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Sample records for perfusion lung scan

  1. Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan? A lung ventilation/perfusion scan, or VQ scan, is a ... that measures air and blood flow in your lungs. A VQ scan most often is used to ...

  2. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health ...

  3. Perfusion lung scan: an aid in detection of lymphangitic carcinomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, S.E.; Tranum, B.L.

    1982-07-15

    Lymphangitic carcinomatosis is usually a late manifestation of metastatic disease. The patient usually presents with cough or dyspnea, and the chest radiograph is often nondiagnostic. Two patients are presented who developed symptoms while on adjuvant chemotherapy. Both had abnormal perfusion lung scans. One had matching ventilation defects; the other a normal ventilation study. Biopsy revealed metastatic carcinoma; in one case tumor was seen in both the pulmonary lymphatics and arterioles; in the other, tumor was identified but the site could not be specified. The radionuclide lung scan is a technique which can speed diagnosis and institution of therapy in lymphangitic carcinomatosis.

  4. Perfusion lung scan: an aid in detection of lymphangitic carcinomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, S.E.; Tranum, B.L.

    1982-07-15

    Lymphangitic carcinomatosis is usually a late manifestation of metastatic disease. The patient usually presents with cough or dyspnea, and the chest radiograph is often nondiagnostic. Two patients are presented who developed symptoms while on adjuvant chemotherapy. Both had abnormal perfusion lung scans. One had matching ventilation defects; the other a normal ventilation study. Biopsy revealed metastatic carcinoma; in one case tumor was seen in both the pulmonary lymphatics and arterioles; in technique which can speed diagnosis and institution of therapy in lymphangitic carcinomatosis.

  5. Correlation between the clinical pretest probability score and the lung ventilation and perfusion scan probability

    PubMed Central

    Bhoobalan, Shanmugasundaram; Chakravartty, Riddhika; Dolbear, Gill; Al-Janabi, Mazin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Aim of the study was to determine the accuracy of the clinical pretest probability (PTP) score and its association with lung ventilation and perfusion (VQ) scan. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of 510 patients who had a lung VQ scan between 2008 and 2010 were included in the study. Out of 510 studies, the number of normal, low, and high probability VQ scans were 155 (30%), 289 (57%), and 55 (11%), respectively. Results: A total of 103 patients underwent computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) scan in which 21 (20%) had a positive scan, 81 (79%) had a negative scan and one (1%) had an equivocal result. The rate of PE in the normal, low-probability, and high-probability scan categories were: 2 (9.5%), 10 (47.5%), and 9 (43%) respectively. A very low correlation (Pearson correlation coefficient r = 0.20) between the clinical PTP score and lung VQ scan. The area under the curve (AUC) of the clinical PTP score was 52% when compared with the CTPA results. However, the accuracy of lung VQ scan was better (AUC = 74%) when compared with CTPA scan. Conclusion: The clinical PTP score is unreliable on its own; however, it may still aid in the interpretation of lung VQ scan. The accuracy of the lung VQ scan was better in the assessment of underlying pulmonary embolism (PE). PMID:24379532

  6. Ultra-Low Dose Lung CT Perfusion Regularized by a Previous Scan

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hengyong; Zhao, Shiying; Hoffman, Eric A.; Wang, Ge

    2009-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Our previous scan regularized reconstruction (PSRR) method is proposed to reduce radiation dose and applied for lung perfusion studies. The normal and ultra-low dose lung CT perfusion studies are compared in terms of estimation accuracy of pulmonary functional parameters. Materials and Methods A sequences of sheep lung scans were performed in three prone, anesthetized sheep at normal and ultra-low doses. A scan protocol was developed for the ultra-low dose studies with ECG gating - time point one for a normal x-ray dose scan (100kV/150mAs) and time points 2–21 for low dose scans (80kV/17mAs). A nonlinear diffusion-based post-filtering (NDPF) method was applied to the difference images between the low-dose images and the high-quality reference image. The final images at 20 time points were generated by fusing the reference image with the filtered difference images. Results The power spectra of perfusion images and coherences with the normal scans show a great improvement in image quality of the ultra-low dose scans with PSRR relative to that without RSRR. The Gamma variate-fitting and the repeatability of the measurements of the mean transit time demonstrate that the key parameters of lung functions can be reliably accessed using PSRR. The variability of the ultra-low dose scan results obtained using PSRR is not substantially different from that between two normal dose scans. Conclusions Our studies have shown that a ~90% reduction in radiation dose is achievable using PSRR without compromising the quantitative CT measurements of regional lung functions. PMID:19201366

  7. Reversibility of intrapulmonary arteriovenous shunts in liver cirrhosis documented by serial radionuclide perfusion lung scans

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N.S.; Barnett, C.A.; Farrer, P.A.

    1984-05-01

    Using serial perfusion lung scans, the opening up and closure of right-to-left intrapulmonary arteriovenous shunts has been documented over a period of several weeks in a patient with chronic alcoholic liver disease. The presence of the shunts correlates well with the severity of hypoxemia and the presence of nodular mottling on chest radiographs. The time course of these changes with clinical status suggests lability and the functional nature of these shunts.

  8. An expert system for the interpretation of radionuclide ventilation-perfusion lung scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, Frank V.; Datz, Frederick L.; Christian, Paul E.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Morton, Kathryn A.

    1993-09-01

    One of the most commonly performed imaging procedures in nuclear medicine is the lung scan for suspected pulmonary embolism. The purpose of this research was to develop an expert system that interprets lung scans and gives a probability of pulmonary embolism. Three standard ventilation and eight standard perfusion images are first outlined manually. Then the images are normalized. Because lung size varies from patient to patient, each image undergoes a two-dimensional stretch onto a standard-size mask. To determine the presence of regional defects in ventilation or perfusion, images are then compared on a pixel by pixel basis with a normal database. This database consists of 21 normal studies that represent the variation in activity between subjects. Any pixel that falls more than 2.2 standard deviations below the normal file is flagged as possibly abnormal. To reduce statistical fluctuations, a clustering criteria is applied such that each pixel must have at least two continuous neighbors that are abnormal for a pixel to be flagged abnormal.

  9. Lung scans with significant perfusion defects limited to matching pleural effusions have a low probability of pulmonary embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, F.L.; Bedont, R.A.; Taylor, A.

    1985-05-01

    Patients with a pleural effusion on chest x-ray often undergo a lung scan to exclude pulmonary embolism (PE). According to other studies, when the scan shows a perfusion defect equal in size to a radiographic abnormality on chest x-ray, the scan should be classified as indeterminate or intermediate probability for PE. However, since those studies dealt primarily with alveolar infiltrates rather than pleural effusions, the authors undertook a retrospective study to determine the probability of PE in patients with pleural effusion and a matching perfusion defect. The authors reviewed 451 scans and x-rays of patients studied for suspected PE. Of those, 53 had moderate or large perfusion defects secondary to pleural effusion without other significant (>25% of a segment) effusion without other significant (>25% of a segment) defects on the scan. Final diagnosis was confirmed by pulmonary angiography (16), thoracentesis (40), venography (11), other radiographic and laboratory studies, and clinical course. Of the 53 patients, only 2 patients had venous thrombotic disease. One patient had PE on pulmonary angiography, the other patient had thrombophlebitis on venography. The remainder of the patients had effusions due to congestive heart failure (12), malignancy (12), infection (7), trauma (7), collegen vascular disease (7), sympathetic effusion (3) and unknown etiology (3). The authors conclude that lung scans with significant perfusion defects limited to matching pleural effusions on chest x-ray have a low probability for PE.

  10. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Reeb, Jeremie; Cypel, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    Lung transplantation is an established life-saving therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Unfortunately, greater success in lung transplantation is hindered by a shortage of lung donors and the relatively poor early-, mid-, and long-term outcomes associated with severe primary graft dysfunction. Ex vivo lung perfusion has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for a more accurate lung assessment and improvement in lung quality. This review outlines the: (i) rationale behind the method; (ii) techniques and protocols; (iii) Toronto ex vivo lung perfusion method; (iv) devices available; and (v) clinical experience worldwide. We also highlight the potential of ex vivo lung perfusion in leading a new era of lung preservation. PMID:26700566

  11. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Machuca, Tiago N; Cypel, Marcelo

    2014-08-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  12. Ex vivo lung perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Machuca, Tiago N.

    2014-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  13. Reversibility of hepatopulmonary syndrome evidenced by serial pulmonary perfusion scan.

    PubMed

    Shijo, H; Sasaki, H; Sakata, H; Kusuhara, H; Ueki, T; Okumura, M

    1993-02-01

    A patient with liver cirrhosis who exhibited marked hypoxemia is presented. An abnormal dilatation of intrapulmonary capillaries was evidenced by perfusion lung scan, contrast-enhanced echocardiography, and histological examinations of lungs. Serial perfusion lung scan disclosed that the radioisotope uptake by extrapulmonary organs was significantly increased and uptake by both lungs was significantly decreased during the state of severer hypoxemia. Shunt quantification method revealed that intrapulmonary right-to-left shunt ratio also paralleled the extent of hypoxemia. The pathophysiology of hepatopulmonary syndrome appeared to involve a reversible intrapulmonary vascular dilatation. The perfusion lung scan could semiquantitate the severity of intrapulmonary vascular dilatation and could offer the efficient method to follow their progress. PMID:8440418

  14. Ex vivo lung graft perfusion.

    PubMed

    Briot, Raphaël; Gennai, Stéphane; Maignan, Maxime; Souilamas, Redha; Pison, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    This review proposes an update of the state of the art and the ongoing clinical trials of ex vivo lung perfusion for lung transplantation in patients. Ex vivo lung perfusion techniques (EVLP) can be used to evaluate a lung graft outside of the body. The goal of EVLP is to study the functional status of lung grafts that were first rejected for transplantation because they did not match all criteria for a conventional transplantation. After an EVLP evaluation, some of these lungs may be requalified for a possible transplantation in patients. This article proposes an overview of the developments of EVLP techniques. During EVLP, the perfusion and ventilation of the isolated lung preparation are very progressive in order to avoid oedema due to ischaemia-reperfusion injuries. Lung evaluation is mainly based on gasometric (PaO2/FiO2) and rheological criteria (low pulmonary arterial resistance). Several series of patients transplanted with EVLP evaluated lungs have been recently published with promising results. EVLP preparations also allow a better understanding of the physiopathology and treatments of ischaemia-reperfusion injuries. Organ procurements from "non-heart-beating" donors will probably require a wider application of these ex vivo techniques. The development of semi-automated systems might facilitate the clinical use of EVLP techniques. PMID:26746565

  15. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics COPD Lung Diseases Nuclear Scans Pulmonary Embolism Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  16. Revival of impaired lung perfusion after sleeve lobectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shibano, Tomoki; Endo, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Maki, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Sleeve resection, a mainstay for centrally-located lung cancer, is a challenging procedure when the preserved lung is impaired. We herein reported a 61-year-old male who underwent right upper sleeve lobectomy for squamous cell carcinoma located at the orifice of the upper bronchus. The tumor invaded the main bronchus. A lung perfusion scan showed severe impairment, while the right middle and lower lobes were well expanded. Not only the spirogram, but also the lung perfusion in the residual lung, had markedly recovered at 2 months after the right upper extended sleeve lobectomy. The patient is currently living his normal daily life. Residual lung perfusion can be revived, even if it is impaired preoperatively. PMID:27076980

  17. The diagnosis of pneumothorax by radionuclide lung scan

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, V.W.; Dedick, P.; Shapiro, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    A case of pneumothorax diagnosed by ventilation-perfusion lung scintigraphy is reported. The diagnosis was not suspected clinically initially and a chest x-ray taken before the lung scan was also interpreted as normal.

  18. Perfusion and ventilation of isolated canine lungs

    PubMed Central

    Otto, T. J.; Trenkner, M.; Stopczyk, A.; Gawdziński, M.; Chełstowska, B.

    1968-01-01

    In order to evaluate methods of preserving lungs for use in transplantation, experiments on 28 mongrel dogs were carried out. Two methods were tried—first, mechanical respiration of isolated lungs under deep hypothermia, with the vascular bed filled with blood; and, secondly, the perfusion of isolated lungs with the aid of a modified DeWall's apparatus. Allogenic transplantations of lungs preserved in both ways were carried out. Gasometric and histological examinations of preserved lungs, before and after transplantation, were performed. The best results were obtained with perfusion under hypothermic conditions; ventilation without perfusion resulted in failure. Lung transplantation was successful when, after being preserved, the lung remained unchanged. Major discrepancies between the macroscopic and microscopic findings in preserved lungs were observed. An original classification of the changes occurring in preserved lungs is proposed. PMID:4886091

  19. N-terminal natriuretic peptide and ventilation-perfusion lung scan in sickle cell disease and thalassemia patients with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mokhtar, Galila M; Adly, Amira A M; El Alfy, Mohsen S; Tawfik, Lamis M; Khairy, Ahmed T

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in sickle cell disease and thalassemia patients in relation to clinical and laboratory parameters of hemolysis and hemosidersosis, as well as plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP). The study also aimed to define the role of thromboembolic pulmonary artery (PA) obstruction in its etiology. Forty sickle cell disease and 30 thalassemia patients [15 beta-thalassemia major (beta-TM) and 15 beta-thalassemia intermedia (beta-TI)] were screened for PH defined as tricuspid regurgitant velocity (TRV) >2.5 m/sec and evaluated for PA obstruction using ventilation-perfusion lung scan (V/Q), together with measurement of their plasma levels of NT-pro-BNP. Patients were prospectively followed up for a mean of 18 +/- 6.1 months. The prevalence of PH was 37.5, 40.0 and 26.7% in sickle cell disease, beta-TI and beta-TM patients, respectively. Pulmonary hypertension patients were older, had longer disease duration, higher serum ferritin, serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and NT-pro-BNP with lower hemoglobin (Hb) levels compared to patients without PH. N-terminal pro-BNP was positively correlated with duration of illness, TRV, LDH, serum ferritin, and negatively correlated with Hb levels. The strongest predictor for TRV was serum ferritin followed by the NT-pro-BNP level. Forty-six-point-seven percent of sickle cell disease patients with PH had either high or intermediate probability V/Q scan results compared to 10% of thalassemic patients with PH who had high probability V/Q scan results. Pulmonary hypertension is highly prevalent in young sickle cell disease and thalassemia patients, where elevated serum ferritin and NT-pro-BNP are the main indicators. PMID:20113292

  20. Regional pulmonary perfusion following human heart-lung transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lisbona, R.; Hakim, T.S.; Dean, G.W.; Langleben, D.; Guerraty, A.; Levy, R.D. )

    1989-08-01

    Ventilation and perfusion scans were obtained in six subjects who had undergone heart-lung transplantation with consequent denervation of the cardiopulmonary axis. Two of the subjects had developed obliterative bronchiolitis, which is believed to be a form of chronic rejection. Their pulmonary function tests demonstrated airflow obstruction and their scintigraphic studies were abnormal. In the remaining four subjects without obstructive airways disease, ventilation and planar perfusion scans were normal. Single photon emission computed tomography imaging of pulmonary perfusion in these patients revealed a layered distribution of blood flow indistinguishable from that of normal individuals. It is concluded that neurogenic mechanisms have little influence on the pattern of local pulmonary blood flow at rest.

  1. Ex vivo lung perfusion in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Luis Gustavo; Braga, Karina Andrighetti de Oliveira; Nepomuceno, Natalia Aparecida; Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the use of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) clinically to prepare donor lungs for transplantation. Methods: A prospective study involving EVLP for the reconditioning of extended-criteria donor lungs, the criteria for which include aspects such as a PaO2/FiO2 ratio < 300 mmHg. Between February of 2013 and February of 2014, the lungs of five donors were submitted to EVLP for up to 4 h each. During EVLP, respiratory mechanics were continuously evaluated. Once every hour during the procedure, samples of the perfusate were collected and the function of the lungs was evaluated. Results: The mean PaO2 of the recovered lungs was 262.9 ± 119.7 mmHg at baseline, compared with 357.0 ± 108.5 mmHg after 3 h of EVLP. The mean oxygenation capacity of the lungs improved slightly over the first 3 h of EVLP-246.1 ± 35.1, 257.9 ± 48.9, and 288.8 ± 120.5 mmHg after 1, 2, and 3 h, respectively-without significant differences among the time points (p = 0.508). The mean static compliance was 63.0 ± 18.7 mmHg, 75.6 ± 25.4 mmHg, and 70.4 ± 28.0 mmHg after 1, 2, and 3 h, respectively, with a significant improvement from hour 1 to hour 2 (p = 0.029) but not from hour 2 to hour 3 (p = 0.059). Pulmonary vascular resistance remained stable during EVLP, with no differences among time points (p = 0.284). Conclusions: Although the lungs evaluated remained under physiological conditions, the EVLP protocol did not effectively improve lung function, thus precluding transplantation. PMID:27167429

  2. Lung PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... emission tomography; PET - chest; PET - lung; PET - tumor imaging ... Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2015: ...

  3. Lung gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... any concerns you have about radiation with the health care provider who recommends the test. ... Usually the health care provider will recommend this scan based on ... the scan. For this reason, this test is not often done anymore.

  4. Positron emission tomography to assess hypoxia and perfusion in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Verwer, Eline E; Boellaard, Ronald; van der Veldt, Astrid AM

    2014-01-01

    In lung cancer, tumor hypoxia is a characteristic feature, which is associated with a poor prognosis and resistance to both radiation therapy and chemotherapy. As the development of tumor hypoxia is associated with decreased perfusion, perfusion measurements provide more insight into the relation between hypoxia and perfusion in malignant tumors. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a highly sensitive nuclear imaging technique that is suited for non-invasive in vivo monitoring of dynamic processes including hypoxia and its associated parameter perfusion. The PET technique enables quantitative assessment of hypoxia and perfusion in tumors. To this end, consecutive PET scans can be performed in one scan session. Using different hypoxia tracers, PET imaging may provide insight into the prognostic significance of hypoxia and perfusion in lung cancer. In addition, PET studies may play an important role in various stages of personalized medicine, as these may help to select patients for specific treatments including radiation therapy, hypoxia modifying therapies, and antiangiogenic strategies. In addition, specific PET tracers can be applied for monitoring therapy. The present review provides an overview of the clinical applications of PET to measure hypoxia and perfusion in lung cancer. Available PET tracers and their characteristics as well as the applications of combined hypoxia and perfusion PET imaging are discussed. PMID:25493221

  5. Lung gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation in the lungs, most often due to sarcoidosis or a certain type of pneumonia. Normal Results ... up very little gallium. What Abnormal Results Mean Sarcoidosis Other respiratory infections, most often pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia ...

  6. Scintigraphic perfusion patterns in patients with diffuse lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, G.E.; Sullivan, D.C.; Gottschalk, A.; Putman, C.E.

    1982-04-01

    Perfusion scintigrams of 55 patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse lung disease were reviewed. Thirty-nine had acute and/or chronic changes caused by congestive heart failure, and 16 had diffuse reticulonodular disease. A normal or near-normal perfusion pattern was seen in 40/55 (73%), and this finding was equally common in the two groups. The authors conclude that perfusion scintigraphy is useful in excluding pulmonary embolism in patients with radiographic evidence of diffuse, symmetrical lung disease.

  7. Prediction of postoperative pulmonary function following thoracic operations. Value of ventilation-perfusion scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Bria, W.F.; Kanarek, D.J.; Kazemi, H.

    1983-08-01

    Surgical resection of lung cancer is frequently required in patients with severely impaired lung function resulting from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Twenty patients with obstructive lung disease and cancer (mean preoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) . 1.73 L) were studied preoperatively and postoperatively by spirometry and radionuclide perfusion, single-breath ventilation, and washout techniques to test the ability of these methods to predict preoperatively the partial loss of lung function by the resection. Postoperative FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC) were accurately predicted by the formula: postoperative FEV1 (or FVC) . preoperative FEV1 X percent function of regions of lung not to be resected (r . 0.88 and 0.95, respectively). Ventilation and perfusion scans are equally effective in prediction. Washout data add to the sophistication of the method by permitting the qualitative evaluation of ventilation during tidal breathing. Criteria for patients requiring the study are suggested.

  8. Perfusion Scintigraphy and Patient Selection for Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Divay; Lipson, David A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Sciurba, Frank C.; DeCamp, Malcolm M.; Reilly, John J.; Washko, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: It is unclear if lung perfusion can predict response to lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). Objectives: To study the role of perfusion scintigraphy in patient selection for LVRS. Methods: We performed an intention-to-treat analysis of 1,045 of 1,218 patients enrolled in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial who were non–high risk for LVRS and had complete perfusion scintigraphy results at baseline. The median follow-up was 6.0 years. Patients were classified as having upper or non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema on visual examination of the chest computed tomography and high or low exercise capacity on cardiopulmonary exercise testing at baseline. Low upper zone perfusion was defined as less than 20% of total lung perfusion distributed to the upper third of both lungs as measured on perfusion scintigraphy. Measurements and Main Results: Among 284 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and low exercise capacity at baseline, the 202 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS versus medical management (risk ratio [RR], 0.56; P = 0.008) unlike the remaining 82 with high perfusion where mortality was unchanged (RR, 0.97; P = 0.62). Similarly, among 404 of 1,045 patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema and high exercise capacity, the 278 with low upper zone perfusion had lower mortality with LVRS (RR, 0.70; P = 0.02) unlike the remaining 126 with high perfusion (RR, 1.05; P = 1.00). Among the 357 patients with non–upper lobe–predominant emphysema (75 with low and 282 with high exercise capacity) there was no improvement in survival with LVRS and measurement of upper zone perfusion did not contribute new prognostic information. Conclusions: Compared with optimal medical management, LVRS reduces mortality in patients with upper lobe–predominant emphysema when there is low rather than high perfusion to the upper lung. PMID:20538961

  9. FATE OF INHALED NITROGEN DIOXIDE IN ISOLATED PERFUSED RAT LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of inhaled NO2 was studied with isolated perfused rat lungs. The isolated lungs were exposed to 5 ppm NO2 for 90 min at a ventilation rate of 45 ml/min. The NO2 exposure had no adverse effects on the lungs as judged from their weights, glucose uptake, or lactate producti...

  10. Perfusion of nonventilated lung: failure of hypoxic vasoconstriction

    SciTech Connect

    Sostman, H.D.; Neumann, R.D.; Gottschalk, A.; Greenspan, R.H.

    1983-07-01

    Alveolar hypoxia is a well established cause of regional vasoconstriction such that nonventilated segments are not perfused. The paradoxical situation of retained perfusion of nonventilated lung has seldom been discussed. Three clinical examples are illustrated. In each case coexistent chronic obstructive lung disease may have contributed to this unexpected finding by reducing pulmonary vascular capacity such that blood flow diversion from hypoxic segments was not possible.

  11. Logistic ex Vivo Lung Perfusion for Hyperimmunized Patients.

    PubMed

    De Wolf, Julien; Puyo, Philippe; Bonnette, Pierre; Roux, Antoine; Le Guen, Morgan; Parquin, François; Chapelier, Alain; Sage, Edouard

    2016-09-01

    Hyperimmunized patients have restricted access to lung transplantation because of the low rate of donor lung availability. Sensitization to human leukocyte antigen is associated with acute rejection, allograft dysfunction, and decreased survival. Prospective crossmatching could allow matching a lung graft with the recipient; however, such a strategy would increase graft ischemia, with a worse impact on the long-term results of lung transplantation. We used logistic ex vivo lung perfusion for 3 patients at the Foch Hospital while waiting for a negative result of the prospective crossmatching and then moved forward to lung transplantation. All patients are alive 3 years after bilateral lung transplantation. PMID:27549543

  12. Computed tomography studies of lung ventilation and perfusion.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Eric A; Chon, Deokiee

    2005-01-01

    With the emergence of multidetector-row computed tomography (CT) it is now possible to image both structure and function via use of a single imaging modality. Breath-hold spiral CT provides detail of the airway and vascular trees along with texture reflective of the state of the lung parenchyma. Use of stable xenon gas wash-in and/or wash-out methods using an axial mode of the CT scanner whereby images are acquired through gating to the respiratory cycle provide detailed images of regional ventilation with isotropic voxel dimensions now on the order of 0.4 mm. Axial scanning during a breath hold and gating to the electrocardiogram during the passage of a sharp bolus injection of iodinated contrast agent provide detailed images of regional pulmonary perfusion. These dynamic CT methods for the study of regional lung function are discussed in the context of other methods that have been used to study heterogeneity of lung function. PMID:16352755

  13. Intensity correlation of ventilation-perfusion lung images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Antonio A.; Vaz de Carvalho, Carlos; Seixas, M.; Ferreira, F. N.; Guedes, M. A.; Amaral, I.

    1993-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a method to create new images, based on lung verification and perfusion raw nuclear medicine images obtained from a gamma camera, that may help the correlation of their intrinsic information. Another major topic of this study is the assessment of the usefulness of this method in the detection of lung malfunction.

  14. Ex Vivo Perfusion Treatment of Infection in Human Donor Lungs.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, D; Cypel, M; Bonato, R; Machuca, T N; Iskender, I; Hashimoto, K; Linacre, V; Chen, M; Coutinho, R; Azad, S; Martinu, T; Waddell, T K; Hwang, D M; Husain, S; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2016-04-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a platform to treat infected donor lungs with antibiotic therapy before lung transplantation. Human donor lungs that were rejected for transplantation because of clinical concern regarding infection were randomly assigned to two groups. In the antibiotic group (n = 8), lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h with high-dose antibiotics (ciprofloxacin 400 mg or azithromycin 500 mg, vancomycin 15 mg/kg, and meropenem 2 g). In the control group (n = 7), lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h without antibiotics. A quantitative decrease in bacterial counts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was found in all antibiotic-treated cases but in only two control cases. Perfusate endotoxin levels at 12 h were significantly lower in the antibiotic group compared with the control group. EVLP with broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy significantly improved pulmonary oxygenation and compliance and reduced pulmonary vascular resistance. Perfusate endotoxin levels at 12 h were strongly correlated with levels of perfusates tumor necrosis factor α, IL-1β and macrophage inflammatory proteins 1α and 1β at 12 h. In conclusion, EVLP treatment of infected donor lungs with broad-spectrum antibiotics significantly reduced BAL bacterial counts and endotoxin levels and improved donor lung function. PMID:26730551

  15. Evaluation of pulmonary perfusion in lung regions showing isolated xenon-133 ventilation washout defects

    SciTech Connect

    Bushnell, D.L.; Sood, K.B.; Shirazi, P.; Pal, I. )

    1990-08-01

    Xenon-133 washout phase imaging is often used to help determine whether the etiology of a perfusion defect is embolic or due to pulmonary parenchymal pathology, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This study was designed to evaluate the pulmonary blood flow patterns associated with isolated defects on xenon washout images. Scintigraphic lung studies were reviewed until 100 cases with abnormal ventilation results were obtained. Ventilation abnormalities were compared with the corresponding perfusion scan results at the same anatomic site. Of the 208 individual lung regions with xenon abnormalities, 111 showed isolated washout defects (that is, with normal washin). Ninety-four of these 111 sites showed either normal perfusion or a small, nonsegmental corresponding perfusion defect. Three segmental perfusion defects were noted in association with isolated xenon retention. In each of these cases, however, the patient was felt actually to have pulmonary embolism. Thus, it is recommended that, for interpretation of scintigraphic images in the assessment of pulmonary embolism, lung pathology associated with isolated xenon retention not be considered a potential cause for large or segmental perfusion defects.

  16. Diffusion and perfusion MRI of the lung and mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Henzler, Thomas; Schmid-Bindert, Gerald; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Fink, Christian

    2010-12-01

    With ongoing technical improvements such as multichannel MRI, systems with powerful gradients as well as the development of innovative pulse sequence techniques implementing parallel imaging, MRI has now entered the stage of a radiation-free alternative to computed tomography (CT) for chest imaging in clinical practice. Whereas in the past MRI of the lung was focused on morphological aspects, current MRI techniques also enable functional imaging of the lung allowing for a comprehensive assessment of lung disease in a single MRI exam. Perfusion imaging can be used for the visualization of regional pulmonary perfusion in patients with different lung diseases such as lung cancer, chronic obstructive lung disease, pulmonary embolism or for the prediction of postoperative lung function in lung cancer patients. Over the past years diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DW-MRI) of the thorax has become feasible with a significant reduction of the acquisition time, thus minimizing artifacts from respiratory and cardiac motion. In chest imaging, DW-MRI has been mainly suggested for the characterization of lung cancer, lymph nodes and pulmonary metastases. In this review article recent MR perfusion and diffusion techniques of the lung and mediastinum as well as their clinical applications are reviewed. PMID:20627435

  17. Hyperventilation induces release of cytokines from perfused mouse lung.

    PubMed

    von Bethmann, A N; Brasch, F; Nüsing, R; Vogt, K; Volk, H D; Müller, K M; Wendel, A; Uhlig, S

    1998-01-01

    Artificial mechanical ventilation represents a major cause of iatrogenic lung damage in intensive care. It is largely unknown which mediators, if any, contribute to the onset of such complications. We investigated whether stress caused by artificial mechanical ventilation leads to induction, synthesis, and release of cytokines or eicosanoids from lung tissue. We used the isolated perfused and ventilated mouse lung where frequent perfusate sampling allows determination of mediator release into the perfusate. Hyperventilation was executed with either negative (NPV) or positive pressure ventilation (PPV) at a transpulmonary pressure that was increased 2.5-fold above normal. Both modes of hyperventilation resulted in an approximately 1.75-fold increased expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA, but not of cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA. After switching to hyperventilation, prostacyclin release into the perfusate increased almost instantaneously from 19 +/- 17 pg/min to 230 +/- 160 pg/min (PPV) or 115 +/- 87 pg/min (NPV). The enhancement in TNFalpha and IL-6 production developed more slowly. In control lungs after 150 min of perfusion and ventilation, TNFalpha and IL-6 production was 23 +/- 20 pg/min and 330 +/- 210 pg/min, respectively. In lungs hyperventilated for 150 min, TNFalpha and IL-6 production were increased to 287 +/- 180 pg/min and more than 1,000 pg/min, respectively. We conclude that artificial ventilation might cause pulmonary and systemic adverse reactions by inducing the release of mediators into the circulation. PMID:9445308

  18. A Short Period of Ventilation without Perfusion Seems to Reduce Atelectasis without Harming the Lungs during Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Pierre, Leif

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the lung function of donors after circulatory deaths (DCDs), ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has been shown to be a valuable method. We present modified EVLP where lung atelectasis is removed, while the lung perfusion is temporarily shut down. Twelve pigs were randomized into two groups: modified EVLP and conventional EVLP. When the lungs had reached 37°C in the EVLP circuit, lung perfusion was temporarily shut down in the modified EVLP group, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was increased to 10 cm H2O for 10 minutes. In the conventional EVLP group, PEEP was increased to 10 cm H2O for 10 minutes with unchanged lung perfusion. In the modified EVLP group, the arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) was 18.5 ± 7.0 kPa before and 64.5 ± 6.0 kPa after the maneuver (P < 0.001). In the conventional EVLP group, the PaO2 was 16.8 ± 3.1 kPa and 46.8 ± 2.7 kPa after the maneuver (P < 0.01; P < 0.01). In the modified EVLP group, the pulmonary graft weight was unchanged, while in the conventional EVLP group, the pulmonary graft weight was significantly increased. Modified EVLP with normoventilation of the lungs without ongoing lung perfusion for 10 minutes may eliminate atelectasis almost completely without harming the lungs. PMID:24102021

  19. A Short Period of Ventilation without Perfusion Seems to Reduce Atelectasis without Harming the Lungs during Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Pierre, Leif; Ingemansson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the lung function of donors after circulatory deaths (DCDs), ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has been shown to be a valuable method. We present modified EVLP where lung atelectasis is removed, while the lung perfusion is temporarily shut down. Twelve pigs were randomized into two groups: modified EVLP and conventional EVLP. When the lungs had reached 37°C in the EVLP circuit, lung perfusion was temporarily shut down in the modified EVLP group, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was increased to 10 cm H2O for 10 minutes. In the conventional EVLP group, PEEP was increased to 10 cm H2O for 10 minutes with unchanged lung perfusion. In the modified EVLP group, the arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) was 18.5 ± 7.0 kPa before and 64.5 ± 6.0 kPa after the maneuver (P < 0.001). In the conventional EVLP group, the PaO2 was 16.8 ± 3.1 kPa and 46.8 ± 2.7 kPa after the maneuver (P < 0.01; P < 0.01). In the modified EVLP group, the pulmonary graft weight was unchanged, while in the conventional EVLP group, the pulmonary graft weight was significantly increased. Modified EVLP with normoventilation of the lungs without ongoing lung perfusion for 10 minutes may eliminate atelectasis almost completely without harming the lungs. PMID:24102021

  20. Review of diagnostic uses of shunt fraction quantification with technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin perfusion scan as illustrated by a case of Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chokkappan, Kabilan; Kannivelu, Anbalagan; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian; Babut, Suresh Balasubramanian

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare and are often associated with the hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT/Osler-Weber-Rendu) syndrome. We present a woman who presented with neurological symptoms due to a cerebral abscess. On further evaluation, bilateral pulmonary AVMs were identified. The patient was diagnosed with HHT, based on positive family history and multiple cerebral AVMs recognized on subsequent catheter angiogram, in addition to the presence of bilateral pulmonary AVMs. Craniotomy with drainage of the brain abscess and endovascular embolization of the pulmonary AVMs was offered to the patient. As a preembolization work-up, the patient underwent nuclear lung perfusion scan with technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin (Tc-99m MAA) to assess the right-to-left shunt secondary to the pulmonary AVMs. Postembolization follow-up perfusion scan was also obtained to estimate the hemodynamic response. The case is presented to describe the role of Tc-99m MAA perfusion lung scan in preoperatively evaluating patients with pulmonary AVMs and to emphasize on the scan's utility in posttreatment follow-up. Various present day usages of the Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scan, other than diagnosing pulmonary thromboembolism, are discussed. Providing background knowledge on the physiological and hemodynamic aspects of the Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scan is also attempted. Various imaging pitfalls and necessary precautions while performing Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scan are highlighted. PMID:27168866

  1. Review of diagnostic uses of shunt fraction quantification with technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin perfusion scan as illustrated by a case of Osler–Weber–Rendu syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chokkappan, Kabilan; Kannivelu, Anbalagan; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian; Babut, Suresh Balasubramanian

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare and are often associated with the hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT/Osler–Weber–Rendu) syndrome. We present a woman who presented with neurological symptoms due to a cerebral abscess. On further evaluation, bilateral pulmonary AVMs were identified. The patient was diagnosed with HHT, based on positive family history and multiple cerebral AVMs recognized on subsequent catheter angiogram, in addition to the presence of bilateral pulmonary AVMs. Craniotomy with drainage of the brain abscess and endovascular embolization of the pulmonary AVMs was offered to the patient. As a preembolization work-up, the patient underwent nuclear lung perfusion scan with technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin (Tc-99m MAA) to assess the right-to-left shunt secondary to the pulmonary AVMs. Postembolization follow-up perfusion scan was also obtained to estimate the hemodynamic response. The case is presented to describe the role of Tc-99m MAA perfusion lung scan in preoperatively evaluating patients with pulmonary AVMs and to emphasize on the scan's utility in posttreatment follow-up. Various present day usages of the Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scan, other than diagnosing pulmonary thromboembolism, are discussed. Providing background knowledge on the physiological and hemodynamic aspects of the Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scan is also attempted. Various imaging pitfalls and necessary precautions while performing Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scan are highlighted. PMID:27168866

  2. Influence of perfusion and ventilation scans on therapeutic decision making and outcome in cases of possible embolism.

    PubMed

    Mercandetti, A J; Kipper, M S; Moser, K M

    1985-02-01

    We examined the influence of perfusion (Q) and ventilation (V) scans on therapeutic decision making and outcome among 229 patients referred for lung scans because embolism was suggested and found that specific V/Q scan patterns strongly influenced postscan decisions regarding initiation, maintenance or cessation of heparin therapy. These therapeutic decisions bore a relationship to outcome (recurrences and death) and disclosed decision-making deficits that need remedy by future investigational and educational efforts. PMID:4013250

  3. Radiation-Induced Reductions in Regional Lung Perfusion: 0.1-12 Year Data From a Prospective Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Junan; Ma Jinli; Zhou Sumin; Hubbs, Jessica L.; Wong, Terence Z.; Folz, Rodney J.; Evans, Elizabeth S.; Jaszczak, Ronald J.; Clough, Robert; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the time and regional dependence of radiation therapy (RT)-induced reductions in regional lung perfusion 0.1-12 years post-RT, as measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) lung perfusion. Materials/Methods: Between 1991 and 2005, 123 evaluable patients receiving RT for tumors in/around the thorax underwent SPECT lung perfusion scans before and serially post-RT (0.1-12 years). Registration of pre- and post-RT SPECT images with the treatment planning computed tomography, and hence the three-dimensional RT dose distribution, allowed changes in regional SPECT-defined perfusion to be related to regional RT dose. Post-RT follow-up scans were evaluated at multiple time points to determine the time course of RT-induced regional perfusion changes. Population dose response curves (DRC) for all patients at different time points, different regions, and subvolumes (e.g., whole lungs, cranial/caudal, ipsilateral/contralateral) were generated by combining data from multiple patients at similar follow-up times. Each DRC was fit to a linear model, and differences statistically analyzed. Results: In the overall groups, dose-dependent reductions in perfusion were seen at each time post-RT. The slope of the DRC increased over time up to 18 months post-RT, and plateaued thereafter. Regional differences in DRCs were only observed between the ipsilateral and contralateral lungs, and appeared due to tumor-associated changes in regional perfusion. Conclusions: Thoracic RT causes dose-dependent reductions in regional lung perfusion that progress up to {approx}18 months post-RT and persists thereafter. Tumor shrinkage appears to confound the observed dose-response relations. There appears to be similar dose response for healthy parts of the lungs at different locations.

  4. Pulmonary ventilation and perfusion studies in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Narabayashi, I.; Otsuka, N.

    1984-02-01

    In 46 patients with bronchogenic carcinoma, the diagnostic significance of pulmonary ventilation images by the continuous inhalation of Kr-81m gas, which has an extremely short half life, was studied in comparison with pulmonary perfusion images with Tc-99m MAA. The data were processed using digital analysis techniques. There were 15 cases with discrepancies between ventilation and perfusion. The V/Q ratios of the affected lung among the 43 patients showed values above 1.2 in nine cases and below 0.8 in six cases. The Kr-81m ventilation and Tc-99m perfusion images were compared before and after radiation therapy in eight patients. It was possible to assess the therapeutic effect on regional ventilation and regional perfusion, which could not be evaluated by chest x-ray alone, under the same conditions of normal breathing.

  5. Patterns of pulmonary perfusion scans in normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, J.M.; Moser, K.M.; Hartman, M.T.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    A vital factor conditioning the usage of the pulmonary perfusion (Q) scan in the evaluation of patients suspected of pulmonary embolism is the prevalence of abnormal Q scans in subjects free of cardiopulmonary disease. Because this prevalence has not been well defined, we performed Q scans in 80 nonsmoking subjects 18 to 29 yr of age having no known active cardiopulmonary disease. Each subject underwent a history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, spirometry, and PA chest roentgenogram, followed by a 6-view Q scan. Two subjects in whom a Q defect was suspected underwent a /sup 133/Xe equilibrium-washout ventilation (V) scan. All Q scans were interpreted blindly and independently by 2 experienced readers. Seventy-nine of the 80 Q scans were read as normal. No subject demonstrated a lobar or segmental defect. One of the 80 subjects, who had a mild pectus excavatum, had a left upper lobe subsegmental defect, which was not seen on the V scan. Based on the statistical analysis of these data, no more than 3.68% of normal nonsmoking persons in this age group may have a lobar or segmental Q scan defect and no more than 6.77% may have a subsegmental defect (with 95% confidence). Therefore, our study indicated that Q scan defects, particularly lobar or segmental, are rarely present among normal nonsmokers in this age group.

  6. A novel dual ex vivo lung perfusion technique improves immediate outcomes in an experimental model of lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Noda, K; Isse, K; Tobita, K; Maniwa, Y; Bhama, J K; D'Cunha, J; Bermudez, C A; Luketich, J D; Shigemura, N

    2015-05-01

    The lungs are dually perfused by the pulmonary artery and the bronchial arteries. This study aimed to test the feasibility of dual-perfusion techniques with the bronchial artery circulation and pulmonary artery circulation synchronously perfused using ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) and evaluate the effects of dual-perfusion on posttransplant lung graft function. Using rat heart-lung blocks, we developed a dual-perfusion EVLP circuit (dual-EVLP), and compared cellular metabolism, expression of inflammatory mediators, and posttransplant graft function in lung allografts maintained with dual-EVLP, standard-EVLP, or cold static preservation. The microvasculature in lung grafts after transplant was objectively evaluated using microcomputed tomography angiography. Lung grafts subjected to dual-EVLP exhibited significantly better lung graft function with reduced proinflammatory profiles and more mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to better posttransplant function and compliance, as compared with standard-EVLP or static cold preservation. Interestingly, lung grafts maintained on dual-EVLP exhibited remarkably increased microvasculature and perfusion as compared with lungs maintained on standard-EVLP. Our results suggest that lung grafts can be perfused and preserved using dual-perfusion EVLP techniques that contribute to better graft function by reducing proinflammatory profiles and activating mitochondrial respiration. Dual-EVLP also yields better posttransplant graft function through increased microvasculature and better perfusion of the lung grafts after transplantation. PMID:25777770

  7. First steps in membrane oxygenation and prolonged extracorporeal perfusion in Duesseldorf using the Bramson membrane lung.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Hagen D

    2003-05-01

    After a shortened history of conventional closed and open heart surgery, including hypothermia by surface cooling and extracorporeal circulation, the first application of a new membrane oxygenator developed by ML Bramson with an integrated temperature exchange system and a heart-lung machine (HLM) was reported in 1972. The aim was to have an efficient oxygenating and gas exchange artificial lung that allowed prolonged perfusions in patients with cardiogenic shock or acute respiratory insufficiency. After in vitro closed recirculation studies comparing different bubble, vertical screen, and the new membrane oxygenators, the Bramson HLM was used in dog experiments before starting clinical cardiac surgery with routine interventions (closure of an atrial septal defect). The first clinically prolonged support for more than three hours after a double valve replacement in a NYHA class IV patient failed. A partial venoarterial prolonged perfusion for 42 hours and 43 minutes in a 10-year-old girl after surgical correction of a partial av canal defect and postoperative development of consistent lung edema caused by myocardial failure after an ischemic time of 43 minutes was the first successful long-term perfusion case in Europe. These first experiences with the Bramson membrane lung formed the basis, in our group, for further investigations of different perfusion routes and cannulations in animal experiments. Also, scanning electron microscopy studies could be performed with experimentally and clinically used membranes. The development of disposable membrane lung devices, for instance, Lande-Edwards, Kolobow Scimed, and General Electric Peirce membrane lungs, ameliorated and improved the use of these devices considerably. Also, BRAMSON had developed a disposable membrane lung device that had proved to be very effective in animal experiments by 1972, but, unfortunately, this device did not become commercially available. PMID:12952126

  8. Effective avoidance of a functional spect-perfused lung using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): an update of a planning study.

    PubMed

    Lavrenkov, Konstantin; Singh, Shalini; Christian, Judith A; Partridge, Mike; Nioutsikou, Elena; Cook, Gary; Bedford, James L; Brada, Michael

    2009-06-01

    IMRT and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-DCRT) plans of 25 patients with non-small cell lung (NSCLC) were compared in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and sparing of functional lung (FL) defined by a SPECT perfusion scan. IMRT resulted in significant reduction of functional V(20) and mean lung dose in stage III patients with inhomogeneous hypoperfusion. If the dose to FL is shown to be the determinant of lung toxicity, IMRT would allow for effective dose escalation by specific avoidance of functional lung. PMID:18995919

  9. Comparison of lung preservation solutions in human lungs using an ex vivo lung perfusion experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Israel L.; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo M.; Mariani, Alessandro W.; Fernandes, Flávio G.; Unterpertinger, Fernando V.; Canzian, Mauro; Jatene, Fabio B.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Experimental studies on lung preservation have always been performed using animal models. We present ex vivo lung perfusion as a new model for the study of lung preservation. Using human lungs instead of animal models may bring the results of experimental studies closer to what could be expected in clinical practice. METHOD: Brain-dead donors whose lungs had been declined by transplantation teams were used. The cases were randomized into two groups. In Group 1, Perfadex® was used for pulmonary preservation, and in Group 2, LPDnac, a solution manufactured in Brazil, was used. An ex vivo lung perfusion system was used, and the lungs were ventilated and perfused after 10 hours of cold ischemia. The extent of ischemic-reperfusion injury was measured using functional and histological parameters. RESULTS: After reperfusion, the mean oxygenation capacity was 405.3 mmHg in Group 1 and 406.0 mmHg in Group 2 (p = 0.98). The mean pulmonary vascular resistance values were 697.6 and 378.3 dyn·s·cm-5, respectively (p = 0.035). The mean pulmonary compliance was 46.8 cm H2O in Group 1 and 49.3 ml/cm H2O in Group 2 (p = 0.816). The mean wet/dry weight ratios were 2.06 and 2.02, respectively (p = 0.87). The mean Lung Injury Scores for the biopsy performed after reperfusion were 4.37 and 4.37 in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (p = 1.0), and the apoptotic cell counts were 118.75/mm2 and 137.50/mm2, respectively (p = 0.71). CONCLUSION: The locally produced preservation solution proved to be as good as Perfadex®. The clinical use of LPDnac may reduce costs in our centers. Therefore, it is important to develop new models to study lung preservation. PMID:23018310

  10. Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion – State of the Art in Lung Donor Pool Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Popov, Aron-Frederik; Sabashnikov, Anton; Patil, Nikhil P.; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Mohite, Prashant N.; Zych, Bartlomiej; Saez, Diana Garcia; Schmack, Bastian; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Karck, Matthias; Simon, Andre R.; Weymann, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation remains the gold standard for patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the number of suitable donor lungs for the increasing number of patients on the waiting list necessitates alternative tools to expand the lung donor pool. Modern preservation and lung assessment techniques could contribute to improved function in previously rejected lungs. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) already demonstrated its value in identification of transplantable grafts from the higher risk donor pool. Moreover, lungs from EVLP did not show significantly different postoperative results compared to standard criteria lungs. This could be explained by the reduction of the ischemia-reperfusion injury through EVLP application. The aim of this article is to review technical characteristics and the growing clinical EVLP experience with special attention to EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25644463

  11. Ex vivo lung perfusion - state of the art in lung donor pool expansion.

    PubMed

    Popov, Aron-Frederik; Sabashnikov, Anton; Patil, Nikhil P; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Mohite, Prashant N; Zych, Bartlomiej; Saez, Diana Garcia; Schmack, Bastian; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Dohmen, Pascal M; Karck, Matthias; Simon, Andre R; Weymann, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation remains the gold standard for patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the number of suitable donor lungs for the increasing number of patients on the waiting list necessitates alternative tools to expand the lung donor pool. Modern preservation and lung assessment techniques could contribute to improved function in previously rejected lungs. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) already demonstrated its value in identification of transplantable grafts from the higher risk donor pool. Moreover, lungs from EVLP did not show significantly different postoperative results compared to standard criteria lungs. This could be explained by the reduction of the ischemia-reperfusion injury through EVLP application. The aim of this article is to review technical characteristics and the growing clinical EVLP experience with special attention to EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25644463

  12. Utilization of the organ care system as ex-vivo lung perfusion after cold storage transportation.

    PubMed

    Mohite, P N; Maunz, O; Popov, A-F; Zych, B; Patil, N P; Simon, A R

    2015-11-01

    The Organ Care System (OCS) allows perfusion and ventilation of the donor lungs under physiological conditions. Ongoing trials to compare preservation with OCS Lung with standard cold storage do not include donor lungs with suboptimal gas exchange and donor lungs treated with OCS following cold storage transportation. We present a case of a 48-yr-old man who received such lungs after cold storage transportation treated with ex-vivo lung perfusion utilizing OCS. PMID:25662732

  13. Lung perfusion and emphysema distribution affect the outcome of endobronchial valve therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Christian; Theilig, Dorothea; Herzog, Dominik; Poellinger, Alexander; Doellinger, Felix; Schreiter, Nils; Schreiter, Vera; Schürmann, Dirk; Temmesfeld-Wollbrueck, Bettina; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Suttorp, Norbert; Hubner, Ralf-Harto

    2016-01-01

    The exclusion of collateral ventilation (CV) and other factors affect the clinical success of endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR). However, despite its benefits, the outcome of ELVR remains difficult to predict. We investigated whether clinical success could be predicted by emphysema distribution assessed by computed tomography scan and baseline perfusion assessed by perfusion scintigraphy. Data from 57 patients with no CV in the target lobe (TL) were retrospectively analyzed after ELVR with valves. Pulmonary function tests (PFT), St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), and 6-minute walk tests (6MWT) were performed on patients at baseline. The sample was grouped into high and low levels at the median of TL perfusion, ipsilateral nontarget lobe (INL) perfusion, and heterogeneity index (HI). These groups were analyzed for association with changes in outcome parameters from baseline to 3 months follow-up. Compared to baseline, patients showed significant improvements in PFT, SGRQ, and 6MWT (all P≤0.001). TL perfusion was not associated with changes in the outcome. High INL perfusion was significantly associated with increases in 6MWT (P=0.014), and high HI was associated with increases in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), (P=0.012). Likewise, there were significant correlations for INL perfusion and improvement of 6MWT (r=0.35, P=0.03) and for HI and improvement in FEV1 (r=0.45, P=0.001). This study reveals new attributes that associate with positive outcomes for patient selection prior to ELVR. Patients with high perfusions in INL demonstrated greater improvements in 6MWT, while patients with high HI were more likely to respond in FEV1. PMID:27354783

  14. Lung perfusion and emphysema distribution affect the outcome of endobronchial valve therapy.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Christian; Theilig, Dorothea; Herzog, Dominik; Poellinger, Alexander; Doellinger, Felix; Schreiter, Nils; Schreiter, Vera; Schürmann, Dirk; Temmesfeld-Wollbrueck, Bettina; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Suttorp, Norbert; Hubner, Ralf-Harto

    2016-01-01

    The exclusion of collateral ventilation (CV) and other factors affect the clinical success of endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR). However, despite its benefits, the outcome of ELVR remains difficult to predict. We investigated whether clinical success could be predicted by emphysema distribution assessed by computed tomography scan and baseline perfusion assessed by perfusion scintigraphy. Data from 57 patients with no CV in the target lobe (TL) were retrospectively analyzed after ELVR with valves. Pulmonary function tests (PFT), St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), and 6-minute walk tests (6MWT) were performed on patients at baseline. The sample was grouped into high and low levels at the median of TL perfusion, ipsilateral nontarget lobe (INL) perfusion, and heterogeneity index (HI). These groups were analyzed for association with changes in outcome parameters from baseline to 3 months follow-up. Compared to baseline, patients showed significant improvements in PFT, SGRQ, and 6MWT (all P≤0.001). TL perfusion was not associated with changes in the outcome. High INL perfusion was significantly associated with increases in 6MWT (P=0.014), and high HI was associated with increases in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), (P=0.012). Likewise, there were significant correlations for INL perfusion and improvement of 6MWT (r=0.35, P=0.03) and for HI and improvement in FEV1 (r=0.45, P=0.001). This study reveals new attributes that associate with positive outcomes for patient selection prior to ELVR. Patients with high perfusions in INL demonstrated greater improvements in 6MWT, while patients with high HI were more likely to respond in FEV1. PMID:27354783

  15. Tomographic digital subtraction angiography for lung perfusion estimation in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Badea, Cristian T.; Hedlund, Laurence W.; De Lin, Ming; Boslego Mackel, Julie S.; Samei, Ehsan; Allan Johnson, G.

    2007-05-15

    In vivo measurements of perfusion present a challenge to existing small animal imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance microscopy, micro computed tomography, micro positron emission tomography, and microSPECT, due to combined requirements for high spatial and temporal resolution. We demonstrate the use of tomographic digital subtraction angiography (TDSA) for estimation of perfusion in small animals. TDSA augments conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) by providing three-dimensional spatial information using tomosynthesis algorithms. TDSA is based on the novel paradigm that the same time density curves can be reproduced in a number of consecutive injections of {mu}L volumes of contrast at a series of different angles of rotation. The capabilities of TDSA are established in studies on lung perfusion in rats. Using an imaging system developed in-house, we acquired data for four-dimensional (4D) imaging with temporal resolution of 140 ms, in-plane spatial resolution of 100 {mu}m, and slice thickness on the order of millimeters. Based on a structured experimental approach, we optimized TDSA imaging providing a good trade-off between slice thickness, the number of injections, contrast to noise, and immunity to artifacts. Both DSA and TDSA images were used to create parametric maps of perfusion. TDSA imaging has potential application in a number of areas where functional perfusion measurements in 4D can provide valuable insight into animal models of disease and response to therapeutics.

  16. Pretreatment with perfluorohexane vapor attenuates fMLP-induced lung injury in isolated perfused rabbit lungs.

    PubMed

    Bleyl, Jörg U; Heller, Axel R; Fehrenbach, Antonia; Heintz, Manuel; Fehrenbach, Heinz; Klenz, Gesa; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo; Hübler, Matthias; Spieth, Peter M; Koch, Thea

    2010-08-01

    The authors investigated the protective effects and dose dependency of perfluorohexane (PFH) vapor on leukocyte-mediated lung injury in isolated, perfused, and ventilated rabbit lungs. Lungs received either 18 vol.% (n = 7), 9 vol.% (n = 7), or 4.5 vol.% (n = 7) PFH. Fifteen minutes after beginning of PFH application, lung injury was induced with formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP). Control lungs (n = 7) received fMLP only. In addition 5 lungs (PFH-sham) remained uninjured receiving 18 vol.% PFH only. Pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP), peak inspiratory pressure (P(max)), and lung weight were monitored for 90 minutes. Perfusate samples were taken at regular intervals for analysis and representative lungs were fixed for histological analysis. In the control, fMLP application led to a significant increase of mPAP, P(max), lung weight, and lipid mediators. Pretreatment with PFH attenuated the rise in these parameters. This was accompanied by preservation of the structural integrity of the alveolar architecture and air-blood barrier. In uninjured lungs, mPAP, P(max), lung weight, and lipid mediator formation remained uneffected in the presence of PFH. The authors concluded that pretreatment with PFH vapor leads to an attenuation of leukocyte-mediated lung injury. Vaporization of perfluorocarbons (PFCs) offers new therapeutic options, making use of their protective and anti-inflammatory properties in prophylaxis or in early treatment of acute lung injury. PMID:20653469

  17. Bone metastasis on Tc99-m sestamibi myocardial perfusion scan

    PubMed Central

    Hatemi, Lachin; Jabi, Feraas

    2015-01-01

    A 75-year-old woman presented to our department for a stress myocardial perfusion imaging study with Tc99m-sestamibi. Incidental focal uptake, found in the left upper anterior chest, was initially felt to be located in the left breast. After additional single-photon CT imaging was performed the same day, extracardiac foci within the ribs, spine, and left lung (worrisome for active metastases) were shown to be present, with the initial focus located within a left rib rather than a breast. A review of previous radiographic and nuclear imaging studies confirmed metastatic disease from recurrent follicular thyroid cancer. Atypical focal extracardiac activity must be closely scrutinized for the possibility of malignancy, as Tc99m-sestamibi (in addition to being myocardium-avid) is tumor-avid.

  18. Successful lung transplantation after donor lung reconditioning with urokinase in ex vivo lung perfusion system.

    PubMed

    Inci, Ilhan; Yamada, Yoshito; Hillinger, Sven; Jungraithmayr, Wolfgang; Trinkwitz, Michael; Weder, Walter

    2014-11-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism is considered a contraindication to lung donation for transplantation as it might result in graft dysfunction. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method to assess and recondition a questionable donor graft before transplantation. In this report we present a case of successful bilateral lung transplant after donor lung assessment and treatment with a fibrinolytic agent, urokinase, during EVLP. PMID:25441801

  19. Perfusion measures from dynamic ICG scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkin, Sean; Invernizzi, Alessandro; Beecher, David; Staurenghi, Giovanni; Holmes, Tim

    2010-02-01

    Movies acquired from fundus imaging using Indocyanine Green (ICG) and a scanning laser ophthalmoscope provide information for identifying vascular and other retinal abnormalities. Today, the main limitation of this modality is that it requires esoteric training for interpretation. A straightforward interpretation of these movies by objective measurements would aid in eliminating this training barrier. A software program has been developed and tested that produces and visualizes 2D maps of perfusion measures. The program corrects for frame-to-frame misalignment caused by eye motion, including rigid misalignment and warp. The alignment method uses a cross-correlation operation that automatically detects the distance due to motion between adjacent frames. The d-ICG movie is further corrected by removing flicker and vignetting artifacts. Each pixel in the corrected movie sequence is fit with a least-squares spline to yield a smooth intensity temporal profile. From the dynamics of these intensity curves, several perfusion measures are calculated. The most effective of these measures include a metric that represents the amount of time required for a vessel to fill with dye, a metric that represents the diffusion of dye, and a metric that is affected by local blood volume. These metrics are calculated from movies acquired before and after treatment for a neovascular condition. A comparison of these before and after measures may someday provide information to the clinician that helps them to evaluate disease progression and response to treatment.

  20. Ventilation/perfusion mismatch during lung aeration at birth.

    PubMed

    Lang, Justin A R; Pearson, James T; te Pas, Arjan B; Wallace, Megan J; Siew, Melissa L; Kitchen, Marcus J; Fouras, Andreas; Lewis, Robert A; Wheeler, Kevin I; Polglase, Graeme R; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Sonobe, Takashi; Hooper, Stuart B

    2014-09-01

    At birth, the transition to newborn life is triggered by lung aeration, which stimulates a large increase in pulmonary blood flow (PBF). Current theories predict that the increase in PBF is spatially related to ventilated lung regions as they aerate after birth. Using simultaneous phase-contrast X-ray imaging and angiography we investigated the spatial relationships between lung aeration and the increase in PBF after birth. Six near-term (30-day gestation) rabbits were delivered by caesarean section, intubated and an intravenous catheter inserted, before they were positioned for X-ray imaging. During imaging, iodine was injected before ventilation onset, after ventilation of the right lung only, and after ventilation of both lungs. Unilateral ventilation increased iodine levels entering both left and right pulmonary arteries (PAs) and significantly increased heart rate, iodine ejection per beat, diameters of both left and right PAs, and number of visible vessels in both lungs. Within the 6th intercostal space, the mean gray level (relative measure of iodine level) increased from 68.3 ± 11.6 and 70.3 ± 7.5%·s to 136.3 ± 22.6 and 136.3 ± 23.7%·s in the left and right PAs, respectively. No differences were observed between vessels in the left and right lungs, despite the left lung not initially being ventilated. The increase in PBF at birth is not spatially related to lung aeration allowing a large ventilation/perfusion mismatch, or pulmonary shunting, to occur in the partially aerated lung at birth. PMID:24994883

  1. Clinical Brain Death with False Positive Radionuclide Cerebral Perfusion Scans

    PubMed Central

    Venkatram, Sindhaghatta; Bughio, Sara; Diaz-Fuentes, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Practice guidelines from the American Academy of Neurology for the determination of brain death in adults define brain death as “the irreversible loss of function of the brain, including the brainstem.” Neurological determination of brain death is primarily based on clinical examination; if clinical criteria are met, a definitive confirmatory test is indicated. The apnea test remains the gold standard for confirmation. In patients with factors that confound the clinical determination or when apnea tests cannot safely be performed, an ancillary test is required to confirm brain death. Confirmatory ancillary tests for brain death include (a) tests of electrical activity (electroencephalography (EEG) and somatosensory evoked potentials) and (b) radiologic examinations of blood flow (contrast angiography, transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD), and radionuclide methods). Of these, however, radionuclide studies are used most commonly. Here we present data from two patients with a false positive Radionuclide Cerebral Perfusion Scan (RCPS). PMID:26167307

  2. Adenosine A2A Agonist Improves Lung Function During Ex-vivo Lung Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Emaminia, Abbas; LaPar, Damien J.; Zhao, Yunge; Steidle, John F.; Harris, David A.; Linden, Joel; Kron, Irving L.; Lau, Christine L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Ex-vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel technique to assess, and potentially repair marginal lungs that may otherwise be rejected for transplantation. Adenosine has been shown to protect against lung ischemia-reperfusion injury through its A2A receptor. We hypothesized that combining EVLP with adenosine A2A receptor agonist treatment would enhance lung functional quality and increase donor lung usage. Methods Eight bilateral pig lungs were harvested and flushed with cold Perfadex. After 14 hours storage at 4°C, EVLP was performed for 5 hours on two explanted lung groups: 1) Control group lungs (n=4), were perfused with Steen Solution and Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and 2) treated group lungs (n=4) received 10μM CGS21680, a selective A2A receptor agonist, in a Steen Solution-primed circuit. Lung histology, tissue cytokines, gas analysis and pulmonary function were compared between groups. Results Treated lungs demonstrated significantly less edema as reflected by wet-dry weight ratio (6.6 vs. 5.2, p<0.03) and confirmed by histology. In addition, treated lung demonstrated significantly lower levels of interferon gamma (45.1 vs. 88.5, p<0.05). Other measured tissue cytokines (interleukin (IL) 1 beta, IL-6, and IL-8) were lower in treatment group, but values failed to reach statistical significance. Oxygenation index was improved in the treated group (1.5 vs. 2.3, p<0.01) as well as mean airway pressure (10.3 vs. 13 p<0.009). Conclusions EVLP is a novel and efficient way to assess and optimize lung function and oxygen exchange within donor lungs, and the use of adenosine A2A agonist potentiates its potential. EVLP with the concomitant administration of A2A agonist may enhance donor lung quality and could increase the donor lung pool for transplantation. PMID:22051279

  3. Ventilation/Perfusion Positron Emission Tomography—Based Assessment of Radiation Injury to Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Siva, Shankar; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Kron, Tomas; Bressel, Mathias; Callahan, Jason; MacManus, Michael P.; Shaw, Mark; Plumridge, Nikki; Hicks, Rodney J.; Steinfort, Daniel; Ball, David L.; Hofman, Michael S.

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate {sup 68}Ga-ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) as a novel imaging modality for assessment of perfusion, ventilation, and lung density changes in the context of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In a prospective clinical trial, 20 patients underwent 4-dimensional (4D)-V/Q PET/CT before, midway through, and 3 months after definitive lung RT. Eligible patients were prescribed 60 Gy in 30 fractions with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Functional images were registered to the RT planning 4D-CT, and isodose volumes were averaged into 10-Gy bins. Within each dose bin, relative loss in standardized uptake value (SUV) was recorded for ventilation and perfusion, and loss in air-filled fraction was recorded to assess RT-induced lung fibrosis. A dose-effect relationship was described using both linear and 2-parameter logistic fit models, and goodness of fit was assessed with Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Results: A total of 179 imaging datasets were available for analysis (1 scan was unrecoverable). An almost perfectly linear negative dose-response relationship was observed for perfusion and air-filled fraction (r{sup 2}=0.99, P<.01), with ventilation strongly negatively linear (r{sup 2}=0.95, P<.01). Logistic models did not provide a better fit as evaluated by AIC. Perfusion, ventilation, and the air-filled fraction decreased 0.75 ± 0.03%, 0.71 ± 0.06%, and 0.49 ± 0.02%/Gy, respectively. Within high-dose regions, higher baseline perfusion SUV was associated with greater rate of loss. At 50 Gy and 60 Gy, the rate of loss was 1.35% (P=.07) and 1.73% (P=.05) per SUV, respectively. Of 8/20 patients with peritumoral reperfusion/reventilation during treatment, 7/8 did not sustain this effect after treatment. Conclusions: Radiation-induced regional lung functional deficits occur in a dose-dependent manner and can be estimated by simple linear models with 4D-V/Q PET

  4. PREOPERATIVE PREDICTION OF LUNG FUNCTION IN PNEUMONECTOMY BY SPIROMETRY AND LUNG PERFUSION SCINTIGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays an increasing number of lung resections are being done because of the rising prevalence of lung cancer that occurs mainly in patients with limited lung function, what is caused by common etiologic factor - smoking cigarettes. Loss of lung tissue in such patients can worsen much the postoperative pulmonary function. So it is necessary to asses the postoperative pulmonary function especially after maximal resection, i.e. pneumonectomy. Objective: To check over the accuracy of preoperative prognosis of postoperative lung function after pneumonectomy using spirometry and lung perfusion scinigraphy. Material and methods: The study was done on 17 patients operated at the Clinic for thoracic surgery, who were treated previously at the Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases “Podhrastovi” in the period from 01. 12. 2008. to 01. 06. 2011. Postoperative pulmonary function expressed as ppoFEV1 (predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in one second) was prognosticated preoperatively using spirometry, i.e.. simple calculation according to the number of the pulmonary segments to be removed and perfusion lung scintigraphy. Results: There is no significant deviation of postoperative achieved values of FEV1 from predicted ones obtained by both methods, and there is no significant differences between predicted values (ppoFEV1) obtained by spirometry and perfusion scintigraphy. Conclusion: It is necessary to asses the postoperative pulmonary function before lung resection to avoid postoperative respiratory failure and other cardiopulmonary complications. It is absolutely necessary for pneumonectomy, i.e.. maximal pulmonary resection. It can be done with great possibility using spirometry or perfusion lung scintigraphy. PMID:23378687

  5. Lung transplantation from donors after circulatory death using portable ex vivo lung perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Bozso, Sabin; Vasanthan, Vishnu; Luc, Jessica GY; Kinaschuk, Katie; Freed, Darren; Nagendran, Jayan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Donation after circulatory death is a novel method of increasing the number of donor lungs available for transplantation. Using organs from donors after circulatory death has the potential to increase the number of transplants performed. METHODS: Three bilateral lung transplants from donors after circulatory death were performed over a six-month period. Following organ retrieval, all sets of lungs were placed on a portable ex vivo lung perfusion device for evaluation and preservation. RESULTS: Lung function remained stable during portable ex vivo perfusion, with improvement in partial pressure of oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen ratios. Mechanical ventilation was discontinued within 48 h for each recipient and no patient stayed in the intensive care unit longer than eight days. There was no postgraft dysfunction at 72 h in two of the three recipients. Ninety-day mortality for all recipients was 0% and all maintain excellent forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced vital capacity values post-transplantation. CONCLUSION: The authors report excellent results with their initial experience using donors after circulatory death after portable ex vivo lung perfusion. It is hoped this will allow for the most efficient use of available donor lungs, leading to more transplants and fewer deaths for potential recipients on wait lists. PMID:25379654

  6. Vascular effects of acetylcholine in the perfused rabbit lung

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, P.D.; Gillis, C.N.

    1986-03-05

    Acetylcholine (ACh) relaxes large, isolated arteries by releasing an endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). The authors decided to determine if ACh releases EDRF in rabbit lungs (RL) perfused in situ and if chemical injury with tetradecanoyl phorbol myristate acetate (TPA) could modify EDRF release in RL and in rabbit pulmonary arteries (RPA) in vitro. RL were perfused at 15 ml/min with Krebs-dextran solution. 1 ..mu..M ACh infusion raised perfusion pressure (P) in RL that was blocked by 30 ..mu..M indomethacin (IND) in the perfusate. However, when IND-treated RL were perfused with the stable endoperoxide analog, U46619 (2-6nM) to increase P, ACh infusion (0.01-1.0 ..mu..M) consistently decreased elevated P. The vasodilator response to infusion of 1 ..mu..M ACh was acutely antagonized by infusion of either 20 ..mu..M quinacrine (Q) or 10 ..mu..M Fe/sup + +/-hemoglobin (Hb). ACh did not decrease P in IND-treated RL pre-equilibrated with Q or Hb. TPA (10 nM) antagonized ACh-reduction of P and the ACh-induced relaxation of isolated RPA. The TPA antagonism of ACh-relaxation of RPA was prevented by catalase (300 U/ml). From these results they conclude that: 1) ACh-induced vasoconstriction in RL depends on cyclooxygenase product(s). 2) IND unmasks ACh-induced vasodilatation in RL that is inhibited by Q and by Hb suggesting that the effect is mediated by EDRF. 3) TPA inhibits ACh-induced vasodilatation and relaxation of RPA via the release of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or a related oxidant that injures the endothelium.

  7. Evaluating acellular versus cellular perfusate composition during prolonged ex vivo lung perfusion after initial cold ischaemia for 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Becker, Simon; Steinmeyer, Jasmin; Avsar, Murat; Höffler, Klaus; Salman, Jawad; Haverich, Axel; Warnecke, Gregor; Ochs, Matthias; Schnapper, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has developed as a powerful technique to evaluate particularly marginal donor lungs prior to transplantation. In this study, acellular and cellular perfusate compositions were compared in an identical experimental setting as no consensus has been reached on a preferred technique yet. Porcine lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h on the basis of an acellular or a cellular perfusate composition after 24 h of cold ischaemia as defined organ stress. During perfusion, haemodynamic and respiratory parameters were monitored. After EVLP, the lung condition was assessed by light and transmission electron microscopy. Aerodynamic parameters did not show significant differences between groups and remained within the in vivo range during EVLP. Mean oxygenation indices were 491 ± 39 in the acellular group and 513 ± 53 in the cellular group. Groups only differed significantly in terms of higher pulmonary artery pressure and vascular resistance in the cellular group. Lung histology and ultrastructure were largely well preserved after prolonged EVLP and showed only minor structural alterations which were similarly present in both groups. Prolonged acellular and cellular EVLP for 12 h are both feasible with lungs prechallenged by ischaemic organ stress. Physiological and ultrastructural analysis showed no superiority of either acellular or cellular perfusate composition. PMID:26264867

  8. Successful emergent lung transplantation after remote ex vivo perfusion optimization and transportation of donor lungs.

    PubMed

    Wigfield, C H; Cypel, M; Yeung, J; Waddell, T; Alex, C; Johnson, C; Keshavjee, S; Love, R B

    2012-10-01

    A recent clinical trial provided evidence that ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) results in optimized human donor lungs for transplantation. Excellent recipient outcomes were documented after 4 h of normothermic perfusion. We report a clinical case utilizing remote EVLP to assess and improve function of initially otherwise unacceptable injured donor lungs followed by transportation and subsequent bilateral lung transplantation in a patient with virally induced refractory respiratory failure supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. This is the first lung transplantation with the application of remote EVLP, wherein the donor lungs were transported from the donor hospital to a center for EVLP and then transported to another hospital for transplantation. It is also the first case of lung transplantation in the United States utilizing EVLP for functional optimization leading to successful transplantation. Organ procurement data, EVLP assessment, and the pre- and postoperative course of the recipient are presented. The available evidence supporting EVLP, the humanitarian and cooperative utilization of lungs otherwise discarded, are discussed. PMID:23009140

  9. Ex vivo lung perfusion in clinical lung transplantation--state of the art.

    PubMed

    Andreasson, Anders S I; Dark, John H; Fisher, Andrew J

    2014-11-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a new technique for assessing and potentially reconditioning human donor lungs previously unacceptable for clinical transplantation with the potential to dramatically push the limits of organ acceptability. With the recent introduction of portable EVLP, a new era in lung preservation may be upon us with the opportunity to also limit organ ischaemic times and potentially improve the outcome of donor lungs already deemed acceptable for transplantation. It took over half a century for the technique to evolve from basic theory to semi-automated circuits fit for clinical use that are now rapidly being adopted in transplant centres across the globe. With this field in constant evolution and many unanswered questions remaining, our review serves as an update on the state of the art of EVLP in clinical lung transplantation. PMID:25061215

  10. Altered Immunogenicity of Donor Lungs via Removal of Passenger Leukocytes Using Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Stone, J P; Critchley, W R; Major, T; Rajan, G; Risnes, I; Scott, H; Liao, Q; Wohlfart, B; Sjöberg, T; Yonan, N; Steen, S; Fildes, J E

    2016-01-01

    Passenger leukocyte transfer from the donor lung to the recipient is intrinsically involved in acute rejection. Direct presentation of alloantigen expressed on donor leukocytes is recognized by recipient T cells, promoting acute cellular rejection. We utilized ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) to study passenger leukocyte migration from donor lungs into the recipient and to evaluate the effects of donor leukocyte depletion prior to transplantation. For this purpose, female pigs received male left lungs either following 3 h of EVLP or retrieved using standard protocols. Recipients were monitored for 24 h and sequential samples were collected. EVLP-reduced donor leukocyte transfer into the recipient and migration to recipient lymph nodes was markedly reduced. Recipient T cell infiltration of the donor lung was significantly diminished via EVLP. Donor leukocyte removal during EVLP reduces direct allorecognition and T cell priming, diminishing recipient T cell infiltration, the hallmark of acute rejection. PMID:26366523

  11. Lung Radiofrequency Ablation: In Vivo Experimental Study with Low-Perfusion-Rate Multitined Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura Lencioni, Riccardo; Bozzi, Elena; Sbrana, Alberto; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of lung radiofrequency (RF) ablation by using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes in an in vivo animal model. Ten New Zealand White rabbits underwent RF ablation using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes (Starburst Talon; RITA Medical Systems, Mountain View, CA) and a 200-W RF generator. The electrode was positioned under fluoroscopy guidance and a single percutaneous RF ablation was performed. Saline perfusate was doped with nonionic iodinated contrast agent to render it visible on computed tomography (CT). The pump infused the saline doped with contrast agent into the lateral tines at a rate of 0.1ml/min. The planned ablation was of 3 min, with the hooks deployed to 2 cm at a target temperature of 105{sup o}C. An immediate posttreatment CT scan documented the distribution of the doped saline and the presence of immediate complications. The animals were monitored for delayed complications and sacrificed within 72 h (n = 4), 2 weeks (n = 3), or 4 weeks (n = 3). Assessment of ablation zone and adjacent structures was done at autopsy. Major complications consisted of pneumothorax requiring drainage (n = 2) and skin burn (n = 1). Immediately after the procedure the area of ablation was depicted at CT as a round, well-demarcated area, homogeneously opacified by iodinated contrast medium (mean size, 2.3 {+-} 0.8 cm). The presence of a sharply demarcated area of coagulation necrosis (mean size, 2.1 {+-} 0.4 cm) without severe damage to adjacent structures was confirmed at autopsy. In one case, euthanized at 4 weeks, in whom pneumothorax and pleural effusion were depicted, pleural fibrinous adhesions were demonstrated at autopsy. In conclusion, lung RF ablation performed in an in vivo animal model using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes is feasible and safe. No severe damage to adjacent structures was demonstrated.

  12. Role of Extracranial Carotid Duplex and Computed Tomography Perfusion Scanning in Evaluating Perfusion Status of Pericarotid Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Chang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Yu, Cheng-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Carotid stenting is an effective treatment of choice in terms of treating ischemic stroke patients with concomitant carotid stenosis. Though computed tomography perfusion scan has been recognized as a standard tool to monitor/follow up this group of patients, not everyone could endure due to underlying medical illness. In contrast, carotid duplex is a noninvasive assessment tool and could track patient clinical condition in real time. In this study we found that “resistance index” of the carotid ultrasound could detect flow changes before and after the stenting procedure, thus having great capacity to replace the role of computed tomography perfusion exam. PMID:27051669

  13. Kinetics of reversible-sequestration of leukocytes by the isolated perfused rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Goliaei, B.

    1980-08-01

    The kinetics and morphology of sequestration and margination of rat leukocytes were studied using an isolated perfused and ventilated rat lung preparation. Whole rat blood, bone marrow suspension, or leukocyte suspensions, were used to perfuse the isolated rat lung. The lung was also perfused with latex particle suspensions and the passage of particles through the lung capillaries was studied. When a leukocyte suspension was perfused through the lung in the single-pass mode, the rate of sequestration decreased as more cells were perfused. In contrast, latex particles of a size comparable to that of leukocytes were totally stopped by the lung. When the leukocyte suspension was recirculated through the lung, cells were rapidly removed from circulation until a steady state was reached, after which no net removal of cells by the lung occurred. These results indicate that leukocytes are reversibly sequestered from circulation. The sequestered cells marginated and attached to the luminal surface of the endothelium of post-capillary venules and veins. A mathematical model was developed based on the assumption that the attachment and detachment of leukocytes to blood vessel walls follows first-order kinetics. The model correctly predicts the following characteristics of the system: (a) the kinetics of the sequestration of leukocytes by the lung; (b) the existence of a steady state when a suspension of leukocytes is recirculated through the lung; and (c) the independence of the fraction of cells remaining in circulation from the starting concentration for all values of starting concentration. (ERB)

  14. Scanning electron microscopic autoradiography of lung

    SciTech Connect

    Lauhala, K.E.; Sanders, C.L.; McDonald, K.E.

    1988-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) autoradiography of the lung is being used to determine the distribution of inhaled, alpha particle-emitting, plutonium dioxide particles. SEM autoradiography provides high visual impact views of alpha activity. Particles irradiating the bronchiolar epithelium were detected both on the bronchiolar surface and in peribronchiolar alveoli. The technique is being used to obtain quantitative data on the clearance rates of plutonium particles from bronchi and bronchioles.

  15. Gas exchange and ventilation-perfusion relationships in the lung.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Johan; Glenny, Robb W

    2014-10-01

    This review provides an overview of the relationship between ventilation/perfusion ratios and gas exchange in the lung, emphasising basic concepts and relating them to clinical scenarios. For each gas exchanging unit, the alveolar and effluent blood partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide (PO2 and PCO2) are determined by the ratio of alveolar ventilation to blood flow (V'A/Q') for each unit. Shunt and low V'A/Q' regions are two examples of V'A/Q' mismatch and are the most frequent causes of hypoxaemia. Diffusion limitation, hypoventilation and low inspired PO2 cause hypoxaemia, even in the absence of V'A/Q' mismatch. In contrast to other causes, hypoxaemia due to shunt responds poorly to supplemental oxygen. Gas exchanging units with little or no blood flow (high V'A/Q' regions) result in alveolar dead space and increased wasted ventilation, i.e. less efficient carbon dioxide removal. Because of the respiratory drive to maintain a normal arterial PCO2, the most frequent result of wasted ventilation is increased minute ventilation and work of breathing, not hypercapnia. Calculations of alveolar-arterial oxygen tension difference, venous admixture and wasted ventilation provide quantitative estimates of the effect of V'A/Q' mismatch on gas exchange. The types of V'A/Q' mismatch causing impaired gas exchange vary characteristically with different lung diseases. PMID:25063240

  16. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  17. Physiological and biochemical markers of alveolar epithelial barrier dysfunction in perfused human lungs

    PubMed Central

    Frank, James A.; Briot, Raphael; Lee, Jae Woo; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Uchida, Tokujiro; Matthay, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    To study air space fluid clearance (AFC) under conditions that resemble the clinical setting of pulmonary edema in patients, we developed a new perfused human lung preparation. We measured AFC in 20 human lungs rejected for transplantation and determined the contribution of AFC to lung fluid balance. AFC was then compared with air space and perfusate levels of a biological marker of epithelial injury. The majority of human lungs rejected for transplant had intact basal (75%) and β2-adrenergic agonist-stimulated (70%) AFC. For lungs with both basal and stimulated AFC, the basal AFC rate was 19 ± 10%/h, and the β2-adrenergic-stimulated AFC rate was 43 ± 13%/h. Higher rates of AFC were associated with less lung weight gain (Pearson coefficient −0.90, P < 0.0001). Air space and perfusate levels of the type I pneumocyte marker receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) were threefold and sixfold higher, respectively, in lungs without basal AFC compared with lungs with AFC (P < 0.05). These data show that preserved AFC is a critical determinant of favorable lung fluid balance in the perfused human lung, raising the possibility that β2-agonist therapy to increase edema fluid clearance may be of value for patients with acute lung injury and pulmonary edema. Also, although additional studies are needed, a biological marker of alveolar epithelial injury may be useful clinically in predicting preserved AFC. PMID:17351061

  18. Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion and Transplant: State of the Art and View to the Future.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohamed S A

    2015-12-01

    After the first clinical application of ex vivo lung perfusion in 2001, the technique has been used in many lung transplant centers worldwide. In addition, many modifications have been tested, leading to the development of various ex vivo lung perfusion systems and application protocols. Currently, the Lund protocol, the Toronto protocol, and Organ Care System Lung protocol are the clinically applied ex vivo lung perfusion protocols, based on the favorable results of the safety studies. Accordingly, the comparison among these EVLP systems and protocols should be an important research target, in order to provide the evidence based medical data that would recommend one protocol over the others. In this manuscript, the current experience with EVLP is reviewed and some molecular and clinical targets, that could be used to compare the various protocols of the technique, are introduced. PMID:26643670

  19. Surface fluorescence studies of tissue mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Staniszewski, Kevin; Audi, Said H; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-04-01

    We designed a fiber-optic-based optoelectronic fluorometer to measure emitted fluorescence from the auto-fluorescent electron carriers NADH and FAD of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC). The ratio of NADH to FAD is called the redox ratio (RR = NADH/FAD) and is an indicator of the oxidoreductive state of tissue. We evaluated the fluorometer by measuring the fluorescence intensities of NADH and FAD at the surface of isolated, perfused rat lungs. Alterations of lung mitochondrial metabolic state were achieved by the addition of rotenone (complex I inhibitor), potassium cyanide (KCN, complex IV inhibitor) and/or pentachlorophenol (PCP, uncoupler) into the perfusate recirculating through the lung. Rotenone- or KCN-containing perfusate increased RR by 21 and 30%, respectively. In contrast, PCP-containing perfusate decreased RR by 27%. These changes are consistent with the established effects of rotenone, KCN, and PCP on the redox status of the ETC. Addition of blood to perfusate quenched NADH and FAD signal, but had no effect on RR. This study demonstrates the capacity of fluorometry to detect a change in mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused lungs, and suggests the potential of fluorometry for use in in vivo experiments to extract a sensitive measure of lung tissue health in real-time. PMID:23238793

  20. [Extended hypothermic heart-lung preservation system for cardiopulmonary preservation with retrograde coronary sinus perfusion and lung immersion].

    PubMed

    Senoo, Y; Bando, K; Tago, M; Seno, S; Teraoka, H; Teramoto, S

    1990-09-01

    One major restriction of clinical heart-lung transplantation has been the inability to provide extended hypothermic organ preservation. We examined whether core-cooling, retrograde heart perfusion and lung immersion could provide adequate cardiopulmonary preservation. Hence, donor dogs were placed on cardiopulmonary bypass, and rapidly cooled to 15 degrees C. Then heterotopic heart unilateral left lung transplantations were performed. In control group I (n = 5), hearts and lungs were harvested following core-cooling and cardioplegic arrest, and transplanted immediately. In experimental group II (n = 5), heart-lung blocks were similarly excised but stored at 4 degrees C for 12 hours and then transplanted. During preservation, the lungs were immersed in the extracellular solution. For the heart, non-recirculating retrograde coronary sinus perfusion was performed with oxygenated intracellular solution containing perfluorochemicals. Myocardial function determined by the ratio of end-systolic pressure to end-systolic dimension in the experimental group was similar to that in controls. Although pulmonary vascular resistance and extravascular lung water of the experimental group was higher than those in control group, arterial oxygenation was similar in both groups. Thus, extended heart-lung preservation with core-cooling, retrograde heart perfusion and lung immersion technique could be achieved for heart-lung transplantation. PMID:2246529

  1. (68)Ga PET Ventilation and Perfusion Lung Imaging-Current Status and Future Challenges.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Dale L; Eslick, Enid M; Schembri, Geoffrey P; Roach, Paul J

    2016-09-01

    Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) is a positron-emitting radionuclide suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging that has a number of convenient features-it has a physical half life of 68 minutes, it is generator produced at the PET facility and needs no local cyclotron, and being a radiometal is able to be chelated to a number of useful molecules for diagnostic imaging with PET. (68)Ga has recently been investigated as a radiotracer for ventilation and perfusion (V/Q) lung imaging. It is relatively easy to produce both V/Q radiopharmaceuticals labeled with (68)Ga for PET studies, it offers higher spatial resolution than equivalent SPECT studies, the short half life allows for multiple (repeated) scans on the same day, and low amounts of radiotracer can be used thus limiting the radiation dose to the subject. In the usual clinical setting requiring a V/Q scan, that of suspected pulmonary embolism, the role of (68)Ga V/Q PET may be limited from a logistical perspective, however, in nonacute applications such as lung function evaluation, radiotherapy treatment planning, and respiratory physiology investigations it would appear to be an ideal modality to employ. PMID:27553468

  2. Perfusion and ventilation filters for Fourier-decomposition MR lung imaging.

    PubMed

    Wujcicki, Artur; Corteville, Dominique; Materka, Andrzej; Schad, Lothar R

    2015-03-01

    MR imaging without the use of contrast agents has recently been used for creating perfusion and ventilation functional lung images. The technique incorporates frequency- or wavelet-domain filters to separate the MR signal components. This paper presents a new, subject-adaptive algorithm for perfusion and ventilation filters design. The proposed algorithm uses a lung signal model for separation of the signal components in the frequency domain. Non-stationary lung signals are handled by a short time Fourier transform. This method was applied to sets of 192 and 90 co-registered non-contrast MR lung images measured for five healthy subjects at the rate of 3,33 images per second, using different slice thicknesses. In each case, the resulted perfusion and ventilation images showed a smaller amount of mutual information, when compared to those obtained using the known lowpass/highpass filter approach. PMID:25466452

  3. Ex vivo lung perfusion: a comprehensive review of the development and exploration of future trends.

    PubMed

    Roman, Marius A; Nair, Sukumaran; Tsui, Steven; Dunning, John; Parmar, Jasvir S

    2013-09-01

    There is a critical mismatch between the number of donor lungs available and the demand for lungs for transplantation. This has created unacceptably high waiting-list mortality for lung transplant recipients. Currently (2012) in the United Kingdom, there are 216 patients on the lung transplant waiting list and 17 on heart and lung transplant list. The waiting times for suitable lungs average 412 days, with an increasing mortality and morbidity among the patients on the lung transplant list. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a technique for the assessment, resuscitation, and potential repair of suboptimal donor lungs. This is a rapidly developing field with significant clinical implications. In this review article, we critically appraise the background developments that have led to our current clinical practice. In particular, we focus on the human and animal experience, the different perfusion-ventilation strategies, and the impact of different perfusates and leukocyte filters. Finally, we examine EVLP as a potential research tool. This will provide insight into EVLP and its future development in the field of clinical lung transplantation. PMID:23694953

  4. Lung perfusion impairments in pulmonary embolic and airway obstruction with noncontrast MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Suga, Kazuyoshi; Ogasawara, Nobuhiko; Okada, Munemasa; Tsukuda, Toshinobu; Matsunaga, Naofumi; Miyazaki, Mitsue

    2002-06-01

    A noncontrast electrocardiography (ECG)-gated, fast-spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging was applied to noninvasively define perfusion impairments in pulmonary embolic and airway obstruction dog models. Two-phase ECG-gated lung images of the minimal lung signal intensity during systole and maximal signal intensity during diastole were acquired by using optimized R-wave triggering delay times in seven dogs anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium before, soon after, and 2 mo after embolization with enbucrilate and in another eight dogs before and after bronchial occlusion with balloon catheters, in combination with a gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-enhanced dynamic study. An ECG-gated subtraction image between the two-phase lung images provided a uniform but gravity-dependent perfusion map in normal lungs. Furthermore, it defined all 13 variable-size perfusion deficits associated with pulmonary embolism and the dynamically decreased perfusion with time after bronchial occlusion in all the airway obstruction models. These results were consistent with contrast-enhanced pulmonary arterial perfusion phase images. This noncontrast imaging could be equivalent to a contrast-enhanced dynamic study in the definition of regionally impaired pulmonary arterial perfusion in pulmonary embolism and airway obstruction. PMID:12015358

  5. The evolving potential for pediatric ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Luc, Jessica G Y; Nagendran, Jayan

    2016-02-01

    Despite the rise in the number of adult lung transplantations performed, rates of pediatric lung transplantation remain low. Lung transplantation is an accepted therapy for pediatric end-stage lung disease; however, it is limited by a shortage of donor organs. EVLP has emerged as a platform for assessment and preservation of donor lung function. EVLP has been adopted in adult lung transplantation and has successfully led to increased adult lung transplantations and donor lung utilization. We discuss the future implications of EVLP utilization, specifically, its potential evolving role in overcoming donor shortages in smaller children and adolescents to improve the quality and outcomes of lung transplantation in pediatric patients. PMID:26694514

  6. Qualitative evaluation of coronary flow during anesthetic induction using thallium-201 perfusion scans

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, B.; Henkin, R.E.; Glisson, S.N.; el-Etr, A.A.; Bakhos, M.; Sullivan, H.J.; Montoya, A.; Pifarre, R.

    1986-02-01

    Qualitative distribution of coronary flow using thallium-201 perfusion scans immediately postintubation was studied in 22 patients scheduled for elective coronary artery bypass surgery. Ten patients received a thiopental (4 mg/kg) and halothane induction. Twelve patients received a fentanyl (100 micrograms/kg) induction. Baseline thallium-201 perfusion scans were performed 24 h prior to surgery. These scans were compared with the scans performed postintubation. A thallium-positive scan was accepted as evidence of relative hypoperfusion. Baseline hemodynamic and ECG data were obtained prior to induction of anesthesia. These data were compared with the data obtained postintubation. Ten patients developed postintubation thallium-perfusion scan defects (thallium-positive scan), even though there was no statistical difference between their baseline hemodynamics and hemodynamics at the time of intubation. There was no difference in the incidence of thallium-positive scans between those patients anesthetized by fentanyl and those patients anesthetized with thiopental-halothane. The authors conclude that relative hypoperfusion, and possibly ischemia, occurred in 45% of patients studied, despite stable hemodynamics, and that the incidence of these events was the same with two different anesthetic techniques.

  7. Changes in distribution of lung perfusion and ventilation at rest and during maximal exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Mohsenifar, Z.; Ross, M.D.; Waxman, A.; Goldbach, P.; Koerner, S.K.

    1985-03-01

    A new method for evaluation of changes in the distribution of pulmonary perfusion and ventilation during exercise was applied to normal male volunteers. Ventilation and perfusion scans were done with the subjects seated on a bicycle ergometer. The resting studies utilized krypton 81 (/sup 81m/Kr) for ventilation and technetium /sup 99m/ (/sup 99m/Tc) macroaggregate albumin intravenously for perfusion. Exercise studies were done when 80 percent of maximum predicted heart rate was maintained for five minutes and utilized /sup 81m/Kr for ventilation and a tenfold dose of /sup 99m/Tc for perfusion. Higher dose of /sup 99m/Tc would minimize the effect of radioactivity left over from the resting study. This method allowed us to assess changes in ventilation and perfusion in normal subjects induced by exercise, but may also be applicable in a variety of cardiopulmonary conditions that affect pulmonary ventilation and perfusion or both.

  8. Effects of lung ventilation–perfusion and muscle metabolism–perfusion heterogeneities on maximal O2 transport and utilization

    PubMed Central

    Cano, I; Roca, J; Wagner, P D

    2015-01-01

    Previous models of O2 transport and utilization in health considered diffusive exchange of O2 in lung and muscle, but, reasonably, neglected functional heterogeneities in these tissues. However, in disease, disregarding such heterogeneities would not be justified. Here, pulmonary ventilation–perfusion and skeletal muscle metabolism–perfusion mismatching were added to a prior model of only diffusive exchange. Previously ignored O2 exchange in non-exercising tissues was also included. We simulated maximal exercise in (a) healthy subjects at sea level and altitude, and (b) COPD patients at sea level, to assess the separate and combined effects of pulmonary and peripheral functional heterogeneities on overall muscle O2 uptake ( and on mitochondrial (). In healthy subjects at maximal exercise, the combined effects of pulmonary and peripheral heterogeneities reduced arterial () at sea level by 32 mmHg, but muscle by only 122 ml min−1 (–3.5%). At the altitude of Mt Everest, lung and tissue heterogeneity together reduced by less than 1 mmHg and by 32 ml min−1 (–2.4%). Skeletal muscle heterogeneity led to a wide range of potential among muscle regions, a range that becomes narrower as increases, and in regions with a low ratio of metabolic capacity to blood flow, can exceed that of mixed muscle venous blood. For patients with severe COPD, peak was insensitive to substantial changes in the mitochondrial characteristics for O2 consumption or the extent of muscle heterogeneity. This integrative computational model of O2 transport and utilization offers the potential for estimating profiles of both in health and in diseases such as COPD if the extent for both lung ventilation–perfusion and tissue metabolism–perfusion heterogeneity is known. PMID:25640017

  9. Cerebral perfusion reserve indexes determined by fluoromethane positron emission scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, R.L.; Sunderland, J.J.; Lagreze, H.L.; Nickles, R.J.; Rowe, B.R.; Turski, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    An index of cerebral perfusion reserve (RES%), defined as the percent change of regional cerebral blood flow over baseline per mm Hg of end-tidal CO/sub 2/ tension, was determined for each middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory in patients with unilateral carotid distribution transient ischemic attacks or minor cerebrovascular accidents and was compared with that of age-matched, neurologically normal volunteers. Vasodilator responses to induced hypercapnia were tested during inhalation of 5% CO/sub 2/ in 95% O/sub 2/ while regional cerebral blood flow was measured by fluoromethane inhalation positron emission tomography. Mean RES% for 24 normal MCA territories was 5.2 +/- 0.8%. Mean RES% for 15 patient nonischemic MCA territories was 3.8 +/- 1.3% and for 15 ischemic MCA territories was 2.8 +/- 1.9% (both p less than 0.001). Individual RES% values and symmetry ratios between ischemic and nonischemic regions were also determined and compared with angiographic data. Areas of diminished, asymmetric, or paradoxical (two patients) CO/sub 2/ reactivity appear to correspond to areas of compensatory vasodilation. We found this technique to be a safe and reproducible method for defining and recording localized areas of cerebral tissue at apparent risk for hemodynamically related damage.

  10. Performance assessment of a new dynamic scan mode for perfusion computed tomography using a biological phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberland, U.; Klotz, E.,; Abolmaali, N.

    2010-04-01

    Perfusion computed tomography is increasingly being used for stroke and tumor assessment. Using continuous periodic table movement the spatial coverage can be increased beyond the detector width with a new adaptive spiral scanning technique (A4DS). The purpose of this study was to compare perfusion values acquired with the A4DS technique with results from standard dynamic scans at different temporal sampling rates. A biological perfusion phantom (preserved porcine kidney) was scanned with both techniques. In standard mode three scans were performed at adjacent overlapping positions (detector width 38.4 mm) covering the whole phantom. Data were reconstructed with temporal resolutions of 0.5, 1 and 1.5 s. The A4DS scan was performed with a cycle time of 1.5 s and scan ranges of 100 and 148 mm respectively. The phantom was not repositioned between scans in order to assure that identical image slices showed identical phantom slices. Tissue flow was calculated with a deconvolution type algorithm. Regions of interest were drawn in strongly and moderately enhancing areas and around the whole cortex in three slices in the upper, central and lower portion of the phantom. In the flow range of 40 to 100 ml/100ml/min values did not differ by more than 5 ml/100ml/min between any of the scan protocols used. The correlation between the continuous table movement modes and the 0.5 s standard mode was excellent (r2>0.98) indicating that the new mode is well suited for perfusion measurements and allows increasing the coverage by almost a factor of four.

  11. Use of Extended-Criteria Lungs on a Lobe-by-Lobe Basis Through Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion Assessment.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Kentaroh; Oto, Takahiro; Konishi, Yusuke; Hirano, Yutaka; Okada, Masanori; Iga, Norichika; Hirayama, Shin; Sugimoto, Seiichiro; Yamane, Masaomi; Kobayashi, Motomu; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2015-01-01

    Initially rejected and extended-criteria lungs were partially used through an ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) assessment that was first clinically applied in Asia. The truly injured lobe (left lower lobe) was identified during 89-minute normothermic EVLP and was excised, and the remaining lobes were successfully transplanted into a patient with lymphangioleiomyomatosis. The lung lobes showed heterogeneous changes on the ex vivo rig, and a brief duration of EVLP helped differentiate lung quality on a lobe-by-lobe basis. PMID:25952220

  12. Changes in lung composition and regional perfusion and tissue distribution in patients with ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Dakin, Jonathan; Jones, Andrew T; Hansell, David M; Hoffman, Eric A; Evans, Timothy W

    2011-01-01

    Background & objective ARDS is characterised by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and refractory hypoxemia attributed to V/Q mismatch. We used dynamic CT to characterise changes in lung composition, regional perfusion and tissue distribution in patients with ARDS in comparison to healthy subjects. Methods The Fick principle was applied to serial attenuation measurements constructed from sequential CT images acquired during the passage of a bolus of iodinated contrast medium in healthy subjects (n=3) and patients with ARDS (n=11). Perfusion was calculated by the Mullani-Gould method and mapped throughout both lungs. Gradients of perfusion and tissue density against vertical height were constructed. Results In comparison to normal individuals, the tissue component of lungs from patients with ARDS was significantly increased (p<0.05). Blood fraction was unchanged. There was a discernable gradient in tissue density from non dependent to dependent regions in the patients with ARDS that was significantly different from controls. The proportion of perfusion applied to consolidated areas (ie shunt) correlated significantly (p<0.05) with the severity of hypoxaemia. Conclusions In patients with ARDS there are changes in both lung composition and the distribution of tissue and perfusion that may account in part for the physiological changes that define the syndrome. PMID:21883676

  13. Automated lung segmentation of low resolution CT scans of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Benjamin M.; Haworth, Steven T.; Clough, Anne V.

    2014-03-01

    Dual modality micro-CT and SPECT imaging can play an important role in preclinical studies designed to investigate mechanisms, progression, and therapies for acute lung injury in rats. SPECT imaging involves examining the uptake of radiopharmaceuticals within the lung, with the hypothesis that uptake is sensitive to the health or disease status of the lung tissue. Methods of quantifying lung uptake and comparison of right and left lung uptake generally begin with identifying and segmenting the lung region within the 3D reconstructed SPECT volume. However, identification of the lung boundaries and the fissure between the left and right lung is not always possible from the SPECT images directly since the radiopharmaceutical may be taken up by other surrounding tissues. Thus, our SPECT protocol begins with a fast CT scan, the lung boundaries are identified from the CT volume, and the CT region is coregistered with the SPECT volume to obtain the SPECT lung region. Segmenting rat lungs within the CT volume is particularly challenging due to the relatively low resolution of the images and the rat's unique anatomy. Thus, we have developed an automated segmentation algorithm for low resolution micro-CT scans that utilizes depth maps to detect fissures on the surface of the lung volume. The fissure's surface location is in turn used to interpolate the fissure throughout the lung volume. Results indicate that the segmentation method results in left and right lung regions consistent with rat lung anatomy.

  14. Lung Perfusion SPECT: Application in a Patient With Tetralogy of Fallot and Suspected Pulmonary Thromboemboli

    PubMed Central

    Ranji Amjad, Mina; Abbasi, Mehrshad; Farzanehfar, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old woman presented with acute left-sided pleuritic chest pain and dyspnea 6 days after surgery for revision of the stenotic central aortopulmonary shunt. She had a history of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), pulmonary valve stenosis, ventricular septal defect and major aortopulmonary collateral artery. Her Waterston shunt was placed when she was 5 years old and stented and re-dilated after stenosis. Acute pulmonary thromboemboli (PTE) was suspected and pulmonary perfusion scan was performed with 4 mCi 99m Technetium labeled macroaggregated albumin. The left lung was globally hypoperfused with evident uptake in the brain, renal parenchyma and thyroid. SPECT images revealed a segmental wedge-shaped peripheral defect in the posterior segment of the left upper lobe. The scan was interpreted as acute/chronic PTE or vascular abnormality. CT angiography excluded PTE; nevertheless the patient was treated with a therapeutic dose of heparin changed to warfarin and was discharged with improvement of the symptoms. Pulmonary artery angiography was not performed. PMID:25901270

  15. Optimization of isolated perfused/ventilated mouse lung to study hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hae Young; Zeifman, Amy; Ko, Eun A.; Smith, Kimberly A.; Chen, Jiwang; Machado, Roberto F.; Zhao, You-Yang; Minshall, Richard D.; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is a compensatory physiological mechanism in the lung that optimizes the matching of ventilation to perfusion and thereby maximizes gas exchange. Historically, HPV has been primarily studied in isolated perfused/ventilated lungs; however, the results of these studies have varied greatly due to different experimental conditions and species. Therefore, in the present study, we utilized the mouse isolated perfused/ventilated lung model for investigation of the role of extracellular Ca2+ and caveolin-1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression on HPV. We also compared HPV using different perfusate solutions: Physiological salt solution (PSS) with albumin, Ficoll, rat blood, fetal bovine serum (FBS), or Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM). After stabilization of the pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP), hypoxic (1% O2) and normoxic (21% O2) gases were applied via a ventilator in five-minute intervals to measure HPV. The addition of albumin or Ficoll with PSS did not induce persistent and strong HPV with or without a pretone agent. DMEM with the inclusion of FBS in the perfusate induced strong HPV in the first hypoxic challenge, but the HPV was neither persistent nor repetitive. PSS with rat blood only induced a small increase in HPV amplitude. Persistent and repetitive HPV occurred with PSS with 20% FBS as perfusate. HPV was significantly decreased by the removal of extracellular Ca2+ along with addition of 1 mM EGTA to chelate residual Ca2+ and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel blocker (nifedipine 1 μM). PAP was also reactive to contractile stimulation by high K+ depolarization and U46619 (a stable analogue of thromboxane A2). In summary, optimal conditions for measuring HPV were established in the isolated perfused/ventilated mouse lung. Using this method, we further confirmed that HPV is dependent on Ca2+ influx. PMID:24015341

  16. Behavior of vascular resistance undergoing various pressure insufflation and perfusion on decellularized lungs.

    PubMed

    da Palma, Renata Kelly; Nonaka, Paula Naomi; Campillo, Noelia; Uriarte, Juan J; Urbano, Jessica Julioti; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon; Oliveira, Luis V F

    2016-05-01

    Bioengineering of functional lung tissue by using whole lung scaffolds has been proposed as a potential alternative for patients awaiting lung transplant. Previous studies have demonstrated that vascular resistance (Rv) could be altered to optimize the process of obtaining suitable lung scaffolds. Therefore, this work was aimed at determining how lung inflation (tracheal pressure) and perfusion (pulmonary arterial pressure) affect vascular resistance. This study was carried out using the lungs excised from 5 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats. The trachea was cannulated and connected to a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device to provide a tracheal pressure ranging from 0 to 15cmH2O. The pulmonary artery was cannulated and connected to a controlled perfusion system with continuous pressure (gravimetric level) ranging from 5 to 30cmH2O. Effective Rv was calculated by ratio of pulmonary artery pressure (PPA) by pulmonary artery flow (V'PA). Rv in the decellularized lungs scaffolds decreased at increasing V'PA, stabilizing at a pulmonary arterial pressure greater than 20cmH2O. On the other hand, CPAP had no influence on vascular resistance in the lung scaffolds after being subjected to pulmonary artery pressure of 5cmH2O. In conclusion, compared to positive airway pressure, arterial lung pressure markedly influences the mechanics of vascular resistance in decellularized lungs. PMID:26949099

  17. Ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy in an adult with congenital unilateral hyperlucent lung

    SciTech Connect

    Wegener, W.A.; Velchik, M.G. )

    1990-10-01

    A variety of congenital and acquired etiologies can give rise to the radiographic finding of a unilateral hyperlucent lung. An unusual case of congenital lobar emphysema diagnosed in a young adult following the initial discovery of a hyperexpanded, hyperlucent lung is reported. Although subsequent bronchoscopy and radiologic studies detailed extensive anatomic abnormalities, functional imaging also played an important role in arriving at this rare diagnosis. In particular, ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy identified the small contralateral lung as the functional lung and helped narrow the differential diagnosis to etiologies involving obstructive airway disorders.

  18. Effect of Fenoterol on PAF-induced lung edema in isolated and perfused rabbit lungs.

    PubMed

    Pesce, L; Tristano, S; Friedman, E; Comellas, A; Marcano, H; Sanchez de León, R

    1998-11-01

    We have studied the effects of fenoterol on PAF-induced response in pulmonary circulation. We used 28 isolated and perfused rabbit lungs preparations: eight control preparations (CP), four vehicles preparations (VP), eight PAF preparations (PP) with two doses of PAF, one called low dose (LD = 0.5 microg/kg of weight) and the other high dose (HD = 1 microg/kg of weight) and eight Fenoterol preparations (FP) which we administered 0.05 mg of Fenoterol for 15 min, followed by a LD and HD of PAF. FP prevented elevation of pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa) as compared to PP, at LD of PAF: 12.615 (CI 95%: 8.57-20.885) versus 83.705 (CI 95%: 50.55-114.3) cm of water; and at HD of PAF: 19.38 (CI 95%: 11.235-28.94) versus 205.1 (CI 95%: 141.3-271) cm of water respectively. FP prevented the increase in fluid filtration rate (FFR) observed in PP at both doses of PAF LD: 0.765 (CI 95%: 0.07-3.385) versus 0.01 (CI 95%: -0.05-0.005) g/min; HD: 5.515 (CI 95%: 2.425-8.865) versus 0.03 (CI 95%: 0-0.33) g/min. Our results suggest that PAF has a vasoconstrictor effect that produces lung edema and this effect is inhibited by fenoterol. PMID:9865589

  19. Accuracy and Utility of Deformable Image Registration in {sup 68}Ga 4D PET/CT Assessment of Pulmonary Perfusion Changes During and After Lung Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Hofman, Michael S.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Callahan, Jason; Kron, Tomas; MacManus, Michael P.; Ball, David L.; Jackson, Price; Siva, Shankar

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: Measuring changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose requires registration of the functional imaging to the radiation therapy treatment planning scan. This study investigates registration accuracy and utility for positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging in radiation therapy for non–small cell lung cancer. Methods: {sup 68}Ga 4-dimensional PET/CT ventilation-perfusion imaging was performed before, during, and after radiation therapy for 5 patients. Rigid registration and deformable image registration (DIR) using B-splines and Demons algorithms was performed with the CT data to obtain a deformation map between the functional images and planning CT. Contour propagation accuracy and correspondence of anatomic features were used to assess registration accuracy. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine statistical significance. Changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose were calculated for each registration method for each patient and averaged over all patients. Results: With B-splines/Demons DIR, median distance to agreement between lung contours reduced modestly by 0.9/1.1 mm, 1.3/1.6 mm, and 1.3/1.6 mm for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.01 for all), and median Dice score between lung contours improved by 0.04/0.04, 0.05/0.05, and 0.05/0.05 for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.001 for all). Distance between anatomic features reduced with DIR by median 2.5 mm and 2.8 for pretreatment and midtreatment time points, respectively (P=.001) and 1.4 mm for posttreatment (P>.2). Poorer posttreatment results were likely caused by posttreatment pneumonitis and tumor regression. Up to 80% standardized uptake value loss in perfusion scans was observed. There was limited change in the loss in lung perfusion between registration methods; however, Demons resulted in larger interpatient variation compared with rigid and B-splines registration

  20. Composite pseudocolor images: a technique to enhance the visual correlation between ventilation-perfusion lung images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz de Carvalho, Carlos; Costa, Antonio A.; Seixas, M.; Ferreira, F. N.; Guedes, M. A.; Amaral, I.

    1993-07-01

    Lung ventilation and perfusion raw nuclear medicine images obtained from a gamma camera can be difficult to analyze on a per si basis. A method to optimize the visual correlation between these images was established through the use of new combination images: Composite Pseudo-Color (CPC) images. The major topic of this study is the assessment of the usefulness of this method in the detection of lung malfunction.

  1. Teaching Ventilation/Perfusion Relationships in the Lung

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenny, Robb W.

    2008-01-01

    This brief review is meant to serve as a refresher for faculty teaching respiratory physiology to medical students. The concepts of ventilation and perfusion matching are some of the most challenging ideas to learn and teach. Some strategies to consider in teaching these concepts are, first, to build from simple to more complex by starting with a…

  2. A General Approach to the Evaluation of Ventilation-Perfusion Ratios in Normal and Abnormal Lungs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Peter D.

    1977-01-01

    Outlines methods for manipulating multiple gas data so as to gain the greatest amount of insight into the properties of ventilation-perfusion distributions. Refers to data corresponding to normal and abnormal lungs. Uses a two-dimensional framework with the respiratory gases of oxygen and carbon dioxide. (CS)

  3. Thromboxane release from irradiated perfused rat lungs: role of oncotic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz, T.R.; Kot, P.A.; Ramwell, P.W.; Schneidkraut, M.J.

    1987-07-27

    Isolated lungs from 20 Gray (Gy) whole body irradiated rats were perfused with Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate plus 3% bovine serum albumin (KRB-BSA). The pulmonary effluent showed a 99% (p < .05) increase in immunoassayable thromboxane B2 (iTXB2) release compared with non-irradiated lungs. Since both arachidonic acid and cyclooxygenase products bind to albumin, studies were performed to determine if omission or substitution of this protein oncotic agent would alter the radiation-induced increase in pulmonary iTXB2 release. Irradiated, isolated lungs perfused with media from which the BSA was omitted (KRB) did not demonstrate the radiation-induced increase in pulmonary iTXB2 release. Similarly, irradiated lungs perfused with media in which Dextran 70 (KRB plus 3% Dextran 70, KRB-Dextran 70) was substituted for BSA also did not show the radiation-induced increase in pulmonary effluent iTXB2 levels. These studies demonstrate the importance of including albumin as the oncotic agent in perfused organ systems when studying cyclooxygenase product release. 23 references, 2 tables.

  4. A Physiologic and Biochemical Profile of Clinically Rejected Lungs on a Normothermic Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion Platform

    PubMed Central

    George, Timothy J.; Arnaoutakis, George J.; Beaty, Claude A.; Jandu, Simran K.; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Shah, Ashish S.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is increasingly being used to evaluate and manipulate potential donor lungs prior to lung transplantation (LTx), data on the biochemistry of lungs during EVLP is limited. In this study, we examined the physiology and biochemistry of human lungs on an EVLP circuit. Methods Unallocated double lungs were recovered in standard fashion and split into single lungs. All lungs received a nebulized arginase inhibitor, 2-S-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH), at either the onset (n=6) or after 3 hours (n=8) of EVLP. Serial biochemical analysis included levels of arginase, endogenous nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), cyclic guanosine monophosphate, and reactive oxygen species. Lungs were considered transplantable if they sustained a PaO2:FiO2≥350 in addition to stable pulmonary function during EVLP. Results A total of 14 single lungs were recovered. 3 single lungs from different donors were deemed transplantable after EVLP. These lungs had superior oxygenation, lower carbon dioxide, and more stable pulmonary artery pressures. Transplantable lungs had higher baseline levels of eNOS and higher final levels of cGMP than non-transplantable lungs. Early ABH administration was associated with a transient increase in dynamic compliance. Conclusion In this biochemical characterization of lungs deemed unsuitable for LTx, early levels of eNOS and late levels of cGMP appear to be associated with improved allograft function during EVLP. Additionally, nebulized ABH is associated with a significant increase in dynamic compliance. These data suggest that biochemical markers during EVLP may predict acceptable allograft function and that this platform can be used to biochemically manipulate donor lungs prior to LTx. PMID:23218735

  5. Active Oxygen Metabolites and Thromboxane in Phorbol Myristate Acetate Toxicity to the Isolated, Perfused Rat Lung.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Laurie Jean

    When administered intravenously or intratracheally to rats, rabbits and sheep, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) produces changes in lung morphology and function are similar to those seen in humans with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Therefore, it is thought that information about the mechanism of ARDS development can be gained from experiments using PMA-treated animals. Currently, the mechanisms by which PMA causes pneumotoxicity are unknown. Results from other studies in rabbits and in isolated, perfused rabbit lungs suggest that PMA-induced lung injury is mediated by active oxygen species from neutrophils (PMN), whereas studies in sheep and rats suggest that PMN are not required for the toxic response. The role of PMN, active oxygen metabolites and thromboxane (TxA_2) in PMA-induced injury to isolated, perfused rat lungs (IPLs) was examined in this thesis. To determine whether PMN were required for PMA to produce toxicity to the IPL, lungs were perfused for 30 min with buffer containing various concentrations of PMA (in the presence or absence of PMN). When concentrations >=q57 ng/ml were added to medium devoid of added PMN, perfusion pressure and lung weight increased. When a concentration of PMA (14-28 ng/ml) that did not by itself cause lungs to accumulate fluid was added to the perfusion medium containing PMN (1 x 10 ^8), perfusion pressure increased, and lungs accumulated fluid. These results indicate that high concentrations of PMA produce lung injury which is independent of PMN, whereas injury induced by lower concentrations is PMN-dependent. To examine whether active oxygen species were involved in mediating lung injury induced by PMA and PMN, lungs were coperfused with the oxygen radical scavengers SOD and/or catalase. Coperfusion with either or both of these enzymes totally protected lungs against injury caused by PMN and PMA. These results suggest that active oxygen species (the hydroxyl radical in particular), mediate lung injury in

  6. Platelet-activating factor induces selective pulmonary arterial hyperreactivity in isolated perfused rabbit lungs.

    PubMed

    Ohar, J A; Waller, K S; Dahms, T E

    1993-07-01

    The role of vasoreactivity in PAF-induced pulmonary hypertension (PHT) was assessed in isolated, perfused rabbit lungs. We evaluated the steady-state pulmonary vascular response to five vasoconstrictors: PGF2 alpha, norepinephrine, angiotensin II, PAF, and KCl. Pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) were significantly greater in lungs of rabbits treated with PAF for 28 days than in control rabbits in response to PGF2 alpha and norepinephrine. When resistance was partitioned by the vascular occlusion method, at baseline the vascular resistance was equally distributed between arterial and venous segments in both experimental groups. Arterial resistance accounted for approximately 76% of PVR during norepinephrine injection and 60% of PVR during PGF2 alpha injection in PAF-treated lungs. Whereas arterial resistance accounted for approximately 63% of PVR during norepinephrine injection and 52% of PVR during PGF2 alpha injection in control lungs, there was no significant difference in the response to angiotensin II, acute PAF, and KCl in lungs from chronic PAF-treated rabbits compared with responses in control rabbit lungs, though the pressor response to acute PAF tended to be blunted in PAF-treated lungs. Chronic PAF treatment results in enhanced pulmonary arterial reactivity to selected autacoids in isolated perfused lungs. PMID:8317792

  7. Quantifying Single Microvessel Permeability in Isolated Blood-perfused Rat Lung Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Kathirvel; Parthasarathi, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    The isolated blood-perfused lung preparation is widely used to visualize and define signaling in single microvessels. By coupling this preparation with real time imaging, it becomes feasible to determine permeability changes in individual pulmonary microvessels. Herein we describe steps to isolate rat lungs and perfuse them with autologous blood. Then, we outline steps to infuse fluorophores or agents via a microcatheter into a small lung region. Using these procedures described, we determined permeability increases in rat lung microvessels in response to infusions of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. The data revealed that lipopolysaccharide increased fluid leak across both venular and capillary microvessel segments. Thus, this method makes it possible to compare permeability responses among vascular segments and thus, define any heterogeneity in the response. While commonly used methods to define lung permeability require postprocessing of lung tissue samples, the use of real time imaging obviates this requirement as evident from the present method. Thus, the isolated lung preparation combined with real time imaging offers several advantages over traditional methods to determine lung microvascular permeability, yet is a straightforward method to develop and implement. PMID:25045895

  8. Pressure- and flow-controlled media perfusion differently modify vascular mechanics in lung decellularization.

    PubMed

    da Palma, Renata K; Campillo, Noelia; Uriarte, Juan J; Oliveira, Luis V F; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon

    2015-09-01

    Organ biofabrication is a potential future alternative for obtaining viable organs for transplantation. Achieving intact scaffolds to be recellularized is a key step in lung bioengineering. Perfusion of decellularizing media through the pulmonary artery has shown to be effective. How vascular perfusion pressure and flow vary throughout lung decellularization, which is not well known, is important for optimizing the process (minimizing time) while ensuring scaffold integrity (no barotrauma). This work was aimed at characterizing the pressure/flow relationship at the pulmonary vasculature and at how effective vascular resistance depends on pressure- and flow-controlled variables when applying different methods of media perfusion for lung decellularization. Lungs from 43 healthy mice (C57BL/6; 7-8 weeks old) were investigated. After excision and tracheal cannulation, lungs were inflated at 10 cmH2O airway pressure and subjected to conventional decellularization with a solution of 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Pressure (PPA) and flow (V'PA) at the pulmonary artery were continuously measured. Decellularization media was perfused through the pulmonary artery: (a) at constant PPA=20 cmH2O or (b) at constant V'PA=0.5 and 0.2 ml/min. Effective vascular resistance was computed as Rv=PPA/V'PA. Rv (in cmH2O/(ml/min)); mean±SE) considerably varied throughout lung decellularization, particularly for pressure-controlled perfusion (from 29.1±3.0 in baseline to a maximum of 664.1±164.3 (p<0.05), as compared with flow-controlled perfusion (from 49.9±3.3 and 79.5±5.1 in baseline to a maximum of 114.4±13.9 and 211.7±70.5 (p<0.05, both), for V'PA of 0.5 and 0.2 ml/min respectively. Most of the media infused to the pulmonary artery throughout decellularization circulated to the airways compartment across the alveolar-capillary membrane. This study shows that monitoring perfusion mechanics throughout decellularization provides information relevant for optimizing the process

  9. Animal models of ex vivo lung perfusion as a platform for transplantation research

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Kevin; Bobba, Christopher; Ghadiali, Samir; Jr, Don Hayes; Black, Sylvester M; Whitson, Bryan A

    2014-01-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a powerful experimental model for isolated lung research. EVLP allows for the lungs to be manipulated and characterized in an external environment so that the effect of specific ventilation/perfusion variables can be studied independent of other confounding physiologic contributions. At the same time, EVLP allows for normal organ level function and real-time monitoring of pulmonary physiology and mechanics. As a result, this technique provides unique advantages over in vivo and in vitro models. Small and large animal models of EVLP have been developed and each of these models has their strengths and weaknesses. In this manuscript, we provide insight into the relative strengths of each model and describe how the development of advanced EVLP protocols is leading to a novel experimental platform that can be used to answer critical questions in pulmonary physiology and transplant medicine. PMID:24977117

  10. Animal models of ex vivo lung perfusion as a platform for transplantation research.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Kevin; Bobba, Christopher; Ghadiali, Samir; Hayes, Don; Black, Sylvester M; Whitson, Bryan A

    2014-05-20

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a powerful experimental model for isolated lung research. EVLP allows for the lungs to be manipulated and characterized in an external environment so that the effect of specific ventilation/perfusion variables can be studied independent of other confounding physiologic contributions. At the same time, EVLP allows for normal organ level function and real-time monitoring of pulmonary physiology and mechanics. As a result, this technique provides unique advantages over in vivo and in vitro models. Small and large animal models of EVLP have been developed and each of these models has their strengths and weaknesses. In this manuscript, we provide insight into the relative strengths of each model and describe how the development of advanced EVLP protocols is leading to a novel experimental platform that can be used to answer critical questions in pulmonary physiology and transplant medicine. PMID:24977117

  11. Do thallium myocardial perfusion scan abnormalities predict survival in sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, E.L.; Caldwell, J.W. )

    1990-07-01

    Whereas the total mortality rate for sarcoidosis is 0.2 per 100,000, the prognosis, when the heart is involved, is very much worse. The authors used the difference in mortality rate to infer whether thallium 201 myocardial perfusion scan abnormalities correspond to myocardial sarcoid by making the simplifying assumption that if they do, then patients with abnormal scans will be found to have a death rate similar to patients with sarcoid heart disease. The authors therefore analyzed complete survival data on 52 sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms an average of eighty-nine months after they had been scanned as part of a protocol. By use of survival analysis (the Cox proportional hazards model), the only variable that was significantly associated with survival was age. The patients' scan pattern, treatment status, gender, and race were not significantly related to survival. The authors conclude that thallium myocardial perfusion scans cannot reliably be used to diagnose sarcoid heart disease in sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms.

  12. Exclusion of pneumothorax by radionuclide lung scan

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, P.E.

    1986-05-01

    A case is reported in which ventilation lung imaging was useful in excluding a large pneumothorax. This technique may be helpful in patients with emphysema in whom exclusion of pneumothorax by radiographic criteria might be difficult.

  13. Patterns of pulmonary perfusion scans in normal subjects. IV. The prevalence of abnormal scans in smokers 30 to 49 years of age

    SciTech Connect

    Fedullo, P.F.; Kapitan, K.S.; Brewer, N.S.; Ashburn, W.L.; Hartman, M.T.; Moser, K.M.

    1989-05-01

    The usefulness of ventilation-perfusion scans in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism is limited by the wide range of pulmonary diseases that are associated with abnormal scans, and by the largely undetermined prevalence of abnormal scans in persons without cardiopulmonary disease. In prior studies, we found perfusion defects to be rarely present in young persons and in older nonsmokers. To determine if normal older smokers have a higher prevalence of abnormal ventilation and perfusion scans, we performed six-view /sup 99m/Tc perfusion (Q) scans and /sup 133/Xe ventilation (V) scans in 40 subjects 30 to 49 yr of age who had no known cardiopulmonary disease. Each subject had undergone a history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, spirometry, and posteroanterior chest roentgenogram prior to scanning. All V and Q scans were interpreted blindly and independently by two experienced readers. No subject demonstrated a lobar or segmental defect on two views. One subject had a matched subsegmental defect, and one subject had delayed washout from a subsegmental area of the right upper lobe during V scanning, with a normal Q scan. We conclude that abnormal V and Q scans are uncommon among normal smokers 30 to 49 yr of age.

  14. Comparison Between Postprocessing Software and Repeated Scanning to Eliminate Subdiaphragmatic Activity in Myocardial Perfusion Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Theerakulpisut, Daris; Chotipanich, Chanisa

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a powerful test of evaluation for coronary artery disease, but subdiaphragmatic radiotracer activity often interferes with the interpretation of inferior wall findings. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of using software elimination of the subdiaphragmatic activity for the assessment of its efficacy in the correctness of image interpretation and the overall image quality of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). MPS studies from January 2010 to October 2012 at our institution were reviewed. Thirty-two SPECT studies were included, all of which had significant subdiaphragmatic activity in the first scan and needed to be delayed to let the activity clear. Each scan was interpreted by using semiquantitative scoring in 17 segments according to the degree of radiotracer uptake. The first scan, which had interfering activity, was manipulated by masking out the unwanted activity with software native to our image processing software suite. The manipulated images were then compared with delayed images of the same patient, of which the subdiaphragmatic activity was spontaneously cleared with time. The first scan masked by software correlated with the delayed scan for myocardial regions supplied by the left circumflex (LCx) and right coronary artery (RCA), but not the left anterior descending (LAD). However, the quality of the masked scans was perceived by the observer to be better in terms of quality and ease of interpretation. Using software to mask out unwanted subdiaphragmatic activity has no detrimental effect on the interpretation of MPS images when compared with delayed scanning, but it can improve subjective scan quality and ease of interpretation. PMID:27134559

  15. Comparison Between Postprocessing Software and Repeated Scanning to Eliminate Subdiaphragmatic Activity in Myocardial Perfusion Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Theerakulpisut, Daris; Chotipanich, Chanisa

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a powerful test of evaluation for coronary artery disease, but subdiaphragmatic radiotracer activity often interferes with the interpretation of inferior wall findings. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of using software elimination of the subdiaphragmatic activity for the assessment of its efficacy in the correctness of image interpretation and the overall image quality of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). MPS studies from January 2010 to October 2012 at our institution were reviewed. Thirty-two SPECT studies were included, all of which had significant subdiaphragmatic activity in the first scan and needed to be delayed to let the activity clear. Each scan was interpreted by using semiquantitative scoring in 17 segments according to the degree of radiotracer uptake. The first scan, which had interfering activity, was manipulated by masking out the unwanted activity with software native to our image processing software suite. The manipulated images were then compared with delayed images of the same patient, of which the subdiaphragmatic activity was spontaneously cleared with time. The first scan masked by software correlated with the delayed scan for myocardial regions supplied by the left circumflex (LCx) and right coronary artery (RCA), but not the left anterior descending (LAD). However, the quality of the masked scans was perceived by the observer to be better in terms of quality and ease of interpretation. Using software to mask out unwanted subdiaphragmatic activity has no detrimental effect on the interpretation of MPS images when compared with delayed scanning, but it can improve subjective scan quality and ease of interpretation. PMID:27134559

  16. Automated scoring of regional lung perfusion in children from contrast enhanced 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Tobias; Eichinger, Monika; Bauman, Grzegorz; Bischoff, Arved; Puderbach, Michael; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2012-03-01

    MRI perfusion images give information about regional lung function and can be used to detect pulmonary pathologies in cystic fibrosis (CF) children. However, manual assessment of the percentage of pathologic tissue in defined lung subvolumes features large inter- and intra-observer variation, making it difficult to determine disease progression consistently. We present an automated method to calculate a regional score for this purpose. First, lungs are located based on thresholding and morphological operations. Second, statistical shape models of left and right children's lungs are initialized at the determined locations and used to precisely segment morphological images. Segmentation results are transferred to perfusion maps and employed as masks to calculate perfusion statistics. An automated threshold to determine pathologic tissue is calculated and used to determine accurate regional scores. We evaluated the method on 10 MRI images and achieved an average surface distance of less than 1.5 mm compared to manual reference segmentations. Pathologic tissue was detected correctly in 9 cases. The approach seems suitable for detecting early signs of CF and monitoring response to therapy.

  17. Site of pulmonary vasodilation by inhaled nitric oxide in the perfused lung

    SciTech Connect

    Rimar, S.; Gillis, C.N.

    1995-05-01

    Site of pulmonary vasodilation by inhaled nitric oxide in the perfused lung. To determine the site of inhaled nitric oxide (NO)-induced pulmonary vasodilation, a double vascular occlusion technique was used with rabbit lungs ventilated and perfused at 20 ml/min with Krebs solution containing 3% dextran and 30 {mu}M indomethacin. Inhaled NO (120 ppm for 3% min) reduced pulmonary vasoconstriction produced by U-46619 infusion (0.5 -1.2 nmol/min), significantly decreasing total resistance (RT) [1,080 {plus_minus} 51 (SE) vs. 1,545 {plus_minus} 109 mmHg-min/l; P < 0.01]. Acetylcholine infusion (ACh; 2-5 nmol/min) and nitroglycerin (NTG; 0.35 {mu}mol) likewise decreased RT. Arterial resistance (Ra) was also significantly less with inhaled NO, ACh, and NTG compared with U-46619 alone. Venous resistance (Rv), however, was unchanged. When the direction of perfusion was reversed in the lung, inhaled NO, ACh, and NTG significantly decreased RT compared with U-46619 alone, and Rv was also reduced by all three agents. After electrolysis-induced acute lung injury, inhaled NO significantly reduced both RT and Ra compared with U-46619 alone, whereas Rv was unaffected. Our results demonstrate that inhaled NO gas affects primarily the arterial (precapillary) component of the pulmonary circulation but, under conditions of extreme venous constriction, may dilate the postcapillary component as well. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Lung Perfusion Measured Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging: New Tools for Physiological Insights Into the Pulmonary Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Susan R.; Prisk, G. Kim

    2012-01-01

    Since the lung receives the entire cardiac output, sophisticated imaging techniques are not required in order to measure total organ perfusion. However, for many years studying lung function has required physiologists to consider the lung as a single entity: in imaging terms as a single voxel. Since imaging, and in particular functional imaging, allows the acquisition of spatial information important for studying lung function, these techniques provide considerable promise and are of great interest for pulmonary physiologists. In particular, despite the challenges of low proton density and short T2* in the lung, noncontrast MRI techniques to measure pulmonary perfusion have several advantages including high reliability and the ability to make repeated measurements under a number of physiologic conditions. This brief review focuses on the application of a particular arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique, ASL-FAIRER (flow sensitive inversion recovery with an extra radiofrequency pulse), to answer physiologic questions related to pulmonary function in health and disease. The associated measurement of regional proton density to correct for gravitational-based lung deformation (the “Slinky” effect (Slinky is a registered trademark of PaufSlinky incorporated)) and issues related to absolute quantification are also discussed. PMID:21105135

  19. Isolated total lung perfusion as a means to deliver organ-specific chemotherapy: long-term studies in animals

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M.R.; Christensen, C.W.; Minchin, R.F.; Rickaby, D.A.; Linehan, J.H.; Schuller, H.M.; Boyd, M.R.; Dawson, C.A.

    1985-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a surgical procedure that would allow for bilateral isolated lung perfusion in vivo as a means of delivering organ-specific chemotherapy and to evaluate the influence of the procedure on certain pulmonary physiologic parameters. The sterile surgical procedure that was carried out in dogs involved the setting up of two separate perfusion circuits. Once standard systemic cardiopulmonary bypass was established, a second circuit was devised to perfuse the lungs by placing an inflow cannula into the main pulmonary artery and collecting venous effluent in the left atrium. Cross-contamination between perfusion circuits was determined in acute studies with labeled plasma protein or red blood cells and was found to be in an acceptable range if the aorta was cross-clamped and the heart arrested. Only about 0.4 ml/min of pulmonary perfusate leaked into the systemic circulation, indicating that systemic toxicity should not be a major concern when chemotherapy agents are added to the pulmonary perfusate. Chronic studies demonstrated that hemodynamic parameters, lung water, pulmonary endothelial serotonin extraction, and histologic findings all showed minimal changes after 50 minutes of isolated lung perfusion. Five days after perfusion, lung dynamic compliance and peak serotonin extraction showed significant decreases. However, all of the measured parameters had returned toward baseline levels by the end of the 8-week postoperative study period. The procedure offers significant advantages over the previously described single lung perfusion and may provide a method of delivering immediate high-concentration adjuvant chemotherapy to coincide with resection of primary or metastatic lung tumors.

  20. Vasomotor tone does not affect perfusion heterogeneity and gas exchange in normal primate lungs during normoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenny, R. W.; Robertson, H. T.; Hlastala, M. P.

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether vasoregulation is an important cause of pulmonary perfusion heterogeneity, we measured regional blood flow and gas exchange before and after giving prostacyclin (PGI(2)) to baboons. Four animals were anesthetized with ketamine and mechanically ventilated. Fluorescent microspheres were used to mark regional perfusion before and after PGI(2) infusion. The lungs were subsequently excised, dried inflated, and diced into approximately 2-cm(3) pieces (n = 1,208-1,629 per animal) with the spatial coordinates recorded for each piece. Blood flow to each piece was determined for each condition from the fluorescent signals. Blood flow heterogeneity did not change with PGI(2) infusion. Two other measures of spatial blood flow distribution, the fractal dimension and the spatial correlation, did not change with PGI(2) infusion. Alveolar-arterial O(2) differences did not change with PGI(2) infusion. We conclude that, in normal primate lungs during normoxia, vasomotor tone is not a significant cause of perfusion heterogeneity. Despite the heterogeneous distribution of blood flow, active regulation of regional perfusion is not required for efficient gas exchange.

  1. Rational diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (RADIA PE) in symptomatic outpatients with suspected PE: an improved strategy to exclude or diagnose venous thromboembolism by the sequential use of a clinical model, rapid ELISA D-dimer test, perfusion lung scan, ultrasonography, spiral CT, and pulmonary angiography.

    PubMed

    Michiels, J J

    1998-01-01

    A prospective management decision analysis for the exclusion and diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) based on pre-test clinical probability (PCP) estimation for PE, a rapid ELISA D-dimer test, perfusion lungscan (P-scan), CUS, spiral CT, and pulmonary angiography is proposed. The modified PCP model for PE of Wells et al. allows reasonably accurate classification of patients with no, low, moderate, and high probability for PE. The combined rational use of the evidence-based noninvasive imaging techniques P-scan, CUS, and spiral CT with the rapid ELISA D-dimer test and PCP will reduce the need for invasive pulmonary angiography to perhaps 10 to 15% of patients, who initially presented with suspected PE. A Rational Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism (RADIA PE) model is proposed for testing in a large multicenter study of patients with suspected PE. PMID:9763360

  2. Optical studies of tissue mitochondrial redox in isolated perfused rat lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, R.; Staniszewski, K.; Jacobs, E. R.; Audi, S.; Ranji, M.

    2012-02-01

    Through the monitoring of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes, NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide) and FAD (Flavoprotein Adenine Dinucleotide), the redox state of metabolism can be probed in real time in many intact organs, but its use has not been fully developed in lungs. The ratio of these fluorophores, (NADH/FAD), referred to as the mitochondrial redox ratio (RR), can be used as a quantitative metabolic marker of tissue. We have designed a fluorometer that can be used to monitor lung surface NADH and FAD fluorescence in isolated perfused lungs. Surface fluorescence NADH and FAD signals were acquired in the absence (control) and presence of pentachlorophenol (PCP), rotenone, and potassium cyanide (KCN). Rotenone, an inhibitor of complex I, increased RR by 18%, predominantly due to an increase in NADH signal. KCN, an inhibitor of complex IV reduced the chain and resulted in an increase of 33% in RR, as a result of 23% increase in NADH and 8% in FAD . PCP, an uncoupler which oxidizes the respiratory chain, decreased RR by 18% as a result of 14% decrease in NADH signal and 4% increase in FAD signal. These results demonstrate the ability of surface fluorometry to detect changes in lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused lungs.

  3. Spectral imaging technique for retinal perfusion detection using confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasta, Seyed Hossein; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Sharp, Peter F.

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate retinal perfusion in the human eye, a dual-wavelength confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) was developed that provides spectral imaging of the fundus using a combination of red (670 nm) and near-infrared (810 nm) wavelengths. The image of the ocular fundus was analyzed to find out if quantitative measurements of the reflectivity of tissue permit assessment of the oxygen perfusion of tissue. We explored problems that affect the reproducibility of patient measurements such as non-uniformity errors on the image. For the first time, an image processing technique was designed and used to minimize the errors of oxygen saturation measurements by illumination correction in retina wide field by increasing SNR. Retinal images were taken from healthy and diabetic retinopathy eyes using the cSLO with a confocal aperture of 100 μm. The ratio image (RI) of red/IR, as oxygen saturation (SO2) index, was calculated for normal eyes. The image correction technique improved the reproducibility of the measurements. Average RI intensity variation of healthy retina tissue was determined within a range of about 5.5%. The capability of the new technique to discriminate oxygenation levels of retinal artery and vein was successfully demonstrated and showed good promise in the diagnosis of the perfused retina.

  4. Perfusion-Decellularization of Porcine Lung and Trachea for Respiratory Bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Weymann, Alexander; Patil, Nikhil Prakash; Sabashnikov, Anton; Korkmaz, Sevil; Li, Shiliang; Soos, Pal; Ishtok, Roland; Chaimow, Nicole; Pätzold, Ines; Czerny, Natalie; Schmack, Bastian; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Simon, Andre Rüdiger; Karck, Matthias; Szabo, Gabor

    2015-12-01

    Decellularization of native organs may provide an acellular tissue platform for organ regeneration. However, decellularization involves a trade-off between removal of immunogenic cellular elements and preservation of biomechanical integrity. We sought to develop a bioartificial scaffold for respiratory tissue engineering by decellularization of porcine lungs and trachea while preserving organ architecture and vasculature. Lung-trachea preparations from 25 German Landrace pigs were perfused in a modified Langendorff circuit and decellularized by an SDC (sodium deoxycholate)-based perfusion protocol. Decellularization was evaluated by histology and fluorescence microscopy, and residual DNA quantified spectrophotometrically and compared with controls. Airway compliance was evaluated by endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation to simulate physiological breathing-induced stretch. Structural integrity was evaluated by bronchoscopy and biomechanical stress/strain analysis by measuring passive tensile strength, all compared with controls. Decellularized lungs and trachea lacked intracellular components but retained specific collagen fibers and elastin. Quantitative DNA analysis demonstrated a significant reduction of DNA compared with controls (32.8 ± 12.4 μg DNA/mg tissue vs. 179.7 ± 35.8 μg DNA/mg tissue, P < 0.05). Lungs and trachea decellularized by our perfusion protocol demonstrated increased airway compliance but preserved biomechanical integrity as compared with native tissue. Whole porcine lungs-tracheae can be successfully decellularized to create an acellular scaffold that preserves extracellular matrix and retains structral integrity and three-dimensional architecture to provide a bioartifical platform for respiratory tissue engineering. PMID:25894696

  5. Radioisotope scanning of brain, liver, lung and bone with a note on tumour localizing agents

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Radioisotopic scanning of brain, liver, lungs and the skeleton is briefly reviewed with a survey of recent developments of clinical significance. In brain scanning neoplasm detection rates of greater than 90% are claimed. The true figure is probably 70-80%. Autopsy data shows a number of false negatives, particularly with vascular lesions. Attempts to make scanning more specific in differentiating neoplasm from vascular lesions by rapid sequence blood flow studies are reviewed. In liver scanning by means of colloids again high success rate is claimed but small metastases are frequently missed and the false negative scan rate is probably quite high. Lung scanning still has its main place in investigating pulmonary embolic disease. Ventilation studies using Xenon 133 are useful, particularly combined with perfusion studies. The various radiopharmaceuticals for use in bone scanning are reviewed. The appearance of technetium labelled phosphate compounds will probably allow much wider use of total skeletal scanning. Research into tumour localizing agents continues, the most recent and interesting being Gallium citrate and labelled bleomycin. Neither agent is predictable however although Gallium may have a place in Hodgkins disease and bronchogenic neoplasm and both may have a place in the detection of cerebral tumours. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3p452-bFig. 3bFig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 5bFig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 12c & 12dFig. 13Fig. 13 b,c,dFig. 14Fig. 14bFig. 15Fig. 15bFig. 16Fig. 17Fig. 18 PMID:4602127

  6. Angiogenesis in tissue-engineered nerves evaluated objectively using MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-kui; Wang, Ya-xian; Xue, Cheng-bin; Li, Zhen-mei-yu; Huang, Jing; Zhao, Ya-hong; Yang, Yu-min; Gu, Xiao-song

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a key process in regenerative medicine generally, as well as in the specific field of nerve regeneration. However, no convenient and objective method for evaluating the angiogenesis of tissue-engineered nerves has been reported. In this study, tissue-engineered nerves were constructed in vitro using Schwann cells differentiated from rat skin-derived precursors as supporting cells and chitosan nerve conduits combined with silk fibroin fibers as scaffolds to bridge 10-mm sciatic nerve defects in rats. Four weeks after surgery, three-dimensional blood vessel reconstructions were made through MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning, and parameter analysis of the tissue-engineered nerves was performed. New blood vessels grew into the tissue-engineered nerves from three main directions: the proximal end, the distal end, and the middle. The parameter analysis of the three-dimensional blood vessel images yielded several parameters, including the number, diameter, connection, and spatial distribution of blood vessels. The new blood vessels were mainly capillaries and microvessels, with diameters ranging from 9 to 301 μm. The blood vessels with diameters from 27 to 155 μm accounted for 82.84% of the new vessels. The microvessels in the tissue-engineered nerves implanted in vivo were relatively well-identified using the MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning method, which allows the evaluation and comparison of differences and changes of angiogenesis in tissue-engineered nerves implanted in vivo. PMID:26981108

  7. MUTAGENICITY OF BENZO(A)PYRENE METABOLITES GENERATED ON THE ISOLATED PERFUSED LUNG FOLLOWING PARTICULATE EXPOSURE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The isolated perfused rabbit lung (IPL) is being used to study the effects of particulate exposure on the pulmonary metabolism of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Pasturealla-free New Zealand white rabbits were treated intraperitoneally with BaP prior to kill. The isolated lungs were then a...

  8. Regional lung perfusion and ventilation with radioisotopes in cervical cord-injured patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraizumi, Y.; Fujimaki, E.; Hishida, T.; Maruyama, T.; Takeuchi, M.

    1986-05-01

    In general, cervical cord-injured patients present with restrictive pulmonary dysfunction resulting from paralysis of the intercostal muscles. Vital capacity frequently decreases below 50% of that in normal subjects, and their respiratory pattern frequently includes paradoxical movement in which the intercostal spaces sink and the abdomen distends at inspiration. Ventilation scintigraphy using Xe-133 and pulmonary perfusion scintigraphy using Tc-99m macroaggregated albumin (MAA) were performed on nine cervical cord-injured patients and four normal subjects to investigate regional lung functions in the cervical cord-injured patients. Pulmonary perfusion scintigraphy, in which measurement was made in the supine position, revealed no differences between the patients and the normal subjects. The inhomogeneous ventilation/perfusion distribution was presumed to have resulted from change in regional intrapleural pressure due to paradoxical movement of the thoracic cage. Washing and washout times were prolonged by paralysis of the intercostal muscles. These phenomena were particularly apparent in the upper and middle lung regions where compensating action by movement of the diaphragm is small.

  9. Automated Lung Segmentation from HRCT Scans with Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pulagam, Ammi Reddy; Kande, Giri Babu; Ede, Venkata Krishna Rao; Inampudi, Ramesh Babu

    2016-08-01

    Performing accurate and fully automated lung segmentation of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images affected by dense abnormalities is a challenging problem. This paper presents a novel algorithm for automated segmentation of lungs based on modified convex hull algorithm and mathematical morphology techniques. Sixty randomly selected lung HRCT scans with different abnormalities are used to test the proposed algorithm, and experimental results show that the proposed approach can accurately segment the lungs even in the presence of disease patterns, with some limitations in the apices and bases of lungs. The algorithm demonstrates a high segmentation accuracy (dice similarity coefficient = 98.62 and shape differentiation metrics dmean = 1.39 mm, and drms = 2.76 mm). Therefore, the developed automated lung segmentation algorithm is a good candidate for the first stage of a computer-aided diagnosis system for diffuse lung diseases. PMID:26961983

  10. Effects of carbonic anhydrase inhibition on ventilation-perfusion matching in the dog lung.

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, E R; Robertson, H T; Hlastala, M P

    1993-01-01

    Lung carbonic anhydrase (CA) permits rapid pH responses when changes in regional ventilation or perfusion alter airway and alveolar PCO2. These pH changes affect airway and vascular resistances and lung compliance to optimize the balance of regional ventilation (VA) and perfusion (Q) in the lung. To test the hypothesis that these or other CA-dependent mechanisms contribute to VA/Q matching, we administered acetazolamide (25 mg/kg intravenously) to six anesthetized and paralyzed dogs and measured VA/Q relationships before and after CA inhibition by the multiple inert gas elimination technique. Four other groups of dogs were studied to control for possible confounding effects of time under anesthesia and nonselective CA inhibition by acetazolamide: (a) saline placebo as a control for duration of anesthesia, (b) 4% CO2 inhalation to mimic systemic CO2 retention, (c) 1 mg/kg benzolamide (a selective renal CA inhibitor) or 0.5 meq/kg HCl to mimic systemic metabolic acidosis, and (d) 500 mg/kg 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (an inhibitor of red cell band 3 protein) to mimic the respiratory acidosis arising from an intracapillary block to rapid mobilization of plasma HCO3- in CO2 exchange. Acetazolamide increased VA/Q mismatch and reduced arterial PO2 measured at equilibrium but these did not occur in the control group. There was no deterioration in VA/Q matching when systemic respiratory acidosis produced either by CO2 inhalation or 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate or metabolic acidosis (benzolamide or HCl) were imposed to mimic the effects of acetazolamide apart from its inhibition of lung CA. These results support the concept that lung CA subserves VA/Q matching in the normal lung. Images PMID:8349809

  11. Localization of coronary artery disease with exercise electrocardiography: correlation with thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, R.F.; Freedman, B.; Bailey, I.K.; Uren, R.F.; Kelly, D.T.

    1981-11-01

    In 61 patients with single vessel coronary artery disease (70 percent or greater obstruction of luminal diameter in only one vessel) and no previous myocardial infarction, the sites of ischemic changes on 12 lead exercise electrocardiography and on thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scanning were related to the obstructed coronary artery. The site of exercise-induced S-T segment depression did not identify which coronary artery was obstructed. In the 37 patients with left anterior descending coronary artery disease S-T depression was most often seen in the inferior leads and leads V4 to V6, and in the 18 patients with right coronary artery disease and in the 6 patients with left circumflex artery disease S-T depression was most often seen in leads V5 and V6. Although S-T segment elevation was uncommon in most leads, it occurred in lead V1 or a VL, or both, in 51 percent of the patients with left anterior descending coronary artery disease. A reversible anterior defect on exercise thallium scanning correlated with left anterior descending coronary artery disease (probability (p) less than 0.0001) and a reversible inferior thallium defect correlated with right coronary or left circumflex artery disease (p less than 0.0001). In patients with single vessel disease, the site of S-T segment depression does not identify the obstructed coronary artery; S-T segment elevation in lead V1 or aVL, or both, identifies left anterior descending coronary artery disease; and the site of reversible perfusion defect on thallium scanning identifies the site of myocardial ischemia and the obstructed coronary artery.

  12. Effect of perfusate hematocrit on urea permeability-surface area in isolated dog lung

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, R.E.; Roselli, R.J.; Haselton, F.R.; Harris, T.R.

    1986-10-01

    Seven dog lower left lung lobes were statically inflated and perfused at a constant rate for each lobe with a perfusate in which the hematocrit was altered over a wide range. The permeability-surface area of urea was calculated from multiple indicator dilution curves using two separate injectates for each hematocrit level. One injectate contained only /sup 125/I-albumin as the vascular reference tracer and the other contained both /sup 51/Cr-erythrocytes and /sup 125/I-albumin as the vascular reference tracers; both contained (/sup 14/C)urea as the permeating tracer. The results strongly indicate that the phenomenon of erythrocyte trapping of urea does not affect the calculation of urea permeability-surface area product provided the appropriate albumin-erythrocyte composite reference tracer is utilized in its calculation.

  13. Lung transplantation with donation after circulatory determination of death donors and the impact of ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Machuca, T N; Mercier, O; Collaud, S; Tikkanen, J; Krueger, T; Yeung, J C; Chen, M; Azad, S; Singer, L; Yasufuku, K; de Perrot, M; Pierre, A; Waddell, T K; Keshavjee, S; Cypel, M

    2015-04-01

    The growing demand for suitable lungs for transplantation drives the quest for alternative strategies to expand the donor pool. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of lung transplantation (LTx) with donation after circulatory determination of death (DCDD) and the impact of selective ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP). From 2007 to 2013, 673 LTx were performed, with 62 (9.2%) of them using DCDDs (seven bridged cases). Cases bridged with mechanical ventilation/extracorporeal life support were excluded. From 55 DCDDs, 28 (51%) underwent EVLP. Outcomes for LTx using DCDDs and donation after neurological determination of death (DNDD) donors were similar, with 1 and 5-year survivals of 85% and 54% versus 86% and 62%, respectively (p = 0.43). Although comparison of survival curves between DCDD + EVLP versus DCDD-no EVLP showed no significant difference, DCDD + EVLP cases presented shorter hospital stay (median 18 vs. 23 days, p = 0.047) and a trend toward shorter length of mechanical ventilation (2 vs. 3 days, p = 0.059). DCDDs represent a valuable source of lungs for transplantation, providing similar results to DNDDs. EVLP seems an important technique in the armamentarium to safely increase lung utilization from DCDDs; however, further studies are necessary to better define the role of EVLP in this context. PMID:25772069

  14. Multiparametric PET/CT-perfusion does not add significant additional information for initial staging in lung cancer compared with standard PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of CT-perfusion (CTP), 18F-FDG-PET/CT and histological parameters, and the possible added value of CTP to FDG-PET/CT in the initial staging of lung cancer. Methods Fifty-four consecutive patients (median age 65 years, 15 females, 39 males) with suspected lung cancer were evaluated prospectively by CT-perfusion scan and 18F-FDG-PET/CT scan. Overall, 46 tumors were identified. CTP parameters blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), and mean transit time (MTT) of the tumor tissue were calculated. Intratumoral microvessel density (MVD) was assessed quantitatively. Differences in CTP parameters concerning tumor type, location, PET positivity of lymph nodes, TNM status, and UICC stage were analyzed. Spearman correlation analyses between CTP and 18F-FDG-PET/CT parameters (SUVmax, SUVmean, PETvol, and TLG), MVD, tumor size, and tumor stage were performed. Results The mean BF (mL/100 mL min-1), BV (mL/100 mL), and MTT (s) was 35.5, 8.4, and 14.2, respectively. The BF and BV were lower in tumors with PET-positive lymph nodes (p = 0.02). However, the CTP values were not significantly different among the N stages. The CTP values were not different, depending on tumor size and location. No significant correlation was found between CTP parameters and MVD. Conclusions Overall, the CTP information showed only little additional information for the initial staging compared with standard FDG-PET/CT. Low perfusion in lung tumors might possibly be associated with metabolically active regional lymph nodes. Apart from that, both CTP and 18F-FDG-PET/CT parameter sets may reflect different pathophysiological mechanisms in lung cancer. PMID:24450990

  15. Partial scan artifact reduction (PSAR) for the assessment of cardiac perfusion in dynamic phase-correlated CT

    SciTech Connect

    Stenner, Philip; Schmidt, Bernhard; Bruder, Herbert; Allmendinger, Thomas; Haberland, Ulrike; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelriess, Marc

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Cardiac CT achieves its high temporal resolution by lowering the scan range from 2{pi} to {pi} plus fan angle (partial scan). This, however, introduces CT-value variations, depending on the angular position of the {pi} range. These partial scan artifacts are of the order of a few HU and prevent the quantitative evaluation of perfusion measurements. The authors present the new algorithm partial scan artifact reduction (PSAR) that corrects a dynamic phase-correlated scan without a priori information. Methods: In general, a full scan does not suffer from partial scan artifacts since all projections in [0, 2{pi}] contribute to the data. To maintain the optimum temporal resolution and the phase correlation, PSAR creates an artificial full scan p{sub n}{sup AF} by projectionwise averaging a set of neighboring partial scans p{sub n}{sup P} from the same perfusion examination (typically N{approx_equal}30 phase-correlated partial scans distributed over 20 s and n=1,...,N). Corresponding to the angular range of each partial scan, the authors extract virtual partial scans p{sub n}{sup V} from the artificial full scan p{sub n}{sup AF}. A standard reconstruction yields the corresponding images f{sub n}{sup P}, f{sub n}{sup AF}, and f{sub n}{sup V}. Subtracting the virtual partial scan image f{sub n}{sup V} from the artificial full scan image f{sub n}{sup AF} yields an artifact image that can be used to correct the original partial scan image: f{sub n}{sup C}=f{sub n}{sup P}-f{sub n}{sup V}+f{sub n}{sup AF}, where f{sub n}{sup C} is the corrected image. Results: The authors evaluated the effects of scattered radiation on the partial scan artifacts using simulated and measured water phantoms and found a strong correlation. The PSAR algorithm has been validated with a simulated semianthropomorphic heart phantom and with measurements of a dynamic biological perfusion phantom. For the stationary phantoms, real full scans have been performed to provide theoretical reference

  16. Novel Flurometric Tool to Assess Mitochondrial Redox State of Isolated Perfused Rat Lungs after Exposure to Hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Sepehr, R; Audi, S H; Staniszewski, K S; Haworth, S T; Jacobs, E R; Ranji, M

    2013-10-16

    Recently we demonstrated the utility of optical fluorometry to detect a change in the redox status of mitochondrial autofluorescent coenzymes NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide) and FAD (oxidized form of Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide (FADH2,)) as a measure of mitochondrial function in isolated perfused rat lungs (IPL). The objective of this study was to utilize optical fluorometry to evaluate the effect of rat exposure to hyperoxia (>95% O2 for 48 hours) on lung tissue mitochondrial redox status of NADH and FAD in a nondestructive manner in IPL. Surface NADH and FAD signals were measured before and after lung perfusion with perfusate containing rotenone (ROT, complex I inhibitor), potassium cyanide (KCN, complex IV inhibitor), and/or pentachlorophenol (PCP, uncoupler). ROT- or KCN-induced increase in NADH signal is considered a measure of complex I activity, and KCN-induced decrease in FAD signal is considered a measure of complex II activity. The results show that hyperoxia decreased complex I and II activities by 63% and 55%, respectively, as compared to lungs of rats exposed to room air (normoxic rats). Mitochondrial complex I and II activities in lung homogenates were also lower (77% and 63%, respectively) for hyperoxic than for normoxic lungs. These results suggest that the mitochondrial matrix is more reduced in hyperoxic lungs than in normoxic lungs, and demonstrate the ability of optical fluorometry to detect a change in mitochondrial redox state of hyperoxic lungs prior to histological changes characteristic of hyperoxia. PMID:25379360

  17. Perfusion of isolated organs and the first heart-lung machine.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, H G

    2001-09-01

    In 1885, Max von Frey (1852-1932), while working in Carl Ludwig's Physiological Institute in Leipzig, Germany, designed an apparatus that had criteria characteristic of a heart-lung machine. With this device, he perfused the entire lower extremity of dogs, and took measurements of oxygen consumption, and carbon dioxide and lactate production. In 1935, another type of perfusion apparatus was constructed by Charles A Lindbergh (1902-1973). This device was the result of cooperation with Alexis Carrel (1873-1944) who was a pioneer of experimental organ transplantation. Using Lindbergh's pulsating device, organs such as thyroid, ovary, suprarenal gland, spleen, heart and kidney from fowls and cats were perfused with an oxygenated medium, and were maintained under sterile conditions. Beginning in 1934, John H Gibbon (1903-1973) developed and tested a heart-lung machine to institute cardiopulmonary bypass in cats during experimental occlusion of the pulmonary artery. In 1953, he performed the first successful open-heart operation in a patient using a heart-lung machine. This included elements that were similar to those used by von Frey - ie, the oxygenator and the pumps for continuous circulation of blood. A comparison of the three experimental devices revealed the following: the application for experimental purposes preceded clinical use; the development shifted from Europe to the United States, and was achieved by people who were not specialists; and the intention to build such a device was first purely scientific interest, but later shifted to the care for and treatment of patients with heart and circulatory defects by open-heart surgery. PMID:11586387

  18. Automatic detection of the myocardial boundaries of the right and left ventricles in MR cardio perfusion scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spreeuwers, Luuk J.; Breeuwer, Marcel M.

    2001-07-01

    Recent advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging allow fast recording of contrast enhanced myocardial perfusion scans. MR perfusion scans are made by recording, during a period of 20-40 seconds a number of short-axis slices through the myocardium. The scanning is triggered by the patient's ECG typically resulting in one set of slices per heart beat. For the perfusion analysis, the myocardial boundaries must be traced in all images Currently this is done manually, a tedious procedure, prone to inter- and intra-observer variability. In this paper a method for automatic detection of myocardial boundaries is proposed. This results in a considerable time reduction of the analysis and is an important step towards automatic analysis of cardiac MR perfusion scans. The most important consideration in the proposed approach is the use of not only spatial-intensity information, but also intensity-time and shape information to realize a robust segmentation. The procedure was tested on a total of 30 image sequences from 14 different scans. From 26 out of 30 sequences the myocardial boundaries were correctly found. The remaining 4 sequences were of very low quality and would most likely not be used for analysis.

  19. Effects of thromboxane A2 analogue on vascular resistance distribution and permeability in isolated blood-perfused dog lungs.

    PubMed

    Shibamoto, T; Wang, H G; Yamaguchi, Y; Hayashi, T; Saeki, Y; Tanaka, S; Koyama, S

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of thromboxane A2 (TxA2) on the distribution of vascular resistance, lung weight, and microvascular permeability in isolated dog lungs perfused at a constant pressure with autologous blood. The stable TxA2 analogue (STA2; 30 micrograms, n = 5) caused an increase in pulmonary capillary pressure (Pc) assessed as double-occlusion pressure to 14.0 +/- 0.4 mmHg from the baseline of 7.9 +/- 0.3 mmHg with progressive lung weight gain. Pulmonary vascular resistance increased threefold exclusively due to pulmonary venoconstriction. Pulmonary venoconstriction was confirmed in lungs perfused in a reverse direction from the pulmonary vein to the artery (n = 5), as evidenced by marked precapillary vasoconstriction and a sustained lung weight loss. Furthermore, in lungs perfused at a constant blood flow (n = 5), STA2 also caused selective pulmonary venoconstriction. Vascular permeability measured by the capillary filtration coefficient and the isogravimetric Pc at 30 and 60 min after STA2 infusion did not change significantly from baseline in any lungs studied. Moreover, elevation of Pc by raising the venous reservoir of the intact lobes (n = 5) to the same level as the STA2 lungs caused a greater or similar weight gain compared with the STA2 lungs. Thus, we conclude that TxA2 constricts selectively the pulmonary vein resulting in an increase in Pc and lung weight gain without significant changes in vascular permeability in isolated blood-perfused dog lungs. PMID:7564480

  20. Mechanical properties and reactivity of vessels in isolated perfused lungs of chronically hypoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Emery, C J; Bee, D; Barer, G R

    1981-11-01

    1. Chronically hypoxic rats kept in 10% (v/v) O2 for 3--6 weeks, were compared with littermate control rats. Pulmonary vascular resistance, measured from the slope of the pressure-flow relationship in isolated lungs perfused with blood of normal packed cell volume was higher in chronically hypoxic than control rats even during normoxia. 2. Chronically hypoxic rats weighed less than control rats but their pulmonary vascular volume, measured with labelled albumin was similar to control rats. This, together with evidence that the number of precapillary vessels is not reduced, does not suggest a large reduction in the vascular bed in chronic hypoxia. 3. A greater vasodilator action of isoprenaline and adenosine in chronically hypoxic than control lungs suggested a higher normoxic vascular tone. This higher tone was not the sole cause of increased resistance in chronically hypoxic lungs, since maximal vasodilatation did not reduce resistance to control levels. The chief cause was probably encroachment of new muscle on the vascular lumen of small vessels. 4. Pulmonary arterial compliance was reduced in chronically hypoxic lungs. 5. Reactivity of vessels to ventilation hypoxia, over a wide range of oxygen tension, to angiotensin II (ANG II) and to adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) was significantly greater in chronically hypoxic than control lungs, but thresholds to these stimuli were not reduced. PMID:7285503

  1. The effect of positive end-expiratory pressure on regional ventilation and perfusion in the normal and injured primate lung.

    PubMed

    Hammon, J W; Wolfe, W G; Moran, J F; Jones, R H; Sabiston, D C

    1976-11-01

    Although positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is being employed in the management of respiratory insufficiency, many of its physiological effects remain undetermined. The cardiopulmonary effects of PEEP as well as its effect on regional ventilation and perfusion were studied in 10 baboons before and after pulmonary injury with oleic acid. In the normal lung, there was significant improvement in oxygenation at a PEEP of 5 cm. of water secondary to improved ventilation and perfusion in all PEEP greater than 5 cm. of water produced increasing mismatch of ventilation and perfusion in all zones. After oleic acid was injected, hypoxemia was evident with a reversal of the normal ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) relationship between upper and lower lung zones. This mismatch of ventilation and perfusion was corrected at a PEEP of 15 cm. of water. It was reasonable to conclude that the use of PEEP in the injured lung exerts it beneficial effect by balancing regional ventilation and perfusion in addition to increasing functional residual capacity. PMID:824505

  2. Cyclooxygenase blockade (COB) attenuates ethanol-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction in perfused rat lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, W.H.; Lyles, D. )

    1990-02-26

    Ethanol causes pulmonary vasoconstriction and vascular leak by obscure mechanisms. In lambs, COB with indomethacin (Indo) or meclofenamate (Meclo) block ethanol's circulatory effects. To test for these effects in rats, in-situ, ventilated, Krebs-Henselheit perfused (constant flow) lungs were studied in 6 groups: ethanol (ETOH) and perfusate controls; ETOH/Meclo, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg, IV; ETOH/Indo, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg, IV, given 30 minutes before study. They measured mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP), peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) and edema, indexed by reservoir weight change (RW), then by tracheal froth ( death'). ETOH doses (0.5, 1.3 and 2.2gm) were infused into the perfusate (60 ml). Data were analyzed by ANOVA and X{sup 2}; n = 9 in each group. PAP differed by treatment, by drug/dose, and by dose/treatment interactions; PIP, RW change, and death' were attenuated. Data show that COB lessens the vascular and edema effects of moderate dose ETOH, which larger ETOH doses override.

  3. A database for estimating organ dose for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans for arbitrary spectra and angular tube current modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rupcich, Franco; Badal, Andreu; Kyprianou, Iacovos; Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a database for estimating organ dose in a voxelized patient model for coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT acquisitions with any spectra and angular tube current modulation setting. The database enables organ dose estimation for existing and novel acquisition techniques without requiring Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: The study simulated transport of monoenergetic photons between 5 and 150 keV for 1000 projections over 360 Degree-Sign through anthropomorphic voxelized female chest and head (0 Degree-Sign and 30 Degree-Sign tilt) phantoms and standard head and body CTDI dosimetry cylinders. The simulations resulted in tables of normalized dose deposition for several radiosensitive organs quantifying the organ dose per emitted photon for each incident photon energy and projection angle for coronary angiography and brain perfusion acquisitions. The values in a table can be multiplied by an incident spectrum and number of photons at each projection angle and then summed across all energies and angles to estimate total organ dose. Scanner-specific organ dose may be approximated by normalizing the database-estimated organ dose by the database-estimated CTDI{sub vol} and multiplying by a physical CTDI{sub vol} measurement. Two examples are provided demonstrating how to use the tables to estimate relative organ dose. In the first, the change in breast and lung dose during coronary angiography CT scans is calculated for reduced kVp, angular tube current modulation, and partial angle scanning protocols relative to a reference protocol. In the second example, the change in dose to the eye lens is calculated for a brain perfusion CT acquisition in which the gantry is tilted 30 Degree-Sign relative to a nontilted scan. Results: Our database provides tables of normalized dose deposition for several radiosensitive organs irradiated during coronary angiography and brain perfusion CT scans. Validation results indicate

  4. Ex vivo lung perfusion to improve donor lung function and increase the number of organs available for transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Valenza, Franco; Rosso, Lorenzo; Coppola, Silvia; Froio, Sara; Palleschi, Alessandro; Tosi, Davide; Mendogni, Paolo; Salice, Valentina; Ruggeri, Giulia M; Fumagalli, Jacopo; Villa, Alessandro; Nosotti, Mario; Santambrogio, Luigi; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the initial clinical experience of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) at the Fondazione Ca’ Granda in Milan between January 2011 and May 2013. EVLP was considered if donor PaO2/FiO2 was below 300 mmHg or if lung function was doubtful. Donors with massive lung contusion, aspiration, purulent secretions, pneumonia, or sepsis were excluded. EVLP was run with a low-flow, open atrium and low hematocrit technique. Thirty-five lung transplants from brain death donors were performed, seven of which after EVLP. EVLP donors were older (54 ± 9 years vs. 40 ± 15 years, EVLP versus Standard, P < 0.05), had lower PaO2/FiO2 (264 ± 78 mmHg vs. 453 ± 119 mmHg, P < 0.05), and more chest X-ray abnormalities (P < 0.05). EVLP recipients were more often admitted to intensive care unit as urgent cases (57% vs. 18%, P = 0.05); lung allocation score at transplantation was higher (79 [40–84] vs. 39 [36–46], P < 0.05). After transplantation, primary graft dysfunction (PGD72 grade 3, 32% vs. 28%, EVLP versus Standard, P = 1), mortality at 30 days (0% vs. 0%, P = 1), and overall survival (71% vs. 86%, EVLP versus Standard P = 0.27) were not different between groups. EVLP enabled a 20% increase in available donor organs and resulted in successful transplants with lungs that would have otherwise been rejected (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01967953). PMID:24628890

  5. Ex vivo lung perfusion to improve donor lung function and increase the number of organs available for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Valenza, Franco; Rosso, Lorenzo; Coppola, Silvia; Froio, Sara; Palleschi, Alessandro; Tosi, Davide; Mendogni, Paolo; Salice, Valentina; Ruggeri, Giulia M; Fumagalli, Jacopo; Villa, Alessandro; Nosotti, Mario; Santambrogio, Luigi; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the initial clinical experience of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) at the Fondazione Ca' Granda in Milan between January 2011 and May 2013. EVLP was considered if donor PaO2 /FiO2 was below 300 mmHg or if lung function was doubtful. Donors with massive lung contusion, aspiration, purulent secretions, pneumonia, or sepsis were excluded. EVLP was run with a low-flow, open atrium and low hematocrit technique. Thirty-five lung transplants from brain death donors were performed, seven of which after EVLP. EVLP donors were older (54 ± 9 years vs. 40 ± 15 years, EVLP versus Standard, P < 0.05), had lower PaO2 /FiO2 (264 ± 78 mmHg vs. 453 ± 119 mmHg, P < 0.05), and more chest X-ray abnormalities (P < 0.05). EVLP recipients were more often admitted to intensive care unit as urgent cases (57% vs. 18%, P = 0.05); lung allocation score at transplantation was higher (79 [40-84] vs. 39 [36-46], P < 0.05). After transplantation, primary graft dysfunction (PGD72 grade 3, 32% vs. 28%, EVLP versus Standard, P = 1), mortality at 30 days (0% vs. 0%, P = 1), and overall survival (71% vs. 86%, EVLP versus Standard P = 0.27) were not different between groups. EVLP enabled a 20% increase in available donor organs and resulted in successful transplants with lungs that would have otherwise been rejected (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01967953). PMID:24628890

  6. Generation of parametric images during routine Tc-99m PYP inhalation/Tc-99m MAA perfusion lung scintigraphy. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Miron, S D; Wiesen, E J; Feiglin, D H; Cohen, A M; Bellon, E M

    1991-07-01

    A simple technique is described for generating ventilation/perfusion ratio and perfusion/ventilation ratio images from the posterior Tc-99m PYP aerosol inhalation and Tc-99m MAA perfusion images obtained during routine lung scintigraphy. These images highlight areas of ventilation/perfusion incongruence--mismatch or reverse mismatch--that may sometimes be difficult to detect on conventional images. PMID:1834387

  7. Oxygen toxicity in the perfused rat liver and lung under hyperbaric conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Nishiki, K; Jamieson, D; Oshino, N; Chance, B

    1976-01-01

    1. In the lung and liver of tocopherol-deficient rats, the activities of glutathione peroxidase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were increased substantially, suggesting an important role for both enzymes in protecting the organ against the deleterious effects of lipid peroxides. 2. Facilitation of the glutathione peroxidase reaction by infusing t-butyl hydroperoxide caused the oxidation of nicotinamide nucleotides and glutathione, resulting in a concomitant increase in the rate of release of oxidized glutathione into the perfusate. Thus the rate of production of lipid peroxide and H2O2 in the perfused organ could be compared by simultaneous measurement of the rate of glutathione release and the turnover number of the catalase reaction. 3. On hyperbaric oxygenation at 4 X 10(5)Pa, H2O2 production, estimated from the turnover of the catalase reaction, was increased slightly in the liver, and glutathione release was increased slightly, in both lung and liver. 4. Tocopherol deficiency caused a marked increase in lipid-peroxide formation as indicated by a corresponding increase in glutathione release under hyperbaric oxygenation, with a further enhancement when the tocopherol-deficient rats were also starved. 5. The study demonstrates that the primary response to hyperbaric oxygenation is an elevation of the rate of lipid peroxidation rather than of the rate of formation of H2O2 or superoxide. PMID:12754

  8. Clinical usefulness of combined radionuclide venography (RNV) and pulmonary perfusion scanning in thromboembolic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Dibos, P.E.; Park, B.J.; Luger, R.C.

    1985-05-01

    Radionuclide venography of the lower extremities and the pelvis (RNV) was performed in 1,089 patients with suspected deep venous thrombosis (INT) during the period February 1978 to December 1984. Sequential images of the calves, knees, thighs and pelvis were obtained immediately after injection of 2 mCi of Tc-99m MAA into a vein of the dorsum of each foot while tourniquets were applied above the ankles. Views of the same regions were obtained after releasing of the tourniquets. Six view pulmonary perfusion scanning (PPS) was performed routinely upon completion of RNV. Xe-133 pulmonary ventilation scans (PVS) were done just prior to RNV in patients suspected of having pulmonary embolism. Conventional radiographic venography (XRV) was obtained in 57 of the 1,089 patients; in most of these cases, XRV was carried out within 48 hours of RVV. Results of RNV and XRV were in agreement in 88% of the cases and conflicted in 12% of the 57 cases. DVT was diagnosed by RNV and XRV in 21 of the 57 patients who had both studies. RNV and XRV were normal in 29 of the 57 patients and conflicting results were obtained in 7 patients. There were 5 false-positive RNV (8.7%) and 2 false-negative RNV (3.5%) considering the XRV as the definitive study. Out of 260 patients scanned during 1984, 26 (10%) patients had RNV/PPS findings positive for DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE); in most of these cases (22) PE was clinically unsuspected. The authors conclude that RNV is a simple, safe, clinically useful technique in the evaluation of patients with suspected DVT. PPS should follow RNV routinely. The incidence of unsuspected PE in patients with DVT is high.

  9. Heterogeneous ventilation and perfusion: a sensitive indicator of lung impairment in nonsmoking coal miners.

    PubMed

    Susskind, H; Acevedo, J C; Iwai, J; Rasmussen, D L; Heydinger, D K; Pate, H R; Harold, W H; Brill, A B

    1988-03-01

    Twenty life-long nonsmoking West Virginia coal-miners participated in a study to amplify the role of focal irregularities on regional ventilation (V) and perfusion (Q) and to develop an improved method for the early detection of coal-workers' pneumoconiosis. Their mean age was 59.3 yr and they averaged 35.2 years' exposure to coal dust. Conventional pulmonary function tests were supplemented by measurement of V, Q and lung volume (V), using radioactive Kr-81m, Tc-99m MAA and Xe-127, respectively, to determine regional abnormalities in lung function. A computer analysis of the regional distributions of V/V, Q/V and V/Q was performed, and their topographical distributions and indices of heterogeneity (HI) computed. V/V and Q/V were significantly reduced in the lower third, and increased in the upper two-thirds of the miners' lungs; V/Q was reduced in the upper half. The miners' V/V and Q/V were more heterogeneous (p less than 0.001) than that of eleven age-matched controls, with mean ventilation HI values of 0.190 +/- 0.027 and 0.133 +/- 0.011, respectively, and mean perfusion HI values of 0.206 +/- 0.022 and 0.164 +/- 0.041, respectively. P(A-a)O2 correlated positively (r = 0.72; p less than 0.001) with ventilation HI. Gas exchange was the most significant functional measurement, being abnormal in 19/20 subjects. In contrast, conventional spirometric measurements were within the predicted normal limits in all but four miners. PMID:3384076

  10. Early Lung Computed Tomography Scan after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cornetto, Marie Alice; Chevret, Sylvie; Abbes, Sarah; de Margerie-Mellon, Constance; Hussenet, Claire; Sicre de Fontbrune, Flore; Tazi, Abdellatif; Ribaud, Patricia; Bergeron, Anne

    2016-08-01

    A lung computed tomography (CT) scan is essential for diagnosing lung diseases in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients. As a result, lung CT scans are increasingly prescribed in the early phase after allogeneic HSCT, with no assessment of the added value for global patient management. Among 250 patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT in our center over a 2-year period, we evaluated 68 patients who had at least 1 lung CT scan within the first 30 days post-transplantation. The median interval between allogeneic HSCT and lung CT scan was 8.5 days. Patients who underwent an early lung CT scan were more immunocompromised and had a more severe course. Fever was the main indication for the CT scan (78%). The lung CT scan was abnormal in 52 patients, including 17 patients who had an abnormal pre-HSCT CT scan. A therapeutic change was noted in 37 patients (54%) within 24 hours after the lung CT scan. The main changes included the introduction of corticosteroids (n = 23; 62%), especially in patients with a normal CT scan (89%). In univariate models, we found that a normal pretransplantation CT scan (P = .002), the absence of either dyspnea (P = .029) or hypoxemia (P = .015), and a serum C-reactive protein level <10 mg/L (P = .004) were associated with a normal post-HSCT lung CT scan. We found that the association of these variables could predict the normality of early post-HSCT lung CT scans. Pretransplantation lung CT scans are useful for the interpretation of subsequent lung CT scans following allogeneic HSCT, which are frequently abnormal. Early post-HSCT lung CT scans are helpful in patient management, but prescriptions could be more targeted. PMID:27189110

  11. Effects of lung recruitment maneuvers on splanchnic organ perfusion during endotoxin-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Daudel, Fritz; Gorrasi, José; Bracht, Hendrik; Brandt, Sebastian; Krejci, Vladimir; Jakob, Stephan M; Takala, Jukka; Rothen, Hans Ulrich

    2010-11-01

    Lung recruitment maneuvers (RMs), used to reopen atelectatic lung units and to improve oxygenation during mechanical ventilation, may result in hemodynamic impairment. We hypothesize that pulmonary arterial hypertension aggravates the consequences of RMs in the splanchnic circulation. Twelve anesthetized pigs underwent laparotomy and prolonged postoperative ventilation. Systemic, regional, and organ blood flows were monitored. After 6 h (= baseline), a recruitment maneuver was performed with sustained inflation of the lungs. Thereafter, the pigs were randomly assigned to group C (control, n = 6) or group E with endotoxin-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (n = 6). Endotoxemia resulted in a normotensive and hyperdynamic state and a deterioration of the oxygenation index by 33%. The RM was then repeated in both groups. Pulmonary artery pressure increased during lipopolysaccharide infusion from 17 ± 2 mmHg (mean ± SD) to 31 ± 10 mmHg and remained unchanged in controls (P < 0.05). During endotoxemia, RM decreased aortic pulse pressure from 37 ± 14 mmHg to 27 ± 13 mmHg (mean ± SD, P = 0.024). The blood flows of the renal artery, hepatic artery, celiac trunk, superior mesenteric artery, and portal vein decreased to 71% ± 21%, 69% ± 20%, 76% ± 16%, 79% ± 18%, and 81% ± 12%, respectively, of baseline flows before RM (P < 0.05 all). Organ perfusion of kidney cortex, kidney medulla, liver, and jejunal mucosa in group E decreased to 65% ± 19%, 77% ± 13%, 66% ± 26%, and 71% ± 12%, respectively, of baseline flows (P < 0.05 all). The corresponding recovery to at least 90% of baseline regional blood flow and organ perfusion lasted 1 to 5 min. Importantly, the decreases in regional blood flows and organ perfusion and the time to recovery of these flows did not differ from the controls. In conclusion, lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension does not aggravate the RM-induced significant but short-lasting decreases in systemic, regional, and

  12. Characterization of the Isolated, Ventilated, and Instrumented Mouse Lung Perfused with Pulsatile Flow

    PubMed Central

    Vanderpool, Rebecca R.; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2011-01-01

    The isolated, ventilated and instrumented mouse lung preparation allows steady and pulsatile pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships to be measured with independent control over pulmonary arterial flow rate, flow rate waveform, airway pressure and left atrial pressure. Pulmonary vascular resistance is calculated based on multi-point, steady pressure-flow curves; pulmonary vascular impedance is calculated from pulsatile pressure-flow curves obtained at a range of frequencies. As now recognized clinically, impedance is a superior measure of right ventricular afterload than resistance because it includes the effects of vascular compliance, which are not negligible, especially in the pulmonary circulation. Three important metrics of impedance - the zero hertz impedance Z0, the characteristic impedance ZC, and the index of wave reflection RW - provide insight into distal arterial cross-sectional area available for flow, proximal arterial stiffness and the upstream-downstream impedance mismatch, respectively. All results obtained in isolated, ventilated and perfused lungs are independent of sympathetic nervous system tone, volume status and the effects of anesthesia. We have used this technique to quantify the impact of pulmonary emboli and chronic hypoxia on resistance and impedance, and to differentiate between sites of action (i.e., proximal vs. distal) of vasoactive agents and disease using the pressure dependency of ZC. Furthermore, when these techniques are used with the lungs of genetically engineered strains of mice, the effects of molecular-level defects on pulmonary vascular structure and function can be determined. PMID:21559007

  13. Inflammatory Markers and Intimal Media Thickness in Diabetics with Negative Myocardial Perfusion Scan

    PubMed Central

    Shakir, Douraid K.; Mohmmed, Ibrahim; Zarie, Mahmood; Kateeb, Dawod Al; Kiliyanni, Abdul Salim; Suwaidi, Jassim Al

    2009-01-01

    Background We compared the type and duration of diabetes mellitus (DM), patient demography, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), Homocysteine and other variables with IMT, to determine if these markers were correlated in diabetes (in whom technetium myocardial perfusion scan were negative) and would it be appropriate biomarkers for arthrosclerosis detection in this group of diabetics. Methods Forty patients with DM, without CHD history, were screened with stress sintigraphy imaging using 2 days stress/rest Technetium 99 tetrafosmin protocol, employing the standard Bruce protocol. Echocardiography study requested for each patient, two blood samples for hsCRP, were requested for each candidate three weeks apart, Lipid profiles, plasma homocysteine, and hemoglobin A1C were also requested. Finally Intima-media thickness were measured for all patients. Results There were no relationships between hsCRP level and DM duration or with the type of DM; also there were no relation between DM duration and homocysteine or between DM type and Homocysteine. Intimal media thickness was increased proportionally with the serum level of Homocysteine. Conclusions This study did not show any role for the inflammatory markers in predicating the presence of coronary artery disease in participants with DM, without medium size artery disease, which may support that DM is not the only player in initiating atherosclerosis. Keywords Diabetes mellitus; Inflammatory markers; C-reactive protein; Myocardial ischemia; Homocysteine; Intima-media thickness PMID:22505974

  14. Primed stimulation of isolated perfused rabbit lung by endotoxin and platelet activating factor induces enhanced production of thromboxane and lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Salzer, W L; McCall, C E

    1990-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis often precedes the development of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and bacterial endotoxin (LPS) produces a syndrome similar to ARDS when infused into experimental animals. We determined in isolated, buffer-perfused rabbit lungs, free of plasma and circulating blood cells that LPS synergized with platelet activating factor (PAF) to injure the lung. In lungs perfused for 2 h with LPS-free buffer (less than 100 pg/ml), stimulation with 1, 10, or 100 nM PAF produced transient pulmonary hypertension and minimal edema. Lungs perfused for 2 h with buffer containing 100 ng/ml of Escherichia coli 0111:B4 LPS had slight elevation of pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and did not develop edema. In contrast, lungs exposed to 100 ng/ml of LPS for 2 h had marked increases in PAP and developed significant edema when stimulated with PAF. LPS treatment increased capillary filtration coefficient, suggesting that capillary leak contributed to pulmonary edema. LPS-primed, PAF-stimulated lungs had enhanced production of thromboxane B2 (TXB) and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6KPF). Indomethacin completely inhibited PAF-stimulated production of TXB and 6KPF in control and LPS-primed preparations, did not inhibit the rise in PAP produced by PAF in control lungs, but blocked the exaggerated rise in PAP and edema seen in LPS-primed, PAF-stimulated lungs. The thromboxane synthetase inhibitor dazoxiben, and the thromboxane receptor antagonist, SQ 29,548, similarly inhibited LPS-primed pulmonary hypertension and edema after PAF-stimulation. These studies indicate that LPS primes the lung for enhanced injury in response to the physiologic mediator PAF by amplifying the synthesis and release of thromboxane in lung tissue. PMID:2318970

  15. Validation of measurements of ventilation-to-perfusion ratio inequality in the lung from expired gas.

    PubMed

    Prisk, G Kim; Guy, Harold J B; West, John B; Reed, James W

    2003-03-01

    The analysis of the gas in a single expirate has long been used to estimate the degree of ventilation-perfusion (Va/Q) inequality in the lung. To further validate this estimate, we examined three measures of Va/Q inhomogeneity calculated from a single full exhalation in nine anesthetized mongrel dogs under control conditions and after exposure to aerosolized methacholine. These measurements were then compared with arterial blood gases and with measurements of Va/Q inhomogeneity obtained using the multiple inert gas elimination technique. The slope of the instantaneous respiratory exchange ratio (R slope) vs. expired volume was poorly correlated with independent measures, probably because of the curvilinear nature of the relationship due to continuing gas exchange. When R was converted to the intrabreath Va/Q (iV/Q), the best index was the slope of iV/Q vs. volume over phase III (iV/Q slope). This was strongly correlated with independent measures, especially those relating to inhomogeneity of perfusion. The correlations for iV/Q slope and R slope considerably improved when only the first half of phase III was considered. We conclude that a useful noninvasive measurement of Va/Q inhomogeneity can be derived from the intrabreath respiratory exchange ratio. PMID:12433859

  16. Validation of measurements of ventilation-to-perfusion ratio inequality in the lung from expired gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim; Guy, Harold J B.; West, John B.; Reed, James W.

    2003-01-01

    The analysis of the gas in a single expirate has long been used to estimate the degree of ventilation-perfusion (Va/Q) inequality in the lung. To further validate this estimate, we examined three measures of Va/Q inhomogeneity calculated from a single full exhalation in nine anesthetized mongrel dogs under control conditions and after exposure to aerosolized methacholine. These measurements were then compared with arterial blood gases and with measurements of Va/Q inhomogeneity obtained using the multiple inert gas elimination technique. The slope of the instantaneous respiratory exchange ratio (R slope) vs. expired volume was poorly correlated with independent measures, probably because of the curvilinear nature of the relationship due to continuing gas exchange. When R was converted to the intrabreath Va/Q (iV/Q), the best index was the slope of iV/Q vs. volume over phase III (iV/Q slope). This was strongly correlated with independent measures, especially those relating to inhomogeneity of perfusion. The correlations for iV/Q slope and R slope considerably improved when only the first half of phase III was considered. We conclude that a useful noninvasive measurement of Va/Q inhomogeneity can be derived from the intrabreath respiratory exchange ratio.

  17. /sup 67/Gallium lung scans in progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, M.; Feiglin, D.; Hyland, R.; Urowitz, M.B.; Shiff, B.

    1983-08-01

    /sup 67/Gallium lung scans were performed in 19 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (scleroderma). Results were expressed quantitatively as the /sup 67/Gallium Uptake Index. The mean total pulmonary /sup 67/Gallium Uptake Index in patients was significantly higher than that in controls (41 versus 25), and 4 patients (21%) fell outside the normal range. There were no clinical or laboratory variables that correlated with the /sup 56/Gallium uptake. Increased pulmonary /sup 67/Gallium uptake in scleroderma may prove useful as an index of pulmonary disease activity.

  18. Novel Flurometric Tool to Assess Mitochondrial Redox State of Isolated Perfused Rat Lungs After Exposure to Hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Audi, Said H.; Staniszewski, Kevin S.; Haworth, Steven T.; Jacobs, Elizabeth R.; Ranji, Mahsa; Zablocki, Clement J.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated the utility of optical fluorometry to detect a change in the redox status of mitochondrial autofluorescent coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized form of flavin adenine dinucleotide \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$({\\rm FADH}_{2})$\\end{document} (FAD), as a measure of mitochondrial function in isolated perfused rat lungs (IPL). The objective of this paper was to utilize optical fluorometry to evaluate the effect of rat exposure to hyperoxia (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}${>}{95\\%}~{\\rm O}_{2}$\\end{document} for 48 h) on lung tissue mitochondrial redox status of NADH and FAD in a nondestructive manner in IPL. Surface NADH and FAD signals were measured before and after lung perfusion with perfusate containing rotenone (ROT, complex I inhibitor), potassium cyanide (KCN, complex IV inhibitor), and/or pentachlorophenol (PCP, uncoupler). ROT- or KCN-induced increase in NADH signal is considered a measure of complex I activity, and KCN-induced decrease in FAD signal is considered a measure of complex II activity. The results show that hyperoxia decreased complex I and II activities by 63% and 55%, respectively, when compared to lungs of rats exposed to room air (normoxic rats). Mitochondrial complex I and II activities in lung homogenates were also lower (77% and 63%, respectively) for hyperoxic than for normoxic lungs. These results suggest that the mitochondrial matrix is more reduced in hyperoxic lungs than in normoxic lungs, and demonstrate the ability of optical fluorometry to detect a change

  19. Spectral CT imaging as a new quantitative tool? Assessment of perfusion defects of pulmonary parenchyma in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ying-Shi; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Cui, Yong; Tang, Lei; Li, Xiao-Ting; Chen, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the capability of dual-energy spectral computed tomography (CT) to quantitatively evaluate lung perfusion defects that are induced by central lung cancer. Methods Thirty-two patients with central lung cancer underwent CT angiography using spectral imaging. A univariate general linear model was conducted to analyze the variance of iodine concentration/CT value with three factors of lung fields. A paired t-test was used to compare iodine concentrations and CT values between the distal end of lung cancer and the corresponding area in the contralateral normal lung. Results Iodine concentrations increased progressively in the far, intermediate and near ground sides in the normal lung fields at 0.60±0.28, 0.93±0.27 and 1.25±0.38 mg/mL, respectively (P<0.001). The same trend was observed for the CT values [–(840.64±49.08), –(812.66±50.85) and –(760.83±89.17) HU, P<0.001]. The iodine concentration (0.70±0.42 mg/mL) of the lung field in the distal end of lung cancer was significantly lower than the corresponding area in the contralateral normal lung (1.19±0.62 mg/mL) (t=–7.23, P<0.001). However, the CT value of lung field in the distal end of lung cancer was significantly higher than the corresponding area in the contralateral normal lung [–(765.29±93.34) HU vs. –(800.07±76.18) HU, t=3.564, P=0.001]. Conclusions Spectral CT imaging based on the spectral differentiation of iodine is feasible and can quantitatively evaluate pulmonary perfusion and identify perfusion defects that are induced by central lung cancer. Spectral CT seems to be a promising technique for the simultaneous evaluation of both morphological and functional lung information. PMID:24385700

  20. Effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on pulmonary vasoreactivity in isolated perfused lungs.

    PubMed

    Pak, Oleg; Bakr, Adel G; Gierhardt, Mareike; Albus, Julia; Strielkov, Ievgen; Kroschel, Florian; Hoeres, Timm; Hecker, Matthias; Ghofrani, Hossein A; Seeger, Werner; Weissmann, Norbert; Sommer, Natascha

    2016-01-15

    In addition to its renowned poisonous effects, carbon monoxide (CO) is being recognized for its beneficial actions on inflammatory and vasoregulatory pathways, particularly when applied at low concentrations via CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs). In the lung, CO gas and CO-RMs are suggested to decrease pulmonary vascular tone and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV). However, the direct effect of CO-RMs on the pulmonary vasoreactivity in isolated lungs has not yet been investigated. We assessed the effect of CORM-2 and CORM-3 on the pulmonary vasculature during normoxia and acute hypoxia (1% oxygen for 10 min) in isolated ventilated and perfused mouse lungs. The effects were compared with those of inhaled CO gas (10%). The interaction of CORM-2 or CO with cytochrome P-450 (CYP) was measured simultaneously by tissue spectrophotometry. Inhaled CO decreased HPV and vasoconstriction induced by the thromboxane mimetic U-46619 but did not alter KCl-induced vasoconstriction. In contrast, concentrations of CORM-2 and CORM-3 used to elicit beneficial effects on the systemic circulation did not affect pulmonary vascular tone. High concentration of CO-RMs or long-term application induced a continuous increase in normoxic pressure. Inhaled CO showed spectral alterations correlating with the inhibition of CYP. In contrast, during application of CORM-2 spectrophotometric signs of interaction with CYP could not be detected. Application of CO-RMs in therapeutic doses in isolated lungs neither decreases pulmonary vascular tone and HPV nor does it induce spectral alterations that are characteristic of CO-inhibited CYP. High doses, however, may cause pulmonary vasoconstriction. PMID:26586910

  1. Scanning electron microscopy of lung following alpha irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.L.; Lauhala, K.E.; McDonald, K.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Pulmonary aggregation of inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} particles leads to a cellular evolution of focal inflammation, fibrosis, epithelial dysplasia and lung tumor formation. Female Wistar rats were exposed to an aerosol of high-fired {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} (initial lung burden, 3.9 kBq) and the lungs examined at intervals from 1 day to 700 days after exposure by light and scanning electron microscopy and autoradiography. Peribronchiolar Pu particle aggregation increased with time, resulting in well-defined focal inflammatory lesions after 120 days and fibrotic lesions after 180 days. A generalized hypertrophy and hyperplasia of nonciliated bronchiolar cells was seen at 15 days and type II cell hyperplasia by 30 days after exposure. Focal dysplastic changes in type II alveolar epithelium and terminal nonciliated bronchiolar epithelium preceded carcinoma formation. Alveolar bronchiolarization was first noted at 120 days, squamous metaplasia at 210 days, squamous carcinoma at 270 days and adenocarcinoma at 600 days after exposure.

  2. Risk of recurrence in patients with pulmonary embolism: predictive role of D-dimer and of residual perfusion defects on lung scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Poli, Daniela; Cenci, Caterina; Antonucci, Emilia; Grifoni, Elisa; Arcangeli, Chiara; Prisco, Domenico; Abbate, Rosanna; Miniati, Massimo

    2013-02-01

    The stratification of recurrence risk after a first episode of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an important topic of research, especially in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). Elevated D-dimer levels and residual vein obstruction (RVO) at compression ultrasonography have been studied as predictors of recurrence after withdrawing oral anticoagulant treatment (OAT). It is still unknown if residual perfusion defects (PD) on lung scintigraphy are related to recurrent PE. In the present study, we evaluated the association of PD with PE recurrence. The relationship between PD, elevated D-dimer levels, and RVO was also investigated. We prospectively followed 236 consecutive patients who survived a first episode of objectively confirmed PE, with or without deep-vein thrombosis. After at least three months of OAT, treatment was withdrawn in 139 patients. D-dimer levels were evaluated at one month of OAT withdrawal, RVO was measured, and perfusion lung scan (P-scan) was performed to evaluate PD. During follow-up, 20 patients experienced a recurrent episode of VTE. Elevated D-dimer levels were significantly associated with VTE recurrence, (p=0.003). RVO was present in 22% of the patients with recurrence and in 7.5% of those without (p=0.07). No significant association was found between PD >10% and VTE recurrence, D-dimer, or RVO. In conclusion, we confirmed the positive predictive value of elevated D-dimer levels for recurrent VTE. Residual PD on lung scintigraphy are neither predictive of recurrence nor related to D-dimer levels or RVO. PMID:23196319

  3. Method of Isolated Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion in a Rat Model: Lessons Learned from Developing a Rat EVLP Program

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Kevin; Bobba, Christopher; Eren, Emre; Spata, Tyler; Tadres, Malak; Hayes,, Don; Black, Sylvester M.

    2015-01-01

    The number of acceptable donor lungs available for lung transplantation is severely limited due to poor quality. Ex-Vivo Lung Perfusion (EVLP) has allowed lung transplantation in humans to become more readily available by enabling the ability to assess organs and expand the donor pool. As this technology expands and improves, the ability to potentially evaluate and improve the quality of substandard lungs prior to transplant is a critical need. In order to more rigorously evaluate these approaches, a reproducible animal model needs to be established that would allow for testing of improved techniques and management of the donated lungs as well as to the lung-transplant recipient. In addition, an EVLP animal model of associated pathologies, e.g., ventilation induced lung injury (VILI), would provide a novel method to evaluate treatments for these pathologies. Here, we describe the development of a rat EVLP lung program and refinements to this method that allow for a reproducible model for future expansion. We also describe the application of this EVLP system to model VILI in rat lungs. The goal is to provide the research community with key information and “pearls of wisdom”/techniques that arose from trial and error and are critical to establishing an EVLP system that is robust and reproducible. PMID:25741794

  4. Method of isolated ex vivo lung perfusion in a rat model: lessons learned from developing a rat EVLP program.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Kevin; Bobba, Christopher; Eren, Emre; Spata, Tyler; Tadres, Malak; Hayes, Don; Black, Sylvester M; Ghadiali, Samir; Whitson, Bryan A

    2015-01-01

    The number of acceptable donor lungs available for lung transplantation is severely limited due to poor quality. Ex-Vivo Lung Perfusion (EVLP) has allowed lung transplantation in humans to become more readily available by enabling the ability to assess organs and expand the donor pool. As this technology expands and improves, the ability to potentially evaluate and improve the quality of substandard lungs prior to transplant is a critical need. In order to more rigorously evaluate these approaches, a reproducible animal model needs to be established that would allow for testing of improved techniques and management of the donated lungs as well as to the lung-transplant recipient. In addition, an EVLP animal model of associated pathologies, e.g., ventilation induced lung injury (VILI), would provide a novel method to evaluate treatments for these pathologies. Here, we describe the development of a rat EVLP lung program and refinements to this method that allow for a reproducible model for future expansion. We also describe the application of this EVLP system to model VILI in rat lungs. The goal is to provide the research community with key information and "pearls of wisdom"/techniques that arose from trial and error and are critical to establishing an EVLP system that is robust and reproducible. PMID:25741794

  5. Solubilized xenon 133 lung scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, E.; Sarno, R.C.

    1988-11-01

    Lung scanning using solubilized xenon 133 can provide important information concerning both pulmonary perfusion and ventilation. This technique proved valuable in establishing the diagnosis of congenital lobar emphysema in a 7-month-old baby.

  6. [Simultaneous analysis of the distribution of ventilation and diffusive conductance to perfusion in the lungs].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K

    1989-12-01

    Theoretical analysis and experimental observations were performed to establish an essential method allowing demonstration of the characteristics of distribution of ventilation (VA) as well as of diffusive conductance (G) to perfusion (Q) in the lungs. O2, CO2 and CO binding to hemoglobin molecules within erythrocytes, together with six inert gases including SF6, ethane, cyclopropane, halothane, diethyl ether and acetone, possessing various degrees of solubility in blood and different degrees of diffusibility in lung tissue were used as indicator gases. Fifteen patients with interstitial pneumonia of unknown etiology, placed in a supine position, were given a mixture of 21% O2 and 0.1% CO in N2 as the inspired gas and normal saline containing appropriate amounts of the six inert gases via the antecubital vein. After a steady state was established, the expired gas was collected and both arterial and mixed venous blood were simultaneously sampled through the catheter inserted either into the femoral or pulmonary artery. The concentrations of the indicator gases in the samples were measured by gas chromatography, with electrodes or with Scholander gas analyzer. Assuming that the mass transfer efficiency of a given indicator gas at each gas exchange unit would be limited by the ratio of VA to Q (VA/Q) and by that of G/Q, the data obtained from the human subjects were analyzed in terms of a lung model having 20 units along the VA/Q and G/Q axes, respectively. The numerical analysis including the procedure of a simultaneous Bohr integration for O2, CO2 and CO in a pulmonary capillary and the method of weighted least-squares combined with the idea of constrained optimization permitted the data to be transformed into a virtually continuous distribution of Q against VA/Q and G/Q axes. The numerical procedure was strictly tested based on many artificial distributions of VA/Q and G/Q ratios, showing that it could characterize distributions containing up to at least two modes

  7. Continuous distributions of ventilation and gas conductance to perfusion in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Kawai, A; Mori, M; Asano, K; Takasugi, T; Umeda, A; Yokoyama, T

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical analysis and experimental observations were conducted to establish a method allowing to demonstrate the characteristics of distribution of ventilation (VA) as well as of diffusive conductance (G) to perfusion (Q) in the lungs. O2, CO2 and CO binding to hemoglobin molecules within the erythrocyte together with six inert gases including SF6, ethane, cyclopropane, halothane, diethyl ether and acetone, of varied solubility in blood and different diffusivity in lung tissue, were used as indicator gases. 15 patients with interstitial pneumonia of unknown etiology, placed in the supine position, were given a mixture of 21% O2 and 0.1% CO in N2 as the inspired gas and saline containing appropriate amount of the six inert gases was infused via an antecubital vein. After a steady state was established, the expired gas was collected and the samples of both arterial and mixed venous blood were simultaneously taken through catheters inserted into the femoral and pulmonary artery. The concentrations of the indicator gases in the samples were measured by gas chromatography, with electrodes or with the Scholander gas analyzer. Assuming that the mass transfer efficiency of a given indicator gas at each gas exchange unit would be limited by VA/Q and G/Q ratios, the data obtained from the human subjects were analyzed in terms of a lung model having 20 units along the VA/Q and G/Q axes, respectively. The numerical analysis including the procedure of simultaneous Bohr integration for O2, CO2 and CO in a pulmonary capillary and the method of weighted least-squares combined with constrained optimization permitted the data to be transformed into a virtually continuous distribution of Q against VA/Q and G/Q axes. The numerical procedure was strictly tested using various artificial distributions of VA/Q and G/Q ratios, showing that it could characterize the distributions containing up to at least two modes on VA/Q-G/Q field with a substantial accuracy. Analytical results

  8. Ex Vivo Rehabilitation of Non-Heart-Beating Donor Lungs in a Preclinical Porcine Model: Delayed Perfusion Results in Superior Lung Function

    PubMed Central

    Mulloy, Daniel P.; Stone, Matthew L.; Crosby, Ivan K.; LaPar, Damien J.; Sharma, Ashish K.; Webb, David V.; Lau, Christine L.; Laubach, Victor E.; Kron, Irving L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a promising modality for the evaluation and treatment of marginal donor lungs. The optimal timing of EVLP initiation and potential for rehabilitation of donor lungs with extended warm-ischemic times is unknown. This study compares the efficacy of different treatment strategies for uncontrolled non-heart-beating donor lungs. Methods Mature swine underwent hypoxic arrest followed by 60 minutes of no-touch warm-ischemia. Lungs were harvested and flushed with 4°C Perfadex®. Three groups (n=5/group) were stratified according to preservation method: cold-static preservation (CSP: 4 hrs 4°C storage), immediate EVLP (I-EVLP: 4 hrs EVLP at 37°C), and delayed EVLP (D-EVLP: 4 hrs cold storage followed by 4 hrs EVLP). EVLP groups were perfused with Steen solution™ supplemented with heparin, methylprednisolone, cefazolin, and an adenosine 2A receptor agonist. Lungs then underwent allotransplantation and four hours of recipient reperfusion prior to allograft assessment for resultant ischemia-reperfusion injury. Results Donor blood oxygenation (PO2:FiO2) prior to euthanasia was not different between groups. Oxygenation after transplantation was significantly higher in the D-EVLP group compared to the I-EVLP or CSP groups. Mean airway pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, and expression of IL-8, IL-1β, and TNF-α were all significantly reduced in the D-EVLP group. Importantly, post-transplant oxygenation exceeded acceptable clinical levels only in D-EVLP lungs. Conclusions Uncontrolled non-heart-beating donor lungs with extended warm-ischemia can be reconditioned for successful transplantation. The combination of CSP and EVLP present in the D-EVLP group was necessary to obtain optimal post-transplant function. This finding, if confirmed clinically, will allow expanded use of non-heart-beating donor lungs. PMID:22944084

  9. The significance of single V-P mismatches found in Kr-81m/Tc-99m lung scans

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, J.M.; Palestro, C.J.; Markowitz, D.; Alderson, P.O.

    1985-05-01

    Ventilation-perfusion lung scans demonstrating two or more areas of V-P mismatch (MM) are considered by most nuclear medicine physicians to indicate a high probability of pulmonary embolism (PE). Considerable disagreement exists, however, with regard to the significance of a single area of segmental (S) or subsegmental (SS) MM. The authors reviewed the studies of 22 patients suspected of having PE reviewed the studies of 22 patients suspected of having PE whose lung scans demonstrated a single area of V-P MM and whose diagnosis was confirmed by pulmonary angiography. All V scans were multi-view studies performed with Kr-81m. P scans were performed either with Tc-99m macroaggregated albumin or human albumin microspheres. P defects greater than 75% of the size of a brochopulmonary segment (BPS) were reported as S; defects between 25% and 75% of a BPS were reported as SS. The area of V-P MM was found in the lower lobes in 13 patients, the middle lobe or lingula in 6, and the upper lobes in 3. Of 17 patients with a VP MM and a clear chest x-ray, 4 of 10 patients with a SS MM had PE, as did 4 of 6 patients with a S MM; one patient with a single regional (R) area of V-P MM did not have PE. An additional 5 cases demonstrated a single area of V-P MM and an x-ray opacity of comparable size in the same location; three of these 5 patients had PE. Thus, 11 of the total 22 patients had PE (S:6/9, R:0/2, SS:5/11. The data demonstrate an intermediate level of probability of PE in all subgroups with a single V-P MM, and suggest that V-P lung scans showing a single area of V-P MM should be reported as indeterminate for PE.

  10. SN50, a Cell-Permeable Inhibitor of Nuclear Factor-κB, Attenuates Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury in an Isolated and Perfused Rat Lung Model.

    PubMed

    Chian, Chih-Feng; Chiang, Chi-Huei; Chuang, Chiao-Hui; Liu, Shiou-Ling; Tsai, Chen-Liang

    2016-08-01

    High tidal volume (VT) ventilation causes the release of various mediators and results in ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). SN50, a cell-permeable nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitory peptide, attenuates inflammation and acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, the mechanisms associated with the effects of SN50 in VILI have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the cellular and molecular mechanisms for the effects of SN50 treatment in VILI. An isolated and perfused rat lung model was exposed to low (5 mL/kg) or high (15 mL/kg) VT ventilation for 6 h. SN50 was administered in the perfusate at the onset of the high-stretch mechanical ventilation. The hemodynamics, lung histological changes, inflammatory responses, and activation of apoptotic pathways were evaluated. VILI was demonstrated by increased pulmonary vascular permeability and lung weight gain, as well as by increased levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, myeloperoxidase (MPO), hydrogen peroxide, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The lung tissue expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), caspase-3, and phosphorylation of serine/threonine-specific protein kinase (p-AKT) was greater in the high VT group than in the low VT group. Upregulation and activation of NF-κB was associated with increased lung injury in VILI. SN50 attenuated the inflammatory responses, including the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, MPO, MAPKs, and NF-κB. In addition, the downregulation of apoptosis was evaluated using caspase-3 and p-AKT expression. Furthermore, SN50 mitigated the increases in the lung weights, pulmonary vascular permeability, and lung injury. In conclusion, VILI is associated with inflammatory responses and activation of NF-κB. SN50 inhibits the activation of NF-κB and attenuates VILI. PMID:26780513

  11. EGFR kinase domain mutation positive lung cancers are sensitive to intrapleural perfusion with hyperthermic chemotherapy (IPHC) complete treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongjuan; Zhan, Cheng; Ke, Ji; Xue, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Aiqun; Xu, Kaifeng; Shen, Zhirong; Yu, Lei; Chen, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the global leading cause of cancer-related deaths. A significant portion of lung cancer patients harbor kinase domain mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). While EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) effectively shrink tumors harboring mutant EGFR, clinical efficacy is limited by the development of TKI resistance. Effective alternatives are desperately needed in clinic for treating EGFR kinase domain mutation positive lung cancer. In our clinic in treating M1a lung cancer patients through intrapleural perfusion with hyperthermic chemotherapy (IPHC) followed by cycles of systemic chemotherapy (we termed this procedure IPHC complete treatment, IPHC-CT), we found dramatic tumor shrinkage in mutant EGFR-positive patients. We further confirmed the sensitivity of EGFR mutation-positive lung cancer cell lines derived from patients to HC (hyperthermic chemotherapy) treatment. We found that hyperthermia promoted accumulation of cisplatin in lung cancer cells. Hyperthermia and cisplatin synergistically downregulated the EGFR protein level, leading to quenching of signal from EGFR and induction of apoptosis. Our work therefore showed IPHC-CT is an effective treatment for EGFR kinase domain mutation positive lung cancer patients. PMID:26654941

  12. Changes in Global Function and Regional Ventilation and Perfusion on SPECT During the Course of Radiotherapy in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Shuanghu; Frey, Kirk A.; Gross, Milton D.; Hayman, James A.; Arenberg, Doug; Cai Xuwei; Ramnath, Nithya; Hassan, Khaled; Moran, Jean; Eisbruch, Avraham; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Kong Fengming

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to (1) examine changes in dyspnea, global pulmonary function test (PFT) results, and functional activity on ventilation (V)/perfusion (Q) single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) scans during the course of radiation (RT), and (2) factors associated with the changes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Fifty-six stage I to III NSCLC patients treated with definitive RT with or without chemotherapy were enrolled prospectively. Dyspnea was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 prior to and weekly during RT. V/Q SPECT-computed tomography (CT) and PFTs were performed prior to and during RT at approximately 45 Gy. Functions of V and Q activities were assessed using a semiquantitative scoring of SPECT images. Results: Breathing improved significantly at the third week (mean dyspnea grade, 0.8 vs. 0.6; paired t-test p = 0.011) and worsened during the later course of RT (p > 0.05). Global PFT results did not change significantly, while regional lung function on V/Q SPECT improved significantly after {approx}45 Gy. The V defect score (DS) was 4.9 pre-RT versus 4.3 during RT (p = 0.01); Q DS was 4.3 pre-RT versus 4.0 during RT (p < 0.01). Improvements in V and Q functions were seen primarily in the ipsilateral lung (V DS, 1.9 pre-RT versus 1.4 during RT, p < 0.01; Q DS, 1.7 pre-RT versus 1.5 during RT, p < 0.01). Baseline primary tumor volume was significantly correlated with pre-RT V/Q DS (p < 0.01). Patients with central lung tumors had greater interval changes in V and Q than those with more peripheral tumors (p <0.05 for both V and Q DS). Conclusions: Regional ventilation and perfusion improved during RT at 45 Gy. This suggests that adaptive planning based on V/Q SPECT during RT may allow sparing of functionally recoverable lung tissue.

  13. The effect of CO sub 2 on pulmonary artery pressure (P sub pa ) over time in the isolated perfused rabbit lung

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, P.; Shayevitz, J. )

    1991-03-11

    The isolated perfused rabbit lung model is used in studies of pulmonary hemodynamics, structure, and function under conditions closely resembling those which occur in living animals. The purpose of this study is to observe changes in P{sub pa} in response to differing concentrations of CO{sub 2} over time. After rapid exsanguination a tracheostomy was performed. Cannulas were secured in the main pulmonary artery and the left atrium. The lungs were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer mixed with blood at a rate of 120 ml/min with recirculation. The temperature of the perfusate was maintained between 35 and 38C. The lungs were then ventilated with 5% CO{sub 2} in air with a tidal volume of 10 ml/kg at 20 breaths/min. CO{sub 2} was altered randomly by ventilating the lungs 2, 5 or 10% CO{sub 2} in air. Metabolic acidosis was corrected with NaHCO{sub 3}. In the first two hour period after lung perfusion was begun, the model was allowed to stabilize at each CO{sub 2} concentration, and pH, pCO{sub 2}, pO{sub 2}, and base excess were determined at each P{sub pa}. All measurements were repeated in the second period beginning two hours after lung perfusion was started. P{sub pa} was plotted against pH for each animal in both early and late phases, and simple regression analysis was performed. The slopes and the y intercepts for the data sets in both groups were compared using one factor ANOVA, and were found to be significantly different, implying a statistical difference between regression lines. In the early phase this model behaves like the in vivo lung, i.e. hypercarbia appears to increase, while hypocarbia decreases, P{sub pa}. During the late phase of lung perfusion the opposite occurs.

  14. [Effect of using several levels of positive end-expiratory pressure over barotrauma's induced lung injury in a model of isolated and perfused rabbit lungs].

    PubMed

    Trejo, Humberto; Urich, Daniela; Pezzulo, Alejandro; Novoa, Eva; Marcano, Héctor; Crespo, Astrid; Sánchez de León, Roberto

    2006-03-01

    The use of Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) as a strategy of mechanical ventilation offers its advantages, such as improved oxygenation, without causing alveolar overstretching and barotrauma. We aim to investigate the effect of several levels of PEEP on barotrauma and, whether an optimal level of PEEP exists. Forty-eight New Zealand rabbits (2.5-3.5 kg) were divided into four groups with PEEP settings of 0, 4, 8 and 12 cmH2O, at increasing levels of inspiratory volume (IV). This was done in blood perfused rabbit lungs and in lungs perfused with a Buffer-Albumin Solution. We observed that lungs ventilated with PEEP 0 cmH2O suffered pulmonary rupture at high IV (300cc), with significant increases of Pap (Pulmonary artery pressure) and FFR (Fluid filtration rate). Lungs ventilated with PEEP 8 and 12 suffered pulmonary rupture at lower IV (200cc and 150cc vs. 300cc respectively) On the other hand, lungs ventilated with PEEP 4 cmH2O reached the highest IV (400cc), in addition, they showed the lowest elevations of Pap and FFR. The acellular lungs ventilated with PEEP 4, 8 and 12 showed pulmonary rupture at lower IV when compared with cellular ones (300cc vs. 400cc: 100cc vs. 200cc and 100cc vs. 150cc respectively). We concluded that an optimal PEEP exists, which protects against barotrauma, however, excess of PEEP could enhance its development. The blood could contain some mediators which attenuate the damage induced by barotrauma. PMID:16562644

  15. Lung uptake on a bone scan: a case of pulmonary Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Ortapamuk, H; Alp, A

    2002-11-01

    Pulmonary involvement secondary to Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WMG) is described in a 40-year-old male by incidental findings on a bone scan. He was examined for right leg pain, and bone scan revealed unexpected pulmonary uptake of Tc-99m MDP. CT scan of the thorax revealed pleural effusion and slightly disseminated micronoduler density increase in the right lung and parenchymal infiltration in the left lung. Transdermal lung biopsy demonstrated diffuse infiltration of lymphoplasmocytoids. Reporting the presence of pulmonary involvement is important because it may prevent morbidity from pulmonary dysfunction. PMID:12508840

  16. SU-F-BRF-11: Dose Rearrangement in High Dose Locally Advanced Lung Patients Based On Perfusion Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Matrosic, C; Jarema, D; Kong, F; McShan, D; Stenmark, M; Owen, D; Ten Haken, R; Matuszak, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The use of mean lung dose (MLD) limits allows individualization of lung patient tumor doses at safe levels. However, MLD does not account for local lung function differences between patients, leading to toxicity variability at the same MLD. We investigated dose rearrangement to minimize dose to functional lung, as measured by perfusion SPECT, while maintaining target coverage and conventional MLD limits. Methods: Retrospective plans were optimized for 15 locally advanced NSCLC patients enrolled in a prospective imaging trial. A priority-based optimization system was used. The baseline priorities were (1) meet OAR dose constraints, (2) maximize target gEUD, and (3) minimize physical MLD. As a final step, normal tissue doses were minimized. To determine the benefit of rearranging dose using perfusion SPECT, plans were reoptimized to minimize functional lung gEUD as the 4th priority. Results: When only minimizing physical MLD, the functional lung gEUD was 10.8+/−5.0 Gy (4.3–19.8 Gy). Only 3/15 cases showed a decrease in functional lung gEUD of ≥4% when rearranging dose to minimize functional gEUD in the cost function (10.5+/−5.0 Gy range 4.3−19.7). Although OAR constraints were respected, the dose rearrangement resulted in ≥10% increases in gEUD to an OAR in 4/15 cases. Only slight reductions in functional lung gEUD were noted when omitting the minimization of physical MLD, suggesting that constraining the target gEUD minimizes the potential to redistribute dose. Conclusion: Prioritydriven optimization permits the generation of plans that respect traditional OAR limits and target coverage, but with the ability to rearrange dose based on functional imaging. The latter appears to be limited due to the decreased solution space when constraining target coverage. Since dose rearrangement may increase dose to other OARs, it is also worthwhile to investigate global biomarkers of lung toxicity to further individualize treatment in this population

  17. The Role of Anion Exchanger on Pulmonary Vascular Response to Sustained Alveolar Hypoxia in the Isolated Perfused Rabbit Lung

    PubMed Central

    Ketabchi, Farzaneh; Mansoori, Somayeh; Moosavi, Seyed Mostafa Shid

    2015-01-01

    Background Some respiratory diseases may induce alveolar hypoxia thereby hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV). However, the mechanisms of this physiologic phenomenon are not fully understood. This study was the first to investigate the role of anion exchanger in sustained HPV. Methods Experiments were performed in the isolated perfused rabbit lung. After preparation, the lungs were divided into six groups: two DIDS (4,4-diisothiocyanostilbene 2,2-disulfonic acid, anion exchanger inhibitor)-treated [200 µM (n=5) or 400 µM (n=3)] hypoxic groups, two HCO3- free hypoxic groups, one control hypoxic group (n=7) and one control normoxic group (n=4). DIDS were added to the perfusate at 10 minutes before starting the experiments. In the HCO3- free groups, HEPES (4-(2-Hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid) were added to the perfusate instead of bicarbonate. Furthermore, in the HEPES1 (n=4) and HEPES2 (n=4) groups, the lungs were ventilated with hypoxic gas with or without CO2, respectively. Results Ventilation of the lungs with hypoxic gas resulted in biphasic HPV, the acute (0-20 minutes) and sustained (20-60 minutes) phases. No alteration in both phases of HPV was detected by DIDS (200 µM). However, DIDS (400 µM), extended the ascending part of acute HPV until min 24. Both phases of HPV were decreased in the HEPES1 group. However, in the HEPES 2 group, HPV tended to increase during the rising part of the acute phase of HPV. Conclusions Since DIDS (400 µM) extended acute phase of HPV, and HCO3- free perfusate buffer enhanced rising phase of it, therefore it can be suggested that anion exchanger may modulate HPV especially during the acute phase. The abstract of this article was presented as a poster in the congress of European Respiratory Society (ERS) on Monday, 08 September 2014, Munich, Germany and was published in the ERJ September 1, 2014 vol. 44 no. Suppl 58 P2343. PMID:25999626

  18. Acute tumor vascular effects following fractionated radiotherapy in human lung cancer: In vivo whole tumor assessment using volumetric perfusion computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Q.-S.; Goh, Vicky; Milner, Jessica; Padhani, Anwar R.; Saunders, Michele I.; Hoskin, Peter J. . E-mail: peterhoskin@nhs.net

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively assess the in vivo acute vascular effects of fractionated radiotherapy for human non-small-cell lung cancer using volumetric perfusion computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, undergoing palliative radiotherapy delivering 27 Gy in 6 fractions over 3 weeks, were scanned before treatment, and after the second (9 Gy), fourth (18 Gy), and sixth (27 Gy) radiation fraction. Using 16-detector CT, multiple sequential volumetric acquisitions were acquired after intravenous contrast agent injection. Measurements of vascular blood volume and permeability for the whole tumor volume were obtained. Vascular changes at the tumor periphery and center were also measured. Results: At baseline, lung tumor vascularity was spatially heterogeneous with the tumor rim showing a higher vascular blood volume and permeability than the center. After the second, fourth, and sixth fractions of radiotherapy, vascular blood volume increased by 31.6% (paired t test, p = 0.10), 49.3% (p = 0.034), and 44.6% (p = 0.0012) respectively at the tumor rim, and 16.4% (p = 0.29), 19.9% (p = 0.029), and 4.0% (p = 0.0050) respectively at the center of the tumor. After the second, fourth, and sixth fractions of radiotherapy, vessel permeability increased by 18.4% (p = 0.022), 44.8% (p = 0.0048), and 20.5% (p = 0.25) at the tumor rim. The increase in permeability at the tumor center was not significant after radiotherapy. Conclusion: Fractionated radiotherapy increases tumor vascular blood volume and permeability in human non-small-cell lung cancer. We have established the spatial distribution of vascular changes after radiotherapy; greater vascular changes were demonstrated at the tumor rim compared with the center.

  19. Deep Vein Thrombosis Presenting on Pulmonary Ventilation and Perfusion Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Itani, Malak; Fair, Joanna; Hillman, Zachary; Behnia, Fatemeh; Elojeimy, Saeed

    2016-10-01

    A 52-year-old woman presenting with dyspnea was referred for a ventilation and perfusion scan (VQ). VQ images (with Tc-DTPA [diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid aerosol] and Tc-MAA [macroaggregated albumin]) initially appeared normal; however, count rates on perfusion images were similar to ventilation images, implying little Tc-MAA had reached the lungs. Spot images of the injected extremity demonstrated focal Tc-MAA accumulation worrisome for a venous thrombus, subsequently confirmed by Doppler ultrasound. Careful attention to relative radiotracer count rates on VQ scans is crucial to ensure diagnostic utility. In addition, abnormal low perfusion radiotracer counts may unveil other pathology with important clinical implications. PMID:27556796

  20. ROI for outlining an entire tumor is a reliable approach for quantification of lung cancer tumor vascular parameters using CT perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ensen; Ren, An; Gao, Baoxiang; Yang, Minxing; Zhao, Qichao; Wang, Wu; Li, Kefeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of position and size of tumor region of interest (ROI) on the estimation of lung cancer vascular parameters using 256-slice computed tomography (CT) perfusion. Methods After institutional review board approval and written informed consent, 16 men and 11 women with lung cancer were enrolled in this CT perfusion study. Perfusion, blood volume, and peak enhancement were determined for 60 or 120 mm2 circular ROIs placed at the edge, center, and around (outlining) the visible tumor. Average values were obtained by performing ROI analysis twice by the same observers without any procedural changes. Results Perfusion, blood volume, and peak enhancement measurements were substantially higher at the edge than at the center for both 60 and 120 mm2 ROIs (all P<0.05). Measurements varied substantially depending on the ROI size. Perfusion, blood volume, and peak enhancement for the ROIs outlining tumor were intermediate between those at the tumor edge and center. There were significant correlations between median values and interquartile ranges as follows; perfusion (12.51 [7.91–28.10] mL⋅min−1⋅100 mL−1), blood volume (29.31 [21.82–37.65] mL⋅100 g−1), peak enhancement (12.93 [2.42–22.50]) for the ROIs outlining the tumor, and microvascular density ([19.43±8.78] vessels/0.74 mm2), respectively (r values were 0.732, 0.590, and 0.544 respectively, all P<0.05). Conclusion Spatial and size selection of ROI significantly affects CT perfusion analysis. ROI outlining of entire tumor provides efficient and reliable measurements for clinical assessment of lung cancer using CT perfusion. PMID:27175083

  1. Ascorbic acid prolongs the viability and stability of isolated perfused lungs: A mechanistic study using 31P and hyperpolarized 13C nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Shaghaghi, Hoora; Kadlecek, Stephen; Siddiqui, Sarmad; Pourfathi, Mehrdad; Hamedani, Hooman; Clapp, Justin; Profka, Harrilla; Rizi, Rahim

    2015-12-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has recently shown promise as a means of more accurately gauging the health of lung grafts and improving graft performance post-transplant. However, reperfusion of ischemic lung promotes the depletion of high-energy compounds and a progressive loss of normal mitochondrial function, and it remains unclear how and to what extent the EVLP approach contributes to this metabolic decline. Although ascorbate has been used to mitigate the effects of ischemia-reperfusion injury, the nature of its effects during EVLP are also not clear. To address these uncertainties, this study monitored the energy status of lungs during EVLP and after the administration of ascorbate using (31)P and hyperpolarized (13)C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance). Our experiments demonstrated that the oxidative phosphorylation capacity and pyruvate dehydrogenase flux of lungs decline during ex vivo perfusion. The addition of ascorbate to the perfusate prolonged lung viability by 80% and increased the hyperpolarized (13)C bicarbonate signal by a factor of 2.7. The effect of ascorbate is apparently due not to its antioxidant quality but rather to its ability to energize cellular respiration given that it increased the lung's energy charge significantly, whereas other antioxidants (glutathione and α-lipoic acid) did not alter energy metabolism. During ascorbate administration, inhibition of mitochondrial complex I with rotenone depressed energy charge and shifted the metabolic state of the lung toward glycolysis; reenergizing the electron transport chain with TMPD (N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine) recovered metabolic activity. This indicates that ascorbate slows the decline of the ex vivo perfused lung's mitochondrial activity through an independent interaction with the electron transport chain complexes. PMID:26165188

  2. Methodology for ventilation/perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Bajc, Marika; Neilly, Brian; Miniati, Massimo; Mortensen, Jan; Jonson, Björn

    2010-11-01

    Ventilation/perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (V/Q SPECT) is the scintigraphic technique of choice for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and many other disorders that affect lung function. Data from recent ventilation studies show that the theoretic advantages of Technegas over radiolabeled liquid aerosols are not restricted to the presence of obstructive lung disease. Radiolabeled macroaggregated human albumin is the imaging agent of choice for perfusion scintigraphy. An optimal combination of nuclide activities and acquisition times for ventilation and perfusion, collimators, and imaging matrix yields an adequate V/Q SPECT study in approximately 20 minutes of imaging time. The recommended protocol based on the patient remaining in an unchanged position during the initial ventilation study and the perfusion study allows presentation of matching ventilation and perfusion slices in all projections as well as in rotating volume images based upon maximum intensity projections. Probabilistic interpretation of V/Q SPECT should be replaced by a holistic interpretation strategy on the basis of all relevant information about the patient and all ventilation/perfusion patterns. PE is diagnosed when there is more than one subsegment showing a V/Q mismatch representing an anatomic lung unit. Apart from pulmonary embolism, other pathologies should be identified and reported, for example, obstructive disease, heart failure, and pneumonia. Pitfalls exist both with respect to imaging technique and scan interpretation. PMID:20920632

  3. What to do when a smoker's CT scan is "normal"?: Implications for lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Zurawska, Joanna H; Jen, Rachel; Lam, Stephen; Coxson, Harvey O; Leipsic, Jonathon; Sin, Don D

    2012-05-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States and around the world. There are > 90 million current and ex-smokers in the United States who are at increased risk of lung cancer. The published data from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) suggest that yearly screening with low-dose thoracic CT scan in heavy smokers can reduce lung cancer mortality by 20% and all-cause mortality by 7%. However, to implement this program nationwide using the NLST inclusion and exclusion criteria would be extremely expensive, with CT scan costs alone > $2 billion per annum. In this article, we offer a possible low-cost strategy to risk-stratify smokers on the basis of spirometry measurements and emphysema scoring by radiologists on CT scans. PMID:22553261

  4. Iterative image reconstruction for cerebral perfusion CT using pre-contrast scan induced edge-preserving prior

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianhua; Zhang, Hua; Gao, Yang; Huang, Jing; Liang, Zhengrong; Feng, Qianjing; Chen, Wufan

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral perfusion X-ray computed tomography (PCT) imaging, which detects and characterizes the ischemic penumbra, and assesses blood-brain barrier permeability with acute stroke or chronic cerebrovascular diseases, has been developed extensively over the past decades. However, due to its sequential scan protocol, the associated radiation dose has raised significant concerns to patients. Therefore, in this study we developed an iterative image reconstruction algorithm based on the maximum a posterior (MAP) principle to yield a clinically acceptable cerebral PCT image with lower milliampere seconds (mAs). To preserve the edges of the reconstructed image, an edge-preserving prior was designed using a normal-dose pre-contrast unenhanced scan. For simplicity, the present algorithm was termed as “MAP-ndiNLM”. Evaluations with the digital phantom and the simulated low-dose clinical brain PCT datasets clearly demonstrate that the MAP-ndiNLM method can achieve more significant gains than the existing FBP and MAP-Huber algorithms with better image noise reduction, low-contrast object detection and resolution preservation. More importantly, the MAP-ndiNLM method can yield more accurate kinetic enhanced details and diagnostic hemodynamic parameter maps than the MAP-Huber method. PMID:23104003

  5. Iterative image reconstruction for cerebral perfusion CT using a pre-contrast scan induced edge-preserving prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianhua; Zhang, Hua; Gao, Yang; Huang, Jing; Liang, Zhengrong; Feng, Qianjing; Chen, Wufan

    2012-11-01

    Cerebral perfusion x-ray computed tomography (PCT) imaging, which detects and characterizes the ischemic penumbra, and assesses blood-brain barrier permeability with acute stroke or chronic cerebrovascular diseases, has been developed extensively over the past decades. However, due to its sequential scan protocol, the associated radiation dose has raised significant concerns to patients. Therefore, in this study we developed an iterative image reconstruction algorithm based on the maximum a posterior (MAP) principle to yield a clinically acceptable cerebral PCT image with lower milliampere-seconds (mA s). To preserve the edges of the reconstructed image, an edge-preserving prior was designed using a normal-dose pre-contrast unenhanced scan. For simplicity, the present algorithm was termed as ‘MAP-ndiNLM’. Evaluations with the digital phantom and the simulated low-dose clinical brain PCT datasets clearly demonstrate that the MAP-ndiNLM method can achieve more significant gains than the existing FBP and MAP-Huber algorithms with better image noise reduction, low-contrast object detection and resolution preservation. More importantly, the MAP-ndiNLM method can yield more accurate kinetic enhanced details and diagnostic hemodynamic parameter maps than the MAP-Huber method.

  6. WE-G-18C-02: Estimation of Optimal B-Value Set for Obtaining Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Free From Perfusion in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Karki, K; Hugo, G; Ford, J; Saraiya, S; Weiss, E; Olsen, K; Groves, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) is increasingly being investigated for radiotherapy planning and response assessment. Selection of a limited number of b-values in DW-MRI is important to keep geometrical variations low and imaging time short. We investigated various b-value sets to determine an optimal set for obtaining monoexponential apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) close to perfusion-insensitive intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model ADC (ADCIVIM) in nonsmall cell lung cancer. Methods: Seven patients had 27 DW-MRI scans before and during radiotherapy in a 1.5T scanner. Respiratory triggering was applied to the echo-planar DW-MRI with TR=4500ms approximately, TE=74ms, pixel size=1.98X1.98mm{sub 2}, slice thickness=4–6mm and 7 axial slices. Diffusion gradients were applied to all three axes producing traceweighted images with eight b-values of 0–1000μs/μm{sup 2}. Monoexponential model ADC values using various b-value sets were compared to ADCIVIM using all b-values. To compare the relative noise in ADC maps, intra-scan coefficient of variation (CV) of active tumor volumes was computed. Results: ADCIVIM, perfusion coefficient and perfusion fraction for tumor volumes were in the range of 880-1622 μm{sup 2}/s, 8119-33834 μm{sup 2}/s and 0.104–0.349, respectively. ADC values using sets of 250, 800 and 1000; 250, 650 and 1000; and 250–1000μs/μm{sup 2} only were not significantly different from ADCIVIM(p>0.05, paired t-test). Error in ADC values for 0–1000, 50–1000, 100–1000, 250–1000, 500–1000, and three b-value sets- 250, 500 and 1000; 250, 650 and 1000; and 250, 800 and 1000μs/μm{sup 2} were 15.0, 9.4, 5.6, 1.4, 11.7, 3.7, 2.0 and 0.2% relative to the reference-standard ADCIVIM, respectively. Mean intrascan CV was 20.2, 20.9, 21.9, 24.9, 32.6, 25.8, 25.4 and 24.8%, respectively, whereas that for ADCIVIM was 23.3%. Conclusion: ADC values of two 3 b-value sets

  7. Functional Lung MRI in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Comparison of T1 Mapping, Oxygen-Enhanced T1 Mapping and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Jobst, Bertram J.; Triphan, Simon M. F.; Sedlaczek, Oliver; Anjorin, Angela; Kauczor, Hans Ulrich; Biederer, Jürgen; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Ley, Sebastian; Wielpütz, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Monitoring of regional lung function in interventional COPD trials requires alternative endpoints beyond global parameters such as FEV1. T1 relaxation times of the lung might allow to draw conclusions on tissue composition, blood volume and oxygen fraction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential value of lung Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with native and oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping for the assessment of COPD patients in comparison with contrast enhanced perfusion MRI. Materials and Methods 20 COPD patients (GOLD I-IV) underwent a coronal 2-dimensional inversion recovery snapshot flash sequence (8 slices/lung) at room air and during inhalation of pure oxygen, as well as dynamic contrast-enhanced first-pass perfusion imaging. Regional distribution of T1 at room air (T1), oxygen-induced T1 shortening (ΔT1) and peak enhancement were rated by 2 chest radiologists in consensus using a semi-quantitative 3-point scale in a zone-based approach. Results Abnormal T1 and ΔT1 were highly prevalent in the patient cohort. T1 and ΔT1 correlated positively with perfusion abnormalities (r = 0.81 and r = 0.80; p&0.001), and with each other (r = 0.80; p<0.001). In GOLD stages I and II ΔT1 was normal in 16/29 lung zones with mildly abnormal perfusion (15/16 with abnormal T1). The extent of T1 (r = 0.45; p<0.05), ΔT1 (r = 0.52; p<0.05) and perfusion abnormalities (r = 0.52; p<0.05) showed a moderate correlation with GOLD stage. Conclusion Native and oxygen-enhanced T1 mapping correlated with lung perfusion deficits and severity of COPD. Under the assumption that T1 at room air correlates with the regional pulmonary blood pool and that oxygen-enhanced T1 reflects lung ventilation, both techniques in combination are principally suitable to characterize ventilation-perfusion imbalance. This appears valuable for the assessment of regional lung characteristics in COPD trials without administration of i.v. contrast. PMID:25822195

  8. Interactive lung segmentation in abnormal human and animal chest CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Kockelkorn, Thessa T. J. P. Viergever, Max A.; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M.; Bozovic, Gracijela; Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate; Rikxoort, Eva M. van; Brown, Matthew S.; Jong, Pim A. de; Ginneken, Bram van

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Many medical image analysis systems require segmentation of the structures of interest as a first step. For scans with gross pathology, automatic segmentation methods may fail. The authors’ aim is to develop a versatile, fast, and reliable interactive system to segment anatomical structures. In this study, this system was used for segmenting lungs in challenging thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods: In volumetric thoracic CT scans, the chest is segmented and divided into 3D volumes of interest (VOIs), containing voxels with similar densities. These VOIs are automatically labeled as either lung tissue or nonlung tissue. The automatic labeling results can be corrected using an interactive or a supervised interactive approach. When using the supervised interactive system, the user is shown the classification results per slice, whereupon he/she can adjust incorrect labels. The system is retrained continuously, taking the corrections and approvals of the user into account. In this way, the system learns to make a better distinction between lung tissue and nonlung tissue. When using the interactive framework without supervised learning, the user corrects all incorrectly labeled VOIs manually. Both interactive segmentation tools were tested on 32 volumetric CT scans of pigs, mice and humans, containing pulmonary abnormalities. Results: On average, supervised interactive lung segmentation took under 9 min of user interaction. Algorithm computing time was 2 min on average, but can easily be reduced. On average, 2.0% of all VOIs in a scan had to be relabeled. Lung segmentation using the interactive segmentation method took on average 13 min and involved relabeling 3.0% of all VOIs on average. The resulting segmentations correspond well to manual delineations of eight axial slices per scan, with an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.933. Conclusions: The authors have developed two fast and reliable methods for interactive lung segmentation in

  9. Immune complexes, gallium lung scans, and bronchoalveolar lavage in idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis-fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Gelb, A.F.; Dreisen, R.B.; Epstein, J.D.; Silverthorne, J.D.; Bickel, Y.; Fields, M.; Border, W.A.; Taylor, C.R.

    1983-08-01

    We obtained results of lung immune complexes (LIC), circulating immune complexes (CIC), 48-hour gallium lung scans (scans), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and pulmonary function tests in 20 patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis-fibrosis. Sixteen patients had predominantly interstitial (13 cases UIP) and/or intraalveolar (3 cases DIP) cellular disease (group 1). Prior to corticosteroid therapy in group 1, scans were positive in 75 percent, CIC were elevated in 86 percent, LIC were present in 64 percent, and BAL was abnormal in 90 percent. Duration of follow-up after treatment was 3.5 +/- 1.0 year. In group 1 after treatment with corticosteroids in 13 patients and corticosteroids and penicillamine (three patients) and plasmapheresis (one patient), only four patients remain stable or improved. After corticosteroid therapy, elevated CIC returned to normal values despite progressive patient deterioration. In three patients, lung immune complexes were still detected after circulating immune complexes had returned to normal after corticosteroid therapy. In group 2 were four patients with fibrotic disease; scans and CIC were uniformly negative, LIC were weakly present in only one patient, and BAL was abnormal in all. Despite corticosteroid therapy, all have died or deteriorated. These results suggest that positive gallium lung scans, BAL, circulating immune complexes, and to a lesser extent, lung immune complexes are associated with the cellular phase of interstitial pneumonia, but do not reliably identify a corticosteroid-responsive group.

  10. Abnormal ventilation scans in middle-aged smokers. Comparison with tests of overall lung function

    SciTech Connect

    Barter, S.J.; Cunningham, D.A.; Lavender, J.P.; Gibellino, F.; Connellan, S.J.; Pride, N.B.

    1985-07-01

    The uniformity of regional ventilation during tidal breathing has been assessed using continuous inhalation of krypton-81m in 43 male, lifelong nonsmokers and 46 male, current cigarette smokers (mean daily consumption 24.1 cigarettes/day) between 44 and 61 yr of age and with mild or no respiratory symptoms. All subjects had normal chest radiographs. The results of the ventilation scans were compared with tests of overall lung function (spirometry, maximal expiratory flow-volume curves, and single-breath N2 test). Diffuse abnormalities of the ventilation scan were found in 19 (41%) of the 46 smokers but in none of the nonsmokers. Focal abnormalities were found in 7 smokers and 3 nonsmokers. Smokers showed the expected abnormalities in overall lung function (reduced FEV1 and VC, increased single-breath N2 slope, and closing volume), but in individual smokers there was only a weak relation between the severity of abnormality of overall lung function and an abnormal ventilation scan. Abnormal scans could be found when overall lung function was normal and were not invariably found when significant abnormalities in FEV1/VC or N2 slope were present. There was no relation between the presence of chronic expectoration and an abnormal scan. The prognostic significance of an abnormal ventilation scan in such smokers remains to be established.

  11. Simulation-based validation and arrival-time correction for Patlak analyses of Perfusion-CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredno, Jörg; Hom, Jason; Schneider, Thomas; Wintermark, Max

    2009-02-01

    Blood-brain-barrier (BBB) breakdown is a hypothesized mechanism for hemorrhagic transformation in acute stroke. The Patlak analysis of a Perfusion Computed Tomography (PCT) scan measures the BBB permeability, but the method yields higher estimates when applied to the first pass of the contrast bolus compared to a delayed phase. We present a numerical phantom that simulates vascular and parenchymal time-attenuation curves to determine the validity of permeability measurements obtained with different acquisition protocols. A network of tubes represents the major cerebral arteries ipsi- and contralateral to an ischemic event. These tubes branch off into smaller segments that represent capillary beds. Blood flow in the phantom is freely defined and simulated as non-Newtonian tubular flow. Diffusion of contrast in the vessels and permeation through vessel walls is part of the simulation. The phantom allows us to compare the results of a permeability measurement to the simulated vessel wall status. A Patlak analysis reliably detects areas with BBB breakdown for acquisitions of 240s duration, whereas results obtained from the first pass are biased in areas of reduced blood flow. Compensating for differences in contrast arrival times reduces this bias and gives good estimates of BBB permeability for PCT acquisitions of 90-150s duration.

  12. Evaluation of tumour vascularisation in two rat sarcoma models for studying isolated lung perfusion. Injection route determines the origin of tumour vessels.

    PubMed

    Pan, Youmin; Krueger, T; Tran, Nam; Yan, Hua; Ris, H-B; McKee, T A

    2005-01-01

    Isolated cytostatic lung perfusion (ILP) is an attractive technique allowing delivery of a high-dose of cytostatic agents to the lungs while limiting systemic toxicity. In developing a rat model of ILP, we have analysed the effect of the route of tumour cell injection on the source of tumour vessels. Pulmonary sarcomas were established by injecting a sarcoma cell suspension either by the intravenous (i.v.) route or directly into the lung parenchyma. Ink perfusion through either pulmonary artery (PA) or bronchial arteries (BA) was performed and the characteristics of the tumour deposits defined. i.v. and direct injection methods induced pulmonary sarcoma nodules, with similar histological features. The intraparenchymal injection of tumour cells resulted in more reliable and reproducible tumour growth and was associated with a longer survival of the animals. i.v. injected tumours developed a PA-derived vascular tree whereas directly injected tumours developed a BA-derived vasculature. PMID:15905614

  13. The effect of exogenous substrate concentrations on true and apparent metabolism of hyperpolarized pyruvate in the isolated perfused lung.

    PubMed

    Kadlecek, Stephen; Shaghaghi, Hoora; Siddiqui, Sarmad; Profka, Harrilla; Pourfathi, Mehrdad; Rizi, Rahim

    2014-12-01

    Although relatively metabolically inactive, the lung has an important role in maintaining systemic glycolytic intermediate and cytosolic redox balance. Failure to perform this function appropriately may lead to lung disease progression, including systemic aspects of these disorders. In this study, we experimentally probe the response of the isolated, perfused organ to varying glycolytic intermediate (pyruvate and lactate) concentrations, and the effect on the apparent metabolism of hyperpolarized 1-(13)C pyruvate. Twenty-four separate conditions were studied, from sub-physiological to super-physiological concentrations of each metabolite. A three-compartment model is developed, which accurately matches the full range of experiments and includes a full account of evolution of agent concentration and polarization. The model is then refined using a series of approximations which are shown to be applicable to cases of physiological relevance, and which facilitate an intuitive understanding of the saturation and scaling behavior. Perturbations of the model assumptions are used to determine the sensitivity to input parameter estimates, and finally the model is used to examine the relationship between measurements accessible by NMR and the underlying physiological parameters of interest. Based on the observed scaling of lactate labeling with lactate and pyruvate concentrations, we conclude that the level of hyperpolarized lactate signal in the lung is primarily determined by the rate at which NAD(+) is reduced to NADH. Further, although weak dependences on other factors are predicted, the modeled NAD(+) reduction rate is largely governed by the intracellular lactate pool size. Conditions affecting the lactate pool can therefore be expected to display the highest contrast in hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate imaging. The work is intended to serve as a basis both to interpret the signal dynamics of hyperpolarized measurements in the normal lung and to understand the cause of

  14. Clinical outcomes of cytoreductive surgery combined with intrapleural perfusion of hyperthermic chemotherapy in advanced lung adenocarcinoma with pleural dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Eunjue; Kim, Daejoong; Cho, Sukki; Kim, Kwhanmien

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the safety and feasibility of intrapleural perfusion hyperthermic chemotherapy (IPHC) followed by cytoreductive surgery as a part of multimodal strategy for the treatment of advanced lung adenocarcinoma. Methods Medical records of advanced lung cancer patients with pleural dissemination who underwent surgical treatment between 2003 and 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Enrolled patients were divided into a surgery group comprising patients who underwent surgery only and an IPHC group, which consisted of patients who underwent surgery combined with IPHC. Results A total of 33 patients were enrolled in this study. Twenty-three patients underwent IPHC after surgical resection, and 10 patients underwent surgical resection only. The complication rate of the IPHC group was estimated to be 34.8% (8 cases), none of which included postoperative mortality. The complication rate of the surgery group was 40.0% (4 cases), which included one postoperative mortality. The 6-month, 1-year, and 3-year overall survival rates for the IPHC group were 95.7%, 91.3% and 38.6%, respectively, while those of the surgery group were 80.0%, 80.0% and 37.5%. The 6-month, 1-year and 3-year progression-free survival rates for the IPHC group were 87.0%, 47.8% and 24.3%, while those of surgery group were 44.4%, 33.3% and 0.0%, respectively. There were significant differences in overall survival rates between two groups (P=0.045); however, progression-free survival was not different between the two groups. Conclusions IPHC combined with cytoreductive surgery for advanced lung adenocarcinoma associated with pleural seeding could be performed safely and feasible. It would be part of multimodality therapy for certain category of advanced lung adenocarcinoma. However, the long-term benefits for survival is uncertain. More extensive and precisely designed studies are warranted to further evaluate the effectiveness of IPHC. PMID:27499943

  15. Meta-analysis of the independent and cumulative effects of multiple genetic modifications on pig lung xenograft performance during ex vivo perfusion with human blood

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Donald G.; Quinn, Kevin J.; French, Beth M.; Schwartz, Evan; Kang, Elizabeth; Dahi, Siamak; Phelps, Carol J.; Ayares, David L.; Burdorf, Lars; Azimzadeh, Agnes M.; Pierson, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetically modified pigs are a promising potential source of lung xenografts. Ex-vivo xenoperfusion is an effective platform for testing the effect of new modifications, but typical experiments are limited by testing of a single genetic intervention and small sample sizes. The purpose of this study was to analyze the individual and aggregate effects of donor genetic modifications on porcine lung xenograft survival and injury in an extensive pig lung xenoperfusion series. Methods Data from 157 porcine lung xenoperfusion experiments using otherwise unmodified heparinized human blood were aggregated as either continuous or dichotomous variables. Lungs were wild type in 17 perfusions (11% of the study group), while 31 lungs (20% of the study group) had 1 genetic modification, 40 lungs (39%) had 2, and 47 lungs (30%) had 3 or more modifications. The primary endpoint was functional lung survival to 4 hours of perfusion. Secondary analyses evaluated previously identified markers associated with known lung xenograft injury mechanisms. In addition to comparison among all xenografts grouped by survival status, a subgroup analysis was performed of lungs incorporating the GalTKO.hCD46 genotype. Results Each increase in the number of genetic modifications was associated with additional prolongation of lung xenograft survival. Lungs that exhibited survival to 4 hours generally had reduced platelet activation and thrombin generation. GalTKO and the expression of hCD46, HO-1, hCD55 or hEPCR were associated with improved survival. hTBM, HLA-E, and hCD39 were associated with no significant effect on the primary outcome. Conclusion This meta-analysis of an extensive lung xenotransplantation series demonstrates that increasing the number of genetic modifications targeting known xenogeneic lung injury mechanisms is associated with incremental improvements in lung survival. While more detailed mechanistic studies are needed to explore the relationship between gene expression

  16. Quantitative assessment of emphysema from whole lung CT scans: comparison with visual grading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Apanosovich, Tatiyana V.; Wang, Jianwei; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2009-02-01

    Emphysema is a disease of the lungs that destroys the alveolar air sacs and induces long-term respiratory dysfunction. CT scans allow for imaging of the anatomical basis of emphysema and for visual assessment by radiologists of the extent present in the lungs. Several measures have been introduced for the quantification of the extent of disease directly from CT data in order to add to the qualitative assessments made by radiologists. In this paper we compare emphysema index, mean lung density, histogram percentiles, and the fractal dimension to visual grade in order to evaluate the predictability of radiologist visual scoring of emphysema from low-dose CT scans through quantitative scores, in order to determine which measures can be useful as surrogates for visual assessment. All measures were computed over nine divisions of the lung field (whole lung, individual lungs, and upper/middle/lower thirds of each lung) for each of 148 low-dose, whole lung scans. In addition, a visual grade of each section was also given by an expert radiologist. One-way ANOVA and multinomial logistic regression were used to determine the ability of the measures to predict visual grade from quantitative score. We found that all measures were able to distinguish between normal and severe grades (p<0.01), and between mild/moderate and all other grades (p<0.05). However, no measure was able to distinguish between mild and moderate cases. Approximately 65% prediction accuracy was achieved from using quantitative score to predict visual grade, with 73% if mild and moderate cases are considered as a single class.

  17. Reproducibility and validity of lung density measures from cardiac CT scans – the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Lung Study

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Eric A; Jiang, Rui; Baumhauer, Heather; Brooks, Michael A; Carr, J Jeffrey; Detrano, Robert; Reinhardt, Joseph; Rodriguez, Josanna; Stukovsky, Karen; Wong, Nathan; Barr, R Graham

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Cardiac CT scans for the assessment of coronary calcium scores include approximately 70% of the lung volume and may be useful for the quantitative assessment of emphysema. The reproducibility of lung density measures from cardiac CTs and their validity compared to lung density measures from full-lung scans is unknown. Methods and Methods The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) performed paired cardiac CT scans for 6,814 participants at baseline and at follow-up. The MESA-Lung Study assessed lung density measures in the lung fields of these cardiac scans, counting voxels below -910 HU as moderate-to-severe emphysema-like lung regions. We evaluated: 1) the reproducibility of lung density measures among 120 randomly selected participants, 2) the comparability of measures acquired on electron-beam CT (EBT) and multidetector CT (MDCT) scanners among 10 participants; and 3) the validity of these measures compared to full-lung scans among 42 participants. Limits of agreement were determined using Bland-Altman approaches. Results Percent emphysema measures from paired cardiac scans were highly correlated (r=0.92-0.95) with mean difference of -0.05% (95% limits of agreement: -8.3, 8.4%). Measures from EBT and MDCT scanners were comparable (mean difference -0.9%; 95% limits of agreement: -5.1, 3.3%). Percent emphysema measures from MDCT cardiac and MDCT full-lung scans were highly correlated (r=0.93) and demonstrated reasonable agreement (mean difference 2.2%; 95% limits of agreement: -9.2, 13.8%). Conclusion While full-lung imaging is preferred for the quantification of emphysema, the lung imaging from paired cardiac CTs provided a reproducible and valid quantitative assessment of emphysema in a population-based sample. PMID:19427979

  18. Ventilation perfusion radionuclide imaging in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis.

    PubMed

    Bourke, S J; Hawkins, T; Keavey, P M; Gascoigne, A D; Corris, P A

    1993-06-01

    There is increasing interest in ventilation perfusion (V/Q) imaging in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis because of the data these scans provide on the dynamic V/Q relationships in such patients undergoing single lung transplantation. However, the full spectrum of V/Q abnormalities in this disease is poorly defined. We therefore analysed the V/Q scans of 45 consecutive patients with advanced cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis being considered for single lung transplantation. Scans were classified according to the presence, severity and degree of matching of defects in ventilation and perfusion images and the results were compared with the data obtained from lung function tests. Ventilation images showed defects in 13 (29%) and 'washout delay' in 15 (33%) patients; 10 (22%) patients had asymmetric distribution of ventilation with one lung receiving > 60% of total ventilation. Perfusion images showed normal perfusion in 8 (18%), mild defects in 18 (40%) and major defects in 19 (42%) patients. The distribution of perfusion between lungs was significantly asymmetric in 20 (45%) patients. V/Q images were matched in 15 (33%), mildly mismatched in 15 (33%) and severely mismatched in 15 (33%) patients, but the degree of V/Q mismatch did not show a relationship to KCO, PaO2 or A-aO2 gradient. The appearances were atypical of pulmonary embolism in eight patients. V/Q images in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis show a diverse range of appearances and may mimic pulmonary embolism. V/Q imaging complements the data obtained from lung function tests and is particularly useful in defining the differential function of each lung which is particularly important in the assessment of patients for single lung transplantation. PMID:8321484

  19. Lung function in silica-exposed workers. A relationship to disease severity assessed by CT scan.

    PubMed

    Bégin, R; Ostiguy, G; Cantin, A; Bergeron, D

    1988-09-01

    To investigate the relationship of lung function, airflow limitation, and lung injury in silica-exposed workers, we analyzed the clinical, functional, and radiologic data of 94 long-term workers exposed in the granite industry or in foundries. The subjects were divided into four subsets based on chest roentgenogram and CT scan of the thorax: group 1 consisted of 21 subjects with category 0 chest roentgenogram and category 0 CT scan; group 2, 28 subjects with category E 1 on both chest roentgenogram and CT scan; group 3, 18 subjects with category E 1 on chest roentgenogram but with coalescence or conglomeration or both seen only on CT scan; and group 4, 27 subjects with category E 1 and coalescence or conglomeration or both on roentgenogram and CT scan. The groups did not differ in terms of age, height, cigarette smoking, or years of exposure. Lung volumes were significantly reduced only in group 4 (p less than 0.05). Lung compliance, diffusion capacity, and the rest-exercise P(A-a)O2 gradient were reduced in groups 3 and 4 (p less than 0.05). Expiratory flow rates were significantly reduced in groups 2, 3, and 4, with the lowest values in group 4. The expiratory flow rates in group 3 were significantly lower in group 3 than in group 2. These results support the concept that airflow in silica-exposed workers is significantly reduced when the disease is detectable on simple chest roentgenogram; coalescence or conglomeration or both on chest roentgenogram or CT scan is associated with significant loss of lung volumes, gas exchange function, and increased airflow obstruction. PMID:3409733

  20. Patient willingness and barriers to receiving a CT scan for lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Delmerico, Jennifer; Hyland, Andrew; Celestino, Paula; Reid, Mary; Cummings, K Michael

    2014-06-01

    CT scans are becoming a more common method for detecting lung cancers at an earlier, potentially more curable, stage of disease. There is currently little data on attitudes and beliefs about screening for lung cancer. This paper presents the results of a 2011 survey of adult current and former smokers that queried about past use of CT scanning and reasons for having or not having the screening done. A random-digit dialed telephone survey was administered to a representative sample of 1290 US adults. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the correlates of having the test while controlling for the covariates. A total of 13.4% (n = 45) of the sample had ever had a CT scan to detect lung cancer. Of current smokers, 14.6% had received a CT scan, as compared with 12.7% of former smokers. The oldest age group (55+) was significantly more likely to have received a CT scan than the younger age groups. 78.5% of current smokers and 81.4% of former smokers indicated willingness to get the test if advised to do so by their doctor. Among those who said they were not willing to get screened, lack of insurance coverage was cited by 33% of current smokers and 25% of former smokers. Additionally, 33% of current smokers were afraid to find out whether they had cancer. The main barrier to CT scanning for lung cancer is likely to be insurance coverage for the test, which would be a burden for those on limited and fixed incomes. Next steps should include further research into the effect of increased public education about the availability, risks, benefits and barriers to lung cancer screening. PMID:24674155

  1. Quantitative assessment of ventilation-perfusion mismatch by radioxenon imaging of the lung.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Y; Itoh, H; Suzuki, T; Yonekura, Y; Mukai, T; Torizuka, K

    1978-06-01

    By the use of xenon-133 and a scintillation camera with digital data storage and processing system, a topographic relationship between ventilation distribution (V) and perfusion distribution (Q) was examined quantitatively in two groups of normal nonsmokers and one of older smokers, all healthy. In addition, subjects with a variety of cardiopulmonary disease were tested. The fractional regional ventilation (VR) and regional perfusion (QR) were plotted against the V/Q ratio on a logarithmic abscissa for the normal subjects; both were distributed log-normally with a narrow standard deviation, and were dissociated slightly from each other. However, with smoking and with increasing age, the s.d. and the dissociation became wider, suggesting an impairment of gas exchange as estimated by alveolar-atrial gas-pressure differences (A-aD), which were calculated by putting these topographic relationships into a gas-exchange program in a computer. In various cardiopulmonary diseases a good correlation was found between the estimated A-aDO2 thus obtained and the actual A-aDO2 derived from analysis of the blood gases. PMID:660273

  2. Benzo(a)pyrene oxidation, conjugation and disposition in the isolated perfused rabbit lung: role of the glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Ball, L M; Plummer, J L; Smith, B R; Bend, J R

    1979-10-01

    The isolated perfused rabbit lung metabolised 7--11 % of 20 mumol of [14C]-benzo(a)pyrene added in the perfusion medium in 1 h. The major metabolite formed was 3-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene, both free (30--40 % of the total metabolites) and conjugated (4 % of total metabolites). Quinones comprised 15 % of the total and metabolism at the 9, 10 position accounted for a further 10 %. Forty per cent of the water-soluble metabolites was chromatographically identical to the glutathione conjugate of benzo(a)pyrene 4,5-oxide. Sulphate and glucuronide conjugates were formed in small but detectable amounts, principally from phenols, but also from dihydrodiols. After 1 h the more water-soluble conjugates had diffused from the lung into the perfusion medium, but the majority (60--90 %) of the metabolic products were still concentrated within the lung. The lung's limited ability to conjugate its major metabolites of benzo(a)pyrene with sulphuric or glucuronic acid, coupled with slow elimination of the products formed, particularly dihydrodiols may contribute to the susceptibility of this organ to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:522517

  3. The use and benefit of stereology in choosing a CT scanning protocol for the lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowitz, Zvi; Loew, Murray H.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2005-04-01

    When a patient is examined at different times using different protocols, how can we know whether the observed differences in the area or volume estimate are due to the patient, the protocol, or both? Specifically, we ask what is the smallest difference in lung volume that can be computed reliably when two sets of CT data are acquired by varying the number and thickness of the slices, but while holding constant the in-plane resolution. The accuracy and precision of the total lung volume estimates are calculated based on the principles of stereology using uniform design sampling. Comparisons of the lung volume estimate based on fewer slices using stereological principles are employed. A formal test made of the hypothesis that the use of fewer slices can yield satisfactory precision of the lung estimate. It is known that estimation of lung volume based on CT images is sensitive to the acquisition parameters used during scanning: dose, scan time, number of cross-sectional slices, and slice collimation. Those parameters are very different depending on the lung examination required: routine studies or high-resolution detailed studies. Thus, if different protocols are to be used confidently for volume estimation, it is important to understand the factors that influence volume estimate accuracy and to provide the associated confidence intervals for the measurements.

  4. Regional ventilation/perfusion mismatch pattern in patient with Swyer James (MacLeod's) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sager, Sait; Asa, Sertac; Akyel, Reşit; Atahan, Ersan; Kanmaz, Bedii

    2014-09-01

    Swyer James (McLeod's) syndrome (SJMS) is an uncommon disease, which occurs as a result of childhood bronchiolitis obliterans. Patients may not be diagnosed until later in their life. A 46-year-old man underwent ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy for acute onset of dyspnea. The scan showed markedly diminished ventilation and perfusion unilaterally on the right middle and inferior lobes. However, mismatched ventilation-perfusion pattern was shown on the upper right lobe, which was consistent with pulmonary embolism. Unilaterally matched ventilation/perfusion defect can see in SJMS in lung scintigraphy; however, when pulmoner embolism may accompany, scintigraphy should be carefully examined. PMID:25535507

  5. Estimation of optimal b-value sets for obtaining apparent diffusion coefficient free from perfusion in non-small cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, Kishor; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Ford, John C.; Olsen, Kathryn M.; Saraiya, Siddharth; Groves, Robert; Weiss, Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine optimal sets of b-values in diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) for obtaining monoexponential apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) close to perfusion-insensitive intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model ADC (ADCIVIM) in non-small cell lung cancer. Ten subjects had 40 DW-MRI scans before and during radiotherapy in a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Respiratory triggering was applied to the echo-planar DW-MRI with \\text{TR}≈ 4500 ms, TE  =  74 ms, eight b-values of 0-1000 μs μm-2, pixel size  =  1.98× 1.98 mm2, slice thickness  =  6 mm, interslice gap  =  1.2 mm, 7 axial slices and total acquisition time ≈6 min. One or more DW-MRI scans together covered the whole tumour volume. Monoexponential model ADC values using various b-value sets were compared to reference-standard ADCIVIM values using all eight b-values. Intra-scan coefficient of variation (CV) of active tumour volumes was computed to compare the relative noise in ADC maps. ADC values for one pre-treatment DW-MRI scan of each of the 10 subjects were computed using b-value pairs from DW-MRI images synthesized for b-values of 0-2000 μs μm-2 from the estimated IVIM parametric maps and corrupted by various Rician noise levels. The square root of mean of squared error percentage (RMSE) of the ADC value relative to the corresponding ADCIVIM for the tumour volume of the scan was computed. Monoexponential ADC values for the b-value sets of 250 and 1000; 250, 500 and 1000; 250, 650 and 1000; 250, 800 and 1000; and 250-1000 μs μm-2 were not significantly different from ADCIVIM values (p>0.05 , paired t-test). Mean error in ADC values for these sets relative to ADCIVIM were within 3.5%. Intra-scan CVs for these sets were comparable to that for ADCIVIM. The monoexponential ADC values for other sets—0-1000 50-1000 100-1000 500-1000 and 250 and 800 μs μm-2 were significantly different from the ADCIVIM values. From Rician noise simulation

  6. Ventilation-perfusion relationships in the lung during head-out water immersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derion, Toniann; Guy, Harold J. B.; Tsukimoto, Koichi; Schaffartzik, Walter; Prediletto, Renato; Poole, David C.; Knight, Douglas R.; Wagner, Peter D.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanisms of altered pulmonary gas exchange during water immersion were studied in 12 normal males: 6 young (aged 20-29) and 6 older (aged 40-45). It is concluded that, in young subjects with closing volume (CV) less than expiratory reserve volume (ERV), gas exchange was enhanced during immersion, because normal ventilation-perfusion relations were preserved, and by mass balance, the ventilation/O2 uptake changes elevated arterial P(O2). In older males with CV greater than ERV and 52 percent of tidal volume below CV, immersion-induced airways closure during tidal breathing was associated with minimally increased shunt that did not significantly impair gas exchange. It is suggested that airways closure of this degree is of little importance to gas exchange.

  7. A comparative analysis of the dependences of the hemodynamic parameters on changes in ROI's position in perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong-Seok; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Namgung, Jang-Sun; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Yoon, Dae-Young; Lee, Han-Joo

    2013-05-01

    This study performed a comparative analysis of cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTT), and mean time-to-peak (TTP) obtained by changing the region of interest's (ROI) anatomical positions, during CT brain perfusion. We acquired axial source images of perfusion CT from 20 patients undergoing CT perfusion exams due to brain trauma. Subsequently, the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP values were calculated through data-processing of the perfusion CT images. The color scales for the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP maps were obtained using the image data. Anterior cerebral artery (ACA) was taken as the standard ROI for the calculations of the perfusion values. Differences in the hemodynamic average values were compared in a quantitative analysis by placing ROI and the dividing axial images into proximal, middle, and distal segments anatomically. By performing the qualitative analysis using a blind test, we observed changes in the sensory characteristics by using the color scales of the CBV, CBF, and MTT maps in the proximal, middle, and distal segments. According to the qualitative analysis, no differences were found in CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP values of the proximal, middle, and distal segments and no changes were detected in the color scales of the the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP maps in the proximal, middle, and distal segments. We anticipate that the results of the study will useful in assessing brain trauma patients using by perfusion imaging.

  8. Short inhalation exposures of the isolated and perfused rat lung to respirable dry particle aerosols; the detailed pharmacokinetics of budesonide, formoterol, and terbutaline.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Per; Eirefelt, Stefan J; Andersson, Paul; Blomgren, Anders; Ryrfeldt, Ake; Gerde, Per

    2008-06-01

    There is an increasing interest in using the lung as a route of entry for both local and systemic administration of drugs. However, because adequate technologies have been missing in the preclinical setting, few investigators have addressed the detailed disposition of drugs in the lung following short inhalation exposures to highly concentrated dry powder aerosols. New methods are needed to explore the disposition of drugs after short inhalation exposures, thus mimicking a future clinical use. Our aim was to study the pulmonary disposition of budesonide, formoterol, and terbutaline, which are clinically used for the treatment of bronchial asthma. Using the recently developed DustGun aerosol technology, we exposed by inhalation for approximately 1 min the isolated and perfused rat lung (IPL) to respirable dry particle aerosols of the three drugs at high concentrations. The typical aerosol concentration was 1 mug/mL, and the particle size distribution of the tested substances varied with a MMAD ranging from 2.3 to 5.3 mum. The IPL was perfused in single pass mode and repeated samples of the perfusate were taken for up to 80 min postexposure. The concentration of drug in perfusate and in lung extracts was measured using LC-MS/MS. The deposited dose was determined by adding the amounts of drug collected in perfusate to the amount extracted from the tissues at 80 min. Deposited amounts of budesonide, formoterol fumarate, and terbutaline sulphate were 23 +/- 17, 36 +/- 8, and 60 +/- 3.2 mug (mean +/- SD, n = 3), respectively. Retention in lung tissues at the end of the perfusion period expressed as fraction of deposited dose was 0.19 +/- 0.05, 0.19 +/- 0.06, and 0.04 +/- 0.01 (mean +/- SD, n = 3) for budesonide, formoterol, and terbutaline, respectively. Each short inhalation exposure to the highly concentrated aerosols consumed 1-3 mg powder. Hence, this system can be particularly useful for obtaining a detailed pharmacokinetic characterization of inhaled compounds in

  9. Three-dimensional Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography of alveolar mechanics in stepwise inflated and deflated isolated and perfused rabbit lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Alexander; Knels, Lilla; Meissner, Sven; Wendel, Martina; Heller, Axel R.; Lambeck, Thomas; Koch, Thea; Koch, Edmund

    2007-07-01

    Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) was used to acquire three-dimensional image stacks of isolated and perfused rabbit lungs (n = 4) at different constant pulmonary airway pressures (CPAP) and during vascular fixation. After despeckling and applying a threshold, the images were segmented into air and tissue, and registered to each other to compensate for movement between CPAP steps. The air-filled cross-sectional areas were quantified using a semi-automatic algorithm. The cross-sectional area of alveolar structures taken at all three perpendicular planes increased with increasing CPAP. Between the minimal CPAP of 3 mbar and the maximum of 25 mbar the areas increased to about 140% of their initial value. There was no systematic dependency of inflation rate on initial size of the alveolar structure. During the perfusion fixation of the lungs with glutaraldehyde morphometric changes of the alveolar geometry measured with FD-OCT were negligible.

  10. Abolished ventilation and perfusion of lung caused by blood clot in the left main bronchus: auto-downregulation of pulmonary arterial blood supply.

    PubMed

    Afzelius, P; Bergmann, A; Henriksen, J H

    2015-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the lungs possess arterial autoregulation associated with bronchial obstruction. A patient with pneumonia and congestive heart failure unexpectedly developed frequent haemoptysis. High-resolution CT and diagnostic CT were performed as well as ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy with single-photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT. V/Q SPECT/CT demonstrated abolished ventilation due to obstruction of the left main bronchus and markedly reduced perfusion of the entire left lung, a condition that was completely reversed after removal of a blood clot. We present the first pictorially documented case of hypoxia-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction and flow shift in a main pulmonary artery due to a complete intrinsic obstruction of the ipsilateral main bronchus. The condition is reversible, contingent on being relieved within a few days. PMID:26374773

  11. Bilateral basal Xe-133 retention and ventilation/perfusion patterns in mild and subclinical congestive heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.K.; Skarzynski, J.J.; Spadaro, A. )

    1989-12-01

    The Xe-133 ventilation pattern in congestive heart failure (CHF) was assessed using 24 inpatient ventilation/perfusion studies performed to rule out pulmonary embolism. Patients with histories of CHF, myocardial infarction (MI), and cardiomyopathy were included in the study. Frank pulmonary edema, pulmonary embolism, and other known lung diseases such as chronic obstructive lung disease, tumor, and pneumonia were excluded. Fifteen of the 24 patients had abnormal ventilation scans. Twelve of the 15 showed bilateral basal Xe-133 retention on washout; the remaining 3 showed diffuse, posterior regional retention. On perfusion scans, 14 of the 15 abnormal ventilation patients showed evidence of CHF such as inverted perfusion gradient, enlarged cardiac silhouette, or patchy perfusion, and all of them had a history of CHF or cardiac disease. Nine of the 24 patients had normal ventilation scans, including normal washout patterns. Seven of the nine had normal perfusion (p less than 0.01). Four of the nine normal ventilation patients had a history of cardiac disease or CHF but no recent acute MI. Bilateral basal regional Xe-133 retention, coupled with perfusion scan evidence of CHF such as inverted perfusion gradient, enlarged cardiac silhouette, and patchy perfusion pattern, appears to be a sensitive and characteristic ventilation/perfusion finding in mild or subclinical CHF.

  12. [Effects of the PAF antagonist WEB 2086 on hypoxia and angiotensin II-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction in the isolated perfused rat lung].

    PubMed

    Kempfert, C; Brandt, R; Siewert, B; Kanowski, U; Oddoy, A

    1991-10-01

    Using isolated blood-perfused lung preparations of rats, we tested the influence of the PAF antagonist WEB 2086 on vasoconstriction triggered by hypoxia or angiotensin II (A II). If a constant flow was pre-set, changes in the prepulmonarily measured pressure were directly related to the changes of resistance in the pulmonary flow. WEB 2086 reduced the hypoxically conditioned vasoconstriction (HPV) when using blood as perfusion medium, the effect being dependent on the dose (ED50 = 127.3 +/- 21.1 mg/l). HPV was lowered on the average by 82% if the full pharmacologic dose of 800 mg/l WEB 2086 was added to the perfusate. The A II response was weakened to a lesser degree (by 45%). If plasma was used as perfusate, the pressure increase in response to hypoxic stimulation or A II was less marked. However, the relative effect of the PAF antagonist was analogous (attenuation by 83% or 53%, respectively). In chronically hypoxic animals (3 weeks at 10% O2) the relative pressure drop in the lesser circulation after application of WEB 2086 (400 mg/l; HPV; blood as perfusate) was definitely more pronounced (p less than 0.001). The fact that WEB partly antagonises the pulmonary vasoconstriction triggered both by alveolar hypoxy and by angiotensin II, seems to indicate that in both constrictive stimuli PAF participates in the complex mediator mechanism or that WEB 2086 exercises a non-specific vasodilatory effect on the pulmonary flow. PMID:1758848

  13. Depleted energy charge and increased pulmonary endothelial permeability induced by mitochondrial complex I inhibition are mitigated by coenzyme Q1 in the isolated perfused rat lung.

    PubMed

    Bongard, Robert D; Yan, Ke; Hoffmann, Raymond G; Audi, Said H; Zhang, Xiao; Lindemer, Brian J; Townsley, Mary I; Merker, Marilyn P

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with various forms of lung injury and disease that also involve alterations in pulmonary endothelial permeability, but the relationship, if any, between the two is not well understood. This question was addressed by perfusing isolated intact rat lung with a buffered physiological saline solution in the absence or presence of the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone (20 μM). Compared to control, rotenone depressed whole lung tissue ATP from 5.66 ± 0.46 (SEM) to 2.34 ± 0.15 µmol · g(-1) dry lung, with concomitant increases in the ADP:ATP and AMP:ATP ratios. Rotenone also increased lung perfusate lactate (from 12.36 ± 1.64 to 38.62 ± 3.14 µmol · 15 min(-1) perfusion · g(-1) dry lung) and the lactate:pyruvate ratio, but had no detectable impact on lung tissue GSH:GSSG redox status. The amphipathic quinone coenzyme Q1 (CoQ1; 50 μM) mitigated the impact of rotenone on the adenine nucleotide balance, wherein mitigation was blocked by NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase 1 or mitochondrial complex III inhibitors. In separate studies, rotenone increased the pulmonary vascular endothelial filtration coefficient (Kf) from 0.043 ± 0.010 to 0.156 ± 0.037 ml · min(-1) · cm H2O(-1) · g(-1) dry lung, and CoQ1 protected against the effect of rotenone on Kf. A second complex I inhibitor, piericidin A, qualitatively reproduced the impact of rotenone on Kf and the lactate:pyruvate ratio. Taken together, the observations imply that pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity depends on mitochondrial bioenergetics as reflected in lung tissue ATP levels and that compensatory activation of whole lung glycolysis cannot protect against pulmonary endothelial hyperpermeability in response to mitochondrial blockade. The study further suggests that low-molecular-weight amphipathic quinones may have therapeutic utility in protecting lung barrier function in mitochondrial insufficiency. PMID:23912160

  14. Depleted energy charge and increased pulmonary endothelial permeability induced by mitochondrial complex I inhibition are mitigated by coenzyme Q1 in the isolated perfused rat lung

    PubMed Central

    Bongard, Robert D.; Yan, Ke; Hoffmann, Raymond G.; Audi, Said H.; Zhang, Xiao; Lindemer, Brian J.; Townsley, Mary I.; Merker, Marilyn P.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with various forms of lung injury and disease that also involve alterations in pulmonary endothelial permeability, but the relationship, if any, between the two is not well understood. This question was addressed by perfusing the isolated intact rat lung with a buffered physiological saline solution in the absence or presence of the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone (20 uM). As compared to control, rotenone depressed whole lung tissue ATP from 5.66 ± 0.46 (SEM) to 2.34 ± 0.15 (SEM) μmol·gram−1 dry lung, with concomitant increases in the ADP:ATP and AMP:ATP ratios. Rotenone also increased lung perfusate lactate (from 12.36 ± 1.64 (SEM) to 38.62 ± 3.14 μmol·15 min−1 perfusion·gm−1 dry lung) and the lactate:pyruvate ratio, but had no detectable impact on lung tissue GSH:GSSG redox status. The amphipathic quinone, coenzyme Q1 (CoQ1; 50 μM) mitigated the impact of rotenone on the adenine nucleotide balance, wherein mitigation was blocked by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) or mitochondrial complex III inhibitors. In separate studies, rotenone increased the pulmonary vascular endothelial filtration coefficient (Kf) from 0.043 ± 0.010 (SEM) to 0.156 ± 0.037 (SEM) ml·min−1·cm H2O−1·gm−1 dry lung weight, and CoQ1 protected against the effect of rotenone on Kf. A second complex I inhibitor, piericidin A, qualitatively reproduced the impact of rotenone on Kf and the lactate/pyruvate ratio. Taken together, the observations imply that pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity depends on mitochondrial bioenergetics as reflected in lung tissue ATP levels and that compensatory activation of whole lung glycolysis cannot protect against pulmonary endothelial hyperpermeability in response to mitochondrial blockade. The study further suggests that low molecular weight amphipathic quinones may have therapeutic utility in protecting lung barrier function in mitochondrial insufficiency. PMID:23912160

  15. Ventilation-perfusion inequality in the human lung is not increased following no-decompression-stop hyperbaric exposure.

    PubMed

    Moore, Gaea Schwaebe; Wong, Stewart C; Darquenne, Chantal; Neuman, Tom S; West, John B; Kim Prisk, G

    2009-11-01

    Venous gas bubbles occur in recreational SCUBA divers in the absence of decompression sickness, forming venous gas emboli (VGE) which are trapped within pulmonary circulation and cleared by the lung without overt pathology. We hypothesized that asymptomatic VGE would transiently increase ventilation-perfusion mismatch due to their occlusive effects within the pulmonary circulation. Two sets of healthy volunteers (n = 11, n = 12) were recruited to test this hypothesis with a single recreational ocean dive or a baro-equivalent dry hyperbaric dive. Pulmonary studies (intrabreath V (A)/Q (iV/Q), alveolar dead space, and FVC) were conducted at baseline and repeat 1- and 24-h after the exposure. Contrary to our hypothesis V (A)/Q mismatch was decreased 1-h post-SCUBA dive (iV/Q slope 0.023 +/- 0.008 ml(-1) at baseline vs. 0.010 +/- 0.005 NS), and was significantly reduced 24-h post-SCUBA dive (0.000 +/- 0.005, p < 0.05), with improved V (A)/Q homogeneity inversely correlated to dive severity. No changes in V (A)/Q mismatch were observed after the chamber dive. Alveolar dead space decreased 24-h post-SCUBA dive (78 +/- 10 ml at baseline vs. 56 +/- 5, p < 0.05), but not 1-h post dive. FVC rose 1-h post-SCUBA dive (5.01 +/- 0.18 l vs. 5.21 +/- 0.26, p < 0.05), remained elevated 24-h post SCUBA dive (5.06 +/- 0.2, p < 0.05), but was decreased 1-hr after the chamber dive (4.96 +/- 0.31 L to 4.87 +/- 0.32, p < 0.05). The degree of V (A)/Q mismatch in the lung was decreased following recreational ocean dives, and was unchanged following an equivalent air chamber dive, arguing against an impact of VGE on the pulmonary circulation. PMID:19690884

  16. Quantitation of brain perfusion with {sup 99m}{Tc}-bicisate and single SPECT scan: Comparison with microsphere measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pupi, A.; De Cristofaro, T.R.; Passeri, A.; Castagnoli, A.; Bacciottini, L.; Bottoncetti, A.; Dal Pozzo, G.; Santoro, G.M.; Antoniucci, D.

    1994-01-01

    This study describes and validates in a preliminary manner a method to measure the steady-state influx constant (K{sub 1}) of {sup 99m}{Tc}-bicisate with one single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan. The method is based on the analysis of the arterial concentration of the radioactivity. The results of this quantitation procedure were compared with regional CBF (rCBF) measurements made using {sup 99m}{Tc}-microspheres (MI). Two quantitative indexes of perfusion, fractional brain uptake (FBU) and normalized (with cerebellum) brain uptake (NBU), were also evaluated. Two SPECT studies were performed on seven cardiovascular patients who had no signs of neurological disease. In the first of these, {sup 99m}{Tc}-bicisate was used, while in the other, which was performed 2 days later, MI were injected into the left heart ventricle. The values of the FBU, NBU, and K{sub 1} of {sup 99m}{Tc}-bicisate were calculated in several gray and white matter brain regions of interest (ROIs) and compared with the rCBF values measured with MI in coupled ROIs. Mean FBU values were 0.00008 {+-} 0.00002 and 0.00004 {+-} 0.00001 in the gray and the white matter, respectively. Mean NBU values were 0.99 {+-} 0.04 and 0.54 {+-} 0.05, mean K{sub 1} values were 0.36 {+-} 0.06 and 0.19 {+-} 0.03 ml g{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1} and mean rCBF values were 0.51 {+-} 0.04 and 0.27 {+-} 0.04 ml g{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1} in gray and white matter, respectively. Analysis of variance of the regression gave different F values for the regressions with rCBF of FBU (F = 19, n = 126), NBU (F = 289, n = 112), and K{sub 1}(F = 117, n = 112), and K{sub 1}(F = 117, n = 126). The regression of K{sub 1} versus rCBF was K{sub 1} = 0.08 {+-} 0.55 rCBF. 25 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Metabolism of delta1-tetrahydrocannabinol by the isolated perfused dog lung. Comparison with in vitro liver metabolism.

    PubMed

    Widman, M; Nordqvist, M; Dollery, C T; Briant, R H

    1975-11-01

    The metabolism of (-)-delta1-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta1-THC) has been studied in the isolated perfused dog lung. After intravascular administration of [3H]-delta1-THC there was an overall biotransformation of 12%. Two major metabolites were isolated and identified as 3'-hydroxy-delta1-THC and 4'-hydroxy-delta1-THC. 7-Hydroxy-delta1-THC was also present together with small amounts of 6alpha-hydroxy-delta1-THC and 6beta-hydroxy-delta1-THC. An in vitro experiment using a dog liver microsomal preparation was also carried out and showed that the major metabolites were 6beta-hydroxy-delta1-THC and 6alpha-hydroxy-delta1-THC. 7-Hydroxy-delta1-THC and 1,2-epoxy-hexahydrocannabinol were also isolated together with small amounts of 3'-hydroxy-delta1-THC and 4'-hydroxy-delta1-THC. The side-chain hydroxylated compounds are hitherto undescribed metabolites of delta1-THC. PMID:1493

  18. [Effect of hypocapnia/alkalosis on the fluid filtration rate in isolated and perfused rabbit lungs].

    PubMed

    Urich, Daniela; Trejo, Humberto; Pezzulo, Alejandro; Caraballo, Juan Carlos; Gutiérrez, Jeydith; Castro, Ignacio; Sánchez-de León, Roberto

    2008-06-01

    Hypocapnia/alkalosis is a consequence of several lung and metabolic pathologies. The aim of this study was to determine whether the increase of fluid filtration rate (FFR) that occurs during Hypocapnia/alkalosis circumstances is determined by hypocapnia, alkalosis or both. 7 groups were formed (N=36) using isolated rabbit lungs. Group 1: Control (PCO2 6%, pH: 7.35-7.45); Group 2 (n=6): Hypocapnia/Alkalosis (CO2 1%, pH: 7.9); Group 3 (n=6): Hypocapnia/Normo-pH (CO2 1% pH 7.35-7.45), Group 4 (n=6) Normocapnia/Alcalosis (CO2 6%, pH: 7.9). Fenoterol, papaverine and hydrocortisone were added to Groups 5, 6 and 7 (n=4) respectively, all under Normocapnia/Alkalosis. FFR and Pulmonary Arterial Pressure (Pap) were considerably higher in group 2 than in control (FFR: 1.92g/min +/- 0.6 vs 0.0 g/min +/- 0.006). A strong influence exerted by pH was observed when Group 3 and group 4 were compared (FFR: 0.02 g/min +/- 0.009 vs 2.3 g/min +/- 0.9) and (Pap: 13.5 cmH2O +/- 1.4 vs 90 cmH2O +/- 15). A reduced effect was observed in groups 5 and 6 (papaverine and hydrocorisone) and a totally abolished effect was observed in group 7 (fenoterol) (FFR: 0.001 +/- 0.0003 mL/min and Pap: 14 +/- 0.8 cmH2O). Pulmonary edema induced by Hypocapnia/alkalosis is a consequence of alkalosis and not of hypocapnia. This effect could be due to inflammatory damage in the lung parenchyma and alkalosis-mediated vasoconstriction. PMID:18717265

  19. Bronchoalveolar lavage and gallium-67 lung scanning in the evaluation of asbestos-exposed individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Tawil, W.G.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, an attempt is made to evaluate certain parameters that might indicate the beginning of a certain fibrogenic activity in the lung parenchyma, even before such changes become visible on the chest x-ray. The hypothesis is that studies such as certain bronchoalveolar immunological characteristics and Gallium-67 lung scans may be more sensitive indicators of parenchymal lung damage in response to asbestos inhalation than conventional radiographic criteria. If so, then in those cases where the criteria for the diagnosis of asbestosis lack the presence of parenchymal changes, it would be unwise to deny the diagnosis unless further investigation, such as the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid analysis and the Gallium-67 lung scan techniques, are made available. The most significant laboratory parameter for bronchoalveolar lavage, in this study, is that of Neutrophils (PMNs). All three asbestos-exposed groups showed no differences when compared with each other, while such differences were statistically significant when such groups were separately compared with the normal comparison group. A similar finding existed also when the Helper: suppressor T-Cell ratios were compared, and found to be higher in all the asbestos-exposed groups.

  20. The gravitational distribution of ventilation-perfusion ratio is more uniform in prone than supine posture in the normal human lung.

    PubMed

    Henderson, A Cortney; Sá, Rui Carlos; Theilmann, Rebecca J; Buxton, Richard B; Prisk, G Kim; Hopkins, Susan R

    2013-08-01

    The gravitational gradient of intrapleural pressure is suggested to be less in prone posture than supine. Thus the gravitational distribution of ventilation is expected to be more uniform prone, potentially affecting regional ventilation-perfusion (Va/Q) ratio. Using a novel functional lung magnetic resonance imaging technique to measure regional Va/Q ratio, the gravitational gradients in proton density, ventilation, perfusion, and Va/Q ratio were measured in prone and supine posture. Data were acquired in seven healthy subjects in a single sagittal slice of the right lung at functional residual capacity. Regional specific ventilation images quantified using specific ventilation imaging and proton density images obtained using a fast gradient-echo sequence were registered and smoothed to calculate regional alveolar ventilation. Perfusion was measured using arterial spin labeling. Ventilation (ml·min(-1)·ml(-1)) images were combined on a voxel-by-voxel basis with smoothed perfusion (ml·min(-1)·ml(-1)) images to obtain regional Va/Q ratio. Data were averaged for voxels within 1-cm gravitational planes, starting from the most gravitationally dependent lung. The slope of the relationship between alveolar ventilation and vertical height was less prone than supine (-0.17 ± 0.10 ml·min(-1)·ml(-1)·cm(-1) supine, -0.040 ± 0.03 prone ml·min(-1)·ml(-1)·cm(-1), P = 0.02) as was the slope of the perfusion-height relationship (-0.14 ± 0.05 ml·min(-1)·ml(-1)·cm(-1) supine, -0.08 ± 0.09 prone ml·min(-1)·ml(-1)·cm(-1), P = 0.02). There was a significant gravitational gradient in Va/Q ratio in both postures (P < 0.05) that was less in prone (0.09 ± 0.08 cm(-1) supine, 0.04 ± 0.03 cm(-1) prone, P = 0.04). The gravitational gradients in ventilation, perfusion, and regional Va/Q ratio were greater supine than prone, suggesting an interplay between thoracic cavity configuration, airway and vascular tree anatomy, and the effects of gravity on Va/Q matching. PMID

  1. The Impact of Sources of Variability on Parametric Response Mapping of Lung CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    Boes, Jennifer L.; Bule, Maria; Hoff, Benjamin A.; Chamberlain, Ryan; Lynch, David A.; Stojanovska, Jadranka; Martinez, Fernando J.; Han, Meilan K.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Ross, Brian D.; Galbán, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Parametric response mapping (PRM) of inspiration and expiration computed tomography (CT) images improves the radiological phenotyping of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). PRM classifies individual voxels of lung parenchyma as normal, emphysematous, or nonemphysematous air trapping. In this study, bias and noise characteristics of the PRM methodology to CT and clinical procedures were evaluated to determine best practices for this quantitative technique. Twenty patients of varying COPD status with paired volumetric inspiration and expiration CT scans of the lungs were identified from the baseline COPD-Gene cohort. The impact of CT scanner manufacturer and reconstruction kernels were evaluated as potential sources of variability in PRM measurements along with simulations to quantify the impact of inspiration/expiration lung volume levels, misregistration, and image spacing on PRM measurements. Negligible variation in PRM metrics was observed when CT scanner type and reconstruction were consistent and inspiration/expiration lung volume levels were near target volumes. CT scanner Hounsfield unit drift occurred but remained difficult to ameliorate. Increasing levels of image misregistration and CT slice spacing were found to have a minor effect on PRM measurements. PRM-derived values were found to be most sensitive to lung volume levels and mismatched reconstruction kernels. As with other quantitative imaging techniques, reliable PRM measurements are attainable when consistent clinical and CT protocols are implemented. PMID:26568983

  2. Bronchoalveolar lavage analysis, gallium-67 lung scanning and soluble interleukin-2 receptor levels in asbestos exposure.

    PubMed

    Delclos, G L; Flitcraft, D G; Brousseau, K P; Windsor, N T; Nelson, D L; Wilson, R K; Lawrence, E C

    1989-04-01

    This study examined different markers of lung immunologic and inflammatory responses to previous asbestos exposure. We performed bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and gallium-67 (67Ga) lung scans and measured serum and BAL soluble interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (SACE) levels in 32 subjects with a history of significant asbestos exposure, 14 without (EXP) and 18 with (ASB) radiographic evidence of asbestosis. BAL analysis revealed increases in neutrophils in both ASB and EXP when compared to controls (P less than 0.01), which persisted after adjustment for smoking category. Although significant abnormalities of macrophage and total lymphocyte profiles were not found in the study population, lymphocyte subpopulation analysis revealed elevation of BAL T4/T8 ratios in the entire study group (ASB + EXP) when compared to controls (P less than 0.05), independent of smoking category. 67Ga lung scan activity was increased in 56% of ASB and in 36% of EXP: no correlations between positive scans and different radiological and functional parameters could be found. There was no significant elevation of mean SACE, serum, or BAL IL-2R levels in any of the study categories. These data suggest that asbestos exposure may be associated with parenchymal inflammation, even in the absence of clinical criteria for asbestosis. Abnormalities of gallium uptake and of BAL analysis reflect the clinically inapparent inflammation. The increased BAL T4/T8 ratios observed suggest that abnormal local pulmonary immunoregulation may play a role in the pathogenesis of asbestos-related lung diseases. PMID:2538325

  3. Variation compensation and analysis on diaphragm curvature analysis for emphysema quantification on whole lung CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Barr, R. Graham; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2010-03-01

    CT scans allow for the quantitative evaluation of the anatomical bases of emphysema. Recently, a non-density based geometric measurement of lung diagphragm curvature has been proposed as a method for the quantification of emphysema from CT. This work analyzes variability of diaphragm curvature and evaluates the effectiveness of a compensation methodology for the reduction of this variability as compared to emphysema index. Using a dataset of 43 scan-pairs with less than a 100 day time-interval between scans, we find that the diaphragm curvature had a trend towards lower overall variability over emphysema index (95% CI:-9.7 to + 14.7 vs. -15.8 to +12.0), and that the variation of both measures was reduced after compensation. We conclude that the variation of the new measure can be considered comparable to the established measure and the compensation can reduce the apparent variation of quantitative measures successfully.

  4. Estimation of Radiation Exposure of 128-Slice 4D-Perfusion CT for the Assessment of Tumor Vascularity

    PubMed Central

    Horger, Marius; Buchgeister, Markus; Fenchel, Michael; Thomas, Christoph; Boehringer, Nadine; Schulze, Maximilian; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Claussen, Claus D.; Heuschmid, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Objective We aimed to estimate the effective dose of 4D-Perfusion-CT protocols of the lung, liver, and pelvis for the assessment of tumor vascularity. Materials and Methods An Alderson-Rando phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters was used to determine the effective dose values of 4D-Perfusion-CT. Phantom measurements were performed on a 128-slice single-source scanner in adaptive 4D-spiral-mode with bidirectional table movement and a total scan range of 69 mm over a time period of nearly 120 seconds (26 scans). Perfusion measurements were simulated for the lung, liver, and pelvis under the following conditions: lung (80 kV, 60 mAs), liver (80 kV/80 mAs and 80 kV/120 mAs), pelvis (100 kV/80 mAs and 100 kV/120 mAs). Results Depending on gender, the evaluated body region and scan protocol, an effective whole-body dose between 2.9-12.2 mSv, was determined. The radiation exposure administered to gender-specific organs like the female breast tissue (lung perfusion) or to the ovaries (pelvic perfusion) led to an increase in the female specific dose by 86% and 100% in perfusion scans of the lung and the pelvis, respectively. Conclusion Due to a significant radiation dose of 4D-perfusion-CT protocols, the responsible use of this new promising technique is mandatory. Gender- and organ-specific differences should be considered for indication and planning of tumor perfusion scans. PMID:20808699

  5. Ventilation-perfusion scintiscanning in tropical pulmonary eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Ray, D; Jayachandran, C A

    1993-08-01

    We report the findings of ventilation and perfusion scintiscanning performed in three untreated patients with acute tropical pulmonary eosinophilia (TPE). In a 26-year-old man whose arterial blood gas values were normal, the lung scan showed normal radioactivity. The scintigrams of a 20-year-old woman who had hypoxemia and hypercapnea showed gross ventilation defects of both lungs that were mainly mismatched; changes in the perfusion scan were minimal. Scintiscanning in a 14-year-old girl who had moderate arterial hypoxia and mild hypocapnea, on the other hand, showed ventilation defects in both lungs, more marked in left lung; multiple matching ventilation-perfusion defects were also seen; however, the V/Q defects did not appear to be equally matched. The scintigraphic findings were compatible with arterial blood gas status of the individual patients and consistent with the notion that a disturbed ventilation-perfusion relationship may be responsible for hypoxemia in some of the patients with TPE. PMID:8339640

  6. Lung uptake on Tc-99m albumin colloid liver spleen scan and on Ga-67 scan in angiotropic lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kacki, M.H.; Joyce, J.M.; Coupal, J.J.; Ryo, U.Y. )

    1990-03-01

    Lung uptake of Tc-99m sulfur colloid has been reported in various hepatic and extrahepatic diseases, and lung uptake of gallium-67 may occur in patients with various interstitial lung disease without radiographic abnormality. This may be the first case of Tc-99m albumin colloid and Ga-67 lung uptake in a patient with angiotropic lymphoma of the liver, spleen, and uterus.

  7. Thallium myocardial perfusion scans for the assessment of right ventricular hypertrophy in patients with cystic fibrosis. A comparison with other noninvasive techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Newth, C.J.; Corey, M.L.; Fowler, R.S.; Gilday, D.L.; Gross, D.; Mitchell, I.

    1981-01-01

    The incidence of right ventricular hypertrophy in 32 patients with cystic fibrosis was studied using thallium 201 (TI-201) myocardial perfusion scans, and compared with other noninvasive techniques including electrocardiography, vectorcardiography, and M-mode echocardiography. The patients (mean age, 17.3 yr; range, 7 to 33) had a wide range of clinical and pulmonary abnormalities (mean Shwachman-Kulczycki score, 66.6). In the total study group, TI-201 scans, like the vectorcardiograms and the M-mode echocardiograms, gave a surprisingly high proportion of positive predictions for right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) (44%). The correlations with all other noninvasive methods were uniformly poor, so caution must be exercised in using this technique to predict early RVH in order to follow the natural history of cor pulmonale in cystic fibrosis. At the time of the study, 6 patients had clinical evidence of right ventricular failure, and in this disease setting must have had RVH. In 3 patients, RVH was confirmed at autopsy, and it was successfully predicted by TI-201 scans in 5 of the 6 patients. The false negative scan may have been due to regional myocardial ischemia secondary to severe right ventricular failure. In contrast, the vectorcardiogram, using Fowler's new criteria, made a successful prediction of RVH in all 6 patients, and the electro cardiogram in only 3. Although the M-mode echocardiogram was abnormal in all patients, it would have predicted RVH (with increased right ventricular anterior wall thickness) in only 1 patient. We concluded that TI-201 myocardial perfusion cans are good at confirming RVH in cases with established right ventricular failure, but have no advantage over vectorcardiographic assessments, which are logistically easier to perform and carry no radiation risks.

  8. Computerized lung nodule detection on screening CT scans: performance on juxta-pleural and internal nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahiner, Berkman; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Zhou, Chuan; Wei, Jun

    2006-03-01

    We are developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for lung nodules in thoracic CT volumes. Our CAD system includes an adaptive 3D pre-screening algorithm to segment suspicious objects, and a false-positive (FP) reduction stage to classify the segmented objects as true nodules or normal lung structures. We found that the effectiveness of the FP reduction stage was limited by the different characteristics of the objects in the internal and the juxta-pleural (JP) regions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate object characteristics in the internal and JP regions of a lung CT scan, and to develop different FP reduction classifiers for JP and internal objects. Our FP reduction technique utilized shape, grayscale, and gradient features, as well as the scores of a newly-developed neural network trained on the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix in a volume of interest containing the suspicious object. We designed an algorithm to automatically label the objects as internal or JP. Based on a training set of 75 CT scans containing internal and JP nodules, two FP classifiers were trained separately for objects in the two types of lung regions. The system performance was evaluated on an independent test set of 27 low dose screening scans. An experienced chest radiologist identified 64 solid nodules (mean diameter: 5.3 mm, range: 3.0-12.9 mm) on the test cases, of which 33 were internal and 31 were JP. Our adaptive 3D prescreening algorithm detected 28 internal and 29 JP nodules. At 80% sensitivity, the average number of FPs was 3.9 and 9.7 in the internal and JP regions per scan, respectively. In comparison, a classifier designed to work on both types of nodules had an average of 29.4 FPs per scan at the same sensitivity. Our results indicate that it is more effective to use two different classifiers for JP and internal nodules because of their different characteristics. FPs in the JP region were more difficult to distinguish from true nodules. Further investigation

  9. WE-G-BRD-07: Investigation of Distal Lung Atelectasis Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Using Regional Lung Volume Changes Between Pre- and Post- Treatment CT Scans

    SciTech Connect

    Diot, Q; Kavanagh, B; Miften, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a quantitative method using lung deformations to differentiate between radiation-induced fibrosis and potential airway stenosis with distal atelectasis in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Methods: Twenty-four lung patients with large radiation-induced density increases outside the high dose region had their pre- and post-treatment CT scans manually registered. They received SBRT treatments at our institution between 2002 and 2009 in 3 or 5 fractions, to a median total dose of 54Gy (range, 30–60). At least 50 anatomical landmarks inside the lung (airway branches) were paired for the pre- and post-treatment scans to guide the deformable registration of the lung structure, which was then interpolated to the whole lung using splines. Local volume changes between the planning and follow-up scans were calculated using the deformation field Jacobian. Hyperdense regions were classified as atelectatic or fibrotic based on correlations between regional density increases and significant volume contractions compared to the surrounding tissues. Results: Out of 24 patients, only 7 demonstrated a volume contraction that was at least one σ larger than the remaining lung average. Because they did not receive high doses, these shrunk hyperdense regions were likely showing distal atelectasis resulting from radiation-induced airway stenosis rather than conventional fibrosis. On average, the hyperdense regions extended 9.2 cm farther than the GTV contours but not significantly more than 8.6 cm for the other patients (p>0.05), indicating that a large offset between the radiation and hyperdense region centers is not a good surrogate for atelectasis. Conclusion: A method based on the relative comparison of volume changes between different dates was developed to identify potential lung regions experiencing distal atelectasis. Such a tool is essential to study which lung structures need to be avoided to prevent

  10. Motion mitigation for lung cancer patients treated with active scanning proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Sharp, Greg; Paganetti, Harald

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Motion interplay can affect the tumor dose in scanned proton beam therapy. This study assesses the ability of rescanning and gating to mitigate interplay effects during lung treatments. Methods: The treatments of five lung cancer patients [48 Gy(RBE)/4fx] with varying tumor size (21.1–82.3 cm{sup 3}) and motion amplitude (2.9–30.6 mm) were simulated employing 4D Monte Carlo. The authors investigated two spot sizes (σ ∼ 12 and ∼3 mm), three rescanning techniques (layered, volumetric, breath-sampled volumetric) and respiratory gating with a 30% duty cycle. Results: For 4/5 patients, layered rescanning 6/2 times (for the small/large spot size) maintains equivalent uniform dose within the target >98% for a single fraction. Breath sampling the timing of rescanning is ∼2 times more effective than the same number of continuous rescans. Volumetric rescanning is sensitive to synchronization effects, which was observed in 3/5 patients, though not for layered rescanning. For the large spot size, rescanning compared favorably with gating in terms of time requirements, i.e., 2x-rescanning is on average a factor ∼2.6 faster than gating for this scenario. For the small spot size however, 6x-rescanning takes on average 65% longer compared to gating. Rescanning has no effect on normal lung V{sub 20} and mean lung dose (MLD), though it reduces the maximum lung dose by on average 6.9 ± 2.4/16.7 ± 12.2 Gy(RBE) for the large and small spot sizes, respectively. Gating leads to a similar reduction in maximum dose and additionally reduces V{sub 20} and MLD. Breath-sampled rescanning is most successful in reducing the maximum dose to the normal lung. Conclusions: Both rescanning (2–6 times, depending on the beam size) as well as gating was able to mitigate interplay effects in the target for 4/5 patients studied. Layered rescanning is superior to volumetric rescanning, as the latter suffers from synchronization effects in 3/5 patients studied. Gating minimizes the

  11. Four-dimensional CT scans for treatment planning in stereotactic radiotherapy for stage I lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Underberg, Rene; Lagerwaard, Frank J. . E-mail: fj.lagerwaard@vumc.nl; Cuijpers, Johan P.; Slotman, Ben J.; van Soernsen de Koste, John R.; Senan, Suresh

    2004-11-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer requires that meticulous attention be paid toward ensuring optimal target definition. Two computed tomography (CT) scan techniques for defining internal target volumes (ITV) were evaluated. Methods and materials: Ten consecutive patients treated with SRT underwent six 'standard' rapid multislice CT scans to generate an ITV{sub 6CT} and one four-dimensional CT (4DCT) scan that generated volumetric datasets for 10 phases of the respiratory cycle, all of which were used to generate an ITV{sub 4DCT}. Geometric and dosimetric analyses were performed for (1) PTV{sub 4DCT}, derived from the ITV{sub 4DCT} with the addition of a 3-mm margin; (2) PTV{sub 6CT}, derived from the ITV{sub 6CT} with the addition of a 3-mm margin; and (3) 6 PTV{sub 10mm}, derived from each separate GTV{sub 6CT}, to which a three-dimensional margin of 10 mm was added. Results: The ITV{sub 4DCT} was not significantly different from the ITV{sub 6CT} in 8 patients, but was considerably larger in 2 patients whose tumors exhibited the greatest mobility. On average, the ITV{sub 6CT} missed on average 22% of the volume encompassing both ITVs, in contrast to a corresponding mean value of only 8.3% for ITV{sub 4DCT}. Plans based on PTV{sub 4DCT} resulted in coverage of the PTV{sub 6CT} by the 80% isodose in all patients. However, plans based on use of PTV{sub 6CT} led to a mean PTV{sub 4DCT} coverage of only 92.5%, with a minimum of 77.7% and 77.5% for the two most mobile tumors. PTVs derived from a single multislice CT expanded with a margin of 10 mm were on average twice the size of PTVs derived using the other methods, but still led to an underdosing in the two most mobile tumors. Conclusions: Individualized ITVs can improve target definition for SRT of Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer, and use of only a single CT scan with a 10-mm margin is inappropriate. A single 4D scan generates comparable or larger

  12. Imaging of the three-dimensional alveolar structure and the alveolar mechanics of a ventilated and perfused isolated rabbit lung with Fourier domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Popp, Alexander; Wendel, Martina; Knels, Lilla; Koch, Thea; Koch, Edmund

    2006-01-01

    In this feasibility study, Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FDOCT) is used for visualizing the 3-D structure of fixated lung parenchyma and to capture real-time cross sectional images of the subpleural alveolar mechanics in a ventilated and perfused isolated rabbit lung. The compact and modular setup of the FDOCT system allows us to image the first 500 microm of subpleural lung parenchyma with a 3-D resolution of 16 x 16 x 8 microm (in air). During mechanical ventilation, real-time cross sectional FDOCT images visualize the inflation and deflation of alveoli and alveolar sacks (acini) in successive images of end-inspiratory and end-expiratory phase. The FDOCT imaging shows the relation of local alveolar mechanics to the setting of tidal volume (VT), peak airway pressure, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Application of PEEP leads to persistent recruitment of alveoli and acini in the end-expiratory phase, compared to ventilation without PEEP where alveolar collapse and reinflation are observed. The imaging of alveolar mechanics by FDOCT will help to determine the amount of mechanical stress put on the alveolar walls during tidal ventilation, which is a key factor in understanding the development of ventilator induced lung injury (VILI). PMID:16526892

  13. Imaging of the three-dimensional alveolar structure and the alveolar mechanics of a ventilated and perfused isolated rabbit lung with Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Alexander; Wendel, Martina; Knels, Lilla; Koch, T.; Koch, Edmund

    2006-01-01

    In this feasibility study, Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FDOCT) is used for visualizing the 3-D structure of fixated lung parenchyma and to capture real-time cross sectional images of the subpleural alveolar mechanics in a ventilated and perfused isolated rabbit lung. The compact and modular setup of the FDOCT system allows us to image the first 500 µm of subpleural lung parenchyma with a 3-D resolution of 16×16×8 µm (in air). During mechanical ventilation, real-time cross sectional FDOCT images visualize the inflation and deflation of alveoli and alveolar sacks (acini) in successive images of end-inspiratory and end-expiratory phase. The FDOCT imaging shows the relation of local alveolar mechanics to the setting of tidal volume (VT), peak airway pressure, and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Application of PEEP leads to persistent recruitment of alveoli and acini in the end-expiratory phase, compared to ventilation without PEEP where alveolar collapse and reinflation are observed. The imaging of alveolar mechanics by FDOCT will help to determine the amount of mechanical stress put on the alveolar walls during tidal ventilation, which is a key factor in understanding the development of ventilator induced lung injury (VILI).

  14. SCAN+

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Krebs, John Svoboda

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determine the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.

  15. [Effect of changes in airway pressure and the inspiratory volume on the fluid filtration rate and pulmonary artery pressure in isolated rabbit lungs perfused with blood and acellular solution].

    PubMed

    Crespo, Astrid; Novoa, Eva; Urich, Daniela; Trejo, Humberto; Pezzulo, Alejandro; Sznajder, Jacob I; Livia, Fernández; Sánchez-de León, Roberto

    2006-12-01

    It has been reported that ventilation with large tidal volumes causes pulmonary edema in rats by the stimulation and release of proinflammatory mediators. Our objective was to determine the level at which volutrauma induced by changes in Airway Pressure (PAW) and Inspiratory Volume (VI) produce significant changes on the Fluid Filtration Rate (FFR) and Pulmonary Artery Pressure (PAP) in lungs perfused with blood (cellular groups) or with a buffer-albumin solution (acellular groups), with a Positive End Expiratory Pressure (PEEP) 0 or 2 cmH2O and to study the effect of a vasodilator with antiinflammatory properties (fenoterol) in blood-perfused groups. Three experimental groups were used: the cellular groups studied the effect of increased PAW and IV in isolated lungs perfused with blood and PEEP 0 and 2; the acellular groups studied the increased PAW and IV in isolated lungs perfused with a buffer-albumin solution and PEEP 0 and 2; The fenoterol group studied the effect of increased PAW and IV in isolated lungs perfused with blood + fenoterol and PEEP 2. The results show that an increase of FFR is produced earlier in acellular groups than in cellular ones and that the damage in cellular groups is microscopically and macroscopically inferior when compared to acellular groups. Fenoterol did not inhibit edema formation, and that PEEP 2, both in the cellular and the acellular groups, has a protective effect. We propose the possible existence of mediators with protective effects against the formation of pulmonary edema in the blood. These data suggest that volutrauma induced pulmonary edema has a predominantly traumatic origin when the lungs are perfused with blood. PMID:17176901

  16. Distribution of perfusion.

    PubMed

    Glenny, Robb; Robertson, H Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Local driving pressures and resistances within the pulmonary vascular tree determine the distribution of perfusion in the lung. Unlike other organs, these local determinants are significantly influenced by regional hydrostatic and alveolar pressures. Those effects on blood flow distribution are further magnified by the large vertical height of the human lung and the relatively low intravascular pressures in the pulmonary circulation. While the distribution of perfusion is largely due to passive determinants such as vascular geometry and hydrostatic pressures, active mechanisms such as vasoconstriction induced by local hypoxia can also redistribute blood flow. This chapter reviews the determinants of regional lung perfusion with a focus on vascular tree geometry, vertical gradients induced by gravity, the interactions between vascular and surrounding alveolar pressures, and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. While each of these determinants of perfusion distribution can be examined in isolation, the distribution of blood flow is dynamically determined and each component interacts with the others so that a change in one region of the lung influences the distribution of blood flow in other lung regions. PMID:23737171

  17. Systematic evaluation of four-dimensional hybrid depth scanning for carbon-ion lung therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Shinichiro; Furukawa, Takuji; Inaniwa, Taku; Zenklusen, Silvan; Nakao, Minoru; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Irradiation of a moving target with a scanning beam requires a comprehensive understanding of organ motion as well as a robust dose error mitigation technique. The authors studied the effects of intrafractional respiratory motion for carbon-ion pencil beam scanning with phase-controlled rescanning on dose distributions for lung tumors. To address density variations, they used 4DCT data. Methods: Dose distributions for various rescanning methods, such as simple layer rescanning (LR), volumetric rescanning, and phase-controlled rescanning (PCR), were calculated for a lung phantom and a lung patient studies. To ensure realism, they set the scanning parameters such as scanning velocity and energy variation time to be similar to those used at our institution. Evaluation metrics were determined with regard to clinical relevance, and consisted of (i) phase-controlled rescanning, (ii) sweep direction, (iii) target motion (direction and amplitude), (iv) respiratory cycle, and (v) prescribed dose. Spot weight maps were calculated by using a beam field-specific target volume, which takes account of range variations for respective respiratory phases. To emphasize the impact of intrafractional motion on the dose distribution, respiratory gating was not used. The accumulated dose was calculated by applying a B-spline-based deformable image registration, and the results for phase-controlled layered rescanning (PCR{sub L}) and phase-controlled volumetric rescanning (PCR{sub V}) were compared. Results: For the phantom study, simple LR was unable to improve the dose distributions for an increased number of rescannings. The phase-controlled technique without rescanning (1 Multiplication-Sign PCR{sub L} and 1 Multiplication-Sign PCR{sub V}) degraded dose conformity significantly due to a reduced scan velocity. In contrast, 4 Multiplication-Sign PCR{sub L} or more significantly and consistently improved dose distribution. PCR{sub V} showed interference effects, but in general

  18. Lung Metastasis From Prostate Cancer Revealed by 18F-FDG PET/CT Without Osseous Metastasis on Bone Scan.

    PubMed

    Su, Hung-Yi; Chen, Meng-Lin; Hsieh, Ping-Ju; Hsieh, Teh-Sheng; Chao, Ing-Ming

    2016-05-01

    A 54-year-old man, a case of prostate cancer, underwent radical prostatectomy and hormone therapy. Elevated prostate-specific antigen level developed 7 years later, but pelvic MRI and bone scan revealed negative results. Radiotherapy was performed under the suspicion of local recurrence but in vain. F-FDG PET/CT performed 1 more year later showed 3 FDG-avid lesions in the right lung and mediastinum. Lung and lymph node metastases were proved with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. Bone scan remained negative at that time. PMID:26859201

  19. Unsuspected pneumonia detected by increased lung uptake on 111In-ibritumomab tiuxetan scan.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Misun; Joyce, Judith M; Klein, Herbert; Hou, Jing-Zhou

    2012-10-01

    99Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) is a CD20-targeted radioimmunotherapy for the treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma approved by the FDA in 2002. The acquisition of an 111In ibritumomab tiuxetan scan (bioscan) to confirm normal biodistribution before treatment with 99Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan was initially required in the United States until November 2011. This is the first documented example of abnormal biodistribution due to unsuspected pneumonia detected by increased lung uptake on the bioscan. The pneumonia was treated and resolved before 99Y Zevalin, avoiding potential harm and indicating that a screening chest x-ray may be appropriate when a bioscan is not performed. PMID:22955077

  20. Gallium lung scanning and bronchoalveolar lavage in crocidolite-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, A.A.; Mullan, B.; Lovegrove, F.T.; Rose, A.H.; Musk, A.W.; Robinson, B.W.

    1989-07-01

    Gallium lung scanning is widely used to evaluate pulmonary inflammation in patients with interstitial lung disease but has not previously been reported in crocidolite-exposed workers. In order to characterize the pulmonary inflammation caused by crocidolite inhalation, GLS and BAL findings were related to chest x-ray film changes graded according to the ILO classification of roentgenograms of pneumoconioses. In individuals with roentgenographic evidence of asbestosis (CXR greater than or equal to 1/0, n = 15), 13 had a positive GLS and 13 had an abnormal BAL. In asbestos-exposed individuals with equivocal chest x-ray film changes (CXR 0/1, n = 12), six had a positive GLS and six had BAL changes (both GLS and BAL abnormal in three). In individuals with a normal chest x-ray film (CXR 0/0 n = 8), two had a positive GLS and two BAL changes (both abnormal in 1). These data demonstrate that most subjects with crocidolite-induced asbestosis have an abnormal GLS and BAL. In addition, many individuals with asbestos exposure and equivocal or no chest x-ray film changes have an abnormal GLS and/or BAL, suggesting the presence of active subclinical pulmonary inflammation in these individuals.

  1. SCAN+

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determinemore » the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.« less

  2. [Unilateral hyperlucent lung induced by a carcinoid tumor: comments on the differential diagnosis and mechanisms of hypoperfusion].

    PubMed

    Schmitz, N; Bugnet, A-S; Demian, M; Massard, G; De Blay, F; Pauli, G

    2005-04-01

    We report the case of a 35-year-old woman in whom a systematic thoracic x-ray led to the diagnosis of unilateral hyperlucent lung due to a carcinoid tumor obstructing the main left bronchus almost completely. Injected computed tomography permitted diagnosis of left lung hypoperfusion and visualization of the tumor. After enlarged inferior left lobar resection, normal perfusion was observed six months later on the isotopic lung perfusion scan. Other reported causes of unilateral hyperlucent lung are discussed as well as pathophysiological mechanisms of lung hypoperfusion and hypoxic vasoconstriction. PMID:16012363

  3. Granulocytes and phorbol myristate acetate increase permeability to albumin of cultured endothelial monolayers and isolated perfused lungs. Role of oxygen radicals and granulocyte adherence.

    PubMed

    Shasby, D M; Shasby, S S; Peach, M J

    1983-01-01

    Human granulocytes and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) increased permeability to albumin of monolayers of cultured endothelial cells grown on micropore filters. Granulocytes from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease and PMA did not increase endothelial permeability to albumin, demonstrating that the increase in permeability is dependent on granulocyte-derived oxygen radicals. When granulocytes were separated from the endothelial cells by a micropore filter, granulocytes and PMA no longer increased endothelial permeability to albumin, demonstrating that PMA-stimulated granulocytes must be closely approximated to endothelial cells to increase endothelial permeability. The relevance of these in vitro findings to an intact microvasculature was confirmed by demonstrating that agents that reduce granulocyte adherence to endothelium reduce edema formed in isolated lungs by granulocytes and PMA, an oxygen radical dependent process. Pretreatment of granulocytes with cytochalasin B or addition of 2% dextran to isolated lung perfusates reduced granulocyte adherence and markedly reduced edema formation in isolated lungs. These studies demonstrate that PMA-stimulated granulocytes must be closely apposed to endothelial cells to increase endothelial permeability through an oxygen-radical-dependent mechanism, and they suggest that reduction of granulocyte adherence may protect against granulocyte-dependent edema. PMID:6849554

  4. TU-F-BRF-03: Effect of Radiation Therapy Planning Scan Registration On the Dose in Lung Cancer Patient CT Scans

    SciTech Connect

    Cunliffe, A; Contee, C; White, B; Justusson, J; Armato, S; Malik, R; Al-Hallaq, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the effect of deformable registration of serial computed tomography (CT) scans on the radiation dose calculated from a treatment planning scan. Methods: Eighteen patients who received curative doses (≥60Gy, 2Gy/fraction) of photon radiation therapy for lung cancer treatment were retrospectively identified. For each patient, a diagnostic-quality pre-therapy (4–75 days) CT scan and a treatment planning scan with an associated dose map calculated in Pinnacle were collected. To establish baseline correspondence between scan pairs, a researcher manually identified anatomically corresponding landmark point pairs between the two scans. Pre-therapy scans were co-registered with planning scans (and associated dose maps) using the Plastimatch demons and Fraunhofer MEVIS deformable registration algorithms. Landmark points in each pretherapy scan were automatically mapped to the planning scan using the displacement vector field output from both registration algorithms. The absolute difference in planned dose (|ΔD|) between manually and automatically mapped landmark points was calculated. Using regression modeling, |ΔD| was modeled as a function of the distance between manually and automatically matched points (registration error, E), the dose standard deviation (SD-dose) in the eight-pixel neighborhood, and the registration algorithm used. Results: 52–92 landmark point pairs (median: 82) were identified in each patient's scans. Average |ΔD| across patients was 3.66Gy (range: 1.2–7.2Gy). |ΔD| was significantly reduced by 0.53Gy using Plastimatch demons compared with Fraunhofer MEVIS. |ΔD| increased significantly as a function of E (0.39Gy/mm) and SD-dose (2.23Gy/Gy). Conclusion: An average error of <4Gy in radiation dose was introduced when points were mapped between CT scan pairs using deformable registration. Dose differences following registration were significantly increased when the Fraunhofer MEVIS registration algorithm was used

  5. Comparison of Two Deformable Registration Algorithms in the Presence of Radiologic Change Between Serial Lung CT Scans.

    PubMed

    Cunliffe, Alexandra R; White, Bradley; Justusson, Julia; Straus, Christopher; Malik, Renuka; Al-Hallaq, Hania A; Armato, Samuel G

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the image registration accuracy achieved using two deformable registration algorithms when radiation-induced normal tissue changes were present between serial computed tomography (CT) scans. Two thoracic CT scans were collected for each of 24 patients who underwent radiation therapy (RT) treatment for lung cancer, eight of whom experienced radiologically evident normal tissue damage between pre- and post-RT scan acquisition. For each patient, 100 landmark point pairs were manually placed in anatomically corresponding locations between each pre- and post-RT scan. Each post-RT scan was then registered to the pre-RT scan using (1) the Plastimatch demons algorithm and (2) the Fraunhofer MEVIS algorithm. The registration accuracy for each scan pair was evaluated by comparing the distance between landmark points that were manually placed in the post-RT scans and points that were automatically mapped from pre- to post-RT scans using the displacement vector fields output by the two registration algorithms. For both algorithms, the registration accuracy was significantly decreased when normal tissue damage was present in the post-RT scan. Using the Plastimatch algorithm, registration accuracy was 2.4 mm, on average, in the absence of radiation-induced damage and 4.6 mm, on average, in the presence of damage. When the Fraunhofer MEVIS algorithm was instead used, registration errors decreased to 1.3 mm, on average, in the absence of damage and 2.5 mm, on average, when damage was present. This work demonstrated that the presence of lung tissue changes introduced following RT treatment for lung cancer can significantly decrease the registration accuracy achieved using deformable registration. PMID:25822396

  6. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yupeng; Kardar, Laleh; Liao, Li; Lim, Gino; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong; Cao, Wenhua; Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Methods: Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Results: Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Conclusions: Despite

  7. Three-dimensional x-ray imaging of the anatomy and function of the lungs and pulmonary arteries in dogs following single lung transplant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing-Hua; McGregor, Christopher G. A.; Wu, Xue-Si; Rinaldi, Mauro; Nilsson, Folke N.; Tazelaar, Henry D.; Ritman, Erik L.

    1996-04-01

    It was the goal of this study to see if relatively noninvasive CT studies could provide a quantitative index of acute lung rejection in single lung transplantation. Using volume scanning fast CT, the change in cross-sectional area of the major pulmonary arteries from systole to diastole, regional lung perfusion and ventilation was measured in 12 dogs with left lung allotransplantation before and during rejection and four dogs with left lung autotransplantation. All dogs were anesthetized and scanned in a fast computed tomography scanner (dynamic spatial reconstructor--DSR) during several ventilatory cycles and again during injection of contrast medium into the right atrium. There was significant reduction of regional air content, ventilation, perfusion and pulmonary artery compliance during rejection of the transplanted lung. The severity of these changes related linearly with the histological indices of rejection. It is concluded that minimally invasive dynamic CT imaging of transplanted lung can be used to detect acute rejection and its severity.

  8. Automated detection of pulmonary nodules from whole lung helical CT scans: performance comparison for isolated and attached nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enquobahrie, Andinet A.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this research is to evaluate and compare the performance of our automated detection algorithm on isolated and attached nodules in whole lung CT scans. Isolated nodules are surrounded by the lung parenchyma with no attachment to large solid structures such as the chest wall or mediastinum surface, while attached nodules are adjacent to these structures. The detection algorithm involves three major stages. First, the region of the image space where pulmonary nodules are to be found is identified. This involves segmenting the lung region and generating the pleural surface. In the second stage, which is the hypothesis generation stage, nodule candidate locations are identified and their sizes are estimated. The nodule candidates are successively refined in the third stage a sequence of filters of increasing complexity. The algorithm was tested on a dataset containing 250 low-dose whole lung CT scans with 2.5mm slice thickness. A scan is composed of images covering the whole lung region for a single person. The dataset was partitioned into 200 and 50 scans for training and testing the algorithm. Only solid nodules were considered in this study. Experienced chest radiologists identified a total of 447 solid nodules. 345 and 102 of the nodules were from the training and testing datasets respectively. 126(28.2%) of the nodules in the dataset were attached nodules. The detection performance was then evaluated separately for isolated and attached nodule types considering different size ranges. For nodules 3mm and larger, the algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 97.8% with 2.0 false positives (FPs) per scan and 95.7% with 19.3 FPs per scan for isolated and attached nodules respectively. For nodules 4mm and larger, a sensitivity of 96.6% with 1.5 FP per scan and a 100% sensitivity with 13 FPs per scan were obtained for isolated and attached nodule types respectively. The results show that our algorithm detects isolated and attached nodules with comparable

  9. Lung texture in serial thoracic CT scans: Correlation with radiologist-defined severity of acute changes following radiation therapya

    PubMed Central

    Cunliffe, Alexandra R.; Armato, Samuel G.; Straus, Christopher; Malik, Renuka; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the correlation between the radiologist-defined severity of normal tissue damage following radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer treatment and a set of mathematical descriptors of computed tomography (CT) scan texture (“texture features”). A pre-therapy CT scan and a post-therapy (median: 33 days) CT scan were retrospectively collected under IRB approval for each of 25 patients who underwent definitive RT (median dose: 66 Gy). Sixty regions of interest (ROIs) were automatically identified in the non-cancerous lung tissue of each post-therapy scan. A radiologist compared post-therapy scan ROIs with pre-therapy scans and categorized each as containing no abnormality, mild abnormality, moderate abnormality, or severe abnormality. Twenty texture features that characterize gray-level intensity, region morphology, and gray-level distribution were calculated in post-therapy scan ROIs and compared with anatomically matched ROIs in the pre-therapy scan. Linear regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis were used to compare the percent feature value change (ΔFV) between ROIs at each category of visible radiation damage. Most ROIs contained no (65%) or mild abnormality (30%). ROIs with moderate (3%) or severe (2%) abnormalities were observed in 9 patients. For 19 of 20 features, ΔFV was significantly different among severity levels. For 12 features, significant differences were observed at every level. Compared with regions with no abnormalities, ΔFV for these 12 features increased, on average, by 1.5%, 12%, and 30%, respectively, for mild, moderate, and severe abnormalitites. Area under the ROC curve was largest when comparing ΔFV in the highest severity level with the remaining three categories (mean AUC across features: 0.84). In conclusion, 19 features that characterized the severity of radiologic changes from pre-therapy scans were identified. These features may be used in future studies to quantify acute normal lung

  10. Comparison of 133Xenon Ventilation Equilibrium Scan (XV) and 99mTechnetium Transmission (TT) Scan for Use in Regional Lung Analysis by 2D Gamma Scintigraphy in Healthy and Cystic Fibrosis Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jihong; Donaldson, Scott H.; Bennett, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Quantification of particle deposition in the lung by gamma scintigraphy requires a reference image for location of regions of interest (ROIs) and normalization to lung thickness. In various laboratories, the reference image is made by a transmission scan (57Co or 99mTc) or gas ventilation scan (133Xe or 81Kr). There has not been a direct comparison of measures from the two methods. Methods We compared 99mTc transmission scans to 133Xe equilibrium ventilation scans as reference images for 38 healthy subjects and 14 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients for their effects on measures of regional particle deposition: the central-to-peripheral ratio of lung counts (C/P); and ROI area versus forced vital capacity. Whole right lung ROI was based on either an isocontour threshold of three times the soft tissue transmission (TT) or a threshold of 20% of peak xenon ventilation counts (XV). We used a central ROI drawn to 50% of height and of width of the whole right lung ROI and placed along the left lung margin and centered vertically. Results In general, the correlation of normalized C/P (nC/P) between the two methods was strong. However, the value of nC/P was significantly smaller for the XV method than the TT method. Regression equations for the relationship of nC/P between the two methods were, for healthy subjects, y=0.75x+0.61, R2=0.64 using rectangular ROIs and y=0.76x+0.45, R2=0.66 using isocontour ROIs; and for CF patients, y=0.94x+0.46, R2=0.43 and y=0.85x+0.42, R2=0.41, respectively. Conclusions (1) A transmission scan with an isocontour outline in combination with a rectangular central region to define the lung borders may be more useful than a ventilation scan. (2) Close correlation of nC/Ps measured by transmission or gas ventilation should allow confident comparison of values determined by the two methods. PMID:23421899