediate strength and Equiaxed had sustained work hardening. The transformation in Fine and Coarse was minimal. Coarse had some slow, steady transformation, but Fine may have had none. The transformation in Equiaxed was larger. It started quickly and then slowed at higher strains. The austenite in Acicular

  11. Characterization of the Carbon and Retained Austenite Distributions in Martensitic Medium Carbon, Low Alloy, Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, D. H.; Cross, Steven M; Kim, Sangho; Grandjean, F.; Long, G. J.; Miller, Michael K

    2007-01-01

    The retained austenite content and carbon distribution in martensite were determined as a function of cooling rate and temper temperature in steel that contained 1.31 at. pct C, 3.2 at. pct Si, and 3.2 at. pct non-iron metallic elements. Mossbauer spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), transmission synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), and atom probe tomography were used for the microstructural analyses. The retained austenite content was an inverse, linear function of cooling rate between 25 and 560 K/s. The elevated Si content of 3.2 at. pct did not shift the start of austenite decomposition to higher tempering temperatures relative to SAE 4130 steel. The minimum tempering temperature for complete austenite decomposition was significantly higher (>650 C) than for SAE 4130 steel ({approx}300 C). The tempering temperatures for the precipitation of transition carbides and cementite were significantly higher (>400 C) than for carbon steels (100 C to 200 C and 200 C to 350 C), respectively. Approximately 90 pct of the carbon atoms were trapped in Cottrell atmospheres in the vicinity of the dislocation cores in dislocation tangles in the martensite matrix after cooling at 560 K/s and aging at 22 C. The 3.2 at. pct Si content increased the upper temperature limit for stable carbon clusters to above 215 C. Significant autotempering occurred during cooling at 25 K/s. The proportion of total carbon that segregated to the interlath austenite films decreased from 34 to 8 pct as the cooling rate increased from 25 to 560 K/s. Developing a model for the transfer of carbon from martensite to austenite during quenching should provide a means for calculating the retained austenite. The maximum carbon content in the austenite films was 6 to 7 at. pct, both in specimens cooled at 560 K/s and at 25 K/s. Approximately 6 to 7 at. pct carbon was sufficient to arrest the transformation of austenite to martensite. The chemical potential of carbon is the same in martensite

  12. Characterization of the Carbon and Retained Austenite Distributions in Martensitic Medium Carbon, High Silicon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Donald H.; Cross, Steven M.; Kim, Sangho; Grandjean, Fernande; Long, Gary J.; Miller, Michael K.

    2007-08-01

    The retained austenite content and carbon distribution in martensite were determined as a function of cooling rate and temper temperature in steel that contained 1.31 at. pct C, 3.2 at. pct Si, and 3.2 at. pct noniron metallic elements. Mössbauer spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), transmission synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), and atom probe tomography were used for the microstructural analyses. The retained austenite content was an inverse, linear function of cooling rate between 25 and 560 K/s. The elevated Si content of 3.2 at. pct did not shift the start of austenite decomposition to higher tempering temperatures relative to SAE 4130 steel. The minimum tempering temperature for complete austenite decomposition was significantly higher (>650 °C) than for SAE 4130 steel (˜300 °C). The tempering temperatures for the precipitation of transition carbides and cementite were significantly higher (>400 °C) than for carbon steels (100 °C to 200 °C and 200 °C to 350 °C), respectively. Approximately 90 pct of the carbon atoms were trapped in Cottrell atmospheres in the vicinity of the dislocation cores in dislocation tangles in the martensite matrix after cooling at 560 K/s and aging at 22 °C. The 3.2 at. pct Si content increased the upper temperature limit for stable carbon clusters to above 215 °C. Significant autotempering occurred during cooling at 25 K/s. The proportion of total carbon that segregated to the interlath austenite films decreased from 34 to 8 pct as the cooling rate increased from 25 to 560 K/s. Developing a model for the transfer of carbon from martensite to austenite during quenching should provide a means for calculating the retained austenite. The maximum carbon content in the austenite films was 6 to 7 at. pct, both in specimens cooled at 560 K/s and at 25 K/s. Approximately 6 to 7 at. pct carbon was sufficient to arrest the transformation of austenite to martensite. The chemical potential of carbon is the same in

  13. Pedestrian Deaths in U.S. Projected to Jump 10 Percent

    MedlinePlus

    ... now account for 15 percent of all motor vehicle crash-related deaths, compared with 11 percent a ... as vulnerable when they're hit by a vehicle, the researchers pointed out. SOURCE: Governors Highway Safety ...

  14. Just 6 Percent of Chest Pain Cases in ER Are Life-Threatening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Percent of Chest Pain Cases in ER Are Life-Threatening: Study Muscle strains, anxiety, gastrointestinal issues often ... than 6 percent of these patients suffer from life-threatening conditions such as a heart attack. Most ...

  15. Effect of martensite to austenite reversion on the formation of nano/submicron grained AISI 301 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Karimi, M.; Najafizadeh, A.; Kermanpur, A.; Eskandari, M.

    2009-11-15

    The martensite to austenite reversion behavior of 90% cold rolled AISI 301 stainless steel was investigated in order to refine the grain size. Cold rolled specimens were annealed at 600-900 deg. C, and subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Feritscope, and hardness measurements. The effects of annealing parameters on the formation of fully-austenitic nano/submicron grained structure and the mechanisms involved were studied. It was found that annealing at 800 deg. C for 10 s exhibited the smallest average austenite grain size of 240 {+-} 60 nm with an almost fully-austenitic structure.

  16. Correlation between mechanical properties and retained austenite characteristics in a low-carbon medium manganese alloyed steel plate

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jun; Lv, Mengyang; Tang, Shuai; Liu, Zhenyu; Wang, Guodong

    2015-08-15

    The effects of retained austenite characteristics on tensile properties and low-temperature impact toughness have been investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. It was found that only part of austenite phase formed during heat treating was left at room temperature. Moreover, the film-like retained austenite is displayed between bcc-martensite laths after heat treating at 600 °C, while the block-form retained austenite with thin hcp-martensite laths is observed after heat treating at 650 °C. It has been demonstrated that the film-like retained austenite possesses relatively high thermal and mechanical stability, and it can greatly improve low-temperature impact toughness, but its contribution to strain hardening capacity is limited. However, the block-form retained austenite can greatly enhance ultimate tensile strength and strain hardening capacity, but its contribution to low-temperature impact toughness is poor. - Highlights: • Correlation between retained austenite and impact toughness was elucidated. • The impact toughness is related to mechanical stability of retained austenite. • The effect of retained austenite on tensile and impact properties is inconsistent.

  17. Effects of Retained Austenite Volume Fraction, Morphology, and Carbon Content on Strength and Ductility of Nanostructured TRIP-assisted Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Qiu, LN; Sun, Xin; Zuo, Liang; Liaw, Peter K.; Raabe, Dierk

    2015-06-01

    With a suite of multi-modal and multi-scale characterization techniques, the present study unambiguously proves that a substantially-improved combination of ultrahigh strength and good ductility can be achieved by tailoring the volume fraction, morphology, and carbon content of the retained austenite (RA) in a transformation-induced-plasticity (TRIP) steel with the nominal chemical composition of 0.19C-0.30Si-1.76Mn-1.52Al (weight percent, wt.%). After intercritical annealing and bainitic holding, a combination ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of 1,100 MPa and true strain of 50% has been obtained, as a result of the ultrafine RA lamellae, which are alternately arranged in the bainitic ferrite around junction regions of ferrite grains. For reference, specimens with a blocky RA, prepared without the bainitic holding, yield a low ductility (35%) and a low UTS (800 MPa). The volume fraction, morphology, and carbon content of RA have been characterized using various techniques, including magnetic probing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron-backscatter-diffraction (EBSD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Interrupted tensile tests, mapped using EBSD in conjunction with the kernel average misorientation (KAM) analysis, reveal that the lamellar RA is the governingmicrostructure component responsible for the higher mechanical stability, compared to the blocky one. By coupling these various techniques, we quantitatively demonstrate that in addition to the RA volume fraction, its morphology and carbon content are equally important in optimizing the strength and ductility of TRIP-assisted steels.

  18. Anisotropy of thermal fatigue properties of cold-rolled TiNi sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Mulder, Ir.J.H.; Beyer, J. . Lab. for Materials Science); Thoma, P.E )

    1994-04-01

    The texture of cold-rolled and heat-treated TiNi sheet has been measured and designated as (110)<1[anti 1]0>[sub p]. This material has been used in thermal fatigue tests during and after which the anisotropy and development of several thermomechanical properties, such as transformation temperatures and strains, have been measured. Furthermore, the resulting changes of texture after thermal fatigue are presented. The observed effects are explained on the basis of the parent texture and the specific martensite variants that are formed according to the lattice correspondence between austenite (P) and martensite (M).

  19. Texture memory and strain-texture mapping in a NiTi shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, B.; Majumdar, B. S.; Dutta, I.

    2007-08-06

    The authors report on the near-reversible strain hysteresis during thermal cycling of a polycrystalline NiTi shape memory alloy at a constant stress that is below the yield strength of the martensite. In situ neutron diffraction experiments are used to demonstrate that the strain hysteresis occurs due to a texture memory effect, where the martensite develops a texture when it is cooled under load from the austenite phase and is thereafter ''remembered.'' Further, the authors quantitatively relate the texture to the strain by developing a calculated strain-texture map or pole figure for the martensite phase, and indicate its applicability in other martensitic transformations.

  20. Theoretical investigation of the magnetic and structural transitions of Ni-Co-Mn-Sn metamagnetic shape-memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Mei; Hu, Qing-Miao; Yang, Rui; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2015-07-01

    The composition-dependent crystal structure, elastic modulus, phase stability, and magnetic property of Ni2 -xCoxMn1.60Sn0.40 (0 ≤x ≤0.50 ) are studied by using first-principles calculations in combination with atomistic spin dynamics method. It is shown that the present lattice parameters and Curie temperature (TC) are in agreement with the available experimental data. The martensitic phase transformation (MPT) occurs for x <0.43 , where the austenite is in the ferromagnetic (FM) state whereas the martensite is in the antiferromagnetic (AFM) one at 0 K. The x dependence of the lattice parameter, elastic modulus, and energy difference between the FM austenite and the AFM martensite well accounts for the decrease of the MPT temperature (TM) with the Co addition. With increasing x , the increase of the magnetic excitation energy between the paramagnetic and FM austenite of these alloys is in line with the TC˜x . The Ni 3 d as well as the Co 3 d electronic states near the Fermi level are confirmed mainly dominating the phase stability of the studied alloys.

  1. Low Temperature Creep of Hot-Extruded Near-Stoichiometric NiTi Shape Memory Alloy. Part I; Isothermal Creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Noebe, R. D.

    2013-01-01

    This two-part paper is the first published report on the long term, low temperature creep of hot-extruded near-stoichiometric NiTi. Constant load tensile creep tests were conducted on hot-extruded near-stoichiometric NiTi at 300, 373 and 473 K under initial applied stresses varying between 200 and 350 MPa as long as 15 months. These temperatures corresponded to the martensitic, two-phase and austenitic phase regions, respectively. Normal primary creep lasting several months was observed under all conditions indicating dislocation activity. Although steady-state creep was not observed under these conditions, the estimated creep rates varied between 10(exp -10) and 10(exp -9)/s. The creep behavior of the two phases showed significant differences. The martensitic phase exhibited a large strain on loading followed by a primary creep region accumulating a small amount of strain over a period of several months. The loading strain was attributed to the detwinning of the martensitic phase whereas the subsequent strain accumulation was attributed to dislocation glide-controlled creep. An "incubation period" was observed before the occurrence of detwinning. In contrast, the austenitic phase exhibited a relatively smaller loading strain followed by a primary creep region, where the creep strain continued to increase over several months. It is concluded that the creep of the austenitic phase occurs by a dislocation glide-controlled creep mechanism as well as by the nucleation and growth of deformation twins.

  2. Optical and magneto-optical studies of martensitic transformation in Ni-Mn-Ga magnetic shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Beran, L.; Cejpek, P.; Kulda, M.; Antos, R.; Holy, V.; Veis, M.; Straka, L.; Heczko, O.

    2015-05-07

    Optical and magneto-optical properties of single crystal of Ni{sub 50.1}Mn{sub 28.4}Ga{sub 21.5} magnetic shape memory alloy during its transformation from martensite to austenite phase were systematically studied. Crystal orientation was approximately along (100) planes of parent cubic austenite. X-ray reciprocal mapping confirmed modulated 10 M martensite phase. Temperature depended measurements of saturation magnetization revealed the martensitic transformation at 335 K during heating. Magneto-optical spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry were measured in the sample temperature range from 297 to 373 K and photon energy range from 1.2 to 6.5 eV. Magneto-optical spectra of polar Kerr rotation as well as the spectra of ellipsometric parameter Ψ exhibited significant changes when crossing the transformation temperature. These changes were assigned to different optical properties of Ni-Mn-Ga in martensite and austenite phases due to modification of electronic structure near the Fermi energy during martensitic transformation.

  3. Optical and magneto-optical studies of martensitic transformation in Ni-Mn-Ga magnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beran, L.; Cejpek, P.; Kulda, M.; Antos, R.; Holy, V.; Veis, M.; Straka, L.; Heczko, O.

    2015-05-01

    Optical and magneto-optical properties of single crystal of Ni50.1Mn28.4Ga21.5 magnetic shape memory alloy during its transformation from martensite to austenite phase were systematically studied. Crystal orientation was approximately along {100} planes of parent cubic austenite. X-ray reciprocal mapping confirmed modulated 10 M martensite phase. Temperature depended measurements of saturation magnetization revealed the martensitic transformation at 335 K during heating. Magneto-optical spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry were measured in the sample temperature range from 297 to 373 K and photon energy range from 1.2 to 6.5 eV. Magneto-optical spectra of polar Kerr rotation as well as the spectra of ellipsometric parameter Ψ exhibited significant changes when crossing the transformation temperature. These changes were assigned to different optical properties of Ni-Mn-Ga in martensite and austenite phases due to modification of electronic structure near the Fermi energy during martensitic transformation.

  4. Improving the low temperature ductility of NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guha, Sumit; Munroe, Paul R.; Baker, Ian

    1989-01-01

    As part of a study aimed at developing a ductile NiAl-based alloy, ingots of Ni-Fe-Al alloys were cast and hot extruded to rods. The purpose of the iron additions was two-fold viz; to produce a change in the slip vector from 001 to 111 line and, in one alloy, to add a L1(2)-structured ductile second phase. Extruded Ni-20Al-30Fe was two-phase, containing a pro-eutectic B2 phase in a fine lamellar structure of B2+L1(2) phases. Room temperature tensile testing of both single extruded and double extruded alloys resulted in 8-percent and 22-percent plastic elongation and yield stresses of 850 and 760 MPa, respectively. Fracture in both cases occurred by ductile tearing of the eutectic and transgranular cleavage of the proeutectic phase at 1350 MPa. The ductility in double extruded condition is higher than that reported earlier in rapidly solidified wires by Inoue et al. (1984). By comparison, extruded single-phase B2-structured Ni-30Al-20Fe exhibited a fracture strength of 780 MPa, no plasticity, and a mixture of intergranular fracture and transgranular cleavage. This is contrast to earlier work by Inoue et al. where a yield stress of 400 MPa, 5 percent plastic strain, and a mixture of dimple and intergranular fracture was reported.

  5. Investigation of Effectiveness of a Wing Equipped with a 50-percent-chord Sliding Flap, a 30-percent-chord Slotted Flap, and a 30-percent-chord Slat in Deflecting Propeller Slipstreams Downward for Vertical Take-off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Richard E

    1957-01-01

    Results are presented of an investigation of the effectiveness of a wing equipped with a 50-percent-chord sliding flap and a 30-percent-chord slotted flap in deflecting a propeller slipstream downward for vertical take-off. Tests were conducted at zero forward speed in a large room and included the effects of flap deflection, proximity to the ground, a leading-edge slat, and end plates. A turning angle of about 70 degrees and a resultant force of about 100 percent of the thrust were achieved near the ground. Out of the ground-effect region, the turning angle was also about 70 degrees but the resultant force was reduced to about 86 percent of the thrust.

  6. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). 57.22236 Section 57.22236 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  7. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). 57.22236 Section 57.22236 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  8. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). 57.22236 Section 57.22236 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  9. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). 57.22236 Section 57.22236 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  10. 12 CFR 741.4 - Insurance premium and one percent deposit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insurance premium and one percent deposit. 741... Insurance premium and one percent deposit. (a) Scope. This section implements the requirements of Section... a deposit by each insured credit union in an amount equaling one percent of its insured shares...

  11. 49 CFR 173.182 - Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet. 173.182 Section 173.182 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.182 Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet. Barium azide—50 percent or...

  12. 49 CFR 173.182 - Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet. 173.182 Section 173.182 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.182 Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet. Barium azide—50 percent or...

  13. 49 CFR 173.182 - Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet. 173.182 Section 173.182 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.182 Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet. Barium azide—50 percent or...

  14. 49 CFR 173.182 - Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet. 173.182 Section 173.182 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.182 Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet. Barium azide—50 percent or...

  15. 49 CFR 173.182 - Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Barium azide-50 percent or more water wet. 173.182 Section 173.182 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.182 Barium azide—50 percent or more water wet. Barium azide—50 percent or...

  16. 30 CFR 57.22236 - Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22236 Actions at 1.0 percent methane (VI mines). If methane reaches 1.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  17. 30 CFR 57.22233 - Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-C mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22233 Actions at 0.5 percent methane (I-C mines). If methane reaches 0.5 percent in the mine atmosphere, ventilation...

  18. 30 CFR 57.22239 - Actions at 2.0 percent methane (IV mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions at 2.0 percent methane (IV mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22239 Actions at 2.0 percent methane (IV mines). If methane reaches 2.0 percent in the mine atmosphere, all persons other...

  19. Thermomechanical behavior of 55Ni45Ti nitinol

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, D.S.; White, S.R.

    1996-06-01

    Extensive and full range mechanical testing of 55Ni45Ti nitinol alloy wire up to failure over a wide range of testing temperatures is reported. Thermomechanical properties are obtained including: initial modulus, secondary modulus, critical martensitic start and finish stresses, plastic flow stress, recovery strain limit, failure stress and plastic modulus. The data is correlated with the Brinson constitutive model modified to account for full range loading. The ratio of austenite to martensite moduli was found to be 5.8 and the secondary modulus (stress-induced martensite) was found to be smaller by a factor of two when compared to the modulus of (stress-free) thermally induced martensite. The influence of the initial temperature treatment of the nitinol was shown to be pronounced within the transformation range. Reasonably accurate correlation is obtained with the modified Brinson constitutive model although there is some discrepancy in critical stress predictions which is partially attributed to experimental scatter.

  20. Thermopower behavior for the shape memory alloy NiTi

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. Y.; McIntosh, G. C.; Kaiser, A. B.; Park, Y. W.; Kaack, M.; Pelzl, J.; Kim, Chul Koo; Nahm, Kyun

    2001-06-01

    We report thermopower measurements for the nickel titanium shape memory alloy Ni{sub 0.507}Ti{sub 0.493}. Our measurements reveal abrupt changes in the temperature dependence of thermopower, which correlate well with the structural phase transition between the austenitic and martensitic phases. These transition effects in thermopower are more clearly defined than in the resistivity, which is also reported. In the martensitic phase, thermopower exhibits standard metallic diffusion behavior with a nonlinearity, which is consistent with either a small peak in the density of states just below the Fermi level, as calculated by Kulkova, Egorushkin, and Kalchikhin [Solid State Commun. 77, 667 (1991)], or else electron{endash}phonon mass enhancement. For thermally or mechanically treated samples, the magnitude of the transition effects in thermopower are reduced. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Near Zero Emissions at 50 Percent Thermal Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-12-31

    Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a 10 year DOE sponsored heavy-duty truck engine program, hereafter referred to as the NZ-50 program. This program was split into two major phases. The first phase was called Near-Zero Emission at 50 Percent Thermal Efficiency, and was completed in 2007. The second phase was initiated in 2006, and this phase was named Advancements in Engine Combustion Systems to Enable High-Efficiency Clean Combustion for Heavy-Duty Engines. This phase was completed in September, 2010. The key objectives of the NZ-50 program for this first phase were to: Quantify thermal efficiency degradation associated with reduction of engine-out NOx emissions to the 2007 regulated level of ~1.1 g/hp-hr. Implement an integrated analytical/experimental development plan for improving subsystem and component capabilities in support of emerging engine technologies for emissions and thermal efficiency goals of the program. Test prototype subsystem hardware featuring technology enhancements and demonstrate effective application on a multi-cylinder, production feasible heavy-duty engine test-bed. Optimize subsystem components and engine controls (calibration) to demonstrate thermal efficiency that is in compliance with the DOE 2005 Joule milestone, meaning greater than 45% thermal efficiency at 2007 emission levels. Develop technology roadmap for meeting emission regulations of 2010 and beyond while mitigating the associated degradation in engine fuel consumption. Ultimately, develop technical prime-path for meeting the overall goal of the NZ-50 program, i.e., 50% thermal efficiency at 2010 regulated emissions. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the NZ-50 program. The most noteworthy achievements in this program are summarized as follows: Demonstrated technologies through advanced integrated experiments and analysis to achieve the technical objectives of the NZ-50 program with 50.2% equivalent thermal efficiency under

  2. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  3. Dislocation loop evolution under ion irradiation in austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etienne, A.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Genevois, C.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P.

    2010-05-01

    A solution annealed 304 and a cold worked 316 austenitic stainless steels were irradiated from 0.36 to 5 dpa at 350 °C using 160 keV Fe ions. Irradiated microstructures were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Observations after irradiation revealed the presence of a high number density of Frank loops. Size and number density of Frank loops have been measured. Results are in good agreement with those observed in the literature and show that ion irradiation is able to simulate dislocation loop microstructure obtained after neutron irradiation. Experimental results and data from literature were compared with predictions from the cluster dynamic model, MFVIC (Mean Field Vacancy and Interstitial Clustering). It is able to reproduce dislocation loop population for neutron irradiation. Effects of dose rate and temperature on the loop number density are simulated by the model. Calculations for ion irradiations show that simulation results are consistent with experimental observations. However, results also show the model limitations due to the lack of accurate parameters.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel core internal welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Park, J.-H.; Ruther, W. E.; Sanecki, J. E.; Strain, R. V.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1999-04-14

    Microstructural analyses by several advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on austenitic stainless steel mockup and core shroud welds that had cracked in boiling water reactors. Contrary to previous beliefs, heat-affected zones of the cracked Type 304L, as well as 304 SS core shroud welds and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds, were free of grain-boundary carbides, which shows that core shroud failure cannot be explained by classical intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Neither martensite nor delta-ferrite films were present on the grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to welding fumes, the heat-affected zones of the core shroud welds were significantly contaminated by oxygen and fluorine, which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination seems to promote fluorine contamination and suppress thermal sensitization. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests also indicate that fluorine exacerbates the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of core shroud welds.

  5. Array imaging of austenitic welds by measuring weld material map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Z.; Lowe, M.

    2014-02-01

    It is difficult to inspect for defects in austenitic welds ultrasonically due to complicated material properties inside the weld. Weld microstructures typically lead to weld stiffnesses that are both anisotropic and inhomogeneous, so that ultrasonic waves tend to deviate and scatter. A weld performance map is commonly used to describe how the material properties vary throughout the weld, and this idea has been applied to wave propagation models. In this work, we developed a non-destructive method to measure this map using ultrasonic arrays. A material model (previously published by others) with a small number of parameters has been applied to describe the weld performance map. It uses the information of the welding procedure and rules for crystalline growth to predict the orientations, therefore it has a good physical foundation. An inverse model has then been developed to measure the weld performance map based on the matching of predictions by the ray tracing method to selected experimental array measurements. The process is validated by both finite element models and experiments. The results have been applied to correct array images to compensate for deviations of the ultrasonic rays.

  6. Laser beam surface melting of high alloy austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Woollin, P.

    1996-12-31

    The welding of high alloy austenitic stainless steels is generally accompanied by a substantial reduction in pitting corrosion resistance relative to the parent, due to microsegregation of Mo and Cr. This prevents the exploitation of the full potential of these steels. Processing to achieve remelting and rapid solidification offers a means of reducing microsegregation levels and improving corrosion resistance. Surface melting of parent UNS S31254 steel by laser beam has been demonstrated as a successful means of producing fine, as-solidified structures with pitting resistance similar to that of the parent, provided that an appropriate minimum beam travel speed is exceeded. The use of N{sub 2} laser trail gas increased the pitting resistance of the surface melted layer. Application of the technique to gas tungsten arc (GTA) melt runs has shown the ability to raise the pitting resistance significantly. Indeed, the use of optimized beam conditions, N{sub 2} trail gas and appropriate surface preparation prior to laser treatment increased the pitting resistance of GTA melt runs to a level approaching that of the parent material.

  7. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  8. Modified Monkman-Grant relationship for austenitic stainless steel foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman Ali, Hassan; Tamin, Mohd Nasir

    2013-02-01

    Characteristics of creep deformation for austenitic stainless steel foils are examined using the modified Monkman-Grant equation. A series of creep tests are conducted on AISI 347 steel foils at 700 °C and different stress levels ranging from 54 to 221 MPa. Results showed that at lower stress levels below 110 MPa, the creep life parameters ɛ, ɛr, tr can be expressed using the modified Monkman-Grant equation with exponent m'= 0.513. This indicates significant deviation of the creep behavior from the first order reaction kinetics theory for creep (m' = 1.0). The true tertiary creep damage in AISI 347 steel foil begins after 65.9% of the creep life of the foil has elapsed at stress levels above 150 MPa. At this high stress levels, Monkman-Grant ductility factor λ' saturates to a value of 1.3 with dislocation-controlled deformation mechanisms operating. At low stress levels, λ' increases drastically (λ'=190 at 54 MPa) when slow diffusion-controlled creep is dominant.

  9. A new constitutive model for nitrogen austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fréchard, S.; Lichtenberger, A.; Rondot, F.; Faderl, N.; Redjaïmia, A.; Adoum, M.

    2003-09-01

    Quasi-static, quasi-dynamic and dynamic compression tests have been performed on a nitrogen alloyed austenitic stainless steel. For all strain rates, a high strain hardening rate and a good ductility have been achieved. In addition, this steel owns a great strain rate sensitivity. The temperature sensitivity bas been determined between 20°C and 400°C. Microstructural analysis has been performed after different loading conditions in relation to the behaviour of the material. Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong models have been selected to fit the experimental data into constitutive equations. These models do not reproduce properly the behaviour of this type of steel over the complete range. A new constitutive model that fits very well all the experimental data at different strain, strain rate and temperature has been determined. The model is based on empirical considerations on the separated influence of the main parameters. Single Taylor tests have been realized to validate the models. Live observations of the specimen during impact have been achieved using a special CCD camera set-up. The overall profile at different times are compared to numerical predictions using LS-DYNA code.

  10. Material Parameters for Creep Rupture of Austenitic Stainless Steel Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, H.; Borhana, A.; Tamin, M. N.

    2014-08-01

    Creep rupture properties of austenitic stainless steel foil, 347SS, used in compact recuperators have been evaluated at 700 °C in the stress range of 54-221 MPa to establish the baseline behavior for its extended use. Creep curves of the foil show that the primary creep stage is brief and creep life is dominated by tertiary creep deformation with rupture lives in the range of 10-2000 h. Results are compared with properties of bulk specimens tested at 98 and 162 MPa. Thin foil 347SS specimens were found to have higher creep rates and higher rupture ductility than their bulk specimen counterparts. Power law relationship was obtained between the minimum creep rate and the applied stress with stress exponent value, n = 5.7. The value of the stress exponent is indicative of the rate-controlling deformation mechanism associated with dislocation creep. Nucleation of voids mainly occurred at second-phase particles (chromium-rich M23C6 carbides) that are present in the metal matrix by decohesion of the particle-matrix interface. The improvement in strength is attributed to the precipitation of fine niobium carbides in the matrix that act as obstacles to the movement of dislocations.

  11. Welding techniques for high alloy austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gooch, T.G.; Woollin, P.

    1996-11-01

    Factors controlling corrosion resistance of weldments in high alloy austenitic stainless steel are described, with emphasis on microsegregation, intermetallic phase precipitation and nitrogen loss from the molten pool. The application is considered of a range of welding processes, both fusion and solid state. Autogenous fusion weldments have corrosion resistance below that of the parent, but low arc energy, high travel speed and use of N{sub 2}-bearing shielding gas are recommended for best properties. Conventional fusion welding practice is to use an overalloyed nickel-base filler metal to avoid preferential weld metal corrosion, and attention is given to the effects of consumable composition and level of weldpool dilution by base steel. With non-matching consumables, overall joint corrosion resistance may be limited by the presence of a fusion boundary unmixed zone: better performance may be obtained using solid state friction welding, given appropriate component geometry. Overall, the effects of welding on superaustenitic steels are understood, and the materials have given excellent service in welded fabrications. The paper summarizes recommendations on preferred welding procedure.

  12. Deuterium retention in ITER-grade austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemanič, Vincenc; Žumer, Marko; Zajec, Bojan

    2008-11-01

    In view of the construction of ITER, it is essential to confirm that the retention of tritium by the large interior surface area of stainless steel will not become an issue for safety or operating inventory reasons. Retention of deuterium in ITER-grade austenitic stainless steel samples was studied during t = 24 h exposures to pure gaseous deuterium at p = 0.01 mbar and 0.1 mbar and T = 100 °C, 250 °C and 400 °C, respectively. The required high sensitivity for distinguishing hydrogen isotopes involved in the process (H2, HD and D2) was gained after suppression of the native hydrogen concentration by a thermal treatment at T = 400 °C for t = 200 h. The quantity of retained deuterium was determined by measuring the absolute pressure change during the deuterium exposure and subsequent mass spectrometry revealing an intense isotope exchange reaction. The retained amount of 2.6 × 1016 D cm-2 was the highest at T = 400 °C and p = 0.1 mbar and noticeably less at lower deuterium pressure and temperature. Our results, when compared with similar tritium exposures, do not exceed the limits set in the generic safety analysis for the ITER. They manifest that an extremely high sensitivity for deuterium absorption and release can be gained with a precise pressure measuring technique, otherwise attributed exclusively to tritium scintillation methods.

  13. Hydrogen-related phase transformations in austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, N.; Altstetter, C. J.; Birnbaum, H. K.

    1982-08-01

    The effect of hydrogen and stress (strain) on the stability of the austenite phase in stainless steels was investigated. Hydrogen was introduced by severe cathodic charging and by elevated temperature equilibration with high pressure H2 gas. Using X-ray diffraction and magnetic techniques, the behavior of two “stable” type AISI310 steels and an “unstable” type AISI304 steel was studied during charging and during the outgassing period following charging. Transformation from the fcc γ phase to an expanded fcc phase, γ*, and to the hcp ɛ phase occurred during cathodic charging. Reversion of the γ* and e phases to the original γ structure and formation of the bcc α structure were examined, and the kinetics of these processes was studied. The γ* phase was shown to be ferromagnetic with a subambient Curie temperature. The γ⇆ɛ phase transition was studied after hydrogen charging in high pressure gas, as was the formation of a during outgassing. These results are interpreted as effects of hydrogen and stress (strain) on the stability of the various phases. A proposed psuedo-binary phase diagram for the metal-hydrogen system was proposed to account for the formation of the γ* phase. The relation of these phase changes to hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel is discussed.

  14. Critical dependence of magnetostructural coupling and magnetocaloric effect on particle size in Mn-Fe-Ni-Ge compounds

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rongrong; Shen, Feiran; Hu, Fengxia; Wang, Jing; Bao, Lifu; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Yao; Zhao, Yingying; Liang, Feixiang; Zuo, Wenliang; Sun, Jirong; Shen, Baogen

    2016-01-01

    Magnetostructural coupling, which is the coincidence of crystallographic and magnetic transition, has obtained intense attention for its abundant magnetoresponse effects and promising technological applications, such as solid-state refrigeration, magnetic actuators and sensors. The hexagonal Ni2In-type compounds have attracted much attraction due to the strong magnetostructural coupling and the resulted giant negative thermal expansion and magnetocaloric effect. However, the as-prepared samples are quite brittle and naturally collapse into powders. Here, we report the effect of particle size on the magnetostructural coupling and magnetocaloric effect in the Ni2In-type Mn-Fe-Ni-Ge compound, which undergoes a large lattice change across the transformation from paramagnetic austenite to ferromagnetic martensite. The disappearance of martensitic transformation in a large amount of austenitic phase with reducing particle size, to our best knowledge, has not been reported up to now. The ratio can be as high as 40.6% when the MnNi0.8Fe0.2Ge bulk was broken into particles in the size range of 5~15 μm. Meanwhile, the remained magnetostructural transition gets wider and the magnetic hysteresis becomes smaller. As a result, the entropy change drops, but the effective cooling power RCeffe increases and attains to the maximum at particles in the range of 20~40 μm. These observations provide constructive information and highly benefit practical applications for this class of novel magnetoresponse materials. PMID:26883719

  15. Critical dependence of magnetostructural coupling and magnetocaloric effect on particle size in Mn-Fe-Ni-Ge compounds.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rongrong; Shen, Feiran; Hu, Fengxia; Wang, Jing; Bao, Lifu; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Yao; Zhao, Yingying; Liang, Feixiang; Zuo, Wenliang; Sun, Jirong; Shen, Baogen

    2016-01-01

    Magnetostructural coupling, which is the coincidence of crystallographic and magnetic transition, has obtained intense attention for its abundant magnetoresponse effects and promising technological applications, such as solid-state refrigeration, magnetic actuators and sensors. The hexagonal Ni2In-type compounds have attracted much attraction due to the strong magnetostructural coupling and the resulted giant negative thermal expansion and magnetocaloric effect. However, the as-prepared samples are quite brittle and naturally collapse into powders. Here, we report the effect of particle size on the magnetostructural coupling and magnetocaloric effect in the Ni2In-type Mn-Fe-Ni-Ge compound, which undergoes a large lattice change across the transformation from paramagnetic austenite to ferromagnetic martensite. The disappearance of martensitic transformation in a large amount of austenitic phase with reducing particle size, to our best knowledge, has not been reported up to now. The ratio can be as high as 40.6% when the MnNi0.8Fe0.2Ge bulk was broken into particles in the size range of 5~15 μm. Meanwhile, the remained magnetostructural transition gets wider and the magnetic hysteresis becomes smaller. As a result, the entropy change drops, but the effective cooling power RCeffe increases and attains to the maximum at particles in the range of 20~40 μm. These observations provide constructive information and highly benefit practical applications for this class of novel magnetoresponse materials. PMID:26883719

  16. Critical dependence of magnetostructural coupling and magnetocaloric effect on particle size in Mn-Fe-Ni-Ge compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Rongrong; Shen, Feiran; Hu, Fengxia; Wang, Jing; Bao, Lifu; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Yao; Zhao, Yingying; Liang, Feixiang; Zuo, Wenliang; Sun, Jirong; Shen, Baogen

    2016-02-01

    Magnetostructural coupling, which is the coincidence of crystallographic and magnetic transition, has obtained intense attention for its abundant magnetoresponse effects and promising technological applications, such as solid-state refrigeration, magnetic actuators and sensors. The hexagonal Ni2In-type compounds have attracted much attraction due to the strong magnetostructural coupling and the resulted giant negative thermal expansion and magnetocaloric effect. However, the as-prepared samples are quite brittle and naturally collapse into powders. Here, we report the effect of particle size on the magnetostructural coupling and magnetocaloric effect in the Ni2In-type Mn-Fe-Ni-Ge compound, which undergoes a large lattice change across the transformation from paramagnetic austenite to ferromagnetic martensite. The disappearance of martensitic transformation in a large amount of austenitic phase with reducing particle size, to our best knowledge, has not been reported up to now. The ratio can be as high as 40.6% when the MnNi0.8Fe0.2Ge bulk was broken into particles in the size range of 5~15 μm. Meanwhile, the remained magnetostructural transition gets wider and the magnetic hysteresis becomes smaller. As a result, the entropy change drops, but the effective cooling power RCeffe increases and attains to the maximum at particles in the range of 20~40 μm. These observations provide constructive information and highly benefit practical applications for this class of novel magnetoresponse materials.

  17. Correlation between Mechanical Behavior and Actuator-type Performance of Ni-Ti-Pd High-temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Glen S.; Padula, Santo A., II; Garg, Anita; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    High-temperature shape memory alloys in the NiTiPd system are being investigated as lower cost alternatives to NiTiPt alloys for use in compact solid-state actuators for the aerospace, automotive, and power generation industries. A range of ternary NiTiPd alloys containing 15 to 46 at.% Pd has been processed and actuator mimicking tests (thermal cycling under load) were used to measure transformation temperatures, work behavior, and dimensional stability. With increasing Pd content, the work output of the material decreased, while the amount of permanent strain resulting from each load-biased thermal cycle increased. Monotonic isothermal tension testing of the high-temperature austenite and low temperature martensite phases was used to partially explain these behaviors, where a mismatch in yield strength between the austenite and martensite phases was observed at high Pd levels. Moreover, to further understand the source of the permanent strain at lower Pd levels, strain recovery tests were conducted to determine the onset of plastic deformation in the martensite phase. Consequently, the work behavior and dimensional stability during thermal cycling under load of the various NiTiPd alloys is discussed in relation to the deformation behavior of the materials as revealed by the strain recovery and monotonic tension tests.

  18. Structural Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Induced by Deuterium Implantation: Irradiation at 295 K.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Oleksandr; Zhurba, Volodymir; Neklyudov, Ivan; Mats, Oleksandr; Progolaieva, Viktoria; Boshko, Valerian

    2016-12-01

    Deuterium thermal desorption spectra were investigated on the samples of austenitic steel 18Cr10NiTi pre-implanted at 295 K with deuterium ions in the dose range from 8 × 10(14) to 2.7 × 10(18) D/cm(2). The kinetics of structural transformation development in the steel layer was traced from deuterium thermodesorption spectra as a function of deuterium concentration. Three characteristic regions with different low rates of deuterium amount desorption as the implantation dose increases were revealed: I-the linear region of low implantation doses (up to 1 × 10(17) D/cm(2)); II-the nonlinear region of medium implantation doses (1 × 10(17) to 8 × 10(17) D/cm(2)); III-the linear region of high implantation doses (8 × 10(17) to 2.7 × 10(18) D/cm(2)). During the process of deuterium ion irradiation, the coefficient of deuterium retention in steel varies in discrete steps. Each of the discrete regions of deuterium retention coefficient variation corresponds to different implanted-matter states formed during deuterium ion implantation. The low-dose region is characterized by formation of deuterium-vacancy complexes and solid-solution phase state of deuterium in the steel. The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in this region varies between 2.5 and 3 at.%. The medium-dose region is characterized by the radiation-induced action on the steel in the presence of deuterium with the resulting formation of the energy-stable nanosized crystalline structure of steel, having a developed network of intercrystalline boundaries. The basis for this developed network of intercrystalline boundaries is provided by the amorphous state, which manifests itself in the thermodesorption spectra as a widely temperature-scale extended region of deuterium desorption (structure formation with a varying activation energy). The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in the region of medium implantation doses makes 7 to 8 at.%. The

  19. Structural Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Induced by Deuterium Implantation: Irradiation at 295 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Oleksandr; Zhurba, Volodymir; Neklyudov, Ivan; Mats, Oleksandr; Progolaieva, Viktoria; Boshko, Valerian

    2016-02-01

    Deuterium thermal desorption spectra were investigated on the samples of austenitic steel 18Cr10NiTi pre-implanted at 295 K with deuterium ions in the dose range from 8 × 1014 to 2.7 × 1018 D/cm2. The kinetics of structural transformation development in the steel layer was traced from deuterium thermodesorption spectra as a function of deuterium concentration. Three characteristic regions with different low rates of deuterium amount desorption as the implantation dose increases were revealed: I—the linear region of low implantation doses (up to 1 × 1017 D/cm2); II—the nonlinear region of medium implantation doses (1 × 1017 to 8 × 1017 D/cm2); III—the linear region of high implantation doses (8 × 1017 to 2.7 × 1018 D/cm2). During the process of deuterium ion irradiation, the coefficient of deuterium retention in steel varies in discrete steps. Each of the discrete regions of deuterium retention coefficient variation corresponds to different implanted-matter states formed during deuterium ion implantation. The low-dose region is characterized by formation of deuterium-vacancy complexes and solid-solution phase state of deuterium in the steel. The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in this region varies between 2.5 and 3 at.%. The medium-dose region is characterized by the radiation-induced action on the steel in the presence of deuterium with the resulting formation of the energy-stable nanosized crystalline structure of steel, having a developed network of intercrystalline boundaries. The basis for this developed network of intercrystalline boundaries is provided by the amorphous state, which manifests itself in the thermodesorption spectra as a widely temperature-scale extended region of deuterium desorption (structure formation with a varying activation energy). The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in the region of medium implantation doses makes 7 to 8 at.%. The resulting structure shows stability against the action of

  20. Solid-Particle Erosion Behaviour of WC/Ni Composite Clad layers with Different Contents of WC Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, C. P.; Mishra, S. K.; Tiwari, P.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the solid particle erosion behaviour of WC-reinforced Ni-matrix based laser clad layers to improve the performance of engineering components for potential power plant applications. WC-reinforced Ni-matrix based laser clad layers having various compositions of WC (5, 10 and 15wt%) were deposited on austenitic stainless steel substrates. The laser clad layers were characterised using optical and scanning electron microscopy, microhardness testing and air-jet erosion testing. In solid particle erosion studies using the air-jet erosion tester, the set of testing parameters, including air-erodent compositions, erodent particle velocities and impact angles, was selected by using the Taguchi technique. The morphologies of the worn surfaces were used to predict the wear mechanisms. The results of a microstructural examination of the cross-sections of laser clad revealed a good metallurgical bond between the WC-reinforced Ni matrix and the austenitic stainless steel substrate. Dissociation/partial melting/full melting of WC particles was not observed in the laser clad layers. The microhardness value in the laser cladding zone was between 900-2400 VHN, while it was 230-270 VHN on the substrate. The results of erosion wear studies of the WC-Ni laser clad surface revealed that the erosion behaviour of the WC-Ni laser clad is primarily governed by erodent jet velocity followed by impact angle. The erosion does not much depend on the Ni-concentration in the MMC or the erodent feed rate. The wear signature at the erosion wear surface indicated that the erosion was primarily governed by a ductile erosion mechanism followed by the removal of WC particles from the matrix. The erosion resistance of the Ni-clad layer with WC was found to be at least four times higher than that without WC particles. The quantified contribution of various erosion parameters is useful for function-based design of components with extended service life.

  1. Reaction synthesis of Ni-Al based particle composite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    SUSAN,DONALD F.; MISIOLEK,WOICECK Z.; MARDER,ARNOLD R.

    2000-02-11

    Electrodeposited metal matrix/metal particle composite (EMMC) coatings were produced with a nickel matrix and aluminum particles. By optimizing the process parameters, coatings were deposited with 20 volume percent aluminum particles. Coating morphology and composition were characterized using light optical microscopy (LOM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Differential thermal analysis (DTA) was employed to study reactive phase formation. The effect of heat treatment on coating phase formation was studied in the temperature range 415 to 1,000 C. Long-time exposure at low temperature results in the formation of several intermetallic phases at the Ni matrix/Al particle interfaces and concentrically around the original Al particles. Upon heating to the 500--600 C range, the aluminum particles react with the nickel matrix to form NiAl islands within the Ni matrix. When exposed to higher temperatures (600--1,000 C), diffusional reaction between NiAl and nickel produces ({gamma})Ni{sub 3}Al. The final equilibrium microstructure consists of blocks of ({gamma}{prime})Ni{sub 3}Al in a {gamma}(Ni) solid solution matrix, with small pores also present. Pore formation is explained based on local density changes during intermetallic phase formation and microstructural development is discussed with reference to reaction synthesis of bulk nickel aluminides.

  2. Aluminum-matrix composites with embedded Ni-Ti wires by ultrasonic consolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahnlen, Ryan; Dapino, Marcelo J.; Short, Matt; Graff, Karl

    2009-03-01

    [Smart Vehicle Workshop] This paper presents the development of active aluminum-matrix composites manufactured by Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing (UAM), an emerging rapid prototyping process based on ultrasonic metal welding. Composites created through UAM experience process temperatures as low as 20°C, in contrast to current metal-matrix fabrication processes which require fusion of materials and hence reach temperatures of 500°C and above. UAM thus creates unprecedented opportunities to develop adaptive structures with seamlessly embedded smart materials and electronic components without degrading the properties that make embedding these materials and components attractive. This research focuses on three aspects of developing UAM Ni-Ti/Al composites which have not been accomplished before: (i) Characterization of the mechanical properties of the composite matrix; (ii) Investigation of Ni-Ti/Al composites as tunable stiffness materials and as strain sensors based on the shape memory effect; and (iii) Development of constitutive models for UAM Ni-Ti/Al composites. The mechanical characterization shows an increase in tensile strength of aluminum UAM builds over the parent material (Al 3003-H18), likely due to grain refinement caused by the UAM process. We demonstrate the ability to embed Ni-Ti wires up to 203 μm in diameter in an aluminum matrix, compared with only 100 μm in previous studies. The resulting Ni-Ti/Al UAM composites have cross sectional area ratios of up to 13.4% Ni-Ti. These composites exhibit a change in stiffness of 6% and a resistivity change of -3% when the Ni- Ti wires undergo martensite to austenite transformation. The Ni-Ti area ratios and associated strength of the shape memory effect are expected to increase as the UAM process becomes better understood and is perfected. The Brinson constitutive model for shape memory transformations is used to describe the stiffness and the strain sensing of Ni-Ti/Al composites in response to

  3. Prediction and Validation of the Austenite Phase Fraction upon Intercritical Annealing of Medium Mn Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahani, Hussein; Xu, Wei; van der Zwaag, Sybrand

    2015-11-01

    In this research, the effects of Mn and Si concentration and that of the isothermal intercritical holding temperature on the austenite-to-ferrite ( γ → α) and the martensite-to-austenite ( α' → γ) phase transformations are studied for a series of Fe-C-Mn-Si steels with up to 7 wt pct Mn. The model is based on the local equilibrium (LE) concept. The model predictions are compared to experimental observations. It is found that the austenite volume fraction at the end of intercritical annealing depends significantly on the initial microstructure. For Mn concentrations between 3 and 7 wt pct, the LE model is qualitatively correct. However, at higher Mn levels the discrepancy between the predicted austenite fractions and the experimental values increases, in particular for the α' → γ transformation. Intragrain nucleation is held responsible for the higher austenite fractions observed experimentally. Silicon is found have a much smaller effect on the kinetics of the intercritical annealing than Mn.

  4. Residual Ferrite and Relationship Between Composition and Microstructure in High-Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingchuan; Ren, Yibin; Yao, Chunfa; Yang, Ke; Misra, R. D. K.

    2015-12-01

    A series of high-nitrogen stainless steels (HNS) containing δ-ferrite, which often retained in HNS, were studied to establish the relationship between composition and microstructure. Both ferrite and nitrogen depletions were found in the center regions of cast ingots, and the depletion of nitrogen in that area was found to be the main reason for the existence of δ-ferrite. Because of the existence of heterogeneity, the variation of microstructure with nitrogen content was detected. Hence, the critical contents of nitrogen (CCN) for the fully austenitic HNS were obtained. Then the effects of elements such as N, Cr, Mn, and Mo on austenite stability were investigated via thermodynamic calculations. The CCN of HNS alloys were also obtained by calculations. Comparing the CCN obtained from experiment and calculation, it was found that the forged microstructure of the HNS was close to the thermodynamic equilibrium. To elucidate the above relationship, by regression analysis using calculated thermodynamic data, nitrogen equivalent and a new constitution diagram were proposed. The constitution diagram accurately distinguishes the austenitic single-phase region and the austenite + ferrite dual-phase region. The nitrogen equivalent and the new constitution diagram can be used for alloying design and microstructural prediction in HNS. According to the nitrogen equivalent, the ferrite stabilizing ability of Mo is weaker than Cr, and with Mn content increases, Mn behaves as a weak austenite stabilizer first and then as a ferrite stabilizer.

  5. Microstructure and Deformation Behavior of Phase-Reversion-Induced Nanograined/Ultrafine-Grained Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, R. D. K.; Nayak, S.; Mali, S. A.; Shah, J. S.; Somani, M. C.; Karjalainen, L. P.

    2009-10-01

    Materials with submicron to nanometer-sized grains by virtue of their high grain boundary area to grain size ratio provide valuable tools for studying deformation behavior in ultrafine-grained structures. In this regard, the well-known strain-induced martensite transformation and its reversal to the parent austenite phase were used to produce nanograins/ultrafine grains via controlled annealing of heavily cold-worked metastable austenite. The results of the electron microscopy study of phase-reversion-induced microstructure and deformation behavior of nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) austenitic stainless steel during tensile straining are described here. The phase-reversion-induced structure was observed to depend on the cold rolling reduction and temperature-time annealing cycle. The optimized structure consisted of nanocrystalline ( d < 100 nm), ultrafine ( d ≈ 100 to 500 nm), and submicron ( d ≈ 500 to 1000 nm) grains and was characterized by a high yield strength (800 to 1000 MPa)-high ductility (30 to 40 pct) combination. Austenite nucleation during phase-reversion annealing occurred in the form of thin plates or as equiaxed grains along the martensite laths. Twinning and dislocation glide were identified as the primary deformation mechanisms, where twinning had a varied character. However, the high elongation seems to be associated with the gradual transformation of metastable austenite, with twinning having only a minor contribution.

  6. Study of biocompatibility of medical grade high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Menghua; Yin, Tieying; Wang, Yazhou; Du, Feifei; Zou, Xingzheng; Gregersen, Hans; Wang, Guixue

    2014-10-01

    Adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the living organism have resulted in development of high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also improves steel properties. The cell cytocompatibility, blood compatibility and cell response of high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel were studied in vitro. The mechanical properties and microstructure of this stainless steel were compared to the currently used 316L stainless steel. It was shown that the new steel material had comparable basic mechanical properties to 316L stainless steel and preserved the single austenite organization. The cell toxicity test showed no significant toxic side effects for MC3T3-E1 cells compared to nitinol alloy. Cell adhesion testing showed that the number of MC3T3-E1 cells was more than that on nitinol alloy and the cells grew in good condition. The hemolysis rate was lower than the national standard of 5% without influence on platelets. The total intracellular protein content and ALP activity and quantification of mineralization showed good cell response. We conclude that the high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel is a promising new biomedical material for coronary stent development. PMID:25175259

  7. A review on nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Talha, Mohd; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2013-10-01

    The field of biomaterials has become a vital area, as these materials can enhance the quality and longevity of human life. Metallic materials are often used as biomaterials to replace structural components of the human body. Stainless steels, cobalt-chromium alloys, commercially pure titanium and its alloys are typical metallic biomaterials that are being used for implant devices. Stainless steels have been widely used as biomaterials because of their very low cost as compared to other metallic materials, good mechanical and corrosion resistant properties and adequate biocompatibility. However, the adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have promoted the development of "nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels" for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel and emphatically the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steel, as well as the development of nickel-free nitrogen containing stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength, better corrosion and wear resistance and superior biocompatibility in comparison to the currently used austenitic stainless steel (e.g. 316L), the newly developed nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventionally used medical stainless steels. PMID:23910251

  8. Magnetic and transport properties of (β+γ) Ni35Co35Al30 ferromagnetic shape memory alloy across the martensitic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhey, Kanwaljeet S.; Manekar, Meghmalhar; Chattopadhyay, M. K.; Kaul, Rakesh; Roy, S. B.; Chaddah, P.

    2003-06-01

    The results of dc-magnetization, resistivity and ac-susceptibility studies performed on (β+γ) Ni35Co35Al30 magnetic shape memory alloy are presented highlighting the transition between two equilibrium lattice configurations of austenite and martensite phases. The first order nature of this martensitic transition is emphasized by highlighting the presence of thermal hysteresis and phase co-existence. This transition is apparently broadened with the introduction of γ-phase in the pure β-phase Ni35Co35Al30 alloy giving rise to a relatively large thermal hysteresis.

  9. Phase transformations during deformation of Fe-Ni and Fe-Mn alloys produced by mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherdyntsev, V. V.; Pustov, L. Yu.; Kaloshkin, S. D.; Tomilin, I. A.; Shelekhov, E. V.; Laptev, A. I.; Baldokhin, Yu. V.; Estrin, E. I.

    2007-10-01

    Compositions of Fe(100 - x)Mn x ( x = 10 and 12 at. %) and Fe(100 - y)Ni y ( y = 18 and 20 at. %) were produced by combined mechanical alloying of pure-metal powders and annealed in the austenitic field. After annealing and cooling to room temperature, the alloys had a single-phase austenitic structure. During deformation, the γ phase partially transforms into the α 2 phase (and/or ɛ phase in Fe-Mn alloys). The phase composition of the alloys after deformation depends on the amount of alloying elements and the predeformation annealing regime. The amount of martensite in the structure of a bulk alloy obtained by powder compacting grows proportionally to the degree of deformation of the sample.

  10. Effects of Laser Quenching on Impact Toughness and Fracture Morphologies of 40CrNiMo High Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejun, Kong; Lei, Zhang

    2014-10-01

    The surface of 40CrNiMo steel was quenched with a CO2 laser, Charpy impact test was conducted at temperatures of 20, 0, and -20 °C, and the impact absorption energies were measured. The fracture morphologies were observed with SEM, and the influence of microhardness, residual stress, and retained austenite on mechanical behavior of impact fracture after laser quenching was discussed. The results show that the hardened layer depth is more than 1 mm after laser quenching, and hardness is about 480-500 HV. The fracture morphology of the sample is dimple rupture at a temperature of 20 °C; with the lower temperature the fracture dimples become smaller. At a temperature of -20 °C, the fracture morphologies change from ductile to brittle, which is mainly cleavage fracture. The increase in surface hardness, production of compressive residual stress, and existence of retained austenite after laser quenching are the main mechanisms of increasing impact toughness.

  11. Directionally solidified pseudo-binary eutectics of Ni-Cr-(Hf, Zr)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. G.; Ashbrook, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    A pseudo-binary eutectic, in which the intermetallic Ni7Hf2 reinforces the Ni-Cr solid solution phase, was previously predicted in the Ni-Cr-Hf system by a computer analysis. The experimental determination of pseudo binary eutectic compositions and the directional solidification of the Ni-Cr-Hf, Zr, and Ni-Cr-Zr eutectic alloys are discussed. To determine unknown eutectics, chemical analyses were made of material bled from near eutectic ingots during incipient melting. Nominal compositions in weight percent of Ni-18.6Cr-24.0HF, Ni19.6Cr-12.8Zr-2.8Hf, and Ni-19.2Cr-14.8Zr formed aligned pseudo-binary eutectic structures. The melting points were about 1270 C. The reinforcing intermetallic phases were identified as noncubic (Ni,Cr)7Hf2 and (Ni,Cr)7(Hf,Zr)2, and face centered cubic (Ni,Cr)5Zr. The volume fraction of the reinforcing phases were about 0.5.

  12. NiAl-base composite containing high volume fraction of AlN for advanced engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan (Inventor); Whittenbeger, John D. (Inventor); Lowell, Carl F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy has a NiAl matrix and greater than about 13 volume percent fine particles of AlN within the matrix. The particles preferably have a diameter from about 15 nanometers to about 50 nanometers. The particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy may be prepared by cryomilling prealloyed NiAl in liquid nitrogen using grinding media having a diameter of from about 2 to 6 mm at an impeller speed of from about 450 RPM to about 800 RPM. The cryomilling may be done for a duration of from about 4 hours to about 20 hours to obtain a cryomilled powder. The cryomilled powder may be consolidated to form the particulate reinforced NiAl-AlN composite alloy. The particulate reinforced alloy can further include a toughening alloy. The toughening alloy may include NiCrAlY, FeCrAlY, and FeAl.

  13. Soft mode behavior in Ni--Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S.M.; Yang, B.X.; Shirane, G.; Larese, J.Z.; Tanner, L.E.; Moss, S.C.

    1988-06-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiments performed on carefully prepared single crystals of Ni/sub x/Al/sub 1/minus/x/ (x /equals/ 50, 58, 62.5 at. percent) reveal an anomaly in the //zeta//zeta/0)-TA mode whose position in /zeta/ depends linearly on x. The temperature dependent studies of the 62.5/percent/ alloy show marked softening of the phonon energy at /zeta/ /equals/ 1/6. At the same temperatures, an elastic central peak develops. At T/sub M/ /equals/ 80K a new structure develops which exhibits a modulation at nearly, but not exactly, /zeta/ /equals/ 1/7. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Cast heat-resistant austenitic steel with improved temperature creep properties and balanced alloying element additions and methodology for development of the same

    DOEpatents

    Pankiw, Roman I; Muralidharan, Govindrarajan; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Maziasz, Philip J

    2012-11-27

    The present invention addresses the need for new austenitic steel compositions with higher creep strength and higher upper temperatures. The new austenitic steel compositions retain desirable phases, such as austenite, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and MC in its microstructure to higher temperatures. The present invention also discloses a methodology for the development of new austenitic steel compositions with higher creep strength and higher upper temperatures.

  15. TEM studies of plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Stróz, D; Psoda, M

    2010-03-01

    Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and X-ray phase analysis were used to study the structure of a layer formed during nitriding the AISI 316L stainless steel at temperature 440 degrees C. It was found that the applied treatment led to the formation of 6-microm-thick layer of the S-phase. There is no evidence of CrN precipitation. The X-ray diffraction experiments proved that the occurred austenite lattice expansion - due to nitrogen atoms - depended on the crystallographic direction. The cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy studies showed that the layer consisted of a single cubic phase that contained a lot of defects such as dislocations, stacking faults, slip bands and twins. The high-resolution electron microscopy observations were applied to study the defect formation due to the nitriding process. It was shown that the presence of great number of stacking faults leads to formation of nanotwins. Weak, forbidden {100} reflections were still another characteristic feature of the S-phase. These were not detected in the X-ray spectra of the phase. Basing on the high-resolution electron microscopy studies it can be suggested that the short-range ordering of the nitrogen atoms in the octahedral sites inside the f.c.c. matrix lattice takes place and gives rise to appearance of these spots. It is suggested that the cubic lattice undergoes not only expansion but also slight rombohedral distortion that explains differences in the lattice expansion for different crystallographic directions. PMID:20500370

  16. Prediction of Austenite Formation Temperatures Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, P.; Schmidl, E.; Grund, T.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    For the modeling and design of heat treatments, in consideration of the development/ transformation of the microstructure, different material data depending on the chemical composition, the respective microstructure/phases and the temperature are necessary. Material data are, e.g. the thermal conductivity, heat capacity, thermal expansion and transformation data etc. The quality of thermal simulations strongly depends on the accuracy of the material data. For many materials, the required data - in particular for different microstructures and temperatures - are rare in the literature. In addition, a different chemical composition within the permitted limits of the considered steel alloy cannot be predicted. A solution for this problem is provided by the calculation of material data using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). In the present study, the start and finish temperatures of the transformation from the bcc lattice to the fcc lattice structure of hypoeutectoid steels are calculated using an Artificial Neural Network. An appropriate database containing different transformation temperatures (austenite formation temperatures) to train the ANN is selected from the literature. In order to find a suitable feedforward network, the network topologies as well as the activation functions of the hidden layers are varied and subsequently evaluated in terms of the prediction accuracy. The transformation temperatures calculated by the ANN exhibit a very good compliance compared to the experimental data. The results show that the prediction performance is even higher compared to classical empirical equations such as Andrews or Brandis. Therefore, it can be assumed that the presented ANN is a convenient tool to distinguish between bcc and fcc phases in hypoeutectoid steels.

  17. Microstructure and magnetic properties of as-cast Ni2MnGa alloys processed by twin roller melt spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozo López, G.; Condó, A. M.; Giordano, R. N.; Urreta, S. E.; Haberkorn, N.; Winkler, E.; Fabietti, L. M.

    2013-06-01

    The magnetism and the microstructure of Ni2MnGa alloys, processed for the first time by twin roller melt spinning at tangential wheel speeds of 10 m/s (V10), 15 m/s (V15) and 20 m/s (V20) are investigated. At room temperature, the major phase in the as-cast alloys is the cubic L21 Ni2MnGa ordered austenitic phase, with a lattice parameter only ˜0.1% larger than the tabulated value. The order domain size in the austenitic phase decreases from (40±1) nm in samples V10 to (19±1) nm in V20. Mn(S,Se) small precipitates are also found uniformly embedded in the ribbons with mean size of (26±2) nm (V10) and (7±2) nm (V20), exhibiting a definite orientation relation with the austenitic matrix, <1 0 0>P// <1 0 0>a. The as-cast alloys transform to an intermediate cubic phase I at about 220-230 K depending on the quenching rate and to a martensitic phase at about 130 K. The high temperature austenitic phase and the low temperature martensitic phase are ferromagnetic; in both cases the saturation polarization is lower in samples quenched at higher rates. The demagnetization curves measured from saturation in the martensitic state show two marked steps: a first one for positive fields in V15 and V10 (˜46 mT) and a larger second one for relatively large inverse fields (˜130-250 mT) in all the samples. These steps are likely to arise from a demagnetization mechanism involving a field induced twin boundary motion in the few martensite variants selected by the crystallographic texture and the quenched stresses in the ribbons.

  18. Anomalous magnetic configuration of Mn{sub 2}NiAl ribbon and the role of hybridization in the martensitic transformation of Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 50−x}Al{sub x} ribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, R. B.; Zhao, D. W.; Li, G. K.; Ma, L. E-mail: houdenglu@mail.hebtu.edu.cn; Zhen, C. M.; Hou, D. L. E-mail: houdenglu@mail.hebtu.edu.cn; Wang, W. H.; Liu, E. K.; Chen, J. L.; Wu, G. H.

    2014-12-08

    The magnetic configuration of Mn{sub 2}NiAl ribbon has been investigated. In contrast to Ni{sub 2}MnAl, the compound Mn{sub 2}NiAl with considerable disorder does exhibit ferromagnetism and, due to exchange interaction competition, both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic moment orientations can coexist between nearest neighbor Mn atoms. This is unexpected in Heusler alloys. Regarding the mechanism of the martensitic transformation in Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 50−x}Al{sub x}, it is found that increasing the Al content results in an unusual change in the lattice constant, a decrease of the transformation entropy change, and enhancement of the calculated electron localization. These results indicate that the p-d covalent hybridization between Mn (or Ni) and Al atoms gradually increases at the expense of the d-d hybridization between Ni and Mn atoms. This leads to an increased stability of the austenite phase and a decrease of the martensitic transformation temperature. For 11 ≤ x ≤ 14, Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 50−x}Al{sub x} ferromagnetic shape memory alloys are obtained.

  19. Magnetic and magneto-transport studies of substrate effect on the martensitic transformation in a NiMnIn shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Andrei; Kirianov, Eugene; Zlenko, Albina; Quetz, Abdiel; Aryal, Anil; Pandey, Sudip; Dubenko, Igor; Stadler, Shane; Ali, Naushad; Al-Aqtash, Nabil; Sabirianov, Renat

    2016-05-01

    The effect of substrates on the magnetic and transport properties of Ni2Mn1.5In0.5 ultra-thin films were studied theoretically and experimentally. High quality 8-nm films were grown by laser-assisted molecular beam epitaxy deposition. Magneto-transport measurements revealed that the films undergo electronic structure transformation similar to those of bulk materials at the martensitic transformation. The temperature of the transformation depends strongly on lattice parameters of the substrate. To explain this behavior, we performed DFT calculations on the system and found that different substrates change the relative stability of the ferromagnetic (FM) austenite and ferrimagnetic (FiM) martensite states. We conclude that the energy difference between the FM austenite and FiM martensite states in Ni2Mn1.5In0.5 films grown on MgO (001) substrates is ΔE = 0.20 eV per NiMnIn f.u, somewhat lower compared to ΔE = 0.24 eV in the bulk material with the same lattice parameters. When the lattice parameters of Ni2Mn1.5In0.5 film have values close to those of the MgO substrate, the energy difference becomes ΔE = 0.08 eV per NiMnIn f.u. These results suggest the possibility to control the martensitic transition in thin films through substrate engineering.

  20. X-ray magnetic-circular-dichroism study of Ni/Fe (001) multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, T.; Schwickert, M.M.; Tomaz, M.A.; Chen, H.; Harp, G.R.

    1999-06-01

    The structure and magnetic properties of Fe/Ni(001) multilayers are studied using x-ray diffraction, magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometry, and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Multilayers are deposited with constant Fe layers (12 {Angstrom}) and wedged Ni layers (0{endash}30 {Angstrom}), repeated 20 times, to explore the magnetic moment and the structure dependence upon thickness of Ni (t{sub Ni}). Up to t{sub Ni}{approx}16 {Angstrom} (11 ML), both the Fe and the Ni have a bct structure, similar to the bulk structure of bcc Fe. The magnetic moments of Ni in the bct region are nearly constant at 0.85{mu}{sub B} for a Ni thickness t{sub Ni} in the range 3 {Angstrom}{lt}t{sub Ni}{lt}16 {Angstrom}. This represents a significant enhancement over the moment in bulk fcc Ni (0.59{mu}B). The Fe/Ni multilayer undergoes a crystalline phase transition between 16 {Angstrom}{lt}t{sub Ni}{lt}23 {Angstrom}, beyond which both the Fe and Ni have an fct structure. In the fct region, the Ni magnetic moment is close to its bulk value and the Fe magnetic moment drops to 1.5{mu}{sub B}, which is {approximately}70{percent} of its bulk value. The crystalline phase transition is also accompanied by a rotation of the magnetic easy axis by 45{degree} in the plane of the film. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}