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Sample records for perinatal asphyxial encephalopathy

  1. The TOBY Study. Whole body hypothermia for the treatment of perinatal asphyxial encephalopathy: A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Azzopardi, Dennis; Brocklehurst, Peter; Edwards, David; Halliday, Henry; Levene, Malcolm; Thoresen, Marianne; Whitelaw, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Background A hypoxic-ischaemic insult occurring around the time of birth may result in an encephalopathic state characterised by the need for resuscitation at birth, neurological depression, seizures and electroencephalographic abnormalities. There is an increasing risk of death or neurodevelopmental abnormalities with more severe encephalopathy. Current management consists of maintaining physiological parameters within the normal range and treating seizures with anticonvulsants. Studies in adult and newborn animals have shown that a reduction of body temperature of 3–4°C after cerebral insults is associated with improved histological and behavioural outcome. Pilot studies in infants with encephalopathy of head cooling combined with mild whole body hypothermia and of moderate whole body cooling to 33.5°C have been reported. No complications were noted but the group sizes were too small to evaluate benefit. Methods/Design TOBY is a multi-centre, prospective, randomised study of term infants after perinatal asphyxia comparing those allocated to "intensive care plus total body cooling for 72 hours" with those allocated to "intensive care without cooling". Full-term infants will be randomised within 6 hours of birth to either a control group with the rectal temperature kept at 37 +/- 0.2°C or to whole body cooling, with rectal temperature kept at 33–34°C for 72 hours. Term infants showing signs of moderate or severe encephalopathy +/- seizures have their eligibility confirmed by cerebral function monitoring. Outcomes will be assessed at 18 months of age using neurological and neurodevelopmental testing methods. Sample size At least 236 infants would be needed to demonstrate a 30% reduction in the relative risk of mortality or serious disability at 18 months. Recruitment was ahead of target by seven months and approvals were obtained allowing recruitment to continue to the end of the planned recruitment phase. 325 infants were recruited. Primary outcome Combined

  2. Blood Biomarkers for Evaluation of Perinatal Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Ernest M.; Burd, Irina; Everett, Allen D.; Northington, Frances J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research in identification of brain injury after trauma shows many possible blood biomarkers that may help identify the fetus and neonate with encephalopathy. Traumatic brain injury shares many common features with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Trauma has a hypoxic component, and one of the 1st physiologic consequences of moderate-severe traumatic brain injury is apnea. Trauma and hypoxia-ischemia initiate an excitotoxic cascade and free radical injury followed by the inflammatory cascade, producing injury in neurons, glial cells and white matter. Increased excitatory amino acids, lipid peroxidation products, and alteration in microRNAs and inflammatory markers are common to both traumatic brain injury and perinatal encephalopathy. The blood-brain barrier is disrupted in both leading to egress of substances normally only found in the central nervous system. Brain exosomes may represent ideal biomarker containers, as RNA and protein transported within the vesicles are protected from enzymatic degradation. Evaluation of fetal or neonatal brain derived exosomes that cross the blood-brain barrier and circulate peripherally has been referred to as the “liquid brain biopsy.” A multiplex of serum biomarkers could improve upon the current imprecise methods of identifying fetal and neonatal brain injury such as fetal heart rate abnormalities, meconium, cord gases at delivery, and Apgar scores. Quantitative biomarker measurements of perinatal brain injury and recovery could lead to operative delivery only in the presence of significant fetal risk, triage to appropriate therapy after birth and measure the effectiveness of treatment. PMID:27468268

  3. HIV-1 Encephalopathy among Perinatally Infected Children: Neuropathogenesis and Response to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Charles D.

    2006-01-01

    HIV-1 encephalopathy among perinatally infected children in the United States was initially defined by a classic triad of findings that included: (1) developmental delay, (2) secondary or acquired microcephaly, and (3) pyramidal tract neuromotor deficits. The most severe form of this disorder typically occurred among young children who developed…

  4. Impact of HAART and CNS-penetrating antiretroviral regimens on HIV encephalopathy among perinatally infected children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kunjal; Ming, Xue; Williams, Paige L.; Robertson, Kevin R.; Oleske, James M.; Seage, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Prior to antiretroviral treatment, HIV-infected children frequently developed encephalopathy, resulting in debilitating morbidity and mortality. This is the first large study to evaluate the impact of HAART and central nervous system (CNS)-penetrating antiretroviral regimens on the incidence of HIV encephalopathy and survival after diagnosis of HIV encephalopathy among perinatally infected children. Design A total of 2398 perinatally HIV-infected children with at least one neurological examination were followed in a US-based prospective cohort study conducted from 1993 to 2007. Methods Trends in incidence rates over calendar time were described and Cox regression models were used to estimate the effects of time-varying HAART and CNS-penetrating antiretroviral regimens on HIV encephalopathy and on survival after diagnosis of HIV encephalopathy. Results During a median of 6.4 years of follow-up, 77 incident cases of HIV encephalopathy occurred [incidence rate 5.1 cases per 1000 person-years, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.0–6.3]. A 10-fold decline in incidence was observed beginning in 1996, followed by a stable incidence rate after 2002. HAART regimens were associated with a 50% decrease (95% CI 14–71%) in the incidence of HIV encephalopathy compared with non-HAART regimens. High CNS-penetrating regimens were associated with a substantial survival benefit (74% reduction in the risk of death, 95% CI 39–89%) after HIV encephalopathy diagnosis compared with low CNS-penetrating regimens. Conclusion A dramatic decrease in the incidence of HIV encephalopathy occurred after the introduction of HAART. The use of HAART was highly effective in reducing the incidence of HIV encephalopathy among perinatally infected children and adolescents. Effective CNS-penetrating antiretroviral regimens are important in affecting survival after diagnosis of HIV encephalopathy. PMID:19644348

  5. Perinatal risk factors for severe injury in neonates treated with whole-body hypothermia for encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wayock, Christopher P.; Meserole, Rachel L.; Saria, Suchi; Jennings, Jacky M.; Huisman, Thierry A. G. M.; Northington, Frances J.; Graham, Ernest M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to identify perinatal risk factors that are available within 1 hour of birth that are associated with severe brain injury after hypothermia treatment for suspected hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Study Design One hundred nine neonates at ≥35 weeks' gestation who were admitted from January 2007 to September 2012 with suspected hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy were treated with whole-body hypothermia; 98 of them (90%) underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 7-10 days of life. Eight neonates died before brain imaging. Neonates who had severe brain injury, which was defined as death or abnormal MRI results (cases), were compared with surviving neonates with normal MRI (control subjects). Logistic regression models were used to identify risk factors that were predictive of severe injury. Results Cases and control subjects did not differ with regard to gestational age, birthweight, mode of delivery, or diagnosis of non-reassuring fetal heart rate before delivery. Cases were significantly (P ≤ .05) more likely to have had an abruption, a cord and neonatal arterial gas level that showed metabolic acidosis, lower platelet counts, lower glucose level, longer time to spontaneous respirations, intubation, chest compressions in the delivery room, and seizures. In multivariable logistic regression, lower initial neonatal arterial pH (P = .004), spontaneous respiration at >30 minutes of life (P = .002), and absence of exposure to oxytocin (P = .033) were associated independently with severe injury with 74.3% sensitivity and 74.4% specificity. Conclusion Worsening metabolic acidosis at birth, longer time to spontaneous respirations, and lack of exposure to oxytocin correlated with severe brain injury in neonates who were treated with whole-body hypothermia. These risk factors may help quickly identify neonatal candidates for time-sensitive investigational therapies for brain neuroprotection. PMID:24657795

  6. Motor Testing at 1 Year Improves the Prediction of Motor and Mental Outcome at 2 Years after Perinatal Hypoxic-Ischaemic Encephalopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Schie, Petra Em; Becher, Jules G.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Barkhof, Frederik; van Weissenbruch, Mirjam M.; Vermeulen, R. Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the predictive value of motor testing at 1 year for motor and mental outcome at 2 years after perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) in term neonates. Method: Motor and mental outcome at 2 years was assessed with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, 2nd edition (BSID-II) in 32 surviving children (20 males, 12…

  7. Perinatal inflammation/infection and its association with correction of metabolic acidosis in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, CT; Burd, I; Raghunathan, R; Northington, FJ; Graham, EM

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the decreased response to hypothermia in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and infection, we sought to determine the association of fetal inflammation/infection with perinatal metabolic acidosis. STUDY DESIGN We performed a retrospective cohort study of neonates with suspected HIE started on whole-body hypothermia within 6 h of birth that had a cord gas at delivery and placental pathology performed. Neonates were compared based on the presence of clinical and histologic chorioamnionitis. The cord gas at delivery was compared with the initial arterial gas after birth. RESULTS In all, 50 out of 67 (74.6%) neonates admitted for therapeutic hypothermia met inclusion criteria. Chorioamnionitis did not affect the cord gas at delivery, but both clinical and histologic chorioamnionitis were associated with a significantly increased metabolic acidosis on the initial neonatal arterial gas. CONCLUSION Chorioamnionitis, diagnosed both clinically and histologically, is associated with a persistent state of acidosis in neonates with HIE that may contribute to worse neurologic outcomes. PMID:26796123

  8. [Experience of very early Vojta therapy in two infants with severe perinatal hypoxic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Hayasi, M; Arizono, Y

    1999-11-01

    We present two case reports with severe hypoxic encephalopathy at birth. Studies carried out in the NICU included cranial ultrasonography, CT, and MRI. Due to abnormalities found by the latter two they were referred to our center at the age of two months and one month, and then an early Vojta therapy commenced. Changes were monitored periodically by assessing their spontaneous movements, postural reactions and neurological manifestations. The first case presented with ventricular hemorrhage and was diagnosed as having severe CCD (central coordination disturbance) with the risk of athetotic type cerebral palsy. The second case presented with severe low density in the frontal and temporo-parietal white matter and was diagnosed as having moderate CCD with the risk of mental retardation or brain atrophy. Although their status fluctuated temporarily, the two infants didn't show any paresis or mental retardation. Recently the studies on mechanisms of brain plasticity have advanced. The findings of our experience might suggest that the plasticity of an immature brain could be enhanced by the very early Vojta therapy. We propose that a therapeutic intervention should commence early before clinical symptoms become evident. PMID:10565191

  9. Impact of Perinatal Systemic Hypoxic–Ischemic Injury on the Brain of Male Offspring Rats: An Improved Model of Neonatal Hypoxic–Ischemic Encephalopathy in Early Preterm Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongwu; Wu, Weizhao; Lai, Xiulan; Ho, Guyu; Ma, Lian; Chen, Yunbin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to design a model using Sprague-Dawley rats to better reproduce perinatal systemic hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in early preterm newborns. On day 21 of gestation, the uterus of pregnant rats were exposed and the blood supply to the fetuses of neonatal HIE groups were thoroughly abscised by hemostatic clamp for 5, 10 or 15 min. Thereafter, fetuses were moved from the uterus and manually stimulated to initiate breathing in an incubator at 37 °C for 1 hr in air. We showed that survival rates of offspring rats were decreased with longer hypoxic time. TUNEL staining showed that apoptotic cells were significant increased in the brains of offspring rats from the 10 min and 15 min HIE groups as compared to the offspring rats in the control group at postnatal day (PND) 1, but there was no statistical difference between the offspring rats in the 5 min HIE and control groups. The perinatal hypoxic treatment resulted in decreased neurons and increased cleaved caspase-3 protein levels in the offspring rats from all HIE groups at PND 1. Platform crossing times and the percentage of the time spent in the target quadrant of Morris Water Maze test were significantly reduced in the offspring rats of all HIE groups at PND 30, which were associated with decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and neuronal cells in the hippocampus of offspring rats at PND 35. These data demonstrated that perinatal ischemic injury led to the death of neuronal cells and long-lasting impairment of memory. This model reproduced hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in early preterm newborns and may be appropriate for investigating therapeutic interventions. PMID:24324800

  10. Angiogenesis Dysregulation in Term Asphyxiated Newborns Treated with Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Henna; Boudes, Elodie; Khoja, Zehra; Shevell, Michael; Wintermark, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Background Neonatal encephalopathy following birth asphyxia is a major predictor of long-term neurological impairment. Therapeutic hypothermia is currently the standard of care to prevent brain injury in asphyxiated newborns but is not protective in all cases. More robust and versatile treatment options are needed. Angiogenesis is a demonstrated therapeutic target in adult stroke. However, no systematic study examines the expression of angiogenesis-related markers following birth asphyxia in human newborns. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the expression of angiogenesis-related protein markers in asphyxiated newborns developing and not developing brain injury compared to healthy control newborns. Design/Methods Twelve asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia were prospectively enrolled; six developed eventual brain injury and six did not. Four healthy control newborns were also included. We used Rules-Based Medicine multi-analyte profiling and protein array technologies to study the plasma concentration of 49 angiogenesis-related proteins. Mean protein concentrations were compared between each group of newborns. Results Compared to healthy newborns, asphyxiated newborns not developing brain injury showed up-regulation of pro-angiogenic proteins, including fatty acid binding protein-4, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, neuropilin-1, and receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-3; this up-regulation was not evident in asphyxiated newborns eventually developing brain injury. Also, asphyxiated newborns developing brain injury showed a decreased expression of anti-angiogenic proteins, including insulin-growth factor binding proteins -1, -4, and -6, compared to healthy newborns. Conclusions These findings suggest that angiogenesis pathways are dysregulated following birth asphyxia and are putatively involved in brain injury pathology and recovery. PMID:25996847

  11. Neurological outcomes at 18 months of age after moderate hypothermia for perinatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy: synthesis and meta-analysis of trial data

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A David; Brocklehurst, Peter; Gunn, Alistair J; Halliday, Henry; Juszczak, Edmund; Levene, Malcolm; Strohm, Brenda; Thoresen, Marianne; Whitelaw, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether moderate hypothermia after hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in neonates improves survival and neurological outcome at 18 months of age. Design A meta-analysis was performed using a fixed effect model. Risk ratios, risk difference, and number needed to treat, plus 95% confidence intervals, were measured. Data sources Studies were identified from the Cochrane central register of controlled trials, the Oxford database of perinatal trials, PubMed, previous reviews, and abstracts. Review methods Reports that compared whole body cooling or selective head cooling with normal care in neonates with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and that included data on death or disability and on specific neurological outcomes of interest to patients and clinicians were selected. Results We found three trials, encompassing 767 infants, that included information on death and major neurodevelopmental disability after at least 18 months’ follow-up. We also identified seven other trials with mortality information but no appropriate neurodevelopmental data. Therapeutic hypothermia significantly reduced the combined rate of death and severe disability in the three trials with 18 month outcomes (risk ratio 0.81, 95% confidence interval 0.71 to 0.93, P=0.002; risk difference −0.11, 95% CI −0.18 to −0.04), with a number needed to treat of nine (95% CI 5 to 25). Hypothermia increased survival with normal neurological function (risk ratio 1.53, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.93, P<0.001; risk difference 0.12, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.18), with a number needed to treat of eight (95% CI 5 to 17), and in survivors reduced the rates of severe disability (P=0.006), cerebral palsy (P=0.004), and mental and the psychomotor developmental index of less than 70 (P=0.01 and P=0.02, respectively). No significant interaction between severity of encephalopathy and treatment effect was detected. Mortality was significantly reduced when we assessed all 10 trials (1320 infants; relative risk 0

  12. [Laryngomalacia in a follow-up of a child development cohort for antecedents of perinatal encephalopathy. Implications for nosologic conceptualization].

    PubMed

    Mandujano-Valdés, Mario Antonio; Sánchez-Pérez, María del Carmen

    2004-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective analysis of 10 cases of congenital laryngeal stridor. Reports of laryngeal endoscopy and diagnosis define laryngomalacia as laryngeal flaccidity and stridor. Some authors postulate that in addition to immaturity of cartilage, there exist the possibility of laryngeal uncoordination and dyskinesia. They support this idea in cases of late presentation, neurological damage, and atypical cases related with functional state or anesthesia. Laryngeal endoscopies were carried out in 10 cases included in a cohort of subjects from a longitudinal follow-up diagnosed with neurologica damage of perinatal origin. One case was diagnosed with postoperative unilateral paralysis of vocal chord and another identified vascular ring. The eight remaining cases fulfilled laryngomalacia criteria of diagnosis, but because of their characteristics origin is not an anatomic alteration but a functional hypotonia. The need to carry out an integral study to describe co-morbidity is emphasized. PMID:15559228

  13. Diagnostic Accuracy of S100B Urinary Testing at Birth in Full-Term Asphyxiated Newborns to Predict Neonatal Death

    PubMed Central

    Gazzolo, Diego; Frigiola, Alessandro; Bashir, Moataza; Iskander, Iman; Mufeed, Hala; Aboulgar, Hanna; Venturini, Pierluigi; Marras, Mauro; Serra, Giovanni; Frulio, Rosanna; Michetti, Fabrizio; Petraglia, Felice; Abella, Raul; Florio, Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    Background Neonatal death in full-term infants who suffer from perinatal asphyxia (PA) is a major subject of investigation, since few tools exist to predict patients at risk of ominous outcome. We studied the possibility that urine S100B measurement may identify which PA-affected infants are at risk of early postnatal death. Methodology/Principal Findings In a cross-sectional study between January 1, 2001 and December 1, 2006 we measured S100B protein in urine collected from term infants (n = 132), 60 of whom suffered PA. According to their outcome at 7 days, infants with PA were subsequently classified either as asphyxiated infants complicated by hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy with no ominous outcome (HIE Group; n = 48), or as newborns who died within the first post-natal week (Ominous Outcome Group; n = 12). Routine laboratory variables, cerebral ultrasound, neurological patterns and urine concentrations of S100B protein were determined at first urination and after 24, 48 and 96 hours. The severity of illness in the first 24 hours after birth was measured using the Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology-Perinatal Extension (SNAP-PE). Urine S100B levels were higher from the first urination in the ominous outcome group than in healthy or HIE Groups (p<0.001 for all), and progressively increased. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed a significant correlation between S100B concentrations and the occurrence of neonatal death. At a cut-off >1.0 µg/L S100B had a sensitivity/specificity of 100% for predicting neonatal death. Conclusions/Significance Increased S100B protein urine levels in term newborns suffering PA seem to suggest a higher risk of neonatal death for these infants. PMID:19183802

  14. Auto-erotic asphyxiation: three case reports.

    PubMed

    Cooper, A J

    1996-01-01

    Men who indulge in auto-erotic asphyxial practices are rarely encountered by psychiatrists. More often, they come to light at a coroner's inquest, and a verdict of "accidental death" is usually rendered (e.g., from hanging/suffocation). This paper describes and contrasts three cases of auto-erotic asphyxial practices. The first case, of accidental death by hanging, was an apparently highly successful young man who functioned at a high level and was without "serious psychopathology." In contrast, the other two, both survivors of asphyxial practices, manifested multiple paraphilias and other types of psychopathology. The syndrome may be extremely diverse, and survivors who consult psychiatrists require holistic assessment and treatment tailored to multifarious needs. PMID:8699497

  15. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    ... is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that ... medical care is an important factor in staying as healthy as possible. The American Liver Foundation is ...

  16. [Death by erotic asphyxiation (breath control play)].

    PubMed

    Madea, Burkhard; Hagemeier, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Most cases of sexual asphyxia are due to autoerotic activity. Asphyxia due to oronasal occlusion is mostly seen in very old or very young victims. Oronasal occlusion is also used in sadomasochistic sexual practices like "breath control play" or "erotic asphyxiation". If life saving time limitations of oronasal occlusion are not observed, conviction for homicide caused by negligence is possible. PMID:23596893

  17. The importance of cold-reactive autoantibodies in an asphyxiated infant before therapeutic hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Beken, Serdar; Altuntaş, Nilgün; Koç, Esin; Yenicesu, Idil; Ergenekon, Ebru; Hirfanoğlu, Ibrahim Murat; Onal, Esra; Türkyilmaz, Canan; Atalay, Yildiz

    2013-11-01

    Perinatal asphyxia is an important cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Hypothermia is an effective treatment of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in infants. Cold agglutination is a primary or acquired autoimmune disease that involves autoantibodies that lead to hemagglutination at low temperatures lower than that of the body. In this case the importance of cold agglutinins during therapeutic hypothermia is presented. PMID:23271311

  18. Acute kidney injury in asphyxiated neonates admitted to a tertiary neonatal unit in Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Medani, Safaa A; Kheir, Abdelmoneim E M; Mohamed, Mazahir B

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a recognized complication of birth asphyxia. Early recognition of AKI is important in asphyxiated neonates as it helps in early intervention and appropriate management. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of AKI in asphyxiated neonates and its relation to the grade of Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE). This was a prospective hospital based study, conducted in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Gafaar Ibn Auf Children’s Specialized Hospital during the period between January 2013 and December 2013. A total of 85 full term asphyxiated neonates who were admitted in NICU and diagnosed as HIE were enrolled in this study. with 50 (58.8%) less than 7 days of age, 31(36.5%) between (8–15) days and 4(4.7%) between (16–28) days. Males were found to be more affected than females (58.9% and 41.1%) respectively. Spontaneous vaginal delivery was the mode of delivery in 48(56.4%), assisted vaginal delivery in 14(16.5%), emergency caesarian in 19(22.4%) and elective caesarian section in. Percentage of AKI in those babies was 54.1%(46). With 30(65%) from those had non-oliguric type. Ten babies (21.7%) had serum creatinine between (1.5 – 2mg/dl), 29 (63.04%) between (2 – 3mg/dl) and 7(15.22%) between (3–4mg/ dl). This means that the majority of patients presented in injury stage. Hyperkalemia was found in (37.6%), hyponatremia in (27.1%) and hypocalceamia in (25.8%). Most of the babies with AKI had stage (ii) HIE. All babies were treated conservatively and 4(8.6%) died. In conclusion AKI was observed to be a common complication in asphyxiated neonates.

  19. Dynamic thoracoplasty for asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kaddoura, I L; Obeid, M Y; Mroueh, S M; Nasser, A A

    2001-11-01

    The life-saving procedures to expand the chests of infants born with Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy provide a static solution incapable of responding to the growth demands of thriving patients. We describe an instrument that provided a dynamic solution for an infant, where an initial methyl methacrylate midsternotomy spacer placed at 4 months of age was followed at 11 months with recurrence of his difficulties. At 8 months after the second operation the patient was stable and thriving with no recurrence of symptoms. The instrument modifications, limitations, and possible complications are described. PMID:11722089

  20. Perinatal depression

    PubMed Central

    Alhusen, Jeanne L.; Alvarez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Perinatal depression is a common condition with significant adverse maternal, fetal, neonatal, and early childhood outcomes. The perinatal period is an opportune time to screen, diagnose, and treat depression. Improved recognition of perinatal depression, particularly among low-income women, can lead to improved perinatal health outcomes. PMID:26934457

  1. Safety and efficacy of topiramate in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy treated with hypothermia (NeoNATI)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite progresses in neonatal care, the mortality and the incidence of neuro-motor disability after perinatal asphyxia have failed to show substantial improvements. In countries with a high level of perinatal care, the incidence of asphyxia responsible for moderate or severe encephalopathy is still 2–3 per 1000 term newborns. Recent trials have demonstrated that moderate hypothermia, started within 6 hours after birth and protracted for 72 hours, can significantly improve survival and reduce neurologic impairment in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. It is not currently known whether neuroprotective drugs can further improve the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Topiramate has been proven to reduce brain injury in animal models of neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. However, the association of mild hypothermia and topiramate treatment has never been studied in human newborns. The objective of this research project is to evaluate, through a multicenter randomized controlled trial, whether the efficacy of moderate hypothermia can be increased by concomitant topiramate treatment. Methods/Design Term newborns (gestational age ≥ 36 weeks and birth weight ≥ 1800 g) with precocious metabolic, clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) signs of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy will be randomized, according to their EEG pattern, to receive topiramate added to standard treatment with moderate hypothermia or standard treatment alone. Topiramate will be administered at 10 mg/kg once a day for the first 3 days of life. Topiramate concentrations will be measured on serial dried blood spots. 64 participants will be recruited in the study. To evaluate the safety of topiramate administration, cardiac and respiratory parameters will be continuously monitored. Blood samplings will be performed to check renal, liver and metabolic balance. To evaluate the efficacy of topiramate, the neurologic outcome of enrolled newborns will be evaluated by serial

  2. Toxic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Woo

    2012-01-01

    This article schematically reviews the clinical features, diagnostic approaches to, and toxicological implications of toxic encephalopathy. The review will focus on the most significant occupational causes of toxic encephalopathy. Chronic toxic encephalopathy, cerebellar syndrome, parkinsonism, and vascular encephalopathy are commonly encountered clinical syndromes of toxic encephalopathy. Few neurotoxins cause patients to present with pathognomonic neurological syndromes. The symptoms and signs of toxic encephalopathy may be mimicked by many psychiatric, metabolic, inflammatory, neoplastic, and degenerative diseases of the nervous system. Thus, the importance of good history-taking that considers exposure and a comprehensive neurological examination cannot be overemphasized in the diagnosis of toxic encephalopathy. Neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging typically play ancillary roles. The recognition of toxic encephalopathy is important because the correct diagnosis of occupational disease can prevent others (e.g., workers at the same worksite) from further harm by reducing their exposure to the toxin, and also often provides some indication of prognosis. Physicians must therefore be aware of the typical signs and symptoms of toxic encephalopathy, and close collaborations between neurologists and occupational physicians are needed to determine whether neurological disorders are related to occupational neurotoxin exposure. PMID:23251840

  3. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bleibel, Wissam; Al-Osaimi, Abdullah M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis affect hundreds of millions of patients all over the world. The majority of patients with cirrhosis will eventually develop complications related to portal hypertension. One of these recurrent and difficult to treat complications is hepatic encephalopathy. Studies have indicated that overt hepatic encephalopathy affects 30 to 45% of patients with cirrhosis and a higher percentage may be affected by minimal degree of encephalopathy. All of these factors add to the impact of hepatic encephalopathy on the healthcare system and presents a major challenge to the gastroenterologist, hospitalist and primary care physician. PMID:23006457

  4. The relationship between serial sexual murder and autoerotic asphyxiation.

    PubMed

    Myers, Wade C; Bukhanovskiy, Alexandr; Justen, Elle; Morton, Robert J; Tilley, John; Adams, Kenneth; Vandagriff, Virgil L; Hazelwood, Robert R

    2008-04-01

    This case series documents and examines the association between autoerotic asphyxiation, sadomasochism, and serial sexual murderers. Autoerotic asphyxiation, along with other paraphilias found in this population, is reviewed. Five cases of serial sexual killers who engaged in autoerotic asphyxiation were identified worldwide: four from the United States and one from Russia. Case reports for each are provided. All (100%) were found to have sexual sadism in addition to autoerotic asphyxiation. Furthermore, two (40%) had bondage fetishism, and two (40%) had transvestic fetishism, consistent with these paraphilias co-occurring in those with autoerotic asphyxiation. Overall the group averaged 4.0 lifetime paraphilias. Some possible relationships were observed between the offenders' paraphilic orientation and their modus operandi, e.g., all of these serial killers strangled victims-suggesting an association between their sadistic and asphyxiative paraphilic interests. The overlap of seemingly polar opposite paraphilias in this sample--sexual sadism and autoerotic asphyxiation--is explored from a historical and clinical perspective. Multiple commonalities shared between these five offenders and serial sexual murderers in general are addressed. A primary limitation of this study is its small sample size and empirical basis; the results may not be generalizable beyond the sample. The findings from this study support the supposition that crime scene behaviors often reflect paraphilic disturbances in those who commit serial sexual homicides. PMID:17980531

  5. Effects of dichloroacetate following canine asphyxial arrest.

    PubMed

    Gin-Shaw, S L; Barsan, W G; Eymer, V; Hedges, J

    1988-05-01

    Sodium dichloroacetate (DCA) has been shown to lower elevated serum lactate levels produced by hypoxia, exercise, and phenformin. We conducted a study to investigate the effect of DCA treatment on lactic acidosis following resuscitation from asphyxial cardiac arrest. Conditioned dogs were anesthetized with pentobarbital (30 mg/kg), endotracheally intubated, and mechanically ventilated to maintain an arterial pCO2 of 30 to 40 mm Hg. Asphyxial cardiac arrest was produced by endotracheal tube occlusion for six to eight minutes. After five minutes of cardiac arrest, the endotracheal tube was unclamped and closed-chest CPR was begun. Six animals received DCA 100 mg/kg IV push after one minute of CPR. Control animals (n = 6) received an equal volume of saline. CPR was continued until the return of a spontaneous pulse, when mechanical ventilation was resumed. Arterial and venous blood gases, glucose, and lactate levels were obtained at baseline and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after resuscitation. Mean arterial blood pressure, pulse, and glucose, and venous and arterial blood gases were similar in both groups throughout the study. By 45 minutes after resuscitation, the DCA-treated group showed a significantly faster rate of decline in lactate levels that continued to the final sampling period. By 90 minutes, arterial lactate in DCA animals was not significantly different from baseline (pre-arrest) values. DCA given during cardiac arrest will cause a more rapid normalization of arterial lactate after successful resuscitation. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effects of lowered lactic acid on survival and neurological outcome following cardiac arrest. PMID:3129970

  6. The “Neurovascular Unit approach” to Evaluate Mechanisms of Dysfunctional Autoregulation in Asphyxiated Newborns in the era of Hypothermia Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chalak, Lina F.; Tarumi, Takashi; Zhang, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Despite improvements in obstetrical and neonatal care, and introduction of hypothermia as a neuroprotective therapy, perinatal brain injury remains a frequent cause of cerebral palsy, mental retardation and epilepsy. The recognition of dysfunction of cerebral autoregulation is essential for a real time measure of efficacy to identify those who are at highest risk for brain injury. This article will focus on the “neurovascular unit” approach to the care of asphyxiated neonates to review 1) potential mechanisms of dysfunctional cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, 2) optimal monitoring methodology such as NIRS (near infrared spectroscopy), and TCD (transcutaneous Doppler), and 3) clinical implications of monitoring in the neonatal intensive care setting in asphyxiated newborns undergoing hypothermia and rewarming. Critical knowledge of the functional regulation of the neurovascular unit may lead to improved ability to predict outcomes in real time during hypothermia, as well as differentiate nonresponders who might benefit from additional therapies. PMID:25062804

  7. Lethal Injection for Execution: Chemical Asphyxiation?

    PubMed Central

    Zimmers, Teresa A; Sheldon, Jonathan; Lubarsky, David A; López-Muñoz, Francisco; Waterman, Linda; Weisman, Richard; Koniaris, Leonidas G

    2007-01-01

    Background Lethal injection for execution was conceived as a comparatively humane alternative to electrocution or cyanide gas. The current protocols are based on one improvised by a medical examiner and an anesthesiologist in Oklahoma and are practiced on an ad hoc basis at the discretion of prison personnel. Each drug used, the ultrashort-acting barbiturate thiopental, the neuromuscular blocker pancuronium bromide, and the electrolyte potassium chloride, was expected to be lethal alone, while the combination was intended to produce anesthesia then death due to respiratory and cardiac arrest. We sought to determine whether the current drug regimen results in death in the manner intended. Methods and Findings We analyzed data from two US states that release information on executions, North Carolina and California, as well as the published clinical, laboratory, and veterinary animal experience. Execution outcomes from North Carolina and California together with interspecies dosage scaling of thiopental effects suggest that in the current practice of lethal injection, thiopental might not be fatal and might be insufficient to induce surgical anesthesia for the duration of the execution. Furthermore, evidence from North Carolina, California, and Virginia indicates that potassium chloride in lethal injection does not reliably induce cardiac arrest. Conclusions We were able to analyze only a limited number of executions. However, our findings suggest that current lethal injection protocols may not reliably effect death through the mechanisms intended, indicating a failure of design and implementation. If thiopental and potassium chloride fail to cause anesthesia and cardiac arrest, potentially aware inmates could die through pancuronium-induced asphyxiation. Thus the conventional view of lethal injection leading to an invariably peaceful and painless death is questionable. PMID:17455994

  8. Hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Juan; Mínguez, Beatriz

    2008-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a severe complication of cirrhosis that is related to the effects of ammonia. Analysis of interorgan ammonia trafficking has identified an important role of skeletal muscle in ammonia removal and has highlighted the importance of the nutritional status. Ammonia causes neurotransmitter abnormalities and induces injury to astrocytes that is partially mediated by oxidative stress. These disturbances lead to astrocyte swelling and brain edema, which appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of neurological manifestations. Inflammatory mediators worsen brain disturbances. New methods for assessing hepatic encephalopathy include clinical scales, neuropsychological tests, imaging of portal-systemic circulation, and magnetic resonance of the brain. Reappraisal of current therapy indicates the need for performing placebo-controlled trials and the lack of evidence for administering diets with restricted protein content. Liver transplant should be considered in selected patients with hepatic encephalopathy. Future prospects include new drugs that decrease plasma ammonia, measures to reduce brain edema, and liver-support devices. PMID:18293278

  9. Antecedents of Neonatal Encephalopathy in the Vermont Oxford Network Encephalopathy Registry

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Peter; Edwards, Erika M.; Horbar, Jeffrey D.; Kenny, Michael J.; Inder, Terrie; Pfister, Robert H.; Raju, Tonse; Soll, Roger F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neonatal encephalopathy (NE) is a major predictor of death and long-term neurologic disability, but there are few studies of antecedents of NE. OBJECTIVES: To identify antecedents in a large registry of infants who had NE. METHODS: This was a maternal and infant record review of 4165 singleton neonates, gestational age of ≥36 weeks, meeting criteria for inclusion in the Vermont Oxford Network Neonatal Encephalopathy Registry. RESULTS: Clinically recognized seizures were the most prevalent condition (60%); 49% had a 5-minute Apgar score of ≤3 and 18% had a reduced level of consciousness. An abnormal maternal or fetal condition predated labor in 46%; maternal hypertension (16%) or small for gestational age (16%) were the most frequent risk factors. In 8%, birth defects were identified. The most prevalent birth complication was elevated maternal temperature in labor of ≥37.5°C in 27% of mothers with documented temperatures compared with 2% to 3.2% in controls in population-based studies. Clinical chorioamnionitis, prolonged membrane rupture, and maternal hypothyroidism exceeded rates in published controls. Acute asphyxial indicators were reported in 15% (in 35% if fetal bradycardia included) and inflammatory indicators in 24%. Almost one-half had neither asphyxial nor inflammatory indicators. Although most infants with NE were observably ill since the first minutes of life, only 54% of placentas were submitted for examination. CONCLUSIONS: Clinically recognized asphyxial birth events, indicators of intrauterine exposure to inflammation, fetal growth restriction, and birth defects were each observed in term infants with NE, but much of NE in this large registry remained unexplained. PMID:23071210

  10. Deferoxamine prevents cerebral glutathione and vitamin E depletions in asphyxiated neonatal rats: role of body temperature.

    PubMed

    Kletkiewicz, Hanna; Nowakowska, Anna; Siejka, Agnieszka; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Woźniak, Alina; Caputa, Michał; Rogalska, Justyna

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury involves increased oxidative stress. In asphyxiated newborns iron deposited in the brain catalyses formation of reactive oxygen species. Glutathione (GSH) and vitamin E are key factors protecting cells against such agents. Our previous investigation has demonstrated that newborn rats, showing physiological low body temperature as well as their hyperthermic counterparts injected with deferoxamine (DF) are protected against iron-mediated, delayed neurotoxicity of perinatal asphyxia. Therefore, we decided to study the effects of body temperature and DF on the antioxidant status of the brain in rats exposed neonatally to critical anoxia. Two-day-old newborn rats were exposed to anoxia in 100% nitrogen atmosphere for 10 min. Rectal temperature was kept at 33 °C (physiological to rat neonates), or elevated to the level typical of healthy adult rats (37 °C), or of febrile adult rats (39 °C). Half of the rats exposed to anoxia under extremely hyperthermic conditions (39 °C) were injected with DF. Cerebral concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA, lipid peroxidation marker) and the levels of GSH and vitamin E were determined post-mortem, (1) immediately after anoxia, (2) 3 days, (3) 7 days, and (4) 2 weeks after anoxia. There were no post-anoxic changes in MDA, GSH and vitamin E concentrations in newborn rats kept at body temperature of 33 °C. In contrast, perinatal anoxia at elevated body temperatures intensified oxidative stress and depleted the antioxidant pool in a temperature-dependent manner. Both the depletion of antioxidants and lipid peroxidation were prevented by post-anoxic DF injection. The data support the idea that hyperthermia may extend perinatal anoxia-induced brain lesions. PMID:26794834

  11. Solvent encephalopathy.

    PubMed Central

    King, M D; Day, R E; Oliver, J S; Lush, M; Watson, J M

    1981-01-01

    Nineteen children aged 8-14 years were admitted over a six-year period with an acute encephalopathy due to toluene intoxication. Seven had a history of euphoria and hallucinations. The remainder presented with coma (4), ataxia (3), convulsions (3), and behaviour disturbance with diplopia (2), A history of glue sniffing was elicited in 14, but in the remainder toluene assay confirmed the diagnosis. Thirteen children recovered completely; five still had psychological impairment and personality change on discharge from hospital but were lost to follow-up, and one has a persistent cerebellar ataxia one year after the acute episode, despite absence of further exposure. Toluene inhalation is an important cause of encephalopathy in children and may lead to permanent neurological damage. Diagnosis is most important if further damage due to continued abuse is to be prevented, and toluene assay is a valuable aid to diagnosis. PMID:6790121

  12. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Jacques, Jérémie; Carrier, Paul; Debette-Gratien, Marilyne; Sobesky, Rodolphe; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a severe complication of liver cirrhosis and is an important therapeutic challenge, with a social and economic issue. If, now, the pathophysiology is not totally understood (main role of ammonia, but a better understanding of cerebral mechanisms), the clinical presentation is well-known. Some treatments are useful (disaccharides, treatment of the trigger) but their efficiency is limited. Nevertheless, the emergence of new treatments, such as non-absorbable antibiotics (rifaximin essentially), is an interesting therapeutic tool. PMID:26597584

  13. The Diagnostic Value of Both Troponin T and Creatinine Kinase Isoenzyme (CK-MB) in Detecting Combined Renal and Myocardial Injuries in Asphyxiated Infants

    PubMed Central

    Sadoh, Wilson E.; Eregie, Charles O.; Nwaneri, Damian U.; Sadoh, Ayebo E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Troponin T (cTnT) and Creatinine Kinase Isoenzyme (CK-MB) are both markers of myocardial injuries. However, CK-MB is also elevated in acute kidney injury. Objective The diagnostic value of both cTnT and cardiac CK-MB in combined myocardial and acute kidney injuries (AKI) in asphyxiated neonates was evaluated. Method 40 asphyxiated infants and 40 non-asphyxiated controls were consecutively recruited. Serum levels of cTnT, CK-MB and creatinine were measured. Myocardial injury and AKI were defined as cTnT >95th percentile of the control and serum creatinine >1.0 mg/dl respectively. Results Of the 40 subjects, 9 (22.50%), 8 (20.00%) and 4 (10.00%) had myocardial injury, AKI and combined AKI and myocardial injuries respectively. The mean cTnT and CK-MB values were highest in infants with combined AKI and myocardial injuries. The Mean cTnT in infants with AKI, myocardial injury and combined AKI and myocardial injuries were 0.010±0.0007 ng/ml, 0.067±0.040 ng/ml and 0.084±0.067 ng/ml respectively, p = 0.006. The mean CK-MB in infants with AKI, myocardial injury and combined AKI and myocardial injuries were 2.78±0.22 ng/ml, 1.28±0.11 ng/ml and 4.58±0.52 ng/ml respectively, p = <0.0001. Conclusion In severe perinatal asphyxia, renal and myocardial injuries could co-exist. Elevated cTnT signifies the presence of myocardial injury. Elevated CK-MB indicates either myocardial injury, AKI or both. Therefore renal injury should be excluded in asphyxiated infants with elevated CK-MB. PMID:24625749

  14. Perinatal risk factors and later social, thought, and attention problems after perinatal stroke.

    PubMed

    Harbert, Mary J; Jett, Micaela; Appelbaum, Mark; Nass, Ruth; Trauner, Doris A

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Survivors of perinatal stroke may be at risk for behavioral problems. Perinatal risk factors that might increase the likelihood of later behavior problems have not been identified. The goal of this study was to explore whether perinatal factors might contribute to behavior problems after perinatal stroke. Methods. 79 children with unilateral perinatal stroke were studied. Perinatal factors included gender, gestational age, neonatal seizures, instrumented delivery, fetal distress, acute birth problems, birth weight, and time of diagnosis. Subjects with evidence of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy were excluded. Parents completed the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) (Achenbach 1985). The CBCL yields T-scores in several symptom scales. We focused on Social, Thought, and Attention Problems scates. Results. Gestational age and the presence of uteroplacental insufficiency were associated with significant differences on the Thought Problems scale; Attention Problems scores approached significance for these variables. Fetal distress, neonatal seizures, or neonatal diagnosis was associated with 25-30% incidence of clinically significant T-scores on Social, Thought, and Attention Problems scales. Conclusions. Several perinatal factors were associated with a high incidence of social, thought, and behavior problems in children with perinatal stroke. These findings may be useful in anticipatory guidance to parents and physicians caring for these children. PMID:22685688

  15. Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Schiess, Nicoline; Pardo, Carlos A

    2008-10-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a controversial neurological disorder that comprises a heterogenous group of neurological symptoms that manifest in patients with high titers of antithyroid antibodies. Clinical manifestations of HE may include encephalopathic features such as seizures, behavioral and psychiatric manifestations, movement disorders, and coma. Although it has been linked to cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis or thyroid dysfunction, the most common immunological feature of HE is the presence of high titers of antithyroglobulin or anti-TPO (antimicrosomal) antibodies. At present, it is unclear whether antithyroid antibodies represent an immune epiphenomenon in a subset of patients with encephalopathic processes or they are really associated with pathogenic mechanisms of the disorder. The significance of classifying encephalopathies under the term HE will be determined in the future once the relevance of the role of antithyroid antibodies is demonstrated or dismissed by more detailed experimental and immunopathological studies. The responsiveness of HE to steroids or other therapies such as plasmapheresis supports the hypothesis that this is a disorder that involves immune pathogenic mechanisms. Further controlled studies of the use of steroids, plasmapheresis, or immunosuppressant medications are needed in the future to prove the concept of the pathogenic role of antithyroid antibodies in HE. PMID:18990131

  16. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Juan; Mur, Rafael Esteban

    2014-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (EH) is a severe complication of hepatic cirrhosis that is characterized by multiple neuropsychiatric manifestations. EH is usually triggered by a precipitating factor and occurs in patients with severely impaired hepatic function. Minimal EH is characterized by minor cognitive impairments that are difficult to specify but represent a risk for the patients. The primary pathophysiological mechanism of EH is considered to be an increase in blood ammonia with an impairment in the patency of the blood-brainbarrier and its metabolism to glutamine in astrocytes. The diagnosis is clinical and neuroimaging techniques can be complementary. The diagnosis of minimal EH requires specific neurocognitive tests. The clinical evaluation should be directed towards identifying the trigger. Nonabsorbable disaccharides and rifaximin constitute the treatment of choice, along with prophylaxis for new episodes. PMID:25087716

  17. Pilot randomized trial of therapeutic hypothermia with serial cranial ultrasound and 18-22 month follow-up for neonatal encephalopathy in a low resource hospital setting in uganda: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is now convincing evidence that in industrialized countries therapeutic hypothermia for perinatal asphyxial encephalopathy increases survival with normal neurological function. However, the greatest burden of perinatal asphyxia falls in low and mid-resource settings where it is unclear whether therapeutic hypothermia is safe and effective. Aims Under the UCL Uganda Women's Health Initiative, a pilot randomized controlled trial in infants with perinatal asphyxia was set up in the special care baby unit in Mulago Hospital, a large public hospital with ~20,000 births in Kampala, Uganda to determine: (i) The feasibility of achieving consent, neurological assessment, randomization and whole body cooling to a core temperature 33-34°C using water bottles (ii) The temperature profile of encephalopathic infants with standard care (iii) The pattern, severity and evolution of brain tissue injury as seen on cranial ultrasound and relation with outcome (iv) The feasibility of neurodevelopmental follow-up at 18-22 months of age Methods/Design Ethical approval was obtained from Makerere University and Mulago Hospital. All infants were in-born. Parental consent for entry into the trial was obtained. Thirty-six infants were randomized either to standard care plus cooling (target rectal temperature of 33-34°C for 72 hrs, started within 3 h of birth) or standard care alone. All other aspects of management were the same. Cooling was performed using water bottles filled with tepid tap water (25°C). Rectal, axillary, ambient and surface water bottle temperatures were monitored continuously for the first 80 h. Encephalopathy scoring was performed on days 1-4, a structured, scorable neurological examination and head circumference were performed on days 7 and 17. Cranial ultrasound was performed on days 1, 3 and 7 and scored. Griffiths developmental quotient, head circumference, neurological examination and assessment of gross motor function were obtained at 18

  18. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Festi, Davide; Marasco, Giovanni; Ravaioli, Federico; Colecchia, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of liver cirrhosis and it can manifest with a broad spectrum of neuropsychiatric abnormalities of varying severity, acuity and time course with important clinical implications. According to recent guidelines, HE has been classified into different types, depending on the severity of hepatic dysfunction, the presence of porto-systemic shunts and the number of previous episodes or persistent manifestations. From a clinical point of view, HE can be recognized as unimpaired, covert (that deals with minimal and grade 1 according to the grading of mental state), and overt (that is categorized from grade 2 to grade 4). Different and only partially known pathogenic mechanisms have been identified, comprising ammonia, inflammatory cytokines, benzodiazepine-like compounds and manganese deposition. Different therapeutic strategies are available for treating HE, in particular the overt HE, since covert HE needs to be managed case by case. Recognition and treatment of precipitating factors represent fundamental part of the management. The more effective treatments, which can be performed separately or combined, are represented by non-absorbable disaccharides (lactulose and lactitol) and the topic antibiotic rifaximin; other possible therapies, mainly used in patients non responders to previous treatments, are represented by branched chain amino acids and metabolic ammonia scavengers. PMID:27571468

  19. Autoimmune encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, Frank; Armangue, Thaís; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 10 years the continual discovery of novel forms of encephalitis associated with antibodies to cell-surface or synaptic proteins has changed the paradigms for diagnosing and treating disorders that were previously unknown or mischaracterized. We review here the process of discovery, the symptoms, and the target antigens of twelve autoimmune encephatilic disorders, grouped by syndromes and approached from a clinical perspective. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis, several subtypes of limbic encephalitis, stiff-person spectrum disorders, and other autoimmune encephalitides that result in psychosis, seizures, or abnormal movements are described in detail. We include a novel encephalopathy with prominent sleep dysfunction that provides an intriguing link between chronic neurodegeneration and cell-surface autoimmunity (IgLON5). Some of the caveats of limited serum testing are outlined. In addition, we review the underlying cellular and synaptic mechanisms that for some disorders confirm the antibody pathogenicity. The multidisciplinary impact of autoimmune encephalitis has been expanded recently by the discovery that herpes simplex encephalitis is a robust trigger of synaptic autoimmunity, and that some patients may develop overlapping syndromes, including anti-NMDAR encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica or other demyelinating diseases. PMID:25315420

  20. Suicidal asphyxiation by using helium - two case reports.

    PubMed

    Smędra, A; Szustowski, S; Jurczyk, A P; Klemm, J; Szram, S; Berent, J

    2015-01-01

    Helium is one of inert gases causing physical asphyxiation, whose excess content in the breathing atmosphere reduces the partial pressure of oxygen and may be fatal after short-term exposure. When breathing a mixture of an inert gas (helium, nitrogen, argon) with a small amount of oxygen, with the possibility of exhaling carbon dioxide, no warning signs characteristic of suffocation are perceived by the subject. Freedom from discomfort and pain, effectiveness, rapid effect and relatively easy availability of required accessories have resulted in the use of inert gases for suicidal purposes. The paper reports two cases of suicide committed by using a special kit consisting of the so-called "suicide bag" (or "exit bag") filled with helium supplied through a plastic tube. In both cases, examination of the sites where the corpses were found and analysis of collected material allowed to establish that before their death the subjects had searched the Internet for instructions on how to commit suicide using helium. Due to the advanced putrefaction process, the autopsies failed to determine the causes of their death unequivocally. However, the circumstances surrounding the deaths suggested rapid asphyxiation as a result of oxygen deficiency in the breathing mixture. Since in cases of the type discussed here the cause of death cannot generally be established by autopsy, knowledge of the circumstances of disclosure of the corpse, as well as examination of the cadaver and the death scene is of utmost importance. PMID:26007160

  1. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  2. Deaths from asphyxiation and poisoning at work in the United States 1984-6.

    PubMed Central

    Suruda, A; Agnew, J

    1989-01-01

    A review of 4756 deaths investigated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in 1984-6 found 233 deaths from asphyxiation and poisoning, excluding asphyxiations from trench cave-ins. The highest rates were in the oil and gas industry and in utilities. Toxic gases were the largest group (65) followed by simple asphyxiants (48), mechanical causes (42), and solvents (35). Deaths from solvents were significantly more likely in young workers. Nine deaths were caused by improper air supply to respirators and five by recreational inhalation of gas or vapours. Of the 146 deaths in confined spaces, only 12% were in rescuers, fewer than previously reported. PMID:2775673

  3. Non-fatal asphyxiation and foreign body ingestion in children 0-14 years.

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, A. E.; Ozanne-Smith, J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the frequency and nature of non-fatal asphyxiation and foreign body ingestion injuries among children in the state of Victoria, Australia, and to identify possible areas for prevention. METHODS: For children under 15 years, all Victorian public hospital admissions, July 1987 to June 1995, due to asphyxiation or 'foreign body entering through other orifice' (which includes ingestions), were reviewed. Emergency department presentations due to asphyxiation and foreign body ingestion provided information on circumstances of, and the type of foreign bodies involved in the injuries. RESULTS: The childhood average annual admission rate for asphyxiation was 15.1 per 100,000. Food related asphyxiation peaked in infants under 1 year, and declined to low levels by 3 years. The main foods involved were nuts, carrot, apple, and candy. The rate of non-food related asphyxiation was relatively constant to 3 years of age and then declined by 6 years. Mechanical suffocation was less common. The annual admission rate for 'foreign body entering through other orifice' was 31.7 per 100,000. These injuries peaked in 2-3 year olds then gradually declined. About 80% of these foreign body admissions were ingestions, with coins being the major object ingested. Admission rates for these causes remained constant over the eight years. Asphyxiation resulted in a higher proportion admitted and longer hospital stays. CONCLUSIONS: Prevention of suffocation and strangulation needs to focus on a safe sleeping environment and avoidance of ropes and cords, while foreign body asphyxiation and ingestion needs a focus on education of parents and child carers regarding age, appropriate food, risk of play with coins, and other small items. Legislation for toy small parts could be extended to those used by children up to the age of 5 years, and to other products marketed for children. Design changes and warning labels also have a place in prevention. PMID:9338828

  4. Perinatal Asphyxia from the Obstetric Standpoint: Diagnosis and Interventions.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Christina A; Silver, Robert M

    2016-09-01

    Perinatal asphyxia is a general term referring to neonatal encephalopathy related to events during birth. Asphyxia refers to a deprivation of oxygen for a duration sufficient to cause neurologic injury. Most cases of perinatal asphyxia are not necessarily caused by intrapartum events but rather associated with underlying chronic maternal or fetal conditions. Of intrapartum causes, obstetric emergencies are the most common and are not always preventable. Screening high-risk pregnancies with ultrasound, Doppler velocimetry, and antenatal testing can aid in identifying fetuses at risk. Interventions such as intrauterine resuscitation or operative delivery may decrease the risk of severe hypoxia from intrauterine insults and improve long-term neurologic outcomes. PMID:27524445

  5. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also referred to as “mad cow disease” is a chronic, non-febrile, neuro-degenerative disease affecting the central nervous system. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of domestic animals, of which BSE is a member includes scrapie of sheep...

  6. Suicidal asphyxiation with helium: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Grassberger, Martin; Krauskopf, Astrid

    2007-01-01

    Helium is an inert gas that among other things is used medically to alleviate the symptoms of airway obstruction, as part of a diving mix in deep-sea diving or as balloon gas. In recent years the so-called right-to-die literature has suggested suffocation with inhaled helium as an effective and peaceful means of self-deliverance for terminally ill patients. Helium displaces oxygen and carbon dioxide and can thus lead to asphyxia. We report three cases of suicidal asphyxiation with helium gas that were examined at the Department of Forensic Medicine Vienna within three months in 2006. In all three cases, autopsy was unrewarding from the point of view of gross pathology. Special autopsy techniques and devices are required for collection of the gas from the lungs. Gas-chromatography is used to examine the gas for helium; however, this requires replacement of the carrier gas, which is itself usually helium. The fact that three people in Vienna committed suicide using this method within a short period of time, together with the abundance of detailed how-to literature on the Internet, suggests a possible future increase in the number of deaths associated with the inhalation of inert gases, particularly helium. Because of the diagnostic obstacles involved, it is necessary to rely on good death-scene investigation for situational evidence when the body is discovered. PMID:17571238

  7. Short and long term prognosis in perinatal asphyxia: An update

    PubMed Central

    Ahearne, Caroline E; Boylan, Geraldine B; Murray, Deirdre M

    2016-01-01

    Interruption of blood flow and gas exchange to the fetus in the perinatal period, known as perinatal asphyxia, can, if significant, trigger a cascade of neuronal injury, leading on to neonatal encephalopathy (NE) and resultant long-term damage. While the majority of infants who are exposed to perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia will recover quickly and go on to have a completely normal survival, a proportion will suffer from an evolving clinical encephalopathy termed hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) or NE if the diagnosis is unclear. Resultant complications of HIE/NE are wide-ranging and may affect the motor, sensory, cognitive and behavioural outcome of the child. The advent of therapeutic hypothermia as a neuroprotective treatment for those with moderate and severe encephalopathy has improved prognosis. Outcome prediction in these infants has changed, but is more important than ever, as hypothermia is a time sensitive intervention, with a very narrow therapeutic window. To identify those who will benefit from current and emerging neuroprotective therapies we must be able to establish the severity of their injury soon after birth. Currently available indicators such as blood biochemistry, clinical examination and electrophysiology are limited. Emerging biological and physiological markers have the potential to improve our ability to select those infants who will benefit most from intervention. Biomarkers identified from work in proteomics, metabolomics and transcriptomics as well as physiological markers such as heart rate variability, EEG analysis and radiological imaging when combined with neuroprotective measures have the potential to improve outcome in HIE/NE. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the literature in regards to short and long-term outcome following perinatal asphyxia, and to discuss the prediction of this outcome in the early hours after birth when intervention is most crucial; looking at both currently available tools and introducing

  8. Short and long term prognosis in perinatal asphyxia: An update.

    PubMed

    Ahearne, Caroline E; Boylan, Geraldine B; Murray, Deirdre M

    2016-02-01

    Interruption of blood flow and gas exchange to the fetus in the perinatal period, known as perinatal asphyxia, can, if significant, trigger a cascade of neuronal injury, leading on to neonatal encephalopathy (NE) and resultant long-term damage. While the majority of infants who are exposed to perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia will recover quickly and go on to have a completely normal survival, a proportion will suffer from an evolving clinical encephalopathy termed hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) or NE if the diagnosis is unclear. Resultant complications of HIE/NE are wide-ranging and may affect the motor, sensory, cognitive and behavioural outcome of the child. The advent of therapeutic hypothermia as a neuroprotective treatment for those with moderate and severe encephalopathy has improved prognosis. Outcome prediction in these infants has changed, but is more important than ever, as hypothermia is a time sensitive intervention, with a very narrow therapeutic window. To identify those who will benefit from current and emerging neuroprotective therapies we must be able to establish the severity of their injury soon after birth. Currently available indicators such as blood biochemistry, clinical examination and electrophysiology are limited. Emerging biological and physiological markers have the potential to improve our ability to select those infants who will benefit most from intervention. Biomarkers identified from work in proteomics, metabolomics and transcriptomics as well as physiological markers such as heart rate variability, EEG analysis and radiological imaging when combined with neuroprotective measures have the potential to improve outcome in HIE/NE. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the literature in regards to short and long-term outcome following perinatal asphyxia, and to discuss the prediction of this outcome in the early hours after birth when intervention is most crucial; looking at both currently available tools and introducing

  9. Hepatic encephalopathy: a review.

    PubMed

    Lizardi-Cervera, Javier; Almeda, Paloma; Guevara, Luis; Uribe, Misael

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complication that presents in as many as 28% of patients with cirrhosis, and reported up to ten years after the diagnosis of cirrhosis. Commonly, it is observed in patients with severe hepatic failure and is characterized by neuropsychiatric manifestations that can range in severity from a mild alteration in mental state to a coma; additionally, some neuromuscular symptoms can be observed. This complication of either acute or chronic hepatic disease is the result of a diminished hepatic reservoir and inability to detoxify some toxins that originate in the bowel. Today, the role of astrocytes, specifically the Alzheimer type II cells, is known to be very important in the pathogenesis of the hepatic encephalopathy, and will be reviewed later. In conclusion, the objectives of this review are: To understand the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy, To recognize the precipitating factors, as well as preventive measures for the development of the hepatic encephalopathy, To describe the new classification of hepatic encephalopathy and its clinical implications, To recognize the clinical manifestations and stages of the disease, To understand the main diagnostic tests used to detect the hepatic encephalopathy, To describe the main therapeutic treatments of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:15115963

  10. Antibiotic-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Shamik; Darby, R Ryan; Raibagkar, Pooja; Gonzalez Castro, L Nicolas; Berkowitz, Aaron L

    2016-03-01

    Delirium is a common and costly complication of hospitalization. Although medications are a known cause of delirium, antibiotics are an underrecognized class of medications associated with delirium. In this article, we comprehensively review the clinical, radiologic, and electrophysiologic features of antibiotic-associated encephalopathy (AAE). AAE can be divided into 3 unique clinical phenotypes: encephalopathy commonly accompanied by seizures or myoclonus arising within days after antibiotic administration (caused by cephalosporins and penicillin); encephalopathy characterized by psychosis arising within days of antibiotic administration (caused by quinolones, macrolides, and procaine penicillin); and encephalopathy accompanied by cerebellar signs and MRI abnormalities emerging weeks after initiation of antibiotics (caused by metronidazole). We correlate these 3 clinical phenotypes with underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of antibiotic neurotoxicity. Familiarity with these types of antibiotic toxicity can improve timely diagnosis of AAE and prompt antibiotic discontinuation, reducing the time patients spend in the delirious state. PMID:26888997

  11. Perinatal Patient Safety Project

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Julie; McFerran, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    The Perinatal Patient Safety Project (PPSP) was created as a systemic strategy for creating high-reliability perinatal units by preventing identified causes of perinatal events in the clinical setting. With developmental funding from a Garfield grant, implementation of the PPSP has been completed at four pilot sites in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) Region. Its success has resulted in implementation at all perinatal units in the KPNC Region as well as being promoted by National Risk Management for nationwide implementation. PPSP emphasizes structured communication, multidisciplinary rounds, a definition of fetal well-being, and practicing for emergencies. Steps taken to create high reliability perinatal care include improved communication, patient safety focus, and satisfaction among perinatal patients, providers, and staff. PMID:21660157

  12. Current pathogenetic aspects of hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cichoż-Lach, Halina; Michalak, Agata

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a medical phenomenon that is described as a neuropsychiatric manifestation of chronic or acute liver disease that is characterized by psychomotor, intellectual and cognitive abnormalities with emotional/affective and behavioral disturbances. This article focuses on the underlying mechanisms of the condition and the differences between hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious condition that can cause neurological death with brain edema and intracranial hypertension. It is assumed that approximately 60%-80% of patients with liver cirrhosis develop hepatic encephalopathy. This review explores the complex mechanisms that lead to hepatic encephalopathy. However, noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is not associated with hepatic diseases and has a completely different etiology. Noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a severe occurrence that is connected with multiple pathogeneses. PMID:23326159

  13. The Role of Plasma and Urine Metabolomics in Identifying New Biomarkers in Severe Newborn Asphyxia: A Study of Asphyxiated Newborn Pigs following Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Sachse, Daniel; Solevåg, Anne Lee; Berg, Jens Petter; Nakstad, Britt

    2016-01-01

    Background Optimizing resuscitation is important to prevent morbidity and mortality from perinatal asphyxia. The metabolism of cells and tissues is severely disturbed during asphyxia and resuscitation, and metabolomic analyses provide a snapshot of many small molecular weight metabolites in body fluids or tissues. In this study metabolomics profiles were studied in newborn pigs that were asphyxiated and resuscitated using different protocols to identify biomarkers for subject characterization, intervention effects and possibly prognosis. Methods A total of 125 newborn Noroc pigs were anesthetized, mechanically ventilated and inflicted progressive asphyxia until asystole. Pigs were randomized to resuscitation with a FiO2 0.21 or 1.0, different duration of ventilation before initiation of chest compressions (CC), and different CC to ventilation ratios. Plasma and urine samples were obtained at baseline, and 2 h and 4 h after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, heart rate > = 100 bpm). Metabolomics profiles of the samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results Plasma and urine showed severe metabolic alterations consistent with hypoxia and acidosis 2 h and 4 h after ROSC. Baseline plasma hypoxanthine and lipoprotein concentrations were inversely correlated to the duration of hypoxia sustained before asystole occurred, but there was no evidence for a differential metabolic response to the different resuscitation protocols or in terms of survival. Conclusions Metabolic profiles of asphyxiated newborn pigs showed severe metabolic alterations. Consistent with previously published reports, we found no evidence of differences between established and alternative resuscitation protocols. Lactate and pyruvate may have a prognostic value, but have to be independently confirmed. PMID:27529347

  14. Detection of acute kidney injury in premature asphyxiated neonates by serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (sNGAL) – sensitivity and specificity of a potential new biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Pejović, Biljana; Erić-Marinković, Jelena; Pejović, Marija; Kotur-Stevuljević, Jelena; Peco-Antić, Amira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in neonatal intensive care units (NICU). In recent years, every effort is made for early detection of AKI. Our hypothesis was that serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (sNGAL) may be a reliable screening test for early diagnosis of AKI in premature neonates after perinatal asphyxia. Therefore, our aim was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of sNGAL for AKI in premature asphyxiated neonates. Materials and methods AKI was defined in the third day of life (DOL 3) as a serum creatinine (sCr) increase ≥ 26.5 μmol/L from baseline (the lowest previous sCr). According to the increase of sCr, AKI patients were divided in AKIN1 (sCr increase up to 1.9 baseline) and AKIN2 (sCr increase from 2.0 to 2.9 baseline). sNGAL levels were measured on DOL 1, 3 and 7. Results AKI was diagnosed in 73 (0.676) of 108 enrolled premature asphyxiated neonates. Sixty one patients (0.836) were classified in AKIN1 and 12 patients (0.164) in AKIN2. sNGAL reached the maximal concentrations on DOL 1 within 4 hours after admission to NICU, being higher in AKI compared with no-AKI group (160.8 ± 113.1 vs. 87.1 ± 81.6; P < 0.001) as well as in AKIN2 compared with AKIN1 group (222.8 ± 112.9 vs. 147.8 ± 109.9; P < 0.001). The best areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) for prediction of AKI were 0.72 [95% (0.62-0.80) P < 0.001] on DOL1 at 2h and 0.72 [95% (0.63-0.80) P < 0.001] at 4th hour after admission respectively. The corresponding sNGAL cutoff concentrations were 84.87 ng/mL (sensitivity 69.0% and specificity 71.9%) and 89.43 ng/mL (sensitivity 65.7% and specificity 74.3%). Conclusions In premature asphyxiated neonates sNGAL measured within the first 4 hours of DOL 1 is predictive of the occurrence and severity of AKI. Therefore, plasma levels of NGAL may be used for early diagnosis of AKI in these patients. PMID:26525750

  15. Predictors of Asphyxiation Risk in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Dysphagia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, R.; Chadwick, D. D.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Adults with learning disabilities referred for assessment of their eating and drinking are frequently reported to cough and choke when eating and drinking. The research literature investigating dysphagia has often overlooked asphyxiation risk, highlighting coughing and choking as indicators of aspiration only. This is a notable…

  16. Suicidal asphyxiation by inhalation of automobile emission without carbon monoxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    deRoux, Stephen J

    2006-09-01

    Reported herein is the suicidal asphyxiation of a young man due to exhaustion of oxygen in the interior of a sealed automobile into which the exhaust emissions were diverted. His blood carboxyhemaglobin concentration was less than 5% saturation. The car was equipped with a catalytic converter and when tested, the exhaust carbon monoxide concentration was 0.01%. PMID:17018100

  17. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy and autoantibodies].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Encephalopathy occasionally occurs in association with thyroid disorders, but most of these are treatable. These encephalopathies include a neuropsychiatric disorder associated with hypothyroidism, called myxedema encephalopathy. Moreover, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) has been recognized as a new clinical disease based on an autoimmune mechanism associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Steroid treatment was successfully administered to these patients. Recently, we discovered that the serum autoantibodies against the NH2-terminal of α-enolase (NAE) are highly specific diagnostic biomarkers for HE. Further, we analyzed serum anti-NAE autoantibodies and the clinical features in many cases of HE from institutions throughout Japan and other countries. Approximately half of assessed HE patients carry anti-NAE antibodies. The age was widely distributed with 2 peaks (20-30 years and 50-70 years). Most HE patients were in euthyroid states, and all patients had anti-thyroid (TG) antibodies and anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies. Anti-TSH receptor (TSH-R) antibodies were observed in some cases. The common neuropsychiatry features are consciousness disturbance and psychosis, followed by cognitive dysfunction, involuntary movements, seizures, and ataxia. Abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow on brain SPECT were common findings, whereas abnormal findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were rare. HE patients have various clinical phenotypes such as the acute encephalopathy form, the chronic psychiatric form, and other particular clinical forms, including limbic encephalitis, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)-like form. The cerebellar ataxic form of HE clinically mimics spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and is characterized by the absence of nystagmus, absent or mild cerebellar atrophy, and lazy background activities on EEG. Taken together, these data suggest that the possibility of

  18. Long-Term Cognitive Outcomes of Birth Asphyxia and the Contribution of Identified Perinatal Asphyxia to Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Athina; Korzeniewski, Steven J

    2016-09-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy among survivors of presumed perinatal asphyxia is recognized as an important cause of cerebral palsy (CP) and neuromotor impairment. Recent studies suggest that moderate to severe neonatal encephalopathy contributes to a wide range of neurodevelopmental and cognitive impairments among survivors with and without CP. Nearly 1 of every 4 to 5 neonates treated with hypothermia has or develops CP. Neonatal encephalopathy is diagnosed in only approximately 10% of all cases. This article reviews the long-term cognitive outcomes of children with presumed birth asphyxia and describes what is known about its contribution to CP. PMID:27524454

  19. Perinatal depression: A clinical update.

    PubMed

    Alhusen, Jeanne L; Alvarez, Carmen

    2016-05-19

    Perinatal depression is a common condition with significant adverse maternal, fetal, neonatal, and early childhood outcomes. The perinatal period is an opportune time to screen, diagnose, and treat depression. Improved recognition of perinatal depression, particularly among low-income women, can lead to improved perinatal health outcomes. PMID:26934457

  20. Correlation of Apgar Score with Asphyxial Hepatic Injury and Mortality in Newborns: A Prospective Observational Study From India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepak; Choudhary, Mukesh; Lamba, Mamta; Shastri, Sweta

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study is to determine the correlation of Apgar score with asphyxial hepatic injury and neonatal mortality in moderately and severely asphyxiated newborns. MATERIAL AND METHODS This is a secondary analysis of our prospective observational case-controlled study. Sixteen neonates with severe birth asphyxia (five-minute Apgar ≤3) were compared with either 54 moderate asphyxia neonates (five-minute Apgar >3) or 30 normal neonates. Liver function tests were measured on postnatal days 1, 3, and 10 in the study and control groups. Neonatal mortality was observed in the study and control population. RESULTS Correlation of Apgar score in severely asphyxiated neonates compared with normal Apgar score neonates and moderately asphyxiated neonates for deranged hepatic function showed significant correlation (odds ratio [OR] 4.88, 95% CI 3.26–5.84, P = 0.01 and OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.94–3.32, P = 0.02, respectively). There was a significant increase in serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and total bilirubin on day 1 and serum LDH at age of 10th postnatal life in severely asphyxiated neonates when compared to moderately asphyxiated neonates, whereas there was a significant decrease in total bilirubin and serum albumin on day 3 in severely asphyxiated neonates. There was a significant increase in serum alanine transaminase, serum LDH, and total bilirubin on day 1, serum aspartate transaminase, serum LDH, and total bilirubin on day 3, and International Normalized Ratio on day 10 of postnatal life when severely asphyxiated neonates were compared with normal neonates. There was a significant reduction in total protein and serum albumin on day 1 and direct bilirubin on day 3 in severely asphyxiated neonates when compared with normal neonates. There was a significant increase in neonatal mortality in severely asphyxiated neonates when compared to the other two groups. Correlation of Apgar score in severely asphyxiated neonates compared with normal Apgar

  1. Nonalcoholic Wernicke's encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Amanda; Rogers, Peter; Clift, Fraser

    2016-07-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a serious neurologic condition resulting from thiamine deficiency. The majority of cases involve alcoholism; however, nonalcohol-associated WE does occur and is under-recognized. We discuss a case of a 22-year-old man with a history of Crohn's disease who presented to our emergency department with multiple neurologic complaints related to WE. PMID:25985980

  2. [Bovine spongiform encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Suárez Fernández, G

    2001-01-01

    An histórical and conceptual review is made about Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy or mad cows disease and an epidemiological analysis as a present and future health problem. This analysis of BSE should not be negative, considering the truths that we know today. PMID:11783042

  3. KCNQ2 encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Millichap, John J.; Park, Kristen L.; Tsuchida, Tammy; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Carmant, Lionel; Flamini, Robert; Joshi, Nishtha; Levisohn, Paul M.; Marsh, Eric; Nangia, Srishti; Narayanan, Vinodh; Ortiz-Gonzalez, Xilma R.; Patterson, Marc C.; Pearl, Phillip L.; Porter, Brenda; Ramsey, Keri; McGinnis, Emily L.; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Tracy, Molly; Tran, Baouyen; Venkatesan, Charu; Weckhuysen, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To advance the understanding of KCNQ2 encephalopathy genotype–phenotype relationships and to begin to assess the potential of selective KCNQ channel openers as targeted treatments. Methods: We retrospectively studied 23 patients with KCNQ2 encephalopathy, including 11 treated with ezogabine (EZO). We analyzed the genotype–phenotype relationships in these and 70 previously described patients. Results: The mean seizure onset age was 1.8 ± 1.6 (SD) days. Of the 20 EEGs obtained within a week of birth, 11 showed burst suppression. When new seizure types appeared in infancy (15 patients), the most common were epileptic spasms (n = 8). At last follow-up, seizures persisted in 9 patients. Development was delayed in all, severely in 14. The KCNQ2 variants identified introduced amino acid missense changes or, in one instance, a single residue deletion. They were clustered in 4 protein subdomains predicted to poison tetrameric channel functions. EZO use (assessed by the treating physicians and parents) was associated with improvement in seizures and/or development in 3 of the 4 treated before 6 months of age, and 2 of the 7 treated later; no serious side effects were observed. Conclusions: KCNQ2 variants cause neonatal-onset epileptic encephalopathy of widely varying severity. Pathogenic variants in epileptic encephalopathy are clustered in “hot spots” known to be critical for channel activity. For variants causing KCNQ2 channel loss of function, EZO appeared well tolerated and potentially beneficial against refractory seizures when started early. Larger, prospective studies are needed to enable better definition of prognostic categories and more robust testing of novel interventions. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that EZO is effective for refractory seizures in patients with epilepsy due to KCNQ2 encephalopathy. PMID:27602407

  4. Asphyxiation by occlusion of nose and mouth by duct tape: two unusual suicides.

    PubMed

    deRoux, Stephen; Leffers, Beverly

    2009-11-01

    The most recent U.S. statistics (2005) determined that 22.2% of suicides are by suffocation. This number likely includes suicidal hanging. Based on previous reports the majority of nonhanging suicidal asphyxiations are accomplished by securing a plastic bag over the head. We report two instances of a far less common method of suicidal asphyxiation, occlusion of the nose and mouth by duct tape. One was a 47-year-old man with a history of paranoid schizophrenia with suicidal ideation and the other was a 52-year-old man who was depressed due to gambling debts. The value of scene investigation, including review of available video surveillance to determine the manner of death is highlighted. PMID:19737336

  5. [EEG manifestations in metabolic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chou-Ching K

    2005-09-01

    Normal brain function depends on normal neuronal metabolism, which is closely related to systemic homeostasis of metabolites, such as glucose, electrolytes, amino acids and ammonia. "Metabolic encephalopathy" indicates diffuse brain dysfunction caused by various systemic derangements. Electroencephalogram (EEG) is widely used to evaluate metabolic encephalopathy since 1937, when Berger first observed slow brain activity induced by hypoglycemia. EEG is most useful in differentiating organic from psychiatric conditions, identifying epileptogenicity, and providing information about the degree of cortical or subcortical dysfunction. In metabolic encephalopathy, EEG evolution generally correlates well with the severity of encephalopathy. However, EEG has little specificity in differentiating etiologies in metabolic encephalopathy. For example, though triphasic waves are most frequently mentioned in hepatic encephalopathy, they can also be seen in uremic encephalopathy, or even in aged psychiatric patients treated with lithium. Spike-and-waves may appear in hyper- or hypo-glycemia, uremic encephalopathy, or vitamin deficiencies, etc. Common principles of EEG changes in metabolic encephalopathy are (1) varied degrees of slowing, (2) assorted mixtures of epileptic discharge, (3) high incidence of triphasic waves, and (4), as a rule, reversibility after treatment of underlying causes. There are some exceptions to the above descriptions in specific metabolic disorders and EEG manifestations are highly individualized. PMID:16252619

  6. Determining oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point in Chanodichthys mongolicus using an improved respirometer chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Longwu; Jiang, Haifeng; Tong, Guangxiang; Xu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of oxygen consumption rates and asphyxiation points in fish is important to determine appropriate stocking and water quality management in aquaculture. The oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point in Chanodichthys mongolicus were detected under laboratory conditions using an improved respirometer chamber. The results revealed that more accurate estimates can be obtained by adjusting the volume of the respirometer chamber, which may avoid system errors caused by either repeatedly adjusting fish density or selecting different equipment specifications. The oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point of C. mongolicus increased with increasing water temperature and decreasing fish size. Changes in the C. mongolicus oxygen consumption rate were divided into three stages at water temperatures of 11-33°C: (1) a low temperature oxygen consumption rate stage when water temperature was 11-19°C, (2) the optimum temperature oxygen consumption rate stage when water temperature was 19-23°C, and (3) a high temperature oxygen consumption rate stage when water temperature was > 27°C. The temperature quotients (Q10) obtained suggested that C. mongolicus preferred a temperature range of 19-23°C. At 19°C, C. mongolicus exhibited higher oxygen consumption rates during the day when the maximum values were observed at 10:00 and 14:00 than at night when the minimum occurred at 02:00.

  7. Effect of vasopressin on hippocampal injury in a rodent model of asphyxial cardiopulmonary arrest

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, NAN; ZANG, XIU-XIAN; DONG, NING; LIU, FANG; WANG, SHAO-KUN; YAN, HE; XU, DA-HAI; LIU, XIAO-LIANG; PANG, LI

    2016-01-01

    The effect of vasopressin on the neuronal injury following the restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in cardiac arrest (CA) is not yet fully understood. The present study was conducted in order to investigate the effect of vasopressin alone, or in combination with epinephrine, on the ROSC and hippocampal injury in a rat model of asphyxial CA. Asphyxial CA was induced in 144 rats by clamping the tracheal tube, and animals were allocated equally into the following three groups: Treatment with vasopressin (0.8 U/kg); epinephrine (0.2 mg/kg); or vasopressin (0.8 U/kg) plus epinephrine (0.2 mg/kg). An additional 48 rats underwent a sham surgical procedure without asphyxial CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Hippocampal tissue was harvested at 1, 3, 6 and 12 h post-ROSC, and the levels of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 were determined using immunohistochemistry. In comparison with rats treated with epinephrine alone, higher ROSC success rates were observed in rats treated with vasopressin, or vasopressin plus epinephrine. In addition, treatment with vasopressin attenuated hippocampal injury and reduced hippocampal p38 MAPK and NF-κB expression more efficiently compared with epinephrine alone. In conclusion, treatment with vasopressin exhibits a protective effect in patients experiencing CA, and this may be attributed to the inhibition of p38 MAPK and NF-κB expression. PMID:27073454

  8. Hypoxic-Ischemic Neonatal Encephalopathy: Animal Experiments for Neuroprotective Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ikenoue, Tsuyomu

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy and ensuing brain damage is still an important problem in modern perinatal medicine. In this paper, we would like to share some of the results of our recent studies on neuroprotective therapies in animal experiments, as well as some literature reviews. From the basic animal studies, we have now obtained some possible candidates for therapeutic measures against hypoxic-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy. For example, they are hypothermia, rehabilitation, free radical scavenger, neurotrophic factors and growth factors, steroid, calcium channel blocker, vagal stimulation, some anti apoptotic agents, pre- and post conditioning, antioxidants, cell therapy with stem cells, modulators of K(+)-ATP channels, and so on. Whether combination of these therapies may be more beneficial than any single therapy needs to be clarified. Hypoxia-ischemia is a complicated condition, in which the cause, severity, and time-course are different in each case. Likewise, each fetus has its own inherent potentials such as adaptation, preconditioning-tolerance, and intolerance. Therefore, further extensive studies are required to establish an individualized strategy for neuroprotection against perinatal hypoxic-ischemic insult. PMID:23533962

  9. Diets in Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Abdelsayed, George G

    2015-08-01

    As many as 80% of patients with end-stage liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy have significant protein-calorie malnutrition. Because of the severe hypercatabolic state of cirrhosis, the provision of liberal amounts of carbohydrate (at least 35 to 40 kcal/kg per day), and between 1.2 and 1.6 g/kg of protein is necessary. Protein restriction is not recommended. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation and vegetable protein are associated with improved outcomes. Dietary supplementation with vitamins, minerals (with the notable exception of zinc) and probiotics should be decided on a case-by-case basis. PMID:26195204

  10. Perinatal care in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Basys, V; Liubsys, A

    1997-01-01

    The Preventive Program of Perinatal, Neonatal and Congenital Abnormalities in Lithuania was launched in 1992. That was the beginning of the reorganization of the Soviet maternal and child health care system. The first stage of the Program provided for the years 1992 through 1996 and aimed to create a system of maternal and neonatal care; to create a system of diagnosis and prevention of congenital abnormalities; to collect, process, and analyze maternal and neonatal data (to establish a new database); to evaluate, distribute, and use available resources efficiently; to plan financial and human resources for a perinatal care infrastructure; and to train medical personnel and control the level and quality of their knowledge. The reorganization was based on a three-tiered maternal and neonatal care system. By the end of 1996 the major goal of the Program was achieved successfully (i.e., perinatal, neonatal, and infant mortality rates decreased significantly. During the next 5 years the Program will focus mainly on qualitative aspects of perinatal care. PMID:9210082

  11. TCTEX1D2 mutations underlie Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with impaired retrograde intraflagellar transport.

    PubMed

    Schmidts, Miriam; Hou, Yuqing; Cortés, Claudio R; Mans, Dorus A; Huber, Celine; Boldt, Karsten; Patel, Mitali; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Plaza, Jean-Marc; van Beersum, Sylvia E C; Yap, Zhi Min; Letteboer, Stef J F; Taylor, S Paige; Herridge, Warren; Johnson, Colin A; Scambler, Peter J; Ueffing, Marius; Kayserili, Hulya; Krakow, Deborah; King, Stephen M; Beales, Philip L; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Wicking, Carol; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M; Witman, George B

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of individuals with ciliary chondrodysplasias can shed light on sensitive mechanisms controlling ciliogenesis and cell signalling that are essential to embryonic development and survival. Here we identify TCTEX1D2 mutations causing Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with partially penetrant inheritance. Loss of TCTEX1D2 impairs retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in humans and the protist Chlamydomonas, accompanied by destabilization of the retrograde IFT dynein motor. We thus define TCTEX1D2 as an integral component of the evolutionarily conserved retrograde IFT machinery. In complex with several IFT dynein light chains, it is required for correct vertebrate skeletal formation but may be functionally redundant under certain conditions. PMID:26044572

  12. TCTEX1D2 mutations underlie Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with impaired retrograde intraflagellar transport

    PubMed Central

    Schmidts, Miriam; Hou, Yuqing; Cortés, Claudio R.; Mans, Dorus A.; Huber, Celine; Boldt, Karsten; Patel, Mitali; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Plaza, Jean-Marc; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Yap, Zhi Min; Letteboer, Stef J. F.; Taylor, S. Paige; Herridge, Warren; Johnson, Colin A.; Scambler, Peter J.; Ueffing, Marius; Kayserili, Hulya; Krakow, Deborah; King, Stephen M.; Beales, Philip L.; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Wicking, Carol; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Witman, George B.; Al-Turki, Saeed; Anderson, Carl; Anney, Richard; Antony, Dinu; Asimit, Jennifer; Ayub, Mohammad; Barrett, Jeff; Barroso, Inês; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Blackwood, Douglas; Bobrow, Martin; Bochukova, Elena; Bolton, Patrick; Boustred, Chris; Breen, Gerome; Brion, Marie-Jo; Brown, Andrew; Calissano, Mattia; Carss, Keren; Chatterjee, Krishna; Chen, Lu; Cirak, Sebhattin; Clapham, Peter; Clement, Gail; Coates, Guy; Collier, David; Cosgrove, Catherine; Cox, Tony; Craddock, Nick; Crooks, Lucy; Curran, Sarah; Daly, Allan; Danecek, Petr; Smith, George Davey; Day-Williams, Aaron; Day, Ian; Durbin, Richard; Edkins, Sarah; Ellis, Peter; Evans, David; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Fitzpatrick, David; Flicek, Paul; Floyd, Jamie; Foley, A. Reghan; Franklin, Chris; Futema, Marta; Gallagher, Louise; Gaunt, Tom; Geschwind, Daniel; Greenwood, Celia; Grozeva, Detelina; Guo, Xiaosen; Gurling, Hugh; Hart, Deborah; Hendricks, Audrey; Holmans, Peter; Huang, Jie; Humphries, Steve E.; Hurles, Matt; Hysi, Pirro; Jackson, David; Jamshidi, Yalda; Jewell, David; Chris, Joyce; Kaye, Jane; Keane, Thomas; Kemp, John; Kennedy, Karen; Kent, Alastair; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Lachance, Genevieve; Langford, Cordelia; Lee, Irene; Li, Rui; Li, Yingrui; Ryan, Liu; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Lopes, Margarida; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Massimo, Mangino; Marchini, Jonathan; Maslen, John; McCarthy, Shane; McGuffin, Peter; McIntosh, Andrew; McKechanie, Andrew; McQuillin, Andrew; Memari, Yasin; Metrustry, Sarah; Min, Josine; Moayyeri, Alireza; Morris, James; Muddyman, Dawn; Muntoni, Francesco; Northstone, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Oualkacha, Karim; Owen, Michael; Palotie, Aarno; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Parker, Victoria; Parr, Jeremy; Paternoster, Lavinia; Paunio, Tiina; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John; Pietilainen, Olli; Plagnol, Vincent; Quail, Michael A.; Quaye, Lydia; Raymond, Lucy; Rehnström, Karola; Brent Richards, J.; Ring, Sue; Ritchie, Graham R S; Savage, David B.; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Semple, Robert K.; Serra, Eva; Shihab, Hashem; Shin, So-Youn; Skuse, David; Small, Kerrin; Smee, Carol; Soler, Artigas María; Soranzo, Nicole; Southam, Lorraine; Spector, Tim; St Pourcain, Beate; St. Clair, David; Stalker, Jim; Surdulescu, Gabriela; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Tian, Jing; Timpson, Nic; Tobin, Martin; Valdes, Ana; van Kogelenberg, Margriet; Vijayarangakannan, Parthiban; Wain, Louise; Walter, Klaudia; Wang, Jun; Ward, Kirsten; Wheeler, Ellie; Whittall, Ros; Williams, Hywel; Williamson, Kathy; Wilson, Scott G.; Wong, Kim; Whyte, Tamieka; ChangJiang, Xu; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhang, Feng; Zheng, Hou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of individuals with ciliary chondrodysplasias can shed light on sensitive mechanisms controlling ciliogenesis and cell signalling that are essential to embryonic development and survival. Here we identify TCTEX1D2 mutations causing Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy with partially penetrant inheritance. Loss of TCTEX1D2 impairs retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in humans and the protist Chlamydomonas, accompanied by destabilization of the retrograde IFT dynein motor. We thus define TCTEX1D2 as an integral component of the evolutionarily conserved retrograde IFT machinery. In complex with several IFT dynein light chains, it is required for correct vertebrate skeletal formation but may be functionally redundant under certain conditions. PMID:26044572

  13. Treatment of epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    McTague, Amy; Cross, J Helen

    2013-03-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy is defined as a condition where the epileptic activity itself may contribute to the severe neurological and cognitive impairment seen, over and above that which would be expected from the underlying pathology alone. The epilepsy syndromes at high risk of this are a disparate group of conditions characterized by epileptic seizures that are difficult to treat and developmental delay. In this review, we discuss the ongoing debate regarding the significance of inter-ictal discharges and the impact of the seizures themselves on the cognitive delay or regression that is a common feature of these syndromes. The syndromes also differ in many ways and we provide a summary of the key features of the early-onset epileptic encephalopathies including Ohtahara and West syndromes in addition to later childhood-onset syndromes such as Lennox Gastaut and Doose syndromes. An understanding of the various severe epilepsy syndromes is vital to understanding the rationale for treatment. For example, the resolution of hypsarrhythmia in West syndrome is associated with an improvement in cognitive outcome and drives treatment choice, but the same cannot be applied to frequent inter-ictal discharges in Lennox Gastaut syndrome. We discuss the evidence base for treatment where it is available and describe current practice where it is not. For example, in West syndrome there is some evidence for preference of hormonal treatments over vigabatrin, although the choice and duration of hormonal treatment remains unclear. We describe the use of conventional and newer anti-epileptic medications in the various syndromes and discuss which medications should be avoided. Older possibly forgotten treatments such as sulthiame and potassium bromide also have a role in the severe epilepsies of childhood. We discuss hormonal treatment with particular focus on the treatment of West syndrome, continuous spike wave in slow wave sleep (CSWS)/electrical status epilepticus in slow wave

  14. [Prevention of hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Morillas, Rosa M; Sala, Marga; Planas, Ramon

    2014-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a frequent complication of cirrhosis which, in addition to producing a great social impact, deteriorates the quality of life of patients and is considered a sign of advanced liver disease and therefore a clinical indication for liver transplant evaluation. Patients who have had episodes of HE have a high risk of recurrence. Thus, after the HE episode resolves, it is recommended: control and prevention of precipitating factors (gastrointestinal bleeding, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, use of diuretics with caution, avoid nervous system depressant medications), continued administration of non-absorbable disaccharides such as lactulose or lactitol, few or non-absorbable antibiotics such as rifaximin and assess the need for a liver transplant as the presence of a HE episode carries a poor prognosis in cirrhosis. PMID:24480288

  15. The Urinary Uric Acid/Creatinine Ratio is An Adjuvant Marker for Perinatal Asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Bhongir, Aparna Varma; Yakama, Akhil Varma Venkata; Saha, Subhajit; Radia, Sejal B.; Pabbati, Jayalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the urinary uric acid/creatinine ratio (UA/Cr) in relation to Apgar score and cord blood gas analysis in identification of perinatal asphyxia and to define the cutoff values. Design case control study. Setting The newborns admitted in the department of pediatrics and NICU of Mediciti Institute of Medical Science, Ghanpur, Medchal mandal, Telangana from May-July 2011 were enrolled. Participants/patients The study was conducted on 31 (18 males, 13 females) controls and 18 (12males, 6 females) asphyxiated neonates. Outcome Measure(s) 5ml of arterial cord blood of newborn collected at the time of birth and spot urine samples were collected within 24-72 hours of life. Cord blood gas analysis were done immediately and Urinary uric acid was measured by modified Uricase method, urinary creatinine by modified kinetic Jaffe's reaction. Results The mean urinary uric acid and creatinine ratio (2.58± 0.48 vs 1.89 ± 0.59) is significantly higher in Asphyxiated group than in the control group. The umbilical cord blood pH had significant positive correlation with 1st minute Apgar score (r= 0.41, p=0.003), 5th minute Apgar (r= 0.44, p=0.002), while urinary UA/Cr ratio had significant negative correlation with cord blood pH (r= -0.63, p=0.002). Urinary UA/Cr ratio with criterion of >2.43 had 80% sensitivity, 87.5% specificity with AUC of 0.84 (p=0.003) had a better predictive value. Conclusions Urinary UA/Cr ratio is easy, non-invasive, painless and economical adjuvant parameter with better predictive value for diagnosing perinatal asphyxia with simple diagnostic equipment. PMID:26998526

  16. The role of inflammation in perinatal brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Hagberg, Henrik; Mallard, Carina; Ferriero, Donna M.; Vannucci, Susan J.; Levison, Steven W.; Vexler, Zinaida S.; Gressens, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is increasingly recognized as being a critical contributor to both normal development and injury outcome in the immature brain. The focus of this Review is to highlight important differences in innate and adaptive immunity in immature versus adult brain, which support the notion that the consequences of inflammation will be entirely different depending on context and stage of CNS development. Perinatal brain injury can result from neonatal encephalopathy and perinatal arterial ischaemic stroke, usually at term, but also in preterm infants. Inflammation occurs before, during and after brain injury at term, and modulates vulnerability to and development of brain injury. Preterm birth, on the other hand, is often a result of exposure to inflammation at a very early developmental phase, which affects the brain not only during fetal life, but also over a protracted period of postnatal life in a neonatal intensive care setting, influencing critical phases of myelination and cortical plasticity. Neuroinflammation during the perinatal period can increase the risk of neurological and neuropsychiatric disease throughout childhood and adulthood, and is, therefore, of concern to the broader group of physicians who care for these individuals. PMID:25686754

  17. Feasibility and Safety of Therapeutic Hypothermia and Short Term Outcome in Neonates with Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Purkayastha, Jayashree; Lewis, Leslie Edward; Bhat, Ramesh Y; Anusha, K M

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is well known for neuroprotection in asphyxiated neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. The authors aimed to study the feasibility and safety of therapeutic hypothermia and short term outcome in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Total 31 neonates with moderate to severe HIE were enrolled in the study. Continuous temperature recording was noted in 31 neonates; 17 neonates were studied prospectively while 14 neonates were studied retrospectively. Rectal temperature was monitored in 31 neonates and maintained between 33 and 34 °C by switching off the warmer and using ice packs. Reusable ice packs were used which were inexpensive. Therapeutic hypothermia was maintained for 72 h and babies were then rewarmed 0.5 °C every hour. Therapeutic hypothermia was feasible and inexpensive. There was no major complication during the study. MRI was done in 17 neonates; 52 % were found to have normal MRI at the end of first week. Among the study neonates (n = 31) 64.5 % were neurologically normal at the time of discharge. To conclude, therapeutic hypothermia is feasible in a low resource setting and is a safe way of neuroprotection. Short term outcome was also favourable in these neonates. PMID:26141549

  18. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies of livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. TSEs have been described in several species including bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids, tr...

  19. Cardiotocography in the Prognosis of Perinatal Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanovic, Gordana; Babovic, Adnan; Rizvanovic, Mirzeta; Ljuca, Dzenita; Grgic, Gordana; Djuranovic–Milicic, Jadranaka

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: The objective of the study was to examine whether cardiotocography can (CTG) predict asphyxia of the embryo, manifested as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), and to what extent one can rely on CTG record. Material and methods: Retrospective research was carried out at the Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics UKC Tuzla and medical documentation from the history of mothers and newborns was used. The study group consisted of 68 pregnancies and newborns who developed HIE. The control group consisted of 40 pregnancies, which resulted in birth of healthy newborns – without signs of asphyxia. CTG records were analyzed, Apgar score, the ways of finishing delivery. Results: Pathological CTG records (bradycardia 100, tachycardia 180, silent type of curve, late decelerations) were found in 45 (66,17%) cases of the study group in comparison to 11 (27,5%) in the control group. In the study group Apgar score in 5th minute lower than 7 had 17,46% newborns and the highest incidence of the normally finished deliveries. We conclude that cardiotocography is one of the reliable methods of fetal monitoring in pregnancy and delivery, and that pathological CTG record very likely indicates the possible presence of perinatal asphyxia. Conclusion: Achieving a low degree of correlation between pathological intrapartum cardiotocography findings and long-term outcome of children can be achieved by rapid and adequate obstetric intervention and the relatively short duration of fetal acidosis, and optimal procedures during intensive care of newborns. PMID:24937932

  20. Sepsis Associated Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Neera; Duggal, Ashish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a common but poorly understood neurological complication of sepsis. It is characterized by diffuse brain dysfunction secondary to infection elsewhere in the body without overt CNS infection. The pathophysiology of SAE is complex and multifactorial including a number of intertwined mechanisms such as vascular damage, endothelial activation, breakdown of the blood brain barrier, altered brain signaling, brain inflammation, and apoptosis. Clinical presentation of SAE may range from mild symptoms such as malaise and concentration deficits to deep coma. The evaluation of cognitive dysfunction is made difficult by the absence of any specific investigations or biomarkers and the common use of sedation in critically ill patients. SAE thus remains diagnosis of exclusion which can only be made after ruling out other causes of altered mentation in a febrile, critically ill patient by appropriate investigations. In spite of high mortality rate, management of SAE is limited to treatment of the underlying infection and symptomatic treatment for delirium and seizures. It is important to be aware of this condition because SAE may present in early stages of sepsis, even before the diagnostic criteria for sepsis can be met. This review discusses the diagnostic approach to patients with SAE along with its epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis. PMID:26556425

  1. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Schmutzhard, E

    2016-06-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome refers to a neurological disorder characterized by headache, disorders of consciousness, visual disturbances, epileptic seizures, and subcortical vasogenic edema. About two thirds of patients develop neurological symptoms, which are associated with blood pressure fluctuations. One hypothesis is that hypertensive episodes cause autoregulatory failure, and values above the upper limit of cerebral autoregulation result in a breakthrough followed by hyperperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. In another hypothesis, endothelial dysfunction triggered by numerous factors including preeclampsia, immunosuppressive agents, chemotherapeutics, sepsis, or autoimmune disorders is thought to be the key pathomechanism. Endo- or exogenic toxic agents including pharmacological substances, cytokines, or bacterial toxins are supposed to trigger endothelial activation and dysfunction resulting in the release of vasoconstrictors, pro-inflammatory mediators, and vascular leakage. Diagnosis is usually based on clinical and neuroimaging findings that frequently show a bilateral, symmetric, and parietooccipital pattern. However, the diagnosis can often only be confirmed during the course of disease after excluding important differential diagnoses. Currently, there is no specific treatment available. Lowering of arterial blood pressure and eliminating the underlying cause usually leads to an improvement of clinical and neuroradiological findings. Admission to a critical care unit is required in about 40 % of patients due to complicating conditions including status epilepticus, cerebral vasoconstriction, ischemia, or intracerebral hemorrhage. Prognosis is favorable; in the majority of patients neurological deficits and imaging findings resolve completely. PMID:27272329

  2. [Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy disease].

    PubMed

    Benureau, A; Meyer, P; Maillet, O; Leboucq, N; Legras, S; Jeziorski, E; Fournier-Favre, S; Jeandel, C; Gaignard, P; Slama, A; Rivier, F; Roubertie, A; Carneiro, M

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy disease (MNGIE) is a rare autosomal-recessive syndrome, resulting from mutations in the TYMP gene, located at 22q13. The mutation induces a thymidine phosphorylase (TP) deficit, which leads to a nucleotide pool imbalance and to instability of the mitochondrial DNA. The clinical picture regroups gastrointestinal dysmotility, cachexia, ptosis, ophthalmoplegia, peripheral neuropathy, and asymptomatic leukoencephalopathy. The prognosis is unfavorable. We present the case of a 14-year-old Caucasian female whose symptoms started in early childhood. The diagnosis was suspected after magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), performed given the atypical features of mental anorexia, which revealed white matter abnormalities. She presented chronic vomiting, postprandial abdominal pain, and problems gaining weight accompanied by cachexia. This diagnosis led to establishing proper care, in particular an enteral and parenteral nutrition program. There is no known specific effective treatment, but numerous studies are in progress. In this article, after reviewing the existing studies, we discuss the main diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the disease. We argue for the necessity of performing a cerebral MRI given the atypical features of a patient with suspected mental anorexia (or when the clinical pattern of a patient with mental anorexia seems atypical), so that MNGIE can be ruled out. PMID:25282463

  3. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Juneyoung; Padalino, David J; Chin, Lawrence S; Montenegro, Philip; Cantu, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Sports-related concussion has gained increased prominence, in part due to media coverage of several well-known athletes who have died from consequences of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE was first described by Martland in 1928 as a syndrome seen in boxers who had experienced significant head trauma from repeated blows. The classic symptoms of impaired cognition, mood, behavior, and motor skills also have been reported in professional football players, and in 2005, the histopathological findings of CTE were first reported in a former National Football League (NFL) player. These finding were similar to Alzheimer's disease in some ways but differed in critical areas such as a predominance of tau protein deposition over amyloid. The pathophysiology is still unknown but involves a history of repeated concussive and subconcussive blows and then a lag period before CTE symptoms become evident. The involvement of excitotoxic amino acids and abnormal microglial activation remain speculative. Early identification and prevention of this disease by reducing repeated blows to the head has become a critical focus of current research. PMID:23314081

  4. Sepsis-Associated Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cotena, Simona; Piazza, Ornella

    2012-01-01

    Summary Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is defined as a diffuse or multifocal cerebral dysfunction induced by the systemic response to the infection without clinical or laboratory evidence of direct brain infection. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial. SAE generally occurs early during severe sepsis and precedes multiple-organ failure. The most common clinical feature of SAE is the consciousness alteration which ranges from mildly reduced awareness to unresponsiveness and coma. Diagnosis of SAE is primarily clinical and depends on the exclusion of other possible causes of brain deterioration. Electroencephalography (EEG) is almost sensitive, but it is not specific for SAE. Computed Tomography (CT) head scan generally is negative in case of SAE, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can show brain abnormalities in case of SAE, but they are not specific for this condition. Somatosensitive Evoked Potentials (SEPs) are sensitive markers of developing cerebral dysfunction in sepsis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CBF) analysis is generally normal, a part an inconstant elevation of proteins concentration. S100B and NSE have been proposed like biomarkers for diagnosis of SAE, but the existing data are controversial. SAE is reversible even if survivors of severe sepsis have often long lasting or irreversible cognitive and behavioral sequel; however the presence of SAE can have a negative influence on survival. A specific therapy of SAE does not exist and the outcome depends on a prompt and appropriate treatment of sepsis as whole. PMID:23905041

  5. Non-Hyperammonemic valproate encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Omar; Zunga, Pervaiz M; Dar, Mohd I; Rather, Abdul Q; Rashid, Samia; Basu, Javid; Dar, Ishrat H; Ashraf, Mohd

    2014-04-01

    A 21-year-old male known case of primary hypothyroidism, Seizure disorder sequelae of an old trauma receiving sodium valproate, clobazam and phenobarbitone for control of Generalized tonic clonic seizures reported to neurology OPD with history of altered sensorium and gait unsteadiness for 1 week with history of hike in valproate dose 2 weeks before. On examination he was drowsy. Neurological examination was unremarkable except for gait unsteadiness and ataxia. Patient was admitted and evaluated for acute worsening. All (the) biochemical parameters including complete blood count, liver function tests, kidney function tests, routine urine examination, arterial blood gas analysis, blood and urine culture tests were normal. CSF analysis was also normal. Repeat MRI brain was also done which depicted all old changes with no fresh changes which will account for worsening of his sensorium. EEG was suggestive of diffuse encephalopathy. Thyroid function tests were also normal. Valproate encephalopathy was suspected and Valproate was empirically stopped and he was put on levetiracetam and phenytoin. His sensorium improved rapidly after stoppage of valproate with normalization of EEG. Serum valproate Levels were high with serum ammonia levels were in the normal range. We made the inference of nonhyperammoneamic valproate encephalopathy. This case highlights the existence of non-hyperammonemic valproate induced encephalopathy, suggesting mechanisms other than hyperammonemia responsible for this encephalopathy. PMID:25206067

  6. Autoerotic asphyxial deaths: analysis of nineteen fatalities in Alberta, 1978 to 1989.

    PubMed

    Tough, S C; Butt, J C; Sanders, G L

    1994-04-01

    This paper presents an unusual form of sexual (masturbatory) activity and brings this unusual cause of death to wider medical attention and understanding. All 19 cases of autoerotic asphyxial death that occurred between 1978 and 1989 in the province of Alberta, Canada were reviewed. The fatal victim of autoerotic asphyxia is typically a single male aged 15 to 29 years. Autoerotic sexual activity is typically performed in isolation; often there is evidence of repetitive practice. The accidental death usually results when the "safety" mechanism designed to alleviate neck compression fails. Often the first sign of the activity (usually a surprise to family and friends) is death itself. Physicians who are alert to the practice may suggest counselling when patients present with sexual concerns, unusual marks around the neck or evidence of abrasions to limbs suggesting bondage or other masochistic practices. PMID:8033021

  7. Asphyxiation Incidents by Hydrogen Sulfide at Manure Storage Facilities of Swine Livestock Farms in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Jihoon; Kang, Taesun; Jin, Suhyun; Heo, Yong; Kim, Kyungran; Lee, Kyungsuk; Tsai, Perngjy; Yoon, Chungsik

    2016-01-01

    Livestock workers are involved in a variety of tasks, such as caring for animals, maintaining the breeding facilities, cleaning, and manure handling, and are exposed to health and safety risks. Hydrogen sulfide is considered the most toxic by-product of the manure handling process at livestock facilities. Except for several reports in developed countries, the statistics and cause of asphyxiation incidents in farms have not been collected and reported systematically, although the number of these incidents is expected to increase in developing and underdeveloped countries. In this study, the authors compiled the cases of work-related asphyxiation incidents at livestock manure storage facilities and analyzed the main causes. In this survey, a total of 17 incidents were identified through newspapers or online searches and public reports. Thirty workers died and eight were injured due to work-related tasks and rescue attempts from 1998 to 2013 in Korea. Of the 30 fatalities, 18 occurred during manure handling/maintenance tasks and 12 during rescue attempts. All incidents except for one case occurred during the warm season from the late spring (April) to early autumn (September) when manure is likely to decompose rapidly. It is important to train employees involved in the operation of the facilities (i.e., owners, managers, employees) regarding the appropriate prevention strategies for confined space management, such as hazard identification before entry, periodical facility inspection, restriction of unnecessary access, proper ventilation, and health and safety. Sharing information or case reports on previous incidents could also help prevent similar cases from occurring and reduce the number of fatalities and injuries. PMID:26765950

  8. Diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Weissenborn, Karin

    2015-03-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (mHE) has significant impact upon a liver patient's daily living and health related quality of life. Therefore a majority of clinicians agree that mHE should be diagnosed and treated. The optimal means for diagnosing mHE, however, is controversial. This paper describes the currently most frequently used methods-EEG, critical flicker frequency, Continuous Reaction time Test, Inhibitory Control Test, computerized test batteries such as the Cognitive Drug Research test battery, the psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score (PHES) and the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS)-and their pros and cons. PMID:26041959

  9. Hashimoto's Encephalopathy Presenting with Chorea.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Abhijeet; Sengupta, Sarbani; Mukhopadhyay, Sarmishtha; Ghosh, Bhaskar

    2015-09-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a steroid-responsive relapsing neuropsychiatric disorder associated with high titers of antithyroid antibody with or without thyroid dysfunction. We report a case of HE in a 78 year old female who developed sudden onset behavioral abnormalities associated with choreiform movement of extremities. All causes of vascular, infective, metabolic, autoimmune, paraneoplastic and toxic encephalopathy were excluded. Anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) antibody was found to be raised with very high titre. A diagnosis of HE was made. Prompt treatment with high dose steroid led to dramatic improvement of symptoms including choreiform movement. PMID:27608878

  10. Maternal and perinatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Krishna Menon, M K

    1972-01-01

    A brief analysis of data from the records of the Government Hospital for Women and Children in Madras for a 36-year period (1929-1964) is presented. India with a population of over 550 million has only 1 doctor for each 6000 population. For the 80% of the population which is rural, the doctor ratio is only 88/1 million. There is also a shortage of paramedical personnel. During the earlier years of this study period, abortions, puerperal infections; hemorrhage, and toxemia accounted for nearly 75% of all meternal deaths, while in later years deaths from these causes were 40%. Among associated factors in maternal mortality, anemia was the most frequent, it still accounts for 20% and is a contributory factor in another 20%. The mortality from postpartum hemorrhage was 9.3% but has now decreased to 2.8%. Eclampsia is a preventable disease and a marked reduction in maternal and perinatal mortality from this cause has been achieved. Maternal deaths from puerperal infections have dropped from 25% of all maternal deaths to 7%. Uterine rupture has been reduced from 75% to 9.3% due to modern facilities. Operative deliveries still have an incidence of 2.1% and a mortality rate of 1.4% of all deliveries. These rates would be further reduced by more efficient antenatal and intranatal care. Reported perinatal mortality of infants has been reduced from 182/1000 births to an average of 78/1000 in all areas, but is 60.6/1000 in the city of Madras. Socioeconomic standards play an important role in perinatal mortality, 70% of such deaths occurring in the lowest economic groups. Improvement has been noted in the past 25 years but in rural areas little progress has been made. Prematurity and low birth weights are still larger factors in India than in other countries, with acute infectious diseases, anemia, and general malnutrition among mothers the frequent causes. Problems requiring further efforts to reduce maternal and infant mortality are correct vital statistics, improved

  11. Perinatal Grief in Latino Parents

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Claudia; Kavanaugh, Karen; Klima, Carrie

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research exists that describes the meaning of perinatal loss to some parents, but the experience of loss from the perspective of Latino parents is not clearly understood. Additionally, current perinatal bereavement practices used often to facilitate memory-making for parents (such as viewing or holding the baby, taking photographs, or collecting mementos) are based upon research done primarily with non-Latino families. Are these common practices appropriate for this population? Because there is a paucity of research on this topic, this article describes what has been written over the past 30 years on the topic of grief and perinatal loss in Latino culture. PMID:20975393

  12. Countrywide analysis of perinatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Stembera, Z; Kravka, A; Mandys, F

    1988-01-01

    The computer laboratory of the Research Institute for the Care of Mother and Child in Prague performs annually a countrywide analysis of perinatal outcome in order to obtain a background for the preparation of the optimal strategy for improving perinatal care in CSR in the future. The total as well as weight specific perinatal mortality rate further sub-divided into early neonatal death rate and late fetal death rate and differentiated according to the birthweight, was correlated with the incidence of different factors influencing the perinatal mortality rate both countrywide and for each of the eight provinces of CSR. This way a correlation was found between some of the mentioned perinatal outcomes and e.g. instrumental equipment of obstetrical departments and neonatal intensive care units, frequency of caesarean sections, or transport of LBW newborns in incubators or "in utero" etc. The results of this analysis have proved that there still remain in some provinces opportunity for further decrease in perinatal mortality due to the incomplete observance of the two intervention strategies "Risk approach" and "New technology" which were introduced in the whole country during the last 10 years. PMID:3221298

  13. Pharmacotherapy for hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Phongsamran, Paula V; Kim, Jiwon W; Cupo Abbott, Jennifer; Rosenblatt, Angela

    2010-06-18

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a challenging clinical complication of liver dysfunction with a wide spectrum of neuropsychiatric abnormalities that range from mild disturbances in cognitive function and consciousness to coma and death. The pathogenesis of HE in cirrhosis is complex and multifactorial, but a key role is thought to be played by circulating gut-derived toxins of the nitrogenous compounds, most notably ammonia. Therapeutic treatment options for HE are currently limited and have appreciable risks and benefits associated with their use. Management of HE primarily involves avoidance of precipitating factors, limitation of dietary protein intake, and administration of various ammonia-lowering therapies such as non-absorbable disaccharides and select antimicrobial agents. Non-absorbable disaccharides, such as lactulose, have traditionally been regarded as first-line pharmacotherapy for patients with HE. However, multiple adverse events have been associated with their use. In addition, recent literature has questioned the true efficacy of the disaccharides for this indication. Neomycin, metronidazole and vancomycin may be used as alternative treatments for patients intolerant or unresponsive to non-absorbable disaccharides. Antimicrobials reduce bacterial production of ammonia and other bacteria-derived toxins through suppression of intestinal flora. Neomycin has been reported to be as effective as lactulose, and similar efficacy has been reported with vancomycin and metronidazole for the management of HE. However, the adverse effects frequently associated with these antimicrobials limit their use as first-line pharmacological agents. Neomycin is the most commonly used antimicrobial for HE and, although poorly absorbed, systemic exposure to the drug in sufficient amounts causes hearing loss and renal toxicity. Long-term neomycin therapy requires annual auditory testing and continuous monitoring of renal function. Long-term use of metronidazole has been

  14. Relationship between opioid therapy, tissue-damaging procedures, and brain metabolites as measured by proton MRS in asphyxiated term neonates.

    PubMed

    Angeles, Danilyn M; Ashwal, Stephen; Wycliffe, Nathaniel D; Ebner, Charlotte; Fayard, Elba; Sowers, Lawrence; Holshouser, Barbara A

    2007-05-01

    To examine the effects of opioid and tissue-damaging procedures (TDPs) [i.e. procedures performed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) known to result in pain, stress, and tissue damage] on brain metabolites, we reviewed the medical records of 28 asphyxiated term neonates (eight opioid-treated, 20 non-opioid treated) who had undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) within the first month of life as well as eight newborns with no clinical findings of asphyxial injury. We found that lower creatine (Cr), myoinositol (Ins), and N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/choline (Cho) (p < or = 0.03) and higher Cho/Cr and glutamate/glutamine (Glx) Cr (p < or = 0.02) correlated with increased TDP incidence in the first 2 d of life (DOL). We also found that occipital gray matter (OGM) NAA/Cr was decreased (p = 0.03) and lactate (Lac) was present in a significantly higher amount (40%; p = 0.03) in non-opioid-treated neonates compared with opioid-treated neonates. Compared with controls, untreated neonates showed larger changes in more metabolites in basal ganglia (BG), thalami (TH), and OGM with greater significance than treated neonates. Our data suggest that TDPs affect spectral metabolites and that opioids do not cause harm in asphyxiated term neonates exposed to repetitive TDPs in the first 2-4 DOL and may provide a degree of neuroprotection. PMID:17413864

  15. Fatal Asphyxiation in Two Long-Finned Pilot Whales (Globicephala melas) Caused by Common Soles (Solea solea)

    PubMed Central

    IJsseldijk, Lonneke L.; Leopold, Mardik F.; Bravo Rebolledo, Elisa L.; Deaville, Rob; Haelters, Jan; IJzer, Jooske; Jepson, Paul D.; Gröne, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas) are rare visitors to the southern North Sea, but recently two individual strandings occurred on the Dutch coast. Both animals shared the same, unusual cause of death: asphyxiation from a common sole (Solea solea) stuck in their nasal cavity. This is a rare cause of death in cetaceans. Whilst asphyxiation has been reported in smaller odontocetes, there are no recent records of this occurring in Globicephala species. Here we report the stranding, necropsy and diet study results as well as discuss the unusual nature of this phenomenon. Flatfish are not a primary prey species for pilot whales and are rarely eaten by other cetaceans, such as harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), in which there are several reports of asphyxiation due to airway obstruction by soles. This risk may be due to the fish’s flexible bodies which can enter small cavities either actively in an attempt to escape or passively due to the whale ‘coughing’ or ‘sneezing’ to rid itself of the blockage of the trachea. It is also possible that the fish enter the airways whilst the whale is re-articulating the larynx after trying to ingest large, oddly shaped prey. It is unlikely that the soles entered the airways after the death of the whales and we believe therefore that they are responsible for the death of these animals. PMID:26580786

  16. Psychological aspects of risk appraisal in asphyxiation accidents: a review of the factors influencing children’s perception and behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Zigon, G; Corradetti, R; Morra, B; Snidero, S; Gregori, D; Passali, D

    2005-01-01

    Summary Psychological aspects determining children’s behaviour in response to asphyxiation risk due to ingestion of foreign matter have been rarely and non-systematically examined in the literature. Aim of this report is to highlight – through a review of the most significant psychological research in the literature – which factors influence the behaviour, perception and assessments of children 0 to 14 years of age, in a risk situation. In particular, attention is focused on the direct experience of a child at risk, assuming that this experience can play a significant role in future dangerous situations. Outcomes of studies taken into consideration have highlighted the influence of age, sex, socio-economic status, parents’ role, peer group, personal traits, television and personal experience. The latter refutes the initial hypotheses, showing an unexpected and clearly negative effect on future evaluation and behaviour in response to similar contexts of asphyxiation risk. The implications for research on asphyxiation due to ingestion of foreign matter are examined. PMID:16116832

  17. Fatal Asphyxiation in Two Long-Finned Pilot Whales (Globicephala melas) Caused by Common Soles (Solea solea).

    PubMed

    IJsseldijk, Lonneke L; Leopold, Mardik F; Bravo Rebolledo, Elisa L; Deaville, Rob; Haelters, Jan; IJzer, Jooske; Jepson, Paul D; Gröne, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas) are rare visitors to the southern North Sea, but recently two individual strandings occurred on the Dutch coast. Both animals shared the same, unusual cause of death: asphyxiation from a common sole (Solea solea) stuck in their nasal cavity. This is a rare cause of death in cetaceans. Whilst asphyxiation has been reported in smaller odontocetes, there are no recent records of this occurring in Globicephala species. Here we report the stranding, necropsy and diet study results as well as discuss the unusual nature of this phenomenon. Flatfish are not a primary prey species for pilot whales and are rarely eaten by other cetaceans, such as harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), in which there are several reports of asphyxiation due to airway obstruction by soles. This risk may be due to the fish's flexible bodies which can enter small cavities either actively in an attempt to escape or passively due to the whale 'coughing' or 'sneezing' to rid itself of the blockage of the trachea. It is also possible that the fish enter the airways whilst the whale is re-articulating the larynx after trying to ingest large, oddly shaped prey. It is unlikely that the soles entered the airways after the death of the whales and we believe therefore that they are responsible for the death of these animals. PMID:26580786

  18. Perinatal Asphyxia Affects Rat Auditory Processing: Implications for Auditory Perceptual Impairments in Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Strata, Fabrizio; Stoianov, Ivilin P.; de Villers-Sidani, Etienne; Bonham, Ben; Martone, Tiziana; Kenet, Tal; Chang, Edward F.; Vincenti, Vincenzo; Merzenich, Michael M.

    2010-01-01

    Perinatal asphyxia, a naturally and commonly occurring risk factor in birthing, represents one of the major causes of neonatal encephalopathy with long term consequences for infants. Here, degraded spectral and temporal responses to sounds were recorded from neurons in the primary auditory cortex (A1) of adult rats exposed to asphyxia at birth. Response onset latencies and durations were increased. Response amplitudes were reduced. Tuning curves were broader. Degraded successive-stimulus masking inhibitory mechanisms were associated with a reduced capability of neurons to follow higher-rate repetitive stimuli. The architecture of peripheral inner ear sensory epithelium was preserved, suggesting that recorded abnormalities can be of central origin. Some implications of these findings for the genesis of language perception deficits or for impaired language expression recorded in developmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders, contributed to by perinatal asphyxia, are discussed. PMID:21203459

  19. [Wernicke encephalopathy accompanying linitis plastica].

    PubMed

    Soós, Zsuzsanna; Salamon, Mónika; Oláh, Roland; Czégeni, Anna; Salamon, Ferenc; Folyovich, András; Winkler, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (or Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy) is a rarely diagnosed neurological disorder, which is caused by vitamin B1 deficiency. In the classical form it is characterized by a typical triad (confusion, oculomotor disturbance and ataxia), however, in the majority of the cases only confusion is present. It can be frequently observed in subjects with chronic alcohol consumption, but it may accompany different pathological states of which end stage malignant diseases are the most importants, where confusion may have different backgrounds. The authors present the case of an old male patient with advanced gastric cancer recognised and treated vitamin B1 deficiency, and they draw attention to difficulties of the diagnosis of Wernicke's disease. PMID:24379094

  20. Mutations in the gene encoding IFT dynein complex component WDR34 cause Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Schmidts, Miriam; Vodopiutz, Julia; Christou-Savina, Sonia; Cortés, Claudio R; McInerney-Leo, Aideen M; Emes, Richard D; Arts, Heleen H; Tüysüz, Beyhan; D'Silva, Jason; Leo, Paul J; Giles, Tom C; Oud, Machteld M; Harris, Jessica A; Koopmans, Marije; Marshall, Mhairi; Elçioglu, Nursel; Kuechler, Alma; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Moore, Anthony T; Wilson, Louise C; Janecke, Andreas R; Hurles, Matthew E; Emmet, Warren; Gardiner, Brooke; Streubel, Berthold; Dopita, Belinda; Zankl, Andreas; Kayserili, Hülya; Scambler, Peter J; Brown, Matthew A; Beales, Philip L; Wicking, Carol; Duncan, Emma L; Mitchison, Hannah M

    2013-11-01

    Bidirectional (anterograde and retrograde) motor-based intraflagellar transport (IFT) governs cargo transport and delivery processes that are essential for primary cilia growth and maintenance and for hedgehog signaling functions. The IFT dynein-2 motor complex that regulates ciliary retrograde protein transport contains a heavy chain dynein ATPase/motor subunit, DYNC2H1, along with other less well functionally defined subunits. Deficiency of IFT proteins, including DYNC2H1, underlies a spectrum of skeletal ciliopathies. Here, by using exome sequencing and a targeted next-generation sequencing panel, we identified a total of 11 mutations in WDR34 in 9 families with the clinical diagnosis of Jeune syndrome (asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy). WDR34 encodes a WD40 repeat-containing protein orthologous to Chlamydomonas FAP133, a dynein intermediate chain associated with the retrograde intraflagellar transport motor. Three-dimensional protein modeling suggests that the identified mutations all affect residues critical for WDR34 protein-protein interactions. We find that WDR34 concentrates around the centrioles and basal bodies in mammalian cells, also showing axonemal staining. WDR34 coimmunoprecipitates with the dynein-1 light chain DYNLL1 in vitro, and mining of proteomics data suggests that WDR34 could represent a previously unrecognized link between the cytoplasmic dynein-1 and IFT dynein-2 motors. Together, these data show that WDR34 is critical for ciliary functions essential to normal development and survival, most probably as a previously unrecognized component of the mammalian dynein-IFT machinery. PMID:24183451

  1. Mutations in the Gene Encoding IFT Dynein Complex Component WDR34 Cause Jeune Asphyxiating Thoracic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Schmidts, Miriam; Vodopiutz, Julia; Christou-Savina, Sonia; Cortés, Claudio R.; McInerney-Leo, Aideen M.; Emes, Richard D.; Arts, Heleen H.; Tüysüz, Beyhan; D’Silva, Jason; Leo, Paul J.; Giles, Tom C.; Oud, Machteld M.; Harris, Jessica A.; Koopmans, Marije; Marshall, Mhairi; Elçioglu, Nursel; Kuechler, Alma; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Moore, Anthony T.; Wilson, Louise C.; Janecke, Andreas R.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Emmet, Warren; Gardiner, Brooke; Streubel, Berthold; Dopita, Belinda; Zankl, Andreas; Kayserili, Hülya; Scambler, Peter J.; Brown, Matthew A.; Beales, Philip L.; Wicking, Carol; Duncan, Emma L.; Mitchison, Hannah M.

    2013-01-01

    Bidirectional (anterograde and retrograde) motor-based intraflagellar transport (IFT) governs cargo transport and delivery processes that are essential for primary cilia growth and maintenance and for hedgehog signaling functions. The IFT dynein-2 motor complex that regulates ciliary retrograde protein transport contains a heavy chain dynein ATPase/motor subunit, DYNC2H1, along with other less well functionally defined subunits. Deficiency of IFT proteins, including DYNC2H1, underlies a spectrum of skeletal ciliopathies. Here, by using exome sequencing and a targeted next-generation sequencing panel, we identified a total of 11 mutations in WDR34 in 9 families with the clinical diagnosis of Jeune syndrome (asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy). WDR34 encodes a WD40 repeat-containing protein orthologous to Chlamydomonas FAP133, a dynein intermediate chain associated with the retrograde intraflagellar transport motor. Three-dimensional protein modeling suggests that the identified mutations all affect residues critical for WDR34 protein-protein interactions. We find that WDR34 concentrates around the centrioles and basal bodies in mammalian cells, also showing axonemal staining. WDR34 coimmunoprecipitates with the dynein-1 light chain DYNLL1 in vitro, and mining of proteomics data suggests that WDR34 could represent a previously unrecognized link between the cytoplasmic dynein-1 and IFT dynein-2 motors. Together, these data show that WDR34 is critical for ciliary functions essential to normal development and survival, most probably as a previously unrecognized component of the mammalian dynein-IFT machinery. PMID:24183451

  2. [CLINICAL ASPECTS OF SEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY].

    PubMed

    Fesenko, O V; Sinopal'nikov, A I; Filatov, V V; Danishevsky, S V; Styrt, E A

    2016-01-01

    Septic encephalopathy is a form of general cerebral dysfunction caused by a systemic inflammatory reaction. Its investigation encounters enormous difficulties for the lack of reliable biological markers of neuronal lesions and methods for the evaluation of consciousness in severely ill patients. Hence, the importance of correct clinical interpretation of the character and magnitude of CNS activity. Examples are presented demonstrating the difficulty of interpreting disorders in CNS activity associated with evere community-acquired pneumonia. PMID:27172727

  3. [Imaging in acute toxic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Dietemann, J-L; Botelho, C; Nogueira, T; Vargas, M I; Audibert, C; Abu Eid, M; Bogorin, A; Bernardo, R; Jacques, C; Kremer, S; Zöllner, G

    2004-09-01

    Neuroimaging, particularly MR imaging, plays a major role for the diagnosis of many acute toxic encephalopathies. Toxic disorders are related to drugs (immunosuppressive agents, chemotherapeutic agents, anti-epileptic drugs, heroin...), to metals (lead, manganese, mercury...), and to industrial and environmental chemicals (solvent, carbon monoxide...). MR imaging with diffusion and perfusion imaging provides information regarding brain lesions induced by the toxic agents (vasogenic edema, cytotoxic edema, infarction, hemorrhage, demyelination...). PMID:15545943

  4. Metabolic Causes of Epileptic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, Phillip L.

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy can be induced by inborn metabolic defects that may be rare individually but in aggregate represent a substantial clinical portion of child neurology. These may present with various epilepsy phenotypes including refractory neonatal seizures, early myoclonic encephalopathy, early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, infantile spasms, and generalized epilepsies which in particular include myoclonic seizures. There are varying degrees of treatability, but the outcome if untreated can often be catastrophic. The importance of early recognition cannot be overemphasized. This paper provides an overview of inborn metabolic errors associated with persistent brain disturbances due to highly active clinical or electrographic ictal activity. Selected diseases are organized by the defective molecule or mechanism and categorized as small molecule disorders (involving amino and organic acids, fatty acids, neurotransmitters, urea cycle, vitamers and cofactors, and mitochondria) and large molecule disorders (including lysosomal storage disorders, peroxisomal disorders, glycosylation disorders, and leukodystrophies). Details including key clinical features, salient electrophysiological and neuroradiological findings, biochemical findings, and treatment options are summarized for prominent disorders in each category. PMID:23762547

  5. Preclinical Models of Encephalopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Jantzie, Lauren L.; Robinson, Shenandoah

    2015-01-01

    Encephalopathy of prematurity (EoP) encompasses the central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities associated with injury from preterm birth. Although rapid progress is being made, limited understanding exists of how the cellular and molecular CNS injury from early birth manifests as the myriad of neurological deficits in children who are born preterm. More importantly, this lack of direct insight into the pathogenesis of these deficits hinders both our ability to diagnose those infants who are at risk in real-time and could potentially benefit from treatment, and our ability to develop more effective interventions. Current barriers to clarifying the pathophysiology, developmental trajectory, injury timing and evolution include preclinical animal models that only partially recapitulate the molecular, cellular, histological and functional abnormalities observed in the mature CNS following EoP. Inflammation from hypoxic-ischemic and/or infectious injury induced in utero in lower mammals, or actual prenatal delivery of more phylogenetically-advanced mammals, are likely to be the most clinically relevant EOP models, facilitating translation to benefit infants. Injury timing, type, severity and pathophysiology need to be optimized to address the specific hypothesis being tested. Functional assays of the mature animal following perinatal injury to mimic EoP should ideally test for the array of neurological deficits commonly observed in preterm infants including gait, seizure threshold, cognitive and behavioral abnormalities. Here, we review the merits of various preclinical models, identify gaps in knowledge that warrant further study and consider challenges that animal researchers may face in embarking on these studies. While no one model system is perfect, insights relevant to the clinical problem can be gained with interpretation of experimental results within the context of inherent limitations of the chosen model system. Collectively, optimal use of multiple models will

  6. Requesting perinatal autopsy: multicultural considerations.

    PubMed

    Chichester, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    The subject of perinatal autopsy is not frequently seen in the literature. Perinatal loss, particularly stillbirth, frequently remains unexplained, despite current technology and diagnostic procedures. Parents may automatically refuse an autopsy, despite the potentially valuable information it could provide about the current pregnancy and subsequent pregnancies and despite the possible comfort the results could provide for relatives. Other reasons for declining an autopsy could be cultural or religious prohibitions. In addition, healthcare providers sometimes lack the knowledge of circumstances under which a postmortem examination is permitted, and fail to use culturally sensitive and culturally competent discussions about the reasons a postmortem examination is important and permissible. This purpose of this article is to provide information on selected cultural and religious groups to assist the nurse who is seeking consent for a perinatal autopsy. PMID:17356412

  7. Evolution of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Fractional Anisotropy in the Cerebrum of Asphyxiated Newborns Treated with Hypothermia over the First Month of Life.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Saskia; Boudes, Elodie; Benseler, Anouk; Gilbert, Guillaume; Saint-Martin, Christine; Shevell, Michael; Wintermark, Pia

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the evolution of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) over the first month of life in asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia and to compare it with that of healthy newborns. Asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia were enrolled prospectively; and the presence and extent of brain injury were scored on each MRI. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values were measured in the basal ganglia, in the white matter and in the cortical grey matter. Sixty-one asphyxiated newborns treated with hypothermia had a total of 126 ADC and FA maps. Asphyxiated newborns developing brain injury eventually had significantly decreased ADC values on days 2-3 of life and decreased FA values around day 10 and 1 month of life compared with those not developing brain injury. Despite hypothermia treatment, asphyxiated newborns may develop brain injury that still can be detected with advanced neuroimaging techniques such as DWI and DTI as early as days 2-3 of life. A study of ADC and FA values over time may aid in the understanding of how brain injury develops in these newborns despite hypothermia treatment. PMID:26229690

  8. Rifaximin in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Iadevaia, Maddalena Diana; Prete, Anna Del; Cesaro, Claudia; Gaeta, Laura; Zulli, Claudio; Loguercio, Carmelina

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a challenging complication in patients with advanced liver disease. It can be defined as a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by portosystemic venous shunting, ranging from minimal to overt hepatic encephalopathy or coma. Its pathophysiology is still unclear, although increased levels of ammonia play a key role. Diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy is currently based on specific tests evaluating the neuropsychiatric state of patients and their quality of life; the severity of hepatic encephalopathy is measured by the West Haven criteria. Treatment of hepatic encephalopathy consists of pharmacological and corrective measures, as well as nutritional interventions. Rifaximin received approval for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in 2010 because of its few side effects and pharmacological benefits. The aim of this work is to review the use and efficacy of rifaximin both in acute and long-term management of hepatic encephalopathy. Treatment of overt hepatic encephalopathy involves management of the acute episode as well as maintenance of remission in those patients who have previously experienced an episode, in order to improve their quality of life. The positive effect of rifaximin in reducing health care costs is also discussed. PMID:24367227

  9. Rifaximin in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Iadevaia, Maddalena Diana; Prete, Anna Del; Cesaro, Claudia; Gaeta, Laura; Zulli, Claudio; Loguercio, Carmelina

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a challenging complication in patients with advanced liver disease. It can be defined as a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by portosystemic venous shunting, ranging from minimal to overt hepatic encephalopathy or coma. Its pathophysiology is still unclear, although increased levels of ammonia play a key role. Diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy is currently based on specific tests evaluating the neuropsychiatric state of patients and their quality of life; the severity of hepatic encephalopathy is measured by the West Haven criteria. Treatment of hepatic encephalopathy consists of pharmacological and corrective measures, as well as nutritional interventions. Rifaximin received approval for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in 2010 because of its few side effects and pharmacological benefits. The aim of this work is to review the use and efficacy of rifaximin both in acute and long-term management of hepatic encephalopathy. Treatment of overt hepatic encephalopathy involves management of the acute episode as well as maintenance of remission in those patients who have previously experienced an episode, in order to improve their quality of life. The positive effect of rifaximin in reducing health care costs is also discussed. PMID:24367227

  10. Brainstem tegmental lesions in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: Magnetic resonance diagnosis and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Fariello, Giuseppe; Longo, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Lesions of the brainstem have been reported in the clinical scenarios of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), although the prevalence of these lesions is probably underestimated. Neuropathologic studies have demonstrated brainstem involvement in severely asphyxiated infants as an indicator of poor outcome. Among survivors to HIE, the most frequent clinical complaints that may be predicted by brainstem lesions include feeding problems, speech, language and communication problems and visual impairments. Clinical series, including vascular and metabolic etiologies, have found selective involvement of the brainstem with the demonstration of symmetric bilateral columnar lesions of the tegmentum. The role of brainstem lesions in HIE is currently a matter of debate, especially when tegmental lesions are present in the absence of supra-tentorial lesions. Differential diagnosis of tegmental lesions in neonates and infants include congenital metabolic syndromes and drug-related processes. Brainstem injury with the presence of supratentorial lesions is a predictor of poor outcome and high rates of mortality and morbidity. Further investigation will be conducted to identify specific sites of the brainstem that are vulnerable to hypoxic-ischemic and toxic-metabolic insults. PMID:26981220

  11. Flaxseed mitigates brain mass loss, improving motor hyperactivity and spatial memory, in a rodent model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Mucci, Daniela de Barros; Fernandes, Flávia Spreafico; Souza, Amanda Dos Santos; Sardinha, Fátima Lúcia de Carvalho; Soares-Mota, Márcia; Tavares do Carmo, Maria das Graças

    2015-06-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) encephalopathy is a major cause of perinatal morbimortality. There is growing evidence that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), attenuate brain injury. This study aimed to investigate the possible neuroprotective effect of maternal intake of flaxseed, rich in DHA׳s precursor α-linolenic acid, in the young male offspring subjected to perinatal HI. Wistar rats were divided in six groups, according to maternal diet and offspring treatment at day 7: Control HI (CHI) and Flaxseed HI (FHI); Control Sham and Flaxseed Sham; Control Control and Flaxseed Control. Flaxseed diet increased offspring׳s hippocampal DHA content and lowered depressive behavior. CHI pups presented brain mass loss, motor hyperactivity and poor spatial memory, which were improved in FHI rats. Maternal flaxseed intake may prevent depressive symptoms in the offspring and promote neuroprotective effects, in the context of perinatal HI, improving brain injury and its cognitive and behavioral impairments. PMID:25865679

  12. PeriStats: Perinatal Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... is developed by the March of Dimes Perinatal Data Center and provides access to maternal and infant health ... on PeriStats sometimes different from my health department's data? What should I do if pop-up blocker ... We acknowledge the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for its support ...

  13. Current understanding and neurobiology of epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Auvin, Stéphane; Cilio, Maria Roberta; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2016-08-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a group of diseases in which epileptic activity itself contributes to severe cognitive and behavioral impairments above and beyond what might be expected from the underlying pathology alone. These impairments can worsen over time. This concept has been continually redefined since its introduction. A few syndromes are considered epileptic encephalopathies: early myoclonic encephalopathy and Ohtahara syndrome in the neonatal period, epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures, West syndrome or infantile spasms, Dravet syndrome during infancy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes-and-waves during sleep, and Landau-Kleffner syndrome during childhood. The inappropriate use of this term to refer to all severe epilepsy syndromes with intractable seizures and severe cognitive dysfunction has led to confusion regarding the concept of epileptic encephalopathy. Here, we review our current understanding of those epilepsy syndromes considered to be epileptic encephalopathies. Genetic studies have provided a better knowledge of neonatal and infantile epilepsy syndromes, while neuroimaging studies have shed light on the underlying causes of childhood-onset epileptic encephalopathies such as Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Apart from infantile spasm models, we lack animal models to explain the neurobiological mechanisms at work in these conditions. Experimental studies suggest that neuroinflammation may be a common neurobiological pathway that contributes to seizure refractoriness and cognitive involvement in the developing brain. PMID:26992889

  14. Paroxysmal Amnesia Attacks due to Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nar Senol, Pelin; Bican Demir, Aylin; Bora, Ibrahim; Bakar, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a rare disease which is thought to be autoimmune and steroid responsive. The syndrome is characterized by cognitive impairment, encephalopathy, psychiatric symptoms, and seizures associated with increased level of anti-thyroid antibodies. The exact pathophysiology underlying cerebral involvement is still lesser known. Although symptoms suggest a nonlesional encephalopathy in most of the cases, sometimes the clinical appearance can be subtle and may not respond to immunosuppressants or immunomodulatory agents. Here we report a case who presented with drowsiness and amnestic complaints associated with paroxysmal electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities which could be treated only with an antiepileptic drug. PMID:27034679

  15. Encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure in the skull, prolonged exposure to toxic elements (including solvents, drugs, radiation, paints, industrial chemicals, and certain metals), chronic progressive trauma, poor nutrition, ...

  16. Treatment of Overt Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Norman L

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is defined by an altered mental status in the setting of portosystemic shunting, with or without cirrhosis. The basis of HE is probably multi-factorial, but increased ammonia delivery to the brain is thought to play a pivotal role. Medical therapies have typically focused on reducing blood ammonia concentrations. These measures are moderately effective, but further improvements will require identification of new therapeutic targets. Two medications, lactulose and rifaximin, are currently approved for the treatment of HE in the USA - new compounds are available off-label, and are in clinical trials. The presence of HE is associated with a higher risk of death in cirrhotic patients. Liver transplantation typically cures HE, but HE does not increase the MELD score, and therefore does not contribute to the likelihood of liver transplantation. PMID:26195208

  17. Suicide and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Grant L

    2016-01-01

    For nearly 80 years, suicidality was not considered to be a core clinical feature of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In recent years, suicide has been widely cited as being associated with CTE, and now depression has been proposed to be one of three core diagnostic features alongside cognitive impairment and anger control problems. This evolution of the clinical features has been reinforced by thousands of media stories reporting a connection between mental health problems in former athletes and military veterans, repetitive neurotrauma, and CTE. At present, the science underlying the causal assumption between repetitive neurotrauma, depression, suicide, and the neuropathology believed to be unique to CTE is inconclusive. Epidemiological evidence indicates that former National Football League players, for example, are at lower, not greater, risk for suicide than men in the general population. This article aims to discuss the critical issues and literature relating to these possible relationships. PMID:26449269

  18. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in ALL.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J Gordon

    2015-07-01

    Investigators from Soochow University, Suzhou, China, studied the possible pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) observed in 11 cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) after induction chemotherapy. PMID:26933594

  19. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy: Atypical Pros and Cons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal neurologic diseases that affect several mammalian species including human beings. Four animal TSE agents have been reported: scrapie of sheep and goats; chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk, and moose; transmissible mink encephalopath...

  20. Neuroimaging in Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Pradeep; Shroff, Manohar

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is emerging as one of the most important tools in identifying the etiology of neonatal encephalopathy as well as in predicting long-term outcomes. This makes it imperative to have a broader understanding of normal myelination of the neonatal brain on MR imaging and to be familiar with the spectrum of imaging features in ischemic and non-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy. Hypoxic ischemic injury (HIE) is one of the most common causes of neonatal encephalopathy and imaging appearances are influenced by factors such as the stage of maturation of the neonatal brain and severity as well as duration of ischemic insult. Other common causes of neonatal encephalopathy include infectious diseases, congenital disorders and inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:26909496

  1. Adverse Perinatal Outcome in Subsequent Pregnancy after Stillbirth by Placental Vascular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Monari, Francesca; Pedrielli, Giulia; Vergani, Patrizia; Pozzi, Elisa; Mecacci, Federico; Serena, Caterina; Neri, Isabella; Facchinetti, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate outcome in the pregnancy following a stillbirth (SB) by a placental vascular disorders. Study Design A prospective, observational, multicenter study was conducted in woman with a history of stillbirth (> 22 weeks) between 2005 and June 2013, in 3 Italian University Hospitals. Causes of SB were previously identified after extensive investigations. Pregnant women were enrolled within the first trimester. The main outcome was “adverse neonatal outcome”, including perinatal death, fetal growth restriction, early preterm birth <33+6 weeks, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, intracranial hemorrhage or respiratory distress. Results Out of 364 index pregnancies, 320 women (87.9%) had a subsequent pregnancy during the study period. Forty-seven had an early pregnancy loss. Out of 273 babies, 67 (24.5%) had an adverse perinatal outcome, including 1 SB and 1 early neonatal death (3.7/1000). Women who had a SB related to placental vascular disorders (39.6%), were at higher risk of an adverse neonatal outcome compared with women whose SB was unexplained or resulted from other causes (Adj. OR = 2.1, 95%CI: 1.2–3.8). Moreover, also obesity independently predicts an adverse perinatal outcome (Adj OR = 2.1, 95%CI: 1.1–4.3). Conclusion When previous SB is related to placental vascular disorders there is a high risk for adverse neonatal outcomes in the subsequent pregnancy. Maternal obesity is an additional risk factor. PMID:27228078

  2. Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage: evolution of an animal model.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, Robert C; Vannucci, Susan J

    2005-01-01

    Early research in the Vannucci laboratory prior to 1981 focused largely on brain energy metabolism in the developing rat. At that time, there was no experimental model to study the effects of perinatal hypoxia-ischemia in the rodent, despite the tremendous need to investigate the pathophysiology of perinatal asphyxial brain damage in infants. Accordingly, we developed such a model in the postnatal day 7 rat, using a modification of the Levine preparation in the adult rat. Rat pups underwent unilateral common carotid artery ligation followed by exposure to systemic hypoxia (8% oxygen) at a constant temperature of 37 degrees C. Brain damage, seen histologically, was generally confined to the cerebral hemisphere ipsilateral to the arterial occlusion, and consisted of selective neuronal death or infarction, depending on the duration of the systemic hypoxia. Tissue injury was observed in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and thalamus. Subcortical and periventricular white matter injury was also observed. This model was originally described in the Annals of Neurology in 1981, and during the more than 20 years since that publication numerous investigations utilizing the model have been conducted in our laboratories as well as laboratories around the world. Cerebral blood flow and metabolic correlates have been fully characterized. Physiologic and pharmacologic manipulations have been applied to the model in search of neuroprotective strategies. More recently, molecular biologic alterations during and following the hypoxic-ischemic stress have been ascertained and the model has been adapted to the immature mouse for specific use in genetically altered animals. As predicted in the original article, the model has proven useful for the study of the short- and long-term effects of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage on motor activity, behavior, seizure incidence, and the process of maturation in the brain and other organ systems. PMID:16046840

  3. Risk of Suicidal Ideation in Adolescents with Both Self-Asphyxial Risk-Taking Behavior and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brausch, Amy M.; Decker, Kristina M.; Hadley, Andrea G.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined adolescent participation in self-asphyxial risk-taking behaviors (SAB), sometimes known as the "choking game," and its relationship with other adolescent risk behaviors, including non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Researchers proposed that participation in SAB and NSSI would be associated with suicidal behavior, disordered…

  4. Ischemic perinatal stroke: challenge and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Raju, Tonse N K

    2008-08-01

    The second highest risk group for developing a cerebral stroke is the perinatal period, generally defined as 20 weeks of gestation through 28th postnatal day of age. In this commentary, a brief overview of ischemic perinatal strokes is presented. Ischemic perinatal stroke (IPS) occurs at a rate of 1 : 2300 to 1 : 5000 births, accounting for 30% of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Thus, IPS is the most common known cause for CP [1-3]. Although they occur frequently, much remains to be studied about perinatal strokes in general and the ischemic variety in particular. PMID:18705894

  5. Therapeutic hypothermia following perinatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A D; Azzopardi, D V

    2006-01-01

    Well constructed and carefully analysed trials of hypothermic neural rescue therapy for infants with neonatal encephalopathy have recently been reported. The data suggest that either selective head cooling or total body cooling reduces the combined chance of death or disability after birth asphyxia. However, as there are still unanswered questions about these treatments, many may still feel that further data are needed before health care policy can be changed to make cooling the standard of care for all babies with suspected birth asphyxia. PMID:16492950

  6. [The first application of therapeutic hypothermia in Poland--selective head cooling (Cool-Cap) with whole-body moderate hypothermia in a newborn with features of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Gulczyńska, Ewa; Kesiak, Marcin; Kryszczyńska, Joanna; Gadzinowski, Janusz; Oszukowski, Przemysław

    2012-05-01

    The authors present the first application of therapeutic hypothermia in a newborn in Poland. The female newborn, born with severe asphyxia, was transported to a referral perinatal center where the method of brain cooling was possible. Severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy was confirmed by an integrated EEG. During the cooling procedure (which lasted 72 hours), no important side effects were noticed. The neurodevelopmental outcome of the baby assessed during the first 2 years of her life is normal. PMID:22708339

  7. The physical and psychological effects of HIV infection and its treatment on perinatally HIV-infected children

    PubMed Central

    Vreeman, Rachel C; Scanlon, Michael L; McHenry, Megan S; Nyandiko, Winstone M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) transforms human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) into a manageable chronic disease, new challenges are emerging in treating children born with HIV, including a number of risks to their physical and psychological health due to HIV infection and its lifelong treatment. Methods We conducted a literature review to evaluate the evidence on the physical and psychological effects of perinatal HIV (PHIV+) infection and its treatment in the era of HAART, including major chronic comorbidities. Results and discussion Perinatally infected children face concerning levels of treatment failure and drug resistance, which may hamper their long-term treatment and result in more significant comorbidities. Physical complications from PHIV+ infection and treatment potentially affect all major organ systems. Although treatment with antiretroviral (ARV) therapy has reduced incidence of severe neurocognitive diseases like HIV encephalopathy, perinatally infected children may experience less severe neurocognitive complications related to HIV disease and ARV neurotoxicity. Major metabolic complications include dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, complications that are associated with both HIV infection and several ARV agents and may significantly affect cardiovascular disease risk with age. Bone abnormalities, particularly amongst children treated with tenofovir, are a concern for perinatally infected children who may be at higher risk for bone fractures and osteoporosis. In many studies, rates of anaemia are significantly higher for HIV-infected children. Renal failure is a significant complication and cause of death amongst perinatally infected children, while new data on sexual and reproductive health suggest that sexually transmitted infections and birth complications may be additional concerns for perinatally infected children in adolescence. Finally, perinatally infected children may face psychological challenges, including

  8. Guidelines for Perinatal Care. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Coll. of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC.

    The basic concept emphasized in this book is that a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach within a regionalized system of perinatal care is a constant factor improving the quality of pregancy outcomes. This coordinated multidisciplinary approach has had an impact on perinatal care in three important areas: (1) improved and expanded understanding…

  9. Maternal nutrition and perinatal survival.

    PubMed

    Rush, D

    2001-09-01

    This review addresses the relationship between maternal nutrition and the survival of the foetus and infant. This survey was undertaken because wide-scale programmes on maternal feeding are in process, based, not on a critical synthesis of currently-available empirical research, but on a series of nested and, at times, weakly supported, assumptions. It is concluded that: (i) maternal weight and weight gain are remarkably resistant to either dietary advice or supplementation; (ii) nutritionally-induced increased birth-weight does not universally increase the chance of survival of the offspring, since pre-pregnancy weight, at least in affluent, industrialized societies-while associated with increased birth-weight-is also associated with higher perinatal mortality; (iii) while dietary supplements during pregnancy do have a modest effect on birth-weight, in contrast to a large effect in famine or near-famine conditions, this is not mediated by maternal energy deposition; and (iv) declining peripheral fat stores in late pregnancy are associated with accelerated foetal growth, and improved nutrition can lead to lower fat stores. Rather, the component of maternal weight gain associated with accelerated foetal growth is water, and, presumably, plasma volume. In the few studies, large and thorough enough to adequately address the issues, maternal feeding--both in famine and non-famine conditions--has led to lower perinatal, primarily foetal, mortality; the mechanisms are not likely to have been due only to the acceleration of foetal growth. It is concluded that there is currently an inadequate base of secure knowledge to foster improvement in the health and nutrition of poor mothers and children. The public and policy-makers alike must be informed that greater knowledge relating maternal nutrition to perinatal outcome is urgently needed to create sound health advice and to mount effective programmes. PMID:11761778

  10. Perinatal Safety: From Concept to Nursing Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Holly Powell

    2010-01-01

    Communication and teamwork problems are leading causes of documented preventable adverse outcomes in perinatal care. An essential component of perinatal safety is the organizational culture in which clinicians work. Clinicians’ individual and collective authority to question the plan of care and take action to change the direction of a clinical situation in the patient’s best interest can be viewed as their “agency for safety.” However, collective agency for safety and commitment to support nurses in their advocacy role is missing in many perinatal care settings. This paper draws from Organizational Accident Theory, High Reliability Theory, and Symbolic Interactionism to describe the nurse’s role in maintaining safety during labor and birth in acute care settings, and suggests actions for supporting the perinatal nurse at individual, group, and systems levels to achieve maximum safety in perinatal care. PMID:20147827

  11. Perinatal Depression: An Update and Overview

    PubMed Central

    Stuart-Parrigon, Kaela

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 3 years there have been notable developments in screening and treatment of perinatal depression. Most importantly, the DSM-V has made only minor changes in the diagnostic criteria for perinatal depression as compared to the DSM-IV; “perinatal”, as opposed to “postpartum”, is a specifier for depression with a requirement that the depression onset occurs during pregnancy or the first 4 weeks postpartum. Advances in the treatment of perinatal depression have been made over the last 3 years, including both prevention and acute interventions. Additional support has emerged confirming the primary risk factors for perinatal depression: a personal or family history, low SES, and poor interpersonal support. There is general agreement that universal screening be conducted for all perinatal women, both by the woman’s obstetrician and the baby’s pediatrician. PMID:25034859

  12. Gut microbiota and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Radha K

    2013-06-01

    There is a strong relationship between liver and gut; while the portal venous system receives blood from the gut, and its contents may affect liver functions, liver in turn, affects intestinal functions through bile secretion. There is robust evidence that the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is linked to alterations in gut microbiota and their by-products such as ammonia, indoles, oxindoles, endotoxins, etc. In the setting of intestinal barrier and immune dysfunction, these by-products are involved in the pathogenesis of complications of liver cirrhosis including HE and systemic inflammation plays an important role. Prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics may exhibit efficacy in the treatment of HE by modulating the gut flora. They improve derangement in flora by decreasing the counts of pathogenic bacteria and thus improving the endotoxemia, HE and the liver disease. Current evidence suggest that the trials evaluating the role of probiotics in the treatment of HE are of not high quality and all trials had high risk of bias and high risk of random errors. Therefore, the use of probiotics for patients with HE cannot be currently recommended. Further RCTs are required. This review summarizes the main literature findings about the relationships between gut flora and HE, both in terms of the pathogenesis and the treatment of HE. PMID:23463489

  13. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saulle, Michael; Greenwald, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE. PMID:22567320

  14. Clinical Neurophysiology of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Amodio, Piero; Montagnese, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) has relevant impact on the quality of life of patients and their caregivers and causes relevant costs because of hospitalizations and work days lost. Its quantification is important to perform adequate clinical trials on this relevant complication of cirrhosis and portal-systemic shunting. Clinical neurophysiology, which detects functional alterations of the nervous system, has been applied to the study of HE for over 60 years. This review aims at summarizing and clarifying the role of neurophysiologic techniques in the study of HE. Methods A narrative review was performed aiming at interpreting the cited papers and the techniques on the basis of their physiological and pathophysiological meaning. Results The potential role of EEG, quantified EEG, evoked potentials—both exogenous, endogenous and motor—have been clarified to the reader that may be unfamiliar with neurophysiology. Conclusions The EEG, reflecting the oscillatory changes of neural network is the preferable tool to detect and monitor HE, with the exception of its most severe stage, when EEG flattens. SSEP and MEP have indication to detect and monitor transmission alterations that are likely related to myelin changes and microedema. PMID:26041960

  15. Maternal diabetes and perinatal programming.

    PubMed

    Plagemann, A

    2011-11-01

    Alterations of the intrauterine and neonatal environment may predispose for disorders and diseases throughout later life (perinatal programming). Especially, hormones and nutrients are dose-dependent organizers of the developing organism. Studies in offspring of diabetic mothers (ODM) have paradigmatically contributed to the perception of this developmental principle and our understanding of causal mechanisms. Fetal and neonatal hyperinsulinism in consequence of materno-fetal hyperglycaemia is the pathognomic feature in ODM. Epidemiological, clinical, as well as experimental data indicate that both insulin and glucose, when occurring in elevated concentrations during perinatal life, may epigenetically program a predisposition for obesity and diabetes later on. Similar may occur due to pre- and neonatal overfeeding. From a clinical point of view, avoidance of materno-fetal overnutrition, universal diabetes screening in all pregnant women and adequate therapy of all forms of diabetes during pregnancy, as well as avoidance of neonatal overfeeding are therefore recommended. These measures might serve as causal approaches of a genuine prevention to the benefit of long-term offspring health. PMID:21945359

  16. Perinatal Mortality in the United States, 1950-81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell-Griner, Eve

    1986-01-01

    This report describes long-term trends in perinatal mortality in the United States in three basic parts: development of perinatal mortality measures, components of fetal and infant mortality, and trends and differentials in perinatal mortality. Perinatal deaths refer to the sum of spontaneous fetal deaths occurring after 20 weeks gestation plus…

  17. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Complicating Hyperemesis during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Berdai, Mohamed Adnane; Labib, Smael; Harandou, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is caused by severe thiamine deficiency; it is mostly observed in alcoholic patients. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman, at 17 weeks of gestational age, with severe hyperemesis gravidarum. She presented with disturbance of consciousness, nystagmus, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. The resonance magnetic imagery showed bilaterally symmetrical hyperintensities of thalamus and periaqueductal area. The case was managed with very large doses of thiamine. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was confirmed later by a low thiamine serum level. The patient was discharged home on day 46 with mild ataxia and persistent nystagmus. Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum. It should be diagnosed as early as possible to prevent long-term neurological sequela or death. Thiamine supplementation in pregnant women with prolonged vomiting should be initiated, especially before parenteral dextrose infusion. Early thiamine replacement will reduce maternal morbidity and fetal loss rate. PMID:26989522

  18. Pediatric Epileptic Encephalopathies: Pathophysiology and Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Shao, Li-Rong; Stafstrom, Carl E

    2016-05-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are syndromes in which seizures or interictal epileptiform activity contribute to or exacerbate brain function, beyond that caused by the underlying pathology. These severe epilepsies begin early in life, are associated with poor lifelong outcome, and are resistant to most treatments. Therefore, they represent an immense challenge for families and the medical care system. Furthermore, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the epileptic encephalopathies are poorly understood, hampering attempts to devise novel treatments. This article reviews animal models of the three classic epileptic encephalopathies-West syndrome (infantile spasms), Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and continuous spike waves during sleep or Landau-Kleffner syndrome-with discussion of how animal models are revealing underlying pathophysiological mechanisms that might be amenable to targeted therapy. PMID:27544466

  19. Why the confusion in Hashimoto's encephalopathy?

    PubMed

    Jayasekera, Bodiabaduge A P; McShane, Michael Anthony; Roy, Prem; Anand, Geetha

    2011-01-01

    A 13-year-old girl presented with an afebrile seizure followed by prolonged confusion and visual hallucinations. Initial investigations in the form of blood tests, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and head imaging by CT, were normal. She represented with two further episodes within a period of 3 weeks. Further investigations considering infective, metabolic and some autoimmune causes of encephalopathy were negative. An MRI head scan was normal. Thyroid function testing disclosed primary hypothyroidism and elevated antithyroid antibodies. She responded well to glucocorticoid therapy for presumed Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE). HE describes patients with various neurological manifestations with elevated titres of antithyroid antibodies. There are no clear criteria for diagnosis, with many cases labelled as HE. Responses to corticosteroid therapy are favourable. In patients with unexplained encephalopathy, HE should be considered given the favourable response to glucocorticoid therapy. PMID:22691944

  20. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Complicating Hyperemesis during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Berdai, Mohamed Adnane; Labib, Smael; Harandou, Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is caused by severe thiamine deficiency; it is mostly observed in alcoholic patients. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman, at 17 weeks of gestational age, with severe hyperemesis gravidarum. She presented with disturbance of consciousness, nystagmus, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. The resonance magnetic imagery showed bilaterally symmetrical hyperintensities of thalamus and periaqueductal area. The case was managed with very large doses of thiamine. The diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy was confirmed later by a low thiamine serum level. The patient was discharged home on day 46 with mild ataxia and persistent nystagmus. Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum. It should be diagnosed as early as possible to prevent long-term neurological sequela or death. Thiamine supplementation in pregnant women with prolonged vomiting should be initiated, especially before parenteral dextrose infusion. Early thiamine replacement will reduce maternal morbidity and fetal loss rate. PMID:26989522

  1. Clinical review of genetic epileptic encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Grace J.; Asher, Y. Jane Tavyev; Graham, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Seizures are a frequently encountered finding in patients seen for clinical genetics evaluations. The differential diagnosis for the cause of seizures is quite diverse and complex, and more than half of all epilepsies have been attributed to a genetic cause. Given the complexity of such evaluations, we highlight the more common causes of genetic epileptic encephalopathies and emphasize the usefulness of recent technological advances. The purpose of this review is to serve as a practical guide for clinical geneticists in the evaluation and counseling of patients with genetic epileptic encephalopathies. Common syndromes will be discussed, in addition to specific seizure phenotypes, many of which are refractory to anti-epileptic agents. Divided by etiology, we overview the more common causes of infantile epileptic encephalopathies, channelopathies, syndromic, metabolic, and chromosomal entities. For each condition, we will outline the diagnostic evaluation and discuss effective treatment strategies that should be considered. PMID:22342633

  2. Hashimoto Encephalopathy or Neurosarcoidosis? A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Biggya L.; Pitiyanuvath, Nataria

    2015-01-01

    Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE) is a rare autoimmune disease characterized by symptoms of acute or subacute encephalopathy associated with increased antithyroid antibody levels. Neurosarcoidosis is also a rare entity that occurs in less than 5% of patients with systemic sarcoidosis. Neurosarcoidosis usually presents with cranial neuropathies, myelopathy, or new-onset seizure. We report a case of a 49-year-old caucasian woman, previously healthy, who initially presented for a workup of a new-onset seizure. She had a gradually progressive course with neurocognitive decline and recurrent partial seizures refractory to conventional antiepileptic drugs. Her seizures responded well to a course of intravenous immunoglobulin. She was subsequently diagnosed with HE and pulmonary sarcoidosis based on serological and pathological studies. She improved neurologically once the seizures were controlled. Hashimoto encephalopathy is a rare condition that is potentially treatable and presents with various neuropsychiatric manifestations. It is a diagnosis of exclusion that requires a strong clinical suspicion and is often underrecognized. PMID:25829987

  3. Serial plasma metabolites following hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in a nonhuman primate model

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Pattaraporn T.; McPherson, Ronald J.; Marney, Luke C.; Zangeneh, Sahar Z.; Parsons, Brendon A.; Shojaie, Ali; Synovec, Robert E.; Juul, Sandra E.

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers that indicate the severity of hypoxic ischemic brain injury, response to treatment, and predict neurodevelopmental outcomes are urgently needed to improve the care of affected neonates. We hypothesize that sequentially obtained plasma metabolomes will provide indicators of brain injury and repair, allowing for prediction of neurodevelopmental outcomes. 33 Macaca Nemestrina underwent 0, 15, or 18 minutes of in utero umbilical cord occlusion (UCO) to induce hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), then were delivered by hysterotomy, resuscitated and stabilized. Serial blood samples were obtained at baseline (cord blood), 0.1, 24, 48 and 72 hours of age. Treatment groups included non-asphyxiated controls (N=7), untreated UCO (N=11), UCO + Hypothermia (HT) (N=6), and UCO + HT + erythropoietin (Epo) (n=9). Metabolites were extracted and analyzed using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC x GC-TOFMS) and quantified by parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Using non-targeted discovery-based methods, we identified 63 metabolites as potential biomarkers. The changes in metabolite concentrations were characterized and compared between treatment groups. Further comparison determined that 8 metabolites (arachidonic acid, butanoic acid, citric acid, fumaric acid, lactate, malate, propanoic acid, and succinic acid) correlated with early and/or long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes. The combined outcomes of death or cerebral palsy correlated with citric acid, fumaric acid, lactate, and propanoic acid. This change in circulating metabolome after UCO may reflect cellular metabolism and biochemical changes in response to severity of brain injury and have potential to predict neurodevelopmental outcomes. PMID:25765047

  4. Experimental Interspecies Transmission Studies of the Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies to Cattle: Comparison to Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy in Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of animals include scrapie of sheep and goats; transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME); chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk and moose; and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) of cattle. Since the emergence of BSE and its pr...

  5. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Stein, Thor D; Alvarez, Victor E; McKee, Ann C

    2015-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE. PMID:26260277

  6. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Thor D.; Alvarez, Victor E.; McKee, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE. PMID:26260277

  7. Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy Impairs Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Swastik; Umapathy, Sridharan; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2015-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the mildest form of the spectrum of neurocognitive impairment in cirrhosis. It is a frequent occurrence in patients of cirrhosis and is detectable only by specialized neurocognitive testing. MHE is a clinically significant disorder which impairs daily functioning, driving performance, work capability and learning ability. It also predisposes to the development of overt hepatic encephalopathy, increased falls and increased mortality. This results in impaired quality of life for the patient as well as significant social and economic burden for health providers and care givers. Early detection and treatment of MHE with ammonia lowering therapy can reverse MHE and improve quality of life. PMID:26041957

  8. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy impairs quality of life.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Swastik; Umapathy, Sridharan; Dhiman, Radha K

    2015-03-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the mildest form of the spectrum of neurocognitive impairment in cirrhosis. It is a frequent occurrence in patients of cirrhosis and is detectable only by specialized neurocognitive testing. MHE is a clinically significant disorder which impairs daily functioning, driving performance, work capability and learning ability. It also predisposes to the development of overt hepatic encephalopathy, increased falls and increased mortality. This results in impaired quality of life for the patient as well as significant social and economic burden for health providers and care givers. Early detection and treatment of MHE with ammonia lowering therapy can reverse MHE and improve quality of life. PMID:26041957

  9. Perinatal Complications and Aging Indicators by Midlife

    PubMed Central

    Caspi, Avshalom; Ambler, Antony; Belsky, Daniel W.; Chapple, Simon; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Israel, Salomon; Poulton, Richie; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Rivera, Christine D.; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Benjamin; Wolke, Dieter; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Perinatal complications predict increased risk for morbidity and early mortality. Evidence of perinatal programming of adult mortality raises the question of what mechanisms embed this long-term effect. We tested a hypothesis related to the theory of developmental origins of health and disease: that perinatal complications assessed at birth predict indicators of accelerated aging by midlife. METHODS: Perinatal complications, including both maternal and neonatal complications, were assessed in the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study cohort (N = 1037), a 38-year, prospective longitudinal study of a representative birth cohort. Two aging indicators were assessed at age 38 years, objectively by leukocyte telomere length (TL) and subjectively by perceived facial age. RESULTS: Perinatal complications predicted both leukocyte TL (β = −0.101; 95% confidence interval, −0.169 to −0.033; P = .004) and perceived age (β = 0.097; 95% confidence interval, 0.029 to 0.165; P = .005) by midlife. We repeated analyses with controls for measures of family history and social risk that could predispose to perinatal complications and accelerated aging, and for measures of poor health taken in between birth and the age-38 follow-up. These covariates attenuated, but did not fully explain the associations observed between perinatal complications and aging indicators. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide support for early-life developmental programming by linking newborns’ perinatal complications to accelerated aging at midlife. We observed indications of accelerated aging “inside,” as measured by leukocyte TL, an indicator of cellular aging, and “outside,” as measured by perceived age, an indicator of declining tissue integrity. A better understanding of mechanisms underlying perinatal programming of adult aging is needed. PMID:25349321

  10. Parasagittal lesions and ulegyria in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: neuroimaging findings and review of the pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nikas, Ioannis; Dermentzoglou, Vasiliki; Theofanopoulou, Maria; Theodoropoulos, Vasilios

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury is a very important neurological problem of the perinatal period and a major cause of chronic disability later in childhood. The subsequent neurological deficits are a variety of motor defects-especially spasticity but also choreoathetosis, dystonia and ataxia, often grouped together as "cerebral palsy," mental retardation, and seizures. The gestational age determines the neuropathology of the brain injury. One of the patterns of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, typically affecting full-term infants, consists of parasagittal lesions and ulegyria. The aim of this study is to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and discuss the "suggested" pathogenetic mechanisms of this pattern, which affects the cortex and the white matter in a mainly parasagittal distribution; in this type of brain injury, the damage usually involves the deeper sulcal portion while sparing the apex, thus resulting in the so-called mushroom gyri characteristic ulegyric pattern. We discuss the MRI findings of parasagittal lesions and ulegyria in the brain examinations of 14 patients with a clinical history of perinatal hypoxia/anoxia presenting with mental retardation, seizures, and cerebral palsy. Differential diagnosis from polymicrogyria is discussed. PMID:18160553

  11. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy versus Magnetic Resonance Imaging To Study Brain Perfusion in Newborns with Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy Treated with Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Wintermark, P.; Hansen, A.; Warfield, SK.; Dukhovny, D.; Soul, JS.

    2014-01-01

    Background The measurement of brain perfusion may provide valuable information for assessment and treatment of newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). While arterial spin labeled perfusion (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides noninvasive and direct measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) values, it is logistically challenging to obtain. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) might be an alternative, as it permits noninvasive and continuous monitoring of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygenation at the bedside. Objective The purpose of this study is to determine the correlation between measurements of brain perfusion by NIRS and by MRI in term newborns with HIE treated with hypothermia. Design/Methods In this prospective cohort study, ASL-MRI and NIRS performed during hypothermia were used to assess brain perfusion in these newborns. Regional cerebral blood flow values (CBF), measured from 1–2 MRI scans for each patient, were compared to mixed venous saturation values (SctO2) recorded by NIRS just before and after each MRI. Analysis included groupings into moderate versus severe HIE based on their initial background pattern of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram. Results Twelve concomitant recordings were obtained of seven neonates. Strong correlation was found between SctO2 and CBF in asphyxiated newborns with severe HIE (r = 0.88; p value = 0.0085). Moreover, newborns with severe HIE had lower CBF (likely lower oxygen supply) and extracted less oxygen (likely lower oxygen demand or utilization) when comparing SctO2 and CBF to those with moderate HIE. Conclusions NIRS is an effective bedside tool to monitor and understand brain perfusion changes in term asphyxiated newborns, which in conjunction with precise measurements of CBF obtained by MRI at particular times, may help tailor neuroprotective strategies in term newborns with HIE. PMID:23631990

  12. [Community education in perinatal health].

    PubMed

    Ortigosa-corona, E; Martinez-sanchez, C

    1990-01-01

    The National Institute of Perinatology develops educational programs for the population using its services in order to promote positive behavior related to reproduction. One of the most frequently observed problems during prenatal control is patient abandonment of the services offered by health institutions. We present an investigation of the relationship between the educational program for pregnant women offered by the Institute and compliance with prenatal care. A group of 215 patients elected to participate in the educational program. The program consisted of themes on the evolution and culmination of the pregnancy, preparation for nursing, nutrition, developmental milestones, and dental health. Another group was selected at the same time, equal in size to the first but without participation in the course, as a control group. Both groups contained patients categorized in the 3 perinatal risk groups accepted by the Institute. PMID:12283076

  13. Neuropsychological functioning in Wernicke's encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Behura, Sushree Sangita; Swain, Sarada Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    Context: Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is caused by thiamine (Vitamin B1) deficiency and most commonly found in chronic alcoholism and malnutrition. Clinically, the key features are mental status disturbances (global confusion), oculomotor abnormalities, and gait disturbances (ataxia). Apart from these clinical features, we can find deficits in neuropsychological functioning in patients with WE, which is more prominent after the improvement in the physical conditions. Neuropsychological functioning includes both basic cognitive processes (i.e., attention-concentration) as well as higher order cognitive processes (i.e., memory, executive functioning, reasoning), which is much vital for the maintenance of quality of life of an individual. However, unfortunately, in most of the cases, neuropsychological functioning is ignored by the clinicians. Materials and Methods: In this study four case reports of WE have been presented. The patients were taken from the outdoor department of Mental Health Institute, S.C.B. Medical College, Cuttack, Odisha. Neuropsychological functioning was measured by administration of PGIBBD and Quality of Life was measured by WHO-QOL BREF Odia Version. Discussion: As described in the literature, among the three cardinal signs (global confusion, ataxia, and ocular sings), the first two were present in all cases, but nystagmus was present in only two cases. Memory dysfunction was so disabling that the persons were unable to maintain a good Quality of Life and occupational impairment was prominent. There are disturbances in recent, remote memory, immediate recall, delayed recall, and attention and concentration, ultimately creating both physical and mental disability. PGI-BBD findings also suggest the overall impairment in neuropsychological functioning other than memory, that is, executive functioning, visual acuity, and depth perception. Findings of WHO-QOL BREF suggest the impairment of four domains of QOL in all the cases, but the severity

  14. PRIONS AND THE TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter is an invited, scholarly review of the mechanism(s) of TSEs for the 2nd edition of Metabolic Encephalopathies. Each chapter in the book assumes a professional knowledge of neuroscience and biochemistry, and the focus of the book is on the metabolic basis of dise...

  15. Epileptic encephalopathies: new genes and new pathways.

    PubMed

    Nieh, Sahar Esmaeeli; Sherr, Elliott H

    2014-10-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent a group of devastating epileptic disorders that occur early in life and are often characterized by pharmaco-resistant epilepsy, persistent severe electroencephalographic abnormalities, and cognitive dysfunction or decline. Next generation sequencing technologies have increased the speed of gene discovery tremendously. Whereas ion channel genes were long considered to be the only significant group of genes implicated in the genetic epilepsies, a growing number of non-ion-channel genes are now being identified. As a subgroup of the genetically mediated epilepsies, epileptic encephalopathies are complex and heterogeneous disorders, making diagnosis and treatment decisions difficult. Recent exome sequencing data suggest that mutations causing epileptic encephalopathies are often sporadic, typically resulting from de novo dominant mutations in a single autosomal gene, although inherited autosomal recessive and X-linked forms also exist. In this review we provide a summary of the key features of several early- and mid-childhood onset epileptic encephalopathies including Ohtahara syndrome, Dravet syndrome, Infantile spasms and Lennox Gastaut syndrome. We review the recent next generation sequencing findings that may impact treatment choices. We also describe the use of conventional and newer anti-epileptic and hormonal medications in the various syndromes based on their genetic profile. At a biological level, developments in cellular reprogramming and genome editing represent a new direction in modeling these pediatric epilepsies and could be used in the development of novel and repurposed therapies. PMID:25266964

  16. Intermediate dose 5-fluorouracil-induced encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-A; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Choi, Hye Jin; Rha, Sun Young; Seong, Jin Sil; Jeung, Hei-Cheul

    2006-01-01

    As an acute neurotoxicity, high dose 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced encephalopathy is well-known, but encephalopathy associated with lower dose is rarely reported. Here, we report a case of a male with anal cancer who was treated with 5-FU 1000 mg/m(2), continuous infusion for 5 days q4 weeks. At the second and the fourth cycles of chemotherapy, sudden confusion, cognitive dysfunction and disorientation occurred during 5-FU infusion. They were accompanied by hyperammonemia in the absence of focal neurological deficits or structural abnormalities. These symptoms completely disappeared and the serum ammonia level returned to normal after discontinuation of 5-FU and conservative care. In order to investigate a possible deficit of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), we checked its mRNA level before and after treatment using real-time PCR. The patient's pre-treatment level was 80% compared with reference group, and it was elevated up to 187% of initial after 5-FU treatment, implying that that his encephalopathy may be 5-FU catabolite type rather than DPD deficiency. In conclusion, we report that encephalopathy can develop even with the dose of 5-FU lower than ever reported, and it should be considered as a differential diagnosis for proper management. PMID:16436463

  17. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies of livestock.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Justin J; Greenlee, M Heather West

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal protein-misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. TSEs have been described in several species, including bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids, transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) in mink, and Kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans. These diseases are associated with the accumulation of a protease-resistant, disease-associated isoform of the prion protein (called PrP(Sc)) in the central nervous system and other tissues, depending on the host species. Typically, TSEs are acquired through exposure to infectious material, but inherited and spontaneous TSEs also occur. All TSEs share pathologic features and infectious mechanisms but have distinct differences in transmission and epidemiology due to host factors and strain differences encoded within the structure of the misfolded prion protein. The possibility that BSE can be transmitted to humans as the cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease has brought attention to this family of diseases. This review is focused on the TSEs of livestock: bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle and scrapie in sheep and goats. PMID:25991695

  18. [Myoclonic encephalopathy associated with proton pump inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Boulliat, J; Polard, E; Colin, F; Bentué-Ferrer, D; Allain, H

    2004-03-01

    Two men (66 and 73 Years) with a cardiovascular history were hospitalized for rapid onset encephalopathy associated with myoclonia and an extrapyramidal syndrome. On the basis of the French Pharmacovigilance system, this symptomatology has been attributed to the coadministration of a proton pump inhibitor, lansoprazole (15mg/day) with levodopa. Lansoprazole withdrawal led to a normalisation of the situation. PMID:15037850

  19. Sex and Pregnancy: A Perinatal Educator's Guide

    PubMed Central

    Polomeno, Viola

    2000-01-01

    This article is a continuation in the author's growing series of articles on intimacy and sexuality in the transition to parenthood and its relationship with perinatal education. So many couples in the author's perinatal education practice feel that health professionals are uncomfortable discussing sex and pregnancy. Indeed, the couples have so many questions and concerns regarding this subject; they are seeking answers so that they may better understand and cope with the changes in this aspect of their relationship. Perinatal education group encounters or special sessions are the ideal setting to discuss intimacy and sexuality during pregnancy. The objectives of this article are to provide the perinatal educator with content for the group sessions and tools for teaching strategies and activities. PMID:17273227

  20. Perinatal depression treatment preferences among Latina mothers.

    PubMed

    Lara-Cinisomo, Sandraluz; Wisner, Katherine L; Burns, Rachel M; Chaves-Gnecco, Diego

    2014-02-01

    The study described here was designed to determine treatment preferences among Latinas to identify treatment options that meet their needs and increase their engagement. Focus group interviews were conducted with 22 prenatal and postpartum Latinas at risk for depression. The group interviews were conducted in Spanish and English using a standardized interview protocol. Focus group transcripts were analyzed to identify themes regarding perinatal depression coping strategies, preferred approaches to treating perinatal depression, and recommendations for engaging perinatal Latinas in treatment. The results suggest that Latinas' treatment preferences consist of a pathway (i.e., hierarchical) approach that begins with the use of one's own resources, followed by the use of formal support systems (e.g., home-visiting nurse), and supplemented with the use of behavioral therapy. Antidepressant use was judged to be acceptable only in severe cases or after delivery. The data indicate that to increase health-seeking behaviors among perinatal Latinas, practitioners should first build trust. PMID:24469693

  1. Perinatal mental illness: definition, description and aetiology.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Michael W; Wisner, Katherine L

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal mental illness is a significant complication of pregnancy and the postpartum period. These disorders include depression, anxiety disorders, and postpartum psychosis, which usually manifests as bipolar disorder. Perinatal depression and anxiety are common, with prevalence rates for major and minor depression up to almost 20% during pregnancy and the first 3 months postpartum. Postpartum blues are a common but lesser manifestation of postpartum affective disturbance. Perinatal psychiatric disorders impair a woman's function and are associated with suboptimal development of her offspring. Risk factors include past history of depression, anxiety, or bipolar disorder, as well psychosocial factors, such as ongoing conflict with the partner, poor social support, and ongoing stressful life events. Early symptoms of depression, anxiety, and mania can be detected through screening in pregnancy and the postpartum period. Early detection and effective management of perinatal psychiatric disorders are critical for the welfare of women and their offspring. PMID:24140480

  2. Genetic and perinatal effects of abused substances

    SciTech Connect

    Brande, M.C.; Zimmerman, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the effects of several abused drugs, including opiates, cannabinoids, alcohol, nicotine, and cocaine, with special emphasis on the actions of these substances at the molecular and cellular levels. The first half deals with genetic effects, including molecular genetics, biochemical genetics, pharmacogenetics, cytogenetics, and genetic toxicity. The second half focuses on perinatal effects and covers: drug abuse during pregnancy; biochemical aspects of marihuana on male reproduction; and long-term behavioral and neuroendocrine effects of perinatal alcohol exposure.

  3. A comparison of combination dopamine and epinephrine treatment with high-dose dopamine alone in asphyxiated newborn piglets after resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Manouchehri, Namdar; Bigam, David L.; Churchill, Thomas; Rayner, David; Joynt, Chloe; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Background When asphyxiated neonates require additional cardiovascular support to moderate doses of dopamine infusion, controversy exists on differential hemodynamic effects of two approaches (adding a second inotrope vs. increasing dopamine dosage). We hypothesized that high-dose dopamine (HD) would be detrimental on systemic and regional perfusion when compared with dopamine and epinephrine (D+E) combination therapy using a swine model of neonatal hypoxia-reoxygenation (H-R). Methods Twenty-seven piglets (1–4 days, 1.5–2.5kg) were used for continuous monitoring of systemic (MAP) and pulmonary (PAP) arterial pressures, cardiac output (CI) and carotid (CAFI), superior mesenteric (SMAFI) and renal arterial flows. H-R piglets underwent 2h of hypoxia followed by 2h of reoxygenation prior to drug infusion (2h). Results The hemodynamics of H-R piglets deteriorated gradually after reoxygenation. HD and D+E infusions improved CI similarly (both groups vs. control; p<0.05). Both regimens increased MAP (p<0.05) but not PAP, with decreased PAP/MAP ratio in D+E piglets. Both regimens improved CAFI and SMAFI with decreased mesenteric vascular resistance in HD-treated piglets. No significant effect on renal perfusion was observed. Conclusion In H-R newborn piglets treated with a moderate dose of dopamine, adding epinephrine or further increasing dopamine improved systemic hemodynamics similarly, and have differential effects on the pulmonary and mesenteric circulations. PMID:23344679

  4. Three cases of suprachoroidal hemorrhage associated with chest compression or asphyxiation and detected using postmortem computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Toru; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Ohtani, Maki; Mimasaka, Sohtaro

    2015-05-01

    We report 3 cases of suprachoroidal hemorrhage (SCH) found to be triggered by increased intrathoracic pressure and detected using postmortem computed tomography (PMCT). Case 1 was a man aged in his 50s who was found dead at a landslide site. The autopsy showed clogging of the upper respiratory tract with soil debris from the landslide. The cause of death was determined to be asphyxia. PMCT showed SCH in both eyes, which was believed to be caused by chest compression or choking on the soil debris from the landslide. Case 2 was a woman aged in her 60s who was found dead in the sea. The autopsy revealed injuries primarily to her chest. We concluded that the cause of death was drowning. PMCT showed SCH in her right eye that was believed to be caused by chest compression. Case 3 was a woman aged in her 80s who was buried in a snowdrift and potentially died from hypothermia. PMCT showed SCH in both eyes, which was considered to be from an increase in intrathoracic pressure that might have been caused by the burial in the snow. Histological findings showed serous retinal detachment associated with retinal pigment epithelium damage due to SCH, which indicated that she was alive for several hours after the onset of SCH. The increase in intrathoracic pressure caused by dyspnea or chest compression was considered responsible for the onset of SCH in all of the present cases. PMCT might assist with the differential diagnosis of traumatic asphyxiation by SCH. PMID:25533924

  5. Possible asphyxiation from carbon dioxide of a cross-country skier in eastern California: a deadly volcanic hazard.

    PubMed

    Hill, P M

    2000-01-01

    This report describes an incident in which exceedingly high levels of carbon dioxide may have contributed to the death of a skier in eastern California. A cross-country skier was found dead inside a large, mostly covered snow cave, 1 day after he was reported missing. The autopsy report suggests that the skier died of acute pulmonary edema consistent with asphyxiation; carbon dioxide measurements inside the hole in which he was found reached 70%. This area is known for having a high carbon dioxide flux attributed to degassing of a large body of magma (molten rock) 10 to 20 km beneath the ski area. The literature describes many incidents of fatal carbon dioxide exposures associated with volcanic systems in other parts of the world. We believe this case represents the first reported death associated with volcanically produced carbon dioxide in the United States. Disaster and wilderness medicine specialists should be aware of and plan for this potential health hazard associated with active volcanoes. PMID:11055566

  6. Food Safety: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (Mad Cow Disease).

    PubMed

    Acheson, David W. K.

    2002-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy is just one of a group of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Only recently has it become recognized that transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are likely due to proteins known as prions. Although it has been recognized that transmissible spongiform encephalopathies may readily spread within species, the recent observations that bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle may have originated from another transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in sheep, known as scrapie, is cause for concern. Further, bovine spongiform encephalopathy has now been strongly linked with a universally fatal human neurologic disease known as new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Currently the only approach to preventing bovine spongiform encephalopathy, and subsequent new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, from ingestion of bovine spongiform encephalopathy-infected material is to avoid consumption of contaminated food. Little can be done to treat food that will destroy prions and leave a palatable product. At this stage we are continuing to learn about transmissible spongiform encephalopathies and their implications on human health. This is an ever-changing situation and has an unpredictable element in terms of the extent of the current outbreaks in England and other parts of Europe. PMID:11984426

  7. A clinically relevant model of perinatal global ischemic brain damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Zhuang, Lei; Terrando, Niccolò; Wu, Xinmin; Jonhson, Mark R; Maze, Mervyn; Ma, Daqing

    2011-04-01

    We have designed a clinically relevant model of perinatal asphyxia providing intrapartum hypoxia in rats. On gestation day 22 SD rats were anesthetized and the uterine horns were exteriorized and placed in a water bath at 37°C for up to 20min. After this, pups were delivered from the uterus and manually stimulated to initiate breathing in an incubator at 37°C for 1 h in air. Brains were harvested and stained with cresyl violet, caspase-3, and TUNEL to detect morphological and apoptotic changes on postnatal days (PND) 1, 3, and 7. Separate cohorts were maintained until PND 50 and tested for learning and memory using Morris water maze (WM). Survival rate was decreased with longer hypoxic time, and 100% mortality was noted when hypoxia time was beyond 18min. Apoptosis was increased with the duration of hypoxia with neuronal loss and cell shrinkage in the CA1 of hippocampus. The time taken for the juveniles to locate the hidden platform during WM was increased in animals subjected to hypoxia. These data demonstrate that perinatal ischemic injury leads to neuronal death in the hippocampus and long-lasting cognitive dysfunction. This model mimics hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in humans and may be appropriate for investigating therapeutic interventions. PMID:21281606

  8. Effect of Phenobarbital on Nitric Oxide Level in Term Newborn Infants with Perinatal Asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Khoshdel, Abolfazl; Noormohammadi, Hajar; Kheiri, Soleiman; Reisi, Roya; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Mohammad-Kazem; Panahandeh, Gholam Reza; Heidarian, Esfandiar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Perinatal asphyxia (PA) is very significant in perinatal medicine due to the involvement of the central nervous system. This study was conducted to investigate the biochemical, clinical, and paraclinical changes associated with phenobarbital administration in neonates with PA. Methods In this prospective, case-control study, 30 neonates with PA in two groups of 15 each (case and control) were investigated. The case group received 20 mg/kg intravenous phenobarbital within six hours of birth, and the control group did not receive phenobarbital. Serum concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) were measured at enrollment and one week after birth in the two groups. Clinical, electroencephalography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings of the two groups were compared. Results At enrollment, the two groups did not differ in clinical severity, seizure incidence, or NO concentration. After one week, NO concentration was significantly lower in the case group (p < 0.050), but there was no significant difference in other variables between the two groups. Conclusions Early administration of phenobarbital in term neonates with PA could protect them against encephalopathy. PMID:27602186

  9. Neural crest-specific loss of Prkar1a causes perinatal lethality resulting from defects in intramembranous ossification.

    PubMed

    Jones, Georgette N; Pringle, Daphne R; Yin, Zhirong; Carlton, Michelle M; Powell, Kimerly A; Weinstein, Michael B; Toribio, Ramiro E; La Perle, Krista M D; Kirschner, Lawrence S

    2010-08-01

    The cranial neural crest (CNC) undergoes complex molecular and morphological changes during embryogenesis in order to form the vertebrate skull, and nearly three quarters of all birth defects result from defects in craniofacial development. The molecular events leading to CNC differentiation have been extensively studied; however, the role of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase [protein kinase A (PKA)] during craniofacial development has only been described in palate formation. Here, we provide evidence that strict PKA regulation in postmigratory CNC cells is essential during craniofacial bone development. Selective inactivation of Prkar1a, a regulatory subunit of the PKA holoenzyme, in the CNC results in perinatal lethality caused by dysmorphic craniofacial development and subsequent asphyxiation. Additionally, aberrant differentiation of CNC mesenchymal cells results in anomalous intramembranous ossification characterized by formation of cartilaginous islands in some areas and osteolysis of bony trabeculae with fibrous connective tissue stabilization in others. Genetic interaction studies revealed that genetic reduction of the PKA catalytic subunit C(alpha) was able to rescue the phenotype, whereas reduction in Cbeta had no effect. Overall, these observations provide evidence of the essential role of proper regulation of PKA during the ossification of the bones of the skull. This knowledge may have implications for the understanding and treatment of craniofacial birth defects. PMID:20534695

  10. Fourth goal of perinatal medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Ounsted, C; Roberts, J C; Gordon, M; Milligan, B

    1982-01-01

    Reduction in maternal mortality, infant mortality, and infant morbidity have been successively the goals of perinatal medicine. The fourth is to reduce bonding failure. In July 1978 a preventive service was started in the John Radcliffe Maternity Hospital. A twice-weekly round is made. Midwives refer families who cause them concern. In the first year the referral rate ws 20.5 per 1000 liveborn babies. The referred sample differed from the hospital population in terms of maternal psychiatric history, marital state and babies' admission to special care. The main reasons for referral were: doubt about parenting ability (27%), psychiatric history (15%), disturbed behaviour in hospital (14%), and diffuse social and medical problems (17%). Long-term care was needed for only 14% of families. At their first birthdays, six babies were placed away from their natural parents; the sample had had a slightly higher than expected admission rate to hospital; the distribution of weights did not differ from the expected; doctors and health visitors were still concerned about one-quarter of the families. Seven cases of screening failure were found among those not referred to our service, but only one was seriously abused. No child referred in the first year has been seriously neglected or abused. PMID:6802338

  11. Recovery of amplitude integrated electroencephalographic background patterns within 24 hours of perinatal asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    van Rooij, L G M; Toet, M; Osredkar, D; van Huffelen, A C; Groenendaal, F; de Vries, L S

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the time course of recovery of severely abnormal initial amplitude integrated electroencephalographic (aEEG) patterns (flat trace (FT), continuous low voltage (CLV), or burst suppression (BS)) in full term asphyxiated neonates, in relation to other neurophysiological and neuroimaging findings and neurodevelopmental outcome. Methods: A total of 190 aEEGs of full term infants were reviewed. The neonates were admitted within 6 hours of birth to the neonatal intensive care unit because of perinatal asphyxia, and aEEG recording was started immediately. In all, 160 infants were included; 65 of these had an initial FT or CLV pattern and 25 an initial BS pattern. Neurodevelopmental outcome was assessed using a full neurological examination and the Griffiths' mental developmental scale. Results: In the FT/CLV group, the background pattern recovered to continuous normal voltage within 24 hours in six of the 65 infants (9%). All six infants survived the neonatal period; one had a severe disability, and five were normal at follow up. In the BS group, the background pattern improved to normal voltage in 12 of the 25 infants (48%) within 24 hours. Of these infants, one died, five survived with moderate to severe disability, two with mild disability, and four were normal. The patients who did not recover within 24 hours either died in the neonatal period or survived with a severe disability. Conclusion: In this study there was a small group of infants who presented with a severely abnormal aEEG background pattern within six hours of birth, but who achieved recovery to a continuous normal background pattern within the first 24 hours. Sixty one percent of these infants survived without, or with a mild, disability. PMID:15846017

  12. Encephalopathy of infection and systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Young, G Bryan

    2013-10-01

    This review will discuss several intracranial infections and sepsis-associated encephalopathy. Intracranial infections and inflammation of interest to the neurologist and EEG technicians include viral and autoimmune encephalitides; bacterial, fungal, and other meningitides; cerebritis; and brain abscess and subdural empyema. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy refers to a diffuse brain dysfunction secondary to infection that is principally located outside of the central nervous system. It is much more common than all of the intracranial infections put together, at least for adults in Western society. It probably involves a number of mechanisms that are not mutually exclusive and likely vary from patient to patient. Morbidity and mortality are directly related to the severity of SAE. The earliest features of SAE are delirium and mild EEG slowing; it is crucial to recognize these early features and to search for and treat the underlying infection promptly to reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:24084178

  13. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: A rare proteiform disorder.

    PubMed

    Montagna, Giacomo; Imperiali, Mauro; Agazzi, Pamela; D'Aurizio, Federica; Tozzoli, Renato; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Giovanella, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare not well understood, progressive and relapsing multiform disease, characterized by seizures, movement disorders, subacute cognitive dysfunction, psychiatric symptoms and responsiveness to steroid therapy. The disorder is generally associated with thyroid diseases and the most common feature is the presence of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Patients are usually euthyroid or mildly hypothyroid at presentation. All age groups can be affected. The pathophysiology is still unclear, especially the link between elevated serum TPOAb and the encephalopathy. Most reported cases occurred in women and girls. Unspecific symptoms, non-pathognomonic laboratory neurophysiology and neuroimaging features make its diagnosis a real challenge for clinicians. The case of a 16 year old boy, with a clinical picture of HE associated with hypothyroidism, demonstrating an excellent response to high dose steroids is presented together with a systematic review of the literature. PMID:26849953

  14. Disaccharides in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Praveen; Sharma, Barjesh Chander

    2013-06-01

    Management of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) primarily involves avoidance of precipitating factors and administration of various ammonia-lowering therapies such as nonabsorbable disaccharides and antimicrobial agents like rifaximin. The nonabsorbable disaccharides which include lactulose and lactitol are considered the first-line therapy for the treatment of HE and minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). Lactulose significantly improves cognitive function and health-related quality of life in patients with MHE. Lactitol is comparable to lactulose in the treatment of HE with fewer side effects. Lactulose has also shown to be effective in primary and secondary prophylaxis of HE. Disaccharides were found to be comparable to rifaximin in recent systemic reviews in the treatment of HE however conclusion was based on inclusion of some poor quality trials. Combination therapy of disaccharides either with rifaximin, L-ornithine L-aspartate,probiotics for the treatment of HE needs further validation in large studies. PMID:23456517

  15. Head stereotypies in STXBP1 encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ok; Korff, Christian M; Villaluz, Mel Michel G; Suls, Arvid; Weckhuysen, Sarah; De Jonghe, Peter; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2013-08-01

    STXBP1 encephalopathy is associated with a range of movement disorders. We observed head stereotypies in three patients. These comprised a slow (<1Hz), high-amplitude, horizontal, 'figure-of-eight' pattern, beginning at age 4-6 years and resulting in neck muscle hypertrophy, in two males; a faster (2-3Hz), side-to-side, 'no' movement, starting at the age of 9 years 6 months was observed in one female. Upper limb and truncal stereotypies and vocalization occurred intermittently with the head movements. The stereotypies increased with excitement but settled with concentration and sleep. Head and upper limb stereotypies are valuable clinical clues to the diagnosis of STXBP1 encephalopathy in patients with profound impairments. PMID:23763664

  16. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. PMID:27625729

  17. [Drug therapy of patients with dyscirculatory encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Macheret, Ie L; Khanenko, N V

    2002-01-01

    Results are submitted of treatment of discirculatory encephalopathy having developed against the background of arterial hypertension, with a combination of drugs aktovegin and captopril in 56 patients. The positive effect of the instituted monotherapy has been documented clinically, with correlation established with indices of additional methods of investigation. The secured results of treatment permit recommending actovegin and captopril for a wide use in practical medicine to treat patients in the above category. PMID:12145902

  18. Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by hyperemesis gravidarum

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Delgado-García, Silvia; Martín-Bayón, Tina; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a reversible neurological emergency caused by thiamine deficiency. Prolonged vomiting in pregnancy results in thiamine depletion. The early recognition of its clinical signs and symptoms is essential to establish the suspected diagnosis and can be confirmed by MRI. Prompt administration of thiamine is important for preventing the occurrence of sequelae in the mother and for improving the fetal prognostic. We report a case of WE induced by hyperemesis gravidarum with a good maternal and fetal outcome. PMID:22684836

  19. Ciprofloxacin-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Al Bu Ali, Waleed Hammad

    2013-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-neuroradiological syndrome characterised by numerous symptoms and of no specific aetiology. Headache, confusion, seizures, cortical visual disturbances or blindness are the key symptoms. As this syndrome is reversible and readily treated by interrupting or discontinuing the aetiology, it should sharply be acknowledged. Ciprofloxacin was associated with PRES in an adolescent male treated from chest infection. It was managed in a hospital intensive care unit and was observed until disappearance. PMID:23585504

  20. Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy and Meat Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Hester J. T.; Knight, Richard S. G.

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) comprise a wide-ranging group of neurodegenerative diseases found in animals and humans. They have diverse causes and geographical distributions, but have similar pathological features, transmissibility and, are ultimately, fatal. Central to all TSEs is the presence of an abnormal form of a normal host protein, namely the prion protein. Because of their potential transmissibility, these diseases have wide public health ramifications.

  1. Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy in the Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Leise, Michael D.; Poterucha, John J.; Kamath, Patrick S.; Kim, W. Ray

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) develops in about 50% of patients with cirrhosis and is one of the features of decompensated cirrhosis. The inpatient incidence of HE is approximately 23,000/year and management of these patients is common for internists and subspecialists. Treatment of the hospitalized patient with HE has changed in recent years. Treatment entails two phases, induction and maintenance of remission. Most cases of significant hepatic encephalopathy are precipitated by infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, medications or other culprits. All patients should be evaluated for secondary triggers of HE and treatment should be initiated with a non-absorbable disaccharide (i.e. lactulose) in most cases. Rifaximin (off-label) can be added in patients not responding to lactulose. Neomycin is a less preferable alternative to rifaximin, due to its side effect profile. Other therapies including zinc, LOLA, and branch chain amino acids can be considered for patients not responding to a disaccharide and non-absorbable antibiotic. Large portosystemic shunts may be embolized in patients with medically refractory recurrent or severe HE with otherwise well compensated cirrhosis. Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System is now available for patients with severe hepatic encephalopathy who do not respond to medical therapy. It is critically important that patients hospitalized with significant hepatic encephalopathy continue a maintenance medication(s) at the time of dismissal to prevent further episodes. Patients with a 1st time episode of HE can be placed on lactulose and careful instruction should be provided to patient and caregiver about titration of dose to achieve 3 bowel movements per day. Patients with recurrent HE episodes despite lactulose benefit from the addition of rifaximin which decreases the frequency of recurrent HE episodes and related hospitalizations. Lastly, patients and their families should be counselled about the risk of motor vehicle accidents which

  2. Perinatal Practices & Traditions Among Asian Indian Women.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Deepika

    2016-01-01

    As the population in the United States grows more diverse, nurses caring for childbearing women must be aware of the many cultural traditions and customs unique to their patients. This knowledge and insight supports women and their families with the appropriate care, information, and resources. A supportive relationship builds trust, offers guidance, and allows for the new family to integrate information from nurses and other healthcare providers with the practice of certain perinatal cultural traditions. The Asian Indian culture is rich in tradition, specifically during the perinatal period. To support the cultural beliefs and practices of Asian Indian women during this time, nurses need to be aware of and consider multiple factors. Many women are navigating the new role of motherhood while making sense of and incorporating important cultural rituals. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of perinatal cultural practices and traditions specific to the Asian Indian culture that perinatal nurses may observe in the clinical setting. Cultural traditions and practices specific to the pregnancy and postpartum period are described together with symbolism and implications for nursing practice. It is important to note that information regarding perinatal customs is provided in an effort to promote culturally sensitive nursing care and may not pertain to all Asian Indian women living in the United States. PMID:26909722

  3. Inflammatory and Epigenetic Pathways for Perinatal Depression.

    PubMed

    Garfield, Lindsey; Mathews, Herbert L; Janusek, Linda Witek

    2016-05-01

    Depression during the perinatal period is common and can have adverse consequences for women and their children. Yet, the biobehavioral mechanisms underlying perinatal depression are not known. Adverse early life experiences increase the risk for adult depression. One potential mechanism by which this increased risk occurs is epigenetic embedding of inflammatory pathways. The purpose of this article is to propose a conceptual model that explicates the linkage between early life adversity and the risk for maternal depression. The model posits that early life adversity embeds a proinflammatory epigenetic signature (altered DNA methylation) that predisposes vulnerable women to depression during pregnancy and the postpartum period. As proposed, women with a history of early life adversity are more likely to exhibit higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines and lower levels of oxytocin in response to the demands of pregnancy and new motherhood, both of which are associated with the risk for perinatal depression. The model is designed to guide investigations into the biobehavioral basis for perinatal depression, with emphasis upon the impact of early life adversity. Testing this model will provide a better understanding of maternal depressive risk and improve identification of vulnerable women who would benefit from targeted interventions that can reduce the impact of perinatal depression on maternal-infant health. PMID:26574573

  4. Neonatal-perinatal medicine: Diseases of the fetus and infant

    SciTech Connect

    Fanaroff, A.A.; Martin, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of 40 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Perinatal services and resources; Diabetes in pregnancy; Erythroblastosis fetalis; Placental pathology; Genetic disease and chromosomal abnormalities; Perinatal ultrasound; and Diagnostic imaging.

  5. Valproate-induced encephalopathy with predominant pancerebellar syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Kori, Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Valproate-induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a rare event clinically characterized by impaired sensorium, vomiting, headache, seizures and focal neurological deficits. The pathogenesis of this dreadful complication is not well understood, although hyperammonemia has been implicated in causation of encephalopathy. In this submission, we have highlighted a case of valproate-induced encephalopathy who presented mainly with bilateral cerebellar features and generalized slowing on electroencephalogram. High index of suspicion of valproate-induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy is required if diffuse ataxia is present as it is a potentially reversible clinical disorder. PMID:22345888

  6. The Role of the Neurointensive Care Nursery for Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Glass, Hannah C; Rowitch, David H

    2016-09-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy due to intrapartum events is estimated at 1 to 2 per 1000 live births in high-income countries. Outcomes have improved over the past decade due to implementation of therapeutic hypothermia, the only clinically available neuroprotective strategy for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Neonatal encephalopathy is the most common condition treated within a neonatal neurocritical care unit. Neonates with encephalopathy benefit from a neurocritical care approach due to prevention of secondary brain injury through attention to basic physiology, earlier recognition and treatment of neurologic complications, consistent management using guidelines and protocols, and use of optimized teams at dedicated referral centers. PMID:27524453

  7. NMDA receptors in hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Llansola, Marta; Rodrigo, Regina; Monfort, Pilar; Montoliu, Carmina; Kosenko, Elena; Cauli, Omar; Piedrafita, Blanca; El Mlili, Nisrin; Felipo, Vicente

    2007-12-01

    The NMDA type of glutamate receptors modulates learning and memory. Excessive activation of NMDA receptors leads to neuronal degeneration and death. Hyperammonemia and liver failure alter the function of NMDA receptors and of some associated signal transduction pathways. The alterations are different in acute and chronic hyperammonemia and liver failure. Acute intoxication with large doses of ammonia (and probably acute liver failure) leads to excessive NMDA receptors activation, which is responsible for ammonia-induced death. In contrast, chronic hyperammonemia induces adaptive responses resulting in impairment of signal transduction associated to NMDA receptors. The function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway is impaired in brain in vivo in animal models of chronic liver failure or hyperammonemia and in homogenates from brains of patients died in hepatic encephalopathy. The impairment of this pathway leads to reduced cGMP and contributes to impaired cognitive function in hepatic encephalopathy. Learning ability is reduced in animal models of chronic liver failure and hyperammonemia and is restored by pharmacological manipulation of brain cGMP by administering phosphodiesterase inhibitors (zaprinast or sildenafil) or cGMP itself. NMDA receptors are therefore involved both in death induced by acute ammonia toxicity (and likely by acute liver failure) and in cognitive impairment in hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:17701332

  8. Using saccades to diagnose covert hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Cunniffe, Nicholas; Munby, Henry; Chan, Shona; Saatci, Defne; Edison, Eric; Carpenter, R H S; Massey, Dunecan

    2015-06-01

    Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy (CHE), previously known as Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy, is a subtle cognitive defect found in 30-70 % of cirrhosis patients. It has been linked to poor quality of life, impaired fitness to drive, and increased mortality: treatment is possible. Despite its clinical significance, diagnosis relies on psychometric tests that have proved unsuitable for use in a clinical setting. We investigated whether measurement of saccadic latency distributions might be a viable alternative. We collected data on 35 cirrhosis patients at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, with no evidence of clinically overt encephalopathy, and 36 age-matched healthy controls. Performance on standard psychometric tests was evaluated to determine those patients with CHE as defined by the World Congress of Gastroenterology. We then compared visually-evoked saccades between those with CHE and those without, as well as reviewing blood test results and correlating saccadic latencies with biochemical parameters and prognostic scores. Cirrhosis patients have significantly longer median saccadic latencies than healthy controls. Those with CHE had significantly prolonged saccadic latencies when compared with those without CHE. Analysis of a cirrhosis patient's saccades can diagnose CHE with a sensitivity of 75 % and a specificity of 75 %. We concluded that analysis of a cirrhosis patient's saccadic latency distributions is a fast and objective measure that can be used as a diagnostic tool for CHE. This improved early diagnosis could direct avoidance of high-risk activities such as driving, and better inform treatment strategies. PMID:25586511

  9. De novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Allen, Andrew S; Berkovic, Samuel F; Cossette, Patrick; Delanty, Norman; Dlugos, Dennis; Eichler, Evan E; Epstein, Michael P; Glauser, Tracy; Goldstein, David B; Han, Yujun; Heinzen, Erin L; Hitomi, Yuki; Howell, Katherine B; Johnson, Michael R; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H; Lu, Yi-Fan; Madou, Maura R Z; Marson, Anthony G; Mefford, Heather C; Esmaeeli Nieh, Sahar; O'Brien, Terence J; Ottman, Ruth; Petrovski, Slavé; Poduri, Annapurna; Ruzzo, Elizabeth K; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Sherr, Elliott H; Yuskaitis, Christopher J; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Alldredge, Brian K; Bautista, Jocelyn F; Berkovic, Samuel F; Boro, Alex; Cascino, Gregory D; Consalvo, Damian; Crumrine, Patricia; Devinsky, Orrin; Dlugos, Dennis; Epstein, Michael P; Fiol, Miguel; Fountain, Nathan B; French, Jacqueline; Friedman, Daniel; Geller, Eric B; Glauser, Tracy; Glynn, Simon; Haut, Sheryl R; Hayward, Jean; Helmers, Sandra L; Joshi, Sucheta; Kanner, Andres; Kirsch, Heidi E; Knowlton, Robert C; Kossoff, Eric H; Kuperman, Rachel; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H; McGuire, Shannon M; Motika, Paul V; Novotny, Edward J; Ottman, Ruth; Paolicchi, Juliann M; Parent, Jack M; Park, Kristen; Poduri, Annapurna; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Shellhaas, Renée A; Sherr, Elliott H; Shih, Jerry J; Singh, Rani; Sirven, Joseph; Smith, Michael C; Sullivan, Joseph; Lin Thio, Liu; Venkat, Anu; Vining, Eileen P G; Von Allmen, Gretchen K; Weisenberg, Judith L; Widdess-Walsh, Peter; Winawer, Melodie R

    2013-09-12

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a devastating group of severe childhood epilepsy disorders for which the cause is often unknown. Here we report a screen for de novo mutations in patients with two classical epileptic encephalopathies: infantile spasms (n = 149) and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (n = 115). We sequenced the exomes of 264 probands, and their parents, and confirmed 329 de novo mutations. A likelihood analysis showed a significant excess of de novo mutations in the ∼4,000 genes that are the most intolerant to functional genetic variation in the human population (P = 2.9 × 10(-3)). Among these are GABRB3, with de novo mutations in four patients, and ALG13, with the same de novo mutation in two patients; both genes show clear statistical evidence of association with epileptic encephalopathy. Given the relevant site-specific mutation rates, the probabilities of these outcomes occurring by chance are P = 4.1 × 10(-10) and P = 7.8 × 10(-12), respectively. Other genes with de novo mutations in this cohort include CACNA1A, CHD2, FLNA, GABRA1, GRIN1, GRIN2B, HNRNPU, IQSEC2, MTOR and NEDD4L. Finally, we show that the de novo mutations observed are enriched in specific gene sets including genes regulated by the fragile X protein (P < 10(-8)), as has been reported previously for autism spectrum disorders. PMID:23934111

  10. Perinatal Health Statistics as the Basis for Perinatal Quality Assessment in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Rodin, Urelija; Filipović-Grčić, Boris; Đelmiš, Josip; Glivetić, Tatjana; Juras, Josip; Mustapić, Željka; Grizelj, Ruža

    2015-01-01

    Context. Perinatal mortality indicators are considered the most important measures of perinatal outcome. The indicators reliability depends on births and deaths reporting and recording. Many publications focus on perinatal deaths underreporting and misclassification, disabling proper international comparisons. Objective. Description of perinatal health care quality assessment key indicators in Croatia. Methods. Retrospective review of reports from all maternities from 2001 to 2014. Results. According to reporting criteria for birth weight ≥500 g, perinatal mortality (PNM) was reduced by 31%, fetal mortality (FM) by 32%, and early neonatal mortality (ENM) by 29%. According to reporting criteria for ≥1000 g, PNM was reduced by 43%, FM by 36%, and ENM by 54%. PNM in ≥22 weeks' (wks) gestational age (GA) was reduced by 28%, FM by 30%, and ENM by 26%. The proportion of FM at 32–36 wks GA and at term was the highest between all GA subgroups, as opposed to ENM with the highest proportion in 22–27 wks GA. Through the period, the maternal mortality ratio varied from 2.4 to 14.3/100,000 live births. The process indicators have been increased in number by more than half since 2001, the caesarean deliveries from 11.9% in 2001 to 19.6% in 2014. Conclusions. The comprehensive perinatal health monitoring represents the basis for the perinatal quality assessment. PMID:26693484

  11. The perinatal assessment of psychosocial risk.

    PubMed

    Haglund, L J; Britton, J R

    1998-06-01

    Although evaluation of psychosocial risk factors prior to perinatal hospital discharge has been advocated, the means for accomplishing such an evaluation are not well established. This article reviews several major psychosocial risk factors together with instruments that have been utilized to assess them during the perinatal period. Formal constructs reviewed include anxiety, depression, self-concept, general attitudes, life events, stress, adaptation, social support, marital and family functioning, and the home environment. Ongoing assessment of psychosocial status using formal instruments during routine perinatal care may provide a more complete picture of the psychosocial needs of the individual mother and her family, allowing for more appropriate, timely intervention and utilization of social and health care resources. PMID:9647002

  12. Substance Use in the Perinatal Period.

    PubMed

    Forray, Ariadna; Foster, Dawn

    2015-11-01

    Perinatal substance use remains a major public health problem and is associated with a number of deleterious maternal and fetal effects. Polysubstance use in pregnancy is common and can potentiate adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Tobacco is the most commonly used substance in pregnancy, followed by alcohol and illicit substances. The treatments for perinatal substance use are limited and consist mostly of behavioral and psychosocial interventions. Of these, contingency management has shown the most efficacy. More recently, novel interventions such as progesterone for postpartum cocaine use have shown promise. The purpose of this review is to examine the recent literature on the use of tobacco, alcohol, cannabis, stimulants, and opioids in the perinatal period, their effects on maternal and fetal health, and current treatments. PMID:26386836

  13. Perinatal episodes across the mood disorder spectrum.

    PubMed

    Di Florio, Arianna; Forty, Liz; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Heron, Jess; Jones, Lisa; Craddock, Nicholas; Jones, Ian

    2013-02-01

    CONTEXT Affective disorders are common in women, with many episodes having an onset in pregnancy or during the postpartum period. OBJECTIVE To investigate the occurrence and timing of perinatal mood episodes in women with bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, and recurrent major depression (RMD). SETTING AND PATIENTS Women were recruited in our ongoing research on the genetic and nongenetic determinants of major affective disorders. Participants were interviewed and case notes were reviewed. Best-estimate diagnoses were made according to DSM-IV criteria. The 1785 parous women identified included 1212 women with bipolar disorder (980 with type I and 232 with type II) and 573 with RMD. Data were available on 3017 live births. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES We report the lifetime occurrence of perinatal mood episodes, the rates of perinatal episodes per pregnancy/postpartum period, and the timing of the onset of episodes in relation to delivery. RESULTS More than two-thirds of all diagnostic groups reported at least 1 lifetime episode of illness during pregnancy or the postpartum period. Women with bipolar I disorder reported an approximately 50% risk of a perinatal major affective episode per pregnancy/postpartum period. Risks were lower in women with RMD or bipolar II disorder, at approximately 40% per pregnancy/postpartum period. Mood episodes were significantly more common in the postpartum period in bipolar I disorder and RMD. Most perinatal episodes occurred within the first postpartum month, with mania or psychosis having an earlier onset than depression. CONCLUSIONS Although episodes of postpartum mood disorder are more common in bipolar I disorder and manic and psychotic presentations occur earlier in the postpartum period, perinatal episodes are highly prevalent across the mood disorder spectrum. PMID:23247604

  14. Essential program components for perinatal home care.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, L

    1994-10-01

    Home care will continue to be a rapidly expanding area of health care. This growth will be evident in the perinatal nursing specialty. There are multiple models for delivery of perinatal home services. In each case, consideration needs to be given to licensing and other standards; to operational areas such as staffing, supplies, equipment, and reimbursement; and to quality issues, such as staff development, internal and external customer service, and a continuous quality improvement program. Successful marketing of the services requires recognition that the product is nursing care. PMID:7836991

  15. Del(12)(p11.21p12.2) associated with an asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy or chondroectodermal dysplasia-like syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, T.; Kato, R.; Hasegawa, T.

    1995-01-02

    We describe a 5-year-old Japanese boy who has some radiographic findings characteristic of asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (ATD)-chondroectodermal dysplasia with a de novo chromosome abnormality. He also has mild mental retardation, short stature, hypoplastic hair and skin, oligodontia, small thoracic cage, hypoplastic pelvis and cone-shaped epiphyses of hands. On cytogenetic studies he was found to have a de novo del(12)(p11.21p12.2). These results suggest that the locus of the gene associated with ATD-chondroectodermal dysplasia may be situated at 12p11.21p12.2. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  16. A pathologist׳s perspective on the perinatal autopsy.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Linda M

    2015-02-01

    The perinatal autopsy is an important tool in the investigation of fetal and neonatal death, and a complete understanding of its risks and benefits is necessary for providers of perinatal care. This review, from the perspective of a perinatal pathologist, reports the details of the autopsy procedure, its goals, its value to individual patients and the health care system in general, and its alternatives. Even with new emerging technologies, the conventional perinatal autopsy remains the gold standard for determining the cause of death and the final summary of all pathologic findings. Therefore, the information provided in this review can help providers properly convey information about perinatal autopsy to bereaved families. PMID:25511296

  17. Comparison of Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy Isolates in Raccoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Owing to its susceptibility to various transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) and relatively short incubation times, the raccoon (Procyon lotor) has been suggested as a model for TSE strain differentiation. Transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) is a prion disease of undetermined origin in...

  18. Typical and atypical cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cattle, first detected in 1986 in the United Kingdom and subsequently in other countries. It is the most likely cause of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans, but the origin of BSE has not been eluci...

  19. [Rifaximin for hepatic encephalopathy in children. Case report].

    PubMed

    Malla, Ivone; Torres Cerino, Verónica; Villa, Andrés; Cheang, Yu; Giacove, Gisela; Pedreira, Alejandra; Silva, Marcelo

    2011-12-01

    Rifaximin is an antibiotic recently approved for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in adults. In children more than 12 year-old, it has been approved for travelers' diarrhea and it is also widely used in inflammatory bowel disease. We report, to our knowledge, the first case of a pediatric patient who received rifaximin for hepatic encephalopathy with good clinical outcome. PMID:22231877

  20. Evaluation of the zoonotic potential of transmissible mink encephalopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Successful transmission of Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy (TME) to cattle supports the bovine hypothesis to the still controversial origin of TME outbreaks. Human and primate susceptibility to classical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (c-BSE) and the transmissibility of L-type BSE to macaques as...

  1. The Spectrum of Disease in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Stern, Robert A.; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Hall, Garth; Wojtowicz, Sydney M.; Baugh, Christine M.; Riley, David O.; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Cormier, Kerry A.; Jacobs, Matthew A.; Martin, Brett R.; Abraham, Carmela R.; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Reichard, Robert Ross; Wolozin, Benjamin L.; Budson, Andrew E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Cantu, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive tauopathy that occurs as a consequence of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. We analysed post-mortem brains obtained from a cohort of 85 subjects with histories of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury and found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in 68 subjects: all males, ranging…

  2. Histopathological and imaging modifications in chronic ethanolic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Folescu, Roxana; Zamfir, Carmen Lăcrămioara; Sişu, Alina Maria; Motoc, Andrei Gheorghe Marius; Ilie, Adrian Cosmin; Moise, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Chronic abuse of alcohol triggers different types of brain damage. The Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome gets together Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's syndrome. Another type of encephalopathy associated with chronic ethanol consumption is represented by the Marchiafava-Bignami malady or syndrome, an extremely rare neurological disorder, which is characterized by a demielinization of corpus callosum, extending as far as a necrosis. Because the frequency of ethanolic encephalopathy is increased and plays a major role in the sudden death of ethanolic patients, we have studied the chronic ethanolic encephalopathy both in deceased and in living patients, presenting different pathologies related to the chronic ethanol consumption. The present study investigated the effects of chronic ethanolic encephalopathy on the central nervous system based both on the histopathological exam of the tissular samples and the imaging investigation, such as MRI and CT. PMID:25329105

  3. A Case of Severe Ganciclovir-Induced Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Hikaru; Hirano, Makito; Nose, Kazuhiro; Ueno, Shuichi; Oki, Takashi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Nishioka, Tsukasa; Kusunoki, Susumu; Nakamura, Yusaku

    2013-01-01

    Background Ganciclovir, a drug against cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, is generally well tolerated, but can cause neurotoxicity such as encephalopathy. Although ganciclovir-induced encephalopathy has been described in several reports, a literature search revealed that ganciclovir concentrations in the blood or cerebrospinal fluid were previously measured in only 3 patients with encephalopathy. Symptoms usually include confusion and disturbed consciousness, which mimic CMV encephalitis. Prompt and accurate diagnosis is thus sometimes difficult, and is derived solely from accumulated clinical information of definite cases, since ganciclovir concentrations, not routinely measured, become available after several days or a few weeks. Case Presentation Here, we summarize clinical information of all patients with definite ganciclovir-induced encephalopathy including our own patient, who had severe symptoms, with the highest reported trough concentration of ganciclovir in the blood, and underwent therapeutic dialysis with complete recovery. Conclusion Our summary of patients with definite encephalopathy could lead to prompt and accurate diagnoses. PMID:24403897

  4. The Expanding Clinical Spectrum of Genetic Pediatric Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Shbarou, Rolla; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2016-05-01

    Pediatric epileptic encephalopathies represent a clinically challenging and often devastating group of disorders that affect children at different stages of infancy and childhood. With the advances in genetic testing and neuroimaging, the etiologies of these epileptic syndromes are now better defined. The various encephalopathies that are reviewed in this article include the following: early infantile epileptic encephalopathy or Ohtahara syndrome, early myoclonic encephalopathy, epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures, West syndrome, severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (Dravet syndrome), Landau-Kleffner syndrome, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-and-wave during sleep. Their clinical features, prognosis as well as underlying genetic etiologies are presented and updated. PMID:27544470

  5. Is there an association between female circumcision and perinatal death?

    PubMed Central

    Essen, Birgitta; Bodker, Birgit; Sjoberg, N-O; Gudmundsson, Saemundur; Ostergren, P-O; Langhoff-Roos, Jens

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In Sweden, a country with high standards of obstetric care, the high rate of perinatal mortality among children of immigrant women from the Horn of Africa raises the question of whether there is an association between female circumcision and perinatal death. METHOD: To investigate this, we examined a cohort of 63 perinatal deaths of infants born in Sweden over the period 1990-96 to circumcised women. FINDINGS: We found no evidence that female circumcision was related to perinatal death. Obstructed or prolonged labour, caused by scar tissue from circumcision, was not found to have any impact on the number of perinatal deaths. CONCLUSION: The results do not support previous conclusions that genital circumcision is related to perinatal death, regardless of other circumstances, and suggest that other, suboptimal factors contribute to perinatal death among circumcised migrant women. PMID:12219153

  6. Perinatal mortality--an analysis of causes and strategies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neeru

    2011-04-01

    Perinatal mortality is the most sensitive index while imparting healthcare to mother during pregnancy and delivery and also to the baby in perinatal period. Perinatal mortality is higher in rural areas than in urban areas. Worldover perinatal or infant mortality rate is on decline. Developed countries are ahead of developing nations in giving good antenatal, intrapartal as well as neonatal care. Factors responsible for perinatal mortality in Indian context lie in sociodemographic, maternal and foetal aspects. Regional differences also are there in India while assessing perinatal mortality and delivery practices. The lacunae are to be identified while recommending strategies to be taken to lower the perinatal mortality. A community based data system should be developed so that the information should flow from down to above, from village to subcentre to primary health centre and further from district to state. Some newborns need special care. Since newborns need early recognition of danger signs and prompt treatment measures. PMID:22187796

  7. Electrocardiographic and enzymatic correlations with outcome in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Perinatal asphyxia leading to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a common problem causing multi organ dysfunction including myocardial involvement which can affect the outcome. Objective To evaluate the myocardial dysfunction in neonates having HIE by electrocardiographic(ECG) and cardiac enzymes (CK Total, CK-MB and Troponin I) and find out the relationship with HIE and outcome. Design/Methods This was a hospital based prospective study. Sixty term neonates who had suffered perinatal asphyxia and developed HIE were enrolled. Myocardial involvement was assessed by clinical, ECG, and CK Total, CK-MB and Troponin I measurements. Results Of 60 cases, 13(21.7%) were in mild, 27(45%) in moderate and 20(33.3%) belonged to severe,HIE. ECG was abnormal in 46 (76.7%); of these 19 (41.3%) had grade I, 13 (28.2%) grades II and III each and 1 (2.1%) with grade IV changes. Serum levels of CK Total, CK- MB and Troponin I were raised in 54 (90%), 52 (86.6%) and 48 (80%) neonates, respectively. ECG changes and enzymatic levels showed increasing abnormalities with severity of HIE, and the differences among different grades were significant (p = 0.002, 0.02, <0.001 and 0.004, respectively). Nineteen (32%) cases died during hospital stay. The non- survivors had high proportion of abnormal ECG (p = 0.024), raised levels of CK-MB (p = 0.018) and Troponin I (p = 0.008) in comparison to survivors. Conclusions Abnormal ECG and cardiac enzymes levels are found in HIE and can lead to poor outcome due to myocardial damage Early detection can help in better management and survival of these neonates. PMID:22823976

  8. Predicting motor outcome and death in term hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Biarge, M.; Diez-Sebastian, J.; Kapellou, O.; Gindner, D.; Allsop, J.M.; Rutherford, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Central gray matter damage, the hallmark of term acute perinatal hypoxia-ischemia, frequently leads to severe cerebral palsy and sometimes death. The precision with which these outcomes can be determined from neonatal imaging has not been fully explored. We evaluated the accuracy of early brain MRI for predicting death, the presence and severity of motor impairment, and ability to walk at 2 years in term infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and basal ganglia–thalamic (BGT) lesions. Methods: From 1993 to 2007, 175 term infants with evidence of perinatal asphyxia, HIE, and BGT injury seen on early MRI scans were studied. BGT, white matter, posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC), and cortex and brainstem abnormality were classified by severity. Motor impairment was staged using the Gross Motor Function Classification System. Results: The severity of BGT lesions was strongly associated with the severity of motor impairment (Spearman rank correlation 0.77; p < 0.001). The association between white matter, cortical, and brainstem injury and motor impairment was less strong and only BGT injury correlated significantly in a logistic regression model. The predictive accuracy of severe BGT lesions for severe motor impairment was 0.89 (95% confidence interval 0.83–0.96). Abnormal PLIC signal intensity predicted the inability to walk independently by 2 years (sensitivity 0.92, specificity 0.77, positive predictive value 0.88, negative predictive value 0.85). Brainstem injury was the only factor with an independent association with death. Conclusion: We have shown that in term newborns with HIE and BGT injury, early MRI can be used to predict death and specific motor outcomes. PMID:21670434

  9. Perinatal Major Depression Biomarkers: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Serati, M; Redaelli, M; Buoli, M; Altamura, A C

    2016-03-15

    Postpartum depression, now termed perinatal depression by the DSM-5, is a clinically relevant disorder reaching 15% of incidence. Although it is quite frequent and associated with high social dysfunction, only recently its underpinning biological pathways have been explored, while multiple and concomitant risk factors have been identified (e.g. psychosocial stress). Peripartum depression usually has its onset during the third trimester of pregnancy or in the postpartum, being one of the most common medical complications in new mothers. Purpose of the present review is to summarize the state of art of biological biomarkers involved in the pathogenesis of perinatal depression, in view of the fact that suboptimal prenatal milieu can induce permanent damage in subsequent offspring life and have a negative impact on mother-child relationship. Furthermore, parents' biological changes due to medical/psychiatric disorders or stress exposure could influence offspring life: a concept known as 'intergenerational transmission', acting by variations into gametes and the gestational uterine environment. Given the evidence that perinatal mental disorders involve risks for the mother and offspring, the search for reliable biomarkers in high-risk mothers actually represents a medical priority to prevent perinatal depression. PMID:26802316

  10. DRINKING WATER ARSENIC AND PERINATAL OUTCOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking Water Arsenic and Perinatal Outcomes
    DT Lobdell, Z Ning, RK Kwok, JL Mumford, ZY Liu, P Mendola

    Many studies have documented an association between drinking water arsenic (DWA) and cancer, vascular diseases, and dermatological outcomes, but few have investigate...

  11. Ethical Issues in Perinatal Mental Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, Anna R.; Shivakumar, Geetha; Lee, Simon Craddock; Inrig, Stephen J.; Sadler, John Z.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of Review To review the background of current ethical standards for the conduct of perinatal mental health research and describe the ethical challenges in this research domain. Recent Findings Current literature reflects a growing sentiment in the scientific community that having no information regarding the impact of psychiatric treatment on the mother and developing fetus/infant poses dangers that may exceed the risks involved in research. However, without sufficient consensus across the scientific community, both regulatory bodies and perinatal researchers find themselves without a framework for decision making that satisfactorily limits the risks and facilitates the benefits of participation of pregnant and lactating women in clinical research. Summary Psychiatric research in perinatal mental health is critically important as it enables clinicians and patients to participate in informed decision-making concerning treatment for psychiatric disorders. Specific areas of concern include fetal safety, maternal risk, the therapeutic misconception, commercial interests, forensic/legal issues, the informed consent process, and study design. Developing guidelines that address ethical challenges and include the views and concerns of multiple stakeholders could improve the access of perinatal women to the benefits of participation in mental health research in addition to providing evidence-based mental health care for this subpopulation. PMID:19734786

  12. Perinatal home care: one entrepreneur's experience.

    PubMed

    Eaton, D G

    1994-10-01

    Nurses have responded to the entrepreneurial movement by entering into various nontraditional roles and starting their own businesses. This article describes the author's experience in establishing a perinatal home-care business. The characteristics of women and nurse entrepreneurs are discussed, as are the components of a business plan and how to manage a business. PMID:7836999

  13. Correlation of EEG, CT, and MRI Brain with Neurological Outcome at 12 Months in Term Newborns with Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Annu; Matthai, John; Paul, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To correlate electroencephalogram (EEG), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain with neurological outcome at 12 months in term neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted between June 2010 and November 2011. Consecutive term neonates with perinatal asphyxia and hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy were the subjects. All babies were managed as per standard protocol. EEG was done as soon as the baby was stable and CT brain within 7 days. MRI was done at 3 months. Neurodevelpmental assessment was done at 12 months. Results: Of the 31 babies, four died and one was lost to follow-up. Neurodevelopmental at 12 months of age was normal in 15 babies. EEG was normal in six babies and all of them had a normal neurodevelopment. Thirteen of the 14 babies with burst suppression pattern were abnormal (P<0.001). CT brain was normal in 14 and all of them had normal neurodevelopment (P<0.001), while 11 of the 12 with cerebral edema had abnormal outcome (P<0.001). Of the 16 babies with normal MRI, 14 were normal, while all six babies with abnormal signals in the cortex and thalamus had abnormal outcome (P=0.002). Conclusions: A normal EEG and CT brain in a term newborn with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is associated with good neurological outcome. Burst suppression pattern in EEG, bleeds, or hypodensities in the CT and involvement of basal ganglia/thalamus in the MRI are predictors of abnormal outcome. PMID:24251256

  14. Post-dengue encephalopathy and Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Fong, Choong Yi; Hlaing, Chaw Su; Tay, Chee Geap; Ong, Lai Choo

    2014-10-01

    Parkinsonism as a neurologic manifestation of dengue infection is rare with only 1 reported case in an adult patient. We report a case of a 6-year-old child with self-limiting post-dengue encephalopathy and Parkinsonism. This is the first reported pediatric case of post-dengue Parkinsonism and expands the neurologic manifestations associated with dengue infection in children. Clinicians should consider the possibility of post-dengue Parkinsonism in children with a history of pyrexia from endemic areas of dengue. PMID:24776518

  15. Hepatic Encephalopathy and Sleepiness: An Interesting Connection?

    PubMed Central

    Montagnese, Sara; Turco, Matteo; Amodio, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Sleep-wake abnormalities in patients with cirrhosis have been traditionally associated with hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In recent years, a certain amount of work has been devoted to the study of this relationship. This has lead to a modified picture, with weakening of the association between HE and poor night sleep, and the emergence of stronger links between HE and excessive daytime sleepiness. This brief review focuses on the evidence in favor of the interpretation of HE as a sleepiness syndrome, and on the diagnostic, therapeutic and social implications of such an interpretation. PMID:26041958

  16. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Movement Disorders: Update.

    PubMed

    Tarazi, Apameh; Tator, Charles H; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela

    2016-05-01

    Association of repetitive brain trauma with progressive neurological deterioration has been described since the 1920s. Punch drunk syndrome and dementia pugilistica (DP) were introduced first to explain symptoms in boxers, and more recently, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has been used to describe a neurodegenerative disease in athletes and military personal with a history of multiple concussions. Although there are many similarities between DP and CTE, a number of key differences are apparent especially when comparing movement impairments. The aim of this review is to compare clinical and pathological aspects of DP and CTE with a focus on disorders of movement. PMID:27021775

  17. Strategies to reduce perinatal and neonatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Singh, M; Paul, V K

    1988-06-01

    The perinatal mortality rate in India averages 66.3/1000 live births. 60% of all infant deaths occur during the 1st month, making the neonatal mortality rate 76/1000 in rural areas and 39/1000 in urban areas. These rates have remained static since 1974. Over 90% of all deliveries occur at home and are conducted by untrained birth attendants. The major causes of perinatal deaths are immaturity/low birth weight, birth asphyxia/trauma, neonatal infections, and congenital malformations. Neonatal tetanus alone is responsible for 230,000-280,000 deaths a year. Hypoxia, low birth weight, and tetanus are preventable, if primary perinatal care is provided and high-risk pregnancies are recognized and referred to facilities where fetal monitoring and neonatal care are available. It is proposed to train all of the country's 5 million traditional birth attendants by 1990 to deliver primary perinatal care. By 1990 also there will be 1 village health guide for every 1000 people. All traditional birth attendants must know how to give mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, and the infrastructure for an adequate referral system must be established. In order to reduce the incidence of low birth weight, the Integrated Child Development Service Scheme proposes that all pregnant women receive a dietary supplement of 500 calories and 25 gm protein, and that pregnant women be given a 2-hour midday rest period. The control of malaria and intestinal infections with chloroquine and antibiotics would do much to reduce low birth weight. Simple technologies for measuring birth weight indicators, such as chest circumference or mid-arm circumference, require only a tape measure. Finally, technics of mass communication must be utilized to spread knowledge of perinatal and neonatal care. PMID:3069742

  18. Experimental models of hepatic encephalopathy: ISHEN guidelines.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Roger F; Norenberg, Michael D; Felipo, Vicente; Ferenci, Peter; Albrecht, Jan; Blei, Andres T

    2009-07-01

    Objectives of the International Society for Hepatic Encephalopathy and Nitrogen Metabolism Commission were to identify well-characterized animal models of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and to highlight areas of animal modelling of the disorder that are in need of development. Features essential to HE modelling were identified. The best-characterized animal models of HE in acute liver failure, the so-called Type A HE, were found to be the hepatic devascularized rat and the rat with thioacetamide-induced toxic liver injury. In case of chronic liver failure, surgical models in the rat involving end-to-side portacaval anastomosis or bile duct ligation were considered to best model minimal/mild (Type B) HE. Unfortunately, at this time, there are no satisfactory animal models of Type C HE resulting from end-stage alcoholic liver disease or viral hepatitis, the most common aetiologies encountered in patients. The commission highlighted the urgent need for such models and of improved models of HE in chronic liver failure in general as well as a need for models of post-transplant neuropsychiatric disorders. Studies of HE pathophysiology at the cellular and molecular level continue to benefit from in vitro and or ex vivo models involving brain slices or exposure of cultured cells (principally cultured astrocytes) to toxins such as ammonia, manganese and pro-inflammatory cytokines. More attention could be paid in the future to in vitro models involving the neurovascular unit, microglia and neuronal co-cultures in relation to HE pathogenesis. PMID:19638106

  19. Clinical presentation of chronic traumatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Baugh, Christine M.; Seichepine, Daniel R.; Montenigro, Philip H.; Riley, David O.; Fritts, Nathan G.; Stamm, Julie M.; Robbins, Clifford A.; McHale, Lisa; Simkin, Irene; Stein, Thor D.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Budson, Andrew E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Cantu, Robert C.; McKee, Ann C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to examine the clinical presentation of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in neuropathologically confirmed cases. Methods: Thirty-six adult male subjects were selected from all cases of neuropathologically confirmed CTE at the Boston University Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy brain bank. Subjects were all athletes, had no comorbid neurodegenerative or motor neuron disease, and had next-of-kin informants to provide retrospective reports of the subjects' histories and clinical presentations. These interviews were conducted blind to the subjects' neuropathologic findings. Results: A triad of cognitive, behavioral, and mood impairments was common overall, with cognitive deficits reported for almost all subjects. Three subjects were asymptomatic at the time of death. Consistent with earlier case reports of boxers, 2 relatively distinct clinical presentations emerged, with one group whose initial features developed at a younger age and involved behavioral and/or mood disturbance (n = 22), and another group whose initial presentation developed at an older age and involved cognitive impairment (n = 11). Conclusions: This suggests there are 2 major clinical presentations of CTE, one a behavior/mood variant and the other a cognitive variant. PMID:23966253

  20. Management options for minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2008-12-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is a neurocognitive dysfunction that is present in the majority of patients with cirrhosis. MHE has a characteristic cognitive profile that cannot be diagnosed clinically. This cognitive dysfunction is independent of sleep dysfunction or problems with overall intelligence. MHE has a significant impact on quality of life, the ability to function in daily life and progression to overt hepatic encephalopathy. Driving ability can be impaired in MHE and this may be a significant factor behind motor vehicle accidents. A crucial aspect of the clinical care of MHE patients is their driving history, which is often ignored during routine care and can add a vital dimension to the overall disease assessment. Driving history should be an integral part of the care of patients with MHE. The preserved communication skills and lack of specific signs and insight make MHE difficult to diagnose. The predominant strategies for MHE diagnosis are psychometric or neurophysiological testing. These are usually limited by financial, normative or time constraints. Studies into inhibitory control, cognitive drug research and critical flicker frequency tests are encouraging. These tests do not require a psychologist for administration and interpretation. Lactulose and probiotics have been studied for their potential use as therapies for MHE, but these are not standard-of-care practices at this time. Therapy can improve the quality of life in MHE patients but the natural history, specific diagnostic strategies and treatment options are still being investigated. PMID:19090738

  1. [Clinical importance and diagnostic methods of minimal hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Stawicka, Agnieszka; Zbrzeźniak, Justyna; Świderska, Aleksandra; Kilisińska, Natalia; Świderska, Magdalena; Jaroszewicz, Jerzy; Flisiak, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) encompasses a number of neuropsychological and neurophysiological disorders in patients suffering from liver cirrhosis, who do not display abnormalities during a medical interview or physical examination. A negative influence of MHE on the quality of life of patients suffering from liver cirrhosis was confirmed, which include retardation of ability of operating motor vehicles and disruption of multiple health-related areas, as well as functioning in the society. The data on frequency of traffic offences and accidents amongst patients diagnosed with MHE in comparison to patients diagnosed with liver cirrhosis without MHE, as well as healthy persons is alarming. Those patients are unaware of their disorder and retardation of their ability to operate vehicles, therefore it is of utmost importance to define this group. The term minimal hepatic encephalopathy (formerly "subclinical" encephalopathy) erroneously suggested the unnecessity of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in patients with liver cirrhosis. Diagnosing MHE is an important predictive factor for occurrence of overt encephalopathy - more than 50% of patients with this diagnosis develop overt encephalopathy during a period of 30 months after. Early diagnosing MHE gives a chance to implement proper treatment which can be a prevention of overt encephalopathy. Due to continuing lack of clinical research there exist no commonly agreed-upon standards for definition, diagnostics, classification and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. This article introduces the newest findings regarding the importance of MHE, scientific recommendations and provides detailed descriptions of the most valuable diagnostic methods. PMID:27000818

  2. Hepatic Encephalopathy-the Old and the New.

    PubMed

    Kandiah, Prem A; Kumar, Gagan

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy occurs ubiquitously in all causes of advanced liver failure, however, its implications on mortality diverge and vary depending upon acuity and severity of liver failure. This associated mortality has decreased in subsets of liver failure over the last 20 years. Aside from liver transplantation, this improvement is not attributable to a single intervention but likely to a combination of practical advances in critical care management. Misconceptions surrounding many facets of hepatic encephalopathy exists due to heterogeneity in presentation, pathophysiology and outcome. This review is intended to highlight the important concepts, rationales and strategies for managing hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:27339673

  3. Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in a case of intranuclear rod myopathy without any prenatal sentinel event.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Koya; Nishino, Ichizo; Sugimoto, Mari; Kouwaki, Masanori; Koyama, Norihisa; Yokochi, Kenji

    2015-02-01

    Intranuclear rod myopathy (IRM), a variant of nemaline myopathy, is characterized by the presence of nemaline bodies in myonuclei. We report a case of IRM presenting with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). There were no prenatal complications caused by fetal brain injury. Although no nemaline bodies were observed in the cytoplasm, intranuclear rods were observed in some fibers under light and electron microscopy. Molecular analysis identified a heterozygous variant, c.449C>T (p.Thr150Ile), in ACTA1. On magnetic resonance imaging at 9days of age, injuries to the basal ganglia, thalamus, and brainstem consistent with perinatal HIE were seen. Respiratory insufficiency at birth was strongly suspected to be the cause of HIE. Our case highlights that a patient with a congenital neuromuscular disorder who presents with severe respiratory dysfunction requiring substantial resuscitative efforts at birth can be complicated by HIE without any prenatal sentinel event. Prenatal detection of neuromuscular disorders, careful management of delivery, and neonatal resuscitation and adequate respiratory management are important in preventing irreversible brain injury in these patients. PMID:24787270

  4. Etiological analysis of presumed perinatal stroke.

    PubMed

    Kocaman, Canan; Yilmaz, Yuksel

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the maternal, pre- and perinatal, and prothrombotic factors with congenital hemiparesis due to presumed perinatal stroke (PPS). Prothrombotic risk factors including protein C and S, antithrombin III, lipoprotein (a), homocystein, factor VIII levels; anticardiolipin antibodies and lupus anticoagulant; methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutations, factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A mutations were investigated. Arterial ischemic stroke was detected in 60% and periventricular venous infarction in 40%. At least one prothrombotic risk factor was present in 69%, two in 17%, and three or more in 8.5% of cases. The most common combination was methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T and factor V Leiden heterozygosity. The etiology and pathogenesis of PPS is still unclear. According to this study, most of the patients with PPS might have one or more prothrombotic risk factors and certain prenatal risk factors including intrauterine growth retardation, twin gestation and preeclampsia might be related to PPS. PMID:21561729

  5. Nutritional Interventions in Depression and Perinatal Depression

    PubMed Central

    Rechenberg, Kaitlyn; Humphries, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Depression is the leading cause of mental disability worldwide. Women who are depressed during pregnancy are at a higher risk for preterm delivery, preeclampsia, birth difficulties, and postpartum depression. The treatment of depression in conventional medicine has focused on physiological factors that lead to impaired neurotransmitter function and treatments to improve neurotransmitter function. Pharmaceutical substances pose risks for pregnant and lactating women, and lower risk options are preferred. Micronutrients, including certain B vitamins, folate, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), play a role in the synthesis and absorption of neurotransmitters. Experimental studies suggest that supplementation with specific micronutrients may alleviate depressive symptoms and improve birth outcomes in patients with perinatal depression. Alternative treatments for depression, including nutritional supplements, are an important treatment option for depressive symptoms while limiting potential side effects and treatment costs. This article explores the biological basis of perinatal depression and reviews the potential benefits of non-pharmacological interventions. PMID:23766734

  6. Perinatal depression: treatment options and dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Pearlstein, Teri

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of depression during pregnancy and the postpartum period raises unique concerns about safety for the developing fetus and the infant. An increasing number of studies suggest adverse effects from untreated stress, anxiety and depression as well as adverse effects from antidepressant and other psychotropic medications. Even when studies suggest a lack of short-term adverse effects with some medications, the paucity of systematic longitudinal follow-up studies investigating the development of children exposed to medications during pregnancy and breastfeeding causes apprehension. This review's objective is to highlight what is currently known about the negative effects of untreated disease and exposure to psychotropic medication, the treatment dilemmas confronting women with perinatal depression and issues that future studies should address so that a woman with perinatal depression can make an optimally informed decision. PMID:18592032

  7. Bisphenol A: Perinatal exposure and body weight

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Beverly S.; Soto, Ana M.

    2010-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a component of polycarbonate and other plastics including resins that line food and beverage containers. BPA is known to leach from products in contact with food and drink, and is therefore thought to be routinely ingested. In a recent cross sectional study, BPA was detected in urine samples from 92.6% of the US population examined. The potential for BPA to influence body weight is suggested by in vitro studies demonstrating effects of BPA on adipocyte differentiation, lipid accumulation, glucose transport and adiponectin secretion. Data from in vivo studies have revealed dose-dependent and sex dependent effects on body weight in rodents exposed perinatally to BPA. The mechanisms through which perinatal BPA exposure acts to exert persistent effects on body weight and adiposity remain to be determined. Possible targets of BPA action are discussed. PMID:19433248

  8. Sleep and perinatal mood disorders: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Lori E.; Murray, Brian J.; Steiner, Meir

    2005-01-01

    Pregnancy and the postpartum period are recognized as times of vulnerability to mood disorders, including postpartum depression and psychosis. Recently, changes in sleep physiology and sleep deprivation have been proposed as having roles in perinatal psychiatric disorders. In this article we review what is known about changes in sleep physiology and behaviour during the perinatal period, with a focus on the relations between sleep and postpartum “blues,” depression and psychosis and on sleep-based interventions for the treatment and prevention of perinatal mood disorders. The interaction between sleep and perinatal mood disorders is significant, but evidence-based research in this field is limited. Studies that measure both sleep and mood during the perinatal period, particularly those that employ objective measurement tools such as polysomnography and actigraphy, will provide important information about the causes, prevention and treatment of perinatal mood disorders. PMID:16049568

  9. Perinatal mortality in Matlab, Bangladesh: a community-based study.

    PubMed

    Fauveau, V; Wojtyniak, B; Mostafa, G; Sarder, A M; Chakraborty, J

    1990-09-01

    Perinatal deaths, comprising stillbirths and deaths during the first week of life, were monitored over the eight-year period 1979 to 1986 in a rural Bangladeshi population of 196,000. The perinatal mortality rate was 75 per 1000 total births. The rate was 13% higher in males than females. Stillbirth and early neonatal mortality rates were 37 and 38 per 1000 total births, respectively. The major causes of perinatal deaths are presented, as well as some of the maternal determinants. During the period under study, perinatal mortality declined regularly and significantly over time in an area covered by an intensive Family Planning and Health Services programme, but not in the adjacent control area. This raises the issue of the impact of such a programme upon perinatal mortality, and the need to include a strong maternity care component into primary healthcare strategies if further reductions of perinatal mortality are to be achieved. PMID:2262255

  10. Perinatal mortality attributable to complications of childbirth in Matlab, Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Kusiako, T.; Ronsmans, C.; Van der Paal, L.

    2000-01-01

    Very few population-based studies of perinatal mortality in developing countries have examined the role of intrapartum risk factors. In the present study, the proportion of perinatal deaths that are attributable to complications during childbirth in Matlab, Bangladesh, was assessed using community-based data from a home-based programme led by professional midwives between 1987 and 1993. Complications during labour and delivery--such as prolonged or obstructed labour, abnormal fetal position, and hypertensive diseases of pregnancy--increased the risk of perinatal mortality fivefold and accounted for 30% of perinatal deaths. Premature labour, which occurred in 20% of pregnancies, accounted for 27% of perinatal mortality. Better care by qualified staff during delivery and improved care of newborns should substantially reduce perinatal mortality in this study population. PMID:10859856

  11. Management of hepatic encephalopathy in the hospital.

    PubMed

    Leise, Michael D; Poterucha, John J; Kamath, Patrick S; Kim, W Ray

    2014-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) develops in up to 50% of patients with cirrhosis and is a feature of decompensated cirrhosis. With the goal of reviewing the evidence for treatment and prevention of overt hepatic encephalopathy, pubmed was searched using search terms hepatic encephalopathy AND treatment, limited to human studies from January 1, 2003, through December 1, 2013, and supplemented by key references. The inpatient incidence of HE is approximately 23,000 annually, and management of these patients is common for internists and subspecialists. Treatment of the hospitalized patient with HE has changed in recent years. Treatment entails 2 phases: induction and maintenance of remission. Most cases of significant HE are precipitated by infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, medications, or other culprits. All patients should be evaluated for secondary triggers of HE, and treatment should be initiated with a nonabsorbable disaccharide (ie, lactulose) in most patients. Rifaximin (off label) can be added in patients not responding to lactulose. Neomycin is a less preferred alternative to rifaximin owing to its adverse effect profile. Other therapies, including zinc, L-ornithine-L-aspartate, and branched-chain amino acids, can be considered for patients not responding to disaccharides and nonabsorbable antibiotics. Large portosystemic shunts may be embolized in patients with medically refractory recurrent or severe HE with otherwise well-compensated cirrhosis. Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System is now available for patients with severe HE who do not respond to medical therapy. It is critically important that patients hospitalized with significant HE continue maintenance therapy at the time of dismissal to prevent further episodes. Patients with a first-time episode of HE can be administered lactulose, and careful instructions should be provided to patients and caregivers about dose titration to achieve 3 bowel movements daily. Patients with recurrent HE episodes

  12. Perinatal Risk Factors for Mild Motor Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hands, Beth; Kendall, Garth; Larkin, Dawne; Parker, Helen

    2009-01-01

    The aetiology of mild motor disability (MMD) is a complex issue and as yet is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of perinatal risk factors in a cohort of 10-year-old boys and girls with (n = 362) and without (n = 1193) MMD. Among the males with MMD there was a higher prevalence of postpartum haemorrhage,…

  13. Specific ultrasonographic features of perinatal lethal hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Zankl, Andreas; Mornet, Etienne; Wong, Shell

    2008-05-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of perinatal lethal hypophosphatasia (PL-HPH) by ultrasonography is difficult as PL-HPH must be differentiated from other skeletal dysplasias with short long bones and poor mineralization of the skeleton, such as osteogenesis imperfecta type II and achondrogenesis/hypochondrogenesis. Here we present a case of molecularly confirmed PL-HPH and illustrate specific ultrasonographic findings that help to distinguish PL-HPH from similar conditions. PMID:18386808

  14. Fetal and perinatal consequences of maternal obesity.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Chakrapani; Renfrew, Mary; McGuire, William

    2011-09-01

    In many industrialised countries, one in five women booking for antenatal care is obese. As well as affecting maternal health, maternal obesity may have important adverse consequences for fetal, neonatal and long-term health and well-being. Maternal obesity is associated with a higher risk of stillbirth, elective preterm birth and perinatal mortality. The incidence of severe birth defects, particularly neural tube and structural cardiac defects, appears to be higher in infants of obese mothers. Fetal macrosomia associated with maternal obesity and gestational diabetes predisposes infants to birth injuries, perinatal asphyxia and transitional problems such as neonatal respiratory distress and metabolic instability. Maternal obesity may also result in long-term health problems for offspring secondary to perinatal problems and to intrauterine and postnatal programming effects. Currently, the available interventions to prevent and treat maternal obesity are of limited proven utility and further research is needed to define the effects of maternal weight management interventions on fetal and neonatal outcomes. PMID:20530101

  15. Action plan to reduce perinatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Bhakoo, O N; Kumar, R

    1990-01-01

    The government of India has set a goal of reducing perinatal mortality from its current rate of 48/1000 to 30-35/1000 by the year 2000. Perinatal deaths result from maternal malnutrition, inadequate prenatal care, complications of delivery, and infections in the postpartum period. Since reductions in perinatal mortality require attention to social, economic, and behavioral factors, as well as improvements in the health care delivery system, a comprehensive strategy is required. Social measures, such as raising the age at marriage to 18 years for females, improving the nutritional status of adolescent girls, reducing the strenuousness of work during pregnancy, improving female literacy, raising women's status in the society and thus in the family, and poverty alleviation programs, would all help eliminate the extent of complications of pregnancy. Measures required to enhance infant survival include improved prenatal care, prenatal tetanus toxoid immunization, use of sterile disposable cord care kits, the provision of mucus extractors and resuscitation materials to birth attendants, the creation of neonatal care units in health facilities, and more efficient referral of high-risk newborns and mothers. Since 90% of births in rural India take place at home priority must be given to training traditional birth attendants in the identification of high risk factors during pregnancy, delivery, and the newborn period. PMID:12316585

  16. Neoplasms in young dogs after perinatal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, S.A.; Lee, A.C.; Angleton, G.M.; Saunders, W.J.; Miller, G.K.; Williams, J.S.; Brewster, R.D.; Long, R.I.

    1986-08-01

    For a study of the life-time effects of irradiation during development, 1,680 beagles were given single, whole-body exposures to /sup 60/Co gamma-radiation at one of three prenatal (preimplantation, embryonic, and fetal) or at one of three postnatal (neonatal, juvenile, and young adult) ages. Mean doses were 0, 0.16, or 0.83 Gy. For comparison with data on childhood cancer after prenatal irradiation, examination was made of tumors occurring in young dogs in this life-span experiment. Up to 4 years of age, 18 dogs had neoplasms diagnosed, 2 of these being in controls. Four dogs that were irradiated in the perinatal (late fetal or neonatal) period died of cancers prior to 2 years of age. This risk was of significant increase compared to the risks for other experimental groups and for the canine population in general. Overall, 71% (5 of 7) of all cancers and 56% (10 of 18) of all benign and malignant neoplasms seen in the first 4 years of life occurred in 29% (480 of 1680) of the dogs irradiated in the perinatal period. These data suggest an increased risk for neoplasia after perinatal irradiation in dogs.

  17. Behavioural outcomes of perinatal maternal fluoxetine treatment.

    PubMed

    McAllister, B B; Kiryanova, V; Dyck, R H

    2012-12-13

    During and following pregnancy, women are at considerable risk of experiencing depression. For treatment, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs, such as fluoxetine, are commonly prescribed, yet the potential effects of perinatal exposure to these drugs on the brain and behaviour have not been examined in humans beyond childhood. This is despite abundant evidence from studies using rodents indicating that altered serotonin levels early in life affect neurodevelopment and behavioural outcomes. These reported effects on behaviour are inconsistent, however, and the testing of females has often been overlooked. In the present study, the behavioural outcomes of female mice perinatally (embryonic day 15 to postnatal day 12) treated with fluoxetine (25mg/kg/day) via a non-stressful method of maternal administration were assessed using a battery of tests. Maternal treatment resulted in subtle alterations in anxiety-like and depression-like behaviour in early adulthood, with a decrease in both types of behaviour as well as body weight. Though altered anxiety and depression have previously been reported in this area of research, decreased anxiety is a novel finding. While there was little effect of perinatal maternal fluoxetine treatment on many of the behaviours assessed, the capacity to alter "emotional" behaviours in mice has implications with regard to research on human infant fluoxetine exposure. PMID:23000627

  18. Does perinatal asphyxia impair cognitive function without cerebral palsy?

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, F F; Miller, S P

    2006-01-01

    Some studies on neurodevelopmental outcomes after neonatal encephalopathy have suggested that cognitive deficits do not occur in the absence of cerebral palsy. It is increasingly apparent that childhood survivors of overt neonatal encephalopathy may have cognitive impairments, even in the absence of functional motor deficits. The risk of cognitive deficits is related to the severity of neonatal encephalopathy and the pattern of brain injury on neuroimaging, particularly the watershed pattern of injury. A better understanding of the risk factors for cognitive abnormalities after neonatal encephalopathy will ultimately lead to interventions to prevent these deficits. Identifying the full spectrum of neurodevelopmental outcomes after neonatal encephalopathy will also allow care givers to identify children requiring early intervention to maximise their potential for independent function throughout development. PMID:17056843

  19. Brain MRI findings in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Wicklund, Meredith R; Knopman, David S

    2013-08-01

    A 71-year-old woman with myelofibrosis on chemotherapy experienced an acute illness with nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Two weeks later, she developed an acute confusional state characterized by disorientation and fluctuating alertness with normal speech and language. Her neurologic examination demonstrated an upper motor neuron pattern of right hemiparesis. She reported double vision though ophthalmoparesis was not appreciated. Her gait was normal. While hospitalized, she developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Brain MRI revealed a small area of restricted diffusion of the left precentral gyrus (figure). She was diagnosed with a stroke with secondary seizures; however, as the confusional state resolved, she developed profound retrograde and anterograde amnesia. Review of the brain MRI showed high T2 signal in the medial thalamus and contrast enhancement of the mamillary bodies; a diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome was entertained and she was started on thiamine replacement. The encephalopathy and hemiparesis resolved though she remains severely amnestic. PMID:24195023

  20. Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Atluri, Dileep K; Prakash, Ravi; Mullen, Kevin D

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder seen in patients with advanced liver disease or porto-systemic shunts. Based on etiology and severity of HE, the World Congress of Gastroenterology has divided HE into categories and sub-categories. Many user-friendly computer-based neuropsychiatric tests are being validated for diagnosing covert HE. Currently, emphasis is being given to view HE deficits as a continuous spectrum rather than distinct stages. Ammonia is believed to play crucial role in pathogenesis of HE via astrocyte swelling and cerebral edema. However, evidence has been building up which supports the synergistic role of oxidative stress, inflammation and neurosteroids in pathogenesis of HE. At present, treatment of HE aims at decreasing the production and intestinal absorption of ammonia. But as the role of new pathogenetic mechanisms becomes clear, many potential new treatment strategies may become available for clinician. PMID:25755319

  1. Leucine metabolism in patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, A.S.; Kassouny, M.E.; Matthews, D.E.; Millikan, W.

    1986-03-01

    A primed continuous infusion of (/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C)leucine was used to determine whether increased oxidation and/or protein synthesis of leucine occurs in patients with cirrhosis. Five controls and patients were equilibrated on a metabolic balance diet (0.6 g protein per kg ideal body weight (IBW)). An additional four patients were equilibrated in the same manner with the same type of diet with a protein level of 0.75 g per kg IBW. Plasma leucine and breath CO/sub 2/ enrichments were measured by mass spectrometry. Protein synthesis and leucine metabolism were identical in controls and patients when both were fed a diet with 0.6 g protein/kg IBW. Results indicate that systemic derangements of leucine metabolism are not the cause of Hepatic Encephalopathy.

  2. Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy Caused by Carnitine Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Stephen D.

    2007-01-01

    Carnitine is an essential co-factor in fatty acid metabolism. Carnitine deficiency can impair fatty acid oxidation, rarely leading to hyperammonemia and encephalopathy. We present the case of a 35-year-old woman who developed acute mental status changes, asterixis, and diffuse muscle weakness. Her ammonia level was elevated at 276 μg/dL. Traditional ammonia-reducing therapies were initiated, but proved ineffective. Pharmacologic, microbial, and autoimmune causes for the hyperammonemia were excluded. The patient was severely malnourished and her carnitine level was found to be extremely low. After carnitine supplementation, ammonia levels normalized and the patient’s mental status returned to baseline. In the setting of refractory hyperammonemia, this case illustrates how careful investigation may reveal a treatable condition. PMID:18080167

  3. Wernicke's encephalopathy: expanding the diagnostic toolbox.

    PubMed

    Lough, Mary E

    2012-06-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a life threatening neurological disorder that results from thiamine (Vitamin B1) deficiency. Clinical signs include mental status changes, ataxia, occulomotor changes and nutritional deficiency. The conundrum is that the clinical presentation is highly variable. WE clinical signs, brain imaging, and thiamine blood levels, are reviewed in 53 published case reports from 2001 to 2011; 81 % (43/53) were non-alcohol related. Korsakoff Syndrome or long-term cognitive neurological changes occurred in 28 % (15/53). Seven WE cases (13 %) had a normal magnetic resonance image (MRI). Four WE cases (8 %) had normal or high thiamine blood levels. Neither diagnostic tool can be relied upon exclusively to confirm a diagnosis of WE. PMID:22577001

  4. Does this patient have hypertensive encephalopathy?

    PubMed

    Christopoulou, Foteini; Rizos, Evangelos C; Kosta, Paraskevi; Argyropoulou, Maria I; Elisaf, Moses

    2016-05-01

    A 63-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for further investigation and management of brain metastases. The patient was initially presented with a 4-day history of confusion. On the day of admission, the patient was confused, agitated, disorientated in place and time, and had visual disturbances. His blood pressure was repeatedly recorded high, with levels of systolic blood pressure between 170-210 mm Hg. A brain magnetic resonance imaging showed areas of high signal on T2 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images, located bilaterally in the white matter of the occipital regions and unilateral in the left frontal lobe, suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Aggressive treatment of hypertension resulted in complete resolution of the clinical and radiologic features of the syndrome. PMID:26896240

  5. Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy: Pathophysiology and Experimental Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Kimberly A.; Brandon, Debra H.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a serious birth complication affecting full term infants: 40–60% of affected infants die by 2 years of age or have severe disabilities. The majority of the underlying pathologic events of HIE are a result of impaired cerebral blood flow and oxygen delivery to the brain with resulting primary and secondary energy failure. In the past, treatment options were limited to supportive medical therapy. Currently, several experimental treatments are being explored in neonates and animal models to ameliorate the effects of secondary energy failure. This review discusses the underlying pathophysiologic effects of a hypoxic-ischemic event and experimental treatment modalities being explored to manage infants with HIE. Further research is needed to better understand if the long-term impact of the experimental treatments and whether the combinations of experimental treatments can improve outcomes in infants with HIE. PMID:21927583

  6. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Impact on Athletes.

    PubMed

    Galgano, Michael A; Cantu, Robert; Chin, Lawrence S

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a devastating neuropsychological condition afflicting a small percentage of athletes partaking in high-impact sports. The onset of symptoms lags years behind the inciting events. Repetitive minor head injuries are felt to be the main etiology behind CTE. Routine radiographic imaging generally is unremarkable in cases of CTE. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are advanced MRI-based sequences that have shown promise in detecting early radiographic findings that may be reflective of CTE. Progressive neuronal loss is the histopathological hallmark of this neurodegenerative disease. Strategizing earlier detection techniques is paramount in delivering optimal care to athletes afflicted with CTE. PMID:27088064

  7. Optic nerve hypoplasia, encephalopathy, and neurodevelopmental handicap.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, J P; O'Keefe, M; Bowell, R

    1991-01-01

    Abnormalities of the central nervous system are frequently described in optic nerve hypoplasia. In a longitudinal study of 46 consecutive children (32 term, 14 preterm) with bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia 32 (69.5%) had associated neurodevelopmental handicap. Of these, 90% had structural central nervous system abnormalities on computed tomographic brain scans. Neurodevelopmental handicap occurred in 62.5% of the term and 86% of the preterm infants respectively. Term infants had a greater incidence of ventral developmental midline defects and proportionately fewer maternal and/or neonatal complications throughout pregnancy, while encephaloclastic lesions were commoner among the premature infants. An association of optic nerve hypoplasia with the twin transfusion syndrome and prenatal vascular encephalopathies is described. PMID:2021594

  8. Hepatic Encephalopathy: Pharmacological Therapies Targeting Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Robert S; Rockey, Don C

    2016-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a major complication in patients with decompensated cirrhosis, leading to higher readmission rates causing a profound burden of disease and considerable health care costs. Because ammonia is thought to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HE, therapies directed at reducing ammonia levels are now being aggressively developed. Ammonia scavengers such as AST-120 (spherical carbon adsorbent), glycerol phenylbutyrate, sodium phenylacetate or sodium benzoate, and ornithine phenylacetate have been used to improve HE symptoms. A new approach, bowel cleansing with polyethylene glycol 3350, appears to be a promising therapy, with a recent study demonstrating a more rapid improvement in overt HE (at 24 hours after treatment) than lactulose. Extracorporeal devices, although now used primarily in research settings, have also been utilized in patients with refractory HE, but are not approved for clinical management. PMID:26870932

  9. Is chronic traumatic encephalopathy a real disease?

    PubMed

    Randolph, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has received widespread media attention and is treated in the lay press as an established disease, characterized by suicidality and progressive dementia. The extant literature on CTE is reviewed here. There currently are no controlled epidemiological data to suggest that retired athletes are at increased risk for dementia or that they exhibit any type of unique neuropathology. There remain no established clinical or pathological criteria for diagnosing CTE. Despite claims that CTE occurs frequently in retired National Football League (NFL) players, recent studies of NFL retirees report that they have an all-cause mortality rate that is approximately half of the expected rate, and even lower suicide rates. In addition, recent clinical studies of samples of cognitively impaired NFL retirees have failed to identify any unique clinical syndrome. Until further controlled studies are completed, it appears to be premature to consider CTE a verifiable disease. PMID:24412888

  10. Neuroprotective Strategies after Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Brandon J.; Reis, Cesar; Ho, Wing Mann; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a devastating disease that primarily causes neuronal and white matter injury and is among the leading cause of death among infants. Currently there are no well-established treatments; thus, it is important to understand the pathophysiology of the disease and elucidate complications that are creating a gap between basic science and clinical translation. In the development of neuroprotective strategies and translation of experimental results in HIE, there are many limitations and challenges to master based on an appropriate study design, drug delivery properties, dosage, and use in neonates. We will identify understudied targets after HIE, as well as neuroprotective molecules that bring hope to future treatments such as melatonin, topiramate, xenon, interferon-beta, stem cell transplantation. This review will also discuss some of the most recent trials being conducted in the clinical setting and evaluate what directions are needed in the future. PMID:26389893