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Sample records for percutaneous transgastric computed

  1. Percutaneous Transgastric Snaring for Repositioning of a Dislocated Internal Drain from a Pancreatic Pseudocyst

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnken, Andreas H. Guenther, Rolf W.; Winograd, Ron

    2008-07-15

    Pancreatic pseudocysts may occur in up to 10% of patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis. Symptomatic, persistent, and infected pancreatic pseudocysts require interventional therapy. We present the case of a patient with complete dislocation of a double pigtail catheter into an infected pseudocyst and the repositioning of the drainage catheter using a transgastric snaring technique. The combination of CT-guided percutaneous puncture and fluoroscopic snaring permitted minimally invasive management of this rare complication.

  2. Percutaneous endoscopic transgastric jejunostomy (PEG-J): a retrospective analysis on its utility in maintaining enteral nutrition after unsuccessful gastric feeding

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ezekiel Wong Toh; Yoneda, Kaori; Nakamura, Shinya; Nishihara, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims Although percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the method of choice for long-term enteral nutrition, feeding-related adverse events such as aspiration pneumonia and peristomal leakage can impede the use of PEG. Percutaneous endoscopic transgastric jejunostomy (PEG-J) using large-bore jejunal tubes may help by circumventing gastric passage during enteral nutrition and improving drainage of gastric secretions. Methods 20 patients (12 males and 8 females) who received PEG-J after unsuccessful PEG feeding during a 6-year period in our institution were analysed retrospectively to evaluate the efficacy of large-bore jejunal feeding tubes in maintaining enteral nutrition. Results The median age was 83.5 (71–96) years. The median period between PEG and PEG-J was 33 (14–280) days. Indications were aspiration due to gastro-oesophageal reflux in 18 patients and severe peristomal leakage in 2 patients. Tube placements were successful in all patients. There were 6 (30%) in-hospital mortalities, with 3 (15%) occurring within 30 days after procedure. Conclusions PEG-J can be performed safely in patients with PEG and may facilitate the maintenance of enteral nutrition in most of the patients. Patients with unsuccessful PEG feeding can be offered the option of jejunal feeding before considering termination of enteral nutrition. PMID:27486522

  3. Transgastric Pancreatic Necrosectomy: How I Do It.

    PubMed

    Zyromski, Nicholas J; Nakeeb, Attila; House, Michael G; Jester, Andrea L

    2016-02-01

    Necrotizing pancreatitis is a serious medical problem that often requires intervention to debride necrotic pancreatic and peripancreatic tissue. Recently, minimally invasive approaches have been applied to pancreatic necrosectomy. The purpose of this report is to review the history of transgastric pancreatic debridement, identify appropriate patient selection criteria, and highlight technical "pearls." We present this subject matter in the context of our own clinical experience, with a primary focus on a "How I Do It" type of technical description. PMID:26691148

  4. Computer-assisted percutaneous scaphoid fixation: concepts and evolution.

    PubMed

    Smith, Erin J; Ellis, Randy E; Pichora, David R

    2013-11-01

    Background The treatment for undisplaced scaphoid waist fractures has evolved from conventional cast immobilization to percutaneous screw insertion. Percutaneous fixation reduces some of the risks of open surgery, but can be technically demanding and carries the risk of radiation exposure. Recently, computer-assisted percutaneous scaphoid fixation (CAPSF) has been gaining interest. Materials and Methods Conventional percutaneous scaphoid fixation is performed under fluoroscopic guidance and involves insertion of a guide wire along the length of the scaphoid to facilitate placement of a cannulated screw. Adapting computer-assisted techniques for scaphoid fixation poses several unique challenges including patient tracking and registration. Results To date, five groups have successfully implemented systems for CAPSF. These systems have implemented wrist immobilization strategies to resolve the issue of patient tracking and have developed unique guidance techniques incorporating 2D fluoroscope, cone-beam CT, and ultrasound, to circumvent patient-based registration. Conclusions Computer-aided percutaneous pinning of scaphoid waist fractures can significantly reduce radiation exposure and has the potential to improve the accuracy of this procedure. This article reviews the rationale for, and the evolution of, CAPSF and describes the key principles of computer-assisted technology. PMID:24436833

  5. Computer-Assisted Percutaneous Scaphoid Fixation: Concepts and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Erin J.; Ellis, Randy E.; Pichora, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background The treatment for undisplaced scaphoid waist fractures has evolved from conventional cast immobilization to percutaneous screw insertion. Percutaneous fixation reduces some of the risks of open surgery, but can be technically demanding and carries the risk of radiation exposure. Recently, computer-assisted percutaneous scaphoid fixation (CAPSF) has been gaining interest. Materials and Methods Conventional percutaneous scaphoid fixation is performed under fluoroscopic guidance and involves insertion of a guide wire along the length of the scaphoid to facilitate placement of a cannulated screw. Adapting computer-assisted techniques for scaphoid fixation poses several unique challenges including patient tracking and registration. Results To date, five groups have successfully implemented systems for CAPSF. These systems have implemented wrist immobilization strategies to resolve the issue of patient tracking and have developed unique guidance techniques incorporating 2D fluoroscope, cone-beam CT, and ultrasound, to circumvent patient-based registration. Conclusions Computer-aided percutaneous pinning of scaphoid waist fractures can significantly reduce radiation exposure and has the potential to improve the accuracy of this procedure. This article reviews the rationale for, and the evolution of, CAPSF and describes the key principles of computer-assisted technology. PMID:24436833

  6. An Assessment of Radiologically Inserted Transoral and Transgastric Gastroduodenal Stents to Treat Malignant Gastric Outlet Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Bethany H. T.; Griffiths, Ewen A.; Pursnani, Kishore G. Ward, Jeremy B.; Stockwell, Robert C.

    2013-12-15

    IntroductionSelf-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) are used to palliate malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) and are useful in patients with limited life expectancy or severe medical comorbidity, which would preclude surgery. Stenting can be performed transorally or by a percutaneous transgastric technique. Our goal was to review the outcome of patients who underwent radiological SEMS insertion performed by a single consultant interventional radiologist. Methods: Patients were identified from a prospectively collected database held by one consultant radiologist. Data were retrieved from radiological reports, multidisciplinary team meetings, and the patients' case notes. Univariate survival analysis was performed. Results: Between December 2000 and January 2011, 100 patients (63 males, 37 females) had 110 gastroduodenal stenting procedures. Median age was 73 (range 39-89) years. SEMS were inserted transorally (n = 66) or transgastrically (n = 44). Site of obstruction was the stomach (n = 37), duodenum (n = 50), gastric pull-up (n = 10), or gastroenterostomy (n = 13). Seven patients required biliary stents. Technical success was 86.4 %: 83.3 % for transoral insertion, 90.9 % for transgastric insertion. Eleven patients developed complications. Median GOO severity score: 1 pre-stenting, 2 post-stenting (p = 0.0001). Median survival was 54 (range 1-624) days. Post-stenting GOO severity score was predictive of survival (p = 0.0001). Conclusions: The technical success rate for insertion of palliative SEMS is high. Insertional technique can be tailored to the individual depending on the location of the tumor and whether it is possible to access the stomach percutaneously. Patients who have successful stenting and return to eating a soft/normal diet have a statistically significant increase in survival.

  7. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

    SciTech Connect

    Moehlenbruch, Markus; Nelles, Michael; Thomas, Daniel; Willinek, Winfried; Gerstner, Andreas; Schild, Hans H.; Wilhelm, Kai

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a flat-detector C-arm-guided radiographic technique (cone-beam computed tomography [CBCT]) for percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) insertion. Eighteen patients (13 men and 5 women; mean age 62 years) in whom percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) had failed underwent CBCT-guided PRG insertion. PEG failure or unsuitability was caused by upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction in all cases. Indications for gastrostomy were esophageal and head and neck malignancies, respectively. Before the PRG procedure, initial C-arm CBCT scans were acquired. Three- and 2-dimensional soft-tissue reconstructions of the epigastrium region were generated on a dedicated workstation. Subsequently, gastropexy was performed with T-fasteners after CBCT-guided puncture of the stomach bubble, followed by insertion of an 14F balloon-retained catheter through a peel-away introducer. Puncture of the stomach bubble and PRG insertion was technically successful in all patients without alteration of the epigastric region. There was no malpositioning of the tube or other major periprocedural complications. In 2 patients, minor complications occurred during the first 30 days of follow-up (PRG malfunction: n = 1; slight infection: n = 1). Late complications, which were mainly tube disturbances, were observed in 2 patients. The mean follow-up time was 212 days. CBCT-guided PRG is a safe, well-tolerated, and successful method of gastrostomy insertion in patients in whom endoscopic gastrostomy is not feasible. CBCT provides detailed imaging of the soft tissue and surrounding structures of the epigastric region in one diagnostic tour and thus significantly improves the planning of PRG procedures.

  8. Comparison of Inflammatory Response to Transgastric and Transcolonic NOTES

    PubMed Central

    Hucl, Tomas; Benes, Marek; Kocik, Matej; Splichalova, Alla; Maluskova, Jana; Krak, Martin; Lanska, Vera; Heczkova, Marie; Kieslichova, Eva; Oliverius, Martin; Spicak, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The aim of our study was to determine the physiologic impact of NOTES and to compare the transgastric and transcolonic approaches. Methods. Thirty pigs were randomized to transgastric, transcolonic, or laparoscopic peritoneoscopy. Blood was drawn and analyzed for C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin- (IL-) 1β, IL-6, WBCs, and platelets. Results. Endoscopic closure with an OTSC was successful in all 20 animals. The postoperative course was uneventful in all animals. CRP values rose on day 1 in all animals and slowly declined to baseline levels on day 14 with no differences between the groups (P > 0.05, NS). The levels of TNF-α were significantly increased in the transcolonic group (P < 0.01); however this difference was already present prior to the procedure and remained unchanged. No differences were observed in IL1-β and IL-6 values. There was a temporary rise of WBC on day 1 and of platelets on day 7 in all groups (P > 0.05, NS). Conclusions. Transgastric, transcolonic, and laparoscopic peritoneoscopy resulted in similar changes in systemic inflammatory markers. Our findings do not support the assumption that NOTES is less invasive than laparoscopy. PMID:27403157

  9. Comparison of Inflammatory Response to Transgastric and Transcolonic NOTES.

    PubMed

    Hucl, Tomas; Benes, Marek; Kocik, Matej; Splichalova, Alla; Maluskova, Jana; Krak, Martin; Lanska, Vera; Heczkova, Marie; Kieslichova, Eva; Oliverius, Martin; Spicak, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The aim of our study was to determine the physiologic impact of NOTES and to compare the transgastric and transcolonic approaches. Methods. Thirty pigs were randomized to transgastric, transcolonic, or laparoscopic peritoneoscopy. Blood was drawn and analyzed for C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin- (IL-) 1β, IL-6, WBCs, and platelets. Results. Endoscopic closure with an OTSC was successful in all 20 animals. The postoperative course was uneventful in all animals. CRP values rose on day 1 in all animals and slowly declined to baseline levels on day 14 with no differences between the groups (P > 0.05, NS). The levels of TNF-α were significantly increased in the transcolonic group (P < 0.01); however this difference was already present prior to the procedure and remained unchanged. No differences were observed in IL1-β and IL-6 values. There was a temporary rise of WBC on day 1 and of platelets on day 7 in all groups (P > 0.05, NS). Conclusions. Transgastric, transcolonic, and laparoscopic peritoneoscopy resulted in similar changes in systemic inflammatory markers. Our findings do not support the assumption that NOTES is less invasive than laparoscopy. PMID:27403157

  10. Laparo-endoscopic transgastric resection of gastric submucosal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Geylor; Savides, Thomas J.; Sicklick, Jason K.; Abbas Fehmi, Syed M.; Coker, Alisa M.; Green, Shannon; Broderick, Ryan; Nino, Diego F.; Harnsberger, Cristina R.; Berducci, Martin A.; Sandler, Bryan J.; Talamini, Mark A.; Jacobsen, Garth R.; Horgan, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic and endoluminal surgical techniques have evolved and allowed improvements in the methods for treating benign and malignant gastrointestinal diseases. To date, only case reports have been reported on the application of a laparo-endoscopic approach for resecting gastric submucosal tumors (SMT). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and oncologic outcomes of a laparo-endoscopic transgastric approach to resect tumors that would traditionally require either a laparoscopic or open surgical approach. Herein, we present the largest single institution series utilizing this technique for the resection of gastric SMT in North America. Methods We performed a retrospective review of a prospectively collected patient database. Patients who presented for evaluation of gastric SMT were offered this surgical procedure and informed consents were obtained for participation in the study. Results Fourteen patients were included in this study between August/2010 and January/2013. Eight (8) patients (57.1 %) were female and the median age was 56 years (range 29–78). Of the 14 cases, 8 patients (57.1 %) underwent laparo-endoscopic resection of SMTs with transgastric extraction, 5 patients (35.7 %) had conversions to traditional laparoscopic surgery, and 1 patient (7.2 %) was abandoned intraoperatively. The median operative time for this cohort was 80 min (range 35–167). Ten patients (71.4 %) had GISTs, 3 (21.4 %) had leiomyomas, and 1 (7.1 %) had schwannoma. There were no intraoperative complications. Two patients had postoperative staple line bleeding that required repeat endoscopy. The median hospital stay was 1 day (range 1–6) and there were no postoperative mortalities. At 12-month follow-up visit, only one GIST patient (10 %) had tumor recurrence. Conclusion Our experience suggests that this surgical approach is safe and efficient in the resection of gastric SMT with transgastric extraction. This study found no intraoperative

  11. Percutaneous Transthoracic Computed Tomography-Guided AICD Insertion in a Patient with Extracardiac Fontan Conduit

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Darra T. Moynagh, Michael R.; Walsh, Kevin P.; Noelke, Lars; Murray, John G.

    2011-02-15

    Percutaneous pulmonary venous atrial puncture was performed under computed tomography guidance to successfully place an automated implantable cardiac defibrillator into a 26-year-old patient with extracardiac Fontan conduit who had presented with two out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. The procedure avoided the need for lead placement at thoracotomy.

  12. Multiple large splenic abscesses managed with computed tomography-guided percutaneous catheter drainage in children.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Jung Sook; Park, Ji Sook; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Park, Eun Sil; Lim, Jae-Young; Park, Chan Hoo; Woo, Hyang Ok; Park, Jung Je; Cho, Jae Min; Youn, Hee-Shang

    2013-12-01

    Splenic abscess is a rare finding in children. Splenectomy combined with broad-spectrum antibiotics has been the treatment of choice for multiple splenic abscesses. Herein, we report the case of a 14-year-old girl with multiple large splenic abscesses that were successfully managed after two image-guided percutaneous drainage procedures and administration of intravenous antibiotics. Initially, an abscess located at the periphery in the lower pole of the spleen was aspirated under ultrasound guidance. Finally, another abscess located near the hilum of the spleen was drained under computed tomography guidance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of multiple large splenic abscesses treated with computed tomography-guided percutaneous drainage. PMID:23597527

  13. Characterization of force and torque interactions during a simulated transgastric appendectomy procedure.

    PubMed

    Dargar, Saurabh; Brino, Cecilia; Matthes, Kai; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; De, Suvranu

    2015-03-01

    We have developed an instrumented endoscope grip handle equipped with a six-axis load cell and measured forces and torques during a simulated transgastric natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery appendectomy procedure performed in an EASIE-R ex vivo simulator. The data were collected from ten participating surgeons of varying degrees of expertise which was analyzed to compute a set of six force and torque parameters for each coordinate axis for each of the nine tasks of the appendectomy procedure. The mean push/pull force was found to be 3.64 N (σ = 3.54 N) in the push direction and the mean torque was 3.3 N · mm (σ = 38.6 N · mm) in the counterclockwise direction about the push/pull axis. Most interestingly, the force and torque data about the nondominant x and z axes showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) between the expert and novice groups for five of the nine tasks. These data may be useful in developing surgical platforms especially new haptic devices and simulation systems for emerging natural orifice procedures. PMID:25398173

  14. Characterization of Force and Torque Interactions during a Simulated Transgastric Appendectomy Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Dargar, Saurabh; Brino, Cecilia; Matthes, Kai; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; De, Suvranu

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an instrumented endoscope grip handle equipped with a 6-axis load cell and measured forces and torques during a simulated transgastric NOTES appendectomy procedure performed in an EASIE-R© ex vivo simulator. The data were collected from 10 participating surgeons of varying degrees of expertise which was analyzed to compute a set of 6 force and torque parameters for each coordinate axis for each of the nine tasks of the appendectomy procedure. The mean push/pull force was found to be 3.64 N (σ=3.54 N) in the push direction and the mean torque was 3.3 N-mm (σ=38.6 N-mm) in the counter-clockwise direction about the push/pull axis. Most interestingly, the force and torque data about the non-dominant×and z axes showed a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) between the expert and novice groups for five of the nine tasks. This data may be useful in developing surgical platforms especially new haptic devices and simulation systems for emerging natural orifice procedures. PMID:25398173

  15. Applications of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in percutaneous ablation therapy for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Chyou, Janice Y; Biviano, Angelo; Magno, Pedro; Garan, Hasan; Einstein, Andrew J

    2009-10-01

    Percutaneous catheter ablation is an established therapy for symptomatic drug-refractory atrial fibrillation (AF). Accurate delineation of relevant anatomy is critical but often challenging and limited in traditional technologies such as intra-procedural fluoroscopy. There has been an increased interest in non-invasive three-dimensional imaging technologies, especially computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as useful tools for patients undergoing AF ablation. Here, we review applications of CT and MRI before, during, and after AF ablation and highlight areas for future research. PMID:19521756

  16. Acute inflammatory response to transgastric natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery peritoneoscopy: An experimental study in swine

    PubMed Central

    Rezende, Marcelo; Montero, Edna Frasson de Souza; Salomão, Reinaldo; Brunialti, Milena; Rodrigues, Rodrigo; Gomes, Gustavo; Libera, Alice Della; Ferrari, Angelo; Libera, Ermelindo Della

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of transgastric peritoneal access on plasma biomarkers of acute inflammatory response in comparison to laparoscopy. METHODS: This was a prospective and comparative study in a porcine model. Transgastric peritoneal access performed by natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery was compared with laparoscopy. Laparotomy and sham groups were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Thirty-four pigs were assigned to receive transgastric natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (n = 12), laparoscopy (n = 8), laparotomy (n = 8) or a sham procedure involving only anesthesia (n = 6). In the natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery group, peritoneoscopy was performed with a gastroscope via transgastric access. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 1, 3, 6, 9 and 24 h after the surgical procedure for measurement of interleukins 1β, 6 and 10 and tumor necrosis factor-α. A complete blood count was performed, and C-reactive protein levels were measured at baseline and at 24 h. RESULTS: All surgical and endoscopic procedures were performed without major complications. Peritoneal cavity inventory showed no signs of peritonitis in any animal. Interleukin 1β, interleukin 10 and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were below the threshold of detection. The mean level of interleukin 6 was statistically significantly higher in the laparotomy group than in the other groups (p<0.05), with no significant differences among the sham, laparoscopy and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery groups (p>0.05). C-reactive protein analysis indicated significant increases in all groups, with no differences among the groups. Complete blood count analysis showed no differences among the groups. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the observed interleukin 6 patterns, the systemic inflammatory response resulting from transgastric peritoneal access by natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery is similar in

  17. Percutaneous Cystgastrostomy as a Single-Step Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, L. Sookur, P.; Low, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Fotheringham, T.

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the success of percutaneous transgastric cystgastrostomy as a single-step procedure. We performed a retrospective analysis of single-step percutaneous transgastric cystgastrostomy carried out in 12 patients (8 male, 4 female; mean age 44 years; range 21-70 years), between 2002 and 2007, with large symptomatic pancreatic pseudocysts for whom up to 1-year follow-up data (mean 10 months) were available. All pseudocysts were drained by single-step percutaneous cystgastrostomy with the placement of either one or two stents. The procedure was completed successfully in all 12 patients. The pseudocysts showed complete resolution on further imaging in 7 of 12 patients with either enteric passage of the stent or stent removal by endoscopy. In 2 of 12 patients, the pseudocysts showed complete resolution on imaging, with the stents still noted in situ. In 2 of 12 patients, the pseudocysts became infected after 1 month and required surgical intervention. In 1 of 12 patients, the pseudocyst showed partial resolution on imaging, but subsequently reaccumulated and later required external drainage. In our experience, percutaneous cystgastrostomy as a single-step procedure has a high success rate and good short-term outcomes over 1-year follow-up and should be considered in the treatment of large symptomatic cysts.

  18. Successful transgastric pancreaticography and endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of a disconnected pancreatic tail syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Will, Uwe; Fueldner, Frank; Goldmann, Bernhard; Mueller, Anne-Kathrin; Wanzar, Igor; Meyer, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: We aim to demonstrate that endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided transgastric pancreaticography/drainage of the pancreatic duct is feasible and successful in healing a persisting pancreaticocutaneous fistula. Methods: By means of a case report, we describe the following alternative therapeutic procedure. A 76-year-old male had: (1) 10 surgical interventions because of necrotizing acute pancreatitis with a persisting pancreaticocutaneous fistula (volume 200–300 ml/day); (2) an unsuccessful attempt of transpapillary drainage (disrupted duct after necrosectomy). He then underwent a EUS-guided transluminal pancreaticography/drainage of the pancreatic duct. A transgastric puncture was performed followed by, insertion of a guide wire into the dilated tail segment, and expansion of the gastropancreaticostomy using a 10-Fr retriever. A 10-Fr Amsterdam prosthesis was then placed through the guide wire. Results: The procedure was both a technical and clinical success as indicated by fistula occlusion and sufficient internal drainage of the pancreatic juice via the gastropancreaticostomy. No severe complications such as bleeding, perforation stent occlusion or migration were observed during the 15-month follow-up. Conclusions: Transgastric pancreaticography and EUS-guided drainage of the enlarged pancreatic duct are elegant and feasible alternative options for the treatment of specific pancreatic lesions such as persisting pancreaticocutaneous fistula (complication after necrotizing pancreatitis), after pancreatic resective surgery, chronic pancreatitis and anomaly of the congenital pancreatic or postoperative gastrointestinal anatomy. Moreover, the procedure may represent a valid tool to avoid surgery and more invasive interventions. PMID:21765865

  19. Computer tomography assessment of pedicle screw insertion in percutaneous posterior transpedicular stabilization.

    PubMed

    Schizas, Constantin; Michel, Jacky; Kosmopoulos, Victor; Theumann, Nicolas

    2007-05-01

    Percutaneous insertion of cannulated pedicle screws has been recently developed as a minimally invasive alternative to the open technique during instrumented fusion procedures. Given the reported rate of screw misplacement using open techniques (up to 40%), we considered it important to analyze possible side effects of this new technique. Placement of 60 pedicle screws in 15 consecutive patients undergoing lumbar or lumbosacral fusion, mainly for spondylolisthesis, were analyzed. Axial, coronal, and sagittal reformatted computer tomography images were examined by three observers. Individual and consensus interpretation was obtained for each screw position. Along with frank penetration, we also looked at cortical encroachment of the pedicular wall by the screw. Thirteen percent of the patients (2/15) had severe frank penetration from the screws, while 80% of them (12/15) had some perforation. On axial images the incidence of severe frank pedicle penetration was 3.3% while the overall rate of screw perforation was 23%. In coronal images the overall screw perforation rate rose to 30% while the rate of severe frank pedicle penetration remained unchanged. One patient (6.6%) suffered S1 root symptoms due to a frankly medially misplaced screw, requiring re-operation. This study has shown that percutaneous insertion of cannulated pedicle screws in the lumbar spine is an acceptable procedure. The overall rate of perforation in axial images is below the higher rates reported in the literature but does remain important. Frank penetration of the pedicle was nevertheless low. It remains a demanding technique and has to be performed with extreme care to detail. PMID:16967297

  20. [Scaphoid percutaneous osteosynthesis by screw using computer assisted surgery: an experimental study].

    PubMed

    Liverneaux, P

    2005-01-01

    Scaphoid fractures are sometimes difficult to diagnose and even more difficult to fix. Recent progress such as miniaturization of osteosynthesis material, adoption of the percutaneous route, and widening of the indications to include undisplaced fractures has still not abolished complications. In this context, computer assisted surgery (CAS) may be useful and deserves further study. To apply it to the scaphoid, it is initially necessary to immobilize the "wrist hand fingers" unit in a device adapted to make it a rigid unit. It is then necessary to choose the correct configuration of CAS system. The pedicular fluoroscopic navigation system, which is apparently similar to scaphoid screw insertion, was chosen for this study. The goal of this study is to define the osteosynthesis bases of the scaphoid with CAS. A fresh anatomical subject divided at the elbow joint was prepared at the DETERCA laboratory of the university Bordeaux 2. The solid "wrist hand fingers" unit was immobilized in extension and ulnar deviation of the wrist by a malleable, stable and radio transparent device. The first stage consisted of a calibration of the surgical instruments and the "wrist hand fingers" unit, with a three-dimensional optical localization system. The guide wire was simulated by a gauged stylet. When the axis and the length of the screw had been determined virtually, insertion of the guide wire was carried out under guidance of the virtual images of the computer's screen, without the assistance of the fluoroscopy. Finally the canulated screw was inserted over the guide wire. Insertion was stopped when the screw reached the intra osseous virtually predetermined length. A check using conventional fluoroscopy made it possible to ensure the correct positioning of the screw. Our results show that it is possible to insert a screw into a scaphoid without conventional fluoroscopy, by using the fluoroscopic navigation system. The procedure was performed without difficulty, apart from the

  1. Slow-flow phenomenon after elective percutaneous coronary intervention of computed tomography-detected vulnerable coronary lesion

    PubMed Central

    Wolny, Rafał; Dębski, Artur; Kruk, Mariusz

    2014-01-01

    No-reflow or slow-flow phenomenon is one of the serious complications of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) in acute myocardial infarction, as well as during elective procedures, and is an independent predictor of myocardial infarction, and in-hospital and long-term mortality. We present a case of an elective PCI of native coronary artery lesion that was assessed to be vulnerable based on coronary computed tomography angiography, complicated with slow-flow phenomenon. PMID:25489304

  2. Intramural Dissection of the Renal Collecting System During Percutaneous Nephrostomy: Computed Tomography Findings of a Rare Complication

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelides, Michael Dimarelos, Vasileios Stratilati, Sofia Tsitouridis, Ioannis

    2011-02-15

    Intramural dissection of the renal collecting system during percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) is a rare complication that can be challenging to diagnose. In this report, we describe the computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopic findings of urothelial dissection during CT-guided PCN in a 65-year old patient with an obstructed congenital solitary left kidney due to an urinary bladder carcinoma. To our knowledge, CT findings of urothelial dissection have not yet been described.

  3. Usefulness of computed tomography with air insufflation of the stomach prior to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy procedure

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Kousaku; Adachi, Kyoichi; Onishi, Koji; Fukuda, Kosuke; Kazumori, Hideaki; Ohno, Yasuhiko; Katoh, Takao; Sonoyama, Hiroki; Tada, Yasumasa; Kusunoki, Ryusaku; Oka, Akihiko; Fukuba, Nobuhiko; Oshima, Naoki; Yuki, Takafumi; Ishihara, Shunji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    We examined the results of computed tomography (CT) with and without air insufflation of the stomach prior to performing percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). We retrospectively analyzed 366 patients who underwent PEG. CT images obtained with and without air insufflation were examined for the presence or absence of contact between the gastric anterior wall and abdominal wall. PEG outcome based on CT findings was also examined. CT with and without air insufflation was performed in 272 and 94 patients, respectively. Contact between the gastric anterior wall and abdominal wall was shown in 254 (93.4%) with and 45 (47.9%) without air insufflation, all of whom underwent a successful PEG procedure. In patients without contact between the gastric anterior wall and abdominal wall, PEG was not successful in 3 of 49 (6.1%) examined by CT without and 6 of 18 (33.3%) examined with air insufflation (p = 0.004). Values for diagnostic accuracy for contact between the gastric anterior wall and abdominal wall shown by CT with and without air insufflation in successful PEG cases were 0.96 and 0.51, respectively. In conclusion, CT with air insufflation more often revealed contact between the gastric anterior wall and abdominal wall as compared to CT without air insufflation, which may help to predict PEG procedure success. PMID:27257351

  4. First-in-Man Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Revascularization of Coronary Chronic Total Occlusion Using a Wearable Computer: Proof of Concept.

    PubMed

    Opolski, Maksymilian P; Debski, Artur; Borucki, Bartosz A; Szpak, Marcin; Staruch, Adam D; Kepka, Cezary; Witkowski, Adam

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of successful computed tomography-guided percutaneous revascularization of a chronically occluded right coronary artery using a wearable, hands-free computer with a head-mounted display worn by interventional cardiologists in the catheterization laboratory. The projection of 3-dimensional computed tomographic reconstructions onto the screen of virtual reality glass allowed the operators to clearly visualize the distal coronary vessel, and verify the direction of the guide wire advancement relative to the course of the occluded vessel segment. This case provides proof of concept that wearable computers can improve operator comfort and procedure efficiency in interventional cardiology. PMID:26608117

  5. Accurate guidance for percutaneous access to a specific target in soft tissues: preclinical study of computer-assisted pericardiocentesis.

    PubMed

    Chavanon, O; Barbe, C; Troccaz, J; Carrat, L; Ribuot, C; Noirclerc, M; Maitrasse, B; Blin, D

    1999-06-01

    In the field of percutaneous access to soft tissues, our project was to improve classical pericardiocentesis by performing accurate guidance to a selected target, according to a model of the pericardial effusion acquired through three-dimensional (3D) data recording. Required hardware is an echocardiographic device and a needle, both linked to a 3D localizer, and a computer. After acquiring echographic data, a modeling procedure allows definition of the optimal puncture strategy, taking into consideration the mobility of the heart, by determining a stable region, whatever the period of the cardiac cycle. A passive guidance system is then used to reach the planned target accurately, generally a site in the middle of the stable region. After validation on a dynamic phantom and a feasibility study in dogs, an accuracy and reliability analysis protocol was realized on pigs with experimental pericardial effusion. Ten consecutive successful punctures using various trajectories were performed on eight pigs. Nonbloody liquid was collected from pericardial effusions in the stable region (5 to 9 mm wide) within 10 to 15 minutes from echographic acquisition to drainage. Accuracy of at least 2.5 mm was demonstrated. This study demonstrates the feasibility of computer-assisted pericardiocentesis. Beyond the simple improvement of the current technique, this method could be a new way to reach the heart or a new tool for percutaneous access and image-guided puncture of soft tissues. Further investigation will be necessary before routine human application. PMID:10414543

  6. Accuracy of Percutaneous Lumbosacral Pedicle Screw Placement Using the Oblique Fluoroscopic View Based on Computed Tomography Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Koji; Kanemura, Tokumi; Iwase, Toshiki; Togawa, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective. Purpose This study aims to investigate the accuracy of the oblique fluoroscopic view, based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) images for accurate placement of lumbosacral percutaneous pedicle screws (PPS). Overview of Literature Although PPS misplacement has been reported as one of the main complications in minimally invasive spine surgery, there is no comparative data on the misplacement rate among different fluoroscopic techniques, or comparing such techniques with open procedures. Methods We retrospectively selected 230 consecutive patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion with a pedicle screw construct for degenerative lumbar disease, and divided them into 3 groups, those who had undergone: minimally invasive percutaneous procedure using biplane (lateral and anterior-posterior views using a single C-arm) fluoroscope views (group M-1), minimally invasive percutaneous procedure using the oblique fluoroscopic view based on preoperative CT (group M-2), and conventional open procedure using a lateral fluoroscopic view (group O: controls). The relative position of the screw to the pedicle was graded for the pedicle breach as no breach, <2 mm, 2–4 mm, or >4 mm. Inaccuracy was calculated and assessed according to the spinal level, direction and neurological deficit. Inter-group radiation exposure was estimated using fluoroscopy time. Results Inaccuracy involved an incline toward L5, causing medial or lateral perforation of pedicles in group M-1, but it was distributed relatively equally throughout multiple levels in groups M-2 and controls. The mean fluoroscopy time/case ranged from 1.6 to 3.9 minutes. Conclusions Minimally invasive lumbosacral PPS placement using the conventional fluoroscopic technique carries an increased risk of inaccurate screw placement and resultant neurological deficits, compared with that of the open procedure. Inaccuracy tended to be distributed between medial and lateral perforations of the L5 pedicle

  7. Value of Computed Tomography for Predicting the Outcome After Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Shaker, Hassan; Ismail, Mohamed Ali Ahmed; Kamal, Ahmed M.; Safa, Mohamed; Refaat, Hisham; Abdelsalam, Ahmed; Badawy, Mohamed H.; Elganzoury, Hossam; Elkhouly, Amr; Ghobashy, Samir; Elesaily, Khalid; Eldahshan, Samoir; Nour, Hani H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Computerized tomography of the urinary tract (CT-UT) has been established as the diagnostic procedure of choice for urinary stones. This study aimed to evaluate its role in predicting the outcome of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in terms of stone free rate and residual fragments. Method This prospective cohort study was conducted on 34 patients in the Urology Department of Theodor Bilharz Research Institute from January 2013 to March 2014. The patients who had large and/or multiple renal stones, including staghorn stones, in 19 renal units scheduled for PCNL were included in this study. All had a pre-operative CT-UT to determine the stones’ characteristics and renal anatomy. CT-UT, together with a kidney-Ureter-Bladder (KUB) film, was taken on the first post-operative day. The data were analyzed by SPSS version 17 using independent-samples t-test and the chi-squared test. Results CT-UT showed a statistical significant sensitivity in detecting residual fragments over standard KUB, yet this significance was lost when corrected to significant residual. Stone size and density were independent factors for the presence of residual stones. Conclusion CT-UT post PCNL was sensitive to detect residual fragments, yet it showed no superiority over standard KUB in detecting significant residual. PMID:26767106

  8. Percutaneous Cystogastrostomy with a New Catheter for Drainage of Pancreatic Pseudocysts and Fluid Collections

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Roger P.; Cox, Michael R.; Wilson, Thomas G.; Bowyer, Richard C.; Padbury, Robert T. A.; Toouli, James

    1996-03-15

    We describe a new catheter for the initial percutaneous drainage of large symptomatic pancreatic fluid collections and abscesses using a transgastric approach to allow fluid drainage into the gastric lumen. A double-mushroom stent is placed secondarily for long-term internal drainage to the stomach, avoiding the need for an extended period of external catheter drainage. This technique, termed percutaneous cystogastrostomy (PCG), has been used in 19 consecutive patients with one recurrent symptomatic pseudocyst in the follow-up period of 9<+>-<+>43 months. There was one death within 30 days of PCG and 1 patient proceeded to surgical necrosectomy. After evidence of resolution of the pseudocysts, the internal stent was retrieved in 17 patients by endoscopic snare.

  9. Feasibility Study of Needle Placement in Percutaneous Vertebroplasty: Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Guidance Versus Conventional Fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braak, Sicco J.; Zuurmond, Kirsten Aerts, Hans C. J.; Leersum, Marc van Overtoom, Timotheus T. Th. Heesewijk, Johannes P. M. van Strijen, Marco J. L. van

    2013-08-01

    ObjectiveTo investigate the accuracy, procedure time, fluoroscopy time, and dose area product (DAP) of needle placement during percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance versus fluoroscopy.Materials and MethodsOn 4 spine phantoms with 11 vertebrae (Th7-L5), 4 interventional radiologists (2 experienced with CBCT guidance and two inexperienced) punctured all vertebrae in a bipedicular fashion. Each side was randomization to either CBCT guidance or fluoroscopy. CBCT guidance is a sophisticated needle guidance technique using CBCT, navigation software, and real-time fluoroscopy. The placement of the needle had to be to a specific target point. After the procedure, CBCT was performed to determine the accuracy, procedure time, fluoroscopy time, and DAP. Analysis of the difference between methods and experience level was performed.ResultsMean accuracy using CBCT guidance (2.61 mm) was significantly better compared with fluoroscopy (5.86 mm) (p < 0.0001). Procedure time was in favor of fluoroscopy (7.39 vs. 10.13 min; p = 0.001). Fluoroscopy time during CBCT guidance was lower, but this difference is not significant (71.3 vs. 95.8 s; p = 0.056). DAP values for CBCT guidance and fluoroscopy were 514 and 174 mGy cm{sup 2}, respectively (p < 0.0001). There was a significant difference in favor of experienced CBCT guidance users regarding accuracy for both methods, procedure time of CBCT guidance, and added DAP values for fluoroscopy.ConclusionCBCT guidance allows users to perform PVP more accurately at the cost of higher patient dose and longer procedure time. Because procedural complications (e.g., cement leakage) are related to the accuracy of the needle placement, improvements in accuracy are clinically relevant. Training in CBCT guidance is essential to achieve greater accuracy and decrease procedure time/dose values.

  10. Computed Tomography-Based Software Safely Guides Anterograde Percutaneous Anterior and Posterior Column Acetabular Screws.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Soham; Starr, Adam J; Banerjee, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software to generate the optimal individualized starting points and pathways for anterior and posterior column screws. In this cross-sectional study, 95 consecutive patients from a level I trauma center with noncontrast pelvis computed tomography (CT) images without displaced acetabular fractures were studied. A Java-based program was designed that generated a 3-D graph of pelvic bones and a list was compiled of every potential anterograde anterior and posterior column screw that exited distal to the acetabulum, eliminating screws that did not safely remain within the cortex. The longest safe screw pathway for each patient was determined for both 6.5-mm and 7.3-mm diameter screws. The program was able to identify safe screw pathways for the vast majority of patients (>96%). The study also found that males tolerated significantly longer screws in the anterior column (p < .05), but there was no posterior column difference regarding sex. PMID:27518290

  11. Lung Tumors Treated With Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation: Computed Tomography Imaging Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Palussiere, Jean Marcet, Benjamin; Descat, Edouard; Deschamps, Frederic; Rao, Pramod; Ravaud, Alain; Brouste, Veronique; Baere, Thierry de

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To describe the morphologic evolution of lung tumors treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) by way of computed tomography (CT) images and to investigate patterns of incomplete RFA at the site of ablation. Materials and Methods: One hundred eighty-nine patients with 350 lung tumors treated with RFA underwent CT imaging at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months. CT findings were interpreted separately by two reviewers with consensus. Five different radiologic patterns were predefined: fibrosis, cavitation, nodule, atelectasis, and disappearance. The appearance of the treated area was evaluated at each follow-up CT using the predefined patterns. Results: At 1 year after treatment, the most common evolutions were fibrosis (50.5%) or nodules (44.8%). Differences were noted depending on the initial size of the tumor, with fibrosis occurring more frequently for tumors <2 cm (58.6% vs. 22.9%, P = 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}). Cavitation and atelectasis were less frequent patterns (2.4% and 1.4%, respectively, at 1 year). Tumor location (intraparenchymatous, with pleural contact <50% or >50%) was not significantly correlated with follow-up image pattern. Local tumor progressions were observed with each type of evolution. At 1 year, 12 local recurrences were noted: 2 cavitations, which represented 40% of the cavitations noted at 1 year; 2 fibroses (1.9%); 7 nodules (7.4%); and 1 atelectasis (33.3%). Conclusion: After RFA of lung tumors, follow-up CT scans show that the shape of the treatment zone can evolve in five different patterns. None of these patterns, however, can confirm the absence of further local tumor progression at subsequent follow-up.

  12. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy for vertebral neoplasms: a department's experience and hybrid biopsy technique to improve yield.

    PubMed

    Garg, Vasant; Kosmas, Christos; Josan, Enambir S; Partovi, Sasan; Bhojwani, Nicholas; Fergus, Nathan; Young, Peter C; Robbin, Mark R

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent articles have identified the poor diagnostic yield of percutaneous needle biopsy for vertebral osteomyelitis. The current study aimed to confirm the higher accuracy of CT-guided spinal biopsy for vertebral neoplasms and to identify which biopsy technique provides the highest yield. METHODS Over a 9-year period, the radiology department at University Hospitals Case Medical Center performed 222 CT-guided biopsies of vertebral lesions, of which clinicians indicated a concern for vertebral neoplasms in 122 patients. A retrospective chart review was performed to confirm the higher sensitivity of the percutaneous intervention for vertebral neoplasms. RESULTS A core sample was obtained for all 122 biopsies of concern (100.0%). Only 6 cases (4.9%) were reported as nondiagnostic per histological sampling, and 12 cases (9.8%) were negative for disease. The question of vertebral neoplastic involvement warrants follow-up, and the current study was able to determine the subsequent diagnosis of each lesion. Of the 122 total, 94 (77.0%) core samples provided true-positive results, and the sensitivity of core biopsy measured 87.9%. The technical approach did not demonstrate any significant difference in diagnostic yield. However, when the vertebral cortex was initially pierced with a coaxial bone biopsy system and subsequently a 14-gauge spring-loaded cutting biopsy needle was coaxially advanced into lytic lesions, 14 true positives were obtained with a corresponding sensitivity of 100.0%. CONCLUSIONS This study confirms the higher sensitivity of image-guided percutaneous needle biopsy for vertebral neoplasms. In addition, it demonstrates how the use of a novel cutting needle biopsy approach, performed coaxially through a core biopsy track, provides the highest yield. PMID:27476841

  13. Percutaneous connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picha, G. J.; Taylor, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    A surface possessing a regular array of micro-pillars was evaluated with regard to its ability to control epithelial downgrowth at the percutaneous interface. A range of pillar sizes were applied to the vertical segment of T shaped Biomer (R) implants. These percutaneous tabs were implanted into the dorsum of cats for a period of 6 weeks using a standardized surgical technique. Comments were made post-operatively and at the time of retrieval. A quantitative scoring system was applied to these observations as well as histological results. As observed, the pillar morphology used displayed the ability to control epithelial downgrowth. Collagen ingrowth into the interpillar spaces and possibly direct interactions of the epithelial cells with the morphology may account for the inhibition. The reproducibility of epithelial inhibition is, however, limited by other factors which are currently not well understood. These factors and potential methods of assessment are discussed.

  14. Dataset of calcified plaque condition in the stenotic coronary artery lesion obtained using multidetector computed tomography to indicate the addition of rotational atherectomy during percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Yasushi; Hamazaki, Yuji; Sekimoto, Teruo; Kaneko, Kyouichi; Kodama, Yusuke; Li, Hui-Ling; Suyama, Jumpei; Gokan, Takehiko; Sakai, Koshiro; Kosaki, Ryota; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Tsujita, Hiroaki; Tsukamoto, Shigeto; Sakurai, Masayuki; Sambe, Takehiko; Oguchi, Katsuji; Uchida, Naoki; Kobayashi, Shinichi; Aoki, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Youichi

    2016-06-01

    Our data shows the regional coronary artery calcium scores (lesion CAC) on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and the cross-section imaging on MDCT angiography (CTA) in the target lesion of the patients with stable angina pectoris who were scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). CAC and CTA data were measured using a 128-slice scanner (Somatom Definition AS+; Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) before PCI. CAC was measured in a non-contrast-enhanced scan and was quantified using the Calcium Score module of SYNAPSE VINCENT software (Fujifilm Co. Tokyo, Japan) and expressed in Agatston units. CTA were then continued with a contrast-enhanced ECG gating to measure the severity of the calcified plaque condition. We present that both CAC and CTA data are used as a benchmark to consider the addition of rotational atherectomy during PCI to severely calcified plaque lesions. PMID:26977441

  15. Effectiveness of Computed Tomography Guided Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation Therapy for Osteoid Osteoma: Initial Results and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Karagöz, Erdal; Özel, Deniz; Özkan, Fuat; Özel, Betül Duran; Özer, Özgur; Coşkun, Zafer Ünsal

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The aim of this retrospective study is to determine our experience of technique success rate, complications and clinical results in long term follow up for computed tomography (CT)-guided radiofrequency ablation [RA] therapy for osteoid osteoma (OO). Material/Methods We performed RA therapy to 18 patients with OO referred to interventional radiology from other clinics primarily from orthopedics; between January 2011 to May 2014. Daytime and nighttime pain intensity of 18 patients was noted according to visual analog scale (VAS). After procedure pain intensity was compared with before one. We also discussed other factors can affect it. Results All procedures were completed technically successful for all patients [100%]. We did not experience any major complication or mortality. However we had 3 minor complications. Pain came back in 1 patient after 5 months from procedure and it was considered as recurrence. Dramatic pain intensity fall was seen in patients after procedure, both daytime and nighttime. However we did not find and statistically significant change in comparison of pain intensity reduce and time needed to return back to routine life when using patients demographic data and lesion size. Conclusions CT guided RA therapy of OO is minimally invasive, effective and secure procedure. PMID:27429671

  16. Percutaneous renal cryoablation: current status.

    PubMed

    Mazaris, Evangelos M; Varkarakis, Ioannis M; Solomon, Stephen B

    2008-04-01

    Over the last 13 years, renal cryoablation has emerged as a promising technique for the treatment of solid renal tumors. The improvement in imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography and MRI, as well as the introduction of thinner probes, has led to the spread of the minimally invasive percutaneous approach. We review the historical background of percutaneous renal cryoablation (PRC), present its basic principles, mention the contemporary clinical data and outcomes of this technique and suggest future directions for its wider application in renal tumors. Early results have demonstrated that it may offer an alternative for the treatment of small renal masses with the advantages of minimal complications, spared renal function, decreased overall costs and equivalent oncologic efficacy. Long-term results are required in order to apply this minimally invasive technique to a broader spectrum of patients. PMID:18407738

  17. Percutaneous Nephroscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    With the development of techniques for percutaneous access and equipment to disintegrate calculi, percutaneous nephroscopic surgery is currently used by many urologists and is the procedure of choice for the removal of large renal calculi and the management of diverticula, intrarenal strictures, and urothelial cancer. Although it is more invasive than shock wave lithotripsy and retrograde ureteroscopic surgery, percutaneous nephroscopic surgery has been successfully performed with high efficiency and low morbidity in difficult renal anatomies and patient conditions. These advantages of minimal invasiveness were rapidly perceived and applied to the management of ureteropelvic junction obstruction, calyceal diverticulum, infundibular stenosis, and urothelial cancer. The basic principle of endopyelotomy is a full-thickness incision of the narrow segment followed by prolonged stenting and drainage to allow regeneration of an adequate caliber ureter. The preferred technique for a calyceal diverticulum continues to be debated. Excellent long-term success has been reported with percutaneous, ureteroscopic, and laparoscopic techniques. Each approach is based on the location and size of the diverticulum. So far, percutaneous ablation of the calyceal diverticulum is the most established minimally invasive technique. Infundibular stenosis is an acquired condition usually associated with inflammation or stones. Reported series of percutaneously treated infundibular stenosis are few. In contrast with a calyceal diverticulum, infundibular stenosis is a more difficult entity to treat with only a 50-76% success rate by percutaneous techniques. Currently, percutaneous nephroscopic resection of transitional cell carcinoma in the renal calyx can be applied in indicated cases. PMID:20495691

  18. Computed tomography fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous 125I seed implantation for safe, effective and real-time monitoring radiotherapy of inoperable stage T1-3N0M0 non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIAKAI; YU, MIAO; XIAO, YUEYONG; YANG, LI; ZHANG, JINSHAN; RAY, ERIK; YANG, XIAOMING

    2013-01-01

    The management of inoperable lung cancer remains a challenge. It has been proven that computed tomography (CT)-guided iodine-125 (125I) seed implantation is a safe and efficient method for treating lung cancer. Computed tomographic fluoroscopy (CTF) is superior to traditional CT for percutaneous management of lung lesions, due to the real-time guidance and accurate localization of the lesions. The aim of the present prospective study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of CTF-guided percutaneous permanent implantation of 125I seeds for the treatment of selected patients with inoperable stage T1-3N0M0 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 24 patients with resectable but inoperable stage T1-3N0 NSCLC, with a total of 28 lesions, underwent CTF-guided percutaneous implantation of radioactive 125I seeds. A prescription dose of 100–120 Gy was delivered to each lesion. The complications and local tumor control rates were documented. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. All the patients successfully completed the procedure, with a mean procedure duration of 45.7 min (range, 30–75 min). No severe complications occurred. Small asymptomatic pneumothorax with lung volume compression of <10% and minor hemorrhage along the needle track without hemoptysis occurred immediately after the procedure in 3 (12.5%) and 4 (16.7%) of the 24 patients, respectively. At a median follow-up of 31.5 months (range, 8–46 months), the local control rate (LCR) of the lesions was 78.6% (22/28). The 1-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rate was 95.8, 78 and 55%, respectively. In conclusion, CTF is the favourable imaging guidance method for the percutaneous implantation of 125I seeds. CTF-guided brachytherapy with implantation of 125I seeds is a safe, feasible and effective modality for the treatment of inoperable early-stage NSCLC and may be considered an alternative option in selected patients with medically inoperable NSCLC. PMID:24649287

  19. Percutaneous cholecystostomy in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Teplick, S K; Harshfield, D L; Brandon, J C; Broadwater, J R; Cone, J B

    1991-01-01

    Sixteen critically ill patients underwent percutaneous cholecystostomy because of suspected acute cholecystitis. The procedure was technically successful, although 11 of 16 patients died subsequently because of various complications of their underlying primary disorders. We reviewed this series to reassess the value of percutaneous cholecystostomy. Four of 11 patients with definite acute cholecystitis (group 1) were cured by this technique, but three required surgery because of gallbladder wall necrosis. Two of these were among four cases which had demonstrated pericholecystic fluid collections on computed tomography (CT) or ultrasound of the abdomen. There were also five patients (group 2) in whom acute cholecystitis or its relationship to patients' symptoms were not fully determined, and four of them did not improve after percutaneous cholecystostomy. We conclude that this technique has a lower success rate in critically ill patients than reported previously. PMID:2016030

  20. Percutaneous absorption of drugs.

    PubMed

    Wester, R C; Maibach, H I

    1992-10-01

    The skin is an evolutionary masterpiece of living tissue which is the final control unit for determining the local and systemic availability of any drug which must pass into and through it. In vivo in humans, many factors will affect the absorption of drugs. These include individual biological variation and may be influenced by race. The skin site of the body will also influence percutaneous absorption. Generally, those body parts exposed to the open environment (and to cosmetics, drugs and hazardous toxic substances) are most affected. Treating patients may involve single daily drug treatment or multiple daily administration. Finally, the body will be washed (normal daily process or when there is concern about skin decontamination) and this will influence percutaneous absorption. The vehicle of a drug will affect release of drug to skin. On skin, the interrelationships of this form of administration involve drug concentration, surface area exposed, frequency and time of exposure. These interrelationships determine percutaneous absorption. Accounting for all the drug administered is desirable in controlled studies. The bioavailability of the drug then is assessed in relationship to its efficacy and toxicity in drug development. There are methods, both quantitative and qualitative, in vitro and in vivo, for studying percutaneous absorption of drugs. Animal models are substituted for humans to determine percutaneous absorption. Each of these methods thus becomes a factor in determining percutaneous absorption because they predict absorption in humans. The relevance of these predictions to humans in vivo is of intense research interest. The most relevant determination of percutaneous absorption of a drug in humans is when the drug in its approved formulation is applied in vivo to humans in the intended clinical situation. Deviation from this scenario involves the introduction of variables which may alter percutaneous absorption. PMID:1296607

  1. Intraperitoneal seeding from hepatocellular carcinoma following percutaneous ethanol ablation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kurl, S; Farin, P; Rytkonen, H; Soimakallio, S

    1997-01-01

    We present a case of intraperitoneal seeding in a 36-year-old woman with a large primary hepatocellular carcinoma located superfically in the left lobe of the otherwise normal liver. The patient was treated with percutaneous ethanol ablation therapy. Eight months after the treatment computed tomography and ultrasonography (US) revealed an intraperitoneal seeding that was confirmed with US-guided percutaneous biopsy. PMID:9107646

  2. Superior Mesenteric Artery Embolism Treated with Percutaneous Mechanical Thrombectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, Peter Kuhelj, Dimitrij; Bunc, Matjaz

    2011-02-15

    A case of acute superior mesenteric artery embolism treated with percutaneous thrombus aspiration is described. A 63-year-old man with chronic atrial fibrillation was admitted to the hospital with progressive abdominal pain. Computed tomography angiography revealed an occlusion of the distal part of the superior mesenteric artery. The patient was effectively treated using transaxillary percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy using a 6F Aspirex thrombectomy catheter.

  3. Computed Tomography Guided Percutaneous Injection of a Mixture of Lipiodol and Methylene Blue in Rabbit Lungs: Evaluation of Localization Ability for Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Kwang Nam; Kim, Tae Jung; Song, Yong Sub; Kim, Dong Il

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative localization is necessary prior to video assisted thoracoscopic surgery for the detection of small or deeply located lung nodules. We compared the localization ability of a mixture of lipiodol and methylene blue (MLM) (0.6 mL, 1:5) to methylene blue (0.5 mL) in rabbit lungs. CT-guided percutaneous injections were performed in 21 subjects with MLM and methylene blue. We measured the extent of staining on freshly excised lung and evaluated the subjective localization ability with 4 point scales at 6 and 24 hr after injections. For MLM, radio-opacity was evaluated on the fluoroscopy. We considered score 2 (acceptable) or 3 (excellent) as appropriate for localization. The staining extent of MLM was significantly smaller than methylene blue (0.6 vs 1.0 cm, P<0.001). MLM showed superior staining ability over methylene blue (2.8 vs 2.2, P=0.010). Excellent staining was achieved in 17 subjects (81%) with MLM and 8 (38%) with methylene blue (P=0.011). An acceptable or excellent radio-opacity of MLM was found in 13 subjects (62%). An appropriate localization rate of MLM was 100% with the use of the directly visible ability and radio-opacity of MLM. MLM provides a superior pulmonary localization ability over methylene blue. PMID:24431917

  4. Total Percutaneous Aortic Repair: Midterm Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Clare L. Fotiadis, Nikolas; Renfrew, Ian; Walsh, Michael; Brohi, Karim; Kyriakides, Constantinos; Matson, Matthew

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate and midterm outcomes of percutaneous endovascular repair of thoracic and abdominal aortic pathology. Between December 2003 and June 2005, 21 patients (mean age: 60.4 {+-} 17.1 years; 15 males, 6 females) underwent endovascular stent-graft insertion for thoracic (n = 13) or abdominal aortic (n = 8) pathology. Preprocedural computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was performed to assess the suitability of aorto-iliac and common femoral artery (CFA) anatomy, including the degree of CFA calcification, for total percutaneous aortic stent-graft repair. Percutaneous access was used for the introduction of 18- to 26-Fr delivery devices. A 'preclose' closure technique using two Perclose suture devices (Perclose A-T; Abbott Vascular) was used in all cases. Data were prospectively collected. Each CFA puncture site was assessed via clinical examination and CTA at 1, 6, and 12 months, followed by annual review thereafter. Minimum follow-up was 36 months. Outcome measures evaluated were rates of technical success, conversion to open surgical repair, complications, and late incidence of arterial stenosis at the site of Perclose suture deployment. A total of 58 Perclose devices were used to close 29 femoral arteriotomies. Outer diameters of stent-graft delivery devices used were 18 Fr (n = 5), 20 Fr (n = 3), 22 Fr (n = 4), 24 Fr (n = 15), and 26 Fr (n = 2). Percutaneous closure was successful in 96.6% (28/29) of arteriotomies. Conversion to surgical repair was required at one access site (3.4%). Mean follow-up was 50 {+-} 8 months. No late complications were observed. By CT criteria, no patient developed a >50% reduction in CFA caliber at the site of Perclose deployment during the study period. In conclusion, percutaneous aortic stent-graft insertion can be safely performed, with a low risk of both immediate and midterm access-related complications.

  5. Percutaneous absorption from soil.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rosa Marie; Coman, Garrett; Blickenstaff, Nicholas R; Maibach, Howard I

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Some natural sites, as a result of contaminants emitted into the air and subsequently deposited in soil or accidental industrial release, have high levels of organic and non-organic chemicals in soil. In occupational and recreation settings, these could be potential sources of percutaneous exposure to humans. When investigating percutaneous absorption from soil - in vitro or vivo - soil load, particle size, layering, soil "age" time, along with the methods of performing the experiment and analyzing the results must be taken into consideration. Skin absorption from soil is generally reduced compared with uptake from water/acetone. However, the absorption of some compounds, e.g., pentachlorophenol, chlorodane and PCB 1254, are similar. Lipophilic compounds like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, benzo[A]pyrene, and metals have the tendency to form reservoirs in skin. Thus, one should take caution in interpreting results directly from in vitro studies for risk assessment; in vivo validations are often required for the most relevant risk assessment. PMID:25205703

  6. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA)

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) is a minimally invasive procedure to open up blocked coronary arteries, allowing blood to circulate unobstructed to the heart muscle. The procedure ...

  7. Percutaneous transmyocardial revascularization.

    PubMed

    Kim, C B; Oesterle, S N

    1997-12-01

    Transmyocardial revascularization (TMR) is a potential therapy for patients with severe angina pectoris and coronary anatomy deemed unsuitable for traditional revascularization techniques. Investigations of TMR are reviewed with emphasis on studies relevant to the development of a percutaneous, catheter-based transmyocardial revascularization procedure (PMR). The results of the preliminary animal studies and description of the PMR procedure are discussed. The recently initiated human PMR protocol is summarized and possible future investigative directions are outlined. PMID:9641086

  8. Brachiocephalic artery haemorrhage during percutaneous tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S D; Kumar, G; Hill, C S; Kaddour, H

    2015-03-01

    Percutaneous tracheostomy was performed on a 69-year-old woman to facilitate weaning. Insertion of the size 7 tracheostomy tube resulted in profuse bleeding around the tracheostomy site. On inflation of the tracheostomy balloon, the bleeding stopped. Urgent computed tomography demonstrated the brachiocephalic artery was abnormally high and lying in an oblique fashion over the trachea, and the tracheostomy tube was displacing the trachea posteriorly. Surgical repair of the defect in the brachiocephalic artery was undertaken and a surgical tracheostomy was performed in theatre. This case raises important issues about the potential dangers of percutaneous tracheostomy in cases of abnormal anatomy. It also emphasises the importance of direct visualisation of the seeker needle using the endoscope. In cases where there is a suspicion of abnormal anatomy, it is safer to obtain preprocedural imaging or perform a surgical tracheostomy. PMID:25723674

  9. Treatment of vertebral body compression fractures using percutaneous kyphoplasty guided by a combination of computed tomography and C-arm fluoroscopy with finger-touch guidance to determine the needle entry point.

    PubMed

    Wang, G Y; Zhang, C C; Ren, K; Zhang, P P; Liu, C H; Zheng, Z A; Chen, Y; Fang, R

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the results and complications of image-guided percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP) using computed tomography (CT) and C-arm fluoroscopy, with finger-touch guidance to determine the needle entry point. Of the 86 patients (106 PKP) examined, 56 were treated for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures and 30 for vertebral tumors. All patients underwent image-guided treatment using CT and conventional fluoroscopy, with finger-touch identification of a puncture point within a small incision (1.5 to 2 cm). Partial or complete pain relief was achieved in 98% of patients within 24 h of treatment. Moreover, a significant improvement in functional mobility and reduction in analgesic use was observed. CT allowed the detection of cement leakage in 20.7% of the interventions. No bone cement leakages with neurologic symptoms were noted. All work channels were made only once, and bone cement was distributed near the center of the vertebral body. Our study confirms the efficacy of PKP treatment in osteoporotic and oncological patients. The combination of CT and C-arm fluoroscopy with finger-touch guidance reduces the risk of complications compared with conventional fluoroscopy alone, facilitates the detection of minor cement leakage, improves the operative procedure, and results in a favorable bone cement distribution. PMID:25867298

  10. Benign Biliary Strictures: Diagnostic Evaluation and Approaches to Percutaneous Treatment.

    PubMed

    Fidelman, Nicholas

    2015-12-01

    Interventional radiologists are often consulted to help identify and treat biliary strictures that can result from a variety of benign etiologies. Mainstays of noninvasive imaging for benign biliary strictures include ultrasound, contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and computed tomography cholangiography. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography is the invasive diagnostic procedure of choice, allowing both localization of a stricture and treatment. Percutaneous biliary interventions are reserved for patients who are not candidates for endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (eg, history of distal gastrectomy and biliary-enteric anastomosis to a jejunal roux limb). This review discusses the roles of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and biliary drainage in the diagnosis of benign biliary strictures. The methodology for crossing benign biliary strictures, approaches to balloon dilation, management of recalcitrant strictures (ie, large-bore biliary catheters and retrievable covered stents), and the expected outcomes and complications of percutaneous treatment of benign biliary strictures are also addressed. PMID:26615161

  11. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Placement

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Lourdes R.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart disease and pulmonary valve disease need multiple procedures over their lifetimes to replace their pulmonary valves. Chronic pulmonary stenosis, regurgitation, or both have untoward effects on ventricular function and on the clinical status of these patients. To date, all right ventricle–pulmonary artery conduits have had relatively short lifespans. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation, although relatively new, will probably reduce the number of operative procedures that these patients will have to undergo over a lifetime. Refinement and further development of this procedure holds promise for the extension of this technology to other patient populations. PMID:26175629

  12. Percutaneous left ventricular restoration.

    PubMed

    Ige, Mobolaji; Al-Kindi, Sadeer G; Attizzani, Guilherme; Costa, Marco; Oliveira, Guilherme H

    2015-04-01

    The ventricular partitioning device known as Parachute is the first and only percutaneously implantable device aimed at restoration of normal left ventricular geometry in humans. Since its conception, this technology has undergone extensive animal and human testing, with proved feasibility and safety, and is currently being studied in a pivotal randomized clinical trial. This article discusses ventricular remodeling and therapies attempted in the past, details the components of the ventricular partitioning device, describes the implanting technique, and reviews the most current experience of this device in humans. PMID:25834974

  13. Elective Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Madani, Mohsen; Alizadeh, Keivan; Ghazaee, Sepideh Parchami; Zavarehee, Abbas; Abdi, Seifollah; Shakerian, Farshad; Salehi, Negar; Firouzi, Ata

    2013-01-01

    Regardless of the diabetic status of patients with coronary artery disease, hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia are adversely associated with cardiovascular events. The relationship between glucose levels and increased mortality risk in acute myocardial infarction has been shown through various glucose metrics; however, there is a dearth of multivariate analysis of the relationship between elective coronary angioplasty and preprocedural blood glucose levels. We evaluated the relationship between preprocedural blood glucose levels and myocardial injury in 1,012 consecutive patients who underwent elective percutaneous coronary angioplasty. The patients were classified into 4 glycemic groups on the basis of blood glucose levels measured immediately before the procedure: hypoglycemic, euglycemic, mildly hyperglycemic, and hyperglycemic. Samples for troponin I and creatine kinase–MB fraction were collected before each procedure and at 8, 16, and 24 hours after each procedure. Bivariate analysis revealed that postprocedural troponin I levels were significantly higher in the hyperglycemic group (P=0.027). Although postprocedural levels of creatine kinase–MB fraction rose insignificantly in the hypoglycemic patients, our results showed that these patients were more likely to have postprocedural levels 2 to 5 times the upper limit of normal (P=0.013). We tentatively conclude that abnormally low preprocedural plasma glucose levels—together with a recent history of smoking—are associated with an increased incidence of periprocedural myocardial injury in patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention. PMID:24082370

  14. [Ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Guliev, B G

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to the evaluation of the effectiveness and results of ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL) for the treatment of patients with large stones in renal pelvis. The results of PNL in 138 patients who underwent surgery for kidney stones from 2011 to 2013 were analyzed. Seventy patients (Group 1) underwent surgery with combined ultrasound and radiological guidance, and 68 patients (Group 2)--only with ultrasound guidance. The study included patients with large renal pelvic stones larger than 2.2 cm, requiring the formation of a single laparoscopic approach. Using the comparative analysis, the timing of surgery, the number of intra- and postoperative complications, blood loss and length of stay were evaluated. Percutaneous access was successfully performed in all patients. Postoperative complications (exacerbation of chronic pyelonephritis, gross hematuria) were observed in 14.3% of patients in Group 1 and in 14.7% of patients in Group 2. Bleeding requiring blood transfusion, and injuries of adjacent organs were not registered. Efficacy of PNL in the Group 1 was 95.7%; 3 (4.3%) patients required additional interventions. In Group 2, the effectiveness of PNL was 94.1%, 4 (5.9%) patients additionally underwent extracorporeal lithotripsy. There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of PNL, the volume of blood loss and duration of hospitalization. Ultrasound guided PNL can be performed in large pelvic stones and sufficient expansion of renal cavities, thus reducing radiation exposure of patients and medical staff. PMID:25807772

  15. Percutaneous laser disc decompression.

    PubMed

    Choy, D S

    1995-06-01

    Herniated disc disease has an incidence of 1.7% in the U.S. Heretofore, open operative procedures were the rule for this condition when conservative measures were ineffective. Choy and Ascher introduced this new technique in February 1986 using a Nd:YAG laser introduced into the disc through an optical fiber in a needle. Percutaneous laser disc decompression is based on the principle that in an enclosed hydraulic space, such as an intact disc, a small reduction in volume is associated with a disproportionate fall in pressure. In the disc, this partial vacuum causes the herniated portion to move away from the nerve root back toward the center of the disc. This technique has been taught worldwide and is being performed in most of Europe, Japan, the United States, and Korea. In this special issue devoted to percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD), we will set forth the basic science of PLDD, patient selection, use of the holmium:YAG, and the Nd:YAG lasers, operative technique, and results. PMID:10150634

  16. Image-Guided Percutaneous Splenic Biopsy and Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Sammon, Jennifer; Twomey, Maria; Crush, Lee; Maher, Michael M.; O'Connor, Owen J.

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous splenic biopsy and drainage are relatively safe and accurate procedures. The risk of major complication (1.3%) following percutaneous splenic biopsy does not exceed that of other solid intra-abdominal organ biopsies, and it has less morbidity and mortality than splenectomy. Both computed tomography and ultrasound can be used to provide image guidance for biopsy and drainage. The safety profile of fine-needle aspiration cytology is better than core needle biopsy, but core biopsy has superior diagnostic accuracy. PMID:24293803

  17. PET-Based Percutaneous Needle Biopsy.

    PubMed

    El-Haddad, Ghassan

    2016-07-01

    PET can be used to guide percutaneous needle biopsy to the most metabolic lesion, improving diagnostic yield. PET biopsy guidance can be performed using visual or software coregistration, electromagnetic needle tracking, cone-beam computed tomography (CT), and intraprocedural PET/CT guidance. PET/CT-guided biopsies allow the sampling of lesions that may not be clearly visible on anatomic imaging, or of lesions that are morphologically normal. PET can identify suspicious locations within complex tumors that are most likely to contain important diagnostic and prognostic information. PMID:27321036

  18. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - infants; PQC - infants; Pic line - infants; Per-Q cath - infants ... A percutaneously inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long, very thin, soft plastic tube that is put into a small blood vessel. This article addresses PICCs in ...

  19. Percutaneous Sacroiliac Screw Technique.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, John; Cho, Rosa; Reid, J Spence; Boateng, Henry; Copeland, Carol; Sirlin, Edward

    2016-08-01

    Remembering that preoperative planning, surgical indications, and fracture reduction are paramount for this procedure, presented here is our technique for performing percutaneous sacroiliac screws, both transiliac-transsacral and sacral style. A combination of video, still pictures, and fluoroscopy images will guide the viewer through the process we routinely use highlighting specific details. Patient positioning and intraoperative fluoroscopy imaging are critical to a successful procedure. Although inlet and outlet films remain important, we find the procedure best started on the lateral sacral view to reduce the need for start site, trajectory, and imaging position changes during the case. A cannulated pig sticker (drill guide) used with long drill tip guide wires provide improved manual control to both finding a good start site and directing the trajectory. For patient safety, sacral anatomy and safe zones are discussed as well. Using these technical points will help make this a successful procedure. PMID:27441927

  20. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoung-Doo

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary regurgitation (PR) is a frequent sequelae after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia, truncus arteriosus, Rastelli and Ross operation. Due to patient growth and conduit degeneration, these conduits have to be changed frequently due to regurgitation or stenosis. However, morbidity is significant in these repeated operations. To prolong conduit longevity, bare-metal stenting in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstruction has been performed. Stenting the RVOT can reduce the right ventricular pressure and symptomatic improvement, but it causes PR with detrimental effects on the right ventricle function and risks of arrhythmia. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with pulmonary valve insufficiency, or stenotic RVOTs. PMID:23170091

  1. Determinants of Local Progression After Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for Unresectable Lung Tumors: 9-Year Experience in a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Okuma, Tomohisa Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Akira; Oyama, Yoshimasa; Hamamoto, Shinichi; Toyoshima, Masami; Nakamura, Kenji; Miki, Yukio

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively determine the local control rate and contributing factors to local progression after computed tomography (CT)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for unresectable lung tumor. This study included 138 lung tumors in 72 patients (56 men and 16 women; age 70.0 {+-} 11.6 years (range 31-94); mean tumor size 2.1 {+-} 1.2 cm [range 0.2-9]) who underwent lung RFA between June 2000 and May 2009. Mean follow-up periods for patients and tumors were 14 and 12 months, respectively. The local progression-free rate and survival rate were calculated to determine the contributing factors to local progression. During follow-up, 44 of 138 (32%) lung tumors showed local progression. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year overall local control rates were 61, 57, 57, and 38%, respectively. The risk factors for local progression were age ({>=}70 years), tumor size ({>=}2 cm), sex (male), and no achievement of roll-off during RFA (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis identified tumor size {>=}2 cm as the only independent factor for local progression (P = 0.003). For tumors <2 cm, 17 of 68 (25%) showed local progression, and the 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall local control rates were 77, 73, and 73%, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified that age {>=}70 years was an independent determinant of local progression for tumors <2 cm in diameter (P = 0.011). The present study showed that 32% of lung tumors developed local progression after CT-guided RFA. The significant risk factor for local progression after RFA for lung tumors was tumor size {>=}2 cm.

  2. Standards of Practice: Quality Assurance Guidelines for Percutaneous Treatments of Intervertebral Discs

    SciTech Connect

    Kelekis, Alexis D. Filippiadis, Dimitris K.; Martin, Jean-Baptiste; Brountzos, Elias

    2010-10-15

    Percutaneous treatments are used in the therapy of small- to medium-sized hernias of intervertebral discs to reduce the intradiscal pressure in the nucleus and theoretically create space for the herniated fragment to implode inward, thus reducing pain and improving mobility and quality of life. These techniques involve the percutaneous removal of the nucleus pulposus by using a variety of chemical, thermal, or mechanical techniques and consist of removal of all or part of nucleus pulposus to induce more rapid healing of the abnormal lumbar disc. These guidelines are written to be used in quality improvement programs for assessing fluoroscopy- and/or computed tomography-guided percutaneous intervertebral disc ablative techniques.

  3. Percutaneous Ablation of Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Locklin, Julia; Dupuy, Damian E.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Adrenal tumors comprise a broad spectrum of benign and malignant neoplasms, and include functional adrenal adenomas, pheochromocytomas, primary adrenocortical carcinoma and adrenal metastases. Percutaneous ablative approaches that have been described and used in the treatment of adrenal tumors include percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA), cryoablation, microwave ablation and chemical ablation. Local tumor ablation in the adrenal gland presents unique challenges, secondary to the adrenal gland’s unique anatomic and physiologic features. The results of clinical series employing percutaneous ablative techniques in the treatment of adrenal tumors are reviewed in this article. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the adrenal gland are presented, including approaches commonly used in our practices, and risks and potential complications are discussed. PMID:20540918

  4. Percutaneous Hindfoot and Midfoot Fusion.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Hindfoot and midfoot fusions can be performed with percutaneous techniques. Preliminary results of these procedures are encouraging because they provide similar results than those obtained with open techniques with less morbidity and quick recovery. The best indications are probably fusions for mild-to-moderate reducible hindfoot and midfoot deformities in fragile patients with general or local bad conditions. The main limit is linked to the surgeon's experience in percutaneous foot surgery because a learning curve with the specific tools is necessary before doing these procedures. PMID:27524709

  5. Percutaneous techniques for cervical pain of discal origin.

    PubMed

    Gangi, Afshin; Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Buy, Xavier; Cabral, Jose Facundo; Garnon, Julien

    2011-04-01

    Cervical discogenic pain is an important cause of suffering and disability in the adult population. Pain management in cervical disc herniation relies initially on conservative care (rest, physiotherapy, and oral medications). Once conservative treatment has failed, different percutaneous minimally invasive radiological procedures can be applied to relief pain. This article offers a systematic review on the percutaneous minimally invasive techniques that can be advocated for the treatment of cervical pain of discal origin. Periradicular steroid injection under image guidance (computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging) is the first technique to be considered. The steroid injection aims at reducing the periradicular inflammation and thus relieves the radicular pain. The steroid injections present satisfying short-term results, but pain can recur in the long term. Whenever the steroid injections fail to relieve pain from a contained cervical disc herniation, the more invasive percutaneous disc decompression techniques should be proposed. Percutaneous radiofrequency nucleoplasty is the most often applied technique on the cervical level with a low risk of thermal damage. When the indications and instructions are respected, radiofrequency nucleoplasty presents accepted safety and efficacy levels. PMID:21500138

  6. The value of percutaneous cholangiography

    PubMed Central

    Evison, Gordon; McNulty, Myles; Thomson, Colin

    1973-01-01

    Percutaneous cholangiograms performed on fifty patients in a district general hospital have been reviewed, and the advantages and limitations of the examination are described. The investigation is considered to have sufficient diagnostic value to warrant its inclusion in the diagnostic armamentarium of every general radiological department. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:4788917

  7. Complications of percutaneous vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Saracen, Agnieszka; Kotwica, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is a minimally invasive procedure widely used for the treatment of pain due to vertebral fractures of different origins—osteoporotic, traumatic, or neoplastic. PVP is minimally invasive, but the complications are not rare; however, they are in most cases not significant clinically. The most frequent is cement leakage, which can occur onto veins, paravertebral soft tissue, into the intervertebral disk, or to the spinal canal, affecting foraminal area or epidural space. We analyzed results of treatment and complications of vertebroplasty performed with the use of polimethylomethylacrylate cement (PMMA) on 1100 vertebrae, with a special regard to the severity of complication and eventual clinical manifestation. One thousand one hundred PVP were analyzed, performed in 616 patients. There were 468 (76%) women and 148 men (24%), 24 to 94-year old, mean age 68 years. From 1100 procedures, 794 treated osteporotic and 137 fractures due to malignant disease, 69 PVP were made in traumatic fractures. One hundred patients had painful vertebral hemangiomas. Seven hundred twenty-six (66%) lesions were in thoracic, and 374 (34%) in lumbar area. Results of treatment were assessed using 10 cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) 12 hours after surgery, 7 days, 30 days, and then each 6 months, up to 3 years. Before surgery all patients had significant pain 7 to 10 in VAS scale, mean 8.9 cm. Twelve  hours after surgery 602 (97.7%) reported significant relief of pain, with mean VAS of 2,3 cm. Local complications occurred in 50% of osteoporotic, 34% of neoplastic, 16% of traumatic fractures, and 2% of vertebral hemangiomas. The most common was PMMA leakage into surrounding tissues—20%; paravertebral vein embolism—13%; intradiscal leakage—8%; and PMMA leakage into the spinal canal—0.8%. Results of treatment did not differ between patients with and without any complications. From 104 patients who had chest X-ray or CT study performed

  8. Percutaneous absorption in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    West, D P; Halket, J M; Harvey, D R; Hadgraft, J; Solomon, L M; Harper, J I

    1987-11-01

    The skin of preterm infants varies considerably in its level of maturity. To understand skin absorption in premature infants better, we report a technique for the assessment of percutaneous absorption at various gestational and postnatal ages using stable, isotope-labeled (13C6) benzoic acid. Our results indicate that in the preterm infant, this method detects enhanced skin absorption in the first postnatal days, which declines over three weeks to that expected of a full-term infant. This approach also indicates an inverse relationship between gestational age and skin absorption, as well as postnatal age and skin absorption. The reported technique is a safe and noninvasive method using a model skin penetrant for the study of percutaneous absorption in preterm infants from which basic data may be derived to add to our understanding of skin barrier function. PMID:3422856

  9. New instrumentation in percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Joseph W.; Canales, Benjamin K.

    2010-01-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is the procedure of choice for removing large, complex, and/or multiple renal calculi. Since its first description in 1976, PCNL techniques and equipment have evolved to maximize procedural efficacy, safety, and reproducibility. We reviewed current literature from January 2004 to November 2009 using Medline search regarding PCNL instrumentation and technology. Additional equipment discovered during the review process without published Medline evidence was summarized from manufacturer brochures and data. Included in this review are summaries of intracorporeal lithotriptors and accessory equipment, stone manipulation devices, PCNL tract sealants, and a digital rigid nephroscope. The evolution of these devices from their predecessors has increased the instrumentation options for the treating urologist and may represent more effective technology for the percutaneous treatment of large renal stones. PMID:21116361

  10. Percutaneous penetration--methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Holmgaard, Rikke; Benfeldt, Eva; Nielsen, Jesper B

    2014-07-01

    Studies on percutaneous penetration are needed to assess the hazards after unintended occupational skin exposures to industrial products as well as the efficacy after intended consumer exposure to topically applied medicinal or cosmetic products. During recent decades, a number of methods have been developed to replace methods involving experimental animals. The results obtained from these methods are decided not only by the chemical or product tested, but to a significant degree also by the experimental set-up and decisions made by the investigator during the planning phase. The present MiniReview discusses some of the existing and well-known experimental in vitro and in vivo methods for studies of percutaneous penetration together with some more recent and promising methods. After this, some considerations and recommendations about advantages and limitations of the different methods and their relevance for the prediction of percutaneous penetration are given. Which method to prefer will depend on the product to be tested and the question asked. Regulatory guidelines exist for studies on percutaneous penetration, but researchers as well as regulatory bodies need to pay specific attention to the vehicles and solvents used in donor and sampling fluids so that it reflects in-use conditions as closely as possible. Based on available experimental data, mathematical models have been developed to aid predictions of skin penetration. The authors question the general use of the present mathematical models in hazard assessment, as they seem to ignore outliers among chemicals as well as the heterogeneity of skin barrier properties and skin conditions within the exposed populations. PMID:24373389

  11. [Percutaneous biopsy of the liver].

    PubMed

    Skladaný, L; Jarcuska, P; Oltman, M; Hrusovský, S

    2003-08-01

    Percutaneous liver biopsy represents the most specific examination of the nature and severity of liver diseases. P. Ehrlich was the first physician in history having done the intervention in 1880. The new history begins with the Menghini's publication on s.c. one-second biopsy in 1957. The present paper deals exclusively with diffuse diseases of the liver including the most frequent ones--virus hepatitis, alcohol and non-alcohol steatohepatitis. The contraindications include mainly coagulation disorders and non-cooperative patients. The percutaneous biopsy is mostly executed after ultrasonographic examination or under the control of various image-forming techniques and by means of various types of needles; the authors analyze advantages and disadvantages of individual techniques. If the contraindications are respected, the percutaneous biopsy is a safe method of examination, which may be done on out-patient basis. A large series of complications exists, but their frequency is generally low. Morbidity is referred in 0.2% of patients, the most frequent complications being pain and hypotension from vaso-vagal reactions, extensive intraperitoneal bleeding and hemobilia. Mortality is extremely low, the mean in large studies being 0.001%. PMID:14518095

  12. [Percutaneous therapy of painful arthritis].

    PubMed

    Chlud, K

    1991-01-01

    Pain in osteoarthrosis of the big weight bearing joints is either derived from periarticular ligaments, tendons, fasciae, muscles, bursae--peri-arthropathy as sign of decompensation--or from the reactive synovitis with or without effusion. NSAIDs systemically administered have been so far considered as first choice medication together with physical therapy. New pharmacokinetic data on the topical, percutaneous application of NSAIDs (ibuprofen, diclofenac, indomethacin, some salicylates and to a lesser degree for etofenamate and piroxicam) have demonstrated relevant advantages of the percutaneous route over the systemic one in soft tissue rheumatism. NSAIDs, mentioned above, locally administered as cream, gel or spray, quickly penetrate through the corneal layer of the skin at the site of application, reach high effective concentrations in subcutis, fasciae, tendons, ligaments and muscles, lesser in joint-capsule and -fluid indicating direct penetration. The blood levels of topical NSAIDs are extremely low with no systemic side effects, especially no gastric toxicity; however, local skin irritation is observed (1 to 2%). In contrast to this, systemic (oral) NSAIDs lead primarily via high blood levels to a much lesser concentration--only one tenth--in particular soft tissues with a high incidence of side effects. In conclusion the percutaneous application of certain NSAIDs has become a well established therapeutic regimen in painful osteoarthrosis and in all other inflammatory degenerative and posttraumatic alterations of soft tissue structures. PMID:2011838

  13. Percutaneous Transpedicular Fixation: Technical tips and Pitfalls of Sextant and Pathfinder Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ahmed Salah Aldin

    2016-01-01

    Study Design The efficacy of the operative techniques, possible benefits as well as pitfalls and limitations of the techniques are discussed. Potential drawbacks are also detected. Purpose This study aims to report indications, techniques, and our experience with the use of the Sextant and PathFinder percutaneous transpedicular screw fixation systems. Overview of Literature Percutaneous pedicle screw insertion is a novel technique. Successful percutaneous placement of pedicle screws requires surgical skill and experience because of lack of anatomic surface landmarks. Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous placement of pedicle screws is effective. Many systems are now available. Methods We conducted a prospective operative and postoperative analysis of 40 patients with absolute indication for thoracic or lumbar instability between January 2009 and June 2013. All procedures were performed with the Sextant (group A) and PathFinder (group B) systems under fluoroscopic guidance. Operative techniques are discussed and the results compared. Results Percutaneous transpedicular screw fixation minimizes the morbidity associated with open techniques without compromising the quality of fixation. A total of 190 screws were inserted. There was no additional morbidity. Postoperative computed tomography images and plain X-rays were analyzed. Reduction of visual analog scale scores of back pain was evident. Conclusions Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous pedicular screws are feasible and can be safely done. Current systems allow multi-segmental fixation with significantly less difficulties. The described techniques have acceptable intra- and postoperative complication rates, and overall sufficient pain control with early mobilization of patients. PMID:26949466

  14. Percutaneous Transumbilical Portal Vein Embolization in a Patient with a Ruptured Hepatocellular Carcinoma Supplied by the Portal Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soo Chin; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Chung, Jin Wook; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2011-02-15

    We describe a case of a ruptured hepatocellular carcinoma supplied by the portal vein that was successfully treated with portal vein embolization via a percutaneous transumbilical approach. A contrast material-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scan showed the presence of a large hypervascular tumor on portal venous phase as well as right hepatic vein thrombosis and hemoperitoneum that prevented portal vein embolization by the use of the percutaneous and transjugular transhepatic approach. The use of percutaneous transumbilical portal vein embolization can be an alternative option in this situation.

  15. CT versus ultrasound guidance for percutaneous drainages in the pediatric population: an institutional review meant to limit radiation.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Steven; Schoenfeld, Alan; Zwany, Sarah; Mehta, Anita; Miller, Todd S; Taragin, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous drainage is a minimally invasive procedure that allows for accurate diagnosis and therapy with minimal complications. The drawback is that CT guidance carries a significant amount of radiation exposure. CT-guided percutaneous drainages have been widely used in adults and have been gaining momentum within the pediatric population. Through a thorough review of our institution's (Montefiore Medical Center) CT-guided percutaneous drainages within our pediatric patients, we assessed the radiation exposure per study as well as which studies were deemed possible under ultrasound guidance as a possible alternative. PMID:27133681

  16. Percutaneous diode laser disc nucleoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchetti, P. P.; Longo, Leonardo

    2004-09-01

    The treatment of herniated disc disease (HNP) over the years involved different miniinvasive surgical options. The classical microsurgical approach has been substituted over the years both by endoscopic approach in which is possible to practice via endoscopy a laser thermo-discoplasty, both by percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. In the last ten years, the percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty have been done worldwide in more than 40000 cases of HNP. Because water is the major component of the intervertebral disc, and in HNP pain is caused by the disc protrusion pressing against the nerve root, a 980 nm Diode laser introduced via a 22G needle under X-ray guidance and local anesthesia, vaporizes a small amount of nucleous polposus with a disc shrinkage and a relief of pressure on nerve root. Most patients get off the table pain free and are back to work in 5 to 7 days. Material and method: to date, 130 patients (155 cases) suffering for relevant symptoms therapy-resistant 6 months on average before consulting our department, have been treated. Eightyfour (72%) males and 46 (28%) females had a percutaneous laser disc nucleoplasty. The average age of patients operated was 48 years (22 - 69). The level of disc removal was L3/L4 in 12 cases, L4/L5 in 87 cases and L5/S1 in 56 cases. Two different levels were treated at the same time in 25 patients. Results: the success rate at a minimum follow-up of 6 months was 88% with a complication rate of 0.5%.

  17. Percutaneous Cryoablation for Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Li-Zhi; Li, Jia-Liang; Xu, Ke-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Based on the primary tumor site, liver cancer can be divided into two categories: (1) primary liver cancer and (2) metastatic cancer to the liver from a distant primary site. Guided cryoablation via many imaging methods induces iceball formation and tumor necrosisand is an attractive option for treating unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metastatic liver cancer. There are several advantages to using cryoablation for the treatment of liver cancer: it can be performed percutaneously, intraoperatively, and laparoscopically; iceball formation can be monitored; it has little impact on nearby large blood vessels; and it induces a cryo-immunological response in situ. Clinically, primary research has shown that percutaneous cryoablation of liver cancer is relatively safe and efficient, and it can be combined with other methods, such as radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and immunology, to control disease. Although research is preliminary, cryosurgery is fast becoming an alternative treatment method for HCC or liver tumors. Here, we review the mechanisms of liver tumor cryoablation, cryoablation program selection, clinical efficiency, and complications following treatment. PMID:26355719

  18. Rupture of ectopic renal arterial pseudoaneurysm after percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingshuai; Zhang, Junhui; Xing, Nianzeng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 35-year-old female patient presented with swelling pain at left waist for 1 month. Left renal pelvis stones were found and standard percutaneous nephrolithotomy was successfully performed. Two weeks later, the patient suddenly suffered massive bleeding presented with gross hematuria. Rupture of ectopic renal artery pseudoaneurysm was identified by computed tomography and angiography of the renal artery. Emergency selective angioembolization of one branch of the artery was performed. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ruptured ectopic renal arterial pseudoaneurysm. PMID:27564300

  19. Transgluteal CT-Guided Percutaneous Renal Access for Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy in a Pelvic Horseshoe Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, Ryan J.; Dauw, Casey A.; Borofsky, Michael S.; York, Nadya; Patel, Aashish A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract CT-guided percutaneous renal access has been described as a safe and effective access technique in patients with complex anatomy, including ectopic kidney, retrorenal colon, spinal dysraphism, hepatomegaly, and splenomegaly. In comparison to conventional intraoperative fluoroscopic-guided access, CT imaging allows for delineation of surrounding structures that are at risk for injury during percutaneous access. However, previous reports indicate that pelvic kidneys might be inaccessible percutaneously without laparoscopic assistance. Herein, we present a novel transgluteal route to renal access for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in a patient with a pelvic horseshoe kidney and severe spinal deformity.

  20. Early experience with percutaneous lateral discectomy.

    PubMed

    Stern, M B

    1989-01-01

    Seventeen patients were treated by percutaneous lumbar discectomy for a herniated disc and sciatica. The criteria for inclusion in this series included: (1) a protruding disc in the lumbar area causing neural compression; (2) persistent sciatica; (3) failure of conservative treatment; (4) magnetic resonance imaging, computer tomographic, or myelographic confirmation of the protrusion; and (5) chronic low-back pain with definite evidence of a protruding disc at the appropriate level. The only contraindication to the procedure is the presence of an extruded fragment. There were ten male and seven female patients, with an average age of 40 years. The operation was performed under local anesthesia and by the method of Hijikata. Six cases were at L5-S1, nine at L4-L5, four at L3-L4, and one at L2-L3. Fourteen of 16 patients were relieved of their symptoms. One operation was aborted due to the inability to pass the cannula beneath arthritic facet joints. One complication occurred early while using general anesthetic. An L5 nerve root was injured, causing a permanent drop foot. Major possible complications include infection, nerve root injury, and vascular injury. The success rate with an average follow-up period of six and one-half months was 87.5%. PMID:2910618

  1. Incidence of retrorenal colon during percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Balasar, Mehmet; Kandemir, Abdülkadir; Poyraz, Necdet; Unal, Yunus; Ozturk, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate retrorenal colon incidence in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) interventions made in our clinic. Materials and Methods Clinical data of 804 PNL patients, accumulated over a 7 year period (2006-2012), was surveyed. The patient files were reviewed retrospectively, and only those who had abdominal computed tomography (CT) images before PNL intervention were included in the study. In the CT images, the position of both the ascending and descending colon in relation to the right and left kidneys were evaluated. Results According to our hospital reports, 394 patients with CT images were included in the present study 27 patients (6.9%) had retrorenal colon, of which 18 (4.6%) were on the left side, 4 (1.0%) on the right side and 5 (1.3%) had bilateral retrorenal colons. Colonic perforation complication was seen only in two patients and the colonic perforation rate was 0.3%. These two cases had no CT images. Conclusions PNL, in the process of becoming the standard treatment modality, is a safe and reliable technique for renal stone treatment. Colonic injury should be taken into consideration during PNL interventions of the lower pole of the kidney (especially on the left side) due to the location of retrorenal colon. PMID:26005968

  2. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous thoracoabdominal biopsy.

    PubMed

    Ojalehto, M; Tikkakoski, T; Rissanen, T; Apaja-Sarkkinen, M

    2002-03-01

    This review will discuss the benefits and disadvantages of ultrasound-guided percutaneous fine-needle aspiration and cutting needle biopsies. Clinical efficacy, cost-effectiveness, some controversies and safety will be reviewed. PMID:12010294

  3. Percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... or blood disorder, your doctor may recommend percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling (PUBS), which is performed at ... sample of the fetus' blood directly from the umbilical cord. The sample is then analyzed for genetic ...

  4. [Percutaneous laser disk decompression. Experience since 1989].

    PubMed

    Siebert, W E; Berendsen, B T; Tollgaard, J

    1996-02-01

    Since 1987/1988 percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) has been used clinically for treatment of intervertebral disc prolapses. Credible prospective investigations that have been conducted since 1989 with large patient collectives are now available for analysis of their medium-term results and comparison with other minimally invasive procedures. Our follow-up examination of the first 180 patients treated with PLDD from 1989 to 1993 shows a success rate of 72.8%, similar to that with other percutaneous techniques (automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy, percutaneous lumbar discectomy, chemonucleolysis). To guarantee success, the spinal surgeon must have command of the correct technique and also use the appropriate instruments. Good results with the PLDD procedure can be procured when contraindications and indications for patient selection are strictly observed. Overall, our 5 year results seem encouraging. PMID:8622845

  5. Percutaneous transcatheter snare vegetectomy in a child.

    PubMed

    Saltık, I Levent; Atik, Sezen U; Eroglu, Ayşe G

    2016-04-01

    Surgical vegetectomy may be indicated in patients with unresolving sepsis, heart failure, recurrent embolism, or the presence of large vegetations >10 mm in size. Percutaneous vegetectomy using a snare may be a reasonable option instead of open-heart surgery in selected patients. We describe the case of a patient with operated tetralogy of Fallot and infective endocarditis who underwent vegetectomy via a percutaneous approach. PMID:26817598

  6. Percutaneous needle biopsy of the irradiated skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Edeiken, B.; deSantos, L.A.

    1983-03-01

    Percutaneous needle biopsy was performed in 20 patients who had radiologic abnormalities after irradiation of the skeleton. The biopsies were performed to determine the nature of the bone changes and to differentiate radiation necrosis from metastases or local tumor extension. Eleven patients had tumors, two of which were radiation-induced sarcomas; nine patients did not show evidence of tumor. One patient had osteomyelitis rather than the suspected tumor. The value of percutaneous needle biopsy in the postirradiated skeleton is discussed.

  7. Closed Reduction and Percutaneous Fixation of Calcaneal Fractures in Children.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yongzeng; Yu, Yang; Shui, Xiaolong; Ying, Xiaozhou; Cai, Leyi; Hong, Jianjun

    2016-07-01

    Open reduction and internal fixation has been widely used to treat displaced intra-articular calcaneus fractures in children. However, the complications of surgical trauma and the wound created through the extended lateral approach cannot be ignored. This study analyzed the outcomes of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures in children treated with closed reduction and percutaneous fixation. Medical records of pediatric patients who had displaced intra-articular calcaneus fractures and underwent closed reduction and percutaneous fixation at the study institution between January 2008 and January 2013 were reviewed. Preoperative radiographs and computed tomography scans were used to evaluate and classify the fractures. Clinical outcomes and radiographic findings were assessed at postoperative follow-up. The study included 14 displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures in 11 patients (7 boys and 4 girls). Mean patient age was 11.18 years (range, 6-16 years), and average follow-up time was 42.8 months postoperatively (range, 12-72 months). There were 6 tongue-type fractures and 8 joint depression-type fractures, based on the Essex-Lopresti classification, and there were 11 type II and 3 type III fractures, based on the Sanders classification. Average Böhler angle was 8.00° (range, -5° to 18°) preoperatively and 30.79° (range, 26° to 40°) postoperatively (P<.001). Average subjective American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot score was 65.7 (range, 52-68). No patients had wound breakdown or infection. In the treatment of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures in pediatric patients, closed reduction and percutaneous fixation achieved good outcomes, with few complications. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e744-e748.]. PMID:27111072

  8. Clinical Outcomes of Percutaneous Endoscopic Surgery for Lumbar Discal Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sang Woo; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, SeungMyung; Kim, Yong Hyun; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2012-01-01

    Objective Discal cyst is rare and causes indistinguishable symptoms from lumbar disc herniation. The clinical manifestations and pathological features of discal cyst have not yet been completely known. Discal cyst has been treated with surgery or with direct intervention such as computed tomography (CT) guided aspiration and steroid injection. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the percutaneous endoscopic surgery for lumbar discal cyst over at least 6 months follow-up. Methods All 8 cases of discal cyst with radiculopathy were treated by percutaneous endoscopic surgery by transforaminal approach. The involved levels include L5-S1 in 1 patient, L3-4 in 2, and L4-5 in 5. The preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and 3-dimensional CT with discogram images in all cases showed a connection between the cyst and the involved intervertebral disc. Over a 6-months period, self-reported measures were assessed using an outcome questionaire that incorporated total back-related medical resource utilization and improvement of leg pain [visual analogue scale (VAS) and Macnab's criteria]. Results All 8 patients underwent endoscopic excision of the cyst with additional partial discectomy. Seven patients obtained immediate relief of symptoms after removal of the cyst by endoscopic approach. There were no recurrent lesions during follow-up period. The mean preoperative VAS for leg pain was 8.25±0.5. At the last examination followed longer than 6 month, the mean VAS for leg pain was 2.25±2.21. According to MacNab' criteria, 4 patients (50%) had excellent results, 3 patients (37.5%) had good results; thus, satisfactory results were achieved in 7 patients (87.5%). However, one case had unsatisfactory result with persistent leg pain and another paresthesia. Conclusion The radicular symptoms were remarkably improved in most patients immediately after percutaneous endoscopic cystectomy by transforaminal approach. PMID:22737300

  9. A diffusion-diffusion model for percutaneous drug absorption.

    PubMed

    Kubota, K; Ishizaki, T

    1986-08-01

    Several theories describing percutaneous drug absorption have been proposed, incorporating the mathematical solutions of differential equations describing percutaneous drug absorption processes where the vehicle and skin are regarded as simple diffusion membranes. By a solution derived from Laplace transforms, the mean residence time MRT and the variance of the residence time VRT in the vehicle are expressed as simple elementary functions of the following five pharmacokinetic parameters characterizing the percutaneous drug absorption: kd, which is defined as the normalized diffusion coefficient of the skin, kc, which is defined as the normalized skin-capillary boundary clearance, the apparent length of diffusion of the skin 1d, the effective length of the vehicle lv, and the diffusion coefficient of the vehicle Dv. All five parameters can be obtained by the methods proposed here. Results of numerical computation indicate that: concentration-distance curves in the vehicle and skin approximate two curves which are simply expressed using trigonometric functions when sufficient time elapses after an ointment application; the most suitable condition for the assumption that the concentration of a drug in the uppermost epidermis can be considered unchanged is the case where the partition coefficient between vehicle and skin is small, and the constancy of drug concentration is even more valid when the effective length of the vehicle is large; and the amount of a drug in the vehicle or skin and the flow rate of the drug from vehicle into skin or from skin into blood becomes linear on a semilogarithmic scale, and the slopes of those lines are small when Dv is small, when the partition coefficient between vehicle and skin is small, when lv is large, or when kc is small. A simple simulation method is also proposed using a biexponential for the concentration-time curve for the skin near the skin-capillary boundary, that is, the flow rate-time curve for drug passing from skin

  10. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy for pediatric urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Ganpule, Arvind P.; Mishra, Shashikant; Desai, Mahesh R.

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric urolithiasis is a management dilemma as a number of treatment options are available such as shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), and retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS). PCNL offers good clearance rates in a single hospital stay. The concerns with PCNL include the use of large instrument in pediatric kidneys, parenchymal damage and the associated effects on renal function, radiation exposure with fluoroscopy, and the risk of major complications including sepsis and bleeding. Evolution of pediatric PCNL technique such as miniaturization of instruments, limitation of tract size and advanced intracorporeal lithotripters have resulted in this technique being widely utilized for achieving stone-free status in appropriate patients. Many of the patients in our country come from remote areas thereby requiring special considerations during treatment. This also necessitates complete clearance in a single shorter hospital stay. PCNL appears to be the optimal option available in this scenario. The literature suggests that even complex and staghorn calculi can be tackled with this approach. The choice of the method to gain access is a matter of experience and personal preference. Ultrasound offers the advantage of visualization of spleen, liver and avoids injury. Miniaturization of instruments, particularly smaller nephroscopes and the potential to use lasers will decrease the morbidity and improve the clearance rates further. In this article, we analyze the management of pediatric urolithiasis with PCNL. We discuss our technique and analyze the results, complications and technique mentioned in the contemporary literature. PMID:21369389

  11. Percutaneous Tumor Ablation with Radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Bradford J.; Ramkaransingh, Jeffrey R.; Fojo, Tito; Walther, McClellan M.; Libutti, Stephen K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) is a new minimally invasive treatment for localized cancer. Minimally invasive surgical options require less resources, time, recovery, and cost, and often offer reduced morbidity and mortality, compared with more invasive methods. To be useful, image-guided, minimally invasive, local treatments will have to meet those expectations without sacrificing efficacy. METHODS Image-guided, local cancer treatment relies on the assumption that local disease control may improve survival. Recent developments in ablative techniques are being applied to patients with inoperable, small, or solitary liver tumors, recurrent metachronous hereditary renal cell carcinoma, and neoplasms in the bone, lung, breast, and adrenal gland. RESULTS Recent refinements in ablation technology enable large tumor volumes to be treated with image-guided needle placement, either percutaneously, laparoscopically, or with open surgery. Local disease control potentially could result in improved survival, or enhanced operability. CONCLUSIONS Consensus indications in oncology are ill-defined, despite widespread proliferation of the technology. A brief review is presented of the current status of image-guided tumor ablation therapy. More rigorous scientific review, long-term follow-up, and randomized prospective trials are needed to help define the role of RFA in oncology. PMID:11900230

  12. Neurologic Complications in Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Basiri, Abbas; Soltani, Mohammad Hossein; Kamranmanesh, Mohammadreza; Tabibi, Ali; Mohsen Ziaee, Seyed Amir; Nouralizadeh, Akbar; Sharifiaghdas, Farzaneh; Poorzamani, Mahtab; Gharaei, Babak; Ozhand, Ardalan; Lashay, Alireza; Ahanian, Ali; Aminsharifi, Alireza; Sichani, Mehrdad Mohammadi; Asl-Zare, Mohammad; Ali Beigi, Faramarz Mohammad; Najjaran, Vahid; Abedinzadeh, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has been the preferred procedure for the removal of large renal stones in Iran since 1990. Recently, we encountered a series of devastating neurologic complications during PCNL, including paraplegia and hemiplegia. There are several reports of neurologic complications following PCNL owing to paradoxical air emboli, but there are no reports of paraplegia following PCNL. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who had undergone PCNL in 13 different endourologic centers and retrieved data related to neurologic complications after PCNL, including coma, paraplegia, hemiplegia, and quadriplegia. Results The total number of PCNL procedures in these 13 centers was 30,666. Among these procedures, 11 cases were complicated by neurologic events, and four of these cases experienced paraplegia. All events happened with the patient in the prone position with the use of general anesthesia and in the presence of air injection. There were no reports of neurologic complications in PCNL procedures performed with the patient under general anesthesia and in the prone position and with contrast injection. Conclusions It can be assumed that using room air to opacify the collecting system played a major role in the occurrence of these complications. Likewise, the prone position and general anesthesia may predispose to these events in the presence of air injection. PMID:23526482

  13. [Permanent percutaneous electric connection. General principles].

    PubMed

    Sabin, P; Labbé, D; Levillain, D; Cazin, L; Caston, J

    1997-01-01

    The Swedes for more than twenty years, and the Germans for over five years have been able to maintain inert or active prostheses with permanent percutaneous connections, thanks to the dependable and proven material and techniques of extraoral implants. The significant improvement extra-oral implants have brought about is not only in a new therapeutic approach to the treatment of important facial defects or transmission deafness; it is also because for some twenty old years now, the few millimeter wide cylinders of Titanium, the affixed on the implants, have crossed the cutaneous barrier for extended periods without complications. The percutaneous abutment thus creates a permanent communication between the interior and the exterior of the organism. If the abutment, instead of simply carrying a Maxillo-Facial Prosthesis or an auditive prosthesis, is modified by placing an electric conductor inside it, the simple "percutaneous peg" will turn out to be, in a way, a "percutaneous electric plug". By adapting classic "mechanical" abutments and implants, authors have created a Permanent Percutaneous Electric Connection (PPEC) which has been successfully experimented on rabbits to record EEG. Clinical applications on humans would make it possible either to receive "bio-electrical information" coming from within the organism, or to send electrical energy into the organism. This last application opens vast perspectives of improvement both in diagnosis and therapy in many fields. PMID:9687654

  14. 21 CFR 870.1310 - Vessel dilator for percutaneous catheterization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vessel dilator for percutaneous catheterization... Vessel dilator for percutaneous catheterization. (a) Identification. A vessel dilator for percutaneous catheterization is a device which is placed over the guide wire to enlarge the opening in the vessel, and which...

  15. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Newell, Mary S; Mahoney, Mary C

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous tissue sampling of the breast has positively altered the management of breast lesions, both benign and malignant, since its inception in the 1980s and subsequent widespread acceptance in the 1990s. Its safety, accuracy, and cost-effectiveness have been validated in several studies. However, percutaneous biopsy serves a patient best when performed by an operator with full awareness of patient׳s salient imaging findings; a knowledge of the benefits, limitations, and technical requirements of breast ultrasound; and a thorough understanding of what constitutes an adequate and concordant pathologic specimen. This article outlines a general approach to ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous breast biopsy and discusses indications, potential complications, and technical aspects of the procedure. PMID:24636328

  16. Percutaneous holmium laser fulguration of calyceal diverticula.

    PubMed

    Alwaal, Amjad; Azhar, Raed A; Andonian, Sero

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Calyceal diverticular stones are uncommon findings that represent a challenge in their treatment, due to the technical difficulty in accessing the diverticulum, and the high risk of their recurrence. Current percutaneous technique for calyceal diverticular stones involves establishing a renal access, clearing the stone, and fulguration of the diverticular lining with a roller-ball cautery electrode using hypotonic irrigation solution such as sterile water or glycine solution which may be associated with the absorption of hypotonic fluids with its inherent electrolyte disturbances. Case Report. In this paper, we present for the first time percutaneous holmium laser fulguration of calyceal diverticula in 2 patients using normal saline. Their immediate postoperative sodium was unchanged and their follow-up imaging showed absence of stones. Both patients remain asymptomatic at 30 months post-operatively. Conclusion. This demonstrates that holmium laser is a safe alternative method to fulgurate the calyceal diverticulum after clearing the stone percutaneously. PMID:22606636

  17. Percutaneous Pediatric Foot and Ankle Surgery.

    PubMed

    Uglow, Michael G

    2016-09-01

    The techniques for performing percutaneous osteotomies in treating deformities of the foot in children are presented along with a detailed description of the operative details. The author's use of minimal-access surgery for tibial, os calcis, and midfoot osteotomies is described using a cooled side-cutting burr that has not previously been described for use in the child's foot. The cancellous nature of the bones in the child are easily cut with the burr and the adjacent soft tissues are not damaged. The early experience of the healing times are not impaired and the complications associated with percutaneous scars seem to be negligible. PMID:27524707

  18. Percutaneous Cryotherapy of Vascular Malformation: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelis, F.; Neuville, A.; Labreze, C.; Kind, M.; Bui, B.; Midy, D.; Palussiere, J.; Grenier, N.

    2013-06-15

    The present report describes a case of percutaneous cryotherapy in a 36-year-old woman with a large and painful pectoral venous malformation. Cryoablation was performed in a single session for this 9-cm mass with 24 h hospitalisation. At 2- and 6-month follow-up, the pain had completely disappeared, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a significant decrease in size. Percutaneous cryoablation shows promise as a feasible and apparently safe method for local control in patients with symptomatic venous vascular malformations.

  19. Renal effects of percutaneous stone removal

    SciTech Connect

    Eshghi, M.; Schiff, R.G.; Smith, A.D.

    1989-02-01

    Preoperative and postoperative renography with 99mTechnetium-diethylene-triamine pentaacetic acid was performed on 33 patients who were free of renal scarring, infection, and obstruction and who underwent percutaneous renal stone removal. Although there was a transient decrease in renal function postoperatively in some patients, statistically significant reductions in renal function occurred only in 1 patient with an arteriovenous malformation that was embolized and in 1 patient who had a postoperative ureteropelvic junction stricture. The creation of more than one nephrostomy tract did not affect the results. In the absence of serious complications, percutaneous nephrostomy does not have a significant effect on renal function.

  20. Update on percutaneous mitral commissurotomy.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Maria Carmo P; Nascimento, Bruno Ramos; Lodi-Junqueira, Lucas; Tan, Timothy C; Athayde, Guilherme Rafael Sant'Anna; Hung, Judy

    2016-04-01

    Percutaneous mitral commissurotomy (PMC) is the first-line therapy for managing rheumatic mitral stenosis. Over the past two decades, the indications of the procedure have expanded to include patients with unfavourable valve anatomy as a consequence of epidemiological changes in patient population. The procedure is increasingly being performed in patients with increased age, more deformed valves and associated comorbidities. Echocardiography plays a crucial role in patient selection and to guide a more efficient procedure. The main echocardiographic predictors of immediate results after PMC are mitral valve area, subvalvular thickening and valve calcification, especially at the commissural level. However, procedural success rate is not only dependent on valve anatomy, but a number of other factors including patient characteristics, interventional management strategies and operator expertise. Severe mitral regurgitation continues to be the most common immediate procedural complication with unchanged incidence rates over time. The long-term outcome after PMC is mainly determined by the immediate procedural results. Postprocedural parameters associated with late adverse events include mitral valve area, mitral regurgitation severity, mean gradient and pulmonary artery pressure. Mitral restenosis is an important predictor of event-free survival rates after successful PMC, and repeat procedure can be considered in cases with commissural refusion. PMC can be performed in special situations, which include high-risk patients, during pregnancy and in the presence of left atrial thrombus, especially in centres with specialised expertise. Therefore, procedural decision-making should take into account the several determinant factors of PMC outcomes. This paper provides an overview and update of PMC techniques, complications, immediate and long-term results over time, and assessment of suitability for the procedure. PMID:26743926

  1. Biliary pressure: manometric and perfusion studies at percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and percutaneous biliary drainage

    SciTech Connect

    vanSonnenberg, E.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.; Neff, C.C.; Mueller, P.R.; Simeone, J.F.; Wittenberg, J.

    1983-07-01

    Manometric pressure recordings were attempted during percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and after percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) in 203 cases. Successful readings were achieved at PTC in 85% (104/122) of patients. Pressure measurements were also obtained through 56 biliary drainage catheters, and controlled perfusion challenges were performed in 12 patients (on 18 occasions). Documentation of the occasionally poor correlation between the caliber of ducts and the degree of obstruction (i.e., pressure) was shown, and it was suggested that very high pressures may be predictive of a bile leak after PTC. Adequacy of percutaneous drainage and stricture dilatation were further assessed with these manometric techniques. Pressure and perfusion data aided in detecting and determining the significance of the nondilated obstructed duct, the dilated nonobstructed ductal system, and subtle distal ductal strictures. The knowledge obtained from percutaneous pressure recordings may help to determine appropriate therapy.

  2. Percutaneous Cyanoacrylate Glue Injection into the Renal Pseudoaneurysm to Control Intractable Hematuria After Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Lal, Anupam Kumar, Ajay; Prakash, Mahesh; Singhal, Manphool; Agarwal, Mayank Mohan; Sarkar, Debansu; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2009-07-15

    We report a case of a 43-year-old man who developed intractable hematuria after percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Angiography detected a pseudoaneurysm arising from the lower polar artery; however, embolization could not be performed because of unfavorable vascular anatomy. A percutaneous thrombin injection under ultrasound guidance initially controlled the bleeding, but hematuria subsequently recurred as a result of recanalization of the aneurysm. The case was successfully managed with ultrasound- and fluoroscopic-guided direct injection of cyanoacrylate glue into the pseudoaneurysm.

  3. Improvements in Intracorporeal Lithotripters for Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ramsay L.

    2007-04-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) is an effective minimally invasive surgical approach for the treatment of large renal stone burden. Intracorporeal lithotripters (ICL) are utilized during PNL to fragment calculi, with some devices capable of concurrently removing fragments as well. Much progress has been made in the design of ICL devices, resulting in potentially more efficient treatment of nephrolithiasis.

  4. 21 CFR 870.1250 - Percutaneous catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Percutaneous catheter. 870.1250 Section 870.1250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... through the skin using a dilator and a sheath (introducer) or guide wire. (b) Classification. Class...

  5. Percutaneous Surgery for Severe Hallux Valgus.

    PubMed

    Vernois, Joel; Redfern, David J

    2016-09-01

    Severe hallux valgus is a challenge to treat. If the basal osteotomy is a well known surgery for severe deformity, the chevron osteotomy is usually used in mild to moderate deformity. With a accurent fixation the chevron can also be used in severe deformity. Both techniques can be performed percutaneously and offer reliable techniques. PMID:27524702

  6. [Ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrostomy].

    PubMed

    Martino, P

    2000-12-01

    Percutaneous nephrostomy is a mini-invasive technique that creates an external outlet from the renal excretory tract through a catheter inserted through the flank. Indications for this procedure are of both diagnostic and therapeutic type. The nephrostomic catheter is generally positioned under ultrasound guidance, which has the advantages of showing the localization of the renal cavities and the depth of the kidney, and can be used during pregnancy and in subjects with allergy to contrast medium or with reduced renal function. When possible, it is best to associate US with fluoroscopic guidance, as this association has been found to guarantee a success rate exceeding 98%. Within the kidney, the zone known as Broedel's avascular plane, where the terminal branches of the posterior and anterior arterial systems meet, is the safest place to pass the nephrostomic catheter through, as there is little vascularization in this zone. Access is generally posterior and at the level of the inferior calyx, by means of Seldinger's, the one step or a mixed access technique involving a catheter sheathing a metal cannula. Seldinger's access technique is most commonly used, entailing explorative puncture of the renal cavity with a 22 G needle. We prefer to puncture the kidney direct, under US guidance and using an 18 G needle: a metal wire is passed through the needle and then after withdrawing the needle, the fascia dilators are inserted, of scaled widths increasing up to 2 G wider than the nephrostomic catheter. Care must be taken not to go beyond the curve of the guide wire to avoid trauma to the renal parenchyma. The most critical moment is when the catheter is inserted along the wire at the point of passage through the peri-renal fat: the catheter tends to deflect the point of the guide wire away from the desired direction as the peri-renal fat offers less resistance. The metal wire may be of variable rigidity and length, hydrophilic. The catheter may also be made of various

  7. Percutaneous Retrograde Sclerotherapy for Refractory Bleeding of Jejunal Varices: Direct Injection via Superficial Epigastric Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Manabu Nakata, Waka; Isoda, Norio Yoshizawa, Mitsuyo; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2012-02-15

    Small-bowel varices are rare and almost always occur in cases with portal hypertension. We encountered a patient with bleeding jejunal varices due to liver cirrhosis. Percutaneous retrograde sclerotherapy was performed via the superficial epigastric vein. Melena disappeared immediately after treatment. Disappearance of jejunal varices was confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. After 24 months of follow-up, no recurrent melena was observed.

  8. Percutaneous Retrieval of a Radiolucent Foreign Body from an EVAR Device by Combining Different Image Modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Barbiero, Giulio; Cognolato, Diego; Polverosi, Roberta; Guarise, Alessandro

    2009-07-15

    Percutaneous extraction techniques are an established method for removing endovascular foreign bodies. Generally, the foreign body to be removed is radiopaque (i.e., catheter and guidewire fragments, vena cava filters, embolization coils, endovascular stents). We propose an application of these techniques to remove a radiolucent foreign body (i.e., pigtail cover) by means of a combination of different imaging techniques (fluoroscopy, digital subtraction angiography, ultrasound, and computed axial tomography).

  9. Percutaneous CT-Guided Treatment of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Sacroiliac Joint

    SciTech Connect

    Becce, Fabio; Mouhsine, Elyazid; Mosimann, Pascal John; Anaye, Anass; Letovanec, Igor; Theumann, Nicolas

    2012-08-15

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a joint disorder that affects the articular cartilage and subchondral bone, most commonly at the knee. OCD of the sacroiliac joint is extremely rare. Management of OCD remains controversial, and surgery is often needed, especially when conservative treatment fails. We present a rare case of OCD involving the left sacroiliac joint successfully treated by percutaneous computed tomography-guided retrograde drilling and debridement.

  10. Giant kidney stone: multi-session percutaneous nephrolithotomy with 12 accesses.

    PubMed

    Erbin, Akif; Yürük, Emrah; Binbay, Murat; Müslümanoğlu, Ahmet Yaser

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of a 37-year-old man with a body mass index of 28 kg/m(2) who presented to our outpatient clinic with intermittent left flank pain. Non-contrast abdominopelvic computed tomography revealed a giant coralliform calculus in the left kidney. This giant kidney stone was successfully treated with 3 sessions of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) with a total 12 accesses. There was no significant reduction in the split function of the kidney after PNL. PMID:26516601

  11. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Management of Splenic Ectopic Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Python, Johanne L; Wakefield, Brian W; Kondo, Kimi L; Bang, Tami J; Stamm, Elizabeth R; Hurt, K Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Splenic ectopic pregnancies are a rare cause of abdominal pain in reproductive-age women. A 21-year-old woman with worsening abdominal pain and a positive pregnancy test presented with hemoperitoneum and no intrauterine pregnancy on transvaginal ultrasound. After 2 nondiagnostic laparoscopies, a splenic pregnancy was diagnosed by computed tomography scan and abdominal ultrasound. Currently, diagnosis and treatment of splenic pregnancies involve exploratory surgery and splenectomy. We report the successful treatment of this splenic ectopic pregnancy with combined intramuscular plus ultrasound-guided percutaneous methotrexate injection, with preservation of the patient's spleen. Abdominal implantation must be considered in patients with pregnancy of unknown location, and in carefully selected patients splenic ectopic pregnancy can be successfully managed by minimally invasive methods. PMID:27221066

  12. Percutaneous cardioscopy of the left ventricle in patients with myocarditis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Yasumi; Tomaru, Takanobu; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Oshima, Tomomitsu; Fujimori, Yoshiharu; Hirose, Junichi

    1992-08-01

    The morphology and function of the cardiac chambers have been evaluated clinically using cineventriculography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and endomyocardial biopsy. Excluding the invasive technique of biopsy where tissue is actually removed, these other non-invasive techniques reveal only indirect evidence of endocardial and subendocardial pathology and, therefore, allow the potential for misdiagnosis from insufficient data. Fiberoptic examinations, as recently demonstrated in coronary, pulmonary, and peripheral vessels, allow direct observation of pathology otherwise unobtainable. Recently, similar techniques have been applied to examine the cardiac chambers of dogs and the right heart of humans. In this study, we examine the feasibility and safety of percutaneous fiberoptic cardioscopy of the left ventricle in patients with myocarditis.

  13. Percutaneous discal cyst rupture in a professional football player using sublaminar epidural injection for thecal sac displacement.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Michael V; Park, Andrew; Bumpass, David; Jennings, Jack W; Matava, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    A case of percutaneous discal cyst rupture in a 25-year-old professional American football player is reported. The patient presented with a 3-day history of severe left-sided back pain. Magnetic resonance imaging examination demonstrated a discal cyst effacing the left L4-L5 lateral recess, with interposed thecal sac. A sublaminar epidural injection was performed displacing the thecal sac, exposing the discal cyst, and allowing for percutaneous perforation. The patient had complete resolution of symptoms after discal cyst rupture and was able to compete in a professional football game 3 days later. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous rupture is a therapeutic modality that may be considered for treatment of a symptomatic discal cyst. PMID:25541445

  14. Complications of Percutaneous Nephrostomy, Percutaneous Insertion of Ureteral Endoprosthesis, and Replacement Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Kaskarelis, Ioannis S.; Papadaki, Marina G.; Malliaraki, Niki E.; Robotis, Epaminondas D.; Malagari, Katerina S.; Piperopoulos, Ploutarchos N.

    2001-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to record and identify the frequency of complications following percutaneous nephrostomy, replacement of nephrostomy drains and percutaneous insertion of ureteral endoprostheses.Methods: During a 10-year period 341 patients were referred to our department with indications for percutaneous nephrostomy and/or percutaneous insertion of a ureteral endoprosthesis, and a total of 1036 interventional procedures were performed (nephrostomy, catheter change, stenting).Results: There were three major complications (0.29%): two patients died during the first 30 days after the procedure, due to aggravation of their condition caused by the procedure, and one patient had retroperitoneal bleeding requiring surgery. There were 76 complications of intermediate severity (7.33%): catheter or stent displacement (n = 37, 3.57%) catheter occlusion (n = 18, 1.73%), hematuria (n = 12, 1.16%), and urinary tract infection (n = 9, 0.87%). The 55 minor complications (5.3%) comprised inflammation of the skin at the site of insertion of the percutaneous catheter.Conclusion: The small number of complications observed during acts of interventional uroradiology prove transcutaneous manipulations to be safe medical procedures.

  15. Modified Retroperitoneal Access for Percutaneous Intervention after Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Quek, Lawrence H H

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous access to the surgical bed after pancreaticoduodenectomy can be a challenge, due to the post-operative anatomy alteration. However, immediate complications, such as surgical bed abscess or suspected tumor recurrence, are often best accessed percutaneously, as open surgical or endoscopic approaches are often difficult, if not impossible. We, hereby, describe a safe approach that is highly replicable, in accessing the surgical bed for percutaneous intervention, following pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:23690711

  16. Percutaneous closure of the patent foramen ovale.

    PubMed

    Surmely, J-F; Meier, B

    2007-10-01

    A patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a common finding present in 25% of the population. A relationship between PFO and several clinical conditions such as stroke, migraine, platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome, neurological decompression illness in divers, high altitude pulmonary edema, sleep apnea, and economy class syndrome have been documented. Observational non-randomized studies have shown percutaneous PFO closure more effective than medical treatment for stroke prevention, in particular in patients with complete closure as well as in patients with more than one cerebrovascular event at baseline. In the case of migraine, PFO closure has been shown to result in a marked reduction in migraine burden or migraine days. PFO anatomy, epidemiological data on associated clinical conditions, comparison between percutaneous closure and medical treatment, as well as the technical aspect of the procedure are described in this review. PMID:17912171

  17. Percutaneous Large Arterial Access Closure Techniques.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Charles J; Gandhi, Ripal T; Vatakencherry, Geogy; Baumann, Frederic; Benenati, James F

    2015-06-01

    Endovascular repair has replaced open surgical repair as the standard of care for treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms in appropriately selected patients owing to its decreased morbidity and length of stay and excellent clinical outcomes. Similarly, there is a progressive trend toward total percutaneous repair of the femoral artery using percutaneous suture-mediated closure devices over open surgical repair due to decreased complications and procedure time. This article describes the techniques of closure for large-bore vascular access most commonly used in endovascular treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms, but could similarly be applied to any procedure requiring large-bore arterial access, such as transcatheter aortic valve replacement. PMID:26070624

  18. Embolic protection devices in percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Meneguz Moreno, Rafael A; Costa, José R; Costa, Ricardo A; Abizaid, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Clinical benefit of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) depends on both angiographic success at lesion site as well as the restoration of adequate macro and microvascular perfusion. The pathophysiology of embolization from coronary lesions during PCI is multifactorial, being more frequently observed in patients with acute coronary syndrome and in those with lesions at saphenous vein graft (SVG). In this population, despite successful epicardial intervention, distal tissue perfusion may still be absent in up to a quarter of all PCI. Multiple devices and pharmacologic regimens have been developed and refined in an attempt to protect the microvascular circulation during PCI. Among them, embolic protection devices have raised as an attractive adjunctive toll due to their ability to retain debris and potentially prevent distal embolization, reducing major adverse cardiac events. Currently, their use has been validated for the treatment of SVG lesions but failed to show effectiveness in the percutaneous approach of acute coronary syndrome patients, including those with ST elevation myocardial infarction. PMID:27007782

  19. Bilothorax as a complication of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage.

    PubMed

    Sano, Atsushi; Yotsumoto, Takuma

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of bilothorax that occurred as a complication of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. In an 86-year-old woman who had undergone percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage for obstructive jaundice, bilothorax occurred after accidental removal of the tube. She recovered with chest drainage only. An 83-year-old man who had undergone percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage for cholecystitis developed bilothorax with infection. He recovered with thoracoscopic curettage. Although bilothorax is a rare complication of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, appropriate diagnosis and prompt treatment is important, especially when bilothorax is accompanied by infection. PMID:26294694

  20. Cardiac resynchronisation therapy after percutaneous mitral annuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Swampillai, Janice

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous approaches to reduce mitral regurgitation in ischemic cardiomyopathy have stirred interest recently. Patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and functional mitral regurgitation often meet criteria for cardiac resynchronisation therapy to improve left ventricular function as well as mitral regurgitation, and alleviate symptoms. This case shows that implantation of a pacing lead in the coronary sinus to restore synchronous left and right ventricular contraction is feasible, despite the presence of a remodeling device in the coronary sinus. PMID:27182527

  1. Microcatheter use for difficult percutaneous biliary procedures.

    PubMed

    Brountzos, Elias N; Kelekis, Alexis D; Ptohis, Nikolaos; Kotsioumba, Ioanna; Misiakos, Evangelos; Perros, George; Gouliamos, Athanasios D

    2008-01-01

    Percutaneous biliary drainage procedures in patients with nondilated ducts are demanding, resulting in lower success rates than in patients with bile duct dilatation. Pertinent clinical settings include patients with iatrogenic bile leaks, diffuse cholangiocarcinomas, and sclerosing cholangitis. We describe a method to facilitate these procedures with the combined use of a 2.7-Fr microcatheter and a 0.018-in. hydrophilic wire. PMID:18320271

  2. Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage Complicated by Bilothorax.

    PubMed

    Kim, Stephanie H; Zangan, Steven M

    2015-03-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is a well-established and safe technique for the management of biliary obstructions and leaks. While approach is variable based on operator preference, patient anatomy, and indications; PTBD is commonly performed via a right-sided intercostal route. With a right-sided approach, pleural complications may be encountered. The authors describe a case of a right PTBD complicated by a leak into the pleural space, with the subsequent development of bilothorax. PMID:27053829

  3. Percutaneous absorption in diseased skin: an overview.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Audris; Tudela, Emilie; Maibach, Howard I

    2012-08-01

    The stratum corneum's (SC) functions include protection from external hazardous environments, prevention of water loss and regulation of body temperature. While intact skin absorption studies are abundant, studies on compromised skin permeability are less common, although products are often used to treat affected skin. We reviewed literature on percutaneous absorption through abnormal skin models. Tape stripping is used to disrupt water barrier function. Studies demonstrated that physicochemical properties influence the stripping effect: water-soluble drugs are more affected. Abrasion did not affect absorption as much. Freezing is commonly used to preserve skin. It does not seem to modify water absorption, but still increases the penetration of compounds. Comparatively, heating the skin consistently increased percutaneous absorption. Removing SC lipids may increase percutaneous absorption of drugs. Many organic solvents are employed to delipidize. Delipidization with chloroform-methanol increased hydrophilic compound permeability, but not lipophilic. Acetone pre-treatment enhanced hydrophilic compound penetration. More data is needed to determine influence on highly lipophilic compound penetration. Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) induces irritant dermatitis and is frequently used as a model. Studies revealed that SLS increases hydrophilic compound absorption, but not lipophilic. However, skin irritation with other chemicals increases lipophilic penetration as much as hydrophilic. Animal studies show that UV exposure increases percutaneous absorption whereas human studies do not. Human studies show increased penetration in psoriatic and atopic dermatitis skin. The data summarized here begin to characterize flux alteration associated with damaged skin. Understanding the degree of alteration requires interpretation of involved conditions and the enlarging of our database to a more complete physicochemical spectrum. PMID:22912973

  4. Percutaneous Vertebral Body Augmentation: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    There are many medical conditions like osteoporosis, tumor, or osteonecrosis that weaken the structural strength of the vertebral body and prone it to fracture. Percutaneous vertebral augmentation that is usually applied by polymethylmethacrylate is a relatively safe, effective, and long lasting procedure commonly performed in these situations. In this paper, we updated a review of biomechanics, indications, contraindications, surgical techniques, complications, and overall prognosis of these minimally invasive spinal procedures. PMID:25379561

  5. Management of hemorrhage after percutaneous renal surgery.

    PubMed

    Gallucci, M; Fortunato, P; Schettini, M; Vincenzoni, A

    1998-12-01

    Percutaneous renal surgery is routine therapy for a number of renal pathologies. It is a technique not without complications, often serious ones, of which the worst is bleeding. We reviewed our experience of the incidence, etiology, and management of this serious complication to determine a protocol of treatment that will minimize the consequences. Between 1984 and 1996, we carried out 976 percutaneous operations for reno-calix stones, pyeloureteral junction stenosis, neoplasia of the renal pelvis, diagnosis, and ureteral prostheses. In all cases, the percutaneous access was achieved through a lower calix in the posterior axillary line with the patient in a prone position. The lithotripsy was performed with ultrasound and balistic energy lithotripters. Antegrade endopyelotomy was performed according to our technique. At the end of the procedure, a nephrostomy tube was positioned, 24F for lithotripsy and 16F for endopyelotomy. The nephrostomy tube was removed after 24 to 48 hours. In this series, 146 patients (15%) presented significant perioperative bleeding. In 97 cases (10%), this complication was resolved with the repositioning of the nephrostomy tube, bedrest in a supine position, and observation, whereas in 49 cases (5%), clamping of the nephrostomy tube for 24 hours was necessary. In 56 patients (5.7%), two blood transfusions were necessary, and three patients (0.3%) had bleeding 10, 12, and 20 days after the operation, which was resolved by embolization of the lacerated vessel. PMID:9895253

  6. Comparison of Isocentric C-Arm 3-Dimensional Navigation and Conventional Fluoroscopy for Percutaneous Retrograde Screwing for Anterior Column Fracture of Acetabulum

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiliang; Tan, Guoqing; Zhou, Dongsheng; Sun, Liang; Li, Qinghu; Yang, Yongliang; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous screw insertion for minimally displaced or reducible acetabular fracture using x-ray fluoroscopy and computer-assisted navigation system has been advocated by some authors. The purpose of this study was to compare intraoperative conditions and clinical results between isocentric C-arm 3-dimensional (Iso-C 3D) fluoroscopy and conventional fluoroscopy for percutaneous retrograde screwing of acetabular anterior column fracture. A prospective cohort study was conducted. A total of 22 patients were assigned to 2 different groups: 10 patients in the Iso-C 3D navigation group and 12 patients in the conventional group. The operative time, fluoroscopic time, time of screw insertion, blood loss, and accuracy were analyzed between the 2 groups. There were significant differences in operative time, screw insertion time, fluoroscopy time, and mean blood loss between the 2 groups. Totally 2 of 12 (16.7%) screws were misplaced in the conventional fluoroscopy group, and all 10 screws were in safe zones in the navigation group. Percutaneous screw fixation using the Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system significantly reduced the intraoperative fluoroscopy time and blood loss in percutaneous screwing for acetabular anterior column fracture. The Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system provided a reliable and effective method for percutaneous screw insertion in acetabular anterior column fractures compared to conventional fluoroscopy. PMID:26765448

  7. Comparison of Isocentric C-Arm 3-Dimensional Navigation and Conventional Fluoroscopy for Percutaneous Retrograde Screwing for Anterior Column Fracture of Acetabulum: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    He, Jiliang; Tan, Guoqing; Zhou, Dongsheng; Sun, Liang; Li, Qinghu; Yang, Yongliang; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous screw insertion for minimally displaced or reducible acetabular fracture using x-ray fluoroscopy and computer-assisted navigation system has been advocated by some authors. The purpose of this study was to compare intraoperative conditions and clinical results between isocentric C-arm 3-dimensional (Iso-C 3D) fluoroscopy and conventional fluoroscopy for percutaneous retrograde screwing of acetabular anterior column fracture.A prospective cohort study was conducted. A total of 22 patients were assigned to 2 different groups: 10 patients in the Iso-C 3D navigation group and 12 patients in the conventional group. The operative time, fluoroscopic time, time of screw insertion, blood loss, and accuracy were analyzed between the 2 groups.There were significant differences in operative time, screw insertion time, fluoroscopy time, and mean blood loss between the 2 groups. Totally 2 of 12 (16.7%) screws were misplaced in the conventional fluoroscopy group, and all 10 screws were in safe zones in the navigation group. Percutaneous screw fixation using the Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system significantly reduced the intraoperative fluoroscopy time and blood loss in percutaneous screwing for acetabular anterior column fracture.The Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system provided a reliable and effective method for percutaneous screw insertion in acetabular anterior column fractures compared to conventional fluoroscopy. PMID:26765448

  8. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of radiation-induced arterial stenoses

    SciTech Connect

    Guthaner, D.F.; Schmitz, L.

    1982-07-01

    A case of atherosclerosis resulting from previous irradiation was successfully treated using percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for recanalization of the vessel. Irradiation may result in extensive perivascular fibrosis around an area of arterial narrowing; percutaneous transluminal angioplasty appears to be the method of choice for treatment of such lesions.

  9. Acute endocarditis of a percutaneously placed pulmonary valve

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Karthik V; Olivieri, Laura; Jonas, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Endocarditis of percutaneously placed pulmonary valve is increasingly being recognized and reported as a potentially life-threatening complication. In this report, we discuss a 17-year-old male who presented with septic shock secondary to staphylococcal endocarditis of a percutaneously placed pulmonary valve. PMID:26556969

  10. Percutaneous feeding tube method for use in children.

    PubMed

    Long, B; Rafert, J; Cory, D

    1991-01-01

    Surgical gastrostomy has been a widely accepted method for introducing a percutaneous feeding tube for many years. However, complications are frequent, and many children who need them are not good surgical candidates. This study examines imaging guided percutaneous placement of feeding gastrostomy catheters as a safe and effective alternative to surgery. PMID:1902957

  11. Percutaneous Sclerotherapy With OK-432 of a Cervicomediastinal Lymphangioma.

    PubMed

    Golinelli, Gloria; Toso, Andrea; Borello, Giovanni; Aluffi, Paolo; Pia, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    The present study reports a case of percutaneous sclerotherapy of a giant cystic cervicomediastinal lymphangioma using OK-432. To the best of our knowledge, percutaneous sclerotherapy of a mediastinal lymphangioma using OK 432 has not previously been reported in the English literature. PMID:26522530

  12. Percutaneous Extraction of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty Under CT and Fluoroscopy Guidance: A New Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Amoretti, Nicolas Huwart, Laurent

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: We report a new minimally invasive technique of extraction of cement leakage following percutaneous vertebroplasty in adults. Methods: Seven adult patients (five women, two men; mean age: 81 years) treated for vertebral compression fractures by percutaneous vertebroplasty had cement leakage into perivertebral soft tissues along the needle route. Immediately after vertebroplasty, the procedure of extraction was performed under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance: a Chiba needle was first inserted using the same route as the vertebroplasty until contact was obtained with the cement fragment. This needle was then used as a guide for an 11-gauge Trocar t'am (Thiebaud, France). After needle withdrawal, a 13-gauge endoscopy clamp was inserted through the cannula to extract the cement fragments. The whole procedure was performed under local anesthesia. Results: In each patient, all cement fragments were withdrawn within 10 min, without complication. Conclusions: This report suggests that this CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous technique of extraction could reduce the rate of cement leakage-related complications.

  13. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation versus surgical radiofrequency ablation for malignant liver tumours: the long-term results

    PubMed Central

    Wong, John; Lee, Kit-Fai; Yu, Simon Chun-Ho; Lee, Paul Sing-Fun; Cheung, Yue-Sun; Chong, Ching-Ning; Ip, Philip Ching-Tak; Lai, Paul Bo-San

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used to treat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver metastases for more than 10 years with promising early outcomes. Preliminary results comparing percutaneous and surgical approaches have shown no difference in short-term outcomes. In this study, the longer-term outcomes were presented. Methods Patients with liver malignancies treated by RFA were prospectively studied from 2003 to 2011. Post-ablation assessment by computed tomography (CT) scan and serum biochemistry was performed at regular intervals. Recurrence rates and long-term survival were analysed. Results A total of 233 patients with liver malignancies (75.5% HCC and 24.5% liver metastases) were analysed. Three RFA approaches were used (percutaneous 58.4%, laparoscopic 9.4% and open 32.2%). The median follow-up time was 29 months. Complete ablation was achieved in 83.7%, with no difference between the two approaches. More wound and chest complications were observed in the surgical group. Intra-hepatic recurrences were observed in 69.5%; extra-hepatic recurrences were detected in 22.3%, with no difference between the two groups. There was no statistical difference between the two approaches in overall 1-, 3- and 5-year survival. Conclusion An extended period of follow-up in patients with liver malignancies showed that RFA is an effective treatment. No difference was demonstrated between the percutaneous and surgical approach, in terms of recurrence and survival. PMID:23458320

  14. Imaging Techniques in Percutaneous Cardiac Structural Interventions: Atrial Septal Defect Closure and Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Fernández, Antonio; Bethencourt González, Armando

    2016-08-01

    Because of advances in cardiac structural interventional procedures, imaging techniques are playing an increasingly important role. Imaging studies show sufficient anatomic detail of the heart structure to achieve an excellent outcome in interventional procedures. Up to 98% of atrial septal defects at the ostium secundum can be closed successfully with a percutaneous procedure. Candidates for this type of procedure can be identified through a systematic assessment of atrial septum anatomy, locating and measuring the size and shape of all defects, their rims, and the degree and direction of shunting. Three dimensional echocardiography has significantly improved anatomic assessments and the end result itself. In the future, when combined with other imaging techniques such as cardiac computed tomography and fluoroscopy, 3-dimensional echocardiography will be particularly useful for procedure guidance. Percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage offers an alternative for treating patients with atrial fibrillation and contraindication for oral anticoagulants. In the future, the clinical focus may well turn to stroke prevention in selected patients. Percutaneous closure is effective and safe; device implantation is successful in 94% to 99% of procedures. However, the procedure requires an experienced cardiac structural interventional team. At present, 3-dimensional echocardiography is the most appropriate imaging technique to assess anatomy suitability, select device type and size, guide the procedure alongside fluoroscopy, and to follow-up the patient afterwards. PMID:27354151

  15. Percutaneous Balloon Compression vs Percutaneous Retrogasserian Glycerol Rhizotomy for the Primary Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Blomstedt, Patric; Bergenheim, A. Tommy

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite >30 years of clinical use, the literature is still sparse when it comes to comparisons between percutaneous balloon compression (PBC) and percutaneous retrogasserian glycerol rhizolysis (PRGR) as treatments for trigeminal neuralgia. OBJECTIVE: To perform a retrospective cohort comparison between PBC and PRGR with regard to therapeutic effect, side effects, and complications. METHODS: Medical records and follow-up data from 124 primary PRGRs performed from 1986 to 2000 and 82 primary PBCs performed from 2000 to 2013 were reviewed. All patients had undergone clinical sensory testing and assessment of sensory thresholds. Analyses were performed to compare duration of pain relief, frequency of sensory disturbances, and side effects. RESULTS: Median duration of pain relief was 21 months after PRGR and 20 months after PBC. Both methods carried a high risk of hypesthesia/hypalgesia (P < .001) that was partly reversed with time. Decreased corneal sensibility was common after PRGR (P < .001) but not after PBC. Dysesthesia was more common after PRGR (23%) compared after PBC (4%; P < .001). Other side effects were noted but uncommon. CONCLUSION: PBC and PRGR are both effective as primary surgical treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Both carry a risk of postoperative hypesthesia, but in this series, the side effect profile favored PBC. Furthermore, PBC is technically less challenging, whereas PRGR requires fewer resources. Between these 2 techniques, we propose PBC as the primary surgical technique for percutaneous treatment of trigeminal neuralgia on the basis of its lower incidence of dysesthesia, corneal hypesthesia, and technical failures. ABBREVIATIONS: MS, multiple sclerosis PBC, percutaneous balloon compression PRGR, percutaneous retrogasserian glycerol rhizotomy TN, trigeminal neuralgia PMID:26465639

  16. Orthopedic surgical analyzer for percutaneous vertebroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack, Gye Rae; Choi, Hyung Guen; Lim, Do H.; Lee, Sung J.

    2001-05-01

    Since the spine is one of the most complex joint structures in the human body, its surgical treatment requires careful planning and high degree of precision to avoid any unwanted neurological compromises. In addition, comprehensive biomechanical analysis can be very helpful because the spine is subject to a variety of load. In case for the osteoporotic spine in which the structural integrity has been compromised, it brings out the double challenges for a surgeon both clinically and biomechanically. Thus, we have been developing an integrated medical image system that is capable of doing the both. This system is called orthopedic surgical analyzer and it combines the clinical results from image-guided examination and the biomechanical data from finite element analysis. In order to demonstrate its feasibility, this system was applied to percutaneous vertebroplasty. Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a surgical procedure that has been recently introduced for the treatment of compression fracture of the osteoporotic vertebrae. It involves puncturing vertebrae and filling with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Recent studies have shown that the procedure could provide structural reinforcement for the osteoporotic vertebrae while being minimally invasive and safe with immediate pain relief. However, treatment failures due to excessive PMMA volume injection have been reported as one of complications. It is believed that control of PMMA volume is one of the most critical factors that can reduce the incidence of complications. Since the degree of the osteoporosis can influence the porosity of the cancellous bone in the vertebral body, the injection volume can be different from patient to patient. In this study, the optimal volume of PMMA injection for vertebroplasty was predicted based on the image analysis of a given patient. In addition, biomechanical effects due to the changes in PMMA volume and bone mineral density (BMD) level were investigated by constructing clinically

  17. Percutaneous Mitral Annuloplasty for Functional Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Schofer, Joachim; Siminiak, Tomasz; Haude, Michael; Herrman, Jean P.; Vainer, Jindra; Wu, Justina C.; Levy, Wayne C.; Mauri, Laura; Feldman, Ted; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Kaye, David M.; Duffy, Stephen J.; Tübler, Thilo; Degen, Hubertus; Brandt, Mathias C.; Van Bibber, Rich; Goldberg, Steve; Reuter, David G.; Hoppe, Uta C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional mitral regurgitation (FMR), a well-recognized component of left ventricular remodeling, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure patients. Percutaneous mitral annuloplasty has the potential to serve as a therapeutic adjunct to standard medical care. Methods and Results Patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, moderate to severe FMR, an ejection fraction <40%, and a 6-minute walk distance between 150 and 450 m were enrolled in the CARILLON Mitral Annuloplasty Device European Union Study (AMADEUS). Percutaneous mitral annuloplasty was achieved through the coronary sinus with the CARILLON Mitral Contour System. Echocardiographic FMR grade, exercise tolerance, New York Heart Association class, and quality of life were assessed at baseline and 1 and 6 months. Of the 48 patients enrolled in the trial, 30 received the CARILLON device. Eighteen patients did not receive a device because of access issues, insufficient acute FMR reduction, or coronary artery compromise. The major adverse event rate was 13% at 30 days. At 6 months, the degree of FMR reduction among 5 different quantitative echocardiographic measures ranged from 22% to 32%. Six-minute walk distance improved from 307±87 m at baseline to 403±137 m at 6 months (P<0.001). Quality of life, measured by the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire, improved from 47±16 points at baseline to 69±15 points at 6 months (P<0.001). Conclusions Percutaneous reduction in FMR with a novel coronary sinus–based mitral annuloplasty device is feasible in patients with heart failure, is associated with a low rate of major adverse events, and is associated with improvement in quality of life and exercise tolerance. PMID:19597051

  18. Percutaneous microwave ablation combined with simultaneous transarterial chemoembolization for the treatment of advanced intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guo-Wei; Zhao, Qing; Qian, Sheng; Zhu, Liang; Qu, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Wei; Yan, Zhi-Ping; Cheng, Jie-Min; Liu, Qing-Xin; Liu, Rong; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Aim To retrospectively evaluate the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) combined with simultaneous transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in the treatment of patients with advanced intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). Methods All patients treated with ultrasound-guided percutaneous MWA combined with simultaneous TACE for advanced ICC at our institution were included. Posttreatment contrast-enhanced computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging were retrieved and reviewed for tumor response to the treatment. Routine laboratory studies, including hematology and liver function tests were collected and analyzed. Procedure-related complications were reviewed and survival rates were analyzed. Results From January 2011 to December 2014, a total of 26 advanced ICC patients were treated at our single institute with ultrasound-guided percutaneous MWA combined with simultaneous TACE. There were 15 males and eleven females with an average age of 57.9±10.4 years (range, 43–75 years). Of 26 patients, 20 (76.9%) patients were newly diagnosed advanced ICC without any treatment, and six (23.1%) were recurrent and treated with surgical resection of the original tumor. The complete ablation rate was 92.3% (36/39 lesions) for advanced ICC. There were no major complications observed. There was no death directly from the treatment. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 6.2 and 19.5 months, respectively. The 6-, 12-, and 24-month survival rates were 88.5%, 69.2%, and 61.5%, respectively. Conclusion The study suggests that ultrasound-guided percutaneous MWA combined with simultaneous TACE therapy can be performed safely in all patients with advanced ICC. The complete ablation rate was high and there was no major complication. The overall 24-month survival was 61.5%. PMID:26060410

  19. Percutaneous Cryoablation of Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma with US Guidance and CT Monitoring: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Orlacchio, Antonio Bazzocchi, Gabriele; Pastorelli, Daniela; Bolacchi, Francesca; Angelico, Mario; Almerighi, Cristiana; Masala, Salvatore; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively determine the safety and effectiveness of percutaneous cryoablation, monitored with computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonographic (US) guidance, for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Four patients with small HCCs underwent one percutaneous cryoablation treatment session monitored with CT and US guidance. All patients underwent pretreatment blood chemistry testing and imaging evaluation. We treated lesions with simultaneous insertion of multiple 17-G cryoprobes (two or three) and defined technical success when the extension of a visible iceball was beyond 5 mm from the tumor margin. Intralesional enhancement or tumoral size increase was defined as local progression compared with that on images obtained immediately after ablation. We evaluated complications and follow-up (at 1, 3, and 6 months). All patients survived without short- or long-term complications. Cryoablation was technically successful in all patients at the end of the procedure. During follow-up two patients developed disease recurrence. One patient developed local tumor progression on the margin of the lesion; the other, a new HCC. In the case of local tumor progression a new elevation of {alpha}-fetoprotein ({alpha}FP) levels occurred at first follow-up control. In the other case levels of {alpha}FP remained stable during the first 3 months after the procedure, then demonstrated a progressive increase in {alpha}FP levels beginning at the fourth month, without tumor evidence during CT control at 3 months. We conclude that percutaneous cryotherapy with US guidance and CT monitoring is a feasible, safe, and effective for treatment of HCC. If local ablative procedures of hepatic lesions are to be performed, percutaneous cryoablation, not laparotomic, should be discussed as an alternative therapeutic measure. Longer follow-up should provide proof of the effectiveness of this technique.

  20. Percutaneous cryoablation and vertebroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Masala, Salvatore; Roselli, Mario; Manenti, Guglielmo; Mammucari, Matteo; Bartolucci, Dario Alberto; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    A 70-year-old man with a painful vertebral metastasis was treated with combined percutaneous cryoablation and vertebroplasty therapy (CVT) in one session. The patient was suffering from diffuse visceral metastasized cholangiocarcinoma. After several weeks of back pain, magnetic resonance imaging documented a single L2 bone metastasis. In consultation with the oncologists, palliative combined CVT was administered with the aim of obtaining pain relief and bone stabilization. In our experience this combined treatment is safe and effective for immediate pain relief in painful bone metastases when other standard palliative treatments have failed. PMID:18459032

  1. Direct Percutaneous Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, Sailen G.; Castle, Erik P.; Kriegshauser, J. Scott; Huettl, Eric A.

    2010-02-15

    Stomal variceal bleeding can develop in patients with underlying cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Most patients are best treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation because this addresses the underlying problem of portal hypertension. However, some patients are not good candidates for TIPS creation because they have end-stage liver disease or encephalopathy. We describe such a patient who presented with recurrent bleeding stomal varices, which was successfully treated with percutaneous coil embolization. The patient had bleeding-free survival for 1 month before death from unrelated causes.

  2. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy and ureteroscopy in children: evolutions.

    PubMed

    Long, Christopher J; Srinivasan, Arun K

    2015-02-01

    The increasing incidence of pediatric stone disease has coincided with significant advances in technology and equipment, resulting in drastic improvements in management. Miniaturization of both ureteroscopes and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) equipment has facilitated access to the entirety of the urinary tract and has made ureteroscopy a first-line therapy option along with shock-wave lithotripsy for kidney and ureteral stones. Advances in PCNL have decreased patient morbidity while preserving stone clearance rates. In this review, the advances in operative approach for ureteroscopy and PCNL in children and its applicability to current surgical management of pediatric stone disease are discussed. PMID:25455168

  3. Percutaneous Cryoablation and Vertebroplasty: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Masala, Salvatore; Roselli, Mario; Manenti, Guglielmo; Mammucari, Matteo; Bartolucci, Dario Alberto Simonetti, Giovanni

    2008-05-15

    A 70-year-old man with a painful vertebral metastasis was treated with combined percutaneous cryoablation and vertebroplasty therapy (CVT) in one session. The patient was suffering from diffuse visceral metastasized cholangiocarcinoma. After several weeks of back pain, magnetic resonance imaging documented a single L2 bone metastasis. In consultation with the oncologists, palliative combined CVT was administered with the aim of obtaining pain relief and bone stabilization. In our experience this combined treatment is safe and effective for immediate pain relief in painful bone metastases when other standard palliative treatments have failed.

  4. Radiological considerations: percutaneous laser disc decompression.

    PubMed

    Botsford, J A

    1993-10-01

    Diagnostic radiology is an integral part of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). All physicians involved in PLDD patient selection and treatment must be familiar with the imaging techniques unique to this procedure to ensure a successful outcome. The following review is based on the cumulative experience gained in performing over 150 PLDD procedures. It discusses the function of diagnostic radiology in all facets of PLDD including patient selection, intraoperative imaging, postoperative evaluation, and analysis of complications. Fundamental radiologic concepts that apply to PLDD are explained and protocols suggested to optimize results and avoid complications. PMID:10146513

  5. Percutaneous tracheostomy in patients on anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Pasin, Laura; Frati, Elena; Cabrini, Luca; Giovanni, Landoni; Nardelli, Pasquale; Bove, Tiziana; Calabrò, Maria Grazia; Scandroglio, Anna Mara; Pappalardo, Federico; Zangrillo, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To determine if percutaneous tracheostomy is safe in critically ill patients treated with anticoagulant therapies. Settings and Design: Single-center retrospective study including all the patients who underwent percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) placement over a 1-year period in a 14-bed, cardiothoracic and vascular Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Materials and Methods: Patients demographics and characteristics, anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapies, coagulation profile, performed technique and use of bronchoscopic guidance were retrieved. Results: Thirty-six patients (2.7% of the overall ICU population) underwent PDT over the study period. Twenty-six (72%) patients were on anticoagulation therapy, 1 patient was on antiplatelet therapy and 2 further patients received prophylactic doses of low molecular weight heparin. Only 4 patients had normal coagulation profile and were not receiving anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapies. Overall, bleeding of any severity complicated 19% of PDT. No procedure-related deaths occurred. Conclusions: PDT was proved to be safe even in critically ill-patients treated with anticoagulant therapies. Larger prospective studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:26139737

  6. Laparoscopic-Assisted Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Adarsh M; Sedarat, Alireza

    2016-09-01

    There are a variety of techniques for gastrostomy tube placement. Endoscopic and radiologic approaches have almost entirely superseded surgical placement. However, an aging population and significant advancements in modern healthcare have resulted in patients with increasingly complex medical issues or postsurgical anatomy. The rising prevalence of obesity has also created technical challenges for proceduralists of many specialties. When patients with these comorbidities develop the need for long-term enteral nutrition and feeding tube placement, standard approaches such as percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) by endoscopists and percutaneous image-guided gastrostomy (PIG) by interventional radiologists may be technically difficult or impossible. For these challenging situations, laparoscopic-assisted PEG (LAPEG) is an alternative option. LAPEG combines the advantages of PEG with direct intraperitoneal visualization, helping ensure a safe tube placement tract free of intervening organs or structures. In this review, we highlight some of the important factors of first-line gastrostomy techniques, with an emphasis on the utility and procedural technique of LAPEG when they are not feasible. PMID:27422123

  7. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy - early clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Junichi; Takeda, Masaaki; Itoh, Yasunobu; Matsuoka, Hidenori; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We report our early clinical experience with percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) for herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) in the lumbar spine. We introduced PELD to our clinical practice in June 2009. A total of 311 patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease were treated in our hospital up to August 2011. Thirty-seven patients with lumbar HNP were treated by PELD. PELD was carried out under local anesthesia, and the endoscope was continuously irrigated with saline. Twenty-eight patients were treated through the transforaminal approach, 5 were treated through the interlaminar approach, and 4 were treated through the extraforaminal approach. Surgery was discontinued due to uncontrollable intraoperative pain or anatomical inaccessibility in one case of the interlaminar approach and 2 cases of the extraforaminal approach. In the other 34 patients, the elapsed time of surgery was 34 to 103 minutes (mean 62.4 minutes). Extracorporeal blood loss was insignificant. Immediate symptom relief was achieved in all patients, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging revealed sufficient removal of the HNP. The length of the postoperative hospital stay was 1 or 2 days in all patients. The surgical method of PELD is completely different from percutaneous nucleotomy, and the aim is to directly remove the HNP with minimum damage to the musculoskeletal structure. Although this study is based on our early clinical outcomes, PELD seemed to be a promising minimally invasive surgery for HNP in the lumbar spine. PMID:23006872

  8. [Percutaneous tracheostomy in the ventilated patient].

    PubMed

    Añón, J M; Araujo, J B; Escuela, M P; González-Higueras, E

    2014-04-01

    The medical indications of tracheostomy comprise the alleviation of upper airway obstruction; the prevention of laryngeal and upper airway damage due to prolonged translaryngeal intubation in patients subjected to prolonged mechanical ventilation; and the facilitation of airway access for the removal of secretions. Since 1985, percutaneous tracheostomy (PT) has gained widespread acceptance as a method for creating a surgical airway in patients requiring long-term mechanical ventilation. Since then, several comparative trials of PT and surgical tracheostomy have been conducted, and new techniques for PT have been developed. The use of percutaneous dilatation techniques under bronchoscopic control are now increasingly popular throughout the world. Tracheostomy should be performed as soon as the need for prolonged intubation is identified. However a validated model for the prediction of prolonged mechanical ventilation is not available, and the timing of tracheostomy should be individualized. The present review analyzes the state of the art of PT in mechanically ventilated patients--this being regarded by many as the technique of choice in performing tracheostomy in critically ill patients. PMID:23347906

  9. Percutaneous transhepatic thrombectomy and pharmacologic thrombolysis of mesenteric venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Choi, Lorraine; Lin, Peter H; Dardik, Alan; Eraso, Andrea; Lumsden, Alan B

    2007-01-01

    Mesenteric venous occlusion is a rare yet highly morbid condition that is traditionally treated with anticoagulation while surgery serves as the last resort. Percutaneous intervention provides an effective option with relatively low mortality and morbidity. We herein describe use of transhepatic percutaneous thrombectomy and pharmacologic thrombolysis in treating two cases of symptomatic mesenteric venous thrombosis. These cases underscore the fact that transhepatic thrombectomy and thrombolysis are a highly effective strategy for treating acute symptomatic mesenteric venous thrombosis. Several percutaneous techniques are also reviewed. PMID:17382054

  10. Percutaneous Procedures for the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Bender, Matthew T; Bettegowda, Chetan

    2016-07-01

    Three major percutaneous procedures are currently used to treat trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Percutaneous balloon compression, glycerol rhizotomy, and radiofrequency thermocoagulation interrupt afferent pain fibers by injury to the trigeminal nerve root or ganglion. Each is capable of offering immediate and durable pain relief. Each is associated with relatively low, but variable rates of complications. Patient heterogeneity, technical variation, and nonstandard outcomes plague the existing outcomes literature and limit comparisons of treatments. Rendering treatment selection a function of individual physician preference and practice patterns. Randomized, prospective trials are needed; in the meantime, percutaneous rhizotomy remains an excellent treatment for selected patients. PMID:27324995

  11. Percutaneous Relief of Tension Pneumomediastinum in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Chau, Helen Hoi-lun; Kwok, Philip Chong-hei; Lai, Albert Kwok-hung; Fan, Tsz Wo; Chan, Susan Chi-hum; Miu, Ting Yat; Chan, Grace Lai-har

    2003-11-15

    The purpose of this article was to describe the experience of relieving tension pneumomediastinum by a fluoroscopic-guided percutaneous method. We inserted a percutaneous drainage catheter with a Heimlich valve under fluoroscopic guidance to relieve the tension pneumomediastinum in a 2-year-old girl who suffered from dermatomyositis with lung involvement. This allowed immediate relief without the need for surgery. The procedure was repeated for relapsed tension pneumomediastinum. Good immediate results were achieved in each attempt. We conclude that percutaneous relief of pneumomediastinum under fluoroscopic guidance can be performed safely and rapidly in patients not fit for surgery.

  12. Percutaneous embolization of varicocele: technique, indications, relative contraindications, and complications

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Joshua; Mittal, Sameer; Pereira, Keith; Bhatia, Shivank; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    There are several options for the treatment of varicocele, including surgical repair either by open or microsurgical approach, laparoscopy, or through percutaneous embolization of the internal spermatic vein. The ultimate goal of varicocele treatment relies on the occlusion of the dilated veins that drain the testis. Percutaneous embolization offers a rapid recovery and can be successfully accomplished in approximately 90% of attempts. However, the technique demands interventional radiologic expertise and has potential serious complications, including vascular perforation, coil migration, and thrombosis of pampiniform plexus. This review discusses the common indications, relative contraindications, technical details, and risks associated with percutaneous embolization of varicocele. PMID:26658060

  13. The inferior vena cava clip. The percutaneous approach.

    PubMed

    Bildsoe, M C; Yedlicka, J W; Hunter, D W; Castañeda-Zúñiga, W R; Amplatz, K

    1990-08-01

    Pulmonary embolism in high-risk patients may be minimized by surgical inferior vena cava (IVC) clipping or by the insertion of caval filters. A percutaneous clipping technique was developed that narrows the cava while allowing caval patency. The caval clip is inserted through a percutaneous translumbar approach under fluoroscopic control. Nine dogs underwent percutaneous translumbar caval clip placement without complications. Three of four dogs, followed-up for 5 to 19 weeks by angiography and caval pressure measurements, showed caval patency. This technique eliminates the risks of surgical IVC clip placement and risks from the insertion of intravascular foreign bodies such as filters. PMID:2394568

  14. Percutaneous embolization of varicocele: technique, indications, relative contraindications, and complications.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Joshua; Mittal, Sameer; Pereira, Keith; Bhatia, Shivank; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    There are several options for the treatment of varicocele, including surgical repair either by open or microsurgical approach, laparoscopy, or through percutaneous embolization of the internal spermatic vein. The ultimate goal of varicocele treatment relies on the occlusion of the dilated veins that drain the testis. Percutaneous embolization offers a rapid recovery and can be successfully accomplished in approximately 90% of attempts. However, the technique demands interventional radiologic expertise and has potential serious complications, including vascular perforation, coil migration, and thrombosis of pampiniform plexus. This review discusses the common indications, relative contraindications, technical details, and risks associated with percutaneous embolization of varicocele. PMID:26658060

  15. Percutaneous drainage of abscesses and fluid collections: technique, results, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    vanSonnenberg, E.; Ferrucci, J.T.; Mueller, P.R.; Wittenberg, J.; Simeone, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    A combination of computed tomography, ultrasonography, and fluoroscopy was utilized to guide percutaneous catheter drainage of 58 abscesses and fluid collections in 51 patients. Cavities were evacuated in 53 cases, with surgery avoided in 44 of these. There were two failures and six recurrences. The mean duration of catheter drainage was seven days. Five complications occurred, including a small bowel fistula and a lacerated mesenteric vessel. Based on this experience, guidelines for drainage are presented, as well as principles for the critical step of access route planning. Double-lumen sump drainage catheters and the irrigation procedure have simplified and improved drainage. Causes and solutions for unsatisfactory results are defined.

  16. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of a Small Renal Mass Complicated by Appendiceal Perforation

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, Judith; Bex, Axel; Prevoo, Warner

    2012-06-15

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has gained wide acceptance as nephron-sparing therapy for small renal masses in select patients. Generally, it is a safe procedure with minor morbidity and acceptable short-term oncologic outcome. However, as a result of the close proximity of vital structures, such as the bowel, ureter, and large vessels, to the ablative field, complications regarding these structures may occur. This is the first article describing appendiceal perforation as a complication of computed tomography-guided RFA despite hydrodissection. When performing this innovative and promising procedure one should be aware of the possibility of particular minor and even major complications.

  17. Unsuspected pheochromocytoma: Risk of blood-pressure alterations during percutaneous adrenal biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Casola, G.; Nicolet, V.; van Sonnenberg, E.; Withers, C.; Bretagnolle, M.; Saba, R.M.; Bret, P.M.

    1986-06-01

    Four unsuspected pheochromocytomas were discovered during percutaneous fine-needle biopsy of the adrenal gland under ultrasound (n = 1) and computed tomographic (n = 3) guidance. One patient suffered an acute episode of alternating hypertension and hypotension during the procedure. A second patient had no alterations in vital signs during the procedure but had a severe hypertensive crisis during induction of anesthesia at surgery. Neither biopsy nor surgery affected the vital signs in the other two patients. During biopsy study of adrenal lesions, the possibility of unsuspected pheo-chromocytoma should be considered, and the interventional radiologist must be familiar with the emergency treatment of hypotensive or hypertensive crises that may occur.

  18. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation for Recurrent Thyroid Cancer--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Meijerink, Martijn R; Scheffer, Hester J; de Bree, Remco; Sedee, Robert-Jan

    2015-08-01

    A 74-year-old man presented with a small locoregional, histopathologically proven, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography-avid recurrence of follicular thyroid carcinoma in the left subglottic space after extensive surgical resection, adjuvant radioactive iodine therapy, and external beam radiation therapy. Because all established focal therapies were contraindicated, percutaneous irreversible electroporation was performed without complications. Follow-up imaging at 7 months showed a small ablation scar without signs for residual vital tumor tissue. Irreversible electroporation may be a viable treatment option for selected cases of recurring head and neck tumors that are unsuitable for other local treatments. PMID:26210244

  19. Percutaneous Transpedicular Interbody Fusion Technique in Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Stabilization for Pseudoarthrosis Following Pyogenic Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Ko; Masuda, Keigo; Yonekura, Yutaka; Kitamura, Takahiro; Senba, Hideyuki; Shidahara, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    This report introduces a percutaneous transpedicular interbody fusion (PTPIF) technique in posterior stabilization using percutaneous pedicle screws (PPSs). An 81-year-old man presented with pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis 15 months before. Although no relapse of infection was found, he complained of obstinate low back pain and mild neurological symptoms. Radiological evaluations showed a pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis at T11-12. Posterior stabilization using PPSs from Th9 to L2 and concomitant PTPIF using autologous iliac bone graft at T11-12 were performed. Low back pain and neurological symptoms were immediately improved after surgery. A solid interbody fusion at T11-12 was completed 9 months after surgery. The patient had no restriction of daily activity and could play golf at one year after surgery. PTPIF might be a useful option for perform segmental fusion in posterior stabilization using PPSs. PMID:27114777

  20. Percutaneous Transpedicular Interbody Fusion Technique in Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Stabilization for Pseudoarthrosis Following Pyogenic Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Keigo; Yonekura, Yutaka; Kitamura, Takahiro; Senba, Hideyuki; Shidahara, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    This report introduces a percutaneous transpedicular interbody fusion (PTPIF) technique in posterior stabilization using percutaneous pedicle screws (PPSs). An 81-year-old man presented with pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis 15 months before. Although no relapse of infection was found, he complained of obstinate low back pain and mild neurological symptoms. Radiological evaluations showed a pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis at T11–12. Posterior stabilization using PPSs from Th9 to L2 and concomitant PTPIF using autologous iliac bone graft at T11–12 were performed. Low back pain and neurological symptoms were immediately improved after surgery. A solid interbody fusion at T11–12 was completed 9 months after surgery. The patient had no restriction of daily activity and could play golf at one year after surgery. PTPIF might be a useful option for perform segmental fusion in posterior stabilization using PPSs. PMID:27114777

  1. The effect of abdominal fat parameters on percutaneous nephrolithotomy success

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Ozgur; Tarhan, Huseyin; Cimen, Sertac; Ekin, Rahmi Gokhan; Akarken, Ilker; Oztekin, Ozgur; Can, Ertan; Suelozgen, Tufan; Ilbey, Yusuf Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Obesity has been suggested to lower the success of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). However, the relationship between abdominal fat parameters, such as visceral and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue, and PCNL success remained unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of abdominal fat parameters on PCNL success. Methods: A total of 150 patients who underwent PCNL were retrospectively enrolled in this study. Group 1 consisted of patients who had no residual stones or residual stone fragments <3 mm in diameter while group 2 included patients with residual stone fragments ≥3 mm. PCNL procedure was defined as successful if all stones were eliminated or if there were residual stone fragments <3 mm in diameter confirmed by non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) performed postoperatively. Preoperative NCCT was used to determine abdominal fat parameters. Results: Group 1 consisted of 117 (78.0%) patients while group 2 included 33 (22.0%) patients. On univariate analysis, stone number, stone surface area (SSA), visceral fat area (VFA), abdominal circumference on computerized tomography (ACCT), and duration of procedure were found to be predictive factors affecting PCNL success. Logistic regression analysis revealed that ACCT and SSA were independent prognostic factors for PCNL success. Conclusions: PCNL success was not affected by VFA, subcutaneous fat area (SFA) and body mass index (BMI) in our series. However, ACCT and SSA had negative associations with PCNL success. We conclude that both ACCT and SSA can be used as tools for predicting PCNL outcomes. PMID:27330587

  2. Percutaneous Biopsy of Osteoid Osteomas Prior to Percutaneous Treatment Using Two Different Biopsy Needles

    SciTech Connect

    Laredo, Jean-Denis Hamze, Bassam; Jeribi, Riadh

    2009-09-15

    Biopsy is usually performed as the first step in percutaneous treatment of osteoid osteomas prior to laser photocoagulation. At our institution, 117 patients with a presumed diagnosis of osteoid osteoma had a trephine biopsy before a percutaneous laser photocoagulation. Biopsies were made using two different types of needles. A Bonopty biopsy needle (14-gauge cannula, 16-gauge trephine needle; Radi Medical Systems, Uppsala, Sweden) was used in 65 patients, and a Laurane biopsy needle (11-gauge cannula, 12.5-gauge trephine needle; Laurane Medical, Saint-Arnoult, France) in 43 patients. Overall biopsy results were positive for osteoid osteoma in 83 (70.9%) of the 117 cases. The Laurane needle provided a significantly higher positive rate (81.4%) than the Bonopty needle (66.1%; p < 0.05). This difference was not due to the size of the nidus, which was similar in the two groups (p < 0.05) and may be an effect of differences in needle caliber (12.5 vs. 14 gauge) as well as differences in needle design. The rate of positive biopsy results obtained in the present series with the Laurane biopsy needle is, to our knowledge, the highest rate reported in series dealing with percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and laser photocoagulation of osteoid osteomas.

  3. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation of a "carrot-stick" spinal fracture in an elderly man with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Huwart, Laurent; Amoretti, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    We present a case of percutaneous fixation of a "carrot-stick" spinal fracture in an elderly patient with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A surgical stabilization was not possible in this 83-year-old man with comorbidities. Under local anesthesia, percutaneous screw fixation of a transdiscal shear fracture at the level T10-T11 was performed using computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopy guidance. Two 4.0-mm Asnis III cannulated screws were placed to fix facet joints using transfacet pedicle pathway. The procedure time was 30 min. Using the visual analog scale (VAS), pain decreased from 10, preoperatively, to 1 after the procedure. Radiographic fusion was observed at a 3-month post-procedural CT scan. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation of spinal fractures could potentially be an alternative to surgery in elderly AS patients with poor performance status. PMID:23842576

  4. Age-related percutaneous penetration part 1: skin factors.

    PubMed

    Konda, S; Meier-Davis, S R; Cayme, B; Shudo, J; Maibach, H I

    2012-05-01

    Changes in the skin that occur in the elderly may put them at increased risk for altered percutaneous penetration from pharmacotherapy along with potential adverse effects. Skin factors that may have a role in age-related percutaneous penetration include blood flow, pH, skin thickness, hair and pore density, and the content and structure of proteins, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), water, and lipids. Each factor is examined as a function of increasing age along with its potential impact on percutaneous penetration. Additionally, topical drugs that successfully overcome the barrier function of the skin can still fall victim to cutaneous metabolism, thereby producing metabolites that may have increased or decreased activity. This overview discusses the current data and highlights the importance of further studies to evaluate the impact of skin factors in age-related percutaneous penetration. PMID:22622279

  5. Delayed Nephropleural Fistula After Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kaler, Kamaljot S.; Cwikla, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pleural effusions due to pleural injury following supracostal percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) occur in upwards of 15% of patients; however, these effusions are invariably diagnosed immediately postoperative or during the hospital stay. Herein, we report our initial experience with a delayed nephropleural fistula. A 52-year-old female underwent an uneventful supracostal right PCNL staghorn stone procedure and was discharged on postoperative day 1. She presented to the emergency department 8 days after her original procedure and one day after ureteral stent removal in the office, with right pleural effusion, concomitant contralateral renal colic secondary to migration of a left pelvic stone into her left proximal ureter, and acute renal failure/oliguria. She was treated with right chest tube drainage, bilateral nephrostomy tube placement, and subsequent left holmium laser ureterolithotripsy. PMID:27579431

  6. Percutaneous absorption and disposition of Tinopal EMS.

    PubMed

    Black, J G; Moule, R C; Philp, J

    1977-08-01

    A cotton-substantive, anionic, fluorescent whitening agent manufactured by several suppliers under various trade names e.g. Tinopal EMS, has been synthesized in radioactive form. Intubation of detergent or aqueous solution into rats resulted in little absorption from the intestinal tract as evidenced by low radioactivity in the urine and tissues. Most of the dose was excreted rapidly in the faeces. After parenteral administration to rats, the radioactivity was rapidly excreted in the faeces with small amounts remaining in tissues and organs. There was slight evidence of retention of radioactivity in the kidneys. Very small amounts of Tinopal EMS in detergent were absorbed through rat skin, but only when concentrations greater than those normally used by the consumer, together with occlusion of the skin were employed. Small amounts were absorbed throught skin when applied in ethanol. It is concluded that the possibility of systemic toxic effects in man as a result of percutaneous absorption is remote. PMID:929616

  7. Percutaneous foam sclerotherapy for venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Bush, R; Bush, P

    2013-10-01

    The technique of foam sclerotherapy directed at the distal most vessels, draining the ulcer bed was first described in 2010, with excellent penetration into the underlying venous network possible with this technique. Thirty-five patients have now been treated with this technique as the initial treatment at Midwest Vein Laser, USA. There have been no complications with this technique and rapid healing occurred within 4-8 weeks after the initial treatment in 90% of the patients, and all ulcers were healed at 4 months. Here we present the representative case of a 67-year-old man treated with a modified technique that used a percutaneous approach via reticular or spider veins at the margin of the ulcer bed. PMID:24142137

  8. Embolic protection devices in saphenous percutaneous intervention.

    PubMed

    Morís, Cesar; Lozano, Iñigo; Martín, María; Rondán, Juán; Avanzas, Pablo

    2009-05-01

    Saphenous veins remain a source of conduit for use in surgical coronary bypass graft revascularisation procedures. Saphenous vein grafts have a progressive closure rate estimated to be 12% to 20% at the end of the first year, and approximately 50% by 10 years. Regarding secondary revascularisation in these cases, reoperation carries substantially increased morbidity and mortality rates, making saphenous coronary intervention, in particular stent implantation, a more attractive means of revascularisation. However, this procedure carries a significant risk of major adverse clinical events, predominantly myocardial infarction or reduced antegrade flow (non-reflow phenomenon), mainly due to distal embolisation of atherothrombotic debris and distal microvascular occlusion. Embolic protection devices are used to reduce the risk of distal embolisation. There are two different designs: filter and occlusion-aspiration devices. In this article we present the different systems of embolic protection devices in saphenous percutaneous intervention and the previously published information is reviewed. PMID:19736070

  9. Delayed Nephropleural Fistula After Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Kaler, Kamaljot S; Cwikla, Daniel; Clayman, Ralph V

    2016-01-01

    Pleural effusions due to pleural injury following supracostal percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) occur in upwards of 15% of patients; however, these effusions are invariably diagnosed immediately postoperative or during the hospital stay. Herein, we report our initial experience with a delayed nephropleural fistula. A 52-year-old female underwent an uneventful supracostal right PCNL staghorn stone procedure and was discharged on postoperative day 1. She presented to the emergency department 8 days after her original procedure and one day after ureteral stent removal in the office, with right pleural effusion, concomitant contralateral renal colic secondary to migration of a left pelvic stone into her left proximal ureter, and acute renal failure/oliguria. She was treated with right chest tube drainage, bilateral nephrostomy tube placement, and subsequent left holmium laser ureterolithotripsy. PMID:27579431

  10. Magnetic electrical connectors for biomedical percutaneous implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A biomedical percutaneous connector is described which includes a socket having an enlarged disk shaped base portion for being implanted below the patient's skin and cylindrical portion which is integral with the base portion and extends outwardly of the skin. A conical recess in an upper end of the cylindrical portion has a magnet located in the base. Inclined conductive strips are carried on an upper end of the cylindrical portion to which electrical conductors are attached and extend into the patient's body. A complementary shaped plug which also has electrical contacts provided thereon is adapted to fit within the conical recess of the socket. The plug is held in the socket by magnetic force.

  11. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty in Painful Schmorl Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Masala, Salvatore Pipitone, Vincenzo; Tomassini, Marco; Massari, Francesco; Romagnoli, Andrea; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2006-02-15

    The Schmorl node represents displacement of intervertebral disc tissue into the vertebral body. Both Schmorl nodes and degenerative disc disease are common in the human spine. We performed a retrospective study, for the period from January 2003 to February 2005, evaluating 23 patients affected by painful Schmorl nodes, who underwent in our department percutaneous transpedicular injection of polymethylmethacrylate (vertebroplasty) in order to solve their back pain not responsive to medical and physical management. Eighteen patients reported improvement of the back pain and no one reported a worsening of symptoms. Improvement was swift and persistent in reducing symptoms. Painful Schmorl nodes, refractory to medical or physical therapy, should be considered as a new indication within those vertebral lesions adequately treatable utilizing Vertebroplasty procedure.

  12. Percutaneous Placement and Management of Peritoneovenous Shunts

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Louis G.

    2012-01-01

    Peritoneovenous shunts are used in the treatment of recurrent ascites or recurrent pleural effusions. Generally speaking, the shunts allow passage of ascites or pleural effusions (by either passive or active means) back into the central venous system. The most recent development in peritoneovenous shunts, known as the Denver Shunt, is a modification of a shunt developed for the treatment of hydrocephalus. In recent years, the Denver shunt has been placed by interventional radiologists. It is used to treat both cirrhotic and malignant effusions in the peritoneal and pleural cavities. Reported complications of the shunt are shunt occlusion, infection, post-shunt coagulopathy, deep vein thrombosis, catheter breakage, and leaks. This article discusses the technical aspects related to the percutaneous placement and maintenance of the Denver Shunt. PMID:23729983

  13. Percutaneous Retrieval of a Right Atrioventricular Embolus

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Roger Philip; Harding, James; Hassam, Rhonda

    1998-09-15

    Percutaneous retrieval of a 12-cm-long serpiginous clot lodged in the right atrium and ventricle is reported. Following bilateral common femoral vein puncture, a Bird's Nest cava filter was first positioned ready to deploy immediately below the renal veins via the right femoral vein. From the left femoral vein, a Cook intravascular retrieval basket was advanced to the right atrium. Under transthoracic echocardiographic visualization, the basket was used to engage, trap, and gently withdraw the clot in a single long strand below the prepositioned inferior vena cava filter. The filter was immediately deployed, leaving the clot trapped inferior to the renal veins, in the cava and left iliac vein. The patient remained well and asymptomatic at discharge.

  14. Bioresorbable scaffolds for percutaneous coronary interventions

    PubMed Central

    Gogas, Bill D.

    2014-01-01

    Innovations in drug-eluting stents (DES) have substantially reduced rates of in-segment restenosis and early stent thrombosis, improving clinical outcomes following percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). However a fixed metallic implant in a vessel wall with restored patency and residual disease remains a precipitating factor for sustained local inflammation, in-stent neo-atherosclerosis and impaired vasomotor function increasing the risk for late complications attributed to late or very late stent thrombosis and late target lesion revascularization (TLR) (late catch-up). The quest for optimal coronary stenting continues by further innovations in stent design and by using biocompatible materials other than cobalt chromium, platinum chromium or stainless steel for engineering coronary implants. Bioresorbable scaffolds made of biodegradable polymers or biocorrodible metals with properties of transient vessel scaffolding, local drug-elution and future restoration of vessel anatomy, physiology and local hemodynamics have been recently developed. These devices have been utilized in selected clinical applications so far providing preliminary evidence of safety showing comparable performance with current generation drug-eluting stents (DES). Herein we provide a comprehensive overview of the current status of these technologies, we elaborate on the potential benefits of transient coronary scaffolds over permanent stents in the context of vascular reparation therapy, and we further focus on the evolving challenges these devices have to overcome to compete with current generation DES. Condensed Abstract:: The quest for optimizing percutaneous coronary interventions continues by iterative innovations in device materials beyond cobalt chromium, platinum chromium or stainless steel for engineering coronary implants. Bioresorbable scaffolds made of biodegradable polymers or biocorrodible metals with properties of transient vessel scaffolding; local drug-elution and future

  15. Percutaneous cholecystolithotomy: is gall stone recurrence inevitable?

    PubMed Central

    Donald, J J; Cheslyn-Curtis, S; Gillams, A R; Russell, R C; Lees, W R

    1994-01-01

    Using radiological interventional techniques the gall bladder can be cleared of stones with a high success rate. As with any treatment option that leaves the gall bladder in situ there is an accompanying risk of stone recurrence, which is currently unknown for the radiological method. One hundred patients were studied prospectively to determine the recurrence rate of stones and clinical outcome after successful percutaneous cholecystolithotomy. Follow up included both clinical assessment and ultrasound examination at 3, 6, and 12 months and then annual intervals thereafter. The overall stone recurrence rate was 31% at a mean follow up of 26 months (range, 3-50 months). By actuarial life table analysis, the cumulative proportion of gall stone recurrence was 7, 19, 28, 35, and 44% at 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 months respectively. Of the 31 patients with recurrent stones; 17 remain asymptomatic, seven have experienced biliary colic, two abdominal pain, three non-specific upper gastrointestinal symptoms, and two jaundice secondary to common duct stones. Thirteen of the stone free patients have remained symptomatic; six with abdominal pain and seven with nonspecific upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Eight patients have subsequently had a cholecystectomy. No significant difference was found between the sex of the patient or the number of stones before treatment and the stone recurrence rates. The cumulative stone recurrence rate was significantly less in the 56 patients who received adjuvant chemolitholysis (p < 0.05). These data show that stone recurrence after successful percutaneous cholecystolithotomy occurs in the minority, and is usually asymptomatic. It is concluded that the technique remains justified in the management of selected patients with gall stones. PMID:8200568

  16. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangial drainage: direct approach under fluoroscopic control.

    PubMed

    Takada, T; Hanyu, F; Kobayashi, S; Uchida, Y

    1976-01-01

    We devised a direct percutaneous transhepatic cholangial drainage under fluoroscopic control. The principle is as follows. After percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, the three dimensional structure of intrahepatic bile ducts is projected to a two dimensional plane under fluoroscopy; the needle can then be introduced into the selected bile duct with accuracy. The technique can be used as a preoperative management of operations of patients with jaundice and also as a palliative management of advanced cancer without much complication. PMID:1249944

  17. Percutaneous Surgery for Metatarsalgia and the Lesser Toes.

    PubMed

    Redfern, David J; Vernois, Joel

    2016-09-01

    The traditional open surgical options for the treatment of metatarsalgia and lesser toe deformities are limited and often result in unintentional stiffness. The use of percutaneous techniques for the treatment of metatarsalgia and lesser toe deformities allows a more versatile and tailor-made approach to the individual deformities. As with all percutaneous techniques, it is vital the surgeon engage in cadaveric training from surgeons experienced in these techniques before introducing them into his/her clinical practice. PMID:27524704

  18. Percutaneous ablation therapies of inoperable pancreatic cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Lucchina, Natalie; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Marco, De Chiara; Bracchi, Elena; Cocozza, Eugenio; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Floridi, Chiara; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2015-01-01

    Initial studies about ablation therapies of the pancreas were associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which limited widespread adoption. Development of techniques with high quality imaging used as guidance improve outcomes reducing complications. Moreover, only few experiences of percutaneous pancreatic ablations are reported. They are performed by very skilled operators in highly specialized centers. This review presents the current status of percutaneous local ablative therapies in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26424487

  19. Chest Wall Dissemination of Nocardiosis after Percutaneous Transthoracic Needle Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Shimamoto, Hiroshi Inaba, Yoshitaka; Yamaura, Hidekazu; Sato, Yozo; Kamiya, Mika; Miyazaki, Masaya; Arai, Yasuaki; Horio, Yoshitsugu

    2007-07-15

    We described a case of chest wall dissemination after percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy. A 65-year-old man had a lung nodule which was suspected to be lung carcinoma. He underwent percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy using an 18G semiautomated biopsy needle and pathologic diagnosis showed organizing pneumonia. Two months after the biopsy, chest wall dissemination occurred. Implantation of carcinoma along the biopsy route was suspected, but the mass was actually due to pulmonary nocardiosis.

  20. Percutaneous Management of Biliary Strictures After Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, Roberto Maruzzelli, Luigi; Caruso, Settimo; Riva, Silvia; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2008-09-15

    We analyze our experience with the management of biliary strictures (BSs) in 27 pediatric patients who underwent liver transplantation with the diagnosis of BS. Mean recipient age was 38 months (range, 2.5-182 months). In all patients percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, biliary catheter placement, and bilioplasty were performed. In 20 patients the stenoses were judged resolved by percutaneous balloon dilatation and the catheters removed. Mean number of balloon dilatations performed was 4.1 (range, 3-6). No major complications occurred. All 20 patients are symptom-free with respect to BS at a mean follow-up of 13 months (range, 2-46 months). In 15 of 20 patients (75%) one course of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty was performed, with no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 2-46 months). In 4 of 20 patients (20%) two courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; the mean time to recurrence was 9.8 months (range, 2.4-24 months). There was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 12 months (range, 2-16 months). In 1 of 20 patients (5%) three courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; there was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 10 months. In conclusion, BS is a major problem following pediatric liver transplantation. Radiological percutaneous treatment is safe and effective, avoiding, in most cases, surgical revision of the anastomosis.

  1. Percutaneous pulmonary and tricuspid valve implantations: An update

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Robert; Daehnert, Ingo; Lurz, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    The field of percutaneous valvular interventions is one of the most exciting and rapidly developing within interventional cardiology. Percutaneous procedures focusing on aortic and mitral valve replacement or interventional treatment as well as techniques of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation have already reached worldwide clinical acceptance and routine interventional procedure status. Although techniques of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation have been described just a decade ago, two stent-mounted complementary devices were successfully introduced and more than 3000 of these procedures have been performed worldwide. In contrast, percutaneous treatment of tricuspid valve dysfunction is still evolving on a much earlier level and has so far not reached routine interventional procedure status. Taking into account that an “interdisciplinary challenging”, heterogeneous population of patients previously treated by corrective, semi-corrective or palliative surgical procedures is growing inexorably, there is a rapidly increasing need of treatment options besides redo-surgery. Therefore, the review intends to reflect on clinical expansion of percutaneous pulmonary and tricuspid valve procedures, to update on current devices, to discuss indications and patient selection criteria, to report on clinical results and finally to consider future directions. PMID:25914786

  2. Percutaneous nephrostomy with extensions of the technique: step by step.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Raymond B; Regan, John D; Kavanagh, Peter V; Khatod, Elaine G; Chen, Michael Y; Zagoria, Ronald J

    2002-01-01

    Minimally invasive therapy in the urinary tract begins with renal access by means of percutaneous nephrostomy. Indications for percutaneous nephrostomy include urinary diversion, treatment of nephrolithiasis and complex urinary tract infections, ureteral intervention, and nephroscopy and ureteroscopy. Bleeding complications can be minimized by entering the kidney in a relatively avascular zone created by branching of the renal artery. The specific site of renal entry is dictated by the indication for access with consideration of the anatomic constraints. Successful percutaneous nephrostomy requires visualization of the collecting system for selection of an appropriate entry site. The definitive entry site is then selected; ideally, the entry site should be subcostal and lateral to the paraspinous musculature. Small-bore nephrostomy tracks can be created over a guide wire coiled in the renal pelvis. A large-diameter track may be necessary for percutaneous stone therapy, nephroscopy, or antegrade ureteroscopy. The most common extension of percutaneous nephrostomy is placement of a ureteral stent for treatment of obstruction. Transient hematuria occurs in virtually every patient after percutaneous nephrostomy, but severe bleeding that requires transfusion or intervention is uncommon. In patients with an obstructed urinary tract complicated by infection, extensive manipulations pose a risk of septic complications. PMID:12006684

  3. Ilio-psoas abscesses: percutaneous drainage under image guidance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Suri, S; Gulati, M; Singh, P

    1997-09-01

    Over a 5-year period, 56 psoas abscesses occurring in 51 patients were managed by image-guided percutaneous drainage, either by needle aspiration (n = 10) or by catheter drainage (n = 46) in conjunction with medical therapy. Twenty-seven patients had tuberculous abscesses (bilateral in five) while 24 patients had pyogenic abscesses. Percutaneous treatment was successful in 16 of the 24 patients (66.7%) with pyogenic abscesses. The reasons for failure were co-existent bowel lesions, phlegmonous involvement of muscle without liquefaction, multiloculated abscess cavity and thick tenacious pus not amenable to percutaneous drainage. Surgery was required in seven patients, either for failed percutaneous drainage or for the management of co-existent disease. Percutaneous drainage was initially successful in all 27 patients of tuberculous psoas abscesses. However, eight patients presented with recurrence requiring repeat intervention. The average duration of catheter drainage was longer in patients with tuberculous abscess (11 days) than in patients with pyogenic abscess (6 days). Percutaneous drainage under image guidance provides an effective and safe alternative to more invasive surgical drainage in most patients with psoas abscesses. PMID:9313737

  4. Posttraumatic lingual artery pseudoaneurysm treated with ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection.

    PubMed

    Masella, Pamela C; Hanson, Megan M; Hall, Brian T; Verghese, John J; Kellicut, Dwight C

    2014-07-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the lingual artery are extremely rare and are commonly iatrogenic in nature or less frequently a result of blunt or penetrating trauma. Traditionally, these vascular abnormalities have been repaired with open or endovascular techniques. Although ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection has become a standard treatment for superficial pseudoaneurysms, there are no reports of this being used in the treatment of lingual artery pseudoaneurysms. We report the case of a 26-year-old man who suffered a penetrating head and neck injury after an improvised explosive device blast in Iraq who presented with persistent oropharyngeal swelling. Color-flow Doppler ultrasonography revealed the classic yin/yang sign of a pseudoaneurysm, and a computed tomography scan was obtained that revealed a right lingual artery pseudoaneurysm. With the lack of endovascular capabilities and the excessive risk of open surgery, thrombin was injected directly into the pseudoaneurysm under ultrasound guidance. A computed tomography scan and Doppler ultrasonography revealed complete resolution of the aneurysm. This article presents the first reported case in the English literature of a lingual artery aneurysm after penetrating trauma managed successfully with ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection. PMID:24365080

  5. Major Bleeding after Percutaneous Image-Guided Biopsies: Frequency, Predictors, and Periprocedural Management

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sean A.; Milovanovic, Lazar; Midia, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Major bleeding remains an uncommon yet potentially devastating complication following percutaneous image-guided biopsy. This article reviews two cases of major bleeding after percutaneous biopsy and discusses the frequency, predictors, and periprocedural management of major postprocedural bleeding. PMID:25762845

  6. Percutaneous Drainage Combined with Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Pyogenic Spondylitis with Iliopsoas Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Hiroaki; Komiya, Setsuro

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes in patients with pyogenic spondylitis accompanied by iliopsoas abscess who were treated by percutaneous drainage combined with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy. Overview of Literature To the best of our knowledge, there have been no previous reports of the use of percutaneous drainage combined with HBO therapy for the treatment of this condition. Methods Twenty-three patients (13 men, 10 women; mean age, 69.0 years; range, 45-85 years) were treated with percutaneous drainage combined with HBO therapy in addition to commonly used conservative therapy. Mean follow-up duration was 27.7 months (range, 12-48 months). Clinical outcomes and imaging examinations were retrospectively investigated. Results Symptoms such as low back pain, radicular pain, and hip pain resolved in all patients immediately after treatment. Mean time from the start of treatment to the return of C-reactive protein levels to normal or baseline values recorded before the onset of spondylitis was 28.3 days (range, 8-56 days). In the final set of follow-up radiographic studies, all patients were free from progressive destructive changes. Follow-up magnetic resonance images or computed tomography with contrast enhancement confirmed the disappearance or near-total resolution of the iliopsoas abscess cavity with healing of the pyogenic spondylitis in all 23 patients. No recurrences were observed during follow-up. Conclusions The present study suggests that patients with pyogenic spondylitis accompanied by iliopsoas abscess can be cured without a prolonged period of therapy or recurrence using this treatment. PMID:24967038

  7. Percutaneous vertebral augmentation for painful osteolytic vertebral metastasis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Anselmetti, Giovanni C; Tutton, Sean M; Facchini, Francis R; Miller, Larry E; Block, Jon E

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Vertebral metastases are associated with significant pain, disability, and morbidity. Open surgery for fracture stabilization is often inappropriate in this population due to a poor risk-benefit profile, particularly if life expectancy is short. Percutaneous vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty are appealing adjunctive procedures in patients with malignancy for alleviation of intractable pain. However, these patients have higher risk of serious complications, notably cement extravasation. Described in this report is a case of a painful osteolytic vertebral metastasis that was successfully treated by a novel percutaneous vertebral augmentation system. Case presentation A 42-year-old Caucasian female presented with a history of metastatic lung cancer unresponsive to radiation and chemotherapy with symptoms inadequately controlled by opiates over the previous 6 months. Magnetic resonance imaging and spiral computed tomography with two-dimensional reconstruction showed an osteolytic vertebral metastasis with complete involvement of the T10 vertebral body, extending to the cortical vertebral wall anteriorly and posteriorly. The patient was treated with percutaneous vertebral augmentation (Kiva® VCF Treatment System, Benvenue Medical, Inc, Santa Clara, CA) utilizing a novel coil-shaped polyetheretherketone implant designed to minimize the risk of cement extravasation. After the minimally invasive procedure, bone cement distribution within the vertebral body was ideal, with no observed cement extravasation. No complications were reported, pain completely resolved within 24 hours, and use of intravenous narcotics was progressively diminished within 1 week. Complete pain relief was maintained throughout 4 months of follow-up. Conclusion The Kiva System represents a novel and effective minimally invasive treatment option for patients suffering from severe pain due to osteolytic vertebral metastasis. PMID:23754917

  8. Percutaneous Endovascular Treatment of Hepatic Artery Stenosis in Adult and Pediatric Patients After Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Maruzzelli, Luigi; Miraglia, Roberto Caruso, Settimo; Milazzo, Mariapina; Mamone, Giuseppe; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous endovascular techniques for the treatment of hepatic artery stenosis (HAS) occurring after liver transplantation (LT) in adult and pediatrics patients. From February 2003 to March 2009, 25 patients (15 adults and 10 children) whose developed HAS after LT were referred to our interventional radiology unit. Technical success was achieved in 96% (24 of 25) of patients. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) was performed in 13 patients (7 children), and stenting was performed in 11 patients (2 children). After the procedure, all patients were followed-up with liver function tests, Doppler ultrasound, and/or computed tomography. Mean follow-up was 15.8 months (range 5 days to 58 months). Acute hepatic artery thrombosis occurred immediately after stent deployment in 2 patients and was successfully treated with local thrombolysis. One patient developed severe HA spasm, which reverted after 24 h. After the procedure, mean trans-stenotic pressure gradient decreased from 30.5 to 6.2 mmHg. Kaplan-Meyer curve of HA primary patency was 77% at 1 and 2 years. During the follow-up period, 5 patients (20%) had recurrent stenosis, and 2 patients (8.3%) had late thrombosis. Two of 7 patients with stenosis/thrombosis underwent surgical revascularization (n = 1) and liver retransplantation (n = 1). Six (25%) patients died during follow-up, but overall mortality was not significantly different when comparing patients having patent hepatic arteries with those having recurrent stenosis/thrombosis. There were no significant differences in recurrent stenosis/thrombosis and mortality comparing patients treated by PTA versus stenting and comparing adult versus pediatric status. Percutaneous interventional treatment of HAS in LT recipients is safe and effective and decreases the need for surgical revascularization and liver retransplantation. However, the beneficial effects for survival are not clear, probably because

  9. Outcome of percutaneous continuous drainage of psoas abscess: A clinically guided technique

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Bharat R; Kurupati, Ranganatha Babu; Shah, Dipak; Degulamadi, Devanand; Borgohain, Nitu; Krishnan, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Background: Percutaneous aspiration of abscesses under ultrasonography (USG) and computer tomography (CT) scan has been well described. With recurrence rate reported as high as 66%. The open drainage and percutaneous continuous drainage (PCD) has reduced the recurrence rate. The disadvantage of PCD under CT is radiation hazard and problems of asepsis. Hence a technique of clinically guided percutaneous continuous drainage of the psoas abscess without real-time imaging overcomes these problems. We describe clinically guided PCD of psoas abscess and its outcome. Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine patients with dorsolumbar spondylodiscitis without gross neural deficit with psoas abscess of size >5 cm were selected for PCD. It was done as a day care procedure under local anesthesia. Sequentially, aspiration followed by guide pin-guided trocar and catheter insertion was done without image guidance. Culture sensitivity was done and chemotherapy initiated and catheter kept till the drainage was <10 ml for 48 hours. Outcome assessment was done with relief of pain, successful abscess drainage and ODI (Oswestry Disability Index) score at 2 years. Results: PCD was successful in all cases. Back and radicular pain improved in all cases. Average procedure time was 24.30 minutes, drain output was 234.40 ml, and the drainage duration was 7.90 days. One patient required surgical stabilisation due to progression of the spondylodiscitis resulting in instability inspite of successful drainage of abscess. Problems with the procedure were noticed in six patients. Multiple attempts (n = 2), persistent discharge (n = 1) for 2 weeks, blocked catheter (n = 2) and catheter pull out (n = 1) occurred with no effect on the outcome. The average ODI score improved from 62.47 to 5.51 at 2 years. Conclusions: Clinically guided PCD is an efficient, safe and easy procedure in drainage of psoas abscess. PMID:24600066

  10. Removal of a Trapped Endoscopic Catheter from the Gallbladder via Percutaneous Transhepatic Cholecystostomy: Technical Innovation

    SciTech Connect

    Stay, Rourke M.; Sonnenberg, Eric van Goodacre, Brian W.; Ozkan, Orhan S.; Wittich, Gerhard R.

    2006-12-15

    Background. Percutaneous cholecystostomy is used for a variety of clinical problems. Methods. Percutaneous cholecystostomy was utilized in a novel setting to resolve a problematic endoscopic situation. Observations. Percutaneous cholecystostomy permitted successful removal of a broken and trapped endoscopic biliary catheter, in addition to helping treat cholecystitis. Conclusion. Another valuable use of percutaneous cholecystostomy is demonstrated, as well as emphasizing the importance of the interplay between endoscopists and interventional radiologists.

  11. Percutaneous endovascular stents: an experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wright, K C; Wallace, S; Charnsangavej, C; Carrasco, C H; Gianturco, C

    1985-07-01

    Percutaneous, expanding, endovascular stents were constructed of stainless steel wire formed in a zig-zag pattern. Stents were placed for varying periods of time in the jugular vein, vena cava, and abdominal aorta in each of five adult dogs. The dilating force of the stents could be controlled by different wire size, number and angle of wire bends, and stent length. In addition, multiple stents could be placed one inside the other or one after the other, depending on the circumstance. The stents distended the vessels and increased their diameter. No flow defects, luminal narrowing, or occlusion were noted in any of the stented vessels, even after 6 months. Side branches bridged by the stents remained patent and showed no indication of narrowing. Stent wires became encased by a proliferation of the tunica intima where they contacted the vessel wall. Encasement was slower and less extensive in the abdominal aorta. No vascular erosion or clot formation was found to be associated with any of the stents. PMID:4001423

  12. Percutaneous coronary intervention in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Kully; Nadar, Sunil K

    2015-11-15

    Our population dynamics are changing. The number of octogenarians and older people in the general population is increasing and therefore the number of older patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome or stable angina is increasing. This group has a larger burden of coronary disease and also a greater number of concomitant comorbidities when compared to younger patients. Many of the studies assessing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to date have actively excluded octogenarians. However, a number of studies, both retrospective and prospective, are now being undertaken to reflect the, "real" population. Despite being a higher risk group for both elective and emergency PCIs, octogenarians have the greatest to gain in terms of prognosis, symptomatic relief, and arguably more importantly, quality of life. Important future development will include assessment of patient frailty, encouraging early presentation, addressing gender differences on treatment strategies, identification of culprit lesion(s) and vascular access to minimise vascular complications. We are now appreciating that the new frontier is perhaps recognising and risk stratifying those elderly patients who have the most to gain from PCI. This review article summarises the most relevant trials and studies. PMID:26241641

  13. Percutaneous Local Ablative Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lau, W. Y.; Leung, Thomas W. T.; Yu, Simon C. H.; Ho, Stephen K. W.

    2003-01-01

    Objective To review and compare treatment result for percutaneous local ablative therapy (PLAT) with surgical resection in the treatment of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Summary Background Data PLAT is indicated for small unresectable HCC localized to the liver. From the use of ethanol to the latest technology of radiofrequency ablation, ablative techniques have been refined and their role in the management of HCC established. This review aims to give an overview of various ablative methods, including their efficacy, indications, and limitations, and also tries to look into the future of clinical trials in PLAT. Methods The authors reviewed recent papers in the English medical literature about the use of local ablative therapy for HCC. Focus was given to the results of treatment in terms of local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival, and to compare treatment results with those of surgery. Results PLAT for small HCC (<5 cm) with thermal ablation (radiofrequency ablation or microwave coagulation) can achieve effective local control of disease and is superior to ethanol injection. Progressive disease in untreated areas is a common reason for failure. Overall progression-free survival is similar to that of surgical resection. Conclusions Thermal ablation gives good local control of small HCC, is superior to ethanol, and may be comparable to surgical resection in long-term outcome. PMID:12560774

  14. [Local anesthesia after percutaneous administration. I].

    PubMed

    Ziegenmeyer, J; Meyer, F

    1976-11-01

    Local anesthesia of the intact skin is difficult because of the skin barrier to epicutaneous penetration. Using solutions of local anesthetics in organic agents, which have the ability of penetrating the skin without causing irreversible damage and enhancing the percutaneous absorption of all materials dissolved therein, topical anesthesia seems to be attainable. A satisfactory method for determining pain threshold in uninjured skin of animals has been set up. Measurments of the pricking pain threshold have been made by exposing the skin of guinea-pigs to defined mechanical and electrical stimuli. A nociceptive muscle reflex (twitch) has been taken as the index of pain sensation. The suppression of this twitch has been used as an indicator of anesthetic potency. Two methods have been applied with varying parameters: stimulation at a fixed intensity until the pain threshold was reached (duration of anesthetic effect) and stimulation with increasing stimulus strenght until the cutaneous reflex was elicited (intensity or "depth" of anesthesia). The local anesthetic effects of lidocaine, fomocaine and procaine bases were studied, after dissolving them in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a wellknown carrier for transmembranal application. The duration of local anesthesia measured by electrical stimuli was longer than that obtained with mechanical ones. Differences are discussed. All results indicate that fomocaine (5%) has a greater local anesthetic potency than procaine (5%) but both are less active than lidocaine (5%). No effect could be seen after application of DMSO alone. PMID:1037079

  15. Minimizing radiation exposure during percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Chen, T T; Preminger, G M; Lipkin, M E

    2015-12-01

    Given the recent trends in growing per capita radiation dose from medical sources, there have been increasing concerns over patient radiation exposure. Patients with kidney stones undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) are at particular risk for high radiation exposure. There exist several risk factors for increased radiation exposure during PNL which include high Body Mass Index, multiple access tracts, and increased stone burden. We herein review recent trends in radiation exposure, radiation exposure during PNL to both patients and urologists, and various approaches to reduce radiation exposure. We discuss incorporating the principles of As Low As reasonably Achievable (ALARA) into clinical practice and review imaging techniques such as ultrasound and air contrast to guide PNL access. Alternative surgical techniques and approaches to reducing radiation exposure, including retrograde intra-renal surgery, retrograde nephrostomy, endoscopic-guided PNL, and minimally invasive PNL, are also highlighted. It is important for urologists to be aware of these concepts and techniques when treating stone patients with PNL. The discussions outlined will assist urologists in providing patient counseling and high quality of care. PMID:26354615

  16. Treatment of Colonic Injury During Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Colonic injury during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) persists despite the advances in technical equipment and interventional radiology techniques. According to the Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications, colonic injury is regarded as a stage IVa complication. Currently, the rate of colonic injury ranges between 0.3% and 0.5%, with an unremarkable difference in incidence between supine and prone PCNL procedures. Colon injury is the most significant complication of PCNL. Colonic injury can result in more complicated open exploration of the abdomen, involving colostomy construction. The necessity of a second operation for the closure of the colostomy causes financial and emotional burden on the patients, patients’ relatives, and surgeons. Currently, the majority of colonic injuries occurring during PCNL are retroperitoneal. The primary treatment option is a conservative approach. It must be kept in mind that the time of diagnosis is as important as the diagnosis itself in colonic injury. Surgeons performing PCNL are advised to be conservative when considering exploratory laparotomy and colostomy construction during treatment of colonic injury. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who underwent left prone PCNL that resulted in retroperitoneal colonic injury, along with a review of the current literature. PMID:26543436

  17. Septic thrombophlebitis: percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy and thrombolytic therapies.

    PubMed

    Kar, Subrata; Webel, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Suppurative thrombophlebitis (Lemierre's syndrome) of the internal jugular vein is a rare and sometimes fatal complication. It commonly occurs from oropharyngeal infections, peripheral lines, complications from dental procedures, gingivitis, or central venous catheterizations. Empiric antibiotics are the initial treatment of choice followed by thrombolytics or surgical thrombectomy in refractory cases. We present a case of septic thrombophlebitis of the right internal jugular vein from a peripherally inserted central venous catheter. We also review the current percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy and thrombolytics therapies for such a rare disorder. Mechanical thrombectomy includes rotational thrombectomy or rheolytic therapies. Devices include the Amplatz thrombectomy device (Microvena), the Arrow-Trerotola Percutaneous thrombolytic device (Arrow), and the Cragg-Casteneda thrombolytic brush (Microtherapeutics). Rheolytic therapies include Angiojet, the Hydrolyzer, and the Oasis Thrombectomy System. Percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy techniques include rotational fragmentation, aspiration or suction thrombectomy, and hydrodynamic thrombectomy. AngioJet catheters may be used for percutaneous embolectomy in conjunction with pulse spray techniques, which instill thrombolytics locally. Thrombolytics include streptokinase, urokinase, and recombinant-tissue plasminogen activator. Mechanical thrombectomy combined with thrombolytics provide optimal treatment results secondary to their complementary effects. Therefore, patients who are refractory to standard medical therapy and considered poor surgical candidates may benefit from combined percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy with thrombolytics to achieve superior results if no contraindications exist for thrombolytics. PMID:22198069

  18. Visual servoing for automatic and uncalibrated percutaneous procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loser, Michael H.; Navab, Nassir; Bascle, Benedicte; Taylor, Russell H.

    2000-04-01

    Visual servoing is well established in the field of industrial robotics, when using CCD cameras. This paper describes one of the first medical implementations of uncalibrated visual servoing. To our knowledge, this is the first time that visual servoing is done using x-ray fluoroscopy. In this paper we present a new image based approach for semi-automatically guidance of a needle or surgical tool during percutaneous procedures and is based on a series of granted and pending US patent applications. It is a simple and accurate method which requires no prior calibration or registration. Therefore, no additional sensors, no stererotactic frame and no additional calibration phantom is needed. Our techniques provides accurate 3D alignment of the tool with respect to an anatomic target and estimates the required insertion depth. We implemented and verified this method with three different medical robots at the Computer Integrated Surgery (CIS) Lab at the Johns Hopkins University. First tests were performed using a CCD-camera and a mobile uniplanar x-ray fluoroscope as imaging modality. We used small metal balls of 4 mm in diameter as target points. These targets were placed 60 to 70 mm deep inside a test-phantom. Our method led to correct insertions with mean deviation of 0.20 mm with CCD camera and mean deviation of about 1.5 mm in clinical surrounding with an old x-ray imaging system, where the images were not of best quality. These promising results present this method as a serious alternative to other needle placement techniques, which require cumbersome and time consuming calibration procedures.

  19. Percutaneous Aspiration Thrombectomy for the Treatment of Arterial Thromboembolic Occlusions Following Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Schleder, Stephan; Diekmann, Matthias; Manke, Christoph; Heiss, Peter

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to evaluate the technical success and the early clinical outcome of patients undergoing percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy (PAT) for the treatment of arterial thromboembolism following percutaneous infrainguinal transluminal angioplasty (PTA).MethodsIn this single-center study, during a period of 7 years retrospectively, 47 patients (22 male, 47 %) with a mean age of 73 (range 53–96) years were identified in whom PAT was performed for the treatment of thromboembolic complications of infrainguinal PTA. Primary technical success was defined as residual stenosis of <50 % in diameter after sole PAT, whereas secondary technical success was defined as residual stenosis of <50 % in diameter after PAT and additional PTA and/or stenting. Clinical outcome parameters (e.g., need for further intervention, minor/major amputation) were evaluated for the 30-day postinterventional period.ResultsPrimary technical success was achieved in 64 % of patients (30/47); secondary technical success was obtained in 96 % of patients (45/47). Clinical outcome data were available in 38 patients. In 87 % of patients (33/38), there was no need for further intervention within the 30-day postinterventional period. In three patients, minor amputations were conducted due to preexisting ulcerations (Rutherford Category 5 respectively).ConclusionsPAT enables endovascular treatment of iatrogenic thromboembolic complications after PTA with good technical and early clinical results and minimal morbidity.

  20. Current status of percutaneous vertebroplasty and percutaneous kyphoplasty--a review.

    PubMed

    Yimin, Yang; Zhiwei, Ren; Wei, Ma; Jha, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) and kyphoplasty (PK) are the 2vertebral augmentation procedures that have emerged as minimally invasive surgical options to treat painful vertebral compression fractures (VCF) during the last 2 decades. VCF may either be osteoporotic or tumor-associated. Two hundred million women are affected by osteoporosis globally. Vertebral fracture may result in acute pain around the fracture site, loss of vertebral height due to vertebral collapse, spinal instability, and kyphotic deformity. The main goal of the PV and PK procedures is to give immediate pain relief to patients and restore the vertebral height lost due to fracture. In percutaneous vertebroplasty, bone cement is injected through a minimal incision into the fractured site. Kyphoplasty involves insertion of a balloon into the fractured site, followed by inflation-deflation to create a cavity into which the filler material is injected, and the balloon is taken out prior to cement injection. This literature review presents a qualitative overview on the current status of vertebral augmentation procedures,especially PV and PK, and compares the efficacy and safety of these 2 procedures. The review consists of a brief history of the development of these 2 techniques, a discussion on the current research on the bone cement, clinical outcome of the 2 procedures, and it also sheds light on ongoing and future research to maximize the efficacy and safety of vertebral augmentation procedures. PMID:24097261

  1. Current status of percutaneous vertebroplasty and percutaneous kyphoplasty – a review

    PubMed Central

    Yimin, Yang; Zhiwei, Ren; Wei, Ma; Jha, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) and kyphoplasty (PK) are the 2 vertebral augmentation procedures that have emerged as minimally invasive surgical options to treat painful vertebral compression fractures (VCF) during the last 2 decades. VCF may either be osteoporotic or tumor-associated. Two hundred million women are affected by osteoporosis globally. Vertebral fracture may result in acute pain around the fracture site, loss of vertebral height due to vertebral collapse, spinal instability, and kyphotic deformity. The main goal of the PV and PK procedures is to give immediate pain relief to patients and restore the vertebral height lost due to fracture. In percutaneous vertebroplasty, bone cement is injected through a minimal incision into the fractured site. Kyphoplasty involves insertion of a balloon into the fractured site, followed by inflation-deflation to create a cavity into which the filler material is injected, and the balloon is taken out prior to cement injection. This literature review presents a qualitative overview on the current status of vertebral augmentation procedures, especially PV and PK, and compares the efficacy and safety of these 2 procedures. The review consists of a brief history of the development of these 2 techniques, a discussion on the current research on the bone cement, clinical outcome of the 2 procedures, and it also sheds light on ongoing and future research to maximize the efficacy and safety of vertebral augmentation procedures. PMID:24097261

  2. 21 CFR 880.5970 - Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular... and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5970 Percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular catheter. (a) Identification. A percutaneous, implanted, long-term intravascular catheter is a device...

  3. Perivascular Inflammatory Reaction After Percutaneous Placement of Covered Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Link, Johann; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Brossmann, Joachim; Steffens, Johann C.; Heller, Martin

    1996-09-15

    A 52-year-old woman with an extensive superficial femoral artery occlusion was treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Because of extensive dissections, two covered stents were placed percutaneously. The intervention was successful with respect to vessel patency, but local pain and fever developed 5 hr after the intervention. Swelling of the thigh occurred, but deep venous thrombosis was excluded. MRI revealed pronounced soft-tissue edema in the adductor canal that persisted for 4 weeks. The fever responded to antiinflammatory medication, but the pain remained for 4 weeks. The vessel was patent at the last follow-up, 8 weeks after graft placement. Soft-tissue edema after percutaneous placement of covered stents has been reported previously. The cause of the inflammatory reaction is unclear.

  4. Prevention and Management of Infectious Complications of Percutaneous Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Steven Y.; Philip, Asher; Richter, Michael D.; Gupta, Sanjay; Lessne, Mark L.; Kim, Charles Y.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious complications following interventional radiology (IR) procedures can cause significant patient morbidity and, potentially, mortality. As the number and breadth of IR procedures grow, it becomes increasingly evident that interventional radiologists must possess a thorough understanding of these potential infectious complications. Furthermore, given the increasing incidence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, emphasis on cost containment, and attention to quality of care, it is critical to have infection control strategies to maximize patient safety. This article reviews infectious complications associated with percutaneous ablation of liver tumors, transarterial embolization of liver tumors, uterine fibroid embolization, percutaneous nephrostomy, percutaneous biliary interventions, central venous catheters, and intravascular stents. Emphasis is placed on incidence, risk factors, prevention, and management. With the use of these strategies, IR procedures can be performed with reduced risk of infectious complications. PMID:26038616

  5. Current readings: Percutaneous ablation for pulmonary metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Matthew T; Pomykala, Kelsey L; Suh, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous image-guided ablation is a technique for maintaining local control of metastatic lung lesions that may, in selected patients, confer a survival benefit over no treatment or systemic therapy alone. Although the currently accepted treatment for oligometastatic pulmonary disease is surgical resection, the existing body of literature, including the recent investigations reviewed within this article, supports a role for percutaneous ablation as an important and relatively safe therapeutic option for nonsurgical and in carefully selected surgical patients, conferring survival benefits competitive with surgical metastasectomy. Continued clinical investigations are needed to further understand the nuances of thermal technologies and applications to treat lung primary and secondary pulmonary malignancy, directly compare available therapeutic options and further define the role of percutaneous image-guided ablation in the treatment of pulmonary metastatic disease. PMID:25527018

  6. CT guided percutaneous needle biopsy of the chest: initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Lazguet, Younes; Maarouf, Rachid; Karrou, Marouan; Skiker, Imane; Alloubi, Ihsan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article is to report our first experience of CT guided percutaneous thoracic biopsy and to demonstrate the accuracy and safety of this procedure. This was a retrospective study of 28 CT-Guided Percutaneous Needle Biopsies of the Chest performed on 24 patients between November 2014 and April 2015. Diagnosis was achieved in 18 patients (75%), negative results were found in 3 patients (12,5%). Biopsy was repeated in these cases with two positive results. Complications were seen in 7 patients (29%), Hemoptysis in 5 patients (20%), Pneumothorax in 1 patient (4,1%) and vaso-vagal shock in 1 patient (4,1%). CT Guided Percutaneous Needle Biopsy of the Chest is a safe, minimally invasive procedure with high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosis of lung lesions.

  7. Ectopic Jejunal Variceal Rupture in a Liver Transplant Recipient Successfully Treated With Percutaneous Transhepatic Coil Embolization: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Abe, Satoru; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Hoshikawa, Mayumi; Shirata, Chikara; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-11-01

    Here we present the rupture of ectopic jejunal varices developing in a liver transplant recipient without portal hypertension, which was successfully treated with percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization.A 48-year-old man with massive melena was admitted to our department. He had undergone liver transplantation for hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis 8 months before, and his postoperative course was satisfactory except for an acute cellular rejection. No evidence of bleeding was detected by upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, but dynamic multidetector computed tomography of the whole abdomen revealed an intestinal varix protruding into the lumen of the jejunum with suspected extravasation. There was no evidence of portal venous stenosis or thrombosis. Immediately upon diagnosis of the ruptured ectopic jejunal varix, percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization was performed, achieving complete hemostasis. The portal venous pressure measured during the procedure was within normal limits. He was discharged from the hospital 11 days after embolization and remained in stable condition without re-bleeding 6 months after discharge.This is the first report of an ectopic intestinal variceal rupture in an uneventful liver transplant recipient that was successfully treated with interventional percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization. Clinicians encountering liver transplant recipients with melena should be aware of the possibility of late-onset rupture of ectopic varices, even in those having an uneventful post-transplant course without portal hypertension. PMID:26632745

  8. Percutaneous Glycerol Rhizotomy for Trigeminal Neuralgia Using a Single-Plane, Flat Panel Detector Angiography System: Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Kawajiri, Satoshi; Arai, Hiroshi; Higashino, Yoshifumi; Kodera, Toshiaki; Kikuta, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-05-15

    Percutaneous treatments for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) including glycerol rhizotomy (GR), radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RT), and balloon compression (BC) are effective for patients with medical comorbidities and risk factors of microvascular decompression (MVD). These procedures are usually performed under fluoroscopy. Surgeons advance the needle to the trigeminal plexus through the foramen ovale while observing landmarks of fluoroscopic images; however, it is sometimes difficult to appropriately place the needle tip in Meckel's cave. We present the technical details of percutaneous GR using a single-plane, flat panel detector angiography system to check the needle positioning. When the needle tip may be located near the trigeminal cistern, three-dimensional (3-D) bone images are taken with cone-beam computed tomography (CT). These images clearly show the position of the needle tip in Meckel's cave. If it is difficult to place it through the foramen ovale, surgeons perform cone beam CT to observe the actual position of the needle tip at the skull base. After confirming the positional relation between the needle tip and foramen ovale, surgeons can advance it in the precise direction. In 10 procedures, we could place the nerve-block needle in about 14.5 minutes on average without complications. We think that our method is simple and convenient for percutaneous treatments for TN, and it may be helpful for surgeons to perform such treatments. PMID:27041633

  9. Percutaneous Glycerol Rhizotomy for Trigeminal Neuralgia Using a Single-Plane, Flat Panel Detector Angiography System: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    ARISHIMA, Hidetaka; KAWAJIRI, Satoshi; ARAI, Hiroshi; HIGASHINO, Yoshifumi; KODERA, Toshiaki; KIKUTA, Ken-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous treatments for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) including glycerol rhizotomy (GR), radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RT), and balloon compression (BC) are effective for patients with medical comorbidities and risk factors of microvascular decompression (MVD). These procedures are usually performed under fluoroscopy. Surgeons advance the needle to the trigeminal plexus through the foramen ovale while observing landmarks of fluoroscopic images; however, it is sometimes difficult to appropriately place the needle tip in Meckel’s cave. We present the technical details of percutaneous GR using a single-plane, flat panel detector angiography system to check the needle positioning. When the needle tip may be located near the trigeminal cistern, three-dimensional (3-D) bone images are taken with cone-beam computed tomography (CT). These images clearly show the position of the needle tip in Meckel’s cave. If it is difficult to place it through the foramen ovale, surgeons perform cone beam CT to observe the actual position of the needle tip at the skull base. After confirming the positional relation between the needle tip and foramen ovale, surgeons can advance it in the precise direction. In 10 procedures, we could place the nerve-block needle in about 14.5 minutes on average without complications. We think that our method is simple and convenient for percutaneous treatments for TN, and it may be helpful for surgeons to perform such treatments. PMID:27041633

  10. Risk factors for pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jihion; Choi, Jae Moon; Lee, Joonho; Kwon, Koo; Kong, Yu-Gyeong; Seo, Hyungseok; Hwang, Jai-Hyun; Park, Hyung Keun; Kim, Young-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although percutaneous nephrolithotomy is minimally invasive, it is associated with several complications, including extravasation of fluid and urine, the need for a blood transfusion, and septicemia. However, little is known about pulmonary complications after this procedure. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the risk factors for and outcomes of pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy. All consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy between 2001 and 2014 were identified and divided into group A (no clinically significant pulmonary complications) and group B (clinically significant pulmonary complications). Preoperative and intraoperative variables and postoperative outcomes were evaluated. Independent risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications were evaluated by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. The study included 560 patients: 378 (67.5%) in group A and 182 (32.5%) in group B. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the independent risk factors for pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy were a higher body mass index (odds ratio = 1.062, P = 0.026), intraoperative red blood cell transfusion (odds ratio = 2.984, P = 0.012), and an intercostal surgical approach (odds ratio = 3.046, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the duration of hospital stay was significantly longer (8.4 ± 4.3 days vs 7.6 ± 3.4 days, P = 0.010) and the intensive care unit admission rate was significantly higher [13 (7.1%) vs 1 (0.3%), P < 0.001] in group B than in group A. Risk factors for pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy were a higher body mass index, intraoperative red blood cell transfusion, and an intercostal surgical approach. Postoperative pulmonary complications were associated with poor outcomes. These results may provide useful information for the perioperative management of pulmonary complications after

  11. Paravalvular Regurgitation: Clinical Outcomes in Surgical and Percutaneous Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Carlos Passos; Rezek, Daniele; Costa, Eduardo Paiva; de Carvalho, Edvagner Sergio Leite; Moscoso, Freddy Antonio Brito; Taborga, Percy Richard Chavez; Jeronimo, Andreia Dias; Abizaid, Alexandre Antonio Cunha; Ramos, Auristela Isabel de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Background Paravalvular regurgitation (paravalvular leak) is a serious and rare complication associated with valve replacement surgery. Studies have shown a 3% to 6% incidence of paravalvular regurgitation with hemodynamic repercussion. Few studies have compared surgical and percutaneous approaches for repair. Objectives To compare the surgical and percutaneous approaches for paravalvular regurgitation repair regarding clinical outcomes during hospitalization and one year after the procedure. Methods This is a retrospective, descriptive and observational study that included 35 patients with paravalvular leak, requiring repair, and followed up at the Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology between January 2011 and December 2013. Patients were divided into groups according to the established treatment and followed up for 1 year after the procedure. Results The group submitted to percutaneous treatment was considered to be at higher risk for complications because of the older age of patients, higher prevalence of diabetes, greater number of previous valve surgeries and lower mean creatinine clearance value. During hospitalization, both groups had a large number of complications (74.3% of cases), with no statistical difference in the analyzed outcomes. After 1 year, the percutaneous group had a greater number of re-interventions (8.7% vs 20%, p = 0.57) and a higher mortality rate (0% vs. 20%, p = 0.08). A high incidence of residual mitral leak was observed after the percutaneous procedure (8.7% vs. 50%, p = 0.08). Conclusion Surgery is the treatment of choice for paravalvular regurgitation. The percutaneous approach can be an alternative for patients at high surgical risk. PMID:27305109

  12. Percutaneous Imaging-Guided Access for the Treatment of Calculi in Continent Urinary Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Winston Brooks; Trerotola, Scott O.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Patel, Nilesh H.; Namyslowski, Jan; Stecker, Michael S.; McLennan, Gordon; Shah, Himanshu; Bihrle, Richard; Foster, Richard

    2002-03-15

    Purpose: To describe our long-term experience with percutaneous access to continent urinary reservoirs for calculus removal. Patients and Methods: A retrospective study of 13 procedures in 10 patients was performed. In 2 of the 13 procedures, access and calculus removal was performed in a single session. In the other 11 procedures, initial access was obtained using ultrasonography,fluoroscopy, and/or computed tomography. The patients then returned ata later date for a second step where the access was dilated and the calculi were removed. Results: Access was achieved successfully in all cases with no complications. At mean follow-up time of 13.6 months (range 1-94 months) one patient had died of complications unrelated to her continent urinary reservoir. Another patient had been placed on suppressive antibiotics for recurrent calculi. The remaining patients were stone free and without late complication. Conclusions: Percutaneous removal of reservoir calculi can be performed safely, avoiding potential injury to the continence valve mechanism by a direct cystoscopic approach. We propose a two-stage procedure using CT guidance for initial access as the preferred technique.

  13. Percutaneous Treatment of a Primary Pancreatic Hydatid Cyst Using a Catheterization Technique

    PubMed Central

    Karaman, Bulent; Ustunsoz, Bahri; Ugurel, Mehmet Sahin

    2012-01-01

    Primary pancreatic hydatid cysts are rare and its percutaneous treatment and catheterization technique has, to the best of our knowledge, not been published in literature. A 33-year-old male patient who presented with abdominal pain was evaluated by ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography examinations. Both examinations revealed a cyst in the neck of the pancreas. After the administration of albendazole chemoprophylaxis, the patient underwent diagnostic puncture showing high pressure spring water which harbored the scoleces and was treated percutaneously by the catheterization technique. In this technique, first the cyst was punctured, the fluid content aspirated, the radiocontrast material injected to see possible fistulisation, and then re-aspirated. The 20% hypertonic saline solution was injected and re-aspiration was performed to the best of our abilities, followed by the insertion of a catheter for drainage of the remaining non-aspiratable fluid content. At follow-up examination, the cyst was not visible on US after 6 months. There was no evidence of cyst recurrence or dissemination after 18 months at serologic and imaging follow-up. PMID:22438691

  14. Percutaneous thrombin embolization of a pancreatico-duodenal artery pseudoaneurysm after failing of the endovascular treatment

    PubMed Central

    Barbiero, Giulio; Battistel, Michele; Susac, Ana; Miotto, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatico-duodenal artery (PDA) pseudoaneurysms are rare vascular conditions with high mortality rates after rupture and they are frequently secondary to pancreatitis, surgery, trauma or infection. Due to the high risk of rupture and bleeding, it is mandatory to treat all pseudoaneurysms, regardless of their size or symptomatology. First option of treatment is open surgical repair, but it has high mortality rate, especially in hemodynamically unstable patients. In the recent years, percutaneous ultrasonography (US)- or computed tomography-guided thrombin injection was proposed as an alternative method for treating visceral aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms, but few reports described this therapy in case of peri-pancreatic pseudoaneurysms. We present a rare case of pseudoaneurysm of the PDA in a patient with no previous history of pancreatitis nor major surgery but with an occlusive lesion of the celiac axis. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported case of PDA pseudoaneurysm successfully treated in emergency by single transabdominal US-guided injection of thrombin after failed attempts of percutaneous catheterization of the feeding vessel of the pseudoaneurysm. PMID:25170402

  15. Percutaneous treatment of a primary pancreatic hydatid cyst using a catheterization technique.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Bulent; Battal, Bilal; Ustunsoz, Bahri; Ugurel, Mehmet Sahin

    2012-01-01

    Primary pancreatic hydatid cysts are rare and its percutaneous treatment and catheterization technique has, to the best of our knowledge, not been published in literature. A 33-year-old male patient who presented with abdominal pain was evaluated by ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography examinations. Both examinations revealed a cyst in the neck of the pancreas. After the administration of albendazole chemoprophylaxis, the patient underwent diagnostic puncture showing high pressure spring water which harbored the scoleces and was treated percutaneously by the catheterization technique. In this technique, first the cyst was punctured, the fluid content aspirated, the radiocontrast material injected to see possible fistulisation, and then re-aspirated. The 20% hypertonic saline solution was injected and re-aspiration was performed to the best of our abilities, followed by the insertion of a catheter for drainage of the remaining non-aspiratable fluid content. At follow-up examination, the cyst was not visible on US after 6 months. There was no evidence of cyst recurrence or dissemination after 18 months at serologic and imaging follow-up. PMID:22438691

  16. Submandibular and thyroid gland involvement of hydatid cysts: a very rare association with percutaneous treatment.

    PubMed

    Avcu, Serhat; Unal, Ozkan; Kotan, Cetin; Oztürk, Mustafa; Ozen, Ozkan

    2010-09-01

    A 48-year-old man who had a complaint of swelling in the left submandibular region and right side of the neck was referred to our radiology clinic for sonographic examination that revealed a type 1 hydatid cyst with a diameter of 32 mm in the left submandibular gland, and a type 3 hydatid cyst with a diameter of 33 mm in the right thyroid gland. The diagnosis was verified by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and hemagglutination tests. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case in the literature of hydatid cysts involving both submandibular and thyroid glands. There was no abdominal, thoracic or brain involvement. The patient was a singer and did not accept surgical treatment, and percutaneous drainage with the PAIR (Puncture-Aspiration of cyst contents-Injection of hypertonic saline solution-Reaspiration) technique was performed for both cysts. There were no complications during or after the intervention. During 4 months of follow up the sizes of both cysts were decreased and the germinative membranes were shrunken, having a pseudotumor appearance. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature that the PAIR method was applied for thyroid and submandibular gland hydatid cysts. Percutaneous treatment of thyroid and submandibular gland hydatid cysts seems to be a safe and effective procedure as a possible alternative to surgery. PMID:19821255

  17. SAR models for estimating the percutaneous absorption of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Roy, T A; Krueger, A J; Mackerer, C R; Neil, W; Arroyo, A M; Yang, J J

    1998-01-01

    A structure-activity relationship (SAR) of the in vitro percutaneous absorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is described. The data set consisted of 60 three to seven ring PAH. Over 50 numeric descriptors were generated from the modeled molecular structures. Computer aided methods were used to evaluate descriptors and develop linear expressions relating the percent of dermally applied PAH dose absorbed through skin (PADA) to PAH structure. Three regression models with one and two variables were developed. The log octanol/water partition coefficient (log P) was the most important variable in determining percutaneous absorption. An inverse relationship between log P and the skin penetration properties of the PAH was observed. Nearly 40 of 60 PAH tested had PADA-values within a factor of two of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP); well over 50 of 60 had PADA-values within a factor of three. The results lend support to the use of isotopically labeled BaP as a surrogate for measuring the dermal flux (in vivo and in vitro) and estimating the dermal bioavailability of PAH from complex mineral oil and coal-tar derived mixtures. PMID:9933958

  18. Local Control of Perivascular Malignant Liver Lesions Using Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation: Initial Experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Eller, Achim Schmid, Axel; Schmidt, Joachim; May, Matthias Brand, Michael Saake, Marc Uder, Michael Lell, Michael

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess efficacy and safety in the treatment of perivascular malignant liver lesions using percutaneous, computed tomography (CT)-guided irreversible electroporation (IRE).MethodsFourteen patients (mean age 58 ± 11 years) with 18 malignant liver lesions were consecutively enrolled in this study. IRE was performed in patients not eligible for surgery and lesions abutting large vessels or bile ducts. Follow-up exams were performed using multislice-CT (MS-CT) or MRI.ResultsMedium lesion diameter was 20 ± 5 mm. Ten of 14 (71 %) were successfully treated with no local recurrence to date (mean follow-up 388 ± 160 days). One case left initial tumor control unclear and additional RFA was performed 4 weeks after IRE. Complications occurred in 4 of 14 (29 %) cases. In one case, intervention was terminated and abdominal bleeding required laparotomy. In two cases, a postinterventional hematothorax required intervention. In another case, abdominal bleeding could be managed conservatively. No complications related to the bile ducts occurred.ConclusionsPercutaneous IRE seems to be effective in perivascular lesions but is associated with a higher complication rate compared with thermoablative techniques.

  19. Percutaneous Intradiscal Aspiration of a Lumbar Vacuum Disc Herniation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Kevin I.; Hoffman, David C.; Herzog, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of an 83-year-old gentleman presenting with acute low back pain and radicular left lower extremity pain after golfing. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine revealed a low-signal-density lesion compressing the L5 nerve. A computed tomography scan was then ordered, confirming an extra-foraminal disc protrusion at the L5–S1 level, containing a focus of gas that was compressing the left L5 nerve root and communicating with the vacuum disc at L5–S1. After a failed left L5 transforaminal epidural steroid injection, the patient was brought back for a percutaneous intradiscal aspiration of the vacuum disc gas. This resulted in immediate relief for the patient. A follow-up MRI performed 2 months after the procedure found an approximate 25% reduction in the size of the vacuum disc herniation. Six months after the procedure, the patient remains free of radicular pain. This case report suggests that a percutaneous aspiration of gas from a vacuum disc herniation may assist in the treatment of radicular pain. PMID:22294964

  20. Development of an Experimental Animal Model for Lower Back Pain by Percutaneous Injury-Induced Lumbar Facet Joint Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Ahmadinia, Kasra; Li, Xin; Hamilton, John L; Andrews, Steven; Haralampus, Chris A; Xiao, Guozhi; Sohn, Hong-Moon; You, Jae-Won; Seo, Yo-Seob; Stein, Gary S; Van Wijnen, Andre J; Kim, Su-Gwan; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-11-01

    We report generation and characterization of pain-related behavior in a minimally invasive facet joint degeneration (FJD) animal model in rats. FJD was produced by a non-open percutaneous puncture-induced injury on the right lumbar FJs at three consecutive levels. Pressure hyperalgesia in the lower back was assessed by measuring the vocalization response to pressure from a force transducer. After hyperalgesia was established, pathological changes in lumbar FJs and alterations of intervertebral foramen size were assessed by histological and imaging analyses. To investigate treatment options for lumber FJ osteoarthritis-induced pain, animals with established hyperalgesia were administered with analgesic drugs, such as morphine, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) (ketorolac), or pregabalin. Effects were assessed by behavioral pain responses. One week after percutaneous puncture-induced injury of the lumbar FJs, ipsilateral primary pressure hyperalgesia developed and was maintained for at least 12 weeks without foraminal stenosis. Animals showed decreased spontaneous activity, but no secondary hyperalgesia in the hind paws. Histopathological and microfocus X-ray computed tomography analyses demonstrated that the percutaneous puncture injury resulted in osteoarthritis-like structural changes in the FJs cartilage and subchondral bone. Pressure hyperalgesia was completely reversed by morphine. The administration of celecoxib produced moderate pain reduction with no statistical significance while the administration of ketorolac and pregabalin produced no analgesic effect on FJ osteoarthritis-induced back pain. Our animal model of non-open percutanous puncture-induced injury of the lumbar FJs in rats shows similar characteristics of low back pain produced by human facet arthropathy. PMID:25858171

  1. Sedation Monitoring and Management during Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Oksar, Menekse; Gumus, Tulin; Kanbak, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic laser discectomy (PELD) is a painful intervention that requires deep sedation and analgesia. However, sedation should be light at some point because cooperation by the patient during the procedure is required for successful surgical treatment. Light sedation poses a problem for endotracheal intubation, while patients placed in the prone position during percutaneous endoscopic discectomy pose a problem for airway management. Therefore, under these conditions, sedation should be not deeper than required. Here we report the sedation management of three cases that underwent PELD, with a focus on deep and safe sedation that was monitored using bispectral index score and observer's assessment of alertness/sedation score. PMID:27298743

  2. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous cholecystostomy for acute neonatal biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Helin, Radley; Bhat, Rama; Rao, Bhaskara

    2007-01-01

    Use of a percutaneously-inserted cholecystostomy drainage tube is an effective therapeutic option for acute hyperbilirubinemia in severely-ill adult patients, but to our knowledge has not been previously reported in infants. We describe an infant who developed acute extrahepatic biliary tract obstruction with marked conjugated (direct) hyperbilirubinemia, and who was determined to be an unsuitable surgical candidate. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous cholecystostomy was performed and resulted in prompt, significant, and sustained decline in serum bilirubin levels. Potential risks and benefits, as well as suggested indications for the procedure are discussed. PMID:17568158

  3. Managing Complications of Percutaneous Surgery of the First Metatarsal.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Yuan; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Zhang, Yong-Tao

    2016-09-01

    The percutaneous osteotomy based on a Hohmanntype first metatarsal subcapital linear osteotomy was introduced into Mainland China in the late 1980s. No internal fixation is used for stabilization of the osteotomy, leading unfortunately to unpredictable results. Despite its high acceptance by patients and enthusiasm by surgeons at present, the clinical outcomes of percutaneous surgery have not been promising. The authors have no experience of performing this osteotomy and report only on their management of the complications of this technique and their recommended treatment algorithm. PMID:27524703

  4. Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices by Direct Percutaneous Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Arulraj, Ramakrishnan; Mangat, Kamarjit S.; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2011-02-15

    Stomal varices can occur in patients with stoma in the presence of portal hypertension. Suture ligation, sclerotherapy, angiographic embolization, stoma revision, beta blockade, portosystemic shunt, and liver transplantation have been described as therapeutic options for bleeding stomal varices. We report the case of a 21-year-old patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis and colectomy with ileostomy for ulcerative colitis, where stomal variceal bleeding was successfully treated by direct percutaneous embolization. We consider percutaneous embolization to be an effective way of treating acute stomal bleeding in decompensated patients while awaiting decisions regarding shunt procedures or liver transplantation.

  5. A case of micro-percutaneous nephrolithotomy with macro complication.

    PubMed

    Dede, Onur; Utangaç, Mazhar; Dağguli, Mansur; Hatipoğlu, Namık Kemal; Sancaktutar, Ahmet Ali; Bodakçı, Mehmet Nuri

    2015-06-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is accepted as the standard management approach for kidney stones that are either refractory to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy or are >2 cm in diameter. The recently developed micro-percutaneous nephrolithotomy (microperc) technique provides intrarenal access under full vision using an optic instrument with a smaller calibration. A lesser amount of bleeding has been reported with the use of this method. Here we present a case of a bleeding complication on postoperative day 15 after a microperc procedure used to treat a left kidney stone. The complication led to retention of bloody urine in the bladder and required transfusion of 5 units of whole blood. PMID:26328211

  6. Angioscopy by a new percutaneous transluminal coronary angioscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurada, Masami; Mizuno, Kyoichi; Miyamoto, Akira; Arakawa, Koh; Satomura, Kimio; Shibuya, Toshio; Yanagida, Shigeki; Okamoto, Yasuyuki; Kurita, Akira; Nakamura, Haruo; Arai, Tsunenori; Suda, Akira; Kikuchi, Makoto; Utsumi, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Kiyoshi; Akai, Yoshiro

    1990-07-01

    We developed a new percutaneous transluminal coronary angioscopic catheter for visualization of coronary artery.This angioscopic catheter has an inflatable balloon at the distal tip and one - directional angulation mechanism.We performed percutaneous transluminal coronary angioscopy during cardiac catheterization cosecutively in 155 patients. With this angioscope , we could get good'-'fair visualization in 81%(131 of 162 lesions)without major complications.We could investigate the endothelial macropathology of ischemic heart disease such as unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction.

  7. Percutaneous Ventricular Assist Devices: New Deus Ex Machina?

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Diego; Cook, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    The development of ventricular assist devices has broadened the means with which one can treat acute heart failure. Percutaneous ventricular assist devices (pVAD) have risen from recent technological advances. They are smaller, easier, and faster to implant, all important qualities in the setting of acute heart failure. The present paper briefly describes the functioning and assets of the most common devices used today. It gives an overview of the current evidence and indications for left ventricular assist device use in cardiogenic shock and high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention. Finally, extracorporeal life support devices are dealt with in the setting of hemodynamic support. PMID:22091361

  8. Sedation Monitoring and Management during Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy.

    PubMed

    Oksar, Menekse; Gumus, Tulin; Kanbak, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic laser discectomy (PELD) is a painful intervention that requires deep sedation and analgesia. However, sedation should be light at some point because cooperation by the patient during the procedure is required for successful surgical treatment. Light sedation poses a problem for endotracheal intubation, while patients placed in the prone position during percutaneous endoscopic discectomy pose a problem for airway management. Therefore, under these conditions, sedation should be not deeper than required. Here we report the sedation management of three cases that underwent PELD, with a focus on deep and safe sedation that was monitored using bispectral index score and observer's assessment of alertness/sedation score. PMID:27298743

  9. Atlantoaxial Joint Synovial Cyst: Diagnosis and Percutaneous Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Velan, Osvaldo; Rabadan, Alejandra; Paganini, Lisandro; Langhi, Luciano

    2008-11-15

    Synovial cysts at the atlantoaxial level are found uncommonly. Lumbar symptomatic cases are treated by percutaneous cyst aspiration with or without corticoid injection or by surgical resection, but synovial cysts at the C1-C2 level are usually treated by surgery. We report here a 92-year-old woman with a retro-odontoid synovial cyst producing spinal cord compression that was treated by percutaneous aspiration of the cyst under CT guidance. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an atlantoaxial synovial cyst successfully treated with a minimally invasive procedure.

  10. Extensive subcutaneous emphysema complicating a percutaneous Mumford procedure.

    PubMed

    Saseendar, Shanmugasundaram; Tan, Si Heng Sharon; Vijayan, Sandeep; Pawaskar, Aditya; Kumar, Veerasingam Prem

    2016-06-01

    Subcutaneous emphysema may be a part of a life-threatening pneumomediastinum or pneumothorax and usually does not occur alone. A case of a 75-year-old lady who underwent a percutaneous Mumford procedure for acromioclavicular osteoarthrosis has been reported. She developed extensive subcutaneous emphysema of the neck, chest, bilateral shoulders, and upper arms, in the absence of pneumomediastinum or pneumothorax, during the procedure. Isolated subcutaneous emphysema as a complication of a percutaneous Mumford procedure has not been reported so far in the English literature. The possible mechanism of this complication is discussed. Understanding the mechanism is essential in avoiding this preventable complication. PMID:25059337

  11. Double-orifice mitral valve treated by percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Thomas George; Revankar, Vinod Raghunath; Papanna, Monica; Srinivasan, Harshini

    2016-07-01

    Double-orifice mitral valve is an rare anomaly characterized by a mitral valve with a single fibrous annulus and 2 orifices that open into the left ventricle. It is often associated with other congenital anomalies, most commonly atrioventricular canal defects, and rarely associated with a stenotic or regurgitant mitral valve. A patient who was diagnosed with congenital double-orifice mitral valve with severe mitral stenosis was treated successfully by percutaneous balloon mitral valvotomy rather than the conventional open surgical approach, demonstrating the utility of percutaneous correction of this anomaly. PMID:26045488

  12. Contemporary anticoagulation therapy in patients undergoing percutaneous intervention.

    PubMed

    Bhatty, Shaun; Ali, Asghar; Shetty, Ranjith; Sumption, Kevin F; Topaz, On; Jovin, Ion S

    2014-04-01

    The proper use of anticoagulants is crucial for ensuring optimal patient outcomes post percutaneous interventions in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Anticoagulant agents such as unfractionated heparin, a thrombin inhibitor; low-molecular weight heparins, predominantly Factor Xa inhibitors; fondaparinux, a Factor Xa inhibitor and bivalirudin, a direct thrombin inhibitor have been developed to target various steps in the coagulation cascade to prevent formation of thrombin. Optimal anticoagulation achieves the correct balance between thrombosis and bleeding and is related to optimal outcomes with minimal complications. This review will discuss the mechanisms and appropriate use of current and emerging anticoagulant therapies used during percutaneous interventions. PMID:24506409

  13. Percutaneous cholangioscopy in obstructed biliary metal stents

    SciTech Connect

    Hausegger, Klaus A.; Mischinger, Hans J.; Karaic, Radenko; Klein, Guenther E.; Kugler, Cristian; Kern, Robert; Uggowitzer, Martin; Szolar, Dieter

    1997-05-15

    Purpose. To reevaluate the reasons for the occlusion of self-expanding biliary metal stents, on the basis of cholangioscopic findings. Methods. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopy (PTCS) was performed in 15 patients with obstructed biliary Wallstents. The reason for stent insertion was a malignant obstruction in 14 patients; 1 had a benign biliary stricture. Conventional noncovered stents had been inserted in 12 patients; in 3 cases a polyurethane-covered prototype Wallstent had been used. Stent occlusions occurred after 1-55 months. PTCS was performed with a 2.3-mm endoscope through an 11 Fr sheath. Biopsies were taken via the working channel of the endoscope. Results. In all patients with noncovered stents the inner surface of the stent was highly irregular with seaweed-like protrusions (biopsy-proven granulation tissue). Stent incorporation varied from absent (n=1) to subtotal (n=8), but was always incomplete, no matter how long the stent had been in place. Tumor ingrowth was histologically proven in 2 patients. One patient had a large occluding concrement at the proximal end of the stent. In patients with covered stents, the inner surface appeared more regular; however, viable granulation tissue was found inside two stents and tumor ingrowth in one of them. Conclusion. PTCS showed that incorporation of the stent is virtually always incomplete. The factors contributing most to stent occlusion are the buildup of granulation tissue, bile sludge, and tumor overgrowth. Stone formation and tumor ingrowth can also be important, although less common causes of occlusion. A polyurethane stent covering could not prevent tumor ingrowth in one patient and the buildup of viable granulation tissue inside the stent in two further patients; mean stent patency in the three patients with such a stent was 3 months.

  14. Supracostal percutaneous nephrolithotomy: A prospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Maneesh; Krishnappa, Pramod; Subudhi, Santosh Kumar; Krishnamoorthy, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A widely prevalent fear of thoracic complications with the supracostal approach has led to its underutilization in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). We frequently use the supracostal approach and compared the efficacy and thoracic complications of infracostal, supra 12th, and supra 11th punctures. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study of patients who underwent PCNL between January 2005 and December 2012. The patients were divided into three groups based on the access: infracostal, supra 12th (between the 11th and 12th ribs) and supra 11th (between the 10th and 11th ribs). Clearance rates, fall in hemoglobin levels, transfusion rates, perioperative analgesic requirements, hospital stay and thoracic complications were compared. Results: Seven hundred patients were included for analysis. There were 179 (25.5%) patients in the supra 11th group, 187 (26.7%) patients in the supra 12th group and 334 (47.8%) patients in the infracostal group. The overall clearance rate was 78% with no difference in the three groups. The postoperative analgesic requirements were significantly higher in the supracostal groups and showed a graded increase from infracostal to supra 12th to supra 11th. During the study period, only 2 patients required angioembolization (0.3%) and none required open exploration. The number of patients requiring intercostal chest drain insertion was extremely low, at 1.6% and 2.2% in the supra 12th and supra 11th groups, respectively. Conclusions: Our results confirm the feasibility of the supracostal approach including punctures above the 11th rib, albeit at the cost of an increase in thoracic complications. Staying in the line of the calyx has helped us to minimize the most dreaded complication of bleeding requiring angioembolization. PMID:26941494

  15. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided renal biopsy.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Anuj; Tarsin, Rajab; Elhabbash, Basma; Zagan, Nuri; Markus, Rabia; Drebeka, Sawsen; Abdelmola, Khaled; Shawish, Taib; Shebani, Abdulhafidh; Abdelmola, Tamer; Elusta, Ahmad; Ehtuish, Ehtuish Faraj

    2011-07-01

    This study was done to assess the safety and efficacy of real-time ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) and to determine the optimal period of observation required as well as to ascertain the risk factors for any ensuing complications. Between 1 st February 2006 and 31 st January 2008, a total of 86 PRBs were performed by the radiologist using an automated biopsy gun with 16-gauge needle at the National Organ Transplant Centre, Central Hospital, Tripoli, Libya. Prior to the procedure coagulation profile was done in all the patients. All patients were kept on strict bed rest for 6-hours post-procedure. Of the 86 renal biopsies performed, 78 patients were referred from Rheumatology Department and 8 were post-kidney transplant recipients. There were 23 males with age ranging from 15 to 56 years and 63 females with age ranging from 16 to 66 years. A mean of 17.5 glomeruli were present in each specimen. A glomerular yield of less than five glomeruli was seen in only four biopsies. Class I lupus nephritis (LN) was seen in one patient, class II LN in seven patients, class III LN in 13 patients and class IV LN in 29 patients. All the eight renal allografts were diagnosed as either acute tubular necrosis or acute interstitial rejection. The overall complication rate was 5.8% and these complications were observed within 6 hours of biopsy. No late complications were seen. PRB under real-time ultra-sound guidance is a safe and efficacious procedure to establish the histological diagnosis of the renal disease and may be done as an out-patient procedure. A post-biopsy observation time of 6 hours appears to be optimal. PMID:21743221

  16. Comparison Between Percutaneous Transhepatic Rigid Cholangioscopic Lithotripsy and Conventional Percutaneous Transhepatic Cholangioscopic Surgery for Hepatolithiasis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Beiwang; Huang, Binyuan; Xie, Jiafen; Liu, Yanmin; Zhu, Canhua; Ye, Chen; Zhou, Zixuan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopy (PTCS) is one option for treating hepatolithiasis without surgical resection. This approach can use conventional biliary drainage methods over a long period, but a shorter procedure needs to be evolved. Objective: To evaluate the short-term and the long-term therapeutic outcomes of percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopic lithotripsy (PTCSL) in comparison with conventional PTCS. Methods: In this retrospective study, 118 patients with hepatolithiasis were enrolled who underwent treatment in our hospital between March 2007 and July 2014. About 67 of them received PTCSL and the remaining 51 patients received conventional PTCS. Preoperative data, surgical operation-related records, the postoperative therapeutic effect, and the long-term hepatolithiasis recurrence rate were collected for comparison between the 2 groups. Results: The age, sex, and surgical history were similar between the 2 groups, but there was a significant difference in the Child-Pugh score, with more grade 3 patients in the PTCS group (P=0.002). However, the operation time, intraoperative blood infusion, and the blood loss were similar between the 2 groups. The final clearance ratio of calculus in the PTCSL group was significantly better than in the PTCS group after multivariate analysis (P=0.021; OR=0.201; 95% CI, 0.051-0.785). Calculus recurrence was 9% (PTCSL) and 22% (PTCS). The postoperative hospital stay was significantly shorter in the PTCSL group (P=0.001; OR=1.337; 95% CI, 1.132-1.58). Conclusions: PTCSL was a satisfactory therapeutic option for hepatolithiasis treatment, with less operation time and a superior long-term therapeutic effect compared with conventional PTCS. PMID:26679679

  17. Ultra-mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy: A minimally-invasive option for percutaneous stone removal

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Madhu Sudan; Agarwal, Ketan; Jindal, Tarun; Sharma, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has witnessed rapid advancements, the latest being ultra-mini-percutaneous nephrolithotomy (UMP), which makes the use of 11–13F sheaths as compared to 24–30F sizes used in conventional PCNL. This miniaturization aims to reduce morbidity and improve patient outcomes. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of UMP and report our ourtcomes. Patients and Methods: A total of 120 patients underwent UMP from July 2012 to March 2014. These patients had a single unilateral renal stone measuring between 8 and 20 mm. All patients underwent UMP using a 3F nephroscope, 7.5F inner sheath, and 11F or 13F outer metallic cannula, which served as the Amplatz sheath. Stone fragmentation and clearance were achieved with holmium laser. No nephrostomy or stent was used routinely. Results: Complete stone fragmentation was achieved in 114 out of 120 patients (95%) using UMP; whereas the remaining 6 were converted into mini-PCNL using a 12.5F nephroscope and 15F Amplatz sheath. The mean operative time was 39.7 ± 15.4 min, and the mean postoperative hospital stay was 22.3 ± 2.2 h. Postoperatively, 6 (5%) patients had residual fragments measuring ≤4 mm. At the 2 weeks follow-up, the stone-free status was >99% (119/120). There were no significant postoperative complications. Conclusion: This study shows UMP to be an effective and safe procedure for managing stones up to 20 mm. This procedure offers an attractive alternative to shock wave lithotripsy and retrograde intrarenal surgery for managing small stones. PMID:27127356

  18. Percutaneous iliac screws for minimally invasive spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Michael Y

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Adult spinal deformity (ASD) surgeries carry significant morbidity, and this has led many surgeons to apply minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques to reduce the blood loss, infections, and other peri-operative complications. A spectrum of techniques for MIS correction of ASD has thus evolved, most recently the application of percutaneous iliac screws. Methods. Over an 18 months 10 patients with thoracolumbar scoliosis underwent MIS surgery. The mean age was 73 years (70% females). Patients were treated with multi-level facet osteotomies and interbody fusion using expandable cages followed by percutaneous screw fixation. Percutaneous iliac screws were placed bilaterally using the obturator outlet view to target the ischial body. Results. All patients were successfully instrumented without conversion to an open technique. Mean operative time was 302 minutes and the mean blood loss was 480 cc, with no intraoperative complications. A total of 20 screws were placed successfully as judged by CT scanning to confirm no bony violations. Complications included: two asymptomatic medial breaches at T10 and L5, and one patient requiring delayed epidural hematoma evacuation. Conclusions. Percutaneous iliac screws can be placed safely in patients with ASD. This MIS technique allows for successful caudal anchoring to stress-shield the sacrum and L5-S1 fusion site in long-segment constructs. PMID:22900162

  19. Lateral rectus palsy following coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Luke; Jones, Ruth; Hughes, David S

    2014-01-01

    We present a rare case of unilateral lateral rectus palsy following an elective coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention in a 78-year-oldwoman. Ophthalmoplegia following coronary angiography is extremely rare and this is the first case of a unilateral lateral rectus palsy following the procedure. PMID:24536054

  20. Successful management of dislodged stents during percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Farman, Muhammad Tariq; Sial, Jawaid Akbar; Saghir, Tahir; Rizvi, Syed Nadeem Hasan; Rasool, Syed Ishtiaq; Jamal, Syed Zahid

    2010-02-01

    Stent dislodgement is a very rare but recognized and potentially serious complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). This case series describe the incidence and etiology of such cases at National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Karachi during the year 2008 and the method of treatment of this complication. PMID:20209706

  1. Intrapleural migration of a percutaneous transhepatic hemodialysis catheter.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Sharon W; Kerlan, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic catheters are a form of nonconventional access for patients requiring hemodialysis. We report a complication of these catheters which has not been previously described in the literature. The mechanism for intrapleural migration and a way to avoid this potential complication are discussed. PMID:21786242

  2. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in elective percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    ten Berg, Jurriën M; Plokker, HW Thijs; Verheugt, Freek WA

    2001-01-01

    Thrombosis plays a major role in acute vessel closure both after coronary balloon angioplasty and after stenting. This review will address the role of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in preventing early thrombotic complications after percutaneous coronary intervention. The focus will be on agents that are routinely available and commonly used. PMID:11806786

  3. Percutaneous Drainage of Suppurative Pylephlebitis Complicating Acute Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Nouira, Kais Bedioui, Haykel; Azaiez, Olfa; Belhiba, Hend; Messaoud, Monia Ben; Ksantini, Rachid; Jouini, Mohamed; Menif, Emna

    2007-11-15

    Suppurative pylephlebitis is a rare condition with a significant mortality rate, ranging from 50% to 80%. We report a case of suppurative pylephlebitis complicating acute pancreatitis treated by percutaneous drainage in a 40-year-old woman. The patient had an uneventful recovery.

  4. CT-guided percutaneous biopsies of head and neck masses

    SciTech Connect

    Gatenby, R.A.; Mulhern, C.B. Jr.; Strawitz, J.

    1983-03-01

    Six patients underwent CT-guided percutaneous pharyngeal or laryngeal biopsies. A retromandibular approach was used in five of these patients. Accurate cytologic information was obtained in all six cases, and no complications were encountered. This technique can be helpful in certain clinical settings.

  5. Percutaneous and Endovascular Embolization of Ruptured Hepatic Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Little, Andrew F.; Lee, Wai Kit

    2002-06-15

    A 72-year-old woman presented with an intraperitoneal hemorrhage from a ruptured intrahepatic arteryaneurysm, with an associated pseudoaneurysm developing a high-flow arteriovenous fistula. Persistent coagulopathy and a median arcuate ligament stenosis of the celiac axis further complicated endovascular management. Aneurysm thrombosis required percutaneous embolization with coils, a removable core guidewire and polyvinyl alcohol particles.

  6. Systematic review comparing endoscopic, percutaneous and surgical pancreatic pseudocyst drainage

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Anthony Yuen Bun; Dhir, Vinay; Jin, Zhen-Dong; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Seo, Dong Wan; Ho, Khek Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To perform a systematic review comparing the outcomes of endoscopic, percutaneous and surgical pancreatic pseudocyst drainage. METHODS: Comparative studies published between January 1980 and May 2014 were identified on PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane controlled trials register and assessed for suitability of inclusion. The primary outcome was the treatment success rate. Secondary outcomes included were the recurrence rates, re-interventions, length of hospital stay, adverse events and mortalities. RESULTS: Ten comparative studies were identified and 3 were randomized controlled trials. Four studies reported on the outcomes of percutaneous and surgical drainage. Based on a large-scale national study, surgical drainage appeared to reduce mortality and adverse events rate as compared to the percutaneous approach. Three studies reported on the outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and surgical drainage. Clinical success and adverse events rates appeared to be comparable but the EUS approach reduced hospital stay, cost and improved quality of life. Three other studies compared EUS and esophagogastroduodenoscopy-guided drainage. Both approaches were feasible for pseudocyst drainage but the success rate of the EUS approach was better for non-bulging cyst and the approach conferred additional safety benefits. CONCLUSION: In patients with unfavorable anatomy, surgical cystojejunostomy or percutaneous drainage could be considered. Large randomized studies with current definitions of pseudocysts and longer-term follow-up are needed to assess the efficacy of the various modalities. PMID:27014427

  7. Buried bumper syndrome: a rare complication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

    PubMed

    Kurek, Krzysztof; Baniukiewicz, Andrzej; Świdnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka

    2015-09-01

    Feeding via percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred form of alimentation when oral feeding is impossible. Although it is a relatively safe method, some complications may occur. One uncommon PEG complication is buried bumper syndrome. In this paper we report a case of buried bumper syndrome, successfully managed with PEG tube repositioning. PMID:26649105

  8. Successful Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty and Stenting in Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gartenschlaeger, Soeren Bender, Siegfried; Maeurer, Juergen; Schroeder, Ralf J.

    2008-03-15

    Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is a life-threatening emergency. The complications are high by the time of diagnosis in most cases and therefore only few data on primary percutaneous intervention with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stenting in AMI are available. We present the case of an 84-year-old woman who presented to our emergency department complaining of an acute worsening of pre-existing abdominal periumbilical pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. She had previously undergone percutaneous transluminal embolectomy for an acute occlusion of the left common femoral artery. Due to suspicion of intestinal infarction, conventional angiography of the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was performed and confirmed a proximal occlusion of the SMA. Percutaneous SMA recanalization with balloon dilation and subsequent stent implantation was carried out successfully. The abdominal symptoms subsided after this procedure. In AMI that is diagnosed early, endovascular stenting should be considered as an alternative treatment to the surgical approach that avoids the need for surgical bowel resection.

  9. Percutaneous laser disc decompression with the holmium: YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Casper, G D; Hartman, V L; Mullins, L L

    1995-06-01

    This article discusses the evolution of the percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) method using a holmium:YAG laser. Advantages of using this wavelength and several techniques for its use in PLDD are reviewed. The article also discusses the current devices and delivery systems available for this application. PMID:10150646

  10. Percutaneous pediculoplasty: polymethylmethacrylate injection into lytic vertebral pedicle lesions.

    PubMed

    Gailloud, Philippe; Beauchamp, Norman J; Martin, Jean-Baptiste; Murphy, Kieran J

    2002-05-01

    Two patients with painful lytic lesions of the vertebral pedicle were treated with percutaneous pediculoplasty. This technique, similar to vertebroplasty but with increased procedural risks because of the immediate vicinity of neural structures, was performed under high-quality biplane fluoroscopic guidance. For lesions involving both the pedicle and the vertebral body, a double-needle unipedicular technique is advocated. PMID:11997361