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Sample records for percutaneous endovascular aneurysm

  1. Percutaneous and Endovascular Embolization of Ruptured Hepatic Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Little, Andrew F.; Lee, Wai Kit

    2002-06-15

    A 72-year-old woman presented with an intraperitoneal hemorrhage from a ruptured intrahepatic arteryaneurysm, with an associated pseudoaneurysm developing a high-flow arteriovenous fistula. Persistent coagulopathy and a median arcuate ligament stenosis of the celiac axis further complicated endovascular management. Aneurysm thrombosis required percutaneous embolization with coils, a removable core guidewire and polyvinyl alcohol particles.

  2. Endovascular stent graft for traumatic splenic vein aneurysm via percutaneous transsplenic access

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh Sang; Kim, Joong Suck; Kim, Ji Dae

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic splenic vein aneurysm (SVA) is an extremely rare entity. Traditionally, treatment varied from noninvasive followup to aneurysm excision with splenectomy. However, there has been no prior report of traumatic SVA treated with endovascular stent graft for SVA via percutaneous transsplenic access. Therefore, we report the case of a 56-year-old man successfully treated with endovascular stent graft for traumatic SVA via percutaneous transsplenic access. PMID:27433466

  3. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  4. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    EVAR; Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  5. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000236.htm Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular - discharge To use the sharing features ... enable JavaScript. AAA repair - endovascular - discharge; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular - discharge; EVAR - discharge; Endovascular aneurysm repair - discharge ...

  6. Percutaneous Treatment of Sac Rupture in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Previously Excluded with Endovascular Repair (EVAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Lagana, Domenico Mangini, Monica Fontana, Federico; Nicotera, Paolo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of percutaneous endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) previously treated by EVAR. In the last year, two male patients with AAAs, treated 8 and 23 months ago with bifurcated stent-graft, were observed because of lumbar pain and hemorragic shock. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) showed a retroperitoneal hematoma; in both cases a type III endoleak was detected, in one case associated with a type II endoleak from the iliolumbar artery. The procedures were performed in the theater, in emergency. Type II endoleak was treated with transcatheter superselective glue injection; type III endoleaks were excluded by a stent-graft extension. The procedures were successful in both patients, with immediate hemodynamic stabilization. MDCT after the procedure showed complete exclusion of the aneurysms. In conclusion, endovascular treatment is a safe and feasible option for the treatment of ruptured AAAs previously treated by EVAR; this approach allows avoidance of surgical conversion, which is technical very challenging, with a high morbidity and mortality rate.

  7. Combined Laparoscopic and Percutaneous Treatment of a Type II Endoleak Following Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Karkos, Christos D. Hayes, Paul D.; Lloyd, David M.; Fishwick, Guy; White, Steve A.; Quadar, Salman; Sayers, Robert D.

    2005-06-15

    We describe a novel approach in treating a persistent type II endoleak related to the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and the lower lumbar arteries. The endoleak failed to thrombose following percutaneous IMA coil embolization. We proceeded to one-stage laparoscopic IMA division and intra-sac thrombin injection under direct laparoscopic vision and fluroscopy. A CT scan at 1 and 7 months post-intervention showed no evidence of endoleak and the growth of the aneurysm was arrested. This combined laparoscopic and percutaneous approach may be a useful treatment option in the management of persistent complex type II endoleak. Its durability, however has yet to be defined.

  8. Efficacy and Safety of Augmenting the Preclose Technique with a Collagen-Based Closure Device for Percutaneous Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rafiuddin; Juszczak, Maciej T.; Bratby, Mark J.; Sideso, Ediri; Anthony, Susan; Tapping, Charles R.; Handa, Ashok; Darby, Christopher R.; Perkins, Jeremy; Uberoi, Raman

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo report our experience of selectively augmenting the preclose technique for percutaneous endovascular aneurysm repair (p-EVAR) with an Angio-Seal device as a haemostatic adjunct in cases of significant bleeding after tensioning the sutures of the suture-mediated closure devices.Materials and MethodsProspectively collected data for p-EVAR patients at our institute were analysed. Outcomes included technical success and access site complications. A logistic regression model was used to analyse the effects of sheath size, CFA features and stent graft type on primary failure of the preclose technique necessitating augmentation and also on the development of complications.Resultsp-EVAR was attempted via 122 CFA access sites with a median sheath size of 18-French (range 12- to 28-French). Primary success of the preclose technique was 75.4 % (92/122). Angio-Seal augmentation was utilised as an adjunct to the preclose technique in 20.5 % (25/122). The overall p-EVAR success rate was 95.1 % (116/122). There was a statistically significant relationship (p = 0.0093) between depth of CFA and primary failure of preclose technique. CFA diameter, calcification, type of stent graft and sheath size did not have significant effects on primary preclose technique failure. Overall 4.9 % (6/122) required surgical conversion but otherwise there were no major complications.ConclusionAugmentation with an Angio-Seal device is a safe and effective adjunct to increase the success rate of the preclose technique in p-EVAR.

  9. Endovascular embolization

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment - endovascular embolism; Coil embolization; Cerebral aneurysm - endovascular; Coiling - endovascular; Saccular aneurysm - endovascular; Berry aneurysm - endovascular repair; Fusiform aneurysm repair - endovascular; Aneurysm repair - endovascular

  10. Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair: current endovascular perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Nathan; Minion, David; Bobadilla, Joseph L

    2014-01-01

    Thoracoabdominal aneurysms account for roughly 3% of identified aneurysms annually in the United States. Advancements in endovascular techniques and devices have broadened their application to these complex surgical problems. This paper will focus on the current state of endovascular thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair, including specific considerations in patient selection, operative planning, and perioperative complications. Both total endovascular and hybrid options will be considered. PMID:25170271

  11. Endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Orlando; Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are abnormal dilations of the intracranial vessels, in which all the layers of the vascular wall are affected by degenerative changes that lead to distension of the vessel. Intracranial aneurysms can be classified based on their anatomic location, size, and morphology. Subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most devastating clinical presentation. The goal of preventing hemorrhage or rehemorrhage can only be achieved by excluding the aneurysm from the cerebral circulation. Endovascular or surgical clipping can achieve this goal. Multiple surgical and endovascular approaches have been described for treatment of intracranial aneurysm. Surgical approaches for anterior-circulation intracranial aneurysms include: pterional, orbitozygomatic, and lateral supraorbital craniotomies. Modern microsurgical techniques involve skull base dissection to achieve adequate exposure with minimal brain retraction. Endovascular techniques can be divided into: parent artery reconstruction with coil deposition (primary coil, balloon-assisted coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and other new techniques such as neck reconstruction devices and intraluminal occlusion devices); reconstruction with flow diversion; and deconstructive techniques with involving parent artery sacrifice with or without bypass. PMID:27430470

  12. Bronchial Aneurysms Mimicking Aortic Aneurysms: Endovascular Treatment in Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Vernhet, Helene; Bousquet, Claudine; Jean, Betty; Lesnik, Alvian; Durand, Gerard; Giron, Jacques; Senac, Jean Paul

    1999-05-15

    Bronchial artery dilatation and aneurysm formation is a potential complication of local inflammation, especially in bronchiectasis. When the bronchial artery has an ectopic origin from the inferior segment of the aortic arch, aneurysms may mimick aortic aneurysms. Despite this particular location, endovascular treatment is possible. We report two such aneurysms that were successfully embolized with steel coils.

  13. Endovascular treatment of popliteal aneurysm.

    PubMed

    de Donato, G; Setacci, F; Galzerano, G; Borrelli, M P; Mascolo, V; Mazzitelli, G; Ruzzi, U; Setacci, C

    2015-08-01

    Although traditional surgical repair by aneurysm exclusion and bypass is still considered the gold standard in the treatment of popliteal artery aneurysms (PAAs), the endovascular repair (ER) has been gaining great interest in the last decades. ER offers several advantages over open bypass, including lower morbidity and mortality, and faster functional recovery, but some concerns about migration, occlusion, or fracture remain when a stent graft is deployed across a joint that undergo constant flexion. This review summarizes the current evidence on ER for PAAs. Level I evidence is still very limited, while the majority of published data come from retrospective studies. Moreover the heterogeneity of PAA morphology seems to play a major role in the outcomes after popliteal endografts placement, so that many anatomical criteria should be taken into account to determine which patient is best treated endovascularly. In conclusion, while it is unlike that endovascular treatment may displace open surgical bypass in the near future, it indeed does provide a feasible option for selected patients with high surgical risk and good anatomical features. PMID:25742934

  14. Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Findeiss, Laura K.; Cody, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Degenerative aneurysms of the thoracic aorta are increasing in prevalence; open repair of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Repair of isolated descending thoracic aortic aneurysms using stent grafts was introduced in 1995, and in an anatomically suitable subgroup of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, repair with endovascular stent graft provides favorable outcomes, with decreased perioperative morbidity and mortality relative to open repair. The cornerstones of successful thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair are appropriate patient selection, thorough preprocedural planning, and cautious procedural execution, the elements of which are discussed here. PMID:22379281

  15. Endovascular Exclusion of Renal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Poul Erik Rohr, Nils

    2005-06-15

    A patient who was operated for an abdominal aortic aneurysm 7 years earlier presented with recently discovered iliac and renal artery aneurysms. The renal artery had an angulation of 90{sup o}, but the aneurysm was successfully excluded using a covered vascular stent graft placed over an extrastiff guidewire. Even in cases of complex anatomy of a renal aneurysm, endovascular treatment should be considered. With development of more flexible and low-profile endoprosthesis with accurate deployment, these have become more usable.

  16. Renal interventions during endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Davies, Mark G

    2013-12-01

    Renal insufficiency is a risk factor for mortality and morbidity during endovascular aneurysm repair. Multiple changes in practice have occurred to mitigate renal injury and renal dysfunction. Transrenal fixation does carry an increased risk of a decline in renal function in the medium term. Renal stenting for athero-occlusive disease during endovascular aneurysm repair needs careful consideration, as indications have changed and there are unexpected consequences with early vessel occlusion. The growing number of renal interventions during complex endovascular aneurysm repair with the advent of chimney snorkel/periscope techniques and the introduction of fenestrated grafts has shown the resilience of the intervention with relatively low renal issues (approximately 10%), but has also illustrated the need for additional device development. PMID:25220325

  17. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Current and Future Status

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchliffe, R. J. Ivancev, K.

    2008-05-15

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has rapidly expanded since its introduction in the early 1990s. Early experiences were associated with high rates of complications including conversion to open repair. Perioperative morbidity and mortality results have improved but these concerns have been replaced by questions about long-term durability. Gradually, too, these problems have been addressed. Challenges of today include the ability to roll out the endovascular technique to patients with adverse aneurysm morphology. Fenestrated and branch stent-graft technology is in its infancy. Only now are we beginning to fully understand the advantages, limitations, and complications of such technology. This paper outlines some of the concepts and discusses the controversies and challenges facing clinicians involved in endovascular aneurysm surgery today and in the future.

  18. Endovascular treatment of frontopolar artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Karanam, Lakshmi S Prasanna; Alurkar, Anand; Chakka, Sivaramakrishna

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic intracranial aneurysms are rare and usually present with subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracranial hemorrhage, subdural hematoma, or intraventricular hemorrhage. These are usually not true aneurysms; hence treatment of these cases poses a therapeutic challenge. In this case report, we describe a young Asian male who presented with a ruptured pseudoaneurysm of the distal branch of the anterior cerebral artery. It was treated successfully with endovascular embolization. To our knowledge, there are few reports of this entity in the literature. PMID:27048313

  19. Endovascular treatment of basilar aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Marlin, Evan S; Ikeda, Daniel S; Shaw, Andrew; Powers, Ciarán J; Sauvageau, Eric

    2014-07-01

    Basilar artery aneurysms account for a small percentage of intracranial aneurysms; however, they are a diverse group of lesions necessitating different treatment techniques for those that are ruptured and unruptured. Basilar apex aneurysms are the most common type and are frequently wide-necked, necessitating stent-assisted coiling or balloon remodeling. Other techniques have evolved to forego stenting in acutely ruptured wide-necked aneurysms. The prevention of delayed thromboembolic complications with dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with stents is critical. After treatment, basilar aneurysms require close follow-up to ensure complete occlusion. Basilar apex aneurysms often require delayed re-treatment, especially when previously ruptured. PMID:24994086

  20. Insights on a Giant Aneurysm Treated Endovascularly.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Francesca; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Ulm, Arthur John

    2016-07-01

    Background Endovascular treatment with stent-assisted Guglielmi detachable coils is an accepted method for treating intracranial giant aneurysms that otherwise would require more invasive or destructive treatment or could not be treated at all. Nevertheless, there is a paucity of information concerning inner postcoiling aneurysmal changes in human subjects over the long term. We report a postmortem analysis of a patient with a giant aneurysm at the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) who was treated endovascularly and studied pathologically 24 months after treatment. Materials and Method The head was removed at autopsy and prefixed in a 10% neutral buffered formalin solution. The brain was gently removed from the skull base after cutting the intracranial nerves and vascular structures. The giant VBJ aneurysm and its relationship with the brainstem, cranial nerves, and vessels were captured photographically and analyzed. Afterward, under operating microscope guidance, the vertebrobasilar system with the aneurysm was gently and carefully detached from the brainstem and carefully analyzed. Results No complete fibrous obliteration of the aneurysm lumen could be detected in our case, and no endothelialization had taken place 24 months after treatment. Conclusions Our findings agree with those of previous similar reports. Coiling, in particular in large or giant aneurysms, may be burdened by the risk of coil compaction and recanalization, but it has the advantage of not affecting the flow in the perforating arteries. PMID:26296255

  1. General technical considerations for the endovascular management of cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Eboli, Paula; Ryan, Robert W; Alexander, Michael J

    2014-07-01

    Cerebral aneurysms pose a threat to patients because of their risk of rupture causing subarachnoid hemorrhage, and the goal of treatment is the exclusion of the aneurysm from the circulation to prevent bleeding (in the case of unruptured aneurysms) or rebleeding. This article analyzes the general technical factors associated with the endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms. It discusses issues with transarterial access; imaging of aneurysm size, morphology, and regional anatomy to determine the endovascular plan; the techniques for the major endovascular aneurysm devices; and periprocedural management issues to reduce potential treatment-related complications. PMID:24994079

  2. Endovascular Techniques for the Treatment of Renal Artery Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Elaassar, Omar Auriol, Julien; Marquez, Romero; Tall, Philippe; Rousseau, Herve; Joffre, Francis

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Our goal was to analyze the indications and limitations of the different percutaneous endovascular approaches reported for the treatment of renal artery aneurysms (RAAs) and to develop a scientific approach for optimum selection of treatment strategy of RAAs through analyzing our experience and reviewing available literature. Methods: This retrospective study was designed to evaluate the treatment and follow-up of 13 consecutive patients who presented with 13 RAAs by using a variety of endovascular interventional techniques. Different combinations of coil embolization, liquid embolization, stenting, and stent-graft exclusion were used in correlation with variable-specific aneurysm criteria. Results: All patients were successfully treated with no significant short- or long-term complications. Patients were followed for an average period of 43 (range 13-103) months. Conclusions: Ten different determinants were found to affect our decision making: shape, size, neck, position of aneurysm on artery, branches arising, artery involved, condition of the artery, age, general condition of the patient, and renal function.

  3. Endovascular Management of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Fattori, Rossella Russo, Vincenzo; Lovato, Luigi; Buttazzi, Katia; Rinaldi, Giovanni

    2011-12-15

    The overall survival of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) has improved significantly in the past few years. Endovascular treatment, proposed as an alternative to surgery, has been considered a therapeutic innovation because of its low degree of invasiveness, which allows the treatment of even high-surgical risk patients with limited complications and mortality. A major limitation is the lack of adequate evidence regarding long-term benefit and durability because follow-up has been limited to just a few years even in the largest series. The combination of endovascular exclusion with visceral branch revascularization for the treatment of thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysms involving the visceral aorta has also been attempted. As an alternative, endografts with branches represent a technological evolution that allows treatment of complex anatomy. Even if only small numbers of patients and short follow-up are available, this technical approach, which has with limited mortality (<10%) and paraplegia rates, to expand endovascular treatment to TAA seems feasible. With improved capability to recognize proper anatomy and select clinical candidates, the choice of endovascular stent-graft placement may offer a strategy to optimize management and improve prognosis.

  4. The Endovascular Management of Iliac Artery Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Stroumpouli, Evangelia; Nassef, Ahmed; Loosemore, Tom; Thompson, Matt; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2007-11-15

    Background: Isolated aneurysms of the iliac arteries are uncommon. Previously treated by conventional surgery, there is increasing use of endografts to treat these lesions. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy, safety, and durability of the stent-grafts for treatment of iliac artery aneurysms (IAAs). The results of endografting for isolated IAAs over a 10-year period were analyzed retrospectively. The treatment methods differed depending on the anatomic location of the aneurysms. Twenty-one patients (1 woman, 20 men) underwent endovascular stent-graft repair, with one procedure carried out under emergency conditions after acute rupture. The mean aneurysm diameter was 4.6 cm.Results:The procedural technical success was 100%. There was zero 30-day mortality. Follow-up was by interval CT scans. At a mean follow-up of 51.2 months, the stent-graft patency rate was 100%. Reintervention was performed in four patients (19%): one patient (4.7%) with a type I endoleak and three patients (14.3%) with type II endoleaks.Conclusion:We conclude that endovascular repair of isolated IAAs is a safe, minimally invasive technique with low morbidity rates. Follow-up results up to 10 years suggest that this approach is durable and should be regarded as a first treatment option for appropriate candidates.

  5. Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Buck, Dominique B; van Herwaarden, Joost A; Schermerhorn, Marc L; Moll, Frans L

    2014-02-01

    Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are usually treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), which has become the standard of care in many hospitals for patients with suitable anatomy. Clinical evidence indicates that EVAR is associated with superior perioperative outcomes and similar long-term survival compared with open repair. Since the randomized, controlled trials that provided this evidence were conducted, however, the stent graft technology for infrarenal AAA has been further developed. Improvements include profile downsizing, optimization of sealing and fixation, and the use of low porosity fabrics. In addition, imaging techniques have improved, enabling better preoperative planning, stent graft placement, and postoperative surveillance. Also in the past few years, fenestrated and branched stent grafts have increasingly been used to manage anatomically challenging aneurysms, and experiments with off-label use of stent grafts have been performed to treat patients deemed unfit or unsuitable for other treatment strategies. Overall, the indications for endovascular management of AAA are expanding to include increasingly complex and anatomically challenging aneurysms. Ongoing studies and optimization of imaging, in addition to technological refinement of stent grafts, will hopefully continue to broaden the utilization of EVAR. PMID:24343568

  6. Endovascular reconstruction of aneurysms with a complex geometry.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipul; Parthasarathy, Rajsrinivas; Jha, Ajaya Nand

    2016-01-01

    Conventional endovascular coiling remains the mainstay of treatment for most aneurysms; however, it may not be suitable for aneurysms with a complex geometry and there remains the risk of recanalization. Aneurysms with an unfavorable morphology are difficult to treat through both endovascular and surgical means. Progress in endovascular technology has allowed for the emergence of newer strategies to treat aneurysms with a complex geometry. Better packing density in wide-necked and large aneurysms can be achieved through the balloon remodeling technique. Similarly, a self-expanding stent cannot only act as a scaffold that helps to retain coils but also aids in diverting the blood flow away from the aneurysm sac. Lately, focus has shifted from endosaccular occlusion to endoluminal reconstruction; flow diverters are being increasingly used to treat aneurysms with an unfavorable geometry. However, there is no clear consensus on the best endovascular management strategy in certain subset of aneurysms - large and giant internal carotid aneurysms, blister aneurysms, and fusiform/dissecting aneurysms of the vertebrobasilar artery. We present a review of literature and discuss the current evidence for the various endovascular strategies to treat complex aneurysms. PMID:26954964

  7. Synchronous colorectal malignancy and abdominal aortic aneurysm treated with endovascular aneurysm repair followed by laparoscopic colectomy.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kazushige; Sunami, Eiji; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kazama, Shinsuke; Kanazawa, Takamitsu; Hosaka, Akihiro; Ishihara, Soichiro; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-04-01

    Although the incidence of synchronous abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and malignancies is increasing, there has been no clear consensus in the surgical treatment of such patients. The focus on surgical treatments with minimal invasiveness, such as endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for AAA and laparoscopic colectomy for colorectal cancer, has increased; however, the clinical applicability of combination treatment with EVAR and laparoscopic colectomy has not been established. A 61-year-old man was diagnosed with AAA, advanced sigmoid colon cancer, and coronary artery stenosis. Because the patient also had chronic renal failure with nephrotic syndrome, among several other comorbidities, surgery was considered to be associated with high risks in this patent. Sequential treatments with percutaneous coronary intervention, EVAR, and laparoscopic colectomy were successfully performed. Staged treatment of EVAR followed by laparoscopic colectomy may be a promising strategy for high-risk patients with AAA associated with malignancy. PMID:25875539

  8. Synchronous Colorectal Malignancy and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Treated With Endovascular Aneurysm Repair Followed by Laparoscopic Colectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Kazushige; Sunami, Eiji; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kazama, Shinsuke; Kanazawa, Takamitsu; Hosaka, Akihiro; Ishihara, Soichiro; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Although the incidence of synchronous abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and malignancies is increasing, there has been no clear consensus in the surgical treatment of such patients. The focus on surgical treatments with minimal invasiveness, such as endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for AAA and laparoscopic colectomy for colorectal cancer, has increased; however, the clinical applicability of combination treatment with EVAR and laparoscopic colectomy has not been established. A 61-year-old man was diagnosed with AAA, advanced sigmoid colon cancer, and coronary artery stenosis. Because the patient also had chronic renal failure with nephrotic syndrome, among several other comorbidities, surgery was considered to be associated with high risks in this patent. Sequential treatments with percutaneous coronary intervention, EVAR, and laparoscopic colectomy were successfully performed. Staged treatment of EVAR followed by laparoscopic colectomy may be a promising strategy for high-risk patients with AAA associated with malignancy. PMID:25875539

  9. Combined Endovascular and Microsurgical Management of Complex Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Choudhri, Omar; Mukerji, Nitin; Steinberg, Gary K.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysms are associated with a 50% mortality rate after rupture and patients can suffer significant morbidity during subsequent treatment. Neurosurgical management of both ruptured and unruptured aneurysms has evolved over the years. The historical practice of using microsurgical clipping to treat aneurysms has benefited in the last two decades from tremendous improvement in endovascular technology. Microsurgery and endovascular therapies are often viewed as competing treatments but it is important to recognize their individual limitations. Some aneurysms are considered complex, due to several factors such as aneurysm anatomy and a patient’s clinical condition. A complex aneurysm often cannot be completely excluded with a single approach and its successful treatment requires a combination of microsurgical and endovascular techniques. Planning such an approach relies on understanding aneurysm anatomy and thus should routinely include 3D angiographic imaging. In patients with ruptured aneurysms, endovascular coiling is a well-tolerated early treatment and residual aneurysms can be treated with intervals of definitive clipping. Microsurgical clipping also can be used to reconstruct the neck of a complex aneurysm, allowing successful placement of coils across a narrow neck. Endovascular techniques are assisted by balloons, which can be used in coiling and testing parent vessel occlusion before sacrifice. In some cases microsurgical bypasses can provide alternate flow for planned vessel sacrifice. We present current paradigms for combining endovascular and microsurgical approaches to treat complex aneurysms and share our experience in 67 such cases. A dual microsurgical–endovascular approach addresses the challenge of intracranial aneurysms. This combination can be performed safely and produces excellent rates of aneurysm obliteration. Hybrid angiographic operating-room suites can foster seamless and efficient complementary application of these two

  10. Endovascular Exclusion of Visceral Artery Aneurysms with Stent-Grafts: Technique and Long-Term Follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Michele; Rebonato, Alberto Greco, Laura; Citone, Michele; David, Vincenzo

    2008-01-15

    This paper describes four cases of visceral artery aneurysms (VAAs) successfully treated with endovascular stent-grafts and discusses the endovascular approach to VAAs and the long-term results. Four balloon expandable stent-grafts were used to treat three splenic artery aneurysms and one bleeding common hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm. The percutaneous access site and the materials were chosen on the basis of CT angiography findings. In all cases the aneurysms were successfully excluded. In one case a splenic infarction occurred, with nonrelevant clinical findings. At 16- to 24-month follow-up three patients had patent stents and complete exclusion and shrinkage of the aneurysms. One patient died due to pancreatitis and sepsis, 16 days after successful stenting and exclusion of a bleeding pseudoaneurysm. We conclude that endovascular treatment using covered stent-grafts is a valid therapeutic option for VAAs. Multislice CT preoperative study helps in planning stent-graft positioning.

  11. Considerations for patients undergoing endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Ullery, Brant W; Lee, Jason T

    2014-09-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has taken over open surgery as the primary strategy for treatment of patients with abdominal and thoracic aneurysms. The minimally invasive nature of these techniques requires alterations in preoperative workup, intraoperative management, and familiarity with unique complications that can occur. Familiarity from the anesthetic standpoint of endovascular techniques, including treatment of patients with fenestrated, chimney, snorkel, and periscope grafts, is necessary for the contemporary cardiac anesthesiologist. PMID:25113729

  12. Complications of Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Katzen, Barry T. MacLean, Alexandra A.

    2006-12-15

    The endovascular procedure for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has had an enormous impact on the treatment of this challenging disease. Complications, however, do occur and it is important to have a thorough understanding of the array of complications and appropriate management strategies. In this review of endovascular complications, we describe early and late complications paying particular attention to preventive, treatment and surveillance strategies.

  13. [Debranch Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Therapy for Extending Aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shinji

    2016-07-01

    To apply endovascular aortic repair for arch or thoracoabdominal pathology, it is essential to reconstruct the branches originating in the treatment area. In cases that a stentgraft has to reach ascending aorta we perform "in situ fenestration with squid capture technique".During the procedure cerebral circulation is maintained by percutaneous cardiopulmonary bypass. After deploying the stentgraft we stab it by a needle while squeezed by snare wire and stick a covered stentgraft eventually. Unlike chimney technique which also can be applied for zone 0 thoracic endovascular aortic therapy( TEVAR),this method has no risk of gutter leak. For now there are no fenestrated nor branched grafts in Japan so that we should perform hybrid TEVAR for throacoabdominal aneurysms if patients' conditions cannot allow graft replacement. In such a case we make bypasses between the common iliac artery( or left leg of bifurcated graft) and visceral arteries using a quadrated graft. All anastomosis can be done in a retroperitoneal single plane. TEVAR shouldn't be performed simultaneously with bypass because unstable hemodynamic increase risk of paraplegia. We have never experienced paraplegia among 50 cases except for 1 case in which TEVAR had to be done urgently under critical hypotension. PMID:27440024

  14. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Renal Transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.; Arya, N. Lee, B.; Hannon, R.J.; Loan, W.; Soong, C.V.

    2004-09-15

    Patients with functioning renal transplant who develop abdominal aortic aneurysm can safely be treated with endovascular repair. Endovascular repair of aneurysm avoids renal ischemia associated with cross-clamping of aorta.

  15. Endovascular Treatment of Visceral Aneurysms and Pseudoaneurysms: Long-term Outcomes from a Multicenter European Study

    SciTech Connect

    Spiliopoulos, Stavros Sabharwal, Tarun; Karnabatidis, Dimitrios; Brountzos, Elias; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Krokidis, Miltiadis; Gkoutzios, Panagiotis; Siablis, Dimitrios; Adam, Andreas

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate the percutaneous endovascular management of visceral aneurysms (VA) and visceral pseudoaneurysms (VPA) treated in three European interventional radiology departments. Methods: Patient archives from the department's databases were examined and retrospectively analyzed. Patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2010 with VA and/or VPA, confirmed by computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, or digital subtraction angiography and treated exclusively with percutaneous endovascular methods, were included in the study. The study's primary end points were procedural technical success, target lesion reintervention rate, and periprocedural mortality rate. Secondary end points included major and minor complications rates. Results: The medical records of 54 patients (41 male, mean age 55 {+-} 18.1 years) with 58 VAs or VPAs and treated with various percutaneous endovascular therapeutic modalities were analyzed. In total, 21 VAs (mean diameter 49.4 {+-} 21 mm, range 20-100 mm) and 37 VPAs (mean diameter 25.1 {+-} 14.6 mm, range 8-60 mm) were treated. Procedural technical success was achieved in 100% of the cases, while target lesion reintervention rate was 6.1% (2 of 33) and 14.2% (3 of 21) in the VPA and VA groups, respectively. Mean clinical follow-up period was 19.1 {+-} 21.4 months. Overall periprocedural mortality rate was 3% (1 of 33) in the VPA group and 0% (0 of 21) in the VA group. Conclusion: Percutaneous endovascular treatment of VAs and VPAs is safe and effective with low morbidity and mortality. There is a small but significant reintervention rate, particularly for true aneurysms; dedicated follow-up imaging is recommended. Successful aneurysm exclusion was achieved in all cases with a second procedure.

  16. Endovascular Treatment of Extracranial Internal Carotid Aneurysms Using Endografts

    SciTech Connect

    Baldi, Sebastian Rostagno, Roman D.; Zander, Tobias; Llorens, Rafael; Schonholz, Claudio; Maynar, Manuel

    2008-03-15

    Aneurysms of the extracranial internal carotid artery (EICA) are infrequent. They are difficult to treat with conventional surgery because of their distal extension into the skull base. We report three cases of EICA aneurysms in two symptomatic patients successfully treated with polytetrafluoroethylene self-expanding endografts using an endovascular approach. The aneurysms were located distal to the carotid bifurcation and extended to the subpetrous portion of the internal carotid artery.

  17. Aneurysm growth after late conversion of thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Ichiro; Haijima, Norimasa

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old man underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair of a descending aortic aneurysm. Three years later, he developed impending rupture due to aneurysmal expansion that included the proximal landing zone. Urgent open surgery was performed via lateral thoracotomy, and a Dacron graft was sewn to the previous stent graft distally with Teflon felt reinforcement. Postoperatively, four sequential computed tomography scans demonstrated that the aneurysm was additionally increasing in size probably due to continuous hematoma production, suggesting a possibility of endoleaks. This case demonstrates the importance of careful radiologic surveillance after endovascular repair, and also after partial open conversion. PMID:27489673

  18. Endovascular Treatment of a Renal Artery Branch Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Malacrida, G.; Dalainas, Ilias Medda, Massimo; Nano, Giovanni; Inglese, Luigi

    2007-02-15

    A 58-year-old woman was admitted to our institution because of a left renal artery branch saccular aneurysm with a 2 cm diameter. Due to a hostile abdomen and the infrarenal location, an endovascular approach was chosen. A Jostent Peripheral Stent-Graft was placed under angiographic control, excluding the aneurysm from the circulation. No peri- or postprocedural complications were observed. At 6 months follow-up, the endograft is patent, excluding the aneurysm. Endovascular treatment may represent an alternative to surgery, especially in the distal infraparenchymal location.

  19. Endovascular treatment of multiple aneurysms complicating Cogan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Angiletta, Domenico; Wiesel, Paola; Pulli, Raffaele; Marinazzo, Davide; Bortone, Alessandro Santo; Regina, Guido

    2015-02-01

    To report the use of endografts to manage multiple aneurysms due to Cogan syndrome (CS). A 38-year-old woman with descending thoracic aorta and right common carotid artery aneurysms due to CS was treated with endovascular grafts. After 4 years, angio computed tomography scan demonstrated complete exclusion of the aneurysms with no signs of endoleak, whereas echo color Doppler showed patency of the carotid graft, no signs of restenosis, no progression of the disease in the landing zones, and complete aneurysm exclusion. Endovascular repair seems to have favorable long-term outcomes and should be considered a viable alternative to surgery in unfit for open surgery patients, even if they are young, and when the aneurysm size and location would pose a higher risk of perioperative and postoperative complications after an open surgical procedure. PMID:25462550

  20. Fenestrated endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms: a less invasive option for the treatment of juxtarenal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Bryan A; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2016-05-01

    Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair has become the predominant surgical therapy for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Whereas anatomical limitations had become the major contraindication to endovascular treatment, fenestrated stent grafts were developed to overcome such obstacles. Fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair now provides an additional treatment option for patients felt to be unsuitable for an invasive open repair whose anatomy is not compatible with more traditional stent grafts. We review the evolution of fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and compare its safety and efficacy to other endovascular options. PMID:27092859

  1. Percutaneous Transosseous Embolization of Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm Type II Endoleak: Report of Two Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmete, Joseph J. Arabi, Mohammad; Cwikiel, Wojciech B.

    2011-02-15

    This report describes two cases of successful treatment of an internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) type II endoleak utilizing a percutaneous transosseous access that could not be treated using an endovascular or standard percutaneous approach. A direct percutaneous approach through bone was chosen to avoid vital structures and the surrounding bowel. The procedure was successful and required minimal fluoroscopy time compared with other treatment options. We believe this procedure is an alternative to some of the more complex and technically challenging means of treating this lesion.

  2. A New Murine Model of Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rouer, Martin; Meilhac, Olivier; Delbosc, Sandrine; Louedec, Liliane; Pavon-Djavid, Graciela; Cross, Jane; Legagneux, Josette; Bouilliant-Linet, Maxime; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Alsac, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm exclusion is a validated technique to prevent aneurysm rupture. Long-term results highlight technique limitations and new aspects of Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) pathophysiology. There is no abdominal aortic aneurysm endograft exclusion model cheap and reproducible, which would allow deep investigations of AAA before and after treatment. We hereby describe how to induce, and then to exclude with a covered coronary stentgraft an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a rat. The well known elastase induced AAA model was first reported in 19901 in a rat, then described in mice2. Elastin degradation leads to dilation of the aorta with inflammatory infiltration of the abdominal wall and intra luminal thrombus, matching with human AAA. Endovascular exclusion with small covered stentgraft is then performed, excluding any interactions between circulating blood and the aneurysm thrombus. Appropriate exclusion and stentgraft patency is confirmed before euthanasia by an angiography thought the left carotid artery. Partial control of elastase diffusion makes aneurysm shape different for each animal. It is difficult to create an aneurysm, which will allow an appropriate length of aorta below the aneurysm for an easy stentgraft introduction, and with adequate proximal and distal neck to prevent endoleaks. Lots of failure can result to stentgraft introduction which sometimes lead to aorta tear with pain and troubles to stitch it, and endothelial damage with post op aorta thrombosis. Giving aspirin to rats before stentgraft implantation decreases failure rate without major hemorrhage. Clamping time activates neutrophils, endothelium and platelets, and may interfere with biological analysis. PMID:23851958

  3. Thrombus Volume Change Visualization after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiora, Josu; García, Guillermo; Macía, Iván; Legarreta, Jon Haitz; Boto, Fernando; Paloc, Céline; Graña, Manuel; Abuín, Javier Sanchez

    A surgical technique currently used in the treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA) is the Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR). This minimally invasive procedure involves inserting a prosthesis in the aortic vessel that excludes the aneurysm from the bloodstream. The stent, once in place acts as a false lumen for the blood current to travel down, and not into the surrounding aneurysm sac. This procedure, therefore, immediately takes the pressure off the aneurysm, which thromboses itself after some time. Nevertheless, in a long term perspective, different complications such as prosthesis displacement or bloodstream leaks into or from the aneurysmatic bulge (endoleaks) could appear causing a pressure elevation and, as a result, increasing the danger of rupture. The purpose of this work is to explore the application of image registration techniques to the visual detection of changes in the thrombus in order to assess the evolution of the aneurysm. Prior to registration, both the lumen and the thrombus are segmented

  4. Design and biocompatibility of endovascular aneurysm filling devices

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N.; Hwang, Wonjun; Horn, John; Landsman, Todd L.; Boyle, Anthony; Wierzbicki, Mark A.; Hasan, Sayyeda M.; Follmer, Douglas; Bryant, Jesse; Small, Ward; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2014-01-01

    The rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which can result in severe mental disabilities or death, affects approximately 30,000 people in the United States annually. The traditional surgical method of treating these arterial malformations involves a full craniotomy procedure, wherein a clip is placed around the aneurysm neck. In recent decades, research and device development have focused on new endovascular treatment methods to occlude the aneurysm void space. These methods, some of which are currently in clinical use, utilize metal, polymeric, or hybrid devices delivered via catheter to the aneurysm site. In this review, we present several such devices, including those that have been approved for clinical use, and some that are currently in development. We present several design requirements for a successful aneurysm filling device and discuss the success or failure of current and past technologies. We also present novel polymeric based aneurysm filling methods that are currently being tested in animal models that could result in superior healing. PMID:25044644

  5. Endovascular coil embolization of unruptured posterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Binning, Mandy; Hakma, Zakaria; Veznedaroglu, Erol

    2014-07-01

    The patient is a 60-year-old woman who presented to her primary care physician with new onset of headache. She was neurologically intact without cranial nerve deficit. An outpatient CT angiogram (CTA) revealed no subarachnoid hemorrhage, but showed a right-sided posterior communicating artery aneurysm measuring 11 mm by 10 mm. Digitally subtracted cerebral angiography confirmed these measurements and showed that the aneurysm was amenable to endovascular coil embolization. The patient underwent aneurysm coiling without complication and was discharged to home on postoperative Day 1. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/MjOc3Zpv2K8 . PMID:24983726

  6. Endovascular Management of Delayed Complete Graft Thrombosis After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Thurley, Peter D.; Glasby, Michael J.; Pollock, John G.; Bungay, Peter; Nunzio, Mario De; El-Tahir, Amin M.; Quarmby, John W.

    2010-08-15

    Graft thrombosis rates after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms vary widely in published series. When thrombosis does occur, it usually involves a single limb and occurs within 3 months of stent-graft insertion. If the entire endoprosthesis is thrombosed, treatment may be challenging because femoro-femoral crossover graft insertion is not an option and a greater volume of thrombus is present, thus making thrombolysis more difficult. We present two cases of delayed thrombosis after EVAR involving the entire stent-graft. These were successfully treated by a combined surgical and endovascular technique, and patency has been maintained in both cases to date.

  7. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Sac Rupture for Type IIIa Endoleak in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Previously Excluded with Endovascular Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Mangini, Monica Bracchi, Elena Recaldini, Chiara; Cocozza, Eugenio; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Pellegrino, Carlo Lagana, Domenico Fugazzola, Carlo

    2010-08-15

    Elective endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic pathology has been applied in a variety of conditions. The complications of thoracic aortic stenting are also well recognized. Endoleak after endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms is the most frequent complication; among them, type III is the least frequent. Endovascular treatment of type III endoleak is generally performed under elective conditions; less frequently, in emergency. We report a successful emergency endovascular management of post-thoracic endovascular repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm rupture due to type IIIa endoleak.

  8. Percutaneous endovascular stents: an experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wright, K C; Wallace, S; Charnsangavej, C; Carrasco, C H; Gianturco, C

    1985-07-01

    Percutaneous, expanding, endovascular stents were constructed of stainless steel wire formed in a zig-zag pattern. Stents were placed for varying periods of time in the jugular vein, vena cava, and abdominal aorta in each of five adult dogs. The dilating force of the stents could be controlled by different wire size, number and angle of wire bends, and stent length. In addition, multiple stents could be placed one inside the other or one after the other, depending on the circumstance. The stents distended the vessels and increased their diameter. No flow defects, luminal narrowing, or occlusion were noted in any of the stented vessels, even after 6 months. Side branches bridged by the stents remained patent and showed no indication of narrowing. Stent wires became encased by a proliferation of the tunica intima where they contacted the vessel wall. Encasement was slower and less extensive in the abdominal aorta. No vascular erosion or clot formation was found to be associated with any of the stents. PMID:4001423

  9. Management of Splenic Artery Aneurysms and False Aneurysms with Endovascular Treatment in 12 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Guillon, R.; Garcier, J.M.; Abergel, A.; Mofid, R.; Garcia, V.; Chahid, T.; Ravel, A.; Pezet, D.; Boyer, L.

    2003-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the endovascular treatment of splenic artery aneurysms and false aneurysms. Methods: Twelve patients (mean age 59 years, range 47-75 years) with splenic artery aneurysm (n = 10) or false aneurysm (n = 2) were treated. The lesion was asymptomatic in 11 patients; hemobilia was observed in one patient. The lesion was juxta-ostial in one case, located on the intermediate segment of the splenic artery in four, near the splenic hilus in six,and affected the whole length of the artery in one patient. In 10 cases, the maximum lesion diameter was greater than 2 cm; in one case 30% growth of an aneurysm 18 mm in diameter had occurred in 6 months;in the last case, two distal aneurysms were associated (17 and 18 mm in diameter). In one case, stent-grafting was attempted; one detachable balloon occlusion was performed; the 10 other patients were treated with coils. Results: Endovascular treatment was possible in 11 patients (92%) (one failure: stenting attempt). In four cases among 11, the initial treatment was not successful (residual perfusion of aneurysm); surgical treatment was carried out in one case, and a second embolization in two. Thus in nine cases (75%) endovascular treatment was successful: complete and persistent exclusion of the aneurysm but with spleen perfusion persisting at the end of follow-upon CT scans (mean 13 months). An early and transient elevation of pancreatic enzymes was observed in four cases. Conclusion: Ultrasound and CT have made the diagnosis of splenic artery aneurysm or false aneurysm more frequent. Endovascular treatment, the morbidity of which is low, is effective and spares the spleen.

  10. Ten-Year Follow-Up of Endovascular Aneurysm Treatment with Talent Stent-Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Pitton, Michael B. Scheschkowski, Tobias; Ring, Markus; Herber, Sascha; Oberholzer, Katja; Leicher-Dueber, Annegret; Neufang, Achim; Schmiedt, Walther; Dueber, Christoph

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical results, complications, and secondary interventions during long-term follow-up after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to investigate the impact of endoleak sizes on aneurysm shrinkage. From 1997 to March 2007, 127 patients (12 female, 115 male; age, 73.0 {+-} 7.2 years) with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated with Talent stent-grafts. Follow-up included clinical visits, contrast-enhanced MDCT, and radiographs at 3, 6, and 12 months and then annually. Results were analyzed with respect to clinical outcome, secondary interventions, endoleak rate and management, and change in aneurysm size. There was no need for primary conversion surgery. Thirty-day mortality was 1.6% (two myocardial infarctions). Procedure-related morbidity was 2.4% (paraplegia, partial infarction of one kidney, and inguinal bleeding requiring surgery). Mean follow-up was 47.7 {+-} 34.2 months (range, 0-123 months). Thirty-nine patients died during follow-up; three of the deaths were related to aneurysm (aneurysm rupture due to endoleak, n = 1; secondary surgical reintervention n = 2). During follow-up, a total of 29 secondary procedures were performed in 19 patients, including 14 percutaneous procedures (10 patients) and 15 surgical procedures (12 patients), including 4 cases with late conversion to open aortic repair (stent-graft infection, n = 1; migration, endoleak, or endotension, n = 3). Overall mean survival was 84.5 {+-} 4.7 months. Mean survival and freedom from any event was 66.7 {+-} 4.5 months. MRI depicted significantly more endoleaks compared to MDCT (23.5% vs. 14.3%; P < 0.01). Patients in whom all aneurysm side branches were occluded prior to stent-grafting showed a significantly reduced incidence of large endoleaks. Endoleaks >10% of the aneurysm area were associated with reduced aneurysm shrinkage compared to no endoleaks or <10% endoleaks ({Delta} at 3 years, -1.8% vs. -12.0%; P < 0.05). In conclusion, endovascular

  11. Aortic Arch Aneurysms: Treatment with Extra anatomical Bypass and Endovascular Stent-Grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Noriyuki; Shimono, Takatsugu; Hirano, Tadanori; Mizumoto, Toru; Ishida, Masaki; Fujii, Hideki; Yada, Isao; Takeda, Kan

    2002-10-15

    Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms is emerging as an attractive alternative to surgical graft replacement. However,patients with aortic arch aneurysms are often excluded from the target of endovascular repair because of lack of suitable landing zones, especially at the proximal ones. In this paper we describe our method for treating patients with aortic arch aneurysms using a combination of extra anatomical bypass surgery and endovascular stent-grafting.

  12. Anesthetic considerations for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Kothandan, Harikrishnan; Haw Chieh, Geoffrey Liew; Khan, Shariq Ali; Karthekeyan, Ranjith Baskar; Sharad, Shah Shitalkumar

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysm is defined as a localized and permanent dilatation with an increase in normal diameter by more than 50%. It is more common in males and can affect up to 8% of elderly men. Smoking is the greatest risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and other risk factors include hypertension, hyperlipidemia, family history of aneurysms, inflammatory vasculitis, and trauma. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair [EVAR] is a common procedure performed for AAA, because of its minimal invasiveness as compared with open surgical repair. Patients undergoing EVAR have a greater incidence of major co-morbidities and should undergo comprehensive preoperative assessment and optimization within the multidisciplinary settings. In majority of cases, EVAR is extremely well-tolerated. The aim of this article is to outline the Anesthetic considerations related to EVAR. PMID:26750684

  13. Endovascular Stenting of Peripheral Infected Aneurysms: A Temporary Measure or a Definitive Solution in High-Risk Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Riga, Celia; Bicknell, Colin; Jindal, Ravul; Cheshire, Nicholas; Hamady, Mohamad

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the use of endovascular technology in the management of peripheral infected aneurysms in high-risk patients as a temporary measure or definitive solution. Five cases underwent successful endovascular stenting of infected aneurysms of the subclavian, femoral, and carotid arteries. All these patients were at high risk for open surgery. Covered stents were placed by percutaneous approach under local anesthesia in all patients. Postoperatively, antibiotics were continued for 3 months. A literature review using the Medline database was also undertaken, and all the relevant papers on endovascular management of peripheral infected aneurysms were taken into account. Stent deployment was successful in all patients. One patient died of mediastinal sepsis and another from type A aortic dissection 5 weeks later. Two patients required drainage of the infected hematoma. Three patients did well at a median follow-up of 1 year, with no evidence of sepsis. A review of the literature shows promising early and midterm results. Most early reports were of single cases, reflecting the low incidence of peripheral infected aneurysms. We conclude that further development of endoluminal techniques and long-term follow-up to establish the durability of stenting could potentially lead to a decrease in the high morbidity and mortality rates associated with infected aneurysmal disease in this high-risk group of patients.

  14. Complete regression of a symptomatic, mycotic juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm after treatment with fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Durgin, Jonathan M; Arous, Edward J; Kumar, Shivani; Robinson, William P; Simons, Jessica P; Schanzer, Andres

    2016-09-01

    Mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysms are rare and present unique challenges when potential treatment options are considered. Although aortic resection with in situ grafting techniques or extra-anatomic reconstruction are the treatments of choice, endovascular aortic repair has emerged as a suitable alternative in critically ill patients. We report the successful endovascular repair of a symptomatic, mycotic juxtarenal aortic aneurysm using a physician-modified fenestrated endograft. In this patient, with >6 months of follow-up, the aneurysm has completely regressed, illustrating that in select patients with complex mycotic aneurysms, endovascular repair combined with appropriate medical management is a viable treatment strategy. PMID:26747681

  15. Custom fenestration templates for endovascular repair of juxtarenal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Daniel F; Starnes, Benjamin W

    2015-06-01

    Physician-modified endovascular grafts, with fenestrations added to accommodate major branch vessels, provide a means for endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms that are adjacent to the renal arteries. Manual measurements of vessel origin locations from computed tomography images, however, take time and can lead to errors in the positions of the fenestrations. To make the fenestration process faster and more accurate, we have developed a procedure to create custom templates that serve as patient-specific guides for graft fenestration. We use a three-dimensional printer to create a clear rigid sleeve that replicates the patient's aorta and includes holes placed precisely at the locations of the branch vessels. The sleeve is slipped over the graft, the locations of the openings are marked with a pen, and the fenestrations are created after the sleeve is removed. Custom fenestration templates can potentially save procedural costs and make minimally invasive aortic aneurysm repair available to more patients. PMID:25864045

  16. Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Cartes-Zumelzu, F; Lammer, J; Kretschmer, G; Hoelzenbein, T; Grabenwöger, M; Thurnher, S

    2000-03-01

    The standard technique for the treatment of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms is elective open surgical repair with graft interposition. This standard approach, although steadily improving, is associated with high morbidity and substantial mortality rates and implies a major surgical procedure with lateral thoracotomy, use of cardiopulmonary bypass, long operation times and a variety of peri- and postoperative complications. This and the success of the first endoluminal treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms by Parodi et al. prompted the attention to be thrown on the treatment of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms with endoluminal stent-grafts in many large centres. The aim of this new minimally invasive technique is to exclude the aneurysm from blood flow and in consequence to avoid pressure stress on the aneurysmatic aortic wall, by avoiding a large open operation with significant perioperative morbidity. The potentially beneficial effect of this new treatment approach was evaluated in the course of this study. PMID:10875224

  17. Design and biocompatibility of endovascular aneurysm filling devices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N.; Hwang, Wonjun; Horn, John; Landsman, Todd L.; Boyle, Anthony; Wierzbicki, Mark A.; Hasan, Sayyeda M.; Follmer, Douglas; Bryant, Jesse; Small, Ward; et al

    2014-08-04

    We report that the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which can result in severe mental disabilities or death, affects approximately 30,000 people in the United States annually. The traditional surgical method of treating these arterial malformations involves a full craniotomy procedure, wherein a clip is placed around the aneurysm neck. In recent decades, research and device development have focused on new endovascular treatment methods to occlude the aneurysm void space. These methods, some of which are currently in clinical use, utilize metal, polymeric, or hybrid devices delivered via catheter to the aneurysm site. In this review, we present several suchmore » devices, including those that have been approved for clinical use, and some that are currently in development. We present several design requirements for a successful aneurysm filling device and discuss the success or failure of current and past technologies. Lastly, we also present novel polymeric based aneurysm filling methods that are currently being tested in animal models that could result in superior healing.« less

  18. Design and biocompatibility of endovascular aneurysm filling devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N.; Hwang, Wonjun; Horn, John; Landsman, Todd L.; Boyle, Anthony; Wierzbicki, Mark A.; Hasan, Sayyeda M.; Follmer, Douglas; Bryant, Jesse; Small, Ward; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2014-08-04

    We report that the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which can result in severe mental disabilities or death, affects approximately 30,000 people in the United States annually. The traditional surgical method of treating these arterial malformations involves a full craniotomy procedure, wherein a clip is placed around the aneurysm neck. In recent decades, research and device development have focused on new endovascular treatment methods to occlude the aneurysm void space. These methods, some of which are currently in clinical use, utilize metal, polymeric, or hybrid devices delivered via catheter to the aneurysm site. In this review, we present several such devices, including those that have been approved for clinical use, and some that are currently in development. We present several design requirements for a successful aneurysm filling device and discuss the success or failure of current and past technologies. Lastly, we also present novel polymeric based aneurysm filling methods that are currently being tested in animal models that could result in superior healing.

  19. Treatment of a Hepatic Artery Aneurysm by Endovascular Stent-Grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Jenssen, Guttorm L. Wirsching, Jan; Pedersen, Gustav; Amundsen, Svein Roar; Aune, Steinar; Dregelid, Einar; Jonung, Torbjorn; Daryapeyma, Alireza; Laxdal, Elin

    2007-06-15

    Aneurysms of the visceral arteries are rare. Traditional treatment has been surgical or endovascular with coil embolization. Recently, however, reports on endovascular therapy with stent-grafts have been published. We report the case of a 61-year-old man who was successfully treated with a stent-graft for a symptomatic combined celiac/hepatic artery aneurysm.

  20. Branched endovascular stent–graft for suprarenal aortic aneurysm: the future of aortic stent-grafting?

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Leonard W.; Steinmetz, Oren K.; Abraham, Cherrie Z.; Valenti, David A.; MacKenzie, Kent S.; Obrand, Daniel I.; Chuter, Timothy A.

    2004-01-01

    The use of a branched endovascular stent–graft to repair an aneurysm of the visceral aorta is described. The evolving role of branched endovascular stent–grafts in the management of aortic aneurysms is discussed, and the literature reviewed. PMID:15362327

  1. Comparative study of novel endovascular treatment techniques for intracranial aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantón, Gádor; Lasheras, Juan C.; Levy, David I.; Sparks, Steven R.

    2002-11-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are life-threatening vascular lesions, which are potentially treatable to avoid the consequences of their rupture. Current treatments, either surgical or endovascular, are all guided to reduce the hemodynamic forces acting on the aneurysm wall in an effort to minimize the risk of rupture. Surgical clipping is still the most used technique to treat this type of aneurysm but there is a continued demand for less invasive approaches. This has led to the development of several endovascular techniques. We report here a comparative study of the reduction in the hemodynamic stresses and the modification of the flow in the parent vessel resulting from the use of three different techniques. The first one consists of endosaccular packing with platinum coils (GDC, Target Therapeutics), which is already widely used but its long-term efficacy has not yet been determined. The second one consists of the embolization of the aneurismal sac with Onyx, a polymer which hardens when in contact with the blood (being developed by Micro Therapeutics, Inc.). The third one involves the packing of the sac with hydrocoils, platinum wires coated with a gel which quickly hydrates when in contact with blood (developed by MicroVention). A Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) system is used to measure in vitro the velocity field inside a model of an ACOM aneurysm (an aneurysm forming in the anterior communicating artery). Physiological accurate pulsatile flow conditions are input to the arterial model through a programmable pump. The measurements show that although all treatment techniques lead to a reduction in both normal and tangential shear stresses on the aneurismal sac, each one of them also leads to different modifications of the flow in the parent vessel which may have consequences related to potential for clotting. Comparison of the untreated aneurysm with the above three treated cases also showed that the characteristics of the wall shear stresses on the parent

  2. [Combined Open and Endovascular Repair of Multiple Aortic Aneurysms due to Syphilitic Aortitis].

    PubMed

    Shima, Shotaro; Okamura, Kennichi; Morizumi, Sei; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Suematsu, Yoshihiro

    2015-06-01

    The patient was a 69-year-old man who presented with low-grade fever and appetite loss. Thoracoabdominal computed tomography revealed multiple aneurysms in the distal arch and descending thoracic and infrarenal aortic regions combined with a right common iliac artery aneurysm. After endovascular stent grafting for a right iliac artery aneurysm, he underwent total arch replacement and open stent grafting for the descending thoracic aneurysms. Pathological microscopic examination revealed an inflammatory infiltrate within the adventitia and destruction of the elastic fibers in the media, which are classical features of syphilitic aortitis. Endovascular aneurysm repair is contraindicated in mycotic infected aneurysms. However, endovascular repair is useful for treating mycotic infected aneurysm, if multiple aneurysms have the possibility of rupture and a high risk of surgery. PMID:26066872

  3. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Feasibility and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lagana, Domenico Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Caronno, Roberto; Castelli, Patrizio; Cuffari, Salvatore; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of emergency endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Methods. During 36 months we treated, on an emergency basis, 30 AAAs with endovascular exclusion. In 21 hemodynamically stable patients preoperative CT angiography (CTA) was performed to confirm the diagnosis and to plan the treatment; 9 patients with hemorrhagic shock were evaluated with angiography performed in the operating room. Twenty-two Excluder (Gore) and 8 Zenith (Cook) stent-grafts (25 bifurcated and 5 aorto-uni-iliac) were used. The follow-up was performed by CTA at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results. Technical success was achieved in 100% of cases with a 10% mortality rate. The total complication rate was 23% (5 increases in serum creatinine level and 2 wound infections). During the follow-up, performed in 27 patients (1-36 months, mean 15.2 months), 4 secondary endoleaks (15%) (3 type II, 2 spontaneously thrombosed and 1 under observation, and 1 type III treated by iliac extender insertion) and 1 iliac leg occlusion (treated with femoro-femoral bypass) occurred. We observed a shrinkage of the aneurysmal sac in 8 of 27 cases and stability in 19 of 27 cases; we did not observe any endotension. Conclusions. Endovascular repair is a good option for emergency treatment of AAAs. The team's experience allows correct planning of the procedure in emergency situations also, with technical results comparable with elective repair. In our experience the bifurcated stent-graft is the device of choice in patients with suitable anatomy because the procedure is less time-consuming than aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafting with surgical crossover, allowing faster aneurysm exclusion. However, further studies are required to demonstrate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair compared with surgical treatment.

  4. Late Recurrence of a Hepatic Artery Aneurysm After Treatment Using an Endovascular Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Downer, Jonathan; Choji, Kiyoshi

    2008-11-15

    Endovascular stent placement and coil embolization have become established options in the treatment of visceral arterial aneurysms. In this article we report the case of an 83-year-old presenting with gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to a recurrent hepatic arterial aneurysm occurring 12 years after treatment with an endovascular stent. The recurrent aneurysm had resulted from stent fracture and was successfully treated by coil embolization. To our knowledge, stent fracture complicating the endovascular treatment of a visceral artery aneurysm has not been described in the published literature. With the increasing use of metallic endoprostheses in interventional radiology, recognizing and reporting device failure are of critical importance.

  5. Endovascular vs. Open Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Patelis, Nikolaos; Moris, Demetrios; Karaolanis, Georgios; Georgopoulos, Sotiris

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients presenting with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms are most often treated with open repair despite the fact that endovascular aneurysm repair is a less invasive and widely accepted method with clear benefits for elective aortic aneurysm patients. A debate exists regarding the definitive benefit in endovascular repair for patients with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. The aim of this literature review was to determine if any trends exist in favor of either open or endovascular repair. Material/Methods A literature search was performed using PUBMED, OVID, and Google Scholar databases. The search yielded 64 publications. Results Out of 64 publications, 25 were retrospective studies, 12 were population-based, 21 were prospective, 5 were the results of RCTs, and 1 was a case-series. Sixty-one studies reported on early mortality and provided data comparing endovascular repair (rEVAR) and open repair (rOR) for ruptured abdominal aneurysm groups. Twenty-nine of these studies reported that rEVAR has a lower early mortality rate. Late mortality after rEVAR compared to that of rOR was reported in 21 studies for a period of 3 to 60 months. Results of 61.9% of the studies found no difference in late mortality rates between these 2 groups. Thirty-nine publications reported on the incidence of complications. Approximately half of these publications support that the rEVAR group has a lower complication rate and the other half found no difference between the groups. Length of hospital stay has been reported to be shorter for rEVAR in most studies. Blood loss and need for transfusion of either red cells or fresh frozen plasma was consistently lower in the rEVAR group. Conclusions Differences between the included publications affect the outcomes. Randomized control trials have not been able to provide clear conclusions. rEVAR can now be considered a safe method of treating rAAA, and is at least equal to the well-established rOR method. PMID:27090791

  6. Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Iliac Aneurysm Previously Treated by Endovascular Means

    SciTech Connect

    Dalainas, Ilias Nano, Giovanni; Stegher, Silvia; Bianchi, Paolo; Malacrida, Giovanni; Tealdi, Domenico G.

    2008-03-15

    A patient with a ruptured iliac aneurysm was admitted to the Emergency Department in hypovolemic shock. He had previously undergone surgical treatment for an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm, which was managed with a terminal-terminal Dacron tube graft. Subsequently, he developed two iliac aneurysms, which were treated endovascularly with two wall-grafts in the right and one wall-graft in the left iliac arteries. He suffered chronic renal failure and arterial hypertension. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed rupture of the right iliac aneurysm and dislocation of the two wall-grafts. He was treated in an emergency situation with the implantation of an iliac endograft that bridged the two wall-grafts, which resulted in hemostasis and stabilization of his condition. Five days later, in an elective surgical situation, he was treated with the implantation of an aorto-uni-iliac endograft combined with a femoral-femoral bypass. He was discharged 5 days later in good condition. At the 4 year follow-up visit, the endoprosthesis remained in place with no evidence of an endoleak. In conclusion, overlapping of endografts should be avoided, if possible. Strict surveillance of the endovascularly treated patient remains mandatory.

  7. Endovascular occlusion of intracranial aneurysms with electrically detachable coils: Correlation of aneurysm neck size and treatment results

    SciTech Connect

    Zubillaga, A.F.; Guglielmi, G.; Vinuela, F.; Duckwiler, G.R.

    1994-05-01

    To devise a method to measure aneurysm neck size on angiographic films, and to correlate the sizes obtained with the extent of endovascular aneurysm occlusion, performed with electrically detachable coils. The angiograms of 79 intracranial aneurysms treated by endovascular occlusion using electrically detachable coils were retrospectively analyzed. A method using the average reported caliber of the major intracranial vessels was applied to determine the aneurysm neck sizes on the diagnostic angiograms. The cases were divided into two groups according to neck size, 4 mm being the discriminative value for small and wide necks. The posttreatment angiogram of each case was analyzed to evaluate the degree of occlusion achieved by the technique. Necks were successfully measured in 95% of the aneurysms. Complete aneurysm thrombosis was observed in 85% of the small-necked aneurysms and in 15% of the wide-necked aneurysms. Accurate angiographic measurements of neck diameter can be obtained in most aneurysms. The size of an aneurysm neck correlates well with the results of the endovascular treatment. Small-necked aneurysms can be satisfactorily occluded with this technique. In wide-necked aneurysms this technique should be reserved for lesions having a high surgical risk. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Endovascular Broad-Neck Aneurysm Creation in a Porcine Model Using a Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlenbruch, Georg Nikoubashman, Omid; Steffen, Bjoern; Dadak, Mete; Palmowski, Moritz; Wiesmann, Martin

    2013-02-15

    Ruptured cerebral arterial aneurysms require prompt treatment by either surgical clipping or endovascular coiling. Training for these sophisticated endovascular procedures is essential and ideally performed in animals before their use in humans. Simulators and established animal models have shown drawbacks with respect to degree of reality, size of the animal model and aneurysm, or time and effort needed for aneurysm creation. We therefore aimed to establish a realistic and readily available aneurysm model. Five anticoagulated domestic pigs underwent endovascular intervention through right femoral access. A total of 12 broad-neck aneurysms were created in the carotid, subclavian, and renal arteries using the Amplatzer vascular plug. With dedicated vessel selection, cubic, tubular, and side-branch aneurysms could be created. Three of the 12 implanted occluders, two of them implanted over a side branch of the main vessel, did not induce complete vessel occlusion. However, all aneurysms remained free of intraluminal thrombus formation and were available for embolization training during a surveillance period of 6 h. Two aneurysms underwent successful exemplary treatment: one was stent-assisted, and one was performed with conventional endovascular coil embolization. The new porcine aneurysm model proved to be a straightforward approach that offers a wide range of training and scientific applications that might help further improve endovascular coil embolization therapy in patients with cerebral aneurysms.

  9. Multiple endovascular aortic aneurysm repair graft failures and re-interventions over 15 years

    PubMed Central

    Belchos, Jessica; Wheatcroft, Mark; Moloney, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Re-intervention on abdominal aortic aneurysm treated by endovascular aortic aneurysm repair for complications such as endoleak, graft migration, and graft failure is relatively common. However, re-do endovascular aortic aneurysm repair can be complex, as the failed graft still resides within the vessel. In addition, some re-do endovascular aortic aneurysm repairs call for an advanced custom graft, which can further increase the complexity and technical skill required. We describe a case of a 15-year-old endovascular aortic aneurysm repair originally implanted in a 71-year-old man, followed by three separate complications requiring intervention. We describe important procedural decisions taken into consideration when presented with failure of an older graft. PMID:27489701

  10. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair and Sealing (EVARS): A Useful Adjunct in Treating Challenging Morphology.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Gareth J; Antoniou, George A; Torella, Francesco; McWilliams, Richard G; Fisher, Robert K

    2016-04-01

    An 81-year-old male with previous open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair presented with asymptomatic large pseudoaneurysms at both ends of an open surgical tube graft. Endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS) in combination with the iliac limbs of a standard endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) successfully excluded both pseudoaneurysms from circulation. We describe the combination of elements of EVAS and EVAR and have termed this endovascular aneurysm repair and sealing (EVARS). EVARS has the advantage of harnessing the benefits of endobag sealing in aortic necks unsuitable for standard EVAR whilst providing the security of accurate stent placement within short common iliac arteries. In conclusion, EVAS may be combined with standard endovascular iliac limbs and is a possible treatment option for pseudoaneurysm following open aneurysm repair. PMID:26493819

  11. Emergent Endovascular Stent Grafts for Ruptured Aortic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Jennifer P; Kolbeck, Kenneth J; Kaufman, John A

    2015-09-01

    Ruptured aortic aneurysms uniformly require emergent attention. Historically, urgent surgical repair or medical management was the only treatment options. The development of covered stent grafts has introduced a third approach in the care of these critical patients. The clinical status of the patient and local physician expertise drive the treatment modalities in the majority of cases. The goal of therapy in these patients is to stabilize the patient as quickly as possible, establish maximum survival with minimum morbidity, and provide a long lasting result. The endovascular approach has become an acceptable treatment option in an increasing number of patients presenting with ruptured aneurysmal disease of both the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta. Major factors influencing treatment include patient clinical status, characteristics of the aorta, physician preference, institutional experience, and availability of appropriate equipment. Planning, experience, and the ability to improvise effective solutions are keys to the success of the procedure when endovascular techniques are utilized. Three separate cases, requiring intraprocedural improvisation, are presented followed by a review of the literature. PMID:26327743

  12. Another late complication after endovascular aneurysm repair: aneurysmal degeneration at the iliac artery landing site.

    PubMed

    Agu, Obekieze; Boardley, Dee; Adiseshiah, Mohan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a hitherto underreported late complication of infrarenal endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), namely type Ib endoleakage resulting from aneurysmal degeneration at the iliac artery landing site. In a prospectively recorded audit, between 1994 and 2007, 297 patients underwent EVAR. All cases that developed iliac artery aneurysm (IAA) were studied. Ten cases of IAA in seven patients (2.4% of the cohort) developed 5 to 9 years after EVAR. Eight of the 10 involved the lower landing site of the stent graft. Landing site diameter before EVAR was 12 mm (range 10-15 mm). Three IAAs presented as emergencies with rapidly expanding sacs and impending rupture. All cases underwent further endovascular intervention with no < 30-day mortality. Iliac artery landing site aneurysm formation after EVAR occurs uncommonly after 5 or more years. It should be regarded as an indication for intervention prior to type Ib endoleakage development. The need for lifelong surveillance is highlighted. PMID:19344588

  13. Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Aortocaval Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Guzzardi, Giuseppe Fossaceca, Rita; Divenuto, Ignazio; Musiani, Antonello; Brustia, Piero; Carriero, Alessandro

    2010-08-15

    Aortocaval fistula (ACF) is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We report the endovascular repair of an AAA rupture into the inferior vena cava. A 78-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for acute hypotension. She presented with a pulsatile abdominal mass and became rapidly anuric. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed an AAA rupture into the inferior vena cava. The features of the AAA made it suitable for endovascular repair. To prevent pulmonary embolism caused by the presence of sac thrombosis near the vena cava lumen, a temporary vena cava filter was deployed before the procedure. A bifurcated stent-graft was placed with the patient under local anaesthesia, and the AAA was successfully treated. A transient type II endoleak was detected on CT 3 days after endograft placement. At routine follow-up 6 and 12 months after the procedure, the patient was in good clinical condition, and the type II endoleak had sealed completely. Endovascular treatment offers an attractive therapeutic alternative to open repair in case of ACF; however, only small numbers of patients have been treated, and long-term follow-up interval is lacking.

  14. Type B Aortic Dissection with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture 1 Year after Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Guillaume; Ben Ahmed, Sabrina; Warein, Edouard; Gallon, Arnaud; Rosset, Eugenio

    2016-05-01

    We report a patient who developed a type B aortic dissection and ruptured his aneurysmal sac 1 year after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), despite standard follow-up. This 79-year-old man was presented to emergency room with acute abdominal pain and an acute lower limb ischemia. Computed tomography scan showed an acute type B aortic dissection feeding the aneurysmal sac of the EVAR. The aneurysm rupture occurred during imaging. Type B aortic dissection is a rare cause of aneurysmal rupture after EVAR. The first postoperative computed tomography scan should maybe include the arch and the descending thoracic aorta to rule out an iatrogenic dissection after EVAR. PMID:26902937

  15. Extra-anatomic endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a horseshoe kidney supplied by the aneurysmal aorta.

    PubMed

    Rey, Jorge; Golpanian, Samuel; Yang, Jane K; Moreno, Enrique; Velazquez, Omaida C; Goldstein, Lee J; Chahwala, Veer

    2015-07-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated by a horseshoe kidney (HSK, fused kidney) represents a unique challenge for repair. Renal arteries arising from the aneurysmal aorta can further complicate intervention. Reports exist describing the repair of these complex anatomies using fenestrated endografts, hybrid open repairs (debranching), and open aneurysmorrhaphy with preservation of renal circulation. We describe an extra-anatomic, fully endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a HSK partially supplied by a renal artery arising from the aneurysm. We successfully applied aortouni-iliac endografting, femorofemoral bypass, and retrograde renal artery perfusion via the contralateral femoral artery to exclude the abdominal aortic aneurysm and preserve circulation to the HSK. PMID:25770382

  16. Endovascular Coiling of Aneurysm Remnants after Clipping in Patients with Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Mangiafico, S.; Cellerini, M.; Villa, G.; Ammannati, F.; Paoli, L.; Mennonna, P.

    2005-01-01

    Summary The vast majority of intracranial aneurysms can be obliterated completely with surgical clipping. However, postoperative remnants occur in about 4 to 8% of patients who undergo postoperative angiography. Endovascular embolization has been successfully performed in patients with postoperative aneurysm remnant and it may represent a therapeutic alternative to surgical reintervention. Twelve aneurysm remnants after surgical clipping were treated with endovascular embolization using GDC. All aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation. Our experience confirms the feasibility and relative safety of this treatment strategy that may be considered a valid alternative to reintervention. PMID:20584434

  17. Successful Endovascular Repair of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    SciTech Connect

    Kaskarelis, Ioannis S. Koukoulaki, Maria; Lappas, Ioannis; Karkatzia, Fani; Dimopoulos, Nikitas; Filias, Vasilios; Bellenis, Ion; Vougas, Vasilios; Drakopoulos, Spiros

    2006-04-15

    A renal transplant recipient presented in the early post-transplantation period with rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The high mortality rate of the surgical repair of ruptured aneurysm in addition to the concern of preserving the renal graft prompted us to seek alternative approaches, such as repairing the aneurysm by means of endovascular techniques. The ruptured aneurysm was confirmed by performing computed tomography and digital angiography and thereafter was successfully repaired by endovascular stenting technique (Talent stent-graft), which seems to be a safe and effective method of preserving a renal graft.

  18. Modification of an endovascular stent graft for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moloye, Olajompo Busola

    Endovascular surgery is currently used to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). A stent graft is deployed to exclude blood flow from the aneurysm sac. It is an effective procedure used in preventing aneurysm rupture, with reduced patient morbidity and mortality compared to open surgical repair. Migration and leakage around the device ("endoleak") due to poor sealing of the stent graft to the aorta have raised concerns about the long-term durability of endovascular repair. A preliminary study of cell migration and proliferation is presented as a prelude to a more extensive in vivo testing. A method to enhance the biological seal between the stent graft and the aorta is proposed to eliminate this problem. This can be achieved by impregnating the stent graft with 50/50 poly (DL-lactide co glycolic acid) (PLGA) and growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), at the proximal and distal ends. It is hypothesized that as PLGA degrades it will release the growth factors that will promote proliferation and migration of aortic smooth muscle cells to the coated site, leading to a natural seal between the aorta and the stent graft. In addition, growth factor release should promote smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction that will help keep the stent graft in place at the proximal and distal ends. It is shown that a statistically significant effect of increased cell proliferation and migration is observed for CTGF release. Less of an effect is noted for bFGF or just the PLGA. The effect is estimated to be large enough to be clinically significant in a future animal study. The long term goal of this study is to reduce migration encounter after graft deployment and to reduce secondary interventions of EVAR especially for older patients who are unfit for open surgical treatment.

  19. Endovascular Treatment of Multiple HIV-related Aneurysms Using Multilayer Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Euringer, Wulf; Suedkamp, Michael; Rylski, Bartosz; Blanke, Philipp

    2012-08-15

    Complex peripheral aneurysm anatomy with major artery branches in the immediate vicinity and mycotic aneurysm often impede endovascular management using covered stent grafts. The Cardiatis Multilayer Stent (Cardiatis, Isnes, Belgium) is a recently approved innovative stent system for peripheral aneurysm management. Its multilayer design aims at decreasing mean velocity and vorticity within the aneurysm sac to cause thrombus formation while maintaining patency of branching vessels due to laminar flow. We present a case of bilateral subclavian artery aneurysms and perivisceral aortic aneurysms in an AIDS patient successfully treated with the Cardiatis Multilayer Stent at 18 months' follow-up.

  20. Recovery of Third Nerve Palsy after Endovascular Packing of Internal Carotid-Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Mavilio, N.; Pisani, R.; Rivano, C.; Testa, V.; Spaziante, R.; Rosa, M.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Endovascular packing of intracranial aneurysm with preservation of the parent vessel has become in many cases a valid alternative to surgical clipping. Regression of oculomotor disorders after clipping of internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (ICA-PCoA) aneurysms has been well assessed. This report focuses on the reversal of third nerve palsy after endovascular packing of ICA-PCoA aneurysms. To this end, clinical appearances, neuroradiological features, and endovascular interventional procedures of six treated patient are reported and discussed in the light of the very few previous case observations found in the literature. Results indicate that endovascular packing of ICA-PCoA aneurysms may produce effective recovery of correlated third nerve dysfunction. PMID:20667199

  1. Epithelioid Angiosarcoma With Metastatic Disease After Endovascular Therapy of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Schmehl, Joerg; Scharpf, Marcus; Brechtel, Klaus; Kalender, Guenay; Heller, Stephan; Claussen, Claus D.; Lescan, Mario

    2012-02-15

    Malignancies of the aortic wall represent a rare condition, and only a few reports have covered cases of sarcomas arising at the site of a prosthesis made of Dacron. A coincidence with endovascular repair has only been reported in one case to date. We report a patient with epithelioid angiosarcoma and metastatic disease, which was found in an aneurysmal sac after endovascular aortic repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  2. Sac Angiography and Glue Embolization in Emergency Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Yuya Nishimura, Jun-ichi Hase, Soichiro Yamasaki, Motoshige

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to demonstrate a sac angiography technique and evaluate the feasibility of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in hemodynamically unstable patients.MethodsA retrospective case series of three patients in whom sac angiography was performed during emergency EVAR for ruptured AAA was reviewed. After stent graft deployment, angiography within the sac of aneurysm (sac angiography) was performed by manually injecting 10 ml of contrast material through a catheter to identify the presence and site of active bleeding. In two patients, sac angiography revealed active extravasation of the contrast material, and NBCA embolization with a coaxial catheter system was performed to achieve prompt sealing.ResultsSac angiography was successful in all three patients. In the two patients who underwent NBCA embolization for aneurysm sac bleeding, follow-up computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated the accumulation of NBCA consistent with the bleeding site in preprocedural CT images.ConclusionsEVAR is associated with a potential risk of ongoing bleeding from type II or IV endoleaks into the disrupted aneurysm sac in patients with severe coagulopathy. Therefore, sac angiography and NBCA embolization during emergency EVAR may represent a possible technical improvement in the treatment of ruptured AAA in hemodynamically unstable patients.

  3. Intraoperative Sac Pressure Measurement During Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Hiroyuki; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Ohta, Takashi; Sugimoto, Ikuo; Iwata, Hirohide; Yamada, Tetsuya; Tadakoshi, Masao; Hida, Noriyuki; Orimoto, Yuki; Kamei, Seiji

    2010-10-15

    PurposeIntraoperative sac pressure was measured during endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) to evaluate the clinical significance of sac pressure measurement.MethodsA microcatheter was placed in an aneurysm sac from the contralateral femoral artery, and sac pressure was measured during EVAR procedures in 47 patients. Aortic blood pressure was measured as a control by a catheter from the left brachial artery.ResultsThe systolic sac pressure index (SPI) was 0.87 {+-} 0.10 after main-body deployment, 0.63 {+-} 0.12 after leg deployment (P < 0.01), and 0.56 {+-} 0.12 after completion of the procedure (P < 0.01). Pulse pressure was 55 {+-} 21 mmHg, 23 {+-} 15 mmHg (P < 0.01), and 16 {+-} 12 mmHg (P < 0.01), respectively. SPI showed no significant differences between the Zenith and Excluder stent grafts (0.56 {+-} 0.13 vs. 0.54 {+-} 0.10, NS). Type I endoleak was found in seven patients (15%), and the SPI decreased from 0.62 {+-} 0.10 to 0.55 {+-} 0.10 (P = 0.10) after fixing procedures. Type II endoleak was found in 12 patients (26%) by completion angiography. The SPI showed no difference between type II endoleak positive and negative (0.58 {+-} 0.12 vs. 0.55 {+-} 0.12, NS). There were no significant differences between the final SPI of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter decreased in the follow-up and that of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter did not change (0.53 {+-} 0.12 vs. 0.57 {+-} 0.12, NS).ConclusionsSac pressure measurement was useful for instant hemodynamic evaluation of the EVAR procedure, especially in type I endoleaks. However, on the basis of this small study, the SPI cannot be used to reliably predict sac growth or regression.

  4. Endovascular repair of mitroaortic intervalvular fibrosa aneurysm after bentall surgery.

    PubMed

    Vola, Marco; Gerbay, Antoine; Campisi, Salvatore; Duprey, Ambroise; Heller, Fabien; Patoir, Arnaud; Albertini, Jean Noel; Fuzellier, Jean Francois; Isaaz, Karl; Favre, Jean Pierre

    2015-02-01

    We report the first case of a successful transapical transcatheter treatment of a giant pseudoaneurysm originating from a rupture of the mitroaortic fibrosa that occurred 3 months after a Bentall procedure in a 81-year-old male patient. Because of the age of the patient and the location of the leak at the mitroaortic fibrosa, the risk of a conventional ascending aorta reoperation was considered too high, and a transcatheter approach was chosen. A transapical puncture was performed with a left minithoracotomy followed by a catheterization of the pseudoaneurysm neck and an 8-mm Amplatzer (St. Jude Medical, Saint Paul, MN, USA) device was delivered, resulting in a successful complete endovascular exclusion of the pseudo-aneurysmal sac. PMID:25639415

  5. Endovascular treatment of proximal arsastomotic aneurysms after aortic prosthetic reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Tiesenhausen, Kurt; Hausegger, Klaus A.; Tauss, Josef; Amann, Wilfried; Koch, Guenter

    2001-01-15

    Purpose: To describe the efficacy and value of endovascular stent-grafts for the treatment of aortic anastomotic pseudo-aneurysms.Methods: Three patients with proximal aortic anastomotic pseudoaneurysms 8-15 years after prosthetic reconstruction were treated by transfemoral stent-graft implantation. In two patients the pseudoaneurysms were excluded by Talent prostheses [tube graft (n=1), bifurcated graft (n=s1)]. In one patient an uniiliac Zenith stent-graft was implanted and an extra-anatomic crossover bypass for revascularization of the contralateral lower extremity was performed.Results: All procedures were successful with primary exclusion of the pseudoaneurysms. During the follow-up (mean 16 months) one endoleak occurred due to migration of the tube stent-graft. The endoleak was sealed successfully by implanting an additional bifurcated stent-graft.Conclusion: Stent-graft exclusion of aortic pseudoaneurysms offers a minimally invasive and safe alternative to open surgical reconstruction.

  6. Successful Endovascular Treatment of a Left Common Carotid Artery Aneurysm Following Failed Surgery of a Right Common Carotid Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Cil, Barbaros E. Ucar, Ibrahim; Ozsoy, Fatma; Arat, Anil; Yorgancioglu, Cem; Boeke, Erkmen

    2005-04-15

    Aneurysm of the common carotid artery is a rare and serious disease requiring prompt treatment in order to avoid neurologic complications. A 39-year-old man presented with voice impairment and a pulsatile mass at the right side of his neck and was found by color Doppler examination to have bilateral common carotid artery aneurysms of unknown origin. The right-sided large aneurysm was treated with placement of an 8 mm interposition Gore-Tex graft between the right common and internal carotid arteries. The surgical graft thrombosed 7 days after the surgery but the left-sided aneurysm was successfully treated by a Jostent peripheral stent-graft. Color Doppler examination showed a patent stent and no filling of the aneurysm on his first and sixth-month follow-up. Bilateral common carotid artery aneurysm is an exceptionally unusual condition and endovascular treatment of carotid artery aneurysms with covered stents may become an effective treatment alternative for these lesions.

  7. Endovascular Treatment of Cerebral Mycotic Aneurysm: A Review of the Literature and Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Zanaty, Mario; Starke, Robert M.; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula; Gonzalez, L. Fernando; Hasan, David; Rosenwasser, Robert; Jabbour, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The management of mycotic aneurysm has always been subject to controversy. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on the intracranial infected aneurysm from pathogenesis till management while focusing mainly on the endovascular interventions. This novel solution seems to provide additional benefits and long-term favorable outcomes. PMID:24383049

  8. Endovascular Treatment of Femoropopliteal Aneurysms: A Five-Year Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Lagana, Domenico Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Mangini, Monica; Caronno, Roberto; Giorgianni, Andrea; Lumia, Domenico; Castelli, Patrizio; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-10-15

    Purpose. To assess the effectiveness of endovascular treatment of femoropopliteal aneurysms (FPAs). Methods. In the last 5 years, we have treated 17 FPAs (diameter 21-75 cm, mean 38.4 cm; length 27-100 cm, mean 72.5 cm) in 15 patients (age 57-80 years, mean 70.9 years). The diagnosis was obtained by color Doppler ultrasound (CDU) and the procedure was planned by CT angiography (CTA) and preprocedural angiography. Eight FPAs were excluded with only one stent-graft; in 8 patients, two stent-grafts were positioned; and in 1 patient, three stent-grafts were used. In 14 cases we used a Wallgraft endoprosthesis, in 2 cases a Hemobahn, and in 1 case an Excluder contralateral leg. The patients were followed up with CDU and occasionally with CTA. Results. Immediate technical success was obtained in 17 of 17 cases (100%). One patient died during the first year. During a mean follow-up of 26.9 months (range 3-60 months) we observed 6 of 16 (38%) stent-graft occlusions (3 of which were recanalized with locoregional thrombolysis and 3 with mechanical thrombectomy). Two stent-grafts were patent at 12 and 24 months. Four patients experienced subsequent occlusions and recanalizations until corrected by surgical bypass (1 at 14 months, 2 at 18 months, and 1 at 36 months). Therefore the primary patency was 63% and assisted patency was 73%. Conclusion. The endovascular approach is a minimally invasive treatment option for FPAs. Moreover endovascular stent-grafting does not necessarily preclude conventional surgical repair, but it can delay it. Longer follow-up will be needed to determine the long-term patency rate.

  9. Influencing factors of immediate angiographic results in intracranial aneurysms patients after endovascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Xiang; Lai, Ling-Feng; Zheng, Kuang; Li, Guo-Xiong; He, Xu-Ying; Li, Liang-Ping; Duan, Chuan-Zhi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze influencing factors associated with immediate angiographic results in intracranial aneurysms patients after endovascular treatment (EVT), providing theoretical evidence and guidance for clinical treatment of intracranial aneurysms. Totally 529 patients met the inclusive criteria, consisting of 338 males and 191 females. Gender; age; history of hypertension, diabetes, and smoking; intracranial atherosclerosis; rupture status, size and location, features of aneurysmal neck, shapes; vasospasm; treatment modality; and degree of aneurysm occlusion were all carefully and completely recorded. All data were investigated in univariate and multivariate logistic regression model to determine whether they were correlated with the degree of aneurysm occlusion. According to aneurysm size, aneurysms were classified as micro-miniature, miniature, and large aneurysms. There were 451 narrow-neck aneurysms and 78 wide-neck aneurysms. Totally 417 were regular and 112 were irregular. And 125 were un-ruptured aneurysms; 404 were ruptured aneurysms. The modalities of treatment were as follows: embolization with coil (n = 415), stent-assisted coil embolization (n = 89), and balloon-assisted coil embolization (n = 25). Univariate analysis showed that aneurysm size, feature of aneurysm neck, shape, and rupture status might affect the immediate occlusion after EVT. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that ruptured aneurysm, tiny aneurysm, and wide-neck aneurysm were independent influencing factors of complete occlusion of intracranial aneurysm. Aneurysm rupture status, size, feature of aneurysmal neck, and shape might be the independent influencing factors of immediate angiographic results in intracranial aneurysm patients after EVT. Un-ruptured, micro-miniature, narrow-neck, and regular-shaped aneurysms were more probable to be occluded completely. PMID:26100332

  10. Stent-Assisted Endovascular Treatment of Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms – Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Kocur, Damian; Ślusarczyk, Wojciech; Przybyłko, Nikodem; Bażowski, Piotr; Właszczuk, Adam; Kwiek, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Summary The anterior cerebral artery is a common location of intracranial aneurysms. The standard coil embolization technique is limited by its inability to occlude wide-neck aneurysms. Stent deployment across the aneurysm neck supports the coil mass inside the aneurysmal sac, and furthermore, has an effect on local hemodynamic and biologic changes. In this article, various management strategies and techniques as well as angiographic outcomes and complications related to stent-assisted endovascular treatment of anterior communicating artery aneurysms are presented. This treatment method is safe and associated with low morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:27559426

  11. Stent-Assisted Endovascular Treatment of Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms - Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Kocur, Damian; Ślusarczyk, Wojciech; Przybyłko, Nikodem; Bażowski, Piotr; Właszczuk, Adam; Kwiek, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    The anterior cerebral artery is a common location of intracranial aneurysms. The standard coil embolization technique is limited by its inability to occlude wide-neck aneurysms. Stent deployment across the aneurysm neck supports the coil mass inside the aneurysmal sac, and furthermore, has an effect on local hemodynamic and biologic changes. In this article, various management strategies and techniques as well as angiographic outcomes and complications related to stent-assisted endovascular treatment of anterior communicating artery aneurysms are presented. This treatment method is safe and associated with low morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:27559426

  12. Consecutive Endovascular Treatment of 20 Ruptured Very Small (<3 mm) Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Kaiz S.; Sattar, Ahsan; Lazzaro, Marc A.; Fitzsimmons, Brian-Fred; Lynch, John R.; Zaidat, Osama O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Small aneurysms located at the anterior communicating artery carry significant procedural challenges due to a complex anatomy. Recent advances in endovascular technologies have expanded the use of coil embolization for small aneurysm treatment. However, limited reports describe their safety and efficacy profiles in very small anterior communicating artery aneurysms. Objective We sought to review and report the immediate and long-term clinical as well as radiographic outcomes of consecutive patients with ruptured very small anterior communicating artery aneurysms treated with current endovascular coil embolization techniques. Methods A prospectively maintained single-institution neuroendovascular database was accessed to identify consecutive cases of very small (<3 mm) ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysms treated endovascularly between 2006 and 2013. Results A total of 20 patients with ruptured very small (<3 mm) anterior communicating artery aneurysms were consecutively treated with coil embolization. The average maximum diameter was 2.66 ± 0.41 mm. Complete aneurysm occlusion was achieved for 17 (85%) aneurysms and near-complete aneurysm occlusion for 3 (15%) aneurysms. Intraoperative perforation was seen in 2 (10%) patients without any clinical worsening or need for an external ventricular drain. A thromboembolic event occurred in 1 (5 %) patient without clinical worsening or radiologic infarct. Median clinical follow-up was 12 (±14.1) months and median imaging follow-up was 12 (±18.4) months. Conclusion This report describes the largest series of consecutive endovascular treatments of ruptured very small anterior communicating artery aneurysms. These findings suggest that coil embolization of very small aneurysms in this location can be performed with acceptable rates of complications and recanalization. PMID:27610122

  13. Endovascular Repair of an Anastomotic Leak Following Open Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Mofidi, R. Flett, M.; Milne, A.; Chakraverty, S.

    2007-09-15

    This report describes the case of an early postoperative anastomotic leak following elective open repair of an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm which was successfully treated by endovascular stent-grafting. A 71-year-old man underwent open tube graft repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Twelve days later he presented with a contained leak from the distal anastomosis, which was confirmed on CT scan. This was successfully treated with a bifurcated aortic stent-graft. This case illustrates the usefulness of the endovascular approach for resolving this rare surgical complication of open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and the challenges associated with the deployment of such a device within an aortic tube graft.

  14. Hybrid Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair for Intercostal Patch Aneurysm after Thoracoabdominal Aortic Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitake, Akihiro; Hachiya, Takashi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Hirano, Akinori; Kasai, Mio; Akamatsu, Yuta; Oka, Hidetoshi; Shimizu, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of hybrid thoracic endovascular aortic repair for intercostal patch aneurysm after thoracoabdominal aortic replacement. Eighteen years ago, a 63-year-old woman with Marfan syndrome had undergone thoracoabdominal aortic replacement with reimplantation of the intercostal artery in an island fashion. Follow-up computed tomography (CT) revealed a remaining intercostal patch aneurysm of diameter 60 mm 17 years after the last operation. Hybrid thoracic endovascular aortic repair for exclusion of this intercostal patch aneurysm was successfully performed, with visceral artery bypasses. Postoperative CT showed no anastomotic stenosis or endoleak. PMID:26730265

  15. An Aortoenteric Fistula Arising after Endovascular Management of a Mycotic Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Complicated with a Psoas Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Gülcü, Aytaç; Gezer, Naciye Sinem; Uğurlu, Şevket Baran; Göktay, Ahmet Yiğit

    2016-01-01

    Mycotic aortic aneurysms account for 1–3% of all aortic aneurysms. The management of this disease is controversial. Since open surgical repair is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, endovascular aneurysm repair is an alternative treatment method with promising early and midterm outcomes, although its long-term durability is unknown. Secondary aortoenteric fistulas may occur iatrogenically after either aortic reconstructive surgery or endovascular repair. As the number of aneurysms managed with endovascular aneurysm repair has substantially increased, cases of aortoenteric fistulas referred for endovascular repair are augmented. We report the case of an aortoduodenal fistula manifested with duodenal perforation after staged endovascular and surgical treatment of a mycotic aortic aneurysm. PMID:27365559

  16. An Aortoenteric Fistula Arising after Endovascular Management of a Mycotic Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Complicated with a Psoas Abscess.

    PubMed

    Gülcü, Aytaç; Gezer, Naciye Sinem; Uğurlu, Şevket Baran; Göktay, Ahmet Yiğit

    2016-07-01

    Mycotic aortic aneurysms account for 1-3% of all aortic aneurysms. The management of this disease is controversial. Since open surgical repair is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, endovascular aneurysm repair is an alternative treatment method with promising early and midterm outcomes, although its long-term durability is unknown. Secondary aortoenteric fistulas may occur iatrogenically after either aortic reconstructive surgery or endovascular repair. As the number of aneurysms managed with endovascular aneurysm repair has substantially increased, cases of aortoenteric fistulas referred for endovascular repair are augmented. We report the case of an aortoduodenal fistula manifested with duodenal perforation after staged endovascular and surgical treatment of a mycotic aortic aneurysm. PMID:27365559

  17. Percutaneous Endoluminal Bypass of Iliac Aneurysms with a Covered Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebben, Alexander; Tettoni, Serena; Muratore, Pierluigi; Rossato, Dennis; Savio, Daniele; Rabbia, Claudio

    1998-07-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of percutaneous treatment of iliac aneurysms, a covered stent was inserted in nine men suffering from common iliac artery aneurysms (six cases), external iliac aneurysms (one case), or pseudoaneurysms (two cases). Placement of the stent was successful in all patients. In one patient, an endoprosthesis thrombosed after 15 days, but was successfully treated by thrombolysis and additional stent placement. At the follow-up examinations (mean period 22 months) all stent-grafts had remained patent. No late leakage or stenosis was observed.

  18. Emergency Endovascular Management of Pulmonary Artery Aneurysms In Behcet's Disease: Report of Two Cases and a Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Cantasdemir, Murat; Kantarci, Fatih; Mihmanli, Ismail; Akman, Canan; Numan, Furuzan; Islak, Civan; Bozkurt, A. Kursat

    2002-12-15

    his report describes two patients with a known history of Behcet's disease in whom massive hemoptysis developed from rupture of pulmonary artery aneurysms. The high recurrence rate of complications related to pulmonary artery aneurysms and even the aneurysms themselves due to inadequacy of medical therapy and the disadvantages of surgical treatment make these aneurysms candidates for endovascular management.The pulmonary artery aneurysms reported here were successfully treated with endovascular embolization using n-butylcyanoacrylate. Pulmonary artery aneurysm embolization in Behcet's disease has been reviewed in the light of relevant literature.

  19. Innovative chimney-graft technique for endovascular repair of a pararenal abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Galiñanes, Edgar Luis; Hernandez-Vila, Eduardo A; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2015-02-01

    After abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, progressive degeneration of the aneurysm can be challenging to treat. Multiple comorbidities and previous operations place such patients at high risk for repeat surgery. Endovascular repair is a possible alternative; however, challenging anatomy can push the limits of available technology. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man who presented with a 5.3-cm pararenal aneurysm 4 years after undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. To avoid reoperation, we excluded the aneurysm by endovascular means, using visceral-artery stenting, a chimney-graft technique. Low-profile balloons on a monorail system enabled the rapid exchange of coronary wires via a buddy-wire technique. This novel approach facilitated stenting and simultaneous angioplasty of multiple visceral vessels and the abdominal aorta. PMID:25873796

  20. Innovative Chimney-Graft Technique for Endovascular Repair of a Pararenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Galiñanes, Edgar Luis; Hernandez-Vila, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    After abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, progressive degeneration of the aneurysm can be challenging to treat. Multiple comorbidities and previous operations place such patients at high risk for repeat surgery. Endovascular repair is a possible alternative; however, challenging anatomy can push the limits of available technology. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man who presented with a 5.3-cm pararenal aneurysm 4 years after undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. To avoid reoperation, we excluded the aneurysm by endovascular means, using visceral-artery stenting, a chimney-graft technique. Low-profile balloons on a monorail system enabled the rapid exchange of coronary wires via a buddy-wire technique. This novel approach facilitated stenting and simultaneous angioplasty of multiple visceral vessels and the abdominal aorta. PMID:25873796

  1. Endovascular coil embolization for ruptured kissing aneurysms associated with A1 fenestration

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhara, Takafumi; Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Kiura, Yoshihiro; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2011-01-01

    Background: Fenestration of intracranial arteries is a rare anomaly, and is frequently associated with cerebral aneurysms. In this paper, we report rare kissing aneurysms associated with A1 fenestration. Case Description: A 71-year-old woman presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Diagnostic digital subtraction angiography revealed two saccular aneurysms at the proximal junction of a fenestration and posterior aspect of the fenestration that appeared to be ‘kissing’ each other. Emergent endovascular coil embolization was performed. Conclusion: Kissing aneurysms associated with fenestration of the horizontal segment in the anterior cerebral artery are rare, and have not been reported. During treatment of such specific types of aneurysms by endovascular treatment, three-dimensional rotational digital subtraction angiography was very useful for deciding the appropriate working angles. PMID:21748037

  2. Percutaneous endovascular management of atherosclerotic axillary artery stenosis: Report of 2 cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Vijayvergiya, Rajesh; Yadav, Mukesh; Grover, Anil

    2011-01-01

    With recent advancement in percutaneous endovascular management, most atherosclerotic peripheral arterial diseases are amenable for intervention. However, there is limited published literature about atherosclerotic axillary artery involvement and its endovascular management. We report two cases of atherosclerotic axillary artery stenosis, which were successfully managed with stent angioplasty using self expanding nitinol stents. The associated coronary artery disease was treated by percutaneous angioplasty and stenting. The long term follow-up revealed patent axillary stents in both cases. PMID:21666817

  3. Treatment of fenestrated vertebrobasilar junction-related aneurysms with endovascular techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhu, De-Yuan; Fang, Yi-Bin; Wu, Yi-Na; Li, Qiang; Duan, Guo-Li; Liu, Jian-Min; Xu, Yi; Hong, Bo; Zhao, Wen-Yuan; Huang, Qing-Hai

    2016-06-01

    Fenestrated vertebrobasilar junction-related aneurysms (fVBJ-AN) are uncommon and endovascular management strategies have become the first options for the treatment of these lesions. This clinical study aimed to report our experience in the endovascular management of these lesions and to review the literature. We retrospectively reviewed 10 consecutive patients harboring 12 fVBJ-AN between January 2007 and December 2014. The demographic, angiographic and clinical data were reviewed. Additionally, a literature review was performed. Endovascular management strategies were successfully applied in all 10 patients. Post-procedural angiograms indicated total occlusion in eight (66.7%) aneurysms, a residual neck in one (8.3%) aneurysm, and three residual aneurysms (25%). No procedure-related complications were observed. Follow-up angiograms were obtained in eight patients and revealed nine occluded aneurysms and one improved aneurysm; two patients were lost to angiographic follow-up. Clinical follow-ups were obtained in all patients (until July 2015), and the modified Rankin Scale scores at 69.5months (range 17-101months) of follow-up were 0 in eight patients and 1 in two patients. Endovascular management strategies provided a high occlusion rate and an acceptable complication rate and are thus efficacious in the treatment of fVBJ-AN. Further studies are necessary to validate the utility of these treatments due to the low incidence of fVBJ-AN. PMID:26778513

  4. Popliteal Artery Aneurysm Repair in the Endovascular Era

    PubMed Central

    Ronchey, Sonia; Pecoraro, Felice; Alberti, Vittorio; Serrao, Eugenia; Orrico, Matteo; Lachat, Mario; Mangialardi, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To compare outcomes of popliteal artery aneurysm (PAA) repair by endovascular treatment, great saphenous vein (GSV) bypass, and prosthetic bypass. Single center retrospective analysis of patients presenting PAA from 2000 to 2013. Patients were divided into endovascular treatment (group A); GSV bypass (group B); and prosthetic graft bypass (group C). Outcomes were technical success, perioperative mortality, and morbidity. Survival, primary and secondary patency, and freedom from reintervention rate were estimated. Differences in ankle-brachial index (ABI), in-hospital length of stay (InH-Los), red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, and limb loss were reported. Mean follow-up was 49 (median: 35; 1–145; SD 42) months. Sixty-seven patients were included; 25 in group A, 28 in group B, and 14 in group C. PAA was symptomatic in 23 (34%) cases. Technical success was 100%. No perioperative death occurred. Three (4.5%) perioperative complications were reported with no significant difference between groups (P = 0.866). Five-years estimated survival was 78%. Estimated 5-years primary patency for groups A, B, and C was 71%, 81%, and 69%, respectively (P = 0.19). Estimated 5-years secondary patency for groups A, B, and C was 88%, 85%, and 84% (P = 0.85). Estimated 5-years freedom from reintervention for groups A, B, and C was 62%, 84%, and 70%, respectively (P = 0.16). A significant difference between preoperative ABI versus postoperative ABI was observed (P = 0.001). InH-LoS was significantly shorter in group A (P < 0.001). RBC transfusions were required significantly less in group A when compared to group C (P = 0.045). Overall limb salvage was achieved in all but 1 patient. PAA repair has good early and long-term outcomes with different treatment options. Endovascular treatment was not inferior to surgical repair with a reduced InH-LoS and RBC transfusion. It can be successfully employed even in nonelective setting. A randomized controlled

  5. Limitations of Endovascular Treatment with Stent-Grafts for Active Mycotic Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Masaki; Kato, Noriyuki; Hirano, Tadanori; Shimono, Takatsugu; Yasuda, Fuyuhiko; Tanaka, Kuniyoshi; Yada, Isao; Takeda, Kan

    2002-06-15

    An 81-year-old woman with ruptured mycotic thoracic aortic aneurysm was treated with endovascular placement of stent-grafts fabricated from expanded polytetrafluoroethylene and Z-stents. Although exclusion of the aneurysm was achieved at the end of the procedure, a type I endoleak developed on the following day.Despite emergent surgical resection of the aneurysm and extra-anatomical reconstruction, the patient died 2 days later. Stent-graft repair may not be a suitable method for the treatment of ruptured mycotic aneurysm in the presence of active infection.

  6. Endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in the presence of a hydronephrotic horseshoe kidney.

    PubMed

    Krivoshei, Lian; Akin-Olugbade, Yemi; McWilliams, Glen; Halak, Moshe; Silverberg, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to report an unusual case of a patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and a hydronephrotic horseshoe kidney (HSK) that was repaired by endovascular means. An 81-year-old male patient with a known HSK was found to have hydronephrosis and an AAA. The patient's aneurysm was treated with an endovascular stent graft which required the covering of accessory renal arteries. He had an uneventful recovery with complete resolution of the hydronephrosis evident on a computed tomography scan performed seven months after the surgery. In conclusion, endovascular aneurysm repair is a feasible therapeutic option for an AAA coexisting with an HSK and may be considered as a valid alternative to open repair when concomitant hydronephrosis is present. PMID:22328622

  7. Preservation of pelvic circulation in one-stage endovascular repair of bilateral hypogastric artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Christos, Karathanos; Dimitrios, Xanthopoulos; Elias, Kaperonis; Theophanis, Konstantopoulos; Maria, Exarchou; Vasilios, Papavassiliou

    2014-10-01

    Bilateral hypogastric artery aneurysms (HAAs) are relatively rare conditions that pose increased management difficulties. We report a case of one-stage endovascular repair of bilateral HAAs preserving pelvic circulation. A 67-year-old asymptomatic man with bilateral HAAs (4-cm right and 3.9-cm left) was successfully treated with an endovascular approach. The aneurysmal sac of the right hypogastric artery (HA) was embolized first and 2 covered stent grafts were deployed into the HA. Coil embolization of the left HAA was then performed followed by deployment of a covered stent graft to the common and external iliac arteries. Final angiography revealed complete exclusion of the aneurysms without endoleaks and with preservation of the pelvic flow. At the 18-month follow-up, the patient remained asymptomatic with good patency of the stent grafts. This case demonstrates an alternative endovascular approach for the treatment of bilateral HAAs that minimizes the risk of ischemic complications by preserving pelvic circulation. PMID:24858586

  8. Prognosis Predicting Score for Endovascular Treatment of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Guoli; Yang, Pengfei; Li, Qiang; Zuo, Qiao; Zhang, Lei; Hong, Bo; Xu, Yi; Zhao, Wenyuan; Liu, Jianmin; Huang, Qinghai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The elderly patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) have a greater risk of poor clinical outcome after endovascular treatment (EVT) than younger patients do. Hence, it is necessary to explore which factors are associated with poor outcome and develop a predictive score specifically for elderly patients with aSAH receiving EVT. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a predictive score for 1-year outcomes in individual elderly patients with aSAH underwent EVT. In this 10-year prospective study, 520 consecutive aSAH elderly (age ≥ 60 years) patients underwent EVT in a single center were included. The risk factors, periprocedural, and 1-year follow-up data of all patients were entered in a specific prospective database. The modified Rankin scale was used for evaluating clinical outcome. To optimize the model's predictive capacity, the original matrix was randomly divided in 2 submatrices (learning and testing). The predictive score was developed using Arabic numerals for all variables based on the variable coefficients (β) of multivariable logistic regression analysis in the learning set and the predictive performance evaluation was assessed in the testing set. The risk classes were constructed using classification criteria based on sensitivity and specificity. The poor outcome rate at 1 year was 26.15%. Six risk factors, including age, hypertension, Hunt–Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications, were independently associated with poor outcome and assembled the Changhai score. The discriminative power analysis with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of the Changhai score was statistically significant (0.864, 0.824–0.904, P < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of the Changhai score were 82.07% and 78.06%, respectively. Our study indicated that age, hypertension, Hunt–Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications were

  9. Therapeutic algorithm to treat common iliac artery aneurysms by endovascular means.

    PubMed

    Panuccio, Giuseppe; Torsello, Giovanni F; Torsello, Giovanni B; Donas, Konstantinos P

    2016-10-01

    Use of endovascular means is gaining ever greater acceptance in the treatment of aorto-iliac aneurysms. Especially, the treatment of patients with common iliac aneurysms (CIAs) may be very challenging due to the complexity of the underlying disease with often involvement of the hypogastric artery. Additionally, the variety of endovascular therapeutic options such as the use of iliac branch devices, parallel grafts, the bell-bottom technique or coil embolization of the hypogastric artery and overstenting of the origin represents significant limitation regarding the presentation of a clear and robust endovascular therapeutic algorithm. Aim of the present article was the demonstration of the institutional experience with the endovascular management of CIAs in order to provide a clinical recommendation and algorithm. PMID:27406396

  10. The expanding realm of endovascular neurosurgery: flow diversion for cerebral aneurysm management.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Chandan; Sonig, Ashish; Natarajan, Sabareesh K; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of intracranial aneurysms is estimated to be between 5% and 10%, with some demographic variance. Subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to ruptured intracranial aneurysm results in devastating neurological outcomes, leaving the majority of victims dead or disabled. Surgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms remained the definitive mode of treatment until Guglielmi detachable coils were introduced in the 1990s. This revolutionary innovation led to the recognition of neurointervention/neuroendovascular surgery as a bona fide option for intracranial aneurysms. Constant evolution of endovascular devices and techniques supported by several prospective randomized trials has catapulted the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms to its current status as the preferred treatment modality for most ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms. We are slowly transitioning from the era of coils to the era of flow diverters. Flow-diversion technology and techniques have revolutionized the treatment of wide-necked, giant, and fusiform aneurysms, where the results of microsurgery or conventional neuroendovascular strategies have traditionally been dismal. Although the Pipeline Embolization Device (ev3-Covidien, Irvine, CA) is the only flow-diversion device approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the United States, others are commercially available in Europe and South America, including the Silk (Balt Extrusion, Montmorency, France), Flow-Redirection Endoluminal Device (FRED; MicroVention, Tustin, CA), Surpass (Stryker, Kalamazoo, MI), and p64 (Phenox, Bochum, Germany). Improvements in technology and operator experience and the encouraging results of clinical trials have led to broader acceptance for the use of these devices in cerebral aneurysm management. Continued innovation and refinement of endovascular devices and techniques will inevitably improve technical success rates, reduce procedure-related complications, and broaden the

  11. The Expanding Realm of Endovascular Neurosurgery: Flow Diversion for Cerebral Aneurysm Management

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Chandan; Sonig, Ashish; Natarajan, Sabareesh K.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of intracranial aneurysms is estimated to be between 5% and 10%, with some demographic variance. Subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to ruptured intracranial aneurysm results in devastating neurological outcomes, leaving the majority of victims dead or disabled. Surgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms remained the definitive mode of treatment until Guglielmi detachable coils were introduced in the 1990s. This revolutionary innovation led to the recognition of neurointervention/neuroendovascular surgery as a bona fide option for intracranial aneurysms. Constant evolution of endovascular devices and techniques supported by several prospective randomized trials has catapulted the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms to its current status as the preferred treatment modality for most ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms. We are slowly transitioning from the era of coils to the era of flow diverters. Flow-diversion technology and techniques have revolutionized the treatment of wide-necked, giant, and fusiform aneurysms, where the results of microsurgery or conventional neuroendovascular strategies have traditionally been dismal. Although the Pipeline™ Embolization Device (ev3-Covidien, Irvine, CA) is the only flow-diversion device approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the United States, others are commercially available in Europe and South America, including the Silk (Balt Extrusion, Montmorency, France), Flow-Redirection Endoluminal Device (FRED; MicroVention, Tustin, CA), Surpass (Stryker, Kalamazoo, MI), and p64 (Phenox, Bochum, Germany). Improvements in technology and operator experience and the encouraging results of clinical trials have led to broader acceptance for the use of these devices in cerebral aneurysm management. Continued innovation and refinement of endovascular devices and techniques will inevitably improve technical success rates, reduce procedure-related complications, and broaden

  12. Percutaneous Endovascular Treatment of Chronic Iliac Artery Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, F. C. De Blas, Mariano; Merino, Santiago; Egana, Jose M.; Caldas, Jose G.M.P.

    2004-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and radiological long-term results of recanalization of chronic occluded iliac arteries with balloon angioplasty and stent placement.Methods: Sixty-nine occluded iliac arteries (mean length 8.1 cm; range 4-16 cm) in 67 patients were treated by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement. Evaluations included clinical assesment according to Fontaine stages, Doppler examinations with ankle-brachial index (ABI) and bilateral lower extremity arteriograms. Wallstent and Cragg vascular stents were inserted for iliac artery recanalization under local anesthesia. Follow-up lasted 1-83 months (mean 29.5 months).Results: Technical success rate was 97.1% (67 of 69). The mean ABI increased from 0.46 to 0.85 within 30 days after treatment and was 0.83 at the most recent follow-up. Mean hospitalization time was 2 days and major complications included arterial thrombosis (3%), arterial rupture (3%) and distal embolization (1%). During follow-up 6% stenosis and 9% thrombosis of the stents were observed. Clinical improvement occurred in 92% of patients. Primary and secondary patency rates were 75% and 95%, respectively.Conclusion: The long-term patency rates and clinical benefits suggest that percutaneous endovascular revascularization with metallic stents is a safe and effective treatment for patients with chronic iliac artery occlusion.

  13. Fenestrated Endovascular Grafts for the Repair of Juxtarenal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) allows the exclusion of the dilated aneurismal segment of the aorta from the systematic circulation. The procedure requires, however, that the endograft extends to the healthy parts of the aorta above and below the aneurysm, yet the neck of a juxtarenal aortic aneurysm (JRA) is too short for a standard endovascular repair. Fenestrated endovascular aortic repair (f—EVAR) provides a solution to overcome this problem by enabling the continuation of blood flow to the renal and visceral arteries through holes or ‘fenestrations’ in the graft. These fenestrations are designed to match the ostial diameter of the renal and visceral arteries. There are three varieties fenestration, small, large, and scallop, and their location needs to be customized to fit the anatomy of the patient. If the device is not properly designed, if the alignment is inaccurate, or if the catheterization of the visceral arteries is not possible, the procedure may fail. In such cases, conversion to open surgery may become the only option as fenestrated endografts are not retrievable. It is recommended that a stent be placed within each small fenestration to the target artery to prevent shuttering of the artery or occlusion. Many authors have noted an increased risk of vessel occlusion in unstented fenestrations and scallops. Once placed in a patient, life-long follow-up at regular intervals is necessary to ensure the graft remains in its intended location, and that the components have adequate overlap. Should the need arise, routine follow-up allows the performance of timely and appropriate intervention through detection of events that could impact the long-term outcomes. Alternative Technology The technique of fenestrated endovascular grafting is still in evolution and few studies have been with published mid-term outcome data. As the technique become more common in vascular surgery practices, it will be important to

  14. Fibromuscular Dysplasia-Related Renal Artery Stenosis Associated with Aneurysm: Successive Endovascular Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Serter, Selim Oran, Ismail; Parildar, Mustafa; Memis, Ahmet

    2007-04-15

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a nonatherosclerotic, noninflammatory vascular disease. FMD of the renal arteries is one of the leading causes of curable hypertension. The simultaneous occurrence of FMD and renal artery aneurysm has been described previously. In this case, we present a fibrodysplastic lesion and an aneurysm in a renal artery treated with a percutanous transluminal angioplasty and coil embolization.

  15. Multiple multilayer stents for thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm: a possible new tool for aortic endovascular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tolva, Valerio Stefano; Bianchi, Paolo Guy; Cireni, Lea Valeria; Lombardo, Alma; Keller, Guido Carlo; Parati, Gianfranco; Casana, Renato Maria

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Endovascular surgery data are confirming the paramount role of modern endovascular tools for a safe and sure exclusion of thoracoabdominal lesions. Case report A 57-year-old female presented with severe comorbidity affected by a 58 mm thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA). After patient-informed consent and local Ethical Committee and Italian Public Health Ministry authorization, three multilayer stents were implanted in the thoracoabdominal aortic tract, obtaining at a 20-month computed tomography scan follow up, a complete exclusion of the TAAA, with normal patency of visceral vessels. Conclusion Multilayer stents can be used in thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm, with positive results. PMID:22866014

  16. Endovascular parent artery occlusion of proximal posterior cerebral artery aneurysms: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Hidenori; Tanoue, Shunsuke; Teranishi, Kosuke; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Senshu; Magami, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Munetaka; Arai, Hajime

    2016-06-01

    We report two cases of proximal posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysms treated with endovascular parent artery occlusion (PAO) with coils. In both cases, selective injection from the 4 F distal access catheter clearly showed the perforating arteries arising from the PCA. Case No 1, a 49-year-old woman, was successfully treated with preservation of a paramedian artery. Case No 2, a 54-year-old woman, was treated in the same manner. The patient underwent extensive thalamic infarction after the procedure because of paramedian artery occlusion. Endovascular PAO with coils is feasible for proximal PCA aneurysms; however, preservation of perforating arteries arising from the PCA is mandatory. PMID:25969452

  17. Analysis of risk factors for perifocal oedema after endovascular embolization of unruptured intracranial arterial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Lukic, Snezana; Jankovic, Slobodan; Popovic, Katarina Surlan; Bankovic, Dragic; Popovic, Peter; Mijailovic, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Background Endovascular embolization is a treatment of choice for the management of unruptured intracranial aneurysms, but sometimes is complicated with perianeurysmal oedema. The aim of our study was to establish incidence and outcomes of perianeurysmal oedema after endovascular coiling of unruptured intracranial aneurysms, and to reveal possible risk factors for development of this potentially serious complication. Methods In total 119 adult patients with endovascular embolization of unruptured intracranial aneurysm (performed at Department for Interventional Neuroradiology, Clinical Center, Kragujevac, Serbia) were included in our study. The embolizations were made by electrolite-detachable platinum coils: pure platinum, hydrophilic and combination of platinum and hydrophilic coils. Primary outcome variable was perianeurysmal oedema visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 7, 30 and 90 days after the embolization. Results The perianurysmal oedema appeared in 47.6% of patients treated with hydrophilic coils, in 21.6% of patients treated with platinum coils, and in 53.8% of those treated with mixed type of the coils. The multivariate logistic regression showed that variables associated with occurrence of perianeurysmal oedema are volume of the aneurysm, hypertension, diabetes and smoking habit. Hypertension is the most important independent predictor of the perianeurysmal oedema, followed by smoking and diabetes. Conclusions The results of our study suggest that older patients with larger unruptured intracranial aneurysms, who suffer from diabetes mellitus and hypertension, and have the smoking habit, are under much higher risk of having perianeurysmal oedema after endovascular coiling. PMID:26834520

  18. Ductus arteriosus aneurysm presenting as hoarseness: successful repair with an endovascular approach.

    PubMed

    De Freitas, Simon; Connolly, Caoilfhionn; Neary, Colm; Sultan, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    An aneurysm of the ductus arteriosus is a rare finding, particularly in the adult population. These saccular aneurysms arise at the site of an incompletely obliterated ductus arteriosus along the lesser curvature of the aortic arch. Left untreated, it is associated with a high risk of potentially life-threatening complications including rupture, infection and thromboembolism. As a result, surgical correction is recommended. Previously, options were limited to open repair but as endovascular experience grows, novel techniques afford safer and less invasive alternatives. In contrast, neonatal ductus arteriosus aneurysms may regress spontaneously and expectant treatment can be justified. We present the case of a 74-year-old woman who presented with hoarseness secondary to a ductus arteriosus aneurysm; a diagnosis consistent with Ortner's syndrome. The patient underwent an uncomplicated endovascular repair using the chimney-graft technique. PMID:27141045

  19. Ductus arteriosus aneurysm presenting as hoarseness: successful repair with an endovascular approach

    PubMed Central

    De Freitas, Simon; Connolly, Caoilfhionn; Neary, Colm; Sultan, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    An aneurysm of the ductus arteriosus is a rare finding, particularly in the adult population. These saccular aneurysms arise at the site of an incompletely obliterated ductus arteriosus along the lesser curvature of the aortic arch. Left untreated, it is associated with a high risk of potentially life-threatening complications including rupture, infection and thromboembolism. As a result, surgical correction is recommended. Previously, options were limited to open repair but as endovascular experience grows, novel techniques afford safer and less invasive alternatives. In contrast, neonatal ductus arteriosus aneurysms may regress spontaneously and expectant treatment can be justified. We present the case of a 74-year-old woman who presented with hoarseness secondary to a ductus arteriosus aneurysm; a diagnosis consistent with Ortner’s syndrome. The patient underwent an uncomplicated endovascular repair using the chimney-graft technique. PMID:27141045

  20. How To Diagnose and Manage Infected Endografts after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Setacci, Carlo; Chisci, Emiliano; Setacci, Francesco; Ercolini, Leonardo; de Donato, Gianmarco; Troisi, Nicola; Galzerano, Giuseppe; Michelagnoli, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of endograft infections (EI) after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is below 1%. With the growing number of patients with aortic endografts and the aging population, the number of patients with EI might also increase. The diagnosis is based on an association of clinical symptoms, imaging, and microbial cultures. Angio-computed tomography is currently the gold-standard technique for diagnosis. Low-grade infection sometimes requires nuclear medicine imaging to make a correct diagnosis. There is no good evidence to guide management so far. In the case of active gastrointestinal bleeding, pseudoaneurysm, or extensive perigraft purulence involving adjacent organs, an invasive treatment should always be attempted. In the other cases (the majority), when there is not an immediate danger to the patient's life, a conservative management is started with a proper antimicrobial therapy. Any infectious cavity can be percutaneously drained. Management depends on the patient's condition and a tailored approach should always be offered. In the case of a patient who is young, has a good life expectancy, or in whom there is absence of significant comorbidities, a surgical attempt can be proposed. Surgical techniques favor, in terms of mortality, patency, and reinfection rate, the in situ reconstruction. Choice of technique relies on the center and the operator's experience. Long-term antibiotic therapy is always required in all cases, with close monitoring of the C-reactive protein. PMID:26798744

  1. How To Diagnose and Manage Infected Endografts after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Setacci, Carlo; Chisci, Emiliano; Setacci, Francesco; Ercolini, Leonardo; de Donato, Gianmarco; Troisi, Nicola; Galzerano, Giuseppe; Michelagnoli, Stefano

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of endograft infections (EI) after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is below 1%. With the growing number of patients with aortic endografts and the aging population, the number of patients with EI might also increase. The diagnosis is based on an association of clinical symptoms, imaging, and microbial cultures. Angio-computed tomography is currently the gold-standard technique for diagnosis. Low-grade infection sometimes requires nuclear medicine imaging to make a correct diagnosis. There is no good evidence to guide management so far. In the case of active gastrointestinal bleeding, pseudoaneurysm, or extensive perigraft purulence involving adjacent organs, an invasive treatment should always be attempted. In the other cases (the majority), when there is not an immediate danger to the patient's life, a conservative management is started with a proper antimicrobial therapy. Any infectious cavity can be percutaneously drained. Management depends on the patient's condition and a tailored approach should always be offered. In the case of a patient who is young, has a good life expectancy, or in whom there is absence of significant comorbidities, a surgical attempt can be proposed. Surgical techniques favor, in terms of mortality, patency, and reinfection rate, the in situ reconstruction. Choice of technique relies on the center and the operator's experience. Long-term antibiotic therapy is always required in all cases, with close monitoring of the C-reactive protein. PMID:26798744

  2. Late Sac Behavior after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Masahiro; Onohara, Toshihiro; Okamoto, Minoru; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Shimoe, Yasushi; Yamashita, Masafumi; Takahashi, Toshiki; Kishimoto, Jyunji; Mizuno, Akihiro; Kei, Junichi; Nakai, Mikizou; Sakaki, Masayuki; Suhara, Hitoshi; Kasashima, Fuminori; Endo, Masamitsu; Nishina, Takeshi; Furuyama, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Masakazu; Iwata, Keiji; Marumoto, Akira; Urata, Yasuhisa; Sato, Katsutoshi; Ryugo, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sac behavior after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is considered as a surrogate for the risk of late rupture. The purpose of the study is to assess the sac behavior of AAAs after EVAR. Methods and Results: Late sac enlargement (LSE) (≥5 mm) and late sac shrinkage (LSS) (≥5 mm) were analyzed in 589 consecutive patients who were registered at 14 national centers in Japan. The proportions of patients who had LSE at 1, 3 and 5 years were 2.6% ± 0.7%, 10.0% ± 1.6% and 19.0% ± 2.9%. The proportions of patients who had LSS at 1, 3 and 5 years were 50.1% ± 0.7%, 59.2% ± 2.3% and 61.7% ± 2.7%. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified two variables as a risk factor for LSE; persistent endoleak (Odds ratio 9.56 (4.84–19.49), P <0.001) and low platelet count (Odds ratio 0.92 (0.86–0.99), P = 0.0224). The leading cause of endoleak in patients with LSE was type II. Conclusions: The incidence of LSE is not negligible over 5 year period. Patients with persistent endoleak and/or low platelet count should carefully be observed for LSE. Clinical Trial Registration: UMIN-CTR (UMIN000008345). PMID:27375803

  3. Preoperative Predictors of Long-Term Mortality after Elective Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Saya; Kudo, Toshifumi; Inoue, Yoshinori; Akaza, Miho; Sasano, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to clarify long-term mortality and its predictors in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Materials and Methods: Patients with AAA who underwent elective EVAR at Tokyo Medical and Dental University hospital between 2008 and 2011 were reviewed. The patients’ data were retrospectively collected from medical records. Results: Sixty-four patients were identified for this study. In long-term follow-up, the survival rate was significantly lower in patients with high preoperative C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Patients with obstructive lung disease (FEV1/FVC <70%) or anemia tended to have a poorer prognosis but the association was not statistically significant. Age, concurrent hyperlipidemia, and blood pressure levels were not predictors of mortality rates. Discussion: High CRP level, COPD, and anemia reflect inflammation, which is associated with the pathogenesis of AAA. These inflammatory markers are predictors of long-term mortality after EVAR for AAA as well as for other diseases. Conclusions: A high preoperative CRP level was a predictor of increased long-term mortality in patients with AAA who underwent EVAR. No specific leading causes of death were identified for this increase in the mortality rate. PMID:27087872

  4. Giant vertebral artery aneurysm in a child treated with endovascular parent artery occlusion and coil embolization

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hun-Soo; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Wada, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Hironaka, Yasuo; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intracranial giant vertebral artery aneurysms are extremely rare in the pediatric population and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The present report describes a case of a pediatric patient with giant vertebral artery aneurysm who presented with intracranial mass effect. This patient was successfully treated with endovascular parent artery occlusion and coil embolization. Case Description: A 7-year-old girl presented with tetraparesis, ataxia, dysphagia, and dysphonia. Cerebral angiography revealed intracranial giant aneurysm arising from the right vertebral artery. The patient underwent endovascular parent artery occlusion alone to facilitate aneurysmal thrombosis as an initial treatment. This was done to avoid a coil mass effect to the brainstem. However, incomplete thrombosis occurred in the vicinity of the vertebral artery union. Therefore, additional coil embolization for residual aneurysm was performed. Two additional coil embolization procedures were performed in response to recurrence. Mass effect and clinical symptoms gradually improved, and the patient had no associated morbidity or recurrence at 2 years after the last fourth coil embolization. Conclusion: Intracranial giant vertebral artery aneurysms are rare and challenging in pediatric patients. Staged endovascular strategy can be a safe and effective treatment option. PMID:25071937

  5. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection Repair (EVAR) in Iran: Descriptive Midterm Follow-up Results

    PubMed Central

    Haji Zeinali, Ali Mohammad; Marzban, Mehrab; Zafarghandi, Mohammadreza; Shirzad, Mahmood; Shirani, Shapour; Mahmoodian, Roshanak; Sheikhvatan, Mehrdad; Lotfi-Tokaldany, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endovascular repair of aorta in comparison to open surgery has a low early operative mortality rate, but its long-term results are uncertain. Objectives: The current study describes for the first time our initial four-year experience of elective endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) at Tehran heart center, the first and a major referral heart center in Iran, as a pioneer of EVAR in Iran. Patients and Methods: A total of 51 patients (46 men) who had the diagnosis of either an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) (n = 36), thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) (n = 7), or thoracic aortic dissection (TAD) (n = 8) who had undergone EVAR by Medtronic stent grafts by our team between December 2006 and June 2009 were reviewed. Results: The rate of in-hospital aneurysm-related deaths in the group with AAA stood at 2.8% (one case), while there was no in-hospital mortality in the other groups. All patients were followed up for 13-18 months. The cumulative death rate in follow-up was nine cases from the total 51 cases (18%), out of which six cases were in the AAA group (four patients due to non-cardiac causes and two patients due to aneurysm-related causes), one case in the TAA group (following a severe hemoptysis), and two cases in the TAD group (following an expansion of dissection from re-entrance). The major event-free survival rate was 80.7% for endovascular repair of AAA, 85.7% for endovascular repair of TAA, and 65.6% for endovascular repair of TAD. Conclusion: The endovascular stent-graft repair of the abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection had high technical success rates in tandem with low-rate early mortality and morbidity, short hospital stay, and acceptable mid-term free symptom survival among Iranian patients. PMID:27110330

  6. Endovascular vs open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Nedeau, April E.; Pomposelli, Frank B.; Hamdan, Allen D.; Wyers, Mark C.; Hsu, Richard; Sachs, Teviah; Siracuse, Jeffrey J.; Schermerhorn, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Endovascular repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) has become first-line therapy at our institution and is performed under a standardized protocol. We compare perioperative mortality, midterm survival, and morbidity after EVAR and open surgical repair (OSR). Methods Records were retrospectively reviewed from May 2000 to September 2010 for repair of infrarenal rAAAs. Primary end points included perioperative mortality and midterm survival. Secondary end points included acute limb ischemia, length of stay, ventilator-dependent respiratory failure, myocardial infarction, renal failure, abdominal compartment syndrome, and secondary intervention. Statistical analysis was performed using the t-test,X2 test, the Fisher exact test, and logistic regression calculations. Midterm survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models. Results Seventy-four infrarenal rAAAs were repaired, 19 by EVAR and 55 by OSR. Despite increased age and comorbidity in the EVAR patients, perioperative mortality was 15.7% for EVAR, which was significantly lower than the 49% for OSR (odds ratio, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.05-0.74; P = .008). Midterm survival also favored EVAR (hazard ratio, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.21-0.77; P = .028, adjusted for age and sex). Mean follow-up was 20 months, and 1-year survival was 60% for EVAR vs 45% for OSR. Mean length of stay for patients surviving >1 day was 10 days for EVAR and 21 days for OSR (P = .004). Ventilator-dependent respiratory failure was 5% in the EVAR group vs 42% for OSR (odds ratio, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.01-0.62; P = .001). Conclusions EVAR of rAAA has a superior perioperative survival advantage and decreased morbidity vs OSR. Although not statistically significant, overall survival favors EVAR. We recommend that EVAR be considered as the first-line treatment of rAAAs and practiced as the standard of care. PMID:22626871

  7. Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair by Means of the Chimney Technique in a Patient with Crossed Fused Renal Ectopia

    PubMed Central

    Kfoury, Elias; Almanfi, Abdelkader; Dougherty, Kathryn G.

    2016-01-01

    Crossed fused renal ectopia, a congenital anomaly in 1 of 7,000 individuals, presents a challenge during endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Most treatment approaches in these patients have involved open surgical repair of the aneurysm or endovascular repair with coverage of the ectopic renal artery. We present what we think is the first case of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with use of the chimney technique (parallel stent-grafting) to preserve an ectopic renal artery, in an 88-year-old man who was at high risk for open surgery. In addition to the patient's case, we discuss the relevant medical literature. PMID:27303239

  8. Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair by Means of the Chimney Technique in a Patient with Crossed Fused Renal Ectopia.

    PubMed

    Kfoury, Elias; Almanfi, Abdelkader; Dougherty, Kathryn G; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2016-06-01

    Crossed fused renal ectopia, a congenital anomaly in 1 of 7,000 individuals, presents a challenge during endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Most treatment approaches in these patients have involved open surgical repair of the aneurysm or endovascular repair with coverage of the ectopic renal artery. We present what we think is the first case of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with use of the chimney technique (parallel stent-grafting) to preserve an ectopic renal artery, in an 88-year-old man who was at high risk for open surgery. In addition to the patient's case, we discuss the relevant medical literature. PMID:27303239

  9. Endovascular Tubular Stent-Graft Placement for Isolated Iliac Artery Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takuya Yamaguchi, Masato; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Ryota; Nomura, Yoshikatsu; Okita, Yutaka; Sugimura, Kazuro; Sugimoto, Koji

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety, efficacy, and mid-term outcomes of endovascular tubular stent-graft placement for repair of isolated iliac artery aneurysms (IAAs). Materials and Methods: Between January 2002 and March 2010, 20 patients (7 women and 13 men; mean age 74 years) underwent endovascular repair of 22 isolated IAAs. Two patients underwent endovascular repair for bilateral aneurysms. Ten para-anastomotic aneurysms (45%) developed after open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair with an aorto-iliac graft, and 12 were true aneurysms (55%). Eleven straight and 11 tapered stent-grafts were placed. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) was performed to detect complications and evaluate aneurysmal shrinkage at week 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and once every year thereafter. Non-contrast-enhanced CT was performed in seven patients with chronic kidney disease. Results: All procedures were successful, without serious complications, during the mean (range) follow-up period of 746 days (47-2651). Type II endoleak not requiring treatment was noted in one patient. The mean (SD) diameters of the true and para-anastomotic aneurysms significantly (p < 0.05) decreased from 42.0 (9.3) to 36.9 (13.6) mm and from 40.1 (13.0) to 33.6 (15.8) mm, respectively; the mean (SD) shrinkage rates were 15.1% (20.2%) and 18.9% (22.4%), respectively. The primary patency rate was 100%, and no secondary interventions were required. Four patients (21%) developed transient buttock claudication, and one patient (5%) developed colorectal ischaemia, which was treated conservatively. Conclusion: Endovascular tubular stent-graft placement for the repair of isolated IAAs is safe and efficacious. Tapered stent-grafts of various sizes are required for accurate placement.

  10. Endovascular Treatment of a Ruptured Para-Anastomotic Aneurysm of the Abdominal Aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Sfyroeras, Giorgos S.; Lioupis, Christos Bessias, Nikolaos; Maras, Dimitris; Pomoni, Maria; Andrikopoulos, Vassilios

    2008-07-15

    We report a case of a ruptured para-anastomotic aortic aneurysm treated with implantation of a bifurcated stent-graft. A 72-year-old patient, who had undergone aortobifemoral bypass for aortoiliac occlusive disease 16 years ago, presented with a ruptured para-anastomotic aortic aneurysm. A bifurcated stent-graft was successfully deployed into the old bifurcated graft. This is the first report of a bifurcated stent-graft being placed through an 'end-to-side' anastomosed old aortobifemoral graft. Endovascular treatment of ruptured para-anastomotic aortic aneurysms can be accomplished successfully, avoiding open surgery which is associated with increased mortality and morbidity.

  11. Unique Technique for Open Surgical Repair after Failed Endovascular Aneurysm Repair with Proximal Anastomoses

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, Jun; Mori, Kazuki; Shuto, Takashi; Okamoto, Keitaro; Sato, Aiko; Wada, Tomoyuki; Anai, Hirofumi; Miyamoto, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) has revolutionized the management of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), with lower perioperative morbidity and mortality compared to conventional surgical repair. However, late secondary re-interventions after EVAR are still needed before aneurysm rupture in many cases. A patient with impending rupture of an AAA associated with a type I endoleak 7 years after EVAR who was successfully treated with a unique technique of fixation of the proximal aortic neck taking into account the structure of the stent graft is reported. This technique offers a safe solution to late open conversion after failed EVAR. PMID:27375808

  12. Aortoiliac Aneurysm with Arteriocaval Fistula Treated by a Bifurcated Endovascular Stent-Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Beveridge, Carolyn J.; Pleass, Henry C.C.; Chamberlain, John; Wyatt, Michael G.; Rose, John D.G.

    1998-05-15

    A 71-year-old patient with high-output cardiac failure was found to have an aneurysmal distal aorta with evidence of an arteriocaval fistula on ultrasound scanning. CT demonstrated an aneurysm of the distal aorta and right common iliac artery and an intraarterial digital subtraction angiogram confirmed an arteriocaval fistula. In view of the patient's cardiac failure and general condition an endovascular stent was considered. The right internal iliac artery was occluded with Tungsten coils prior to the insertion of a bifurcated stent-graft. This resulted in total occlusion of the aneurysm and obliteration of the arteriocaval fistula. To our knowledge such a case has not been previously reported.

  13. Y-Stenting Endovascular Treatment for Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysms : A Single-Institution Experience in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Joo

    2012-01-01

    Objective Stent-assisted coiling on intracranial aneurysm has been considered as an effective technique and has made the complex aneurysms amenable to coiling. To achieve reconstruction of intracranial vessels with preservation of parent artery the use of stents has the greatest potential for assisted coiling. We report the results of our experiences in ruptured wide-necked intracranial aneurysms using Y-stent coiling. Methods From October 2003 to October 2011, 12 patients (3 men, 9 women; mean age, 62.6) harboring 12 complex ruptured aneurysms (3 middle cerebral artery, 9 basilar tip) were treated by Y-stent coiling by using self-expandable intracranial stents. Procedural complications, clinical outcome, and initial and midterm angiographic results were evaluated. The definition of broad-necked aneurysm is neck diameter over than 4 mm or an aneurysm with a neck diameter smaller than 4 mm in which the dome/neck ratio was less than 2. Results In all patients, the aneurysm was successfully occluded with no apparent procedure-related complication. There was no evidence of thromboembolic complication, arterial dissection and spasm during procedure. Follow-up studies showed stable and complete occlusion of the aneurysm in all patients with no neurologic deficits. Conclusion The present study did show that the Y-stent coiling seemed to facilitate endovascular treatment of ruptured wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. More clinical data with longer follow-up are needed to establish the role of Y-stent coiling in ruptured aneurysms. PMID:23115659

  14. External transabdominal manipulation of vessels: a useful adjunct with endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Sternbergh, W C; Money, S R; Yoselevitz, M

    2001-04-01

    During endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, a severely angulated aortic neck or tortuous iliac arteries can make delivery of endografts difficult. We describe a simple adjunct in which transabdominal manipulation of vessels is used, which can greatly facilitate delivery of these devices in patients with challenging anatomy. PMID:11296348

  15. Review of the Use of Ionizing Radiation in Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Dindyal, S; Rahman, S; Kyriakides, C

    2015-08-01

    Endovascular repair for aortic aneurysm (EVAR) is rapidly increasing in popularity. The nature of this intervention requires significant exposure to ionizing radiation both during the procedure and for postoperative surveillance, generally in the form of computed tomography. Here the authors review the literature for radiation exposure during EVAR, both for the patient and the physician. PMID:25225195

  16. Reduction of aneurysm pressure and wall stress after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Marston, W A; Criado, E; Baird, C A; Keagy, B A

    1996-03-01

    A canine model was designed to evaluate the changes in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) pressure and wall stress after endovascular repair. Eight canines underwent laparotomy and creation of an AAA. The aneurysm was then excluded with a transluminally placed endovascular graft (TPEG) inserted through the right femoral artery and deployed across the AAA to exclude the infrarenal aortic branches from aortic perfusion. Blood pressure and flow data were recorded for 6 hours. The AAA blood pressure decreased from 135 +/- 9.3 mm Hg before exclusion to 45 +/- 17.6 mm Hg at 10 minutes after exclusion (p < 0.001). At 6 hours, AAA blood pressure had declined further to 26 +/- 12.5 mm Hg. Blood flow in the excluded iliac artery decreased from a baseline of 242 +/- 58 ml/min to 41 +/- 29 ml/min 10 minutes after TPEG placement (p < 0.001). At 6 hours, flow was reduced to 12 +/- 3.5 ml/min (p < 0.05 compared with that at 10 minutes). Aortic wall stress was significantly reduced by TPEG placement but was only slightly lower than baseline aortic wall stress before AAA creation. The lumbar arteries were patent with retrograde flow in all cases and were found to be the major contributors to postexclusion aneurysm pressure. Endovascular AAA exclusion results in an immediate decrease in blood pressure and wall stress within the excluded aneurysm, but the aneurysm remains perfused by retrograde flow through the lumbar arteries, which resulted in near-baseline levels of aneurysm wall stress in this canine model. Embolization of patient lumbar vessels at prosthesis placement may further reduce the risk of late rupture. PMID:8733869

  17. Endovascular Treatment of a Mycotic Intracavernous Carotid Artery Aneurysm Using a Stent Graft

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vivek; Jain, Vikash; Mathuria, SN; Khandelwal, N

    2013-01-01

    Summary Intracavernous carotid artery mycotic aneurysms are rare and management is determined by clinical presentation. We describe the first documented proximal intracranial mycotic aneurysm treated by a balloon expandable Aneugraft PCS covered stent. An 11-year-old female child presented with acute onset fever, headache, chemosis followed by diplopia, right-sided ptosis with ophthalmoplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral cavernous sinus thrombosis. Subsequent work-up included serial computed tomographic arteriography and digital subtraction angiography which revealed a progressively enlarging intracavernous carotid aneurysm. An Aneugraft PCS covered stent was successfully deployed endovascularly, and complete exclusion of the aneurysm was achieved while maintaining the patency of the parent artery. The use of covered stents in intracranial vasculature can be an effective and safe treatment modality for exclusion of the mycotic aneurysm in selected cases. PMID:24070080

  18. Accuracy of Computational Cerebral Aneurysm Hemodynamics Using Patient-Specific Endovascular Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGah, Patrick; Levitt, Michael; Barbour, Michael; Mourad, Pierre; Kim, Louis; Aliseda, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    We study the hemodynamic conditions in patients with cerebral aneurysms through endovascular measurements and computational fluid dynamics. Ten unruptured cerebral aneurysms were clinically assessed by three dimensional rotational angiography and an endovascular guidewire with dual Doppler ultrasound transducer and piezoresistive pressure sensor at multiple peri-aneurysmal locations. These measurements are used to define boundary conditions for flow simulations at and near the aneurysms. The additional in vivo measurements, which were not prescribed in the simulation, are used to assess the accuracy of the simulated flow velocity and pressure. We also performed simulations with stereotypical literature-derived boundary conditions. Simulated velocities using patient-specific boundary conditions showed good agreement with the guidewire measurements, with no systematic bias and a random scatter of about 25%. Simulated velocities using the literature-derived values showed a systematic over-prediction in velocity by 30% with a random scatter of about 40%. Computational hemodynamics using endovascularly-derived patient-specific boundary conditions have the potential to improve treatment predictions as they provide more accurate and precise results of the aneurysmal hemodynamics. Supported by an R03 grant from NIH/NINDS

  19. Microembolism after Endovascular Treatment of Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysms: Reduction of its Incidence by Microcatheter Lumen Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Yoon; Park, Jung Cheol; Kim, Jae Kyun; Sung, Yu Sub; Park, Eun Suk; Kwak, Jae Hyuk; Choi, Choong-Gon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Diffusion-weighted MR images (DWI) obtained after endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms frequently show multiple high-signal intensity (HSI) dots. The purpose of this study was to see whether we could reduce their incidence after embolization of unruptured cerebral aneurysms by modification of our coiling technique, which involves the deliberate aspiration of the microcatheter lumen right after delivery of each detachable coil into the aneurysm sac. Materials and Methods From January 2011 to June 2011, all 71 patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms were treated using various endovascular methods. During the earlier period, 37 patients were treated using our conventional embolization technique (conventional period). Then 34 patients were treated with a modified coiling technique (modified period). DWI was obtained on the following day. We compared the occurrence of any DWI HSI lesions and the presence of the symptomatic lesions during the two time periods. Results The incidence of the DWI HSI lesions differed significantly at 89.2% (33/37) during the conventional period and 26.5% (9/34) during the modified period (p < 0.0001). The incidence of symptomatic lesions differed between the two periods (29.7% during the conventional period vs. 2.9% during the modified period, p < 0.003). Conclusion Aspiration of the inner content of the microcatheter right after detachable coil delivery was helpful for the reduction of the incidence of microembolisms after endovascular coil embolization for the treatment of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. PMID:26389009

  20. Endovascular Repair of a Ruptured Mycotic Aneurysm of the Common Iliac Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Mofidi, R. Bhat, R.; Nagy, J.; Griffiths, G. D.; Chakraverty, S.

    2007-09-15

    This report describes the case of a ruptured mycotic aneurysm of the left common iliac artery, successfully treated with endovascular stent-grafting. A 64-year-old woman underwent diagnostic coronary angiography complicated by an infected hematoma of the left groin. Seven days later, she developed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septicemia and CT scan evidence of perivascular inflammation around the left common iliac artery. This was followed by rupture of a mycotic aneurysm of the left common iliac artery. The lesion was successfully treated with a stent-graft and prolonged antibiotic therapy, and the patient remains free of infection 10 months later. Accumulating evidence suggests that endovascular repair can be used safely for the repair of ruptured infected aneurysms.

  1. Endovascular treatment for ruptured distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm -case report-.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Daizo; Takechi, Akihiko; Shinagawa, Katsuhiro; Sogabe, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by a ruptured left distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysm. Computed tomography showed a thin subarachnoid hemorrhage in the ambient cistern, and digital subtraction angiography revealed an aneurysm arising from the lateral branch of the left AICA, which was separate from the meatal loop. Endovascular treatment was performed to achieve parent artery occlusion using two Guglielmi detachable coils. Postoperatively, the patient had no complications except for left hearing disturbance, and she was independent in daily life. Endovascular parent artery occlusion for distal AICA aneurysm, especially distal from the meatal loop, can avoid sacrificing the internal auditory artery if the lateral branch of the AICA could be occluded more distally from the meatal loop. Sufficient collateral circulation prevents major infarction, and this strategy may be the first-line treatment choice. PMID:20505296

  2. Swine Hybrid Aneurysm Model for Endovascular Surgery Training

    PubMed Central

    Namba, K.; Mashio, K.; Kawamura, Y.; Higaki, A.; Nemoto, S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to develop a technically simple swine aneurysm-training model by inserting a silicone aneurysm circuit in the cervical vessels. A silicone aneurysm circuit was created by designing multiple aneurysms in size and configuration on a silicone vessel. Five swine underwent surgical implantation of this circuit in the cervical vessels: one end in the common carotid artery and the other in the external jugular vein. Using this model, an aneurysm coiling procedure was simulated under fluoroscopic guidance, roadmapping and digital subtraction angiography. Creating an aneurysm model for training purposes by this method was technically simple and enabled the formation of a wide variety of aneurysms in a single procedure. The quality of the model was uniform and the model was reproducible. Coiling training using this model resembled a realistic clinical situation. The swine hybrid aneurysm-training model was advantageous from the standpoint of technical simplicity in the creation and variety of aneurysms it provided. The swine hybrid aneurysm model may be an additional option for aneurysm coiling training. PMID:23693037

  3. Swine hybrid aneurysm model for endovascular surgery training.

    PubMed

    Namba, K; Mashio, K; Kawamura, Y; Higaki, A; Nemoto, S

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a technically simple swine aneurysm-training model by inserting a silicone aneurysm circuit in the cervical vessels. A silicone aneurysm circuit was created by designing multiple aneurysms in size and configuration on a silicone vessel. Five swine underwent surgical implantation of this circuit in the cervical vessels: one end in the common carotid artery and the other in the external jugular vein. Using this model, an aneurysm coiling procedure was simulated under fluoroscopic guidance, roadmapping and digital subtraction angiography. Creating an aneurysm model for training purposes by this method was technically simple and enabled the formation of a wide variety of aneurysms in a single procedure. The quality of the model was uniform and the model was reproducible. Coiling training using this model resembled a realistic clinical situation. The swine hybrid aneurysm-training model was advantageous from the standpoint of technical simplicity in the creation and variety of aneurysms it provided. The swine hybrid aneurysm model may be an additional option for aneurysm coiling training. PMID:23693037

  4. Patient Compliance with Surveillance Following Elective Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, Anthony D. Morbi, Abigail H. M. Nordon, Ian M.

    2015-10-15

    PurposeIntegral to maintaining good outcomes post-endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a robust surveillance protocol. A significant proportion of patients fail to comply with surveillance, exposing themselves to complications. We examine EVAR surveillance in Wessex (UK), exploring factors that may predict poor compliance.MethodsRetrospective analysis of 179 consecutive elective EVAR cases [2008–2013] was performed. 167 patients were male, with the age range of 50–95. Surveillance was conducted centrally (tertiary referral trauma centre) and at four spoke units. Surveillance compliance and predictors of non-compliance including age, gender, co-morbid status, residential location and socioeconomic status were analysed for univariate significance.ResultsFifty patients (27.9 %) were non-compliant with surveillance; 14 (8.1 %) had no imaging post-EVAR. At 1 year, 56.1 % (of 123 patients) were compliant. At years 2 and 3, 41.5 and 41.2 % (of 65 and 34 patients, respectively) were compliant. Four years post-EVAR, only one of eight attended surveillance (12.5 %). There were no statistically significant differences in age (p = 0.77), co-morbid status or gender (p = 0.64). Distance to central unit (p = 0.67) and surveillance site (p = 0.56) was non-significant. While there was a trend towards compliance in upper-middle-class socioeconomic groups (ABC1 vs. C1C2D), correlating with >50 % of non-compliant patients living within <10 mile radius of the central unit, overall predictive value was not significant (p = 0.82).ConclusionsCompliance with surveillance post-EVAR is poor. No independent predictor of non-compliance has been confirmed, but socioeconomic status appears to be relevant. There is a worrying drop-off in attendance beyond the first year. This study highlights a problem that needs to be addressed urgently, if we are to maintain good outcomes post-EVAR.

  5. Use of T-stat to Predict Colonic Ischemia during and after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eugene S.; Pevec, William C.; Link, Daniel P.; Dawson, David L.

    2009-01-01

    As surgeons become more aggressive in treating aneurysms with endovascular techniques, traditional surgical principles of preserving internal iliac arteries and the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) have been challenged. A case is presented where the T-stat device, an FDA approved device for measuring colon ischemia, was used as an adjunctive measure to assist in the successful endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in a patient at high risk for colon ischemia. PMID:18295116

  6. Predictors of Reintervention After Endovascular Repair of Isolated Iliac Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Zayed, Hany A. Attia, Rizwan; Modarai, Bijan; Clough, Rachel E.; Bell, Rachel E.; Carrell, Tom; Sabharwal, Tarun; Reidy, John; Taylor, Peter R.

    2011-02-15

    The objective of this study was to identify factors predicting the need for reintervention after endovascular repair of isolated iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA). We reviewed prospectively collected database records of all patients who underwent endovascular repair of IIAA between 1999 and 2008. Detailed assessment of the aneurysms was performed using computed tomography angiography (CTA). Follow-up protocol included CTA at 3 months. If this showed no complication, then annual duplex scan was arranged. Multivariate analysis and analysis of patient survival and freedom from reintervention were performed using Kaplan-Meier life tables. Forty IIAAs (median diameter 44 mm) in 38 patients were treated (all men; median age 75 years), and median follow-up was 27 months. Endovascular repair of IIAA was required in 14 of 40 aneurysms (35%). The rate of type I endoleak was significantly higher with proximal landing zone (PLZ) diameter >30 mm in the aorta or >24 mm in the common iliac artery or distal landing zone (DLZ) diameter >24 mm (P = 0.03, 0.03, and 0.0014, respectively). Reintervention rate (RR) increased significantly with increased diameter or decreased length of PLZ; increased DLZ diameter; and endovascular IIAA repair (P = 0.005, 0.005, 0.02, and 0.02 respectively); however, RR was not significantly affected by length of PLZ or DLZ. Freedom-from-reintervention was 97, 93, and 86% at 12, 24, and 108 months. There was no in-hospital or aneurysm-related mortality. Endovascular IIAA repair is a safe treatment option. Proper patient selection is essential to decrease the RR.

  7. Percutaneous Endovascular Salvage Techniques for Implanted Venous Access Device Dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Breault, Stéphane; Glauser, Frédéric; Babaker, Malik Doenz, Francesco Qanadli, Salah Dine

    2015-06-15

    PurposeImplanted venous access devices (IVADs) are often used in patients who require long-term intravenous drug administration. The most common causes of device dysfunction include occlusion by fibrin sheath and/or catheter adherence to the vessel wall. We present percutaneous endovascular salvage techniques to restore function in occluded catheters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of these techniques.Methods and MaterialsThrough a femoral or brachial venous access, a snare is used to remove fibrin sheath around the IVAD catheter tip. If device dysfunction is caused by catheter adherences to the vessel wall, a new “mechanical adhesiolysis” maneuver was performed. IVAD salvage procedures performed between 2005 and 2013 were analyzed. Data included clinical background, catheter tip position, success rate, recurrence, and rate of complication.ResultsEighty-eight salvage procedures were performed in 80 patients, mostly women (52.5 %), with a mean age of 54 years. Only a minority (17.5 %) of evaluated catheters were located at an optimal position (i.e., cavoatrial junction ±1 cm). Mechanical adhesiolysis or other additional maneuvers were used in 21 cases (24 %). Overall technical success rate was 93.2 %. Malposition and/or vessel wall adherences were the main cause of technical failure. No complications were noted.ConclusionThese IVAD salvage techniques are safe and efficient. When a catheter is adherent to the vessel wall, mechanical adhesiolysis maneuvers allow catheter mobilization and a greater success rate with no additional risk. In patients who still require long-term use of their IVAD, these procedures can be performed safely to avoid catheter replacement.

  8. Endovascular repair of thoracoabdominal aneurysms: results of the first 48 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lanziotti, Luiz; Cunha, Rodrigo; d’Utra, Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    Background In 2006, we began our experience with a novel technology for fully endovascular thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair, based on a custom-made, branched stent graft design. After 48 cases, we have learned and achieved substantial progress both in technical and in clinical skills. This paper describes the partial results of this ongoing experience. Methods Patients in this series were selected for the presence of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms, with or without dissection, which was present in one patient. The observation of extensive anatomical variations in several patients prompted changes in many of the basic stent graft configurations, which are also described. Results Between August 2006 and June 2012, 48 patients were treated consecutively with custom-made branch stent grafts. The five patients with the longest follow-up available so far are at 71, 65, 60, 54 and 51 months post-procedure. The operative mortality rate, defined as death during or within a month of surgical hospitalization, was 21% (10 patients); each case is described herein. During postoperative follow up, nine patients died from causes not directly related to aneurysmal disease, at 3, 18, 20, 22, 24, 24, 37, 44 and 46 months. The main causes of death were myocardial infarction (four cases), cancer (two cases), gastrointestinal hemorrhage (one case), ischemic stroke (one case), and sepsis (one case). Permanent paraplegia occurred in one patient. Conclusions It is still too soon to compare the results of endovascular repair of thoracoabdominal aneurysms with those of open surgical series. Despite the active and rapid progress currently observed for the endovascular method, it is still far from reaching its state-of-the-art plateau or becoming a gold standard. Further technological and technical advances in endovascular stent grafting seem to have a clear potential to provide very satisfactory operative outcomes for thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms. PMID:23977512

  9. A Retrospective Study of Survivors of Endovascular Coiling for Posterior and Anterior Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sarah J.; Drackford, Ruth; Holt, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article documents the longer-term medical and psychosocial outcomes of patients referred for endovascular coiling. There is limited research investigating outcome following endovascular coiling for posterior compared to anterior circulation aneurysms, and minimal understanding of how medical outcomes relate to patient experiences of treatment and quality of life. We studied a consecutive cohort of 80 patients referred Australia wide for endovascular coiling between 1995 and 2003 (49% posterior; 76% ruptured; 69% women, mean age 51.5 years). We used a mixed methods approach, assessing medical outcome with the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS) in 61 patients (76%), and health-related quality of life and psychosocial functioning using the EuroQol questionnaire and a qualitative semistructured interview in 49 patients (61%). Despite the high proportion of posterior aneurysms, the majority of patients (80%) showed good medical outcomes as indicated by regained independence of activities of daily living (MRS score ≤3). Patients with unruptured aneurysms were significantly more likely to show good outcomes (P < 0.04), whereas aneurysm location (posterior, anterior, or mixed) showed no significant effect. In patients with good medical outcomes, greater functional disability was associated with neurological complications surrounding treatment (P < 0.05). Good outcomes correlated with higher EuroQol ratings (P < 0.001) and the experience of less change after treatment (P < 0.001), although psychosocial adjustment issues were reported by most of the patients, including those with no medical symptoms. These results support the long-term efficacy of endovascular coiling, particularly for posterior circulation aneurysms. They have implications for guiding clinicians and patients in their choice of treatment, as well as the provision of psychological counseling for patient adjustment issues posttreatment. PMID:26266373

  10. Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair with chimney and snorkel grafts: indications, techniques and results.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rakesh P; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Verhoeven, Eric L G; Adam, Donald J; Hardman, John A

    2013-12-01

    The chimney technique in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (Ch-EVAR) involves placement of a stent or stent-graft parallel to the main aortic stent-graft to extend the proximal or distal sealing zone while maintaining side branch patency. Ch-EVAR can facilitate endovascular repair of juxtarenal and aortic arch pathology using available standard aortic stent-grafts, therefore, eliminating the manufacturing delays required for customised fenestrated and branched stent-grafts. Several case series have demonstrated the feasibility of Ch-EVAR both in acute and elective cases with good early results. This review discusses indications, technique, and the current available clinical data on Ch-EVAR. PMID:23674274

  11. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with Chimney and Snorkel Grafts: Indications, Techniques and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rakesh P.; Katsargyris, Athanasios Verhoeven, Eric L. G.; Adam, Donald J.; Hardman, John A.

    2013-12-15

    The chimney technique in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (Ch-EVAR) involves placement of a stent or stent-graft parallel to the main aortic stent-graft to extend the proximal or distal sealing zone while maintaining side branch patency. Ch-EVAR can facilitate endovascular repair of juxtarenal and aortic arch pathology using available standard aortic stent-grafts, therefore, eliminating the manufacturing delays required for customised fenestrated and branched stent-grafts. Several case series have demonstrated the feasibility of Ch-EVAR both in acute and elective cases with good early results. This review discusses indications, technique, and the current available clinical data on Ch-EVAR.

  12. Towards individualized follow-up protocols after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Laturnus, Johanna; Oliveira, Nelson; Basto Gonçalves, Frederico; Schurink, Geert W; Verhagen, Hence; Jacobs, Michael J; Mees, Barend M E

    2016-04-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has become the primary treatment option for elective abdominal aortic aneurysms. However, a significant number of patients require secondary interventions to maintain adequate aneurysm exclusion and ultimately prevent death from abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture. To maintain success and offer timely secondary intervention, intensive image surveillance has been recommended. These rigorous surveillance regimens are costly and may have deleterious effects from radiation and contrast exposure. Improvements in patient selection, operative technique and devices have caused a decline in complications after EVAR. Therefore, there is a need to reduce surveillance after EVAR for patients at lower risk of complications and install individualized follow-up protocols. This review describes the current strategies for surveillance and clarification of risk factors and predictors for late complications and discusses proposed risk-adapted strategies for postoperative surveillance after EVAR. PMID:26745264

  13. Endovascular repair for an extracranial internal carotid aneurysm with cervical access: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Chavarría, Ignacio J.; Alvarado-Marín, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Carotid aneurysms are a rare pathology. This vascular disorder can be asymptomatic or it can cause local compression. The disorder poses a high risk of embolization and rupture. Presentation of case A 79 years old female, presents with a right internal carotid fusiform aneurysm, approximately 3.8 cm in diameter, localized 3.30 cm from the common carotid artery bifurcation with an extremely tortuous common carotid artery. Discussion Surgical management of the extracranial internal carotid artery remains varying and challenging, particularly with a distal internal carotid aneurysm and with anatomical difficulties. Conclusion Endovascular management of an internal carotid aneurysm with cervical access using an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene covered stent with Heparin Bioactive Surface in the carotid area, is safe and effective. PMID:26706595

  14. Endovascular management of ruptured common iliac mycotic aneurysm in an HIV-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Aamir; Mooka, Busi; Clarke Moloney, Mary; Kavanagh, Eamon

    2013-01-01

    Isolated iliac artery aneurysms are a rare entity. The majority of cases are asymptomatic and often escape detection. Mortality rates after sudden rupture and emergent surgery for iliac artery aneurysm are very high. We report a case of a 56-year-old man who presented with right hip pain masquerading as septic arthritis or psoas abscess. CT showed ruptured right common iliac artery aneurysm with extensive active extravasation into psoas with a retroperitoneal haematoma. Aneurysm was repaired using an endovascular technique. Postoperative recovery was eventful with the patient experiencing severe back pain radiating down the leg accompanied with fever. CT showed persistent, right iliopsoas haematoma and pelvic haematoma with secondary hydronephrosis. Viral screen for hepatitis B, C and HIV returned positive. The patient was started on intravenous meropenem. Fever and pain settled. Repeated CT scan showed decrease in retroperitoneal pelvic haematoma. PMID:23917370

  15. Endovascular coiling of middle cerebral artery aneurysms as an alternative to surgical clipping.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Hwan; Cha, Ki-Chul; Kim, Jong-Soo; Hong, Seung-Chyul

    2013-04-01

    Surgical clipping is preferred to endovascular coil embolization for the treatment of middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms. The aim of this study was to describe our experience of coiling for MCA aneurysms, to analyze the reasons for choosing coiling instead of clipping, and to evaluate the appropriateness of the choice. We retrospectively reviewed data of 30 patients who had coiling for MCA aneurysms in our Institute from January 2008 to February 2011. We analyzed the morphologies, techniques, angiographic results and complications of 30 aneurysms treated with coiling, and compared the outcomes with those of 78 clipped aneurysms during the same period. The most common reason for choosing coiling instead of clipping was the short length of the M1 artery (17/30, 56.7%). Complete obliteration of the aneurysm was achieved in 28 of 30 coiling patients (93%) and in 72 of 78 clipping patients (92%). In the coiling group, two of 30 patients (6.7%) had post-procedural infarctions on radiologic evaluation, with only one infarction in clinically relevant territory. There was one intra-procedural rupture and one aneurysm recanalization requiring retreatment in the coiling group. In the clipping group, two infarctions, one subdural hygroma and two intracerebral hematomas were found as postoperative complications, with two clinical deteriorations. Endovascular coil embolization should be considered for treatment of MCA aneurysms as it has angiographic results equivalent to surgical clipping and acceptable post-procedural complications. It is particularly appropriate for patients with serious medical problems or where there is the risk of damaging perforating lenticulostriate arteries on the MCA during surgery. PMID:23375399

  16. Comparative outcome analysis of anterior choroidal artery aneurysms treated with endovascular coiling or surgical clipping

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Takachika; Hirohata, Masaru; Noguchi, Kei; Komaki, Satoru; Orito, Kimihiko; Morioka, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treatment of anterior choroidal artery (AChA) aneurysms with endovascular coiling or surgical clipping may increase the risk of ischemic complications owing to the critical territory supplied by the AChA. We analyzed the surgical results of endovascular coiling and surgical clipping for AChA aneurysms performed in a single institution, as well as the role of indocyanine green-videoangiography (ICG-VAG) and motor-evoked potential (MEP). Methods: We analyzed 50 patients (51 aneurysms; 21 men, 29 women; mean age: 58 years) including 25 with subarachnoid hemorrhage treated with endovascular coiling or surgical clipping between April 1990 and October 2013. The complication rates and clinical outcomes of the coil group (mean follow-up: 61 months) and the clip group (mean follow-up: 121 months) were analyzed with a modified Rankin scale. Results: The overall clinical outcome of the coil group (95%) was better than that of the clip group (85%). Especially, the outcomes in the coil group were better in the first investigated period (1990–2007) (P < 0.05). However, after the introduction of ICG-VAG and MEP, the outcomes in the clip group improved significantly (P = 0.005), and treatment-related complications decreased from 20 to 4.7%. Eleven aneurysms (coil group: 8, clip group: 3) showed small neck remnants but no remarkable regrowth, except for 1 case during the mean follow-up period of 91 months. Conclusions: Surgical clipping of AChA aneurysms has become safer because of ICG-VAG and MEP monitoring. Coiling and clipping of AChA aneurysms showed good and comparable outcomes with these monitoring methods.

  17. Maximum Diameter Measurements of Aortic Aneurysms on Axial CT Images After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Sufficient for Follow-up?

    SciTech Connect

    Baumueller, Stephan Nguyen, Thi Dan Linh Goetti, Robert Paul; Lachat, Mario; Seifert, Burkhardt; Pfammatter, Thomas Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum diameter measurements of aortic aneurysms after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on axial computed tomographic (CT) images in comparison to maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the intravascular centerline for follow-up by using three-dimensional (3D) volume measurements as the reference standard. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine consecutive patients (73 {+-} 7.5 years, range 51-88 years), who underwent EVAR of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm were retrospectively included. Two blinded readers twice independently measured the maximum aneurysm diameter on axial CT images performed at discharge, and at 1 and 2 years after intervention. The maximum diameter perpendicular to the centerline was automatically measured. Volumes of the aortic aneurysms were calculated by dedicated semiautomated 3D segmentation software (3surgery, 3mensio, the Netherlands). Changes in diameter of 0.5 cm and in volume of 10% were considered clinically significant. Intra- and interobserver agreements were calculated by intraclass correlations (ICC) in a random effects analysis of variance. The two unidimensional measurement methods were correlated to the reference standard. Results: Intra- and interobserver agreements for maximum aneurysm diameter measurements were excellent (ICC = 0.98 and ICC = 0.96, respectively). There was an excellent correlation between maximum aneurysm diameters measured on axial CT images and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001) as well as between maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the centerline and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Measurements of maximum aneurysm diameters on axial CT images are an accurate, reliable, and robust method for follow-up after EVAR and can be used in daily routine.

  18. Combined Endovascular Repair of a Celiac Trunk Aneurysm Using Celiac-Splenic Stent Graft and Hepatic Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Giampaolo; Rivolta, Nicola; Fontana, Federico; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Bracchi, Elena; Ferrario, Massimo

    2010-04-15

    Celiac trunk aneurysms are rare and usually asymptomatic lesions. However, treatment is generally warranted to avoid catastrophic rupture. We report a case of a 70-year-old man who sought care for a celiac trunk aneurysm close to the hepatosplenic bifurcation managed endovascularly by using a combined treatment of celiac-splenic stent-graft implantation and hepatic artery embolization.

  19. [Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm in a patient with transplanted kidney].

    PubMed

    Khabazov, R I; Chupin, A V; Kolosov, R V; Deriabin, S V

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular repair of the abdominal aorta is a method of choice in pronounced concomitant pathology and high risk of open surgical treatment. The article deals with a clinical case report of successful surgical management of a patient with an infrarenal aortic aneurysm, transplanted kidney, chronic renal insufficiency, secondary diabetes mellitus, multifocal atherosclerosis with predominant involvement of coronary arteries and lower-limb arteries, in whom open surgical treatment was associated with high risk. Endoprosthetic repair of the abdominal aortic aneurysm was performed with a good postoperative outcome. PMID:27626264

  20. A ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm managed endovascularly using the telescoping chimney technique.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Steve; Popori, R K; Pichel, Adam C; Farquharson, Finn; Serracino-Inglott, Ferdinand

    2011-04-01

    Extending the proximal landing zone to facilitate endovascular repair of aortic aneurysms with short proximal necks using the chimney, top-fenestration, or snorkel technique has been previously reported. In addition, extending the distal landing zone using the periscope technique has also been recently described. In this study, we used an extended chimney technique, the "telescoping technique," to successfully treat a ruptured Crawford type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm in a patient with pre-existing renal failure and an occluded superior mesenteric artery. PMID:21396567

  1. Use of spiral computed tomographic angiography in monitoring abdominal aortic aneurysms after transfemoral endovascular repair.

    PubMed Central

    Balm, R; Jacobs, M J

    1997-01-01

    Transfemoral endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has proved to be technically feasible in a selected group of patients. However, long-term efficacy has not been proved. Graft performance after implantation can be monitored by a single imaging technique: spiral computed tomographic angiography. With this technique, the parameters for continuing clinical success of the procedure-graft patency, endoleaks, graft migration, attachment site diameter, attachment system failure, and aneurysm diameter-can be monitored. Only in selected cases will an additional imaging technique be necessary. PMID:9339508

  2. The Underlying Mechanisms of Endovascular Exclusion of Intracranial Aneurysms by Coils

    PubMed Central

    Henkes, H.; Brew, S.; Miloslavski, E.; Fischer, S.; Tavrovski, I.; Kühne, D.

    2003-01-01

    Summary Endovascular coil treatment of intracranial aneurysms is now widely accepted. We discuss some of the arguments for the relative roles of electrothrombosis, spontaneous thrombosis, mechanical filling, haemodynamic effects and surface properties in successful coil treatment. Despite an enormous body of literature, with many theories and much data, there is limited evidence for, or understanding of, the mechanisms by which coil treatment protects against aneurysm rupture. It seems likely that electrothrombosis plays no part. Dense packing is probably important in preventing recurrence. New technologies aiming to encourage endothelialisation and increased connective tissue formation appear promising. PMID:20591263

  3. Successful endovascular treatment of a 13 cm abdominal aortic aneurysm. Case report.

    PubMed

    Santagata, A; Giribono, A M; Ferrara, D; Viviani, E; Narese, D; Midiri, F; Albano, D; Padricelli, A; Del Guercio, L

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence in the literature that endovascular aneurysm repair is the first-line approach for most of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Furthermore aortouniiliac stent graft placement is, in high risk patients or during emergency setting, a safe procedure over the mid- and long-term period and compares well with the results of bifurcated stent grafts. We present a case of a 66 -year-old gentleman, with pneumothorax after therapeutic thoracentesis and a giant AAA, successfully treated with an aortomonoiliac stent grafting and femoro-femoral crossover bypass. PMID:27212572

  4. Pipeline endovascular reconstruction of traumatic dissecting aneurysms of the intracranial internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vikram; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Jindal, Gaurav

    2014-12-01

    A 22-year-old woman was involved in a motor vehicle collision resulting in multiple facial fractures and extensive internal carotid artery (ICA) injury including a right carotid-cavernous fistula, complex dissection flap and dissecting aneurysms. Endovascular coil embolization was initially performed to treat the cavernous carotid fistula and then again on two separate occasions to treat expanding dissecting aneurysms. Parent vessel reconstruction of the right ICA was subsequently performed with the Pipeline embolization device, resulting in complete anatomical restoration of this vessel. PMID:24353328

  5. JAG Tearing Technique with Radiofrequency Guide Wire for Aortic Fenestration in Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio Leonini, Sara; Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Neri, Eugenio; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Tommasino, Giulio; Sassi, Carlo

    2012-02-15

    An innovative approach, the JAG tearing technique, was performed during thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair in a patient with previous surgical replacement of the ascending aorta with a residual uncomplicated type B aortic dissection who developed an aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta with its lumen divided in two parts by an intimal flap. The proximal landing zone was suitable to place a thoracic stent graft. The distal landing zone was created by cutting the intimal flap in the distal third of the descending thoracic aorta with a radiofrequency guide wire and intravascular ultrasound catheter.

  6. 3D Road-Mapping in the Endovascular Treatment of Cerebral Aneurysms and Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Rossitti, S.; Pfister, M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary 3D road-mapping with syngo iPilot was used as an additional tool for assessing cerebral aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) for endovascular therapy. This method provides accurate superimposition of a live fluoroscopic image (native or vascular road-map) and its matching 2D projection of the 3D data set, delivering more anatomic information on one additional display. In the endovascular management of cases with complex anatomy, 3D road-mapping provides excellent image quality at the intervention site. This method can potentially reduce intervention time, the number of DSA runs, fluoroscopy time and the amount of contrast media used in a procedure, with reservation for these factors being mainly operator-dependent. 3D road-mapping probably does not provide any advantage in the treatment of cerebral aneurysms or AVMs with very simple configuration, and it should not be used when acquisition of an optimum 3D data set is not feasible. PMID:20465911

  7. An Update on the Inflammatory Response after Endovascular Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Arnaoutoglou, Eleni; Kouvelos, George; Koutsoumpelis, Andreas; Patelis, Nikolaos; Lazaris, Andreas; Matsagkas, Miltiadis

    2015-01-01

    Postimplantation syndrome (PIS) is the clinical and biochemical expression of an inflammatory response following endovascular repair of an aortic aneurysm (EVAR). The goal of this review is to provide an update on the inflammatory response after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm, discussing its causes and effects on the clinical outcome of the patient. PIS concerns nearly one-third of patients after EVAR. It is generally a benign condition, although in some patients it may negatively affect outcome. The different definitions and conclusions drawn from several studies reveal that PIS needs to be redefined with standardized diagnostic criteria. The type of the endograft's material seems to play a role in the inflammatory response. Future studies should focus on a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiology, predictors, and risk factors as well as determining whether effective preventive strategies are necessary. PMID:26166953

  8. Endovascular Treatment of an Aneurysmal Aberrant Systemic Artery Supplying a Pulmonary Sequestrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kristensen, Katrine Lawaetz; Duus, Louise Aarup; Elle, Bo

    2015-10-15

    An aberrant systemic artery originating from the abdominal aorta supplying a pulmonary sequestration is a rare congenital malformation. This causes a left-to-left shunt. Symptoms include recurrent pneumonias, hemoptysis, and, in the long term, heart failure. Aneurysm of the aberrant vessel is rarely seen. Traditionally, treatment of pulmonary sequestrations includes ligation of the feeding vessel and lobectomy. A new promising treatment is an endovascular approach. Only a few cases describe endovascular treatment of pulmonary sequestration. This is the first published case of a giant aneurysmal branch from the abdominal aorta to the normal basal segments of the lung, successfully occluded with an Amplatzer Vascular Plug II (AVP II, St.Jude Medical, MN, USA) alone.

  9. Endovascular Treatment of an Aneurysmal Aberrant Systemic Artery Supplying a Pulmonary Sequestrum.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Katrine Lawaetz; Duus, Louise Aarup; Elle, Bo

    2015-10-01

    An aberrant systemic artery originating from the abdominal aorta supplying a pulmonary sequestration is a rare congenital malformation. This causes a left-to-left shunt. Symptoms include recurrent pneumonias, hemoptysis, and, in the long term, heart failure. Aneurysm of the aberrant vessel is rarely seen. Traditionally, treatment of pulmonary sequestrations includes ligation of the feeding vessel and lobectomy. A new promising treatment is an endovascular approach. Only a few cases describe endovascular treatment of pulmonary sequestration. This is the first published case of a giant aneurysmal branch from the abdominal aorta to the normal basal segments of the lung, successfully occluded with an Amplatzer Vascular Plug II (AVP II, St.Jude Medical, MN, USA) alone. PMID:25737458

  10. Endovascular Treatment of a Symptomatic Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm by Chimney and Periscope Techniques for Total Visceral and Renal Artery Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Cariati, Maurizio; Mingazzini, Pietro; Dallatana, Raffaello; Rossi, Umberto G.; Settembrini, Alberto; Santuari, Davide

    2013-05-02

    Conventional endovascular therapy of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with involving visceral and renal arteries is limited by the absence of a landing zone for the aortic endograft. Solutions have been proposed to overcome the problem of no landing zone; however, most of them are not feasible in urgent and high-risk patients. We describe a case that was successfully treated by total endovascular technique with a two-by-two chimney-and-periscope approach in a patient with acute symptomatic type IV thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with supra-anastomotic aneurysm formation involving the renal and visceral arteries and a pseduaneurismatic sac localized in the left ileopsoas muscle.

  11. A cost-effectiveness analysis of standard versus endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Thomas L.; DeRose, Guy; Kribs, Stewart; Harris, Kenneth A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To compare endovascular and standard open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in terms of initial in-hospital costs and the costs of secondary interventions and surveillance. Design A retrospective study. Setting A university-affiliated tertiary care medical centre. Patients Seven patients who underwent elective endovascular (EV) repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in 1998 and 31 patients anatomically suitable for endovascular repair who underwent standard (STAN) elective repair. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 14 months. Interventions Elective repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with use of the standard technique or endovascular technology. Outcome measures Costs common to both groups were not determined. Costs were determined for total hospital stay, preoperative or postoperative embolization, grafts, additional endovascular equipment, and follow-up computed tomography. Results Groups were similar with respect to demographic data and aneurysm size (EV = 6.23 cm v. STAN = 6.05 cm). All patients were in American Society of Anesthesiologists class III or IV. Vanguard bifurcated grafts and extensions were used in the EV group. The total cost for both groups in Canadian dollars included: cost of stay (EV, 5.6 d, $2092.63 v. STAN, 10.7 d, $4449.19; p = 0.009); cost of embolization (EV, n = 3; $900/procedure); cost of follow-up CT (EV, 5.4 per patient; $450/CT); cost of grafts (EV = $8571.43, STAN = $374); additional radiologic equipment costs (EV = $1475). The mean total cost differed significantly between the 2 groups (EV = $14 967.63 v. STAN = $4823.19; p = 0.004). The additional cost associated with a reduction in hospital stay was calculated by determining the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER: difference in mean costs/difference in mean length of stay = $1604.51). Conclusions Endovascular repair continues to be more expensive than standard open repair determined according to procedural and follow-up costs. The technology is still in the

  12. Molded Parallel Endografts for Branch Vessel Preservation during Endovascular Aneurysm Repair in Challenging Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Minion, David

    2012-06-01

    Parallel endografts (also known as snorkels or chimneys) are a proposed strategy for increasing the applicability of endovascular repair to aneurysms involving branch vessels. One major disadvantage of this strategy is the imperfect nature of seal inherent to having multiple side-by-side endografts. In this article, the use of odd-shaped parallel endografts to facilitate apposition and improve seal is proposed and a technique to mold a round stent graft into an "eye" shape using balloons is described. PMID:23730134

  13. Percutaneous Aspiration Thrombectomy for Arterial Thromboembolism during Infrainguinal Endovascular Recanalization

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Li-Ming; Zhu, Yue-Qi; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Pei-Lei; Li, Xiao-Cong; Zhao, Jun-Gong; Lu, Hai-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy (PAT) for infrainguinal arterial thromboembolism in patients undergoing endovascular recanalization (EVR) and to investigate the predictors for thromboembolic complications. Materials and Methods In total, 23 patients (23 limbs) who underwent PAT for thromboembolism (PAT group, PG) during EVR and 237 patients (302 limbs) who underwent successful EVR without thromboembolic complications (control group, CG) were enrolled. Immediate post-operation and follow-up outcomes were compared between the two groups. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify the predictors of thromboembolic complications. Technical success of PAT was defined as achievement of <30% residual stenosis and restoration of mTIMI grade 3. Results The technical success rate was 95.7% in PG. After intervention, the ankle–brachial index (ABI), restoration of blood flow and improvement in dorsal/plantar arterial pulse score showed no significant differences between PG and CG. During follow-up in PG, a sustained ABI improvement was observed in 63.6% (70.9% in CG), an improvement in walking distance in 68.8% (79.9% in CG,), ulcer healing in 75.0% (71.7% in CG) and restenosis/occlusion in 31.8% (25.2% in CG). The limb salvage rate was 100% in PG (96.0% in CG), and pain relief was observed in 66.7% patients with critical limb ischaemia (81.6% in CG). Superficial femoral artery involvement [0.233; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.108–0.461; P < 0.001], de-novo lesion occlusion (683.8; 95% CI, 36.5–12804.6; P < 0.001) and intraluminal angioplasty (118.4; 95% CI, 8.0–1758.0; P = 0.001) was associated with high incidence of thromboembolism. Conclusion PAT is a safe and effective treatment for thromboembolism during infrainguinal arterial EVR. SFA involvement, de-novo lesion occlusion and intraluminal angioplasty may be predictors of thromboembolic complications. PMID:26484672

  14. Midterm results of endovascular infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, A David; Forbes, Thomas L; Novick, Teresa V; Lovell, Marge B; Kribs, Stewart W; Lawlor, D Kirk; Harris, Kenneth A; DeRose, Guy

    2007-01-01

    Short-term and midterm clinical outcomes after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) have been well documented. Evaluation of longer term outcomes is now possible. Here we describe our initial 100 high-risk patients treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), all with a minimum of 5 years of follow-up. A retrospective review of prospectively recorded data in a departmental database was undertaken for the first 100 consecutive EVAR patients with a minimum of 5 years (range, 60-105 months) of follow-up performed between December 1997 and June 2001. Information was obtained from surgical follow-up visits and family doctors' offices. Endovascular repair of AAA in high-risk patients can be achieved with acceptably low postoperative mortality and morbidity. Longer term results in this high-risk cohort suggest that EVAR is effective in preventing aneurysm-related deaths at 5 years and beyond. All late mortalities were due to patients' comorbid diseases. PMID:17704332

  15. Suprarenal fixation barbs can induce renal artery occlusion in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Subedi, Shree K; Lee, Andy M; Landis, Gregg S

    2010-01-01

    Renal artery occlusion following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with suprarenal fixation is uncommon. We report one patient who was found to develop renal artery occlusion and parenchymal infarction 6 months after repair using an endovascular graft with suprarenal fixation. Our patient underwent emergent endovascular repair of a symptomatic 6 cm abdominal aortic aneurysm. The covered portion of the endograft was inadvertently deployed well below the renal artery orifices. At the completion of the procedure both renal arteries were confirmed to be patent. One month postoperatively, a computed tomographic (CT) scan showed exclusion of the aortic sac and normal enhancement of both kidneys. At 6 months, the patient was found to have elevated serum creatinine levels despite having no clinical symptoms. CT scanning revealed a nonenhancing left kidney, and angiography demonstrated an occlusion of the left renal artery. A barb welded to the bare metal stent appeared to be impinging on the renal artery. We believe that renal artery occlusion after endovascular repair can occur due to repetitive injury to the renal artery orifice from barbs welded to the bare metal stent. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of renal artery occlusion caused by repetitive injury from transrenal fixation systems. PMID:19540715

  16. Accuracy of Computational Cerebral Aneurysm Hemodynamics Using Patient-Specific Endovascular Measurements

    PubMed Central

    McGah, Patrick M.; Levitt, Michael R.; Barbour, Michael C.; Morton, Ryan P.; Nerva, John D.; Mourad, Pierre D.; Ghodke, Basavaraj V.; Hallam, Danial K.; Sekhar, Laligam N.; Kim, Louis J.; Aliseda, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Computational hemodynamic simulations of cerebral aneurysms have traditionally relied on stereotypical boundary conditions (such as blood flow velocity and blood pressure) derived from published values as patient-specific measurements are unavailable or difficult to collect. However, controversy persists over the necessity of incorporating such patient specific conditions into computational analyses. We perform simulations using both endovascular-derived patient-specific and typical literature-derived inflow and outflow boundary conditions. Detailed three-dimensional anatomical models of the cerebral vasculature are developed from rotational angiography data, and blood flow velocity and pressure are measured in situ by a dual-sensor pressure and velocity endovascular guidewire at multiple peri-aneurysmal locations in ten unruptured cerebral aneurysms. These measurements are used to define inflow and outflow boundary conditions for computational hemodynamic models of the aneurysms. The additional in situ measurements which are not prescribed in the simulation are then used to assess the accuracy of the simulated flow velocity and pressure drop. Simulated velocities using patient-specific boundary conditions show good agreement with the guidewire measurements at measurement locations inside the domain, with no bias in the agreement and a random scatter of ≈25%. Simulated velocities using the simplified, literature-derived values show a systematic bias and over-predicted velocity by ≈30% with a random scatter of ≈40%. Computational hemodynamics using endovascularly measured patient-specific boundary conditions have the potential to improve treatment predictions as they provide more accurate and precise results of the aneurysmal hemodynamics than those based on commonly accepted reference values for boundary conditions. PMID:24162859

  17. The role of contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging in the follow-up of patients post-endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Nadia; Parker, Pamela; Lakshminarayan, Raghuram

    2016-02-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair is a minimally invasive technique for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Patients who undergo endovascular aneurysm repair are potentially at risk of developing problems related to the graft such as the development of endoleaks. Endoleaks can cause expansion of the aneurysmal sac, which can potentially lead to rupture. It is for this reason that lifelong surveillance of patients is required to assess the graft and the aneurysmal sac. This article discusses the role of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in the follow-up of patients post-endovascular aneurysm repair. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound is rapidly becoming a powerful, accurate and cost-effective tool to complement computed tomography in the follow-up of endovascular aneurysm repair patients. Real-time imaging of contrast filling into the arterial system means that contrast-enhanced ultrasound is an excellent problem-solving tool, particularly when assessing for the type and anatomy of endoleaks. In some instances, contrast-enhanced ultrasound can detect endoleaks when other modalities are equivocal. PMID:27433275

  18. Morbidity and mortality of patients with endovascularly treated intracerebral aneurysms: does physician specialty matter?

    PubMed

    Fennell, Vernard S; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Palejwala, Sheri K; Lemole, G Michael; Dumont, Travis M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Endovascular treatment of cerebrovascular pathology, particularly aneurysms, is becoming more prevalent. There is a wide variety in clinical background and training of physicians who treat cerebrovascular pathology through endovascular means. The impact of clinical training background on patient outcomes is not well documented. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of a large national database, the University HealthSystem Consortium, that was queried in the years 2009-2013. Cases of both unruptured cerebral aneurysms and subarachnoid hemorrhage treated by endovascular obliteration were studied. Outcome measures of morbidity and mortality were evaluated according to the specialty of the treating physician. RESULTS Elective embolization of an unruptured aneurysm was the procedure code and primary diagnosis, respectively, for 12,400 cases. Patients with at least 1 complication were reported in 799 cases (6.4%). Deaths were reported in 193 cases (1.6%). Complications and deaths were varied by specialty; the highest incidence of complications (11.1%) and deaths (3.0%) were reported by neurologists. The fewest complications were reported by neurosurgeons (5.4%; 1.4% deaths), with a higher incidence of complications reported in cases performed by neurologists (p < 0.0001 for both complications and deaths) and to a lesser degree interventional radiologists (p = 0.0093 for complications). Subarachnoid hemorrhage was the primary diagnosis and procedure for 8197 cases. At least 1 complication was reported in 2385 cases (29%) and deaths in 983 cases (12%). The number of complications and deaths varied among specialties. The highest incidence of complications (34%) and deaths (13.5%) in subarachnoid hemorrhage was in cases performed by neurologists. The fewest complications were in cases by neurosurgeons (27%), with a higher incidence of complications in cases performed by neurologists (34%, p < 0.0001), and a trend of increased complications with

  19. Emergency endovascular aortic repair of a ruptured mycotic aorto-iliac aneurysm presenting with lumbar radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ting-Ying; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Lin, Yi-Chanag; Hsu, Po-Shun

    2014-01-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is life-threatening without immediate management. The initial clinical presentation is non-specific and impending rupture is easily missed, especially without a CT scan. We present a case of a 56-year-old man with low-back pain and left lower-extremity numbness, which was diagnosed as a herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) with left acute sciatica syndrome. He also complained of persistent fever and abdominal discomfort. Routine blood work-up revealed leukocytosis and decreasing haemoglobin levels. CT angiography (CTA) showed impending rupture of the left aorto-iliac aneurysm. We therefore performed endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Blood culture revealed Salmonella enterica, for which he received antibiotics. No acute sciatica syndrome was present immediately after the EVAR. No EVAR-related complications were noted in the one-year CTA follow up. PMID:25000523

  20. Endovascular Therapeutic Options for Isolated Iliac Aneurysms with a Working Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrni, Markus; Lachat, Mario M; Wildermuth, Simon; Pfammatter, Thomas

    2003-09-15

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a variety of stent-grafting and embolization techniques and describe a new classification for endovascular treatment of isolated iliac artery aneurysms. A total of 19 patients were treated for isolated iliac aneurysms. Depending on the proximal iliac neck and the uni-/bilaterality of common iliac artery aneurysms (CIAA's) the patient may be treated by a tube (Type Ia) or a bifurcated stent-graft (Type Ib) in addition to internal iliac artery embolization. Neck anatomy is also critical in determining therapeutical options for internal iliac artery aneurysms (IIAA's). These are tube stent-grafting plus internal iliac branch embolization (Type IIa), coiling of afferent and efferent internal iliac vessels (Type IIb) and IIAA packing (Type IIc). The average length of stay for these procedures was 3.8 days. During the mean follow-up of 20.9 months, aneurysm size remained unchanged in all but 4 patients. Reinterventions were necessary in option Type Ib (3/8 pat.) and Type Ia (1/7 pat.) due to extender stent-graft migration (n = 2) or reperfusion leaks (n 2). We conclude that Iliac artery aneurysms may be successfully and safely treated by a tailored approach using embolization or a combination of embolization and stent-grafting. Long-term CT imaging follow-up is necessary, particularly in patients treated with bifurcated stent-grafts (Type Ib)

  1. Vertebro-Basilar Junction Aneurysms: A Single Centre Experience and Meta-Analysis of Endovascular Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Francesca; Ganau, Mario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Vascular lesions of the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) are challenging in neurosurgical practice, and their gold-standard therapy is still under debate. We describe the operative strategies currently in use for the management of these complex vascular lesions and discuss their rationale in a literature meta-analysis and single centre blinded retrospective study. The single centre study included a review of initial presentation, angiographic features and clinical outcome (with modified Rankin Scale [mRS] scores) over a long-term follow-up. In our series, small aneurysms were effectively treated by endosaccular coil embolization, whereas a strategy including flow-diverter devices combined with endosaccular coil embolization was the option of choice in large and giant aneurysms, leading to satisfactory outcomes in most cases. Our Medline review showed that endovascular treatment was chosen in most VBJ cases, whereas the microsurgical option was assigned to only a few cases. Among the endovascular treatments, the most common techniques used for the treatment of VBJ aneurysms were: coiling, stent-assisted coiling and flow diversion. Our study highlights that aneurysm morphology, location and patient-specific angio-architecture are key factors to be considered in the management of VBJ aneurysms. Most case series, including our own, show that parent artery reconstruction using a flow-diverter device is a feasible and successful technique in some cases of giant and complex aneurysms (especially those involving the lower third of the basilar artery) while a "sit back, wait and see" approach may represent the safest and most reasonable option. PMID:25489898

  2. [Abdominal aortic aneurysm treated by endovascular surgery: a case report].

    PubMed

    Alconero-Camarero, Ana Rosa; Cobo-Sánchez, José Luis; Casaus-Pérez, María; García-Campo, María Elena; García-Zarrabeitia, María José; Calvo-Diez, Marta; Mirones-Valdeolivas, Luz Elena

    2008-01-01

    An aneurysm is an abnormal dilation or irreversible convex of a portion of an artery. The most common site of aneurysms is the abdominal aorta and their appearance is often due to degeneration of the arterial wall, associated with atherosclerosis and favored by risk factors such as smoking and hypertension, among others. Left untreated, aneurysm of the abdominal aorta usually leads to rupture. Treatment is surgical, consisting of the introduction of a prosthesis, composed basically of a stent and an introducer, into the aorta. We report the case of a person diagnosed with abdominal aortic aneurysm in a routine examination who was admitted for ambulatory surgical treatment. We designed a nursing care plan, following Virginia Henderson's conceptual model. The care plan was divided into 2 parts, a first preoperative phase and a second postimplantation or monitoring phase. The care plan contained the principal nursing diagnoses, based on the taxonomies of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA), nursing interventions classification (NIC) and nursing outcomes classifications (NOC), and collaboration problems/potential complications. The patient was discharged to home after contact was made with his reference nurse in the primary health center, since during the hospital phase, some NOC indicators remained unresolved. PMID:18448049

  3. Deformable Surface Model for the Evaluation of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Treated with an Endovascular Sealing System.

    PubMed

    Casciaro, Mariano E; El-Batti, Salma; Chironi, Gilles; Simon, Alain; Mousseaux, Elie; Armentano, Ricardo L; Alsac, Jean-Marc; Craiem, Damian

    2016-05-01

    Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is responsible for 1-3% of all deaths among the elderly population in developed countries. A novel endograft proposes an endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS) system that isolates the aneurysm wall from blood flow using a polymer-filled endobag that surrounds two balloon-expandable stents. The volume of injected polymer is determined by monitoring the endobag pressure but the final AAA expansion remains unknown. We conceived and developed a fully deformable surface model for the comparison of pre-operative sac lumen size and final endobag size (measured using a follow-up scan) with the volume of injected polymer. Computed tomography images were acquired for eight patients. Aneurysms were manually and automatically segmented twice by the same observer. The injected polymer volume resulted 9% higher than the aneurysm pre-operative lumen size (p < 0.05), and 11% lower than the final follow-up endobag volume (p < 0.01). The automated method required minimal user interaction; it was fast and used a single set of parameters for all subjects. Intra-observer and manual vs. automated variability of measured volumes were 0.35 ± 2.11 and 0.07 ± 3.04 mL, respectively. Deformable surface models were used to quantify AAA size and showed that EVAS system devices tended to expand the sac lumen size. PMID:26350505

  4. Aortocaval Fistula Resulting From Rupture of Abdominal Aortic Dissecting Aneurysm Treated by Delayed Endovascular Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tiehao; Huang, Bin; Zhao, Jichun; Yang, Yi; Yuan, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aortocaval fistula (ACF) after rupture of an abdominal aortic dissecting aneurysm is a rare emergency situation, which has a high mortality. However, the diagnosis is usually delayed, which increases the difficulties of treatment. We describe a case that successfully delayed use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for ACF resulting from rupture of abdominal aortic dissecting aneurysm. We describe a special case of a 70-year-old male with an abdominal aortic dissecting aneurysm rupturing into inferior vena cava (IVC). On account of his atypical presentation, the diagnosis had been delayed for half a year. Due to severe metabolic sequelaes of the ACF and preexisting conditions, the traditional open repair was too risky. Minimally invasive EVAR was performed with a successful result. There were no endoleak or fistula at the follow-up of 9th month. EVAR is the most suitable method in patients with ACF from rupture of abdominal aortic dissecting aneurysm. Further educational programs should be developed, which may give rise to earlier diagnosis and treatment with better outcomes. PMID:27149481

  5. Real-Time Magnetic Resonance-Guided Endovascular Repair of Experimental Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Venkatesh K.; Karmarkar, Parag V.; Guttman, Michael A.; Dick, Alexander J.; Peters, Dana C.; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Pessanha, Breno S. S.; Thompson, Richard B.; Raval, Amish N.; DeSilva, Ranil; Aviles, Ronnier J.; Atalar, Ergin; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study tested the hypotheses that endografts can be visualized and navigated in vivo solely under real-time magnetic resonance imaging (rtMRI) guidance to repair experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in swine, and that MRI can provide immediate assessment of endograft apposition and aneurysm exclusion. BACKGROUND Endovascular repair for AAA is limited by endoleak caused by inflow or outflow malapposition. The ability of rtMRI to image soft tissue and flow may improve on X-ray guidance of this procedure. METHODS Infrarenal AAA was created in swine by balloon overstretch. We used one passive commercial endograft, imaged based on metal-induced MRI artifacts, and several types of homemade active endografts, incorporating MRI receiver coils (antennae). Custom interactive rtMRI features included color coding the catheter-antenna signals individually, simultaneous multislice imaging, and real-time three-dimensional rendering. RESULTS Eleven repairs were performed solely using rtMRI, simultaneously depicting the device and soft-tissue pathology during endograft deployment. Active devices proved most useful. Intraprocedural MRI provided anatomic confirmation of stent strut apposition and functional corroboration of aneurysm exclusion and restoration of laminar flow in successful cases. In two cases, there was clear evidence of contrast accumulation in the aneurysm sac, denoting endoleak. CONCLUSIONS Endovascular AAA repair is feasible under rtMRI guidance. Active endografts facilitate device visualization and complement the soft tissue contrast afforded by MRI for precise positioning and deployment. Magnetic resonance imaging also permits immediate post-procedural anatomic and functional evaluation of successful aneurysm exclusion. PMID:15963411

  6. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in the Presence of a Transplanted Kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Silverberg, Daniel Yalon, Tal; Halak, Moshe

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo present our experience performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in kidney transplanted patients.MethodsA retrospective review of all patients who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) performed at our institution from 2007 to 2014. We identified all patients who had previously undergone a kidney transplant. Data collected included: comorbidities, preoperative imaging modalities, indication for surgery, stent graft configurations, pre- and postoperative renal function, perioperative complications, and survival rates.ResultsA total of 267 EVARs were performed. Six (2 %) had a transplanted kidney. Mean age was 74 (range, 64–82) years; five were males. Mean time from transplantation to EVAR was 7.5 (range, 2–12) years. Five underwent preoperative planning with noncontrast modalities only. Devices used included bifurcated (n = 3), aortouniiliac (n = 2), and tube (n = 1) stent grafts. Technical success was achieved in all patients. None experienced deterioration in renal function. Median follow-up was 39 (range, 6–51) months. Four patients were alive at the time of the study. Two patients expired during the period of follow-up from unrelated causes.ConclusionsEVAR is an effective modality for the management of AAAs in the coexistence of a transplanted kidney. It can be performed with minimal morbidity and mortality without harming the transplanted kidney. Special consideration should be given to device configuration to minimize damage to the renal graft.

  7. Three-dimensional aortic aneurysm model and endovascular repair: An educational tool for surgical trainees

    PubMed Central

    Wilasrusmee, Chumpon; Suvikrom, Jesada; Suthakorn, Jackrit; Lertsithichai, Panuwat; Sitthiseriprapip, Kriskrai; Proprom, Napaphat; Kittur, Dilip S

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a current valid treatment option for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). The success of EVAR depends on the selection of appropriate patients, which requires detailed knowledge of the patient’s vascular anatomy and preoperative planning. Three-dimensional (3D) models of AAA using a rapid prototyping technique were developed to help surgical trainees learn how to plan for EVAR more effectively. METHOD: Four cases of AAA were used as prototypes for the models. Nine questions associated with preoperative planning for EVAR were developed by a group of experts in the field of endovascular surgery. Forty-three postgraduate trainees in general surgery participated in the present study. The participants were randomly assigned into two groups. The ‘intervention’ group was provided with the rapid prototyping AAA models along with 3D computed tomography (CT) corresponding to the cases of the test, while the control group was provided with 3D CTs only. RESULTS: Differences in the scores between the groups were tested using the unpaired t test. The mean test scores were consistently and significantly higher in the 3D CT group with models compared with the 3D CT group without models for all four cases. Age, year of training, sex and previous EVAR experience had no effect on the scores. CONCLUSION: The 3D aortic aneurysm model constructed using the rapid prototype technique may significantly improve the ability of trainees to properly plan for EVAR. PMID:22477415

  8. Most Coarctations, Recoarctations, and Coarctation-Related Aneurysms Should Be Treated Endovascularly

    PubMed Central

    Galiñanes, Edgar Luis; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    For patients with coarctation of the aorta (CoA), surgical intervention results in an overall survival rate nearly twice that of medical management. Therefore, surgical correction of CoA has traditionally been warranted in the majority of patients, even though open repair entails its own complications. With the advent of endovascular technology, many interventionalists hoped that this approach would decrease the complications associated with open surgical repair of CoA. Nevertheless, there is still an ongoing debate about the merits of traditional open surgery versus endovascular therapy. In this review, we discuss the role of these two approaches for the management of CoA, recoarctation, and coarctation-related aneurysms. PMID:27069944

  9. Endovascular Therapeutic Occlusion of the Posterior Cerebral Artery: An Option for Ruptured Giant Aneurysm in a Child.

    PubMed

    Demartini, Zeferino; Matos, Luiz Afonso Dias; Dos Santos, Marcio Luis Tostes; Cardoso-Demartini, Adriane de Andre

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population is low, and surgical clipping remains a good long-term treatment option. However, posterior circulation aneurysms are even more complex to manage in children than in adults. We report a case of a giant aneurysm of the posterior cerebral artery in a 10-year-old boy presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Endovascular treatment with platinum coils was performed with total occlusion of the aneurysm and the affected arterial segment without complications. The patient achieved good recovery, and a late control angiogram confirmed exclusion of the aneurysm. Occurrence of special features of cerebral aneurysm in children, in comparison to adults, is also described. Parent artery sacrifice is an effective therapeutic option, but long-term follow-up is necessary to avoid recurrence and rebleeding. PMID:26974558

  10. Endovascular Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms in the Flow Diverter Era: Frequency of Use and Results in a Consecutive Series of 550 Treatments in a Single Centre

    PubMed Central

    Jan van Rooij, Willem; Bechan, Ratna S; Peluso, Jo P; Sluzewski, Menno

    2014-01-01

    Summary Flow diverter devices became available in our department in 2009. We considered treatment with flow diverters only in patients with aneurysms not suitable for surgery or conventional endovascular techniques. This paper presents our preliminary experience with flow diverters in a consecutive series of 550 endovascular aneurysm treatments. Between January 2009 and July 2013, 550 endovascular treatments for intracranial aneurysms were performed. Of these, 490 were first-time aneurysm treatments in 464 patients and 61 were additional treatments of previously coiled aneurysms in 51 patients. Endovascular treatments consisted of selective coiling in 445 (80.8%), stent-assisted coiling in 68 (12.4%), balloon-assisted coiling in 13 (2.4%), parent vessel occlusion in 12 (2.2%) and flow diverter treatment in 12 (2.2%). Eleven patients with 12 aneurysms were treated with flow diverters. Two patients had ruptured dissecting aneurysms. One patient with a basilar trunk aneurysm died of acute in stent thrombosis and another patient died of brain stem ischaemia at 32 months follow-up. One patient had ischaemia with permanent neurological deficit. Two aneurysms are still open at up to 30 months follow-up. Flow diversion was used in 2% of all endovascular treatments. Both our own poor results and the high complication rates reported in the literature have converted our initial enthusiasm to apprehension and hesitancy. The safety and efficacy profile of flow diversion should discourage the use of these devices in aneurysms that can be treated with other techniques. PMID:25207905

  11. Technical tips for successful outcomes using adjunctive procedures during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Kasirajan, Karthikeshwar; Gupta, Naren

    2012-09-01

    The inability to obtain proximal or distal seal continues to remain one of the main challenges of endovascular aneurysm repair. This is particularly relevant when endografts are used in patients with unsuitable proximal or distal landing zones. A variety of techniques can be used to achieve a seal in these difficult situations. Two specific techniques that can help intraoperatively to resolve the lack of adequate graft to aortic wall opposition are discussed in this article. These include the use of Palmaz stents for proximal seal and hypogastric snorkel for distal seal with internal iliac flow preservation. PMID:23062496

  12. Suprarenal fixation resulting in intestinal malperfusion after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Siani, Andrea; Accrocca, Federico; De Vivo, Gennaro; Marcucci, Giustino

    2016-05-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and coeliac axis (CA) occlusion after endovascular abdominal aneurysm aortic repair (EVAR-AAA), using endograft with suprarenal fixation, are uncommon. However, we are reporting a case of visceral malperfusion, which occurred 7 days after successful EVAR with suprarenal fixation for symptomatic AAA. Endograft metal stent barbs caused severe stenosis of SMA and CA. A successful recovery of SMA was carried out by means of a balloon-expandable stent released through bare metal stent barbs. We believe that an unfavourable anatomy of a proximal aortic neck and visceral aorta may have caused a wrong stent strut deployment with the coverage of CA and SMA. PMID:26826712

  13. Customized Tapered Stent-Grafts in the Endovascular Management of Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysms: A Useful Adjunct to Conventional Endovascular Options

    SciTech Connect

    Haslam, J. Elizabeth Hardman, John; Horrocks, Michael; Fay, Dominic

    2009-01-15

    The endovascular exclusion of an isolated iliac artery aneurysm is recognized as a safe and favorable alternative to open surgical repair, with low associated morbidity and mortality. It has particular advantages in the treatment of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) given the technical difficulties associated with open surgical repair deep within the pelvis. We describe the use of customized tapered stent-grafts in the exclusion of wide-necked IIAA in five male patients considered high-risk for conventional surgical repair, in whom the common and external iliac artery morphology precluded the use of standard endovascular devices. In each case, IIAA outflow was selectively embolized and the aneurysm neck excluded by placement of a customized tapered stent-graft across the internal iliac artery origin. This technique was extremely effective, with 100% technical success, no serious associated morbidity, and zero mortality. In all five patients sac size was stable or reduced on computed tomography follow-up of up to 3 years (mean, 24.4 months), with a primary patency rate of 100%. We therefore advocate the use of customized tapered stent-grafts as a further endovascular option in the management of IIAA unsuitable for conventional endovascular repair.

  14. Endovascular Treatment of Proximal Anastomotic Aneurysms After Aortic Prosthetic Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Tiesenhausen, Kurt; Hausegger, Klaus A.; Tauss, Josef; Amann, Wilfried; Koch, Guenter

    2001-01-15

    Purpose: To describe the efficacy and value of endovascular stent-grafts for the treatment of aortic anastomotic pseudoaneurysms.Methods: Three patients with proximal aortic anastomotic pseudoaneurysms 8-15 years after prosthetic reconstruction were treated by transfemoral stent-graft implantation. In two patients the pseudoaneurysms were excluded by Talent prostheses [tube graft (n = 1), bifurcated graft (n = 1)]. In one patient an uni iliac Zenith stent-graft was implanted and an extra-anatomic crossover bypass for revascularization of the contralateral lower extremity was performed.Results: All procedures were successful with primary exclusion of the pseudoaneurysms. During the follow-up (mean 16 months) one endoleak occurred due to migration of the tube stent-graft. The endoleak was sealed successfully by implanting an additional bifurcated stent-graft.Conclusion: Stent-graft exclusion of aortic pseudoaneurysms offers a minimally invasive and safe alternative to open surgical reconstruction.

  15. Treatment of Type II Endoleaks After Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Transcaval Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mansueto, Giancarlo Cenzi, Daniela; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Petrella, Enrico; Gumbs, Andrew A.; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi

    2005-06-15

    The purpose of the note is to describe a new technique for type II endoleak treatment, using an alternative approach through femoral venous access. Three patients who developed type II endoleak after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm were treated with direct transcaval puncture and embolization inside the aneurysm sac. The detailed technique is described. All patients were treated without any complications and discharged 48 hours after the treatment. At 1 month follow-up the computed tomograph scan did not show a recurrence of a type II endoleak. The management of patients with type II endoleak is a controversial issue and different techniques have been proposed. We suggest an alternative technique for type II endoleak treatment. The feasibility and the advantages of this approach can offer new possibilities for the diagnosis as well as for the treatment of this complication.

  16. Ruptured Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm: Staged Emergency Endovascular Treatment in the Interventional Radiology Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Kelckhoven, Bas-Jeroen van Bruijninckx, Boy M. A.; Knippenberg, Bob; Overhagen, Hans van

    2007-07-15

    Ruptured aneurysms of the internal iliac artery (IIA) are rare and challenging to treat surgically. Due to their anatomic location they are difficult to operate on and perioperative morbidity is high. An endovascular approach can be helpful. We recently treated a patient with a ruptured IIA aneurysm in the interventional radiology suite with embolization of the side-branch of the IIA and placement of a covered stent in the ipsilateral common and external iliac arteries. A suitable stent-graft was not available initially and had to be brought in from elsewhere. An angioplasty balloon was temporarily placed across the ostium of the IIA to obtain hemostasis. Two hours later, the procedure was finished by placing the stent-graft.

  17. Secondary aorto-esophageal fistula after thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascular repair treated by covered esophageal stenting

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Mary; Shlomovitz, Eran; Darling, Gail; Roche-Nagle, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for thoracic aortic aneurysms is an accepted alternative to open surgery, especially in patients with significant comorbidities. The procedure itself has a low risk of complications and fistulas to surrounding organs are rarely reported. An 86-year-old patient was admitted to our hospital with gastro intestinal (GI) bleeding and a suspected aortoesophageal fistula. Eight months prior, the patient had undergone a stent graft repair of a mycotic thoracic aneurysm. Computerized tomography angiography and upper GI endoscopy confirmed an aortoesophageal fistula, which was treated by esophageal stenting. With early recognition, esophageal stenting may have a role in the initial emergency control of bleeding from and palliation of aortoesophageal fistula. PMID:27574612

  18. Secondary aorto-esophageal fistula after thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascular repair treated by covered esophageal stenting.

    PubMed

    Tao, Mary; Shlomovitz, Eran; Darling, Gail; Roche-Nagle, Graham

    2016-08-16

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for thoracic aortic aneurysms is an accepted alternative to open surgery, especially in patients with significant comorbidities. The procedure itself has a low risk of complications and fistulas to surrounding organs are rarely reported. An 86-year-old patient was admitted to our hospital with gastro intestinal (GI) bleeding and a suspected aortoesophageal fistula. Eight months prior, the patient had undergone a stent graft repair of a mycotic thoracic aneurysm. Computerized tomography angiography and upper GI endoscopy confirmed an aortoesophageal fistula, which was treated by esophageal stenting. With early recognition, esophageal stenting may have a role in the initial emergency control of bleeding from and palliation of aortoesophageal fistula. PMID:27574612

  19. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Analysis of Aneurysm Volumetric Changes at Mid-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Bargellini, Irene Cioni, Roberto; Petruzzi, Pasquale; Pratali, Alessandro; Napoli, Vinicio; Vignali, Claudio; Ferrari, Mauro; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the volumetric changes in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) after endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) in 24 months of follow-up. Methods. We evaluated the volume modifications in 63 consecutive patients after EVAR. All patients underwent strict duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography (CTA) follow-up; when complications were suspected, digital subtraction angiography was also performed. CTA datasets at 1, 6, 12, and 24 months were post-processed through semiautomatic segmentation, to isolate the aneurysmal sac and calculate its volume. Maximum transverse diameters (Dmax) were also obtained in the true axial plane, Presence and type of endoleak (EL) were recorded. A statistical analysis was performed to assess the degree of volume change, correlation with diameter modifications, and significance of the volume increase with respect to ELs. Results. Mean reconstruction time was 7 min. Mean volume reduction rates were 6.5%, 8%, and 9.6% at 6, 12, and 24 months follow-up, respectively. Mean Dmax reduction rates were 4.2%, 6.7%, and 12%; correlation with volumes was poor (r = 0.73-0.81). ELs were found in 19 patients and were more frequent (p = 0.04) in patients with higher preprocedural Dmax, The accuracies of volume changes in predicting ELs ranged between 74.6% and 84.1% and were higher than those of Dmax modifications. The strongest independent predictor of EL was a volume change at 6 months {<=}0.3% (p = 0.005), although 6 of 19 (32%) patients with EL showed no significant AAA enlargement, whereas in 6 of 44 (14%) patients without EL the aneurysm enlarged. Conclusion. The lack of volume decrease in the aneurysm of at least 0.3% at 6 months follow-up indicates the need for closer surveillance, and has a higher predictive accuracy for an endoleak than Dmax.

  20. Endovascular treatment of ectopic bronchial artery aneurysm with brachiocephalic artery stent placement and coil embolization

    PubMed Central

    Di, Xiao; Ji, Dong-Hua; Chen, Yu; Liu, Chang-Wei; Liu, Bao; Yang, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Bronchial artery aneurysm (BAA) is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening disease, and multiple BAAs are even rarer. Clinically, the tortuous and short neck of a BAA may present significant challenges for invasive intervention. Methods: This report describes the detailed process of diagnosis and treatment and includes a literature review of the etiology, clinical presentation, and therapeutic management of BAA. Results: A rare case of multiple BAAs, with one having an inflow artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk, was referred to our hospital. The patient was successfully treated with coil embolization and brachiocephalic artery stent placement. In addition, we conducted a literature review involving 63 cases of BAA. BAA was most commonly associated with bronchiectasis and was located predominantly in the mediastinum. There was no significant difference between the diameters of the ruptured aneurysms and those of the nonruptured aneurysms (P = 0.115). Transcatheter arterial embolization was the most commonly adopted technique to treat BAA, while thoracic aortic endovascular repair was selected if the neck between the aneurysm and the aorta was short. Subgroup analysis suggested that patients with > 1 BAA were significantly more likely to be female than male (χ2 test, P = 0.034). Conclusion: Transcatheter coil embolization combined with stent placement could be a reasonable treatment option for BAAs with a tortuous and short neck. According to our literature review, patients with multiple BAAs display distinctive clinical characteristics compared with patients with a single BAA. PMID:27583854

  1. [Successful endovascular repair of a ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with severe mural thrombus].

    PubMed

    Nakao, Yoshihisa; Akagi, Haruhiko; Irie, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shoji; Sakai, Kei

    2014-11-01

    A 51-year-old man was transferred to our hospital on an emergency basis complaining of a sudden onset of severe left lumbar back pain. An emergency contrasted computed tomography showed a ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm( rTAAA:Crawford classification type III). The ruptured site was near the aortic bifurcation, and the aneurysm had a relatively narrow segment with an extensive mural thrombus just below the renal arteries. Considering the high mortality of open surgery for the rTAAA and the poor general condition of the patient, we decided to perform endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) as a rescue procedure using the narrowed segment by the thrombus for a proximal landing zone. The abdominal part of the thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) was successfully excluded with a stent graft to obtain complete hemostasis. The postoperative course was uneventful except for the need for hemodialysis. Even though there is a risk of developing late type 1 endoleak, this procedure can be a feasible option as a rescue procedure or a bridge to radical open surgery for ruptured TAAA in a specially anatomical setting like this case. PMID:25391465

  2. Automatic detection of selective arterial devices for advanced visualization during abdominal aortic aneurysm endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Simon; Kauffmann, Claude; Pfister, Marcus; Cloutier, Guy; Thérasse, Éric; de Guise, Jacques A; Soulez, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    Here we address the automatic segmentation of endovascular devices used in the endovascular repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) that deform vascular tissues. Using this approach, the vascular structure is automatically reshaped solving the issue of misregistration observed on 2D/3D image fusion for EVAR guidance. The endovascular devices we considered are the graduated pigtail catheter (PC) used for contrast injection and the stent-graft delivery device (DD). The segmentation of the DD was enhanced using an asymmetric Frangi filter. The segmented geometries were then analysed using their specific features to remove artefacts. The radiopaque markers of the PC were enhanced using a fusion of Hessian and newly introduced gradient norm shift filters. Extensive experiments were performed using a database of images taken during 28 AAA-EVAR interventions. This dataset was divided into two parts: the first half was used to optimize parameters and the second to compile performances using optimal values obtained. The radiopaque markers of the PC were detected with a sensitivity of 88.3% and a positive predictive value (PPV) of 96%. The PC can therefore be positioned with a majority of its markers localized while the artefacts were all located inside the vessel lumen. The major parts of the DD, the dilatator tip and the pusher surfaces, were detected accurately with a sensitivity of 85.9% and a PPV of 88.7%. The less visible part of the DD, the stent enclosed within the sheath, was segmented with a sensitivity of 63.4% because the radiopacity of this region is low and uneven. The centreline of the DD in this stent region was alternatively traced within a 0.74 mm mean error. The automatic segmentation of endovascular devices during EVAR is feasible and accurate; it could be useful to perform elastic registration of the vascular lumen during endovascular repair. PMID:26362721

  3. Endovascular Treatment of a Superior Mesenteric Artery Aneurysm Secondary to Behcet's Disease with Onyx (Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer)

    SciTech Connect

    Gueven, Koray Rozanes, Izzet; Kayabali, Murat; Minareci, Ozenc

    2009-01-15

    Behcet's disease is a complex multisystemic chronic inflammatory disease that is characterized by oral and genital aphtous ulcers and vasculitis. Aneurysms of major arteries are the most important cause of mortality in Behcet's disease. Four patients with superior mesenteric artery (SMA) aneurysms related to Behcet's disease have been reported in the literature. We report here the first successful endovascular treatment of a giant, wide-necked SMA aneurysm secondary to Behcet's disease. We performed a balloon-assisted embolization technique using ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer (Onyx, ev3, Irvine, CA, USA). There were no signs of recurrence during 2-year follow-up.

  4. Endovascular stent graft repair for thoracic aortic aneurysms: the history and the present in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Yoshitake, Akihiro; Shimazaki, Taro; Iwahashi, Toru; Ogino, Hitoshi; Ishimaru, Shin; Shigematsu, Hiroshi; Yozu, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    Stent-grafts for endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms have been commercially available for more than ten years in the West, whereas, in Japan, a manufactured stent-graft was not approved for the use until March 2008. Nevertheless, endovascular thoracic intervention began to be performed in Japan in the early 1990s, with homemade devices used in most cases. Many researchers have continued to develop their homemade devices. We have participated in joint design and assessment efforts with a stent-graft manufacturer, focusing primarily on fenestrated stent-grafts used in repairs at the distal arch, a site especially prone to aneurysm. In March 2008, TAG (W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Flagstaff, Arizona, USA) was approved as a stent graft for the thoracic area first in Japan, which was major turning point in treatment for thoracic aortic aneurysms. Subsequently, TALENT (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA) was approved in May 2009, and TX2 (COOK MEDICAL Inc., Bloomington, Indiana, USA) in March 2011. Valiant as an improved version of TALENT was approved in November 2011, and TX2 Proform as an improved version of TX2 began to be supplied in October 2012. These stent grafts are excellent devices that showed good results in Western countries, and marked effectiveness can be expected by making the most of the characteristics of each device. A clinical trial in Japan on Najuta (tentative name) (Kawasumi Labo., Inc., Tokyo, Japan) as a line-up of fenestrated stent grafts that can be applied to distal arch aneurysms showing a high incidence, and allow maintenance of blood flow to the arch vessel was initiated. This trial was completed, and Najuta has just been approved in January of 2013 in Japan, and further development is expected. In the U.S., great efforts have recently been made to develop and manufacture excellent stent grafts for thoracic aneurysms, and rapid progress has been achieved. In particular, in the area of the aortic arch, in which we

  5. A Literature Review of the Numerical Analysis of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Treated with Endovascular Stent Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Roy, David; Kauffmann, Claude; Delorme, Sébastien; Lerouge, Sophie; Cloutier, Guy; Soulez, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the basic principles and relevant advances in the computational modeling of abdominal aortic aneurysms and endovascular aneurysm repair, providing the community with up-to-date state of the art in terms of numerical analysis and biomechanics. Frameworks describing the mechanical behavior of the aortic wall already exist. However, intraluminal thrombus nonhomogeneous structure and porosity still need to be well characterized. Also, although the morphology and mechanical properties of calcifications have been investigated, their effects on wall stresses remain controversial. Computational fluid dynamics usually assumes a rigid artery wall, whereas fluid-structure interaction accounts for artery compliance but is still challenging since arteries and blood have similar densities. We discuss alternatives to fluid-structure interaction based on dynamic medical images that address patient-specific hemodynamics and geometries. We describe initial stresses, elastic boundary conditions, and statistical strength for rupture risk assessment. Special emphasis is accorded to workflow development, from the conversion of medical images into finite element models, to the simulation of catheter-aorta interactions and stent-graft deployment. Our purpose is also to elaborate the key ingredients leading to virtual stenting and endovascular repair planning that could improve the procedure and stent-grafts. PMID:22997538

  6. Direct and indirect measurement of patient radiation exposure during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Dustin J; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Longo, G Mathew; Lynch, Thomas G; Rutar, Frank J; Johanning, Jason M

    2008-11-01

    With the increasing complexity of endovascular procedures, concern has grown regarding patient radiation exposure. Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair represents the most common complex endovascular procedure currently performed by vascular specialists. Our study evaluates the patient radiation dose received during endovascular AAA repair. Over a 3-month period we prospectively monitored the radiation dose in a series of consecutive patients undergoing endovascular AAA repair. All patients underwent standard endovascular AAA repair with one of two commercially available grafts using the GE OEC 9800 unit. Direct measurement of maximum radiation dose at skin level (peak skin dose, PSD) was recorded using GAFCHROMIC radiographic dosimetry film. Indirect measurements of radiation dose (fluoroscopy time and dose-area-product [DAP]) were recorded with the C-arm dosimeter. A total of 12 consecutive patients undergoing standard endovascular AAA repair were evaluated. Mean PSD was 0.75 Gy (range 0.27-1.25). Mean total fluoroscopy time was 20.6 min (range 12.6-34.2) with an average of 92% spent in standard fluoroscopy and 8% spent in cinefluoroscopy. Regarding total fluoroscopy time, 49% was spent in normal field of view and 51% in magnified view. Mean DAP was 15,166 cGy x cm(2) (range 5,207-24,536). PSD correlated with DAP (r = 0.9, p < 0.05) but not total fluoroscopy time (r = 0.18, p > 0.05). PSD also correlated with body mass index (BMI; r = 0.82, p < 0.05). Obese patients had a mean PSD of 1.1 Gy compared to 0.5 Gy in nonobese patients. PSD of all patients was well below the accepted 2.0 Gy threshold for skin injury. PSD correlated with DAP but not total fluoroscopy time. PSD also correlated with BMI, and the mean PSD was significantly increased in obese compared to nonobese patients. Despite the complexity and duration of endovascular AAA repair, the procedure can be performed safely without excessive radiation exposure. PMID:18992664

  7. Efficacy of thoracic endovascular stent repair for chronic type B aortic dissection with aneurysmal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Scali, Salvatore T.; Feezor, Robert J.; Chang, Catherine K.; Stone, David H.; Hess, Philip J.; Martin, Tomas D.; Huber, Thomas S.; Beck, Adam W.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Food and Drug Administration has approved devices for endovascular management of thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (TEVAR); however, limited data exist describing the outcomes of TEVAR for aneurysms attributable to chronic type B aortic dissection (cTBAD). This study was undertaken to determine the results of endovascular treatment of cTBAD with aneurysmal degeneration. Methods A retrospective analysis of all patients treated for cTBAD with aneurysmal degeneration at the University of Florida from 2004 to 2011 was performed. Computed tomograms with centerline reconstruction were analyzed to determine change in aortic diameter, relative proportions of aortic treatment lengths, and false lumen perfusion status. Reintervention and mortality were estimated using life-tables. Cox regression analysis was completed to predict mortality. Results Eighty patients underwent TEVAR for aneurysm due to cTBAD (mean age [± standard deviation], 60 ± 13 years [male, 87.5%; n = 70]; median follow-up, 26 [range, 1–74] months). Median time from diagnosis of TBAD to TEVAR was 16 (range, 1–72) months. Prior aortic root/arch replacement had been performed in 29% (n = 23) at a median interval of 28.5 (range, 0.5–312) months. Mean preoperative aneurysm diameter was 62.0 ± 9.9 mm. In 75% (n = 60) of cases, coverage was proximal to zone 3, and 24% (n = 19) underwent carotid-subclavian bypass or other arch debranching procedure. Spinal drains were used in 78% (pre-op 71%, n = 57; post-op 6%, n = 5). Length of stay was 6.5 ± 4.7 days with a composite morbidity of 26% and in-hospital mortality of 2.5% (n = 2). Overall neurologic event rate was 17% (spinal cord ischemia 10% [n = 8], with a permanent deficit observed in 6.2% [n = 5]; stroke 7.5%). Aneurysm diameter reduced or stabilized in 65%. The false lumen thrombosed completely within the thoracic aorta in 52%, and reintervention within the treated aortic segment was required in 16% (n = 13). One- and 3-year

  8. Endovascular Management of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: An 8-year Single-Centre Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Gerassimidis, Thomas S.; Karkos, Christos D. Karamanos, Dimitrios G.; Papazoglou, Konstantinos O.; Papadimitriou, Dimitrios N.; Demiropoulos, Filippos P.; Malkotsis, Dimitrios P.; Kamparoudis, Apostolos G.

    2009-03-15

    We aimed to review our experience with the endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA). During an 8-year period, 69 patients with a RAAA presented to our department; 67 underwent assessment by computed axial tomography, and 2 died on arrival before any evaluation was possible. A total of 42 patients (63%) were suitable for stent-grafting, and all but 1 (c-arm failure) proceeded to endovascular repair. Of these, 27 underwent surgery with local anaesthesia; 3 did so under general anaesthesia; and a further 11 procedures were commenced with the patient under local anaesthesia and then converted to general anaesthesia. A total of 28 bifurcated and 14 aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafts were implanted. Aortic occlusion balloons were used in 2 (5%) patients. The in-hospital and the 30-day mortality rates were 36% and 41%, respectively. After surgery, 21 complications were encountered in 17 patients. Two patients required reintervention during their hospital stay (1 type I endoleak and 1 limb occlusion). During the follow-up (median 730 days [range 90 to 580 days]), the 1-year and 5-year cumulative survival probabilities were 53% (SE 7.9%) and 50% (SE 8.0%), respectively. Three reinterventions were necessary during follow-up (2 type I endoleaks and 1 graft occlusion). We conclude that endovascular treatment is feasible in the emergency setting, and the early experience is promising. Whether such an approach is superior to open surgery remains to be determined.

  9. Endovascular Repair of Complex Aortic Aneurysms: Intravascular Ultrasound Guidance with an Intracardiac Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Zanchetta, Mario Rigatelli, Gianluca; Pedon, Luigi; Zennaro, Marco; Ronsivalle, Salvatore; Maiolino, Pietro

    2003-09-15

    To assess the accuracy and efficacy of intravascular ultrasound guidance obtained by an intracardiac ultrasound probe during complex aortic endografting. Between November 1999 and July 2002, 19 patients (5 female, 14 male; mean age 73.5 {+-} 2.1 years) underwent endovascular repair of thoracic (n = 10), complex abdominal (n = 6) and concomitant thoraco-abdominal (n = 3) aortic aneurysm. The most suitable size and configuration of the stent-graft were chosen on the basis of preoperative computed tomographic angiography (CTA) or magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Intraoperative intravascular ultrasound imaging was obtained using a 9 Fr, 9 MHz intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) probe, 110 cm in length, inserted through a 10 Fr precurved long sheath. The endografts were deployed as planned by CTA or MRA. Before stent-graft deployment, the ICE probe allowed us to view the posterior aortic arch and descending thoraco-abdominal aorta without position-related artifacts, and to identify both sites of stent-graft positioning. After stent-graft deployment, the ICE probe allowed us to detect the need for additional modular components to internally reline the aorta in 11 patients, and to discover 2 incomplete graft expansions subsequently treated with adjunctive balloon angioplasty. In 1 patient, the ICE probe supported the decision that the patient was ineligible for the endovascular exclusion procedure. The ICE probe provides accurate information on the anatomy of the posterior aortic arch and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and a rapid identification of attachment sites and stent-graft pathology, allowing refinement and improvement of the endovascular strategy.

  10. Clinical outcomes of endovascular aneurysm repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated with hypertension: A 5-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xi-Tao; Yuan, Qi-Dong; Cui, Ming-Zhe; Fang, Hong-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) complicated with hypertension. Methods: Fifty-two patients with AAA complicated with hypertension treated in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. They were divided into an observation group (34 cases) and a control group (18 cases). The control group was treated by incision of AAA and artificial blood vessel replacement, and the observation group was treated by EVAR. Results: All surgeries were performed successfully. However, compared with the control group, the observation group had significantly less surgical time, intraoperative blood loss and blood transfusion, as well as significantly higher total hospitalization expense (P<0.05). During the one-month follow-up, the observation group was significantly less prone to pulmonary infection, surgical site infection, lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis and lower extremity weakness than the control group (P<0.05). The observation group enjoyed significantly better quality of life than the control group did one and three months after surgery (P<0.05). Conclusion: Given sufficient funding, EVAR should be preferentially selected in the treatment of AAA complicated with hypertension due to minimal invasion, safety, stable postoperative vital signs and improved quality of life. PMID:27022336

  11. Clinical, Microbiologic, and Outcome Analysis of Mycotic Aortic Aneurysm: The Role of Endovascular Repair

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yao-Kuang; Chen, Chyi-Liang; Lu, Ming-Shian; Tsai, Feng-Chun; Lin, Pyng-Ling; Wu, Chih-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Mycotic aortic aneurysm (MAA) is an infrequent but devastating form of vascular disease. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study at a major medical center to identify independent risk factors for MAA and to provide opinions about treating it. The study population consisted of 43 patients who had had 44 MAAs over a period of 15 y. Results: All of the patients had positive blood cultures, radiologic findings typical of MAA, and clinical signs of infection (leukocytosis, fever, and elevated C-reactive protein). The mean age of the patients was 63.8±10.6 y and the mean period of their follow up was 35.7±39.3 mo. Twenty-nine patients with MAAs underwent traditional open surgery, 11 others received endovascular stent grafts, and four MAAs were managed conservatively. The most frequent causative pathogens were Salmonella (36/44 patients [81.8%]), in whom organisms of Salmonella serogroup C (consisting mainly of S. choleraesuis) were identified in 14 patients, organisms of Salmonella serogroup D were identified in 13 patients, and species without serogroup information were identified in nine patients. The overall mortality in the study population was 43.2% (with an aneurysm-related mortality of 18.2%, surgically related mortality of 13.6%, and in-hospital mortality of 22.7%). Conclusions: Shock is a risk factor for operative mortality. Misdiagnosis and treatment of MAA as low back pain, co-existing connective-tissue disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis, and Salmonella serogroup C-associated bacteremia are risk factors for aneurysm-related death. Endovascular repair should be considered as an alternative option to the open repair of MAA. PMID:24800865

  12. Endovascular strategy or open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: one-year outcomes from the IMPROVE randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Braithwaite, Bruce; Cheshire, Nicholas J.; Greenhalgh, Roger M.; Grieve, Richard; Hassan, Tajek B.; Hinchliffe, Robert; Howell, Simon; Moore, Fionna; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Soong, Chee V.; Thompson, Matt M.; Thompson, Simon G.; Ulug, Pinar; Heatley, Francine; Anjum, Aisha; Kalinowska, Gosia; Sweeting, Michael J.; Thompson, Simon G.; Gomes, Manuel; Grieve, Richard; Powell, Janet T.; Ashleigh, Ray; Gomes, Manuel; Greenhalgh, Roger M.; Grieve, Richard; Hinchliffe, Robert; Sweeting, Michael; Thompson, Matt M.; Thompson, Simon G.; Ulug, Pinar; Roberts, Ian; Bell, Peter R. F.; Cheetham, Anne; Stephany, Jenny; Warlow, Charles; Lamont, Peter; Moss, Jonathan; Tijssen, Jan; Braithwaite, Bruce; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Thompson, Matthew; Ashleigh, Ray; Thompson, Luke; Cheshire, Nicholas J.; Boyle, Jonathan R.; Serracino-Inglott, Ferdinand; Thompson, Matt M.; Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Bell, Rachel; Wilson, Noel; Bown, Matt; Dennis, Martin; Davis, Meryl; Ashleigh, Ray; Howell, Simon; Wyatt, Michael G.; Valenti, Domenico; Bachoo, Paul; Walker, Paul; MacSweeney, Shane; Davies, Jonathan N.; Rittoo, Dynesh; Parvin, Simon D.; Yusuf, Waquar; Nice, Colin; Chetter, Ian; Howard, Adam; Chong, Patrick; Bhat, Raj; McLain, David; Gordon, Andrew; Lane, Ian; Hobbs, Simon; Pillay, Woolagasen; Rowlands, Timothy; El-Tahir, Amin; Asquith, John; Cavanagh, Steve; Dubois, Luc; Forbes, Thomas L.; Ashworth, Emily; Baker, Sara; Barakat, Hashem; Brady, Claire; Brown, Joanne; Bufton, Christine; Chance, Tina; Chrisopoulou, Angela; Cockell, Marie; Croucher, Andrea; Dabee, Leela; Dewhirst, Nikki; Evans, Jo; Gibson, Andy; Gorst, Siobhan; Gough, Moira; Graves, Lynne; Griffin, Michelle; Hatfield, Josie; Hogg, Florence; Howard, Susannah; Hughes, Cían; Metcalfe, David; Lapworth, Michelle; Massey, Ian; Novick, Teresa; Owen, Gareth; Parr, Noala; Pintar, David; Spencer, Sarah; Thomson, Claire; Thunder, Orla; Wallace, Tom; Ward, Sue; Wealleans, Vera; Wilson, Lesley; Woods, Janet; Zheng, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Aims To report the longer term outcomes following either a strategy of endovascular repair first or open repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, which are necessary for both patient and clinical decision-making. Methods and results This pragmatic multicentre (29 UK and 1 Canada) trial randomized 613 patients with a clinical diagnosis of ruptured aneurysm; 316 to an endovascular first strategy (if aortic morphology is suitable, open repair if not) and 297 to open repair. The principal 1-year outcome was mortality; secondary outcomes were re-interventions, hospital discharge, health-related quality-of-life (QoL) (EQ-5D), costs, Quality-Adjusted-Life-Years (QALYs), and cost-effectiveness [incremental net benefit (INB)]. At 1 year, all-cause mortality was 41.1% for the endovascular strategy group and 45.1% for the open repair group, odds ratio 0.85 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62, 1.17], P = 0.325, with similar re-intervention rates in each group. The endovascular strategy group and open repair groups had average total hospital stays of 17 and 26 days, respectively, P < 0.001. Patients surviving rupture had higher average EQ-5D utility scores in the endovascular strategy vs. open repair groups, mean differences 0.087 (95% CI 0.017, 0.158), 0.068 (95% CI −0.004, 0.140) at 3 and 12 months, respectively. There were indications that QALYs were higher and costs lower for the endovascular first strategy, combining to give an INB of £3877 (95% CI £253, £7408) or €4356 (95% CI €284, €8323). Conclusion An endovascular first strategy for management of ruptured aneurysms does not offer a survival benefit over 1 year but offers patients faster discharge with better QoL and is cost-effective. Clinical trial registration ISRCTN 48334791. PMID:25855369

  13. Endovascular treatments for posterior cerebral artery aneurysms and vascular insufficiency of fetal-type circulation after parent artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hideaki; Kato, Noriyuki; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Hosoo, Hisayuki; Yamazaki, Tomosato; Yasuda, Susumu; Matsumura, Akira

    2016-10-01

    We present a retrospective analysis of endovascular treatments for posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysms and discuss the susceptibility of a fetal-type PCA to vascular insufficiency after parent artery occlusion. Among 1207 aneurysms treated with endovascular therapy between March 1997 and March 2013 in our institution, 10 patients (0.8%) presented PCA aneurysms. The principal strategy was to employ selective coil embolization for the aneurysm. However, in certain cases of fusiform or dissecting aneurysms, we performed parent artery occlusion with coils. Clinical and radiological data were collected from hospital charts and evaluated retrospectively. The mean age was 52.7±15.6years (range, 12-65years). Five patients (50%) were admitted with a subarachnoid hemorrhage, and one patient presented with slowly developing paralysis. The remaining four patients were diagnosed incidentally. Five patients underwent selective coil embolization, and five patients underwent parent artery occlusion. All endovascular therapies were successfully performed. However, two patients in the parent artery occlusion group suffered cerebral infarction, and both patients exhibited a fetal-type PCA. The remaining three patients in the parent artery occlusion group exhibited an adult-type PCA and did not suffer a cerebral infarction. Endovascular treatment with either selective coil embolization or parent artery occlusion is safe and effective as the long as the anatomical type of the PCA is considered. Patients with a fetal-type PCA may develop vascular insufficiency upon parent artery occlusion. Neurosurgeons should attempt to preserve the parent artery using a flow-diverting stent or stent-assisted technique for a fetal-type PCA aneurysm. PMID:27523585

  14. Results and challenges for the endovascular repair of aortic arch aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Lioupis, Christos; Abraham, Cherrie Z

    2011-09-01

    Endovascular aortic arch reconstruction provides an attractive alternative to treat aortic arch disease in high-risk patients who would otherwise be unsuitable for open repair. Success with multibranched stent grafts in the thoracoabdominal aorta along with recent advances in design such as the precurved inner nitinol cannula have simplified the endovascular reconstruction of aortic arch aneurysms with multibranched stent grafts. These devices allow for greater flexibility in conforming to difficult anatomy and preserving important side branches. During the first surgical stage, a left carotid -subclavian bypass or left subclavian artery transposition is performed. The second stage is the endovascular procedure. The device is inserted through a transfemoral approach, and crossing of the aortic valve with the device is necessary. The stent graft is deployed during brief periods of rapid pacing. Bridging from the branches to the innominate and left common carotid arteries requires a suitable covered stent. In the case of a large-diameter innominate artery, a custom-made bridging limb has to be used to ensure that adequate length and size are available. Direct flow to the innominate and left common carotid arteries do not cease for any significant time during the procedure. Initial experience with mean follow up more than 6 months is encouraging. The method is not suitable for patients with extensive atheromatous involvement of the aortic arch. Careful preoperative planning (preoperative imaging, device construction, and access issues), high endovascular skills, and appropriate imaging equipment are imperative for a successful result. Long-term follow-up is necessary to evaluate the efficacy and safety of these new devices. PMID:21821619

  15. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair Using a Reverse Chimney Technique in a Patient With Marfan Syndrome and Contained Ruptured Chronic Type B Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelsen, Dominik; Kalender, Guenay; Heuschmid, Martin; Syha, Roland; Mangold, Stefanie; Claussen, Claus D.; Brechtel, Klaus

    2011-10-15

    We report endovascular thoracic and abdominal aneurysm repair (EVAR) with reverse chimney technique in a patient with contained ruptured type B dissection. EVAR seems feasible as a bailout option in Marfan patients with acute life-threatening disease.

  16. Is Internal Iliac Artery Embolization Essential Prior to Endovascular Repair of Aortoiliac Aneurysms?

    SciTech Connect

    Bharwani, N. Raja, J.; Choke, E.; Belli, A. M.; Thompson, M. M.; Morgan, R. A.; Munneke, G.

    2008-05-15

    Patients who undergo endovascular repair of aorto-iliac aneurysms (EVAR) require internal iliac artery (IIA) embolization (IIAE) to prevent type II endoleaks after extending the endografts into the external iliac artery. However, IIAE may not be possible in some patients due to technical factors or adverse anatomy. The aim of this study was to assess retrospectively whether patients with aorto-iliac aneurysms who fail IIAE have an increase in type II endoleak after EVAR compared with similar patients who undergo successful embolization. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 148 patients who underwent EVAR from December 1997 to June 2005. Sixty-one patients had aorto-iliac aneurysms which required IIAE before EVAR. Fifty patients had successful IIAE and 11 patients had unsuccessful IIAE prior to EVAR. The clinical and imaging follow-up was reviewed before and after EVAR. The endoleak rate of the embolized group was compared with that of the group in whom embolization failed. After a mean follow-up of 19.7 months in the study group and 25 months in the control group, there were no statistically significant differences in outcome measures between the two groups. Specifically, there were no type II endoleaks related to the IIA in patients where IIAE had failed. We conclude that failure to embolize the IIA prior to EVAR should not necessarily preclude patients from treatment. In patients where there is difficulty in achieving coil embolization, it is recommended that EVAR should proceed, as clinical sequelae are unlikely.

  17. Type II Endoleak After Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Effectiveness of Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Nevala, Terhi; Biancari, Fausto; Manninen, Hannu; Aho, Pekka-Sakari; Matsi, Pekka; Maekinen, Kimmo; Roth, Wolf-Dieter; Yloenen, Kari; Lepaentalo, Mauri; Peraelae, Jukka

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience in treating type II endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Two hundred eighteen patients underwent EVAR with a Zenith stent-graft from January 2000 to December 2005. During a follow-up period of 4.5 {+-} 2.3 years, solely type II endoleak was detected in 47 patients (22%), and 14 of them underwent secondary interventions to correct this condition. Ten patients had transarterial embolization, and four patients had translumbar/transabdominal embolization. The embolization materials used were coils, thrombin, gelatin, Onyx (ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer), and glue. Disappearance of the endoleak without enlargement of the aneurysm sac after the first secondary intervention was achieved in only five of these patients (5/13). One patient without surveillance imaging was excluded from analyses of clinical success. After additional interventions in four patients and the spontaneous disappearance of type II endoleak in two patients, overall clinical success was achieved in eight patients (8/12). One patient did not have surveillance imaging after the second secondary intervention. Clinical success after the first secondary intervention was achieved in two patients (2/9) in the transarterial embolization group and three patients (3/4) in the translumbar embolization group. The results of secondary interventions for type II endoleak are unsatisfactory. Although the small number of patients included in this study prevents reliable comparisons between groups, the results seem to favor direct translumbar embolization in comparison to transarterial embolization.

  18. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Is Imaging Surveillance Robust, and Does It Influence Long-term Mortality?

    SciTech Connect

    Waduud, Mohammed Abdul; Choong, Wen Ling; Ritchie, Moira Williams, Claire; Yadavali, Reddi; Lim, Shueh; Buchanan, Fraser; Bhat, Raj; Ramanathan, Krishnappan; Ingram, Susan Cormack, Laura; Moss, Jonathan G.

    2015-02-15

    PurposeEndovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is the dominant treatment strategy for abdominal aortic aneurysms. However, as a result of uncertainty regarding long-term durability, an ongoing imaging surveillance program is required. The aim of the study was to assess EVAR surveillance in Scotland and its effect on all-cause and aneurysm-related mortality.MethodsA retrospective analysis of all EVAR procedures carried out in the four main Scottish vascular units. The primary outcome measure was the implementation of post-EVAR imaging surveillance across Scotland. Patients were identified locally and then categorized as having complete, incomplete, or no surveillance. Secondary outcome measures were all-cause mortality and aneurysm-related mortality. Cause of death was obtained from death certificates.ResultsData were available for 569 patients from the years 2001 to 2012. All centers had data for a minimum of 5 contiguous years. Surveillance ranged from 1.66 to 4.55 years (median 3.03 years). Overall, 53 % had complete imaging surveillance, 43 % incomplete, and 4 % none. For the whole cohort, all-cause 5-year mortality was 33.5 % (95 % confidence interval 28.0–38.6) and aneurysm-related mortality was 4.5 % (.8–7.3). All-cause mortality in patients with complete, incomplete, and no imaging was 49.9 % (39.2–58.6), 19.1 % (12.6–25.2), and 47.2 % (17.7–66.2), respectively. Aneurysm-related mortality was 3.7 % (1.8–7.4), 4.4 % (2.2–8.9), and 9.5 % (2.5–33.0), respectively. All-cause mortality was significantly higher in patients with complete compared to incomplete imaging surveillance (p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed in aneurysm-related mortality (p = 0.2).ConclusionOnly half of EVAR patients underwent complete long-term imaging surveillance. However, incomplete imaging could not be linked to any increase in mortality. Further work is required to establish the role and deliverability of EVAR imaging surveillance.

  19. Fibered Electrolytically Detachable Platinum Coils Used for the Endovascular Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Liebig, T.; Henkes, H.; Fischer, S.; Weber, W.; Miloslavski, E.; Mariushi, W.; Brew, S.; Kühne, D.

    2004-01-01

    Summary Between 1992 and 2003, a total of2029 aneurysms in 1748 patients were treated by endovascular occlusion with electrolytically detachable coils. In this series, electrolytically detachable platinum coils with Nylon fibers (Sapphire Detachable Coil System, MTI, Irvine, CA, USA) were used in 474 aneurysms solely or in combination with bare coils from various manufacturers. To determine the safety and clinical efficacy of Nylon fibered coils for the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms in comparison to bare platinum coils a thorough retrospective statistical analysis by means of logistic regression and matched pairs analysis was performed. Only treatments with data for all matching variables were used, resulting in 421 matched pairs. The analysis was performed with respect to clinical status and numerous parameters concerning individual aneurysm characteristics (e.g., location, neck width, fundus diameter). Treatment-related parameters included the use and percentage of fibered coils, occlusion rate, procedural complications, early clinical outcome and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores. Finally, long-term follow-up results (particularly recurrence, cause of recurrence and post treatment haemorrhage) were evaluated. Both logistic regression and matched pairs analysis showed a statistically improved occlusion rate if fibered coils had been used (96% largely occluded with the use of fibered coils vs. 84-85% with the exclusive use of bare coils). However, the amount of fibered coils calculated as percentage of coil length did not seem to have significant impact. Procedures with fibered coils did not lead to a higher rate of thromboembolic events (8.0% for fibered vs. l0.5% for bare coils).The apparently better clinical outcome in the group treated with fibered coils determined by both postprocedural outcome and GOS, did not reach statistical significance. Analysis of the anatomical properties showed no differences between the groups treated with bare

  20. Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors of Cerebral Infarction in 439 Patients Undergoing Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kanaoka, Yuji; Ohki, Takao; Maeda, Koji; Baba, Takeshi; Fujita, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to identify the potential risk factors of cerebral infarction associated with thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR). TEVAR was developed as a less invasive surgical alternative to conventional open repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm treatment. However, outcomes following TEVAR of aortic and distal arch aneurysms remain suboptimal. Cerebral infarction is a major concern during the perioperative period. We included 439 patients who underwent TEVAR of aortic aneurysms at a high-volume teaching hospital between July 2006 and June 2013. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify perioperative cerebral infarction risk factors. Four patients (0.9%) died within 30 days of TEVAR; 17 (3.9%) developed cerebral infarction. In univariate analysis, history of ischemic heart disease and cerebral infarction and concomitant cerebrovascular disease were significantly associated with cerebral infarction. “Shaggy aorta” presence, left subclavian artery coverage, carotid artery debranching, and pull-through wire use were identified as independent risk factors of cerebral infarction. In multivariate analysis, history of ischemic heart disease (odds ratio [OR] 6.49, P = 0.046) and cerebral infarction (OR 43.74, P = 0.031), “shaggy aorta” (OR 30.32, P < 0.001), pull-through wire use during surgery (OR 7.196, P = 0.014), and intraoperative blood loss ≥800 mL (OR 24.31, P = 0.017) were found to be independent risk factors of cerebral infarction. This study identified patient- and procedure-related risk factors of cerebral infarction following TEVAR. These results indicate that patient outcomes could be improved through the identification and management of procedure-related risk factors. PMID:27082585

  1. Endovascular Repair versus Open Repair for Isolated Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung Chae; Joo, Hyun-Chel; Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Sak; Chang, Byung-Chul; Yoo, Kyung-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) with those of open repair for descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAA). Materials and Methods We compared the outcomes of 114 patients with DTAA and proximal landing zones 3 or 4 after TEVAR to those of 53 patients after conventional open repairs. Thirty-day and late mortality were the primary endpoints, and early morbidities, aneurysm-related death, and re-intervention were the secondary endpoints. Results The TEVAR group was older and had more incidences of dissecting aneurysm. The mean follow-up was 36±26 months (follow-up rate, 97.8%). The 30-day mortality in the TEVAR and open repair groups were 3.5% and 9.4% (p=0.11). Perioperative stroke and paraplegia incidences were similar between the groups [5.3% vs. 7.5% (p=0.56) and 7.5% vs. 3.5% (p=0.26), respectively]. Respiratory failure occurred more in the open repair group (1.8% vs. 26.4%, p<0.01). The incidence of acute kidney injury requiring dialysis was higher in the open repair group (1.8% vs. 9.4%, p<0.01). The cumulative survival rate was higher in the TEVAR group at 2 to 5 years (79.6% vs. 58.3%, p=0.03). The free from re-intervention was lower in the TEVAR group (65.3% vs. 100%, p=0.02), and the free from aneurysm-related death in the TEVAR and open repair groups were 88.5% and 86.1% (p=0.45). Conclusion TEVAR is safe and effective for treating DTAAs with improved perioperative and long-term outcomes compared with open repair. PMID:26069110

  2. A Retrospective Study of Survivors of Endovascular Coiling for Posterior and Anterior Aneurysms: Medical and Patient Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sarah J; Drackford, Ruth; Holt, Michael

    2015-08-01

    This article documents the longer-term medical and psychosocial outcomes of patients referred for endovascular coiling.There is limited research investigating outcome following endovascular coiling for posterior compared to anterior circulation aneurysms, and minimal understanding of how medical outcomes relate to patient experiences of treatment and quality of life.We studied a consecutive cohort of 80 patients referred Australia wide for endovascular coiling between 1995 and 2003 (49% posterior; 76% ruptured; 69% women, mean age 51.5 years). We used a mixed methods approach, assessing medical outcome with the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS) in 61 patients (76%), and health-related quality of life and psychosocial functioning using the EuroQol questionnaire and a qualitative semistructured interview in 49 patients (61%).Despite the high proportion of posterior aneurysms, the majority of patients (80%) showed good medical outcomes as indicated by regained independence of activities of daily living (MRS score ≤3). Patients with unruptured aneurysms were significantly more likely to show good outcomes (P < 0.04), whereas aneurysm location (posterior, anterior, or mixed) showed no significant effect. In patients with good medical outcomes, greater functional disability was associated with neurological complications surrounding treatment (P < 0.05). Good outcomes correlated with higher EuroQol ratings (P < 0.001) and the experience of less change after treatment (P < 0.001), although psychosocial adjustment issues were reported by most of the patients, including those with no medical symptoms.These results support the long-term efficacy of endovascular coiling, particularly for posterior circulation aneurysms. They have implications for guiding clinicians and patients in their choice of treatment, as well as the provision of psychological counseling for patient adjustment issues posttreatment. PMID:26266373

  3. Endovascular repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm using the off-the-shelf multibranched t-Branch stent graft.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Bernardo C; Oderich, Gustavo S

    2016-05-01

    Endovascular repair has been increasingly used to treat thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms using patient-specific or off-the-shelf fenestrated and branched stent grafts. Device customization limits the application of patient-specific devices in patients who need urgent or emergency repair because of ruptured or large, rapidly expanding aneurysms. For these patients, an off-the-shelf multibranched stent graft, the t-Branch stent graft (Cook Medical, Bjaeverskov, Denmark) has been developed based on the relative predictability of visceral vessel anatomy, allowing incorporation and intraoperative customization of target vessels with four down-going directional branches. We used the t-Branch stent graft in a 66-year-old woman with a rapidly enlarging type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm. Completion angiography and follow-up computed tomography angiography demonstrated successful exclusion of the aneurysm sac, patent target vessels, and nearly complete sac shrinkage at the 12-month follow-up. PMID:27109801

  4. Management of an aorto-esophageal fistula, complicating a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascularly repaired.

    PubMed

    Georvasili, Vaia K; Bali, Christina; Peroulis, Michalis; Kouvelos, George; Avgos, Stavros; Godevenos, Dimitris; Liakakos, Theodoros; Matsagkas, Miltiadis

    2016-04-01

    Aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF) is a rare but devastating complication of thoracic aorta endovascular repair (TEVAR). We report a case of a 64-year-old male who presented with chest pain and high CRP levels 10 months after TEVAR for a 9 cm diameter descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. The diagnosis of an AEF was confirmed and the patient was treated conservatively with broad spectrum antibiotics and total parental alimentation. After control of sepsis was achieved, esophagectomy with gastric tube reconstruction was performed and an omental pedicle was used to cover the aortic wall. No intervention to the aorta was made at that time due to the potentially infected mediastinum. The patient's recovery was uneventful and 2 years postoperatively he is in good condition and lives a normal life. Esophagectomy seems to be a mandatory stage of treatment in the setting of AEF. In cases where signs of graft infection are persistent, aortic surgery might be also necessary. PMID:24838140

  5. Feasibility of Three-Dimensional MR Angiography Image Fusion Guidance for Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Tacher, Vania; Desgranges, Pascal; You, Ketsakin; Ridouani, Fourat; Marzelle, Jean; Kobeiter, Hicham

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) angiography image fusion (IF) with live fluoroscopy guidance was used while performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (EVAR) in five patients with a history of chronic renal disease or severe contrast allergy. Intraprocedural technical success was 100%. Median procedure time was 120 minutes (range, 60-180 min), fluoroscopy time was 40 minutes (range, 17-65 min), dose-area product was 245,867 mGy × cm(2) (range, 68,435-690,053 mGy × cm(2)), and iodinated contrast volume injected was 15 mL (range, 0-40 mL). Technical success was achieved in four of five patients (80%); one case was complicated by a type 1 endoleak on follow-up MR angiography, which was successfully treated. EVAR with MR angiography IF guidance was technically feasible and safe in five patients and reduced or eliminated the use of iodinated contrast media. PMID:26830935

  6. Pregnancy with a ruptured renal artery aneurysm: management concerns and endovascular management.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Siddharth; Sharma, Sanjay; Singh, Prabhjot; Nayak, Brusabhanu

    2015-01-01

    Renal artery aneurysm (RAA) affects <0.01% of the general population. Rupture of RAA is a rare catastrophe that can complicate pregnancy and is associated with high maternal and fetal mortality. Presentation is usually acute with severe flank pain, with or without haematuria, and haemodynamic instability requiring exploration and nephrectomy. A 26-year-old pregnant woman had sudden onset of gross haematuria and on evaluation was found to have a left RAA with an intrapelvic rupture and thinned out renal parenchyma. In view of the high risk of surgery, she was managed with endovascular placement of an Amplatzer type II vascular plug. Immediate and complete occlusion of blood flow was achieved and nephrectomy was avoided. Follow-up Doppler ultrasound revealed a reduced 5 cm mass in the left renal fossa with no internal flow and plug in position. She is currently on follow-up with 3-6 monthly ultrasonography not requiring any intervention. PMID:26504094

  7. Large Diameter Limbs for Dilated Common Iliac Arteries in Endovascular Aneurysm Repair. Is It Safe?

    SciTech Connect

    Malagari, Katerina Brountzos, Elias; Gougoulakis, Alexandros; Papathanasiou, Matilda; Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Mastorakou, Renata; Kelekis, Dimitris

    2004-09-15

    In this prospective study we examined whether dilated common iliac arteries (CIAs) can provide a safe distal seal in endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with the use of bifurcated stent grafts with large diameter limbs. Sixteen patients with 26 dilated CIAs with a diameter of {>=}6 mm who were offered EVAR using stent grafts with large diameter limbs were included in the study (Group A). Forty-two patients who also underwent EVAR without iliac dilatation, matched for age, sex and surgical risk were used for comparison (controls-Group B). In group A mean CIA diameter was 18.2 mm (16-28) and mean abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) diameter was 6.87 {+-} 1.05 cm; mean age was 77.2 {+-} 4.8 yrs (67-81). Mean follow-up was 33.6 months (2.8 yrs). CIA diameter changes and development of endoleaks were assessed by CT angiography (CTA). Overall iliac dilatation was present in 16/58 of our patients (27.6%). In 10 patients dilatation was bilateral (17.3%). Partial or complete flow to the internal iliac artery (IIA) territories was preserved in all patients post-EVAR. On follow-up, stable caliber of the dilated CIAs was observed in 21 patients (84%), enlargement of 1mm in 3 (16%), and failure of the distal attachment in 1 (6.2%). Compared to the control group there was no statistical significance in the incidence of complications. Dilated common iliac arteries provide a safe distal seal in patients who have undergone EVAR, thus obviating the need for additional endovascular procedures and sparing flow in the IIA vascular bed.

  8. Endovascular Treatment of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy (JR-NET) 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    IMAMURA, Hirotoshi; SAKAI, Nobuyuki; SAKAI, Chiaki; FUJINAKA, Toshiyuki; ISHII, Akira

    2014-01-01

    To distinguish the characteristics of ruptured cerebral aneurysm that are suitable for endovascular treatment from those that are not, we evaluated factors that influenced the results of aneurysm embolization in patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysm, based on data from the Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy (JR-NET) 1 and 2. The multivariate analysis revealed that young patients, patients with low modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores before onset, and patients with low World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) grades had good outcome. Compared to proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms, the odds ratio of middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms was 1.67, indicating poorer outcome for MCA aneurysms, and patients with small, wide-neck cerebral aneurysms had poor outcome. Patients treated after 15 days had better outcome than during other periods. The timing of treatment, however, did not influence the outcome in patients treated within 14 days. The outcome was poorer when the responsible doctor for the treatment was a specialist or a non-specialist than a supervisory doctor. The outcome of patients treated with bare platinum coils, and three dimensional (3D) rotational angiography was better, and the outcome of patients who completed treatment with body filling was poorer than in patients with complete occlusion. Perioperative hemorrhagic complications, all ischemic complications, and rebleeding occurred in 4.5%, 6.4%, and 1.4% of patients, respectively. All these complications had poor outcome factors on day 30, with odds ratios of 2.72, 2.96, and 25.49, respectively. We must be fully aware of these risk factors and determine indications for the treatment when endovascular treatment is performed as the treatment of choice for ruptured cerebral aneurysm. PMID:24390181

  9. The usefulness of near-infrared spectroscopy in the anesthetic management of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Wakimoto, Masahiro M; Kadosaki, Mamoru; Nagata, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Kenji S

    2012-12-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) may be a useful method for monitoring the regional oxygen saturation (rSO(2)) of the lower extremity during endovascular aortic repair. Eighteen patients with thoracic descending and/or abdominal aortic aneurysm were enrolled in this study. NIRS probes were placed bilaterally on the calves. Muscular rSO(2) (mrSO(2)) was monitored every 30 s throughout the operation. In the leg in which the femoral artery was clamped, mrSO(2) values were selected at 3 or 4 points-just before clamping (control value), 30 min after clamping, 10 min after the first declamping, and 10 min after the second declamping following repair of the femoral artery, if necessary. In all patients, mrSO(2) decreased significantly during clamping, from 64 ± 11 % (mean ± SD) of the control value to 32 ± 15 %. After declamping, mrSO(2) recovered to 69 ± 14 % of the control value in 16 patients. In the 2 other patients, however, mrSO(2) did not recover after the first declamping, because of femoral artery dissection. After additional repair, mrSO(2) recovered quickly to the control value. These data suggested NIRS may objectively and quantitatively reflect oxygenation of the lower extremities, and may indicate an ischemic event that needs additional repair during endovascular aortic repair. PMID:22733429

  10. Early Experiences with the Endovascular Repair of Ruptured Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Sung; Oh, Se Jin; Sung, Yong Won; Moon, Hyun Jong; Lee, Jung Sang

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to report our early experiences with the endovascular repair of ruptured descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (rDTAAs), which are a rare and life-threatening condition. Methods Among 42 patients who underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) between October 2010 and September 2015, five patients (11.9%) suffered an rDTAA. Results The mean age was 72.4±5.1 years, and all patients were male. Hemoptysis and hemothorax were present in three (60%) and two (40%) patients, respectively. Hypovolemic shock was noted in three patients who underwent emergency operations. A hybrid operation was performed in three patients. The mean operative time was 269.8±72.3 minutes. The mean total length of aortic coverage was 186.0±49.2 mm. No 30-day mortality occurred. Stroke, delirium, and atrial fibrillation were observed in one patient each. Paraplegia did not occur. Endoleak was found in two patients (40%), one of whom underwent an early and successful reintervention. During the mean follow-up period of 16.8±14.8 months, two patients died; one cause of death was a persistent type 1 endoleak and the other cause was unknown. Conclusion TEVAR for rDTAA was associated with favorable early mortality and morbidity outcomes. However, early reintervention should be considered if persistent endoleak occurs. PMID:27064672

  11. Finite element modeling of endovascular coiling and flow diversion enables hemodynamic prediction of complex treatment strategies for intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Damiano, Robert J; Ma, Ding; Xiang, Jianping; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Snyder, Kenneth V; Meng, Hui

    2015-09-18

    Endovascular interventions using coil embolization and flow diversion are becoming the mainstream treatment for intracranial aneurysms (IAs). To help assess the effect of intervention strategies on aneurysm hemodynamics and treatment outcome, we have developed a finite-element-method (FEM)-based technique for coil deployment along with our HiFiVS technique for flow diverter (FD) deployment in patient-specific IAs. We tested four clinical intervention strategies: coiling (1-8 coils), single FD, FD with adjunctive coils (1-8 coils), and overlapping FDs. By evaluating post-treatment hemodynamics using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), we compared the flow-modification performance of these strategies. Results show that a single FD provides more reduction in inflow rate than low packing density (PD) coiling, but less reduction in average velocity inside the aneurysm. Adjunctive coils add no additional reduction of inflow rate beyond a single FD until coil PD exceeds 11%. This suggests that the main role of FDs is to divert inflow, while that of coils is to create stasis in the aneurysm. Overlapping FDs decreases inflow rate, average velocity, and average wall shear stress (WSS) in the aneurysm sac, but adding a third FD produces minimal additional reduction. In conclusion, our FEM-based techniques for virtual coiling and flow diversion enable recapitulation of complex endovascular intervention strategies and detailed hemodynamics to identify hemodynamic factors that affect treatment outcome. PMID:26169778

  12. Endovascular Therapy of Bronchial Artery Aneurysm: Five Cases With Six Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, Peng-Hua Wang Lifu; Su Yusheng; Lee, Deok-Hee; Wang Shuxiang; Sun Ling; Geng Suping; Huang Wennuo

    2011-06-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA)-Lipiodol mixture in patients with bronchial artery aneurysm (BAA). From January 2005 to January 2010, five patients presenting hemoptysis with six BAAs were treated with NBCA-Lipiodol mixture, including intra-aneurysm embolization (IAE) in one patient. Adjuvant embolization with spherical polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) embolic microparticles or NBCA was first performed to embolize the distal engorged bronchiectatic arteries. Bronchial arterial angiography showed six BAAs (four in the right lobe and two in the left lobe) and some engorged, tortuous bronchial arteries. TAE through microcatheter was successful in all cases. Postembolization angiogram demonstrated the NBCA cast and total occlusion of BAAs and bronchiectatic engorged vessels. After these procedures, hemoptysis completely disappeared in all patients. Follow-up computed tomography (CT) scan was performed at an average of 3 months (range 2 to 6), which showed no enhancement of BAAs and accumulation of NBCA. TAE is a minimally invasive, effective, and reliable approach for treatment for patients with BAA. NBCA-Lipiodol mixture provides a good choice for treatment of BAA, especially when catheterization of the efferent branches is impossible.

  13. Bladder and rectal incontinence without paraplegia or paraparesis after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Naritomo; Kurimoto, Yoshihiko; Maruyama, Ryushi; Ujihira, Kosuke; Iba, Yutaka; Hatta, Eiichiro; Yamada, Akira; Nakanishi, Katsuhiko

    2016-12-01

    Spinal cord ischemia is a well-known potential complication of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), and it is usually manifested by paraplegia or paraparesis. We describe a case in which spinal cord ischemia after EVAR presented by isolated bladder and rectal incontinence without other neurological deficits. A 63-year-old woman presented with intermittent claudication secondary to an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), and a left common iliac artery obstruction, for which she underwent EVAR using an aorto-uniiliac (AUI) device and ilio-femoral artery bypass. On postoperative day 3, she developed urinary and fecal incontinence without signs of paraplegia or paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a hyper-intense signal in the spinal cord. She received hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy and was discharged after 18 days when her urinary and fecal incontinence were almost resolved. This report suggests that spinal cord ischemia after EVAR for aortoiliac occlusive disease might present as bladder and rectal incontinence without other neurological manifestations. PMID:26943687

  14. Early Amiodarone-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Uzung; Marinelli, Laura; Ali, Sayed; Huberfeld, Seymour; Barrera, Rafael; Chang, John B

    2016-09-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic drug that has been commonly used to treat supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. This drug is an iodine-containing compound that tends to accumulate in several organs, including the lungs. Especially, its main metabolically active metabolite desethylamiodarone can adversely affect many organs. A very well-known severe complication of amiodarone therapy is the amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity. This article presents the case study of an 82-year-old male patient with acute amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity. The patient underwent endovascular aneurysm repair for rapidly increasing abdominal aortic aneurysm. During the postoperative period the patient developed rapid atrial fibrillation and amiodarone therapy was initiated. Subsequently, the patient went into acute respiratory failure and was requiring high supplemental oxygen support and a chest X-ray revealed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. During the hospital course the patient required mechanical ventilator support. With discontinuation of amiodarone, supportive therapy and steroid treatment patient symptoms significantly improved. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity must be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients on the medication with progressive or acute respiratory symptoms. Early discontinuation of amiodarone and aggressive corticosteroid therapy should be considered as a viable treatment strategy. PMID:27574388

  15. Endovascular Treatment of Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms with the EndoFit Stent-Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Saratzis, N.; Saratzis, Athanasios Melas, N.; Ginis, G.; Lioupis, A.; Lykopoulos, D.; Lazaridis, J.; Kiskinis, Dimitrios

    2007-04-15

    Objective. To evaluate the mid-term feasibility, efficacy, and durability of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (DTAA) exclusion using the EndoFit device (LeMaitre Vascular). Methods. Twenty-three (23) men (mean age 66 years) with a DTAA were admitted to our department for endovascular repair (21 were ASA III+ and 2 refused open repair) from January 2003 to July 2005. Results. Complete aneurysm exclusion was feasible in all subjects (100% technical success). The median follow-up was 18 months (range 8-40 months). A single stent-graft was used in 6 cases. The deployment of a second stent-graft was required in the remaining 17 patients. All endografts were attached proximally, beyond the left subclavian artery, leaving the aortic arch branches intact. No procedure-related deaths have occurred. A distal type I endoleak was detected in 2 cases on the 1 month follow-up CT scan, and was repaired with reintervention and deployment of an extension graft. A nonfatal acute myocardial infarction occurred in 1 patient in the sixth postoperative month. Graft migration, graft infection, paraplegia, cerebral or distal embolization, renal impairment or any other major complications were not observed. Conclusion. The treatment of DTAAs using the EndoFit stent-graft is technically feasible. Mid-term results in this series are promising.

  16. Impact of sarcopenia on long-term mortality following endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Hale, Allyson L; Twomey, Kayla; Ewing, Joseph A; Langan, Eugene M; Cull, David L; Gray, Bruce H

    2016-06-01

    Sarcopenia, also known as a reduction of skeletal muscle mass, is a patient-specific risk factor for vascular and cancer patients. However, there are no data on abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) who have sarcopenia. To determine the impact of sarcopenia on mortality following EVAR, we retrospectively reviewed 200 patients treated with EVAR by estimating muscle mass on abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans. Mortality was analyzed according to its presence (n=25) or absence (n=175). Sarcopenia was more common in women than men (32.0% vs 9.7%; p=0.005). Patients with sarcopenia had an increased risk of mortality compared to those without (76% vs 48%; p=0.016). Of note, the overall mortality rate was 51% with a median follow up of 8.4 years (interquartile range, 5.3-11.7). In conclusion, the presence of sarcopenia on a CT scan is an important predictor of long-term mortality in patients treated for AAA with EVAR. Pending further study, these data suggest that sarcopenia may aid in pre-procedural long-term survival assessment of patients undergoing EVAR. PMID:26850115

  17. Endovascular stent-graft repair of spontaneous aorto-caval fistula secondary to a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: An emergency management of hostile anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingyuan; Wang, Haofu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Although endovascular aneurysm repair of aorto-caval fistula offers a safe and efficient approach compared to traditional open repair, endovascular techniques for the treatment of aorto-caval fistula with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms in emergency circumstance are not well established. This study aims to evaluate the effect of endovascular repair of aorto-caval fistula of a patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and hostile anatomy. Methods: we report a case of an aorto-caval fistula endovascular repaired in a 78-year-old male using a hybrid stent-graft technique. Results: The patient had an uneventful recovery and CTA follow up showed no sign of ACF or any endoleak. Conclusion: This case highlights ACF might be managed by composite endograft implantation with careful and solid sealing of anchoring zones on the two sides. PMID:27489717

  18. Clinical outcomes of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms that underwent endovascular repair in a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chih-Hsien; Chang, Chien-Jung; Huang, Jau-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) in patients at a district general hospital. Methods A retrospective clinical study was conducted using data on 16 patients with elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and nine patients with consecutive rAAA treated with EVAR from January 2010 to December 2014 in a district general hospital in Taiwan. Results The preoperative characteristics of the two groups are listed. Thirty-six percent (9/25) of the patients were referred from other hospitals that did not offer surgical services. The percentage of patients with rAAA that were transferred from other hospitals was 55.5% (5/9). The stay durations in the intensive care unit for elective EVAR cases were shorter than those for emergent EVAR (1.75±1 d elective vs. 10±13.37 d emergent; P<0.019). The hospitalization days (11.06±4.07 d elective vs. 21.89±18.36 d emergent; P<0.031), operative time (183.63±57.24 min elective vs. 227.11±59.92 min emergent; P<0.009), and blood loss volumes (115.63±80.41 mL elective vs. 422.22±276.26 mL emergent; P<0.005) are shown; statistics for use of Perclose ProGlide® (7 cases elective vs. 0 case emergent; P<0.024) are compared. The overall 30-d mortality rate was 11.11% (1/9). Conclusions The results confirm that EVAR surgery can be safely performed in a district general hospital with an integrated health care system. Using Perclose ProGlide® for selected cases may reduce blood loss and operative time. PMID:27499945

  19. Endovascular repair or open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: a Cochrane systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Badger, S A; Harkin, D W; Blair, P H; Ellis, P K; Kee, F; Forster, R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (eEVAR) may improve outcomes for patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA). The study aim was to compare the outcomes for eEVAR with conventional open surgical repair for the treatment of RAAA. Setting A systematic review of relevant publications was performed. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing eEVAR with open surgical repair for RAAA were included. Participants 3 RCTs were included, with a total of 761 patients with RAAA. Interventions Meta-analysis was performed with fixed-effects models with ORs and 95% CIs for dichotomous data and mean differences with 95% CIs for continuous data. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcome was short-term mortality. Secondary outcome measures included aneurysm-specific and general complication rates, quality of life and economic analysis. Results Overall risk of bias was low. There was no difference between the 2 interventions on 30-day (or in-hospital) mortality, OR 0.91 (95% CI 0.67 to 1.22; p=0.52). 30-day complications included myocardial infarction, stroke, composite cardiac complications, renal complications, severe bowel ischaemia, spinal cord ischaemia, reoperation, amputation and respiratory failure. Reporting was incomplete, and no robust conclusion was drawn. For complication outcomes that did include at least 2 studies in the meta-analysis, there was no clear evidence to support a difference between eEVAR and open repair. Longer term outcomes and cost per patient were evaluated in only a single study, thus precluding definite conclusions. Conclusions Outcomes between eEVAR and open repair, specifically 30-day mortality, are similar. However, further high-quality trials are required, as the paucity of data currently limits the conclusions. PMID:26873043

  20. Patient-specific simulation of endovascular repair surgery with tortuous aneurysms requiring flexible stent-grafts.

    PubMed

    Perrin, David; Badel, Pierre; Orgeas, Laurent; Geindreau, Christian; du Roscoat, Sabine Rolland; Albertini, Jean-Noël; Avril, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    The rate of post-operative complications is the main drawback of endovascular repair, a technique used to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms. Complex anatomies, featuring short aortic necks and high vessel tortuosity for instance, have been proved likely prone to these complications. In this context, practitioners could benefit, at the preoperative planning stage, from a tool able to predict the post-operative position of the stent-graft, to validate their stent-graft sizing and anticipate potential complications. In consequence, the aim of this work is to prove the ability of a numerical simulation methodology to reproduce accurately the shapes of stent-grafts, with a challenging design, deployed inside tortuous aortic aneurysms. Stent-graft module samples were scanned by X-ray microtomography and subjected to mechanical tests to generate finite-element models. Two EVAR clinical cases were numerically reproduced by simulating stent-graft models deployment inside the tortuous arterial model generated from patient pre-operative scan. In the same manner, an in vitro stent-graft deployment in a rigid polymer phantom, generated by extracting the arterial geometry from the preoperative scan of a patient, was simulated to assess the influence of biomechanical environment unknowns in the in vivo case. Results were validated by comparing stent positions on simulations and post-operative scans. In all cases, simulation predicted stents deployed locations and shapes with an accuracy of a few millimetres. The good results obtained in the in vitro case validated the ability of the methodology to simulate stent-graft deployment in very tortuous arteries and led to think proper modelling of biomechanical environment could reduce the few local discrepancies found in the in vivo case. In conclusion, this study proved that our methodology can achieve accurate simulation of stent-graft deployed shape even in tortuous patient specific aortic aneurysms and may be potentially helpful to

  1. Predictor's analysis of anterior circulation cerebral infarction after the endovascular treatment of anterior communicating artery aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liqian; Jing, Xiaobin; Cui, Changmeng; Cui, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite increasing acceptance of endovascular coiling for treating anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysms, anterior circulation cerebral infarction (ACI) after embolization remains a limitation. With higher incidence, higher morbidity and higher mortality, it is one of the main factors influencing the ACoA aneurysms prognosis. Determining the risk factors leading to ACI after embolization will have clinical significance. Through retrospective case analysis, this study investigated the risk factors related to ACI after embolization in order to provide information to serve the clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was performed of patients who had undergone coiling of ACoA aneurysms from 2008 to 2012. All patients had ruptured prior to the completion of embolization. Cases with acute stroke symptoms without alternative diagnoses after embolization were diagnosed as ACI. A total of 32 risk factors such as age, sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, modified Fisher grade, Hunt-Hess grade, ventricular hemorrhage, etc. were analyzed using univariate and logistic regression analysis. Results: Univariate analysis showed that negative fluid volume balance (P = 0.041 <0.05) and modified Fisher grade (P = 0.049 <0.05) reached statistical significance, suggesting that they might be risk factors for ACI after embolization. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that modified Fisher grade was significantly associated with ACI after embolization, suggesting that it was an independent risk factor (odds ratios (OR): 4.968, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.013-24.360, P = 0.048). Conclusion: Modified Fisher grade is an independent risk factor for ACI after embolization. PMID:25097601

  2. Endovascular treatment of aortoiliac aneurysms: From intentional occlusion of the internal iliac artery to branch iliac stent graft

    PubMed Central

    Duvnjak, Stevo

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 20%-40% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms can have unilateral or bilateral iliac artery aneurysms and/or ectasia. This influences and compromises the distal sealing zone during endovascular aneurysm repair. There are a few endovascular techniques that are used to treat these types of aneurysms, including intentional occlusion/over-stenting of the internal iliac artery on one or both sides, the “bell-bottom” technique, and the more recent method of using an iliac branch stent graft. In some cases, other options include the “snorkel and sandwich” technique and hybrid interventions. Pelvic ischemia, represented as buttock claudication, has been reported in 16%-55% of cases; this is followed by impotence, which has been described in 10%-17% of cases following internal iliac artery occlusion. The bell-bottom technique can be used for a common iliac artery up to 24 mm in diameter given that the largest diameter of the stent graft is 28 mm. There is a paucity of data and evidence regarding the “snorkel and sandwich” technique, which can be used in a few clinical scenarios. The hybrid intervention is comprised of a surgical operation, and is not purely endovascular. The newest branch stent graft technology enables preservation of the anterograde flow of important side branches. Technical success with the newest technique ranges from 85%-96.3%, and in some small series, technical success is 100%. Buttock claudication was reported in up to 4% of patients treated with a branch stent graft at 5-year follow-up. Mid- and short-term follow-up results showed branch patency of up to 88% during the 5-6-year period. Furthermore, branch graft occlusion is a potential complication, and it has been described to occur in 1.2%-11% of cases. Iliac branch stent graft placement represents a further development in endovascular medicine, and it has a high technical success rate without serious complications. PMID:27027393

  3. Endovascular treatment of aortoiliac aneurysms: From intentional occlusion of the internal iliac artery to branch iliac stent graft.

    PubMed

    Duvnjak, Stevo

    2016-03-28

    Approximately 20%-40% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms can have unilateral or bilateral iliac artery aneurysms and/or ectasia. This influences and compromises the distal sealing zone during endovascular aneurysm repair. There are a few endovascular techniques that are used to treat these types of aneurysms, including intentional occlusion/over-stenting of the internal iliac artery on one or both sides, the "bell-bottom" technique, and the more recent method of using an iliac branch stent graft. In some cases, other options include the "snorkel and sandwich" technique and hybrid interventions. Pelvic ischemia, represented as buttock claudication, has been reported in 16%-55% of cases; this is followed by impotence, which has been described in 10%-17% of cases following internal iliac artery occlusion. The bell-bottom technique can be used for a common iliac artery up to 24 mm in diameter given that the largest diameter of the stent graft is 28 mm. There is a paucity of data and evidence regarding the "snorkel and sandwich" technique, which can be used in a few clinical scenarios. The hybrid intervention is comprised of a surgical operation, and is not purely endovascular. The newest branch stent graft technology enables preservation of the anterograde flow of important side branches. Technical success with the newest technique ranges from 85%-96.3%, and in some small series, technical success is 100%. Buttock claudication was reported in up to 4% of patients treated with a branch stent graft at 5-year follow-up. Mid- and short-term follow-up results showed branch patency of up to 88% during the 5-6-year period. Furthermore, branch graft occlusion is a potential complication, and it has been described to occur in 1.2%-11% of cases. Iliac branch stent graft placement represents a further development in endovascular medicine, and it has a high technical success rate without serious complications. PMID:27027393

  4. Brain aneurysm repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  5. Endovascular interventions for descending thoracic aortic aneurysms: The pivotal role of the clinical nurse in postoperative care.

    PubMed

    Dolinger, Cami; Strider, David V

    2010-12-01

    Descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (dTAA) comprise 40% of all aneurysms arising from the thoracic aorta. Because rupture of thoracic aneurysms is associated with a 94% mortality rate, timely detection, surveillance and treatment is imperative. Endovascular stent-graft repair of thoracic aneurysms was first performed in 1992 and has become an accepted treatment option for this condition in select candidates. There is an abundance of information for the care of patients after open surgical repair of dTAA. However, still relatively few written guidelines exist in the nursing literature for postoperative care and complications associated with endovascular stent-graft repair. The prevalence of aortic endografting, however, now makes it necessary for nurses to have a solid knowledge base in the operative procedure, complications and postoperative care for this patient population. Ideal candidates for aortic endografting undergo CTA or MRI preoperatively and fit a set of strict anatomic criteria to ensure proper delivery and fixation of the device. The early postoperative care focuses on minimizing pulmonary complications, paraplegia, renal failure and embolic complications such as stroke and limb ischemia through skilled nursing assessment and interventions. Late complications such as stent-graft migration, kinking, stent fracture and endoleak are often without symptoms, making it necessary for patients to be educated about these potential complications and to be encouraged to comply with lifelong follow up. This overview provides a sound cognitive framework for nurses practicing in a vascular surgery milieu. PMID:21074117

  6. Early sac shrinkage predicts a low risk of late complications after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Bastos Gonçalves, F; Baderkhan, H; Verhagen, H J M; Wanhainen, A; Björck, M; Stolker, R J; Hoeks, S E; Mani, K

    2014-01-01

    Background Aneurysm shrinkage has been proposed as a marker of successful endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Patients with early postoperative shrinkage may experience fewer subsequent complications, and consequently require less intensive surveillance. Methods Patients undergoing EVAR from 2000 to 2011 at three vascular centres (in 2 countries), who had two imaging examinations (postoperative and after 6–18 months), were included. Maximum diameter, complications and secondary interventions during follow-up were registered. Patients were categorized according to early sac dynamics. The primary endpoint was freedom from late complications. Secondary endpoints were freedom from secondary intervention, postimplant rupture and direct (type I/III) endoleaks. Results Some 597 EVARs (71·1 per cent of all EVARs) were included. No shrinkage was observed in 284 patients (47·6 per cent), moderate shrinkage (5–9 mm) in 142 (23·8 per cent) and major shrinkage (at least 10 mm) in 171 patients (28·6 per cent). Four years after the index imaging, the rate of freedom from complications was 84·3 (95 per cent confidence interval 78·7 to 89·8), 88·1 (80·6 to 95·5) and 94·4 (90·1 to 98·7) per cent respectively. No shrinkage was an independent risk factor for late complications compared with major shrinkage (hazard ratio (HR) 3·11; P < 0·001). Moderate compared with major shrinkage (HR 2·10; P = 0·022), early postoperative complications (HR 3·34; P < 0·001) and increasing abdominal aortic aneurysm baseline diameter (HR 1·02; P = 0·001) were also risk factors for late complications. Freedom from secondary interventions and direct endoleaks was greater for patients with major sac shrinkage. Conclusion Early change in aneurysm sac diameter is a strong predictor of late complications after EVAR. Patients with major sac shrinkage have a very low risk of complications for up to 5 years. This parameter may be used to tailor postoperative surveillance. PMID:24752772

  7. Endovascular treatment of intracranial infectious aneurysms in eloquent cortex with super-selective provocative testing: Case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Matthew R; Stapleton, Christopher J; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Thomas, Ajith J; Ogilvy, Christopher S

    2016-04-01

    Intracranial infectious aneurysms (IIAs) are a rare subgroup of intracranial aneurysms. Often erroneously termed mycotic aneurysms, these lesions most often result from infectious endocarditis and involve the distal anterior cortical circulation. Diagnosis typically follows headaches or septic infarcts, although increasing numbers of lesions are found incidentally, during screening protocols for infectious endocarditis. Open surgical treatment was previously the mainstay of treatment; however, these IIAs are often fusiform and quite fragile, making open surgical obliteration difficult and typically requiring lesion trapping. Current treatment techniques more commonly involve endovascular coil embolization or parent vessel occlusion. Many of these lesions occur distally, in or around the eloquent cortex, making embolization potentially dangerous. We present cases that highlight the use of super-selective provocative testing with sodium amobarbital and lidocaine, to help clarify and predict the risk of parent vessel occlusion in IIAs located in the eloquent cortex. PMID:26672110

  8. Treatment of a Common Iliac Aneurysm by Endovascular Exclusion Using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug and Femorofemoral Crossover Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Coupe, Nicholas J. Ling, Lynn; Cowling, Mark G.; Asquith, John R.; Hopkinson, Gregory B.

    2009-07-15

    We report our initial experience using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug II (AVP2) in the treatment of a left common iliac aneurysm. Following investigation by computerized tomographic angiography and catheter angiography, a 79-year-old man was found to have a markedly tortuous iliac system, with a left common iliac artery aneurysm that measured 48 mm in maximal diameter. Due to the patient's age and comorbidities the surgical opinion was that conventional open repair was not suitable. However, due to the tortuous nature of the aneurysm and iliac vessels, standard endovascular repair, using either a bifurcated or an aorto-uni-iliac stent graft, was also not possible. A combined approach was used by embolizing the ipsilateral internal iliac artery using coils and excluding the aneurysm using two AVP2 occlusion devices, followed by femorofemoral crossover grafting. Total aneurysm occlusion was achieved using this method and this allowed the patient to have a much less invasive surgical procedure than with conventional open repair of common iliac aneurysms, thus avoiding potential comorbidity and mortality.

  9. Aspergillus-Associated Cerebral Aneurysm Successfully Treated by Endovascular and Surgical Intervention with Voriconazole in Lupus Nephritis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Chul; Lee, Hajeong; Ryu, Han Hee; Beom, Seung Hoon; Yang, Yaewon; Kim, Suhnggwon

    2012-01-01

    During the last five decades, long-term therapy with immunosuppressive agents such as pulse cyclophosphamide in conjunction with high-dose corticosteroids has enhanced both patient survival and renal survival in patients with diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis. Nevertheless, severe side effects such as infectious complications remain the main cause of morbidity and mortality. Central nervous system aspergillosis is uncommon but life-threatening in lupus patients. In this single-patient case study, carotid aneurysm with sphenoidal sinusitis was suspected when severe epistaxis occurred during cyclophosphamide pulse therapy. With anti-fungal therapy, a graft stent was successfully deployed to the aneurysm and specimens of sphenoidal mucosa showed typical hyphae, indicating aspergillosis. Three months after stopping voriconazole treatment, two cerebral aneurysms that were revealed on MR images were successfully removed by aneurysmal clipping. The patient remained alive at one-year follow-up with lupus nephritis in remission. The rarity and high mortality of aspergillus-related fungal aneurysms have led to most cases being recognized postmortem. However, such aneurysms must be diagnosed early to prevent fatal complications by performing appropriate management such as surgical procedure or endovascular intervention. PMID:22379345

  10. Practical Feasibility and Packing Density of Endovascular Coiling Using Target® Nano™ Coils in Small Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hae Woong

    2015-01-01

    Objective Based on the use of Nano™ coils, we retrospectively compared the proportion of the coils (≤ 1.5 mm) and packing density in two patient groups with small cerebral aneurysms (< 4 mm diameter) who were treated with or without Nano™ coils. Materials and Methods Between January 2012 and November 2013, in 548 cerebral aneurysms treated by endovascular coiling, 143 patients with 148 small cerebral aneurysms underwent endovascular coiling. After March 2013, coiling with Nano™ coils was performed on 45 small cerebral aneurysms (30.4%). Results There were no significant differences in the size and locations of the cerebral aneurysms, the age of the patients, and the procedural modalities between the two groups. The proportion of the coil (≤ 1.5 mm) of the group treated with Nano™ coils (53.6%) was higher than the proportion of the coil (≤ 1.5 mm) of the group treated without Nano™ coils (14.7%) with statistical significance (p < 0.001). The packing density of the group treated with Nano™ coils (31.3 ± 9.69%) was higher than the packing density of the group treated without Nano™ coils (29.49 ± 7.84%), although the difference was not significant. Procedural complications developed in 3 lesions (2 thromboembolisms and 1 carotid dissection) (2.0%). Treatment-related transient neurological deficits due to thromboembolism developed in 1 lesion, which had not been treated with Nano™ coils. There was no treatment-related permanent morbidity or mortality in either of the groups. Conclusion In our series, the small cerebral aneurysms treated with Nano™ coils showed more packing density with no additive procedural risk or difficulty. PMID:27064999

  11. Visceral and Renal Artery Complications of Suprarenal Fixation during Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Choke, Edward; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria; Dawson, Joseph; Loftus, Ian M.; McFarland, Robert; Loosemore, Thomas; Thompson, Matthew M.

    2007-07-15

    Background. The effect of suprarenal fixation of endovascular grafts on renal and visceral artery function remains undefined. This study aimed to determine renal and visceral artery complications following suprarenal fixation during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVR). Methods. Prospectively collected data from 112 patients who received suprarenal fixation (group SF) and 36 patients who received infrarenal fixation (group IF) in a single institution from December 1997 to April 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Median follow-up was 26 months (range 0.1-101 months). Results. Stent struts extended to or above the level of 106 (94.6%) right renal arteries, 104 (92.9%) left renal arteries, 49 (43.8%) superior mesenteric arteries (SMA), and 7 (6.3%) celiac arteries in group SF. This group had 2 (1.8%) unintentional main renal artery occlusions, of which 1 was successfully treated at the first procedure with a renal stent. There was 1 (0.9%) SMA occlusion which resulted in bowel infarction and death. Group IF had no renal or visceral artery complications. There were no late-onset occlusions or infarcts. There was no significant difference in median serum creatinine between groups SF and IF at 1 month (p = 0.18) and 6 months to 12 months (p 0.22) follow-up. The change in serum creatinine over time was also not significantly different within each group (SF, p = 0.09; IF, p 0.38). Conclusions. In this study, suprarenal fixation was associated with a very small incidence of immediate renal and visceral artery occlusion. There did not appear to be any medium-term sequelae of suprarenal fixation.

  12. Lower Extremity Microembolism in Open vs. Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Toursavadkohi, Shahab; Kakkos, Stavros K.; Rubinfeld, Ilan; Shepard, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have documented the occurrence of microembolization during abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair by both open and endovascular approaches, no study has compared the downstream effects of these two repair techniques on lower extremity hemodynamics. In this prospective cohort study, 20 patients were treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) (11 Zenith, 8 Excluder, and 1 Medtronic) and 18 patients with open repair (OR) (16 bifurcated grafts, 2 tube grafts). Pre- and postoperative ankle-brachial indices (ABIs) and toe-brachial indices (TBIs) were measured preoperatively and on postoperative day (POD) 1 and 5. Demographics and preoperative ABIs/TBIs were identical in EVAR (0.97/0.63) and OR (0.96/0.63) patients (p = 0.21). There was a significant decrease in ABIs/TBIs following both EVAR (0.83/0.52, p = 0.01) and OR (0.73/0.39, p = 0.003) on POD #1, although this decrease was greater following OR than EVAR (p = 0.002). This difference largely resolved by POD #5 (p = 0.41). In the OR group, TBIs in the limb in which flow was restored first was significantly reduced compared to the contralateral limb (0.50 vs. 0.61, p = 0.03). In the EVAR group, there was also a difference in TBIs between the main body insertion side and the contralateral side (0.50 vs. 0.59, p = 0.02). Deterioration of lower extremity perfusion pressures occurs commonly after AAA repair regardless of repair technique. Toe perfusion is worse in the limb opened first during OR and on the main body insertion side following EVAR, suggesting that microembolization plays a major role in this deterioration. The derangement following OR is more profound than after EVAR on POD #1, but recovers rapidly. This finding suggests that microembolizarion may be worse with OR or alternatively that other factors associated with OR (e.g., the hemodynamic response to surgery with redistribution of flow to vital organs peri-operatively) may play a role. PMID

  13. Lower Extremity Microembolism in Open vs. Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Toursavadkohi, Shahab; Kakkos, Stavros K; Rubinfeld, Ilan; Shepard, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have documented the occurrence of microembolization during abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair by both open and endovascular approaches, no study has compared the downstream effects of these two repair techniques on lower extremity hemodynamics. In this prospective cohort study, 20 patients were treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) (11 Zenith, 8 Excluder, and 1 Medtronic) and 18 patients with open repair (OR) (16 bifurcated grafts, 2 tube grafts). Pre- and postoperative ankle-brachial indices (ABIs) and toe-brachial indices (TBIs) were measured preoperatively and on postoperative day (POD) 1 and 5. Demographics and preoperative ABIs/TBIs were identical in EVAR (0.97/0.63) and OR (0.96/0.63) patients (p = 0.21). There was a significant decrease in ABIs/TBIs following both EVAR (0.83/0.52, p = 0.01) and OR (0.73/0.39, p = 0.003) on POD #1, although this decrease was greater following OR than EVAR (p = 0.002). This difference largely resolved by POD #5 (p = 0.41). In the OR group, TBIs in the limb in which flow was restored first was significantly reduced compared to the contralateral limb (0.50 vs. 0.61, p = 0.03). In the EVAR group, there was also a difference in TBIs between the main body insertion side and the contralateral side (0.50 vs. 0.59, p = 0.02). Deterioration of lower extremity perfusion pressures occurs commonly after AAA repair regardless of repair technique. Toe perfusion is worse in the limb opened first during OR and on the main body insertion side following EVAR, suggesting that microembolization plays a major role in this deterioration. The derangement following OR is more profound than after EVAR on POD #1, but recovers rapidly. This finding suggests that microembolizarion may be worse with OR or alternatively that other factors associated with OR (e.g., the hemodynamic response to surgery with redistribution of flow to vital organs peri-operatively) may play a role. PMID

  14. Risk Factor Analysis for Buttock Claudication after Internal Iliac Artery Embolization with Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hye Ryeon; Park, Ki Hyuk; Lee, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) involving the common iliac artery requires extension of the stent-graft limb into the external iliac artery. For this procedure, internal iliac artery (IIA) embolization is performed to prevent type II endoleak. In this study, we investigated the frequency and risk factor of buttock claudication (BC) in patients having interventional embolization of the IIA. Materials and Methods: From January 2010 to December 2013, a total of 110 patients with AAA were treated with EVAR in our institution. This study included 27 patients (24.5%) who had undergone unilateral IIA coil embolization with EVAR. We examined hospital charts retrospectively and interviewed by telephone for the occurrence of BC. Results: Mean age of total patients was 71.9±7.0 years and 88.9% were males. During a mean follow-up of 8.65±9.04 months, the incidence of BC was 40.7% (11 of 27 patients). In 8 patients with claudication, the symptoms had resolved within 1 month of IIA embolization, but the symptoms persisted for more than 6 months in the remaining 3 patients. In univariate and multivariate analysis, risk factors such as age, sex, comorbidity, patency of collateral arteries, and anatomical characteristics of AAA were not significantly related with BC. Conclusion: In this study, BC was a frequent complication of IIA embolization during EVAR and there was no associated risk factor. Certain principles such as checking preoperative angiogram, proximal and unilateral IIA embolization may have contributed to reducing the incidence of BC. PMID:27386451

  15. Outcomes of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in Patients with Hostile Neck Anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Choke, Edward; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria; Loftus, Ian; McFarland, Robert; Loosemore, Thomas; Thompson, Matthew M.

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. The principal anatomic contraindication to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVR) is an unfavorable proximal aortic neck. With increasing experience, a greater proportion of patients with unfavorable neck anatomy are being offered EVR. This study aimed to evaluate outcomes in patients with challenging proximal aortic neck anatomy. Methods. Prospectively collected data from 147 consecutive patients who underwent EVR between December 1997 and April 2005 were supplemented with a retrospective review of medical records and radiological images. Unfavorable anatomic features were defined as neck diameter >28 mm, angulation >60 deg., circumferential thrombus >50%, and length <10 mm. Eighty-seven patients with 0 adverse features (good necks) were compared with 60 patients with one or more adverse features (hostile necks). Results. Comparing the good neck with the hostile neck group, there were no significant differences in the incidence of primary technical success (p = 0.15), intraoperative adjunctive procedures (p = 0.22), early proximal type I endoleak (<30 days) (p = 1.0), late proximal type I endoleak (>30 days) (p = 0.57), distal type I endoleak (p = 0.40), type III endoleak (p 0.51), secondary interventions (p = 1.0), aneurysm sac expansion (p = 0.44), or 30 day mortality (p = 0.70). The good neck group had a significantly increased incidence of type II endoleak (p = 0.023). By multivariate analysis, the incidence of intraoperative adjunctive procedures was significantly increased in the presence of severe angulation (p = 0.041, OR 3.08, 95% CI 1.05-9.04). Conclusion. Patients with severely hostile proximal aortic neck anatomy may be treated with EVR, although severely angulated necks require additional intraoperative procedures. Early outcomes are encouraging and suggest that indications for EVR may be expanded to include patients with hostile neck anatomy.

  16. Use of Triple Microcatheters for Endovascular Treatment of Wide-Necked Intracranial Aneurysms: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young Dae; Rhim, Jong Kook; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Park, Jeong Jin; Jeon, Jin Pyeong; Kim, Jeong Eun; Cho, Won Sang

    2015-01-01

    Objective The dual microcatheter technique is common practice for coil embolization of a wide-necked aneurysm, due to safety and efficacy. However, technical limitations of some complex configurations may necessitate additional microcatheters to bolster coil stability, compact the coil, or for protection. Described herein is a triple microcatheter technique for endovascular management of wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. Materials and Methods Data accruing prospectively between January 2006 and October 2014 on simultaneously executed triple microcatheter coil embolization procedures done in 38 saccular aneurysms were reviewed. Clinical and morphological outcomes were assessed, with emphasis on technical aspects of treatment. Results The triple microcatheter technique was successfully applied to all 38 saccular aneurysms, involving the posterior communicating artery (n = 13), the middle cerebral artery (n = 10), the basilar tip (n = 7), the anterior cerebral artery (n = 5), and the internal carotid artery (n = 3). Stent protection was added in four patients and balloon remodeling in one. Dual microcatheters (n = 24) were usually deployed to deliver the coil within sacs of aneurysms, with the additional microcatheter used for protection. Otherwise, triple microcatheters were deployed for coil delivery (n = 11) or coils were delivered via a single microcatheter, with dual microcatheters deployed for protection (n = 3). Successful occlusion of aneurysms was achieved in 89.5% of cases, with no procedure-related morbidity or mortality. Stable occlusion was maintained in 72.2% (26/36) of the aneurysms at the final follow-up (mean interval, 30.2 ± 22.7 months). Conclusion The outcomes of this limited study suggest that the triple microcatheter technique may be an effective and safe therapeutic option for wide-necked aneurysms, using technical strategies tailored to complex angio-anatomic configurations. PMID:26356992

  17. Mid-Term Results After Endovascular Stent-Grafting of Descending Aortic Aneurysms in High-Risk Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Michael Walluscheck, Knut P.; Jahnke, Thomas; Attmann, Tim; Heller, Martin; Cremer, Jochen; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan

    2006-10-15

    Purpose. To analyze our experience with endovascular stent-grafting of descending aortic aneurysms in high-risk patients. Methods. Nineteen patients underwent endovascular stent-graft repair of descending aortic aneurysms using the Talent Stent Graft System (Medtronic). All patients were considered high-risk for open surgical repair due to their age, requirement for emergency surgery, and comorbidities. Computed tomography and/or MR tomography were performed at 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively and thereafter every 12 months. Results. Secondary technical success was 100%. Thirty-day mortality was 5%. Incidence of postoperative stroke and paraplegia were 5% each. One patient required a second stent-graft due to a type I endoleak during the same hospital stay (primary technical success 95%). All patients have been followed for a median of 20 months. No migration, wire fractures or endoleak appeared during follow-up. Conclusion. Endovascular stent-grafting had a low 30-day mortality and morbidity in high-risk patients. One patient developed an aortoesophageal fistula 40 days after stent implantation. Stent-graft repair is a valuable supplement to surgical therapy in high-risk patients.

  18. [Perioperative management of endovascular stent graft placement for abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, A; Ishida, K; Aratake, K; Wakamatsu, H; Kawata, R; Kunihiro, M; Sakabe, T

    2000-09-01

    We retrospectively examined the changes in hemodynamics, oxygen index and renal function along with the complications in 25 patients who had undergone endovascular stent graft placement (ESG) surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm. During stent graft placement, mean arterial pressure decreased to 58 +/- 8 mmHg by increasing the dose of anesthetics and/or using vasodilators. Except for this intended hypotensive period, mean arterial pressure and heart rate were relatively stable and adequately maintained during surgical manipulation. Oxygenation index was well maintained. A patient with a high preoperative creatinine level underwent prophylactic hemodialysis postoperatively. In other patients except one who died in early postoperative period, both BUN and creatinine levels were kept within normal ranges. Four patients died postoperatively and the causes of the death in two patients are related to the surgical procedure; one with multiple emboli possibly due to released atheloma from the aortic wall during procedure, the other with sepsis due to infected stent graft. Although ESG is a well tolerated procedure, embolism is the most serious complication. Careful preoperative evaluation of the ascending arch and descending aortic wall and monitoring with transcranial doppler are necessary. PMID:11025953

  19. A Mechanical Coil Insertion System for Endovascular Coil Embolization of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Haraguchi, K.; Miyachi, S.; Matsubara, N.; Nagano, Y.; Yamada, H.; Marui, N.; Sano, A.; Fujimoto, H.; Izumi, T.; Yamanouchi, T.; Asai, T.; Wakabayashi, T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Like other fields of medicine, robotics and mechanization might be introduced into endovascular coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms for effective treatment. We have already reported that coil insertion force could be smaller and more stable when the coil delivery wire is driven mechanically at a constant speed. Another background is the difficulty in synchronizing operators' minds and hands when two operators control the microcatheter and the coil respectively. We have therefore developed a mechanical coil insertion system enabling a single operator to insert coils at a fixed speed while controlling the microcatheter. Using our new system, the operator manipulated the microcatheter with both hands and drove the coil using foot switches simultaneously. A delivery wire force sensor previously reported was used concurrently, allowing the operator to detect excessive stress on the wire. In vitro coil embolization was performed using three methods: simple mechanical advance of the coil; simple mechanical advance of the coil with microcatheter control; and driving (forward and backward) of the coil using foot switches in addition to microcatheter control. The system worked without any problems, and did not interfere with any procedures. In experimental coil embolization, delivery wire control using the foot switches as well as microcatheter manipulation helped to achieve successful insertion of coils. This system could offer the possibility of developing safer and more efficient coil embolization. Although we aim at total mechanization and automation of procedures in the future, microcatheter manipulation and synchronized delivery wire control are still indispensable using this system. PMID:23693038

  20. A mechanical coil insertion system for endovascular coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, K; Miyachi, S; Matsubara, N; Nagano, Y; Yamada, H; Marui, N; Sano, A; Fujimoto, H; Izumi, T; Yamanouchi, T; Asai, T; Wakabayashi, T

    2013-06-01

    Like other fields of medicine, robotics and mechanization might be introduced into endovascular coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms for effective treatment. We have already reported that coil insertion force could be smaller and more stable when the coil delivery wire is driven mechanically at a constant speed. Another background is the difficulty in synchronizing operators' minds and hands when two operators control the microcatheter and the coil respectively. We have therefore developed a mechanical coil insertion system enabling a single operator to insert coils at a fixed speed while controlling the microcatheter. Using our new system, the operator manipulated the microcatheter with both hands and drove the coil using foot switches simultaneously. A delivery wire force sensor previously reported was used concurrently, allowing the operator to detect excessive stress on the wire. In vitro coil embolization was performed using three methods: simple mechanical advance of the coil; simple mechanical advance of the coil with microcatheter control; and driving (forward and backward) of the coil using foot switches in addition to microcatheter control. The system worked without any problems, and did not interfere with any procedures. In experimental coil embolization, delivery wire control using the foot switches as well as microcatheter manipulation helped to achieve successful insertion of coils. This system could offer the possibility of developing safer and more efficient coil embolization. Although we aim at total mechanization and automation of procedures in the future, microcatheter manipulation and synchronized delivery wire control are still indispensable using this system. PMID:23693038

  1. Endovascular Repair of a Type III Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Occlusion of Visceral Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Klonaris, Chris Katsargyris, Athanasios; Giannopoulos, Athanasios; Georgopoulos, Sotiris; Tsigris, Chris; Michail, Othon; Marinos, George; Bastounis, Elias

    2007-07-15

    The successful endovascular repair of a type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) with the use of a tube endograft is reported. A 56-year-old male with a 6.4-cm type III TAAA, a 4.2-cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm, and chronic renal insufficiency presented with flank pain, nausea, acute anuria, and serum creatinine of 6.1 mg/dl. Acute occlusion of the left solitary renal artery was diagnosed and emergent recanalization with percutaneus transluminal angioplasty and stenting was performed successfully, with reversal of the serum creatinine level at 1.6 mg/dl. Further imaging studies for TAAA management revealed ostial occlusion of both the celiac artery (CA) and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) but a hypertrophic inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) providing retrograde flow to the aforementioned vessels. This rare anatomic serendipity allowed us to repair the TAAA simply by using a two-component tube endograft without fenestrations (Zenith; William Cook, Bjaeverskov, Denmark) that covered the entire length of the aneurysm, including the CA and SMA origins, since a natural arterial bypass from the IMA to the CA and SMA already existed, affording protection from gastrointestinal ischemic complications. The patient had a fast and uneventful recovery and is currently doing well 6 months after the procedure. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the English literature of successful endovascular repair of a TAAA involving visceral arteries with the simple use of a tube endograft.

  2. Transcaval Aortic Access for Percutaneous Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Initial Human Experience

    PubMed Central

    Uflacker, Andre; Lim, Scott; Ragosta, Michael; Haskal, Ziv J; Lederman, Robert J.; Kern, John; Upchurch, Gilbert; Huber, Timothy; Angle, John F.; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2015-01-01

    Transcaval aortic access has been used for deployment of transcatheter aortic valves in patients in whom conventional arterial approaches are not feasible. The present report describes its use for thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in a 61-year-old man with a descending thoracic aneurysm. Transcaval access was performed in lieu of a surgical iliac conduit in view of small atherosclerotic pelvic arteries. TEVAR was successfully performed, followed by intervascular tract occlusion with the use of a ventricular septal occluder. Computed tomography 2 d later demonstrated no extravasation. At 1 mo, the aneurysm was free of endoleaks, the aortocaval tract had healed, and the patient had returned to baseline functional status. PMID:26408210

  3. Percutaneous Endovascular Treatment of Hepatic Artery Stenosis in Adult and Pediatric Patients After Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Maruzzelli, Luigi; Miraglia, Roberto Caruso, Settimo; Milazzo, Mariapina; Mamone, Giuseppe; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous endovascular techniques for the treatment of hepatic artery stenosis (HAS) occurring after liver transplantation (LT) in adult and pediatrics patients. From February 2003 to March 2009, 25 patients (15 adults and 10 children) whose developed HAS after LT were referred to our interventional radiology unit. Technical success was achieved in 96% (24 of 25) of patients. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) was performed in 13 patients (7 children), and stenting was performed in 11 patients (2 children). After the procedure, all patients were followed-up with liver function tests, Doppler ultrasound, and/or computed tomography. Mean follow-up was 15.8 months (range 5 days to 58 months). Acute hepatic artery thrombosis occurred immediately after stent deployment in 2 patients and was successfully treated with local thrombolysis. One patient developed severe HA spasm, which reverted after 24 h. After the procedure, mean trans-stenotic pressure gradient decreased from 30.5 to 6.2 mmHg. Kaplan-Meyer curve of HA primary patency was 77% at 1 and 2 years. During the follow-up period, 5 patients (20%) had recurrent stenosis, and 2 patients (8.3%) had late thrombosis. Two of 7 patients with stenosis/thrombosis underwent surgical revascularization (n = 1) and liver retransplantation (n = 1). Six (25%) patients died during follow-up, but overall mortality was not significantly different when comparing patients having patent hepatic arteries with those having recurrent stenosis/thrombosis. There were no significant differences in recurrent stenosis/thrombosis and mortality comparing patients treated by PTA versus stenting and comparing adult versus pediatric status. Percutaneous interventional treatment of HAS in LT recipients is safe and effective and decreases the need for surgical revascularization and liver retransplantation. However, the beneficial effects for survival are not clear, probably because

  4. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Follow-up with Noninvasive Vascular Elastography in a Canine Model.

    PubMed

    Salloum, Eli; Bertrand-Grenier, Antony; Lerouge, Sophie; Kauffman, Claude; Héon, Hélène; Therasse, Eric; Salazkin, Igor; Roy Cardinal, Marie-Hélène; Cloutier, Guy; Soulez, Gilles

    2016-05-01

    Purpose To assess the ability of noninvasive vascular elastography (NIVE) to help characterize endoleaks and thrombus organization in a canine model of abdominal aortic aneurysm after endovascular aneurysm repair with stent-grafts, in comparison with computed tomography (CT) and pathologic examination findings. Materials and Methods All protocols were approved by the Animal Care Committee in accordance with the guidelines of the Canadian Council of Animal Care. Stent-grafts were implanted in a group of 18 dogs with aneurysms created in the abdominal aorta. Type I endoleak was created in four aneurysms; type II endoleak, in 13 aneurysms; and no endoleak, in one aneurysm. Doppler ultrasonography and NIVE examinations were performed at baseline and at 1-week, 1-month, 3-month, and 6-month follow-up. Angiography, CT, and macroscopic tissue examination were performed at sacrifice. Strain values were computed by using the Lagrangian speckle model estimator. Areas of endoleak, solid organized thrombus, and fresh thrombus were identified and segmented by comparing the results of CT and macroscopic tissue examination. Strain values were compared by using the Wilcoxon rank-sum and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results All stent-grafts were successfully deployed, and endoleaks were clearly depicted in the last follow-up elastography examinations. Maximal axial strains over consecutive heart cycles in endoleak, organized thrombus, and fresh thrombus areas were 0.78% ± 0.22, 0.23% ± 0.02, 0.10% ± 0.04, respectively. Strain values were significantly different between endoleak and organized or fresh thrombus areas (P < .000) and between organized and fresh thrombus areas (P < .0002). No correlation was found between strain values and type of endoleak, sac pressure, endoleak size, and aneurysm size. Conclusion NIVE may be able to help characterize endoleak and thrombus organization, regardless of the size, pressure, and type of endoleak. (©) RSNA, 2015. PMID:26690905

  5. Transcatheter Embolization of Type IA Endoleak after Nellix Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Sealing with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate: Technique in Three Patients.

    PubMed

    Harvey, John Julian; Stefan, Brew; Hill, Andrew; Holden, Andrew H

    2016-02-01

    The successful transcatheter treatment of a type IA endoleak after endovascular aortic aneurysm sealing with the Nellix EndoVascular Aneurysm Sealing system (Endologix Inc, Irvine, California) using proximal covered stent extension and transarterial N-butyl cyanoacrylate sac embolization is described. Three patients were treated using the same technique with a mean interval between the index procedure and reintervention of 9.3 months (range, 3-15 mo). No complications or endoleaks were seen on follow-up imaging. The mean follow-up time after reintervention was 10.3 months (range, 7-13 mo). PMID:26830936

  6. Percutaneous thrombin embolization of a pancreatico-duodenal artery pseudoaneurysm after failing of the endovascular treatment

    PubMed Central

    Barbiero, Giulio; Battistel, Michele; Susac, Ana; Miotto, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatico-duodenal artery (PDA) pseudoaneurysms are rare vascular conditions with high mortality rates after rupture and they are frequently secondary to pancreatitis, surgery, trauma or infection. Due to the high risk of rupture and bleeding, it is mandatory to treat all pseudoaneurysms, regardless of their size or symptomatology. First option of treatment is open surgical repair, but it has high mortality rate, especially in hemodynamically unstable patients. In the recent years, percutaneous ultrasonography (US)- or computed tomography-guided thrombin injection was proposed as an alternative method for treating visceral aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms, but few reports described this therapy in case of peri-pancreatic pseudoaneurysms. We present a rare case of pseudoaneurysm of the PDA in a patient with no previous history of pancreatitis nor major surgery but with an occlusive lesion of the celiac axis. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported case of PDA pseudoaneurysm successfully treated in emergency by single transabdominal US-guided injection of thrombin after failed attempts of percutaneous catheterization of the feeding vessel of the pseudoaneurysm. PMID:25170402

  7. Endovascular Treatment of a Ruptured Pulmonary Artery Aneurysm in a Patient with Behçet's Disease Using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug 4

    PubMed Central

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Nicotera, Paolo; Vaghi, Adriano; Cazzulani, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    A pulmonary artery aneurysm is a common manifestation and the leading cause of mortality in Behçet's disease. We describe a case of spontaneous rupture of a pulmonary artery aneurysm that, due to the inadequacy of medical therapy and the disadvantages of surgery, became the ideal candidate for endovascular management and was successfully performed by using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug 4. PMID:23482415

  8. Percutaneous Treatment of an Infected Aneurysmal Sac Secondary to Aortoesophageal Fistula with a History of Stent-Graft Treatment for Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Numan, Furuzan Gulsen, Fatih; Cantasdemir, Murat; Solak, Serdar; Arbatli, Harun

    2012-06-15

    A 68-year-old man who was subjected to stent-grafting of a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) 4 months previously was admitted to our hospital with constitutional symptoms, including high fever, sweating, nausea, vomiting, weight loss, and backache. An infected aneurysmal sac was suspected based on computed tomography (CT) findings, and an aortoesophageal fistula (AEF) was identified during esophagoscopy. CT-guided aspiration was performed using a 20-G Chiba needle, confirming the presence of infection. For treatment of the infected aneurysmal sac, CT-guided percutaneous catheter drainage in a prone position was performed under general anesthesia with left endobronchial intubation. Drainage catheter insertion was successfully performed using the Seldinger technique, which is not a standard treatment of an infected aneurysmal sac. Improvement in the patient's clinical condition was observed at follow-ups, and CT showed total regression of the collection in the aneurysmal sac.

  9. Endovascular management of a vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation in an infant with challenging femoral arterial access.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesan, Bharathi D; Zacharatos, Haralabos; Nascene, David R; Grande, Andrew W; Guillaume, Daniel J; Tummala, Ramachandra P

    2016-08-01

    A 5-month-old infant was to be treated with elective transarterial embolization for a vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation (VGAM). A team of endovascular surgical neuroradiologists, pediatric interventional radiologists, and pediatric cardiologists attempted conventional femoral arterial access, which was unsuccessful given the small caliber of the femoral arteries and superimposed severe vasospasm. Thereafter, eventual arterial access was achieved by navigating from the venous to the arterial system across the patent foramen ovale following a right femoral venous access. Embolization was then successfully performed. At a later date, the child underwent successful transvenous balloon-assisted embolization and eventual arterial embolization with cure of the VGAM. PMID:27058455

  10. An unusual duplication of the inferior vena cava in a patient with endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Polguj, Michał; Szubert, Wojciech; Topol, Mirosław; Stefańczyk, Ludomir

    2015-01-01

    A 66-year-old Caucasian male, with sensation of abdominal pulsation was admitted to our hospital. In multidetector 64-row computed tomography (CT) angiography, an abdominal aortic aneurysm was observed. Endovascular aortic repair was performed. Control CT confirmed prosperity with stent graft fixation and absence of any vascular complications. Investigation also showed asymmetrical duplication of the inferior vena cava (IVC). Right (RIVC) and left (LIVC) inferior vena cava arose from the confluence of the right and left iliac veins. The LIVC continued as left renal vein. PMID:26429190

  11. Successful endovascular treatment using a covered stent for artery–ureteral fistula after surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Takase, Yasukazu; Kodama, Koichi; Motoi, Isamu

    2015-01-01

    Artery–ureteral fistula (AUF) is a rare condition but there is an increase in the number of reported cases. It is frequently difficult to treat. A 63-year-old male who had undergone a Dacron Y-graft placement for an infrarenal aortic aneurysm 3 years earlier, presented with hematuria. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a fistula located between the right common iliac artery and the right ureter at graft anastomosis. Endovascular treatment using a covered stent was performed successfully. PMID:26166974

  12. Percutaneous Endoluminal Stent and Stent-Graft Placement for the Treatment of Femoropopliteal Aneurysms: Early Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Link, Johann; Schwarzenberg, Helmut; Walluscheck, Knut P.; Heller, Martin

    1999-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of percutaneous endoluminal stents and stent-grafts for the treatment of isolated femoropopliteal aneurysms. Methods: Seven men (age 51-69 years) with femoropopliteal occlusions (n= 6) related to aneurysms and a patent femoropopliteal aneurysm (n= 1) were treated percutaneously. In two patients uncovered Wallstents and in five patients polyester-covered nitinol stents were implanted. Assessment was performed with Doppler ultrasound and duplex ultrasonography 24 hr, 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after the intervention. Additionally, intraarterial angiography was performed at 6 months. Results: Stent placement succeeded in all cases. No immediate adjunctive surgical treatment was necessary. Ankle-brachial index (ABI) improved from 0.29 {+-} 0.29 (SD) before to 0.78 {+-} 0.23 (SD) 24 hr after the intervention. One patient was lost to follow-up. Stent-graft occlusion occurred in four patients: after 2 days (n1), 1 month (n= 2), and 3 months (n= 1). One of the patients, whose stent occluded at 1 month, underwent successful recanalization with local fibrinolysis therapy. Three of the seven, all with three-vessel run-off, demonstrated patency of the stent, which was assessed by duplex ultrasonography at 29, 31, and 34 months. Breaking of the stent struts or significant stent migration was not observed. Conclusions: These results in a small number of patients warrant further investigation to evaluate the role of percutaneous stents in femoropopliteal aneurysms. Until further data of clinical studies are available, this method cannot be recommended, and it cannot replace surgical treatment.

  13. [Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair in a Young Patient with Descending Aortic Injury;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    No, Hironari; Nishida, Satoru; Takagi, Takeshi; Mohri, Ryosuke

    2016-08-01

    A 15-year-old boy was referred to our emergency room due to a penetrating injury of the back. Computed tomography( CT) demonstrated a descending aortic injury at the Th9/10 level, bilateral hemothorax, and spinal cord injury. Although surgical treatment was indicated, multiple organ injury complicated open surgical repair, which required cardiopulmonary bypass with full heparinization. Therefore, the patient was scheduled to undergo thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). A 23×33-mm Excluder aortic extension cuff was chosen for the small, 15-mm diameter aorta. The aortic extension was delivered and deployed in the descending aorta. Postoperative CT demonstrated neither endoleak nor collapse of the stent-graft. TEVAR for traumatic aortic aneurysm appears to be safe and effective, and an aortic extension for an abdominal aortic aneurysm may be utilized as an alternative device if the patient is young and the aorta is small. PMID:27476569

  14. Coil Embolization of Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysms Associated with Celiac Artery Stenosis: Report of Three Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Kawanaka, Kohichi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2007-06-15

    Aneurysms of the pancreaticoduodenal artery are rare. Degeneration of pancreaticoduodenal arcade vessels due to these aneurysms is associated with celiac artery stenosis or occlusion. Untreated lesions enlarge progressively and may rupture spontaneously. As the location of aneurysms of pancreaticoduodenal arcade vessels renders their surgical extirpation a challenge, we examined whether endovascular techniques offer a treatment alternative. We report on 3 patients with aneurysms of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade vessels and concomitant celiac artery stenosis/occlusion due to compression by the median arcuate ligament or chronic pancreatitis. All patients were treated by percutaneous coil embolization of the aneurysm. The aneurysmal sac was successfully excluded and the native circulation was preserved. Endovascular surgery can be used to treat these aneurysms safely and permits retention of the native circulation.

  15. Coil Embolization for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of coil embolization compared with surgical clipping to treat intracranial aneurysms. The Technology Endovascular coil embolization is a percutaneous approach to treat an intracranial aneurysm from within the blood vessel without the need of a craniotomy. In this procedure, a microcatheter is inserted into the femoral artery near the groin and navigated to the site of the aneurysm. Small helical platinum coils are deployed through the microcatheter to fill the aneurysm, and prevent it from further expansion and rupture. Health Canada has approved numerous types of coils and coil delivery systems to treat intracranial aneurysms. The most favoured are controlled detachable coils. Coil embolization may be used with other adjunct endovascular devices such as stents and balloons. Background Intracranial Aneurysms Intracranial aneurysms are the dilation or ballooning of part of a blood vessel in the brain. Intracranial aneurysms range in size from small (<12 mm in diameter) to large (12–25 mm), and to giant (>25 mm). There are 3 main types of aneurysms. Fusiform aneurysms involve the entire circumference of the artery; saccular aneurysms have outpouchings; and dissecting aneurysms have tears in the arterial wall. Berry aneurysms are saccular aneurysms with well-defined necks. Intracranial aneurysms may occur in any blood vessel of the brain; however, they are most commonly found at the branch points of large arteries that form the circle of Willis at the base of the brain. In 85% to 95% of patients, they are found in the anterior circulation. Aneurysms in the posterior circulation are less frequent, and are more difficult to treat surgically due to inaccessibility. Most intracranial aneurysms are small and asymptomatic. Large aneurysms may have a mass effect, causing compression on the brain and cranial nerves and neurological deficits. When an intracranial aneurysm ruptures and bleeds

  16. Finite Element Modeling of A Novel Self-Expanding Endovascular Stent Method in Treatment of Aortic Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arokiaraj, Mark C.; Palacios, Igor F.

    2014-01-01

    A novel large self-expanding endovascular stent was designed with strut thickness of 70 μm × 70 μm width. The method was developed and investigated to identify a novel simpler technique in aortic aneurysm therapy. Stage 1 analysis was performed after deploying it in a virtual aneurysm model of 6 cm wide × 6 cm long fusiform hyper-elastic anisotropic design. At cell width of 9 mm, there was no buckling or migration of the stent at 180 Hg. Radial force of the stents was estimated after parametric variations. In stage 2 analysis, a prototype 300 μm × 150 μm stent with a cell width of 9 mm was chosen, and it was evaluated similarly after embedding in the aortic wall, and also with a tissue overgrowth of 1 mm over the stent. The 300/150 μm stent reduced the peak wall stress by 70% in the aneurysm and 50% reduction in compliance after embedding. Stage 3 analysis was performed to study the efficacy of stents with struts (thickness/width) 70/70, 180/100 and 300/150 μm after embedding and tissue overgrowth. The adjacent wall stresses were very minimal in stents with 180/100 and 70/70 μm struts after embedding. There is potential for a novel stent method in aortic aneurysm therapy.

  17. Celiac Trunk Embolization, as a Means of Elongating Short Distal Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Necks, Prior to Endovascular Aortic Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Belenky, Alexander; Haddad, Menashe; Idov, Igor; Knizhnik, Michael; Litvin, Sergey; Bachar, Gil N.; Atar, Eli

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience in elongating short distal necks of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAAs) by coil embolization of the celiac trunk prior to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). During 6 years seven patients (five men and two women; mean age, 74) who had DTAAs with short distal necks unsuitable for conventional EVAR, and well patent superior and inferior mesenteric arteries based on CT, were treated in one session with EVAR after the celiac trunk was coil embolized to elongate the neck. All patients were followed by CT every 3 months in the first year and every 6 months thereafter. Technical success was achieved in all patients, and no early or late ischemic complications were noted. No procedural complications occurred and good aneurysm sealing was obtained in all patients. Three endoleaks were identified after 3 months (one patient) and 6 months (two patients); all were treated successfully with insertion of an additional stent-graft. In patients with DTAAs who are candidates for EVAR but have short aneurysm distal necks, celiac trunk embolization-only if the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries are patent-is a good and safe way to elongate the neck and enable EVAR.

  18. Early and delayed rupture after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in a 10-year multicenter registry

    PubMed Central

    Candell, Leah; Tucker, Lue-Yen; Goodney, Philip; Walker, Joy; Okuhn, Steven; Hill, Bradley; Chang, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objective Rupture after abdominal endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a function of graft maintenance of the seal and fixation. We describe our 10-year experience with rupture after EVAR. Methods From 2000 to 2010, 1736 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) from 17 medical centers underwent EVAR in a large, regional integrated health care system. Preoperative demographic and clinical data of interest were collected and stored in our registry. We retrospectively identified patients with postoperative rupture, characterized as “early” and “delayed” rupture (≤30 days and >30 days after the initial EVAR, respectively), and identified predictors associated with delayed rupture. Results The overall follow-up rate was 92%, and the median follow-up was 2.7 years (interquartile range, 1.2–4.4 years) in these 1736 EVAR patients. We identified 20 patients with ruptures; 70% were male, the mean age was 79 years, and mean AAA size at the initial EVAR was 6.3 cm. Six patients underwent initial EVAR for rupture (n = 2) or symptomatic presentation (n = 4). Of the 20 post-EVAR ruptures, 25% (five of 20) were early, all occurring within 2 days after the initial EVAR. Of these five patients, four had intraoperative adverse events leading directly to rupture, with one type I and one type III endoleak. Of the five early ruptures, four patients underwent endovascular repair and one received repair with open surgery, resulting in two perioperative deaths. Among the remaining 15 patients, the median time from initial EVAR to rupture was 31.1 months (interquartile range, 13.8–57.3 months). Most of these delayed ruptures (10 of 15) were preceded by AAA sac increases, including three patients with known endoleaks who underwent reintervention. At the time of delayed rupture, nine of 15 patients had new endoleaks. Among all 20 patients, six patients did not undergo repair (all delayed patients) and died, nine underwent repeated EVAR, and five had open repair

  19. Outcomes of Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair in Kidney Transplant Recipients: Results From a National Quality Initiative.

    PubMed

    Bostock, I C; Zarkowsky, D S; Hicks, C W; Stone, D H; Eslami, M H; Malas, M B; Goodney, P P

    2016-08-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) can have devastating consequences. The Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) database was queried to select all KTRs who underwent EVAR between January 2003 and December 2014. Our primary outcome was renal dysfunction, defined as acute kidney injury (AKI; elevation of serum creatinine >0.5 mg/dL from baseline) or new postoperative hemodialysis requirement. Within the EVAR VQI dataset, 40 patients were KTRs (40 of 17 213, or 0.2%). Renal dysfunction occurred in five of 40 patients in the KTR group in comparison to 779 of 17 173 patients in the nontransplanted group (12.5% versus 4.5%, p < 0.01). Emergent EVAR was required in 2 (5%) patients, one of whom required dialysis after surgery and subsequently died. One-year survival after EVAR was similar in the two groups (92.9% versus 93.1%, p = 0.73). KTRs who developed renal dysfunction had significantly lower preoperative estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) (29.5 versus 54.7, p = 0.007) and a significantly higher iodine:eGFR ratio (0.78 versus 0.39, p = 0.02) despite receiving a similar volume of contrast (70.0 versus 68.8, p = 0.97). Renal dysfunction is 3 times more frequent in KTRs treated with EVAR, though overall survival did not differ between the groups. Decreased preoperative eGFR and a higher iodine:eGFR ratio are associated with postoperative renal dysfunction. PMID:26813253

  20. The financial implications of endovascular aneurysm repair in the cost containment era

    PubMed Central

    Stone, David H.; Horvath, Alexander J.; Goodney, Philip P.; Rzucidlo, Eva M.; Nolan, Brian W.; Walsh, Daniel B.; Zwolak, Robert M.; Powell, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is associated with significant direct device costs. Such costs place EVAR at odds with efforts to constrain healthcare expenditures. This study examines the procedure-associated costs and operating margins associated with EVAR at a tertiary care academic medical center. Methods All infrarenal EVARs performed from April 2011 to March 2012 were identified (n = 127). Among this cohort, 49 patients met standard commercial instruction for use guidelines, were treated using a single manufacturer device, and billed to Medicare diagnosis-related group (DRG) 238. Of these 49 patients, net technical operating margins (technical revenue minus technical cost) were calculated in conjunction with the hospital finance department. EVAR implant costs were determined for each procedure. DRG 238-associated costs and length of stay were benchmarked against other academic medical centers using University Health System Consortium 2012 data. Results Among the studied EVAR cohort (age 75, 82% male, mean length of stay, 1.7 days), mean technical costs totaled $31,672. Graft implants accounted for 52% of the allocated technical costs. Institutional overhead was 17% ($5495) of total technical costs. Net mean total technical EVAR-associated operating margins were —$4015 per procedure. Our institutional costs and length of stay, when benchmarked against comparable centers, remained in the lowest quartile nationally using University Health System Consortium costs for DRG 238. Stent graft price did not correlate with total EVAR. market share. Conclusions EVAR is currently associated with significant negative operating margins among Medicare beneficiaries. Currently, device costs account for over 50% of EVAR-associated technical costs and did not impact EVAR market share, reflecting an unawareness of cost differential among surgeons. These data indicate that EVAR must undergo dramatic care delivery redesign for this practice to remain sustainable

  1. Self expandable stent application to prevent limb occlusion in external iliac artery during endovascular aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Iliac extension of stent-graft during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) increases the incidence of limb occlusion (LO). Hypothetically, adjunctive iliac stent (AIS) could offer some additional protection to overcome this anatomic hostility. But still there is no consensus in terms of effective stent characteristics or configuration. We retrospectively reviewed our center's experience to offer a possible answer to this question. Methods Our study included 30 patients (38 limbs) with AIS placed in the external iliac artery (EIA) from January 2010 to December 2013. We classified iliac tortuosity based on anatomic characteristics. AIS's were deployed in EIA with a minimum 5-mm stick-out configuration from the distal edge of the stent-graft. Results According to the iliac artery tortuosity index, grade 0, grade 1, and grade 2 were 5 (13.2%), 30 (78.9%), and 3 (7.9%), respectively. The diameter of all AIS was 12 mm, which was as large as or larger than the diameter of the stent-graft distal limb. SMART stents were preferred in 34 limbs (89.5%) and stents with 60-mm length were usually used (89.5%). During a mean follow-up of 9.13 ± 10.78 months, ischemic limb pain, which could be the sign of LO, was not noticed in any patients. There was no fracture, kinking, migration, in-stent restenosis, or occlusion of AIS. Conclusion The installation of AIS after extension of stent-graft to EIA reduced the risk of LO without any complications. AIS should be considered as a preventive procedure of LO if stent-graft needs to be extended to EIA during EVAR. PMID:27617255

  2. Percutaneous Treatment of Iliac Aneurysms and Pseudoaneurysms with Cragg Endopro System 1 Stent-Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparini, Daniele; Lovaria, Andrea; Saccheri, Silvia; Nicolini, Antonio; Favini, Giorgio; Inglese, Luigi; Giorgetti, Pier Luigi; Basadonna, Pier Tommaso

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and short-term follow-up results of treating iliac aneurysms by the Cragg Endopro System 1 stent-graft. Methods: Nine lesions (two pseudoaneurysms and seven atherosclerotic aneurysms) were treated in eight patients by percutaneous implantation of a total of 10 stent-grafts. The procedure was followed by anticoagulation with heparin for 6 days, then antiplatelet therapy. Follow-up was by color Doppler ultrasound scan at 2 days and 3 months after the procedure for all patients, and by venous digital subtraction angiography and/or angio-CT up to 12 months later for four patients. Results: Initial clinical success rate was 100% and there were two minor complications. In one case the delivery system was faulty resulting in failure to deploy the stent-graft. An additional device had to be used. At 3-12 months all prostheses were patent but one patient (12.5%) had a minimal pergraft leak. Conclusion: Percutaneous stent-grafting with this device is a safe and efficacious treatment of iliac artery aneurysms.

  3. Flow Changes after Endovascular Treatment of a Wide-Neck Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm by using X-configured Kissing Stents (Cross-Kissing Stents) Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Zelenakova, Jana; DeRiggo, Julius; Kurca, Egon; Boudny, Jaroslav; Polacek, Hubert

    2011-12-15

    Endovascular treatment for a wide-neck anterior communicating artery (AcomA) aneurysm remains technically challenging. Stent-assisted embolization has been proposed as an alternative of treatment of complex aneurysms. The X-configuration double-stent-assisted technique was used to achieve successful coiling of wide-neck AcomA aneurysm. Implanted stent can alter intra-arterial flow. Follow-up angiograms 4 months later showed flow changes due to used X-technique of stents implantation and filling of the anterior cerebral artery from the opposite internal carotid artery.

  4. Endovascular thoracic aortic repair and risk of spinal cord ischemia: the role of previous or concomitant treatment for aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Setacci, F; Sirignano, P; De Donato, G; Chisci, E; Galzerano, G; Massaroni, R; Setacci, C

    2010-04-01

    Spinal cord ischemia (SCI) is one of the most devastating complications undergoing surgical or endovascular repair of the thoracic aorta. The incidence of SCI after thoracic aorta open repair varies from 2% to 21%, depending on the extent of the descending thoracic aorta replacement compared with as high as 12% of cases after endovascular aortic repair. Endoluminal repair allows the avoidance of aortic cross clamping and its sequelae; however, the intercostal arteries covered by the stent graft cannot be reimplanted. Perioperative risk factors contributing to SCI have been reported to include length of aortic coverage, prior abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair, hypotension, and left subclavian artery coverage. Although the putative mechanism of loss of lumbar collateral perfusion in those who had prior aortic repairs appears reasonable, occurrence of SCI in this subset of patients has not been consistent. Spinal cord perfusion is dependent on the net pressure of the mean arterial pressure minus the mean intrathecal pressure. Systemic pressure can be maximized by volume resuscitation and vasopressors. Intrathecal spinal pressure can be minimized by drainage of the spinal cord, although this is not without its potential risks. More recently, there have been attempts at attenuating the cellular damage caused by SCI, either with systemic or intrathecal administration of pharmacologic agents, which attempt to mitigate the inflammatory response of cellular reperfusion. This is a review of the risk factors for SCI during TEVAR in patients with previous or concomitant treatment for aortic aneurysm. PMID:20354486

  5. Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aneurysm into the Inferior Vena Cava in Patient After Stent Graft Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert; Pukacki, Fryderyk; Zarzecka, Anna; Kulesza, Jerzy; Majewski, Waclaw

    2009-07-15

    We report the case of a patient who underwent endovascular repair and then reintervention as a result of the presence of a persistent endoleak complicated by an aortocaval fistula. A 76-year-old patient with a history of endovascular treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysm 2 years earlier had a palpable abdominal mass, high-output cardiac failure, and renal failure. A computed tomographic scan and angiography revealed bending of the right iliac limb, a type I endoleak, and rupture of the aneurysm into the inferior vena cava with aortocaval fistula formation. An iliac extension was positioned in the right external iliac artery. The procedure was finished successfully. Control angiography showed normal flow within the endoprosthesis, and both iliac arteries were without signs of endoleakage and aortocaval fistula. Ectatic common iliac artery may lead to a late distal attachment site endoleak. The application of a stent graft in cases of secondary aortocaval fistula after stent graft repair is a good option, particularly in emergency cases.

  6. Transcatheter Embolisation of Proximal Type 1 Endoleaks Following Endovascular Aneurysm Sealing (EVAS) Using the Nellix Device: Technique and Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Ameli-Renani, S. Morgan, R. A.

    2015-10-15

    AimTo evaluate the technical success and mid-term outcomes following transcatheter embolisation of type 1a endoleak after Nellix endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS).Materials and MethodsSeven patients (5 men; mean age 83; range 79–90) underwent transcatheter embolisation between July 2013 and August 2014. The average time from EVAS to embolisation was 136 days (range 6–301) and from endoleak diagnosis to embolisation was 20 days (range 2–50). Embolisation was performed with coils and Onyx in six cases and Onyx only in one case. Technical success, imaging and clinical outcomes of embolisation were reviewed. Technical success was defined as elimination of the endoleak on completion angiography and first imaging follow-up. Clinical success was defined as unchanged or decreased aneurysm sac size on subsequent follow-up (average 8 months; range 103–471 days).ResultsAll cases were technically successful. One patient required a second endovascular procedure following Onyx reflux into the Nellix endograft and another patient required surgical closure of a brachial puncture site. All patients are endoleak free with stable sac size on the latest available follow-up imaging.ConclusionIf a type 1 endoleak occurs after EVAS, embolisation using Onyx with or without coils is feasible and effective with high technical success and freedom from endoleak recurrence at mid-term follow-up.

  7. The Preclose Technique in Percutaneous Endovascular Aortic Repair: A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffan, Abdel Aziz A.; Prince, Ethan A.; Hampson, Christopher O.; Murphy, Timothy P.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To establish the efficacy and safety of the preclose technique in total percutaneous endovascular aortic repair (PEVAR).MethodsA systematic literature search of Medline database was conducted for series on PEVAR published between January 1999 and January 2012.ResultsThirty-six articles comprising 2,257 patients and 3,606 arterial accesses were included. Anatomical criteria used to exclude patients from undergoing PEVAR were not uniform across all series. The technical success rate was 94 % per arterial access. Failure was unilateral in the majority (93 %) of the 133 failed PEVAR cases. The groin complication rate in PEVAR was 3.6 %; a minority (1.6 %) of these groin complications required open surgery. The groin complication rate in failed PEVAR cases converted to groin cutdown was 6.1 %. A significantly higher technical success rate was achieved when arterial access was performed via ultrasound guidance. Technical failure rate was significantly higher with larger sheath size ({>=}20F). Conclusion. The preclose technique in PEVAR has a high technical success rate and a low groin complication rate. Technical success tends to increase with ultrasound-guided arterial access and decrease with larger access. When failure occurs, it is unilateral in the majority of cases, and conversion to surgical cutdown does not appear to increase the operative risk.

  8. High resolution MRI in treatment decision of anterior communicating artery aneurysm accompanied by visual symptoms: Endovascular treatment or surgical clipping? A report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Lv, Xianli; Li, Youxiang; Lv, Ming

    2016-06-01

    Anterior communicating artery (AComA) aneurysm accompanied by visual symptoms is rarely reported. The first case is an asymptomatic 65-year-old woman who presented with an AComA aneurysm, and the pre-procedure high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an AComA aneurysm compressed the left optic nerve and the chiasma with a size of 8.3 × 9.2 mm. She suffered a sudden onset of left eye visual loss and the temporal hemianopia of the right eye after endovascular embolization. She had a light sensation of the left eye and minor enlargement of the visual field in the right eye at the six-month follow-up. The second case is a symptomatic 55-year-old woman suffering a visual loss in the left eye and inferior nasal quadrantanopsia in her right eye. Pre-operative high-resolution MRI found an AComA aneurysm compressing the left part of the chiasma with a size of 7.1 × 8.3 mm. Her visual symptoms improved after surgical clipping. High-resolution MRI could depict the anatomic relationship between the AComA aneurysm and the surrounding optic pathways. Endovascular treatment of an AComA aneurysm may result in visual deterioration due to the mass effect or ischemia after the procedure. Surgical clipping of the AComA aneurysm could relieve the compression symptoms. PMID:26809261

  9. Endovascular Embolization of Visceral Artery Aneurysms with Ethylene-vinyl Alcohol (Onyx): A Case Series

    SciTech Connect

    Bratby, M.J.; Lehmann, E.D.; Bottomley, J.; Kessel, D.O.; Nicholson, A.A.; McPherson, S.J.; Morgan, R.A.; Belli, A.-M.

    2006-12-15

    We report the application of the liquid embolic agent ethylene-vinyl alcohol (Onyx; MicroTherapeutics, Irvine, CA, USA) in the management of visceral artery aneurysms. The technique and indications for using Onyx are discussed with emphasis on the management of wide-necked aneurysms and maintenance of patency of the parent vessel. None of the cases was considered suitable for stent-grafting or embolization with conventional agents. Two aneurysms of the renal artery bifurcation and one aneurysm of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery were treated. Following treatment there was complete exclusion of all aneurysms. There was no evidence of end-organ infarction. Follow-up with intervals up to 6 months has shown sustained aneurysm exclusion. Onyx is known to be effective in the management of intracranial aneurysms. Our experience demonstrates the efficacy and applicability of the use of Onyx in the treatment of complex visceral artery aneurysms.

  10. Endovascular Repair of a Right-Sided Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Associated with a Right Aortic Arch and a Left Subclavian Artery Arising from a Kommerell's Diverticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Klonaris, Chris Avgerinos, Efthimios D.; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Matthaiou, Alexandros; Georgopoulos, Sotirios; Psarros, Vasileios; Bastounis, Elias

    2009-07-15

    This case report describes the endovascular repair of a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm associated with a right aortic arch and an aberrant left subclavian artery. A 76-year-old male with multiple comorbidities was incidentally found to have a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm with a maximum diameter of 6.2 cm. Additionally, there was a right aortic arch with a retroesophageal segment and separate arch branches arising in the following order: left common carotid artery, right common carotid artery, right subclavian artery, and left subclavian artery that was aberrant, arising from a Kommerrell's diverticulum. The aneurysm was successfully excluded by deployment of a Zenith TX1 36 x 32 x 20-mm stent-graft using wire traction technique via the left femoral and right brachial arteries in order to deal with two severe aortic angulations. At 18-month follow-up the patient was doing well, with aneurysm sac shrinkage to 5.9 cm and no signs of endoleak or migration. Endovascular repair of right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysms with a right arch and aberrant left subclavian artery is feasible, safe, and effective. In such rare configurations, which demand considerably increased technical dexterity and center experience, endovascular repair emerges as an attractive therapeutic option.

  11. Aortocoronary Saphenous Vein Graft Aneurysm with Fistula to the Right Atrium: Percutaneous Management of Surgical Complication.

    PubMed

    Barekatain, Armin; Fanari, Zaher; Weiss, Sandra A

    2015-12-01

    Aneurysmal dilatation of aortocoronary saphenous vein grafts (SVG) is a rare but known complication after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). They are most commonly found incidentally, although some may present with unstable angina or myocardial infarction (MI). Rarely, these aneurysms can develop into fistulas to the neighboring cardiac chambers. We report the case of a 66-year old woman with a history of CABG in 1996 with a left internal mammary artery (LIMA) graft to the left anterior descending and a SVG to distal right coronary artery presenting with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) complicated with congestive heart failure. Selective Coronary and Graft angiography showed an aneurysm in the mid SVG with a fistula into the right atrium (RA) resulting in a significant left to right shunt. The significant left to right shunt diverted blood flow from right coronary artery territory resulting in recurrent ischemia and angina and introduced a significant volume overload on the right ventricle resulting in over heart failure. Secondary to the course of LIMA graft along the sternum, surgery was not an option. Secondary to continued symptoms percutaneous intervention was performed with placement of two 6.0 x 50 mm Viabahn self-expanding covered stent with aggressive post-dilation resulting in successful closure with no residual flow. Percutaneous intervention is shown to be an effective approach to manage both aortocoronary fistula and grafts ruptures and is associated with better outcomes than surgical and conservative options. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a successful closure of fistulous communication of a SVG aneurysm to the RA utilizing multiple peripheral covered stents. PMID:26852434

  12. Standard of Practice for the Endovascular Treatment of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Type B Dissections

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Fabrizio; Dake, Michael D.

    2009-09-15

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) represents a minimally invasive technique alternative to conventional open surgical reconstruction for the treatment of thoracic aortic pathologies. Rapid advances in endovascular technology and procedural breakthroughs have contributed to a dramatic transformation of the entire field of thoracic aortic surgery. TEVAR procedures can be challenging and, at times, extraordinarily difficult. They require seasoned endovascular experience and refined skills. Of all endovascular procedures, meticulous assessment of anatomy and preoperative procedure planning are absolutely paramount to produce optimal outcomes. These guidelines are intended for use in quality-improvement programs that assess the standard of care expected from all physicians who perform TEVAR procedures.

  13. Early Experience in the Treatment of Intra-Cranial Aneurysms by Endovascular Flow Diversion: A Multicentre Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, James V.; Beltechi, Radu; Yarnold, Julia A.; Birks, Jacqueline; Kamran, Mudassar

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Flow diversion is a new approach to the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms which uses a high density mesh stent to induce sac thrombosis. These devices have been designed for the treatment of complex shaped and large size aneurysms. So far published safety and efficacy data on this approach is sparse. Material and Methods Over 8 months, standardized clinical and angiographic data were collected on 70 patients treated with a flow diverter device (SILK flow diverter (SFD)) in 18 centres worldwide. Treatment and early follow up details were audited centrally. SFDs were deployed alone in 57 (81%) or with endosaccular coils in 10 (14%) aneurysms, which included: 44 (63%) saccular, 26 (37%) fusiform shapes and 18 (26%) small, 37 (53%) large, 15 (21%) giant sizes. Treatment outcome data up to 30 days were reported for all patients, with clinical (50 patients) and imaging (49 patients) follow up (median 119 days) data available. Results Difficulties in SFD deployment were reported in 15 (21%) and parent artery thrombosis in 8 (11%) procedures. Procedural complications caused stroke in 1 and serious extracranial bleeding in 3 patients; 2 of whom developed fatal pneumonias. Delayed worsening of symptoms occurred in 5 patients (3 transient, 1 permanent neurological deficit, and 1 death) and fatal aneurysm bleeding in 1 patient. Overall permanent morbidity rates were 2 (4%) and mortality 4 (8%). Statistical analysis revealed no significant association between complications and variables related to treated aneurysm morphology or rupture status. Conclusion This series is the largest reporting outcome of the new treatment approach and provides data for future study design. Procedural difficulties in SFD deployment were frequent and anti-thrombosis prophylaxis appears to reduce the resulting clinical sequelae, but at the cost of morbidity due to extracranial bleeding. Delayed morbidity appears to be a consequence of the new approach and warrants care in

  14. Endovascular management of a ruptured thoracoabdominal aneurysm-damage control with superior mesenteric artery snorkel and thoracic stent-graft exclusion.

    PubMed

    Riesenman, Paul J; Reeves, James G; Kasirajan, Karthikeshwar

    2011-05-01

    We report a case of a large ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm, which was stabilized with endovascular aortic exclusion and snorkel bypass of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). An 80-year-old African American woman with multiple medical comorbidities and previous open infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair presented with a ruptured 10.7 × 7.3 cm thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm involving the origins of the renal and mesenteric vessels. The patient underwent emergent endovascular aortic repair with placement of a covered stent into the SMA coursing parallel to the aortic endograft. This technique was initially successful in clinically stabilizing the patient; however; 3 weeks after the initial procedure, she presented with recurrent rupture necessitating proximal extension of her snorkeled SMA bypass and aortic endograft into the mid-descending thoracic aorta. The patient stabilized and was successfully discharged home. PMID:21549926

  15. Safety of coil occlusion of the parent artery for endovascular treatment of anterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanghyeon; Kang, Myongjin; Choi, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Dong Won

    2016-06-01

    Many studies lay emphasis on the clinical importance of perforating branches of the anterior communicating artery (ACoA) and report that vascular damage of the perforators from ACoA aneurysm during surgery cause subsequent postoperative amnesia. The purpose of our study was to analyze the safety of parent artery occlusion for ACoA aneurysm coiling based on the anatomical features of the ACoA complex in 13 patients with 13 ACoA aneurysms. All patients underwent coiling of the aneurysm sac and ACoA. Aneurysm characteristics including size, dome-to-neck ratio, anterior/posterior orientation of the aneurysm dome with respect to the axis of the pericallosal artery, location of the aneurysm neck with respect to the A1-A2 segment of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) or the ACoA, and the presence of hypoplasia/aplasia of A1 segment were assessed. The aneurysm neck was located directly on the ACoA in five aneurysms (38%), whereas eight (62%) had the neck located at the A1-A2 junction. Of the five patients whose aneurysm neck was located in the ACoA, four patients had infarcts in the basal forebrain. Three of the patients complained of amnesia. None of the aneurysms with the neck located at the A1-A2 junction were associated with infarction. There has been little evidence thus far that parent vessel occlusion of ACoA aneurysms is a safe method for the treatment of aneurysms. Patients with the aneurysm neck located at the A1-A2 junction and without A1 aplasia, who were treated with aneurysm sac and ACoA embolism, were potentially safe. PMID:26988084

  16. Seventeen Years’ Experience of Late Open Surgical Conversion after Failed Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair with 13 Variant Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ziheng; Xu, Liang; Qu, Lefeng; Raithel, Dieter

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo investigate the causes and results of late open surgical conversion (LOSC) after failed abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to summarize our 17 years’ experience with 13 various endografts.MethodsRetrospective data from August 1994 to January 2011 were analyzed at our center. The various devices’ implant time, the types of devices, the rates and causes of LOSC, and the procedures and results of LOSC were analyzed and evaluated.ResultsA total of 1729 endovascular aneurysm repairs were performed in our single center (Nuremberg South Hospital) with 13 various devices within 17 years. The median follow-up period was 51 months (range 9–119 months). Among them, 77 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms received LOSC. The LOSC rate was 4.5 % (77 of 1729). The LOSC rates were significantly different before and after January 2002 (p < 0.001). The reasons of LOSC were mainly large type I endoleaks (n = 51) that were hard to repair by endovascular techniques. For the LOSC procedure, 71 cases were elective and 6 were emergent. The perioperative mortality was 5.2 % (4 of 77): 1 was elective (due to septic shock) and 3 were urgent (due to hemorrhagic shock).ConclusionLarge type I endoleaks were the main reasons for LOSC. The improvement of devices and operators’ experience may decrease the LOSC rate. Urgent LOSC resulted in a high mortality rate, while selective LOSC was relatively safe with significantly lower mortality rate. Early intervention, full preparation, and timely LOSC are important for patients who require LOSC.

  17. Endovascular Management of Complex Renal Artery Aneurysms Using the Multilayer Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Carsten; Verrel, Frauke; Weyer, Gunther Wilhelm, Kai

    2011-06-15

    Since its approval as an innovative stent system for peripheral aneurysm management in May 2009, the Cardiatis Multilayer Stent (Cardiatis, Isnes, Belgium) has been applied in several clinical cases. The unique design of this multilayer stent decreases mean velocity and vorticity within the aneurysm sac immediate and causes thrombus to form, resulting in physiological exclusion of the aneurysm from the circulation, whereas branches and collaterals sprouting from the aneurysm remain patent. Here we present a case of a complex renal artery aneurysm successfully treated with a 6 Multiplication-Sign 30-mm Cardiatis Multilayer Stent.

  18. Outcome of Renal Stenting for Renal Artery Coverage During Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hiramoto, Jade S.; Chang, Catherine K.; Reilly, Linda M.; Schneider, Darren B.; Rapp, Joseph H.; Chuter, Timothy A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the outcome of adjunctive renal artery stenting for renal artery coverage at the time of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods Between 8/2000 to 8/2008, 29 patients underwent elective EVAR using bifurcated Zenith stent-grafts and simultaneous renal artery stenting. Renal artery stenting during EVAR was performed with endograft “encroachment” on the renal artery ostium (n = 23) or placement of a renal stent parallel to the main body of the endograft (“snorkel”, n = 8). Follow-up included routine contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), multi-view abdominal x-rays, and creatinine measurement at 1, 6, and 12 months, and then yearly thereafter. Results 31 renal arteries were stented successfully in 29 patients. All patients with planned renal artery stent placement (n=18) had a proximal neck length < 15mm. Mean proximal neck length was shorter in patients who underwent the “snorkel” technique (6.9 ± 3.1 mm) compared to those with planned endograft encroachment (9.9 ± 2.6 mm). None of the patients with unplanned endograft encroachment had neck lengths < 15mm (mean length: 26.3±10.2 mm). Mean proximal neck angulation was 42.8 ± 24.0 degrees and did not differ between the groups. One patient had a type I endoleak on completion angiography, and 2 additional patients had a type I endoleak on the first postoperative CT scan. All type I endoleaks resolved by the one-month postoperative CT scan. Primary-assisted patency of renal artery stents was 100% at a median follow-up of 12.5 months (range 2 days to 77.4 months). One patient had near occlusion of a renal artery stent noted on follow-up CT scan at 9 months; patency was restored by placement of an additional stent. One patient required dialysis following sustained hypotension from a right external iliac artery injury which resulted in prolonged post-operative bleeding. Mean creatinine at baseline was 1.1 ± 0.3 mg/dl, 1.2 ± 0.5 mg/dl at 1 month follow

  19. Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... is thought to play a role in abdominal aortic aneurysms. Atherosclerotic disease (cholesterol buildup in arteries) may also ... your risk of an aneurysm. Images Cerebral aneurysm Aortic aneurysm Intracerebellar hemorrhage - CT scan References Hauser SC. Vascular ...

  20. Using a Surgeon-modified Iliac Branch Device to Preserve the Internal Iliac Artery during Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Single-center Experiences and Early Results

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Wei; Lin, Chen; Liu, Bao; Liu, Chang-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the feasibility of a new surgeon-modified iliac branch device (IBD) technique to maintain pelvic perfusion in the management of common iliac artery (CIA) aneurysm during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods: From January 2011 to December 2013, a new surgeon-modified IBD technique was performed in department of vascular surgery of Peking Union Medical College Hospital in five patients treated for CIA aneurysm with or without abdominal aortic aneurysm. A stent-graft limb was initially deployed in vitro, anastomosed with vascular graft, creating a modified IBD reloaded into a larger sheath, with or without a guidewire preloaded into the side branch. The reloaded IBD was then placed in the iliac artery, with a covered stent bridging internal iliac artery and the branch. Finally, a bifurcated stent-graft was deployed, and a limb device was used to connect the main body and IBD. Results: Technical successes were obtained in all patients. The mean follow-up length was 24 months (range: 6–38 months). All grafts remained patent without any sign of endoleaks. There were no aneurysm ruptures, deaths, or other complications related to pelvic flow. Conclusions: Using the surgeon-modified IBD to preserve pelvic flow is a feasible endovascular technique and an appealing solution for personalized treatment of CIA aneurysm during EVAR. PMID:25698203

  1. Endovascular Management of Ruptured Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysms Associated with Celiac Axis Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kojiro Tachi, Yasushi; Ito, Shinji; Maruyama, Kunihiro; Mori, Yoshine; Komada, Tomohiro; Matsushima, Masaya; Ota, Toyohiro; Naganawa, Shinji

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization for ruptured pancreaticoduodenal artery (PDA) aneurysms associated with celiac axis stenosis (CS). Seven patients (four men and three women; mean age, 64; range, 43-84) were treated with transcatheter arterial embolization between 2002 and 2007. They were analyzed with regard to the clinical presentation, radiological finding, procedure, and outcome. All patients presented with sudden epigastric pain or abdominal discomfort. Contrast-enhanced CT showed a small aneurysm and retroperitoneal hematoma around the pancreatic head in all patients. The aneurysms ranged from 0.3 to 0.9 cm in size. In one patient, two aneurysms were detected. The aneurysms were located in the pancreaticoduodenal artery (n = 5) and the dorsal pancreatic artery (n = 3). Embolization was performed with microcoils in all aneurysms (n = 8). N-Butyl 2-cyanoacrylate (n = 1) and gelatine particle (n = 1) were also used. Complete occlusion was achieved in four patients. In the other three patients, a significantly reduced flow to the aneurysm remained at final angiography. However, these aneurysms were thrombosed on follow-up CT within 2 weeks. And there was no recurrence of the symptoms and bleeding during follow-up (mean, 28 months; range, 5-65 months) in all patients. In conclusion, transcatheter arterial embolization for PDA aneurysms associated with CS is effective. Significant reduction of the flow to the aneurysm at final angiography may be predictive of future thrombosis.

  2. Percutaneous Management of a Hepatic Artery Aneurysm: Bleeding After Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Millonig, Gunda; Graziadei, Ivo W. Waldenberger, Peter; Koenigsrainer, Alfred; Jaschke, Werner; Vogel, Wolfgang

    2004-09-15

    In this article we present an unusual case of hepatic artery aneurysm bleeding due to a hepatic artery thrombosis after liver transplantation. The patient developed a recurrent hepatic artery thrombosis leading to severe graft failure in four consecutive liver transplantations. While being evaluated for a fifth transplant, stabilization of the clinical situation was attempted by interventional therapy. The first intervention was to place a stent into the hepatic artery to prevent further ischemic damage. This failed to improve graft function, but unfortunately led to the development of a pseudoaneurysm at the distal end with a subsequent rupture into the biliary tree. Bleeding was treated successfully by direct puncture and coil embolization of the aneurysm. In addition, the patient demonstrated a hemodynamically relevant portal vein stenosis on the CT scan. Stenting of the portal vein markedly improved graft function. After extensive investigations, a paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria was found to be the underlying cause of the recurrent hepatic artery thrombosis. Here we suggest that hepatic artery aneurysm bleeding is a rare but potentially fatal complication that can be successfully treated by percutaneous coil embolization. Additionally, we propose that stenting of the portal vein can lead to a significant improvement of the graft perfusion even though the hepatic artery remained occluded.

  3. Successful endovascular treatment of rupture of mycotic left main coronary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Torii, Sho; Ohta, Hiroshi; Morino, Yoshihiro; Nakashima, Makoto; Suzuki, Yoshitaka; Murata, Seiichiro; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Ikari, Yuji; Tamura, Tsutomu

    2013-08-01

    Mycotic coronary aneurysm formation is a rare complication in patients with infective endocarditis. Furthermore, rupture of coronary artery aneurysm, also rare, is life threatening. Sudden rupture of left main mycotic coronary aneurysm occurred in a patient, aged 68 years, 1 month after root replacement for aortic regurgitation caused by infectious endocarditis. A polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent was implanted covering the entire aneurysmal portion crossing over the left circumflex coronary artery in this emergent situation. After a successful hemostatic procedure, the patient recovered from cardiogenic shock. We confirmed the sustained patency of the stent segment by coronary angiography 6 months after the procedure. PMID:23395219

  4. Effects of postimplantation systemic inflammatory response on long-term clinical outcomes after endovascular aneurysm repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyunwook; Ko, Gi-Young; Kim, Min-Ju; Han, Youngjin; Noh, Minsu; Kwon, Tae-Won; Cho, Yong-Pil

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between postimplantation syndrome (PIS) and long-term clinical outcomes after elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of an abdominal aortic aneurysm.In this single-center, observational cohort study, a total of 204 consecutive patients undergoing EVAR were included. Primary outcome was long-term mortality from any cause; secondary outcomes included long-term mortality, systemic or implant-related complications, and secondary therapeutic procedures.The diagnosis of PIS was established in 64 patients (31.4%). PIS patients were more likely to receive woven polyester endografts and have a longer postoperative hospital stay and lower incidence of type II endoleaks. In multivariate analysis, PIS was significantly associated with a decreased risk of developing type II endoleaks (P = 0.044). During follow-up period of 44 months, clinical outcomes showed no significant differences in mortality (P = 0.876), systemic (P = 0.668), or implant-related complications (P = 0.847), although rates of secondary therapeutic procedure were significantly higher in non-PIS patients (P = 0.037). The groups had similar rates of overall survival (P = 0.761) and other clinical outcomes (P = 0.562).Patients with and without PIS had similar long-term overall survival rates and other clinical outcomes. PIS was beneficial in preventing type II endoleaks during postoperative period. PMID:27512875

  5. Effects of postimplantation systemic inflammatory response on long-term clinical outcomes after endovascular aneurysm repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyunwook; Ko, Gi-Young; Kim, Min-Ju; Han, Youngjin; Noh, Minsu; Kwon, Tae-Won; Cho, Yong-Pil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the association between postimplantation syndrome (PIS) and long-term clinical outcomes after elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. In this single-center, observational cohort study, a total of 204 consecutive patients undergoing EVAR were included. Primary outcome was long-term mortality from any cause; secondary outcomes included long-term mortality, systemic or implant-related complications, and secondary therapeutic procedures. The diagnosis of PIS was established in 64 patients (31.4%). PIS patients were more likely to receive woven polyester endografts and have a longer postoperative hospital stay and lower incidence of type II endoleaks. In multivariate analysis, PIS was significantly associated with a decreased risk of developing type II endoleaks (P = 0.044). During follow-up period of 44 months, clinical outcomes showed no significant differences in mortality (P = 0.876), systemic (P = 0.668), or implant-related complications (P = 0.847), although rates of secondary therapeutic procedure were significantly higher in non-PIS patients (P = 0.037). The groups had similar rates of overall survival (P = 0.761) and other clinical outcomes (P = 0.562). Patients with and without PIS had similar long-term overall survival rates and other clinical outcomes. PIS was beneficial in preventing type II endoleaks during postoperative period. PMID:27512875

  6. Multimodality Imaging Approach towards Primary Aortic Sarcomas Arising after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Case Series Report.

    PubMed

    Kamran, Mudassar; Fowler, Kathryn J; Mellnick, Vincent M; Sicard, Gregorio A; Narra, Vamsi R

    2016-06-01

    Primary aortic neoplasms are rare. Aortic sarcoma arising after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a scarce subset of primary aortic malignancies, reports of which are infrequent in the published literature. The diagnosis of aortic sarcoma is challenging due to its non-specific clinical presentation, and the prognosis is poor due to delayed diagnosis, rapid proliferation, and propensity for metastasis. Post-EVAR, aortic sarcomas may mimic other more common aortic processes on surveillance imaging. Radiologists are rarely knowledgeable about this rare entity for which multimodality imaging and awareness are invaluable in early diagnosis. A series of three pathologically confirmed cases are presented to display the multimodality imaging features and clinical presentations of aortic sarcoma arising after EVAR. PMID:26721588

  7. Endovascular Treatment of Experimental Cerebral Aneurysms Using Thermoreversible Liquid Embolic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Takao, H.; Murayama, Y.; Saguchi, T.; Ishibashi, T.; Ebara, M.; Irie, K.; Yoshioka, H.; Mori, Y.; Ohtsubo, S.; Viñuela, F.; Abe, T.

    2006-01-01

    Summary We have developed a new embolic agent, thermoreversible gelation polymer (TGP). This polymer is unique in that solidification occurs at body temperature. The utility of this new liquid embolic agent for the treatment of large experimental aneurysms was evaluated angiographically TGP remains liquid at temperatures below the sol-gel transition temperature (TT) and becomes gelatinous above the TT. TGP can also be used to slowly deliver biologically active substances such as growth factors or engineered cells. In this study, TGP was mixed with radiopaque material without solvent. Bilateral common carotid arteries of swine (n=5) were used for surgical creation of lateral aneurysms, then 1 aneurysm in each animal was embolized using TGP without any protection device. The remaining untreated aneurysm in each animal was used as a control. All aneurysms were successfully embolized using TGP. No distal migration of TGP was observed when aneurysms were embolized without using protection devices. TGP can be safely used to embolize experimental aneurysms. Embolization of aneurysms with a protection device needs to be evaluated. Further modifications such as mechanical stability and use as a drug delivery system will be necessary prior to the clinical application of TGP. PMID:20569622

  8. Treatment of cerebral aneurysms-surgical clipping or endovascular coiling: the guiding principles.

    PubMed

    Shivashankar, Ravishankar; Miller, Timothy R; Jindal, Gaurav; Simard, J Marc; Aldrich, E Francois; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2013-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysms represent common intracranial vascular lesions encountered in neurosurgical practice. The clinical presentation is varied, ranging from asymptomatic lesions to those presenting with catastrophic intracranial hemorrhage. Aneurysm treatment has been a rapidly evolving field with numerous technical innovations, especially in the last two decades. Selecting the appropriate treatment can be a complex process that involves integration of information regarding the patient's clinical presentation, associated comorbidities, the aneurysm's morphological characteristics, safety and efficacy of the treatment options and skill and experience of available practitioners, amongst others. In this article, we review each of these factors and appraise the available scientific evidence in an effort to facilitate decision making in the treatment of cerebral aneurysms. The treatment of intracranial aneurysms is best performed at high volume centers that utilize a multidisciplinary, team-based approach. PMID:24504611

  9. Endovascular coil trapping of a ruptured dissecting aneurysm of the vertebral artery using detachable coils and micro-tornado® coils.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeong-Soo

    2013-06-01

    We experienced a patient with a ruptured dissecting aneurysm of the vertebral artery who was treated by trapping of the lesion using Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs) with micro-tornado® coils (MTCs). An 80-year-old male was transferred with a ruptured left vertebral artery dissecting aneurysm (VADA). The dissected portion of the vertebral artery was effectively trapped using GDCs and MTCs. The MTCs used for neurointervention were comprised of various types of coils and we successfully placed them into the parent artery of the dissected segment. The author suggests that this case demonstrates the usefulness of endovascular coil trapping of VADAs using MTCs in achievement of embolization. PMID:23844353

  10. Endovascular Coil Trapping of a Ruptured Dissecting Aneurysm of the Vertebral Artery Using Detachable Coils and Micro-Tornado® Coils

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We experienced a patient with a ruptured dissecting aneurysm of the vertebral artery who was treated by trapping of the lesion using Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs) with micro-tornado® coils (MTCs). An 80-year-old male was transferred with a ruptured left vertebral artery dissecting aneurysm (VADA). The dissected portion of the vertebral artery was effectively trapped using GDCs and MTCs. The MTCs used for neurointervention were comprised of various types of coils and we successfully placed them into the parent artery of the dissected segment. The author suggests that this case demonstrates the usefulness of endovascular coil trapping of VADAs using MTCs in achievement of embolization. PMID:23844353

  11. Endovascular Repair of Acute Symptomatic Pararenal Aortic Aneurysm With Three Chimney and One Periscope Graft for Complete Visceral Artery Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Brechtel, Klaus Ketelsen, Dominik; Endisch, Andrea; Heller, Stephan; Heuschmid, Martin; Stock, Ulrich A.; Kalender, Guenay

    2012-04-15

    PurposeTo describe a modified endovascular technique for complete revascularization of visceral and renal arteries in symptomatic pararenal aortic aneurysm (PRAA).TechniqueArterial access was surgically established in both common femoral arteries (CFAs) and the left subclavian artery (LSA). Revascularization of the left renal artery, the celiac trunk, and the superior mesenteric artery was performed through one single sheath via the LSA. Suitable covered stents were put in the aortic branches but not deployed. The right renal artery was accessed over the left CFA. Due to the longitudinal extension of the presented aneurysm two stent-grafts were introduced via the right CFA. After deploying the aortic stent-grafts, all covered stents in the side branches were deployed consecutively with a minimum overlap of 5 mm over the cranial and caudal stent-graft edges. Simultaneous ballooning was performed to fully expand all stent-grafts and warranty patency. Conclusion: This is the first report in the literature of chimney grafting in PRAA for complete revascularization of visceral and renal branches by using more than two covered stents introduced from one side through one single sheath. However this technique is modified, it should be used only in bailout situations when branched stent-grafts are not available and/or surgery is not suitable.

  12. Can Surgeons Assess CT Suitability for Endovascular Repair (EVAR) in Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm? Implications for a Ruptured EVAR Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Rayt, Harjeet Lambert, Kelly; Bown, Matthew; Fishwick, Guy; Morgan, Robert; McCarthy, Mark; London, Nick; Sayers, Robert

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgeons without formal radiological training are able to assess suitability of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) for EVAR. The CT scans of 20 patients with AAA were reviewed under timed conditions by six vascular surgeons. Twenty minutes was allocated per scan. They were asked to determine if each aneurysm would be treatable by EVAR in the emergency setting and, if so, to measure for device selection. The results were then compared with those of a vascular radiologist. Six surgeons agreed on the suitability of endovascular repair in 45% of cases (95% CI, 23.1-68.5%; 9/20 scans; {kappa} = 0.41 [p = 0.01]) and concurred with the radiologist in eight of these. Individually, agreement ranged from 13 to 16 of the 20 scans, 65-80% between surgeons. The kappa value for agreement between all the surgeons and the radiologist was 0.47 (p = 0.01, moderate agreement). For the individual surgeons, this ranged from 0.3 to 0.6 (p = 0.01). In conclusion, while overall agreement was moderate between the surgeons and the radiologist, it is clear that if surgeons are to assess patients for ruptured EVAR in the future, focused training of surgical trainees is required.

  13. Finite-element-based matching of pre- and intraoperative data for image-guided endovascular aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Dumenil, Aurélien; Kaladji, Adrien; Castro, Miguel; Esneault, Simon; Lucas, Antoine; Rochette, Michel; Goksu, Cemil; Haigron, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms is a well-established technique throughout the medical and surgical communities. Although increasingly indicated, this technique does have some limitations. Because intervention is commonly performed under fluoroscopic control, two-dimensional (2D) visualization of the aneurysm requires the injection of a contrast agent. The projective nature of this imaging modality inevitably leads to topographic errors, and does not give information on arterial wall quality at the time of deployment. A specially-adapted intraoperative navigation interface could increase deployment accuracy and reveal such information, which preoperative three-dimensional (3D) imaging might otherwise provide. One difficulty is the precise matching of preoperative data (images and models) and intraoperative observations affected by anatomical deformations due to tool-tissue interactions. Our proposed solution involves a finite element-based preoperative simulation of tool/tissue interactions, its adaptive tuning regarding patient specific data, and the matching with intra-operative data. The biomechanical model was first tuned on a group of 10 patients and assessed on a second group of 8 patients. PMID:23269745

  14. Endovascular Treatment of a Ruptured Innominate Artery Aneurysm in Behcet Disease.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Kazumasa; Ohkura, Kazuhiro; Shintani, Tsunehiro; Saito, Takaaki; Shiiya, Norihiko

    2016-05-01

    In Behcet disease (BD), vascular complication such as false aneurysm formation is common after surgical treatment in the arterial lesion, and the optimal treatment method remains controversial. Concerning the innominate artery aneurysm, lack of experience due to its rarity in vasculo BD makes decision making even more difficult. We report a ruptured innominate artery aneurysm in a 70-year-old man with BD, which was successfully treated by innominate artery stent grafting through the right common carotid artery, axillo-axillary artery bypass grafting, and right subclavian artery coil embolization. The patient is doing well without any vascular complications at eighth postoperative month. PMID:26907373

  15. Percutaneous Large Arterial Access Closure Techniques.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Charles J; Gandhi, Ripal T; Vatakencherry, Geogy; Baumann, Frederic; Benenati, James F

    2015-06-01

    Endovascular repair has replaced open surgical repair as the standard of care for treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms in appropriately selected patients owing to its decreased morbidity and length of stay and excellent clinical outcomes. Similarly, there is a progressive trend toward total percutaneous repair of the femoral artery using percutaneous suture-mediated closure devices over open surgical repair due to decreased complications and procedure time. This article describes the techniques of closure for large-bore vascular access most commonly used in endovascular treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms, but could similarly be applied to any procedure requiring large-bore arterial access, such as transcatheter aortic valve replacement. PMID:26070624

  16. An Artificial Neural Network Stratifies the Risks of Reintervention and Mortality after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair; a Retrospective Observational study

    PubMed Central

    Karthikesalingam, Alan; Attallah, Omneya; Ma, Xianghong; Bahia, Sandeep Singh; Thompson, Luke; Vidal-Diez, Alberto; Choke, Edward C.; Bown, Matt J.; Sayers, Robert D.; Thompson, Matt M.; Holt, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lifelong surveillance after endovascular repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is considered mandatory to detect potentially life-threatening endograft complications. A minority of patients require reintervention but cannot be predictively identified by existing methods. This study aimed to improve the prediction of endograft complications and mortality, through the application of machine-learning techniques. Methods Patients undergoing EVAR at 2 centres were studied from 2004-2010. Pre-operative aneurysm morphology was quantified and endograft complications were recorded up to 5 years following surgery. An artificial neural networks (ANN) approach was used to predict whether patients would be at low- or high-risk of endograft complications (aortic/limb) or mortality. Centre 1 data were used for training and centre 2 data for validation. ANN performance was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis to compare the incidence of aortic complications, limb complications, and mortality; in patients predicted to be low-risk, versus those predicted to be high-risk. Results 761 patients aged 75 +/- 7 years underwent EVAR. Mean follow-up was 36+/- 20 months. An ANN was created from morphological features including angulation/length/areas/diameters/volume/tortuosity of the aneurysm neck/sac/iliac segments. ANN models predicted endograft complications and mortality with excellent discrimination between a low-risk and high-risk group. In external validation, the 5-year rates of freedom from aortic complications, limb complications and mortality were 95.9% vs 67.9%; 99.3% vs 92.0%; and 87.9% vs 79.3% respectively (p<0.001) Conclusion This study presents ANN models that stratify the 5-year risk of endograft complications or mortality using routinely available pre-operative data. PMID:26176943

  17. Quality Improvement Guidelines for Imaging Detection and Treatment of Endoleaks following Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, T.; Uberoi, R.; Cil, B.; Munneke, G.; Tsetis, D.

    2013-02-15

    Major concerns after aortic aneurysm repair are caused by the presence of endoleaks, which are defined as persistent perigraft flow within the aortic aneurysm sac. Diagnosis of endoleaks can be performed with various imaging modalities, and indications for treatment are based on further subclassifications. Early detection and correct classification of endoleaks are crucial for planning patient management. The vast majority of endoleaks can be treated successfully by interventional means. Guidelines for Imaging Detection and Treatment of endoleaks are described in this article.

  18. Stroke Secondary to Aseptic Meningitis After Endovascular Treatment of a Giant Aneurysm with Parent Artery Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Doenmez, Halil Mavili, Ertugrul Ikizceli, Tuerkan; Durak, Ahmet Candan; Kurtsoy, Ali

    2009-07-15

    Aseptic meningitis related to hydrogel-coated coils is a known complication, but it is extremely rare after platinum bare coil aseptic meningitis. Here we report the development of aseptic meningitis causing brain stem and cerebellar infarct in a patient with a giant aneurysm treated with bare platinum coils. We conclude that aneurysm size is an important factor affecting the occurrence of aseptic meningitis associated with stroke.

  19. Multislice CT Angiography of Fenestrated Endovascular Stent Grafting for Treating Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: a Pictorial Review of the 2D/3D Visualizations

    PubMed Central

    Mwipatayi, Bibombe P; Allen, Yvonne B; Hartley, David E; Lawrence-Brown, Michael M

    2009-01-01

    Fenestrated endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm has been developed to treat patients with a short or complicated aneurysm neck. Fenestration involves creating an opening in the graft fabric to accommodate the orifice of the vessel that is targeted for preservation. Fixation of the fenestration to the renal arteries and the other visceral arteries can be done by implanting bare or covered stents across the graft-artery ostia interfaces so that a portion of the stent protrudes into the aortic lumen. Accurate alignment of the targeted vessels in a longitudinal aspect is hard to achieve during stent deployment because rotation of the stent graft may take place during delivery from the sheath. Understanding the 3D relationship of the aortic branches and the fenestrated vessel stents following fenestration will aid endovascular specialists to evaluate how the stent graft is situated within the aorta after placement of fenestrations. The aim of this article is to provide the 2D and 3D imaging appearances of the fenestrated endovascular grafts that were implanted in a group of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms, based on the multislice CT angiography. The potential applications of each visualization technique were explored and compared with the 2D axial images. PMID:19412517

  20. Image Guidance for Endovascular Repair of Complex Aortic Aneurysms: Comparison of Two-dimensional and Three-dimensional Angiography and Image Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Tacher, Vania; Lin, MingDe; Desgranges, Pascal; Deux, Jean-Francois; Grünhagen, Thijs; Becquemin, Jean-Pierre; Luciani, Alain; Rahmouni, Alain; Kobeiter, Hicham

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of image fusion (IF) of preprocedural arterial-phase computed tomography with intraprocedural fluoroscopy for roadmapping in endovascular repair of complex aortic aneurysms, and to compare this approach versus current roadmapping methods (ie, two-dimensional [2D] and three-dimensional [3D] angiography). Materials and Methods Thirty-seven consecutive patients with complex aortic aneurysms treated with endovascular techniques were retrospectively reviewed; these included aneurysms of digestive and/or renal arteries and pararenal and juxtarenal aortic aneurysms. All interventions were performed with the same angiographic system. According to the availability of different roadmapping software, patients were successively placed into three intraprocedural image guidance groups: (i) 2D angiography (n = 9), (ii) 3D rotational angiography (n = 14), and (iii) IF (n = 14). X-ray exposure (dose–area product [DAP]), injected contrast medium volume, and procedure time were recorded. Results Patient characteristics were similar among groups, with no statistically significant differences (P ≥ .05). There was no statistical difference in endograft deployment success between groups (2D angiography, eight of nine patients [89%]; 3D angiography and IF, 14 of 14 patients each [100%]). The IF group showed significant reduction (P < .0001) in injected contrast medium volume versus other groups (2D, 235 mL ± 145; 3D, 225 mL ± 119; IF, 65 mL ± 28). Mean DAP values showed no significant difference between groups (2D, 1,188 Gy · cm2 ± 1,067; 3D, 984 Gy · cm2 ± 581; IF, 655 Gy · cm2 ± 457; P = .18); nor did procedure times (2D, 233 min ± 123; 3D, 181 min ± 53; IF, 189 min ± 60; P = .59). Conclusions The use of IF-based roadmapping is a feasible technique for endovascular complex aneurysm repair associated with significant reduction of injected contrast agent volume and similar x-ray exposure and procedure time. PMID:24035418

  1. Intracranial Pseudoaneurysms, Fusiform Aneurysms and Carotid-Cavernous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xianli; Jiang, Chuhan; Li, Youxiang; Lv, Ming; Zhang, Jingbo; Wu, Zhongxue

    2008-01-01

    Summary The study assessed the effectiveness and safety of endovascular covered stents in the management of intracranial pseudoaneurysms, fusiform aneurysms and direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Fourteen endovascular covered stents were used to repair three pseudoaneurysms, six fu-siform aneurysms and six direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Aneurysms were in the carotid artery in seven cases, in the vertebral artery two cases. It was not possible to treat two additional cases transcutaneously for technical reasons
2/15. Percutaneous closure of the lesions with an endovascular covered stent was successful in 13 of 15 cases. Initial follow-up showed good stent patency. No complications were observed after stent implantation. During follow-up, stent thromboses were detected in two of nine patients with follow-up digital subtracted angiography. One carotid-cavernous fistula of Barrow Type A transformed into Barrow Type D at nine month follow-up study was cured with a procudure of Onyx-18 injection. Endovascular covered stents may be an option for percutaneous closure of intracranial pseudoaneurysms, fusiform aneurysms and direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Endoluminal vascular repair with covered stents offers an alternative therapeutic approach to conventional modalities. PMID:20557743

  2. Endovascular management of renal artery aneurysms using the multilayer flow modulator

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Sherif; Basuoniy Alawy, Mahmoud; Flaherty, Rita; Kavanagh, Edel P; Elsherif, Mohamed; Elhelali, Ala; Stefanov, Florian; Lundon, Violet; Hynes, Niamh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to describe our experience of the Multilayer Flow Modulator (MFM, Cardiatis, Isnes, Belgium) used in the treatment of type III renal artery aneurysms (RAA). Methods This is a single-centre study. 3 patients (2 men and 1 woman; mean age 59 years; range 41–77 years) underwent treatment of a type III renal artery aneurysm using the MFM. The indications were a 23.9 mm type III RAA at the bifurcation of the upper and lower pole vessels, with 4 side branches; a 42.4 mm type III saccular RAA at the renal hilum; and a 23 mm type III RAA at the origin of the artery, supplying the upper pole. Results Patients had a mean follow-up of 27 months, and were assessed by perioperative renal function tests, and repeat postoperative CT scan. There were no immediate postoperative complications or mortality. The first patient's aneurysm shrank by 8.6 mm, from 23.9 to 15.3 mm over 19 months, with all 4 side branches remaining patent. The largest aneurysm at 42.4 mm completely thrombosed, while the renal artery remained patent to the kidney. The final patient refused to have any follow-up scans but had no deterioration in renal function below 30 mL/min, and no further symptoms reported. Conclusions The MFM is safe and effective in the management of patients with complex renal artery aneurysms. The MFM can be used to treat branched or distal renal artery aneurysms with exclusion of the aneurysm from the circulation, while successfully preserving the flow to the side branches and kidney. Initial results are promising, however, longer follow-up and a larger cohort are required to prove the effectiveness of this emerging technology. PMID:27042315

  3. Medium-Term Outcomes Following Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with an Unfavourable Proximal Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Prakash Hughes, John Patel, Ashish S. Donati, Tommaso Sallam, Morad Patel, Sanjay D. Bell, Rachel E.; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Modarai, Bijan Zayed, Hany A.

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate medium-term outcomes following endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) with unfavourable neck anatomy using stent grafts with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter.Materials and MethodsA retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent elective EVAR between 2006 and 2008 using a stent graft with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter was carried out. All patients had computed tomography angiography (CTA) for procedure planning, and detailed assessment of the aneurysm neck was performed using a three-dimensional CTA workstation. Patients were followed up with CTA at 3 and 12 months and annual duplex thereafter.ResultsThe median aneurysm diameter was 7 cm, and the median aneurysm neck diameter was 31 mm. Cook Zenith stent grafts were used in all patients, with a proximal diameter of 36 mm (n = 25) and 40 mm (n = 2). Primary and assisted primary technical success rates were 74 and 93 %, respectively. The follow-up period ranged from 62 to 84 months, with a median of 72 months. 15 patients died during follow-up. Two patients died from aortic rupture, and the remaining patients died from cardiac disease (n = 4), chest sepsis (n = 6), cancer (n = 2) and renal failure (n = 1). Complications included type I endoleak (n = 5), limb occlusion (n = 2), limb stenosis (n = 2), limb kinking (n = 1), dissection of an artery (n = 1), occlusion of a femorofemoral cross-over graft (n = 1) and poor attachment of a distal limb (n = 1).ConclusionsEVAR using stent grafts in the presence of an unfavourable neck has a high risk of complications. Medium-term survival in this group is low but mainly due to patient co-morbidities.

  4. Endovascular treatment of false-aneurysm ten years after dacron patch aortoplasty for coarctation of the aortic isthmus. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Pacilè, Maria Antonietta; Palumbo, Piergaspare; Salvatori, Filippo Maria; Vietri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    False aneurysm degeneration is a known complication of patch aortoplasty for coarctation of the aortic isthmus. Open surgical treatment consists of prosthetic graft repair of the involved aorta, often requires circulatory arrest to achieve a safe proximal aortic control and perform proximal anastomosis, and finally is associated with substantial perioperative morbidity. Endografting of the diseased aorta is a valuable alternative to open repair, when feasible, with good short and long term results. We now report one more case of false aneurysm ten years after Dacron patch aortoplasty for isthmic coarctation in a 26-year-old woman, successfully treated by endovascular repair via the left common iliac artery, and a complete exclusion of the aneurysm at two year follow-up. PMID:23080212

  5. Percutaneous Management of a Coronary Bifurcation Aneurysm with Mesh-Covered Stents and the Simultaneous Kissing Stent Technique

    PubMed Central

    Bartolini, Davide; Bellotti, Sandro; Iannone, Alessandro; Rubartelli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    A 63-year-old man was admitted with a clinical diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (non-ST-segment elevation), characterized by regional hypokinesia of the left ventricular posterior and lateral walls and by positive cardiac biomarkers. The coronary angiogram showed a 12.5-mm-diameter aneurysm with a mural thrombus and possible distal embolism to the bifurcation of the left circumflex coronary artery and the 2nd marginal branch. The aneurysm was managed percutaneously by implanting 2 mesh-covered stents in accordance with the “simultaneous kissing stent” technique. Follow-up angiography and optical coherence tomography at 5 postprocedural months documented complete sealing of the aneurysm and diffuse in-stent restenosis. No sign of ischemia occurred during the subsequent follow-up. PMID:26413028

  6. Intracerebral malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a child with neurofibromatosis Type 1 and middle cerebral artery aneurysm treated with endovascular coil embolization.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Michael J; Cheshier, Samuel; Sharma, Sunjay; Armstrong, Derek; Hawkins, Cynthia; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T; Taylor, Michael D

    2011-10-01

    Among the neoplastic conditions that affect patients with neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) are malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), which typically arise from peripheral nerves of the limbs, trunk, and lumbar and brachial plexuses. Ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for MPNST development, especially in susceptible patients such as those with NF1. Patients with NF1 are also at risk for intracranial aneurysms, which are increasingly being successfully managed with endovascular therapies. The authors describe the case of a 9-year-old, previously healthy girl who presented in extremis with a right frontal intracerebral hemorrhage resulting from a ruptured right middle cerebral artery (MCA) trifurcation aneurysm. Following urgent decompressive craniectomy, the patient underwent endovascular coil embolization of the MCA aneurysm without complication. Given her mother's history of NF1, the child underwent genetic testing, which disclosed signs positive for NF1. The patient recovered well, but follow-up MR imaging and MR angiography performed at 14 months demonstrated a large frontotemporal mass encasing the right MCA trifurcation. The patient underwent frontotemporal craniotomy and subtotal resection of the mass, which was histologically found to be an intracranial MPNST. The patient received chemotherapy and focal radiation therapy and remains alive at 6 months postresection. To the authors' knowledge, this represents the only known case of intracranial neoplasm arising in the region of an intracranial aneurysm repaired by endovascular coil embolization. While patients with NF1 represent a population with genetic susceptibility to radiation-induced tumors, the pathogenesis of intracerebral MPNSTs remains poorly understood. PMID:21961539

  7. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with the Talent Stent-Graft: Outcomes in Patients with Large Iliac Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    England, Andrew; Butterfield, John S.; McCollum, Charles N.; Ashleigh, Raymond J.

    2008-07-15

    The purpose of this study is to report outcomes following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in patients with ectatic common iliac arteries (CIAs). Of 117 AAA patients treated by EVAR between 1998 and 2005, 87 (74%) had CIAs diameters <18 mm and 30 (26%) patients had one or more CIA diameters >18 but <25 mm. All patients were treated with Talent stent-grafts, 114 bifurcated and 3 AUI devices. Departmental databases and patient records were reviewed to assess outcomes. Technical success, iliac-related outcome, and iliac-related reintervention (IRSI) were analyzed. Patients with EVAR extending into the external iliac artery were excluded. Median (range) follow-up for the study group was 24 (1-84) months. Initial technical success was 98% for CIAs <18 mm and 100% for CIAs {>=}18 mm (p = 0.551). There were three distal type I endoleaks (two in the ectatic group) and six iliac limb occlusions (one in an ectatic patient); there were no statistically significant differences between groups (p = 0.4). There were nine IRSIs (three stent-graft extensions, six femorofemoral crossover grafts); three of these patients had one or both CIAs {>=}18 mm (p = 0.232). One-year freedom from IRSI was 92% {+-} 3% and 84% {+-} 9% for the <18-mm and {>=}18-mm CIA groups, respectively (p = 0.232). We conclude that the treatment of AAA by EVAR in patients with CIAs 18-24 mm appears to be safe and effective, however, it may be associated with more frequent reinterventions.

  8. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Endovascular Coiling versus Neurosurgical Clipping for Intracranial Aneurysms in Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Shang Hun; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Bum-soo; Rho, Myung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) revealed that in ruptured intracranial aneurysms (RA), endovascular coiling (EC) yields better clinical outcomes than neurosurgical clipping (NC) at 1 year. In unruptured aneurysms (UIA), EC is being increasingly used as an alternative to NC due to patients' preference. There is a lot of difference in treatment cost (EC vs. NC) between countries. There is one recently published study dealing with the comparative cost analysis only in UIAs in South Korea. But it is a hospital-based study. So, the authors performed a nation-wide cost effective comparison in our country. Materials and Methods This study was a retrospective analysis of healthcare big data open systems in Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service (HIRA). Hospital cost data of the recent 5 years (from January 2010 to December 2014) were analyzed according to patients' age and sex and the presence of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Results When comparing the total hospital costs for NC of a UIA (n=13,756) and EC of a UIA (n=17,666), NC [mean±standard deviation (SD): ₩7,987,179±3,855,029] resulted in significantly lower total hospital costs than EC [₩10,201,645±5,001,626, p<0.0001], although a shorter hospital stay with EC of a UIA [8.6 ±7.4 days] vs. NC [15.0 ±8.3 days, p<0.0001]. When comparing the total hospital costs for NC of a RA (n=7,293) and EC of a RA (n=6,954), NC [₩13,914,993±6,247,914] resulted in significantly lower total hospital costs than EC [₩16,702,446±7,841,141, p<0.0001], although shorter hospital stays for EC of a RA [19.8 ±11.4] vs. NC [23.0 ±10.3, p<0.0001]. Conclusion The total hospital costs for the NC of both UIAs and RAs were found to be lower than those for EC in South Korea. PMID:27621944

  9. Prognosis Predicting Score for Endovascular Treatment of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Risk Modeling Study for Individual Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Duan, Guoli; Yang, Pengfei; Li, Qiang; Zuo, Qiao; Zhang, Lei; Hong, Bo; Xu, Yi; Zhao, Wenyuan; Liu, Jianmin; Huang, Qinghai

    2016-02-01

    The elderly patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) have a greater risk of poor clinical outcome after endovascular treatment (EVT) than younger patients do. Hence, it is necessary to explore which factors are associated with poor outcome and develop a predictive score specifically for elderly patients with aSAH receiving EVT. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a predictive score for 1-year outcomes in individual elderly patients with aSAH underwent EVT.In this 10-year prospective study, 520 consecutive aSAH elderly (age ≥ 60 years) patients underwent EVT in a single center were included. The risk factors, periprocedural, and 1-year follow-up data of all patients were entered in a specific prospective database. The modified Rankin scale was used for evaluating clinical outcome. To optimize the model's predictive capacity, the original matrix was randomly divided in 2 submatrices (learning and testing). The predictive score was developed using Arabic numerals for all variables based on the variable coefficients (β) of multivariable logistic regression analysis in the learning set and the predictive performance evaluation was assessed in the testing set. The risk classes were constructed using classification criteria based on sensitivity and specificity. The poor outcome rate at 1 year was 26.15%. Six risk factors, including age, hypertension, Hunt-Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications, were independently associated with poor outcome and assembled the Changhai score. The discriminative power analysis with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of the Changhai score was statistically significant (0.864, 0.824-0.904, P < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of the Changhai score were 82.07% and 78.06%, respectively. Our study indicated that age, hypertension, Hunt-Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications were independent risk

  10. State-of-the-art aortic imaging: Part II - applications in transcatheter aortic valve replacement and endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Rengier, Fabian; Geisbüsch, Philipp; Schoenhagen, Paul; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Vosshenrich, Rolf; Karmonik, Christof; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Partovi, Sasan

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) as well as thoracic and abdominal endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR and EVAR) rely on accurate pre- and postprocedural imaging. This review article discusses the application of imaging, including preprocedural assessment and measurements as well as postprocedural imaging of complications. Furthermore, the exciting perspective of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based on cross-sectional imaging is presented. TAVR is a minimally invasive alternative for treatment of aortic valve stenosis in patients with high age and multiple comorbidities who cannot undergo traditional open surgical repair. Given the lack of direct visualization during the procedure, pre- and peri-procedural imaging forms an essential part of the intervention. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the imaging modality of choice for preprocedural planning. Routine postprocedural follow-up is performed by echocardiography to confirm treatment success and detect complications. EVAR and TEVAR are minimally invasive alternatives to open surgical repair of aortic pathologies. CTA constitutes the preferred imaging modality for both preoperative planning and postoperative follow-up including detection of endoleaks. Magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent alternative to CT for postoperative follow-up, and is especially beneficial for younger patients given the lack of radiation. Ultrasound is applied in screening and postoperative follow-up of abdominal aortic aneurysms, but cross-sectional imaging is required once abnormalities are detected. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound may be as sensitive as CTA in detecting endoleaks. PMID:24429327

  11. Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Aneurysms Basic Facts & Information Fill a balloon too full ... of what can happen when you have an aneurysm. Medically, when an artery “balloons,” or widens, it ...

  12. Current technology for the treatment of infection following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) fixation by endovascular repair (EVAR).

    PubMed

    Capoccia, L; Mestres, G; Riambau, V

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, in parallel with the increase of endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) procedures performances, a rise of late open surgical removal of EVAR implants has been observed, due to non-endovascularly correctable graft complications. Among them endograft infection is a rare but devastating occurrence, accounting for an incidence ranging from 0.2% to 0.7% in major series, and almost 1% of all causes of endograft explantations. However, a real estimation of the incidence of the problem respect to the number of EVAR implantations is difficult to obtain. Time to infection is usually defined as the period between EVAR and presentation of symptoms that leads to the infection diagnosis. It can be extremely variable, depending on bacterial virulence and host conditions. The diagnosis of an endograft infection is usually based on a combination of clinical symptoms, imaging studies and microbial cultures whenever possible. If computed tomography (CT) scan is employed in almost 100% of infection diagnosis, a combination of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and CT scan is nowadays used with increasing frequency in order to rise the likelihood of detecting a graft infection, since even cultures of blood or samples collected from the infected field can sometimes be negative. Complete graft excision seems the best approach whenever a surgical reconstruction could be attempted. In situ reconstruction can be performed by the interposition of an autologous vein, a cryopreserved allograft or a rifampin-soaked Dacron graft. The so-called conventional treatment contemplates the re-establishment of vascularization through extranatomical routes, thus preserving the new graft material from possible contamination by the surgical field just cleaned. When severe comorbid conditions did not allow graft excision, a conservative treatment should be taken into account. It is mainly based on broad-spectrum or culture-specific antibiotic therapy combined, whenever

  13. Endovascular glue embolization of dissecting aneurysm of type-3 accessory middle cerebral artery: A contralateral approach.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Rajsrinivas; Goel, Gaurav; Gupta, Vipul; Narang, Karanjit Singh; Anand, Saurabh; Jha, Ajaya Nand

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric intracranial aneurysms are rare with a reported prevalence of 0.5-4.6%. Likewise, anomalous arterial patterns are uncommon in the cerebral circulation. Recognition of these variations and knowledge of vascular territory forms the key to managing pathological conditions associated with these anomalous vessels. Ruptured dissecting aneurysm of type-3 accessory middle cerebral artery (aMCA) has not been reported in the pediatric age group. In addition to type-3 aMCA, the child in this case report had an ipsilateral type-1 aMCA with cortical supply. We describe the patterns of accessory MCA and their vascular territory, state the perplexity involved in deciding the best management strategy, and describe the technical approach we undertook to catheterize this small caliber recurrent artery (type-3 aMCA) originating at an acute angle from the anterior cerebral artery. PMID:26508091

  14. Percutaneous endovascular creation of an inferior vena cava in a patient with caval agenesis, Budd-Chiari syndrome, and iliofemorocaval thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Haskal, Ziv J; Potosky, Darryn R; Twaddell, William S

    2014-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman with acute iliofemorocaval thrombosis was discovered to have suprarenal caval agenesis with azygous continuation, hepatic congestion, and fibrosis as a result of chronic Budd-Chiari syndrome. Three staged procedures were performed: pharmacomechanical thrombolysis of acute thromboses, transfemoral liver biopsy and hemodynamic assessment, and percutaneous endovascular creation of a "neocava" lined with endografts. Symptomatic improvement and patency were maintained at 12-week follow-up. PMID:24365505

  15. Thromboembolic Complications after Zenith{sup ®} Low Profile Endovascular Graft for Infrarenal Abdominal Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Urlings, T. A. J.; Vries, A. C. de Mol van Otterloo, J. C. A. de Eefting, D.; Linden, E. van der

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to objectify and evaluate risk factors for thromboembolic complications after treatment with a Zenith{sup ®} Low Profile Endovascular Graft (Zenith LP). Results were compared with those in the recent literature on endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) and with the thromboembolic complications in the patient group treated with a Zenith Flex Endovascular Graft in our institute in the period before the use of the Zenith LP.Materials and MethodsAll consecutive patients who were suitable for treatment with a Zenith LP endograft between October 2010 and December 2011 were included. The preprocedural computed tomography scan (CT), procedural angiographic images, and the postprocedural CT scans were evaluated for risk factors for and signs of thromboembolic complications. All patients treated between December 2007 and November 2012 with a Zenith Flex endograft were retrospectively evaluated for thromboembolic complications.ResultsIn the study period 17 patients were treated with a LP Zenith endograft. Limb occlusion occurred in 35 % of the patients. Limb occlusions occurred in 24 % of the limbs at risk (one limb occluded twice). In one patient two risk factors for limb occlusion were identified. Between December 2007 and November 2012, a total of 43 patients were treated with a Zenith Flex endograft. No limb occlusion or distal embolization occurred.ConclusionDespite that this was a small retrospective study, the Zenith LP endograft seems to be associated with more frequent thromboembolic complications compared with the known limb occlusion rates in the literature and those of the patients treated with a Zenith Flex endograft in our institute.

  16. Treating patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm with endovascular repair and the crossover chimney technique in the internal iliac artery to protect the unilateral internal iliac artery

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xi; Li, Peng; Liu, Guang-Rui; Huang, Xiao-Yong; Huang, Lian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore the treatment methods for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) that required occlusion of the openings of the bilateral internal iliac arteries (IIAs) in endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to evaluate the efficacy of these treatments. Four patients with AAA were treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and the crossover chimney technique in the bilateral internal iliac arteries (IIAs). We inserted and released the abdominal aortic stent as usual and implanted the bypass stent graft simultaneously. The intraoperative immediate angiography showed complete isolation of the AAA and patency of the bypass. One month after surgery, it showed contrast engorgement in the bypass stent in three patients. The IIA on the bypass side and its branches had good developing. Another case in which we utilized a COOK stent, occlusion started at the opening of the bypass stent, with no occurrence of other complications. For patients in whom AAAs involve bilateral iliac arteries and the openings of the bilateral IIAs need to be occluded, EVAR and a crossover chimney technique can protect the unilateral IIA. PMID:26885136

  17. Neurosurgical versus endovascular treatment of subarachnoid haemorrhage caused by ruptured cerebral aneurysm: comparison of patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kamensky, J

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this critical review is to determine whether endovascular treatment (EVT) of a subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) has better patient outcomes than neurosurgical treatment (NST). A review of six cohort studies (listed in Table 1) was carried out and the main findings were summarised in the conclusion. In addition the list of author's recommendations is included at the end of the paper. Theatre practitioners involved in neurosurgery might find this review useful in enhancing their understanding of how SAH is currently treated. It could also bring some insights about the reasons why a particular modality of the treatment was chosen for their patient. PMID:26016283

  18. Endovascular image-guided treatment of in-vivo model aneurysms with asymmetric vascular stents (AVS): evaluation with time-density curve angiographic analysis and histology

    PubMed Central

    Dohatcu, A.; Ionita, C. N.; Paciorek, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Hoffmann, K. R.; Rudin, S.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we compare the results obtained from Time-Density Curve (TDC) analysis of angiographic imaging sequences with histological evaluation for a rabbit aneurysm model treated with standard stents and new asymmetric vascular stents (AVS) placed by image-guided endovascular deployment. AVSs are stents having a low-porosity patch region designed to cover the aneurysm neck and occlude blood flow inside. To evaluate the AVSs, rabbits with elastase-induced aneurysm models (n=20) were divided into three groups: the first (n=10) was treated with an AVS, the second (n=5) with a non-patch standard coronary stent, and third was untreated as a control (n=5). We used TDC analysis to measure how much contrast media entered the aneurysm before and after treatment. TDCs track contrast-media-density changes as a function of time over the region of interest in x-ray DSA cine-sequences. After 28 days, the animals were sacrificed and the explanted specimens were histologically evaluated. The first group showed an average reduction of contrast flow into the aneurysm of 95% after treatment with an AVS with fully developed thrombus at 28 days follow-up. The rabbits treated with standard stents showed an increase in TDC residency time after treatment and partial-thrombogenesis. The untreated control aneurysms displayed no reduction in flow and were still patent at follow-up. The quantitative TDC analysis findings were confirmed by histological evaluation suggesting that the new AVS has great potential as a definitive treatment for cerebro-vascular aneurysms and that angiographic TDC analysis can provide in-vivo verification. PMID:18958295

  19. Saccular Aneurysms of the Transverse Aortic Arch: Treatment Options Available in the Endovascular EraBased on a Presentation at the 2013 VEITH Symposium, November 19-23, 2013 (New York, NY, USA).

    PubMed

    Preventza, Ourania; Coselli, Joseph S

    2015-04-01

    Saccular aneurysms of the aortic arch, whether single or multiple, are uncommon. The choice of repair technique is influenced by patients' comorbidities and age. Repairing saccular aneurysms with traditional open techniques can be technically demanding; therefore, endovascular technology and a variety of hybrid approaches have been developed to facilitate such repairs and, potentially, to improve clinical outcomes, especially in high-risk patients. There have been no large, randomized studies to compare the outcomes of these different treatment options in patients with single or multiple saccular aneurysms of the arch. In this review, we outline the etiology and common locations of these aneurysms, the different open, completely endovascular, and hybrid techniques used to treat them, and the treatment selection process. PMID:26798759

  20. Intraoperative DynaCT Detection and Immediate Correction of a Type 1a Endoleak Following Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Biasi, Lukla; Ali, Tahir; Hinchliffe, Robert; Morgan, Rob; Loftus, Ian; Thompson, Matt

    2009-05-15

    Reintervention following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is required in up to 10% of patients at 30 days and is associated with a demonstrable risk of increased mortality. Completion angiography cannot detect all graft-related anomalies and computed tomographic angiography is therefore mandatory to ensure clinical success. Intraoperative angiographic computed tomography (DynaCT; Siemens, Germany) utilizes cone beam reconstruction software and flat-panel detectors to generate CT-like images from rotational angiographic acquisitions. We report the intraoperative use of this novel technology in detecting and immediately treating a proximal anterior type Ia endoleak, following an endovascular abdominal aortic repair, which was not seen on completion angiography. Immediate evaluation of cross-sectional imaging following endograft deployment may allow for on-table correction of clinically significant stent-related complications. This should both improve technical success and minimize the need for early secondary intervention following EVAR.

  1. Patient skin dose measurements using a cable free system MOSFETs based in fluoroscopically guided percutaneous vertebroplasty, percutaneous disc decompression, radiofrequency medial branch neurolysis, and endovascular critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Falco, Maria D; Masala, Salvatore; Stefanini, Matteo; Fiori, Roberto; Gandini, Roberto; Bagalà, Paolo; Morosetti, Daniele; Calabria, Eros; Tonnetti, Alessia; Verona-Rinati, Gianluca; Santoni, Riccardo; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work has been to dosimetrically investigate four fluoroscopically guided interventions: the percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP), the percutaneous disc decompression (PDD), the radiofrequency medial branch neurolysis (RF) (hereafter named spine procedures), and the endovascular treatment for the critical limb ischemia (CLI). The X-ray equipment used was a Philips Integris Allura Xper FD20 imaging system provided with a dose-area product (DAP) meter. The parameters investigated were: maximum skin dose (MSD), air kerma (Ka,r), DAP, and fluoroscopy time (FT). In order to measure the maximum skin dose, we employed a system based on MOSFET detectors. Before using the system on patients, a calibration factor Fc and correction factors for energy (CkV) and field size (CFD) dependence were determined. Ka,r, DAP, and FT were extrapolated from the X-ray equipment. The analysis was carried out on 40 patients, 10 for each procedure. The average fluoroscopy time and DAP values were compared with the reference levels (RLs) proposed in literature. Finally, the correlations between MSD, FT, Ka,r, and DAP values, as well as between DAP and FT values, were studied in terms of Pearson's product-moment coefficients for spine procedures only. An Fc value of 0.20 and a very low dependence of CFD on field size were found. A third-order polynomial function was chosen for CkV. The mean values of MSD ranged from 2.3 to 10.8cGy for CLI and PVP, respectively. For these procedures, the DAP and FT values were within the proposed RL values. The statistical analysis showed little correlation between the investigated parameters. The interventional procedures investigated were found to be both safe with regard to deterministic effects and optimized for stochastic ones. In the spine procedures, the observed correlations indicated that the estimation of MSD from Ka,r or DAP was not accurate and a direct measure of MSD is therefore recommended. PMID:25679159

  2. Aneurysm of an Anomalous Systemic Artery Supplying the Normal Basal Segments of the Left Lower Lobe: Endovascular Treatment with the Amplatzer Vascular Plug II and Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Canyigit, Murat Gumus, Mehmet; Kilic, Evrim; Erol, Bekir; Cetin, Huseyin; Hasanoglu, Hatice Canan; Arslan, Halil

    2011-02-15

    An anomalous systemic artery originating from the descending thoracic aorta supplying the normal basal segments of the lower lobe of the left lung without sequestration is a rare congenital anomaly. The published surgical treatments include lobectomy, segmentectomy, anastomosis, and ligation. In addition, endovascular treatment with coils has been reported. A second-generation occluder, the Amplatzer Vascular Plug II (AVP II), has a central plug and two occlusion disks and a finer, more densely woven nitinol wire, thus enabling faster embolization. This published case is the first successful occlusion of an aneurysm of an anomalous systemic artery with the AVP II and fibered coils, with 10 months of follow-up.

  3. Laparoscopic ligation of inferior mesenteric artery and internal iliac artery for the treatment of symptomatic type II endoleak after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Zou, Junjie; Sun, Yueming; Yang, Hongyu; Ma, Hao; Jiang, Jun; Jiao, Yuangyong; Zhang, Xiwei

    2014-01-01

    We present a case undergoing successful laparoscopic ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and internal iliac artery (IIA) for the treatment of a symptomatic type II endoleak (T2E) after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). The patient presented with abdominal and back pain 1 year after EVAR. Subsequent enhanced computed tomography scan showed aneurysm sac enlargement from 60 mm to 70 mm, and digital substraction angiography revealed a T2E caused by patent IMA and right IIA. Then the patient underwent successful laparoscopic ligation of the IMA and right IIA. Postprocedural angiogram demonstrated complete resolution of the type II endoleak, and no intraoperative complications occurred. Also, there was no remaining abdominal pain or back pain after the operation. PMID:25216443

  4. Sealing zones have a greater influence than iliac anatomy on the occurrence of limb occlusion following endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Daoudal, Anne; Cardon, Alain; Verhoye, Jean-Philippe; Clochard, Elodie; Lucas, Antoine; Kaladji, Adrien

    2016-06-01

    Limb occlusion is a well-known complication following endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), and it very often leads to reoperation. The aim of this study is to identify predictive factors for limb occlusion following EVAR. Two hundred and twenty-four patients undergoing EVAR between 2004 and 2012 were included in this retrospective study. Demographics, anatomic, and follow-up data were compared between two groups (with or without thrombosis). Preoperative anatomy was analyzed with a dedicated workstation, using the Society of Vascular Surgery reporting standards. Eleven (4.9%) patients presented with a limb occlusion during follow-up (46 ± 12 months). Univariate analyses were first performed to investigate the influence of preoperative variables on limb occlusion. Then, variables with a p value <0.1 were included in the multivariate analysis and showed that in the occlusion group there was a greater rate of chronic renal failure (18.2% vs. 3.8%, p = 0.012), a more frequent occurrence of distal landing zones in the external iliac artery (15.4% vs. 2.1%, p = 0.006), and a smaller aortic neck diameter (21.0 ± 2.9 mm vs. 23.6 ± 3.3 mm, p = 0.014). Although iliac anatomy does not appear to have a significant influence on limb occlusion rate in the multivariate analysis, proximal and distal sealing zones appear to be involved in this complication. PMID:26084467

  5. Buttock Claudication and Erectile Dysfunction After Internal Iliac Artery Embolization in Patients Prior to Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Rayt, H. S. Bown, M. J.; Lambert, K. V.; Fishwick, N. G.; McCarthy, M. J.; London, N. J. M.; Sayers, R. D.

    2008-07-15

    Coil embolization of the internal iliac artery (IIA) is used to extend the application of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in cases of challenging iliac anatomy. Pelvic ischemia is a complication of the technique, but reports vary as to the rate and severity. This study reports our experience with IIA embolization and compares the results to those of other published series. The vascular unit database of the Leicester Royal Infirmary was used to identify patients who had undergone IIA coil embolization prior to EVAR. Data were collected from hospital case notes and by telephone interviews. Thirty-eight patients were identified; 29 of these were contactable by telephone. A literature search was performed for other studies of IIA embolization and the results were pooled. In this series buttock claudication occurred in 55% (16 of 29 patients) overall: in 52% of unilateral embolizations (11 of 21) and 63% of bilateral embolizations (5 of 8). New erectile dysfunction occurred in 46% (6 of 13 patients) overall: in 38% of unilateral embolizations (3 of 8) and 60% of bilateral embolizations (3 of 5). The literature review identified 18 relevant studies. The results were pooled with our results, to give 634 patients in total. Buttock claudication occurred in 28% overall (178 of 634 patients): in 31% of unilateral embolizations (99 of 322) and 35% of bilateral embolizations (34 of 98) (p = 0.46, Fisher's exact test). New erectile dysfunction occurred in 17% overall (27 of 159 patients): in 17% of unilateral embolizations (16 of 97) and 24% of bilateral embolizations (9 of 38) (p = 0.33). We conclude that buttock claudication and erectile dysfunction are frequent complications of IIA embolization and patients should be counseled accordingly.

  6. Technical success from endovascular aneurysm repair in the post-marketing era: a multicenter prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Naslund, Thomas C; Becker, Stacey Y

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of post-marketing success with the Ancure Endovascular Graft (AEG) was accomplished by review of a multicenter, prospective trial involving 46 centers and 163 patients. A second cohort of patients (n = 350) treated with the AEG under a controlled-use interval prior to the prospective trial was simultaneously evaluated. Technical success in both groups of patients (96.9% and 97.4%, respectively) was similar to what was reported in pre-market clinical trials. Operative implantation complications unique to the AEG included graft limb stenosis/occlusion in 35.6 and 31.4%, contralateral pull wire being caught on hooks in 33.7 and 28%, failure to seal (type I endoleak) in 17.2 and 18.3%, jacket guard being stuck in 12.9 and 11%, contralateral wire being stuck in 6.8 and 7.1%, high jacket retraction force in 16 and 8.5%, and inability to retract jacket in 1.8 and 0.5% of patients involved in the multicenter trial and controlled-use interval, respectively. One of four patients undergoing conversion in the prospective trial had graft misdeployment as a mode of failure. Three were converted for access failure. The 30-day mortality rate in the prospective trial was 3.7%. Interventions to resolve implantation-related events included stenting, guide catheter manipulations, wire exchanges, and delivery catheter disassembly. These interventions were successful in virtually every case. Open surgical procedures were not needed to correct these operative problems. Results from this study demonstrate excellent technical success with the AEG in the post-market era. Interventions to resolve implantation complications, when utilized, are highly successful in facilitating AEG implantation and providing technical success. PMID:12522699

  7. Improving Results of Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair at a Low-Volume Hospital by Risk-Adjusted Selection of Treatment in the Endovascular Era

    SciTech Connect

    Wibmer, Andreas; Meyer, Bernhard; Albrecht, Thomas; Buhr, Heinz-Johannes; Kruschewski, Martin

    2009-09-15

    Several studies have observed both higher mortality rates and lower utilization of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) at low-volume centers. This article presents the results of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair at a low-volume center in the endovascular era and investigates whether postprocedural mortality can be improved by extension of EVAR application also in this setting. This is an 11.6-year retrospective cohort study of 132 patients undergoing elective surgical or endovascular AAA repair at a tertiary care academic hospital between 1997 and July 2008, i.e., a median volume of 12 cases per year. The study was divided into two periods of time according to the respective indications and contraindications for EVAR, which substantially changed in 2005. During period 1, only aneurysms with necks {>=}20 mm long and not involving the iliac arteries were treated endoluminally. Beginning in 2005, indication for EVAR was expanded to aortoiliac aneurysms with a minimum neck length of 15 mm. Preoperative risk was assessed by the SVS/AAVS comorbidity score. During the first period (1997-2004) 18.4% (16/87) of all patients received EVAR. By extending anatomical confines and indications for EVAR in 2005, the utilization rate of EVAR increased to 40.0% (18/45) during the second period (2005-July 2008; p = 0.007). Prevalence of preoperative risk factors did not change during the two observation periods. In contrast to period 1, high-risk patients were preferentially treated endoluminally during the second period, resulting in a significantly higher median SVS/AAVS score in the EVAR group (p < 0.001). A significant decrease in median length of stay at the intensive/intermediate care unit (5 vs. 2 days; p = 0.006) and length of in-hospital stay (20 vs. 12.5 days; p < 0.001) was observed during period 2. Overall perioperative mortality was reduced from 6.9% during the first period to 2.2% during the second period (p = 0.256). EVAR mortality was 0%, mortality after

  8. Chronic Contained Rupture of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: From Diagnosis to Endovascular Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, Roberto Chiocchi, Marcello; Maresca, Luciano; Pipitone, Vincenzo; Messina, Massimo; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2008-07-15

    A male patient, 69 years old, presented with fever, leucocytosis, and persistent low back pain; he also had an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), as previously diagnosed by Doppler UltraSound (US), and was admitted to our hospital. On multislice computed tomography (msCT), a large abdominal mass having no definite border and involving the aorta and both of the psoas muscles was seen. This mass involved the forth-lumbar vertebra with lysis, thus simulating AAA rupture into a paraspinal collection; it was initially considered a paraspinal abscess. After magnetic resonance imaging examination and culture of the fluid aspirated from the mass, no infective organisms were found; therefore, a diagnosisof chronically contained AAA rupture was made, and an aortic endoprosthesis was subsequently implanted. The patient was discharged with decreased lumbar pain. At 12-month follow-up, no evidence of leakage was observed. To our knowledge, this is the first case of endoprosthesis implantation in a patient, who was a poor candidate for surgical intervention due to renal failure, leucocytosis and high fever, having a chronically contained AAA ruptured simulatingspodilodiscitis abscess. Appropriate diagnosis and therapy resolved potentially crippling pathology and avoided surgical graft-related complications.

  9. Endovascular repair of a ruptured descending thoracic aortic aneurysm in a patient with an ascending aortic aneurysm: hybrid open arch reconstruction with simultaneous thoracic stent-graft deployment within elephant trunk.

    PubMed

    Abou-Zamzam, Ahmed M; Zhang, Wayne; Wang, Nan; Razzouk, Anees

    2008-03-01

    Endovascular repair of the thoracic aorta is now widely practiced. The extension of this technique to emergent settings is in evolution. Pathology of the ascending and transverse aortic arch may preclude thoracic aortic stent grafting due to the lack of a proximal seal zone. Several hybrid open/endovascular approaches have been described. We recently encountered the difficult case of a contained rupture of a 6.8 cm descending thoracic aortic aneurysm in a 60-year-old patient with aneurysmal degeneration of the ascending and transverse aortic arch. This patient was treated with a hybrid approach of open ascending and transverse arch reconstruction along with simultaneous stent-graft repair of the descending thoracic aorta. The open repair established an excellent proximal landing zone by use of the "elephant trunk" technique. This technique also allowed direct suture fixation of the stent graft to the arch graft to prevent stent-graft migration. This hybrid surgical approach was successful and avoided the cumulative morbidity that a left thoracoabdominal approach would have added to the sternotomy. Further creative uses of these hybrid techniques will undoubtedly serve a larger role in the treatment of thoracic aortic pathology. PMID:18346569

  10. Technical and Clinical Outcome of Talent versus Endurant Endografts for Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mensel, Birger; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Träger, Tobias; Dührkoop, Martin; v. Bernstorff, Wolfram; Rosenberg, Christian; Hoene, Andreas; Puls, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Objective The technical evolution of endografts for the interventional management of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) has allowed a continuous expansion of indications. This study compares the established Talent endograft with its successor, the Endurant endograft, taking individual aortoiliac anatomy into account. Methods From June 2007 to December 2010, 35 patients with AAA were treated with a Talent endograft (33 men) and 36 patients with an Endurant endograft (34 men). Aortoiliac anatomy was evaluated in detail using preinterventional computed tomography angiography. The 30-day outcome of both groups were compared regarding technical and clinical success as well as complications including endoleaks. Results The Endurant group included more patients with unfavorable anatomy (kinking of pelvic arteries, p = 0.017; shorter proximal neck, p = 0.084). Primary technical success was 91.4% in the Talent group and 100% in the Endurant group (p = 0.115). Type 1 endoleaks occurred in 5.7% of patients in the Talent group and in 2.8% of those in the Endurant group (p = 0.614). Type 3 endoleaks only occurred in the Talent group (2.9% of patients; p = 0.493). Type 2 endoleaks were significantly less common in the Endurant group than in the Talent group (8.3% versus 28.6%; p = 0.035). Rates of major and minor complications were not significantly different between both groups. Primary clinical success was significantly better in the Endurant group (97.2%) than in the Talent group (80.0%) (p = 0.028). Conclusion Endurant endografts appear to have better technical and clinical outcome in patients with difficult aortoiliac anatomy, significantly reducing the occurrence of type 2 endoleaks. PMID:22715384

  11. Concomitant percutaneous treatment of aortic coarctation and associated intercostal aneurysms: pre-procedural recognition is key.

    PubMed

    Batlivala, Sarosh P; Rome, Jonathan J

    2016-02-01

    Intercostal aneurysms are associated with aortic coarctation. Their aetiology is not well-understood but may be related to intrinsic vascular pathology and altered flow dynamics through the intercostal artery. We present the cases of two patients with coarctation and intercostal aneurysms. The aneurysms were recognised on pre-catheterisation imaging studies and were selectively occluded during the same procedure to treat the coarctation. There were no complications; both the patients have no residual coarctation at the most recent follow-up. Intercostal aneurysms associated with coarctation can have significant consequences including late rupture, paralysis, and even death. These aneurysms are common with an incidence of up to 40% with adult-diagnosed coarctation; one treatment plan is to treat both the coarctation and aneurysm during a single catheterisation. Pre-catheterisation CT or MRI may play a role in this strategy. PMID:26089120

  12. Fluid-structure interaction of a patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm treated with an endovascular stent-graft

    PubMed Central

    Molony, David S; Callanan, Anthony; Kavanagh, Eamon G; Walsh, Michael T; McGloughlin, Tim M

    2009-01-01

    Background Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are local dilatations of the infrarenal aorta. If left untreated they may rupture and lead to death. One form of treatment is the minimally invasive insertion of a stent-graft into the aneurysm. Despite this effective treatment aneurysms may occasionally continue to expand and this may eventually result in post-operative rupture of the aneurysm. Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) is a particularly useful tool for investigating aneurysm biomechanics as both the wall stresses and fluid forces can be examined. Methods Pre-op, Post-op and Follow-up models were reconstructed from CT scans of a single patient and FSI simulations were performed on each model. The FSI approach involved coupling Abaqus and Fluent via a third-party software - MpCCI. Aneurysm wall stress and compliance were investigated as well as the drag force acting on the stent-graft. Results Aneurysm wall stress was reduced from 0.38 MPa before surgery to a value of 0.03 MPa after insertion of the stent-graft. Higher stresses were seen in the aneurysm neck and iliac legs post-operatively. The compliance of the aneurysm was also reduced post-operatively. The peak Post-op axial drag force was found to be 4.85 N. This increased to 6.37 N in the Follow-up model. Conclusion In a patient-specific case peak aneurysm wall stress was reduced by 92%. Such a reduction in aneurysm wall stress may lead to shrinkage of the aneurysm over time. Hence, post-operative stress patterns may help in determining the likelihood of aneurysm shrinkage post EVAR. Post-operative remodelling of the aneurysm may lead to increased drag forces. PMID:19807909

  13. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in Detection and Follow-Up of an Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Aorto-Caval Fistula and Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Clevert, D.-A. Stickel, M.; Flach, P.; Strautz, T.; Horng, A.; Jauch, K. W.; Reiser, M.

    2007-06-15

    An aorto-caval fistula is a rare complication of a symptomatic or ruptured infrarenal aortic aneurysm having a frequency of 3-6%. Patients typically present with clinical signs of diffuse abdominal pain associated with increasing venous congestion and tachycardia, rapid cardiopulmonary decompensation with acute dyspnea, and an audible machinerylike bruit. Perioperative mortality is high, ranging from 20% to 60%. We report a case of an endovascular aortic repair in a patient with a symptomatic infrarenal aortic aneurysm and an aorto-caval fistula. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound seems to be a promising new diagnostic option for the diagnosis and preoperative treatment planning for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms with rupture into the inferior vena cava. It is in addition to computed tomography angiography. It might allow a more rapid and noninvasive diagnosis, especially for patients in intensive care because of its bedside availability. Because the examination is dynamic, additional information about blood flow between the aorta and inferior cava vein can be evaluated.

  14. Study Design of PROCEDURE Study. A Randomized Comparison of the Dose-Dependent Effects of Pitavastatin in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Massive Aortic Atheroma: Prevention of Cholesterol Embolization during Endovascular and Open Aneurysm Repair with Pitavastatin (PROCEDURE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Masaru; Hashimoto, Takuya; Miura, Sumio; Urabe, Go; Nakazawa, Tatsu; Hosaka, Akihiro; Kato, Masaaki; Ohkubo, Nobukazu; Miyairi, Takeshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Miyata, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Outcomes of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair have improved in the 2 decades since the emergence of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). However, EVAR is considered a contraindication for shaggy aorta because of the high risk of shower embolization. Recently, statins have been implicated in preventing embolization in patients with shaggy aorta via its pleiotropic effects, including atheroma reduction and coronary artery stabilization. We selected pitavastatin, a statin with potent effects, discovered and developed by a Japanese company because it has shown excellent pleiotropic effects on atheromatous arteries in the Japanese population. A randomized comparison study of dose-dependent effects of pitavastatin in patients with AAA with massive atheromatous aortic thrombus (PROCEDURE study) has begun. PROCEDURE has an enrollment goal of up to 80 patients with AAA with massive aortic atheroma (excluding intrasac atheroma), randomly allocated into 2 groups receiving pitavastatin at a dose of 1 or 4 mg/day. The endpoints of the PROCEDURE study include change in atheroma volume, major adverse events related to shower embolization after aneurysm repair, and lipid-lowering effects. When complete, results of the PROCEDURE study should provide objective evidence to use statins preoperatively for AAA with massive aortic atheroma. PMID:23641286

  15. Successful endovascular reconstruction of a recurrent giant middle cerebral artery aneurysm with multiple telescoping flow diverters in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Daniel S; Marlin, Evan S; Shaw, Andrew; Powers, Ciarán J

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms of the pediatric population are rare, but giant fusiform aneurysms (GFAs) of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) are common within this cohort of patients. These aneurysms are difficult to treat and often require advanced microsurgical skills, as they are usually not amenable to direct clipping. Here, we report the successful treatment of a recurrent GFA of the MCA with three telescoping Pipeline Embolization Devices 6 months after attempted clip reconstruction in a pediatric patient. PMID:25790956

  16. Traumatic Inferior Gluteal Artery Aneurysm Managed with Emergency Transcatheter Thrombin Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert; Zielinski, Maciej; Wykretowicz, Mateusz; Piekarek, Alina; Majewski, Waclaw

    2010-06-15

    Pseudoaneurysms of the inferior gluteal artery (IGA) are rare and are often caused by trauma. Treatment options vary and include surgery, ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection, and endovascular procedures such as stent-graft placement, coil embolization, and glue injection. We report a 70-year-old male who presented to the hospital after a road accident with a posttraumatic pseudoaneurysm that was treated by endovascular thrombin embolization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of inferior gluteal artery false aneurysm treated by this method.

  17. Angiographic analysis for phantom simulations of endovascular aneurysm treatments with a new fully retrievable asymmetric flow diverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoganand, Aradhana; Wood, Rachel P.; Jimenez, Carlos; Siddiqui, Adnan; Snyder, Kenneth; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.; Baier, Robert; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2015-03-01

    Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) is the main diagnostic tool for intracranial aneurysms (IA) flow-diverter (FD) assisted treatment. Based on qualitative contrast flow evaluation, interventionists decide on subsequent steps. We developed a novel fully Retrievable Asymmetric Flow-Diverter (RAFD) which allows controlled deployment, repositioning and detachment achieve optimal flow diversion. The device has a small low porosity or solid region which is placed such that it would achieve maximum aneurysmal in-jet flow deflection with minimum impairment to adjacent vessels. We tested the new RAFD using a flow-loop with an idealized and a patient specific IA phantom in carotid-relevant physiological conditions. We positioned the deflection region at three locations: distally, center and proximally to the aneurysm orifice and analyzed aneurysm dome flow using DSA derived maps for mean transit time (MTT) and bolus arrival times (BAT). Comparison between treated and untreated (control) maps quantified the RAFD positioning effect. Average MTT, related to contrast presence in the aneurysm dome increased, indicating flow decoupling between the aneurysm and parent artery. Maximum effect was observed in the center and proximal position (~75%) of aneurysm models depending on their geometry. BAT maps, correlated well with inflow jet direction and magnitude. Reduction and jet dispersion as high as about 50% was observed for various treatments. We demonstrated the use of DSA data to guide the placement of the RAFD and showed that optimum flow diversion within the aneurysm dome is feasible. This could lead to more effective and a safer IA treatment using FDs.

  18. Flat-detector computed tomography evaluation in an experimental animal aneurysm model after endovascular treatment: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ott, Sabine; Gölitz, Philipp; Adamek, Edyta; Royalty, Kevin; Doerfler, Arnd; Struffert, Tobias

    2015-08-01

    We compared flat-detector computed tomography angiography (FD-CTA) to multislice computed tomography (MS-CTA) and digital subtracted angiography (DSA) for the visualization of experimental aneurysms treated with stents, coils or a combination of both.In 20 rabbits, aneurysms were created using the rabbit elastase aneurysm model. Seven aneurysms were treated with coils, seven with coils and stents, and six with self-expandable stents alone. Imaging was performed by DSA, MS-CTA and FD-CTA immediately after treatment. Multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) was performed and two experienced reviewers compared aneurysm/coil package size, aneurysm occlusion, stent diameters and artifacts for each modality.In aneurysms treated with stents alone, the visualization of the aneurysms was identical in all three imaging modalities. Residual aneurysm perfusion was present in two cases and visible in DSA and FD-CTA but not in MS-CTA. The diameter of coil-packages was overestimated in MS-CT by 56% and only by 16% in FD-CTA compared to DSA (p < 0.05). The diameter of stents was identical for DSA and FD-CTA and was significantly overestimated in MS-CTA (p < 0.05). Beam/metal hardening artifacts impaired image quality more severely in MS-CTA compared to FD-CTA.MS-CTA is impaired by blooming and beam/metal hardening artifacts in the visualization of implanted devices. There was no significant difference between measurements made with noninvasive FD-CTA compared to gold standard of DSA after stenting and after coiling/stent-assisted coiling of aneurysms. FD-CTA may be considered as a non-invasive alternative to the gold standard 2D DSA in selected patients that require follow up imaging after stenting. PMID:26111985

  19. Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome in association with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm in the endovascular era: vigilance remains critical.

    PubMed

    Bozeman, Matthew C; Ross, Charles B

    2012-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are common complications of ruptured abdominal aortoiliac aneurysms (rAAAs) and other abdominal vascular catastrophes even in the age of endovascular therapy. Morbidity and mortality due to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ failure (MOF) are significant. Recognition and management of IAH are key critical care measures which may decrease morbidity and improve survival in these vascular patients. Two strategies have been utilized: expectant management with prompt decompressive laparotomy upon diagnosis of threshold levels of IAH versus prophylactic, delayed abdominal closure based upon clinical parameters at the time of initial repair. Competent management of the abdominal wound with preservation of abdominal domain is also an important component of the care of these patients. In this review, we describe published experience with IAH and ACS complicating abdominal vascular catastrophes, experience with ACS complicating endovascular repair of rAAAs, and techniques for management of the abdominal wound. Vigilance and appropriate management of IAH and ACS remains critically important in decreasing morbidity and optimizing survival following catastrophic intra-abdominal vascular events. PMID:22454763

  20. Hepatic arterial loop with accessory right hepatic artery aneurysm with celiac atresia: endovascular therapy with a stent and detachable coils.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G; Seitun, Sara; Bovio, Giulio; Castellan, Lucio; De Paolis, Marco; Castaneda-Zuniga, Wilfrido R

    2008-08-01

    The present report describes an unusual case of an aneurysm of a right hepatic artery (RHA) branching from the superior mesenteric artery; the accessory RHA was looped to the left hepatic artery arising from the celiac axis (CA) and was associated with congenital atresia of the CA. The accessory RHA aneurysm was treated with the placement of a bare stent and detachable coils through the mesh of the stent. Complete and prompt exclusion of the aneurysm was achieved with blood flow preservation in the parent artery at midterm follow-up. PMID:18656020

  1. Percutaneous Transcatheter Closure of Ruptured Sinus of Valsalva Aneurysm: Immediate Result and Long-Term Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sudhir Chandra; Sujatha, Vipperla; Mahapatro, Anil Kumar

    2015-06-01

    There is scarcity of data on closure and long-term follow-up of percutaneous treatment of ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (RSOVA). In this article, we present our experience in percutaneous closure of this defect. Between December 2009 and July 2014, 11 cases of RSOVA were referred to our hospital. Eight of the 11 cases (72.7%) were considered for percutaneous closure. Seven of the eight (87.5%) patients underwent successful percutaneous closure. There were four females and three males in the age group of 16 to 48 years (mean 24.7 ± 6.1 years). Associated defects were bicuspid aortic valve in one patient, mild preexisting aortic regurgitation in two patients, and healed infective endocarditis in one patient. Echocardiography revealed RSOVA from right coronary sinus (RCS) to right atrium (RA) in one patient (14.3%), RCS to right ventricular outflow in three patients (42.8%), and noncoronary sinus ruptured into RA in three patients (42.8%). All patients were symptomatic in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II to IV. The defect size ranged from 7 to 10 mm (mean 8.4 ± 1.3 mm). The defects were closed from the venous side with device selection 2 to 4 mm higher than the defect size under fluoroscopy and transesophageal echocardiography guidance. Technical success was 87.5%. The mean device size was 12.0 ± 1.6 mm/10.0 ± 1.6 mm. Six out of seven patients (85.7%) had complete disappearance of shunt before discharge. During 1 to 55 months follow-up, all patients were in NYHA class I. There was no residual shunt, progression of AR or new AR, infective endocarditis or device embolization. Percutaneous closure of RSOVA appears to be a safe alternative to surgical therapy, with high technical success and excellent long-term outcome. PMID:26060380

  2. Endovascular Treatment of Pseudoaneurysm of the Common Hepatic Artery with Intra-aneurysmal Glue (N-Butyl 2-Cyanoacrylate) Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Ashwin Banait, Swati; Babhad, Sudeep; Kanchankar, Niraj; Nimade, Pradeep; Panchal, Chintan

    2007-09-15

    A 40-year-old man, a chronic alcoholic, presented with acute epigastric pain. Selective celiac arteriography showed a pseudoaneurysm arising from the common hepatic artery. We hereby describe a technical innovation where complete pseudoaneurysm exclusion was seen after intra-aneurysmal N-butyl 2-cyanoacrylate (glue) injection with preservation of antegrade hepatic arterial flow and conclude that intra-aneurysmal liquid injection may have potential as a therapeutic option to reconstruct a defective vessel wall and thereby maintain the antegrade flow.

  3. Initial experience with an extremely soft bare platinum coil, ED coil-10 Extra Soft, for endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Kei; Morioka, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose The ED coil-10 Extra Soft (EDC-10 ES) is an extremely soft coil with excellent operability for embolization of cerebral aneurysms and is frequently used as a ‘finishing coil’. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this coil. Methods Clinical data were analyzed retrospectively for 92 consecutive aneurysms for which at least one EDC-10 ES was used. Follow-up angiography at 6 months was available for 69 aneurysms. Initial and follow-up outcomes were evaluated using three-category occlusion grading. Factors that affect the packing density were also investigated. Results Of the 92 aneurysms, 63 (68.5%) were classified as complete occlusion, 11 (12.0%) as having a neck remnant and 18 (19.6%) with dome filling immediately after the embolization procedure. The mean±SD packing density was 29.5±10.6%. Periprocedural complications were observed in three cases (3.3%). At 6 months the rate of completely occluded cases increased to 78.3% (54/69) and those for neck remnant and dome filling decreased to 11.8% (8/69) and 10.1% (7/69), respectively. Recanalization occurred in six aneurysms and one aneurysm was retreated during the follow-up period, giving an overall recurrence rate of 10.0% (7/70). Linear regression analysis showed a significant association of packing density with the percentage EDC-10 ES volume (p<0.001) and with the maximum aneurysm size (p<0.001). Conclusions Use of the EDC-10 ES permits safe and effective embolization of a cerebral aneurysm and contributes to a reduction in the rate of recanalization. PMID:23190564

  4. Bilateral Renal Artery Aneurysm: Percutaneous Treatment with Stent-Graft Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, R.; Spinelli, A.; Pampana, E.; Fabiano, S.; Pendenza, G. Simonetti, G.

    2006-10-15

    A 51-year-old man with an 8-year history of hypertension (170/115 mmHg with two drugs) and altered renal function (5.6 mg/dl serum creatinine, 101 mg/dl BUN) was referred to our Department to evaluate the renal arteries and rule out renovascular hypertension. Doppler ultrasound and magnetic resonance angiography revealed significant bilateral renal artery stenosis and the presence of bilateral renal artery aneurysms. A self-expandable polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered nitinol stent-graft was deployed in each renal artery to treat the stenoses and to exclude the aneurysm. Postprocedural digital subtraction angiography confirmed the resolution of the renal artery stenoses and the complete exclusion of the aneurysms. At the 6 month follow-up, color Doppler confirmed normal patency of the renal arteries with complete exclusion of the aneurysms and significant reduction of the blood pressure (130/85 mmHg with one drug) and serum creatinine levels (2.1 mg/dl)

  5. Novel endovascular procedures and new developments in aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S W K

    2016-09-01

    Endovascular repair has evolved to become a viable mainstream treatment for aortic pathology in both acute and elective settings. As technology advanced, traditional anatomical barriers were progressively tackled using new devices and novel procedures, and there are now multiple options available to the vascular surgeon. In the abdominal aorta, advances in endovascular aneurysm repair have been in the treatment of hostile aortic necks using new sealing concepts and ancillary procedures, and in branch preservation using fenestrations and snorkels. Access challenges have been met with a percutaneous approach and low-profile devices, and standard protocols have improved mortality for ruptured aneurysms. In the thoracic aorta, more invasive hybrid procedures have given way gradually to branched endografts. Particular challenges to the anaesthetist include blood pressure control and the prevention of stroke and paraplegia. Current focus in the thoracic aorta is in treating aortic arch pathology and in optimal management of acute and chronic dissections. This review describes the latest trends in the endovascular treatment of aortic diseases and examines the current evidence for different modalities of management. PMID:27566806

  6. Endovascular Management of an Infected Superficial Femoral Artery Pseudoaneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Damodharan, Karthik Beckett, David

    2013-10-15

    This article describes an endovascular technique of treating an infected pseudoaneurysm by direct thrombin injection via a catheter placed inside the aneurysm sac while maintaining temporary balloon occlusion of the neck of the false aneurysm.

  7. New Technique for the Preservation of the Left Common Carotid Artery in Zone 2a Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert Kulesza, Jerzy; Zarzecka, Anna; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Majewski, Waclaw

    2011-02-15

    To describe a technique for the preservation of the left common carotid artery (CCA) in zone 2 endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm. This technique involves the placement of a guide wire into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment to enable precise visualization and protection of the left CCA during the whole procedure. Of the 107 patients with thoracic endovascular aortic repair in our study, 32 (30%) had the left subclavian artery intentionally covered (landing zone 2). Eight (25%) of those 32 had landing zone 2a-the segment distally the origin of the left CCA, halfway between the origin of the left CCA and the left subclavian artery. In all patients, a guide wire was positioned into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment. It is a retrospective study in design. In seven patients, stent grafts were positioned precisely. In the remaining patient, the positioning was imprecise; the origin of the left CCA was partially covered by the graft. A stent was implanted into the left CCA to restore the flow into the vessel. All procedures were performed successfully. The technique of placing a guide wire into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment is a safe and effective method that enables the precise visualization of the left CCA during the whole procedure. Moreover, in case of inadvertent complete or partial coverage of the origin of the left CCA, it supplies safe and quick access to the artery for stent implantation.

  8. In endovascular aneurysm repair cases, when should you consider internal iliac artery embolization when extending a stent into the external iliac artery?

    PubMed

    Kouvelos, George N; Koutsoumpelis, Andreas; Peroulis, Michalis; Matsagkas, Miltiadis

    2014-06-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether internal iliac artery (IIA) embolization is necessary for achieving the best clinical outcome in all patients when extension of the stent graft to the external iliac artery is required. Altogether more than 400 papers were found using the reported search, of which 5 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. There is a significant gap in the current literature regarding the subset of patients that may benefit from an IIA embolization during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) as indications have not been clearly defined. There are several situations concerning a small number of patients, that IIA embolization might be beneficial in preventing endoleak not only to the common iliac artery but also to the aortic aneurysmal sac. For the majority of patients requiring extension of the stent graft to the external iliac artery, the current evidence, even retrospective in nature and reporting on small numbers of patients, shows that IIA embolization seems to be associated with worse clinical outcome, mostly raising the risk for new-onset buttock claudication. It seems that not all patients require embolization, as IIA coverage solely by the stent graft was not associated with a significant higher rate of type II endoleak in either study. Furthermore, coil embolization in the largest study so far was associated with higher procedure and fluoroscopy time and amount of contrast media, facts that should not be neglected. However the above-mentioned results should be taken into account with caution, as all studies were retrospective and reported on small number of patients. PMID:24591400

  9. Minimally invasive percutaneous endovascular therapies in the management of complications of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD): A case report.

    PubMed

    Salsamendi, Jason; Pereira, Keith; Kang, Kyungmin; Fan, Ji

    2015-09-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a spectrum of disorders from simple steatosis to inflammation leading to fibrosis, cirrhosis, and even hepatocellular carcinoma. With the progressive epidemics of obesity and diabetes, major risk factors in the development and pathogenesis of NAFLD, the prevalence of NAFLD and its associated complications including liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma is expected to increase by 2030 with an enormous health and economic impact. We present a patient who developed Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) cirrhosis. Due to morbid obesity, she was not an optimal transplant candidate and was not initially listed. After attempts for lifestyle modifications failed to lead to weight reduction, a transarterial embolization of the left gastric artery was performed. This is the sixth such procedure in humans in literature. Subsequently she had a meaningful drop in BMI from 42 to 36 over the following 6 months ultimately leading to her being listed for transplant. During this time, the left hepatic HCC was treated with chemoembolization without evidence of recurrence. In this article, we wish to highlight the use of minimally invasive percutaneous endovascular therapies such as transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in the comprehensive management of the NAFLD spectrum and percutaneous transarterial embolization of the left gastric artery (LGA), a novel method, for the management of obesity. PMID:26629307

  10. Minimally invasive percutaneous endovascular therapies in the management of complications of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD): A case report

    PubMed Central

    Salsamendi, Jason; Pereira, Keith; Kang, Kyungmin; Fan, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a spectrum of disorders from simple steatosis to inflammation leading to fibrosis, cirrhosis, and even hepatocellular carcinoma. With the progressive epidemics of obesity and diabetes, major risk factors in the development and pathogenesis of NAFLD, the prevalence of NAFLD and its associated complications including liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma is expected to increase by 2030 with an enormous health and economic impact. We present a patient who developed Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) cirrhosis. Due to morbid obesity, she was not an optimal transplant candidate and was not initially listed. After attempts for lifestyle modifications failed to lead to weight reduction, a transarterial embolization of the left gastric artery was performed. This is the sixth such procedure in humans in literature. Subsequently she had a meaningful drop in BMI from 42 to 36 over the following 6 months ultimately leading to her being listed for transplant. During this time, the left hepatic HCC was treated with chemoembolization without evidence of recurrence. In this article, we wish to highlight the use of minimally invasive percutaneous endovascular therapies such as transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in the comprehensive management of the NAFLD spectrum and percutaneous transarterial embolization of the left gastric artery (LGA), a novel method, for the management of obesity. PMID:26629307

  11. Successful Occlusion of a Ruptured Aortic Aneurysm Using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug: A Technical Note

    SciTech Connect

    Zander, Tobias Baldi, Sebastian; Rabellino, Martin; Blasco, Oscar; Febles, Tomas; Wisniewska, Katarzyna; Maynar, Manuel

    2011-02-15

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is related with a 100% mortality rate if left untreated. Even with surgical intervention or endovascular repair, mortality is still extremely high. However, there are conditions in which neither open surgical aneurysm repair nor endovascular aneurysm repair can be considered a viable therapeutic option because of comorbidities or anatomic reasons. We report a case of successful endovascular treatment in a patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm by occluding the abdominal aneurysm using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug (AVP II).

  12. Can Early Computed Tomography Angiography after Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair Predict the Need for Reintervention in Patients with Type II Endoleak?

    SciTech Connect

    Dudeck, O.; Schnapauff, D.; Herzog, L.; Löwenthal, D.; Bulla, K.; Bulla, B.; Halloul, Z.; Meyer, F.; Pech, M.; Gebauer, B.; Ricke, J.

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to identify parameters on CT angiography (CTA) of type II endoleaks following endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), which can be used to predict the subsequent need for reinterventions.MethodsWe retrospectively identified 62 patients with type II endoleak who underwent early CTA in mean 3.7 ± 1.9 days after EVAR. On the basis of follow-up examinations (mean follow-up period 911 days; range, 373–1,987 days), patients were stratified into two groups: those who did (n = 18) and those who did not (n = 44) require reintervention. CTA characteristics, such as AAA, endoleak, as well as nidus dimensions, patency of the inferior mesenteric artery, number of aortic branch vessels, and the pattern of endoleak appearance, were recorded and correlated with the clinical outcome.ResultsUnivariate and receiver operating characteristic curve regression analyses revealed significant differences between the two groups for the endoleak volume (surveillance group: 1391.6 ± 1427.9 mm{sup 3}; reintervention group: 3227.7 ± 2693.8 mm{sup 3}; cutoff value of 2,386 mm{sup 3}; p = 0.002), the endoleak diameter (13.6 ± 4.3 mm compared with 25.9 ± 9.6 mm; cutoff value of 19 mm; p < 0.0001), the number of aortic branch vessels (2.9 ± 1.2 compared with 4.2 ± 1.4 vessels; p = 0.001), as well as a “complex type” endoleak pattern (13.6 %, n = 6 compared with 44.4 %, n = 8; p = 0.02).ConclusionsEarly CTA can predict the future need for reintervention in patients with type II endoleak. Therefore, treatment decision should be based not only on aneurysm enlargement alone but also on other imaging characteristics.

  13. Comparison of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound and Computed Tomography in Classifying Endoleaks After Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aorta Aneurysms: Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Lagana, Domenico; Recaldini, Chiara; Mangini, Monica; Bertolotti, Elena; Caronno, Roberto; Tozzi, Matteo; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Annibale Genovese, Eugenio; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of the study was to assess the effectiveness of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) in endoleak classification after endovascular treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm compared to computed tomography angiography (CTA). From May 2001 to April 2003, 10 patients with endoleaks already detected by CTA underwent CEUS with Sonovue (registered) to confirm the CTA classification or to reclassify the endoleak. In three conflicting cases, the patients were also studied with conventional angiography. CEUS confirmed the CTA classification in seven cases (type II endoleaks). Two CTA type III endoleaks were classified as type II using CEUS and one CTA type II endoleak was classified as type I by CEUS. Regarding the cases with discordant classification, conventional angiography confirmed the ultrasound classification. Additionally, CEUS documented the origin of type II endoleaks in all cases. After CEUS reclassification of endoleaks, a significant change in patient management occurred in three cases. CEUS allows a better attribution of the origin of the endoleak, as it shows the flow in real time. CEUS is more specific than CTA in endoleak classification and gives more accurate information in therapeutic planning.

  14. Comparison of Superb Micro-Vascular Ultrasound Imaging (SMI) and Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) for Detection of Endoleaks After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR)

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Marcin; Tomczak, Jolanta; Snoch-Ziółkiewicz, Magdalena; Dzieciuchowicz, Łukasz; Strauss, Ewa; Oszkinis, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 68 Final Diagnosis: Unusual clinical course Symptoms: None Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Angio CT Specialty: Surgery Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: High-resolution contrast-enhanced ultrasound is one of methods used in the detection and characterization of endoleaks, which is a frequent complication after EVAR. A new technology provided by Toshiba’s AplioTM 500 ultrasound system, called Superb Micro-Vascular Imaging (SMI), is dedicated specifically to imaging very low flow states and appears to be a promising new method for detection of endoleaks. Case Report: After endovascular treatment, a 68-year-old patient who had stent-graft implantation underwent clinical examinations, including contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), superb micro-vascular imaging (SMI), and computed tomographic angiography (CTA), revealing additional information about abnormal blood flow localized in the periphery of the sack of the left common iliac artery aneurysm. By using CEUS and SMI, the endoleak was clearly visible. Conclusions: This case report illustrates the potential clinical value of this advanced Doppler technology (SMI) and how it could influence clinical management. PMID:26806053

  15. Follow-up of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair: Preliminary validation of digital tomosynthesis and contrast enhanced ultrasound in detection of medium- to long-term complications

    PubMed Central

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Guerrini, Susanna; Mazzei, Francesco Giuseppe; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Notaro, Dario; de Donato, Gianmarco; Galzerano, Giuseppe; Sacco, Palmino; Setacci, Francesco; Volterrani, Luca; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To validate the feasibility of digital tomosynthesis of the abdomen (DTA) combined with contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in assessing complications after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) by using computed tomography angiography (CTA) as the gold standard. METHODS: For this prospective study we enrolled 163 patients (123 men; mean age, 65.7 years) referred for CTA for EVAR follow-up. CTA, DTA and CEUS were performed at 1 and 12 mo in all patients, with a maximum time interval of 2 d. RESULTS: Among 163 patients 33 presented complications at CTA. DTA and CTA correlated for the presence of complications in 32/33 (96.96%) patients and for the absence of complications in 127/130 (97.69%) patients; the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of DTA were 97%, 98%, 91%, 99%, and 98%, respectively. CEUS and CTA correlated for the presence of complications in 19/33 (57.57%) patients and for the absence of complications in 129/130 (99.23%) patients; the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy of CEUS were 58%, 99%, 95%, 90%, and 91%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of combining DTA and CEUS together in detecting EVAR complications were 77%, 98% and 95%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Combining DTA and CEUS in EVAR follow-up has the potential to limit the use of CTA only in doubtful cases. PMID:27247719

  16. Validation of a Metal Artifact Reduction Algorithm Using 1D Linear Interpolation for Cone Beam CT after Endovascular Coiling Therapy for Cerebral Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Mitsuyoshi; Yoshikawa, Kohki; Kato, Kyoichi; Sai, Shogo; Sakiyama, Koshi; Kobayashi, Yoshifumi; Oosawa, Miwa; Sato, Hisaya; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Nakazawa, Yasuo

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm using 1D linear interpolation on cone-beam CT (CBCT). We performed phantom and clinical qualitative studies with and without MAR application using 1D linear interpolation. In the phantom study, the standard deviation (SD) was estimated from the images obtained from the water phantom in which a metal coil was placed at the center, and observed the changes in the SDs before and after MAR application. In the clinical qualitative study, the clinical images after endovascular treatment (EVT) for cerebral aneurysms were visually evaluated before and after MAR application. In the phantom study, the SDs after MAR application decreased by 56 to 35% compared with that before MAR application. In the clinical qualitative study, the artifacts from the metal coil decreased or increased depending on locations, and the contrasts of gray matter and white matter were attenuated when MAR was applied. In conclusion, the metal artifact decreases when MAR using 1D linear interpolation is applied to cerebral CBCT. However, another artifacts increase or soft tissue contrast is changed in some cases. MAR largely contributes to the reduction of streaking artifacts, whereas it may induce cerebral parenchyma at distant metal body or quality deterioration of the image not including the metal body. This should be taken into account in the diagnosis of secondary hemorrhage or infarction. PMID:25489899

  17. Embolization for type 2 endoleak with sac expansion after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: safety and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Kenji; Yamagami, Takuji; Urashima, Masaki; Tomiyoshi, Hideki; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Ishikawa, Masaki; Awai, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and outcome of embolization as treatment for persistent type 2 endoleak (T2EL) occurring after abdominal aortic stent graft implantation. This retrospective study included seven consecutive patients (one female, six males, mean age 72 years, range 66-88 years) with T2EL between January 2011 and September 2012. In all, T2EL was associated with an increase more than 5 mm in the aneurysm. The endoleak cavity or feeding artery was embolized with coils and/or n-butyl cyanoacrylate. Clinical success was defined as regression or stabilization of the aneurysm sac irrespective of residual endoleaks on follow-up CT studies. At the time of T2EL intervention, mean aneurysm sac diameter was 63 mm (range 52-72 mm), and mean increase size of aneurysm sac diameter was 7 mm (range 5-13). Mean follow-up period was 6.0 ± 6.2 months (range 3-18 months). Our technical success rate was 100 %. Clinical success was obtained in 5 (71.4 %) of the seven patients. One patient was embolized three times due to sac expansion. T2EL was treated by transarterial embolization in eight procedures, and one procedure was performed by direct puncture embolization. There were no major complications; two procedures elicited minor complications: transient back pain and muscle weakness of the left lower leg. We suggest embolization was safe and effective treatment, a less invasive treatment option comparison to open repair, as one choice to address T2EL. PMID:27006871

  18. Early prediction of acute kidney injury biomarkers after endovascular stent graft repair of aortic aneurysm: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and serious condition usually detected some time after onset by changes in serum creatinine (sCr). Although stent grafting to repair aortic aneurysms is associated with AKI caused by surgical procedures or the use of contrast agents, early biomarkers for AKI have not been adequately examined in stent graft recipients. We studied biomarkers including urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), blood NGAL, N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase (NAG), microalbumin (Alb), and liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) as prospective early biomarkers for AKI in patients who had received stent graft repairs of aortic aneurysms. Methods In addition to pre-surgical sampling, at 2 to 6 h and at 1, 3 to 4, and 5 days or later (until stable) after surgery, urine and serum biomarkers were sampled from 47 patients who underwent stent graft repair of aortic aneurysms. Results Using Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria, 6 (14%) of 42 retained patients developed AKI. NGAL corrected with urine Cr (NGAL/Cr) values demonstrated the best predictive value for AKI (97% specificity, 83% sensitivity at a 65.1 μg/gCr cutoff). The area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve of NGAL/Cr value 2 h after surgery was 0.9. Although NGAL/Cr, L-FABP corrected with urine Cr (L-FABP/Cr), L-FABP, NAG, and Alb corrected by urine Cr (Alb/Cr) all reached peak values before AKI detection by sCr in AKI patients, all biomarkers reached the cutoff value before AKI detection after adaption of cutoff value. Conclusions After stent graft repair of aortic aneurysm, NGAL/Cr is a potentially useful early biomarker for AKI. PMID:25960881

  19. Delayed massive hemorrhage due to external iliac artery pseudo-aneurysm and uretero-iliac artery fistula following robotic radical cystectomy and intracorporeal Studer pouch reconstruction: Endovascular management of an unusual complication

    PubMed Central

    Atmaca, Ali Fuat; Canda, Abdullah Erdem; Gumus, Mehmet; Asil, Erem; Balbay, Mevlana Derya

    2013-01-01

    We report a very unusual complication of uretero-iliac artery fistula that developed following robotic radical cystectomy (RARC), bilateral extended pelvic lymph node dissection and intracorporeal Studer pouch reconstruction. Our patient was a 54-year-old male who was admitted 1 month after undergoing robotic surgery due to intermittently occurring massive transurethral bleeding necessitating blood transfusion that stopped by itself. Angiography showed a right external iliac artery pseudo-aneurysm and a fistula tract between the pseudo-aneurysm and Wallace type ureteral anostomosis that was successfully treated by an angiographic endovascular stent insertion at this level. Uretero-iliac artery fistula might occur following RARC, bilateral extended pelvic lymph node dissection and intracorporeal Studer pouch reconstruction leading to intermittently massive transurethral bleeding. Angiography and stenting are important for diagnosis and successful treatment of this rare entity. PMID:24069106

  20. Extracranial Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysms: Report of a Ruptured Case and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Siablis, Dimitrios Karnabatidis, Dimitrios; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Mastronikolis, Nikos; Zabakis, Peter; Kraniotis, Pantelis

    2004-08-15

    Aneurysms of the extracranial carotid arteries (ECAA) are extremely rare. Schechter et al. documented 835 cases in the literature up to 1977. One hundred and sixteen cases of ECAA have been documented in the Chinese literature since 1981, suggesting a higher prevalence of carotid aneurysmal disease in China than in the West. Four percent of all peripheral artery aneurysms are reported to be ECAA. Those arising from the internal carotid artery (EICAA) are even more rare. Two recent reviews reported 24 and 25 cases of EICAA during 21 and 17 years, respectively, the majority of them is treated surgically. Our literature review revealed only a few true EICAA managed endovascularly, but none of them with a covered stent. We describe a rare such case of ruptured atherosclerotic EICAA which was treated percutaneously.

  1. High Retention and Safety of Percutaneously Implanted Endovascular Embolization Coils as Fiducial Markers for Image-Guided Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Pulmonary Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Julian C.; Yu Yao; Rao, Aarti K.; Dieterich, Sonja; Maxim, Peter G.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Diehn, Maximilian; Sze, Daniel Y.; Kothary, Nishita; Loo, Billy W.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the retention rates of two types of implanted fiducial markers for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of pulmonary tumors, smooth cylindrical gold 'seed' markers ('seeds') and platinum endovascular embolization coils ('coils'), and to compare the complication rates associated with the respective implantation procedures. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the retention of percutaneously implanted markers in 54 consecutive patients between January 2004 and June 2009. A total of 270 markers (129 seeds, 141 coils) were implanted in or around 60 pulmonary tumors over 59 procedures. Markers were implanted using a percutaneous approach under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Postimplantation and follow-up imaging studies were analyzed to score marker retention relative to the number of markers implanted. Markers remaining near the tumor were scored as retained. Markers in a distant location (e.g., pleural space) were scored as lost. CT imaging artifacts near markers were quantified on radiation therapy planning scans. Results: Immediately after implantation, 140 of 141 coils (99.3%) were retained, compared to 110 of 129 seeds (85.3%); the difference was highly significant (p < 0.0001). Of the total number of lost markers, 45% were reported lost during implantation, but 55% were lost immediately afterwards. No additional markers were lost on longer-term follow-up. Implanted lesions were peripherally located for both seeds (mean distance, 0.33 cm from pleural surface) and coils (0.34 cm) (p = 0.96). Incidences of all pneumothorax (including asymptomatic) and pneumothorax requiring chest tube placement were lower in implantation of coils (23% and 3%, respectively) vs. seeds (54% and 29%, respectively; p = 0.02 and 0.01). The degree of CT artifact was similar between marker types. Conclusions: Retention of CT-guided percutaneously implanted coils is significantly better than that of seed markers. Furthermore, implanting coils is at

  2. Rat Endovascular Perforation Model

    PubMed Central

    Sehba, Fatima A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental animal models of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have provided a wealth of information on the mechanisms of brain injury. The Rat endovascular perforation model (EVP) replicates the early pathophysiology of SAH and hence is frequently used to study early brain injury following SAH. This paper presents a brief review of historical development of the EVP model, details the technique used to create SAH and considerations necessary to overcome technical challenges. PMID:25213427

  3. Automatic pose initialization for accurate 2D/3D registration applied to abdominal aortic aneurysm endovascular repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Shun; Lucas, Joseph; Liao, Rui

    2012-02-01

    Minimally invasive abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) stenting can be greatly facilitated by overlaying the preoperative 3-D model of the abdominal aorta onto the intra-operative 2-D X-ray images. Accurate 2-D/3-D registration in 3-D space makes the 2-D/3-D overlay robust to the change of C-Arm angulations. By far, the 2-D/3-D registration methods based on simulated X-ray projection images using multiple image planes have been shown to be able to provide satisfactory 3-D registration accuracy. However, one drawback of the intensity-based 2-D/3-D registration methods is that the similarity measure is usually highly non-convex and hence the optimizer can easily be trapped into local minima. User interaction therefore is often needed in the initialization of the position of the 3-D model in order to get a successful 2-D/3-D registration. In this paper, a novel 3-D pose initialization technique is proposed, as an extension of our previously proposed bi-plane 2-D/3-D registration method for AAA intervention [4]. The proposed method detects vessel bifurcation points and spine centerline in both 2-D and 3-D images, and utilizes landmark information to bring the 3-D volume into a 15mm capture range. The proposed landmark detection method was validated on real dataset, and is shown to be able to provide a good initialization for 2-D/3-D registration in [4], thus making the workflow fully automatic.

  4. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Setacci, Francesco; Galzerano, Giuseppe; De Donato, Gianmarco; Benevento, Domenico; Guerrieri, Massimiliano W; Ruzzi, Umberto; Borrelli, Maria P; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has become a milestone in the treatment of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm. Technological improvement allows treatment in more and more complex cases. This review summarizes all grafts available on the market. A complete review of most important trial on this topic is provided to the best of our knowledge, and technical tips and tricks for standard cases are also included. PMID:26771730

  5. General Considerations of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung Won; Bae, Miju; Chung, Sung Woon

    2015-01-01

    Although development of surgical technique and critical care, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm still carries a high mortality. In order to obtain good results, various efforts have been attempted. This paper reviews initial management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and discuss the key point open surgical repair and endovascular aneurysm repair. PMID:25705591

  6. Radiation exposure to anaesthetists during endovascular procedures.

    PubMed

    Arii, T; Uchino, S; Kubo, Y; Kiyama, S; Uezono, S

    2015-01-01

    Medical radiation exposure increases the likelihood of cataract formation. A personal dosimeter was attached to the left temple of 77 anaesthetists during 45 endovascular aortic aneurysm repairs and 32 interventional neuroradiology procedures. Compared with interventional neuroradiology, the median (IQR [range]) total radiation dose emitted by fluoroscopic equipment was significantly lower during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (4175 (3127-5091 [644-9761]) mGy than interventional neuroradiology (1420 (613-2424 [165-10,840]) mGy, p < 0.001). However, radiation exposure to the anaesthetist's temple was significantly greater during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (15 (6-41 [1-109]) μSv) than interventional neuroradiology (4 (2-8 [0-67]) μSv, p < 0.001). These data suggest that anaesthetists at our institution would have to deliver anaesthesia for ~1300 endovascular aortic aneurysm repairs and ~5000 interventional neuroradiology cases annually to exceed the general occupational limits, and ~10,000 endovascular aortic aneurysm repairs and ~37,500 interventional neuroradiology cases to exceed the ocular exposure limits recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Nevertheless, anaesthetists should be aware of the risk of ocular radiation exposure, and reduce this by limiting the time of exposure, increasing the distance from the source of radiation, and shielding. PMID:25267714

  7. Current Status of Endovascular Treatment for Vasospasm following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Analysis of JR-NET2

    PubMed Central

    HAYASHI, Kentaro; HIRAO, Tomohito; SAKAI, Nobuyuki; NAGATA, Izumi

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular treatments are employed for cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is not responded to the medical treatments. However, the effect or complication of the treatments is not known well. Here, we analyzed the data of Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy 2 (JRNET2) and revealed current status of the endovascular treatment for the cerebral vasospasm. JR-NET2 is conducted from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2009. Information on the clinical status, imaging studies, treatment methods, the results of treatment, and status 30 days later were recorded. Totally 645 treatments for 480 patients (mean age, 59.4 years; 72.7% woman) were included. Factors related to the neurological improvement and treatment related complications were statistically analyzed. Treatments for ruptured cerebral aneurysm were direct surgery for 366 cases and endovascular treatment for 253 cases. The timing of the endovascular treatment for the cerebral vasospasm was within 3 hours in 209 cases, 3–6 hours in 158 cases, and more than 6 hours in 158 cases. Intra-arterial vasodilator was employed for the 495 cases and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for 140 cases. Neurological improvement was observed in 372 cases and radiological improvement was seen in 623 cases. The treatment related complication occurred in 20 cases (3.1%), including 6 cases of intracranial hemorrhage, 5 cases of cerebral ischemia, a case of puncture site trouble, and 8 cases of others. Statistical analysis showed early treatment was related to the neurological improvement. Current status of endovascular treatment for cerebral vasospasm was revealed. Endovascular treatment was effective for vasospasm especially was performed early. PMID:24257541

  8. [A3-A3 side-to-side anastomosis combined with endovascular intervention in recurrent complex anterior artery aneurysm: a case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xian-yi; Wang, Lin; Fang, Bing; Yu, Tun

    2015-07-01

    A 28-year-old female patient was admitted to the Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, with sudden headache and vomiting for 1 day. CT scan conducted at emergency revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage, whereas digital subtraction angiography demonstrated a wide-neck aneurysm located at A1 segment of the left anterior cerebral artery. The aneurysm was totally coiled using stent assistance, which, however, was recanalized at 3 month follow-up. This patient was then subjected to aneurysm and parent artery occlusion after bypass of the bilateral A3 segments, who recovered well and discharged without ischemic complications. PMID:26555417

  9. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms:

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; Nguyen, T.; Chagnon, M.; Gevry, G.

    2007-01-01

    'if a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; 'but if he will be content to begin with doubts he shall end in certainties'. Sir Francis Bacon, The Advancement of Learning Summary In the absence of level one evidence, the treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms is grounded on opinions. Results of the largest registry available, ISUIA (the International Study on Unruptured Intraacranial Aneurysms) suggest that surgical or endovascular treatments are rarely justified. Yet the unruptured aneurysm is the most frequent indication for treatment in many endovascular centres. In preparation for the initiation of a randomized trial, we aimed at a better knowledge of endovascular expert opinions on unruptured aneurysms. We administered a standard questionnaire to 175 endovascular experts gathered at the WFITN meeting in Val d'lsère in 2007. Four paradigm unruptured aneurysms were used to poll opinions on risks of treatment or observation, as well as on their willingness to treat, observe or propose to the patient participation in a randomized trial, using six questions for each aneurysm. Opinions varied widely among lesions and among participants. Most participants (92.5%) were consistent, as they would offer treatment only if their estimate of the ten-year risk of spontaneous hemorrhage would exceed risks of treatment. Estimates of the natural history were consistently higher than that reported by ISUIA. Conversely, treatment risks were underestimated compared to those reported in ISUIA, but within the range reported in a recent French registry (ATENA). Participants were more confident in their evaluation of treatment risks and in their skills at treating aneurysms than in their estimates of risks of rupture entailed by the presence of the lesion, the latter being anchored at or close to 1% /year. The gulf between expert opinions, clinical practices and available data from registries persist. Expert opinions are compatible with the primary hypothesis

  10. Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Deena M; Brown, Robert D

    2016-09-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA) occur in approximately 2-3 % of the population. Most of these lesions are incidentally found, asymptomatic and typically carry a benign course. Although the risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is low, this complication can result in significant morbidity and mortality, making assessment of this risk the cornerstone of UIA management. This article reviews important factors to consider when managing unruptured intracranial aneurysms including patient demographics, comorbidities, family history, symptom status, and aneurysm characteristics. It also addresses screening, monitoring, medical management and current surgical and endovascular therapies. PMID:27443382

  11. Endovascular Stent-Graft Repair as a Late Secondary Procedure After Previous Aortic Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Matsagas, Miltiadis I. Anagnostopoulos, Constantine E.; Papakostas, John C.; DeRose, Joseph J.; Siminelakis, Stavros; Katsouras, Christos S.; Toumpoulis, Ioannis K.; Drossos, George E.; Michalis, Lampros K.

    2006-08-15

    Thoracic and abdominal aortic endovascular procedures as alternatives to aortic reoperations were studied in three different cases. An anastomotic aneurysm after previous thoracic aortic graft for coarctation, a second-stage elephant trunk repair (descending thoracic aortic aneurysm), and a secondary aneurysm proximal to a previous abdominal aortic graft were successfully treated with endovascular stent-grafts. During the follow-up period no lethal events or major aortic or graft-related complications were observed, except a type II endoleak in the anastomotic aortic aneurysm case. An endovascular stent-graft can be safely deployed into a previously implanted vascular graft, avoiding repeat surgery.

  12. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  13. Posttraumatic lingual artery pseudoaneurysm treated with ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection.

    PubMed

    Masella, Pamela C; Hanson, Megan M; Hall, Brian T; Verghese, John J; Kellicut, Dwight C

    2014-07-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the lingual artery are extremely rare and are commonly iatrogenic in nature or less frequently a result of blunt or penetrating trauma. Traditionally, these vascular abnormalities have been repaired with open or endovascular techniques. Although ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection has become a standard treatment for superficial pseudoaneurysms, there are no reports of this being used in the treatment of lingual artery pseudoaneurysms. We report the case of a 26-year-old man who suffered a penetrating head and neck injury after an improvised explosive device blast in Iraq who presented with persistent oropharyngeal swelling. Color-flow Doppler ultrasonography revealed the classic yin/yang sign of a pseudoaneurysm, and a computed tomography scan was obtained that revealed a right lingual artery pseudoaneurysm. With the lack of endovascular capabilities and the excessive risk of open surgery, thrombin was injected directly into the pseudoaneurysm under ultrasound guidance. A computed tomography scan and Doppler ultrasonography revealed complete resolution of the aneurysm. This article presents the first reported case in the English literature of a lingual artery aneurysm after penetrating trauma managed successfully with ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection. PMID:24365080

  14. Contrast-Enhanced and Time-of-Flight MR Angiographic Assessment of Endovascular Coiled Intracranial Aneurysms at 1.5 T

    PubMed Central

    Levent, Akin; Yuce, Ihsan; Eren, Suat; Ozyigit, Omer; Kantarci, Mecit

    2014-01-01

    Summary This study evaluated contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF-MRA) through comparisons with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for the follow-up of intracranial aneurysms treated with detachable coils. Sixty-seven patients with 79 aneurysms underwent 3D-TOF-MRA, CE-MRA, and catheter angiography one year after coiling. Two independent observers classified recanalization status on images as neck or body remnant or no recanalization. For 3D-TOF-MRA and CE-MRA, the intermodality agreement, interobserver agreement, and correlation with angiography were assessed. Sixty-seven patients with 79 coiled aneurysms agreed to participate in the study. Three aneurysms could not be detected on 3D-TOF-MRA, so they were excluded from this study. Interobserver agreement was very good for 3D-TOF-MRA and CE-MRA (kappa (κ): 0.87, 0.94, respectively). Correlation of TOF-MRA with angiography was good (κ: 0.76). Correlation of CE-MRA with angiography was excellent (κ: 0.91). The sensitivity and specificity of TOF-MRA were 92% and 98%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of CE-MRA were 96% and 98%, respectively. After selective embolization of intracranial aneurysms, CE-MRA is useful and comparable to DSA in the assessment of aneurysmal recanalization. Agreement with the gold standard is stronger with CE-MRA than with 3D-TOF-MRA. PMID:25496678

  15. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  16. Endovascular Treatment of Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia: Results in 14 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chahid, Tamam; Alfidja, Agaicha T.; Biard, Marie; Ravel, Anne; Garcier, Jean Marc; Boyer, L.

    2004-11-15

    We evaluated immediate and long-term results of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stent placement to treat stenotic and occluded arteries in patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia. Fourteen patients were treated by 3 exclusive celiac artery (CA) PTAs (2 stentings), 3 cases with both Superior Mesenteric Artery (SMA) and CA angioplasties, and 8 exclusive SMA angioplasties (3 stentings). Eleven patients had atheromatous stenoses with one case of an early onset atheroma in an HIV patient with antiphospholipid syndrome. The other etiologies of mesenteric arterial lesions were Takayashu arteritis (2 cases) and a postradiation stenoses (1 case). Technical success was achieved in all cases. Two major complications were observed: one hematoma and one false aneurysm occurring at the brachial puncture site (14.3%). An immediate clinical success was obtained in all patients. During a follow-up of 1-83 months (mean: 29 months), 11 patients were symptom free; 3 patients had recurrent pain; in one patient with inflammatory syndrome, pain relief was obtained with medical treatment; in 2 patients abdominal pain was due to restenosis 36 and 6 months after PTA, respectively. Restenosis was treated by PTA (postirradiation stenosis), and by surgical bypass (atheromatous stenosis). Percutaneous endovascular techniques are safe and accurate. They are an alternative to surgery in patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia due to short and proximal occlusive lesions of SMA and CA.

  17. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Keisler, Brian; Carter, Chuck

    2015-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm refers to abdominal aortic dilation of 3.0 cm or greater. The main risk factors are age older than 65 years, male sex, and smoking history. Other risk factors include a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery disease, hypertension, peripheral artery disease, and previous myocardial infarction. Diagnosis may be made by physical examination, an incidental finding on imaging, or ultrasonography. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released updated recommendations for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in 2014. Men 65 to 75 years of age with a history of smoking should undergo one-time screening with ultrasonography based on evidence that screening will improve abdominal aortic aneurysm-related mortality in this population. Men in this age group without a history of smoking may benefit if they have other risk factors (e.g., family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, other vascular aneurysms, coronary artery disease). There is inconclusive evidence to recommend screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in women 65 to 75 years of age with a smoking history. Women without a smoking history should not undergo screening because the harms likely outweigh the benefits. Persons who have a stable abdominal aortic aneurysm should undergo regular surveillance or operative intervention depending on aneurysm size. Surgical intervention by open or endovascular repair is the primary option and is typically reserved for aneurysms 5.5 cm in diameter or greater. There are limited options for medical treatment beyond risk factor modification. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is a medical emergency presenting with hypotension, shooting abdominal or back pain, and a pulsatile abdominal mass. It is associated with high prehospitalization mortality. Emergent surgical intervention is indicated for a rupture but has a high operative mortality rate. PMID:25884861

  18. Infectious or Noninfectious? Ruptured, Thrombosed Inflammatory Aortic Aneurysm with Spondylolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Elgalal, Marcin; Papiewski, Andrzej; Szubert, Wojciech; Szopinski, Piotr

    2013-06-15

    Osteolysis of vertebrae due to inflammatory aortic aneurysm is rarely observed. However, it is estimated that up to 10 % of infectious aneurysms coexist with bone tissue destruction, most commonly the vertebrae. Inflammatory aneurysms with no identified infection factor, along with infiltration of adjacent muscle and in particular extensive destruction of bone tissue have rarely been described in the literature. A case of inflammatory aneurysm with posterior wall rupture and inflammatory infiltration of the iliopsoas muscle and spine, together with extensive vertebral body destruction, is presented. The aneurysm was successfully treated with endovascular aneurysm repair EVAR.

  19. Rupture of an Aneurysm of a Small Branch of the Superior Mesenteric Artery: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arer, Ilker Murat; Gedikoglu, Murat; Yabanoglu, Hakan; Noyan, Mustafa Turgut

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Superior mesenteric artery aneurysm (SMAA) is an uncommon vascular disorder. Complications such as rupture have been reported. Once complication has been encountered both surgical and endovascular treatment techniques can be considered. Case Report We present a case of 68-year old male patient with SMAA rupture treated by endovascular modality. Conclusions Endovascular therapy is an effective and less invasive option for rupture of superior mesenteric artery aneurysm. PMID:27536338

  20. Endoport-Assisted Microsurgical Treatment of a Ruptured Periventricular Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Jen; Caruso, James; Starke, Robert M; Ding, Dale; Buell, Thomas; Crowley, R Webster; Liu, Kenneth C

    2016-01-01

    Background and Importance. Ruptured periventricular aneurysms in patients with moyamoya disease represent challenging pathologies. The most common methods of treatment include endovascular embolization and microsurgical clipping. However, rare cases arise in which the location and anatomy of the aneurysm make these treatment modalities particularly challenging. Clinical Presentation. We report a case of a 34-year-old female with moyamoya disease who presented with intraventricular hemorrhage. CT angiography and digital subtraction angiography revealed an aneurysm located in the wall of the atrium of the right lateral ventricle. Distal endovascular access was not possible, and embolization risked the sacrifice of arteries supplying critical brain parenchyma. Using the BrainPath endoport system, the aneurysm was able to be accessed. Since the fusiform architecture of the aneurysm prevented clip placement, the aneurysm was ligated with electrocautery. Conclusion. We demonstrate the feasibility of endoport-assisted approach for minimally invasive access and treatment of uncommon, distally located aneurysms. PMID:27195160

  1. Endoport-Assisted Microsurgical Treatment of a Ruptured Periventricular Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ching-Jen; Caruso, James; Buell, Thomas; Crowley, R. Webster; Liu, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Importance. Ruptured periventricular aneurysms in patients with moyamoya disease represent challenging pathologies. The most common methods of treatment include endovascular embolization and microsurgical clipping. However, rare cases arise in which the location and anatomy of the aneurysm make these treatment modalities particularly challenging. Clinical Presentation. We report a case of a 34-year-old female with moyamoya disease who presented with intraventricular hemorrhage. CT angiography and digital subtraction angiography revealed an aneurysm located in the wall of the atrium of the right lateral ventricle. Distal endovascular access was not possible, and embolization risked the sacrifice of arteries supplying critical brain parenchyma. Using the BrainPath endoport system, the aneurysm was able to be accessed. Since the fusiform architecture of the aneurysm prevented clip placement, the aneurysm was ligated with electrocautery. Conclusion. We demonstrate the feasibility of endoport-assisted approach for minimally invasive access and treatment of uncommon, distally located aneurysms. PMID:27195160

  2. Double Stent Assist Coiling of Ruptured Large Saccular Aneurysm in Proximal Basilar Artery Fenestration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Woong Bae; Huh, Joon; Cho, Chul Bum; Yang, Seung Ho; Kim, Il Sup; Hong, Jae Taek; Lee, Sang Won

    2015-01-01

    Basilar artery fenestration is infrequent and even rarer in association with a large aneurysm. With proximity to brain stem and vital perforators, endovascular coiling can be considered first. If the large ruptured aneurysm with a wide neck originated from fenestra of the proximal basilar artery and the fenestration loop has branches of posterior circulation, therapeutic consideration should be thorough and fractionized. We report endovascular therapeutic details for a case of a ruptured large saccular aneurysm in proximal basilar artery fenestration. PMID:26523257

  3. Endovascular Treatment for Ruptured Vertebral Artery Dissecting Aneurysms: Results from Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy (JR-NET) 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    SATOW, Tetsu; ISHII, Daizo; IIHARA, Koji; SAKAI, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    In treating ruptured vertebral artery dissecting aneurysms (VADAs), neuroendovascular therapy (NET) represented by coil obliteration is considered to be a reliable intervention. However, there has been no multi-center based study in this setting so far. In this article, results of NET for ruptured VADA obtained from Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy (JR-NET) 1 and 2 were assessed to elucidate the factors associated with favorable outcome. A total of 213 in JR-NET1 and 381 patients in JR-NET2 with ruptured VADA were included, and they were separately analyzed because several important datasets such as vasospasm and site of dissecting aneurysms in relation to the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) were collected only in JR-NET1. The ratio of poor World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) grade (4 and 5) was 48.8% and 53.9%, and the ratio of favorable outcome (modified Rankin scale, mRS 0 to 2) at 30 days after onset was 61.1 % and 49.1% in JR-NET1 and 2, respectively. In both studies, poor WFNS grade and procedural complication were independently correlated as negative factors for favorable outcome. In JR-NET1, PICA-involved lesion was also designated as a negative factor while elderly age and absence of postprocedural antithrombotic therapy was detected as other negative factors in JR-NET2. The ratios of favorable outcome in poor grade patients were 25.4% in JR-NET1 and 31.3% in JR-NET2, which seemed compatible with the previous studies. These results may provide a baseline data for the NET in this disease and could be useful for validating the benefits of novel devices. PMID:24390187

  4. Reinterventions after open and endovascular AAA repair.

    PubMed

    Malina, M

    2015-04-01

    Reinterventions seem to occur more frequently after endovascular aneurysm repair than after open surgical repair and are encountered in about 20% versus 10% of the cases, respectively. However, reinterventions following endovascular repair are predominantly endoluminal and early reinterventions are more frequent after open repair. The indications for reintervention after EVAR have changed over time. The incidence and type of reintervention depends on the complexity of the primary procedure, irrespective of whether it was open or endovascular. The use of a device outside instructions for use is associated with a higher complication rate but it may nevertheless be fully justified. Advanced stent-grafts such as fenestrated and branched devices require secondary procedures more often than a standard stent-graft. Similarly, more complex open repair, e.g. a bifurcated bypass, reimplantation of visceral arteries or a redo procedure, is also associated with more reinterventions than a simple tube graft. This manuscript presents some of the most common complications of open and endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and the reinterventions they require. Many of the complications are similar with both open and endovascular techniques. Limb thrombosis, infections and endoleaks are the most frequent indications for reintervention. PMID:25644827

  5. Balloon-Assisted Coil Embolization for Large-Necked Renal Artery Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Mounayer, Charbel; Aymard, Armand; Saint-Maurice, Jean-Pierre; Chapot, Rene; Merland, Jean-Jacques; Houdart, Emmanuel

    2000-03-15

    An aneurysm of the right renal artery was discovered in a patient suffering from cerebral arterial angiodysplasia and arterial hypertension. The aneurysm was large necked, which made selective endovascular treatment very difficult. To perform the embolization of the aneurysm, a balloon remodelling technique was used. This prevented migration of coils within the arterial lumen.

  6. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Stanlies

    2015-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  7. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  8. Intracranial Aneurysms: Review of Current Treatment Options and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Seibert, Brad; Tummala, Ramachandra P.; Chow, Ricky; Faridar, Alireza; Mousavi, Seyed A.; Divani, Afshin A.

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are present in roughly 5% of the population, yet most are often asymptomatic and never detected. Development of an aneurysm typically occurs during adulthood, while formation and growth are associated with risk factors such as age, hypertension, pre-existing familial conditions, and smoking. Subarachnoid hemorrhage, the most common presentation due to aneurysm rupture, represents a serious medical condition often leading to severe neurological deficit or death. Recent technological advances in imaging modalities, along with increased understanding of natural history and prevalence of aneurysms, have increased detection of asymptomatic unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). Studies reporting on the risk of rupture and outcomes have provided much insight, but the debate remains of how and when unruptured aneurysms should be managed. Treatment methods include two major intervention options: clipping of the aneurysm and endovascular methods such as coiling, stent-assisted coiling, and flow diversion stents. The studies reviewed here support the generalized notion that endovascular treatment of UIA provides a safe and effective alternative to surgical treatment. The risks associated with endovascular repair are lower and incur shorter hospital stays for appropriately selected patients. The endovascular treatment option should be considered based on factors such as aneurysm size, location, patient medical history, and operator experience. PMID:21779274

  9. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms: Computational Analyses of Aneurysm Progress and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Woowon; Rhee, Kyehan

    2012-01-01

    The progression of a cerebral aneurysm involves degenerative arterial wall remodeling. Various hemodynamic parameters are suspected to be major mechanical factors related to the genesis and progression of vascular diseases. Flow alterations caused by the insertion of coils and stents for interventional aneurysm treatment may affect the aneurysm embolization process. Therefore, knowledge of hemodynamic parameters may provide physicians with an advanced understanding of aneurysm progression and rupture, as well as the effectiveness of endovascular treatments. Progress in medical imaging and information technology has enabled the prediction of flow fields in the patient-specific blood vessels using computational analysis. In this paper, recent computational hemodynamic studies on cerebral aneurysm initiation, progress, and rupture are reviewed. State-of-the-art computational aneurysmal flow analyses after coiling and stenting are also summarized. We expect the computational analysis of hemodynamics in cerebral aneurysms to provide valuable information for planning and follow-up decisions for treatment. PMID:22454695

  10. Saccular Aneurysms of the Transverse Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Preventza, Ourania; Coselli, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    Saccular aneurysms of the aortic arch, whether single or multiple, are uncommon. The choice of repair technique is influenced by patients' comorbidities and age. Repairing saccular aneurysms with traditional open techniques can be technically demanding; therefore, endovascular technology and a variety of hybrid approaches have been developed to facilitate such repairs and, potentially, to improve clinical outcomes, especially in high-risk patients. There have been no large, randomized studies to compare the outcomes of these different treatment options in patients with single or multiple saccular aneurysms of the arch. In this review, we outline the etiology and common locations of these aneurysms, the different open, completely endovascular, and hybrid techniques used to treat them, and the treatment selection process. PMID:26798759

  11. Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Information Page Synonym(s): Aneurysm, Brain Aneurysm Condensed from ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Aneurysms? A cerebral aneurysm is a weak or thin ...

  12. Inflammation and human cerebral aneurysms: current and future treatment prospects

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Joseph S; Hoyne, Danielle S; Hasan, David M

    2013-01-01

    The formation of cerebral aneurysms and their rupture propensity is of immediate clinical importance. Current management includes observation with expectant management, microsurgical clipping and/or endovascular coiling. The surgical options are invasive and are not without increased risk despite the technological advances. Recent human and animal studies have shown that inflammation plays a critical role in aneurysm formation and progression to rupture. Modulating this inflammatory process may prove to be clinically significant. This review will discuss cerebral aneurysm pathogenesis with a focus on current and future research of potential use of pharmaceutical agents that attenuate inflammation in the aneurysm wall leading to decreased risk of aneurysm rupture. PMID:24376373

  13. Endovascular Treatment of Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia: Report of Five Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, Ulf; Ivancev, Krasnodar; Lindh, Mats; Uher, Petr

    1998-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the midterm results of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stent placement in stenotic and occluded mesenteric arteries in five consecutive patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia. Methods: Five patients with 70%-100% obliterations of all mesenteric vessels resulting in chronic mesenteric ischemia (n= 4) and as a prophylactic measure prior to abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (n= 1) underwent PTA of celiac and/or superior mesenteric artery (SMA) stenoses (n= 2), primary stenting of ostial celiac occlusions (n= 2), and secondary stenting of a SMA occlusion (n= 1; recoil after initial PTA). All patients underwent duplex ultrasonography (US) (n= 3) and/or angiography (n= 5) during a median follow-up of 21 months (range 8-42 months). Results: Clinical success was obtained in all five patients. Asymptomatic significant late restenoses (n3) were successfully treated with repeat PTA (n= 2) and stenting of an SMA occlusion (n= 1; celiac stent restenosis). Recurrent pain in one patient was interpreted as secondary to postsurgical abdominal adhesions. Two puncture-site complications occurred requiring local surgical treatment. Conclusions: Endovascular techniques may be attempted prior to surgery in cases of stenotic or short occlusive lesions in patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia. Surgery may still be preferred in patients with long occlusions and a low operative risk.

  14. Towards an entirely endovascular aortic world: an update of techniques and outcomes for endovascular and open treatment of type I, II, and III endoleaks.

    PubMed

    Mangialardi, Nicola; Orrico, Matteo; Ronchey, Sonia; Praquin, Barbara; Alberti, Vittorio; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is largely the most adopted strategy for aneurysmal disease of the aorta. Nevertheless, the high incidence of reintervention makes it difficult to identify EVAR as a definitive solution; in particular, the most frequent indication of reintervention is endoleak, which is defined as persistent flow into the aneurysmal sac from different sources. Several treatment strategies are described. A contemporary literature search was performed with the intent of describing techniques and outcomes of endovascular and open strategies to type I, II, and III endoleak. Described techniques and outcomes were organized by indication (type I, II, and III endoleak) and by type of approach (endovascular, open, and laparoscopic) to give an overview of the current status of the treatment for the three most frequent types of endoleak. Several endovascular means are described in the literature for the treatment of endoleak. PMID:27465391

  15. Ruptured ileocolic artery aneurysm: an unusual cause of hemoperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Zakaur R; Yousif, Omer F; Halliday, Mark W; Hubaishah, Nasser A; Adam, Khalid A

    2012-01-01

    Ruptured aneurysm of a branch of ileocolic artery is a rare finding and is an unusual cause of haemoperitoneum. Rapid diagnosis, and surgical or endovascular intervention are necessary to avoid devastating consequences and high mortality rates following an emergency operation after rupture. Resection is a good choice for surgical intervention for some aneurysms that are not suitable for endovascular repair. This report describes the case of a middle-aged man with a ruptured superior mesenteric artery branch aneurysm and his subsequent surgical management. PMID:23006464

  16. Ruptured Ileocolic Artery Aneurysm: An Unusual Cause of Hemoperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Zakaur R.; Yousif, Omer F.; Halliday, Mark W.; Hubaishah, Nasser A.; Adam, Khalid A.

    2012-01-01

    Ruptured aneurysm of a branch of ileocolic artery is a rare finding and is an unusual cause of haemoperitoneum. Rapid diagnosis, and surgical or endovascular intervention are necessary to avoid devastating consequences and high mortality rates following an emergency operation after rupture. Resection is a good choice for surgical intervention for some aneurysms that are not suitable for endovascular repair. This report describes the case of a middle-aged man with a ruptured superior mesenteric artery branch aneurysm and his subsequent surgical management. PMID:23006464

  17. Newer endovascular tools: a review of experimental and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Sorenson, Thomas; Brinjikji, Waleed; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    The history of treatment of intracranial aneurysms dates back to the late 18th century. These early physicians largely based their crude techniques around "wire insertion alone, galvanopuncture (electrothrombosis), and fili-galvanopuncture (wire insertion together with electrothrombosis)," albeit with overwhelmingly unfavorable outcomes. By the end of the 20th century, treatment options progressed to include two highly effective, and safe, procedures: surgical clipping and endovascular coiling. These methods have been found to be effective treatments for a large portion of aneurysms, but there still exists a subset of patients that do not respond well to these therapies. While much progress has been made in stent-assisted coiling including the development of newer stents aimed at keep the coil ball from protruding into the parent vessel, the introduction of flow diverters has characterized a new phase in the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms. This treatment paradigm is rapidly becoming the treatment of choice for large and complex aneurysms internal carotid artery. Intrasaccular flow diverters such as the Woven EndoBridge device (WEB) and Luna device are showing promise in the treatment of wide neck bifurcation aneurysms. Other newer devices including the pCONus Bifurcating Aneurysm Implant and Endovascular Clip Systems (eCLIPs) are showing promise in small clinical and preclinical studies. As technology improves, newer devices with ingenious designs are constantly being introduced into the clinical arena. Most of these devices try to address the limitations of traditional endovascular methods in regard to providing a safe and effective treatment of wide-necked bifurcation aneurysms. Several large prospective studies are underway and once completed, the role of these newer devices will be better defined. It is easy to anticipate that with advances in 3D techniques and printing, a future in which customized devices are designed based on the individual

  18. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta ...

  19. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the ...

  20. Aneurysm Repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... to other parts of the body (the aorta). Aortic aneurysms can occur in the area below the stomach ( ... or in the chest (thoracic aneurysms). An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is usually located below the kidneys. In ...

  1. TEVAR: Endovascular Repair of the Thoracic Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Nation, David A.; Wang, Grace J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has allowed a minimally invasive approach for management of an array of thoracic aortic pathologies. Initially developed specifically for exclusion of thoracic aortic aneurysms, TEVAR is now used as an alternative to open surgery for a variety of disease pathologies due to the lower morbidity of this approach. Advances in endograft technology continue to broaden the applications of this technique. PMID:26327745

  2. Current Options for the Management of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage-Induced Cerebral Vasospasm: A Comprehensive Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dabus, Guilherme; Nogueira, Raul G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Cerebral vasospasm is one of the leading causes of morbi-mortality following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. The aim of this article is to discuss the current status of vasospasm therapy with emphasis on endovascular treatment. Methods A comprehensive review of the literature obtained by a PubMed search. The most relevant articles related to medical, endovascular and alternative therapies were selected for discussion. Results Current accepted medical options include the oral nimodipine and ‘triple-H’ therapy (hypertension, hypervolemia and hemodilution). Nimodipine remains the only modality proven to reduce the incidence of infarction. Although widely used, ‘triple-H’ therapy has not been demonstrated to significantly change overall outcome after cerebral vasospasm. Indeed, both induced hypervolemia and hemodilution may have deleterious effects, and more recent physiologic data favor normovolemia with induced hypertension or optimization of cardiac output. Endovascular options include percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty (PTA) and intra-arterial (IA) infusion of vasodilators. Multiple case reports and case series have been encountered in the literature using different drug regimens with diverse mechanisms of action. Compared with PTA, IA drug infusion has the advantages of distal penetration and a better safety profile. Its main disadvantages are the more frequent need for repeat treatments and its systemic hemodynamic repercussions. Alternative options using intraventricular/cisternal drug therapy and flow augmentation strategies have also shown possible benefits; however, their use is not yet as well established. Conclusion Blood pressure or cardiac output optimization should be the mainstay of hyperdynamic therapy. Endovascular treatment appears to have a positive impact on neurological outcome compared with the natural history of the disease. The role of intraventricular therapy and flow augmentation strategies in association

  3. A Case of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    I report a hemorrhagic complication due to disseminated intravascular coagulation after thoracic endovascular aortic repair for a dissecting aortic aneurysm. A 74-year-old man underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair and carotid-carotid artery bypass to close the primary entry site of the dissecting aortic aneurysm. Postoperatively, he developed a gradually expanding cervical hematoma. Laboratory data showed disseminated intravascular coagulation. He could not extubated until postoperative day 6 because of the risk of airway obstruction. He was treated with transfusion to replenish the coagulation factor. Disseminated intravascular coagulation may occur secondary to thrombus formation in the false lumen after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:26730263

  4. Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm Embolization with Fibrin Sealant: A Simple and Effective Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Brountzos, Elias N.; Malagari, Katerina; Papathanasiou, Mathildi A.; Gougoulakis, Alexandros; Kelekis, Dimitrios A.

    2003-02-15

    Endovascular treatment of internal iliac artery (IIA) aneurysms is an attractive alternative to surgical management, because the former is associated with less morbidity and mortality.Embolization with coils or exclusion of the IIA orifice with stent -grafts are the preferred techniques. Although uncommon, technical failures occur with reported aneurysm rupture. Two patients with IIA aneurysms are reported here, where we describe successful occlusion of their IIA aneurysms with the use of fibrin sealant, after initial failure of coil embolization.

  5. Endovascular exclusion of an external carotid artery pseudoaneurysm using a covered stent.

    PubMed

    Riesenman, Paul J; Mendes, Robert R; Mauro, Matthew A; Farber, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    Aneurysmal lesions of the external carotid artery are extremely rare. A case is presented of a 3.8 cm right external carotid artery pseudoaneurysm treated by transluminal exclusion using an endovascular stent-graft. Following stent-graft placement, complete occlusion of the aneurysmal sac and main vessel lumen patency was successfully demonstrated. This report demonstrates the technical feasibility of utilizing stent-grafts to treat aneurysmal lesions involving the external carotid artery. PMID:17497068

  6. Trials and tribulations: an evidence-based approach to aneurysm treatment.

    PubMed

    Sorenson, Thomas; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    Since the introduction of embolic coils in the early 1990s, endovascular treatment has gained much traction for use when treating ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Three prospective studies have been conducted comparing endovascular coil embolization versus clipping for ruptured intracranial aneurysms. The first study took place in Finland and was the first head-to-head look at treating ruptured aneurysms by either endovascular coiling or surgical clipping. Results from this study suggested better functional outcome after endovascular treatment than surgery at the expenses of higher rates of incomplete aneurysm occlusion. The second largest and only multicenter study was the International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT). The ISAT took place across Europe and was the first large-scale comparison between endovascular and surgical treatments. The results from this study caused a major opinion shift across the world in regards to optimal treatment of ruptured aneurysms. Additionally, the quantity of data from this study allowed for many subgroup analyses to be made. However, to assess the generalizability of the ISAT study, the Barrow Neurological Institute investigators conducted a single-center study. The intent of this latter study was to remove any potential bias and preselection by enrolling every consenting patient that presented with the designated pathology without any exclusion. However, this enrollment strategy resulted in a high percentage of patients with aneurysms not suitable for endovascular therapy being assigned to the coil group which in turn resulted in a high rate of turn over from the endovascular to the surgical arm of the study. Despite, these limitations, this latter trial presented similar results as the Kuopio and ISAT. Although each of these trials was not methodologically flawless, the combined results from all three suggest that endovascular treatment of ruptured aneurysms suitable for this treatment strategy results in

  7. Aortoesophageal fistula after thoracic endovascular aortic repair and transthoracic embolization.

    PubMed

    Riesenman, Paul J; Farber, Mark A; Mauro, Matthew A; Selzman, Craig H; Feins, Richard H

    2007-10-01

    Endografts are more commonly being used to treat thoracic aortic aneurysms and other vascular lesions. Endoleaks are a potential complication of this treatment modality and can be associated with aneurysmal sac expansion and rupture. This case report presents a patient who developed a type IA endoleak after endograft repair of a descending thoracic aneurysm. The endoleak was successfully treated through computed tomographic-guided transthoracic embolization, although the patient experienced lower extremity paraparesis postprocedurally. The patient's endovascular repair was complicated by the development of an aortoesophageal fistula and endograft infection necessitating operative débridement and endograft explantation. PMID:17903656

  8. Post-sternotomy intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm. Sonographic diagnosis and thrombosis by ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Sebastian Fernandez; Azcona, Covadonga Mendieta; Heredero, Alvaro Fernandez; de Cubas, Luis Riera

    2009-10-01

    Intercostal artery pseudoaneurysms are extremely rare. We present a case of an intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm after median sternotomy that was treated by ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection. They are a potential source of complications, especially haemothorax, and treatment is mandatory. Different methods may be used for the confirmatory diagnosis of false aneurysms. Doppler ultrasound (DUS) and CT are the two most commonly used methods, but pseudoaneurysms have also been diagnosed by means of arteriography (AR), which enables endovascular treatment of the pseudoaneurysm in a single procedure. We used Doppler sonography alone, because this technique yielded a definitive diagnosis without the need for other complementary imaging modalities to treat the lesion. There are various possible treatments for lesions of this kind. Endovascular embolization is the commonly used treatment for intercostal pseudoaneurysm but also stent grafting has been described. Surgical aneurysmectomy with proximal ligation of the intercostal artery is an option described for the treatment of the pseudoaneurysm. To date only seven cases have been published in the literature. Our case is the only published instance of treatment of an intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm by direct percutaneous thrombin injection under sonographic guidance. PMID:19602496

  9. Mechanisms of Healing in Coiled Intracranial Aneurysms: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Brinjikji, W; Kallmes, D F; Kadirvel, R

    2015-07-01

    Recanalization of intracranial aneurysms following endovascular coiling remains a frustratingly common occurrence. An understanding of the molecular and histopathologic mechanisms of aneurysm healing following coil embolization is essential to improving aneurysm occlusion rates. Histopathologic studies in coiled human and experimental aneurysms suggest that during the first month postcoiling, thrombus formation and active inflammation occur within the aneurysm dome. Several months following embolization, the aneurysm is excluded from the parent vessel by formation of a neointimal layer, which is often thin and discontinuous, across the aneurysm neck. Numerous coil modifications and systemic therapies have been tested in animals and humans in an attempt to improve the aneurysm-healing process; these modifications have met with variable levels of success. In this review, we summarize the histopathologic and molecular biology of aneurysm healing and discuss how these findings have been applied in an attempt to improve angiographic outcomes in patients with intracranial aneurysms. PMID:25430855

  10. Mechanisms of Healing in Coiled Intracranial Aneurysms: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Brinjikji, Waleed; Kallmes, David F; Kadirvel, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Recanalization of intracranial aneurysms following endovascular coiling remains a frustratingly common occurrence. An understanding of the molecular and histopathological mechanisms of aneurysm healing following coil embolization is essential to improving aneurysm occlusion rates. Histolopathologic studies in coiled human and experimental aneurysms suggest that during the first month post-coiling, thrombus formation and active inflammation occur within the aneurysm dome. Several months following embolization, the aneurysm is excluded from the parent vessel by formation of a neointimal layer, which is often thin and discontinuous, across the aneurysm neck. Numerous coil modifications and systemic therapies have been tested in animals and humans in an attempt to improve the aneurysm healing process; these modifications have met with variable levels of success. In this review, we summarize the histopathologic and molecular biology of aneurysm healing and discuss how these findings have been applied in an attempt to improve angiographic outcomes in patients harboring intracranial aneurysm. PMID:25430855

  11. Evolution of Management of Intracranial Aneurysms in Children: A Systematic Review of the Modern Literature.

    PubMed

    Beez, Thomas; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Hänggi, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Pediatric intracranial aneurysms are rare. Management of their more common adult counterparts was profoundly influenced by recent high-quality clinical studies. The aim of this review was to aggregate the modern pediatric data published in the wake of these studies and to analyze their impact on management of aneurysms in children. A systematic PubMed search identified 135 publications published between 2000 and 2015, accounting for 573 children and 656 aneurysms. Descriptive statistical analyses revealed differences between children and adults concerning demographics and aneurysm characteristics. A significant proportion of patients were treated endovascularly, suggesting endovascular treatment has been established in the therapeutic armamentarium for pediatric aneurysms. However, these data highlight the unique nature of pediatric aneurysms, and neither this review nor generalization from adult data can replace high-quality clinical research. Multicenter registries and controlled trials are required to establish the natural history and evidence-based treatment of pediatric aneurysms. PMID:26516106

  12. [Abdominal aortic aneurysm and renovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Riambau, Vicente; Guerrero, Francisco; Montañá, Xavier; Gilabert, Rosa

    2007-06-01

    Recent technological advances in the diagnosis and therapy of abdominal aortic aneurysm and renovascular disease are continuing to bring about changes in the way patients suffering from these conditions are treated. The prevalence of both these conditions is increasing. This is due to greater life-expectancy in patients with arteriosclerosis, a pathogenetic factor underlying both conditions. The application of diagnostic imaging techniques to non-vascular conditions has led to the early diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Clinical suspicion of reno-vascular disease can be confirmed easily using high-resolution diagnostic imaging modalities such as CT angiography and magnetic resonance angiography. Endovascular intervention is successfully replacing conventional surgical repair techniques, with the result that it may be possible to improve outcome in both conditions using effective and minimally invasive approaches. Future technological developments will enable these endovascular techniques to be applied in the large majority of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm or renovascular disease. PMID:17580053

  13. Branched endograft repair of mycotic ascending aortic aneurysm using the snorkel technique.

    PubMed

    Quinney, Brenton Ellisor; Jordan, William

    2011-07-01

    Mycotic aneurysms are difficult clinical cases that can be approached by several methods. Debridement of infected tissue with in situ or extra-anatomic bypass is the traditional treatment. In poor operative candidates or reoperative cases, endovascular therapies can be an alternative. We present a 9-year-old with an ascending aortic mycotic aneurysm temporized with an endovascular repair as a bridge to definitive open surgery. PMID:21719552

  14. Basilar Artery Aneurysm at a Persistent Trigeminal Artery Junction

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, G.B.; Conti, M.L.M.; Veiga, J.C.E.; Jory, M.; Souza, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The trigeminal artery is an anastomosis between the embryonic precursors of the vertebrobasilar and carotid systems, and may persist into adult life. The association of the persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) with cerebral aneurysm is well documented in the literature and, in general, aneurysms are located in the anterior circulation. We describe a patient who presented with a panencephalic Fisher III subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm. Digital arteriography showed a saccular aneurysm in the middle third of the basilar artery, adjacent to the junction with a persistent trigeminal artery. She was submitted to endovascular treatment with embolization of the basilar artery aneurysm with coils. Aneurysms at the PTA junction with the basilar artery are rare. This paper describes a case of PTA associated with an aneurysm in the basilar artery at PTA junction and briefly reviews the literature. PMID:22005697

  15. A Case of Glucocorticoid Remediable Aldosteronism and Thoracoabdominal Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Shahrrava, Anahita; Moinuddin, Sunnan; Boddu, Prajwal; Shah, Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid remediable aldosteronism (GRA) is rare familial form of primary aldosteronism characterized by a normalization of hypertension with the administration of glucocorticoids. We present a case of GRA and thoracoabdominal aneurysm complicated by multiple aortic dissections requiring complex surgical and endovascular repairs. Registry studies have shown a high rate of intracranial aneurysms in GRA patients with high case fatality rates. The association of thoracoabdominal aneurysms with GRA has not been described, thus far, in literature. Studies have shown that high tissue aldosterone levels concomitant with salt intake have a significant role in the pathogenesis of aneurysms and this may explain the formation of aneurysms in the intracranial vasculature and aorta. The association of GRA with thoracic aortic aneurysms needs to be further studied to develop screening recommendations for early identification and optimal treatment. Also, the early use of mineralocorticoid antagonists may have a significant preventive and attenuating effect in aneurysm formation, an association which needs to be confirmed in future studies. PMID:27366333

  16. Stent-assisted coil embolization of a symptomatic middle cerebral artery aneurysm in an infant.

    PubMed

    Savastano, Luis E; Chaudhary, Neeraj; Gemmete, Joseph J; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O; Pandey, Aditya S

    2014-11-01

    Pediatric intracranial aneurysms are rare and challenging to treat. Achieving efficacy and durability of aneurysmal occlusion while maintaining parent vessel patency requires innovative treatment strategies, especially in cases in which aneurysmal location or morphology pose substantial morbidity associated with microsurgical treatment. In the last 3 decades, endovascular treatments have had a remarkable evolution and are currently considered safe and effective therapeutic options for cerebral aneurysms. While endovascular techniques are well described in the English literature, the endovascular management of pediatric aneurysms continues to pose a challenge. In this report, the authors describe the case of a 9-month-old infant who presented with a 1-day history of acute-onset left-sided hemiparesis and left facial droop. Imaging revealed a large symptomatic saccular middle cerebral artery aneurysm. Treatment included successful stent-assisted aneurysm coiling. At follow-up, the patient continued to fare well and MR angiography confirmed complete occlusion of the aneurysm dome. This case features the youngest patient in the English literature to harbor an intracranial aneurysm successfully treated with stent-assisted coiling. Based on this experience, endovascular intervention with vascular reconstruction can be safe and effective for the treatment of infants and could further improve prognosis; however, further studies are necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:25171722

  17. Infantile intracranial aneurysm of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Del Santo, Molly Ann; Cordina, Steve Mario

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare. We report a case of a 3-month-old infant who presented with inconsolable crying, vomiting, and sunset eye sign. CT revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage, with CT angiogram revealing a superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. An external ventricular drain was placed for acute management of hydrocephalus, with definitive treatment by endovascular technique with a total of six microcoils to embolize the aneurysm. Serial transcranial Dopplers revealed no subsequent vasospasm. Although aneurysms in the pediatric population are rare, once the diagnosis is established, early treatment results in better outcomes. PMID:26929222

  18. Stent Application for the Treatment of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Joon; Kim, Dong Ik

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and striking development in both the techniques and devices make it possible to treat most of cerebral aneurysms endovascularly. Stent has become one of the most important tools in treating difficult aneurysms not feasible for simple coiling. The physical features, the dimensions, and the functional characteristics of the stents show considerable differences. There are also several strategies and tips to treat difficult aneurysms by using stent and coiling. Nevertheless, they require much experience in clinical practice as well as knowledge of the stents to treat cerebral aneurysms safely and effectively. In this report, a brief review of properties of the currently available stents and strategies of their application is presented. PMID:22125751

  19. [Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Kalder, J; Kotelis, D; Jacobs, M J

    2016-09-01

    Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) are rare events with an incidence of 5.9 cases per 100,000 persons per year. In Germany approximately 940 TAAA procedures are performed annually. The cause of TAAA is mostly degenerative but they can also occur on the basis of an aortic dissection or connective tissue disease (e. g. Marfan's syndrome). Patients often have severe comorbidities and suffer from hypertension, coronary heart disease or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mostly as a result of smoking. Operative treatment is indicated when the maximum aortic diameter has reached 6 cm (> 5 cm in patients with connective tissue disease) or the aortic diameter rapidly increases (> 5 mm/year). Treatment options are open surgical aortic repair with extracorporeal circulation, endovascular repair with branched/fenestrated endografts and parallel grafts (chimneys) or a combination of open and endovascular procedures (hybrid procedures). Mortality rates after both open and endovascular procedures are approximately 8 % depending on the extent of the repair. Furthermore, there are relevant risks of complications, such as paraplegia (up to 20 %) and the necessity for dialysis. In recent years several approaches to minimize these risks have been proposed. Besides cardiopulmonary risk evaluation, clinical assessment of patients by the physician with respect to the patient-specific anatomy influences the allocation of patients to one treatment option or another. Surgery of TAAA should ideally be performed in high-volume centers in order to achieve better results. PMID:27558261

  20. Utility of Balloon-Assisted Guglielmi Detachable Coiling in the Treatment of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Mangiafico, S.; Cellerini, M.; Villa, G.; Nistri, M.; Pandolfo, C.; Ammannati, F.; Mennonna, P.; Giordano, GP.

    2002-01-01

    Summary Balloon-assisted Guglielmi detachable coiling (BAGDC) is a new technical option developed to allow endovascular treatment of wide-necked aneurysms. Aim of the following work is to report a single center experience of BADGC of aneurysms with assessment of its efficacy and safety. BAGDC of wide-necked aneurysms (SNR close to 1) was retrospectively evaluated in 37 patients (28 females, nine males, mean age: 56.6 yrs, range: 27-81 yrs) who underwent the procedure between january 1999 and january 2002 for a total of 45 procedures on 41 aneurysms. Twenty-nine patients presented with SAH from an acutely ruptured aneurysm. In two patients BAGDC failed whereas 35 patients successfully underwent BADGC (39 aneurysms). Twenty-nine patients (31 aneurysms) were available for angiographic follow-up (mean: 10 mo, range: 3-24 mo). At the last angiographic follow-up 29/33 aneurysms (87%) resulted stable and occluded (22 aneurysms with dense and seven with loose packing of the sac and the neck), two aneurysms showed regrowth, one aneurysm showed a neck remnant and another one a sac and neck remnant. Complications directly related to the procedure occurred in five patients (three perforations, one thromboembolism, one femoral AV) with a mortality and morbility rate of 2.7 and 5.4 respectively. BAGDC is a promising adjunct to treatment of wide-necked aneurysms broadening the spectrum of indications for endovascular treament of challenging aneurysms. PMID:20594481

  1. Endovascular Intervention for Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thukkani, Arun K.; Kinlay, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Advances in endovascular therapies during the past decade have broadened the options for treating peripheral vascular disease percutaneously. Endovascular treatment offers a lower risk alternative to open surgery in many patients with multiple comorbidities. Noninvasive physiological tests and arterial imaging precede an endovascular intervention and help localize the disease and plan the procedure. The timing and need for revascularization are broadly related to the 3 main clinical presentations of claudication, critical limb ischemia, and acute limb ischemia. Many patients with claudication can be treated by exercise and medical therapy. Endovascular procedures are considered when these fail to improve quality of life and function. In contrast, critical limb ischemia and acute limb ischemia threaten the limb and require more urgent revascularization. In general, endovascular treatments have greater long-term durability for aortoiliac disease than femoral popliteal disease. Infrapopliteal revascularization is generally reserved for critical and acute limb ischemia. Balloon angioplasty and stenting are the mainstays of endovascular therapy. New well-tested innovations include drug-eluting stents and drug-coated balloons. Adjunctive devices for crossing chronic total occlusions or debulking plaque with atherectomy are less rigorously studied and have niche roles. Patients receiving endovascular procedures need a structured surveillance plan for follow-up care. This includes intensive treatment of cardiovascular risk factors to prevent myocardial infarction and stroke, which are the main causes of death. Limb surveillance aims to identify restenosis and new disease beyond the intervened segments, both of which may jeopardize patency and lead to recurrent symptoms, functional impairment, or a threatened limb. PMID:25908731

  2. Endovascular Treatment of Mycotic Aortic Pseudoaneurysms with Stent-Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Tiesenhausen, Kurt Hessinger, Michael; Tomka, Maurice; Portugaller, Horst; Swanidze, Shota; Oberwalder, Peter

    2008-05-15

    Mycotic aortic aneurysms remain a therapeutic challenge, especially in patients who are not suitable for open surgery. Endovascular treatment with stent-grafts in this indication is still disputed. Between January 2002 and January 2006, six patients with mycotic aneurysms of the thoracoabdominal or abdominal aorta were admitted to our department. All patients were male, aged 57-83 years (mean, 74.6 years). The mycotic aneurysms were diagnosed on the basis of clinical signs of infection, on CT, and, in four cases, on a positive blood culture. In all patients the mycotic aortic aneurysms were treated endovascularly by stent-graft implantation. Technical and clinical success was achieved in all patients. There was no in-hospital or 30-day mortality. In the follow-up period (range, 2-47 months) four patients died of cancer, cardiac failure, or unknown cause (one case). Two patients are still alive with nearly complete regression of the aneurysms. We conclude that treatment of mycotic aortic aneurysms with stent-grafts may be an alternative in selected patients.

  3. Surgical clipping is still a good choice for the treatment of paraclinoid aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Felix Hendrik; Oliveira, Matheus Fernandes de; Brock, Roger Schmidt; Lucio, José Erasmo Dal Col; Rotta, José Marcus

    2016-04-01

    Paraclinoid aneurysms are lesions located adjacent to the clinoid and ophthalmic segments of the internal carotid artery. In recent years, flow diverter stents have been introduced as a better endovascular technique for treatment of these aneurysms. Method From 2009 to 2014, a total of 43 paraclinoid aneurysms in 43 patients were surgically clipped. We retrospectively reviewed the records of these patients to analyze clinical outcomes. Results Twenty-six aneurysms (60.5%) were ophthalmic artery aneurysms, while 17 were superior hypophyseal artery aneurysms (39.5%). The extradural approach to the clinoid process was used to clip these aneurysms. One hundred percent of aneurysms were clipped (complete exclusion in 100% on follow-up angiography). The length of follow-up ranged from 1 to 60 months (mean, 29.82 months). Conclusion Surgical clipping continues to be a good option for the treatment of paraclinoid aneurysms. PMID:27097005

  4. Aneurysmal Neck Clipping as the Primary Treatment Option for Both Ruptured and Unruptured Middle Cerebral Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jai Ho; Park, Jung Eon; Kim, Myeong Jin; Kim, Bum Su

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms are less amenable to coil embolization, an increasing number of studies support favorable endovascular treatment for them. The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of two different treatments (surgery versus coiling) and evaluate the benefits of surgical clipping for MCA aneurysms. Methods Here we retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of 178 ruptured and unruptured MCA aneurysms treated in patients between September 2008 and April 2012. Parameters assessing treatment outcomes include degree of aneurysm occlusion, presence of regrowth, clinical status, and complications. Results Among 178 MCA aneurysms, 153 were treated surgically. After a mean follow-up of 12 months, the surgery group showed a clinically significant complete occlusion rate (98%) compared with the coiling group (56%) (p<0.001). Follow-up radiologic evaluation showed a higher regrowth rate (four of 16 cases) in the coiling group than in the surgery group (one of 49 cases) (p=0.003). There was no statistically significant difference in favorable clinical outcome rate between the two groups. The procedure-related permanent morbidity and mortality rates were 2% (three of 153 cases) in the surgery group and 0% (0 of 25 cases) in the coiling group. Conclusion Compared to endovascular treatment, surgical neck clipping for both ruptured and unruptured MCA aneurysms results in a significantly higher complete obliteration rate and less regrowth. Therefore, even in this endovascular era, we still recommend surgical clipping as the primary treatment option for MCA aneurysms rather than coil embolization. PMID:27226859

  5. Brain Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  6. Giant Cavernous Aneurysm Associated with a Persistent Trigeminal Artery and Persistent Otic Artery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chang-wei; Yang, Zhi-gang; Wang, Chao-hua; You, Chao; Mao, Bo-yong; He, Min; Sun, Hong

    2009-01-01

    Primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) and primitive otic artery (POA) is a very rare entity in adult life. We present a case of PTA and POA associated with a giant unruptured cavernous aneurysm in a 54-year-old woman. The PTA and the POA arose from the sac of the aneurysm directly, which greatly complicated endovascular therapy management. PMID:19721839

  7. Rebleeding of a neck remnant in a case of ruptured aneurysm initially treated with coils.

    PubMed

    Benaissa, Azzedine; Pierot, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    The follow-up and indications for retreatment of intracranial aneurysms treated endovascularly are still a matter of debate. We report the case of a patient with a ruptured aneurysm who was treated twice with coils and regularly followed up with MRI/MR angiography which showed a neck remnant that finally rebled. PMID:25895511

  8. Internal iliac aneurysm presenting with lower back pain, sciatica and foot drop.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rohit; Moores, Thomas; Maddox, Mark; Horton, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Internal iliac aneurysms are usually silent and are identified as an incidental finding on a radiological investigation for an unrelated condition, unless catastrophic bleeding occurs. We present the first case of a middle-aged man with a large internal iliac aneurysm presenting with a foot drop and sciatic nerve pain. The endovascular management is discussed. PMID:24964407

  9. Transcatheter Embolization of a Renal Arteriovenous Fistula Complicated by an Aneurysm of the Feeding Renal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Kensella, Denise; Kakani, Nirmal Pocock, Richard; Thompson, John; Cowan, Andrew; Watkinson, A.

    2008-03-15

    Renal arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is rare. Renal AVF complicated by aneurysm of the feeding artery presents a technical challenge for endovascular treatment. We report a case managed by covered stenting of the renal artery aneurysm, coil embolization of the fistula, and bare stenting of the aorta.

  10. Warning leak of intracranial aneurysm masquerading as sinus node dysfunction: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bisht, Devendra Singh; Garg, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    We describe the successful endovascular repair of an intracranial aneurysm causing subarachnoid hemorrhage in a 62-year-old man, who was initially diagnosed and treated as a case of symptomatic sinus bradycardia. The aim of this report and following discussion is to discuss the subtle warning signs of intracranial aneurysm that may masquerade as sinus node dysfunction. PMID:27489696

  11. Interposition vein graft for giant coronary aneurysm repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Azoury, F.; Lytle, B. W.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Coronary aneurysms in adults are rare. Surgical treatment is often concomitant to treating obstructing coronary lesions. However, the ideal treatment strategy is poorly defined. We present a case of successful treatment of a large coronary artery aneurysm with a reverse saphenous interposition vein graft. This modality offers important benefits over other current surgical and percutaneous techniques and should be considered as an option for patients requiring treatment for coronary aneurysms.

  12. Snorkel/chimney and fenestrated endografts for complex abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ullery, B W; Lee, J T; Dalman, R L

    2015-10-01

    Complex endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) involves extension of the proximal aortic seal zone with preservation of branch vessel patency, thereby expanding the applicability of endografting from the infrarenal to the suprarenal aorta. Snorkel/chimney (Sn-EVAR) and fenestrated EVAR (f-EVAR) serve as the two most commonly utilized advanced endovascular techniques to combat hostile proximal neck anatomy. The purpose of this article is to describe the principles and evolution of these advanced endovascular strategies, technical considerations, and results of sn- and f-EVAR in the management of challenging neck anatomy in abdominal aortic aneurysm disease. PMID:25800354

  13. Vertebral Dissecting Aneurysm Treated with Wingspan Stent Deployment and Detachable Coils

    PubMed Central

    Lv, M.; Lv, X.; Li, Y.; Yang, X.; Wu, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We describe the first documented endovascular treatment of vertebral dissecting aneurysm using a Wingspan stent and detachable coils. A 54-year-old man presented with a nonruptured vertebral dissecting aneurysm. Because of the dissecting nature of the vertebral aneurysms, a 3x15-mm Wingspan stent was placed in the left vertebral artery. One month later, several detachable coils were introduced into the aneurysm. Six-month follow-up angiogram confirmed the obliteration. Vertebral dissecting aneurysm can be treated with Wingspan stent placement and detachable coils. PMID:20465940

  14. Surgical repair of an aberrant splenic artery aneurysm: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; LaMuraglia, Glenn; Nigri, Giuseppe; Vietri, Francesco

    2007-03-01

    Aneurysms of the splenic artery are the most common splanchnic aneurysms. Aneurysms of a splenic artery with an anomalous origin from the superior mesenteric artery are however rare, with eight previously reported cases. Their indications for treatment are superposable to those of aneurysms affecting an orthotopic artery. Methods of treatment of this condition include endovascular, minimally invasive techniques and surgical resection. We report one more case of aneurysm of an aberrant splenic artery, treated with surgical resection, and preservation of the spleen. PMID:17349366

  15. Treatment of Vertebro-Basilar Dissecting Aneurysms Using Intravascular Stents

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Kawano, Y.; Yoshimura, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Hara, M.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Endovascular surgery is an established primary therapeutic modality for dissecting aneurysms at vertebro-basilar arteries. Intravascular stents can be used to treat the dissecting aneurysms for which simple obliteration procedures cannot be used. In such cases, stent implantation alone or a combination of stents and coils need to be selected properly by taking into consideration the site and shape of dissections. In this report, three patterns of stent application are described and their method of selection is discussed. PMID:20569619

  16. [False aneurysm on dacron prosthesis, 20 years after aortofemoral bypass].

    PubMed

    Illuminati, G; Bertagni, A; Nasti, A G; Montesano, G

    2001-10-01

    A 85-year-old male developed a false, non septic, non anastomotic aneurysm, 20 years after right aorto-femoral Dacron grafting for claudication. On account of the proximity to the femoral anastomosis, and the association with a profunda femoris stenosis, a conventional surgical repair was preferred to an endovascular treatment. The patient underwent a successful aneurysm resection followed by PTFE interposition between the primary graft and the profunda femoris artery, with uneventful recovery. PMID:11692765

  17. Endovascular Repair of a Secondary Aorto-Appendiceal Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Tse, Donald M. L.; Thompson, Andrew R. A.; Perkins, Jeremy; Bratby, Mark J.; Anthony, Susan; Uberoi, Raman

    2011-10-15

    Aortoenteric fistula (AEF) is an uncommon but serious complication occurring after aortic surgery and may occur at any site in the gastrointestinal tract, with the duodenum being the most common. Conventional surgical repair of secondary AEF has high mortality, whereas endovascular repair has emerged as an alternative treatment despite concerns about persistent or recurrent infection. We report the case of a 91-year old man who was admitted with rectal bleeding from an aorto-appendiceal fistula 9 years after open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. This rare site for AEF was diagnosed on computed tomography, and we present the first case of endovascular treatment of this uncommon complication.

  18. Percutaneous Glue Embolization of a Visceral Artery Pseudoaneurysm in a Case of Sickle Cell Anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, Gurpreet S.; Gulati, Manpreet S. Makharia, Govind; Hatimota, Pradeep; Saikia, Nripen; Paul, Shashi B.; Acharya, Subrat

    2006-08-15

    Although aneurysmal complications of sickle cell anemia have been described in the intracranial circulation, visceral artery pseudoaneurysms in this disease entity have not previously been reported in the literature. Conventional treatment of visceral pseudoaneurysms has been surgical ligation or resection of the aneurysm. Transcatheter embolization has emerged as an attractive, minimally invasive alternative to surgery in the treatment of these lesions. In certain situations, however, due to the unfavorable angiographic anatomy precluding safe transcatheter embolization, direct percutaneous glue injection of the pseudoaneurysm sac may be considered to achieve successful occlusion of the sac. The procedure may be rendered safer by simultaneous balloon protection of the parent artery. We describe this novel treatment modality in a case of inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm in a patient with sickle cell anemia. Although a complication in the form of glue reflux into the parent vessel occurred that necessitated surgery, this treatment modality may be used in very selected cases (where conventional endovascular embolization techniques are not applicable) after careful selection of the balloon diameter and appropriate concentration of the glue-lipiodol mixture.

  19. Endovascular Treatment of Anastomotic Pseudoaneurysms after Aorto-iliac Surgical Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Lagana, Domenico Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Mangini, Monica Recaldini, Chiara; Lumia, Domenico; Cuffari, Salvatore; Caronno, Roberto; Castelli, Patrizio; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2007-11-15

    Purpose. To assess the effectiveness of endovascular treatment of anastomotic pseudoaneurysms (APAs) following aorto-iliac surgical reconstruction. Materials. We retrospectively evaluated 21 men who, between July 2000 and March 2006, were observed with 30 APAs, 13 to the proximal anastomosis and 17 to the distal anastomosis. The patients had had previous aorto-iliac reconstructive surgery with a bypass due to aneurysm (15/21) or obstructive disease (6/21). The following devices were used: 12 bifurcated endoprostheses, 2 aorto-monoiliac, 4 aortic extenders, 1 stent-graft leg, and 2 covered stents. Follow-up was performed with CT angiography at 1, 3, and 6 months after the procedure and yearly thereafter. Results. Immediate technical success was 100%. No periprocedural complications occurred. Four patients died during follow-up from causes not related to APA, and 1 (treated for prosthetic-enteric fistula) from sepsis 3 months after the procedure. During a mean follow-up of 19.7 months (range 1-72 months), 2 of 21 occlusions of stent-graft legs occurred 3 and 24 months after the procedure (treated with thrombolysis and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and femorofemoral bypass, respectively) and 1 type I endoleak. Primary clinical success rate was 81% and secondary clinical success was 91%. Conclusion. Endovascular treatment is a valid alternative to open surgery and can be proposed as the treatment of choice for APAs, especially in patients who are a high surgical risk. Further studies with larger series and longer follow-up are necessary to confirm the long-term effectiveness of this approach.

  20. [Isolated true aneurysm of the deep femoral artery].

    PubMed

    Salomon du Mont, L; Holzer, T; Kazandjian, C; Saucy, F; Corpataux, J M; Rinckenbach, S; Déglise, S

    2016-07-01

    Aneurysms of the deep femoral artery, accounting for 5% of all femoral aneurysms, are uncommon. There is a serious risk of rupture. We report the case of an 83-year-old patient with a painless pulsatile mass in the right groin due to an aneurysm of the deep femoral artery. History taking revealed no cardiovascular risk factors and no other aneurysms at other localizations. The etiology remained unclear because no recent history of local trauma or puncture was found. ACT angiography was performed, revealing a true isolated aneurysm of the deep femoral artery with a diameter of 90mm, beginning 1cm after its origin. There were no signs of rupture or distal emboli. Due to unsuitable anatomy for an endovascular approach, the patient underwent open surgery, with exclusion of the aneurysm and interposition of an 8-mm Dacron graft to preserve deep femoral artery flow. Due to their localization, the diagnosis and the management of aneurysms of the deep femoral artery can be difficult. Options are surgical exclusion or an endovascular approach in the absence of symptoms or as a bridging therapy. If possible, blood flow to the distal deep femoral artery should be maintained, the decision depending also on the patency of the superficial femoral artery. In case of large size, aneurysms of the deep femoral artery should be treated without any delay. PMID:27289256

  1. A Concealed Intracranial Aneurysm Detected after Recanalization of an Occluded Vessel: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Torikoshi, Sadaharu; Akiyama, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Background Based on the results of several randomized controlled trials, acute endovascular thrombectomy is strongly recommended for patients with acute ischemic stroke due to large artery occlusion (LAO). The incidence of an intracranial aneurysm has been reported to be approximately 5% in the general population. Therefore, the possibility of the coincidence of LAO and an intracranial aneurysm at the distal part of an occluded vessel should be considered. Summary A 74-year-old female patient presented with the sudden onset of consciousness disturbance and left-sided weakness. Neuroimages demonstrated an acute infarction due to right middle cerebral artery occlusion. The occlusion was successfully treated, and an aneurysm was incidentally detected at the occluded artery. We reviewed the literature and identified 11 cases in 8 reports, which were similar to our case. Among the 11 cases, aneurysms ruptured during endovascular therapy in 2 cases. In the present report, we discussed the prediction of concealed aneurysms and avoidance of their rupture during endovascular intervention. Key Message The presence of an aneurysm concealed behind an embolus should be carefully assessed on preoperative and intraoperative neuroimages. The important findings for suspecting such an aneurysm are a hyperdense nodular sign on preoperative computed tomography and unusual motion of the microwire during the endovascular intervention. Even if there is no finding indicative of an aneurysm, the catheter and thrombectomy devices should be more carefully advanced than usual, especially at the common sites of aneurysms, and the devices should be appropriately chosen. PMID:27051404

  2. Internal iliac artery aneurysmo-colonic fistula after endovascular stent-graft repair: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yanase, Yohsuke; Fukada, Johji; Tamiya, Yukihiko

    2015-01-01

    We describe rare ilio-enteric fistula that developed after endovascular repair of a left internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA). An 83-year-old man with a history of previous surgeries via laparotomies suddenly developed a high fever 3 years after undergoing endovascular abdominal aortic repair (EVAR) with a stent-graft to treat a left isolated IIAA. Computed tomography imaging revealed a fistula between the IIAA and the sigmoid colon. A colostomy was created because severe intraperitoneal adhesions prevented resection of the IIAA. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient remained free of infection without antibiotics. Residual aneurysms can cause complications after EVAR. PMID:25848433

  3. Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysmo–Colonic Fistula after Endovascular Stent-Graft Repair: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Fukada, Johji; Tamiya, Yukihiko

    2015-01-01

    We describe rare ilio-enteric fistula that developed after endovascular repair of a left internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA). An 83-year-old man with a history of previous surgeries via laparotomies suddenly developed a high fever 3 years after undergoing endovascular abdominal aortic repair (EVAR) with a stent-graft to treat a left isolated IIAA. Computed tomography imaging revealed a fistula between the IIAA and the sigmoid colon. A colostomy was created because severe intraperitoneal adhesions prevented resection of the IIAA. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient remained free of infection without antibiotics. Residual aneurysms can cause complications after EVAR. PMID:25848433

  4. Endovascular Treatment for Proximal Anastomotic Pseudoaneurysm after Total Arch Replacement in Behcet's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Tomoki; Ueda, Hideki; Watanabe, Michiko; Kohno, Hiroki; Tamura, Yusaku; Abe, Shinichiro; Inage, Yuichi; Ikeuchi, Hiroki; Kanda, Tomoyoshi; Fujii, Masahiko; Matsumiya, Goro

    2016-07-01

    A 17-year-old patient underwent total arch replacement for aortic arch aneurysm due to vascular Behcet's disease (BD). Follow-up computed tomography, performed 6 months after the operation, demonstrated pseudoaneurysm formation at the proximal anastomotic site. We performed endovascular treatment and used a short stent graft that was originally designed for abdominal aortic aneurysm. To avoid the occlusion of the coronary or brachiocephalic artery (BCA) due to stent graft migration, we used right ventricular rapid pacing and BCA ballooning. Thus, we believe that endovascular treatment can be used for anastomotic complications in the ascending aorta after open surgery for connective tissue disorders including BD. PMID:27174345

  5. Endovascular repair of a pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta secondary to translumbar aortography.

    PubMed

    Mir, Naheed; De Nunzio, Mario; Pollock, John G

    2006-01-01

    This report describes an incidental finding of a pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta on a computed tomography (CT) renal angiogram during investigation of chronic renal failure in a 73-year-old man. The patient had undergone a translumbar aortogram 20 years previously. An increase in the size of the aneurysm by 7 mm over 6 months prompted treatment and the aneurysm underwent successful endovascular repair with a custom-made stent-graft. PMID:16184323

  6. Giant Intracranial Aneurysms: Evolution of Management in a Contemporary Surgical Series

    PubMed Central

    Sughrue, Michael E.; Saloner, David; Rayz, Vitaliy L.; Lawton, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many significant microsurgical series of patients with giant aneurysms predate changes in practice during the endovascular era. OBJECTIVE A contemporary surgical experience is presented to examine changes in management relative to earlier reports, to establish the role of open microsurgery in the management strategy, and to quantify results for comparison with evolving endovascular therapies. METHODS During a 13-year period, 140 patients with 141 giant aneurysms were treated surgically. 100 aneurysms (71%) were located in the anterior circulation, and 41 aneurysms were located in the posterior circulation. RESULTS 108 aneurysms (77%) were completely occluded, 14 aneurysms (10%) had minimal residual aneurysm, and 16 aneurysms (11%) were incompletely occluded with reversed or diminished flow. 3 patients with calcified aneurysms were coiled after unsuccessful clipping attempts. 18 patients died in the perioperative period (surgical mortality, 13%). Bypass-related complications resulted from bypass occlusion (7 patients), aneurysm hemorrhage due to incomplete aneurysm occlusion (4 patients), or aneurysm thrombosis with perforator or branch artery occlusion (4 patients). 13 patients were worse at late follow-up (permanent neurological morbidity, 9%; mean length of follow-up, 23±1.9 months). Overall, good outcomes (GOS 5 or 4) were observed in 114 patients (81%) and 109 patients (78%) were improved or unchanged after therapy. CONCLUSION A heavy reliance on bypass techniques plus indirect giant aneurysm occlusion distinguishes this contemporary surgical experience from earlier ones, and obviates the need for hypothermic circulatory arrest. Experienced neurosurgeons can achieve excellent results with surgery as the “first-line” management approach and endovascular techniques as adjuncts to surgery. PMID:21734614

  7. Small Intracranial Aneurysm Treatment Using Target ® Ultrasoft ™ Coils

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Gaurav; Miller, Timothy; Iyohe, Moronke; Shivashankar, Ravi; Prasad, Vikram; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The introduction of small, soft, complex-shaped microcoils has helped facilitate the endovascular treatment of small intracranial aneurysms (IAs) over the last several years. Here, we evaluate the initial safety and efficacy of treating small IAs using only Target® Ultrasoft™ coils. Materials and methods A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained clinical database at a single, high volume, teaching hospital was performed from September 2011 to May 2015. IAs smaller than or equal to 5.0 mm in maximal dimension treated with only Target® Ultrasoft™ coils were included. Results A total of 50 patients with 50 intracranial aneurysms were included. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from index aneurysm rupture was the indication for treatment in 23 of 50 (46%) cases, and prior subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from another aneurysm was the indication for treatment in eight of 50 (16%) cases. The complete aneurysm occlusion rate was 70% (35/50), the minimal residual aneurysm rate was 14% (7/50), and residual aneurysm rate was 16% (8/50). One intraoperative aneurysm rupture occurred. Three patients died during hospitalization from clinical sequelae of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Follow-up at a mean of 13.6 months demonstrated complete aneurysm occlusion in 75% (30/40) of cases, near complete occlusion in 15% (6/40) of cases, and residual aneurysm in 10% (4/40) of cases, all four of which were retreated. Conclusion Our initial results using only Target® Ultrasoft™ coils for the endovascular treatment of small intracranial aneurysms demonstrate initial excellent safety and efficacy profiles. PMID:27403224

  8. Giant aortic aneurysm in a child with Takayasu arteritis.

    PubMed

    Halaweish, Ihab; Patel, Himanshu; Si, Ming-Sing

    2016-03-01

    Takayasu arteritis is a chronic, idiopathic, granulomatous vasculitis involving the aorta, its major branches, and occasionally the pulmonary arteries. Although rare in children, it is the third most common vasculitis in the paediatric population. Although aneurysmal disease has been reported in adults with Takayasu arteritis, it is a rare entity in children. We present the case of a 10-year-old boy with a giant ascending and arch aneurysm that necessitated follow-up surgery for a new aneurysm and occlusive disease. This is also the first published case involving endovascular aortic graft placement for the management of vascular sequela of Takayasu arteritis in a child. PMID:26365418

  9. Molecular basis and genetic predisposition to intracranial aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Weinsheimer, Shantel; Ronkainen, Antti; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms, also called cerebral aneurysms, are dilatations in the arteries that supply blood to the brain. Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm leads to a subarachnoid hemorrhage, which is fatal in about 50% of the cases. Intracranial aneurysms can be repaired surgically or endovascularly, or by combining these two treatment modalities. They are relatively common with an estimated prevalence of unruptured aneurysms of 2%–6% in the adult population, and are considered a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Known risk factors include smoking, hypertension, increasing age, and positive family history for intracranial aneurysms. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms is complex. Genome-wide approaches such as DNA linkage and genetic association studies, as well as microarray-based mRNA expression studies, provide unbiased approaches to identify genetic risk factors and dissecting the molecular pathobiology of intracranial aneurysms. The ultimate goal of these studies is to use the information in clinical practice to predict an individual's risk for developing an aneurysm or monitor its growth or rupture risk. Another important goal is to design new therapies based on the information on mechanisms of disease processes to prevent the development or halt the progression of intracranial aneurysms. PMID:25117779

  10. A fractured sirolimus-eluting stent with a coronary aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hea; Kim, Hyun Joong; Han, Seong Woo; Jung, Sang Man; Kim, Jun Suk; Chee, Hyun Keun; Ryu, Kyu Hyung

    2009-08-01

    A 55-year-old man had undergone successful percutaneous intervention with a sirolimus-eluting stent, placed in the right coronary artery (2.5 x 33 mm) and distal left circumflex artery (3.0 x 28 mm) without high pressure ballooning. Twelve months later he presented with unstable angina. Angiography revealed two fracture sites on the right coronary artery-deployed stent, with a large aneurysm and an aneurysmal dilatation of the left circumflex artery without stent fracture. Due to the potential risk of aneurysmal rupture, he underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and ligation of the aneurysm. PMID:19632438

  11. Stent-assisted coil embolization of coronary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Terasawa, Akihiro; Yokoi, Tuyoshi; Kondo, Keita

    2013-08-01

    Coronary artery aneurysms are uncommon diseases with potential complications including rupture and ischemia from embolic events or thrombosis. No consensus has been established regarding the optimal therapy for coronary artery aneurysms. Percutaneous catheter-based treatments using membrane-covered stents and coil embolization have been described. However, only few reports of stent-assisted coil embolization for coronary artery aneurysms have been published to date. Therefore, we report a case of coronary artery aneurysm successfully treated with stent-assisted coil embolization. PMID:23913616

  12. Emergency Endovascular 'Bridge' Treatment for Iliac-Enteric Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Franchin, Marco; Tozzi, Matteo; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Castelli, Patrizio

    2011-10-15

    Aortic aneurysm has been reported to be the dominant cause of primary iliac-enteric fistula (IEF) in >70% of cases [1]; other less common causes of primary IEF include peptic ulcer, primary aortitis, pancreatic pseudocyst, or neoplastic erosion into an adjacent artery [2, 3]. We describe an unusual case of IEF managed with a staged approach using an endovascular stent-graft as a 'bridge' in the emergency setting to optimize the next elective definitive excision of the lesion.

  13. An unusual combination of a tuberculous aneurysm of the thoracic aorta and a degenerative aneurysm of the infrarenal abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Avaro, Jean-Philippe; Amabile, Philippe; Paule, Philippe; Peloni, Jean-Michel; Piquet, Philippe

    2011-07-01

    Tuberculous aneurysms of the aorta are rare and give rise to various issues related to their diagnosis and treatment. In this article, we report on an exceptional case concerning a patient who presented with a false tuberculous aneurysm of the thoracic aorta and a degenerative aneurysm of the infrarenal abdominal aorta concomitantly. A discussion on how we approached the diagnosis and devised a therapeutic strategy that allowed us to treat this dual aortic disease effectively has also been provided. The discussion includes details of the order of treatment and the choice between an endovascular and a surgical approach. PMID:21724110

  14. Factors Influencing the Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Podraza, Katherine M; Luthra, Nijee; Origitano, Thomas C; Schneck, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Background Deciding how to manage an unruptured intracranial aneurysm can be difficult for patients and physicians due to controversies about management. The decision as to when and how to intervene may be variable depending on physicians’ interpretation of available data regarding natural history and morbidity and mortality of interventions. Another significant factor in the decision process is the patients’ conception of the risks of rupture and interventions and the psychological burden of harboring an unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Objective  To describe which factors are being considered when patients and their physicians decide how to manage unruptured intracranial aneurysms.  Materials & methods  In a retrospective chart review study, we identified patients seen for evaluation of an unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Data was collected regarding patient and aneurysm characteristics. The physician note pertaining to the management decision was reviewed for documented reasons for intervention. Results  Of 88 patients included, 36 (41%) decided to undergo open or endovascular surgery for at least one unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Multiple aneurysms were present in 14 (16%) patients. Younger patients and current smokers were more likely to undergo surgery, but gender and race did not affect management. Aneurysm size and location strongly influenced management. The most common documented reasons underlying the decision of whether to intervene were the risk of rupture, aneurysm size, and risks of the procedure. For 23 aneurysms (21%), there were no factors documented for the management decision.  Conclusion  The risk of rupture of unruptured intracranial aneurysms may be underestimated by currently available natural history data. Major factors weighed by physicians in management decisions include aneurysm size and location, the patient's age, and medical comorbidities along with the risk of procedural complications. Additional data is needed to

  15. Factors Influencing the Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Gillani, Rebecca L; Podraza, Katherine M; Luthra, Nijee; Origitano, Thomas C; Schneck, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Background Deciding how to manage an unruptured intracranial aneurysm can be difficult for patients and physicians due to controversies about management. The decision as to when and how to intervene may be variable depending on physicians' interpretation of available data regarding natural history and morbidity and mortality of interventions. Another significant factor in the decision process is the patients' conception of the risks of rupture and interventions and the psychological burden of harboring an unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Objective  To describe which factors are being considered when patients and their physicians decide how to manage unruptured intracranial aneurysms.  Materials & methods  In a retrospective chart review study, we identified patients seen for evaluation of an unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Data was collected regarding patient and aneurysm characteristics. The physician note pertaining to the management decision was reviewed for documented reasons for intervention. Results  Of 88 patients included, 36 (41%) decided to undergo open or endovascular surgery for at least one unruptured intracranial aneurysm. Multiple aneurysms were present in 14 (16%) patients. Younger patients and current smokers were more likely to undergo surgery, but gender and race did not affect management. Aneurysm size and location strongly influenced management. The most common documented reasons underlying the decision of whether to intervene were the risk of rupture, aneurysm size, and risks of the procedure. For 23 aneurysms (21%), there were no factors documented for the management decision.  Conclusion  The risk of rupture of unruptured intracranial aneurysms may be underestimated by currently available natural history data. Major factors weighed by physicians in management decisions include aneurysm size and location, the patient's age, and medical comorbidities along with the risk of procedural complications. Additional data is needed to define

  16. Endovascular aortic repair: first twenty years.

    PubMed

    Koncar, Igor; Tolić, Momcilo; Ilić, Nikola; Cvetković, Slobodan; Dragas, Marko; Cinara, Ilijas; Kostić, Dusan; Davidović, Lazar

    2012-01-01

    Endovascular aortic/aneurysm repair (EVAR) was introduced into clinical practice at the beginning of the nineties. Its fast development had a great influence on clinicians, vascular surgeons and interventional radiologists, educational curriculums, patients, industry and medical insurance. The aim of this paper is to present the contribution of clinicians and industry to the development and advancement of endovascular aortic repair over the last 20 years. This review article presents the development of EVAR by focusing on the contribution of physicians, surgeons and interventional radiologists in the creation of the new field of vascular surgery termed hybrid vascular surgery, and also the contribution of technological advancement by a significant help of industrial representatives--engineers and their counselors. This article also analyzes studies conducted in order to compare the successfulness of EVAR with up-to-now applied open surgical repair of aortic aneurysms, and some treatment techniques of other aortic diseases. During the first two decades of its development the EVAR method was rapidly progressing and was adopted concurrently with the expansion of technology. Owing to large randomized studies, early and long-term results indicate specific complications of this method, thus influencing further technological improvement and defining risk patients groups in whom the use of the technique should be avoided. Good results are insured only in centers, specialized in vascular surgery, which have on their disposal adequate conditions for solving all complications associated with this method. PMID:23350259

  17. Corking the WEB and coiling through a jailed microcatheter: WEB assisted coiling, a useful technique avoiding the use of stents in treating wide-necked large intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Leyon, Joe Joseph; Chavda, Swarupsinh; Lamin, Saleh

    2016-05-01

    The WEB is an endovascular flow-disrupting device used in treating wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. Although the device is available in varying sizes, large aneurysms pose a challenge with the need for custom-made devices. We describe the use of coils as an adjunct to the WEB device in successfully treating large aneurysms in two patients, one with an acutely ruptured aneurysm. This novel technique of jailing a microcatheter, deploying the WEB and then coiling the aneurysm saves the need for intracranial stenting, thereby avoiding the need for antiplatelet therapy, which is of benefit in the setting of acute aneurysm rupture. PMID:25953859

  18. Fenestrated and Chimney Technique for Juxtarenal Aortic Aneurysm: A Systematic Review and Pooled Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Hu, Zhongzhou; Bai, Chujie; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Tao; Ge, Yangyang; Luan, Shaoliang; Guo, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Juxtarenal aortic aneurysms (JAA) account for approximately 15% of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (FEVAR) and chimney endovascular aneurysm repair (CH-EVAR) are both effective methods to treat JAAs, but the comparative effectiveness of these treatment modalities is unclear. We searched the PubMed, Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases to identify English language articles published between January 2005 and September 2013 on management of JAA with fenestrated and chimney techniques to conduct a systematic review to compare outcomes of patients with juxtarenal aortic aneurysm (JAA) treated with the two techniques. We compared nine F-EVAR cohort studies including 542 JAA patients and 8 CH-EVAR cohorts with 158 JAA patients regarding techniques success rates, 30-day mortality, late mortality, endoleak events and secondary intervention rates. The results of this systematic review indicate that both fenestrated and chimney techniques are attractive options for JAAs treatment with encouraging early and mid-term outcomes. PMID:26869488

  19. Onyx embolization of a ruptured aneurysm in a patient with moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Daou, Badih; Chalouhi, Nohra; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula; Rosenwasser, Robert H; Jabbour, Pascal

    2015-10-01

    We report a woman who presented with an intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Her cerebral angiogram showed a middle cerebral artery (MCA) M1 occlusion with multiple collaterals supplying the distal MCA territory, compatible with moyamoya disease. Also, an associated 8 mm dysplastic distal aneurysm fed by a left-sided P2 perforator was seen, collateral from the posterior cerebral artery. The aneurysm was successfully occluded with Onyx (ev3 Endovascular, Plymouth, MN, USA) embolization. The woman had an uneventful postoperative course. Aneurysm formation in patients with moyamoya disease represents a major hemorrhagic risk. Several treatment strategies exist including endovascular and surgical approaches. Patients with moyamoya disease who present with aneurysmal intracerebral hemorrhage should be treated to prevent rebleeding. Onyx embolization can be an effective treatment of aneurysms that are associated with moyamoya disease and would otherwise be difficult to treat surgically. PMID:26209917

  20. Flow in experimental berry aneurysms: method and model.

    PubMed

    Kerber, C W; Heilman, C B

    1983-01-01

    This study addresses two basic questions: What are the flow dynamics in aneurysms? Can these flows be modified to enhance retention of adhesive? Using Pyrex glass bifurcations, fluid flow was studied in a variety of aneurysms placed at varying positions around the bifurcations. Indicators injected into the slipstreams were recorded and studied both by stop-frame high-speed movie analysis and with 35 mm slides. Even at low-flow rates, a central slipstream strikes the apex of bifurcations, and may be partly responsible for the initial production of berry aneurysms. A low-pressure zone occurs at the lateral angle of bifurcations, probably explaining the formation of endovascular cushions. Flow into symmetrically placed narrow neck aneurysms did not occur. Indicator entered the aneurysm in a turbulent fashion only when there was orifice (lip) asymmetry. Both lip asymmetry and rapid flow favor intraaneurysmal turbulent flow. PMID:6410748

  1. Posterior spinal artery aneurysm rupture after ‘Ecstasy’ abuse

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeremiah; Patel, Shnehal; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2014-01-01

    Posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysms are a rare cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The commonly abused street drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or ‘Ecstasy’ has been linked to both systemic and neurological complications. A teenager presented with neck stiffness, headaches and nausea after ingesting ‘Ecstasy’. A brain CT was negative for SAH but a CT angiogram suggested cerebral vasculitis. A lumbar puncture showed SAH but a cerebral angiogram was negative. After a spinal MR angiogram identified abnormalities on the dorsal surface of the cervical spinal cord, a spinal angiogram demonstrated a left PSA 2 mm fusiform aneurysm. The patient underwent surgery and the aneurysmal portion of the PSA was excised without postoperative neurological sequelae. ‘Ecstasy’ can lead to neurovascular inflammation, intracranial hemorrhage, SAH and potentially even de novo aneurysm formation and subsequent rupture. PSA aneurysms may be treated by endovascular proximal vessel occlusion or open surgical excision. PMID:24994748

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: Endovascular interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, L. W.; Bakker, C. J. G.

    2003-07-01

    Minimally invasive interventional radiological procedures, such as balloon angioplasty, stent placement or coiling of aneurysms, play an increasingly important role in the treatment of patients suffering from vascular disease. The non-destructive nature of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), its ability to combine the acquisition of high quality anatomical images and functional information, such as blood flow velocities, perfusion and diffusion, together with its inherent three dimensionality and tomographic imaging capacities, have been advocated as advantages of using the MRI technique for guidance of endovascular radiological interventions. Within this light, endovascular interventional MRI has emerged as an interesting and promising new branch of interventional radiology. In this review article, the authors will give an overview of the most important issues related to this field. In this context, we will focus on the prerequisites for endovascular interventional MRI to come to maturity. In particular, the various approaches for device tracking that were proposed will be discussed and categorized. Furthermore, dedicated MRI systems, safety and compatibility issues and promising applications that could become clinical practice in the future will be discussed.

  3. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Aortic Aneurysm Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... cause of most deaths from aortic aneurysms. Aortic Aneurysm in the United States Aortic aneurysms were the ...

  4. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis ... aortic aneurysm treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, ...

  5. What Is an Aneurysm?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is an Aneurysm? An aneurysm (AN-u-rism) is a balloon-like bulge ... the weakened or injured walls can cause an aneurysm. An aneurysm can grow large and rupture (burst) ...

  6. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic aneurysm - thoracic; Syphilitic aneurysm; Aneurysm - thoracic aortic ... The most common cause of a thoracic aortic aneurysm is hardening of the ... with high cholesterol, long-term high blood pressure, or who ...

  7. Persistent Aneurysm Growth Following Pipeline Embolization Device Assisted Coiling of a Fusiform Vertebral Artery Aneurysm: A Word of Caution!

    PubMed Central

    Kerolus, Mena; Lopes, Demetrius K.

    2015-01-01

    The complex morphology of vertebrobasilar fusiform aneurysms makes them one of the most challenging lesions treated by neurointerventionists. Different management strategies in the past included parent vessel occlusion with or without extra-intracranial bypass surgery and endovascular reconstruction by conventional stents. Use of flow diversion has emerged as a promising alternative option with various studies documenting its efficacy and safety. However, there are various caveats associated with use of flow diversion in patients with fusiform vertibrobasilar aneurysms especially in patients presenting with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We report a rare case of persistent aneurysmal growth after coiling and placement of the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED; ev3, Irvine, California, USA) for SAH from a fusiform vertebral artery aneurysm. As consequences of aneurysm rupture can be devastating especially in patients with a prior SAH, the clinical relevance of recognizing and understanding such patterns of failure cannot be overemphasized as highlighted in the present case. PMID:25763295

  8. Endovascular Repair of a Primary Iliac-Cecal Fistula Presenting with Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, Charlotte Sara Ananthakrishnan, Ganapathy; DeNunzio, Mario Cosimo; Quarmby, John Winston; Bungay, Peter Mark

    2008-07-15

    We report a case of an arterio-enteric fistula between an external iliac artery aneurysm and otherwise healthy cecum, presenting with torrential hemorrhage per rectum in an 85-year-old patient. Whilst fistulization to the aorta and common iliac arteries has been reported, to our knowledge no previous cases of primary fistulization between an external iliac aneurysm and normal cecum have been. Successful endovascular exclusion of the aneurysm was undertaken with a Wallgraft covered stent and the patient remains well at 1 year.

  9. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists ...

  10. Basilar artery aneurysm at a persistent trigeminal artery junction. A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, G B; Conti, M L M; Veiga, J C E; Jory, M; Souza, R B

    2011-09-01

    The trigeminal artery is an anastomosis between the embryonic precursors of the vertebrobasilar and carotid systems, and may persist into adult life. The association of the persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) with cerebral aneurysm is well documented in the literature and, in general, aneurysms are located in the anterior circulation. We describe a patient who presented with a panencephalic Fisher III subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm. Digital arteriography showed a saccular aneurysm in the middle third of the basilar artery, adjacent to the junction with a persistent trigeminal artery. She was submitted to endovascular treatment with embolization of the basilar artery aneurysm with coils. Aneurysms at the PTA junction with the basilar artery are rare. This paper describes a case of PTA associated with an aneurysm in the basilar artery at PTA junction and briefly reviews the literature. PMID:22005697

  11. Non coding RNAs in aortic aneurysmal disease

    PubMed Central

    Duggirala, Aparna; Delogu, Francesca; Angelini, Timothy G.; Smith, Tanya; Caputo, Massimo; Rajakaruna, Cha; Emanueli, Costanza

    2015-01-01

    An aneurysm is a local dilatation of a vessel wall which is >50% its original diameter. Within the spectrum of cardiovascular diseases, aortic aneurysms are among the most challenging to treat. Most patients present acutely after aneurysm rupture or dissection from a previous asymptomatic condition and are managed by open surgical or endovascular repair. In addition, patients may harbor concurrent disease contraindicating surgical intervention. Collectively, these factors have driven the search for alternative methods of identifying, monitoring and treating aortic aneurisms using less invasive approaches. Non-coding RNA (ncRNAs) are emerging as new fundamental regulators of gene expression. The small microRNAs have opened the field of ncRNAs capturing the attention of basic and clinical scientists for their potential to become new therapeutic targets and clinical biomarkers for aortic aneurysm. More recently, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) have started to be actively investigated, leading to first exciting reports, which further suggest their important and yet largely unexplored contribution to vascular physiology and disease. This review introduces the different ncRNA types and focus at ncRNA roles in aorta aneurysms. We discuss the potential of therapeutic interventions targeting ncRNAs and we describe the research models allowing for mechanistic studies and clinical translation attempts for controlling aneurysm progression. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of microRNAs and lncRNAs as clinical biomarkers. PMID:25883602

  12. Non coding RNAs in aortic aneurysmal disease.

    PubMed

    Duggirala, Aparna; Delogu, Francesca; Angelini, Timothy G; Smith, Tanya; Caputo, Massimo; Rajakaruna, Cha; Emanueli, Costanza

    2015-01-01

    An aneurysm is a local dilatation of a vessel wall which is >50% its original diameter. Within the spectrum of cardiovascular diseases, aortic aneurysms are among the most challenging to treat. Most patients present acutely after aneurysm rupture or dissection from a previous asymptomatic condition and are managed by open surgical or endovascular repair. In addition, patients may harbor concurrent disease contraindicating surgical intervention. Collectively, these factors have driven the search for alternative methods of identifying, monitoring and treating aortic aneurisms using less invasive approaches. Non-coding RNA (ncRNAs) are emerging as new fundamental regulators of gene expression. The small microRNAs have opened the field of ncRNAs capturing the attention of basic and clinical scientists for their potential to become new therapeutic targets and clinical biomarkers for aortic aneurysm. More recently, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) have started to be actively investigated, leading to first exciting reports, which further suggest their important and yet largely unexplored contribution to vascular physiology and disease. This review introduces the different ncRNA types and focus at ncRNA roles in aorta aneurysms. We discuss the potential of therapeutic interventions targeting ncRNAs and we describe the research models allowing for mechanistic studies and clinical translation attempts for controlling aneurysm progression. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of microRNAs and lncRNAs as clinical biomarkers. PMID:25883602

  13. Percutaneous Thrombin Injection to Complete SMA Pseudoaneurysm Exclusion After Failing of Endograft Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Szopinski, Piotr Ciostek, Piotr; Pleban, Eliza; Iwanowski, Jaroslaw; Krol, Malgorzata Serafin-; Marianowska, Agnieszka; Noszczyk, Wojciech

    2005-05-15

    Visceral aneurysms are potentially life-threatening vascular lesions. Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) pseudoaneurysms are a rare but well-recognized complication of chronic pancreatitis. Open surgical repair of such an aneurysm, especially in patients after previous surgical treatment, might be dangerous and risky. Stent graft implantation makes SMA pseudoaneurysm exclusion possible and therefore avoids a major abdominal operation. Percutaneous direct thrombin injection is also one of the methods of treating aneurysms in this area. We report a first case of percutaneous ultrasound-guided thrombin injection to complete SMA pseudoaneurysm exclusion after an unsuccessful endograft placement. Six-month follow-up did not demonstrate any signs of aneurysm recurrence.

  14. Stent-Assisted Clip Placement for Complex Internal Carotid Artery Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Chughtai, Morad; Khan, Asif A.; Suri, M. Fareed K.; Sherr, Gregory T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We report two procedures using a stent-assisted microsurgical clip placement to treat complex intracranial aneurysms originating from supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery. CASE DESCRIPTIONS In both procedures, primary clip placement was considered technically difficult due to either complex morphology or inferior protrusion of aneurysm fundus within the interclinoid space. A nitinol self-expanding stent was placed across the neck of the aneurysm either preoperatively or intraoperatively. Obliteration of aneurysm and patency of the artery was confirmed by angiography after clip placement. CONCLUSION Description of an integrated open microsurgical and endovascular approach and review of literature pertaining to considerations for treatment approach are discussed. PMID:26958150

  15. Progressive Deconstruction of a Distal Posterior Cerebral Artery Aneurysm Using Competitive Flow Diversion.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew K; Tan, Lee A; Lopes, Demetrius K; Moftakhar, Roham

    2016-03-01

    Progressive deconstruction is an endovascular technique for aneurysm treatment that utilizes flow diverting stents to promote progressive thrombosis by diverting blood flow away from the aneurysm's parent vessel. While the aneurysm thromboses, collateral blood vessels develop over time to avoid infarction that can often accompany acute parent vessel occlusion. We report a 37-year-old woman with a left distal posterior cerebral artery aneurysm that was successfully treated with this strategy. The concept and rationale of progressive deconstruction are discussed in detail. PMID:26958413

  16. Ruptured aneurysm of major aortopulmonary collateral artery: management using amplatzer vascular plug

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Priya, Sarv

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysm of a major aortopulmonary collateral artery (MAPCA) is quite rare. Aneurysmally dilated MAPCA may be complicated with rupture and massive hemoptysis leading to sudden death. Possible pathophysiology for aneurysm formation is persistent high pressure state in collateral circulation. High index of suspicion is necessary to avoid catastrophic complications as the amount of hemoptysis does not correlate with disease severity and etiology. We present a case of large ruptured aneurysm of a MAPCA presenting with massive haemoptysis in a patient of cyanotic congenital heart disease which was salvaged by endovascular deployment of vascular plug. PMID:27280092

  17. Successful treatment of a giant pediatric fusiform basilar trunk aneurysm with surpass flow diverter.

    PubMed

    Kan, Peter; Mokin, Maxim; Puri, Ajit S; Wakhloo, Ajay K

    2016-06-01

    Fusiform aneurysms present a unique challenge to traditional microsurgical and endovascular treatment because of the lack of a discernible neck and the involvement of parent vessel. Flow diversion has increasingly become the treatment of choice for fusiform aneurysms in the anterior circulation, but its results in the posterior circulation are variable. We report successful treatment of a giant fusiform upper basilar trunk aneurysm with the Surpass flow diverter in an adolescent, and discuss the potential advantages of this emerging technology in the treatment of fusiform posterior circulation aneurysms. PMID:26063795

  18. TEVAR for Flash Pulmonary Edema Secondary to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm to Pulmonary Artery Fistula.

    PubMed

    Bornak, Arash; Baqai, Atif; Li, Xiaoyi; Rey, Jorge; Tashiro, Jun; Velazquez, Omaida C

    2016-01-01

    Enlarging aneurysms in the thoracic aorta frequently remain asymptomatic. Fistulization of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) to adjacent structures or the presence of a patent ductus arteriosus and TAA may lead to irreversible cardiopulmonary sequelae. This article reports on a large aneurysm of the thoracic aorta with communication to the pulmonary artery causing pulmonary edema and cardiorespiratory failure. The communication was ultimately closed after thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair allowing rapid symptom resolution. Early diagnosis and closure of such communication in the presence of TAA are critical for prevention of permanent cardiopulmonary damage. PMID:26522587

  19. Endovascular infection with Salmonella group C – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Arbune, Manuela; Ciobotaru, Roxana; Voinescu, Doina Carina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The risk of secondary endovascular infections after bacteremia with Salmonella spp. is augmented by preexisting atherosclerotic arterial lesions. Over the age of 50, the incidence varies between 25 and 35%. Case report A 57-year-old male, smoker, alcohol user, in poor social condition, was hospitalized for fever, malaise, left leg persistent thrombophlebitis, coxofemoral and back pain. His medical history was significant for recent sepsis with Salmonella group C, and a recent diagnosis of hepatitis C. During the antibiotic treatment, he complained of a left inguinal tumor, corresponding to a paravertebral image along the left psoas muscle identified by abdominal computed tomography. A paravertebral hematoma and an aneurysm of the left aortoiliac junction were repaired by surgery. The culture of the aneurysm was positive for Salmonella group C. Conclusion The differential diagnosis of lower limb persistent thrombophlebitis should consider the compression by abdominal aneurysm, consequent to a vascular complication from bacteremia with Salmonella spp. PMID:26405678

  20. Percutaneous Cyanoacrylate Glue Injection into the Renal Pseudoaneurysm to Control Intractable Hematuria After Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Lal, Anupam Kumar, Ajay; Prakash, Mahesh; Singhal, Manphool; Agarwal, Mayank Mohan; Sarkar, Debansu; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2009-07-15

    We report a case of a 43-year-old man who developed intractable hematuria after percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Angiography detected a pseudoaneurysm arising from the lower polar artery; however, embolization could not be performed because of unfavorable vascular anatomy. A percutaneous thrombin injection under ultrasound guidance initially controlled the bleeding, but hematuria subsequently recurred as a result of recanalization of the aneurysm. The case was successfully managed with ultrasound- and fluoroscopic-guided direct injection of cyanoacrylate glue into the pseudoaneurysm.